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Sample records for vls nanowire growth

  1. Growth parameters and shape specific synthesis of silicon nanowires by the VLS method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latu-Romain, Laurence; Mouchet, Celine [CEA-Grenoble, LITEN/DTNM/LCH (France); Cayron, Cyril [CEA-Grenoble, LITEN/DTH/Grenoble Electron Microscopy-Minatec (France); Rouviere, Emmanuelle; Simonato, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jean-pierre.simonato@cea.f [CEA-Grenoble, LITEN/DTNM/LCH (France)

    2008-12-15

    In this paper the effect of varying temperature, pressure and chemical precursors on the vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of silicon nanowires (Si NWs) have been investigated. Some aspects of nucleation and growth mechanisms are discussed. Control on Si NW morphology by varying the choice of gaseous precursor (silane or dichlorosilane) at elevated temperatures is reported.

  2. Re-entrant-Groove-Assisted VLS Growth of Boron Carbide Five-Fold Twinned Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xin; JIANG Jun; LIU Chao; YU Zhi-Yang; Steffan LEA; YUAN Jun

    2009-01-01

    We report a preferential growth of boron carbide nanowires with a Eve-fold twinned internal structure.The nanowires are found to grow catalytically via iron boron nanoparticles,but unusually the catalytic particle is in contact with the low-energy surfaces of boron carbide with V-shaped contact lines.We propose that this catalytical growth may be caused by preferential nucleation at the re-entrant grooves due to the twinning planes,followed by rapid spreading of atomic steps.This is consistent with the observed temperature dependence of the five-fold twinned nanowire growth.

  3. MBE-VLS grown zinc selenide and zinc sulfide nanowires: Growth mechanisms and photoluminescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu Keung

    A lot of effort was recently devoted in realizing semiconducting nanowires (NWs) that are considered as a channel for electrons and photons no wider than a few thousand atoms. Such a one-dimensional structure will find potential applications in nano-optoelectronics and nano-photonics. The control of the growth orientation of NWs is particularly important because it will eventually affect their optical and transport properties. The ordering of NWs has also been a recent focus due to the fact that some of the above mentioned applications require the NWs fabricated in regular and periodic arrays. In this study, the growth of ZnSe and ZnS nanowires using the molecular beam epitaxy technique via the vapor-liquid-solid reaction with Au alloy droplets as the catalyst is successfully demonstrated. The nanowires resulting from this approach were found to orient along some specific crystallographic directions. Through detailed structural characterization, we have revealed that the preferred growth orientation of NWs depends on the chosen size of the catalyst and growth temperature. A phenomenological model based on the minimization of the total system energy of a nanowire was proposed to explain these observations. Based on these findings, we have successfully grown vertical ZnSe nanowires with a diameter around 10 nm on a GaAs(110) substrate. The interactions between the catalyst and the direct-contact materials (either the GaAs substrate or the ZnSe buffer) were analyzed in details. Through this study, it was found that thermal annealing of Au alloy catalyst droplets on a ZnSe buffer surface could result in nano-trenches along the directions. Based on the results obtained from a number of surface profiling and chemical analysis techniques, a model is proposed to describe the possible formation mechanisms of the observed nanotrenches. An ordered ZnSe NW array fabricated on a GaAs (111) substrate with a novel pre-patterning method associated with plasma etching is also

  4. Assessing individual radial junction solar cells over millions on VLS-grown silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linwei; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Tchernycheva, Maria; Misra, Soumyadeep; Foldyna, Martin; Picardi, Gennaro; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2013-07-12

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) grown on low-cost substrates provide an ideal framework for the monolithic fabrication of radial junction photovoltaics. However, the quality of junction formation over a random matrix of SiNWs, fabricated via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, has never been assessed in a realistic context. To address this, we probe the current response of individual radial junction solar cells under electron-beam and optical-beam excitations. Excellent current generation from the radial junction units, compared to their planar counterparts, has been recorded, indicating a high junction quality and effective doping in the ultra-thin SiNWs with diameters thinner than 20 nm. Interestingly, we found that the formation of radial junctions by plasma deposition can be quite robust against geometrical disorder and even the crossings of neighboring cell units. These results provide a strong support to the feasibility of building high-quality radial junction solar cells over high-throughput VLS-grown SiNWs on low-cost substrates.

  5. One-step growth of Si 3 N 4 stem-branch featured nanostructures: Morphology control by VS and VLS mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiushi; Gao, Wei; Shan, Lianchen; Zhang, Jian; Jin, Yunxia; Cong, Ridong; Cui, Qiliang

    2011-09-01

    We report here one-step synthesis of Si 3N 4 nanodendrites by selectively applying a vapor-solid (VS) and vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) strategy via direct current arc discharge method. The resultant nanodendrites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The spine-shaped nanodendrites were generated by a noncatalytic growth following a VS mode. The uniform secondary nanowire branches were epitaxial grown from two side surfaces of the nanowire stems. The pine-shaped nanodendrites were obtained through a catalytic growth in a VLS process. These branch nanowires were unsystematically grown from the nanocone-like stems. The photoluminescence spectra of the nanodendrites show a strong white light emission around 400-750 nm, suggesting their potential applications in light and electron emission devices.

  6. Investigation of the growth process of Si nanowires using the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢英杰; 俞大鹏; 奚中和; 薛增泉

    2002-01-01

    Silicon nanowires have been grown by the thermal decomposition of silane via the vapour-liquid-solid (VLS)mechanism. Three different stages of VLS growth (eutectic alloy formation, crystal nucleation and unidirectional growth)were studied separately using a scanning electron microscope and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope.Very short silicon nanowires prepared under particular conditions provide direct evidence of the VLS mechanism on a nanometre scale. Our results will be very helpful for the controllable synthesis of Si nanowires.

  7. Aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires: Growth methods, properties, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainey, Mel F.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-12-01

    Metal-mediated vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth is a promising approach for the fabrication of silicon nanowires, although residual metal incorporation into the nanowires during growth can adversely impact electronic properties particularly when metals such as gold and copper are utilized. Aluminum, which acts as a shallow acceptor in silicon, is therefore of significant interest for the growth of p-type silicon nanowires but has presented challenges due to its propensity for oxidation. This paper summarizes the key aspects of aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth along with wire properties and device results. In the first section, aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth is discussed with a specific emphasis on methods to mitigate aluminum oxide formation. Next, the influence of growth parameters such as growth temperature, precursor partial pressure, and hydrogen partial pressure on nanowire morphology is discussed, followed by a brief review of the growth of templated and patterned arrays of nanowires. Aluminum incorporation into the nanowires is then discussed in detail, including measurements of the aluminum concentration within wires using atom probe tomography and assessment of electrical properties by four point resistance measurements. Finally, the use of aluminum-catalyzed VLS growth for device fabrication is reviewed including results on single-wire radial p-n junction solar cells and planar solar cells fabricated with nanowire/nanopyramid texturing.

  8. Comparison of InAs nanowire conductivity: influence of growth method and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sladek, Kamil; Winden, Andreas; Wirths, Stephan; Weis, Karl; Bloemers, Christian; Guel, Oender; Grap, Thomas; Lenk, Steffi; Ahe, Martina van der; Hardtdegen, Hilde; Lepsa, Mihail Ion; Lueth, Hans; Schaepers, Thomas; Gruetzmacher, Detlev [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Juelich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) (Germany); Weirich, Thomas E. [Juelich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy (GFE), Institute of Crystallography, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Lysov, Andrey; Li, Zi-An; Prost, Werner; Tegude, Franz-Josef [Center for Nanointegration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    The conductivity and crystal structure of nominally undoped InAs nanowires deposited by three different methods - 1. selective area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (SA MOVPE), 2. gold assisted vapor liquid solid (VLS) MOVPE and 3. extrinsic catalyst free VLS molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) - is investigated. The influence on conductivity by stacking faults and different growth conditions is analyzed to determine the main impact. It is found that in terms of crystal structure, nanowires deposited by VLS MOVPE and VLS MBE behave similarly showing a zinc blende (ZB) phase while nanowires deposited by SA MOVPE feature a high density of stacking faults and a tendency to higher amounts of wurtzite (WZ) when grown with a decreased growth rate. However, the conductivity of wires deposited by VLS MOVPE is found to be much higher and statistically less dispersive compared to the other two wire types. An electrical similarity between nominally undoped wires in VLS MOVPE and previously reported intentionally doped wires in SA MOVPE is observed and discussed. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Growth of Gold-assisted Gallium Arsenide Nanowires on Silicon Substrates via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon M. delos Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gallium arsenide nanowires were grown on silicon (100 substrates by what is called the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS growth mechanism using a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE system. Good quality nanowires with surface density of approximately 108 nanowires per square centimeter were produced by utilizing gold nanoparticles, with density of 1011 nanoparticles per square centimeter, as catalysts for nanowire growth. X-ray diffraction measurements, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the nanowires are epitaxially grown on the silicon substrates, are oriented along the [111] direction and have cubic zincblende structure.

  10. Epitaxial growth of silicon nanowires using an aluminium catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yewu; Schmidt, Volker; Senz, Stephan; Gösele, Ulrich

    2006-12-01

    Silicon nanowires have been identified as important components for future electronic and sensor nanodevices. So far gold has dominated as the catalyst for growing Si nanowires via the vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Unfortunately, gold traps electrons and holes in Si and poses a serious contamination problem for Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) processing. Although there are some reports on the use of non-gold catalysts for Si nanowire growth, either the growth requires high temperatures and/or the catalysts are not compatible with CMOS requirements. From a technological standpoint, a much more attractive catalyst material would be aluminium, as it is a standard metal in Si process lines. Here we report for the first time the epitaxial growth of Al-catalysed Si nanowires and suggest that growth proceeds via a vapour-solid-solid (VSS) rather than a VLS mechanism. It is also found that the tapering of the nanowires can be strongly reduced by lowering the growth temperature.

  11. Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe Vilstrup

    -catalyzed nanowire growth, and grown GaAs1−xPx nanowires with different inclusions of P(x) directly on silicon. The incorporation of P was generally higher in nanowires than for planar growth at identical P flux percentage. More interestingly, the percentage of P in the nanowire was found to be a concave function...... of the percentage of P in the flux, while for planar growth it was a convex function. We have demonstrated GaAs0.8P0.2 nanowires and further grown a shell surrounding the core with the same composition. The lattice matched GaAsP core-shell nanowire were doped to produce radial p-i-n junctions in each...... of the nanowires, some of which were removed from their growth substrate and turned into single nanowire solar cells (SNWSC). The best device showed a conversion efficiency of 6.8% under 1.5AMG 1-sun illumination. In order to improve the efficiency a surface passivating shell consisting of highly doped, wide...

  12. Elaboration and characterization of boron doping during SiC growth by VLS mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soueidan, Maher; Ferro, Gabriel; Nsouli, Bilal; Roumié, Mohamad; Habka, Nada; Souliere, Véronique; Bluet, Jean-Marie; Kazan, Michel

    2011-07-01

    VLS mechanism was used for growing boron doped homoepitaxial SiC layers on 4H-SiC(0 0 0 1) 8° off substrate. Si-based melts were fed by propane in the temperature range 1450-1500 °C. Two main approaches were studied to incorporate boron during growth: (1) adding elemental B in the initial melt, with two different compositions: Si 90B 10 and Si 27Ge 68B 5; the growth was performed at 1500 °C; (2) adding B 2H 6 to the gas phase during growth with a melt composition of Si 25Ge 75; the growth was performed at 1450 °C. In most cases, the growth time was limited by liquid loss. The longest growth duration (1 h) was obtained when adding B 2H 6 to the gas phase. In the case of Si 90B 10 melt, the surface morphology exhibits large and parallel terraces whereas the step front is more undulated when adding Ge. Raman and photoluminescence characterizations performed on these layers confirmed the 4H polytype of the layers in addition to the presence of B, which results in a strong B-N donor-acceptor band. The thickness and the growth rate were determined by micro-Infrared spectroscopy. Particle Induced γ-ray Emission (PIGE) was tentatively used to detect B incorporation inside the grown layers. These results were compared to SIMS measurements from which B concentration was found to vary from 10 18 to 10 19 at cm -3.

  13. Growth mechanism of nanowires: binary and ternary chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N. B.; Coriell, S. R.; Su, Ching Hua; Hopkins, R. H.; Arnold, B.; Choa, Fow-Sen; Cullum, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor nanowires exhibit very exciting optical and electrical properties including high transparency and a several order of magnitude better photocurrent than thin film and bulk materials. We present here the mechanism of nanowire growth from the melt-liquid-vapor medium. We describe preliminary results of binary and ternary selenide materials in light of recent theories. Experiments were performed with lead selenide and thallium arsenic selenide systems which are multifunctional material and have been used for detectors, acoustooptical, nonlinear and radiation detection applications. We observed that small units of nanocubes and elongated nanoparticles arrange and rearrange at moderate melt undercooling to form the building block of a nanowire. Since we avoided the catalyst, we observed self-nucleation and uncontrolled growth of wires from different places. Growth of lead selenide nanowires was performed by physical vapor transport method and thallium arsenic selenide nanowire by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method. In some cases very long wires (>mm) are formed. To achieve this goal experiments were performed to create situation where nanowires grew on the surface of solid thallium arsenic selenide itself.

  14. Catalytic growth of CdTe nanowires by closed space sublimation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Gwangseok; Jung, Younghun [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Seungju; Kim, Donghwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jihyun, E-mail: hyunhyun7@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    CdTe nano-/micro-structures with various morphologies were grown by using the closed space sublimation (CSS) method on a sapphire substrate by Au-catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) mechanism. Length, diameter, and morphology of the CdTe nano-/micro-structures depended on the growth time and temperature gradient between the substrate and powdered CdTe source. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that an Au catalyst droplet existed at the tips of CdTe nanowires, which confirms that CdTe nanowires were grown by an Au-catalyzed VLS mechanism. Also, we observed that the two-dimensional CdTe film layer initially formed before the growth of the CdTe nano-/micro-wires. The optical and structural properties of CdTe nano-/micro-structures were characterized by X-ray diffraction technique and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Our study demonstrates that diverse CdTe nano-/micro-structures can be fabricated by using Au-catalyzed VLS growth process in a simple CSS chamber by controlling the temperature gradient and growth time. - Highlights: • We demonstrated CdTe nanowires using closed space sublimation method. • Au-catalyst droplets at the tips confirmed vapor–liquid–solid mechanism. • Diameters and lengths increased with increasing temperature gradient and time.

  15. Self-Catalytic Growth of Tin Oxide Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongani S. Thabethe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis of tin oxide (SnO2 nanowires by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD process. Commercially bought SnO nanopowders were vaporized at 1050°C for 30 minutes with argon gas continuously passing through the system. The as-synthesized products were characterized using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The band gap of the nanowires determined from UV-visible absorption was around 3.7 eV. The SEM micrographs revealed “wool-like” structure which contains nanoribbons and nanowires with liquid droplets at the tips. Nanowires typically have diameter in the range of 50–200 nm and length 10–100 μm. These nanowires followed the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS growth mechanism.

  16. Epitaxy-enabled vapor-liquid-solid growth of tin-doped indium oxide nanowires with controlled orientations

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Youde

    2014-08-13

    Controlling the morphology of nanowires in bottom-up synthesis and assembling them on planar substrates is of tremendous importance for device applications in electronics, photonics, sensing and energy conversion. To date, however, there remain challenges in reliably achieving these goals of orientation-controlled nanowire synthesis and assembly. Here we report that growth of planar, vertical and randomly oriented tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowires can be realized on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates via the epitaxy-assisted vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, by simply regulating the growth conditions, in particular the growth temperature. This robust control on nanowire orientation is facilitated by the small lattice mismatch of 1.6% between ITO and YSZ. Further control of the orientation, symmetry and shape of the nanowires can be achieved by using YSZ substrates with (110) and (111), in addition to (100) surfaces. Based on these insights, we succeed in growing regular arrays of planar ITO nanowires from patterned catalyst nanoparticles. Overall, our discovery of unprecedented orientation control in ITO nanowires advances the general VLS synthesis, providing a robust epitaxy-based approach toward rational synthesis of nanowires. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  17. Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe Vilstrup

    Solar cells commercial success is based on an efficiency/cost calculation. Nanowire solar cells is one of the foremost candidates to implement third generation photo voltaics, which are both very efficient and cheap to produce. This thesis is about our progress towards commercial nanowire solar...... cells. Resonance effects between the light and nanowire causes an inherent concentration of the sunlight into the nanowires, and means that a sparse array of nanowires (less than 5% of the area) can absorb all the incoming light. The resonance effects, as well as a graded index of refraction, also traps...... the light. The concentration and light trapping means that single junction nanowire solar cells have a higher theoretical maximum efficiency than equivalent planar solar cells. We have demonstrated the built-in light concentration of nanowires, by growing, contacting and characterizing a solar cell...

  18. Directed growth of horizontally aligned gallium nitride nanowires for nanoelectromechanical resonator arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Tania; Kim, Kyungkon; Ren, Zaiyuan; Yerino, Christopher; Han, Jung; Tang, Hong X

    2007-11-01

    We report the growth of horizontally aligned arrays and networks of GaN nanowires (NWs) as resonant components in nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). A combination of top-down selective area growth (SAG) and bottom-up vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) synthesis enables flexible fabrication of highly ordered nanowire arrays in situ with no postgrowth dispersion. Mechanical resonance of free-standing nanowires are measured, with quality factors (Q) ranging from 400 to 1000. We obtained a Young's modulus (E) of approximately 338 GPa from an array of NWs with varying diameters and lengths. The measurement allows detection of nanowire motion with a rotating frame and reveals dual fundamental resonant modes in two orthogonal planes. A universal ratio between the resonant frequencies of these two fundamental modes, irrespective of their dimensions, is observed and attributed to an isosceles cross section of GaN NWs.

  19. Predicting the growth of S i3N4 nanowires by phase-equilibrium-dominated vapor-liquid-solid mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongliang; Cai, Jing; Yang, Lijun; Wu, Qiang; Wang, Xizhang; Hu, Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Nanomaterial synthesis is experiencing a profound evolution from empirical science ("cook-and-look") to prediction and design, which depends on the deep insight into the growth mechanism. Herein, we report a generalized prediction of the growth of S i3N4 nanowires by nitriding F e28S i72 alloy particles across different phase regions based on our finding of the phase-equilibrium-dominated vapor-liquid-solid (PED-VLS) mechanism. All the predictions about the growth of S i3N4 nanowires, and the associated evolutions of lattice parameters and geometries of the coexisting Fe -Si alloy phases, are experimentally confirmed quantitatively. This progress corroborates the general validity of the PED-VLS mechanism, which could be applied to the design and controllable synthesis of various one-dimensional nanomaterials.

  20. Synthesis of nanostructures in nanowires using sequential catalyst reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciera, F.; Chou, Y.-C.; Reuter, M. C.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Hofmann, S.; Ross, F. M.

    2015-08-01

    Nanowire growth by the vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) process enables a high level of control over nanowire composition, diameter, growth direction, branching and kinking, periodic twinning, and crystal structure. The tremendous impact of VLS-grown nanowires is due to this structural versatility, generating applications ranging from solid-state lighting and single-photon sources to thermoelectric devices. Here, we show that the morphology of these nanostructures can be further tailored by using the liquid droplets that catalyse nanowire growth as a `mixing bowl’, in which growth materials are sequentially supplied to nucleate new phases. Growing within the liquid, these phases adopt the shape of faceted nanocrystals that are then incorporated into the nanowires by further growth. We demonstrate this concept by epitaxially incorporating metal-silicide nanocrystals into Si nanowires with defect-free interfaces, and discuss how this process can be generalized to create complex nanowire-based heterostructures.

  1. Directional Growth of Polymeric Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Prem; Flanders, Bret

    2009-03-01

    This work establishes an innovative electrochemical approach to the template free growth of conducting polypyrrole and polythiophene wires. These polymeric wires exhibit a knobby structure, but persistent growth in a given direction up to 30 μm in length. A long-range component of the applied voltage signal defines the growth-path. Moreover, the presence of this component enables the growth of amorphous nanowires with wire-like geometries. Such wires are employed in a non-invasive methodology for attaining strong mechanical attachments to live cells. This capability is of potential use in the electro-mechanical probing of cell physiological processes.

  2. Selective growth of silica nanowires using an Au catalyst for optical recognition of interleukin-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Praveen K.; Ramgir, Niranjan S.; Joshi, Rakesh K.; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2008-06-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth procedure has been extended for the selective growth of silica nanowires on SiO2 layer by using Au as a catalyst. The nanowires were grown in an open tube furnace at 1100 °C for 60 min using Ar as a carrier gas. The average diameter of these bottom-up nucleated wires was found to be 200 nm. Transmission electron microscopy analysis indicates the amorphous nature of these nanoscale wires and suggests an Si-silica heterostructure. The localized silica nanowires have been used as an immunoassay template in the detection of interleukin-10 which is a lung cancer biomarker. Such a nanostructured platform offered a tenfold enhancement in the optical response, aiding the recognition of IL-10 in comparison to a bare silica substrate. The role of nanowires in the immunoassay was verified through the quenching behavior in the photoluminescence (PL) spectra. Two orders of reduction in PL intensity have been observed after completion of the immunoassay with significant quenching after executing every step of the protocol. The potential of this site-specific growth of silica nanowires on SiO2 as a multi-modal biosensing platform has been discussed.

  3. Selective growth of silica nanowires using an Au catalyst for optical recognition of interleukin-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekhar, Praveen K; Ramgir, Niranjan S; Joshi, Rakesh K; Bhansali, Shekhar [Bio-MEMS and Microfabrication Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, 4202 E Fowler Avenue, ENB 118, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)], E-mail: bhansali@eng.usf.edu

    2008-06-18

    The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth procedure has been extended for the selective growth of silica nanowires on SiO{sub 2} layer by using Au as a catalyst. The nanowires were grown in an open tube furnace at 1100 deg. C for 60 min using Ar as a carrier gas. The average diameter of these bottom-up nucleated wires was found to be 200 nm. Transmission electron microscopy analysis indicates the amorphous nature of these nanoscale wires and suggests an Si-silica heterostructure. The localized silica nanowires have been used as an immunoassay template in the detection of interleukin-10 which is a lung cancer biomarker. Such a nanostructured platform offered a tenfold enhancement in the optical response, aiding the recognition of IL-10 in comparison to a bare silica substrate. The role of nanowires in the immunoassay was verified through the quenching behavior in the photoluminescence (PL) spectra. Two orders of reduction in PL intensity have been observed after completion of the immunoassay with significant quenching after executing every step of the protocol. The potential of this site-specific growth of silica nanowires on SiO{sub 2} as a multi-modal biosensing platform has been discussed.

  4. Growth of Vertically Aligned ZnO Nanowire Arrays Using Bilayered Metal Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertically aligned, high-density ZnO nanowires (NWs were grown for the first time on c-plane sapphire using binary alloys of Ni/Au or Cu/Au as the catalyst. The growth was performed under argon gas flow and involved the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS growth process. We have investigated various ratios of catalyst components for the NWs growth and results indicate that very thin adhesion layers of Ni or Cu deposited prior to the Au layer are not deleterious to the ZnO NW array growth. Significant improvement of the Au adhesion on the substrate was noted, opening the potential for direct catalyst patterning of Au and subsequent NW array growth. Additionally, we found that an increase of in thickness of the Cu adhesion layer results in the simultaneous growth of NWs and nanoplates (NPs, indicating that in this case the growth involves both the VLS and vapor-solid (VS growth mechanisms. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS studies were also performed to characterize the resulting ZnO NW arrays, indicating that the NWs grown using a thin adhesion layer of Ni or Cu under the Au show comparable SERS enhancement to those of the pure Au-catalyzed NWs.

  5. Phase diagrams for understanding gold-seeded growth of GaAs and InAs nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Masoomeh; Johansson, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    Phase diagrams are useful tools to study the phase equilibria of nanowire materials systems because the growth of nanowires is accompanied by phase formation and phase transition. We have modeled the phase equilibria of the As–Au–Ga ternary system by means of the CALPHAD method. This method is a well-established semi-empirical technique for thermodynamic modeling in which Gibbs energy functions with free parameters are defined for all phases in a system followed by adjusting these parameters to the experimental data. Using the resulting As–Au–Ga thermodynamic database, four vertical cuts of this ternary system are calculated and all show good agreement with experiments. This ternary system is particularly useful for predicting the state of the Au seed alloys when growing GaAs nanowires and we discuss such predictions. Similar calculations are performed for Au-seeded InAs nanowires. We show that the vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) growth fails for InAs nanowires, while GaAs nanowires can grow from a liquid particle. Our calculations are in agreement with experimental data on the growth of Au-seeded GaAs and InAs nanowires.

  6. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs nanowires and their sustainability for optoelectronic applications. Comparing Au- and self-assisted growth methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Steffen

    2011-09-28

    In this work the synthesis of GaAs nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using the vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism is investigated. A comparison between Au- and self-assisted VLS growth is at the centre of this thesis. While the Au-assisted method is established as a versatile tool for nanowire growth, the recently developed self-assisted variation results from the exchange of Au by Ga droplets and thus eliminates any possibility of Au incorporation. By both methods, we achieve nanowires with epitaxial alignment to the Si(111) substrates. Caused by differences during nanowire nucleation, a parasitic planar layer grows between the nanowires by the Au-assisted method, but can be avoided by the self-assisted method. Au-assisted nanowires grow predominantly in the metastable wurtzite crystal structure, while their self-assisted counterparts have the zincblende structure. All GaAs nanowires are fully relaxed and the strain arising from the lattice mismatch between GaAs and Si of 4.1 % is accommodated by misfit dislocations at the interface. Self-assisted GaAs nanowires are generally found to have vertical and non-polar side facets, while tilted and polar nanofacets were described for Au-assisted GaAs nanowires. We employ VLS nucleation theory to understand the effect of the droplet material on the lateral facets. Optoelectronic applications require long minority carrier lifetimes at room temperature. We fabricate GaAs/(Al,Ga)As core-shell nanowires and analyse them by transient photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The results are 2.5 ns for the self-assisted nanowires as well as 9 ps for the Au-assisted nanowires. By temperature-dependent PL measurements we find a characteristic activation energy of 77 meV that is present only in the Au-assisted nanowires. We conclude that most likely Au is incorporated from the droplets into the GaAs nanowires and acts as a deep, non-radiative recombination centre.

  7. Flow-Solution-Liquid-Solid Growth of Semiconductor Nanowires: A Novel Approach for Controlled Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Palaniappan, Kumaranand [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laocharoensuk, Rawiwan [National Science and Technology Center, Thailand; Smith, Nickolaus A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dickerson, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Casson, Joanna L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07

    Semiconductor nanowires (SC-NWs) have potential applications in diverse technologies from nanoelectronics and photonics to energy harvesting and storage due to their quantum-confined opto-electronic properties coupled with their highly anisotropic shape. Here, we explore new approaches to an important solution-based growth method known as solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth. In SLS, molecular precursors are reacted in the presence of low-melting metal nanoparticles that serve as molten fluxes to catalyze the growth of the SC-NWs. The mechanism of growth is assumed to be similar to that of vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, with the clear distinctions of being conducted in solution in the presence of coordinating ligands and at relatively lower temperatures (<300 C). The resultant SC-NWs are soluble in common organic solvents and solution processable, offering advantages such as simplified processing, scale-up, ultra-small diameters for quantum-confinement effects, and flexible choice of materials from group III-V to groups II-VI, IV-VI, as well as truly ternary I-III-VI semiconductors as we recently demonstrates. Despite these advantages of SLS growth, VLS offers several clear opportunities not allowed by conventional SLS. Namely, VLS allows sequential addition of precursors for facile synthesis of complex axial heterostructures. In addition, growth proceeds relatively slowly compared to SLS, allowing clear assessments of growth kinetics. In order to retain the materials and processing flexibility afforded by SLS, but add the elements of controlled growth afforded by VLS, we transformed SLS into a flow based method by adapting it to synthesis in a microfluidic system. By this new method - so-called 'flow-SLS' (FSLS) - we have now demonstrated unprecedented fabrication of multi-segmented SC-NWs, e.g., 8-segmented CdSe/ZnSe defined by either compositionally abrupt or alloyed interfaces as a function of growth conditions. In addition, we have studied growth

  8. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picht, Oliver

    2010-05-26

    Polycrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}m. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 {mu}m thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  9. Growth mechanism and quantum confinement effect of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯孙齐; 俞大鹏; 张洪洲; 白志刚; 丁彧; 杭青岭; 邹英华; 王晶晶

    1999-01-01

    The methods for synthesizing one-dimensional Si nanowires with controlled diameter are introduced. The mechanism for the growth of Si nanowires and the growth model for different morphologies of Si nanowires are described, and the quantum confinement effect of the Si nanowires is presented.

  10. Aerotaxy - A Gas-Phase Nanowire Growth Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Heurlin, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis an efficient nanowire fabrication technique, called Aerotaxy, is investigated. Traditional nanowire fabrication techniques include the use of a substrate as a point of nanowire nucleation which limits the amount of nanowires that can be produced per unit time. In contrary, Aerotaxy offers a continuous growth process, in the gasphase, which could substantially increase the rate at which nanowires are fabricated and thus lower their fabrication cost. Investig...

  11. Growth of Silicon Nanowires by Heating Si Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢英杰; 奚中和; 俞大鹏; 杭青岭; 严涵斐; 冯孙齐; 薛增泉

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous silicon nanowires were prepared by heating an Si substrate at high temperatures using an Ni (or Au) catalyst. The nanowires have a diameter of 10 - 40nm and a length of up to several tens of micrometres.Unlike the well-known vapour-liquid-solid mechanism, a solid-liquid-solid mechanism appeared to control the nanowire growth. The heating process had a strong influence on the growth of silicon nanowires. It was found that ambient gas was necessary to grow nanowires. This method can be used to prepare other kinds of nanowires.

  12. Tapered ZnO Whiskers: {hkil}-Specific Mosaic Twinning VLS Growth from a Partially Molten Bottom Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shuei-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Zn particulates overlaid with wurtzite (W-type ZnO condensates having nearly orthogonal and facets were found to self-catalyze unusual tapered W-ZnO whiskers upon isothermal atmospheric annealing, i.e., thermal oxidation, at 600 °C. Analytical electron microscopic observations indicated that such whiskers formed tapered slabs having mosaic and twinned domains. The tapered whiskers can be rationalized by an alternative vapor–liquid–solid growth, i.e., {hkil}-specific coalescence twinning growth from the ZnO condensates taking advantage of a partially molten bottom source of Zn and the adsorption of atoms at the whisker tips and ledges under the influence of capillarity effect. The tapered whiskers having strong photoluminescence at 391 nm and with a considerable flexibility could have potential applications.

  13. Synthesis of silicon carbide nanowires by solid phase source chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Jie; LI Zhengcao; ZHANG Zhengjun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we report a simple approach to synthesize silicon carbide(SiC)nanowires by solid phase source chemical vapor deposition(CVD) at relatively low temperatures.3C-SiC nanowires covered by an amorphous shell were obtained on a thin film which was first deposited on silicon substrates,and the nanowires are 20-80 am in diameter and several μm in length,with a growth direction of[200].The growth of the nanowires agrees well on vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)process and the film deposited on the substrates plays an important role in the formation of nanowires.

  14. Direct observation of nanowire growth and decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskas, Simas; Shandakov, Sergey D; Jiang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    knowledge, so far this has been only postulated, but never observed at the atomic level. By means of in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy we monitored and examined the atomic layer transformation at the conditions of the crystal growth and its decomposition using CuO nanowires selected...... as a model object. The atomic layer growth/decomposition was studied by varying an O2 partial pressure. Three distinct regimes of the atomic layer evolution were experimentally observed: growth, transition and decomposition. The transition regime, at which atomic layer growth/decomposition switch takes place...

  15. Growth of wurtzite InP/GaP core-shell nanowires by metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Nripendra N.; Kelrich, Alexander; Kauffmann, Yaron; Cohen, Shimon; Ritter, Dan

    2017-04-01

    We report on the selective area vapor-liquid-solid (SA-VLS) growth of InP/GaP core shell nano-wires (NWs) by metal organic molecular beam epitaxy. Wurtzite crystal structure of the core InP was transferred to the GaP shell through layer by layer radial growth which eliminated bending of the NWs in random directions. Low growth temperature restricted surface segregation and kept the shell free from indium. Strain in the GaP shell was partially relaxed through formation of periodic misfit dislocations. From the periodicity of Moiré fringes and splitting of the fast-Fourier-transform of the transmission electron micrographs, the radial and axial strain were determined as 4.5% and 6.2%, respectively.

  16. Growth and characterization of gold catalyzed SiGe nanowires and alternative metal-catalyzed Si nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gentile Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growth of semiconductor (SC nanowires (NW by CVD using Au-catalyzed VLS process has been widely studied over the past few years. Among others SC, it is possible to grow pure Si or SiGe NW thanks to these techniques. Nevertheless, Au could deteriorate the electric properties of SC and the use of other metal catalysts will be mandatory if NW are to be designed for innovating electronic. First, this article's focus will be on SiGe NW's growth using Au catalyst. The authors managed to grow SiGe NW between 350 and 400°C. Ge concentration (x in Si1- x Ge x NW has been successfully varied by modifying the gas flow ratio: R = GeH4/(SiH4 + GeH4. Characterization (by Raman spectroscopy and XRD revealed concentrations varying from 0.2 to 0.46 on NW grown at 375°C, with R varying from 0.05 to 0.15. Second, the results of Si NW growths by CVD using alternatives catalysts such as platinum-, palladium- and nickel-silicides are presented. This study, carried out on a LPCVD furnace, aimed at defining Si NW growth conditions when using such catalysts. Since the growth temperatures investigated are lower than the eutectic temperatures of these Si-metal alloys, VSS growth is expected and observed. Different temperatures and HCl flow rates have been tested with the aim of minimizing 2D growth which induces an important tapering of the NW. Finally, mechanical characterization of single NW has been carried out using an AFM method developed at the LTM. It consists in measuring the deflection of an AFM tip while performing approach-retract curves at various positions along the length of a cantilevered NW. This approach allows the measurement of as-grown single NW's Young modulus and spring constant, and alleviates uncertainties inherent in single point measurement.

  17. Epitaxial growth of aligned GaN nanowires and nanobridges

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Homo-epitaxialy grown aligned GaN nanowires were prepared on crystalline GaN mesas. The GaN nanowires showed preferential growth along the 〈100〉 direction (m-axis direction). By using selectively positioned and crystallographically well defined GaN epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) mesas as substrate, we obtained horizontally aligned GaN nanowires, in comb-like arrays and hexagonal network interconnecting the ELO mesas. Preliminary testing of the nanomechanical behavior of horizontal nanowir...

  18. Doping GaP Core-Shell Nanowire pn-Junctions: A Study by Off-Axis Electron Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Sadegh; Berg, Alexander; Borgström, Magnus T; Kasama, Takeshi; Beleggia, Marco; Samuelson, Lars; Wagner, Jakob B

    2015-06-10

    The doping process in GaP core-shell nanowire pn-junctions using different precursors is evaluated by mapping the nanowires' electrostatic potential distribution by means of off-axis electron holography. Three precursors, triethyltin (TESn), ditertiarybutylselenide, and silane are investigated for n-type doping of nanowire shells; among them, TESn is shown to be the most efficient precursor. Off-axis electron holography reveals higher electrostatic potentials in the regions of nanowire cores grown by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism (axial growth) than the regions grown parasitically by the vapor-solid (VS) mechanism (radial growth), attributed to different incorporation efficiency between VLS and VS of unintentional p-type carbon doping originating from the trimethylgallium precursor. This study shows that off-axis electron holography of doped nanowires is unique in terms of the ability to map the electrostatic potential and thereby the active dopant distribution with high spatial resolution.

  19. Alumina nanowire growth by water decomposition and the peritectic reaction of decagonal Al{sub 65}Cu{sub 15}Co{sub 20} quasicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Téllez-Vázquez, J.O., E-mail: oswald.tellez@gmail.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Metalurgia y Materiales, UMSNH, Edificio U, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 58060 Morelia Michoacán, México (Mexico); Patiño-Carachure, C., E-mail: cpatino@pampano.unacar.mx [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Carmen, Campus III, Avenida Central S/N, Esq. Con Fracc. Mundo Maya, C.P. 24115 Ciudad del Carmen, Campeche, México (Mexico); Rosas, G., E-mail: grtrejo@yahoo07.com.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Metalurgia y Materiales, UMSNH, Edificio U, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 58060 Morelia Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, the results of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires' growth through a chemical reaction between Al and water vapor at 1050 °C are presented. Our approach is based on two primary considerations. First, at room temperature, the Al{sub 65}Cu{sub 15}Co{sub 20} alloy is affected by the following mechanism: 2Al (s) + 3H{sub 2}O (g) → Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (s) + H{sub 2} (g). In this reaction, the released hydrogen induces cleavage fracture of the material to form small particles. Second, the Al{sub 65}Cu{sub 15}Co{sub 20} quasicrystalline phase is transformed on heating to liquid + Al (Cu, Co) cubic phase through a peritectic reaction at 1050 °C. The Al-rich liquid then reacts with water vapor, forming Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the formed nanowires have a hexagonal structure, and infrared analysis further confirms the presence of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase in the final products. Transmission electron microscopy observations show that nanoparticles are present at the end of nanowires, suggesting the VLS growth mechanism. Elemental analysis by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) indicates that the particles at the tip of the nanowires are mainly formed by Co and Cu alloying elements and small amounts of Al. Electron microscopy observations showed nanowires with diameters ranging from 20 to 70 nm; the average diameter was 37 nm and the nanowire lengths were up to several micrometers. - Highlights: • Hexagonal alumina nanowires are grown at 1050 °C through the VLS process. • Alumina nanowires are obtained by the decomposition of decagonal quasicrystalline phase. • The decagonal phase decomposition follows a peritectic reaction at 1030 °C. • Nanoparticles are obtained by hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. • The nanoparticles catalyze the water decomposition to form wires.

  20. Scenarios of stable Vapor→Liquid Droplet→Solid Nanowire growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebol`sin, Valery A.; Dunaev, Alexander I.; Tatarenkov, Alexander F.; Shmakova, Svetlana S.

    2016-09-01

    In the process of Nanowire (NW) growth under the Vapor→Liquid Droplet→Solid (VLS) scheme, the stages that reach the boundary of the crystallization front (the triple phase line (TPL)) under the droplet of the catalyst are either absorbed by the TPL, or accumulate ahead of it. It has been shown that, in the first case, TPL can release stages, which leads to a decrease in supersaturation necessary for NW growth. An equation has been derived, which defines the change in free surface energy of the three-phase system in the absorption (release) of a stage, being a function of the contact angle of the droplet, and the ratio between the phase conjugation angles interface at equilibrium shift in the boundary line. A thermodynamic model has been developed and three possible scenarios for sustainable NW growth: Non-Wetting, Wetting and Fully Wetting have been considered in accordance with the processes occurring at the interface of three phases. The results obtained for each scenario were used to analyze the polytypism of GaAs and InAs NW, the radial periodic instability of Si NW and the formation of "negative" NW.

  1. Nucleation, Growth, and Bundling of GaN Nanowires in Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Disentangling the Origin of Nanowire Coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganer, Vladimir M; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Dogan, Pinar; Sabelfeld, Karl K; Brandt, Oliver

    2016-06-08

    We investigate the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of spontaneously formed GaN nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy combining the statistical analysis of scanning electron micrographs with Monte Carlo growth models. We find that (i) the nanowire density is limited by the shadowing of the substrate from the impinging fluxes by already existing nanowires, (ii) shortly after the nucleation stage, nanowire radial growth becomes negligible, and (iii) coalescence is caused by bundling of nanowires. The latter phenomenon is driven by the gain of surface energy at the expense of the elastic energy of bending and becomes energetically favorable once the nanowires exceed a certain critical length.

  2. Phase selection enabled formation of abrupt axial heterojunctions in branched oxide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Lebedev, Oleg I; Turner, Stuart; Li, Yong Feng; Lu, Yun Hao; Feng, Yuan Ping; Boullay, Philippe; Prellier, Wilfrid; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Wu, Tom

    2012-01-11

    Rational synthesis of nanowires via the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism with compositional and structural controls is vitally important for fabricating functional nanodevices from bottom up. Here, we show that branched indium tin oxide nanowires can be in situ seeded in vapor transport growth using tailored Au-Cu alloys as catalyst. Furthermore, we demonstrate that VLS synthesis gives unprecedented freedom to navigate the ternary In-Sn-O phase diagram, and a rare and bulk-unstable cubic phase can be selectively stabilized in nanowires. The stabilized cubic fluorite phase possesses an unusual almost equimolar concentration of In and Sn, forming a defect-free epitaxial interface with the conventional bixbyite phase of tin-doped indium oxide that is the most employed transparent conducting oxide. This rational methodology of selecting phases and making abrupt axial heterojunctions in nanowires presents advantages over the conventional synthesis routes, promising novel composition-modulated nanomaterials.

  3. In Situ Study of Noncatalytic Metal Oxide Nanowire Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskas, Simas; Jiang, Hua; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2014-01-01

    energy planes. Atomic layers nucleate at the edge of twin boundary ridges and form a long-range ordering along the twin boundary. We anticipate our study to be a starting point to employ defects for nanowire growth control and consequently shaping the geometry of nanowires in a similar manner...

  4. Au catalyst assisted growth of ZnO nanowires by vapour phase transport method on p-Si and fabrication of p-Si/n-ZnO heterojunction diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Shashidhara; V, Shrisha B.; Naik, K Gopalakrishna, E-mail: gopal-mng@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri – 574199 (India)

    2015-06-24

    In this work ZnO nanowires were grown on p type silicon (p-Si) substrate using Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) approach using Au as catalyst by vapor phase transport growth method. Surface morphology and structural properties of the grown ZnO nanowires were examined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Using the n-ZnO nanowires (NW) grown on p-type silicon, n-ZnO NW/p-Si heterojunction diode was fabricated. The rectification property of the fabricated diode was studied by room temperature as well as high temperature (up to 370 K) current-voltage (I-V) measurements.

  5. Density-controlled growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowires using chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Well-aligned ZnO nanowires were grown on Si substrate by chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the density of nanowires was related to the heating process and growth temperature.High-density ZnO nanowires were obtained under optimal conditions.The growth mechanism of the ZnO nanowires was presented as well.

  6. Germanium nanowires grown using different catalyst metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia, R.C., E-mail: riama@ifsp.edu.br [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Área de Ciências, Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia de São Paulo, Rua Américo Ambrósio, 269, Jd. Canaã, Sertãozinho, CEP 14169-263 (Brazil); Kamimura, H.; Munhoz, R.; Rodrigues, A.D. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Leite, E.R. [Departamento de Química – LIEC, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Chiquito, A.J. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    Germanium nanowires have been synthesized by the well known vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism using gold, silver, cooper, indium and nickel as catalyst metals. The influence of metal seeds on nanowires structural and electronic transport properties was also investigated. Electron microscopy images demonstrated that, despite differences in diameters, all nanowires obtained presented single crystalline structures. X-ray patterns showed that all nanowires were composed by germanium with a small amount of germanium oxide, and the catalyst metal was restricted at the nanowires' tips. Raman spectroscopy evidenced the long range order in the crystalline structure of each sample. Electrical measurements indicated that variable range hopping was the dominant mechanism in carrier transport for all devices, with similar hopping distance, regardless the material used as catalyst. Then, in spite of the differences in synthesis temperatures and nanowires diameters, the catalyst metals have not affected the composition and crystalline quality of the germanium nanowires nor the carrier transport in the germanium nanowire network devices. - Highlights: • Ge nanowires were grown by VLS method using Au, Ag, Cu, In and Ni as catalysts. • All nanowires presented high single crystalline quality and long range order. • Devices showed semiconducting behavior having VRH as dominant transport mechanism. • The metal catalyst did not influence structural properties or the transport mechanism.

  7. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Zou, Xingquan; Chi, Lingfei; Li, Qiang; Xiao, Tan

    2007-03-01

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO2 and active carbon at 1000 °C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 µm. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiOx nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  8. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Ping; Zou Xingquan; Chi Lingfei; Li Qiang; Xiao Tan [Department of Physics, Shantou University, Shantou 515063 (China)

    2007-03-28

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO{sub 2} and active carbon at 1000 deg. C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 {mu}m. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiO{sub x} nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  9. Gallium loading of gold seed for high yield of patterned GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulanger, J. P.; Chia, A. C. E.; LaPierre, R. R., E-mail: lapierr@mcmaster.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2014-08-25

    A method is presented for maximizing the yield and crystal phase purity of vertically aligned Au-assisted GaAs nanowires grown with an SiO{sub x} selective area epitaxy mask on GaAs (111)B substrates. The nanowires were grown by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method in a gas source molecular beam epitaxy system. During annealing, Au VLS seeds will alloy with the underlying GaAs substrate and collect beneath the SiO{sub x} mask layer. This behavior is detrimental to obtaining vertically aligned, epitaxial nanowire growth. To circumvent this issue, Au droplets were pre-filled with Ga assuring vertical yields in excess of 99%.

  10. Growth of ZnO nanowires on nonwoven polyethylene fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Baruah et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the growth of ZnO nanowires on nonwoven polyethylene fibers using a simple hydrothermal method at a temperature below the boiling point of water. The ZnO nanowires were grown from seed ZnO nanoparticles affixed onto the fibers. The seed ZnO nanoparticles, with diameters of about 6–7 nm, were synthesized in isopropanol by reducing zinc acetate hydrate with sodium hydroxide. The growth process was carried out in a sealed chemical bath containing an equimolar solution of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamethylene tetramine at a temperature of 95 °C over a period of up to 20 h. The thickness and length of the nanowires can be controlled by using different concentrations of the starting reactants and growth durations. A 0.5 mM chemical bath yielded nanowires with an average diameter of around 50 nm, while a 25 mM bath resulted in wires with a thickness of up to about 1 μm. The length of the wires depends both on the concentration of the precursor solution as well as the growth duration, and in 20 h, nanowires as long as 10 μm can be grown. The nonwoven mesh of polyethylene fibers covered with ZnO nanowires can be used for novel applications such as water treatment by degrading pollutants by photocatalysis. Photocatalysis tests carried out on standard test contaminants revealed that the polyethylene fibers with ZnO nanowires grown on them could accelerate the photocatalytic degradation process by a factor of 3.

  11. Growth mechanism and photoluminescence of the SnO2 nanotwists on thin film and the SnO2 short nanowires on nanorods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bing; Xu Ping

    2009-01-01

    SnO2 nanotwists on thin film and SnO2 short nanowires on nanorods have been grown on single silicon substrates by using Au-Ag alloying catalyst assisted carbothermal evaporation of SnO2 and active carbon powders. The morphology and the structure of the prepared nanostructures are determined on the basis of field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electronic diffraction (SAED), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and photoluminescence (PL) spectra analysis. The new peaks at 356, 450, and 489 nm in the measured PL spectra of two kinds of SnO2 nanostructures are observed, implying that more luminescence centres exist in these SnO2 nanostructures due to nanocrystals and defects. The growth mechanism of these nanostructures belongs to the vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism.

  12. Catalyst shape engineering for anisotropic cross-sectioned nanowire growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahorra, Yonatan; Kelrich, Alexander; Cohen, Shimon; Ritter, Dan

    2017-01-01

    The ability to engineer material properties at the nanoscale is a crucial prerequisite for nanotechnology. Hereunder, we suggest and demonstrate a novel approach to realize non-hemispherically shaped nanowire catalysts, subsequently used to grow InP nanowires with a cross section anisotropy ratio of up to 1:1.8. Gold was deposited inside high aspect ratio nanotrenches in a 5 nm thick SiNx selective area mask; inside the growth chamber, upon heating to 455 °C, the thin gold stripes agglomerated, resulting in an ellipsoidal dome (hemiellipsoid). The initial shape of the catalyst was preserved during growth to realize asymmetrically cross-sectioned nanowires. Moreover, the crystalline nature of the nanowire side facets was found to depend on the nano-trench orientation atop the substrate, resulting in hexagonal or octagonal cross-sections when the nano-trenches are aligned or misaligned with the [1¯10] orientation atop a [111]B substrate. These results establish the role of catalyst shape as a unique tool to engineer nanowire growth, potentially allowing further control over its physical properties.

  13. Initial Growth of Single-Crystalline Nanowires: From 3D Nucleation to 2D Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun GZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The initial growth stage of the single-crystalline Sb and Co nanowires with preferential orientation was studied, which were synthesized in porous anodic alumina membranes by the pulsed electrodeposition technique. It was revealed that the initial growth of the nanowires is a three-dimensional nucleation process, and then gradually transforms to two-dimensional growth via progressive nucleation mechanism, which resulting in a structure transition from polycrystalline to single crystalline. The competition among the nuclei inside the nanoscaled-confined channel and the growth kinetics is responsible for the structure transition of the initial grown nanowires.

  14. Electrodeposition of Metal on GaAs Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Einabad, Omid; Watkins, Simon; Kavanagh, Karen

    2010-10-01

    Copper (Cu) electrical contacts to freestanding gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowires have been fabricated via electrodeposition. The nanowires are zincblende (111) oriented grown epitaxially on n-type Si-doped GaAs (111)B substrates by gold-catalyzed Vapor Liquid Solid (VLS) growth in a metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) reactor. The epitaxial electrodeposition process, based on previous work with bulk GaAs substrates, consists of a substrate oxide pre-etch in dilute ammonium-hydroxide carried out prior to galvanostatic electrodeposition in a pure Cu sulphate aqueous electrolyte at 20-60^oC. For GaAs nanowires, we find that Cu or Fe has a preference for growth on the gold catalyst avoiding the sidewalls. After removing gold, both metals still prefer to grow only on top of the nanowire, which has the largest potential field.

  15. Long SiC nanowires synthesized from off-gases of the polycarbosilane-derived SiC preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gong-Yi; Li, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Hao [National University of Defense Technology, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, Changsha (China); Liu, Lin [Wuhan Mechanical Technology College, Wuhan (China)

    2010-02-15

    In this communication, we report on the attempt to make full use of the off-gases from polycarbosilane-derived SiC preparation, and we successfully synthesized long SiC nanowires in large areas with Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} as catalyst. The nanowires have diameters of about 80-300 nm and lengths of millimeters, and they are identified as single crystals {beta}-SiC along the left angle 111 right angle direction. The VLS mechanism was employed to interpret the nanowire growth. (orig.)

  16. Solution-solid-solid mechanism: superionic conductors catalyze nanowire growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junli; Chen, Kangmin; Gong, Ming; Xu, Bin; Yang, Qing

    2013-09-11

    The catalytic mechanism offers an efficient tool to produce crystalline semiconductor nanowires, in which the choice, state, and structure of catalysts are active research issues of much interest. Here we report a novel solution-solid-solid (SSS) mechanism for nanowire growth catalyzed by solid-phase superionic conductor nanocrystals in low-temperature solution. The preparation of Ag2Se-catalyzed ZnSe nanowires at 100-210 °C is exampled to elucidate the SSS model, which can be extendable to grow other II-VI semiconductor (e.g., CdSe, ZnS, and CdS) nanowires by the catalysis of nanoscale superionic-phase silver or copper(I) chalcogenides (Ag2Se, Ag2S, and Cu2S). The exceptional catalytic ability of these superionic conductors originates from their structure characteristics, known for high-density vacancies and fast mobility of silver or copper(I) cations in the rigid sublattice of Se(2-) or S(2-) ions. Insights into the SSS mechanism are provided based on the formation of solid solution and the solid-state ion diffusion/transport at solid-solid interface between catalyst and nanowire.

  17. Controlled growth mechanism of poly (3-hexylthiophene) nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiymaz, D.; Yagmurcukardes, M.; Tomak, A.; Sahin, H.; Senger, R. T.; Peeters, F. M.; Zareie, H. M.; Zafer, C.

    2016-11-01

    Synthesis of 1D-polymer nanowires by a self-assembly method using marginal solvents is an attractive technique. While the formation mechanism is poorly understood, this method is essential in order to control the growth of nanowires. Here we visualized the time-dependent assembly of poly (3-hexyl-thiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) nanowires by atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The assembly of P3HT nanowires was carried out at room temperature by mixing cyclohexanone (CHN), as a poor solvent, with polymer solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB). Both π-π stacking and planarization, obtained at the mix volume ratio of P3HT (in DCB):CHN (10:7), were considered during the investigation. We find that the length of nanowires was determined by the ordering of polymers in the polymer repetition direction. Additionally, our density functional theory calculations revealed that the presence of DCB and CHN molecules that stabilize the structural distortions due to tail group of polymers was essential for the core-wire formation.

  18. Promotion of the Growth of Boron-Carbide Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranov, Yanko; Zhang, Daqing; McIlroy, David; Norton, Grant

    2000-03-01

    Boron carbide, is a wide bandgap semiconductor (2.1eV) with a high melting temperature in excess of 2400^circC. Initial studies indicate that nanowires of boron carbide approximately 25 ~30 μm in length and less than 100 nm in diameter can be grown by the technique of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition by a mode of the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism [1] at relatively low temperatures ( ~1150^circC). Through the use of boron based eutectics such as FeB, NiB and PtB nanowire growth at temperatures below 1150^circC. These metal borides have successively lower melting temperatures, respectively. In this paper we will discuss a simple technique for making submicron metal boride particles, as well as a simple means of depositing them onto a surface. In addition, the effect of droplet size on nanowire diameter and the stability of the size of the metal boride droplet during growth will be discussed. These studies demonstrate that the surface can be selectively seeded thereby controlling the location of the nanowires, i.e. select area deposition. Lastly, the techniques and materials used to grow boron carbide nanowires can easily be used to grow other types of nanowires, as well as carbon nanotubes. [1]. D. N. McIlroy, Daqing Zhang, Robert M. Cohen, J. Wharton, Yongjun Geng, M. Grant Norton, G. De Stasio, B.Gilbert, L.Perfetti, J.H.Streiff, B.Broocks and J.L. McHale, Phys. Rev. B 60 (1999) 4874

  19. Controlling nanowire growth through electric field-induced deformation of the catalyst droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panciera, Federico; Norton, Michael M.; Alam, Sardar Bilal

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires with precisely controlled structure, and hence well-defined electronic and optical properties, can be grown by self-assembly using the vapour-liquid-solid process. The structure and chemical composition of the growing nanowire is typically determined by global parameters s...... surface tension, important for quantitative development of strategies to control nanowire growth.......Semiconductor nanowires with precisely controlled structure, and hence well-defined electronic and optical properties, can be grown by self-assembly using the vapour-liquid-solid process. The structure and chemical composition of the growing nanowire is typically determined by global parameters...... such as source gas pressure, gas composition and growth temperature. Here we describe a more local approach to the control of nanowire structure. We apply an electric field during growth to control nanowire diameter and growth direction. Growth experiments carried out while imaging within an in situ transmission...

  20. Growth map for Ga-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiman, Faebian; Küpers, Hanno; Somaschini, Claudio; Geelhaar, Lutz

    2016-03-04

    For the Ga-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy, growth temperature, As flux, and Ga flux have been systematically varied across the entire window of growth conditions that result in the formation of nanowires. A range of GaAs structures was observed, progressing from pure Ga droplets under negligible As flux through horizontal nanowires, tilted nanowires, vertical nanowires, and nanowires without droplets to crystallites as the As flux was increased. Quantitative analysis of the resulting sample morphology was performed in terms of nanowire number and volume density, number yield and volume yield of vertical nanowires, diameter, length, as well as the number and volume density of parasitic growth. The result is a growth map that comprehensively describes all nanowire and parasitic growth morphologies and hence enables growth of nanowire samples in a predictive manner. Further analysis indicates the combination of global Ga flux and growth temperature determines the total density of all objects, whereas the global As/Ga flux ratio independently determines the resultant sample morphology. Several dependencies observed here imply that all objects present on the substrate surface, i.e. both nanowires and parasitic structures, originate from Ga droplets.

  1. Selective MBE-growth of GaN nanowires on patterned substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, Timo; Gotschke, Tobias; Stoica, Toma; Limbach, Friedrich; Calarco, Raffaella [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Center Juelich GmbH (Germany); JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Self assembled III-nitride nanowires are promising candidates for optoelectronic devices. The precise control of size and position of the nanowires is crucial for further applications. We demonstrate the selective growth of arranged GaN nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on an AlN buffer. The position of each nanowire is controlled by a thin silicon oxide mask, patterned by electron beam lithography. The dependence of selectivity and nanowire morphology on the growth parameters and mask properties are investigated. We change the substrate temperature and the Ga-flux, retaining nitrogen rich conditions, which are suitable for self-assembled nanowire growth. Samples with different masks are produced, varying the thickness and the layout. The diameter of the holes and their distance from each other vary across the pattern. We discuss the influence of these parameters on the nanowire growth and morphology.

  2. Gibbs–Thomson Effect in Planar Nanowires: Orientation and Doping Modulated Growth

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Youde

    2016-06-02

    Epitaxy-enabled bottom-up synthesis of self-assembled planar nanowires via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism is an emerging and promising approach toward large-scale direct integration of nanowire-based devices without postgrowth alignment. Here, by examining large assemblies of indium tin oxide nanowires on yttria-stabilized zirconia substrate, we demonstrate for the first time that the growth dynamics of planar nanowires follows a modified version of the Gibbs-Thomson mechanism, which has been known for the past decades to govern the correlations between thermodynamic supersaturation, growth speed, and nanowire morphology. Furthermore, the substrate orientation strongly influences the growth characteristics of epitaxial planar nanowires as opposed to impact at only the initial nucleation stage in the growth of vertical nanowires. The rich nanowire morphology can be described by a surface-energy-dependent growth model within the Gibbs-Thomson framework, which is further modulated by the tin doping concentration. Our experiments also reveal that the cutoff nanowire diameter depends on the substrate orientation and decreases with increasing tin doping concentration. These results enable a deeper understanding and control over the growth of planar nanowires, and the insights will help advance the fabrication of self-assembled nanowire devices. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  3. Microspheres for the Growth of Silicon Nanowires via Vapor-Liquid-Solid Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arancha Gómez-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires have been synthesized by a simple process using a suitable support containing silica and carbon microspheres. Nanowires were grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition via a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism with only the substrate as silicon source. The curved surface of the microsized spheres allows arranging the gold catalyst as nanoparticles with appropriate dimensions to catalyze the growth of nanowires. The resulting material is composed of the microspheres with the silicon nanowires attached on their surface.

  4. Gibbs-Thomson Effect in Planar Nanowires: Orientation and Doping Modulated Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Y; Chen, R.; Yu, X.; Wang, Q.; Jungjohann, KL; Dayeh, SA; Wu, T.

    2016-01-01

    Epitaxy-enabled bottom-up synthesis of self-assembled planar nanowires via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism is an emerging and promising approach toward large-scale direct integration of nanowire-based devices without postgrowth alignment. Here, by examining large assemblies of indium tin oxide nanowires on yttria-stabilized zirconia substrate, we demonstrate for the first time that the growth dynamics of planar nanowires follows a modified version of the Gibbs-Thomson mechanism, which has be...

  5. SiC nanowires grown on activated carbon in a polymer pyrolysis route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Gongyi, E-mail: nudtlgy@gmail.co [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, No. 109 Deya Road, Shangdalong Street, Kaifu District, Changsha 410073 (China); Li Xiaodong, E-mail: xdli0153@sina.co [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, No. 109 Deya Road, Shangdalong Street, Kaifu District, Changsha 410073 (China); Wang Hao; Xing Xin; Yang Yong [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, No. 109 Deya Road, Shangdalong Street, Kaifu District, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2010-01-15

    beta-SiC nanowires are a novel type of photocatalysts. However, they tend to be entangled together especially at high concentrations when dispersed in water, which may reduce the photocatalytic activity. It is reasonable to expect that beta-SiC nanowires would provide better photocatalytic activity if they are grown on activated carbon. In the letter we report the successful synthesis of quantities of beta-SiC nanowires grown on the surfaces of the activated carbon by pyrolysis of polycarbosilane at 1300 deg. C. The nanowires, with the diameters of 50-100 nm and the length of tens of micrometers, are composed of single crystal beta-SiC along the <1 1 1> direction. Both the VLS and the VS mechanisms were employed to interpret the nanowires growth.

  6. Corner wetting during the vapor-liquid-solid growth of faceted nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brian; Davis, Stephen

    2016-11-01

    We consider the corner wetting of liquid drops in the context of vapor-liquid-solid growth of nanowires. Specifically, we construct numerical solutions for the equilibrium shape of a liquid drop on top of a faceted nanowire by solving the Laplace-Young equation with a free boundary determined by mixed boundary conditions. A key result for nanowire growth is that for a range of contact angles there is no equilibrium drop shape that completely wets the corner of the faceted nanowire. Based on our numerical solutions we determine the scaling behavior for the singular surface behavior near corners of the nanowire in terms of the Young contact angle and drop volume.

  7. Photoluminescence and structural properties of Si/SiC core–shell nanowires growth by HWCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarudin, Nur Fatin Farhanah Binti; Mohd Noor, Nurul Jannah Binti; Rahman, Saadah Abdul; Goh, Boon Tong, E-mail: boontong77@yahoo.com

    2015-01-15

    Si/SiC core–shell nanowires grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition were studied. Ni nanoparticles act as metal nano-templates to catalyze the growth of these core–shell nanowires. These nanowires were grown at different deposition pressures of 0.5 and 1 mbar. The nanowires showed a tapered-like morphology at deposition pressure 0.5 mbar. Increase in pressure to 1 mbar leads to a formation of agglomerated grains at the root of the nanowires. The results show that these nanowires consisted of crystalline Si core and amorphous SiC shell nanowires. Increase in pressure enhanced the formation of SiC phase in the shell of the nanowires. On the other hand, the formation of the agglomerated grains attributed to an increasing of the SiC phase at higher deposition pressure. The presence of Si and SiC nano-crystallites embedded within an amorphous matrix exhibited a room temperature PL emission in the range of 400–1000 nm. The effects of the deposition pressure on the optical and structural properties of the nanowires are also discussed. - Highlights: • Growth of Si/SiC core–shell nanowires by HWCVD. • The nanowires consisted of crystalline Si core and amorphous SiC shell. • Metal nano-templates catalyzed the growth of Si core nanowires. • Increase in deposition pressure enhanced the SiC phase. • The presence of nano-crystallites exhibited a room temperature PL.

  8. Radial growth of zinc oxide nanowire for piezoelectric nanogenerator application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Safa

    2017-04-01

    Nano- and micro-self-biased sensors employed environmental harvested energy, which are provided by different methods, such as piezoelectric. Piezoelectric materials are capable of producing electrical energy from environmental mechanical force. In this paper, a radial layer of well-arrayed hexagonal zinc oxide nanowires is grown on carbon fiber substrate using a two-step Chemical deposition method of metal salt growth. The resulted morphology is examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) micrographs and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) pattern which indicates the quality and the crystallization order of the samples. In addition, composition of the material is studied using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy method. The results show that zinc oxide nanowires are well managed in vertical direction on the cylindrical carbon fibers. The hexagonal nanowires are grown with a length from 206 to 286 nm (Nanometer) and the diameter from 75 to 103 nm. The results of FTIR spectroscopy and XRD also illustrate the wurtzite structure of zinc oxide. The synthesized nanowires are then applied in a flexible capacitive piezoelectric nanogenerator consisting of a thin Ag layer as the upper contact and a carbon substrate as the back contact which are separated by a PMMA dielectric film. The output current and voltage are measured by applying a random pulse mechanical force on the upper contact. A maximum voltage and current of 14 mV (millivolt) and 20 nA (nanoampere) are generated at the output of nanogenerator, respectively.

  9. Controlling nanowire growth through electric field-induced deformation of the catalyst droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciera, Federico; Norton, Michael M.; Alam, Sardar B.; Hofmann, Stephan; Mølhave, Kristian; Ross, Frances M.

    2016-07-01

    Semiconductor nanowires with precisely controlled structure, and hence well-defined electronic and optical properties, can be grown by self-assembly using the vapour-liquid-solid process. The structure and chemical composition of the growing nanowire is typically determined by global parameters such as source gas pressure, gas composition and growth temperature. Here we describe a more local approach to the control of nanowire structure. We apply an electric field during growth to control nanowire diameter and growth direction. Growth experiments carried out while imaging within an in situ transmission electron microscope show that the electric field modifies growth by changing the shape, position and contact angle of the catalytic droplet. This droplet engineering can be used to modify nanowires into three dimensional structures, relevant to a range of applications, and also to measure the droplet surface tension, important for quantitative development of strategies to control nanowire growth.

  10. Thermochemistry and growth mechanism of SiC nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianjun; Ding, Lijuan; Xin, Lipeng; Zeng, Fan; Chen, Jun

    2017-09-01

    The chemical reaction thermodynamics and a novel two-stage growth mechanism of SiC nanowires synthesized by carbothermal reduction reactions were investigated based on the Si-C-O systems over a wide temperature range (1050 ≤ T ≤ 2000 K). The carbothermal reduction reaction process involves the fast formation of gaseous SiO and CO crucial intermediates, and the further carbon reduction of SiO to SiC. The relationship between the free energy changes and temperature at different pressures was also discussed. Some fundamental data in the work can help to analyze the thermochemistry of the carbothermal reduction reaction in the Si-C-O system, which is beneficial to optimize the temperature, pressure and the input precursors for controlling the SiC nanowire growth.

  11. Structure and morphology in diffusion-driven growth of nanowires: the case of ZnTe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Fonseca, P; Bellet-Amalric, E; Vigliaturo, R; den Hertog, M; Genuist, Y; André, R; Robin, E; Artioli, A; Stepanov, P; Ferrand, D; Kheng, K; Tatarenko, S; Cibert, J

    2014-01-01

    Gold-catalyzed ZnTe nanowires were grown at low temperature by molecular beam epitaxy on a ZnTe(111) B buffer layer, under different II/VI flux ratios, including with CdTe insertions. High-resolution electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) gave information about the crystal structure, polarity, and growth mechanisms. We observe, under stoichiometric conditions, the simultaneous presence of zinc-blende and wurtzite nanowires spread homogeneously on the same sample. Wurtzite nanowires are cylinder-shaped with a pyramidal-structured base. Zinc-blende nanowires are cone-shaped with a crater at their base. Both nanowires and substrate show a Te-ended polarity. Te-rich conditions favor zinc-blende nanowires, while Zn-rich suppress nanowire growth. Using a diffusion-driven growth model, we present a criterion for the existence of a crater or a pyramid at the base of the nanowires. The difference in nanowire morphology indicates lateral growth only for zinc-blende nanowires. The role of the direct impinging flux on the nanowire's sidewall is discussed.

  12. Correction: β-Sialon nanowires, nanobelts and hierarchical nanostructures: morphology control, growth mechanism and cathodoluminescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juntong; Huang, Zhaohui; Liu, Yangai; Fang, Minghao; Chen, Kai; Huang, Yaoting; Huang, Saifang; Ji, Haipeng; Yang, Jingzhou; Wu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-07-01

    Correction for `β-Sialon nanowires, nanobelts and hierarchical nanostructures: morphology control, growth mechanism and cathodoluminescence properties' by Juntong Huang, et al., Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 424-432.

  13. Nanowire growth process modeling and reliability models for nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi Aghdam, Faranak

    Nowadays, nanotechnology is becoming an inescapable part of everyday life. The big barrier in front of its rapid growth is our incapability of producing nanoscale materials in a reliable and cost-effective way. In fact, the current yield of nano-devices is very low (around 10 %), which makes fabrications of nano-devices very expensive and uncertain. To overcome this challenge, the first and most important step is to investigate how to control nano-structure synthesis variations. The main directions of reliability research in nanotechnology can be classified either from a material perspective or from a device perspective. The first direction focuses on restructuring materials and/or optimizing process conditions at the nano-level (nanomaterials). The other direction is linked to nano-devices and includes the creation of nano-electronic and electro-mechanical systems at nano-level architectures by taking into account the reliability of future products. In this dissertation, we have investigated two topics on both nano-materials and nano-devices. In the first research work, we have studied the optimization of one of the most important nanowire growth processes using statistical methods. Research on nanowire growth with patterned arrays of catalyst has shown that the wire-to-wire spacing is an important factor affecting the quality of resulting nanowires. To improve the process yield and the length uniformity of fabricated nanowires, it is important to reduce the resource competition between nanowires during the growth process. We have proposed a physical-statistical nanowire-interaction model considering the shadowing effect and shared substrate diffusion area to determine the optimal pitch that would ensure the minimum competition between nanowires. A sigmoid function is used in the model, and the least squares estimation method is used to estimate the model parameters. The estimated model is then used to determine the optimal spatial arrangement of catalyst arrays

  14. Template-assisted growth of transparent plasmonic nanowire electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterina Giordano, Maria; Repetto, Diego; Mennucci, Carlo; Carrara, Angelica; Buatier de Mongeot, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Self-organized nanowire arrays are confined by glancing-angle Au deposition on nanopatterned glass templates prepared by ion beam sputtering. The semi-transparent 1D nanowire arrays are extended over large cm2 areas and are endowed with excellent electrical conductivity competitive with the best transparent conductive oxides (sheet resistance in the range of 5-20 Ohm sq-1). In addition, the nanowires support localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonances, which are easily tunable into the visible and near infrared spectrum and are selectively excited with incident light polarized perpendicularly to the wires. Such substrates, thus, behave as multifunctional nanoelectrodes, which combine good optoelectronic performance with dichroic plasmonic excitation. The electrical percolation process of the Au nanoelectrodes was monitored in situ during growth at glancing angle, both on flat and nanopatterned glass templates. In the first case, we observed a universal scaling of the differential percolation rate, independently of the glancing deposition angle, while deviations from the universal scaling were observed when Au was confined on nanopatterned templates. In the latter case, the pronounced shadowing effect promotes the growth of locally connected 1D Au nanosticks on the ‘illuminated’ ripple ridges, thus, introducing strong anisotropies with respect to the case of a 2D percolating network.

  15. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared.

  16. Effect of growth temperature on photoluminescence and piezoelectric characteristics of ZnO nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Water, Walter [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Fang, T.-H. [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Institute of Mechanical and Electromechanical Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: fang.tehua@msa.hinet.net; Ji, L.-W.; Lee, C.-C. [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)

    2009-02-25

    ZnO nanowire arrays were synthesized on Au-coated silicon (1 0 0) substrates by using vapour-liquid-solid process in this work. The effect of growth temperatures on the crystal structure and the surface morphology of ZnO nanowires were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The absorption and optical characteristics of the nanowires were examined by Ultraviolet/Visible spectroscopy, and photoluminescence, respectively. The photoluminescence results exhibited ZnO nanowires had an ultraviolet and blue emission at 383 and 492 nm. Then a nanogenerator with ZnO nanowire arrays was fabricated and demonstrated Schottky-like current-voltage characteristics.

  17. Novel approach to the growth and characterization of aligned epitaxial gallium nitride nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Tania Alicia

    Nanowire devices are potential building blocks for complex electronic circuitry, however, challenges such as in-place alignment, precise positioning and nanowire device integration need to be addressed. In this work selective area grown (SAG), micron sized gallium nitride (GaN) mesas were used as growth substrates for lateral epitaxial GaN nanowire arrays. The thermodynamically stable mesa facets provide a crystallographic match for directed nanowire synthesis by minimizing the surface energy at the interface between the nanowire and substrate Nanowires grow from the sidewalls of GaN mesas forming parallel and hexagonal networks. Alignment occurs in the nonpolar m-axis and semipolar directions respectively. Gallium nitride nanowires are interconnected between thermodynamically stable and smooth pyramidal (10ll) , and (1l22) surfaces of adjacent GaN mesas, and they also grow from a single mesa to form free-standing nanowire cantilevers. The synthesis of lateral free-standing nanowires has led to exciting studies of their structural, electrical, and optical properties. Characterization of the electrical properties is carried out by in situ probing of single nanowires on the growth substrate inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The current transport is found to be largely dominated by thermionic field emission and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, and is significantly limited by a large contact resistance at the probe-nanowire interface. The carrier concentration and mobilities of the probed nanowires are extracted and are in agreement with standard field effects transistors (FETs) fabricated from nanowires grown using similar growth conditions. These results reveal that electrical probing of lateral GaN nanowires is a reliable means of characterizing their electrical properties once the interface resistance between the probe and nanowire is considered. The optical properties of the nanowires were investigated. Photon emission at 3.26 eV dominated the

  18. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  19. Tungsten/Platinum Hybrid Nanowire Growth via Field Emission Using Nanorobotic Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports tungsten-platinum hybrid nanowire growth via field emission, based on nanorobotic manipulation within a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM. A multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT was used as the emitter, and a tungsten probe was used as the anode at the counterposition, by way of nanomanipulation. By independently employing trimethylcyclopentadienyl platinum (CpPtMe3 and tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO6 as precursors, the platinum nanowire grew on the tip of the MWCNT emitter. Tungsten nanowires then grew on the tip of the platinum nanowire. The hybrid nanowire length wascontrolled by nanomanipulation. Their purity was evaluated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Thus, it is possible to fabricate various metallic hybrid nanowires by changing the precursor materials. Hybrid nanowires have various applications in nanoelectronics, nanosensor devices, and nanomechanical systems.

  20. Growth of Catalyst-Free Epitaxial InAs Nanowires on Si Wafers Using Metallic Masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, M Teng; Zheng, Kun; Gao, Qiang; Tan, H Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Zou, Jin

    2016-07-13

    Development of heteroepitaxy growth of catalyst-free vertical III-V nanowires on Si wafers is highly desirable for future nanoscale Si-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. In this study, a proof-of-concept approach is developed for catalyst-free heteroepitaxy growth of InAs nanowires on Si wafers. Before the growth of InAs nanowires, a Si-compatible metallic film with a thickness of several tens of nanometers was predeposited on a Si wafer and then annealed to form nanosize openings so as to obtain a metallic mask. These nano-openings exposed the surface of the Si wafer, which allowed subsequent nucleation and growth of epitaxial InAs nanowires directly on the surface of the Si wafer. The small size of the nano-openings limits the lateral growth of the nanostructures but promotes their axial growth. Through this approach, catalyst-free InAs nanowires were grown on both Si (111) and (001) wafers successfully at different growth temperatures. In particular, ultralong defect-free InAs nanowires with the wurtzite structure were grown the Si (111) wafers at 550 °C using the Ni mask. This study offers a simple, cost-effective, and scalable method to grow catalyst-free III-V nanowires on Si wafers. The simplicity of the approach opens a new avenue for the growth and integration of catalyst-free high-quality heteroepitaxial III-V nanowires on Si wafers.

  1. Alumina Template-Dependant Growth of Cobalt Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Malferrari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Different electrochemical regimes and porous alumina were applied for template synthesis of cobalt nanowire (nw arrays, revealing several peculiar cases. In contrast to quite uniform filling of sulfuric acid alumina templates by alternating current deposition, nonuniform growth of the Co nw tufts and mushrooms was obtained for the case of oxalic acid templates. We showed herein for the first time that such configurations arise from the spontaneous growth of cobalt nw groups evolving from the cobalt balls at the Al/alumina interface. Nevertheless, the uniform growth of densely packed cobalt nw arrays, up to tens of micrometers in length, was obtained via long-term direct current galvanostatic deposition at low current density using oxalic acid templates one-side coated by conducting layer. The unique point of this regime is the formation of hexagonal lattice Co nws with a preferred (100 growth direction.

  2. A Novel Discovery of Growth Process for Ag Nanowires and Plausible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiejun Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel growth process of silver nanowires was revealed by tracing the morphology evolution of Ag nanostructures fabricated by an improved polyol process. A mixture of Ag nanowires and nanoparticles was obtained with the usage of PVP-K25 (MW = 38,000. The products sampled at different reaction time were studied in detail using UV-visible absorption spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. An interesting phenomenon unknown in the past was observed where Ag nanoparticles undergo an important dissolution-recrystallization process and Ag nanowires are formed at the expense of the preformed Ag nanoparticles. A plausible novel growth mechanism for the silver nanowires was proposed.

  3. Measurement of Local Si-Nanowire Growth Kinetics Using In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of Heated Cantilevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Christian; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Mølhave, Kristian;

    2010-01-01

    A technique to study nanowire growth processes on locally heated microcantilevers in situ in a transmission electron microscope has been developed. The in situ observations allow the characterization of the nucleation process of silicon wires, as well as the measurement of growth rates...... of individual nanowires and the ability to observe the formation of nanowire bridges between separate cantilevers to form a complete nanowire device. How well the nanowires can be nucleated controllably on typical cantilever sidewalls is examined, and the measurements of nanowire growth rates are used...

  4. Controlled growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowire arrays using the improved hydrothermal method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Zhitao; Li Sisi; Chu Jinkui; Chen Yong

    2013-01-01

    Well-aligned ZnO nanowires were hydrothermally synthesized based on a facile method for preparing the ZnO seed layer which was derived from the combination of a sol-gel process and the spin-coating technique.The effect of the contents of growth solution and the growth duration on the morphology ofZnO nanowires has been investigated.The results indicated that long and vertically aligned ZnO nanowires could be obtained by adjusting the contents of ammonia and polyethyleneimine (PEI) in the growth solution.Under the optimized condition,the length of ZnO nanowires increased fast and almost linearly with the growth duration.After 10 h incubation,ZnO nanowires more than 25μm in length were obtained.By combining the conventional photolithographic method with this hydrothermal approach,long and well-aligned ZnO nanowire arrays were selectively grown on the substrate.In addition,the bottom fusion at the foot of the nanowires has been obviously improved.The results demonstrated that the improved hydrothermal process is favorable to synthesize long and well-aligned ZnO nanowires,and possesses good process compatibility with the conventional photolithographic technique for preparing ZnO nanowire arrays.So it has great potential in applications such as display and field emission devices.

  5. Growth strategies to control tapering in Ge nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Periwal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of PH3 on the morphology of Au catalyzed Ge nanowires (NWs. Ge NWs were grown on Si (111 substrate at 400 °C in the presence of PH3, using vapor-liquid-solid method by chemical vapor deposition. We show that high PH3/GeH4 ratio causes passivation at NW surface. At high PH3 concentration phosphorous atoms attach itself on NW surface and form a self-protection coating that prevents conformal growth and leads to taper free nanostructures. However, in case of low PH3 flux the combination of axial and radial growth mechanism occurs resulting in conical structure. We have also investigated axial PH3-intrinsic junctions in Ge NWs. The unusual NW shape is attributed to a combination of catalyzed, uncatalyzed and diffusion induced growth.

  6. Structural and electronic properties of InN nanowire network grown by vapor-liquid-solid method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barick, B. K., E-mail: bkbarick@gmail.com, E-mail: subho-dh@yahoo.co.in; Dhar, S., E-mail: bkbarick@gmail.com, E-mail: subho-dh@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, Mumbai-400076 (India); Rodríguez-Fernández, Carlos; Cantarero, Andres [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia, PO Box 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Growth of InN nanowires have been carried out on quartz substrates at different temperatures by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) technique using different thicknesses of Au catalyst layer. It has been found that a narrow window of Au layer thickness and growth temperature leads to multi-nucleation, in which each site acts as the origin of several nanowires. In this multi-nucleation regime, several tens of micrometer long wires with diameter as small as 20 nm are found to grow along [112{sup -}0] direction (a-plane) to form a dense network. Structural and electronic properties of these wires are studied. As grown nanowires show degenerate n-type behavior. Furthermore, x-ray photoemission study reveals an accumulation of electrons on the surface of these nanowires. Interestingly, the wire network shows persistence of photoconductivity for several hours after switching off the photoexcitation.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and photoluminescence of tin oxide nanoribbons and nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duraia, El-Shazly M.A., E-mail: duraia_physics@yahoo.co [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physics and Technology, 11 Ibragimov Street, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Mansorov, Z.A. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Tokmolden, S. [Institute of Physics and Technology, 11 Ibragimov Street, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2009-11-15

    In this work we report the successful formation of tin oxide nanowires and tin oxide nanoribbons with high yield and by using simple cheap method. We also report the formation of curved nanoribbon, wedge-like tin oxide nanowires and star-like nanowires. The growth mechanism of these structures has been studied. Scanning electron microscope was used in the analysis and the EDX analysis showed that our samples is purely Sn and O with ratio 1:2. X-ray analysis was also used in the characterization of the tin oxide nanowire and showed the high crystallinity of our nanowires. The mechanism of the growth of our1D nanostructures is closely related to the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process. The photoluminescence PL measurements for the tin oxide nanowires indicated that there are three stable emission peaks centered at wavelengths 630, 565 and 395 nm. The nature of the transition may be attributed to nanocrystals inside the nanobelts or to Sn or O vacancies occurring during the growth which can induce trapped states in the band gap.

  8. H2-Assistance One-Step Growth of Si Nanowires and Their Growth Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Ming-Xia; RUAN Shuang-Chen; GAO Biao; HUO Kai-Fu; ZHAI Jian-Pang; LI Ling; LIAO Hui; XU Xin-Tong

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale nanowires are grown on Si wafers by the catalyst-free one-step thermal reaction method in Ar/H2 mixture atmosphere at 1000℃. The x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results reveal that the final nanowires are of silicon nanostructures. The Held emission scanning electron microscopy shows that these self-organized Si nanowires (SiNWs) possess curly crowns with diameters varying from 10 to 300 nm and lengths of up to several hundreds of micrometers. The transmission electron microscopy indicates that the nanowires are pure Si with amorphous structures. All the measurement results show that no silicon oxide is generated in our products. The growth mechanism is proposed tentatively. Silicon oxide is reduced into Si nanoparticles under the Ar/H2 mixture, which is the main reason for the formation of such SiNWs. Our experiments offer a method of preparing Si nanostructures by simply reducing silicon oxide at high temperature.%Large-scale nanowires are grown on Si wafers by the catalyst-free one-step thermal reaction method in Ar/H2 mixture atmosphere at 1000℃.The x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results reveal that the final nanowires are of silicon nanostructures.The field emission scanning electron microscopy shows that these self-organized Si nanowires (SiNWs) possess curly crowns with diameters varying from 10 to 300nm and lengths of up to several hundreds of micrometers.The transmission electron microscopy indicates that the nanowires are pure Si with amorphous structures.All the measurement results show that no silicon oxide is generated in our products.The growth mechanism is proposed tentatively.Silicon oxide is reduced into Si nanoparticles under the Ar/H2 mixture,which is the main reason for the formation of such SiNWs.Our experiments offer a method of preparing Si nanostructures by simply reducing silicon oxide at high temperature.Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have higher carrier mobility,a larger

  9. Nanomanufacturing of silica nanowires: Synthesis, characterization and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Praveen Kumar

    In this research, selective and bottom-up manufacturing of silica nanowires on silicon (Si) and its applications has been investigated. Localized synthesis of these nanowires on Si was achieved by metal thin film catalysis and metal ion implantation based seeding approach. The growth mechanism of the nanowires followed a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Mass manufacturing aspects such as growth rate, re-usability of the substrate and experimental growth model were also investigated. Further, silica nanowires were explored as surface enhanced Raman (SER) substrate and immunoassay templates towards optical and electrochemical detection of cancer biomarkers respectively. Investigating their use in photonic applications, optically active silica nanowires were synthesized by erbium implantation after nanowire growth and implantation of erbium as a metal catalyst in Si to seed the nanowires. Ion implantation of Pd in Si and subsequent annealing in Ar at 1100 0 C for 60 mins in an open tube furnace resulted in silica nanowires of diameters ranging from 15 to 90 nm. Similarly, Pt was sputtered on to Si and further annealed to obtain silica nanowires of diameters ranging from 50 to 500 nm. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed the amorphous nature of the wires. In addition, nano-sized Pd catalyst was found along the body of the nanowires seeded by Pd implantation into Si. After functionalization of the wires with 3 - AminoPropylTriMethoxySilane (APTMS), the Pd decorated silica nanowires served as an SER substrate exhibiting a sensitivity of 10 7 towards the detection of interleukin-10 (IL-10, a cancer biomarker) with higher spatial resolution. Voltammetric detection of IL-10 involved silica nanowires synthesized by Pd thin film catalysis on Si as an immunoassay template. Using the electrochemical scheme, the presence of IL-10 was detected down to 1fg/mL in ideal pure solution and 1 pg/mL in clinically relevant samples. Time resolved photoluminescence (PL

  10. Silicon oxide nanowire growth mechanisms revealed by real-time electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolíbal, Miroslav; Novák, Libor; Shanley, Toby; Toth, Milos; Šikola, Tomáš

    2015-12-01

    Growth of one-dimensional materials is possible through numerous mechanisms that affect the nanowire structure and morphology. Here, we explain why a wide range of morphologies is observed when silicon oxide nanowires are grown on silicon substrates using liquid gallium catalyst droplets. We show that a gallium oxide overlayer is needed for nanowire nucleation at typical growth temperatures, and that it can decompose during growth and, hence, dramatically alter the nanowire morphology. Gallium oxide decomposition is attributed to etching caused by hydrogen that can be supplied by thermal dissociation of H2O (a common impurity). We show that H2O dissociation is catalyzed by silicon substrates at temperatures as low as 320 °C, identify the material supply pathways and processes that rate-limit nanowire growth under dry and wet atmospheres, and present a detailed growth model that explains contradictory results reported in prior studies. We also show that under wet atmospheres the Ga droplets can be mobile and promote nanowire growth as they traverse the silicon substrate.Growth of one-dimensional materials is possible through numerous mechanisms that affect the nanowire structure and morphology. Here, we explain why a wide range of morphologies is observed when silicon oxide nanowires are grown on silicon substrates using liquid gallium catalyst droplets. We show that a gallium oxide overlayer is needed for nanowire nucleation at typical growth temperatures, and that it can decompose during growth and, hence, dramatically alter the nanowire morphology. Gallium oxide decomposition is attributed to etching caused by hydrogen that can be supplied by thermal dissociation of H2O (a common impurity). We show that H2O dissociation is catalyzed by silicon substrates at temperatures as low as 320 °C, identify the material supply pathways and processes that rate-limit nanowire growth under dry and wet atmospheres, and present a detailed growth model that explains

  11. Controlled growth of Si-based heterostructure nanowires and their structural and electrical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Guanghan; Rahman, Saadah Abdul; Goh, Boon Tong

    2015-12-01

    Ni-catalyzed Si-based heterostructure nanowires grown on crystal Si substrates by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) were studied. The nanowires which included NiSi nanowires, NiSi/Si core-shell nanowires, and NiSi/SiC core-shell nanowires were grown by varying the filament temperature T f from 1150 to 1850 °C. At a T f of 1450 °C, the heterostructure nanowires were formed by crystalline NiSi and crystalline Si that were attributed to the core and shell of the nanowires, respectively. The morphology of the nanowires showed significant changes with the increase in the filament temperature to 1850 °C. Moreover, the effect of hydrogen heat transfer from the filament temperature demonstrated significant phase changes from NiSi to Ni2Si with increase in the filament temperature. The increased filament temperature also enhanced reactions in the gas phase thus generating more SiC clusters and consequently formed the NiSi/SiC heterostructure core-shell nanowires at T f of 1850 °C. This paper discusses the role of filament temperatures on the growth and constituted phase change of the nanowires as well as their electrical characteristics.

  12. Controlled growth of Si-based heterostructure nanowires and their structural and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Guanghan; Rahman, Saadah Abdul; Goh, Boon Tong

    2015-06-01

    Ni-catalyzed Si-based heterostructure nanowires grown on crystal Si substrates by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) were studied. The nanowires which included NiSi nanowires, NiSi/Si core-shell nanowires, and NiSi/SiC core-shell nanowires were grown by varying the filament temperature T f from 1150 to 1850 °C. At a T f of 1450 °C, the heterostructure nanowires were formed by crystalline NiSi and crystalline Si that were attributed to the core and shell of the nanowires, respectively. The morphology of the nanowires showed significant changes with the increase in the filament temperature to 1850 °C. Moreover, the effect of hydrogen heat transfer from the filament temperature demonstrated significant phase changes from NiSi to Ni2Si with increase in the filament temperature. The increased filament temperature also enhanced reactions in the gas phase thus generating more SiC clusters and consequently formed the NiSi/SiC heterostructure core-shell nanowires at T f of 1850 °C. This paper discusses the role of filament temperatures on the growth and constituted phase change of the nanowires as well as their electrical characteristics.

  13. Wide band gap semiconductor nanowires for optical devices 1 low-dimensionality related effects and growth

    CERN Document Server

    Consonni , Vincent

    2014-01-01

    GaN and ZnO nanowires can by grown using a wide variety of methods from physical vapor deposition to wet chemistry for optical devices. This book starts by presenting the similarities and differences between GaN and ZnO materials, as well as the assets and current limitations of nanowires for their use in optical devices, including feasibility and perspectives. It then focuses on the nucleation and growth mechanismsof ZnO and GaN nanowires, grown by various chemical and physical methods. Finally, it describes the formation of nanowire heterostructures applied to optical devices.

  14. Transfer-free synthesis of highly ordered Ge nanowire arrays on glass substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, M.; Toko, K., E-mail: toko@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Suemasu, T. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Jevasuwan, W.; Fukata, N. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Saitoh, N.; Yoshizawa, N. [Electron Microscope Facility, TIA, AIST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8569 (Japan)

    2015-09-28

    Vertically aligned Ge nanowires (NWs) are directly synthesized on glass via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth using chemical-vapor deposition. The use of the (111)-oriented Ge seed layer, formed by metal-induced crystallization at 325 °C, dramatically improved the density, uniformity, and crystal quality of Ge NWs. In particular, the VLS growth at 400 °C allowed us to simultaneously achieve the ordered morphology and high crystal quality of the Ge NW array. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the resulting Ge NWs had no dislocations or stacking faults. Production of high-quality NW arrays on amorphous insulators will promote the widespread application of nanoscale devices.

  15. Dynamical theory and experiments on GaAs nanowire growth for photovoltaic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogstrup, Peter

    The geometry of nanowire solar cells provides many potential advantages compared to planar solar cells, such as reduced reflection, built-in light concentration due to absorption resonances, improved band gap tuning for multi-junction devices and an increased defect tolerance. Moreover, the use...... cells, as it requires control and an in-depth understanding of complex growth kinetics controlling the nanowire crystal formation and dopant incorporation. This thesis is concerned with the growth of self catalyzed GaAs based semiconductor nanowires on silicon substrates in a molecular beam epitaxy...... such as in-situ x-ray characterization of growing nanowires and growth of advanced photovoltaic structures and finally photovoltaic characterization of both lying and standing single nanowire devices are presented. All the different kind of single NW solar cell devices show an enormous potential as light...

  16. Ledge-flow-controlled catalyst interface dynamics during Si nanowire growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, S; Sharma, R; Wirth, CT

    2008-01-01

    Self-assembled nanowires offer the prospect of accurate and scalable device engineering at an atomistic scale for applications in electronics, photonics and biology. However, deterministic nanowire growth and the control of dopant profiles and heterostructures are limited by an incomplete...

  17. Tuning growth direction of catalyst-free InAs(Sb) nanowires with indium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Heidi; Morgan, Nicholas P.; Tütüncüoglu, Gözde; Friedl, Martin; Morral, Anna Fontcuberta i.

    2017-02-01

    The need for indium droplets to initiate self-catalyzed growth of InAs nanowires has been highly debated in the last few years. Here, we report on the use of indium droplets to tune the growth direction of self-catalyzed InAs nanowires. The indium droplets are formed in situ on InAs(Sb) stems. Their position is modified to promote growth in the or equivalent directions. We also show that indium droplets can be used for the fabrication of InSb insertions in InAsSb nanowires. Our results demonstrate that indium droplets can initiate growth of InAs nanostructures as well as provide added flexibility to nanowire growth, enabling the formation of kinks and heterostructures, and offer a new approach in the growth of defect-free crystals.

  18. Growth and properties of In(Ga)As nanowires on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertenberger, Simon

    2012-10-15

    In this thesis the integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires on silicon (Si) platform by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated. All nanowires are grown without the use of foreign catalysts such as Au to achieve high purity material. First, InAs nanowires are grown in a self-assembled manner on SiO{sub x}-masked Si(111) where pinholes in the silicon oxide serve as nucleation spots for the nanowires. This leads to the growth of vertically aligned, (111)-oriented nanowires with hexagonal cross-section. Based on this simple process, the entire growth parameter window is investigated for InAs nanowires, revealing an extremely large growth temperature range from 380 C to 580 C and growth rates as large as 6 μ/h. Complex quantitative in-situ line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry experiments during nanowire growth and post-growth thermal decomposition studies support these findings and indicate a very high thermal stability up to >540 C for InAs nanowires. Furthermore, the influence of the As/In ratio on the nanowire growth is studied revealing two distinct growth regimes, i.e., an In-rich regime for lower As fluxes and an As-rich regime for larger As fluxes, where the latter shows characteristic saturation of the nanowire aspect ratio. For the catalyst-free growth, detailed investigation of the growth mechanism is performed via a combination of in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex-situ scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM,TEM). An abrupt onset of nanowire growth is observed in RHEED intensity and in-plane lattice parameter evolution. Furthermore, completely droplet-free nanowires, continuous radial growth, constant vertical growth rate and growth interruption experiments suggest a vapor-solid growth mode for all investigated nanowire samples. Moreover, site-selective (positioned) growth of InAs nanowires on pre-patterned SiO{sub 2} masked Si(111) substrates is demonstrated which is needed for ultimate control of

  19. Dynamical theory and experiments on GaAs nanowire growth for photovoltaic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogstrup, Peter

    cells, as it requires control and an in-depth understanding of complex growth kinetics controlling the nanowire crystal formation and dopant incorporation. This thesis is concerned with the growth of self catalyzed GaAs based semiconductor nanowires on silicon substrates in a molecular beam epitaxy...... with a formulation of a theoretical framework which can serve as a basis to model and understand the dynamics of III-V nanowire growth via the ‘vapor-liquid-solid’ method. The formalism is based on principles from transition state kinetics driven by a Gibbs free energy minimization process. The crystallization...

  20. Electrochemical growth of ZnO nanowires inside nanoporous alumina templates. A comparison with metallic Zn nanowires growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Daniel [Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique (UMR CNRS 7575), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP) (France); Pauporte, Thierry; Lincot, Daniel [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique (UMR CNRS 7575), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP) (France); Gomez, Humberto [Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2008-10-15

    Molecular oxygen reduction in presence of Zn(II) allowed to get arrays of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) inside thick anodic alumina membranes (AAM), previously made by anodization in oxalic acid. A Zinc (Zn) NWs array made by electrochemical deposition (ED) was employed as a metal reference in order to compare its growth behavior with respect to that of ZnO, a semiconducting material. Chronoamperometric measurements for Zn NWs showed a typical response for metallic growth inside porous templates while ZnO NWs did not show this behavior. We observed that Zn NWs grew faster than ZnO NWs as checked by the electrical charge. SEM images showed the presence of ZnO NWs only after long deposition time. X-ray diffraction data confirmed the ZnO structure. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. EDITORIAL: Nanowires Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadish, Chennupati

    2010-02-01

    Nanowires are considered as building blocks for the next generation of electronics, photonics, sensors and energy applications. One-dimensional nanostructures offer unique opportunities to control the density of states of semiconductors, and in turn their electronic and optical properties. Nanowires allow the growth of axial heterostructures without the constraints of lattice mismatch. This provides flexibility to create heterostructures of a broad range of materials and allows integration of compound semiconductor based optoelectronic devices with silicon based microelectronics. Nanowires are widely studied and the number of papers published in the field is growing exponentially with time. Already nanowire lasers, nanowire transistors, nanowire light emitting diodes, nanowire sensors and nanowire solar cells have been demonstrated. This special issue on semiconductor nanowires features 17 invited papers from leading experts in the field. In this special issue, the synthesis and growth of semiconductor nanowires of a broad range of materials have been addressed. Both axial and radial heterostructures and their structural properties have been discussed. Electrical transport properties of nanowires have been presented, as well as optical properties and carrier dynamics in a range of nanowires and nanowire heterostructures. Devices such as nanowire lasers and nanowire sensors have also been discussed. I would like to thank the Editorial Board of the journal for suggesting this special issue and inviting me to serve as the Guest Editor. Sincere thanks are due to all the authors for their contributions to this special issue. I am grateful to the reviewers and editorial staff at Semiconductor Science and Technology and the Institute of Physics Publishing for their excellent efforts. Special thanks are due to Dr Claire Bedrock for coordinating this special issue.

  2. Temperature dependent growth and optical properties of SnO2 nanowires and nanobelts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S P Mondal; S K Ray; J Ravichandran; I Manna

    2010-08-01

    SnO2 nanowires and nanobelts have been grown by the thermal evaporation of Sn powders. The growth of nanowires and nanobelts has been investigated at different temperatures (750–1000°C). The field emission scanning electron microscopic and transmission electron microscopic studies revealed the growth of nanowires and nano-belts at different growth temperatures. The growth mechanisms of the formation of the nanostructures have also been discussed. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the nanowires and nanobelts are highly crystalline with tetragonal rutile phase. UV-visible absorption spectrum showed the bulk bandgap value (∼ 3.6 eV) of SnO2. Photoluminescence spectra demonstrated a Stokes-shifted emission in the wavelength range 558–588 nm. The Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed the formation of stoichiometric SnO2 at different growth temperatures.

  3. Raman scattering and growth disorders in single as-grown TiO{sub 2} nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C I; Lee, Y D; Yeh, V; Huang, Y L [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Tseng, C M, E-mail: huang_yuelin@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10601, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-15

    An oxidation procedure has been developed to grow single-crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanowires of the pure rutile phase, allowing subsequent characterizations of SEM, XRD, Raman, and TEM without any post-growth preparations. TEM observations support that the 1D anisotropic growth is dominated by oriented attachment processes, leading to typical growth-induced defects in the nanowires. Spatial variations of the rutile E{sub g} and A{sub 1g} Raman modes were unambiguously revealed on single nanowires while scanned along the growth direction parallel to the rutile [110]. Symmetry-sensitive deviations were identified by comparing the Raman data with the spatial correlation model calculations based on realistic dispersion relations of the rutile, reflecting morphology-correlated defect distributions along single nanowires. This work provides an efficient, non-destructive in situ characterization approach for guiding growth design in future nanotechnology.

  4. Growth and Raman spectroscopy studies of gold-free catalyzed semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zardo, Ilaria

    2010-12-15

    The present Ph.D. thesis proposes two aims: the search for catalysts alternative to gold for the growth of silicon nanowires and the investigation of the structural properties of the gold-free catalyzed Si, Ge, and GaAs nanowires. The successful growth of gold free catalyzed silicon nanowires was obtained using Ga and In as catalyst. Hydrogen plasma conditions were needed during the growth process. We proposed a growth mechanism where the role of the hydrogen plasma is taken into account. The influence of the growth conditions on nanowire growth morphology and structural properties was investigated in detail. The TEM studies showed the occurrence of different kind of twin defects depending on the nanowire growth direction. The intersection of twins in different spatial directions in <111>-oriented nanowires or the periodicity of highly dense twins in <112>-oriented nanowires leads to the formation of hexagonal domains embedded in the diamond silicon structure. A simple crystallographic model which illustrates the formation of the hexagonal phase was proposed. The presence of the hexagonal domains embedded in the diamond silicon structure was investigated also by means of Raman spectroscopy. The measured frequencies of the E2g and A1g modes were found to be in agreement with frequencies expected from phonon dispersion folding. An estimation of the percentage of hexagonal structure with respect to the cubic structure was given. The relative percentage of the two structures was found to change with growth temperature. Spatially resolved Raman scattering experiments were also realized on single Si nanowires. The lattice dynamics of gold-free catalyzed Ge and GaAs nanowires was studied by means of Raman spectroscopy. We performed spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy experiments on single crystalline- amorphous core-shell Ge nanowires. The correlation with TEM studies on nanowires grown under the same conditions and with AFM measurements realized of the same nanowires

  5. Structural, optical and ethanol sensing properties of Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johari, Anima, E-mail: animajohari@gmail.com; Sharma, Manish [Center for Applied Research in Electronics (CARE), IIT Delhi, Hauz khas, New Delhi-110016 (India); Johari, Anoopshi [THDC Institute of Hydropower Institute of Engineering and Technology, Tehri-249124 (India); Bhatnagar, M. C. [Physics Department, IIT Delhi, Hauz khas, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2014-04-24

    In present work, one-dimensional nanostructure of Cu-doped Tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) was synthesized by using thermal evaporation method in a tubular furnace under Nitrogen (N{sub 2}) ambience. The growth was carried out at atmospheric pressure. SEM and TEM images reveal the growth of wire-like nanostructures of Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} on Si substrate. The XRD analysis confirms that the synthesized SnO{sub 2} nanowires have tetragonal rutile structure with polycrystalline nature and X-ray diffraction pattern also showed that Cu gets incorporated into the SnO{sub 2} lattice. EDX spectra confirm the doping of Cu into SnO{sub 2} nanowires and atomic fraction of Cu in nanowires is ∼ 0.5 at%. The Vapor Liquid Solid (VLS) growth mechanism for Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires was also confirmed by EDX spectra. The optical properties of as grown Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires were studied by using UV-vis spectra which concludes the band gap of about 3.7 eV. As synthesized single Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowire based gas sensor exhibit relatively good performance to ethanol gas. This sensing behaviour offers a suitable application of the Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowire sensor for detection of ethanol gas.

  6. Topotaxial growth of α-Fe2O3 nanowires on iron substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Srivastava, A. K.; Babu, Mahendra; Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas

    2016-05-01

    α-Fe2O3 (hematite) nanowires have been grown by simple thermal oxidation of iron foil at 700°C in a moist oxygen flow. It was observed that the growth of nanowires highly depends on the texture of the iron substrate, in particular the presence of [110] oriented iron grains. Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigation of as-grown sample revealed that the growth of nanowires has definite orientation relation with the underlying oxide grains Fe3O4 (magnetite) and FeO (wustite), which can be interpreted by the primary orientation relationships of topotaxial growth of iron oxides. The observation can pave the way for patterning of the nanowire growth by controlling the texture of original substrate. Samples were also characterized with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  7. Topotaxial growth of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires on iron substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Himanshu, E-mail: himsri@rrcat.gov.in; Srivastava, A. K.; Babu, Mahendra; Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas [Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2016-05-23

    α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite) nanowires have been grown by simple thermal oxidation of iron foil at 700°C in a moist oxygen flow. It was observed that the growth of nanowires highly depends on the texture of the iron substrate, in particular the presence of [110] oriented iron grains. Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigation of as-grown sample revealed that the growth of nanowires has definite orientation relation with the underlying oxide grains Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite) and FeO (wustite), which can be interpreted by the primary orientation relationships of topotaxial growth of iron oxides. The observation can pave the way for patterning of the nanowire growth by controlling the texture of original substrate. Samples were also characterized with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  8. Incubation behavior of silicon nanowire growth investigated by laser-assisted rapid heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sang-gil; Kim, Eunpa; Allen, Frances I.; Hwang, David J.; Minor, Andrew M.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the early stage of silicon nanowire growth by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism using laser-localized heating combined with ex-situ chemical mapping analysis by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. By achieving fast heating and cooling times, we can precisely determine the nucleation times for nanowire growth. We find that the silicon nanowire nucleation process occurs on a time scale of ˜10 ms, i.e., orders of magnitude faster than the times reported in investigations using furnace processes. The rate-limiting step for silicon nanowire growth at temperatures in the vicinity of the eutectic temperature is found to be the gas reaction and/or the silicon crystal growth process, whereas at higher temperatures it is the rate of silicon diffusion through the molten catalyst that dictates the nucleation kinetics.

  9. Incubation behavior of silicon nanowire growth investigated by laser-assisted rapid heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sang-gil; Kim, Eunpa; Grigoropoulos, Costas P., E-mail: cgrigoro@berkeley.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States); Allen, Frances I.; Minor, Andrew M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hwang, David J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the early stage of silicon nanowire growth by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism using laser-localized heating combined with ex-situ chemical mapping analysis by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. By achieving fast heating and cooling times, we can precisely determine the nucleation times for nanowire growth. We find that the silicon nanowire nucleation process occurs on a time scale of ∼10 ms, i.e., orders of magnitude faster than the times reported in investigations using furnace processes. The rate-limiting step for silicon nanowire growth at temperatures in the vicinity of the eutectic temperature is found to be the gas reaction and/or the silicon crystal growth process, whereas at higher temperatures it is the rate of silicon diffusion through the molten catalyst that dictates the nucleation kinetics.

  10. Growth of Ag-seeded III-V Nanowires and TEM Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Anna Helmi Caroline

    This thesis deals with growth and characterization of GaAs and InAs nanowires. Today Au nanoparticle-seeding together with self-catalyzing are the dominating techniques to grow III-V nanowires with molecular beam epitaxy. In this thesis we instead investigate the possibility to use Ag as seed......) substrates as well as growths of InAs nanowires on InAs(111)B substrates. We have used a wide range of the basic growth parameters, such as temperature, As-pressure and group III- ux, in order to nd good growth conditions for the Ag-seeded nanowires. The overall growths have been evaluated with SEM and, when...... appropriate, the density and the vertical yield were obtained. The crystal structures for the grown nanowires have been investigated with TEM.We have also performed additional growths to further understand exactly how the nanowire growth proceeds as well as to understand the limitations of using Ag as a seed...

  11. Fabrication of SiC Composites with Synergistic Toughening of Carbon Whisker and In Situ 3C-SiC Nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The SiC composites with synergistic toughening of carbon whisker and in situ 3C-SiC nanowire have been fabricated by hot press sinter technology and annealed treatment technology. Effect of annealed time on the morphology of SiC nanowires and mechanical properties of the Cw/SiC composites was surveyed in detail. The appropriate annealed time improved mechanical properties of the Cw/SiC composites. The synergistic effect of carbon whisker and SiC nanowire can improve the fracture toughness for Cw/SiC composites. The vapor-liquid-solid growth (VLS mechanism was proposed. TEM photo showed that 3C-SiC nanowire can be obtained with preferential growth plane ({111}, which corresponded to interplanar spacing about 0.25 nm.

  12. Growth of Semiconductor Nanowires for Solar Cell Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Heurlin, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Nanowires have the ability to absorb light much more efficient than conventional thin film layers. This makes them candidates for the development of new types of solar cells that have higher efficiency and lower material usage than current technologies. In this thesis fabrication of nanowires with techniques suitable for large area applications are investigated. The nanowires are grown by either Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) or a novel technique called Aerotaxy. When using M...

  13. Controlled growth of large-scale silver nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Cong-Wen; Yang Hai-Tao; Shen Cheng-Min; Li Zi-An; Zhang Huai-Ruo; Liu Fei; Yang Tian-Zhong; Chen Shu-Tang; Gao Hong-Jun

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale silver nanowires with controlled aspect ratio were synthesized via reducing silver nitrate with 1, 2-propanediol in the presence of poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were employed to characterize these silver nanowires. The diameter of the silver nanowires can be readily controlled in the range of 100 to 400 nm by varying the experimental conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results show that there exists no chemical bond between the silver and the nitrogen atoms. The interaction between PVP and silver nanowires is mainly through the oxygen atom in the carbonyl group.

  14. Helical Growth of Ultrathin Gold-Copper Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Cruz, Rubén; Bazán-Díaz, Lourdes; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Bahena-Uribe, Daniel; Reyes-Gasga, José; Romeu, David; Guisbiers, Grégory; Herrera-Becerra, Raúl; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2016-03-09

    In this work, we report the synthesis and detailed structural characterization of novel helical gold-copper nanowires. The nanowires possess the Boerdijk-Coxeter-Bernal structure, based on the pile up of octahedral, icosahedral, and/or decahedral seeds. They are self-assembled into a coiled manner as individual wires or into a parallel-ordering way as groups of wires. The helical nanowires are ultrathin with a diameter of less than 10 nm and variable length of several micrometers, presenting a high density of twin boundaries and stacking faults. To the best of our knowledge, such gold-copper nanowires have never been reported previously.

  15. Self-induced growth of vertical GaN nanowires on silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaresan, V.; Largeau, L.; Oehler, F.; Zhang, H.; Mauguin, O.; Glas, F.; Gogneau, N.; Tchernycheva, M.; Harmand, J.-C.

    2016-04-01

    We study the self-induced growth of GaN nanowires on silica. Although the amorphous structure of this substrate offers no possibility of an epitaxial relationship, the nanowires are remarkably aligned with the substrate normal whereas, as expected, their in-plane orientation is random. Their structural and optical characteristics are compared to those of GaN nanowires grown on standard crystalline Si (111) substrates. The polarity inversion domains are much less frequent, if not totally absent, in the nanowires grown on silica, which we find to be N-polar. This work demonstrates that high-quality vertical GaN nanowires can be elaborated without resorting to bulk crystalline substrates.

  16. Understanding and Controlling the Growth of Monodisperse CdS Nanowires in Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xi, Lifei; Tan, Winnie Xiu Wen; Boothroyd, Chris;

    2008-01-01

    diffusion rate of the precursor and hence low reactivity. Therefore, ODPA is good for generating nearly monodisperse and high aspect ratio US nanowires. Our nanowires have a high degree of dispersibility and thus can be easily processed for potential applications as solar cells and transistors. Finally......Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanowires with a monodisperse diameter of 3.5 nm and length of about 600 nm were successfully synthesized using a simple and reproducible hot coordination solvents method. Structural characterization showed that the one-dimensional nanowires grow along the [001] direction......, we propose that the ODPA-to-Cd mole ratio is the key factor affecting the morphology of the nanowires because it affects both the cleavage rate of the P=S double bond and the nucleation/growth rate of the anisotropic nanocrystals. In addition, it was found that Cd-ODPA complexes give rise to a low...

  17. Bismuth nanowire growth under low deposition rate and its ohmic contact free of interface damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available High quality bismuth (Bi nanowire and its ohmic contact free of interface damage are quite desired for its research and application. In this paper, we propose one new way to prepare high-quality single crystal Bi nanowires at a low deposition rate, by magnetron sputtering method without the assistance of template or catalyst. The slow deposition growth mechanism of Bi nanowire is successfully explained by an anisotropic corner crossing effect, which is very different from existing explanations. A novel approach free of interface damage to ohmic contact of Bi nanowire is proposed and its good electrical conductivity is confirmed by I-V characteristic measurement. Our method provides a quick and convenient way to produce high-quality Bi nanowires and construct ohmic contact for desirable devices.

  18. Optical properties of semiconducting nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, L.K. van

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires of high purity and crystallinity hold promise as building blocks for opto-electronical devices at the nanoscale.. They are commonly grown via a Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism in which metal (nano) droplets collect the semiconductor precursors to form a solution which, whe

  19. Isolated High-Purity Platinum Nanowire Growth via Field Emission from a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhan; Nakajima, Masahiro; Saito, Yahachi; Ode, Yasuhito; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-03-01

    Isolated high-purity platinum nanowire growth was presented via field emission from the tip of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with a precursor of cyclopentadienyl-trimethyl-platinum(IV) (CpPtMe3) inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). A nanomanipulation system was used to adjust the gap between the anode (tungsten probe) and cathode (MWCNT) in order to control the nanowire growth length which achieved a platinum nanowire length of 1.18 µm. The chemical composition of the platinum nanowire analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) shows that the purity of the platinum in the nanowire reaches 94.9 wt %.

  20. Polarity and growth directions in Sn-seeded GaSb nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Reza R; Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Niu, Jie; Sköld, Niklas; Dick, Kimberly A

    2017-03-02

    We here investigate the growth mechanism of Sn-seeded GaSb nanowires and demonstrate how the seed particle and its dynamics at the growth interface of the nanowire determine the polarity, as well as the formation of structural defects. We use aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging methodologies to study the interrelationship between the structural properties, i.e. polarity, growth mechanism, and formation of inclined twin boundaries in pairs. Moreover, the optical properties of the Sn-seeded GaSb nanowires are examined. Their photoluminescence response is compared with one of their Au-seeded counterparts, suggesting the incorporation of Sn atoms from the seed particles into the nanowires.

  1. Growth of silicon oxide nanowires at low temperature using tin hydroxide catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carole, Davy; Brioude, Arnaud; Pillonnet, Anne; Lorenzzi, Jean; Kim-Hak, Olivier; Cauwet, François; Ferro, Gabriel

    2011-04-01

    Silane was successfully used to grow SiO x nanowires by vapor-liquid-solid at low temperature (<600 °C) using in-situ reduced tin oxide catalyst. The temperature of catalyst reduction was found to have a significant impact on the morphology, which was mainly composed of nanowires cocoons and bamboo-like microtubes. Experimental results suggest that the catalyst drop size is probably at the origin of the morphology selection. Growth mechanisms are proposed to explain these results. For long growth time, partial etching of the nanowires was observed due to SiO formation. Growing at very low temperature (<400 °C) was found to significantly reduce the growth rate while improving the shape and size control. PL measurements evidenced defects in SiO x nanowires coming from oxygen deficiency.

  2. Influence of growth conditions on the performance of InP nanowire solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Alessandro; Cui, Yingchao; Kölling, Sebastian; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Plissard, Sebastien R.; Wang, Jia; Koenraad, Paul M.; Haverkort, Jos E. M.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Nanowire based solar cells have attracted great attention due to their potential for high efficiency and low device cost. Photovoltaic devices based on InP nanowires now have characteristics comparable to InP bulk solar cells. A detailed and direct correlation of the influence of growth conditions on performance is necessary to improve efficiency further. We explored the effects of the growth temperature, and of the addition of HCl during growth, on the efficiency of nanowire array based solar cell devices. By increasing HCl, the saturation dark current was reduced, and thereby the nanowire solar cell efficiency was enhanced from less than 1% to 7.6% under AM 1.5 illumination at 1 sun. At the same time, we observed that the solar cell efficiency decreased by increasing the tri-methyl-indium content, strongly suggesting that these effects are carbon related.

  3. Influence of growth conditions on the performance of InP nanowire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Alessandro; Cui, Yingchao; Kölling, Sebastian; Verheijen, Marcel A; Plissard, Sebastien R; Wang, Jia; Koenraad, Paul M; Haverkort, Jos E M; Bakkers, Erik P A M

    2016-11-11

    Nanowire based solar cells have attracted great attention due to their potential for high efficiency and low device cost. Photovoltaic devices based on InP nanowires now have characteristics comparable to InP bulk solar cells. A detailed and direct correlation of the influence of growth conditions on performance is necessary to improve efficiency further. We explored the effects of the growth temperature, and of the addition of HCl during growth, on the efficiency of nanowire array based solar cell devices. By increasing HCl, the saturation dark current was reduced, and thereby the nanowire solar cell efficiency was enhanced from less than 1% to 7.6% under AM 1.5 illumination at 1 sun. At the same time, we observed that the solar cell efficiency decreased by increasing the tri-methyl-indium content, strongly suggesting that these effects are carbon related.

  4. Growth and structural characterization of III-V nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dheeraj, D.L.

    2010-10-15

    Heterostructured semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have attracted considerable attention in recent years because of their potential in future nano-electronic and nano-photonic device applications. NWs are usually grown by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism using techniques such as metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, chemical beam epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Of all the available techniques, MBE is known to be the technique which yields highest purity materials. In this study, the growth of GaAs NWs, GaAsSb NWs, as well as GaAs/GaAsSb axial and GaAs/AlGaAs radial heterostructured NWs on GaAs(111)B substrates by MBE is demonstrated. The structural and optical properties of the NWs grown are characterized by electron microscopy techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and micro-photoluminescence, respectively. Firstly, the optimum growth conditions to obtain rod shaped GaAs NWs on GaAs(111)B substrates by MBE is determined. It has been found that in-addition to the V/III ratio and substrate temperature, buffer growth conditions also play an important role on the orientation of the NWs. The effect of V/III ratio, substrate temperature, and the arsenic species (As{sub 2}/As{sub 4}) on the morphology of GaAs NWs has been determined. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization of NWs revealed that GaAs in NW form exhibit wurtzite (WZ) crystal phase in contrast to zinc blende (ZB) phase adapted in its bulk form. Since WZ crystal phase is a metastable phase of GaAs, the WZ GaAs NWs often exhibit stacking faults. The stacking faults are known to be a detrimental problem, if not properly controlled. To gain more insight on the growth kinetics of GaAs NWs grown by MBE, several samples such as GaAs NWs grown for different time durations, and GaAs NWs with three GaAsSb inserts, where GaAsSb inserts acts as markers, have been grown. Interestingly, the growth rates of the GaAs segments and GaAsSb inserts were observed to vary

  5. Aluminum-Catalyzed Growth of ‹110› Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainey, Mel; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Shen, Haoting; Yim, Joanne; Black, Marcie R.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2015-05-01

    The growth of silicon nanowires in the ‹110› direction is reported using a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism with aluminum as the catalyst and SiH4 as the source gas in a low pressure chemical vapor deposition process. The effects of growth conditions on the yield of ‹110› versus ‹111› nanowires were investigated. Increasing reactor pressure beyond 300 Torr was found to improve ‹110› wire yield by suppressing vapor-solid thin film deposition on the nanowire sidewalls during growth that promoted nanowire kinking. Additionally, ‹110› growth was found to occur only at temperatures below the Al-Si eutectic temperature (577°C). At temperatures approximately equal to 577°C or higher, the preferential growth direction was observed to shift from ‹110› to ‹111›. The growth of ‹110› Si nanowires at sub-eutectic temperatures was attributed to a reduction in the silicon concentration in the catalyst droplet which promotes (110) surface nucleation and subsequent growth in the ‹110› direction.

  6. Investigation of Nucleation Mechanism and Tapering Observed in ZnO Nanowire Growth by Carbothermal Reduction Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Ayan; Low, Ke-Bin; Oye, Michael; Stroscio, Michael A; Dutta, Mitra; Nicholls, Alan; Meyyappan, M

    2011-12-01

    ZnO nanowire nucleation mechanism and initial stages of nanowire growth using the carbothermal reduction technique are studied confirming the involvement of the catalyst at the tip in the growth process. Role of the Au catalyst is further confirmed when the tapering observed in the nanowires can be explained by the change in the shape of the catalyst causing a variation of the contact area at the liquid-solid interface of the nanowires. The rate of decrease in nanowire diameter with length on the average is found to be 0.36 nm/s and this rate is larger near the base. Variation in the ZnO nanowire diameter with length is further explained on the basis of the rate at which Zn atoms are supplied as well as the droplet stability at the high flow rates and temperature. Further, saw-tooth faceting is noticed in tapered nanowires, and the formation is analyzed crystallographically.

  7. Investigation of Nucleation Mechanism and Tapering Observed in ZnO Nanowire Growth by Carbothermal Reduction Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oye Michael

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ZnO nanowire nucleation mechanism and initial stages of nanowire growth using the carbothermal reduction technique are studied confirming the involvement of the catalyst at the tip in the growth process. Role of the Au catalyst is further confirmed when the tapering observed in the nanowires can be explained by the change in the shape of the catalyst causing a variation of the contact area at the liquid–solid interface of the nanowires. The rate of decrease in nanowire diameter with length on the average is found to be 0.36 nm/s and this rate is larger near the base. Variation in the ZnO nanowire diameter with length is further explained on the basis of the rate at which Zn atoms are supplied as well as the droplet stability at the high flow rates and temperature. Further, saw-tooth faceting is noticed in tapered nanowires, and the formation is analyzed crystallographically.

  8. Control growth of silicon nanocolumns' epitaxy on silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Su Kong, E-mail: sukong1985@yahoo.com.my [University of Malaya, Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics (Malaysia); Dee, Chang Fu [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN) (Malaysia); Yahya, Noorhana [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Faculty of Science and Information Technology (Malaysia); Rahman, Saadah Abdul [University of Malaya, Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics (Malaysia)

    2013-04-15

    The epitaxial growth of Si nanocolumns on Si nanowires was studied using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. A single-crystalline and surface oxide-free Si nanowire core (core radius {approx}21 {+-} 5 nm) induced by indium crystal seed was used as a substance for the vapor phase epitaxial growth. The growth process is initiated by sidewall facets, which then nucleate upon certain thickness to form Si islands and further grow to form nanocolumns. The Si nanocolumns with diameter of 10-20 nm and aspect ratio up to 10 can be epitaxially grown on the surface of nanowires. The results showed that the radial growth rate of the Si nanocolumns remains constant with the increase of deposition time. Meanwhile, the radial growth rates are controllable by manipulating the hydrogen to silane gas flow rate ratio. The optical antireflection properties of the Si nanocolumns' decorated SiNW arrays are discussed in the text.

  9. MOCVD growth and structural characterization of In-Sb-Te nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selmo, S.; Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Unita di Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Cecchi, S.; Cecchini, R.; Wiemer, C.; Longo, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Unita di Agrate Brianza (Italy); Rotunno, E.; Lazzarini, L. [IMEM-CNR, Parma (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    In this work, the self-assembly of In{sub 3}Sb{sub 1}Te{sub 2} and In-doped Sb{sub 4}Te{sub 1} nanowires (NWs) for phase change memories application was achieved by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, coupled with vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, catalyzed by Au nanoparticles. Single crystal In{sub 3}Sb{sub 1}Te{sub 2} and In-doped Sb{sub 4}Te{sub 1} NWs were obtained for different reactor pressures at 325 C. The parameters influencing the NW self-assembly were studied and the compositional, morphological, and structural analysis of the grown structures was performed, also comparing the effect of the used substrate (crystalline Si and SiO{sub 2}). In both cases, NWs of several micrometer in length and with diameters as small as 15 nm were obtained. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Growth Mechanism and Optimized Parameters to Synthesize Nation-115 Nanowire Arrays with Anodic Aluminium Oxide Membranes as Templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lu; PAN Cao-Feng; ZHU Jing

    2008-01-01

    @@ Nafion-115 nanowire arrays are synthesized with an extrusion method using AAO membranes as templates. It is indicated that the vacuum treating of AAO templates before surface decoration plays an important role in obtaining high filling rate of the Nafion-115 nanowires in the AAO templates, while the concentration of Nafion-115 DMSO solutions does not affect the filling rate greatly. The optimized parameters to synthesize the Nafion-115 nanowire arrays are studied. The filling rate of the Nafion-115 nanowires in the AAO templates synthesized with the optimized parameters is about 95%. The growth mechanism of Nafion-115 nanowires is discussed to qualitatively explain the experimental results.

  11. Growth of epitaxial silicon nanowires on a Si substrate by a metal-catalyst-free process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shuhei; Wakamatsu, Toshiki

    2016-07-28

    The growth of epitaxial Si nanowires by a metal-catalyst-free process has been investigated as an alternative to the more common metal-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid process. The well-aligned Si nanowires are successfully grown on a (111)-oriented Si substrate without any metal catalysts by a thermal treatment using silicon sulfide as a Si source at approximately 1200 °C. The needle-shaped Si nanowires, which have a core-shell structure that consists of a single-crystalline Si core along the direction consistent with the substrate direction and a surface coating of silicon oxide, are grown by a metal-catalyst-free process. In this process, the silicon sulfide in the liquid phase facilitates the nucleation and nanowire growth. In contrast, oxygen-rich nanowires that consist of crystalline Si at the tip and lumpy silicon oxide on the body are observed in a sample grown at 1300 °C, which disturbs the epitaxial growth of Si nanowires.

  12. Growth of aligned ZnO nanowires via modified atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuping; Li, Chengchen [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Chen, Mingming, E-mail: andychain@live.cn [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Yu, Xiao; Chang, Yunwei [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Chen, Anqi [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics & Information Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center (University Town), Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Zhu, Hai, E-mail: zhuhai5@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics & Information Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center (University Town), Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Tang, Zikang, E-mail: zktang@umac.mo [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics & Information Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center (University Town), Guangzhou, 510006 (China); The Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macau (China)

    2016-12-09

    In this work, we report the growth of high-quality aligned ZnO nanowires via a facile atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The CVD reactor chamber used was more complicated than a conventional one due to the quartz boats loaded with sources (ZnO/C) and substrates being inserted into a semi-open quartz tube, and then placed inside the CVD reactor. The semi-open quartz tube played a very important role in growing the ZnO nanowires, and demonstrated that the transportation properties of Zn and O vapor differ from those in the conventional CVD reactor chamber. Aligned ZnO nanowires were successfully obtained, though they were only found at substrates located upstream. The very high crystalline quality of the obtained ZnO nanowires was demonstrated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and room temperature photoluminescence investigations. Such ZnO nanowires with high crystalline quality may provide opportunities for the fabrication of ZnO-based nano-devices in future. - Highlights: • High-quality aligned ZnO nanowires were obtained via modified chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure. • The semi-open quartz tube plays very important roles in growing ZnO nanowires. • The transportation properties of Zn and O vapor differ from those in the conventional CVD reactor chamber.

  13. Spontaneous nucleation and growth of GaN nanowires: the fundamental role of crystal polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Kong, Xiang; Gotschke, Tobias; Calarco, Raffaella; Geelhaar, Lutz; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver

    2012-12-12

    We experimentally investigate whether crystal polarity affects the growth of GaN nanowires in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and whether their formation has to be induced by defects. For this purpose, we prepare smooth and coherently strained AlN layers on 6H-SiC(0001) and SiC(0001̅) substrates to ensure a well-defined polarity and an absence of structural and morphological defects. On N-polar AlN, a homogeneous and dense N-polar GaN nanowire array forms, evidencing that GaN nanowires form spontaneously in the absence of defects. On Al-polar AlN, we do not observe the formation of Ga-polar GaN NWs. Instead, sparse N-polar GaN nanowires grow embedded in a Ga-polar GaN layer. These N-polar GaN nanowires are shown to be accidental in that the necessary polarity inversion is induced by the formation of Si(x)N. The present findings thus demonstrate that spontaneously formed GaN nanowires are irrevocably N-polar. Due to the strong impact of the polarity on the properties of GaN-based devices, these results are not only essential to understand the spontaneous formation of GaN nanowires but also of high technological relevance.

  14. Thermal Stability and Growth Behavior of Erbium Silicide Nanowires Self-Assembled on a Vicinal Si(001) Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Tao; SONG Jun-Qiang; LI Juan; CAI Qun

    2011-01-01

    Erbium silicide nanowires are self-assembled on vicinal Si(Ool) substrates after electron beam evaporation and post annealing at 63(fC In-situ scanning tunneling microscopy investigations manifest that the nanowires will successively shrink and transform into a nanoisland with annealing prolonged. Meanwhile, a structural transition from hexagonal AIB2 phase to tetragonal ThSi'2 phase is revealed with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is also found that the nanowires gradually expand to embed into the substrates during the growth process, which has much influence on the shape instability of nanowires. Additionally, a multiple deposition-annealing treatment is given as a novel growth method to strengthen the controlled fabrication of nanowires.%@@ Erbium silicide nanowires are self-assembled on vicinal Si(001) substrates after electron beam evaporation and post annealing at 630℃ In-situ scanning tunneling microscopy investigations manifest that the nanowires will successively shrink and transform into a nanoisland with annealing prolonged.Meanwhile, a structural transition from hexagonal AlB phase to tetragonal ThSi phase is revealed with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.It is also found that the nanowires gradually expand to embed into the substrates during the growth process, which has much influence on the shape instability of nanowires.Additionally, a multiple deposition- annealing treatment is given as a novel growth method to strengthen the controlled fabrication of nanowires.

  15. Growth and properties of In(Ga)As nanowires on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertenberger, Simon

    2012-10-15

    In this thesis the integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires on silicon (Si) platform by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated. All nanowires are grown without the use of foreign catalysts such as Au to achieve high purity material. First, InAs nanowires are grown in a self-assembled manner on SiO{sub x}-masked Si(111) where pinholes in the silicon oxide serve as nucleation spots for the nanowires. This leads to the growth of vertically aligned, (111)-oriented nanowires with hexagonal cross-section. Based on this simple process, the entire growth parameter window is investigated for InAs nanowires, revealing an extremely large growth temperature range from 380 C to 580 C and growth rates as large as 6 μ/h. Complex quantitative in-situ line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry experiments during nanowire growth and post-growth thermal decomposition studies support these findings and indicate a very high thermal stability up to >540 C for InAs nanowires. Furthermore, the influence of the As/In ratio on the nanowire growth is studied revealing two distinct growth regimes, i.e., an In-rich regime for lower As fluxes and an As-rich regime for larger As fluxes, where the latter shows characteristic saturation of the nanowire aspect ratio. For the catalyst-free growth, detailed investigation of the growth mechanism is performed via a combination of in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex-situ scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM,TEM). An abrupt onset of nanowire growth is observed in RHEED intensity and in-plane lattice parameter evolution. Furthermore, completely droplet-free nanowires, continuous radial growth, constant vertical growth rate and growth interruption experiments suggest a vapor-solid growth mode for all investigated nanowire samples. Moreover, site-selective (positioned) growth of InAs nanowires on pre-patterned SiO{sub 2} masked Si(111) substrates is demonstrated which is needed for ultimate control of

  16. Growth and properties of defect-free ZnSe nanowires and nanoneedles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aichele, Thomas; Tribu, Adrien; Bougerol, Catherine; Kheng, Kuntheak; Donatini, Fabrice; Dang, Le Si; Andre, Regis; Tatarenko, Serge [Nanophysics and Semiconductor Group, CEA/CNRS/Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut Neel, Grenoble (France)

    2009-04-15

    ZnSe nanowires heterostructures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy in the vapour-liquid-solid growth mode assisted by gold catalysts. Size, shape and crystal structure are found to strongly depend on the growth conditions. Both, zinc-blende and wurtzite crystal structures are observed using transmission electron microscopy. At low growth temperature nanoneedles are formed. For higher growth temperature, the nanowires have a high aspect ratio with sizes of 1-2 {mu}m in length and 20-50 nm in width as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Growing a nanowire on top of the base of a nanoneedle allows us to obtain very narrow structures with a diameter less than 10 nm and a low density of stacking fault defects. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Growth temperature dependence of exciton lifetime in wurtzite InP nanowires grown on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, N.; Hadj Alouane, M. H.; Anufriev, R.; Khmissi, H.; Naji, K.; Patriarche, G.; Bru-Chevallier, C.; Gendry, M.

    2012-01-01

    InP nanowires grown on silicon substrate are investigated using time-resolved spectroscopy. A strong modification of the exciton lifetime is observed (from 0.11 to 1.2 ns) when the growth temperature is increased from 340 °C to 460 °C. This strong dependence is not related to the density of zinc-blende insertions in the wurtzite nanowires or to the wurtzite exciton linewidth. The excitation power dependence of the lifetime and linewidth is investigated, and these results allow us to interpret the growth temperature dependence on the lifetime as a consequence of the reduction of the surface recombination velocity with the growth temperature.

  18. Growth and characterisation of group-III nitride-based nanowires for devices

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    One of the main goals of this thesis was to get more insight into the mechanisms driving the growth of nitride nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE). The influence of the group-III and group-V flux as well as the substrate temperature Tsub has been studied leading to the conclusion that the III-V ratio determines the growth mode. N-rich conditions lead to nanowire growth and Tsub has an important influence. For GaN an increase of Tsub enhances the Ga desorption, thus lo...

  19. Facile synthesis of gold wavy nanowires and investigation of their growth mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cun; Peng, Hsin-Chieh; Zeng, Jie; Liu, Jingyue; Gu, Zhongze; Xia, Younan

    2012-12-19

    We describe a synthesis of Au wavy nanowires in an aqueous solution in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The resultant Au nanowires automatically separated from the solution and floated at the air/water interface. We investigated the formation mechanism by characterizing the samples obtained at different stages of the synthesis. Both particle attachment and cold welding were found to be involved in the formation of such nanowires. Based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, the CTAB molecules adsorbed on the surface of a Au nanostructure went through a change in structure from a bilayer to a monolayer, converting the Au surface from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. As a result, the Au wavy nanowires were driven to the air/water interface during the synthesis. This growth mechanism is potentially extendable to many other systems involving small surfactant molecules.

  20. Nanoparticulate PdZn as a Novel Catalyst for ZnO Nanowire Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachamim Aron

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ZnO nanowires have been grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD using PdZn bimetallic nanoparticles to catalyse the process. Nanocatalyst particles with mean particle diameters of 2.6 ± 0.3 nm were shown to catalyse the growth process, displaying activities that compare well with those reported for sputtered systems. Since nanowire diameters are linked to catalyst morphology, the size-control we are able to exhibit during particle preparation represents an advantage over existing approaches in terms of controlling nanowire dimensions, which is necessary in order to utilize the nanowires for catalytic or electrical applications. (See supplementary material 1 Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11671-010-9567-4 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Click here for file

  1. Growth and luminescence characterization of large-scale zinc oxide nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, L; Wang, W J; Zhou, T; Hu, B Q

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires were grown via a simple chemical reaction involving water vapour. Electron microscopy observations reveal that the ZnO nanowires are single crystalline and grow along the c-axis ([001]) direction. Room temperature photoluminescence measurements show a striking blue emission at 466 nm along with two other emissions in the ultraviolet and yellow regions. Annealing treatment of the as-grown ZnO nanowires results in an apparent reduction of the intensity of the blue emission, which indicates that the blue emission might be originating from the oxygen or zinc defects generated in the process of growth of the ZnO nanowires.

  2. Growth and properties of low-dimensional III-V semiconductor nanowire heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, Martin

    2010-08-25

    In this work the properties of GaAs nanowire based heterostructures are investigated. The nanowires and their heterostructures are synthesized with Molecular Beam Epitaxy. The optical and structural properties are characterized by means of low temperature confocal micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Molecular Beam Epitaxy is a versatile technique that allows to switch from radial to axial growth in order to cap the nanowires by an epitaxial prismatic AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. This can passivate surface states and improve the optical properties. The effect of such a passivation layer is studied by quantitative comparison of the diameter dependence of photoluminescence in passivated and unpassivated nanowires. The passivation is an important prerequisite for more complex axial heterostructures. Evidence for radial confinement effects is found in passivated nanowires with core diameters smaller than 70 nm. Furthermore, the polarization dependence of light absorption and emission is investigated. Two different types of axial heterostructures are studied that have the potential to further enhance the functionality of such nanowires. In a first step, the possibility of growth of axial InGaAs heterostructure in the Au-free Molecular Beam Epitaxy growth regime is investigated. Suitable growth conditions are identified and the growth temperature window for both GaAs and InGaAs nanowires is determined. At the optimum growth temperature for GaAs nanowires, the incorporation of indium in the structure is limited to a few percent. It is shown that by lowering the growth temperature the indium concentration in the structure can be increased up to 20%. The optical properties of the synthesized axial heterostructures are investigated by means of micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The second type of axial nanowire heterostructure investigated in the present work is characterized by a change in crystal

  3. Influence of the Hydrothermal Method Growth Parameters on the Zinc Oxide Nanowires Deposited on Several Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Mejía-García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of ZnO nanowires grown on several substrates (PET, glass, and Si using a two-step process: (a preparation of the seed layer on the substrate by spin coating, from solutions of zinc acetate dihydrate and 1-propanol, and (b growth of the ZnO nanostructures by dipping the substrate in an equimolar solution of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamethylenetetramine. Subsequently, films were thermally treated with a commercial microwave oven (350 and 700 W for 5, 20, and 35 min. The ZnO nanowires obtained were characterized structurally, morphologically, and optically using XRD, SEM, and UV-VIS transmission, respectively. XRD patterns spectra revealed the presence of Zn(OH2 on the films grown on glass and Si substrates. A preferential orientation along c-axis directions for films grown on PET substrate was observed. An analysis by SEM revealed that the growth of the ZnO nanowires on PET and glass is better than the growth on Si when the same growth parameters are used. On glass substrates, ZnO nanowires less than 50 nm in diameter and between 200 nm and 1200 nm in length were obtained. The ZnO nanowires band gap energy for the films grown on PET and glass was obtained from optical transmission spectra.

  4. Growth, structural and optical properties of AlGaN nanowires in the whole composition range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, A.; Bougerol, C.; Murcia-Mascaros, S.; Cros, A.; Renevier, H.; Gayral, B.; Daudin, B.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the growth of AlxGa1-xN nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy for x in the 0.3-0.8 range. Based on a combination of macro- and micro-photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy experiments, it is shown that the structural and optical properties of AlGaN NWs are governed by the presence of compositional fluctuations associated with strongly localized electronic states. A growth model is proposed, which suggests that, depending on growth temperature and metal adatom density, macroscopic composition fluctuations are mostly of kinetic origin and are directly related to the nucleation of the AlGaN nanowire section on top of the GaN nanowire base which is used as a substrate.

  5. Fast growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowire arrays by a microwave heating method and their photocatalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guangxia; Hong, Kunquan; Wang, Wenda; Liu, Liqing; Xu, Mingxiang

    2016-10-01

    The fast growth of aligned ZnO nanowire arrays with optimized structure is attractive for electrical and optical devices. In this paper, we report a controllable and rapid growth of ZnO nanowire arrays by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. When using different zinc salts as the precursors, the morphology of the samples changes a lot and the length growth rate is several times different. The growth mechanism is also investigated. It is found that the solution near neutral pH value is ideal for fast nanowire growth, in which the length of the nanowires increases linearly with growth time and the growth rate is over ten times faster than that in the traditional hydrothermal method. Therefore, aligned ZnO nanowire arrays can grow up to tens of microns in a few hours, while the density and sizes of these nanowires can be well controlled. The ZnO nanowire arrays used as photocatalysts present good photocatalytic performance to the degradation of methyl orange (MO) due to the large surface area. So this paper provides an effective method to obtain vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays for practical applications.

  6. The influence of growth temperatures on the characteristics of GaN nanowires: The Raman study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, L.K., E-mail: laykim_tan@ymail.com; Yam, F.K.; Low, L.L.; Beh, K.P.; Hassan, Z.

    2014-02-01

    The study of Raman scattering of GaN nanowires under different growth temperatures (750 °C to 1000 °C) is presented. GaN nanowires grown at 950 °C possessed the highest crystallinity. The Raman measurement illustrated E{sub 2}(high) mode experienced a blueshift at lower temperature and redshift with the rising growth temperatures. This was related to the presence of stress/strain and the considerable oxygen content in the nanowires. By using Raman line shape analysis, the carrier concentration and mobility at different growth temperatures were determined which varied in the range of 4.0×10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 5.27×10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} and 158.2 cm{sup 2}/V s to 376.2 cm{sup 2}/V s, respectively. A comparative analysis of GaN thin film and nanowires revealed that the decreasing dimension of nanowires caused the broadening and lower frequency shift of Raman spectrum.

  7. Diffusion-driven growth of nanowires by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueda-Fonseca, P.; Orrù, M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut NEEL, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Bellet-Amalric, E.; Robin, E. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Den Hertog, M.; Genuist, Y.; André, R.; Tatarenko, S.; Cibert, J., E-mail: joel.cibert@neel.cnrs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut NEEL, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-04-28

    With ZnTe as an example, we use two different methods to unravel the characteristics of the growth of nanowires (NWs) by gold-catalyzed molecular beam epitaxy at low temperature. In the first approach, CdTe insertions have been used as markers, and the nanowires have been characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy, including geometrical phase analysis and energy dispersive electron spectrometry; the second approach uses scanning electron microscopy and the statistics of the relationship between the length of the tapered nanowires and their base diameter. Axial and radial growth are quantified using a diffusion-limited model adapted to the growth conditions; analytical expressions describe well the relationship between the NW length and the total molecular flux (taking into account the orientation of the effusion cells), and the catalyst-nanowire contact area. A long incubation time is observed. This analysis allows us to assess the evolution of the diffusion lengths on the substrate and along the nanowire sidewalls, as a function of temperature and deviation from stoichiometric flux.

  8. Nickel oxide nanowires: vapor liquid solid synthesis and integration into a gas sensing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, N; Comini, E; Zappa, D; Poli, N; Sberveglieri, G

    2016-05-20

    In the field of advanced sensor technology, metal oxide nanostructures are promising materials due to their high charge carrier mobility, easy fabrication and excellent stability. Among all the metal oxide semiconductors, nickel oxide (NiO) is a p-type semiconductor with a wide band gap and excellent optical, electrical and magnetic properties, which has not been much investigated. Herein, we report the growth of NiO nanowires by using the vapor liquid solid (VLS) technique for gas sensing applications. Platinum, palladium and gold have been used as a catalyst for the growth of NiO nanowires. The surface morphology of the nanowires was investigated through scanning electron microscopy to find out which catalyst and growth conditions are best for the growth of nanowires. GI-XRD and Raman spectroscopies were used to confirm the crystalline structure of the material. Different batches of sensors have been prepared, and their sensing performances towards different gas species such as carbon monoxide, ethanol, acetone and hydrogen have been explored. NiO nanowire sensors show interesting and promising performances towards hydrogen.

  9. Strain-promoted growth of Mn silicide nanowires on Si(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Kazushi; Liu, Hongjun; Owen, James H. G.; Renner, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    We have discovered a method to promote the growth of Mn silicide nanowires on the Si(001) at 450° C. Deposition of sub-monolayer quantities of Mn onto a Si(001) surface with a high density of Bi nanolines results in the formation of nanowires, 5-10 nm wide, and up to 600 nm long. These nanowires are never formed if the same growth procedure is followed in the absence of the Bi nanolines. The Haiku core of the Bi nanoline is known to induce short-range stress in the surrounding silicon surface, straining neighbouring dimers, and repelling step edges. We discuss the possible mechanisms for this effect, including the effect of the Bi nanolines on the surface stress tensor and alteration of the available diffusion channels on the surface. This research was partially supported by the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research, the Iketani Science and Technology Foundation.

  10. Growth and characterisation of group-III nitride-based nanowires for devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meijers, R.J.

    2007-08-30

    One of the main goals of this thesis was to get more insight into the mechanisms driving the growth of nitride nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE). The influence of the group-III and group-V flux as well as the substrate temperature T{sub sub} has been studied leading to the conclusion that the III-V ratio determines the growth mode. Ga desorption limits the temperature range to grow GaN nanowires and dissociation of InN is the limiting factor for InN nanowire growth. A reduction of the surface diffusivity on polar surfaces under N-rich conditions explains the anisotropic growth. Growth kinetics of the nanowires show that there are two important contributions to the growth. The first is growth by direct impingement and its contribution is independent of the nanowire diameter. The second contribution comes from atoms, which absorb on the substrate or wire sidewalls and diffuse along the sidewalls to the top of the wire, which acts as an effective sink for the adatoms due to a reduced surface mobility on the polar top of the wires. This diffusion channel, which is enhanced at higher T{sub sub}, becomes more significant for smaller wire diameters, because its contribution scales like 1/d. Experiments with an interruption of the growth and sharp interfaces in TEM images of heterostructures show that the suggestion in literature of a droplet-mediated PA-MBE nitride growth has to be discarded. Despite a thin amorphous silicon nitride wetting layer on the substrate surface, both GaN and InN nanowires grow in the wurtzite structure and epitaxially in a one-to-one relation to the Si(111) substrate surface. There is no evidence for cubic phases. TEM images and optical studies display a high crystalline and optical quality of GaN and InN nanowires. The substrate induces some strain in the bottom part of the nanowires, especially in InN due to the lower T{sub sub} than for GaN, which is released without the formation of dislocations. Only some stacking

  11. Polymer-like conformation and growth kinetics of Bi2S3 nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cademartiri, Ludovico; Guerin, Gerald; Bishop, Kyle J M; Winnik, Mitchell A; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2012-06-06

    One-dimensional inorganic crystals (i.e., crystalline nanowires) are one of the most intensely investigated classes of materials of the past two decades. Despite this intense effort, an important question has yet to be answered: do nanowires display some of the unique characteristics of polymers as their diameter is progressively decreased? This work addresses this question with three remarkable findings on the growth and form of ultrathin Bi(2)S(3) nanowires. (i) Their crystallization in solution is quantitatively describable as a form of living step-growth polymerization: an apparently exclusive combination of addition of "monomer" to the ends of the nanowires and coupling of fully formed nanowires "end-to-end", with negligible termination and initiation. (ii) The rate constants of these two main processes are comparable to those of analogous processes found in polymerization. (iii) The conformation of these nanowires is quantitatively described as a worm-like conformation analytically analogous to that of semiflexible polymers and characterized by a persistence length of 17.5 nm (shorter than that of double-stranded DNA) and contour lengths of hundreds of micrometers (longer than those of most synthetic polymers). These findings do not prove a chemical analogy between crystals and polymers (it is unclear if the monomer is a molecular entity tout court) but demonstrate a physical analogy between crystallization and polymerization. Specifically, they (i) show that the crystallization of ensembles of nanoscale inorganic crystals can be conceptually analogous to polymerization and can be described quantitatively with the same experimental and mathematical tools, (ii) demonstrate that one-dimensional nanocrystals can display topological characteristics of polymers (e.g., worm-like conformation in solution), (iii) establish a unique experimental model system for the investigation of polymer-like topological properties in inorganic crystals, and (iv) provide new

  12. Aqueous-solution growth of GaP and InP nanowires: a general route to phosphide, oxide, sulfide, and tungstate nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yujie; Xie, Yi; Li, Zhengquan; Li, Xiaoxu; Gao, Shanmin

    2004-02-06

    A general synthetic route has been developed for the growth of metal phosphide, oxide, sulfide, and tungstate nanowires in aqueous solution. In detail, cetyltrimethylammonium cations (CTA(+)) can be combined with anionic inorganic species along a co-condensation mechanism to form lamellar inorganic-surfactant intercalated mesostructures, which serve as both microreactors and reactants for the growth of nanowires. For example, GaP, InP, gamma-MnO(2), ZnO, SnS(2), ZnS, CdWO(4), and ZnWO(4) nanowires have been grown by this route. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the synthesis of GaP and InP nanowires in aqueous solution has been achieved. This strategy is expected to extend to grow nanowires of other materials in solution or by vapor transport routes, since the nanowire growth of any inorganic materials can be realized by selecting an appropriate reaction and its corresponding lamellar inorganic-surfactant precursors.

  13. Diameter limitation in growth of III-Sb-containing nanowire heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Martin; Borg, B Mattias; Johansson, Jonas; Dick, Kimberly A

    2013-04-23

    The nanowire geometry offers significant advantages for exploiting the potential of III-Sb materials. Strain due to lattice mismatch is efficiently accommodated, and carrier confinement effects can be utilized in tunneling and quantum devices for which the III-Sb materials are of particular interest. It has however proven difficult to grow thin (below a few tens of nanometers), epitaxial III-Sb nanowires, as commonly no growth is observed below some critical diameter. Here we explore the processes limiting the diameter of III-Sb nanowires in a model system, in order to develop procedures to control this effect. The InAs-GaSb heterostructure system was chosen due to its great potential for tunneling devices in future low-power electronics. We find that with increasing growth temperature or precursor partial pressures, the critical diameter for GaSb growth on InAs decreases. To explain this trend we propose a model where the Gibbs-Thomson effect limits the Sb supersaturation in the catalyst particle. This understanding enabled us to further reduce the nanowire diameter down to 32 nm for GaSb grown on 21 nm InAs stems. Finally, we show that growth conditions must be carefully optimized for these small diameters, since radial growth increases for increased precursor partial pressures beyond the critical values required for nucleation.

  14. Scalable flame synthesis of SiO2 nanowires: dynamics of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricoli, Antonio; Righettoni, Marco; Krumeich, Frank; Stark, Wendelin J; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2010-11-19

    Silica nanowire arrays were grown directly onto plain glass substrates by scalable flame spray pyrolysis of organometallic solutions (hexamethyldisiloxane or tetraethyl orthosilicate). The silicon dioxide films consisted of a network of interwoven nanowires from a few to several hundred nanometres long (depending on the process conditions) and about 20 nm in diameter, as determined by scanning electron microscopy. These films were formed rapidly (within 10-20 s) at high growth rates (ca 11-30 nm s(-1)) by chemical vapour deposition (surface growth) at ambient conditions on the glass substrate as determined by thermophoretic sampling of the flame aerosol and microscopy. In contrast, on high purity quartz nearly no nanowires were grown while on steel substrates porous SiO(2) films were formed. Functionalization with perfluorooctyl triethoxysilane converted the nanowire surface from super-hydrophilic to hydrophobic. Additionally, their hermetic coating by thin carbon layers was demonstrated also revealing their potential as substrates for synthesis of other functional 1D composite structures. This approach is a significant step towards large scale synthesis of SiO(2) nanowires facilitating their utilization in several applications.

  15. Effect of the growth conditions on the spatial features of Re nanowires produced by directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, Srdjan; Hassel, Achim Walter; Schneider, André

    2006-04-01

    The effects of the solidification parameters, such as growth rate and temperature gradient, on the distance and diameter of Re nanowires have been examined. Both the spacing and diameter increase with decreasing growth rate and temperature gradient, respectively. The ratio of fiber spacing to diameter is 9.1. In addition, it was demonstrated that the temperature gradient influences interface undercooling in the same way as the growth rate and may be used as an additional parameter to control fiber spacing and diameter.

  16. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Al(Ga)N nanowire deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Z.; Zhao, S.; Woo, S. Y.; Bugnet, M.; Djavid, M.; Liu, X.; Kang, J.; Kong, X.; Ji, W.; Guo, H.; Liu, Z.; Botton, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the detailed molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Al(Ga)N nanowire heterostructures on Si and their applications for deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lasers. The nanowires are formed under nitrogen-rich conditions without using any metal catalyst. Compared to conventional epilayers, Mg-dopant incorporation is significantly enhanced in nearly strain- and defect-free Al(Ga)N nanowire structures, leading to efficient p-type conduction. The resulting Al(Ga)N nanowire LEDs exhibit excellent performance, including a turn-on voltage of ∼5.5 V for an AlN nanowire LED operating at 207 nm. The design, fabrication, and performance of an electrically injected AlGaN nanowire laser operating in the UV-B band is also presented.

  17. Development of low temperature technology for the growth of wide band gap semiconductor nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jishiashvili

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In2Ge2O7, Ge3N4, In2O3 and germanium nanowires were synthesized by the developed hydrazine (N2H4-based technology. Annealing of germanium or Ge+In sources in the vapor of N2H4+3 mol.% H2O caused the formation of volatile GeO and In2O molecules in the hot zone. These molecules were transferred to the Si substrate, which was placed in the could zone of a reactor. After interacting with hydrazine decomposition products (NH3, NH2, NH, H2, H and water, Ge3N4 nanowires and nanobelts were produced on the Ge source in the temperature range of 500–520 ºC. The growth temperature of Ge3N4 nanowires in hydrazine vapor was by 350 ºC lower than the temperature reported in the literature. Using In+Ge source the tapered In2O3 nanowires were formed on the Si substrate at 400 ºC. At 420–440 ºC the mixture of In2O3 and Ge nanowires were synthesized, while at 450 ºC In2Ge2O7 nanowires were produced, with InN nanocrystals growing on their stems. The possible chemical reactions for the synthesis of these nanostructures were evaluated. The growth temperatures of both, In2Ge2O7 and InN nanostructures were by 50–150 ºC lower than that, reported in the literature. The results of this work clearly demonstrate the ability of hydrazine vapor to reduce the growth temperature of nitride and oxide nanomaterials.

  18. Nanoparticle-mediated nonclassical crystal growth of sodium fluorosilicate nanowires and nanoplates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We observed nonclassical crystal growth of the sodium fluorosilicate nanowires, nanoplates, and hierarchical structures through self-assembly and aggregation of primary intermediate nanoparticles. Unlike traditional ion-by-ion crystallization, the primary nanoparticles formed first and their subsequent self-assembly, fusion, and crystallization generated various final crystals. These findings offer direct evidences for the aggregation-based crystallization mechanism.

  19. Uncovering a solvent-controlled preferential growth of buckminsterfullerene (C60) nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Junfeng; Solov'yov, Ilia; Zhou, Wuzong

    2009-01-01

    The fullerene (C_60) nanowires, which possess a highly unusual morphology featured by a prismlike central core and three nanobelt-like wings joined along the growth direction to give an overall Y-shaped cross section, were studied. The experimental observation coupled with theoretical calculation...

  20. Impact of growth parameters on the morphology and microstructure of epitaxial GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.Y. [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 500 Yu Tian Road, Shanghai 200083 (China); Chen, P.P., E-mail: ppchen@mail.sitp.ac.cn [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 500 Yu Tian Road, Shanghai 200083 (China); Liao, Z.M. [Materials Engineering, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Shi, S.X.; Sun, Y.; Li, T.X.; Zhang, Y.H. [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 500 Yu Tian Road, Shanghai 200083 (China); Zou, J. [Materials Engineering, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Center for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Lu, W. [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 500 Yu Tian Road, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •Defect-free wurtzite GaAs nanowires were obtained by MBE at low growth temperature. •Some GaAs nanowires grown at low temperature show the morphology of two shoulders. •High growth temperature favors the formation of nanowires with uniform diameter. •Low V/III flux ratio causes many kinked GaAs nanowires. •A phase separation of the catalyst is observed under very Ga-rich condition. -- Abstract: The effect of the growth temperature and V/III flux ratio on the morphology and microstructure of GaAs nanowires grown on GaAs (1 1 1){sub B} substrates by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy with solid As{sub 4} source was investigated. It has been found that a low growth temperature of 400 °C can result in defect-free wurtzite structured nanowire with syringe-like morphology, while nanowires with more homogeneous diameter can be obtained at high temperatures (500 °C and 550 °C) with many stacking faults. It was also found that, at a low V/III flux ratio, GaAs nanowires had a shrinking neck section, while a high V/III flux ratio may result in disappearance of the shrinking necking section. For the Ga very rich condition, a phase separation of the catalysts can be observed, leaving a small Au–Ga droplet covered by the outer pure Ga droplet.

  1. A new approach of the synthesis of SiO2 nanowires by using bulk copper foils as catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Martinez, A.; Márquez, F.; Morant, C.

    2016-11-01

    A novel procedure for the growth of SiO2 nanowires (SiO2NWs) directly from polycrystalline copper foils is reported. The single-step synthesis procedure consists of a thermal treatment at 900 °C without the need for additional catalysts. As a result, nanowires with an average diameter of 100 nm are synthesized. A systematic study undertaken at different stages of the SiO2NWs growth confirmed the generation of nucleation centers on the Cu surface, as well as revealed the existence of an intermediate gaseous SiO species at the synthesis temperature. On the basis of these evidences, the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) route has been proposed as the mechanism responsible for the growth.

  2. The morphology of silicon nanowires grown in the presence of trimethylaluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehler, F; Gentile, P; Hertog, M Den; Rouviere, J [CEA, INAC, Minatec, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Baron, T [LTM/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Ferret, P [CEA, LETI, F-38054 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: fabrice.oehler@cea.fr, E-mail: pascal.gentile@cea.fr

    2009-06-17

    The effects of trimethylaluminium (TMA) on silicon nanowires grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) were investigated in the 650-850 deg. C growth temperature range. Gold was used as the growth catalyst and SiH{sub 4} in H{sub 2} carrier gas as the Si precursor. Depending on substrate temperature and TMA partial pressure, the structure's morphology evolves from wires to tapered needles, pyramids or nanotrees. The TMA presence was linked to two specific growth modes: an enhanced surface growth which forms Si needles and a branched growth leading to Si nanotrees. We suggest that competition between these two specific growth modes and the usual Au-catalyzed VLS growth is responsible for the observed morphology changes.

  3. Growth mechanism of titanium dioxide nanowires for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boercker, J E; Enache-Pommer, E; Aydil, E S [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)], E-mail: aydil@umn.edu

    2008-03-05

    Mesoporous films made of titanium dioxide nanowires are desirable for dye-sensitized solar cells because nanowires provide direct conduction pathways for photogenerated electrons. Anatase titanium dioxide nanowires with polycrystalline microstructure were synthesized on titanium foil using a three-step process. First, the top surface of the titanium foil was transformed to Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} nanotubes through hydrothermal oxidation in NaOH. Next, the Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} nanotubes were converted to H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} nanotubes by ion exchange. Finally, the H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} nanotubes were converted to polycrystalline anatase nanowires through a topotactic transformation. The film morphology evolution, crystal structure transformations and growth mechanism are described in detail. Titanium foil reacts with NaOH to form Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} sheets, which exfoliate and spiral into nanotubes. The Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} nanotubes are immersed in HCl solution to replace the Na{sup +} ions with H{sup +} ions. During the topotactic transformation of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} nanotubes to anatase TiO{sub 2} nanowires, the sheets made of edge bonded TiO{sub 6} octahedra in the H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} nanotubes dehydrate and move towards each other to form anatase crystals oriented along the nanotube axis which creates a polycrystalline nanowire. These mesoporous TiO{sub 2} nanowire films were suitable for use as dye-sensitized solar cell photoanodes.

  4. Growth mechanism of titanium dioxide nanowires for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boercker, J E; Enache-Pommer, E; Aydil, E S

    2008-03-05

    Mesoporous films made of titanium dioxide nanowires are desirable for dye-sensitized solar cells because nanowires provide direct conduction pathways for photogenerated electrons. Anatase titanium dioxide nanowires with polycrystalline microstructure were synthesized on titanium foil using a three-step process. First, the top surface of the titanium foil was transformed to Na(2)Ti(2)O(4)(OH)(2) nanotubes through hydrothermal oxidation in NaOH. Next, the Na(2)Ti(2)O(4)(OH)(2) nanotubes were converted to H(2)Ti(2)O(4)(OH)(2) nanotubes by ion exchange. Finally, the H(2)Ti(2)O(4)(OH)(2) nanotubes were converted to polycrystalline anatase nanowires through a topotactic transformation. The film morphology evolution, crystal structure transformations and growth mechanism are described in detail. Titanium foil reacts with NaOH to form Na(2)Ti(2)O(4)(OH)(2) sheets, which exfoliate and spiral into nanotubes. The Na(2)Ti(2)O(4)(OH)(2) nanotubes are immersed in HCl solution to replace the Na(+) ions with H(+) ions. During the topotactic transformation of H(2)Ti(2)O(4)(OH)(2) nanotubes to anatase TiO(2) nanowires, the sheets made of edge bonded TiO(6) octahedra in the H(2)Ti(2)O(4)(OH)(2) nanotubes dehydrate and move towards each other to form anatase crystals oriented along the nanotube axis which creates a polycrystalline nanowire. These mesoporous TiO(2) nanowire films were suitable for use as dye-sensitized solar cell photoanodes.

  5. Hydrothermal Growth and Hydrogen Selective Sensing of Nickel Oxide Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Thanh Le Dang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low cost synthesis of nanostructured metal oxides for gas sensing application at low temperature is nowadays of crucial importance in many fields. Herein, NiO p-type semiconducting nanowires with polycrystalline structure were prepared by a facile and scalable hydrothermal method. Morphology and crystal structure of the NiO nanowires were investigated by scan electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The nanostructured material was then tested as hydrogen sensor showing very good performance in terms of sensor response, stability, absence of drifts, and speed of response and recovery. The selectivity of the NiO sensor to hydrogen towards other gases (ethanol, ammonia, and liquefied petroleum gas was found to be good.

  6. Variable VlsE is critical for host reinfection by the Lyme disease spirochete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogovskyy, Artem S; Bankhead, Troy

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogens make use of antigenic variation as a way to evade the host immune response. A key mechanism for immune evasion and persistent infection by the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is antigenic variation of the VlsE surface protein. Recombination results in changes in the VlsE surface protein that prevent recognition by VlsE-specific antibodies in the infected host. Despite the presence of a substantial number of additional proteins residing on the bacterial surface, VlsE is the only known antigen that exhibits ongoing variation of its surface epitopes. This suggests that B. burgdorferi may utilize a VlsE-mediated system for immune avoidance of its surface antigens. To address this, the requirement of VlsE for host reinfection by the Lyme disease pathogen was investigated. Host-adapted wild type and VlsE mutant spirochetes were used to reinfect immunocompetent mice that had naturally cleared an infection with a VlsE-deficient clone. Our results demonstrate that variable VlsE is necessary for reinfection by B. burgdorferi, and this ability is directly related to evasion of the host antibody response. Moreover, the data presented here raise the possibility that VlsE prevents recognition of B. burgdorferi surface antigens from host antibodies. Overall, our findings represent a significant advance in our knowledge of immune evasion by B. burgdorferi, and provide insight to the possible mechanisms involved in VlsE-mediated immune avoidance.

  7. Variable VlsE is critical for host reinfection by the Lyme disease spirochete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem S Rogovskyy

    Full Text Available Many pathogens make use of antigenic variation as a way to evade the host immune response. A key mechanism for immune evasion and persistent infection by the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is antigenic variation of the VlsE surface protein. Recombination results in changes in the VlsE surface protein that prevent recognition by VlsE-specific antibodies in the infected host. Despite the presence of a substantial number of additional proteins residing on the bacterial surface, VlsE is the only known antigen that exhibits ongoing variation of its surface epitopes. This suggests that B. burgdorferi may utilize a VlsE-mediated system for immune avoidance of its surface antigens. To address this, the requirement of VlsE for host reinfection by the Lyme disease pathogen was investigated. Host-adapted wild type and VlsE mutant spirochetes were used to reinfect immunocompetent mice that had naturally cleared an infection with a VlsE-deficient clone. Our results demonstrate that variable VlsE is necessary for reinfection by B. burgdorferi, and this ability is directly related to evasion of the host antibody response. Moreover, the data presented here raise the possibility that VlsE prevents recognition of B. burgdorferi surface antigens from host antibodies. Overall, our findings represent a significant advance in our knowledge of immune evasion by B. burgdorferi, and provide insight to the possible mechanisms involved in VlsE-mediated immune avoidance.

  8. MBE growth of self-assisted InAs nanowires on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Hyun; Ronen, Yuval; Cohen, Yonatan; Convertino, Domenica; Rossi, Antonio; Coletti, Camilla; Heun, Stefan; Sorba, Lucia; Kacman, Perla; Shtrikman, Hadas

    2016-11-01

    Self-assisted growth of InAs nanowires on graphene by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Nanowires with diameter of ∼50 nm and aspect ratio of up to 100 were achieved. The morphological and structural properties of the nanowires were carefully studied by changing the substrate from bilayer graphene through buffer layer to quasi-free-standing monolayer graphene. The positional relation of the InAs NWs with the graphene substrate was determined. A 30° orientation configuration of some of the InAs NWs is shown to be related to the surface corrugation of the graphene substrate. InAs NW-based devices for transport measurements were fabricated, and the conductance measurements showed a semi-ballistic behavior. In Josephson junction measurements in the non-linear regime, multiple Andreev reflections were observed, and an inelastic scattering length of about 900 nm was derived.

  9. MBE growth of self-assisted InAs nanowires on graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Jung-Hyun; Cohen, Yonatan; Convertino, Domenica; Rossi, Antonio; Coletti, Camilla; Heun, Stefan; Sorba, Lucia; Kacman, Perla; Shtrikman, Hadas

    2016-01-01

    Self-assisted growth of InAs nanowires on graphene by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Nanowires with diameter of ~50 nm and aspect ratio of up to 100 were achieved. The morphological and structural properties of the nanowires were carefully studied by changing the substrate from bilayer graphene through buffer layer to quasi-free-standing monolayer graphene. The positional relation of the InAs NWs with the graphene substrate was determined. A 30{\\deg} orientation configuration of some of the InAs NWs is shown to be related to the surface corrugation of the graphene substrate. InAs NW-based devices for transport measurements were fabricated, and the conductance measurements showed a semi-ballistic behavior. In Josephson junction measurements in the non-linear regime, Multiple Andreev Reflections were observed, and an inelastic scattering length of about 900 nm was derived.

  10. Formation of ultralong copper nanowires by hydrothermal growth for transparent conducting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balela, Mary Donnabelle L.; Tan, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Transparent conducting electrodes are key components of optoelectronic devices, such as touch screens, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and solar cells. Recent market surveys have shown that the demands for these devices are rapidly growing at a tremendous rate. Semiconducting oxides, in particular indium tin oxide (ITO) are the material of choice for transparent conducting electrodes. However, these conventional oxides are typically brittle, which limits their applicability in flexible electronics. Metal nanowires, e.g. copper (Cu) nanowires, are considered as the best candidate as substitute for ITO due to their excellent mechanical and electrical properties. In this paper, ultralong copper (Cu) nanowires with were successfully prepared by hydrothermal growth at 50-80°C for 1 h. Ethylenediamine was employed as the structure-directing agents, while hydrazine was used as the reductant. In situ mixed potential measurement was also carried out to monitor Cu deposition. Higher temperature shifted the mixed potential negatively, leading to thicker Cu nanowires. Transparent conducting electrode, with a sheet resistance of 197 Ω sq-1 at an optical transmittance of around 61 %, was fabricated with the Cu nanowire ink.

  11. Influence of catalyst droplet diameter on the growth direction of InP nanowires grown on Si(001) substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, K.; Saint-Girons, G.; Penuelas, J.; Patriarche, G.; Largeau, L.; Dumont, H.; Rojo-Romeo, P.; Gendry, M.

    2013-06-01

    It is demonstrated that the growth direction of InP nanowires grown on (001)-oriented silicon substrate strongly depends on the diameter of the gold catalyst droplets. Small droplets with diameter less than about 15 nm lead to the formation of nanowires leaning on the {111} planes of the zinc blende InP seeds formed in the early stages of growth. Larger droplets lead to the formation of twins in the InP seeds and to the formation of nanowires leaning on the {111} planes of these twinned InP variants, inducing growth directions corresponding to the directions of the silicon substrate.

  12. Step Flow Model of Radial Growth and Shape Evolution of Semiconductor Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, S. N.; Hervieu, Yu. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    A model of radial growth of vertically aligned nanowires (NW) via formation and propagation of monoatomic steps at nanowire sidewalls is developed. The model allows to describe self-consistently the step dynamics and the axial growth of the NW. It is shown that formation of NWs with an abrupt change of wire diameter and a non-tapered section at the top might be explained by the bunching of sidewall steps due to the presence of a strong sink for adatoms at the NW top. The Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier for the attachment of adatoms to the descending step favors the step bunching at the beginning of the radial growth and promotes the decay of the bunch at a later time of the NW growth.

  13. Improved control over spontaneously formed GaN nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy using a two-step growth process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettler, J K; Corfdir, P; Geelhaar, L; Riechert, H; Brandt, O; Fernández-Garrido, S

    2015-11-06

    We investigate the influence of modified growth conditions during the spontaneous formation of GaN nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We find that a two-step growth approach, where the substrate temperature is increased during the nucleation stage, is an efficient method to gain control over the area coverage, average diameter, and coalescence degree of GaN NW ensembles. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that the growth conditions employed during the incubation time that precedes nanowire nucleation do not influence the properties of the final nanowire ensemble. Therefore, when growing GaN NWs at elevated temperatures or with low Ga/N ratios, the total growth time can be reduced significantly by using more favorable growth conditions for nanowire nucleation during the incubation time.

  14. Kinetics of germanium nanowire growth by the vapor-solid-solid mechanism with a Ni-based catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti V. Thombare

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of vapor-solid-solid (VSS Ge nanowire growth using a Ni-based catalyst were investigated to probe the rate-limiting step for this complex nanoscale crystal growth process. The effects of key parameters such as temperature and precursor partial pressure on the nanowire growth rate were studied in order to gain detailed insights into the growth kinetics. Two different regimes were observed for VSS growth of Ge nanowires as function of temperature. At higher temperatures (345 °C–375 °C, kinetics data suggest that mass transport of germane precursor to the catalyst surface is rate limiting. At lower temperatures (<345 °C, either surface reaction of the GeH4 precursor on the catalyst or incorporation of Ge into the nanowire across the wire/catalyst interface is rate limiting.

  15. Effect of doped substrates on the growth of GaAs nanowires via metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Vertical GaAs nanowires were grown on different doped substrates via Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition by catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. It is found that both n and p type doped substrates affect catalyst distribution during the formation of alloy catalysts. The catalyst density decreases with an increase in the doping concentration of the substrates. In the growth of GaAs nanowires, the growth rate, which is mostly determined by the atoms diffusion from the pyrolysis of precursors on the surface of nanowires and substrates, is proportional to the catalyst densities. Moreover, the structures of as-grown nanowires are all pure zinc blende without any defects. These results will be valuable for the applications of nanowire-based optical and electrical devices.

  16. Growth and Characterization of Silicon Carbide (SiC) Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) for Electronic Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karina

    In recent years nanowires have gained a generous amount of interest because of the possible application of nanowires within electronic devices. A nanowire is a one dimensional semiconductor nanostructure with a diameter less than 100 nm. Nanowires have the potential to be a replacement for the present day complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology; it is believed by 2020, a 5--6 nm gate length within field effect transistors (FET) would be realized and cease further miniaturization of electronic devices. SiC processes several unique chemical and physical properties that make it an attractive alternative to Si as a semiconductor material. Silicon carbide's properties make it a perfect candidate for applications such as high temperature sensors, x-ray emitters and high radiation sensors. The main objective of this thesis is to successfully grow silicon carbide nanowires on silicon substrates with the assistance of a metal catalyst, by the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The contributions made by the work carried out in this thesis are broad. This is the first study that has carried out a comprehensive investigation into a wide range of metal catalyst for the growth of SiC nanowires by the process of chemical vapor deposition. The study proved that the surface tension interactions between the silicon substrate and the metal catalyst are the controlling factor in the determination of the diameter of the nanowires grown. This study also proved that the silicon substrate orientation has no impact on the growth of the nanowires, similar growth patterns occurred on both Si and Si substrates. The nanowires grown were characterized by a variety of different methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and raman spectroscopy. The effect of temperature, growth temperature, growth time and the catalyst type used are investigated to determine the most suitable conditions necessary for SiC nanowire

  17. Optical characteristics of silicon nanowires grown from tin catalyst layers on silicon coated glass

    KAUST Repository

    Ball, Jeremy

    2012-08-20

    The optical characteristics of silicon nanowires grown on Si layers on glass have been modeled using the FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) technique and compared with experimental results. The wires were grown by the VLS (vapour-liquid-solid) method using Sn catalyst layers and exhibit a conical shape. The resulting measured and modeled absorption, reflectance and transmittance spectra have been investigated as a function of the thickness of the underlying Si layer and the initial catalyst layer, the latter having a strong influence on wire density. High levels of absorption (>90% in the visible wavelength range) and good agreement between the modeling and experiment have been observed when the nanowires have a relatively high density of ∼4 wires/μ m2. The experimental and modeled results diverge for samples with a lower density of wire growth. The results are discussed along with some implications for solar cell fabrication. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  18. Graphene templated Directional Growth of an Inorganic Nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-23

    defects2,11,13–17. First, the Raman spectra of graphene before and after nanowire synthesis (Supplementary Fig. 9a,b) maintain very low D peaks, indicating that...the graphene is of high quality and measurable defects are not introduced during the nano- wire synthesis process. Second, atomic-resolution TEM...As also shown by the synthesis of new organic crystals on graphene5,7,8, this result suggests the possi- bility of using graphene as a template for

  19. Effect of catalyst diameter on vapour-liquid-solid growth of GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Dowd, B. J., E-mail: odowdbj@tcd.ie; Shvets, I. V. [CRANN, School of Physics, Trinity College, the University of Dublin, Dublin D2 (Ireland); Wojtowicz, T.; Kolkovsky, V.; Wojciechowski, T.; Zgirski, M. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw 02-668 (Poland); Rouvimov, S. [Notre Dame Integrated Imaging Facility (NDIIF), University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Liu, X.; Pimpinella, R.; Dobrowolska, M.; Furdyna, J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-08-14

    GaAs nanowires were grown on (111)B GaAs substrates using the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism. The Au/Pt nanodots used to catalyse wire growth were defined lithographically and had varying diameter and separation. An in-depth statistical analysis of the resulting nanowires, which had a cone-like shape, was carried out. This revealed that there were two categories of nanowire present, with differing height and tapering angle. The bimodal nature of wire shape was found to depend critically on the diameter of the Au-Ga droplet atop the nanowire. Transmission electron microscopy analysis also revealed that the density of stacking faults in the wires varied considerably between the two categories of wire. It is believed that the cause of the distinction in terms of shape and crystal structure is related to the contact angle between the droplet and the solid-liquid interface. The dependency of droplet diameter on contact angle is likely related to line-tension, which is a correction to Young's equation for the contact angle of a droplet upon a surface. The fact that contact angle may influence resulting wire structure and shape has important implications for the planning of growth conditions and the preparation of wires for use in proposed devices.

  20. Controlled Growth of Copper Oxide Nano-Wires through Direct Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilman, Joann; Neupane, Ravi; Yost, Andrew J.; Chien, Teyu

    Copper oxides, both Cu2O and CuO, have many applications in solar cells, sensors, and nano-electronics. The properties of the copper oxides are further influenced by the dimension of the materials, especially when made in nanoscale. In particular, the properties of the copper oxide nanowires could be tuned by their structures, lengths, and widths. While several methods have been reported to grow nanowires, direct oxidation is arguably the most economical one. This research examines the effects of oxidization duration and temperature in dry air environment on the development of copper oxide nanowires in order to achieve cost effective controllable growth. Using the direct oxidation method in dry air we have demonstrated growth of CuO nano-wires at temperatures as low as 300 °C and as short as 1hr. Furthermore we have observed that the lengths and diameters of the CuO NWs can be controlled by the duration and temperature of the oxidation process. WY NASA Space Grant Consortium.

  1. Ambient surfactantless synthesis, growth mechanism, and size-dependent electrocatalytic behavior of high-quality, single crystalline palladium nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigsmann, Christopher; Santulli, Alexander C; Sutter, Eli; Wong, Stanislaus S

    2011-09-27

    In this report, we utilize the U-tube double diffusion device as a reliable, environmentally friendly method for the size-controlled synthesis of high-quality, single crystalline Pd nanowires. The nanowires grown in 200 and 15 nm polycarbonate template pores maintain diameters of 270 ± 45 nm and 45 ± 9 nm, respectively, and could be isolated either as individual nanowires or as ordered free-standing arrays. The growth mechanism of these nanowires has been extensively explored, and we have carried out characterization of the isolated nanowires, free-standing nanowire arrays, and cross sections of the filled template in order to determine that a unique two-step growth process predominates within the template pores. Moreover, as-prepared submicrometer and nanosized wires were studied by comparison with ultrathin 2 nm Pd nanowires in order to elucidate the size-dependent trend in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysis. Subsequently, the desired platinum monolayer overcoating was reliably deposited onto the surface of the Pd nanowires by Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic displacement of the Cu adatoms. The specific and platinum mass activity of the core-shell catalysts was found to increase from 0.40 mA/cm(2) and 1.01 A/mg to 0.74 mA/cm(2) and 1.74 A/mg as the diameter was decreased from the submicrometer size regime to the ultrathin nanometer range.

  2. InAs nanowire growth modes on Si (111) by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, M. T.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    InAs nanowires (NWs) were grown on silicon substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy using five different growth modes: (1) Au-assisted growth, (2) positioned (patterned) Au-assisted growth, (3) Au-free growth, (4) positioned Au-assisted growth using a patterned oxide mask, and (5) Au-free selective-area epitaxy (SAE) using a patterned oxide mask. Optimal growth conditions (temperature, V/III flux ratio) were identified for each growth mode for control of NW morphology and vertical NW yield. The highest yield (72%) was achieved with the SAE method at a growth temperature of 440 °C and a V/III flux ratio of 4. Growth mechanisms are discussed for each of the growth modes.

  3. Spontaneous formation of GaN/AlN core-shell nanowires on sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trassoudaine, Agnès; Roche, Elissa; Bougerol, Catherine; André, Yamina; Avit, Geoffrey; Monier, Guillaume; Ramdani, Mohammed Réda; Gil, Evelyne; Castelluci, Dominique; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous GaN/AlN core-shell nanowires with high crystal quality were synthesized on sapphire substrates by vapor-liquid-solid hydride vapor phase epitaxy (VLS-HVPE) without any voluntary aluminum source. Deposition of aluminum is difficult to achieve in this growth technique which uses metal-chloride gaseous precursors: the strong interaction between the AlCl gaseous molecules and the quartz reactor yields a huge parasitic nucleation on the walls of the reactor upstream the substrate. We open up an innovative method to produce GaN/AlN structures by HVPE, thanks to aluminum etching from the sapphire substrate followed by redeposition onto the sidewalls of the GaN core. The paper presents the structural characterization of GaN/AlN core-shell nanowires, speculates on the growth mechanism and discusses a model which describes this unexpected behavior.

  4. Impact of growth conditions on morphology, structure and electrical properties of MOVPE grown InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penz, A.; Ahe, M. von der; Sladek, K.; Wirths, S.; Weis, K.; Bloemers, C.; Volk, C.; Schaepers, T.; Hardtdegen, H.; Gruetzmacher, D. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52428 Juelich (Germany); JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Dorn, F.; Weirich, T. [GFE, Gemeinschaftslabor fuer Elektronenmikroskopie (Germany); JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The bottom-up assembly of semiconductor nanowires holds promise for future nanoelectronic devices. The high room temperature carrier mobility and the narrow direct bandgap make InAs an eligible material for this application. However, as recently reported, the conductivity of InAs nanowires could be influenced detrimentally by crystal defects such as twin planes and stacking faults. In this contribution, we report on different strategies to affect the nanowire crystallographic structure. Growth is performed by selective area MOVPE on partially masked substrates. The influence of growth rate, substrate orientation and Si doping on morphological, structural and electrical properties was investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and two-and four-terminal measurements. It is found that especially the growth rate reduces the stacking fault density. Furthermore we observe an increase of conductivity and a decrease of nanowire aspect ratio with higher doping concentration. A correlation between doping, growth rate and electrical characteristics will be presented.

  5. Size-Induced Switching of Nanowire Growth Direction: a New Approach Toward Kinked Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Youde

    2016-04-26

    Exploring self-assembled nanostructures with controllable architectures has been a central theme in nanoscience and nanotechnology because of the tantalizing perspective of directly integrating such bottom-up nanostructures into functional devices. Here, the growth of kinked single-crystal In2O3 nanostructures consisting of a nanocone base and a nanowire tip with an epitaxial and defect-free transition is demonstrated for the first time. By tailoring the growth conditions, a reliable switching of the growth direction from [111] to [110] or [112] is observed when the Au catalyst nanoparticles at the apexes of the nanocones shrink below ≈100 nm. The natural formation of kinked nanoarchitectures at constant growth pressures is related to the size-dependent free energy that changes for different orientations of the nanowires. The results suggest that the mechanism of forming such kinked nanocone-nanowire nanostructures in well-controlled growth environment may be universal for a wide range of functional materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Growth behavior and field emission property of ZnO nanowire arrays on Au and Ag films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hyun Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a facile method to control the growth and areal density of zinc-oxide (ZnO nanowire arrays using gold or silver films deposited on aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO layers coated on glass substrates. Nanowires exceeding 5 μm in length grew on both the glass/AZO-layer and on the glass/AZO-layer/Au-film where the areal array density was controlled primarily by changing the annealing temperature. In contrast, the nanowire arrays grew only on the AZO surface but not on the Ag film owing to the formation of an Ag-oxide layer. We fabricated field emitter devices with density controlled ZnO nanowire arrays and low turn-on electric field of ∼6 V/μm and a field enhancement factor of up to 1188 were obtained with density controlled ZnO nanowire arrays.

  7. Solution-Based Epitaxial Growth of Magnetically Responsive Cu@Ni Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Shengmao

    2010-02-23

    An experiment was conducted to show the solution-based epitaxial growth of magnetically responsive Cu@Ni nanowires. The Ni-sheathed Cu nanowires were synthesized with a one-pot approach. 30 mL of high concentration NaOH, Cu(NO3)2. 3H2O, Cu(NO3)2. 3H2O and 0.07-0.30 mL of Ni(NO3)2. 6H 2O aqueous solutions were added into a plastic reactor with a capacity of 50.0 mL. A varying amount of ethylenediamine (EDA) and hydrazine were also added sequentially, followed by thorough mixing of all reagents. The dimension, morphology, and chemical composition of the products were examined with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The XPS analysis on the as formed Cu nanowires confirms that there is indeed no nickel inclusion in the nanowires prior to the formation of nickel overcoat, which rules out the possibility of Cu-Ni alloy formation.

  8. The effect of doping on low temperature growth of high quality GaAs nanowires on polycrystalline films

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarld, Matt; Teran, Alan; Luengo-Kovac, Marta; Yan, Lifan; Moon, Eun Seong; Beck, Sara; Guillen, Cristina; Sih, Vanessa; Phillips, Jamie; Mirecki Milunchick, Joanna

    2016-12-01

    The increasing demand for miniature autonomous sensors requires low cost integration methods, but to date, material limitations have prevented the direct growth of optically active III-V materials on CMOS devices. We report on the deposition of GaAs nanowires on polycrystalline conductive films to allow for direct integration of optoelectronic devices on dissimilar materials. Undoped, Si-doped, and Be-doped nanowires were grown at Ts = 400 °C on oxide (indium tin oxide) and metallic (platinum and titanium) films. Be-doping is shown to significantly reduce the nanowire diameter and improve the nanowire aspect ratio to 50:1. Photoluminescence measurements of Be-doped nanowires are 1-2 orders of magnitude stronger than undoped and Si-doped nanowires and have a thermal activation energy of 14 meV, which is comparable to nanowires grown on crystalline substrates. Electrical measurements confirm that the metal-semiconductor junction is Ohmic. These results demonstrate the feasibility of integrating nanowire-based optoelectronic devices directly on CMOS chips.

  9. Oxide-assisted Synthesis and Properties of Semiconductor Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee S. T.

    2001-01-01

    @@ We introduce a new synthetic approach, called oxide-assisted growth method, which can produce bulk-quantity synthesis of high-purity (no metal contamination) onedimensional semiconductor nanomaterials. In contrast to the conventional metalcatalyst VLS approach, the oxide-assisted growth method uses oxides instead of metal catalysis in a laser ablation, thermal evaporation or CVD process. Using this new approach, we have synthesized various high-purity, one-dimensional semiconductor nanomaterials, including nanowires of Si, Ge, C, SiC, Si3N4, GaN, GaAs, GaP and CdS. Notably, silicon nanomaterials of controlled diameter, desired orientation or pattern, and morphologies (wire, chain, ribbons, cable) are attainable. We have characterized the morphology, microstructure, and optical and field-emission properties of silicon nanowires. The atomic structure and electronic properties of Si nanowires have been measured by STM and STS, which are correlated to the transport measurements. The effect of quantum confinement has been manifested. The results are important for developing nanoelectronic devices and offer exciting opportunities for research and applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  10. Oxide-assisted Synthesis and Properties of Semiconductor Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee; S.; T.

    2001-01-01

    We introduce a new synthetic approach, called oxide-assisted growth method, which can produce bulk-quantity synthesis of high-purity (no metal contamination) onedimensional semiconductor nanomaterials. In contrast to the conventional metalcatalyst VLS approach, the oxide-assisted growth method uses oxides instead of metal catalysis in a laser ablation, thermal evaporation or CVD process. Using this new approach, we have synthesized various high-purity, one-dimensional semiconductor nanomaterials, including nanowires of Si, Ge, C, SiC, Si3N4, GaN, GaAs, GaP and CdS. Notably, silicon nanomaterials of controlled diameter, desired orientation or pattern, and morphologies (wire, chain, ribbons, cable) are attainable. We have characterized the morphology, microstructure, and optical and field-emission properties of silicon nanowires. The atomic structure and electronic properties of Si nanowires have been measured by STM and STS, which are correlated to the transport measurements. The effect of quantum confinement has been manifested. The results are important for developing nanoelectronic devices and offer exciting opportunities for research and applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology.  ……

  11. Variable VlsE Is Critical for Host Reinfection by the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    OpenAIRE

    Artem S Rogovskyy; Troy Bankhead

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogens make use of antigenic variation as a way to evade the host immune response. A key mechanism for immune evasion and persistent infection by the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is antigenic variation of the VlsE surface protein. Recombination results in changes in the VlsE surface protein that prevent recognition by VlsE-specific antibodies in the infected host. Despite the presence of a substantial number of additional proteins residing on the bacterial surface, V...

  12. Human antibody responses to VlsE antigenic variation protein of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, M B; Hardham, J M; Owens, R T; Nowakowski, J; Steere, A C; Wormser, G P; Norris, S J

    1999-12-01

    VlsE is a 35-kDa surface-exposed lipoprotein of Borrelia burgdorferi that was shown previously to undergo antigenic variation through segmental recombination of silent vls cassettes with vlsE during experimental mouse infections. Previous data had indicated that sera from North American Lyme disease patients and experimentally infected animals contained antibodies reactive with VlsE. In this study, sera from patients with Lyme disease, syphilis, and autoimmune conditions as well as from healthy controls were examined for reactivity with VlsE by Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Strong Western blot reactivity to a recombinant VlsE cassette region protein was obtained consistently with Lyme disease sera. Although sera from Lyme disease patients also reacted with a band corresponding to VlsE in B. burgdorferi B31-5A3, interpretation was complicated by low levels of VlsE expression in in vitro-cultured B. burgdorferi and by the presence of comigrating bands. An ELISA using recombinant VlsE was compared with an ELISA using sonically disrupted B. burgdorferi as the antigen. For a total of 93 Lyme disease patient sera examined, the VlsE ELISA yielded sensitivities of 63% for culture-confirmed erythema migrans cases and 92% for later stages, as compared to 61 and 98%, respectively, for the "whole-cell" ELISA. The specificities of the two assays with healthy blood donor sera were comparable, but the VlsE ELISA was 90% specific with sera from syphilis patients, compared to 20% specificity for the whole-cell ELISA with this group. Neither assay showed reactivity with a panel of sera from 20 non-Lyme disease arthritis patients or 20 systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Our results indicate that VlsE may be useful in the immunodiagnosis of Lyme disease and may offer greater specificity than ELISAs using whole B. burgdorferi as the antigen.

  13. Growth of antimony doped P-type zinc oxide nanowires for optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Pradel, Ken

    2016-09-27

    In a method of growing p-type nanowires, a nanowire growth solution of zinc nitrate (Zn(NO.sub.3).sub.2), hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) and polyethylenemine (800 M.sub.w PEI) is prepared. A dopant solution to the growth solution, the dopant solution including an equal molar ration of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), glycolic acid (C.sub.2H.sub.4O.sub.3) and antimony acetate (Sb(CH.sub.3COO).sub.3) in water is prepared. The dopant solution and the growth solution combine to generate a resulting solution that includes antimony to zinc in a ratio of between 0.2% molar to 2.0% molar, the resulting solution having a top surface. An ammonia solution is added to the resulting solution. A ZnO seed layer is applied to a substrate and the substrate is placed into the top surface of the resulting solution with the ZnO seed layer facing downwardly for a predetermined time until Sb-doped ZnO nanowires having a length of at least 5 .mu.m have grown from the ZnO seed layer.

  14. Growth control, structure, chemical state, and photoresponse of CuO-CdS core-shell heterostructure nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mel, A A; Buffière, M; Bouts, N; Gautron, E; Tessier, P Y; Henzler, K; Guttmann, P; Konstantinidis, S; Bittencourt, C; Snyders, R

    2013-07-05

    The growth of single-crystal CuO nanowires by thermal annealing of copper thin films in air is studied. We show that the density, length, and diameter of the nanowires can be controlled by tuning the morphology and structure of the copper thin films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering. After identifying the optimal conditions for the growth of CuO nanowires, chemical bath deposition is employed to coat the CuO nanowires with CdS in order to form p-n nanojunction arrays. As revealed by high-resolution TEM analysis, the thickness of the polycrystalline CdS shell increases when decreasing the diameter of the CuO core for a given time of CdS deposition. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy combined with transmission x-ray microscopy allows the chemical analysis of isolated nanowires. The absence of modification in the spectra at the Cu L and O K edges after the deposition of CdS on the CuO nanowires indicates that neither Cd nor S diffuse into the CuO phase. We further demonstrate that the core-shell nanowires exhibit the I-V characteristic of a resistor instead of a diode. The electrical behavior of the device was found to be photosensitive, since increasing the incident light intensity induces an increase in the collected electrical current.

  15. Solvothermal growth of single-crystal CdS nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Mahdi; J J Hassan; S J Kasim; S S Ng; Z Hassan

    2014-04-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanowires (NWs) were prepared by the solvothermal method using ethylenedi-amine as a solvent. Two sets of CdS NWs were synthesized at 160 and 200° C for various reaction durations (3.5, 7 and 24 h). Scanning/tunneling electron microscopy was used to examine the surface morphology of the grown NWs. Their dimensions are found to depend on the reaction temperature and duration. The CdS NWs grown at 200° C for all durations are longer than those prepared at 160° C, with diameters ranging from 15 to 40 nm. A three-armed structure is exhibited by all the samples. The grown CdS NWs display a hexagonal wurtzite phase and grows along the 001 direction. The optical absorption of the grown NWs shows a sharp absorption edge with a blueshift, which indicates an expansion of the optical band gap. All prepared samples show two emission peaks in their photoluminescence spectra. The emission peak location depends on the reaction temperature and duration. The CdS NWs prepared at 160° C show a sharp band–band emission compared with those prepared at 200° C. Raman analysis indicates that the optical properties of the grown NWs are enhanced with increased temperature and reaction duration.

  16. Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanowire Arrays on Sulfur Doped Graphene as High Performance Electrocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongyue; Higgins, Drew C.; Hoque, Md Ariful; Lee, DongUn; Hassan, Fathy; Chen, Zhongwei

    2013-01-01

    Graphene supported Pt nanostructures have great potential to be used as catalysts in electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies; however the simultaneous control of Pt morphology and dispersion, along with ideally tailoring the physical properties of the catalyst support properties has proven very challenging. Using sulfur doped graphene (SG) as a support material, the heterogeneous dopant atoms could serve as nucleation sites allowing for the preparation of SG supported Pt nanowire arrays with ultra-thin diameters (2–5 nm) and dense surface coverage. Detailed investigation of the preparation technique reveals that the structure of the resulting composite could be readily controlled by fine tuning the Pt nanowire nucleation and growth reaction kinetics and the Pt-support interactions, whereby a mechanistic platinum nanowire array growth model is proposed. Electrochemical characterization demonstrates that the composite materials have 2–3 times higher catalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reaction compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst. PMID:23942256

  17. Simulation of Nanowires on Metal Vicinal Surfaces: Effect of Growth Parameters and Energetic Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ajmi B. H.; Blel, Sonia; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-02-01

    Growing one-dimensional metal structures is an important task in the investigation of the electronic and magnetic properties of new devices. We used kinetic Monte-Carlo (kMC) method to simulate the formation of nanowires of several metallic and non-metallic adatoms on Cu and Pt vicinal surfaces. We found that mono-atomic chains form on step-edges due to energetic barriers (the so-called Ehrlich-shwoebel and exchange barriers) on step-edge. Creation of perfect wires is found to depend on growth parameters and binding energies. We measure the filling ratio of nanowires for different chemical species in a wide range of temperature and flux. Perfect wires were obtained at lower deposition rate for all tested adatoms, however we notice different temperature ranges. Our results were compared with experimental ones [Gambardella et al., Surf. Sci.449, 93-103 (2000), PRB 61, 2254-2262, (2000)]. We review the role of impurities in nanostructuring of surfaces [Hamouda et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 035423, (2011)] and discuss the effect of their energetic barriers on the obtained quality of nanowires. Our work provides experimentalists with optimum growth parameters for the creation of a uniform distribution of wires on surfaces.

  18. Plasma nitriding induced growth of Pt-nanowire arrays as high performance electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shangfeng; Lin, Kaijie; Malladi, Sairam K; Lu, Yaxiang; Sun, Shuhui; Xu, Qiang; Steinberger-Wilckens, Robert; Dong, Hanshan

    2014-09-22

    In this work, we demonstrate an innovative approach, combing a novel active screen plasma (ASP) technique with green chemical synthesis, for a direct fabrication of uniform Pt nanowire arrays on large-area supports. The ASP treatment enables in-situ N-doping and surface modification to the support surface, significantly promoting the uniform growth of tiny Pt nuclei which directs the growth of ultrathin single-crystal Pt nanowire (2.5-3 nm in diameter) arrays, forming a three-dimensional (3D) nano-architecture. Pt nanowire arrays in-situ grown on the large-area gas diffusion layer (GDL) (5 cm(2)) can be directly used as the catalyst electrode in fuel cells. The unique design brings in an extremely thin electrocatalyst layer, facilitating the charge transfer and mass transfer properties, leading to over two times higher power density than the conventional Pt nanoparticle catalyst electrode in real fuel cell environment. Due to the similar challenges faced with other nanostructures and the high availability of ASP for other material surfaces, this work will provide valuable insights and guidance towards the development of other new nano-architectures for various practical applications.

  19. Elimination of gold diffusion in the heterostructure core/shell growth of high performance Ge/Si nanowire HFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picraux, Samuel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dayeh, Shadi A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Radial heterostructure nanowires offer the possibility of surface, strain, band-edge and modulution-doped engineering for optimizing performance of nanowire transistors. Synthesis of such heterostructures is non-trivial and is typically accompanied with Au diffusion on the nanowire sidewalls that result in rough morphology and undesired whisker growth. Here, they report a novel growth procedure to synthesize Ge/Si core/multi-shell nanowires by engineering the growth interface between the Au seed and the nanowire sidewalls. Single crystal Ge/Si core/multi-shell nanowires are used to fabricate side-by-side FET transistors with and without Au diffusion. Elimination of Au diffusion in the synthesis of such structures led to {approx} 2X improvement in hole field-effect mobility, transconductances and currents. Initial prototype devices with a 10 nm PECVD nitride gate dielectric resulted in a record maximum on current of 430 {micro}A/V (I{sub DS}L{sub G}/{pi}DV{sub DS}), {approx} 2X higher than ever achieved before in a p-type FET.

  20. Shadowing and mask opening effects during selective-area vapor-liquid-solid growth of InP nanowires by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelrich, A; Calahorra, Y; Greenberg, Y; Gavrilov, A; Cohen, S; Ritter, D

    2013-11-29

    Indium phosphide nanowires were grown by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy using the selective-area vapor-liquid-solid method. We show experimentally and theoretically that the size of the annular opening around the nanowire has a major impact on nanowire growth rate. In addition, we observed a considerable reduction of the growth rate in dense two-dimensional arrays, in agreement with a calculation of the shadowing of the scattered precursors. Due to the impact of these effects on growth, they should be considered during selective-area vapor-liquid-solid nanowire epitaxy.

  1. Improving optical performance of GaN nanowires grown by selective area growth homoepitaxy: Influence of substrate and nanowire dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseev, P.; Gačević, Ž.; Torres-Pardo, A.; González-Calbet, J. M.; Calleja, E.

    2016-06-01

    Series of GaN nanowires (NW) with controlled diameters (160-500 nm) and heights (420-1100 nm) were homoepitaxially grown on three different templates: GaN/Si(111), GaN/AlN/Si(111), and GaN/sapphire(0001). Transmission electron microscopy reveals a strong influence of the NW diameter on dislocation filtering effect, whereas photoluminescence measurements further relate this effect to the GaN NWs near-bandgap emission efficiency. Although the templates' quality has some effects on the GaN NWs optical and structural properties, the NW diameter reduction drives the dislocation filtering effect to the point where a poor GaN template quality becomes negligible. Thus, by a proper optimization of the homoepitaxial GaN NWs growth, the propagation of dislocations into the NWs can be greatly prevented, leading to an exceptional crystal quality and a total dominance of the near-bandgap emission over sub-bandgap, defect-related lines, such as basal stacking faults and so called unknown exciton (UX) emission. In addition, a correlation between the presence of polarity inversion domain boundaries and the UX emission lines around 3.45 eV is established.

  2. Improving optical performance of GaN nanowires grown by selective area growth homoepitaxy: Influence of substrate and nanowire dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aseev, P., E-mail: pavel.aseev@isom.upm.es, E-mail: gacevic@isom.upm.es; Gačević, Ž., E-mail: pavel.aseev@isom.upm.es, E-mail: gacevic@isom.upm.es; Calleja, E. [ISOM-ETSIT, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Torres-Pardo, A.; González-Calbet, J. M. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Químicas, Universidad Complutense (UCM), CEI Moncloa, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-06-20

    Series of GaN nanowires (NW) with controlled diameters (160–500 nm) and heights (420–1100 nm) were homoepitaxially grown on three different templates: GaN/Si(111), GaN/AlN/Si(111), and GaN/sapphire(0001). Transmission electron microscopy reveals a strong influence of the NW diameter on dislocation filtering effect, whereas photoluminescence measurements further relate this effect to the GaN NWs near-bandgap emission efficiency. Although the templates' quality has some effects on the GaN NWs optical and structural properties, the NW diameter reduction drives the dislocation filtering effect to the point where a poor GaN template quality becomes negligible. Thus, by a proper optimization of the homoepitaxial GaN NWs growth, the propagation of dislocations into the NWs can be greatly prevented, leading to an exceptional crystal quality and a total dominance of the near-bandgap emission over sub-bandgap, defect-related lines, such as basal stacking faults and so called unknown exciton (UX) emission. In addition, a correlation between the presence of polarity inversion domain boundaries and the UX emission lines around 3.45 eV is established.

  3. Direct observation of Sn crystal growth during the lithiation and delithiation processes of SnO(2) nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li Qiang; Liu, Xiao Hua; Perng, Ya-Chuan; Cho, Jea; Chang, Jane P; Mao, Scott X; Ye, Zhi Zhen; Huang, Jian Yu

    2012-11-01

    Tin (Sn) crystal growth on Sn-based anodes in lithium ion batteries is hazardous for reasons such as possible short-circuit failure by Sn whiskers and Sn-catalyzed electrolyte decomposition, but the growth mechanism of Sn crystals during battery cycling is not clear. Here we report different growth mechanisms of Sn crystal during the lithiation and delithiation processes of SnO(2) nanowires revealed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Large spherical Sn nanoparticles with sizes of 20-200nm grew instantaneously upon lithiation of a single-crystalline SnO(2) nanowire at large current density (j>20A/cm(2)), which suppressed formation of the Li(x)Sn alloy but promoted agglomeration of Sn atoms. Control experiments of Joule-heating (j≈2400A/cm(2)) the pristine SnO(2) nanowires resulted in melting of the SnO(2) nanowires but not Sn particle growth, indicating that the abnormal Sn particle growth was induced by both chemical reduction (i.e., breaking the SnO(2) lattice to produce Sn atoms) and agglomeration of the Sn atoms assisted by Joule heating. Intriguingly, Sn crystals grew out of the nanowire surface via a different "squeeze-out" mechanism during delithiation of the lithiated SnO(2) nanowires coated with an ultra-thin solid electrolyte LiAlSiO(x) layer. It is attributed to the negative stress gradient generated by the fast Li extraction in the surface region through the Li(+)-conducting LiAlSiO(x) layer. Our previous studies showed that Sn precipitation does not occur in the carbon-coated SnO(2) nanowires, highlighting the effect of nanoengineering on tailoring the electrochemical reaction kinetics to suppress the hazardous Sn whiskers or nanoparticles formation in a lithium ion battery.

  4. Shadow mask assisted direct growth of ZnO nanowires as a sensing medium for surface acoustic wave devices using a thermal evaporation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achath Mohanan, Ajay; Parthiban, R.; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2016-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires were directly synthesized on high temperature stable one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators made of LiNbO3 substrate and Pt/Ti electrodes using a self-seeding catalyst-free thermal evaporation method. To enhance post-growth device functionality, one half of an SAW resonator was masked along the interdigital transducer aperture length during the nanowire growth process using a stainless steel shadow mask, while the other half was used as the ZnO nanowire growth site. This was achieved by employing a precisely machined stainless steel sleeve to house the chip and mask in the reaction chamber during the nanowire growth process. The ZnO nanowire integrated SAW resonator exhibited ultraviolet radiation sensing abilities which indicated that the ZnO nanowires grown on the SAW device were able to interact with SAW propagation on the substrate even after the device was exposed to extremely harsh conditions during the nanowire growth process. The use of a thermal evaporation method, instead of the conventionally used solution-grown method for direct growth of ZnO nanowires on SAW devices, paves the way for future methods aimed at the fabrication of highly sensitive ZnO nanowire-LiNbO3 based SAW sensors utilizing coupled resonance phenomenon at the nanoscale.

  5. Modification of Stranski-Krastanov growth on the surface of nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlei; Yang, Guowei

    2014-10-01

    The heteroepitaxial growth of strained islands on a planar substrate offers an attractive route to the fabrication of quantum dots (QDs). To obtain more functions and superior properties, recent efforts have focused on using nanowires (NWs) as substrates to produce attractive structures that combine QDs with NWs. As the lateral size of an NW is large, it is possible that islands are formed on the side walls of the NW. However, no islands exist, and the lateral surface is rather smooth in thin, core-shell NWs. The existing theoretical models on the growth on planar and patterned substrates are not appropriate for the growth transition on the surface with nanoscale curvature. We thus urgently need to understand the basic physics involved in the strain-induced growth on the surface with nanoscale curvature. Here, we established a theoretical model to study the strain-induced growth on the surface, which showed that the Stranski-Krastanov (SK) mode can change to the Frank-van der Merwe (FM) mode due to the limit of the surface to the island’s lateral growth. Using the model to investigate the heterostructured core/shell nanowires (NWs), we found, in addition to the SK mode on thick NWs and the FM mode on thin NWs, that there is a multiplex mode on medium NWs which includes the initial layer growth, the intermediate islands’ growth and the final layer growth again. The established theoretical model not only explained some puzzling experimental results but also provided useful information to design and control the epitaxial growth on the surface with nanoscale curvature.

  6. On the possibility of the electron polarization to be the driving force for the C60-TMB nanowire growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Geng, Junfeng; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2009-01-01

    The effect of electron polarization has been suggested to explain the exceptionally large length-to width aspect ratio (more than 3000) in recently observed C_60-based nanowires. The theoretical estimates performed in the present Letter show that at room temperature the effect of electron...... polarization is negligibly small and, therefore, cannot become the driving force for nanowire growth along one preferential direction. Experimental measurements are in agreement with the theoretical analysis: the nanowires have been observed to emerge from the polar 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and non-polar 1......,3,5-trimethylbenzene solution of C_60, while no nanowires from polar toluene, 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene and non-polar benzene solutions could be recorded....

  7. Vertical nanowire architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfl-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires and statistics: A statistical process for reading ultradense arrays of nanostructured materials is presented (see image). The experimental realization is achieved through selective nanowire growth using porous alumina templates. The statistical patterning approach is found to provide ri...

  8. Foreign-catalyst-free growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires on Si (111) by molecular-beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Hyok; Pan, Dong; Li, Lixia; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-03-01

    Epitaxial high-quality InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires are of great interest due to their distinct advantages in fundamental research as well as applications in semiconductor electronic and quantum devices. Currently, nearly all the growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires is assisted with foreign catalysts such as Au, and work on foreign-catalyst-free growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires is lacking. Here we report on the growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires on Si (111) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy without using any foreign catalysts. The Sb/In beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio is found to have important influence on the heterostructure nanowire morphology, and InSb nanowires can be epitaxially grown on InAs nanowire stems with a hexagonal prism and nanosheet-like shapes when the Sb/In BEP ratio varies from 10 to 20. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the InAs nanowire stems have a mixture of zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) crystal structures, while InSb nanowire parts have a pure ZB crystal structure free of stacking faults. Composition analysis of axial heterostructure nanowires provides clear evidence that the InSb nanowires are epitaxially grown on InAs nanowires in an In self-assisted vapor-liquid-solid manner. This study paves a new route for growing narrow-gap semiconductor heterostructures with strong spin-orbit interaction for the study of topological states, and the growth manner presented here is expected to be used to grow other In-based axial heterostructure nanowires.

  9. Growth of Inclined GaAs Nanowires by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Theory and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchernycheva M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growth of inclined GaAs nanowires (NWs during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE on the rotating substrates is studied. The growth model provides explicitly the NW length as a function of radius, supersaturations, diffusion lengths and the tilt angle. Growth experiments are carried out on the GaAs(211A and GaAs(111B substrates. It is found that 20° inclined NWs are two times longer in average, which is explained by a larger impingement rate on their sidewalls. We find that the effective diffusion length at 550°C amounts to 12 nm for the surface adatoms and is more than 5,000 nm for the sidewall adatoms. Supersaturations of surface and sidewall adatoms are also estimated. The obtained results show the importance of sidewall adatoms in the MBE growth of NWs, neglected in a number of earlier studies.

  10. Growth of Inclined GaAs Nanowires by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Theory and Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Dubrovskii, V G; Sibirev, N V; Cirlin, G E; Sartel, C; Tchernycheva, M; Harmand, J C; Glas, F

    2010-07-24

    The growth of inclined GaAs nanowires (NWs) during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on the rotating substrates is studied. The growth model provides explicitly the NW length as a function of radius, supersaturations, diffusion lengths and the tilt angle. Growth experiments are carried out on the GaAs(211)A and GaAs(111)B substrates. It is found that 20° inclined NWs are two times longer in average, which is explained by a larger impingement rate on their sidewalls. We find that the effective diffusion length at 550°C amounts to 12 nm for the surface adatoms and is more than 5,000 nm for the sidewall adatoms. Supersaturations of surface and sidewall adatoms are also estimated. The obtained results show the importance of sidewall adatoms in the MBE growth of NWs, neglected in a number of earlier studies.

  11. Truncated tetrahedron seed crystals initiating stereoaligned growth of FeSi nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si-in; Yoon, Hana; Seo, Kwanyong; Yoo, Youngdong; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2012-10-23

    We have synthesized epitaxially grown freestanding FeSi nanowires (NWs) on an m-Al(2)O(3) substrate by using a catalyst-free chemical vapor transport method. FeSi NW growth is initiated from FeSi nanocrystals, formed on a substrate in a characteristic shape with a specific orientation. Cross-section TEM analysis of seed crystals reveals the crystallographic structure and hidden geometry of the seeds. Close correlation of geometrical shapes and orientations of the observed nanocrystals with those of as-grown NWs indicates that directional growth of NWs is initiated from the epitaxially formed seed crystals. The diameter of NWs can be controlled by adjusting the composition of Si in a Si/C mixture. The epitaxial growth method for FeSi NWs via seed crystals could be employed to heteroepitaxial growth of other compound NWs.

  12. Electroless selective deposition of gold nano-array for silicon nanowires growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Gomes E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanopatterns of gold clusters on a large surface of oriented Si(111 substrates, from the galvanic displacement of gold salt (via the spontaneous reduction of AuCl4 -, are demonstrated in this work. The Si substrate is patterned by Focused Ion Beam (FIB prior to being dipped in a gold solution. Here, we show that these patterns lead to successful control of the position and size of gold clusters. Sequential patterning reveals a powerful maskless alternative to surface preparation prior to Si nanowire growth

  13. Self-catalytic growth of tin oxide nanowires by chemical vapor deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thabethe, BS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporation Journal of Nanomaterials Volume 2013, Article ID 712361, 7 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/712361 Research Article Self-Catalytic Growth of Tin Oxide Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition Process Bongani S. Thabethe,1,2 Gerald F. Malgas,1... Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535, South Africa Correspondence should be addressed to Gerald F. Malgas; gmalgas@csir.co.za and David E. Motaung; dmotaung@csir.co.za Received 20 February 2013; Accepted 10...

  14. Mechanisms of surface alloy segregation on faceted core-shell nanowire growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Voorhees, Peter W.; Davis, Stephen H.

    2017-03-01

    A general two-dimensional faceted model that accounts for capillarity and deposition of an AxB 1-x alloy is developed for the growth of the shell on a hexagonal core. With this model, the surface alloy segregation and morphological evolution in the processes of the faceted core-shell nanowire growth are studied both analytically and numerically. Mechanisms of formation of Al-rich stripes along { 112 } facets and Al-poor quantum dots/wires at the apices of { 112 } facets are identified. More specifically, it is found that diffusion tends to move the atoms from { 112 } facets to { 110 } facets. The formation of Al-rich stripes along the { 112 } facets is due to the large ratios of mobilities of Al atoms and Ga atoms on { 112 } facets, even though Al atoms diffuse slower than Ga on the { 110 } facets. In addition, the difference of interaction parameters in the enthalpy on different facets can also lead to lines of enhanced concentration of Al behind { 112 } facets. If the attachment rates of Al on the { 112 } facets are smaller than that on { 110 } facets, Al-poor dots will grow at the end of the Al-rich stripes because the growth process switches from diffusion dominant to deposition dominant when the size of the nanowire gets large. Moreover, influences of different parameters on the distribution of concentrations of the atoms in the shell are investigated in details.

  15. The influence of H2O2 concentration to the structure of silicon nanowire growth by metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hafsa; Jani, Abdul Mutalib Md.; Rusop, Mohamad; Abdullah, Saifollah

    2016-07-01

    A simple and low cost method to produce well aligned silicon nanowires at large areas using Ag-assisted chemical etching at room temperature were presented. The structure of silicon nanowires growth by metal-assisted chemical etching was observed. Prior to the etching, the silicon nanowires were prepared by electroless metal deposited (EMD) in solution containing hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide in Teflon vessel. The silver particle was deposited on substrate by immersion in hydrofluoric acid and silver nitrate solution for sixty second. The silicon nanowires were growth in different hydrogen peroxide concentration which are 0.3M, 0.4M, 0.5M and 0.6M and 0.7M.The influence of hydrogen peroxide concentration to the formation of silicon nanowires was studied. The morphological properties of silicon nanowires were investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS).

  16. Growth and Physical Property Study of Single Nanowire (Diameter ~45 nm of Half Doped Manganite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subarna Datta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here the growth and characterization of functional oxide nanowire of hole doped manganite of La0.5Sr0.5MnO3 (LSMO. We also report four-probe electrical resistance measurement of a single nanowire of LSMO (diameter ~45 nm using focused ion beam (FIB fabricated electrodes. The wires are fabricated by hydrothermal method using autoclave at a temperature of 270 °C. The elemental analysis and physical property like electrical resistivity are studied at an individual nanowire level. The quantitative determination of Mn valency and elemental mapping of constituent elements are done by using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS in the Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM mode. We address the important issue of whether as a result of size reduction the nanowires can retain the desired composition, structure, and physical properties. The nanowires used are found to have a ferromagnetic transition (TC at around 325 K which is very close to the bulk value of around 330 K found in single crystal of the same composition. It is confirmed that the functional behavior is likely to be retained even after size reduction of the nanowires to a diameter of 45 nm. The electrical resistivity shows insulating behavior within the measured temperature range which is similar to the bulk system.

  17. Electrophoretic deposition of ZnO nanostructures: Au nanoclusters on Si substrates induce self-assembled nanowire growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, Claudia [Laboratorio de Nanomateriales y Propiedades Dieléctricas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Marin, Oscar [CONICET – LAFISO, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Real, Silvina [Laboratorio de Nanomateriales y Propiedades Dieléctricas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Comedi, David [CONICET – LAFISO, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Tirado, Mónica, E-mail: mtirado@herrera.unt.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Nanomateriales y Propiedades Dieléctricas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanowires were grown on silicon substrate by electrophoretic deposition technique without use a porous template. • The growth was induced by Au nanoclusters and was performed at room temperature. • The photoluminescence spectrum for the nanowires obtained shows a broad UV-blue excitonic emission peak and a low emission in the green region. - Abstract: The present work reports the self-assembled growth of ZnO nanowires on silicon substrate with nanometer sized Au clusters using electrophoretic deposition technique at room temperature without a sacrificial template. A colloidal suspension of ≈5 nm sized ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in 2-propanol was used (nanoparticle bandgap of 3.47 eV as determined from absorbance measurements). The results show that the Au nanoclusters on the silicon substrate induce the self-assembly of the ZnO nanoparticles into vertically aligned ZnO nanowires. This effect is tentatively explained as being due to increased electric field intensities near the Au nanoclusters during the electrophoretic deposition. Photoluminescence measurements reveal the presence of quantum confined excitons and a relatively low concentration of deep defects in the nanowires. The electric field guided growth of semiconductor nanostructures at room temperature has great industrial potential as it minimizes production costs and enables the use of substrate materials not withstanding high temperatures.

  18. MBE Growth of AlN Nanowires on Si Substrates by Aluminizing Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Yanxiong; Hao, Zhibiao; Yu, Jiadong; Wu, Chao; Liu, Runze; Wang, Lai; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Jian; Han, Yanjun; Sun, Changzheng; Luo, Yi

    2015-12-01

    By introducing an aluminization process to achieve nucleation of nanowires (NWs), spontaneous growth of AlN NWs on Si substrates has been realized by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The AlN NWs are grown from the nuclei formed by the aluminization process, and the NW density and diameter can be controlled by the aluminization parameters. The influence of growth conditions on the morphologies of AlN NWs is carefully investigated. Island-like films are found to grow between the NWs due to poor migration ability of Al adatoms. The films are proved to be Al-polar different from the N-polar AlN NWs, which can explain the absence of newly formed NWs. Increasing the V/III ratio can efficiently suppress the growth of Al-polar AlN films.

  19. Gallium-assisted growth of silicon nanowires by electron cyclotron resonance plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, M J; Cervera, M; Ruiz, E; Pau, J L; Piqueras, J [Laboratorio de Microelectronica, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Avella, M; Jimenez, J, E-mail: maria.jesus.hernandez@uam.es [Fisica de la Materia Condensada, ETSII, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2010-11-12

    The use of gallium droplets for growing Si nanowires (SiNWs) by electron cyclotron resonance plasmas is investigated. First, the relationship between evaporation time and resultant size of the gallium droplets is studied. Through the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry, the dependence of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) energy on the droplet size is determined. From these gallium droplets, SiNWs were grown at 300 and 550 deg. C in electron cyclotron resonance plasmas containing SiH{sub 4}, Ar, and H{sub 2}. Scanning electron microscopy results show that tapered NWs are obtained for a wide range of growth conditions. Besides, it is found that H{sub 2} plays an important role in the parasitic axial growth of the SiNWs. Namely, H{sub 2} inhibits the radial growth and contributes dramatically to increasing the SiNW defects.

  20. Nanowire Oriented On-Surface Growth of Chiral Cystine Crystalline Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shenxiang; Zhang, Feng; Qin, Haili; Hu, Liang; Jin, Jian

    2015-08-18

    Exploration of an effective route to achieve the controlled growth of two-dimensional (2D) molecular crystal is of scientific significance yet greatly underdeveloped due to the complexity of weak intermolecular interactions, thus leading to difficulty of inducing anisotropic 2D growth. We report here a facile nanowire oriented on-surface growth strategy for the fabrication of cystine crystalline nanosheets with finely controlled thickness (1.1, 1.9, 2.9, and 4.8 nm which correspond to one layer, two layers, three layers, and five layers of crystal cystine, respectively) and large areas (>100 μm(2)). The cystine crystalline nanosheets display chirality delivered by chiral cysteine monomers, either l-cysteine or d-cysteine. The chiral nanosheets with structural precision and chemical diversity could serve as a novel 2D platform for constructing advanced hybrid materials.

  1. Defect-free zinc-blende structured InAs nanowires realized by in situ two V/III ratio growth in molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2015-08-07

    In this study, we devised a two-V/III-ratio procedure to control the Au-assisted growth of defect-free InAs nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy. The demonstrated two V/III ratio procedure consists of a first high V/III ratio growth step to prepare the nanowire foundation on the substrate surface, followed by a low V/III ratio step to induce the nanowire growth. By manipulating the V/III ratios in different steps, we have achieved the controlled growth of pure defect-free zinc-blende structured InAs nanowires on the GaAs {1̄1̄1̄} substrates. This study provides an approach to control not only the crystal structure of semiconductor nanowires, but also their structural qualities.

  2. Kinetics of Si and Ge nanowires growth through electron beam evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artoni Pietro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Si and Ge have the same crystalline structure, and although Si-Au and Ge-Au binary alloys are thermodynamically similar (same phase diagram, with the eutectic temperature of about 360°C, in this study, it is proved that Si and Ge nanowires (NWs growth by electron beam evaporation occurs in very different temperature ranges and fluence regimes. In particular, it is demonstrated that Ge growth occurs just above the eutectic temperature, while Si NWs growth occurs at temperature higher than the eutectic temperature, at about 450°C. Moreover, Si NWs growth requires a higher evaporated fluence before the NWs become to be visible. These differences arise in the different kinetics behaviors of these systems. The authors investigate the microscopic growth mechanisms elucidating the contribution of the adatoms diffusion as a function of the evaporated atoms direct impingement, demonstrating that adatoms play a key role in physical vapor deposition (PVD NWs growth. The concept of incubation fluence, which is necessary for an interpretation of NWs growth in PVD growth conditions, is highlighted.

  3. Enhanced lithium ion battery cycling of silicon nanowire anodes by template growth to eliminate silicon underlayer islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jeong-Hyun; Picraux, S Tom

    2013-01-01

    It is well-known that one-dimensional nanostructures reduce pulverization of silicon (Si)-based anode materials during Li ion cycling because they allow lateral relaxation. However, even with improved designs, Si nanowire-based structures still exhibit limited cycling stability for extended numbers of cycles, with the specific capacity retention with cycling not showing significant improvements over commercial carbon-based anode materials. We have found that one important reason for the lack of long cycling stability can be the presence of milli- and microscale Si islands which typically form under nanowire arrays during their growth. Stress buildup in these Si island underlayers with cycling results in cracking, and the loss of specific capacity for Si nanowire anodes, due to progressive loss of contact with current collectors. We show that the formation of these parasitic Si islands for Si nanowires grown directly on metal current collectors can be avoided by growth through anodized aluminum oxide templates containing a high density of sub-100 nm nanopores. Using this template approach we demonstrate significantly enhanced cycling stability for Si nanowire-based lithium-ion battery anodes, with retentions of more than ~1000 mA·h/g discharge capacity over 1100 cycles.

  4. Solution-based growth and structural characterization of homo- and heterobranched semiconductor nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Angang; Tang, Rui; Buhro, William E

    2007-10-10

    Colloidal homobranched ZnSe nanowires (NWs) and heterobranched CdSe-ZnSe NWs are successfully synthesized by combining a sequential seeding strategy with the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth process. We have developed an efficient approach to deposit secondary bismuth nanoparticles onto the NW backbone to induce the subsequent SLS branch growth. The density, length, and diameter of branches are rationally controlled by varying reaction conditions. Structural characterization reveals that crystalline branches grow epitaxially from the backbone in both homo- and heterobranched NWs. Two different branching structures are observed in the CdSe-ZnSe heterobranched NWs, owing to the phase admixture, i.e., cubic and hexagonal crystal structures, coexisting in the CdSe NW backbones. These branched NWs with well-designed architectures are expected to have potential as three-dimensional building blocks in the fabrication of nanoscale electronics and photonics.

  5. Growth of Horizonatal ZnO Nanowire Arrays on Any Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Yong

    2008-12-04

    A general method is presented for growing laterally aligned and patterned ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays on any substrate as long as it is flat. The orientation control is achieved using the combined effect from ZnO seed layer and the catalytically inactive Cr (or Sn) layer for NW growth. The growth temperature (< 100 °C) is so low that the method can be applied to a wide range of substrates that can be inorganic, organic, single crystal, polycrystal, or amorphous. The laterally aligned ZnO NW arrays can be employed for various applications, such as gas sensor, field effect transistor, nanogenerator, and flexible electronics. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  6. Synthesis of transparent metallic Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires: Effects of doping concentration on photoelectric properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chang, Po-Yu; Chen, Wei-Hao; Lin, Su-Jien [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu (China)

    2014-02-15

    Degenerately Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (ITO) nanowires were synthesized via an Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method at 750 C. The Au seed layer provided sites with a high surface energy for the selected-area growth of ITO nanowires. Morphology and crystal structures confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to obtain the chemical compositions of the ITO nanowires as well as the ratio of Sn/In and oxygen concentrations. Under the photo-excitation the ITO nanowires emit ultraviolet light, which can be ascribed to transitions related to donor levels. Moreover, photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometer and UV-VIS spectrum analysis revealed a blue shift peaks in the degenerately ITO nanowires. This phenomenon can be explained by Burstein-Moss effect. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Effects of substrate temperature on the growth, structural and optical properties of NiSi/SiC core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzan, Najwa Binti; Nordin, Farah Nadiah Binti; Rahman, Saadah Abdul; Huang, Nay Ming; Goh, Boon Tong

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we attempt to study the growth of NiSi/SiC core-shell nanowires on Ni-coated glass substrates by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. The samples were prepared at different substrate temperatures of between 350 and 527 °C to investigate the growth of the nanowires. Ni nanoparticles were used as templates for initially inducing the growth of these core-shell nanowires at substrate temperature as low as 350 °C. The high density of the nanowires was clearly demonstrated at higher substrate temperatures of 450 and 527 °C. These core-shell nanowires were structured by single crystalline NiSi and amorphous SiC as the core and shell of the nanowires respectively. The amorphous SiC shell consisted of SiC nanocolumns within an amorphous matrix. The formation of these high density nanowires showed a noticeable suppression in photoluminescence emissions from the oxygen-related defects and superior optical absorption in visible and limited near infrared regions. The effects of substrate temperatures on growth, optical and structural properties of the nanowires are presented and discussed.

  8. Growth of tapered silica nanowires with a shallow U-shaped vapor chamber: Growth mechanism and structural and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danqing; Zhang, Xi; Wei, Jianglin; Gu, Gangxu; Xiang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Traditional chemical vapor deposition method modified with a shallow U-shaped vapor chamber has been used to synthesize tapered bamboo shoot-like (BS-like) amorphous SiO2 nanowires (NWs) on Si (100) substrates without catalyst. The key innovation of this approach lies in a creation of swirling flow of the reactant vapors during the growth, which leads to a harvest of tapered silica NWs with lengths up to several microns. The unique structures and corresponding luminescence properties of the BS-like NWs were studied and their relationship with the evaporated active reactants was explored. A thermodynamic model that considers the critical role of the vapor flow during the growth is proposed to understand the structural and optical features. The shallow U-shaped vapor chamber-aided approach may provide a viable way to tailor novel structure of NWs for potential applications in nano-devices.

  9. Growth of tapered silica nanowires with a shallow U-shaped vapor chamber: Growth mechanism and structural and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Danqing; Zhang, Xi, E-mail: xizhang@scu.edu.cn; Wei, Jianglin; Gu, Gangxu; Xiang, Gang, E-mail: gxiang@scu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2015-04-28

    Traditional chemical vapor deposition method modified with a shallow U-shaped vapor chamber has been used to synthesize tapered bamboo shoot-like (BS-like) amorphous SiO{sub 2} nanowires (NWs) on Si (100) substrates without catalyst. The key innovation of this approach lies in a creation of swirling flow of the reactant vapors during the growth, which leads to a harvest of tapered silica NWs with lengths up to several microns. The unique structures and corresponding luminescence properties of the BS-like NWs were studied and their relationship with the evaporated active reactants was explored. A thermodynamic model that considers the critical role of the vapor flow during the growth is proposed to understand the structural and optical features. The shallow U-shaped vapor chamber-aided approach may provide a viable way to tailor novel structure of NWs for potential applications in nano-devices.

  10. Growth and optical investigations of high quality individual CdTe/(Cd,Mg)Te core/shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnar, P.; Płachta, J.; Kret, S.; Kaleta, A.; Zaleszczyk, W.; Szymura, M.; Wiater, M.; Baczewski, L. T.; Pietruczik, A.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.; Kossut, J.

    2017-01-01

    CdTe nanowires with the average diameter of only 40 nm coated with (Cd,Mg)Te shells are grown using Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism in a system for molecular beam epitaxy. High optical quality of individual nanowires is revealed by means of low temperature cathodoluminescence and micro-luminescence. It is found that, the optical emission spectrum consists mostly of the near band edge emission without any significant contribution of defect related luminescence. Moreover, the importance of surface passivation with (Cd,Mg)Te coating shells is demonstrated.

  11. Hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanowires on flexible fabric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gwang-Wook; Yun, Sang-Ho; Kim, Joo-Hyung

    2016-04-01

    ZnO nanowires (NWs) would provide significant enhancement in sensitivity due to high surface to volume ratio. We investigated the first methodical study on the quantitative relationship between the process parameters of solution concentration ratio, structure, and physical and properties of ZnO NWs grown on different flexible fabric surfaces. To develop a fundamental following concerning various substrates, we controlled the growth speed of ZnO NWs and nanowires on cotton surface with easy and moderate cost fabrication method. Using ammonium hydroxide as the reactant with zinc nitrate hexahydrate, ZnO NWs layer have been grown on metal layers, instead of seed layer. ZnO NWs fabrication was done on different fabric substrates such as wool, nylon and polypropylene (PP). After the ZnO NWs grown to each substrates, we coated insulating layer with polyurethane (PU) and ethyl cellulose for prevent external intervention. Detailed electrical characterization was subsequently performed to reveal the working characteristics of the hybrid fabric. For electrical verification of fabricated ZnO NWs, we implemented measurement impact test and material properties with FFT analyzer and LCR meter.

  12. Conformal growth of ZnO on TiO{sub 2} nanowire array for enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Ru-Hua [Key Laboratory of Photonic Devices and Materials, Anhui Province, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, Rua Larga, Coimbra 3004-516 (Portugal); Wu, Jin-Ming, E-mail: msewjm@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Organic Pollution Process and Control, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Xiao, Jing-Zhong [Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, Rua Larga, Coimbra 3004-516 (Portugal); Zhao, Yi-Ping; Dong, Wei-Wei; Fang, Xiao-Dong [Key Laboratory of Photonic Devices and Materials, Anhui Province, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Key Laboratory of New Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Quasi-aligned core–shell TiO{sub 2}/ZnO nanowires were fabricated by a conformal growth of ZnO along TiO{sub 2} nanowires through pulsed laser deposition. The TiO{sub 2} nanowire array was fabricated simply by direct oxidation of metallic Ti substrates in hydrogen peroxide solutions containing trace melamine and nitric acid. The X-ray diffraction pattern shows that, the ZnO layer was oriented grown to exhibit an abnormal strong X-ray peak corresponding to (0 0 2). The UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra reveal that the bandgap of TiO{sub 2} nanowire array and that after the ZnO deposition for 30 min was 3.1 eV and 2.7 eV, respectively. The pulsed laser deposition of ZnO on the TiO{sub 2} nanowire array is effective to improve both the photoelectrochemical response and the efficiency to assist photodegradation of rhodamine B in water.

  13. A model of axial heterostructure formation in III-V semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2016-03-01

    A kinetic model of the formation of axial heterostructures in nanocrystalline wires (nanowires, NWs) of III-V semiconductor compounds growing according to the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism is proposed. A general system of nonstationary equations for effective fluxes of two elements of the same group (e.g., group III) is formulated that allows the composition profile of a heterostructure to be calculated as a function of the coordinate and epitaxial growth conditions, including the flux of a group V element. Characteristic times of the composition relaxation, which determine the sharpness of the heteroboundary (heterointerface), are determined in the linear approximation. A temporal interruption (arrest) of fluxes during the switching of elements for a period exceeding these relaxation times must increase sharpness of the heteroboundary. Model calculations of the composition profile in a double GaAs/InAs/GaAs axial heterostructure have been performed for various NW radii.

  14. Atomic Resolution in Situ Imaging of a Double-Bilayer Multistep Growth Mode in Gallium Nitride Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamalski, A D; Tersoff, J; Stach, E A

    2016-04-13

    We study the growth of GaN nanowires from liquid Au-Ga catalysts using environmental transmission electron microscopy. GaN wires grow in either ⟨112̅0⟩ or ⟨11̅00⟩ directions, by the addition of {11̅00} double bilayers via step flow with multiple steps. Step-train growth is not typically seen with liquid catalysts, and we suggest that it results from low step mobility related to the unusual double-height step structure. The results here illustrate the surprising dynamics of catalytic GaN wire growth at the nanoscale and highlight striking differences between the growth of GaN and other III-V semiconductor nanowires.

  15. Toward optimized light utilization in nanowire arrays using scalable nanosphere lithography and selected area growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaria, Anuj R; Yao, Maoqing; Chi, Chunyung; Huang, Ningfeng; Lin, Chenxi; Li, Ruijuan; Povinelli, Michelle L; Dapkus, P Daniel; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-06-13

    Vertically aligned, catalyst-free semiconducting nanowires hold great potential for photovoltaic applications, in which achieving scalable synthesis and optimized optical absorption simultaneously is critical. Here, we report combining nanosphere lithography (NSL) and selected area metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (SA-MOCVD) for the first time for scalable synthesis of vertically aligned gallium arsenide nanowire arrays, and surprisingly, we show that such nanowire arrays with patterning defects due to NSL can be as good as highly ordered nanowire arrays in terms of optical absorption and reflection. Wafer-scale patterning for nanowire synthesis was done using a polystyrene nanosphere template as a mask. Nanowires grown from substrates patterned by NSL show similar structural features to those patterned using electron beam lithography (EBL). Reflection of photons from the NSL-patterned nanowire array was used as a measure of the effect of defects present in the structure. Experimentally, we show that GaAs nanowires as short as 130 nm show reflection of <10% over the visible range of the solar spectrum. Our results indicate that a highly ordered nanowire structure is not necessary: despite the "defects" present in NSL-patterned nanowire arrays, their optical performance is similar to "defect-free" structures patterned by more costly, time-consuming EBL methods. Our scalable approach for synthesis of vertical semiconducting nanowires can have application in high-throughput and low-cost optoelectronic devices, including solar cells.

  16. The solution growth of copper nanowires and nanotubes is driven by screw dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fei; Jin, Song

    2012-01-11

    Copper (Cu) nanowires (NWs) are inexpensive conducting nanomaterials intensively explored for transparent conducting electrodes and other applications. However, the mechanism for solution growth of Cu NWs remains elusive so far. Here we show that the one-dimensional anisotropic growth of Cu NWs and nanotubes (NTs) in solution is driven by axial screw dislocations. All three types of evidence for dislocation-driven growth have been conclusively observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques: rigorous two-beam TEM analysis that conclusively characterizes the dislocations in the NWs to be pure screw dislocations along direction, twist contour analysis that confirms the presence of Eshelby twist associated with the dislocation, and the observation of spontaneously formed hollow NTs. The reduction-oxidation (redox) electrochemical reaction forming the Cu NWs presents new chemistry for controlling supersaturation to promote dislocation-driven NW growth. Using this understanding to intentionally manipulate the supersaturation, we have further improved the NW growth by using a continuous flow reactor to yield longer Cu NWs under much milder chemical conditions. The rational synthesis of Cu NWs with control over size and geometry will facilitate their applications.

  17. Graphitic platform for self-catalysed InAs nanowires growth by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Qian D; Anyebe, Ezekiel A; Sanchez, Ana M; Rajpalke, Mohana K; Veal, Tim D; Zhukov, Alexander; Robinson, Benjamin J; Anderson, Frazer; Kolosov, Oleg; Fal'ko, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We report the self-catalysed growth of InAs nanowires (NWs) on graphite thin films using molecular beam epitaxy via a droplet-assisted technique. Through optimising metal droplets, we obtained vertically aligned InAs NWs with highly uniform diameter along their entire length. In comparison with conventional InAs NWs grown on Si (111), the graphite surface led to significant effects on the NWs geometry grown on it, i.e. larger diameter, shorter length with lower number density, which were ascribed to the absence of dangling bonds on the graphite surface. The axial growth rate of the NWs has a strong dependence on growth time, which increases quickly in the beginning then slows down after the NWs reach a length of approximately 0.8 μm. This is attributed to the combined axial growth contributions from the surface impingement and sidewall impingement together with the desorption of adatoms during the diffusion. The growth of InAs NWs on graphite was proposed following a vapour-solid mechanism. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the NW has a mixture of pure zinc-blende and wurtzite insertions.

  18. Dislocation-driven CdS and CdSe nanowire growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haoyu; Meng, Fei; Li, Linsen; Jin, Song; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2012-05-22

    We report the synthesis of CdS and CdSe nanowires (NWs) and nanoribbons (NRs) with gold catalysts by H(2)-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Nanopods and nanocones were obtained without catalysts at higher system pressure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies, including two-beam TEM and displaced-aperture dark-field TEM characterization, were used to investigate the NW growth mechanism. Dislocation contrast and twist contours have been routinely observed within the synthesized one-dimensional (1D) CdS and CdSe NWs, suggesting the operation of the dislocation-driven NW growth mechanism under our experimental conditions. The Burgers vectors of dislocations and the associated Eshelby twists were measured and quantified. We hypothesize that gold nanoparticles provide nucleation sites to initiate the growth of CdS/CdSe NWs and lead to the formation of dislocations that continue to drive and sustain 1D growth at a low supersaturation level. Our study suggests that the dislocation-driven mechanism may also contribute to the growth of other 1D nanomaterials that are commonly considered to grow via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism.

  19. Spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic method for in-situ evaluation of mechanical properties during the growth of a C - Pt composite nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Amit; Banerjee, S. S., E-mail: satyajit@iitk.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, 208016 (India)

    2014-05-15

    A core-shell type C-Pt composite nanowire is fabricated using focused ion and electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Using information from spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectra, we detect the resonance vibration in the C-Pt composite nanowire. We use this method to measure the Young's moduli of the constituents (C, Pt) of the composite nanowire and also estimate the density of the FEB CVD grown Pt shell surrounding the C core. By measuring the resonance characteristics of the composite nanowire we estimate a Pt shell growth rate of ∼0.9 nms{sup −1}. The study is analyzed to suggest that the Pt shell growth mechanism is primarily governed by the sticking coefficient of the organometallic vapor on the C nanowire core.

  20. Wafer-scale high-throughput ordered growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yaguang; Wu, Wenzhuo; Guo, Rui; Yuan, Dajun; Das, Suman; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2010-09-01

    This article presents an effective approach for patterned growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays with high throughput and low cost at wafer scale without using cleanroom technology. Periodic hole patterns are generated using laser interference lithography on substrates coated with the photoresist SU-8. ZnO NWs are selectively grown through the holes via a low-temperature hydrothermal method without using a catalyst and with a superior control over orientation, location/density, and as-synthesized morphology. The development of textured ZnO seed layers for replacing single crystalline GaN and ZnO substrates extends the large-scale fabrication of vertically aligned ZnO NW arrays on substrates of other materials, such as polymers, Si, and glass. This combined approach demonstrates a novel method of manufacturing large-scale patterned one-dimensional nanostructures on various substrates for applications in energy harvesting, sensing, optoelectronics, and electronic devices.

  1. Mo2C nanowires and nanoribbons on Si by two-step vapor-phase growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakalakos, L.; Rahmane, M.; Larsen, M.; Gao, Y.; Denault, L.; Wilson, P.; Balch, J.

    2005-08-01

    Transition-metal carbides in bulk form have historically been of technological interest primarily due to their excellent mechanical and refractory properties. As electronic materials these ceramic compounds are also particularly intriguing in that their electrical resistivity is relatively low compared to other ceramics and shows metallic temperature-dependent behavior. Some compositions also have superconducting transitions temperatures above 10°K. However, the synthesis of such materials in the form of one-dimensional nanostructures, which may be of interest for various nanoelectronic applications, is relatively difficult due to their refractory nature (Tmelt⩾2000°C). Here we report the synthesis of well-defined Mo2C nanowires and ribbons using a two-step approach in which we catalytically grow metal oxide nanostructures followed by in situ carburization. The growth mechanisms, microstructure, and initial electrical property measurements are discussed.

  2. A non-catalytic vapor growth regime for organohalide perovskite nanowires using anodic aluminum oxide templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Waleed, Aashir; Gu, Leilei; Zhang, Daquan; Tavakoli, Rouhollah; Lei, Bingbing; Su, Wenjun; Fang, Fang; Fan, Zhiyong

    2017-05-11

    In this work, a novel and facile synthesis process to fabricate single crystalline organometal halide perovskite nanowires has been successfully developed. Nanowires were grown in a high density ordered array from metal nanoclusters inside anodic aluminum oxide templates using a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. Specifically, perovskite NWs were grown as a result of the reaction between methylammonium iodide (MAI) and the Pb/Sn (Pb or Sn) metal in anodic aluminum oxide templates under optimal conditions. The characterization results show that there is a reaction zone at the interface between the perovskite material and metal, at the bottom of the anodic aluminum oxide nanochannels. In order to sustain perovskite NW growth, MAI molecules have to diffuse downward through the perovskite NWs to reach the reaction zone. In fact, the reaction is facilitated by the formation of an intermediate product of the metal iodide compound. This suggests that the Pb/Sn metal is converted to PbI2/SnI2 first and then perovskite NWs are formed as a result of the reaction between MAI and PbI2/SnI2 through a vapor-solid-solid process. The optical characterization results demonstrate that the as-synthesized NWs with an ultra-high nanostructure density can serve as ideal candidates for optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells, light-emitting didoes, photodetectors, etc. And the reported growth approach here is highly versatile combining the merits of excellent controllability, cost-effectiveness and tunability on material composition and physical properties.

  3. Solid source growth of Si oxide nanowires promoted by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Congxiang [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Wen-wen; Wang, Xingli [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Li, Xiaocheng [Laboratory of clean energy chemistry and materials, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Tan, Chong Wei [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Tay, Beng Kang, E-mail: ebktay@ntu.edu.sg [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Coquet, Philippe [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • An array of well aligned and uniform CNTs is successfully fabricated by PECVD. • SiONW growth utilizes Si substrate as the source, ruling out the usage of silane. • With CNT array on the substrate, SiONW growth is improved significantly. • CNTs help dispersion of the catalysts and diffusion of the Si atoms. - Abstract: We report a method to promote solid source growth of Si oxide nanowires (SiONWs) by using an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It starts with the fabrication of CNT array by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on Si wafers, followed by growth of SiONWs. Herein, CNTs serve as a scaffold, which helps the dispersion of catalysts for SiONWs and also provides space for hydrogen which boosts the diffusion of Si atoms and hence formation of SiONWs. As the result, a three dimensional (3D) hybrid network of densely packed SiONWs and CNTs can be produced rapidly.

  4. Growth of SiC nanowires using oil palm empty fruit bunch fibres infiltrated with tetraethyl orthosilicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiew, Y. L.; Cheong, K. Y.

    2012-07-01

    SiC nanowires were produced by pyrolyzing oil palm empty fruit bunch fibres infiltrated with tetraethyl orthosilicate. The effects of the concentration of TEOS (10%, 50% and 100%) and the pyrolysis temperatures (1250 °C, 1300 °C, 1350 °C and 1400 °C) were studied. An increase in TEOS concentration led to an increment in silica content. However, when TEOS was infiltrated into the fibres, the small sizes of the lumens in the oil palm fibres and low fluidity of TEOS resulted in lower amount of silica deposited onto the surface when the concentration was increased to 100%. This in turn resulted in a lower yield of SiC nanowires at higher TEOS concentration. When pyrolysis temperature was raised, there was a decrease in diameter but the lengths of nanowires reached tens of μm. The growth of the nanowires was attributed to the combination of solid-state reaction and vapour-solid growth mechanisms.

  5. Embedded Nanowire Network Growth and Node Device Fabrication for GaAs-Based High-Density Hexagonal Binary Decision Diagram Quantum Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takahiro; Tamai, Isao; Kasai, Seiya; Sato, Taketomo; Hasegawa, Hideki; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2006-04-01

    The basic feasibility of constructing hexagonal binary decision diagram (BDD) quantum circuits on GaAs-based selectively grown (SG) nanowires was investigated from viewpoints of electrical connections through embedded nanowires and electrical uniformity of devices formed on nanowires. For this, - and -oriented nanowires and hexagonal network structures combining these nanowires were formed on (001) GaAs substrates by selective molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth. The width and vertical position of the nanowires could be controlled by growth conditions for both - and -directions. By current-voltage (I-V) measurements, good electrical connection was confirmed at the node point where vertical alignment of embedded GaAs nanowire pieces was found to be important. SG quantum wire (QWR) switches formed on the nanowires showed good gate control over a wide temperature range with clear conductance quantization at low temperatures. Good device uniformities were obtained on the test chips, providing a good prospect for future integration. BDD node devices using SG QWR switches showed clear path switching characteristics. Estimated power-delay product values were very small, confirming the feasibility of ultra low-power operation of future circuits.

  6. Growth and photoluminescence of Si-SiOx nanowires by catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yue [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Luo, Ruiying, E-mail: ryluo@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanxi University of Technology, Hanzhong 723000 (China); Shang, Haidong [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The Si-SiOx NWs were successfully synthesized via a one-step catalyst-free CVD method using TEOS as the precursor. • The Si-SiOx NWs had a core–shell structure with Si as the inner crystalline cores and SiOx as the outer amorphous layer. • The formation of Si-SiOx NWs was implemented by the non-classical crystallization mechanism. • The Si-SiOx NWs spontaneously self-assembled from the building block of charged nanoparticles. • The Si-SiOx NWs showed their potential applications in UV emission and visible light emission devices. - Abstract: We developed a one-step catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition process to synthesize Si-SiOx nanowires using tetraethoxysilane as the precursor. Observations using scanning electron microscopy showed that the Si-SiOx nanowires were 20–50 nm in diameter and tens of microns in length. The high-resolution transmission electron microscope analysis and X-ray diffraction demonstrated that the nanowires consisted of crystal silicon and amorphous SiOx. The Si and O with an atomic ratio of the Si-SiOx NWs were 1:1.2 according to the energy dispersion X-ray spectroscope. A systematic study on the effect of the growth conditions, such as reaction temperature, the reaction time, and the TEOS vapor flow rate was performed. The formation of Si-SiOx nanowires was implemented by the non-classical crystallization mechanism. The charged nanoparticles acting as building blocks self-assembled into nanowires. The photoluminescence measurements were carried out and showed that the Si-SiOx nanowires emitted stable ultraviolet and green luminescence excited by ultraviolet light.

  7. Chromium inhibition and size-selected Au nanocluster catalysis for the solution growth of low-density ZnO nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Vito Errico; Giuseppe Arrabito; Plant, Simon R.; Pier Gianni Medaglia; Palmer, Richard E.; Christian Falconi

    2015-01-01

    The wet chemical synthesis of nanostructures has many crucial advantages over high-temperature methods, including simplicity, low-cost, and deposition on almost arbitrary substrates. Nevertheless, the density-controlled solution growth of nanowires still remains a challenge, especially at the low densities (e.g. 1 to 10 nanowires/100 μm2) required, as an example, for intracellular analyses. Here, we demonstrate the solution-growth of ZnO nanowires using a thin chromium film as a nucleation in...

  8. Intrinsic quantum dots in InAs nanowires; Intrinsische Quantenpunkte in InAs-Nanodraehten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Karl Martin Darius

    2013-07-22

    This work deals with InAs nanowire field effect transistors in back gate configuration. In such devices, quantum dots can form at low temperatures in the order of magnitude of a few Kelvin. These dots are henceforth referred to as intrinsic as they are not intentionally defined by electrodes. For the interpretation of their stability diagrams, a thorough knowledge of the structure and transport properties of the nanowires is required. Therefore, first of all, the influence of growth method and doping on the transport properties is studied at room temperature. The wires are grown by two types of metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy: a selective-area (SA-MOVPE) and an Au-catalyzed vapour-liquid-solid method (VLS-MOVPE). Transport data shows that the background doping of VLS-MOVPE wires is higher than for SA-MOVPE wires, but the variability of the transport properties is lower. The polytypism of the SA-MOVPE wires (they are composed of wurtzite and zinc blende segments) is a possible explanation for the second observation. Furthermore, it is shown that the measured transport properties significantly depend on the dielectric environment of the nanowires and on the way the electrical measurements are done (two- or four-terminal configuration). The conductivity is tunable via doping and the gate voltage. Conductivity measurements in the temperature range from 10 K to 300 K show that different transport regimes can occur (partially metallic behaviour for sufficiently high conductivity, otherwise purely semiconducting behaviour). This is attributed to different positions of the Fermi level and thus, a different effect of potential fluctuations. If conductivity and temperature are sufficiently low, the onset of Coulomb blockade is observed for semiconducting samples. It is even possible to tune the very same sample to different regimes via the gate voltage. The semiconducting behaviour observed in many samples contradicts the Thomas-Fermi theory. This is attributed to the

  9. Zn-catalytic growth and photoluminescence properties of branched MgO nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Mass production of uniform MgO nanostructures has been achieved by a thermal evaporation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses show the product is composed of pure single-crystalline MgO. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterizations show that the MgO branched nanostructures consist of many slim nanowires growing from the thick MgO rods. The as-synthesized nanowires have a length of several tens of microns and a diameter of several tens of nanometers. The preferred growth direction of the nanowires is [001]. Many nanowires are found to have a dendritic structure and temperature grade is thought to be the main cause of the growth of this structure. Zn nanoparticles scattered on the surface of the MgO rods are thought to be the catalyst of the VLS (vapor-liquid-solid) growth of the MgO nanowires. Room-temperature photoluminescence measurements show that the synthesized MgO nanostructures have a strong emission band at 401 nm and a weak emission band at 502 nm.

  10. Selective growth and ordering of SiGe nanowires for band gap engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkouider, A; Ronda, A; Gouyé, A; Herrier, C; Favre, L; Lockwood, D J; Rowell, N L; Delobbe, A; Sudraud, P; Berbezier, I

    2014-08-22

    Selective growth and self-organization of silicon-germanium (SiGe) nanowires (NWs) on focused ion beam (FIB) patterned Si(111) substrates is reported. In its first step, the process involves the selective synthesis of Au catalysts in SiO₂-free areas; its second step involves the preferential nucleation and growth of SiGe NWs on the catalysts. The selective synthesis process is based on a simple, room-temperature reduction of gold salts (Au³⁺Cl₄⁻) in aqueous solution, which provides well-organized Au catalysts. By optimizing the reduction process, we are able to generate a bidimensional regular array of Au catalysts with self-limited sizes positioned in SiO₂-free windows opened in a SiO₂/Si(111) substrate by FIB patterning. Such Au catalysts subsequently serve as preferential nucleation and growth sites of well-organized NWs. Furthermore, these NWs with tunable position and size exhibit the relevant features and bright luminescence that would find several applications in optoelectronic nanodevices.

  11. A review on III–V core–multishell nanowires: growth, properties, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo, Miquel; De Luca, Marta; Rurali, Riccardo; Zardo, Ilaria

    2017-04-01

    This review focuses on the emerging field of core–multishell (CMS) semiconductor nanowires (NWs). In these kinds of wires, a NW grown vertically on a substrate acts as a template for the coaxial growth of two or more layers wrapped around it. Thanks to the peculiar geometry, the strain is partially released along the radial direction, thus allowing the creation of fascinating heterostructures, even based on lattice mismatched materials that would hardly grow in a planar geometry. Enabling the unique bridging of the 1D nature of NWs with the exciting properties of 2D heterostructures, these novel systems are becoming attractive for material science, as well as fundamental and applied physics. We will focus on NWs made of III–V and III–V-based alloys as they represent a model system in which present growth techniques have reached a high degree of control on the material structural properties, and many physical properties have been assessed, from both the theoretical and experimental points of view. In particular, we provide an overview on the growth methods and structural properties of CMS NWs, on the modulation doping mechanisms enabled by these heterostructures, on the effects of a magnetic field, and on the phononic and optical properties typical of CMS NWs. Moreover, we review the main technological applications based on these systems, such as optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  12. Growth of highly bright-white silica nanowires as diffusive reflection coating in LED lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Shuang; Shi, Tielin; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Dan; Lai, Wuxing; Tang, Zirong

    2011-12-19

    Large quantities of silica nanowires were synthesized through thermal treatment of silicon wafer in the atmosphere of N(2)/H(2)(5%) under 1200 °C with Cu as catalyst. These nanowires grew to form a natural bright-white mat, which showed highly diffusive reflectivity over the UV-visible range, with more than 60% at the whole range and up to 88% at 350 nm. The utilization of silica nanowires in diffusive coating on the reflector cup of LED is demonstrated, which shows greatly improved light distribution comparing with the specular reflector cup. It is expected that these nanowires can be promising coating material for optoelectronic applications.

  13. In-Plane Si Nanowire Growth Mechanism in Absence of External Si Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiotto, Stefano; Leroy, Frédéric; Cheynis, Fabien; Müller, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    We report on a new mechanism of nanowire formation: during Au deposition on Si(110) substrates, Au-Si droplets grow, move spontaneously, and fabricate a Si nanowire behind them in the absence of Si external flux. Nanowires are formed by Si dissolved from the substrate at the advancing front of the droplets and transported backward to the crystallization front. The droplet shape is determined by the Si etching anisotropy. The nanowire formation can be tuned by changing experimental parameters like substrate temperature and Au deposition rate.

  14. Compared growth mechanisms of Zn-polar ZnO nanowires on O-polar ZnO and on sapphire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillat-Merceroz, G; Thierry, R; Jouneau, P H; Ferret, P; Feuillet, G

    2012-03-30

    Controlling the growth of zinc oxide nanowires is necessary to optimize the performance of nanowire-based devices such as photovoltaic solar cells, nano-generators, or light-emitting diodes. With this in mind, we investigate the nucleation and growth mechanisms of ZnO nanowires grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy either on O-polar ZnO or on sapphire substrates. Whatever the substrate, ZnO nanowires are Zn-polar, as demonstrated by convergent beam electron diffraction. For growth on O-polar ZnO substrate, the nanowires are found to sit on O-polar pyramids. As growth proceeds, the inversion domain boundary moves up in order to remain at the top of the O-polar pyramids. For growth on sapphire substrates, the nanowires may also originate from the sapphire/ZnO interface. The presence of atomic steps and the non-polar character of sapphire could be the cause of the Zn-polar crystal nucleation on sapphire, whereas it is proposed that the segregation of aluminum impurities could account for the nucleation of inverted domains for growth on O-polar ZnO.

  15. Essential role of catalysts (Mn, Au, and Sn) in the vapor liquid solid growth kinematics of ZnS nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, S.; Shehzad, M. A.; Hafeez, M.; Bhatti, A. S., E-mail: asbhatti@comsats.edu.pk [Center for Micro and Nano Devices (CMND), Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-01-14

    In this paper, we demonstrate that surface energy of the catalyst is a vital parameter for the growth rate, self doping of the self assembled nanowires synthesized by employing vapor liquid solid growth technique. The synthesis of ZnS nanowires was done by selectively using three different catalysts (Mn, Au, and Sn), where Au, is the most common catalyst, was used as a reference. The distinctive difference in the growth rate was due to the surface energy of the metal alloy droplet and the interface energies, as explained theoretically using thermodynamic approach. We have found that the activation energy of diffusion of (Zn, S) species in the catalyst droplet was low in Sn (0.41 eV for Zn and 0.13 eV for S) and high in Mn (1.79 eV for Zn and 0.61 eV for S) compared to Au (0.62 eV for Zn and 0.21 eV for S) catalyzed ZnS nanostructures. The thermodynamic calculations predicted the growth rates of Sn (7.5 nm/s) catalyzed nanowires was faster than Au (5.1 nm/s) and Mn (4.6 nm/s) catalyzed ZnS nanostructures, which were in agreement with the experimental results. Finally, the location of the catalyst as dopant in the grown nanostructure was predicted and compared with experimental observations.

  16. 直流电弧自催化合成β-SiC纳米线%Self-catalytic Synthesis of β-SiC Nanowires by Direct Current Arc Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王峰; 王秋实; 崔启良; 张剑; 邹广田

    2009-01-01

    采用C,Si和SiO2为反应原料,利用直流电弧法制备出长直的β-SiC纳米线.纳米线的直径为100~200 nm,长度为10~20 μm,并且沿着方向生长.通过X射线衍射(XRD)、扫描电子显微术(SEM)、透射电子显微术(TEM)、拉曼光谱等手段,对β-SiC纳米线进行表征.探讨了β-SiC纳米线自催化气-液-固(VLS)生长机制.%Straight and long β-SiC nanowires were synthesized in direct current arc discharge using a mixture of graphite, silicon, and silicon dioxide as the precursor. The diameter of the nanowires is 100~200 nm, and the length is about 10~20 μm. The axis of the nanowire is preferentially along the direction. The morphology and structure of the nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD), scanning electron microscopy(SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The β-SiC nanowires are suggested to be formed via a self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism.

  17. A new architecture for self-organized silicon nanowire growth integrated on a left angle 100 right angle silicon substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttard, D. [Universite Joseph Fourier/IUT-1, Grenoble (France); David, T.; Gentile, P. [CEA-Grenoble/SiNaPS-MINATEC, Grenoble (France); Hertog, M. den; Rouviere, J.L. [CEA-Grenoble/LEMMA-MINATEC, Grenoble (France); Baron, T. [CNRS/LTM, Grenoble (France); Ferret, P. [CEA-DRT/CEA-Grenoble/DOPT, Grenoble (France)

    2008-07-15

    A lithography-independent method for achieving self-organized growth of silicon nanowires by means of a Chemical-Vapor-Deposition process is investigated using a nanoporous alumina template on a left angle 100 right angle oriented silicon substrate. The position of the nanowires is determined by the location of gold colloids, acting as catalysts, which are initially deposited at the bottom of the pores over large areas of the sample. The direction of growth is guided by the pore axis, which is perpendicular to the silicon substrate surface. Results from scanning and transmission electron microscopy are presented and discussed. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Stability of Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, F.; Schiek, M.; Wallmann, I.;

    2011-01-01

    The morphological stability of organic nanowires over time and under thermal load is of major importance for their use in any device. In this study the growth and stability of organic nanowires from a naphthyl end-capped thiophene grown by organic molecular beam deposition is investigated via...... atomic force microscopy (AFM). Aging experiments under ambient conditions already show substantial morphological changes. Nanoscopic organic clusters, which initially coexist with the nanowires, vanish within hours. Thermal annealing of nanowire samples leads to even more pronounced morphology changes......, such as a strong decrease in nanowire number density, a strong increase in nanowire height, and the formation of new types of crystallites. This happens even before sublimation of organic material starts. These experiments also shine new light on the formation process of the nanowires....

  19. Realizing Zinc Blende GaAs/A1GaAs Axial and Radial Heterostructure Nanowires by Tuning the Growth Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingwei Guo; Hui Huang; Xiaomin Ren; Xin Yan; Shiwei Cai; Wei Wang; Yongqing Huang; Qi Wang; Xia Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Vertical zinc blende GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure nanowires were grown at different temperatures by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition via Au-assisted vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. It was found that radial growth can be enhanced by increasing the growth temperature. The growth of radial heterostructure can be realized at temperature higher than 500℃, while the growth temperature of axial heterostructure is lower than 440℃. The room temperature photoluminescence properties of the nanowires were investigated and the relevant growth mechanism was discussed.

  20. The use of SiC/Si(111) hybrid substrate for MBE growth of GaN nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, R. R.; Kotlyar, K. P.; Ilkiv, I. V.; Soshnikov, I. P.; Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.; Nikitina, E. V.; Cirlin, G. E.

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates the possibility of using a silicon substrate with nanoscale buffer layer of silicon carbide for growth of GaN nanowires by molecular epitaxy on. Morphological and optical properties of the grown arrays are studied. It is shown that the integral intensity of the photoluminescence of such structures is more than 2 times higher than the best NWs GaN structures without buffer layer of silicon carbide.

  1. Chemical-vapour-deposition growth and electrical characterization of intrinsic silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, B. [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique (LTM)-UMR 5129 CNRS, CEA-Grenoble, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: bassem.salem@cea.fr; Dhalluin, F.; Baron, T. [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique (LTM)-UMR 5129 CNRS, CEA-Grenoble, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Jamgotchian, H.; Bedu, F.; Dallaporta, H. [CRMC-N, Faculte des Sciences de Luminy, Case 913, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Gentile, P.; Pauc, N. [CEA-DRFMC/SiNaPS, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Hertog, M.I. den; Rouviere, J.L. [CEA-DRFMC/SP2M/LEMMA GEM-minatec, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Ferret, P. [CEA-Leti, DOPT, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2009-03-15

    In this work, we present the elaboration and the electrical characterisation of undoped silicon nanowires (SiNWs) which are grown via vapour-liquid-solid mechanism using Au nucleation catalyst and SiH{sub 4} as the silicon source. The nanowires were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. An electrical test structure was realized by a dispersion of the nanowires on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate with photolithography pre-patterned Au/Ti microelectrodes. The connexion is made on a single nanowire using a cross beam plate form allowing scanning electron microscopy imaging and the deposition of tungsten wiring by focussed ion beam deposition. The current-voltage characteristics of the nanowires are linear which indicates an ohmic contact between tungsten allow and SiNWs. The total resistance of the nanowires increases from 135 M{omega} to 5 G{omega} when the diameter decreases from 190 to 130 nm. This effect is may be due to the reduction of the conductive inner volume of the nanowires and to charged defects at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface if we assume that the contact resistance is constant. Moreover, gate-dependent current versus bias voltage measurement show that the nanowires exhibit a field effect response characteristic of a p-type semiconductor.

  2. Central role of the Holliday junction helicase RuvAB in vlsE recombination and infectivity of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Lin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of many infectious bacteria and protozoa including Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. VlsE, a 35 kDa surface-exposed lipoprotein, undergoes antigenic variation during B. burgdorferi infection of mammalian hosts, and is believed to be a critical mechanism by which the spirochetes evade immune clearance. Random, segmental recombination between the expressed vlsE gene and adjacent vls silent cassettes generates a large number of different VlsE variants within the infected host. Although the occurrence and importance of vlsE sequence variation is well established, little is known about the biological mechanism of vlsE recombination. To identify factors important in antigenic variation and vlsE recombination, we screened transposon mutants of genes known to be involved in DNA recombination and repair for their effects on infectivity and vlsE recombination. Several mutants, including those in BB0023 (ruvA, BB0022 (ruvB, BB0797 (mutS, and BB0098 (mutS-II, showed reduced infectivity in immunocompetent C3H/HeN mice. Mutants in ruvA and ruvB exhibited greatly reduced rates of vlsE recombination in C3H/HeN mice, as determined by restriction fragment polymorphism (RFLP screening and DNA sequence analysis. In severe combined immunodeficiency (C3H/scid mice, the ruvA mutant retained full infectivity; however, all recovered clones retained the 'parental' vlsE sequence, consistent with low rates of vlsE recombination. These results suggest that the reduced infectivity of ruvA and ruvB mutants is the result of ineffective vlsE recombination and underscores the important role that vlsE recombination plays in immune evasion. Based on functional studies in other organisms, the RuvAB complex of B. burgdorferi may promote branch migration of Holliday junctions during vlsE recombination. Our findings are consistent with those in the accompanying article by Dresser et al., and together

  3. Detailed analysis of sequence changes occurring during vlsE antigenic variation in the mouse model of Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Coutte

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease Borrelia can infect humans and animals for months to years, despite the presence of an active host immune response. The vls antigenic variation system, which expresses the surface-exposed lipoprotein VlsE, plays a major role in B. burgdorferi immune evasion. Gene conversion between vls silent cassettes and the vlsE expression site occurs at high frequency during mammalian infection, resulting in sequence variation in the VlsE product. In this study, we examined vlsE sequence variation in B. burgdorferi B31 during mouse infection by analyzing 1,399 clones isolated from bladder, heart, joint, ear, and skin tissues of mice infected for 4 to 365 days. The median number of codon changes increased progressively in C3H/HeN mice from 4 to 28 days post infection, and no clones retained the parental vlsE sequence at 28 days. In contrast, the decrease in the number of clones with the parental vlsE sequence and the increase in the number of sequence changes occurred more gradually in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice. Clones containing a stop codon were isolated, indicating that continuous expression of full-length VlsE is not required for survival in vivo; also, these clones continued to undergo vlsE recombination. Analysis of clones with apparent single recombination events indicated that recombinations into vlsE are nonselective with regard to the silent cassette utilized, as well as the length and location of the recombination event. Sequence changes as small as one base pair were common. Fifteen percent of recovered vlsE variants contained "template-independent" sequence changes, which clustered in the variable regions of vlsE. We hypothesize that the increased frequency and complexity of vlsE sequence changes observed in clones recovered from immunocompetent mice (as compared with SCID mice is due to rapid clearance of relatively invariant clones by variable region-specific anti-VlsE antibody responses.

  4. Evaluation of the Importance of VlsE Antigenic Variation for the Enzootic Cycle of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem S Rogovskyy

    Full Text Available Efficient acquisition and transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi by the tick vector, and the ability to persistently infect both vector and host, are important elements for the life cycle of the Lyme disease pathogen. Previous work has provided strong evidence implicating the significance of the vls locus for B. burgdorferi persistence. However, studies involving vls mutant clones have thus far only utilized in vitro-grown or host-adapted spirochetes and laboratory strains of mice. Additionally, the effects of vls mutation on tick acquisition and transmission has not yet been tested. Thus, the importance of VlsE antigenic variation for persistent infection of the natural reservoir host, and for the B. burgdorferi enzootic life cycle in general, has not been examined to date. In the current work, Ixodes scapularis and Peromyscus maniculatus were infected with different vls mutant clones to study the importance of the vls locus for the enzootic cycle of the Lyme disease pathogen. The findings highlight the significance of the vls system for long-term infection of the natural reservoir host, and show that VlsE antigenic variability is advantageous for efficient tick acquisition of B. burgdorferi from the mammalian reservoir. The data also indicate that the adaptation state of infecting spirochetes influences B. burgdorferi avoidance from host antibodies, which may be in part due to its respective VlsE expression levels. Overall, the current findings provide the most direct evidence on the importance of VlsE for the enzootic cycle of Lyme disease spirochetes, and underscore the significance of VlsE antigenic variation for maintaining B. burgdorferi in nature.

  5. Evaluation of the Importance of VlsE Antigenic Variation for the Enzootic Cycle of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogovskyy, Artem S; Casselli, Timothy; Tourand, Yvonne; Jones, Cami R; Owen, Jeb P; Mason, Kathleen L; Scoles, Glen A; Bankhead, Troy

    2015-01-01

    Efficient acquisition and transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi by the tick vector, and the ability to persistently infect both vector and host, are important elements for the life cycle of the Lyme disease pathogen. Previous work has provided strong evidence implicating the significance of the vls locus for B. burgdorferi persistence. However, studies involving vls mutant clones have thus far only utilized in vitro-grown or host-adapted spirochetes and laboratory strains of mice. Additionally, the effects of vls mutation on tick acquisition and transmission has not yet been tested. Thus, the importance of VlsE antigenic variation for persistent infection of the natural reservoir host, and for the B. burgdorferi enzootic life cycle in general, has not been examined to date. In the current work, Ixodes scapularis and Peromyscus maniculatus were infected with different vls mutant clones to study the importance of the vls locus for the enzootic cycle of the Lyme disease pathogen. The findings highlight the significance of the vls system for long-term infection of the natural reservoir host, and show that VlsE antigenic variability is advantageous for efficient tick acquisition of B. burgdorferi from the mammalian reservoir. The data also indicate that the adaptation state of infecting spirochetes influences B. burgdorferi avoidance from host antibodies, which may be in part due to its respective VlsE expression levels. Overall, the current findings provide the most direct evidence on the importance of VlsE for the enzootic cycle of Lyme disease spirochetes, and underscore the significance of VlsE antigenic variation for maintaining B. burgdorferi in nature.

  6. Selective-Area MOCVD Growth and Carrier-Transport-Type Control of InAs(Sb)/GaSb Core-Shell Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xianghai; Yang, Xiaoguang; Du, Wenna; Pan, Huayong; Yang, Tao

    2016-12-14

    We report the first selective-area growth of high quality InAs(Sb)/GaSb core-shell nanowires on Si substrates using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) without foreign catalysts. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis reveals that the overgrowth of the GaSb shell is highly uniform and coherent with the InAs(Sb) core without any misfit dislocations. To control the structural properties and reduce the planar defect density in the self-catalyzed InAs core nanowires, a trace amount of Sb was introduced during their growth. As the Sb content increases from 0 to 9.4%, the crystal structure of the nanowires changes from a mixed wurtzite (WZ)/zinc-blende (ZB) structure to a perfect ZB phase. Electrical measurements reveal that both the n-type InAsSb core and p-type GaSb shell can work as active carrier transport channels, and the transport type of core-shell nanowires can be tuned by the GaSb shell thickness and back-gate voltage. This study furthers our understanding of the Sb-induced crystal-phase control of nanowires. Furthermore, the high quality InAs(Sb)/GaSb core-shell nanowire arrays obtained here pave the foundation for the fabrication of the vertical nanowire-based devices on a large scale and for the study of fundamental quantum physics.

  7. Native-oxide-based selective area growth of InP nanowires via metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy mediated by surface diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahorra, Yonatan; Greenberg, Yaakov; Cohen, Shimon; Ritter, Dan

    2012-06-22

    The growth of InP nanowires on an InP(111) B substrate is reported. The substrate native oxide was not removed from the surface prior to growth. Nanowires were grown at 400 °C from gold catalysts in a selective area manner, without bulk growth. Unlike SiO(2)-based metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy selective area growth, the growth reported here is mediated by surface diffusion with a characteristic diffusion length of 4 μm, about an order of magnitude larger than values for diffusion on bare substrates. A pre-growth heating treatment at 450 °C was found to increase the yield of nanowire nucleation from the gold catalysts.

  8. Self-assembled growth of GaN nanowires on amorphous Al x O y : from nucleation to the formation of dense nanowire ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobanska, M; Fernández-Garrido, S; Zytkiewicz, Z R; Tchutchulashvili, G; Gieraltowska, S; Brandt, O; Geelhaar, L

    2016-08-12

    We present a comprehensive description of the self-assembled nucleation and growth of GaN nanowires (NWs) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on amorphous Al x O y buffers (a-Al x O y ) prepared by atomic layer deposition. The results are compared with those obtained on nitridated Si(111). Using line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry, we analyze in situ the incorporation of Ga starting from the incubation and nucleation stages till the formation of the final nanowire ensemble and observe qualitatively the same time dependence for the two types of substrates. However, on a-Al x O y the incubation time is shorter and the nucleation faster than on nitridated Si. Moreover, on a-Al x O y we observe a novel effect of decrease in incorporated Ga flux for long growth durations which we explain by coalescence of NWs leading to reduction of the GaN surface area where Ga may reside. Dedicated samples are used to analyze the evolution of surface morphology. In particular, no GaN nuclei are detected when growth is interrupted during the incubation stage. Moreover, for a-Al x O y , the same shape transition from spherical cap-shaped GaN crystallites to the NW-like geometry is found as it is known for nitridated Si. However, while the critical radius for this transition is only slightly larger for a-Al x O y than for nitridated Si, the critical height is more than six times larger for a-Al x O y . Finally, we observe that in fully developed NW ensembles, the substrate no longer influences growth kinetics and the same N-limited axial growth rate is measured on both substrates. We conclude that the same nucleation and growth processes take place on a-Al x O y as on nitridated Si and that these processes are of a general nature. Quantitatively, nucleation proceeds somewhat differently, which indicates the influence of the substrate, but once shadowing limits growth processes to the upper part of the NW ensemble, they are not affected anymore by the type of substrate.

  9. Electrochemical growth of Co nanowires in ultra-high aspect ratio InP membranes: FFT-impedance spectroscopy of the growth process and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical growth of Co nanowires in ultra-high aspect ratio InP membranes has been investigated by fast Fourier transform-impedance spectroscopy (FFT-IS) in the frequency range from 75 Hz to 18.5 kHz. The impedance data could be fitted very well using an electric circuit equivalent model with a series resistance connected in series to a simple resistor-capacitor (RC) element and a Maxwell element. Based on the impedance data, the Co deposition in ultra-high aspect ratio InP membranes can be divided into two different Co deposition processes. The corresponding share of each process on the overall Co deposition can be determined directly from the transfer resistances of the two processes. The impedance data clearly show the beneficial impact of boric acid on the Co deposition and also indicate a diffusion limitation of boric acid in ultra-high aspect ratio InP membranes. The grown Co nanowires are polycrystalline with a very small grain size. They show a narrow hysteresis loop with a preferential orientation of the easy magnetization direction along the long nanowire axis due to the arising shape anisotropy of the Co nanowires. PMID:25050088

  10. Electrochemical growth of Co nanowires in ultra-high aspect ratio InP membranes: FFT-impedance spectroscopy of the growth process and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerngross, Mark-Daniel; Carstensen, Jürgen; Föll, Helmut

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical growth of Co nanowires in ultra-high aspect ratio InP membranes has been investigated by fast Fourier transform-impedance spectroscopy (FFT-IS) in the frequency range from 75 Hz to 18.5 kHz. The impedance data could be fitted very well using an electric circuit equivalent model with a series resistance connected in series to a simple resistor-capacitor ( RC) element and a Maxwell element. Based on the impedance data, the Co deposition in ultra-high aspect ratio InP membranes can be divided into two different Co deposition processes. The corresponding share of each process on the overall Co deposition can be determined directly from the transfer resistances of the two processes. The impedance data clearly show the beneficial impact of boric acid on the Co deposition and also indicate a diffusion limitation of boric acid in ultra-high aspect ratio InP membranes. The grown Co nanowires are polycrystalline with a very small grain size. They show a narrow hysteresis loop with a preferential orientation of the easy magnetization direction along the long nanowire axis due to the arising shape anisotropy of the Co nanowires.

  11. Influence of the oxide layer for growth of self-assisted InAs nanowires on Si(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aagesen Martin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growth of self-assisted InAs nanowires (NWs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE on Si(111 is studied for different growth parameters and substrate preparations. The thickness of the oxide layer present on the Si(111 surface is observed to play a dominant role. Systematic use of different pre-treatment methods provides information on the influence of the oxide on the NW morphology and growth rates, which can be used for optimizing the growth conditions. We show that it is possible to obtain 100% growth of vertical NWs and no parasitic bulk structures between the NWs by optimizing the oxide thickness. For a growth temperature of 460°C and a V/III ratio of 320 an optimum oxide thickness of 9 ± 3 Å is found.

  12. Position-controlled growth of GaN nanowires and nanotubes on diamond by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Fabian; Hetzl, Martin; Weiszer, Saskia; Garrido, Jose A; de la Mata, María; Magen, Cesar; Arbiol, Jordi; Stutzmann, Martin

    2015-03-11

    In this work the position-controlled growth of GaN nanowires (NWs) on diamond by means of molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. In terms of growth, diamond can be seen as a model substrate, providing information of systematic relevance also for other substrates. Thin Ti masks are structured by electron beam lithography which allows the fabrication of perfectly homogeneous GaN NW arrays with different diameters and distances. While the wurtzite NWs are found to be Ga-polar, N-polar nucleation leads to the formation of tripod structures with a zinc-blende core which can be efficiently suppressed above a substrate temperature of 870 °C. A variation of the III/V flux ratio reveals that both axial and radial growth rates are N-limited despite the globally N-rich growth conditions, which is explained by the different diffusion behavior of Ga and N atoms. Furthermore, it is shown that the hole arrangement has no effect on the selectivity but can be used to force a transition from nanowire to nanotube growth by employing a highly competitive growth regime.

  13. Wafer-Scale High-Throughput Ordered Growth of Vertically Aligned ZnO Nanowire Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Yaguang

    2010-09-08

    This article presents an effective approach for patterned growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays with high throughput and low cost at wafer scale without using cleanroom technology. Periodic hole patterns are generated using laser interference lithography on substrates coated with the photoresist SU-8. ZnO NWs are selectively grown through the holes via a low-temperature hydrothermal method without using a catalyst and with a superior control over orientation, location/density, and as-synthesized morphology. The development of textured ZnO seed layers for replacing single crystalline GaN and ZnO substrates extends the large-scale fabrication of vertically aligned ZnO NW arrays on substrates of other materials, such as polymers, Si, and glass. This combined approach demonstrates a novel method of manufacturing large-scale patterned one-dimensional nanostructures on various substrates for applications in energy harvesting, sensing, optoelectronics, and electronic devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Growth and Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion of Wurtzite Indium Phosphide Nanowire Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornienko, Nikolay; Gibson, Natalie A; Zhang, Hao; Eaton, Samuel W; Yu, Yi; Aloni, Shaul; Leone, Stephen R; Yang, Peidong

    2016-05-24

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen is a promising strategy to absorb solar energy and directly convert it into a dense storage medium in the form of chemical bonds. The continual development and improvement of individual components of PEC systems is critical toward increasing the solar to fuel efficiency of prototype devices. Within this context, we describe a study on the growth of wurtzite indium phosphide (InP) nanowire (NW) arrays on silicon substrates and their subsequent implementation as light-absorbing photocathodes in PEC cells. The high onset potential (0.6 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode) and photocurrent (18 mA/cm(2)) of the InP photocathodes render them as promising building blocks for high performance PEC cells. As a proof of concept for overall system integration, InP photocathodes were combined with a nanoporous bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) photoanode to generate an unassisted solar water splitting efficiency of 0.5%.

  15. Electrodeposition of InSb branched nanowires: Controlled growth with structurally tailored properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Suprem R.; Mohammad, Asaduzzaman; Janes, David B., E-mail: janes@ecn.purdue.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Akatay, Cem [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Alam, Muhammad A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Maeda, Kosuke [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta–cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Deacon, Russell S.; Ishibashi, Koji [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chen, Yong P. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Sands, Timothy D. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    In this article, electrodeposition method is used to demonstrate growth of InSb nanowire (NW) arrays with hierarchical branched structures and complex morphology at room temperature using an all-solution, catalyst-free technique. A gold coated, porous anodic alumina membrane provided the template for the branched NWs. The NWs have a hierarchical branched structure, with three nominal regions: a “trunk” (average diameter of 150 nm), large branches (average diameter of 100 nm), and small branches (average diameter of sub-10 nm to sub-20 nm). The structural properties of the branched NWs were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. In the as-grown state, the small branches of InSb NWs were crystalline, but the trunk regions were mostly nanocrystalline with an amorphous boundary. Post-annealing of NWs at 420 °C in argon produced single crystalline structures along 〈311〉 directions for the branches and along 〈111〉 for the trunks. Based on the high crystallinity and tailored structure in this branched NW array, the effective refractive index allows us to achieve excellent antireflection properties signifying its technological usefulness for photon management and energy harvesting.

  16. Modeling of the growth of GaAs–AlGaAs core–shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhees, Peter W; Davis, Stephen H

    2017-01-01

    Heterostructured GaAs–AlGaAs core–shell nanowires with have attracted much attention because of their significant advantages and great potential for creating high performance nanophotonics and nanoelectronics. The spontaneous formation of Al-rich stripes along certain crystallographic directions and quantum dots near the apexes of the shell are observed in AlGaAs shells. Controlling the formation of these core–shell heterostructures remains challenging. A two-dimensional model valid on the wire cross section, that accounts for capillarity in the faceted surface limit and deposition has been developed for the evolution of the shell morphology and concentration in AlxGa1− xAs alloys. The model includes a completely faceted shell–vapor interface. The objective is to understand the mechanisms of the formation of the radial heterostructures (Al-rich stripes and Al-poor quantum dots) in the nanowire shell. There are two issues that need to be understood. One is the mechanism responsible for the morphological evolution of the shells. Analysis and simulation results suggest that deposition introduces facets not present on the equilibrium Wulff shapes. A balance between diffusion and deposition yields the small facets with sizes varying slowly over time, which yield stripe structures, whereas deposition-dominated growth can lead to quantum-dot structures observed in experiments. There is no self-limiting facet size in this case. The other issue is the mechanism responsible for the segregation of Al atoms in the shells. It is found that the mobility difference of the atoms on the {112} and {110} facets together determine the non-uniform concentration of the atoms in the shell. In particular, even though the mobility of Al on {110} facets is smaller than that of Ga, Al-rich stripes are predicted to form along the {112} facets when the difference of the mobilities of Al and Ga atoms is sufficiently large on {112} facets. As the size of the shell increases, deposition

  17. ZrTiO4 nanowire growth using membrane-assisted Pechini route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. de Lucena

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The high surface-to-volume ratio of nanowires makes them natural competitors as new device components. In this regard, a current major challenge is to produce quasi-one-dimensional nanostructures composed of well established oxide-based materials. This article reports the synthesis of ZrTiO4 nanowires on a silicon (100 wafer in a single-step deposition/thermal treatment. The template-directed membrane synthesis strategy was associated with the Pechini route and spin-coating deposition technique. ZrTiO4 nanowires were obtained at 700 ˚C with diameters in the range of 80-100 nm. FEG- SEM images were obtained to investigate ZrTiO4 nanowire formation on the silicon surface and energy dispersive x-ray detection (EDS and x-ray diffraction (XRD analyses were performed to confirm the oxide composition and structure.

  18. The effects of substrates on the geometry and optical properties of aluminum nitride nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavi, Mohammad Amin; Haratizadeh, Hamid; Kitai, Adrian; Moafi, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Based on a Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process, an alumina tube electric furnace was assembled to synthesize different one dimensional aluminum nitride (AIN) nanostructures via aluminum powder and nitrogen gas flow. The products obtained where nanowires, nanorods, a unique chain-linked nanocage structure made from an entanglement of AIN nanowires and an interesting micro-sized spherical architecture. The different growth parameters dictated to the system result the product variety, making structure tuning possible. The incorporation of different substrates (silicon and alumina) not only leads to the formation of different shaped structures, but also results different optical emissions ranging from 450 nm (blue) to 650 nm (red), indicating the high potential of AIN nanostructures in LED fabrication. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Selective Area Electron Diffraction (SAED), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Photoluminescence (PL) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis results are discussed and a Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS)/Vapor-Solid (VS) based growth mechanism is proposed for the mentioned structures.

  19. Self-assembled nanowire arrays as three-dimensional nanopores for filtration of DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahong, Sakon; Yasui, Takao; Yanagida, Takeshi; Nagashima, Kazuki; Kanai, Masaki; Meng, Gang; He, Yong; Zhuge, Fuwei; Kaji, Noritada; Kawai, Tomoji; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Molecular filtration and purification play important roles for biomolecule analysis. However, it is still necessary to improve efficiency and reduce the filtration time. Here, we show self-assembled nanowire arrays as three-dimensional (3D) nanopores embedded in a microfluidic channel for ultrafast DNA filtration. The 3D nanopore structure was formed by a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) nanowire growth technique, which allowed us to control pore size of the filtration material by varying the number of growth cycles. λ DNA molecules (48.5 kbp) were filtrated from a mixture of T4 DNA (166 kbp) at the entrance of the 3D nanopore structure within 1 s under an applied electric field. Moreover, we observed single DNA molecule migration of T4 and λ DNA molecules to clarify the filtration mechanism. The 3D nanopore structure has simplicity of fabrication, flexibility of pore size control and reusability for biomolecule filtration. Consequently it is an excellent material for biomolecular filtration.

  20. Mechanisms involved in the hydrothermal growth of ultra-thin and high aspect ratio ZnO nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demes, Thomas; Ternon, Céline; Morisot, Fanny; Riassetto, David; Legallais, Maxime; Roussel, Hervé; Langlet, Michel

    2017-07-01

    Hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanowires (NWs) with tailored dimensions, notably high aspect ratios (AR) and small diameters, is a major concern for a wide range of applications and still represents a challenging and recurring issue. In this work, an additive-free and reproducible hydrothermal procedure has been developed to grow ultra-thin and high AR ZnO NWs on sol-gel deposited ZnO seed layers. Controlling the substrate temperature and using a low reagent concentration (1 mM) has been found to be essential for obtaining such NWs. We show that the NW diameter remains constant at about 20-25 nm with growth time contrary to the NW length that can be selectively increased leading to NWs with ARs up to 400. On the basis of investigated experimental conditions along with thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, a ZnO NW growth mechanism has been developed which involves the formation and growth of nuclei followed by NW growth when the nuclei reach a critical size of about 20-25 nm. The low reagent concentration inhibits NW lateral growth leading to ultra-thin and high AR NWs. These NWs have been assembled into electrically conductive ZnO nanowire networks, which opens attractive perspectives toward the development of highly sensitive low-cost gas- or bio-sensors.

  1. Influence of the Sn oxidation state in ferromagnetic Sn-doped In2O3 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Francis Scott; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-12-01

    Sn-doped indium oxide nanowires were grown using a vapor-liquid-solid technique (VLS). The Sn content of the nanowires was tunable based on the source powder ratios used in the VLS process. The oxidation state of the Sn ions was examined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that Sn2+ was the dominant ionic species in samples over 6% (atomic percentage) Sn. The nanowires were found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature, and their saturation magnetization increased with increasing Sn concentration, which could be associated with the spin-splitting of a defect band that was encouraged by the imbalance of Sn2+ to Sn4+ species at high Sn concentrations.

  2. Growth by molecular beam epitaxy and properties of inclined GaN nanowires on Si(001) substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysiuk, J; Zytkiewicz, Z R; Sobanska, M; Wierzbicka, A; Klosek, K; Korona, K P; Perkowska, P S; Reszka, A

    2014-04-04

    The growth mode and structural and optical properties of novel type of inclined GaN nanowires (NWs) grown by plasma-assisted MBE on Si(001) substrate were investigated. We show that due to a specific nucleation mechanism the NWs grow epitaxially on the Si substrate without any Si(x)N(y) interlayer, first in the form of zinc-blende islands and then as double wurtzite GaN nanorods with Ga-polarity. X-ray measurements show that orientation of these nanowires is epitaxially linked to the symmetry of the substrate so that [0001] axis of w-GaN nanowire is directed along the [111]Si axis. This is different from commonly observed behavior of self-induced GaN NWs that are N-polar and grow perpendicularly to the surface of nitridized silicon substrate independently on its orientation. The inclined NWs exhibit bright luminescence of bulk donor-bound excitons (D(0)X) at 3.472 eV and exciton-related peak at 3.46 eV having a long lifetime (0.7 ns at 4 K) and observable up to 50 K.

  3. Growth of ZnO nanowires through thermal oxidation of metallic zinc films on CdTe substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, O., E-mail: oscar@fmc.uva.es [Optronlab Group, Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada, Edificio I-D, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belen 1, 47011, Valladolid (Spain); Hortelano, V.; Jimenez, J. [Optronlab Group, Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada, Edificio I-D, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belen 1, 47011, Valladolid (Spain); Plaza, J.L.; Dios, S. de; Olvera, J.; Dieguez, E. [Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fath, R.; Lozano, J.G.; Ben, T.; Gonzalez, D. [Dpto. Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Apdo. 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Mass, J. [Dpto. de Fisica, Universidad del Norte, Km.5 Via Puerto Colombia, Barranquilla (Colombia)

    2011-04-28

    Research highlights: > ZnO nanowires grown from thermal Zn oxidation. > TEM reveals high quality thin nanowires several microns long. > New phase formation at long oxidation time. > Good spectroscopic properties measured by Raman, Photo and Cathodoluminsecence spectroscopies. - Abstract: <112-bar 0> wurtzite ZnO nanowires (NWs) have been obtained by oxidizing in air at 500 deg. C thermally evaporated Zn metal films deposited onto CdTe substrates. The presence of Cd atoms from the substrate on the ZnO seeding layer and NWs seems to affect the growth of the NWs. The effects of the oxidation time on the structural and optical properties of the NWs are described in detail. It is shown that the NWs density decreases and their length increases when increasing the oxidation time. Thicker Zn layers result in thinner and longer ZnO NWs. Very long oxidation times also lead to the formation of a new CdO phase which is related to the partial destruction and quality reduction of the NWs. The possible process for ZnO NW formation on CdTe substrates is discussed.

  4. Engineering scale development of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process for the production of silicon carbide fibrils and linear fibril assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenhover, M.; Biernacki, J. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States); Schatz, K.; Ko, F. [Advanced Product Development, Inc., Bristol, PA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    In order to exploit the superior thermomechanical properties of the VLS fibril, the feasibility of scaled-up production of the SiC fibril is demonstrated in this study. Through time series study and computer simulation, the parameters affecting the growth process and properties of the fibrils were examined. To facilitate translation of the superior mechanical properties into higher level preform structures, conventional and unconventional processing methods were evaluated. As revealed by scanning electron microscopic examination and X-ray diffractometry, high level alignment of the fibrils was achieved by the wet-laid process.

  5. VQS (vapor-quasiliquid-solid, vapor-quasisolid-solid) mechanism for the catalyst-free and catalyst-mediated non-eutectic syntheses of single-crystal nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor Mohammad, S.

    2016-08-01

    Catalyst-free and catalyst-assisted nanowire (NW) syntheses are increasingly carried out by mechanism(s) other than the well-known VLS (vapor-liquid-solid) mechanism. Yet these growths are not fully understood. An in-depth investigation has been carried out to understand the mechanism of the catalyst-free and catalyst-mediated non-VLS NW growths. Various chemical and physical processes involved in these growths have been studied to formulate general principles. Phase transitions, synthesis routes, and the fundamentals underlying these routes have been explored. Nanoparticle surfaces conducive to NW syntheses have been examined. The role of surface treatment, such as oxidation, oxygenation, doping, acid treatment, plasma treatment, etc., in creating such surfaces has been elucidated. Surface treatment and phase transition under appropriate growth conditions (temperature, pressure, ambient, and the presence of contaminants) have been found to be important. They play a crucial role in creating diffusion paths for the diffusion of the growth species for NW growths. Interdiffusion of the catalyst and the growth species on the nanoparticle surface has been found also to add a new dimension to the growth kinetics. When integrated together, they create a unified platform versatile enough to explain essentially all catalyst-free and catalyst-mediated non-eutectic NW growths. The platform uncovers numerous growth-related problems never understood before. Available experiments extensively support this platform. These experiments suggest that it is based on solid foundation and has broad and probably universal appeal. It pertains to the vapor-quasiliquid-solid, vapor-quasi-solid-solid mechanism proposed some six years ago.

  6. Chemical bath deposition of ZnO nanowires at near-neutral pH conditions without hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA): understanding the role of HMTA in ZnO nanowire growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeak, Kevin M; Le, Thinh P; Britton, Nathan G; Nickolov, Zhorro S; Elabd, Yossef A; Baxter, Jason B

    2011-04-05

    Chemical bath deposition (CBD) is an inexpensive and reproducible method for depositing ZnO nanowire arrays over large areas. The aqueous Zn(NO(3))(2)-hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) chemistry is one of the most common CBD chemistries for ZnO nanowire synthesis, but some details of the reaction mechanism are still not well-understood. Here, we report the use of in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to study HMTA adsorption from aqueous solutions onto ZnO nanoparticle films and show that HMTA does not adsorb on ZnO. This result refutes earlier claims that the anisotropic morphology arises from HMTA adsorbing onto and capping the ZnO {10 1 0} faces. We conclude that the role of HMTA in the CBD of ZnO nanowires is only to control the saturation index of ZnO. Furthermore, we demonstrate the first deposition of ZnO nanowire arrays at 90 °C and near-neutral pH conditions without HMTA. Nanowires were grown using the pH buffer 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) and continuous titratation with KOH to maintain the same pH conditions where growth with HMTA occurs. This semi-batch synthetic method opens many new opportunities to tailor the ZnO morphology and properties by independently controlling temperature and pH.

  7. In-situ energy dispersive x-ray diffraction study of the growth of CuO nanowires by annealing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Ganguli, Tapas; Deb, S. K. [Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced technology, Indore-452013 (India); Sant, Tushar; Poswal, H. K.; Sharma, Surinder M. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2013-10-14

    The in-situ growth of CuO nanowires was studied by Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD) to observe the mechanism of growth. The study was carried out for comparison at two temperatures—at 500 °C, the optimum temperature of the nanowires growth, and at 300 °C just below the temperature range of the growth. The in situ observation revealed the successive oxidation of Cu foil to Cu{sub 2}O layer and finally to CuO layer. Further analysis showed the presence of a compressive stress in CuO layer due to interface at CuO and Cu{sub 2}O layers. The compressive stress was found to increase with the growth of the nanowires at 500 °C while it relaxed with the growth of CuO layer at 300 °C. The present results do not support the existing model of stress relaxation induced growth of nanowires. Based on the detailed Transmission Electron Microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope, and EDXRD results, a microstructure based growth model has been suggested.

  8. In Situ TEM Creation of Nanowire Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Sardar Bilal

    Integration of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) as active components in devices requires that desired mechanical, thermal and electrical interfaces can be established between the nanoscale geometry of the SiNW and the microscale architecture of the device. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM...... of SiNW were also investigated in situ. SiNWs were grown on silicon microcantilever heaters using the VLS mechanism. When grown across a gap between adjacent cantilevers, contact was formed when the SiNW impinged on the sidewall of an adjacent cantilever. Using in situ TEM, SiNW contact formation...

  9. Growth and Magnetic Properties of Polycrystalline Self-Assembled Bifurcated Co Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Silverberg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We use anodization of aluminum foil with variable applied anodization voltage to create an alumina template with bifurcated porous structures. The template is then used to electrodeposit Co, fabricating unique bifurcated Co nanowires. In order to better understand the crystal structure of our new material, we then report magnetic properties of these self-assembled bifurcated Co nanowires. Magnetic measurements of the bifurcated wires are studied as functions of branch/stem ratios, wire length, and temperature. The results are compared with those of straight Co nanowires of similar dimensions and thin film Co samples to find that a different crystal lattice structure prevails in the stems than in the branches of the wires.

  10. Template Assisted Growth of Zinc Oxide-Based Nanowires by Electrochemical Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ordered ZnO and Zn1 – xCdxO nanowire/nanorod arrays were fabricated by cathodic electrodeposition based on anodic alumina (AAO membrane and polycarbonate membrane (PCM from an aqueous solution containing zinc nitrate precursor at different bath temperatures. The electrodeposition process involves the electroreduction of nitrate ions to alter the local pH within the pores and precipitation of the metal oxide within the pores. X-Ray diffraction measurements showed that the nanowires/nanorods were of wurtzite crystallographic structures and the average length and diameter of nanorods were measured by SEM and TEM. HRTEM measurements confirm the crystallinity and elemental composition of grown nanowires on PCM/AAO templates.

  11. Growth and Characterization of Ge100-xDyx(x≤2 Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel semiconducting Germanium-Dysprosium nanowires are fabricated by a combined two-step method, which consists of initial arc-melting of the elemental constituents into a pellet and its heat treatment, followed by thermal vapor transport of the powdered pellet in a tube reactor for fabrication of the nanowires. The nanomaterials are fabricated on gold nucleation seeds on Si/SiO2 substrates. The thermodynamic conditions in the reactor are carefully chosen to produce wires with diameters in a narrow, specific range. This nanofabrication method ensures high phase purity and crystallinity of nanowires. Based on the results and theoretical work, it is concluded that the fabricated Ge98Dy2 materials are in a glassy state below 20 K.

  12. Size-controlled growth of ZnO nanowires by catalyst-free high-pressure pulsed laser deposition and their optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Z. Liu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Single crystalline ZnO nanowires were fabricated on Si (100 substrates by catalyst-free high-pressure pulsed laser deposition. It is found that the nanowires start to form when the substrate temperature and growth pressure exceed the critical values of 700 oC and 700 Pa, and their size strongly depends on these growth conditions. That is, the aspect ratio of the nanowires decreases with increasing temperature or decreasing pressure. Such a size dependence on growth conditions was discussed in terms of surface migration and scattering of ablated atoms. Room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of ZnO nanowires shows a dominant near-band-edge emission peak at 3.28 eV and a visible emission band centered at 2.39 eV. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence studies reveal that the former consists of the acceptor-bound exciton and free exciton emissions; while the latter varies in intensity with the aspect ratio of the nanowires and is attributed to the surface-mediated deep level emission.

  13. Dense nanoimprinted silicon nanowire arrays with passivated axial p-i-n junctions for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Pei; Siontas, Stylianos; Zaslavsky, A.; Pacifici, D. [Department of Physics and School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Ha, Jong-Yoon; Krylyuk, S. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Davydov, A. V. [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2015-03-28

    We report on the fabrication and photovoltaic characteristics of vertical arrays of silicon axial p-i-n junction nanowire (NW) solar cells grown by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) epitaxy. NW surface passivation with silicon dioxide shell is shown to enhance carrier recombination time, open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}), short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}), and fill factor (FF). The photovoltaic performance of passivated individual NW and NW arrays was compared under 532 nm laser illumination with power density of ∼10 W/cm{sup 2}. Higher values of V{sub OC} and FF in the NW arrays are explained by enhanced light trapping. In order to verify the effect of NW density on light absorption and hence on the photovoltaic performance of NW arrays, dense Si NW arrays were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography to periodically arrange the gold seed particles prior to epitaxial growth. Compared to sparse NW arrays fabricated using VLS growth from randomly distributed gold seeds, the nanoimprinted NW array solar cells show a greatly increased peak external quantum efficiency of ∼8% and internal quantum efficiency of ∼90% in the visible spectral range. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations of Si NW periodic arrays with varying pitch (P) confirm the importance of high NW density. Specifically, due to diffractive scattering and light trapping, absorption efficiency close to 100% in the 400–650 nm spectral range is calculated for a Si NW array with P = 250 nm, significantly outperforming a blanket Si film of the same thickness.

  14. Nanowire formation is preceded by nanotube growth in templated electrodeposition of cobalt hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Daniel M.; Vidu, Ruxandra; Stroeve, Pieter

    2016-11-01

    Cobalt fluted nanowires, novel nanostructures with a diameter of 200 nm consisting of a solid nanowire base and a thin, nanotubular flute shape, were grown in track-etched polycarbonate membranes via templated electrodeposition. The structures were characterized electrochemically via cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and charge stripping, and structurally via scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and focused ion beam cross-sectioning. Electrochemical and structural analysis reveals details of their deposition kinetics, structure, and morphology, and indicate possible mechanisms for their formation and control. These unique structures provide inspiration for an array of possible applications in electronics, photonics, and other fields.

  15. Stress induced growth of Sn nanowires in a single step by sputtering method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, A., E-mail: asha20yadav@gmail.com; Kothari, D. C. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Patel, N.; Miotello, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Trento, I-38123 Povo (Trento) (Italy)

    2015-06-24

    Sn nanowires in aluminum film have been synthesized in a single step by co-sputtering of Al and Sn targets. Due to immiscibility of Sn and Al, co-sputtering leads to generation of stress in the composite film. In order to attain thermodynamic equilibrium, Sn separates from Al and diffuses towards the grain boundaries. External perturbation due to ambient atmosphere leads to corrosion at the grain boundaries forming pits which provide path for Sn to evolve. Owing to this, extrusion of Sn nanowires from Al film occurs to release the residual stress in the film.

  16. Epitaxial growth of ZnSe and ZnSe/CdSe nanowires on ZnSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellet-Amalric, E.; Bounouar, S.; Kheng, K. [CEA-CNRS-UJF Group, Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, CEA Grenoble, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble (France); Elouneg-Jamroz, M.; Bougerol, C.; Hertog, M. den; Genuist, Y.; Poizat, J.P.; Andre, R.; Tatarenko, S. [CEA-CNRS-UJF Group, Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, Institut Neel, BP 166, 38 042 Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-15

    We report the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of ZnSe nanowires (NWs) on a ZnSe(100) epilayer assisted by gold catalyst. Gold dewetting assists in the formation of nanotrenches along the [0-1-1] direction in the ZnSe buffer layer. Nucleation of the gold catalyst in the trenches leads to the growth of NWs preferentially in directions orthogonal to the trenches. The wires adopt mostly the wurtzite type structure and grow along the c-axis. CdSe quantum dots were inserted in the ZnSe NWs. The CdSe insertions systematically adopt a cubic zinc-blende arrangement with a[111] growth axis, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Patterned growth of ZnO nanowires on flexible substrates for enhanced performance of flexible piezoelectric nanogenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dechao; Qiu, Yu; Jiang, Qingyu; Guo, Zhaoshuai; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Jin; Zong, Yang; Feng, Qiuxia; Sun, Xiaoling

    2017-02-01

    Flexible piezoelectric nanogenerators (NGs) based on patterned growth of ZnO nanowires (PNWs) by the hydrothermal method are proposed for high-efficiency energy harvesting applications. The use of the PNWs in ZnO-based FPNGs results in a significant improvement in terms of the magnitude of the output currents of up to 6 times when compared with pristine ZnO NW-based FPNGs without patterned growth mode. The maximum output current was measured to be about 150 nA, which was enough to drive some micro/nanoelectronic devices. The improved output performance is mainly attributed to the patterned growth mode in FPNGs, which may significantly reduce the piezoelectric potential screening effect caused by free electrons in ZnO. This strategy may provide a highly promising platform as energy harvesting devices for viable industrial applications in portable/wearable nanodevices.

  18. Single Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As nanowires probed by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buick, Benjamin; Richter, Wolfgang [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Speiser, Eugen [ISAS, Institute for Analytical Sciences Department Berlin (Germany); Prete, Paola [IMM-CNR, Lecce Research Unit, Lecce (Italy); Paiano, Pasquale; Lovergine, Nicola [CNISM, Unita di Ricerca di Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universita del Salento, Lecce (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    The stoichiometry of single ternary III-V semiconductor nanowires was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Free-standing Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As nanowires were obtained through metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) by the vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism on GaAs substrates. The as-grown nanowires were studied with a scanning confocal Raman spectrometer (spatial resolution {approx}300 nm). They were located by Rayleigh imaging and individual nanowires selected for Raman spectroscopy. The acquired spectra exhibit 2-mode behavior. The stoichiometry of single nanowires was determined based on the frequencies of the GaAs- and AlAs-like transversal optical (TO) and longitudinal optical (LO) peaks with an accuracy of below 10%. Measurements at different positions along the axis revealed variations of the composition within single nanowires. This non-uniformity evidences that the nanowires possess an internal structure. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. A review of III–V nanowire infrared photodetectors and sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPierre, R. R.; Robson, M.; Azizur-Rahman, K. M.; Kuyanov, P.

    2017-03-01

    A review of III–V nanowire-based infrared photodetectors is provided including single nanowires, ensemble nanowires, and heterostructured nanowires. The performance metrics of reported nanowire photodetectors are compared. The potential advantages of nanowire photodetectors, including enhanced absorption, fast carrier collection, multispectral detection, and direct growth on Si, are discussed.

  20. Alloy formation during molecular beam epitaxy growth of Si-doped InAs nanowires on GaAs[111]B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydok, Anton; Rieger, Torsten; Biermanns, Andreas; Saqib, Muhammad; Grap, Thomas; Lepsa, Mihail Ion; Pietsch, Ullrich

    2013-08-01

    Vertically aligned InAs nanowires (NWs) doped with Si were grown self-assisted by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs[111]B substrates covered with a thin SiO x layer. Using out-of-plane X-ray diffraction, the influence of Si supply on the growth process and nanostructure formation was studied. It was found that the number of parasitic crystallites grown between the NWs increases with increasing Si flux. In addition, the formation of a Ga0.2In0.8As alloy was observed if the growth was performed on samples covered by a defective oxide layer. This alloy formation is observed within the crystallites and not within the nanowires. The Ga concentration is determined from the lattice mismatch of the crystallites relative to the InAs nanowires. No alloy formation is found for samples with faultless oxide layers.

  1. An atomistic study on configuration, mechanics and growth of nanoscale filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Alireza

    conformations in these electronically active filaments open up the possibility of non-linear stretchable interconnects, and we study their reliability by extracting the elastic stiffness of the various conformations. We extract force-displacement curves of scrolls and plectonemes in the various systems. Our analysis sheds light on the relation between the shape of the nanostructures and the elastic stiffness of the nanofilaments. In overall, our study provides us with a novel route to engineer the nanofilaments and tune their mechanical properties using a combination of physical constraints and mechanical loading. In the next part of the dissertation, we perform a comprehensive atomistic study of the nanoscale crystal growth mechanisms of Au-catalyzed silicon nanowires grown via the vapor liquid solid method (VLS) during early stages of the droplet to nanowire transition. The transition sets the size of the nanowire, and the principles of diameter selection remain poorly understood. Our analysis reveals the role of the initial configuration of the nanodroplet and the effect of surface tension on the success of the VLS growth process. We observe lateral extension of liquid feet from the sides of nanodroplet during the VLS process. In addition to the nanodroplet diameter, the liquid feet plays a crucial role on determining the final geometry of the nanowire. We also observe an important correlation between the rate of deposition of Si atoms and presence of the twining in the nanowire structure, which significantly affects its properties. Higher deposition rates result in incorporation of metallic impurities in the nanowire structure, which consequently results in the formation of twining deformation. Our MD studies uncover a previously ignored interplay between solute trapping of catalyst particles in the nanowire, and twin formation, and we discuss this effect in the context of past experimental reports on twin formation in semiconducting nanowires, and the ability to

  2. Engineering of the photoluminescence of ZnO nanowires by different growth and annealing environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes Cauduro, André Luis; Sombrio, C I L; Franzen, P L

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of ZnO nanowires were investigated through photoluminescence (PL) at room and low temperatures. An excitonic structure was observed in the UV band emission and we are able to distinguish between free excitons, bound excitons and donor acceptor pairs. The PL spectra shows deep...

  3. Plasma nitriding induced growth of Pt-nanowire arrays as high performance electrocatalysts for fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, S.; Lin, K.; Malladi, S.R.K.; Lu, Y.; Sun, S.; Xu, Q.; Steinberger-Wilckens, R.; Dong, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate an innovative approach, combing a novel active screen plasma (ASP) technique with green chemical synthesis, for a direct fabrication of uniform Pt nanowire arrays on large-area supports. The ASP treatment enables in-situ N-doping and surface modification to the support

  4. Selective-Area Growth of InAs Nanowires on Ge and Vertical Transistor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Izhizaka, Fumiya; Fukui, Takashi

    2015-11-11

    III-V compound semiconductor and Ge are promising channel materials for future low-power and high-performance integrated circuits. A heterogeneous integration of these materials on the same platform, however, raises serious problem owing to a huge mismatch of carrier mobility. We proposed direct integration of perfectly vertically aligned InAs nanowires on Ge as a method for new alternative integrated circuits and demonstrated a high-performance InAs nanowire-vertical surrounding-gate transistor. Virtually 100% yield of vertically aligned InAs nanowires was achieved by controlling the initial surface of Ge and high-quality InAs nanowires were obtained regardless of lattice mismatch (6.7%). The transistor performance showed significantly higher conductivity with good gate control compared to Si-based conventional field-effect transistors: the drain current was 0.65 mA/μm, and the transconductance was 2.2 mS/μm at drain-source voltage of 0.50 V. These demonstrations are a first step for building alternative integrated circuits using vertical III-V/multigate planar Ge FETs.

  5. Voc Degradation in TF-VLS Grown InP Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yubo; Sun, Xingshu; Johnston, Steve; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Hettick, Mark; Javey, Ali; Bermel, Peter

    2016-11-21

    Here we consider two hypotheses to explain the open-circuit voltage (VOC) degradation observed in thin-film vapor-liquid-solid (TF-VLS) grown p-type InP photovoltaic cells: bandgap narrowing and local shunting. First, a bandgap (Eg) narrowing effect is hypothesized, based on the surface inhomogeneity of VLS InP captured by the photoluminescence (PL) image. The PL data was used to estimate a spatially-resolved active VOC across surface of the InP sample. Combining this data with the effective Jsc allowed an assessment of the I-V characteristics of individual unit cells. Next, an H-SPICE diode compact model was utilized to reproduce the I-V characteristics of the whole sample. We find a good fit to the I-V performance of TF-VLS grown InP solar cell. Second, a local shunting effect was also considered as an alternative explanation of the VOC degradation effect. Again, PL image data was used, and small local shunt resistance was added in arbitrary elementary unit cells to represent certain dark spots seen in the PL image and dictate the VOC degradation occurred in the sample.

  6. Study of the magnetization behavior of ferromagnetic nanowire array: Existence of growth defects revealed by micromagnetic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Vien, G., E-mail: gilles.nguyen@univ-brest.fr [Laboratoire de Magnétisme de Bretagne, EA 4522, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, CS 93837, 29238 Brest-Cedex 3 (France); Rioual, S. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme de Bretagne, EA 4522, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, CS 93837, 29238 Brest-Cedex 3 (France); Gloaguen, F. [Chimie, Electrochimie Moléculaires et Chimie Analytique, UMR CNRS 6521, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, CS 93837, 29238 Brest-Cedex 3 (France); Rouvellou, B.; Lescop, B. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme de Bretagne, EA 4522, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, CS 93837, 29238 Brest-Cedex 3 (France)

    2016-03-01

    High aspect ratio nanowires were electrodeposited in nanoporous anodic alumina template by a potentiostatic method. The angular dependence of the coercive field and remanence magnetization extracted from magnetometry measurements are compared with micromagnetic simulations. Inclusion of magnetostatic interactions between Ni nanowires in simulations is required to explain some of the properties of the magnetization reversal. However, it is not sufficient to reproduce fully the angular dependence of the coercive field. Due to the polycrystalline nature of nanowires and thus to the presence of grain boundaries, defects are included in simulations. A good agreement between theory and experiment is then clearly highlighted, in particular in the nanowire easy axis direction. The achieved results allow a description of several experimental data published in the literature and consequently to get a better understanding of reversal mechanisms that operate in such nanowire arrays. A complementary study of composite nanowire array is successfully performed to prove the adequacy of the simulations method to describe the magnetic properties of nanowire array. - Highlights: • High axial squareness nanowire array are synthetized by a potentiostatic method. • Nanowires are modeled as non-ideal magnetic particles. • Segmentation of nanowire is required to describe the angular dependence of coercivity. • Respective role of magnetostatic coupling and nanowire segmentation in nanowire array are studied. • Micromagnetic simulations lead to quantitative agreement for well-defined composite nanowire array.

  7. Rational solution growth of α-FeOOH nanowires driven by screw dislocations and their conversion to α-Fe2O3 nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fei; Morin, Stephen A; Jin, Song

    2011-06-08

    We report the rational synthesis of α-FeOOH (goethite) nanowires following a dislocation-driven mechanism by utilizing a continuous-flow reactor and chemical equilibria to maintain constant low supersaturations. The existence of axial screw dislocations and the associated Eshelby twist in the nanowire product were confirmed using bright-/dark-field transmission electron microscopy imaging and twist contour analysis. The α-FeOOH nanowires can be readily converted into semiconducting single-crystal but porous α-Fe(2)O(3) (hematite) nanowires via topotactic transformation. Our results indicate that, with proper experimental design, many more useful materials can be grown in one-dimensional morphologies in aqueous solutions via the dislocation-driven mechanism.

  8. Effect of nanohole size on selective area growth of InAs nanowire arrays on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoye; Yang, Wenyuan; Wang, Baojun; Ji, Xianghai; Xu, Shengyong; Wang, Wei; Chen, Qing; Yang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the influence of nanohole size on selective-area growth (SAG) of InAs nanowire (NW) arrays on Si(111) substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The growth of well-defined and position-controlled InAs NW arrays with united vertical orientation can be achieved on the patterned substrates with a certain range of nanohole size, which paves the way for the fabrication of high-electron-mobility and surrounding-gate transistor arrays using NWs as channels. Moreover, it is found that more than one NW are increasingly likely grown per nanohole as the nanohole size increases, and the NWs become increasingly thin and short. This is considered to be due to the supersaturation of adsorbed species in the nanohole and the intense competition for adatoms among multiple NWs per nanohole.

  9. Plasma versus thermal annealing for the Au-catalyst growth of ZnO nanocones and nanowires on Al-doped ZnO buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güell, Frank; Martínez-Alanis, Paulina R.; Roso, Sergio; Salas-Pérez, Carlos I.; García-Sánchez, Mario F.; Santana, Guillermo; Marel Monroy, B.

    2016-06-01

    We successfully synthesized ZnO nanocones and nanowires over polycrystalline Al-doped ZnO (AZO) buffer layers on fused silica substrates by a vapor-transport process using Au-catalyst thin films. Different Au film thicknesses were thermal or plasma annealed in order to analyze their influence on the ZnO nanostructure growth morphology. Striking differences have been observed. Thermal annealing generates a distribution of Au nanoclusters and plasma annealing induces a fragmentation of the Au thin films. While ZnO nanowires are found in the thermal-annealed samples, ZnO nanocones and nanowires have been obtained on the plasma-annealed samples. Enhancement of the preferred c-axis (0001) growth orientation was demonstrated by x-ray diffraction when the ZnO nanocones and nanowires have been grown over the AZO buffer layer. The transmittance spectra of the ZnO nanocones and nanowires show a gradual increase from 375 to 900 nm, and photoluminescence characterization pointed out high concentration of defects leading to observation of a broad emission band in the visible range from 420 to 800 nm. The maximum emission intensity peak position of the broad visible band is related to the thickness of the Au-catalyst for the thermal-annealed samples and to the plasma power for the plasma-annealed samples. Finally, we proposed a model for the plasma versus thermal annealing of the Au-catalyst for the growth of the ZnO nanocones and nanowires. These results are promising for renewable energy applications, in particular for its potential application in solar cells.

  10. Low temperature solution-phase growth of ZnSe and ZnSe/CdSe core/shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchsang, Nattasamon; Shapoval, Liubov; Vietmeyer, Felix; Yu, Yanghai; Hodak, Jose H.; Tang, I.-Ming; Kosel, Thomas H.; Kuno, Masaru

    2011-08-01

    High quality ZnSe nanowires (NWs) and complementary ZnSe/CdSe core/shell species have been synthesized using a recently developed solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth technique. In particular, bismuth salts as opposed to pre-synthesized Bi or Au/Bi nanoparticles have been used to grow NWs at low temperatures in solution. Resulting wires are characterized using transmission electron microscopy and possess mean ensemble diameters between 15 and 28 nm with accompanying lengths ranging from 4-10 μm. Subsequent solution-based overcoating chemistry results in ZnSe wires covered with CdSe nanocrystals. By varying the shell's growth time, different thicknesses can be obtained and range from 8 to 21 nm. More interestingly, the mean constituent CdSe nanocrystal diameter can be varied and results in size-dependent shell emission spectra.High quality ZnSe nanowires (NWs) and complementary ZnSe/CdSe core/shell species have been synthesized using a recently developed solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth technique. In particular, bismuth salts as opposed to pre-synthesized Bi or Au/Bi nanoparticles have been used to grow NWs at low temperatures in solution. Resulting wires are characterized using transmission electron microscopy and possess mean ensemble diameters between 15 and 28 nm with accompanying lengths ranging from 4-10 μm. Subsequent solution-based overcoating chemistry results in ZnSe wires covered with CdSe nanocrystals. By varying the shell's growth time, different thicknesses can be obtained and range from 8 to 21 nm. More interestingly, the mean constituent CdSe nanocrystal diameter can be varied and results in size-dependent shell emission spectra. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10176e

  11. Digital selective growth of a ZnO nanowire array by large scale laser decomposition of zinc acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sukjoon; Yeo, Junyeob; Manorotkul, Wanit; Kang, Hyun Wook; Lee, Jinhwan; Han, Seungyong; Rho, Yoonsoo; Suh, Young Duk; Sung, Hyung Jin; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2013-04-01

    We develop a digital direct writing method for ZnO NW micro-patterned growth on a large scale by selective laser decomposition of zinc acetate. For ZnO NW growth, by replacing the bulk heating with the scanning focused laser as a fully digital local heat source, zinc acetate crystallites can be selectively activated as a ZnO seed pattern to grow ZnO nanowires locally on a larger area. Together with the selective laser sintering process of metal nanoparticles, more than 10 000 UV sensors have been demonstrated on a 4 cm × 4 cm glass substrate to develop all-solution processible, all-laser mask-less digital fabrication of electronic devices including active layer and metal electrodes without any conventional vacuum deposition, photolithographic process, premade mask, high temperature and vacuum environment.We develop a digital direct writing method for ZnO NW micro-patterned growth on a large scale by selective laser decomposition of zinc acetate. For ZnO NW growth, by replacing the bulk heating with the scanning focused laser as a fully digital local heat source, zinc acetate crystallites can be selectively activated as a ZnO seed pattern to grow ZnO nanowires locally on a larger area. Together with the selective laser sintering process of metal nanoparticles, more than 10 000 UV sensors have been demonstrated on a 4 cm × 4 cm glass substrate to develop all-solution processible, all-laser mask-less digital fabrication of electronic devices including active layer and metal electrodes without any conventional vacuum deposition, photolithographic process, premade mask, high temperature and vacuum environment. Electronic supplementary information available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34346d

  12. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes over vertically aligned silicon nanowire bundles for achieving uniform field emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yung-Jr; Huang, Yung-Jui; Chang, Hsuan-Chen; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Lee, San-Liang

    2014-01-01

    A fabrication strategy is proposed to enable precise coverage of as-grown carbon nanotube (CNT) mats atop vertically aligned silicon nanowire (VA-SiNW) bundles in order to realize a uniform bundle array of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions over a large sample area. No obvious electrical degradation of as-fabricated SiNWs is observed according to the measured current-voltage characteristic of a two-terminal single-nanowire device. Bundle arrangement of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions is optimized to relax the electrostatic screening effect and to maximize the field enhancement factor. As a result, superior field emission performance and relatively stable emission current over 12 h is obtained. A bright and uniform fluorescent radiation is observed from CNT-SiNW-based field emitters regardless of its bundle periodicity, verifying the existence of high-density and efficient field emitters on the proposed CNT-SiNW bundle arrays.

  13. Single palladium nanowire growth in place assisted by dielectrophoresis and focused ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferrara, Vera; Alfano, Brigida; Massera, Ettore; Di Francia, Girolamo

    2009-05-01

    Here we report, for the first time, on the combined use of Focused Ion Beam and Dielectrophoresis techniques for the fabrication of a nanodevice whose operating mechanism relies on a single palladium nanowire. Focused Ion Beam is used to deposit, without photolithographic masks, platinum microelectrodes on a silicon/silicon nitride substrate. Dielectrophoresis is employed for assembling the palladium nanowire, starting from a saturated palladium particles solution, and precisely positioning it between the nanocontacts. The nanodevice works as a hydrogen sensor, confirming the reliability of technology. Its electrical response has been recorded, at room temperature, in a dynamic environment, where different hydrogen concentrations, from 0.1% to 4% in dry air, have been introduced. Its sensitivity, towards 0.1% to 1% gas concentrations in dry air, has been calculated, too.

  14. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  15. Heteroepitaxial Patterned Growth of Vertically Aligned and Periodically Distributed ZnO Nanowires on GaN Using Laser Interference Ablation

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Dajun

    2010-08-23

    A simple two-step method of fabricating vertically aligned and periodically distributed ZnO nanowires on gallium nitride (GaN) substrates is described. The method combines laser interference ablation (LIA) and low temperature hydrothermal decomposition. The ZnO nanowires grow heteroepitaxially on unablated regions of GaN over areas spanning 1 cm2, with a high degree of control over size, orientation, uniformity, and periodicity. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy are utilized to study the structural characteristics of the LIA-patterned GaN substrate in detail. These studies reveal the possible mechanism for the preferential, site-selective growth of the ZnO nanowires. The method demonstrates high application potential for wafer-scale integration into sensor arrays, piezoelectric devices, and optoelectronic devices. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Growth and Optical Properties of Direct Band Gap Ge/Ge0.87Sn0.13 Core/Shell Nanowire Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assali, S; Dijkstra, A; Li, A; Koelling, S; Verheijen, M A; Gagliano, L; von den Driesch, N; Buca, D; Koenraad, P M; Haverkort, J E M; Bakkers, E P A M

    2017-03-08

    Group IV semiconductor optoelectronic devices are now possible by using strain-free direct band gap GeSn alloys grown on a Ge/Si virtual substrate with Sn contents above 9%. Here, we demonstrate the growth of Ge/GeSn core/shell nanowire arrays with Sn incorporation up to 13% and without the formation of Sn clusters. The nanowire geometry promotes strain relaxation in the Ge0.87Sn0.13 shell and limits the formation of structural defects. This results in room-temperature photoluminescence centered at 0.465 eV and enhanced absorption above 98%. Therefore, direct band gap GeSn grown in a nanowire geometry holds promise as a low-cost and high-efficiency material for photodetectors operating in the short-wave infrared and thermal imaging devices.

  17. Thermal resistance measurement of In{sub 3}SbTe{sub 2} nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, J.L.; Saci, A.; De, I. [I2M Laboratory, University of Bordeaux, UMR CNRS 5295, Talence (France); Cecchini, R.; Cecchi, S.; Longo, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Unita di Agrate Brianza (Italy); Selmo, S.; Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Unita di Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    The thermal resistance along the thickness of In{sub 3}SbTe{sub 2} crystalline nanowires was measured using the scanning thermal microscopy in 3ω mode. The nanowires were grown by metal organic vapor deposition, exploiting the VLS mechanism induced by Au metal-catalyst nanoparticles and harvested on a SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. Two nanowires with different thickness (13 and 23 nm) were investigated. The thermal resistance of the nanowires was determined using two different approaches; the first one exploits the experimental data, whereas the second one is more sophisticated, since it involves a minimization procedure. Both methods led to comparable values of the thermal resistance along the transverse direction (thickness) of the nanowire. The obtained results were explained starting from the mean free path of phonons calculated in the In{sub 3}SbTe{sub 2} bulk. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Structure, growth and magnetic property of hard magnetic CoPtP nanowires synthesized by electrochemical deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramulu, T.S.; Venu, R.; Anandakumar, S.; Rani, V. Sudha [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, S.S. [Department of Physics, Andong National University, Andong 760-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, C.G., E-mail: cgkim@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-30

    This paper reports the electrochemical synthesis and characterization of one dimensional hard magnetic CoPtP nanowires. Three electrode potentiostatic electrochemical technique was used to deposit nanowires into a nanoporous track-etched polycarbonate membrane with a nominal pore diameter 50 nm and thickness around 6-9 {mu}m. The room temperature electrolyte used for the deposition of nanowires consists of 60 g/lt CoSO{sub 4}7H{sub 2}O, 4.1 g/lt H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}, 4.5 g/lt NaHPO{sub 2} and 25 g/lt B(OH){sub 3}. The structural morphology was observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. The magnetic property of the nanowires was measured by vibrating sample magnetometer before removing the template. The coercive fields were measured to be 143 kA m{sup -1} and 103 kA m{sup -1} for parallel (H{sub Parallel-To }) and perpendicular to the nanowire axis, respectively. The higher coercivity value for H{sub Parallel-To} indicating nanowires' easy magnetization direction lies along the nanowires' axis. The average composition of the CoPtP nanowires was determined by electron dispersive spectroscopy and the crystallinity was measured by X-ray diffractometer. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoPtP hard magnetic nanowires are synthesized by electrochemical deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesized magnetic nanowires are an average of 6 {mu}m in length. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coercivity of nanowires is 143 kA m{sup -1} when the field is parallel to nanowire axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetization direction of the nanowires lies along the nanowire's axis.

  19. Growth of vertical and defect free InP nanowires on SrTiO3(001) substrate and comparison with growth on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, K.; Dumont, H.; Saint-Girons, G.; Penuelas, J.; Patriarche, G.; Hocevar, M.; Zwiller, V.; Gendry, M.

    2012-03-01

    We present a study of the molecular beam epitaxy of InP nanowires (NWs) on (001) oriented SrTiO3 (STO) substrates using vapor liquid solid mechanism and gold-indium as metal catalyst. The growth direction of InP NWs grown on STO(001) is compared with NWs grown on (001) and (111) oriented silicon substrates. Gold-indium dewetting under a flux of indium results in the majority of InP NWs growing vertically from the surface of STO(001). With the growth parameters we have used the NWs have a pure wurtzite structure and are free of stacking faults and cubic segments. The structural quality of the NWs is confirmed by micro-photoluminescence measurements showing a narrow peak linewidth of 6.5 meV.

  20. Porous anodic alumina on galvanically grown PtSi layer for application in template-assisted Si nanowire growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavrinidou Eleni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on the fabrication and morphology/structural characterization of a porous anodic alumina (PAA/PtSi nano-template for use as matrix in template-assisted Si nanowire growth on a Si substrate. The PtSi layer was formed by electroless deposition from an aqueous solution containing the metal salt and HF, while the PAA membrane by anodizing an Al film deposited on the PtSi layer. The morphology and structure of the PtSi layer and of the alumina membrane on top were studied by Scanning and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopies (SEM, HRTEM. Cross sectional HRTEM images combined with electron diffraction (ED were used to characterize the different interfaces between Si, PtSi and porous anodic alumina.

  1. Growth of ZnO nanowires on fibers for one-dimensional flexible quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haining; Zhu, Liqun; Liu, Huicong; Li, Weiping

    2012-02-24

    One-dimensional flexible solar cells were fabricated through vertical growth of ZnO nanowires on freestanding carbon fibers and subsequent deposition of CdS quantum dots (QDs). Under light illumination, excitons were generated in the CdS QDs and dissociated in the ZnO/CdS interface. Photoelectrochemical characterization indicates that fiber quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) could effectively absorb visible light and convert it to electric energy. The photoelectrochemical performance was enhanced after the deposition of a ZnS passivating layer on the CF/ZnO/CdS surface. The highest conversion efficiency of about 0.006% was achieved by the fiber QDSCs. A higher conversion efficiency was expected to be achieved after some important parameters and cell structure were optimized and improved.

  2. Non-Faradaic electrical impedimetric investigation of the interfacial effects of neuronal cell growth and differentiation on silicon nanowire transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Ping; Vinzons, Lester U; Kang, Yu-Shan; Lai, Tung-Yen

    2015-05-13

    Silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) devices have been interfaced with cells; however, their application for noninvasive, real-time monitoring of interfacial effects during cell growth and differentiation on SiNW has not been fully explored. Here, we cultured rat adrenal pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, a type of neural progenitor cell, directly on SiNW FET devices to monitor cell adhesion during growth and morphological changes during neuronal differentiation for a period of 5-7 d. Monitoring was performed by measuring the non-Faradaic electrical impedance of the cell-SiNW FET system using a precision LCR meter. Our SiNW FET devices exhibited changes in impedance parameters during cell growth and differentiation because of the negatively charged cell membrane, seal resistance, and membrane capacitance at the cell/SiNW interface. It was observed that during both PC12 cell growth and neuronal differentiation, the impedance magnitude increased and the phase shifted to more negative values. However, impedance changes during cell growth already plateaued 3 d after seeding, while impedance changes continued until the last observation day during differentiation. Our results also indicate that the frequency shift to above 40 kHz after growth factor induction resulted from a larger coverage of cell membrane on the SiNWs due to distinctive morphological changes according to vinculin staining. Encapsulation of PC12 cells in a hydrogel scaffold resulted in a lack of trend in impedance parameters and confirmed that impedance changes were due to the cells. Moreover, cytolysis of the differentiated PC12 cells led to significant changes in impedance parameters. Equivalent electrical circuits were used to analyze the changes in impedance values during cell growth and differentiation. The technique employed in this study can provide a platform for performing investigations of growth-factor-induced progenitor cell differentiation.

  3. Investigating the potential role of non-vls genes on linear plasmid 28–1 in virulence and persistence by Borrelia burgdorferi

    OpenAIRE

    Magunda, Petronella R. Hove; Bankhead, Troy

    2016-01-01

    Background The lp28-1 plasmid is required for persistent infection by the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Mutational studies on this plasmid have shown that the vls locus is important for antigenic variation of the VlsE lipoprotein that leads to immune evasion and persistence. However, it is still unknown whether the vls system is the only genetic locus on this plasmid necessary for long-term infection, and thus the potential role of non-vls genes on lp28-1 in virulence and per...

  4. Growth of Vertically Aligned ZnO Nanowire Arrays Using Bilayered Metal Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    2010. [9] K. S. Leschkies, R. Divakar, J. Basu et al., “Photosensitization of ZnO nanowires with CdSe quantum dots for photovoltaic devices,” Nano...376, no. 5-6, pp. 653–658, 2003. [25] G. Z. Dai, Q. L. Zhang, Z.W. Peng et al., “One-step synthesis of low-dimensional CdSe nanostructures and...vapor-solid) mechanism, which has been reported by Dong et al. and Dai et al. [24, 25], in the CdSe and CdS system. In our case, during the early

  5. Selective-area growth of GaN nanowires on SiO{sub 2}-masked Si (111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, J. E.; Doundoulakis, G. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P. O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, N. Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Lymperakis, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Eftychis, S.; Georgakilas, A., E-mail: alexandr@physics.uoc.gr [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P. O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Adikimenakis, A.; Tsagaraki, K.; Androulidaki, M.; Konstantinidis, G. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, N. Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Olziersky, A.; Dimitrakis, P.; Ioannou-Sougleridis, V.; Normand, P. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR Demokritos, Patriarchou Grigoriou and Neapoleos 27, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Koukoula, T.; Kehagias, Th.; Komninou, Ph. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2016-06-14

    We analyze a method to selectively grow straight, vertical gallium nitride nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at sites specified by a silicon oxide mask, which is thermally grown on silicon (111) substrates and patterned by electron-beam lithography and reactive-ion etching. The investigated method requires only one single molecular beam epitaxy MBE growth process, i.e., the SiO{sub 2} mask is formed on silicon instead of on a previously grown GaN or AlN buffer layer. We present a systematic and analytical study involving various mask patterns, characterization by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, as well as numerical simulations, to evaluate how the dimensions (window diameter and spacing) of the mask affect the distribution of the nanowires, their morphology, and alignment, as well as their photonic properties. Capabilities and limitations for this method of selective-area growth of nanowires have been identified. A window diameter less than 50 nm and a window spacing larger than 500 nm can provide single nanowire nucleation in nearly all mask windows. The results are consistent with a Ga diffusion length on the silicon dioxide surface in the order of approximately 1 μm.

  6. Selective-area growth of GaN nanowires on SiO2-masked Si (111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, J. E.; Lymperakis, L.; Eftychis, S.; Adikimenakis, A.; Doundoulakis, G.; Tsagaraki, K.; Androulidaki, M.; Olziersky, A.; Dimitrakis, P.; Ioannou-Sougleridis, V.; Normand, P.; Koukoula, T.; Kehagias, Th.; Komninou, Ph.; Konstantinidis, G.; Georgakilas, A.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze a method to selectively grow straight, vertical gallium nitride nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at sites specified by a silicon oxide mask, which is thermally grown on silicon (111) substrates and patterned by electron-beam lithography and reactive-ion etching. The investigated method requires only one single molecular beam epitaxy MBE growth process, i.e., the SiO2 mask is formed on silicon instead of on a previously grown GaN or AlN buffer layer. We present a systematic and analytical study involving various mask patterns, characterization by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, as well as numerical simulations, to evaluate how the dimensions (window diameter and spacing) of the mask affect the distribution of the nanowires, their morphology, and alignment, as well as their photonic properties. Capabilities and limitations for this method of selective-area growth of nanowires have been identified. A window diameter less than 50 nm and a window spacing larger than 500 nm can provide single nanowire nucleation in nearly all mask windows. The results are consistent with a Ga diffusion length on the silicon dioxide surface in the order of approximately 1 μm.

  7. Biofunctionalization of ZnO nanowires for DNA sensory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Ulrich Christian; Gnauck, Martin; Ronning, Carsten [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Moeller, Robert; Rudolph, Bettina; Fritzsche, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Photonische Technologien e.V., Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, DNA detecting systems have received a growing interest due to promising fields of application like DNA diagnostics, gene analysis, virus detection or forensic applications. Nanowire-based DNA biosensor allows both miniaturization and easy continuous monitoring of a detection signal by electrical means. The label free detection scheme based on electrochemical changes of the surface potential during immobilization of specific DNA probes was heretofore mainly studied for silicon. In this work a surface decoration process with bifunctional molecules known as silanization was applied to VLS-grown ZnO nanowires which both feature a large sensitivity for surface modification, are biocompatible and easy to synthesize as well. Successfully bound DNA was proved by fluorescence microscopy. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) was chosen and optimized for quickly contacting the ZnO nanowires. Furthermore, electrical signal characterization was performed in preparation for DNA sensory applications.

  8. Growth of ZnO nanowires on polypropylene membrane surface-Characterization and reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarska, Marta; Nowak, Bartosz; Skowroński, Jarosław; Piątkiewicz, Wojciech; Gradoń, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Need for a new membrane is clearly visible in recent studies, mostly due to the fouling phenomenon. Authors, focused on problem of biofouling caused by microorganisms that are present in water environment. An attempt to form a new membrane with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires was made; where plasma treatment was used as a first step of modification followed by chemical bath deposition. Such membrane will exhibit additional reactive properties. ZnO, because of its antibacterial and photocatalytic properties, is more and more often used in commercial applications. The authors used SEM imaging, measurement of the contact angle, XRD and the FT-IR analysis for membrane characterization. Amount of ZnO deposited on membrane surface was also investigated by dithizone method. Photocatalytic properties of such membranes were examined through methylene blue and humic acid degradation in laboratory scale modules with LEDs as either: wide range white or UV light source. Antibacterial and antifouling properties of polypropylene membranes modified with ZnO nanowires were examined through a series of tests involving microorganisms: model gram-positive and -negative bacteria. The obtained results showed that it is possible to modify the membrane surface in such a way, that additional reactive properties will be given. Thus, not only did the membrane become a physical barrier, but also turned out to be a reactive one.

  9. Vertical growth of core-shell III-V nanowires for solar cells application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D Y; Bae, M H; Shin, J C; Kim, Y J; Lee, Y J; Choi, K J; Seong, T Y; Choi, W J

    2014-04-01

    High density (In)GaAs/GaAs/AIGaAs nanowires (NWs) consisting of n-type core and p-type shell have been vertically grown on (111) GaAs substrate using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and fabricated into solar cells. Au colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) are employed as a catalyst. High density nanowires were obtained by uniform distribution of Au NPs. Fe-SEM, TEM and HRTEM images show that the morphology of shell is sensitive to p-doping concentration. Increase in the density of p-doping precursor results in "kinking" of NPs and rough shell surface. The origin of kinking has been explained by the GaAs twin phases due to Zn segregation on the surface of shell. It has been observed that the morphology of NPs can be controlled through optimizing various source purge technique of DEZn and deposition temperature. Electrical properties of core-shell doped NWs are carried out using I-V characterization. The core-shell NWs show characteristics of p-n junction as revealed by I-V studies.

  10. Controlled growth of Cu-Ni nanowires and nanospheres for enhanced microwave absorption properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Dong, Lifeng; Zhang, Baoqin; Yu, Mingxun; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-03-01

    Copper is a good dielectric loss material but has low stability, whereas nickel is a good magnetic loss material and is corrosion resistant but with low conductivity, therefore Cu-Ni hybrid nanostructures have synergistic advantages as microwave absorption (MA) materials. Different Cu/Ni molar ratios of bimetallic nanowires (Cu13@Ni7, Cu5@Ni5 and Cu7@Ni13) and nanospheres (Cu13@Ni7, Cu5@Ni5 and Cu1@Ni3) have been successfully synthesized via facile reduction of hydrazine under similar reaction conditions, and the morphology can be easily tuned by varying the feed ratio or the complexing agent. Apart from the concentrations of Cu2+ and Ni2+, the reduction parameters are similar for all samples to confirm the effects of the Cu/Ni molar ratio and morphology on MA properties. Ni is incorporated into the Cu-Ni nanomaterials as a shell over the Cu core at low temperature, as proved by XRD, SEM, TEM and XPS. Through the complex relative permittivity and permeability, reflection loss was evaluated, which revealed that the MA capacity greatly depended on the Cu/Ni molar ratio and morphology. For Cu@Ni nanowires, as the molar ratio of Ni shell increased the MA properties decreased accordingly. However, for Cu@Ni nanospheres, the opposite trend was found, that is, as the molar ratio of the Ni shell increased the MA properties increased.

  11. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2013-12-06

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  12. Transition from anodic titania nanotubes to nanowires: arising from nanotube growth to application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lidong; Zhang, Sam; Wang, Xiu; Sun, Xiao Wei; Ong, Duen Yang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Dongliang

    2011-12-23

    Anodic formation of titania nanowires has been interpreted using a bamboo-splitting model; however, a number of phenomena are difficult to explain with this model. Herein, transition from nanotubes to nanowires is investigated by varying the anodizing conditions. The results indicate that the transition requires a large number of hydrogen ions to reduce the passivated area of tube walls, and therefore can be observed only in an intermediate chemical dissolution environment. Accordingly, a model in terms of stretching and splitting is proposed to interpret the transition process. The model provides a basis to suppress the nanowires with surface treatments before anodization and to clear the nanowires with an ultrasonication process after anodization. The nanotube-nanowire transition also arises when the tubes are directly used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Treatment with titanium tetrachloride solution for about 10 h is found to be effective in suppressing the nanowires, and thus improving the photovoltaic properties of the solar cells.

  13. Selective-area catalyst-free MBE growth of GaN nanowires using a patterned oxide layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, T; Gotschke, T; Limbach, F; Stoica, T; Calarco, R

    2011-03-04

    GaN nanowires (NWs) were grown selectively in holes of a patterned silicon oxide mask, by rf-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE), without any metal catalyst. The oxide was deposited on a thin AlN buffer layer previously grown on a Si(111) substrate. Regular arrays of holes in the oxide layer were obtained using standard e-beam lithography. The selectivity of growth has been studied varying the substrate temperature, gallium beam equivalent pressure and patterning layout. Adjusting the growth parameters, GaN NWs can be selectively grown in the holes of the patterned oxide with complete suppression of the parasitic growth in between the holes. The occupation probability of a hole with a single or multiple NWs depends strongly on its diameter. The selectively grown GaN NWs have one common crystallographic orientation with respect to the Si(111) substrate via the AlN buffer layer, as proven by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Based on the experimental data, we present a schematic model of the GaN NW formation in which a GaN pedestal is initially grown in the hole.

  14. Aluminum catalyzed growth of silicon nanowires: Al atom location and the influence of silicon precursor pressure on the morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, David; Cayron, Cyril; De Vito, Eric; Tileli, Vasiliki; Faucherand, Pascal; Morin, Christine; Brioude, Arnaud; Perraud, Simon

    2012-02-01

    We study the growth of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with aluminum as catalyst. We show that for a growth temperature of 600 °C, the silicon precursor partial pressure (SiH4 in this study) is a key parameter for controlling the structural quality of the resulting SiNWs. We find by transmission electron microscopy that at high SiH4 partial pressure, the SiNWs are composed of a monocrystalline core with a high density of surface defects, mainly twins, sheathed by a rough amorphous silicon layer. By contrast, at low SiH4 partial pressure, the SiNWs are monocrystalline with a lower density of surface crystalline defects and a smooth surface. For the low SiH4 partial pressure SiNWs, Al atoms have been detected at the SiNW surface by Auger spectroscopy at level around 3 at% and in the SiNW core by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) at levels around 1 at%. Interestingly, higher Al concentrations are measured inside the nano-twin domains by EDS (around ten times increase). Two possible explanations are proposed; stacking faults are induced by Al atoms that lower their energy formation, or Al atoms can be trapped inside these stacking faults due to segregation effect during growth. These findings will be important for growing high quality SiNWs using Al as metal catalyst in reduced-pressure CVD tool.

  15. Semiconducting silicon nanowires for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Coffer, JL

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical applications have benefited greatly from the increasing interest and research into semiconducting silicon nanowires. Semiconducting Silicon Nanowires for Biomedical Applications reviews the fabrication, properties, and applications of this emerging material. The book begins by reviewing the basics, as well as the growth, characterization, biocompatibility, and surface modification, of semiconducting silicon nanowires. It goes on to focus on silicon nanowires for tissue engineering and delivery applications, including cellular binding and internalization, orthopedic tissue scaffol

  16. A Novel Method to Grow Vertically Aligned Silicon Nanowires on Si (111 and Their Optical Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzuen-Wei Ho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we grew silicon nanowires (SiNWs on Si (111 substrate by gold-catalyzed vapor liquid solid (VLS process using tetrachlorosilane (SiCl4 in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. SiNWs with 150–200 nm diameters were found to grow along the orientations of all 〈111〉 family, including the vertical and the inclined, on Si (111. The effects of various process conditions, including SiCl4 concentration, SiCl4 feeding temperature, H2 annealing, and ramp cooling, on the crystal quality and growth orientation of SiNWs, were studied to optimize the growth conditions. Furthermore, a novel method was developed to reliably grow vertically aligned SiNWs on Si (111 utilizing the principle of liquid phase epitaxy (LPE. A ramp-cooling process was employed to slowly precipitate the epitaxial Si seeds on Si (111 after H2 annealing at 650°C. Then, after heating in SiCl4/H2 up to 850°C to grow SiNWs, almost 100% vertically aligned SiNWs could be achieved reproducibly. The high degree of vertical alignment of SiNWs is effective in reducing surface reflection of solar light with the reflectance decreasing with increasing the SiNWs length. The vertically aligned SiNWs have good potentials for solar cells and nano devices.

  17. Template-Assisted Hydrothermal Growth of Aligned Zinc Oxide Nanowires for Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Canlin; Sanchez-Jimenez, Pedro E; Datta, Anuja; Boughey, Francesca L; Whiter, Richard A; Sahonta, Suman-Lata; Kar-Narayan, Sohini

    2016-06-08

    A flexible and robust piezoelectric nanogenerator (NG) based on a polymer-ceramic nanocomposite structure has been successfully fabricated via a cost-effective and scalable template-assisted hydrothermal synthesis method. Vertically aligned arrays of dense and uniform zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) with high aspect ratio (diameter ∼250 nm, length ∼12 μm) were grown within nanoporous polycarbonate (PC) templates. The energy conversion efficiency was found to be ∼4.2%, which is comparable to previously reported values for ZnO NWs. The resulting NG is found to have excellent fatigue performance, being relatively immune to detrimental environmental factors and mechanical failure, as the constituent ZnO NWs remain embedded and protected inside the polymer matrix.

  18. Growth and Transfer of Monolithic Horizontal ZnO Nanowire Superstructures onto Flexible Substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Sheng

    2010-04-28

    A method of fabricating horizontally aligned ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays with full control over the width and length is demonstrated. A cross-sectional view of the NWs by transmission electron microscopy shows a "mushroom-like" structure. Novel monolithic multisegment superstructures are fabricated by making use of the lateral overgrowth. Ultralong horizontal ZnO NWs of an aspect ratio on the order often thousand are also demonstrated. These horizontal NWs are lifted off and transferred onto a flexible polymer substrate, which may have many great applications in horizontal ZnO NW-based nanosensor arrays, light-emitting diodes, optical gratings, integrated circuit interconnects, and high-output-power alternating-current nanogenerators. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  19. Bamboo-like 3C-SiC nanowires with periodical fluctuating diameter: Homogeneous synthesis, synergistic growth mechanism, and their luminescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Jian; Li, Zhenjiang; Yu, Hongyuan; Wang, Yaqi; Meng, Alan; Li, Qingdang

    2016-11-01

    Herein, bamboo-like 3C-SiC nanowires have been successfully fabricated on homogeneous 6H-SiC substrate by a simple chemical vapor reaction (CVR) approach. The obtained 3C-SiC nanostructure with periodical fluctuating diameter, is composed of two alternating structure units, the typical normal-sized stem segment with perfect crystallinity and obvious projecting nodes segment having high-density stacking faults. The formation of the interesting morphology is significantly subjected to the peculiar growth condition provided by the homogeneous substrate as well as the varying growth elastic energy. Furthermore, the photoluminescence (PL) performance measured on the bamboo-like SiC nanowire shows an intensive emission peaks centered at 451 nm and 467 nm, which has been expected to make a positive progress toward the optical application of the SiC-based one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures, such as light emission diode (LED).

  20. FFT-impedance spectroscopy analysis of the growth of magnetic metal nanowires in ultra-high aspect ratio InP membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerngross, M.-D.; Carstensen, J.; Föll, H.; Adelung, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the characterization of the electrochemical growth process of magnetic nanowires in ultra-high-aspect ratio InP membranes via in situ fast Fourier transform impedance spectroscopy in a typical frequency range from 75 Hz to 18.5 kHz. The measured impedance data from the Ni, Co, and FeCo can be very well fitted using the same electric equivalent circuit consisting of a series resistance in serial connection to an RC-element and a Maxwell element. The impedance data clearly indicate the similarities in the growth behavior of Ni, Co and FeCo nanowires in ultra-high aspect ratio InP membranes—the beneficial impact of boric acid on the metal deposition in ultra-high aspect ratio membranes and the diffusion limitation of boric acid, as well as differences such as passivation or side reactions.

  1. Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Al-Shamery, Katharina;

    Single crystalline nanowires from fluorescing organic molecules like para-phenylenes or thiophenes are supposed to become key elements in future integrated optoelectronic devices [1]. For a sophisticated design of devices based on nanowires the basic principles of the nanowire formation have...

  2. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Desheng

    2010-01-13

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi2Se3 material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi2Se5 nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi 2Se5 nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [1120] direction with a rectangular cross-section and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with ∼ 1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitais to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  3. Short-wavelength infrared photodetector on Si employing strain-induced growth of very tall InAs nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun Wook; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Doo Gun; Bae, Myung-Ho; Heo, Jaeyeong; Choi, Kyoung Jin; Choi, Won Jun; Choe, Jeong-woo; Shin, Jae Cheol

    2015-06-02

    One-dimensional crystal growth enables the epitaxial integration of III-V compound semiconductors onto a silicon (Si) substrate despite significant lattice mismatch. Here, we report a short-wavelength infrared (SWIR, 1.4-3 μm) photodetector that employs InAs nanowires (NWs) grown on Si. The wafer-scale epitaxial InAs NWs form on the Si substrate without a metal catalyst or pattern assistance; thus, the growth is free of metal-atom-induced contaminations, and is also cost-effective. InAs NW arrays with an average height of 50 μm provide excellent anti-reflective and light trapping properties over a wide wavelength range. The photodetector exhibits a peak detectivity of 1.9 × 10(8) cm · Hz(1/2)/W for the SWIR band at 77 K and operates at temperatures as high as 220 K. The SWIR photodetector on the Si platform demonstrated in this study is promising for future low-cost optical sensors and Si photonics.

  4. Parameters Influencing the Growth of ZnO Nanowires as Efficient Low Temperature Flexible Perovskite-Based Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Dymshits

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite has proved to be a superior material for photovoltaic solar cells. In this work we investigate the parameters influencing the growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs for use as an efficient low temperature photoanode in perovskite-based solar cells. The structure of the solar cell is FTO (SnO2:F-glass (or PET-ITO (In2O3·(SnO2 (ITO on, polyethylene terephthalate (PET/ZnAc seed layer/ZnO NWs/CH3NH3PbI3/Spiro-OMeTAD/Au. The influence of the growth rate and the diameter of the ZnO NWs on the photovoltaic performance were carefully studied. The ZnO NWs perovskite-based solar cell demonstrates impressive power conversion efficiency of 9.06% on a rigid substrate with current density over 21 mA/cm2. In addition, we successfully fabricated flexible perovskite solar cells while maintaining all fabrication processes at low temperature, achieving power conversion efficiency of 6.4% with excellent stability for over 75 bending cycles.

  5. Parameters Influencing the Growth of ZnO Nanowires as Efficient Low Temperature Flexible Perovskite-Based Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymshits, Alex; Iagher, Lior; Etgar, Lioz

    2016-01-19

    Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite has proved to be a superior material for photovoltaic solar cells. In this work we investigate the parameters influencing the growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs) for use as an efficient low temperature photoanode in perovskite-based solar cells. The structure of the solar cell is FTO (SnO₂:F)-glass (or PET-ITO (In₂O₃·(SnO₂) (ITO)) on, polyethylene terephthalate (PET)/ZnAc seed layer/ZnO NWs/CH₃NH₃PbI₃/Spiro-OMeTAD/Au. The influence of the growth rate and the diameter of the ZnO NWs on the photovoltaic performance were carefully studied. The ZnO NWs perovskite-based solar cell demonstrates impressive power conversion efficiency of 9.06% on a rigid substrate with current density over 21 mA/cm². In addition, we successfully fabricated flexible perovskite solar cells while maintaining all fabrication processes at low temperature, achieving power conversion efficiency of 6.4% with excellent stability for over 75 bending cycles.

  6. Effects of growth substrates on the morphologies of TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays and the performance of assembled UV detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guohua; Zhang, Min [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Dezhong [College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Gu, Xuehui [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Meng, Fanxu [College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Wen, Shanpeng, E-mail: sp_wen@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Chen, Yu, E-mail: chenyu_1099@163.com [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No A35 QingHua East Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Ruan, Shengping, E-mail: rspjlu@163.com [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays with different morphologies were synthesized on ITO and FTO. • Growth mechanism of the TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays (TNAs) was investigated. • Back-incident array UV detectors based on the two TNAs were assembled. • Effects of growth substrates on device performance were studied for the first time. • Detector based on the well-aligned TNAs on FTO exhibits more excellent performance. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays (TNAs) with different morphologies were synthesized on transparent conductive tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) and fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO). Back-incident array TNA-based UV detectors were assembled. Effects of growth substrates on the morphologies of TNAs and the performance of UV detectors were investigated for the first time. The device based on the vertically aligned TNAs on FTO (TNFs) exhibited more excellent photoresponse properties than that based on the cluster-shaped TNAs on ITO (TNIs). This phenomenon can be ascribed to the easier and faster electron transport in the single crystallographic orientation TNFs. The outstanding performance also demonstrated the obvious superiority of TNFs in the application of UV detection.

  7. Electrochemically grown rough-textured nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Pawan; Postetter, David; Saragnese, Daniel [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States); Papadakis, Stergios J. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (United States); Gracias, David H., E-mail: dgracias@jhu.ed [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Nanowires with a rough surface texture show unusual electronic, optical, and chemical properties; however, there are only a few existing methods for producing these nanowires. Here, we describe two methods for growing both free standing and lithographically patterned gold (Au) nanowires with a rough surface texture. The first strategy is based on the deposition of nanowires from a silver (Ag)-Au plating solution mixture that precipitates an Ag-Au cyanide complex during electrodeposition at low current densities. This complex disperses in the plating solution, thereby altering the nanowire growth to yield a rough surface texture. These nanowires are mass produced in alumina membranes. The second strategy produces long and rough Au nanowires on lithographically patternable nickel edge templates with corrugations formed by partial etching. These rough nanowires can be easily arrayed and integrated with microscale devices.

  8. Anisotropy of chemical transformation from In2Se3 to CuInSe2 nanowires through solid state reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, David T; Peng, Hailin; Cui, Yi

    2009-06-17

    In(2)Se(3) nanowires synthesized by the VLS technique are transformed by solid-state reaction with copper into high-quality single-crystalline CuInSe(2) nanowires. The process is studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy. The transformation temperature exhibits a surprising anisotropy, with In(2)Se(3) nanowires grown along their [0001] direction transforming at a surprisingly low temperature of 225 degrees C, while nanowires in a [11(2)0] orientation require a much higher temperature of 585 degrees C. These results offer a route to the synthesis of CuInSe(2) nanowires at a relatively low temperature as well as insight into the details of a transformation commonly used in the fabrication of thin-film solar cells.

  9. Dendritic gold nanowire growth observed in liquid with transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Tobias; de Jonge, Niels

    2013-07-02

    The growth of nanoscale gold dendrites was studied in situ in a thin liquid film with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) windows. Gold nanoparticle seeds were covered by a thin liquid layer containing precursor solution. Dendrite nucleation was induced by the electron beam leading to an initial burst of growth. The growth then settled at tip velocities between 0.1 and 2.0 nm/s for different dendrites. Tip velocities fluctuated as different dendrite geometries grew from the tips. Those dendrites showing granularities in their structure experienced the largest growth speed. Comparison of the observed velocities with diffusion-limited growth rates suggests that dendrite growth in thin films at this scale is limited by diffusion. The described method may find application in research on the mechanisms behind dendrite growth and also to study other types of anisotropic growth of nanomaterials driven by crystal and twin geometries.

  10. High Purity and Large-scale Preparation of β-Ga2O3 Nanowires and Nanosheets by CVD and Their Raman and Photoluminescence Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhou; GONG Min; SUN Xiao-song; YANG Zhi-mei; CHEN Hao; WU Zhan-wen; JIN Yong; JIAO Zhi-feng; HE Yi; WANG Hui; LIU Jun-gang

    2007-01-01

    Ga2O3 nano-structures,nanowires and nanosheets are produced on Au pre-coated(111) silicon substrates with chemical vapor deposition(CVD) technique.By evaporating pure Ga powder in the H2O atmosphere under ambient pressure the large-scale preparation of β-Ga2O3 with monoclinic crystalline structure is achieved.The crystalline structures and morphologies of produced Ga2O3 nano-structures are characterized by means of scanning electron microscope(SEM),X-ray diffraction(XRD),selected area electron diffraction(SAED) and transmission electron microscope(TEM).Raman spectrum reveals the typical vibration modes of Ga2O3.The vibration mode shifts corresponding to Ga2O3 nano-structures are not found.Two distinguish photoluminescence(PL) emissions are found at about 399 nm and 469 nm owing to the VO-VGa excitation and VO-VGa-O excitation,respectively.The growth mechanisms of Ga2O3 nanowires and nanosheets are discussed with vapor-liquid-solid(VLS) and vapor-solid(VS) mechanisms.

  11. Nanowire sensors and arrays for chemical/biomolecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Minhee; Lee, Choonsup; Vasquez, Richard P.; Ramanathan, K.; Bangar, M. A.; Chen, W.; Mulchandan, A.; Myung, N. V.

    2005-01-01

    We report electrochemical growth of single nanowire based sensors using e-beam patterned electrolyte channels, potentially enabling the controlled fabrication of individually addressable high density arrays. The electrodeposition technique results in nanowires with controlled dimensions, positions, alignments, and chemical compositions. Using this technique, we have fabricated single palladium nanowires with diameters ranging between 75 nm and 300 nm and conducting polymer nanowires (polypyrrole and polyaniline) with diameters between 100 nm and 200 nm. Using these single nanowires, we have successfully demonstrated gas sensing with Pd nanowires and pH sensing with polypirrole nanowires.

  12. Semiconductor nanowires and templates for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Xiang

    2009-07-15

    This thesis starts by developing a platform for the organized growth of nanowires directly on a planar substrate. For this, a method to fabricate horizontal porous alumina membranes is studied. The second part of the thesis focuses on the study of nanowires. It starts by the understanding of the growth mechanisms of germanium nanowires and follows by the structural and electrical properties at the single nanowire level. Horizontally aligned porous anodic alumina (PAA) was used as a template for the nanowire synthesis. Three PAA arrangements were studied: - high density membranes - micron-sized fingers - multi-contacts Membranes formed by a high density of nanopores were obtained by anodizing aluminum thin films. Metallic and semiconducting nanowires were synthesized into the PAA structures via DC deposition, pulsed electro-depostion and CVD growth. The presence of gold, copper, indium, nickel, tellurium, and silicon nanowires inside PAA templates was verified by SEM and EDX analysis. Further, room-temperature transport measurements showed that the pores are completely filled till the bottom of the pores. In this dissertation, single crystalline and core-shell germanium nanowires are synthesized using indium and bismuth as catalyst in a chemical vapor deposition procedure with germane (GeH{sub 4}) as growth precursor. A systematic growth study has been performed to obtain high aspect-ratio germanium nanowires. The influence of the growth conditions on the final morphology and the crystalline structure has been determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In the case of indium catalyzed germanium nanowires, two different structures were identified: single crystalline and crystalline core-amorphous shell. The preferential growth axis of both kinds of nanowires is along the [110] direction. The occurrence of the two morphologies was found to only depend on the nanowire dimension. In the case of bismuth

  13. Gas-Phase Growth of Heterostructures of Carbon Nanotubes and Bimetallic Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whi Dong Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, inexpensive, and viable method for growing multiple heterostructured carbon nanotubes (CNTs over the entire surface of Ni-Al bimetallic nanowires (NWs in the gas phase was developed. Polymer-templated bimetallic nitrate NWs were produced by electrospinning in the first step, and subsequent calcination resulted in the formation of bimetallic oxide NWs by thermal decomposition. In the second step, free-floating bimetallic NWs were produced by spray pyrolysis in an environment containing hydrogen gas as a reducing gas. These NWs were continuously introduced into a thermal CVD reactor in order to grow CNTs in the gas phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and Raman spectrometry analyses revealed that the catalytic Ni sites exposed in the non-catalytic Al matrix over the entire surface of the bimetallic NWs were seeded to radially grow highly graphitized CNTs, which resembled “foxtail” structures. The grown CNTs were found to have a relatively uniform diameter of approximately 10±2 nm and 10 to 15 walls with a hollow core. The average length of the gas-phase-grown CNTs can be controlled between 100 and 1000 nm by adjusting the residence time of the free-floating bimetallic NWs in the thermal CVD reactor.

  14. Rational growth of branched nanowire heterostructures with synthetically encoded properties and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Tian, Bozhi; Xiang, Jie; Qian, Fang; Zheng, Gengfeng; Wang, Hongtao; Mai, Liqiang; Lieber, Charles M

    2011-07-26

    Branched nanostructures represent unique, 3D building blocks for the "bottom-up" paradigm of nanoscale science and technology. Here, we report a rational, multistep approach toward the general synthesis of 3D branched nanowire (NW) heterostructures. Single-crystalline semiconductor, including groups IV, III-V, and II-VI, and metal branches have been selectively grown on core or core/shell NW backbones, with the composition, morphology, and doping of core (core/shell) NWs and branch NWs well controlled during synthesis. Measurements made on the different composition branched NW structures demonstrate encoding of functional p-type/n-type diodes and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as well as field effect transistors with device function localized at the branch/backbone NW junctions. In addition, multibranch/backbone NW structures were synthesized and used to demonstrate capability to create addressable nanoscale LED arrays, logic circuits, and biological sensors. Our work demonstrates a previously undescribed level of structural and functional complexity in NW materials, and more generally, highlights the potential of bottom-up synthesis to yield increasingly complex functional systems in the future.

  15. Growth and Magnetic Characterization of 1D Permalloy Nanowires Using Self Developed Anodic Aluminium Oxide Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashutosh K; Mandal, Kalyan

    2016-01-01

    1D Permalloy refers to arrays of nanowires (NWs) made of an alloy of Ni and Fe with 80 and 20 at% composition respectively. In the present work 1 D Permalloy NWs arrays were fabricated into the pores of self engineered Anodic Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates by a simple electrodeposition technique (EDT). By varying the anodization voltage and parameters of the electrolyte solutions we developed AAO templates with different average pore diameters (40 nm to 70 nm) and developed 1D Permalloy NWs within them. Structural characterization of AAO templates and 1D Permalloy NWs were performed by Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy (TEM and SEM respectively). X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of 1D Permalloy NWs showed their fcc crystalline structure and the AAO template was found to be amorphous in nature. Magnetic studies showed the 1D Permalloy NWs arrays to have strong shape anisotropy, and the easy axis was found to be parallel to the NWs axis. We studied the angular dependence of magnetic properties of the NWs. Coercivity (Hc) and remanence (Mr/Ms) measured along the NWs axis were found to be higher than those measured in a direction perpendicular to the NWs axis. 1D Permalloy NWs developed in this work have the potential to be used in magnetic recording devices.

  16. Comparative genome analysis: selection pressure on the Borrelia vls cassettes is essential for infectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilske Bettina

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At least three species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Bbsl cause tick-borne Lyme disease. Previous work including the genome analysis of B. burgdorferi B31 and B. garinii PBi suggested a highly variable plasmid part. The frequent occurrence of duplicated sequence stretches, the observed plasmid redundancy, as well as the mainly unknown function and variability of plasmid encoded genes rendered the relationships between plasmids within and between species largely unresolvable. Results To gain further insight into Borreliae genome properties we completed the plasmid sequences of B. garinii PBi, added the genome of a further species, B. afzelii PKo, to our analysis, and compared for both species the genomes of pathogenic and apathogenic strains. The core of all Bbsl genomes consists of the chromosome and two plasmids collinear between all species. We also found additional groups of plasmids, which share large parts of their sequences. This makes it very likely that these plasmids are relatively stable and share common ancestors before the diversification of Borrelia species. The analysis of the differences between B. garinii PBi and B. afzelii PKo genomes of low and high passages revealed that the loss of infectivity is accompanied in both species by a loss of similar genetic material. Whereas B. garinii PBi suffered only from the break-off of a plasmid end, B. afzelii PKo lost more material, probably an entire plasmid. In both cases the vls gene locus encoding for variable surface proteins is affected. Conclusion The complete genome sequences of a B. garinii and a B. afzelii strain facilitate further comparative studies within the genus Borrellia. Our study shows that loss of infectivity can be traced back to only one single event in B. garinii PBi: the loss of the vls cassettes possibly due to error prone gene conversion. Similar albeit extended losses in B. afzelii PKo support the hypothesis that infectivity of Borrelia

  17. In Situ X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure Spectroscopy of ZnO Nanowire Growth During Chemical Bath Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPeak, Kevin M.; Becker, Matthew A.; Britton, Nathan G.; Majidi, Hasti; Bunker, Bruce A.; Baxter, Jason B. (Drexel); (Notre)

    2010-12-03

    Chemical bath deposition (CBD) offers a simple and inexpensive route to deposit semiconductor nanostructures, but lack of fundamental understanding and control of the underlying chemistry has limited its versatility. Here we report the first use of in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy during CBD, enabling detailed investigation of both reaction mechanisms and kinetics of ZnO nanowire growth from zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) precursors. Time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were used to quantify Zn(II) speciation in both solution and solid phases. ZnO crystallizes directly from [Zn(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} without long-lived intermediates. Using ZnO nanowire deposition as an example, this study establishes in situ XANES spectroscopy as an excellent quantitative tool to understand CBD of nanomaterials.

  18. Epitaxial growth of ZnO Nanodisks with large exposed polar facets on nanowire arrays for promoting photoelectrochemical water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haining; Wei, Zhanhua; Yan, Keyou; Bai, Yang; Zhu, Zonglong; Zhang, Teng; Yang, Shihe

    2014-11-01

    Single-crystalline and branched 1D arrays, ZnO nanowires/nanodisks (NWs/NDs) arrays, are fabricated to significantly enhance the performance of photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. The epitaxial growth of the ZnO NDs with large exposed polar facets on ZnO NWs exhibits a laminated structure, which dramatically increases the light scattering capacity of the NWs arrays, especially in the wavelength region around 400 nm. The ND branching of the 1D arrays in the epitaxial fashion not only increase surface area and light utilization, but also support fast charge transport, leading to the considerable increase of photocurrent. Moreover, the tiny size NDs can facilitate charge separation and reduce charge recombination, while the large exposed polar facets of NDs reduce the external potential bias needed for water splitting. These advantages land the ZnO NWs/NDs arrays a four times higher power conversion efficiency than the ZnO NWs arrays. By sensitizing the ZnO NWs/NDs with CdS and CdSe quantum dots, the PEC performance can be further improved. This work advocates a trunk/leaf in forest concept for the single-crystalline NWs/NDs in array with enlarged exposure of polar facets, which opens the way for optimizing light harvesting and charge separation and transport, and thus the PEC water splitting.

  19. Facile synthesis and growth mechanism of Ni-catalyzed GaAs nanowires on non-crystalline substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Ning; Hui, Alvin T; Hou, Jared J; Shan Guangcun; Xiu Fei; Hung, TakFu; Ho, Johnny C [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wang Fengyun, E-mail: johnnyho@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2011-07-15

    GaAs nanowires (NWs) have been extensively explored for next generation electronics, photonics and photovoltaics due to their direct bandgap and excellent carrier mobility. Typically, these NWs are grown epitaxially on crystalline substrates, which could limit potential applications requiring high growth yield to be printable or transferable on amorphous and flexible substrates. Here, utilizing Ni as a catalytic seed, we successfully demonstrate the synthesis of highly crystalline, stoichiometric and dense GaAs NWs on amorphous SiO{sub 2} substrates. Notably, the NWs are found to grow via the vapor-solid-solid (VSS) mechanism with non-spherical NiGa catalytic tips and low defect densities while exhibiting a narrow distribution of diameter (21.0 {+-} 3.9 nm) uniformly along the entire length of the NW (>10 {mu}m). The NWs are then configured into field-effect transistors showing impressive electrical characteristics with I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} > 10{sup 3}, which further demonstrates the purity and crystal quality of NWs obtained with this simple synthesis technique, compared to the conventional MBE or MOCVD grown GaAs NWs.

  20. Growth and Photovoltaic Properties of High-Quality GaAs Nanowires Prepared by the Two-Source CVD Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Zaixing; Wu, Xiaofeng; Han, Ning; Liu, Hanyu; Wang, Shuobo; Li, Jun; Tse, WaiMan; Yip, SenPo; Chen, Yunfa; Ho, Johnny C

    2016-12-01

    Growing high-quality and low-cost GaAs nanowires (NWs) as well as fabricating high-performance NW solar cells by facile means is an important development towards the cost-effective next-generation photovoltaics. In this work, highly crystalline, dense, and long GaAs NWs are successfully synthesized using a two-source method on non-crystalline SiO2 substrates by a simple solid-source chemical vapor deposition method. The high V/III ratio and precursor concentration enabled by this two-source configuration can significantly benefit the NW growth and suppress the crystal defect formation as compared with the conventional one-source system. Since less NW crystal defects would contribute fewer electrons being trapped by the surface oxides, the p-type conductivity is then greatly enhanced as revealed by the electrical characterization of fabricated NW devices. Furthermore, the individual single NW and high-density NW parallel arrays achieved by contact printing can be effectively fabricated into Schottky barrier solar cells simply by employing asymmetric Ni-Al contacts, along with an open circuit voltage of ~0.3 V. All these results indicate the technological promise of these high-quality two-source grown GaAs NWs, especially for the realization of facile Schottky solar cells utilizing the asymmetric Ni-Al contact.

  1. Electrochemical pore filling strategy for controlled growth of magnetic and metallic nanowire arrays with large area uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefpour, M; Kashi, M Almasi; Ramazani, A; Montazer, A H

    2016-06-01

    While a variety of template-based strategies have been developed in the fabrication of nanowires (NWs), a uniform pore filling across the template still poses a major challenge. Here, we present a large area controlled pore filling strategy in the reproducible fabrication of various magnetic and metallic NW arrays, embedded inside anodic aluminum oxide templates. Using a diffusive pulsed electrodeposition (DPED) technique, this versatile strategy relies on the optimized filling of branched nanopores at the bottom of templates with Cu. Serving the Cu filled nanopores as appropriate nucleation sites, the DPED is followed by a uniform and homogeneous deposition of magnetic (Ni and Fe) and metallic (Cu and Zn) NWs at a current density of 50 mA cm(-2) for an optimal thickness of alumina barrier layer (∼18 nm). Our strategy provides large area uniformity (exceeding 400 μm(2)) in the fabrication of 16 μm long free-standing NW arrays. Using hysteresis loop measurements and scanning electron microscopy images, the electrodeposition efficiency (EE) and pore filling percentage (F p) are evaluated, leading to maximum EE and F p values of 91% and 95% for Ni and Zn, respectively. Moreover, the resulting NW arrays are found to be highly crystalline. Accordingly, the DPED technique is capable of cheaply and efficiently controlling NW growth over a large area, providing a tool for various nanoscale applications including biomedical devices, electronics, photonics, magnetic storage medium and nanomagnet computing.

  2. Electrochemical pore filling strategy for controlled growth of magnetic and metallic nanowire arrays with large area uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefpour, M.; Almasi Kashi, M.; Ramazani, A.; Montazer, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    While a variety of template-based strategies have been developed in the fabrication of nanowires (NWs), a uniform pore filling across the template still poses a major challenge. Here, we present a large area controlled pore filling strategy in the reproducible fabrication of various magnetic and metallic NW arrays, embedded inside anodic aluminum oxide templates. Using a diffusive pulsed electrodeposition (DPED) technique, this versatile strategy relies on the optimized filling of branched nanopores at the bottom of templates with Cu. Serving the Cu filled nanopores as appropriate nucleation sites, the DPED is followed by a uniform and homogeneous deposition of magnetic (Ni and Fe) and metallic (Cu and Zn) NWs at a current density of 50 mA cm-2 for an optimal thickness of alumina barrier layer (˜18 nm). Our strategy provides large area uniformity (exceeding 400 μm2) in the fabrication of 16 μm long free-standing NW arrays. Using hysteresis loop measurements and scanning electron microscopy images, the electrodeposition efficiency (EE) and pore filling percentage (F p) are evaluated, leading to maximum EE and F p values of 91% and 95% for Ni and Zn, respectively. Moreover, the resulting NW arrays are found to be highly crystalline. Accordingly, the DPED technique is capable of cheaply and efficiently controlling NW growth over a large area, providing a tool for various nanoscale applications including biomedical devices, electronics, photonics, magnetic storage medium and nanomagnet computing.

  3. Growth and Photovoltaic Properties of High-Quality GaAs Nanowires Prepared by the Two-Source CVD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Zaixing; Wu, Xiaofeng; Han, Ning; Liu, Hanyu; Wang, Shuobo; Li, Jun; Tse, WaiMan; Yip, SenPo; Chen, Yunfa; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-04-01

    Growing high-quality and low-cost GaAs nanowires (NWs) as well as fabricating high-performance NW solar cells by facile means is an important development towards the cost-effective next-generation photovoltaics. In this work, highly crystalline, dense, and long GaAs NWs are successfully synthesized using a two-source method on non-crystalline SiO2 substrates by a simple solid-source chemical vapor deposition method. The high V/III ratio and precursor concentration enabled by this two-source configuration can significantly benefit the NW growth and suppress the crystal defect formation as compared with the conventional one-source system. Since less NW crystal defects would contribute fewer electrons being trapped by the surface oxides, the p-type conductivity is then greatly enhanced as revealed by the electrical characterization of fabricated NW devices. Furthermore, the individual single NW and high-density NW parallel arrays achieved by contact printing can be effectively fabricated into Schottky barrier solar cells simply by employing asymmetric Ni-Al contacts, along with an open circuit voltage of ~0.3 V. All these results indicate the technological promise of these high-quality two-source grown GaAs NWs, especially for the realization of facile Schottky solar cells utilizing the asymmetric Ni-Al contact.

  4. Magnetic-composite-modified polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor for vascular endothelial growth factor detection and cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Qiu, Jian-Tai; Yang, Fu-Liang; Liu, Yin-Chih; Chen, Min-Cheng; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Yang, Hung-Wei; Lin, Chia-Yi; Lin, Chu-Chi; Wu, Tzong-Shoon; Tu, Yi-Ming; Xiao, Min-Cong; Ho, Chia-Hua; Huang, Chien-Chao; Lai, Chao-Sung; Hua, Mu-Yi

    2014-10-01

    This study proposes a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) biosensor for diagnosing various stages of cervical carcinoma. In addition, VEGF concentrations at various stages of cancer therapy are determined and compared to data obtained by computed tomography (CT) and cancer antigen 125 (CA-125). The increase in VEGF concentrations during operations offers useful insight into dosage timing during cancer therapy. This biosensor uses Avastin as the biorecognition element for the potential cancer biomarker VEGF and is based on a n-type polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (poly-SiNW-FET). Magnetic nanoparticles with poly[aniline-co-N-(1-one-butyric acid) aniline]-Fe3O4 (SPAnH-Fe3O4) shell-core structures are used as carriers for Avastin loading and provide rapid purification due to their magnetic properties, which prevent the loss of bioactivity; furthermore, the high surface area of these structures increases the quantity of Avastin immobilized. Average concentrations in human blood for species that interfere with detection specificity are also evaluated. The detection range of the biosensor for serum samples covers the results expected from both healthy individuals and cancer patients.

  5. Synthesis and electrical characterization of intrinsic and in situ doped Si nanowires using a novel precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Molnar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Perchlorinated polysilanes were synthesized by polymerization of tetrachlorosilane under cold plasma conditions with hydrogen as a reducing agent. Subsequent selective cleavage of the resulting polymer yielded oligochlorosilanes SinCl2n+2 (n = 2, 3 from which the octachlorotrisilane (n = 3, Cl8Si3, OCTS was used as a novel precursor for the synthesis of single-crystalline Si nanowires (NW by the well-established vapor–liquid–solid (VLS mechanism. By adding doping agents, specifically BBr3 and PCl3, we achieved highly p- and n-type doped Si-NWs by means of atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD. These as grown NWs were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, as well as electrical measurements of the NWs integrated in four-terminal and back-gated MOSFET modules. The intrinsic NWs appeared to be highly crystalline, with a preferred growth direction of [111] and a specific resistivity of ρ = 6 kΩ·cm. The doped NWs appeared to be [112] oriented with a specific resistivity of ρ = 198 mΩ·cm for p-type Si-NWs and ρ = 2.7 mΩ·cm for n-doped Si-NWs, revealing excellent dopant activation.

  6. Synthesis and electrical characterization of intrinsic and in situ doped Si nanowires using a novel precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Wolfgang; Lugstein, Alois; Wojcik, Tomasz; Pongratz, Peter; Auner, Norbert; Bauch, Christian; Bertagnolli, Emmerich

    2012-01-01

    Perchlorinated polysilanes were synthesized by polymerization of tetrachlorosilane under cold plasma conditions with hydrogen as a reducing agent. Subsequent selective cleavage of the resulting polymer yielded oligochlorosilanes Si(n)Cl(2) (n) (+2) (n = 2, 3) from which the octachlorotrisilane (n = 3, Cl(8)Si(3), OCTS) was used as a novel precursor for the synthesis of single-crystalline Si nanowires (NW) by the well-established vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. By adding doping agents, specifically BBr(3) and PCl(3), we achieved highly p- and n-type doped Si-NWs by means of atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). These as grown NWs were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), as well as electrical measurements of the NWs integrated in four-terminal and back-gated MOSFET modules. The intrinsic NWs appeared to be highly crystalline, with a preferred growth direction of [111] and a specific resistivity of ρ = 6 kΩ·cm. The doped NWs appeared to be [112] oriented with a specific resistivity of ρ = 198 mΩ·cm for p-type Si-NWs and ρ = 2.7 mΩ·cm for n-doped Si-NWs, revealing excellent dopant activation.

  7. Bimetallic-catalyst-mediated syntheses of nanomaterials (nanowires, nanotubes, nanofibers, nanodots, etc) by the VQS (vapor-quasiliquid-solid, vapor- quasisolid-solid) growth mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    The enhanced synergistic, catalytic effect of bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs), as compared to monometallic nanoparticles (NPs), on the nanomaterials (nanowires, nanotubes, nanodots, nanofibers, etc) synthesed by chemical vapor deposition has been investigated. A theoretical model for this catalytic effect and hence for nanomaterial growth, has been developed. The key element of the model is the diffusion of the nanomaterial source species through the nanopores of quasiliquid (quasisolid) BNP, rather than through the liquid or solid BNP, for nanomaterial growth. The role of growth parameters such as temperature, pressure and of the BNP material characteristics such as element mole fraction of BNP, has been studied. The cause of enhanced catalytic activity of BNPs as compared to NPs as a function of temperature has been explored. The dependence of growth rate on the nanomaterial diameter has also been examined. The calculated results have been extensively compared with available experiments. Experimental supports for the growth mechanism have been presented as well. Close correspondence between the calculated and experimental results attests to the validity of the proposed model. The wide applicability of the proposed model to nanowires, nanotubes, nanofibers, nanodots, etc suggests that it is general and has broad appeal.

  8. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs/InAs core-shell nanowires and fabrication of InAs nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Torsten; Luysberg, Martina; Schäpers, Thomas; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lepsa, Mihail Ion

    2012-11-14

    We present results about the growth of GaAs/InAs core-shell nanowires (NWs) using molecular beam epitaxy. The core is grown via the Ga droplet-assisted growth mechanism. For a homogeneous growth of the InAs shell, the As(4) flux and substrate temperature are critical. The shell growth starts with InAs islands along the NW core, which increase in time and merge giving finally a continuous and smooth layer. At the top of the NWs, a small part of the core is free of InAs indicating a crystal phase selective growth. This allows a precise measurement of the shell thickness and the fabrication of InAs nanotubes by selective etching. The strain relaxation in the shell occurs mainly via the formation of misfit dislocations and saturates at ~80%. Additionally, other types of defects are observed, namely stacking faults transferred from the core or formed in the shell, and threading dislocations.

  9. Potential of semiconductor nanowires for single photon sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmand, J.-C.; Liu, L.; Patriarche, G.; Tchernycheva, M.; Akopian, N.; Perinetti, U.; Zwiller, V.

    2009-01-01

    The catalyst-assisted growth of semiconductor nanowires heterostructures offers a very flexible way to design and fabricate single photon emitters. The nanowires can be positioned by organizing the catalyst prior to growth. Single quantum dots can be formed in the core of single nanowires which can

  10. Nanowire Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Couteau C.; Larrue A.; Wilhelm C.; Soci C.

    2015-01-01

    We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D) nature, fl...

  11. Plasmonic Properties of Vertically Aligned Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanowires (NWs/Ag sheath composites were produced to investigate plasmonic coupling between vertically aligned NWs for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS applications. In this investigation, two types of vertical NW arrays were studied; those of ZnO NWs grown on nanosphere lithography patterned sapphire substrate via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS mechanism and Si NW arrays produced by wet chemical etching. Both types of vertical NW arrays were coated with a thin layer of silver by electroless silver plating for SERS enhancement studies. The experimental results show extremely strong SERS signals due to plasmonic coupling between the NWs, which was verified by COMSOL electric field simulations. We also compared the SERS enhancement intensity of aligned and random ZnO NWs, indicating that the aligned NWs show much stronger and repeatable SERS signal than those grown in nonaligned geometries.

  12. Investigation of the genes involved in antigenic switching at the vlsE locus in Borrelia burgdorferi: an essential role for the RuvAB branch migrase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley R Dresser

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Persistent infection by pathogenic organisms requires effective strategies for the defense of these organisms against the host immune response. A common strategy employed by many pathogens to escape immune recognition and clearance is to continually vary surface epitopes through recombinational shuffling of genetic information. Borrelia burgdorferi, a causative agent of Lyme borreliosis, encodes a surface-bound lipoprotein, VlsE. This protein is encoded by the vlsE locus carried at the right end of the linear plasmid lp28-1. Adjacent to the expression locus are 15 silent cassettes carrying information that is moved into the vlsE locus through segmental gene conversion events. The protein players and molecular mechanism of recombinational switching at vlsE have not been characterized. In this study, we analyzed the effect of the independent disruption of 17 genes that encode factors involved in DNA recombination, repair or replication on recombinational switching at the vlsE locus during murine infection. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 10 such genes have been implicated in recombinational switching at the pilE locus. Eight of these genes, including recA, are either absent from B. burgdorferi, or do not show an obvious requirement for switching at vlsE. The only genes that are required in both organisms are ruvA and ruvB, which encode subunits of a Holliday junction branch migrase. Disruption of these genes results in a dramatic decrease in vlsE recombination with a phenotype similar to that observed for lp28-1 or vls-minus spirochetes: productive infection at week 1 with clearance by day 21. In SCID mice, the persistence defect observed with ruvA and ruvB mutants was fully rescued as previously observed for vlsE-deficient B. burgdorferi. We report the requirement of the RuvAB branch migrase in recombinational switching at vlsE, the first essential factor to be identified in this process. These findings are supported by the independent work of Lin et

  13. Bismuth-catalyzed and doped silicon nanowires for one-pump-down fabrication of radial junction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linwei; Fortuna, Franck; O'Donnell, Benedict; Jeon, Taewoo; Foldyna, Martin; Picardi, Gennaro; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2012-08-08

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are becoming a popular choice to develop a new generation of radial junction solar cells. We here explore a bismuth- (Bi-) catalyzed growth and doping of SiNWs, via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mode, to fabricate amorphous Si radial n-i-p junction solar cells in a one-pump-down and low-temperature process in a single chamber plasma deposition system. We provide the first evidence that catalyst doping in the SiNW cores, caused by incorporating Bi catalyst atoms as n-type dopant, can be utilized to fabricate radial junction solar cells, with a record open circuit voltage of V(oc) = 0.76 V and an enhanced light trapping effect that boosts the short circuit current to J(sc) = 11.23 mA/cm(2). More importantly, this bi-catalyzed SiNW growth and doping strategy exempts the use of extremely toxic phosphine gas, leading to significant procedure simplification and cost reduction for building radial junction thin film solar cells.

  14. Nanowired Delivery of Growth Hormone Attenuates Pathophysiology of Spinal Cord Injury and Enhances Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Concentration in the Plasma and the Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muresanu, Dafin F; Sharma, Aruna; Lafuente, José V; Patnaik, Ranjana; Tian, Z Ryan; Nyberg, Fred; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory showed that topical application of growth hormone (GH) induced neuroprotection 5 h after spinal cord injury (SCI) in a rat model. Since nanodelivery of drugs exerts superior neuroprotective effects, a possibility exists that nanodelivery of GH will induce long-term neuroprotection after a focal SCI. SCI induces GH deficiency that is coupled with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) reduction in the plasma. Thus, an exogenous supplement of GH in SCI may enhance the IGF-1 levels in the cord and induce neuroprotection. In the present investigation, we delivered TiO2-nanowired growth hormone (NWGH) after a longitudinal incision of the right dorsal horn at the T10-11 segments in anesthetized rats and compared the results with normal GH therapy on IGF-1 and GH contents in the plasma and in the cord in relation to blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption, edema formation, and neuronal injuries. Our results showed a progressive decline in IGF-1 and GH contents in the plasma and the T9 and T12 segments of the cord 12 and 24 h after SCI. Marked increase in the BSCB breakdown, as revealed by extravasation of Evans blue and radioiodine, was seen at these time points after SCI in association with edema and neuronal injuries. Administration of NWGH markedly enhanced the IGF-1 levels and GH contents in plasma and cord after SCI, whereas normal GH was unable to enhance IGF-1 or GH levels 12 or 24 h after SCI. Interestingly, NWGH was also able to reduce BSCB disruption, edema formation, and neuronal injuries after trauma. On the other hand, normal GH was ineffective on these parameters at all time points examined. Taken together, our results are the first to demonstrate that NWGH is quite effective in enhancing IGF-1 and GH levels in the cord and plasma that may be crucial in reducing pathophysiology of SCI.

  15. Synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Teresa J. (Arizona State University); Hsu, Julia W. P.

    2007-11-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid growth process for synthesis of group-IV semiconducting nanowires using silane, germane, disilane and digermane precursor gases has been investigated. The nanowire growth process combines in situ gold seed formation by vapor deposition on atomically clean silicon (111) surfaces, in situ growth from the gaseous precursor(s), and real-time monitoring of nanowire growth as a function of temperature and pressure by a novel optical reflectometry technique. A significant dependence on precursor pressure and growth temperature for the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires is observed, depending on the stability of the specific precursor used. Also, the presence of a nucleation time for the onset of nanowire growth has been found using our new in situ optical reflectometry technique.

  16. Far field emission profile of pure wurtzite InP nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulgarini, Gabriele, E-mail: g.bulgarini@tudelft.nl; Reimer, Michael E.; Zwiller, Val [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J.; Lapointe, Jean [National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2014-11-10

    We report on the far field emission profile of pure wurtzite InP nanowires in comparison to InP nanowires with predominantly zincblende crystal structure. The emission profile is measured on individual nanowires using Fourier microscopy. The most intense photoluminescence of wurtzite nanowires is collected at small angles with respect to the nanowire growth axis. In contrast, zincblende nanowires present a minimum of the collected light intensity in the direction of the nanowire growth. Results are explained by the orientation of electric dipoles responsible for the photoluminescence, which is different from wurtzite to zincblende. Wurtzite nanowires have dipoles oriented perpendicular to the nanowire growth direction, whereas zincblende nanowires have dipoles oriented along the nanowire axis. This interpretation is confirmed by both numerical simulations and polarization dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy. Knowledge of the dipole orientation in nanostructures is crucial for developing a wide range of photonic devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells.

  17. Catalyst- and template-free low-temperature in situ growth of n-type CdS nanowire on p-type CdTe film and p-n heterojunction properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ligang; Liu, Wenchao; Cai, Hongling; Zhang, Fengming; Wu, Xiaoshan

    2016-12-01

    CdS is an important semiconductor used in optoelectronic devices. Simple techniques for growing CdS nanostructures are thus essential at a low cost. This study presents a novel method for growing single-crystal n-type CdS nanowires on p-type CdTe films by thermal annealing in an H2S/N2 mixed gas flow, which does not require the help of a catalyst or template. The formation process and growth mechanism of the nanowires are investigated. Well-dispersed whiskerlike CdS nanostructures are obtained at an appropriate annealing temperature and duration. We suggest that the stress-driving mechanism of nanowire formation may contribute to the growth of CdS nanowires, and that the evaporation of Te through the boundaries of the CdS grain seeds plays an important role in the sustainable growth of nanowire. In addition, CdS/CdTe heterojunction device is fabricated on Mo glass. The I-V characteristic of the heterojunction in dark shows typical rectifying diode behavior. The turn-on voltage can be regulated by annealing conditions. Meanwhile, the obvious photovoltaic effect is obtained on the in situ growth heterojunction prepared at low annealing temperature. Hence, this is a new fabricated method for CdTe-based materials in the field of energy conversion.

  18. Self organized growth of organic thiophene-phenylene nanowires on silicate surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, F.; Schiek, Manuela; Lützen, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Results of a systematic study of the growth of blue-green light-emitting 2,5-di-4-biphenyl-thiophene (PPTPP) molecules on the (001) faces of the sheet silicates muscovite and phlogopite mica are reported. This includes morphology, crystallography, and optical properties. It is shown that small...

  19. Rational defect introduction in silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Naechul; Chi, Miaofang; Howe, Jane Y; Filler, Michael A

    2013-05-08

    The controlled introduction of planar defects, particularly twin boundaries and stacking faults, in group IV nanowires remains challenging despite the prevalence of these structural features in other nanowire systems (e.g., II-VI and III-V). Here we demonstrate how user-programmable changes to precursor pressure and growth temperature can rationally generate both transverse twin boundaries and angled stacking faults during the growth of oriented Si nanowires. We leverage this new capability to demonstrate prototype defect superstructures. These findings yield important insight into the mechanism of defect generation in semiconductor nanowires and suggest new routes to engineer the properties of this ubiquitous semiconductor.

  20. Morphology Controlled Fabrication of InN Nanowires on Brass Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth of semiconductor nanowires on cheap metal substrates could pave the way to the large-scale manufacture of low-cost nanowire-based devices. In this work, we demonstrated that high density InN nanowires can be directly grown on brass substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. It was found that Zn from the brass substrates is the key factor in the formation of nanowires by restricting the lateral growth of InN. The nanowire morphology is highly dependent on the growth temperature. While at a lower growth temperature, the nanowires and the In droplets have large diameters. At the elevated growth temperature, the lateral sizes of the nanowires and the In droplets are much smaller. Moreover, the nanowire diameter can be controlled in situ by varying the temperature in the growth process. This method is very instructive to the diameter-controlled growth of nanowires of other materials.

  1. Growth and optical properties of CMOS-compatible silicon nanowires for photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Alex Richard

    Silicon (Si) is the dominant semiconductor material in both the microelectronic and photovoltaic industries. Despite its poor optical properties, Si is simply too abundant and useful to be completely abandoned in either industry. Since the initial discovery of efficient room temperature photoluminescence (PL) from porous Si and the following discoveries of PL and time-resolved optical gain from Si nanocrystals (Si-nc) in SiO2, many groups have studied the feasibility of making Si-based, CMOS-compatible electroluminescent devices and electrically pumped lasers. These studies have shown that for Si-ne sizes below about 10 nm, PL can be attributed to radiative recombination of confined excitons and quantum efficiencies can reach 90%. PL peak energies are blue-shifted from the bulk Si band edge of 1.1 eV due to the quantum confinement effect and PL decay lifetimes are on mus timescales. However, many unanswered questions still exist about both the ease of carrier injection and various non-radiative and loss mechanisms that are present. A potential alternative material system to porous Si and Si-nc is Si nanowires (SiNWs). In this thesis, I examine the optical properties of SiNWs with diameters in the range of 3-30 nm fabricated by a number of compound metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible fabrication techniques including Chemical Vapor Deposition on metal nanoparticle coated substrates, catalytic wet etching of bulk Si and top-down electron-beam lithographic patterning. Using thermal oxidation and etching, we can increase the degree of confinement in the SiNWs. I demonstrate PL peaked in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelength ranges that is tunable by controlling the crystalline SiNW core diameter, which is measured with dark field and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. PL decay lifetimes of the SiNWs are on the order of 50 mus after proper surface passivation, which suggest that the PL is indeed from confined carriers in the SiNW cores

  2. Optimization, Yield Studies and Morphology of WO3Nano-Wires Synthesized by Laser Pyrolysis in C2H2and O2Ambients—Validation of a New Growth Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sideras-Haddad E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laser pyrolysis has been used to synthesize WO3nanostructures. Spherical nano-particles were obtained when acetylene was used to carry the precursor droplet, whereas thin films were obtained at high flow-rates of oxygen carrier gas. In both environments WO3nano-wires appear only after thermal annealing of the as-deposited powders and films. Samples produced under oxygen carrier gas in the laser pyrolysis system gave a higher yield of WO3nano-wires after annealing than the samples which were run under acetylene carrier gas. Alongside the targeted nano-wires, the acetylene-ran samples showed trace amounts of multi-walled carbon nano-tubes; such carbon nano-tubes are not seen in the oxygen-processed WO3nano-wires. The solid–vapour–solid (SVS mechanism [B. Mwakikunga et al., J. Nanosci. Nanotechnol., 2008] was found to be the possible mechanism that explains the manner of growth of the nano-wires. This model, based on the theory from basic statistical mechanics has herein been validated by length-diameter data for the produced WO3nano-wires.

  3. Growth and characterization of ZnO nanowires for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSalhi, M. S.; Atif, M.; Ansari, A. A.; Khun, K.; Ibupoto, Z. H.; Willander, M.

    2013-06-01

    In the present work, cerium oxide CeO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by the sol-gel method and used for the growth of ZnO nanorods. The synthesized nanoparticles were studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic techniques. Furthermore, these nanoparticles were used as the seed layer for the growth of ZnO nanorods by following the hydrothermal growth method. The structural study of ZnO nanorods was carried out by means of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and XRD techniques. This study demonstrated that the grown ZnO nanorods are well aligned, uniform, of good crystal quality and have diameters of less than 200 nm. Energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis revealed that the ZnO nanorods are composed only of zinc, cerium as the seed atom, and oxygen atoms, with no other impurities in the grown nanorods. Moreover, a photoluminescence (PL) approach was applied for the optical characterization, and it was observed that the near-band-edge (NBE) emission was the same as that of the zinc acetate seed layer, however the green and orange/red emission peaks were slightly raised due to possibly higher levels of defects in the cerium oxide seeded ZnO nanorods. This study provides an alternative approach for the controlled synthesis of ZnO nanorods using cerium oxide nanoparticles as the seed nucleation layer, improving both the morphology of the nanorods and the performance of devices based upon them.

  4. Effect of gold migration on the morphology of germanium nanowires grown by a two-step growth method with temperature modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhengyu; Usami, Koichi; Simanullang, Marolop; Noguchi, Tomohiro; Kawano, Yukio; Oda, Shunri

    2016-08-01

    Germanium nanowires (Ge NWs) grown at high temperatures (HTs) are investigated because of the demand for impurity doping. However, gold agglomeration, which occurs at HTs, results in undesired moundlike structures. A two-step growth technique with temperature modulation from low temperatures (LTs) to HTs was adopted to prevent gold agglomeration, thus revealing high-yield HT Ge NWs on top of LT Ge NWs. These Ge NWs can be classified into two groups on the basis of their shape. The timing of gold migration plays a crucial role in determining the shape of these NWs. Fat core-shell-like Ge NWs, where gold migration occurs as temperature increases, are due to the enhanced radial growth at HTs generated from the migrated gold nanoparticles on the NW sidewalls. However, for thin NWs, because Au seeds were stabilized on top of NWs until synthesis ended, the axial growth of Ge NWs continued at HTs.

  5. The role of VlsE antigenic variation in the Lyme disease spirochete: persistence through a mechanism that differs from other pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankhead, Troy; Chaconas, George

    2007-09-01

    The linear plasmid, lp28-1, is required for persistent infection by the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. This plasmid contains the vls antigenic variation locus, which has long been thought to be important for immune evasion. However, the role of the vls locus as a virulence factor during mammalian infection has not been clearly defined. We report the successful removal of the vls locus through telomere resolvase-mediated targeted deletion, and demonstrate the absolute requirement of this lp28-1 component for persistence in the mouse host. Moreover, successful infection of C3H/HeN mice with an lp28-1 plasmid in which the left portion was deleted excludes participation of other lp28-1 non-vls genes in spirochete virulence, persistence and the process of recombinational switching at vlsE. Data are also presented that cast doubt on an immune evasion mechanism whereby VlsE directly masks other surface antigens similar to what has been observed for several other pathogens that undergo recombinational antigenic variation.

  6. Epitaxial growth of an antireflective, conductive, graded index ITO nanowire layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colm eO'Dwyer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous and nanostructured films, assemblies and arrangements are important from an applied point of view in microelectronics, photonics and optical materials. The ability to minimize reflection, control light output and use contrast and variation of the refractive index to modify photonic characteristics can provide routes to enhanced photonic crystal devices, omnidirectional reflectors, antireflection coatings and broadband absorbing materials. This work shows how multiscale branching of defect-free ITO NWs grown as a layer with a graded refractive index improves antireflection properties and shifts the transparency window into the near-infrared (NIR. The measurements confirm the structural quality and growth mechanism of the NW layer without any heterogeneous seeding for NW growth. Optical reflectance measurements confirm broadband antireflection down to <5% between 1.3-1.6 um which is tunable with the NW density. The work also outlines how the suppression of the Burstein-Moss shifts using refractive index variation allows transparency in a conductive NW layer into NIR range.

  7. Fabrication and Characterization of ZnO Nanowire Arrays with an Investigation into Electrochemical Sensing Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Weber

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanowire arrays were grown on a Si (100 substrate using the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS method. ZnO nanowires were characterized by XRD, SEM, bright field TEM, and EDS. They were found to have a preferential orientation along the c-axis. The as-prepared sample was functionalized with glucose oxidase by physical adsorption. FTIR was taken before and after functionalization to verify the presence of the attached enzyme. Electrochemical measurements were performed on the nanowire array by differential pulse voltammetry in the range of −0.6 to 0.4 V. The nanoarray sensor displayed high sensitivity to glucose in the range of 1.0 ×10−4 to 1.0 ×10−2 mol L−1.

  8. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, D.S.

    2010-06-02

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [11-20] direction with a rectangular crosssection and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with {approx}1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitals to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states.

  9. Nanowire photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of integrated electronic circuitry ranks among the most disruptive and transformative technologies of the 20th century. Even though integrated circuits are ubiquitous in modern life, both fundamental and technical constraints will eventually test the limits of Moore's law. Nanowire photonic circuitry constructed from myriad one-dimensional building blocks offers numerous opportunities for the development of next-generation optical information processors and spectroscopy. However, several challenges remain before the potential of nanowire building blocks is fully realized. We cover recent advances in nanowire synthesis, characterization, lasing, integration, and the eventual application to relevant technical and scientific questions.

  10. A rapid synthesis/growth process producing massive ZnO nanowires for humidity and gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Nai-Feng; Chung, Tien-Kan

    2014-09-01

    We report a rapid and simple process to massively synthesize/grow ZnO nanowires capable of manufacturing massive humidity/gas sensors. The process utilizing a chemical solution deposition with an annealing process (heating in vacuum without gas) is capable of producing ZnO nanowires within an hour. Through depositing the ZnO nanowires on the top of a Pt-interdigitated-electrode/SiO2/Si-Wafer, a humidity/gas-hybrid sensor is fabricated. The humidity sensitivity (i.e., ratio of the electrical resistance of the sensor at 11-95 % relative humidity level) is approximately 104. The response and recovery time with the humidity changing from 11 to 95 % directly and reversely is 6 and 10 s, respectively. The gas sensitivity (i.e., ratio of electrical resistance of the sensor under the air to vaporized ethanol) is increased from 2 to 56 when the concentration of the ethanol is increased from 40 to 600 ppm. Both the response and recovery times are less than 15 s for the gas sensor. These results show the sensor utilizing the nanowires exhibits excellent humidity and gas sensing.

  11. 双氧水浓度对硅纳米线生长的影响%Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration on the Growth of Silicon Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林星星; 沈文忠

    2012-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen peroxide concentration on the morphology, growth rate and photoluminescence of silicon nanowires in a two-step metal assisted chemical etching method is studied. It is shown that the growth rate increases with the increased concentration. The photoluminescence spectra exhibit broad visible emission centered around 685 nm originating from porous silicon structures. Formation of the porous structure is attributed to the renucleation of Ag nanoparticles on the sidewalls of silicon nanowires through diffusion process.%利用两步法金属辅助化学刻蚀(MACE)法制备硅纳米线(SiNWs)样品。研究了双氧水(H2O2)浓度对SiNWs样品形貌、生长速率以及发光特性的影响。发现随着H2O2浓度的增加,SiNWs样品生长速率随之提高,同时出现了位于685nm附近较宽的来源于多孔硅结构的光致发光峰。实验结果表明,多孔硅结构的形成与银离子(Ag+)通过扩散作用在SiNWs样品侧壁重新沉积有关。

  12. Chemical insights into the roles of nanowire cores on the growth and supercapacitor performances of Ni-Co-O/Ni(OH)2 core/shell electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xuesong; Tang, Chunhua; Zhang, Liuyang; Yu, Zhi Gen; Gong, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured core/shell electrodes have been experimentally demonstrated promising for high-performance electrochemical energy storage devices. However, chemical insights into the significant roles of nanowire cores on the growth of shells and their supercapacitor behaviors still remain as a research shortfall. In this work, by substituting 1/3 cobalt in the Co3O4 nanowire core with nickel, a 61% enhancement of the specific mass-loading of the Ni(OH)2 shell, a tremendous 93% increase of the volumetric capacitance and a superior cyclability were achieved in a novel NiCo2O4/Ni(OH)2 core/shell electrode in contrast to a Co3O4/Ni(OH)2 one. A comparative study suggested that not only the growth of Ni(OH)2 shells but also the contribution of cores were attributed to the overall performances. Importantly, their chemical origins were revealed through a theoretical simulation of the core/shell interfacial energy changes. Besides, asymmetric supercapacitor devices and applications were also explored. The scientific clues and practical potentials obtained in this work are helpful for the design and analysis of alternative core/shell electrode materials.

  13. A Two-Step Growth Pathway for High Sb Incorporation in GaAsSb Nanowires in the Telecommunication Wavelength Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Estiak; Karim, Md Rezaul; Hafiz, Shihab Bin; Reynolds, C Lewis; Liu, Yang; Iyer, Shanthi

    2017-08-31

    Self-catalyzed growth of axial GaAs1-xSbx nanowire (NW) arrays with bandgap tuning corresponding to the telecommunication wavelength of 1.3 µm poses a challenge, as the growth mechanism for axial configuration is primarily thermodynamically driven by the vapor-liquid-solid growth process. A systematic study carried out on the effects of group V/III beam equivalent (BEP) ratios and substrate temperature (Tsub) on the chemical composition in NWs and NW density revealed the efficacy of a two-step growth temperature sequence (initiating the growth at relatively higher Tsub = 620 °C and then continuing the growth at lower Tsub) as a promising approach for obtaining high-density NWs at higher Sb compositions. The dependence of the Sb composition in the NWs on the growth parameters investigated has been explained by an analytical relationship between the effective vapor composition and NW composition using relevant kinetic parameters. A two-step growth approach along with a gradual variation in Ga-BEP for offsetting the consumption of the droplets has been explored to realize long NWs with homogeneous Sb composition up to 34 at.% and photoluminescence emission reaching 1.3 µm at room temperature.

  14. RECONSTRUCTION OF 3D VECTOR MODELS OF BUILDINGS BY COMBINATION OF ALS, TLS AND VLS DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Boulaassal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS and Vehicle based Laser Scanning (VLS are widely used as data acquisition methods for 3D building modelling. ALS data is often used to generate, among others, roof models. TLS data has proven its effectiveness in the geometric reconstruction of building façades. Although the operating algorithms used in the processing chain of these two kinds of data are quite similar, their combination should be more investigated. This study explores the possibility of combining ALS and TLS data for simultaneously producing 3D building models from bird point of view and pedestrian point of view. The geometric accuracy of roofs and façades models is different due to the acquisition techniques. In order to take these differences into account, the surfaces composing roofs and façades are extracted with the same algorithm of segmentation. Nevertheless the segmentation algorithm must be adapted to the properties of the different point clouds. It is based on the RANSAC algorithm, but has been applied in a sequential way in order to extract all potential planar clusters from airborne and terrestrial datasets. Surfaces are fitted to planar clusters, allowing edge detection and reconstruction of vector polygons. Models resulting from TLS data are obviously more accurate than those generated from ALS data. Therefore, the geometry of the roofs is corrected and adapted according to the geometry of the corresponding façades. Finally, the effects of the differences between raw ALS and TLS data on the results of the modeling process are analyzed. It is shown that such combination could be used to produce reliable 3D building models.

  15. Indium Tin Oxide@Carbon Core–Shell Nanowire and Jagged Indium Tin Oxide Nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper reports two new indium tin oxide (ITO-based nanostructures, namely ITO@carbon core–shell nanowire and jagged ITO nanowire. The ITO@carbon core–shell nanowires (~50 nm in diameter, 1–5 μm in length, were prepared by a chemical vapor deposition process from commercial ITO nanoparticles. A carbon overlayer (~5–10 in thickness was observed around ITO nanowire core, which was in situ formed by the catalytic decomposition of acetylene gas. This carbon overlayer could be easily removed after calcination in air at an elevated temperature of 700°C, thus forming jagged ITO nanowires (~40–45 nm in diameter. The growth mechanisms of ITO@carbon core–shell nanowire and jagged ITO nanowire were also suggested.

  16. Facile synthesis of vanadium oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kysar, Jesse; Sekhar, Praveen Kumar

    2016-10-01

    A simple growth process is reported for the synthesis of vanadium (II) oxide nanowires with an average width of 65 nm and up to 5 μm in length for growth at 1000 °C for 3 h. The vanadium (II) oxide nanowires were grown on a gold-coated silicon substrate at ambient pressure using a single heat zone furnace with Ar as the carrier gas. Gold was utilized as a catalyst for the growth of the nanowires. The growth temperature and heating time were varied to observe the nanowire morphology. An increase in nanowire width was observed with an increase in the heating temperature. A ninefold increase in the number density of the nanowires was observed when the heating time was changed from 30 min to 3 h. This is the first time a simple growth process for producing VO nanowires at ambient pressure has been demonstrated. Such a scheme enables wider use of VO nanowires in critical applications such as energy storage, gas sensors, and optical devices.

  17. Transport characterization in nanowires using an electrical nanoprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talin, A. A.; Léonard, F.; Katzenmeyer, A. M.; Swartzentruber, B. S.; Picraux, S. T.; Toimil-Molares, M. E.; Cederberg, J. G.; Wang, X.; Hersee, S. D.; Rishinaramangalum, A.

    2010-02-01

    Electrical transport in semiconductor nanowires is commonly measured in a field effect transistor configuration, with lithographically defined source, drain and in some cases, top gate electrodes. This approach is labor intensive, requires high-end fabrication equipment, exposes the nanowires to extensive processing chemistry and places practical limitations on minimum nanowire length. Here we describe an alternative, simple method for characterizing electrical transport in nanowires directly on the growth substrate, without any need for post growth processing. Our technique is based on contacting nanowires using a nano-manipulator probe retrofitted inside of a scanning electron microscope. Using this approach, we characterize electrical transport in GaN nanowires grown by catalyst-free selective epitaxy, as well as InAs and Ge nanowires grown by a Au-catalyzed vapor solid liquid technique. We find that in situations where contacts are not limiting carrier injection (GaN and InAs nanowires), electrical transport transitions from Ohmic conduction at low bias to space-charge-limited conduction at higher bias. Using this transition and a theory of space-charge-limited transport which accounts for the high aspect ratio nanowires, we extract the mobility and the free carrier concentration. For Ge nanowires, we find that the Au catalyst forms a Schottky contact resulting in rectifying current-voltage characteristics, which are strongly dependent on the nanowire diameter. This dependence arises due to an increase in depletion width at decreased nanowire diameter and carrier recombination at the nanowire surface.

  18. Nanowire Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couteau, C.; Larrue, A.; Wilhelm, C.; Soci, C.

    2015-05-01

    We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D) nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  19. Nanowire Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couteau C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs, solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  20. Homoepitaxial n-core: p-shell gallium nitride nanowires: HVPE overgrowth on MBE nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Aric; Blanchard, Paul; Bertness, Kris; Brubaker, Matthew; Dodson, Christopher; Harvey, Todd; Herrero, Andrew; Rourke, Devin; Schlager, John; Sanford, Norman; Chiaramonti, Ann N; Davydov, Albert; Motayed, Abhishek; Tsvetkov, Denis

    2011-11-18

    We present the homoepitaxial growth of p-type, magnesium doped gallium nitride shells by use of halide vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) on n-type gallium nitride nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Scanning electron microscopy shows clear dopant contrast between the core and shell of the nanowire. The growth of magnesium doped nanowire shells shows little or no effect on the lattice parameters of the underlying nanowires, as measured by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Photoluminescence measurements of the nanowires show the appearance of sub-bandgap features in the blue and the ultraviolet, indicating the presence of acceptors. Finally, electrical measurements confirm the presence of electrically active holes in the nanowires.

  1. New porcine test-model reveals remarkable differences between algorithms for spectrophotometrical haemoglobin saturation measurements with VLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, John; Greisen, Gorm

    2016-01-01

    The study created an 'ex vivo' model to test different algorithms for measurements of mucosal haemoglobin saturation with visible light spectrophotometry (VLS). The model allowed comparison between algorithms, but it also allowed comparison with co-oximetry using a 'gold standard' method. This has......  -32.8 to  +29.9 percentage points and from  -5.0 to  +9.2 percentage points, respectively. CONCLUSION: the algorithms showed remarkable in-between differences when tested on raw-spectra from an 'ex vivo' model. All algorithms had bias, more marked at high oxygenation than low oxygenation. Three...

  2. Engineering scale development of the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) process for the production of silicon carbide fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollar, W.E. Jr. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States). Technology Div.; Mills, W.H. [BP America, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)SiC fibrils are used as reinforcement in ceramic matrix composites (CMC). A program has been completed for determining process scaleup parameters and to produce material for evaluation in a CMC. The scaleup is necessary to lower production cost and increase material availability. Scaleup parameters were evaluated in a reactor with a vertical dimension twice that of the LANL reactor. Results indicate that the scaleup will be possible. Feasibility of recycling process gas was demonstrated and the impact of postprocessing on yields determined.

  3. 片上制备横向结构ZnO纳米线阵列紫外探测器件∗%On-chip fabrication of lateral growth ZnO nanowire array UV sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李江江; 高志远; 薛晓玮; 李慧敏; 邓军; 崔碧峰; 邹德恕

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we integrate nano technology into traditional microelectronic processing, and develop an on-chip UV sensor based on lateral growth ZnO nanowire arrays. Traditional procedures are used to fabricate the interdigital electrodes, and ZnO nanowires are self-organized and grown between electrodes laterally by hydrothermal method. Additional inclined nanowires are removed during the post-processing procedures, such as ultrasound cleansing and electrode reinforcement. Two kinds of electrode structures are applied, i.e. , Cr and Au. For the Cr electrode device structure, because Cr will restrain nanowires from growing vertically on its top, the laterally grown nanowire is long enough to reach the other side of the electrode. The corresponding photoelectric response mechanism is photoconduction controlled by surface oxide ion adsorption. Although the photocurrent is large, the gain is low, and the response speed is slow. Under the UV radiations of 20 mW/cm2 and of 365 nm in wavelength, the dark current is 2.2 × 10−4 A with 1 V bias voltage, the gain is up to 64, the photocurrent cannot reach saturation after 25 s, and the recovery time is 51.9 s. A secondary electrode can be fabricated after growing the nanowire arrays to reinforce the connection between the electrode and the ends of the nanowires. However, the direct contact between metal and semiconductor will form a Schottky contact. The photoelectric response mechanism is then changed to photovoltaic effect, which can greatly improve the gain and response speed. Under UV radiations of 20 mW/cm2 and of 365 nm in wavelength, the dark current is 4.3 × 10−8 A with 1 V bias voltage, the gain is up to 1300, the respond time is 3.8 s, and the recovery time is 5.7 s. For the Au electrode device structure, because Au is catalysis for ZnO nanowire growth, nanowires grown in lateral direction will compete with those grown in vertical direction, and hence the laterally grown nanowires are not long enough to

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of ZnO Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Michael Hsuan-Yi; Mao Samuel; Henning Feick; Yan Haoquan; Wu Yiying; Hennes Kind; Richard Russo; Eicke Weber; Yang Peidong

    2004-01-01

    Zinc oxide is a wide bandgap (3.37 eV) semiconductor with a hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure. ZnO prepared in nanowire form may be used as a nanosized ultraviolet light-emitting source. In this study, ZnO nanowires were prepared by vapor-phase transport of Zn vapor onto gold-coated silicon substrates in a tube furnace heated to 900 C. Gold serves as a catalyst to capture Zn vapor during nanowire growth.Size control of ZnO nanowires has been achieved by varying the gold film thickness, using fine gold clusters, or tuning other growth conditions. Nanowire diameters ranging from 20 - 200 nm and lengths between 2 - 40 μm can be made. Structural characterization of the nanowires was mainly performed using powder X-ray diffractometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Orientational control of ZnO nanowires can be achieved by growing the nanowires on sapphire substrates. Nearly perfect lattice match between the (002) c-axis growth of ZnO nanowires and the (110) a-plane surface of sapphire substrate allows vertical growth of ZnO nanowires. Fabrication of patterned ZnO nanowire array was then made by patterning the gold layer on the sapphire substrates.Optical characterization of the ZnO nanowires using a He-Cd laser (325 nm) shows that the nanowires possess a strong emission band around 375 - 380 nm. Room temperature power-dependent photoluminescence study using a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm, 3-ns pulse width) shows that the nanowires exhibit lasing emission property. This is the first nanowire system displaying such phenomenon.

  5. Self-catalyzed growth of dilute nitride GaAs/GaAsSbN/GaAs core-shell nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasanaboina, Pavan Kumar [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina A& T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 (United States); Ahmad, Estiak [Nanoengineering, Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, NCA& T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27401 (United States); Li, Jia; Iyer, Shanthi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina A& T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 (United States); Nanoengineering, Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, NCA& T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27401 (United States); Reynolds, C. Lewis; Liu, Yang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-09-07

    Bandgap tuning up to 1.3 μm in GaAsSb based nanowires by incorporation of dilute amount of N is reported. Highly vertical GaAs/GaAsSbN/GaAs core-shell configured nanowires were grown for different N contents on Si (111) substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed close lattice matching of GaAsSbN with GaAs. Micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) revealed red shift as well as broadening of the spectra attesting to N incorporation in the nanowires. Replication of the 4K PL spectra for several different single nanowires compared to the corresponding nanowire array suggests good compositional homogeneity amongst the nanowires. A large red shift of the Raman spectrum and associated symmetric line shape in these nanowires have been attributed to phonon localization at point defects. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the dominance of stacking faults and twins in these nanowires. The lower strain present in these dilute nitride nanowires, as opposed to GaAsSb nanowires having the same PL emission wavelength, and the observation of room temperature PL demonstrate the advantage of the dilute nitride system offers in the nanowire configuration, providing a pathway for realizing nanoscale optoelectronic devices in the telecommunication wavelength region.

  6. SiC nanowires: material and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekentes, K.; Rogdakis, K.

    2011-04-01

    SiC nanowires are of high interest since they combine the physical properties of SiC with those induced by their low dimensionality. For this reason, a large number of scientific studies have been dedicated to their fabrication and characterization as well as to their application in devices. SiC nanowires' growth involving different growth mechanisms and configurations was the main theme for the large majority of these studies. Various physical characterization methods have been employed for evaluating SiC nanowire quality. SiC nanowires with narrow-diameter (channel material. On the other hand, the grown nanowires are suitable for field-emission applications and to be used as reinforcing material in composite structures as well as for increasing the hydrophobicity of Si surfaces. All these aspects are examined in detail in different sections of this paper.

  7. How Copper Nanowires Grow and How To Control Their Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shengrong; Stewart, Ian E; Chen, Zuofeng; Li, Bo; Rathmell, Aaron R; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2016-03-15

    Scalable, solution-phase nanostructure synthesis has the promise to produce a wide variety of nanomaterials with novel properties at a cost that is low enough for these materials to be used to solve problems. For example, solution-synthesized metal nanowires are now being used to make low cost, flexible transparent electrodes in touch screens, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), and solar cells. There has been a tremendous increase in the number of solution-phase syntheses that enable control over the assembly of atoms into nanowires in the last 15 years, but proposed mechanisms for nanowire formation are usually qualitative, and for many syntheses there is little consensus as to how nanowires form. It is often not clear what species is adding to a nanowire growing in solution or what mechanistic step limits its rate of growth. A deeper understanding of nanowire growth is important for efficiently directing the development of nanowire synthesis toward producing a wide variety of nanostructure morphologies for structure-property studies or producing precisely defined nanostructures for a specific application. This Account reviews our progress over the last five years toward understanding how copper nanowires form in solution, how to direct their growth into nanowires with dimensions ideally suited for use in transparent conducting films, and how to use copper nanowires as a template to grow core-shell nanowires. The key advance enabling a better understanding of copper nanowire growth is the first real-time visualization of nanowire growth in solution, enabling the acquisition of nanowire growth kinetics. By measuring the growth rate of individual nanowires as a function of concentration of the reactants and temperature, we show that a growing copper nanowire can be thought of as a microelectrode that is charged with electrons by hydrazine and grows through the diffusion-limited addition of Cu(OH)2(-). This deeper mechanistic understanding, coupled to an

  8. Effect of Mn-doping on the growth mechanism and electromagnetic properties of chrysanthemum-like ZnO nanowire clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Jun-Feng; You Tian-Gui; Zhang Zhi-Yong; Tian Jiang-Xiao; Yun Jiang-Ni; Zhao Wu

    2011-01-01

    Chrysanthemum-like ZnO nanowire clusters with different Mn-doping concentrations are prepared by a hydrothermal process. The microstructure, morphology and electromagnetic properties are characterized by x-ray diffractometer high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), a field emission environment scanning electron microscope (FEESEM)and a microwave vector network analyser respectively.The experimental results indicate that the asprepared products are Mn-doped ZnO single crystalline with a hexagonal wurtzite structure, that the growth habit changes due to Mn-doping and that a good magnetic loss property is found in the Mn-doped ZnO products, and theaverage magnetic loss tangent tan6m is up to 0.170099 for 3% Mn-doping, while the dielectric loss tangent tanSe is weakened, owing to the fact that ions Mn2+ enter the crystal lattice of ZnO.

  9. Growth and characterization of wurtzite InP/AlGaP core–multishell nanowires with AlGaP quantum well structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaka, Fumiya; Hiraya, Yoshihiro; Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Motohisa, Junichi; Fukui, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    We report on the selective-area growth and characterization of wurtzite (WZ) InP/AlGaP core–multishell nanowires. Quantum well (QW) structures were fabricated in AlGaP multishells by changing the alloy composition. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the AlGaP multishells were grown with a WZ structure on the side of the WZ InP core. The lattice constants of the WZ InP core and WZ AlGaP shell were determined by X-ray diffraction. Cathodoluminescence studies showed that the WZ AlGaP QW with an Al composition of 20% exhibited green emissions at 2.37 eV. These results open the possibility of fabricating green light-emitting diodes using WZ AlGaP-based materials.

  10. Effect of synthesis temp erature and N2/O2 flow on morphology and field emission prop erty of SnO2 nanowires%合成温度和N2/O2流量比对碳纤维衬底上生长的SnO2纳米线形貌及场发射性能影响∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马立安; 郑永安; 魏朝晖; 胡利勤; 郭太良

    2015-01-01

    A large amount of tin oxide (SnO2) nanowire arrays were synthesized on the flexible conductive carbon fiber substrate by thermal evaporation of tin powders in a tube furnace. The temperature, as well as the flow rate of the carrier N2 gas and the reaction O2 gas, plays an important role in defining the morphology of the SnO2 nanowires. Morphology and structure of the as-grown SnO2 samples are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results show that all the samples possess a typical rutile structure, and no other impurity phases are observed. The morphology changes from rod to wire with the increase of reaction temperature. Ratio of length to diameter of the nanowires increases first and then decreases with the flow ratio of N2/O2 gas. The optimum synthesis conditions of SnO2 nanowire are:reaction temperature 780 ◦C, N2 and O2 flow rates being 300 sccm and 3 sccm respectively. In our growth process, the nanowire grows mainly due to the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth process, but both the VLS process and surface diffusion combined with a preferential growth mechanism play the important role in morphology evolution of the SnO2. Field emission measurements for Samples 1-6 are carried out in a vacuum chamber and a diode plate configuration is used. Relationship between the growth orientation, aspect ratio, density and uniformity of the arrays and field emission performances will be investigated first. Results reveal that the field emission performance of SnO2 nanostructures depends on their morphologies and array density. The turn-on electric field (at the current density of 10 µA/cm2) decreases and the emission site density increases with tin oxide array density, and the turn-on electric field of Sample 5 (synthesized at 780 ◦C, nitrogen and oxygen flow rates being 300 sccm and 3 sccm respectively) is about 1.03 V/µm at a working distance of

  11. GaAs/GaSb nanowire heterostructures grown by MOVPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, Mattias; Dick, Kimberly A.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    We report Au-assisted growth of GaAs/GaSb nanowire heterostructures on GaAs(1 1 1)B-substrates by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. The growth is studied at various precursor molar fractions and temperatures, in order to optimize the growth conditions for the GaSb nanowire segment. In contrast t...

  12. Vapor-Phase Epitaxial Growth of Aligned Nanowire Networks of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskites (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Fu, Yongping; Samad, Leith; Dang, Lianna; Zhao, Yuzhou; Shen, Shaohua; Guo, Liejin; Jin, Song

    2017-01-11

    With the intense interest in inorganic cesium lead halide perovskites and their nanostructures for optoelectronic applications, high-quality crystalline nanomaterials with controllable morphologies and growth directions are desirable. Here, we report a vapor-phase epitaxial growth of horizontal single-crystal CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) nanowires (NWs) and microwires (MWs) with controlled crystallographic orientations on the (001) plane of phlogopite and muscovite mica. Moreover, single NWs, Y-shaped branches, interconnected NW or MW networks with 6-fold symmetry, and, eventually, highly dense epitaxial network of CsPbBr3 with nearly continuous coverage were controllably obtained by varying the growth time. Detailed structural study revealed that the CsPbBr3 wires grow along the [001] directions and have the (100) facets exposed. The incommensurate heteroepitaxial lattice match between the CsPbBr3 and mica crystal structures and the growth mechanism of these horizontal wires due to asymmetric lattice mismatch were proposed. Furthermore, the photoluminescence waveguiding and good performance from the photodetector device fabricated with these CsPbBr3 networks demonstrated that these well-connected CsPbBr3 NWs could serve as straightforward platforms for fundamental studies and optoelectronic applications.

  13. Indium Arsenide Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal

    -ray diffraction is performed with a MBE system attached to a synchrotron beam line. The evolution in crystal structure is monitored for different growth conditions and can be correlated to post growth analysis in TEM. This type of studies gives much more detailed information on formation of the crystal structure......This thesis is about growth of Au-assisted and self-assisted InAs nanowires (NWs). The wires are synthesized using a solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system and characterized with several techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x...... by a systematic study to optimize the growth conditions; first the Au deposition, then the growth temperature and finally the beam fluxes. For further control of the growth, Au droplets have been positioned with electron beam lithography and large scale arrays with a > 99 % yield have been made on 2 inch...

  14. Controllable growth of polyaniline nanowire arrays on hierarchical macro/mesoporous graphene foams for high-performance flexible supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pingping; Zhao, Xin; Li, Yingzhi; Zhang, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    Free-standing hierarchical macro/mesoporous flexible graphene foam have been constructed by rational intergration ofwell dispersed graphene oxide sheets and amino-modified polystyrene (PS) spheres through a facile ;templating and embossing; technique. The three dimensional (3D) macro/mesoporous flexible graphene foam not only inherits the uniform porous structures of graphene foam, but also contains hierarchical macro/mesopores on the struts by sacrificing PS spheres and the activation of KOH, which could providing rapid pathways for ionic and electronic transport to high specific capacitance. Vertically polyaniline (PANI) nanowire arrays are then uniformly deposited onto the hierarchical macro/mesoporous graphene foam(fRGO-F/PANI) by a simple in situ polymerization, which show a high specific capacitance of 939 F g-1. Thanks to the synergistic function of 3D bicontinuous hierarchical porous structure of graphene foam and effective immobilization of PANI nanowires on the struts, the assembled symmetric supercapctior with fRGO-F/PANI as electrodes exhibits a maximum energy density and power density of 20.9 Wh kg-1 and 103.2 kW kg-1, respectively. Moreover, it also displays an excellent cyclic stability with a 88.7% retention after 5000 cycles.

  15. Radial InP/InAsP/InP heterostructure nanowires on patterned Si substrates using self-catalyzed growth for vertical-type optical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Kenichi, E-mail: ken-kawa@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics (NanoQuine), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Sudo, Hisao; Matsuda, Manabu; Takemoto, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi [Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., 10-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi 243-0197 (Japan); Arakawa, Yasuhiko [Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics (NanoQuine), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2015-01-05

    Radial InP/InAsP/InP heterostructure nanowires (NWs) on SiO{sub 2}-mask-pattered Si substrates were reported using self-catalyzed InP NWs. Self-catalyzed growth was performed using low growth temperatures and high group-III flow rates, and vertical InP NWs were formed on the mask openings. The diameter and tapering of the self-catalyzed InP NWs were controlled by the introduction of HCl and H{sub 2}S gases during the NW growth, and InP NWs that have a straight region with decreased diameter were formed. Radial InP/InAsP/InP quantum wells (QWs) were grown on the sidewall of the vertical InP NWs on Si substrates. Room-temperature photoluminescence of single NWs from the QW was clearly observed, which exhibited the potential of building blocks for vertical-type optical devices on Si substrates.

  16. Growth direction control of InAs nanowires on (0 0 1) Si substrate with SiO2/Si nano-trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Chieh; Chen, Li-Hsing; Lin, Yen-Ting; Lin, Hao-Hsiung

    2017-04-01

    We report on direction control of InAs nanowire (NW) grown on (0 0 1) Si substrate with SiO2/Si nanotrench. A two-step method was used to enhance the direction control. In the first step, we aligned the In beam with the longitudinal axis of the trench utilizing shadowing effect to nucleate InAs on only one trench end. In the second step, the growth proceeded with substrate rotation. Comparing with NW growths using only one step, either the first one or the second one, two-step growth demonstrates highly directional NWs. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and one dimensional Fourier image analyses show that InAs NW can be easily grown from the (1 bar 1 1) Si residue, which was left at trench ends by fabrication process, due to the tiny residue volume and low V/III ratio. In contrast, InAs nucleus, located at the center of the trench, developed into island and cluster because of the high V/III ratio and large lattice mismatch.

  17. Selective area growth of high-density GaN nanowire arrays on Si(111) using thin AlN seeding layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. H.; Lee, P. Y.; Chen, K. Y.; Tseng, Y. T.; Wang, Y. L.; Cheng, K. Y.

    2016-11-01

    Selective area growth (SAG) of high-density (2.5×109 cm-2) GaN nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy is presented. The effects of morphology and thickness of the AlN seeding layer on the quality of SAG GaN NWs are investigated. A thin AlN seeding layer of 30 nm thick with a surface roughness of less than 0.5 nm is suitable for high quality SAG GaN NWs growth. High-density AlN nanopedestal arrays used as seeds for SAG GaN NWs are fabricated from thin AlN seeding layers using soft nanoimprint lithography. By adjusting the growth temperature and Ga/N flux ratio, hexagonal shaped SAG GaN NWs are realized. The quality of SAG GaN NWs is evaluated by low temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Three major groups of PL peaks at 3.47, 3.45, and 3.41 eV are identified. The peak at 3.471 eV is related to the neutral donor-bound exciton emission, and the 3.41 eV broadband emission is attributed to stacking faults or structural defects. The 3.45 eV peak is identified as the emission due to exciton recombination at polar inversion domain boundaries of NWs.

  18. Nanowire-decorated microscale metallic electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Antohe, V.A.;

    2008-01-01

    of lithographically defined metallic microelectrodes. The anodization of the aluminum permits electroplating only on top of the metallic electrodes, leading to the nanowire patterns having the same shape as the underlying metallic tracks. The variation in the fabricated structures between the patterned and non......The fabrication of metallic nanowire patterns within anodic alumina oxide (AAO) membranes on top of continuous conducting substrates are discussed. The fabrication protocol is based on the realization of nanowire patterns using supported nanoporous alumina templates (SNAT) prepared on top......-patterned substrates can be interpreted in terms of different behavior during anodization. The improved quality of fabricated nanowire patterns is clearly demonstrated by the SEM imaging and the uniform growth of nanowires inside the alumina template is observed without any significant height variation....

  19. Defect studies of ZnSe nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipose, U; Saxena, Ankur; Ruda, Harry E [Centre for Nanotechnology, University of Toronto, 170 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3E4 (Canada); Simpson, P J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Wang, Y Q; Kavanagh, K L [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2008-05-28

    During the synthesis of ZnSe nanowires various point and extended defects can form, leading to observed stacking faults and twinning defects, and strong defect related emission in photoluminescence spectra. In this paper, we report on the development of a simple thermodynamic model for estimating the defect concentration in ZnSe nanowires grown under varying Se vapour pressure and for explaining the results of our experimental findings. Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used successfully for the first time for nanowires and the results support predictions from the defect model as well as agreeing well with our structural and optical characterization results. Under very high Se vapour pressure, Se nodules were observed to form on the sidewalls of the nanowire, indicating that beyond a limit, excess Se will begin to precipitate out of the liquid alloy droplet in the vapour-liquid-solid growth of nanowires.

  20. Gold as an intruder in ZnO nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Reyes, José M; Monroy, B Marel; Bizarro, Monserrat; Güell, Frank; Martínez, Ana; Ramos, Estrella

    2015-09-07

    Several techniques for obtaining ZnO nanowires (ZnO NWs) have been reported in the literature. In particular, vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) with Au as a catalyst is widely used. During this process, Au impurities in the ZnO NWs can be incorporated accidentally, and for this reason we named these impurities as intruders. It is thought that these intruders may produce interesting alterations in the electronic characteristics of nanowires. In the experiment, it is not easy to detect either Au atoms in these nanowires, or the modification that intruders produce in different electrical, optical and other properties. For this reason, in this density functional theory investigation, the effect of Au intruders on ZnO NWs is analysed. Au extended (thread) and point defects (atoms replacing Zn or O, or Au interstitials) are used to simulate the presence of gold atoms. Optimised geometries, band-gaps and density of states indicate that the presence of small amounts of Au drastically modifies the electronic states of ZnO NWs. The results reported here clearly indicate that small amounts of Au have a strong impact on the electronic properties of ZnO NWs, introducing states in the band edges that may promote transitions in the visible spectral region. The presence of Au as an intruder in ZnO NWs enhances the potential use of this system for photonic and photovoltaic applications.

  1. Continuous gas-phase synthesis of nanowires with tunable properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heurlin, Magnus; Magnusson, Martin H; Lindgren, David; Ek, Martin; Wallenberg, L Reine; Deppert, Knut; Samuelson, Lars

    2012-12-06

    Semiconductor nanowires are key building blocks for the next generation of light-emitting diodes, solar cells and batteries. To fabricate functional nanowire-based devices on an industrial scale requires an efficient methodology that enables the mass production of nanowires with perfect crystallinity, reproducible and controlled dimensions and material composition, and low cost. So far there have been no reports of reliable methods that can satisfy all of these requirements. Here we show how aerotaxy, an aerosol-based growth method, can be used to grow nanowires continuously with controlled nanoscale dimensions, a high degree of crystallinity and at a remarkable growth rate. In our aerotaxy approach, catalytic size-selected Au aerosol particles induce nucleation and growth of GaAs nanowires with a growth rate of about 1 micrometre per second, which is 20 to 1,000 times higher than previously reported for traditional, substrate-based growth of nanowires made of group III-V materials. We demonstrate that the method allows sensitive and reproducible control of the nanowire dimensions and shape--and, thus, controlled optical and electronic properties--through the variation of growth temperature, time and Au particle size. Photoluminescence measurements reveal that even as-grown nanowires have good optical properties and excellent spectral uniformity. Detailed transmission electron microscopy investigations show that our aerotaxy-grown nanowires form along one of the four equivalent〈111〉B crystallographic directions in the zincblende unit cell, which is also the preferred growth direction for III-V nanowires seeded by Au particles on a single-crystal substrate. The reported continuous and potentially high-throughput method can be expected substantially to reduce the cost of producing high-quality nanowires and may enable the low-cost fabrication of nanowire-based devices on an industrial scale.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of single-crystalline alumina nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing; XU Xiang-yu; ZHANG Hong-zhou; CHEN Yao-feng; XU Jun; YU Da-peng

    2005-01-01

    Alumina nanowires were synthesized on large-area silicon substrate via simple thermal evaporation method of heating a mixture of aluminum and alumina powders without using any catalyst or template. The phase structure and the surface morphology of the as-grown sample were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry(XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The chemical composition and the microstructure of the as-grown alumina nanowires were characterized using transmission electron microscope(TEM). The nanowires are usually straight and the single crystalline has average diameter of 40 nm and length of 3 - 5 μm. The growth direction is along the [002] direction. Well aligned alumina nanowire arrays were observed on the surface of many large particles. The catalyst-free growth of the alumina nanowires was explained under the framework of a vapor-solid(VS)growth mechanism. This as-synthesized alumina nanowires could find potential applications in the fabrication of nanodevices.

  3. Composition and bandgap-graded semiconductor alloy nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiujuan; Ning, C Z; Pan, Anlian

    2012-01-03

    Semiconductor alloy nanowires with spatially graded compositions (and bandgaps) provide a new material platform for many new multifunctional optoelectronic devices, such as broadly tunable lasers, multispectral photodetectors, broad-band light emitting diodes (LEDs) and high-efficiency solar cells. In this review, we will summarize the recent progress on composition graded semiconductor alloy nanowires with bandgaps graded in a wide range. Depending on different growth methods and material systems, two typical nanowire composition grading approaches will be presented in detail, including composition graded alloy nanowires along a single substrate and those along single nanowires. Furthermore, selected examples of applications of these composition graded semiconductor nanowires will be presented and discussed, including tunable nanolasers, multi-terminal on-nanowire photodetectors, full-spectrum solar cells, and white-light LEDs. Finally, we will make some concluding remarks with future perspectives including opportunities and challenges in this research area.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT: UV DISINFECTION FOR REUSE APPLICATIONS, ONDEO DEGREMONT, INC., AQUARAY® 40 HO VLS DISINFECTION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verification testing of the Ondeo Degremont, Inc. Aquaray® 40 HO VLS Disinfection System to develop the UV delivered dose flow relationship was conducted at the Parsippany-Troy Hills wastewater treatment plant test site in Parsippany, New Jersey. Three reactor modules were m...

  5. EDITORIAL: Nanowires for energy Nanowires for energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPierre, Ray; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2012-05-01

    This special issue of Nanotechnology focuses on studies illustrating the application of nanowires for energy including solar cells, efficient lighting and water splitting. Over the next three decades, nanotechnology will make significant contributions towards meeting the increased energy needs of the planet, now known as the TeraWatt challenge. Nanowires in particular are poised to contribute significantly in this development as presented in the review by Hiralal et al [1]. Nanowires exhibit light trapping properties that can act as a broadband anti-reflection coating to enhance the efficiency of solar cells. In this issue, Li et al [2] and Wang et al [3] present the optical properties of silicon nanowire and nanocone arrays. In addition to enhanced optical properties, core-shell nanowires also have the potential for efficient charge carrier collection across the nanowire diameter as presented in the contribution by Yu et al [4] for radial junction a-Si solar cells. Hybrid approaches that combine organic and inorganic materials also have potential for high efficiency photovoltaics. A Si-based hybrid solar cell is presented by Zhang et al [5] with a photoconversion efficiency of over 7%. The quintessential example of hybrid solar cells is the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) where an organic absorber (dye) coats an inorganic material (typically a ZnO nanostructure). Herman et al [6] present a method of enhancing the efficiency of a DSSC by increasing the hetero-interfacial area with a unique hierarchical weeping willow ZnO structure. The increased surface area allows for higher dye loading, light harvesting, and reduced charge recombination through direct conduction along the ZnO branches. Another unique ZnO growth method is presented by Calestani et al [7] using a solution-free and catalyst-free approach by pulsed electron deposition (PED). Nanowires can also make more efficient use of electrical power. Light emitting diodes, for example, will eventually become the

  6. Quantitative measurements of C-reactive protein using silicon nanowire arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ho Lee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Min-Ho Lee, Kuk-Nyung Lee, Suk-Won Jung, Won-Hyo Kim, Kyu-Sik Shin, Woo-Kyeong SeongKorea Electronics Technology Institute, Gyeonggi, KoreaAbstract: A silicon nanowire-based sensor for biological application showed highly desirable electrical responses to either pH changes or receptor-ligand interactions such as protein disease markers, viruses, and DNA hybridization. Furthermore, because the silicon nanowire can display results in real-time, it may possess superior characteristics for biosensing than those demonstrated in previously studied methods. However, despite its promising potential and advantages, certain process-related limitations of the device, due to its size and material characteristics, need to be addressed. In this article, we suggest possible solutions. We fabricated silicon nanowire using a top-down and low cost micromachining method, and evaluate the sensing of molecules after transfer and surface modifications. Our newly designed method can be used to attach highly ordered nanowires to various substrates, to form a nanowire array device, which needs to follow a series of repetitive steps in conventional fabrication technology based on a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS method. For evaluation, we demonstrated that our newly fabricated silicon nanowire arrays could detect pH changes as well as streptavidin-biotin binding events. As well as the initial proof-of-principle studies, C-reactive protein binding was measured: electrical signals were changed in a linear fashion with the concentration (1 fM to 1 nM in PBS containing 1.37 mM of salts. Finally, to address the effects of Debye length, silicon nanowires coupled with antigen proteins underwent electrical signal changes as the salt concentration changed.Keywords: silicon nanowire array, C-reactive protein, vapor-liquid-solid method

  7. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  8. Joule heating in nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Fangohr, H.; Chernyshenko, D.; Franchin, Matteo; Fischbacher, Thomas; Meier, G.

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of Joule heating from electric currents flowing through ferromagnetic nanowires on the temperature of the nanowires and on the temperature of the substrate on which the nanowires are grown. The spatial current density distribution, the associated heat generation, and diffusion of heat is simulated within the nanowire and the substrate. We study several different nanowire and constriction geometries as well as different substrates: (thin) silicon nitride membranes, (thick) ...

  9. Growth of Anodic Aluminum Oxide Templates and the Application in Fabrication of the BiSbTe-Based Thermoelectric Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Guo Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-step electrochemical anodization was used to form the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO thin films with nanotube arrays of self-organized honeycomb structure. Al foil was anodized in 10% sulfuric acid (H2SO4 and 3% oxalic acid (H2C2O4 at 25°C at constant voltage of 40 V for 60 min for two times. Ethylene glycol (C2H6O2 was used as a solution and 0.3 M potassium iodide (KI was used to improve the solution’s conductivity. Different electrolyte concentrations of Bi(NO33-5H2O, SbCl3, and TeCl4 were added into KI-C2H6O2 solution and the cyclic voltammetry experiment was used to find the reduced voltages of Bi3+, Sb3+, and Te4+ ions. The potentiostatic deposition and pulse electrodeposition (PED processes were used to deposit the (Bi,Sb2−xTe3+x-based materials. Field-emission scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometers were used to analyze the compositions of the deposited (Bi,Sb2−xTe3+x-based materials. After finding the optimal deposition parameter of the PED process the AAO nanotube arrays were used as the templates to deposit the (Bi,Sb2−xTe3+x-based thermoelectric nanowires.

  10. Optimizing and Improving the Growth Quality of ZnO Nanowire Arrays Guided by Statistical Design of Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Adiga, Nagesh; Ba, Shan; Dasgupta, Tirthankar; Wu, C F Jeff; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2009-07-28

    Controlling the morphology of the as-synthesized nanostructures is usually challenging, and there lacks of a general theoretical guidance in experimental approach. In this study, a novel way of optimizing the aspect ratio of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays is presented by utilizing a systematic statistical design and analysis method. In this work, we use pick-the-winner rule and one-pair-at-a-time main effect analysis to sequentially design the experiments and identify optimal reaction settings. By controlling the hydrothermal reaction parameters (reaction temperature, time, precursor concentration, and capping agent), we improved the aspect ratio of ZnO NWs from around 10 to nearly 23. The effect of noise on the experimental results was identified and successfully reduced, and the statistical design and analysis methods were very effective in reducing the number of experiments performed and in identifying the optimal experimental settings. In addition, the antireflection spectrum of the as-synthesized ZnO NWs clearly shows that higher aspect ratio of the ZnO NW arrays leads to about 30% stronger suppression in the UV-vis range emission. This shows great potential applications as antireflective coating layers in photovoltaic devices.

  11. Electro-Optical Properties of Low-Temperature Growth Indium-tin-oxide Nanowires Using Polystyrene Spheres as Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Gong, Zhina; Li, Yufeng; Liu, Hao; Feng, Lungang; Liu, Shuo; Yun, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Polystyrene sphere was chosen as a catalyst to fabricate indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanowires (NWs) with a low-temperature (280-300 °C) electron-beam deposition process, bearing high purity. The ITO NWs with diameter of 20-50 nm and length of ~2 um were obtained. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscope show high crystal quality. The transmittance is above 90 % at a wavelength 400 nm or more, superior to the ITO bulk film. Owing to the unique morphology gradient of the ITO NWs, the effective refractive index of ITO NWs film is naturally graded from the bottom to the top. The ITO NWs have been used on LED devices ( λ = 450 nm), which improved the light output power by 31 % at the current of 150 mA comparing to the one without NWs and did not deteriorate the electrical properties. Such ITO NWs open opportunity in LED devices to further improve light extraction efficiency.

  12. Growth of doped silicon nanowires by pulsed laser deposition and their analysis by electron beam induced current imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhawer, B; Berger, A; Christiansen, S [Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Zhang, D; Clavel, R [Laboratory of Robotic Systems, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Michler, J, E-mail: bjoern.eisenhawer@ipht-jena.de [Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures Laboratory, EMPA-Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2011-02-18

    Doped silicon nanowires (NWs) were epitaxially grown on silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition following a vapour-liquid-solid process, in which dopants together with silicon atoms were introduced into the gas phase by laser ablation of lightly and highly doped silicon target material. p-n or p{sup ++}-p junctions located at the NW-silicon substrate interfaces were thus realized. To detect these junctions and visualize them the electron beam induced current technique and two-point probe current-voltage measurements were used, based on nanoprobing individual silicon NWs in a scanning electron microscope. Successful silicon NW doping by pulsed laser deposition of doped target material could experimentally be demonstrated. This doping strategy compared to the commonly used doping from the gas phase during chemical vapour deposition is evaluated essentially with a view to potentially overcoming the limitations of chemical vapour deposition doping, which shows doping inhomogeneities between the top and bottom of the NW as well as between the core and shell of NWs and structural lattice defects, especially when high doping levels are envisaged. The pulsed laser deposition doping technique yields homogeneously doped NWs and the doping level can be controlled by the choice of the target material. As a further benefit, this doping procedure does not require the use of poisonous gases and may be applied to grow not only silicon NWs but also other kinds of doped semiconductor NWs, e.g. group III nitrides or arsenides.

  13. Investigations on the mechanical behavior of nanowires with twin boundaries by atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Xia, E-mail: tianxia@lsec.cc.ac.cn [College of Mechanics and Materials, HoHai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

    2015-03-10

    Atomistic simulations are used to study the deformation behavior of twinned Cu nanowires with a <111> growth orientation under tension. Due to the existence of the twin boundaries, the strength of the twinned nanowires is higher than that of the twin-free nanowire and the yielding stress of twinned nanowires is inversely proportional to the spacings of the twin boundaries. Moreover, The ductility of the twin-free nanowire is the highest of all and it grows with the increasing spacings of the twin boundaries for twinned nanowires. Besides, we find that the twin boundaries can be served as dislocation sources as well as the free surfaces and grain boundaries.

  14. Study of Nanowires Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Monk, Joshua D

    2007-01-01

    In this dissertation I present computational studies that focus on the unique characteristics of metallic nanowires. We generated virtual nanowires of nanocrystalline nickel (nc-Ni) and single crystalline silver (Ag) in order to investigate particular nanoscale effects. Three-dimensional atomistic molecular dynamics studies were performed for each sample using the super computer System X located at Virginia Tech. Thermal grain growth simulations were performed on 4 nm grain size nc-Ni by o...

  15. Chemical Sensing with Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Reginald M.

    2012-07-01

    Transformational advances in the performance of nanowire-based chemical sensors and biosensors have been achieved over the past two to three years. These advances have arisen from a better understanding of the mechanisms of transduction operating in these devices, innovations in nanowire fabrication, and improved methods for incorporating receptors into or onto nanowires. Nanowire-based biosensors have detected DNA in undiluted physiological saline. For silicon nanowire nucleic acid sensors, higher sensitivities have been obtained by eliminating the passivating oxide layer on the nanowire surface and by substituting uncharged protein nucleic acids for DNA as the capture strands. Biosensors for peptide and protein cancer markers, based on both semiconductor nanowires and nanowires of conductive polymers, have detected these targets at physiologically relevant concentrations in both blood plasma and whole blood. Nanowire chemical sensors have also detected several gases at the parts-per-million level. This review discusses these and other recent advances, concentrating on work published in the past three years.

  16. Nanowire Optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhihuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanowires have been used in a variety of passive and active optoelectronic devices including waveguides, photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs, lasers, sensors, and optical antennas. We review the optical properties of these nanowires in terms of absorption, guiding, and radiation of light, which may be termed light management. Analysis of the interaction of light with long cylindrical/hexagonal structures with subwavelength diameters identifies radial resonant modes, such as Leaky Mode Resonances, or Whispering Gallery modes. The two-dimensional treatment should incorporate axial variations in “volumetric modes,”which have so far been presented in terms of Fabry–Perot (FP, and helical resonance modes. We report on finite-difference timedomain (FDTD simulations with the aim of identifying the dependence of these modes on geometry (length, width, tapering, shape (cylindrical, hexagonal, core–shell versus core-only, and dielectric cores with semiconductor shells. This demonstrates how nanowires (NWs form excellent optical cavities without the need for top and bottommirrors. However, optically equivalent structures such as hexagonal and cylindrical wires can have very different optoelectronic properties meaning that light management alone does not sufficiently describe the observed enhancement in upward (absorption and downward transitions (emission of light inNWs; rather, the electronic transition rates should be considered. We discuss this “rate management” scheme showing its strong dimensional dependence, making a case for photonic integrated circuits (PICs that can take advantage of the confluence of the desirable optical and electronic properties of these nanostructures.

  17. A high-sensitivity, fast-response, rapid-recovery UV photodetector fabricated based on catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowire networks on glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsultany, Forat H.; Hassan, Z.; Ahmed, Naser M.

    2016-10-01

    Here, we report for the first time the fabrication of metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetector based on catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowire networks on ITO seeds/glass substrates by thermal evaporation method. The morphological, structural, and optical properties of the sample were studied by using field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Upon exposure to 365 nm light (1.5 mW/cm2) at five-bias voltage, the device showed 2.32 × 103 sensitivity. In addition, the photocurrent was 1.79 × 10-4 A, and the internal gain of the photodetector was 24.2. The response and the recovery times were calculated to be 3.9 and 2.6 s, respectively, upon illumination to a pulse UV light (365 nm, 1.5 mW/cm2) at five-bias voltage. All of these results demonstrate that this high-quality detector can be a promising candidate as a low-cost UV photodetector for commercially integrated photoelectronic applications.

  18. Growth and Characterization of High-Quality GaN Nanowires on PZnO and PGaN by Thermal Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Shekari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current research, an easy and inexpensive method is used to synthesize highly crystalline gallium nitride (GaN nanowires (NWs on two different substrates [i.e., porous zinc oxide (PZnO and porous gallium nitride (PGaN] on Si (111 wafer by thermal evaporation without any catalyst. Microstructural studies by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope measurements reveal the role of the substrates in the nucleation and alignment of the GaN NWs. Further structural and optical characterizations were performed using high-resolution X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Results indicate that the NWs have a single-crystal hexagonal GaN structure and growth direction in the (0001 plane. The quality and density of GaN NWs grown on different substrates are highly dependent on the lattice mismatch between the NWs and their substrates. Results indicate that NWs grown on PGaN have better quality and higher density compared to NWs on PZnO.

  19. Epitaxial Integration of Nanowires in Microsystems by Local Micrometer Scale Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Wacaser, Brent A.; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2008-01-01

    Free-standing epitaxially grown nanowires provide a controlled growth system and an optimal interface to the underlying substrate for advanced optical, electrical, and mechanical nanowire device connections. Nanowires can be grown by vapor-phase epitaxy (VPE) methods such as chemical vapor deposi...

  20. Hydrothermal Growth and Application of ZnO Nanowire Films with ZnO and TiO2Buffer Layers in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Chunhua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper reports the effects of the seed layers prepared by spin-coating and dip-coating methods on the morphology and density of ZnO nanowire arrays, thus on the performance of ZnO nanowire-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. The nanowire films with the thick ZnO buffer layer (~0.8–1 μm thick can improve the open circuit voltage of the DSSCs through suppressing carrier recombination, however, and cause the decrease of dye loading absorbed on ZnO nanowires. In order to further investigate the effect of TiO2buffer layer on the performance of ZnO nanowire-based DSSCs, compared with the ZnO nanowire-based DSSCs without a compact TiO2buffer layer, the photovoltaic conversion efficiency and open circuit voltage of the ZnO DSSCs with the compact TiO2layer (~50 nm thick were improved by 3.9–12.5 and 2.4–41.7%, respectively. This can be attributed to the introduction of the compact TiO2layer prepared by sputtering method, which effectively suppressed carrier recombination occurring across both the film–electrolyte interface and the substrate–electrolyte interface.

  1. Hydrothermal Growth and Application of ZnO Nanowire Films with ZnO and TiO2 Buffer Layers in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiguang; Wan, Farong; Chen, Siwei; Jiang, Chunhua

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports the effects of the seed layers prepared by spin-coating and dip-coating methods on the morphology and density of ZnO nanowire arrays, thus on the performance of ZnO nanowire-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The nanowire films with the thick ZnO buffer layer (~0.8-1 μm thick) can improve the open circuit voltage of the DSSCs through suppressing carrier recombination, however, and cause the decrease of dye loading absorbed on ZnO nanowires. In order to further investigate the effect of TiO2 buffer layer on the performance of ZnO nanowire-based DSSCs, compared with the ZnO nanowire-based DSSCs without a compact TiO2 buffer layer, the photovoltaic conversion efficiency and open circuit voltage of the ZnO DSSCs with the compact TiO2 layer (~50 nm thick) were improved by 3.9-12.5 and 2.4-41.7%, respectively. This can be attributed to the introduction of the compact TiO2 layer prepared by sputtering method, which effectively suppressed carrier recombination occurring across both the film-electrolyte interface and the substrate-electrolyte interface.

  2. Permanent bending and alignment of ZnO nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschel, Christian; Spindler, Susann; Lerose, Damiana; Bochmann, Arne; Christiansen, Silke H; Nietzsche, Sandor; Oertel, Michael; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-05-06

    Ion beams can be used to permanently bend and re-align nanowires after growth. We have irradiated ZnO nanowires with energetic ions, achieving bending and alignment in different directions. Not only the bending of single nanowires is studied in detail, but also the simultaneous alignment of large ensembles of ZnO nanowires. Computer simulations reveal how the bending is initiated by ion beam induced damage. Detailed structural characterization identifies dislocations to relax stresses and make the bending and alignment permanent, even surviving annealing procedures.

  3. Smooth germanium nanowires prepared by a hydrothermal deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.Z., E-mail: lzpei1977@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Zhao, H.S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Tan, W. [Henkel Huawei Electronics Co. Ltd., Lian' yungang, Jiangsu 222006 (China); Yu, H.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Chen, Y.W. [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Fan, C.G. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Zhang, Qian-Feng, E-mail: zhangqf@ahut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China)

    2009-11-15

    Smooth germanium nanowires were prepared using Ge and GeO{sub 2} as the starting materials and Cu sheet as the substrate by a simple hydrothermal deposition process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterizations show that the germanium nanowires are smooth and straight with uniform diameter of about 150 nm in average and tens of micrometers in length. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum of the germanium nanowires display that the germanium nanowires are mainly composed of cubic diamond phase. PL spectrum shows a strong blue light emission at 441 nm. The growth mechanism is also discussed.

  4. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  5. Electrochemical route to thermoelectric nanowires via organic electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klammer, Jana; Goesele, Ulrich [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Bachmann, Julien; Toellner, William; Nielsch, Kornelius [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Bourgault, Daniel [Schneider-Electric France, 38TEC/TI, 37 quai Paul Louis Merlin, 38050 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Cagnon, Laurent [Institut Neel, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-06-15

    Thermoelectric nanowires have been predicted to have superior properties compared to their bulk counterparts due to quantum confinement. We present the synthesis of chalcogenide nanowires A{sub 2}B{sub 3} (A = Bi, Sb; B = S, Se, Te) and PbB (B = S, Se, Te) by electrochemical deposition into highly ordered porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes. The narrow pore size distribution of the templates reproducibly yields very homogeneous nanowires upon electrodeposition into the pores. The thermoelectric nanowires presented here were deposited from nonaqueous electrolytes based on Bi{sup 3+} and S (and their heavier counterparts). The transmission electron microscopy investigations on released nanowires show the homogeneous growth behavior of the material. We will present data on the Seebeck coefficients of nanowire ensembles of various IV-VI and V-VI materials embedded in the porous template. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Synthesis and electrical characterization of tungsten oxide nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Rui; Zhu Jing; Yu Rong

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires of diameters ranging from 7 to 200 nm are prepared on a tungsten rod substrate by using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method with vapour-solid (VS) mechanism. Tin powders are used to control oxygen concentration in the furnace, thereby assisting the growth of the tungsten oxide nanowires. The grown tungsten oxide nanowires are determined to be of crystalline W18O49. Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves are measured by an in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) to investigate the electrical properties of the nanowires. All of the Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves observed are symmetric, which reveals that the tungsten oxide nanowires are semiconducting. Quantitative analyses of the experimental I V curves by using a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) model give some intrinsic parameters of the tungsten oxide nanowires, such as the carrier concentration, the carrier mobility and the conductivity.

  7. Synthetic Strategies and Applications of GaN Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoquan Suo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available GaN is an important III-V semiconductor material with a direct band gap of 3.4 eV at 300 K. The wide direct band gap makes GaN an attractive material for various applications. GaN nanowires have demonstrated significant potential as fundamental building blocks for nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices and also offer substantial promise for integrated nanosystems. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review on the general synthetic strategies, characterizations, and applications of GaN nanowires. We first summarize several growth techniques of GaN nanowires. Subsequently, we discuss mechanisms involved to generate GaN nanowires from different synthetic schemes and conditions. Then we review some characterization methods of GaN nanowires. Finally, several kinds of main applications of GaN nanowires are discussed.

  8. Electrochemical synthesis of CORE-shell magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ovejero, Jesús G.

    2015-04-16

    (Fe, Ni, CoFe) @ Au core-shell magnetic nanowires have been synthesized by optimized two-step potentiostatic electrodeposition inside self-assembled nanopores of anodic aluminium templates. The optimal electrochemical parameters (e.g., potential) have been firstly determined for the growth of continuous Au nanotubes at the inner wall of pores. Then, a magnetic core was synthesized inside the Au shells under suitable electrochemical conditions for a wide spectrum of single elements and alloy compositions (e.g., Fe, Ni and CoFe alloys). Novel opportunities offered by such nanowires are discussed particularly the magnetic behavior of (Fe, Ni, CoFe) @ Au core-shell nanowires was tested and compared with that of bare TM nanowires. These core-shell nanowires can be released from the template so, opening novel opportunities for biofunctionalization of individual nanowires.

  9. Engineered Solution-Liquid-Solid Growth of a "Treelike" 1D/1D TiO2 Nanotube-CdSe Nanowire Heterostructure: Photoelectrochemical Conversion of Broad Spectrum of Solar Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Bratindranath; Sarker, Swagotom; Crone, Eric; Pathak, Pawan; Subramanian, Vaidyanathan R

    2016-12-07

    This work presents a hitherto unreported approach to assemble a 1D oxide-1D chalcogenide heterostructured photoactive film. As a representative system, bismuth (Bi) catalyzed 1D CdSe nanowires are directly grown on anodized 1D TiO2 nanotube (T_NT). A combination of the reductive successive-ionic-layer-adsorption-reaction (R-SILAR) and the solution-liquid-solid (S-L-S) approach is implemented to fabricate this heterostructured assembly, reported in this 1D/1D form for the first time. XRD, SEM, HRTEM, and elemental mapping are performed to systematically characterize the deposition of bismuth on T_NT and the growth of CdSe nanowires leading to the evolution of the 1D/1D heterostructure. The resulting "treelike" photoactive architecture demonstrates UV-visible light-driven electron-hole pair generation. The photoelectrochemical results highlight: (i) the formation of a stable n-n heterojunction between TiO2 nanotube and CdSe nanowire, (ii) an excellent correlation between the absorbance vis-à-vis light conversion efficiency (IPCE), and (iii) a photocurrent density of 3.84 mA/cm(2). This proof-of-concept features the viability of the approach for designing such complex 1D/1D oxide-chalcogenide heterostructures that can be of interest to photovoltaics, photocatalysis, environmental remediation, and sensing.

  10. Nanowires-based light emitters on thermally and electrically conductive substrates and of making same

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-04-27

    Elemental or compound semiconductors on metal substrates and methods of growing them are provided. The methods can include the steps of: (i) providing a metal substrate; (ii) adding an interlayer on a surface of the metal substrate, and (iii) growing semiconductor nanowires on the interlayer using a semiconductor epitaxy growth system to form the elemental or compound semiconductor. The method can include direct growth of high quality group III-V and group III-N based materials in the form of nanowires and nanowires-based devices on metal substrates. The nanowires on all- metal scheme greatly simplifies the fabrication process of nanowires based high power light emitters.

  11. Engineering scale development of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process for the production of silicon carbide fibrils. Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnsorg, R.W.; Hollar, W.E. Jr.; Lau, S.K. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States). Technology Div.; Ko, F.K.; Schatz, K. [Advanced Product Development, Bristol, PA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    As reinforcements for composites, VLS SiC fibrils have attractive mechanical properties including high-strength, high modulus, and excellent creep resistance. To make use of their excellent mechanical properties in a composite, a significant volume fraction (>10%) of aligned, long fibrils (>2 mm) needs to be consolidated in the ceramic matrix. The fibrils must be processed into an assembly that will allow for composite fabrication while maintaining fibril alignment and length. With Advanced Product Development (APD) as the yam fabrication subcontractor, Carborundum investigated several approaches to achieve this goaL including traditional yam-forming processes such as carding and air-vortex spinning and nontraditional processes such as tape forming and wet casting. Carborundum additionally performed an economic analysis for producing 500 and 10,000 pounds of SiC fibrils annually using both conservative and more aggressive processing parameters. With the aggressive approach, the projected costs for SiC fibril production for 500 and 10,000 pounds per year are $1,340/pound and $340/pound, respectively.

  12. Vertical group III-V nanowires on si, heterostructures, flexible arrays and fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Deli; Soci, Cesare; Bao, Xinyu; Wei, Wei; Jing, Yi; Sun, Ke

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the invention provide a method for direct heteroepitaxial growth of vertical III-V semiconductor nanowires on a silicon substrate. The silicon substrate is etched to substantially completely remove native oxide. It is promptly placed in a reaction chamber. The substrate is heated and maintained at a growth temperature. Group III-V precursors are flowed for a growth time. Preferred embodiment vertical Group III-V nanowires on silicon have a core-shell structure, which provides a radial homojunction or heterojunction. A doped nanowire core is surrounded by a shell with complementary doping. Such can provide high optical absorption due to the long optical path in the axial direction of the vertical nanowires, while reducing considerably the distance over which carriers must diffuse before being collected in the radial direction. Alloy composition can also be varied. Radial and axial homojunctions and heterojunctions can be realized. Embodiments provide for flexible Group III-V nanowire structures. An array of Group III-V nanowire structures is embedded in polymer. A fabrication method forms the vertical nanowires on a substrate, e.g., a silicon substrate. Preferably, the nanowires are formed by the preferred methods for fabrication of Group III-V nanowires on silicon. Devices can be formed with core/shell and core/multi-shell nanowires and the devices are released from the substrate upon which the nanowires were formed to create a flexible structure that includes an array of vertical nanowires embedded in polymer.

  13. Vertical group III-V nanowires on si, heterostructures, flexible arrays and fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deli; Soci, Cesare; Bao, Xinyu; Wei, Wei; Jing, Yi; Sun, Ke

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the invention provide a method for direct heteroepitaxial growth of vertical III-V semiconductor nanowires on a silicon substrate. The silicon substrate is etched to substantially completely remove native oxide. It is promptly placed in a reaction chamber. The substrate is heated and maintained at a growth temperature. Group III-V precursors are flowed for a growth time. Preferred embodiment vertical Group III-V nanowires on silicon have a core-shell structure, which provides a radial homojunction or heterojunction. A doped nanowire core is surrounded by a shell with complementary doping. Such can provide high optical absorption due to the long optical path in the axial direction of the vertical nanowires, while reducing considerably the distance over which carriers must diffuse before being collected in the radial direction. Alloy composition can also be varied. Radial and axial homojunctions and heterojunctions can be realized. Embodiments provide for flexible Group III-V nanowire structures. An array of Group III-V nanowire structures is embedded in polymer. A fabrication method forms the vertical nanowires on a substrate, e.g., a silicon substrate. Preferably, the nanowires are formed by the preferred methods for fabrication of Group III-V nanowires on silicon. Devices can be formed with core/shell and core/multi-shell nanowires and the devices are released from the substrate upon which the nanowires were formed to create a flexible structure that includes an array of vertical nanowires embedded in polymer.

  14. Structural Investigations of Nanowires Using X-Ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stankevic, Tomas

    a very accurate measurements of strain at every point of the single nanowire. We showed that in critical heterostructures the strain distribution can be very inhomogeneous. (iii) Lastly, we have studied in-situ the nanowire growth by molecular beam epitaxy at the synchrotron beamline. With this, we could...

  15. Surface physics of semiconducting nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Michele; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    Semiconducting nanowires (NWs) are firm candidates for novel nanoelectronic devices and a fruitful playground for fundamental physics. Ultra-thin nanowires, with diameters below 10 nm, present exotic quantum effects due to the confinement of the wave functions, e.g. widening of the electronic band-gap, deepening of the dopant states. However, although several reports of sub-10 nm wires exist to date, the most common NWs have diameters that range from 20 to 200 nm, where these quantum effects are absent or play a very minor role. Yet, the research activity on this field is very intense and these materials still promise to provide an important paradigm shift for the design of emerging electronic devices and different kinds of applications. A legitimate question is then: what makes a nanowire different from bulk systems? The answer is certainly the large surface-to-volume ratio. In this article we discuss the most salient features of surface physics and chemistry in group-IV semiconducting nanowires, focusing mostly on Si NWs. First we review the state-of-the-art of NW growth to achieve a smooth and controlled surface morphology. Next we discuss the importance of a proper surface passivation and its role on the NW electronic properties. Finally, stressing the importance of a large surface-to-volume ratio and emphasizing the fact that in a NW the surface is where most of the action takes place, we discuss molecular sensing and molecular doping.

  16. An analysis of the growth of silver catalyzed In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As nanowires on Si (100) by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, K.; Banerji, P., E-mail: pallab@matsc.iitkgp.ernet.in [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Palit, M.; Chattopadhyay, S. [Centre for Research in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2016-08-28

    A model is proposed here to understand the nucleation of III–V semiconductor nanowires (NW). Whereas the classical nucleation theory is not adequately sufficient in explaining the evolution of the shape of the NWs under different chemical environment such as flow rate or partial pressure of the precursors, the effect of adsorption and desorption mediated growth, and diffusion limited growth are taken into account to explain the morphology and the crystal structure of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As nanowires (NW) on Silicon (100) substrates grown by a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition technique. It is found that the monolayer nucleus that originates at the triple phase line covers the entire nucleus-substrate (NS) region at a specific level of supersaturation and there are cases when the monolayer covers a certain fraction of the NS interface. When the monolayer covers the total NS interface, NWs grow with perfect cylindrical morphology and whenever a fraction of the interface is covered by the nucleus, the NWs become curved as observed from high resolution transmission electron microscopy images. The supersaturation, i.e., the chemical potential is found to be governed by the concentration of precursors into the molten silver which in the present case is taken as a catalyst. Our study provides new insights into the growth of ternary NWs which will be helpful in understanding the behavior of growth of different semiconducting NWs.

  17. Synthesis of nickel catalyzed Si/SiC core-shell nanowires by HWCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong Goh, Boon; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2014-12-01

    Si/SiC core-shell nanowires grown on glass substrates by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition were studied. Nickel was used as a catalyst to initiate the growth of these core-shell nanowires and the nanowires were grown at different deposition pressures of 0.5 and 1 mbar. The core of the nanowire was found to be a single crystalline Si. The shell of the nanowire consisted of Si nano-crystallites embedded within an amorphous SiC matrix which was attributed to a radial growth of columnar structures. The Si and SiC nano-crystallites embedded within an amorphous matrix exhibited room-temperature photoluminescence emissions in the range of 400 nm-1 μm. A vapor-solid-solid growth mechanism of these core-shell nanowires is proposed. The effects of the deposition pressure on the properties of the core-shell nanowires are also discussed.

  18. Impact of nanowire geometry on the carrier transport in GaN/InGaN axial nanowire light-emitting diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaofei Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors have investigated the impact of nanowire geometry on the carrier transport in axial indium gallium nitride and gallium nitride (InGaN/GaN nanowire light-emitting diodes (LEDs. The results reveal that hole transport depends critically on the nanowire geometry. With identical material parameters, the carrier transport process can be varied with different nanowire geometry designs, which lead to different overall device performance. This study offers important insight into the design and epitaxial growth of high-performance nanowire LEDs.

  19. Defect-free thin InAs nanowires grown using molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we designed a simple method to achieve the growth of defect-free thin InAs nanowires with a lateral dimension well below their Bohr radius on different substrate orientations. By depositing and annealing a thin layer of Au thin film on a (100) substrate surface, we have achieved the growth of defect-free uniform-sized thin InAs nanowires. This study provides a strategy to achieve the growth of pure defect-free thin nanowires.

  20. Hierarchical growth of TiO2 nanosheets on anodic ZnO nanowires for high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, David O.; Lee, Chang Soo; Cameron, Petra J.; Mattia, Davide; Kim, Jong Hak

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel route to hierarchical core-shell structures consisting of an anodic ZnO nanowire core surrounded by a shell of TiO2 nanosheets (ZNW@TNS). This material combines the beneficial properties of enhanced electron transport, provided by the nanowire core, with the high surface area and chemical stability of the TiO2 shell. Quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (qssDSSCs) are prepared using different quantities of either the bare ZnO nanowires or the hierarchical nanowire structures and the effect on cell performance is examined. It is found that whilst the addition of the bare ZnO nanowires results in a decrease in cell performance, significant improvements can be achieved with the addition of small quantities of the hierarchical structures. Power conversion efficiencies of up to 7.5% are achieved under 1 Sun, AM 1.5 simulated sunlight, with a ∼30% increase compared to non-hierarchical mesoporous TiO2 films. A solid-state DSSC (ssDSSC) with a single component solid polymer also exhibits excellent efficiency of 7.2%. The improvement in cell performance is related to the improved light scattering, surface area and electron transport properties via the use of reflectance spectroscopy, BET surface area measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  1. Growth and morphological analysis of segmented AuAg alloy nanowires created by pulsed electrodeposition in ion-track etched membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Schubert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multicomponent heterostructure nanowires and nanogaps are of great interest for applications in sensorics. Pulsed electrodeposition in ion-track etched polymer templates is a suitable method to synthesise segmented nanowires with segments consisting of two different types of materials. For a well-controlled synthesis process, detailed analysis of the deposition parameters and the size-distribution of the segmented wires is crucial.Results: The fabrication of electrodeposited AuAg alloy nanowires and segmented Au-rich/Ag-rich/Au-rich nanowires with controlled composition and segment length in ion-track etched polymer templates was developed. Detailed analysis by cyclic voltammetry in ion-track membranes, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy was performed to determine the dependency between the chosen potential and the segment composition. Additionally, we have dissolved the middle Ag-rich segments in order to create small nanogaps with controlled gap sizes. Annealing of the created structures allows us to influence their morphology.Conclusion: AuAg alloy nanowires, segmented wires and nanogaps with controlled composition and size can be synthesised by electrodeposition in membranes, and are ideal model systems for investigation of surface plasmons.

  2. Fabrication of reliable semiconductor nanowires by controlling crystalline structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangdan; Lim, Taekyung; Ju, Sanghyun

    2011-07-29

    One-dimensional SnO(2) nanomaterials with wide bandgap characteristics are attractive for flexible and/or transparent displays and high-performance nano-electronics. In this study, the crystallinity of SnO(2) nanowires was regulated by controlling their growth temperatures. Moreover, the correlation of the crystallinity of nanowires with optical and electrical characteristics was analyzed. When SnO(2) nanowires were grown at temperatures below 900 °C, they showed various growth directions and abnormal discontinuity in their crystal structures. On the other hand, most nanowires grown at 950 °C exhibited a regular growth trend in the direction of [100]. In addition, the low temperature photoluminescence measurement revealed that the higher growth temperatures of nanowires gradually decreased the 500 nm peak rather than the 620 nm peak. The former peak is derived from the surface defect related to the shallow energy level and affects nanowire surface states. Owing to crystallinity and defects, the threshold voltage range (maximum-minimum) of SnO(2) nanowire transistors was 1.5 V at 850 °C, 1.1 V at 900 °C, and 0.5 V at 950 °C, with dispersion characteristics dramatically decreased. This study successfully demonstrated the effects of nanowire crystallinity on optical and electrical characteristics. It also suggested that the optical and electrical characteristics of nanowire transistors could be regulated by controlling their growth temperatures in the course of producing SnO(2) nanowires.

  3. The In situ growth of Nanostructures on Surfaces (INS) endstation of the ESRF BM32 beamline: a combined UHV-CVD and MBE reactor for in situ X-ray scattering investigations of growing nanoparticles and semiconductor nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantelli, V; Geaymond, O; Ulrich, O; Zhou, T; Blanc, N; Renaud, G

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the upgraded `In situ growth of Nanoscructures on Surfaces' (INS) endstation of the InterFace beamline IF-BM32 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). This instrument, originally designed to investigate the structure of clean surfaces/interfaces/thin-films by surface X-ray diffraction, has been further developed to investigate the formation and evolution of nanostructures by combining small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering methodologies, i.e. grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). It consists of a UHV chamber mounted on a z-axis type goniometer, equipped with residual gas analysis, reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to complete the X-ray scattering investigations. The chamber has been developed so as up to eight sources of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) can be simultaneously mounted to elaborate the nanostructures. A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) set-up has been added to expand the range of growing possibilities, in particular to investigate in situ the growth of semiconductor nanowires. This setup is presented in some detail, as well as the first in situ X-ray scattering measurements during the growth of silicon nanowires.

  4. 3-D matrix template-assisted growth of oriented oxide nanowire arrays using glancing angle pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, N.; Mateo-Feliciano, D.; Ostoski, A.; Mukherjee, P.; Witanachchi, S.

    Nanosphere lithography is a combination of different methods to nanofabrication. In this work nanosphere lithography is used to study the growth of Zinc Oxide Nano-columns (ZnO NCs) on different diameter Silica Nanosphere (SNS) self-assembled templates. ZnO NCs are promising building blocks for many existing and emerging optical, electrical, and piezoelectric devices, specifically, the seeded growth of other oxide materials. Recently, reports have shown a ferroelectric phase of zinc stannate (ZnSnO3) and while lead zirconium titanate oxide (PZT) has been the main material of interest in ferroelectric and piezoelectric applications, the toxicity of lead has been of great concern. The possibility of developing lead free piezoelectric materials is of great interest in the ferroelectric community. Langmuir-Blodgett method was used to construct a self-assembled monolayer of SNSs on silicon substrates. Oriented ZnO NCs were grown on top of the spheres using the glancing angle pulsed laser deposition technique. Columns were formed in a spatially ordered closed-packed hexagonal configuration. Growth of ZnO NCs was studied as function of ambient Oxygen pressure with SNS size ranging from 250-1000 nm. Cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to study the template structure. Relative aspect ratios were studied and showed tunability of column dimensions with sphere size. XRD revealed ZnO NC arrays were c-axis oriented with hexagonal wurtzite structure.

  5. Broadband light-absorption InGaN photoanode assisted by imprint patterning and ZnO nanowire growth for energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Junjie; Quang Dang, Vinh; Li, Hongjian; Moon, Sungjin; Li, Panpan; Kim, Yangdoo; Kim, Chaehyun; Choi, Jinyoung; Choi, Hakjong; Liu, Zhiqiang; Lee, Heon

    2017-01-01

    In this research, an InGaN-based photoanode with a broadband light-absorption range from ultraviolet to green, patterned by imprint lithography and branched by ZnO nanowires, has been applied to water splitting. Over the solar spectrum range, the absorbance increases due to the scattering effect of the micro-structure compared to that of flat surface InGaN, which reaches a maximum of over 90% at 380 nm as ZnO nanowires are further employed in this novel photoanode. Consequently, the induced photocurrent density of the InGaN photoanode with a domelike structure and ZnO nanowires on the surface shows a remarkable enhancement of seven times that of the one with a flat surface. Further investigation indicates the wet-etching process for defect removal has an essential impact on photocurrent efficiency. This design demonstrates an innovative approach for water splitting.

  6. Generic nano-imprint process for fabrication of nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierret, Aurelie; Hocevar, Moira; Algra, Rienk E; Timmering, Eugene C; Verschuuren, Marc A; Immink, George W G; Verheijen, Marcel A; Bakkers, Erik P A M [Philips Research Laboratories Eindhoven, High Tech Campus 11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Diedenhofen, Silke L [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics c/o Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Vlieg, E, E-mail: e.p.a.m.bakkers@tue.nl [IMM, Solid State Chemistry, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-10

    A generic process has been developed to grow nearly defect-free arrays of (heterostructured) InP and GaP nanowires. Soft nano-imprint lithography has been used to pattern gold particle arrays on full 2 inch substrates. After lift-off organic residues remain on the surface, which induce the growth of additional undesired nanowires. We show that cleaning of the samples before growth with piranha solution in combination with a thermal anneal at 550 deg. C for InP and 700 deg. C for GaP results in uniform nanowire arrays with 1% variation in nanowire length, and without undesired extra nanowires. Our chemical cleaning procedure is applicable to other lithographic techniques such as e-beam lithography, and therefore represents a generic process.

  7. Full process for integrating silicon nanowire arrays into solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perraud, Simon; Poncet, Severine; Noel, Sebastien; Levis, Michel; Faucherand, Pascal; Rouviere, Emmanuelle [CEA, LITEN, Laboratoire des Composants pour la Recuperation d' Energie, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Thony, Philippe; Jaussaud, Claude; Delsol, Regis [CEA, LITEN, Laboratoire des Composants Solaires, INES-RDI, Savoie Technolac, 50 avenue du Lac Leman, 73377 Le-Bourget-du-Lac (France)

    2009-09-15

    A novel process was developed for integrating silicon nanowire arrays into solar cells. n-Type silicon nanowires were grown by chemical-vapour deposition via the gold-catalysed vapour-liquid-solid method, on a p-type silicon substrate. After the growth, the nanowire array was planarized, by embedding the nanowires in a spin-on glass matrix and subsequent chemical-mechanical polishing of the front surface. This planarization step allows to deposit a continuous and uniform conductive film on top of the nanowire array, and thus to form a high-quality front electrical contact. For an illumination intensity of 100 mW/cm{sup 2}, our devices exhibit an energy conversion efficiency of 1.9%. The main performance limiting factor is a high pn junction reverse current, due to contamination by the growth catalyst or to a lack of passivation of surface electronic defects. (author)

  8. Structural Investigations of Nanowires Using X-Ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stankevic, Tomas

    Advancements in growth of the nanowire-based devices opened another dimension of possible structures and material combinations, which nd their applications in a wide variety of elds, including everyday life. Characterization of such devices brings its own challenges and here we show that X-rays oer...... over large number of nanowires. Knowing the precise positions of multiple Bragg peaks in reciprocal space we could calculate the average strain and composition. (ii) In the second technique we used a nanofocused X-ray beam of 100 nm in diameter to measure the local variation of strain and tilt...... grow the nanowires and measure X-ray diraction in real time. We studied the initial stage of pure WZ InAs nanowire growth. By measuring the interference fringes in the scattering signal, raising from the nite length of the NWs it was possible to precisely determine the nanowire length evolution at each...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of single-crystal strontium hexaboride nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jash, Panchatapa; Nicholls, Alan W; Ruoff, Rodney S; Trenary, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Catalyst-assisted growth of single-crystal strontium hexaboride (SrB6) nanowires was achieved by pyrolysis of diborane (B2H6) over SrO powders at 760-800 degrees C and 400 mTorr in a quartz tube furnace. Raman spectra demonstrate that the nanowires are SrB6, and transmission electron microscopy along with selected area diffraction indicate that the nanowires consist of single crystals with a preferred [001] growth direction. Electron energy loss data combined with the TEM images indicate that the nanowires consist of crystalline SrB 6 cores with a thin (1 to 2 nm) amorphous oxide shell. The nanowires have diameters of 10-50 nm and lengths of 1-10 microm.

  10. Gold nanowires fabricated by immersion plating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Shen, Fang-Yee; Huang, Fon-Shan

    2008-05-14

    The growth mechanism of oriented Au nanowires fabricated by immersion plating was investigated. Both n-type crystal Si (c-Si) and amorphous Si (a-Si) with an electron-beam (E-beam) patterned resist nanotrench were immersed into the plating bath HAuCl(4)/HF. For the Au nanowires fabricated on c-Si, voids, nanograins, and clusters were observed at various plating conditions, time and temperature. The voids were often found in the center of the Au nanowires due to there being fewer nucleation sites on the c-Si surface. However, Au can easily nucleate on the surface of a-Si and form continuous Au nanowires with grain sizes about 10-50 nm. The resistivities of Au nanowires with width 105 nm fabricated on a-Si are about 4.4-6.5 µΩ cm. After annealing at 200 °C for 30 min in N(2) ambient, the resistivities are lowered to about 3.0-3.9 µΩ cm, measured in an atomic force microscope (AFM) in contact mode. The grain size of Au is in the range of ∼50-100 nm. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination and grazing incident x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis were also carried out to study the morphology and crystalline structure of the Au nanowires.

  11. Optical Characterization and Growth Mechanism of Combination of Zinc Oxide Nanowires and Nanorods at Various Substrate Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulami Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the growth of ZnO nanostructures on n-type silicon substrate using pulsed laser deposition technique at substrate temperature ranging from room temperature to 600°C for one hour. We observe both rod- and wire-like structures with different dimensions at room temperature, 150°C, and 450°C substrate temperatures and only wire-like structures at 300°C and 600°C. These combinations of different shapes have been attributed to the initial growth of nanostructures (nucleation sites on the surface obtained during the deposition for 20 minutes. The narrowing in the full-width-half-maximum of the peak corresponding to (002 plane of XRD is looked upon as another possible explanation. The blue shift of the peak at 396 nm observed in the photoluminescence is due to the quantum confinement. The intensity of E2(high mode at 437 cm−1 increases indicating improvement in crystallinity with the substrate temperature.

  12. Influence of oxygen in architecting large scale nonpolar GaN nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Patsha, Avinash; Pandian, Ramanathaswamy; Dhara, S

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of surface architecture of semiconducting nanowires with a control in surface polarity is one of the important objectives for nanowire based electronic and optoelectronic devices for commercialization. We report the growth of exceptionally high structural and optical quality nonpolar GaN nanowires with controlled and uniform surface morphology and size distribution, for large scale production. The role of O contamination (~1-10^5 ppm) in the surface architecture of these nanowires is investigated with the possible mechanism involved. Nonpolar GaN nanowires grown in O rich condition show the inhomogeneous surface morphologies and sizes (50 - 150 nm) while nanowires are having precise sizes of 40(5) nm and uniform surface morphology, for the samples grown in O reduced condition. Relative O contents are estimated using electron energy loss spectroscopy studies. Size-selective growth of uniform nanowires is also demonstrated, in the O reduced condition, using different catalyst sizes. Photoluminescen...

  13. GaAs nanowires. Epitaxy, crystal structure-related properties and magnetic heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubmann, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    The intention of this work is twofold: On the one hand, we explore the controlability of GaAs nanowire growth concerning orientation, shape and crystal structure. These are necessary steps, since the growth of GaAs nanowires proceeds not necessarily uniformly, and in GaAs nanowires the in bulk unstable wurtzite phase, and the usual observed zinc-blende crystal phase may coexist in one and the same nanowire. On the other hand, we include ferromagnetic materials into GaAs nanowires. To do that, we produce either ''core/shell'' structures, where the GaAs nanowire is coated with a ferromagnetic ''shell'' material, or grow ferromagnetic nanoscale segments in GaAs nanowires.

  14. Investigation and comparison of GaN nanowire nucleation and growth by the catalyst-assisted and self-induced approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheze, Caroline

    2010-03-04

    This work focuses on the nucleation and growth mechanisms of GaN nanowires (NWs) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The two main novelties of this study are the intensive employment of in-situ techniques and the direct comparison of selfinduced and catalyst-induced NWs. On silicon substrates, GaN NWs form in MBE without the use of any external catalyst seed. On sapphire, in contrast, NWs grow under identical conditions only in the presence of Ni seeds. NW nucleation was studied in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) in correlation with line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). The latter technique allows to monitor the incorporated amount of Ga. For the catalyst-assisted approach, three nucleation stages were identified: first incorporation of Ga into the Ni seeds, second transformation of the seed crystal structure due to Ga accumulation, and last GaN growth under the seeds. The crystalline structure of the seeds during the first two stages is in accord with the Ni-Ga binary phase diagram and evidenced that only Ga incorporates into the Ni particles. GaN forms only after the Ga concentration is larger than the one of Ni. The observation of diffraction patterns generated by the Ni-Ga seed particles during the whole nucleation evidences the solid state of the seeds. Moreover, the QMS study showed that it is not Ga incorporation into Ni but GaN nucleation itself that limits the growth processes. For the self-induced NWs, QMS and RHEED investigations indicate very similar nucleation processes on Si(001) and Si(111) and two nucleation stages were identified. Transmission electron microscopy on samples grown on Si(001) revealed that the first stage is characterized by the competition between the nucleation of crystalline Si{sub x}N{sub y} and GaN. During this stage, the Si surface strongly roughens by the formation of pits and Si mounds. At the same time, very few GaN islands nucleate. During the second stage, the amorphization of the Si

  15. Co-nucleus 1D/2D Heterostructures with Bi2S3 Nanowire and MoS2 Monolayer: One-Step Growth and Defect-Induced Formation Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Huang, Le; Li, Bo; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhou, Ziqi; Li, Jingbo; Wei, Zhongming

    2016-09-27

    Heterostructures constructed by low-dimensional (such as 0D, 1D, and 2D) materials have opened up opportunities for exploring interesting physical properties and versatile (opto)electronics. Recently, 2D/2D heterostructures, in particular, atomically thin graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides, including graphene/MoS2, WSe2/MoS2, and WS2/WSe2, were efficiently prepared (by transfer techniques, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth, etc.) and systematically studied. In contrast, investigation of 1D/2D heterostructures was still very challenging and rarely reported, and the understanding of such heterostructures was also not well established. Herein, we demonstrate the one-step growth of a heterostructure on the basis of a 1D-Bi2S3 nanowire and a 2D-MoS2 monolayer through the CVD method. Multimeans were employed, and the results proved the separated growth of a Bi2S3 nanowire and a MoS2 sheet in the heterostructure rather than forming a BixMo1-xSy alloy due to their large lattice mismatch. Defect-induced co-nucleus growth, which was an important growth mode in 1D/2D heterostructures, was also experimentally confirmed and systematically investigated in our research. Such 1D/2D heterostructures were further fabricated and utilized in (opto)electronic devices, such as field-effect transistors and photodetectors, and revealed their potential for multifunctional design in electrical properties. The direct growth of such nanostructures will help us to gain a better comprehension of these specific configurations and allow device functionalities in potential applications.

  16. Self-assembly of silicon nanowires studied by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Agati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM was successfully applied to the analysis of silicon nanowires (SiNWs that were self-assembled during an inductively coupled plasma (ICP process. The ICP-synthesized SiNWs were found to present a Si–SiO2 core–shell structure and length varying from ≈100 nm to 2–3 μm. The shorter SiNWs (maximum length ≈300 nm were generally found to possess a nanoparticle at their tip. STEM energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy combined with electron tomography performed on these nanostructures revealed that they contain iron, clearly demonstrating that the short ICP-synthesized SiNWs grew via an iron-catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS mechanism within the plasma reactor. Both the STEM tomography and STEM-EDX analysis contributed to gain further insight into the self-assembly process. In the long-term, this approach might be used to optimize the synthesis of VLS-grown SiNWs via ICP as a competitive technique to the well-established bottom-up approaches used for the production of thin SiNWs.

  17. Heterogeneous nucleation of catalyst-free InAs nanowires on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, U. P.; Ercolani, D.; Zannier, V.; Battiato, S.; Ubyivovk, E.; Mikhailovskii, V.; Murata, Y.; Heun, S.; Beltram, F.; Sorba, L.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the heterogeneous nucleation of catalyst-free InAs nanowires on Si(111) substrates by chemical beam epitaxy. We show that nanowire nucleation is enhanced by sputtering the silicon substrate with energetic particles. We argue that particle bombardment introduces lattice defects on the silicon surface that serve as preferential nucleation sites. The formation of these nucleation sites can be controlled by the sputtering parameters, allowing the control of nanowire density in a wide range. Nanowire nucleation is accompanied by unwanted parasitic islands, but careful choice of annealing and growth temperature allows us to strongly reduce the relative density of these islands and to realize samples with high nanowire yield.

  18. Particle-assisted GaxIn1xP nanowire growth for designed bandgap structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsson, D.; Persson, Johan Mikael; Kriegner, D.

    2012-01-01

    Non-tapered vertically straight GaxIn1−xP nanowires were grown in a compositional range from Ga0.2In0.8P to pure GaP in particle-assisted mode by controlling the trimethylindium, trimethylgallium and hydrogen chloride flows in metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy. X-ray energy dispersive spectroscop...

  19. In-situ growth and photoluminescence of β-Ga2O3 cone-like nanowires on the surface of Ga substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    β-Ga2O3 cone-like nanowires have been in-situ grown on the surface of gallium grains and films by heating gallium substrates at 750-1000℃ for 2h in air.The controllable synthesis of β-Ga2O3 nano-wires with different diameters and lengths was achieved by adjusting the heating temperature and time.The as-synthesized products were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction,scanning electron mi-croscopy and transmission electron microscopy.The results showed that the β-Ga2O3 nanowires are single crystalline with a monoclinic structure and have a controllable diameter and length in the range of 30-100nm and 0.5-1.5μm,respectively.A possible mechanism was also proposed to account for the formation of β-Ga2O3 cone-like nanowires.Photoluminescence spectra of the β-Ga2O3 nanowires obtained at different temperatures were measured at room temperature,and a strong blue photolumi-nescence with peaks at 430 and 460nm and a weak red photoluminescence with peak at 713nm were observed.The blue light emission intensity decreases with increasing the reaction temperature,how-ever,the red light emission intensity hardly changes.The blue and red light emissions originate from the recombination of an electron on an oxygen vacancy with a hole on a gallium-oxygen vacancy pair and the nitrogen dopants,etc.,respectively.

  20. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N R Rao; A Govindaraj

    2001-10-01

    Synthesis and characterization of nanotubes and nanowires constitute an important part of nanoscience since these materials are essential bui lding units for several devices. We have prepared aligned carbon nanotube bundles and Y-junction nanotubes by the pyrolysis of appropriate organic precursors. The aligned bundles are useful for field emission display while the Y-junction nanotubes are likely to be useful as nanochips since they exhibit diode properties at the junction. By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal oxides and GaN have be en obt a ined. Both the oxide and GaN nanowires are single crystalline. Gold nanowires exhibit plasmon bands varying markedly with the aspect ratio. GaN nanowires show excellent photoluminescence characteristics. It has been possible to synthesise nanotubes and nanowires of metal chalcogenides by employing different strategies.

  1. Advances in nanowire bioelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Dai, Xiaochuan; Lieber, Charles M.

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires represent powerful building blocks for next generation bioelectronics given their attractive properties, including nanometer-scale footprint comparable to subcellular structures and bio-molecules, configurable in nonstandard device geometries readily interfaced with biological systems, high surface-to-volume ratios, fast signal responses, and minimum consumption of energy. In this review article, we summarize recent progress in the field of nanowire bioelectronics with a focus primarily on silicon nanowire field-effect transistor biosensors. First, the synthesis and assembly of semiconductor nanowires will be described, including the basics of nanowire FETs crucial to their configuration as biosensors. Second, we will introduce and review recent results in nanowire bioelectronics for biomedical applications ranging from label-free sensing of biomolecules, to extracellular and intracellular electrophysiological recording.

  2. Joule heating in nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangohr, Hans; Chernyshenko, Dmitri S.; Franchin, Matteo; Fischbacher, Thomas; Meier, Guido

    2011-08-01

    We study the effect of Joule heating from electric currents flowing through ferromagnetic nanowires on the temperature of the nanowires and on the temperature of the substrate on which the nanowires are grown. The spatial current density distribution, the associated heat generation, and diffusion of heat are simulated within the nanowire and the substrate. We study several different nanowire and constriction geometries as well as different substrates: (thin) silicon nitride membranes, (thick) silicon wafers, and (thick) diamond wafers. The spatially resolved increase in temperature as a function of time is computed. For effectively three-dimensional substrates (where the substrate thickness greatly exceeds the nanowire length), we identify three different regimes of heat propagation through the substrate: regime (i), where the nanowire temperature increases approximately logarithmically as a function of time. In this regime, the nanowire temperature is well described analytically by You [Appl. Phys. Lett.APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.2399441 89, 222513 (2006)]. We provide an analytical expression for the time tc that marks the upper applicability limit of the You model. After tc, the heat flow enters regime (ii), where the nanowire temperature stays constant while a hemispherical heat front carries the heat away from the wire and into the substrate. As the heat front reaches the boundary of the substrate, regime (iii) is entered, where the nanowire and substrate temperature start to increase rapidly. For effectively two-dimensional substrates (where the nanowire length greatly exceeds the substrate thickness), there is only one regime in which the temperature increases logarithmically with time for large times, before the heat front reaches the substrate boundary. We provide an analytical expression, valid for all pulse durations, that allows one to accurately compute this temperature increase in the nanowire on thin substrates.

  3. Crystallographic alignment of high-density gallium nitride nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Zhang, Yanfeng; Goldberger, Joshua; Sirbuly, Donald; Denlinger, Jonathan; Yang, Peidong

    2004-08-01

    Single-crystalline, one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are considered to be one of the critical building blocks for nanoscale optoelectronics. Elucidation of the vapour-liquid-solid growth mechanism has already enabled precise control over nanowire position and size, yet to date, no reports have demonstrated the ability to choose from different crystallographic growth directions of a nanowire array. Control over the nanowire growth direction is extremely desirable, in that anisotropic parameters such as thermal and electrical conductivity, index of refraction, piezoelectric polarization, and bandgap may be used to tune the physical properties of nanowires made from a given material. Here we demonstrate the use of metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) and appropriate substrate selection to control the crystallographic growth directions of high-density arrays of gallium nitride nanowires with distinct geometric and physical properties. Epitaxial growth of wurtzite gallium nitride on (100) gamma-LiAlO(2) and (111) MgO single-crystal substrates resulted in the selective growth of nanowires in the orthogonal [1\\[Evec]0] and [001] directions, exhibiting triangular and hexagonal cross-sections and drastically different optical emission. The MOCVD process is entirely compatible with the current GaN thin-film technology, which would lead to easy scale-up and device integration.

  4. Serodiagnosis of Lyme disease by kinetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using recombinant VlsE1 or peptide antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi compared with 2-tiered testing using whole-cell lysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Rendi Murphree; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Schriefer, Martin E; Gilmore, Robert D; Philipp, Mario T; Steere, Allen C; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Johnson, Barbara J B

    2003-04-15

    In a study of US patients with Lyme disease, immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM antibody responses to recombinant Borrelia burgdorferi antigen VlsE1 (rVlsE1), IgG responses to a synthetic peptide homologous to a conserved internal sequence of VlsE (C6), and IgM responses to a synthetic peptide comprising the C-terminal 10 amino acid residues of a B. burgdorferi outer-surface protein C (pepC10) were evaluated by kinetic enzyme-linked immunoassay. At 99% specificity, the overall sensitivities for detecting IgG antibody to rVlsE1 or C6 in samples from patients with diverse manifestations of Lyme disease were equivalent to that of 2-tiered testing. When data were considered in parallel, 2 combinations (IgG responses to either rVlsE1 or C6 in parallel with IgM responses to pepC10) maintained high specificity (98%) and were significantly more sensitive than 2-tiered analysis in detecting antibodies to B. burgdorferi in patients with acute erythema migrans. In later stages of Lyme disease, the sensitivities of the in parallel tests and 2-tiered testing were high and statistically equivalent.

  5. High Performance Single Nanowire Tunnel Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallentin, Jesper; Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have emerged as a promising technology for future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Epitaxial growth of III-V materials on Si substrates have been demonstrated, allowing for low-cost production. As the lattice matching requirements are much less strict than for ...

  6. III-nitride nanowires: novel materials for solid-state lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Huang, Jianyu; Talin, A. Alec; Armstrong, Andrew; Upadhya, Prashanth C.; Prasankumar, Rohit P.

    2011-03-01

    Although planar heterostructures dominate current solid-state lighting architectures (SSL), 1D nanowires have distinct and advantageous properties that may eventually enable higher efficiency, longer wavelength, and cheaper devices. However, in order to fully realize the potential of nanowire-based SSL, several challenges exist in the areas of controlled nanowire synthesis, nanowire device integration, and understanding and controlling the nanowire electrical, optical, and thermal properties. Here recent results are reported regarding the aligned growth of GaN and III-nitride core-shell nanowires, along with extensive results providing insights into the nanowire properties obtained using cutting-edge structural, electrical, thermal, and optical nanocharacterization techniques. A new top-down fabrication method for fabricating periodic arrays of GaN nanorods and subsequent nanorod LED fabrication is also presented.

  7. III-nitride nanowires : novel materials for solid-state lighting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, George T.; Upadhya, Prashanth C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Prasankumar, Rohit P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Armstrong, Andrew M.; Huang, Jian Yu; Li, Qiming; Talin, Albert Alec (NIST, Gaithersburg, MD)

    2010-12-01

    Although planar heterostructures dominate current solid-state lighting architectures (SSL), 1D nanowires have distinct and advantageous properties that may eventually enable higher efficiency, longer wavelength, and cheaper devices. However, in order to fully realize the potential of nanowire-based SSL, several challenges exist in the areas of controlled nanowire synthesis, nanowire device integration, and understanding and controlling the nanowire electrical, optical, and thermal properties. Here recent results are reported regarding the aligned growth of GaN and III-nitride core-shell nanowires, along with extensive results providing insights into the nanowire properties obtained using cutting-edge structural, electrical, thermal, and optical nanocharacterization techniques. A new top-down fabrication method for fabricating periodic arrays of GaN nanorods and subsequent nanorod LED fabrication is also presented.

  8. III-Vs at Scale: A PV Manufacturing Cost Analysis of the Thin Film Vapor-Liquid-Solid Growth Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Maxwell; Horowitz, Kelsey; Woodhouse, Michael; Battaglia, Corsin; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The authors present a manufacturing cost analysis for producing thin-film indium phosphide modules by combining a novel thin-film vapor-liquid-solid (TF-VLS) growth process with a standard monolithic module platform. The example cell structure is ITO/n-TiO2/p-InP/Mo. For a benchmark scenario of 12% efficient modules, the module cost is estimated to be $0.66/W(DC) and the module cost is calculated to be around $0.36/W(DC) at a long-term potential efficiency of 24%. The manufacturing cost for the TF-VLS growth portion is estimated to be ~$23/m2, a significant reduction compared with traditional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The analysis here suggests the TF-VLS growth mode could enable lower-cost, high-efficiency III-V photovoltaics compared with manufacturing methods used today and open up possibilities for other optoelectronic applications as well.

  9. A Ga2O·11Al2O3 nanonet prepared by interfacial reaction growth approach and its application in fabricating GaN nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A Ga2O·11Al2O3 nanonet was synthesized by using Ga2O3 powder as the precursor to generate Ga2O vapor in H2 atmosphere which further reacted with Al2O3 at 730 °C to form Ga2O·11Al2O3 at the interfaces of a porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. The prepared Ga2O·11Al2O3 nanonet then served as a Ga2O-stablizing reservoir to fabricate single crystal GaN nanowires. The residual Ga2O3 powder at the surface of the produced Ga2O·11Al2O3 nanonet and the metallic Ga or Ga2O from the Ga2O·11Al2O3 decomposition reacted with ammonia to yield GaN nanowires at 780 °C. The reaction mechanisms were investigated.

  10. Doping evaluation of InP nanowires for tandem junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindelöw, F.; Heurlin, M.; Otnes, G.; Dagytė, V.; Lindgren, D.; Hultin, O.; Storm, K.; Samuelson, L.; Borgström, M.

    2016-02-01

    In order to push the development of nanowire-based solar cells further using optimized nanowire diameter and pitch, a doping evaluation of the nanowire geometry is necessary. We report on a doping evaluation of n-type InP nanowires with diameters optimized for light absorption, grown by the use of metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy in particle-assisted growth mode using tetraethyltin (TESn) as the dopant precursor. The charge carrier concentration was evaluated using four-probe resistivity measurements and spatially resolved Hall measurements. In order to reach the highest possible nanowire doping level, we set the TESn molar fraction at a high constant value throughout growth and varied the trimethylindium (TMIn) molar fraction for different runs. Analysis shows that the charge carrier concentration in nanowires grown with the highest TMIn molar fraction (not leading to kinking nanowires) results in a low carrier concentration of approximately 1016 cm-3. By decreasing the molar fraction of TMIn, effectively increasing the IV/III ratio, the carrier concentration increases up to a level of about 1019 cm-3, where it seems to saturate. Axial carrier concentration gradients along the nanowires are found, which can be correlated to a combination of changes in the nanowire growth rate, measured in situ by optical reflectometry, and polytypism of the nanowires observed in transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Epitaxial integration of nanowires in microsystems by local micrometer-scale vapor-phase epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Wacaser, Brent A; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Wagner, Jakob B; Samuelson, Lars; Bøggild, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Free-standing epitaxially grown nanowires provide a controlled growth system and an optimal interface to the underlying substrate for advanced optical, electrical, and mechanical nanowire device connections. Nanowires can be grown by vapor-phase epitaxy (VPE) methods such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or metal organic VPE (MOVPE). However, VPE of semiconducting nanowires is not compatible with several microfabrication processes due to the high synthesis temperatures and issues such as cross-contamination interfering with the intended microsystem or the VPE process. By selectively heating a small microfabricated heater, growth of nanowires can be achieved locally without heating the entire microsystem, thereby reducing the compatibility problems. The first demonstration of epitaxial growth of silicon nanowires by this method is presented and shows that the microsystem can be used for rapid optimization of VPE conditions. The important issue of the cross-contamination of other parts of the microsystem caused by the local growth of nanowires is also investigated by growth of GaN near previously grown silicon nanowires. The design of the cantilever heaters makes it possible to study the grown nanowires with a transmission electron microscope without sample preparation.

  12. In Situ Growth of Core-Sheath Heterostructural SiC Nanowire Arrays on Carbon Fibers and Enhanced Electromagnetic Wave Absorption Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liwen; Hong, Changqing; Sun, Boqian; Zhao, Guangdong; Cheng, Yehong; Dong, Shun; Zhang, Dongyang; Zhang, Xinghong

    2017-02-22

    Large-scale core-sheath heterostructural SiC nanowires were facilely grown on the surface of carbon fibers using a one-step chemical vapor infiltration process. The as-synthesized SiC nanowires consist of single crystalline SiC cores with a diameter of ∼30 nm and polycrystalline SiC sheaths with an average thickness of ∼60 nm. The formation mechanisms of core-sheath heterostructural SiC nanowires (SiCnws) were discussed in detail. The SiCnws-CF shows strong electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption performance with a maximum reflection loss value of -45.98 dB at 4.4 GHz. Moreover, being coated with conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) by a simple chemical polymerization method, the SiCnws-CF/PPy nanocomposites exhibited superior EM absorption abilities with maximum RL value of -50.19 dB at 14.2 GHz and the effective bandwidth of 6.2 GHz. The SiCnws-CF/PPy nanocomposites in this study are very promising as absorber materials with strong electromagnetic wave absorption performance.

  13. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  14. Artificial nanograting woven by self-assembled nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Qi; Shao, Ye; Huang, Xiu-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2005-10-01

    We report on a new simple route to realize a high resolution nanograting. By adopting an InAlGaAs matrix and strain-compensated technique, we have proved that a uniform self-assembled InAs nanowire array can be fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). A nanograting woven by self-assembled semiconductor nanowires shows a conspicuous diffraction feature. The good agreement between the theoretical and experimental values of diffraction peak positions indicates that a uniform nanowire array is a promising nanograting. This simple one-step MBE growth method will open exciting opportunities for the field of clever optics design.

  15. GaAsP Nanowires Grown by Aerotaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Persson, Axel R.; Mergenthaler, Kilian; Yang, Fangfang; Zhang, Wei; Yartsev, Arkady; Wallenberg, Reine; Pistol, Mats Erik; Deppert, Knut; Samuelson, Lars; Magnusson, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    We have grown GaAsP nanowires with high optical and structural quality by Aerotaxy, a new continuous gas phase mass production process to grow III-V semiconductor based nanowires. By varying the PH3/AsH3 ratio and growth temperature, size selected GaAs1-xPx nanowires (80 nm diameter) with pure zinc-blende structure and with direct band gap energies ranging from 1.42 to 1.90 eV (at 300 K), (i.e., 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.43) were grown, which is the energy range needed for creating tandem III-V solar cells o...

  16. Synthesis of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanowires for excitonic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boercker, Janice Elaine

    Dye-sensitized, quantum-dot sensitized, quantum-dot, and hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells are promising excitonic photovoltaic devices for the generation of low cost, carbon free energy. Wide-band gap semiconductor nanowire photoanodes have the potential to increase the efficiencies of these excitonic solar cells. Controlling and tailoring the dimensions of the nanowires (i.e. nanowire height, diameter, and planar number density) for each solar cell type is important for efficiency improvement. Obtaining such control will require a detailed and fundamental understanding of the nanowire growth process. Towards this end, the synthesis of TiO2 and ZnO nanowire films in aqueous solutions was studied. Anatase TiO2 nanowire films were grown on flexible titanium foil substrates using a three step hydrothermal synthesis. First, the top surface of the titanium foil was transformed to Na2Ti2O 4(OH)2 nanotubes through hydrothermal oxidation in NaOH. Next, the Na2Ti2O4(OH)2 nanotubes were converted to H2Ti2O4(OH)2 nanotubes by ion exchange. Finally, the H2Ti2O 4(OH)2 nanotubes were converted to polycrystalline anatase nanowires through a topotactic transformation. The film morphology evolution, crystal structure transformations, and growth mechanism were examined in detail. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were assembled from these TiO 2 nanowire films. Transient photocurrent and photovoltage spectroscopies were used to measure the electron transport and recombination rates in these solar cells. Compared to TiO2 nanoparticle DSSCs the electron collection efficiency in the TiO2 nanowire DSSCs was increased due to decreased electron recombination. However, the electron transport in the nanowire DSSCs was similar to that of TiO2 nanoparticle DSSCs. The synthesis of ZnO nanowires from aqueous solutions of methenamine (HMT) and zinc nitrate hexahydrate on substrates was studied in detail. A ZnO nanowire growth mechanism was proposed which predicts that the precursor is a zinc

  17. A low cost, green method to synthesize GaN nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun-Wei; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Li, Yong-He; Su, Chao-Hua; Song, Xue-Mei; Yan, Hui; Wang, Ru-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis of gallium nitride nanowires (GaN NWs) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are successfully demonstrated in this work. The simple and green synthesis route is to introduce gallium oxide (Ga2O3) and nitrogen (N2) for the growth of nanowires. The prepared GaN nanowires have a single crystalline wurtzite structure, which the length of some nanowires is up to 20 μm, with a maximum diameter about 140 nm. The morphology and quantity of the nanowires can be modulated by the growth substrate and process parameters. In addition, the photoluminescence and field emission properties of the prepared GaN nanowires have been investigated, which were found to be largely affected by their structures. This work renders an environmentally benign strategy and a facile approach for controllable structures on nanodevice.

  18. Synthesis of Au nanowires with controlled morphological and structural characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Gurvinder, E-mail: gurvinder.singh@ntnu.no [Ugelstad Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Helvoort, Antonius T.J. van [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Bandyopadhyay, Sulalit; Volden, Sondre; Andreassen, Jens-Petter [Ugelstad Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Glomm, Wilhelm R., E-mail: Wilhelm.Glomm@sintef.no [Ugelstad Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Biotechnology and Nanomedicine Sector, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis of metal nanowires. • Control over structural and morphological characteristics via seed type nanoparticle. • Growth via surfactant or surface diffusion process. • Structural and surface characterization. - Abstract: A growth of one-dimensional noble metal nanostructure with controlled structural characteristic has been under intense investigation as the physical properties, for example, mechanical and electrical properties highly depend on the crystallinity of the nanostructure. Herein, we report a seed-mediated growth of gold nanowires with controlled structural and morphological characteristics, which can easily be varied by selecting appropriate seed nanoparticles, either spherical or rod type in aqueous solution at room temperature. The growth of nanowires was monitored by characterizing the samples at different time period during the reaction, and our observations suggest that growth occurs from seeds rapidly growing along one-dimension followed by surfactant induced fusion or welding and surface diffusion. The aspect ratio and morphology of these NWs can be tuned by CTAB concentration, pH and temperature of the growth solution. We show that the aspect ratio and morphology of these NWs can be tuned by the surfactant concentration, pH and temperature of the growth solution. Electron microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopic techniques were employed for investigating structural and surface characteristics of nanowires. This approach can possibly help to synthesize nanowires of other metals with controlled crystalline behaviour which is highly essential for understanding their properties and practical applications in nanoelectronics, optical devices, catalysis, and sensors.

  19. Broadening of length distributions of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdnikov, Yury, E-mail: yuryberdnikov@gmail.com [St. Petersburg Academic University, Khlopina 8/3, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sibirev, Nikolay [St. Petersburg Academic University, Khlopina 8/3, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251 St-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schmidtbauer, Jan [Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth, Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Solid State Physics and NanoLund, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Borg, Mattias [Solid State Physics and NanoLund, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); IBM Research – Zurich, Säumerstrasse 4, 8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland); Johansson, Jonas [Solid State Physics and NanoLund, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Dubrovskii, Vladimir [St. Petersburg Academic University, Khlopina 8/3, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg State University, Physical Faculty, Ulianovskaya Street 3, Petrodvorets, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); ITMO University, Kronverkskiy pr. 49, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    We investigate kinetic broadening effects on the length distributions of gold-catalyzed InAs nanowires having different diameters. It is shown that the length distributions acquire bimodal shape when the longest nanowires exceed the diffusion length of indium adatoms on the nanowire sidewalls. Later on, the length distributions recover unimodal shapes. We develop a theoretical model that is capable of describing the observed behaviors by accounting for the diffusion-induced character of the vapor-liquid-solid growth.

  20. Si nanoparticle-decorated Si nanowire networks for Li-ion battery anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2011-01-01

    We designed and fabricated binder-free, 3D porous silicon nanostructures for Li-ion battery anodes, where Si nanoparticles electrically contact current collectors via vertically grown silicon nanowires. When compared with a Si nanowire anode, the areal capacity was increased by a factor of 4 without having to use long, high temperature steps under vacuum that vapour-liquid-solid Si nanowire growth entails. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.