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Sample records for vlf emissions observed

  1. Unusually high frequency natural VLF radio emissions observed during daytime in Northern Finland

    Manninen, Jyrki; Turunen, Tauno; Kleimenova, Natalia; Rycroft, Michael; Gromova, Liudmila; Sirviö, Iina

    2016-12-01

    Geomagnetic field variations and electromagnetic waves of different frequencies are ever present in the Earth’s environment in which the Earth’s fauna and flora have evolved and live. These waves are a very useful tool for studying and exploring the physics of plasma processes occurring in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Here we present ground-based observations of natural electromagnetic emissions of magnetospheric origin at very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz), which are neither heard nor seen in their spectrograms because they are hidden by strong impulsive signals (sferics) originating in lightning discharges. After filtering out the sferics, peculiar emissions are revealed in these digital recordings, made in Northern Finland, at unusually high frequencies in the VLF band. These recently revealed emissions, which are observed for several hours almost every day in winter, contain short (˜1-3 min) burst-like structures at frequencies above 4-6 kHz, even up to 15 kHz; fine structure on the 1 s time scale is also prevalent. It seems that these whistler mode emissions are generated deep inside the magnetosphere, but the detailed nature, generation region and propagation behaviour of these newly discovered high latitude VLF emissions remain unknown; however, further research on them may shed new light on wave-particle interactions occurring in the Earth’s radiation belts.

  2. Some unusual discrete VLF emissions observed at a low-latitude ground station at Agra

    B. Singh

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis of the VLF emissions data obtained during occasional whistler campaigns at the low-latitude ground station Agra (geomagnetic latitude 17°1' N, L = 1.15 has yielded some unusual discrete VLF emissions of the rising type. These include (1 emissions occurring at time intervals increasing in ge ommetrical progression, (2 emissions occuring simulta neously in different frequency ranges and (3 emissions observed during daytime. In the present study, the observed characteristics of these emissions are described and interpreted. It is shown that the increasing time delay between different components of the emissions match closely with the propagation time delays between different hops of a whistler of dispersion 19 s1/2, the unusual occurrence of the emissions in two different frequency ranges approximately at the same time may possibly be linked with their generation at two different locations, and the occurrence of emissions during daytime may be due to propagation under the influence of equatorial anomaly.

  3. Features of discrete VLF emissions observed at Gulmarg, India during the magnetic storm of 6–7 March, 1986

    R Singh; A K Singh; D Siingh; R P Singh

    2007-12-01

    During the analysis of archived VLF data from Indian low latitude ground stations, some discrete VLF emissions recorded at the low latitude ground station Gulmarg (geomagnetic latitude 24°26′N; geomagnetic longitude 147° 09′E, L = 1.28) during moderate magnetic storm activity ( $K^{−}_{P}$} = 32, index varies from 4 to 6 during the observation period) on 6/7 March, 1986 are presented in this paper. The dynamic spectra of these discrete VLF emissions were observed along with tweeks and its harmonics, which is interesting and complex to explain. In most of the events the harmonic frequency of tweeks correlates with the starting frequency of harmonics of discrete emissions. In order to explain the observed features of discrete VLF emissions, we propose cyclotron resonance interaction between whistler mode wave and energetic electrons of inner radiation belt as possible generation mechanism. An attempt is also made to determine parallel energy, anisotropy and wave growth relevant to the generation process of VLF emissions.

  4. Quasi-periodic VLF emissions observed during daytime at a low latitude Indian ground station Jammu

    K K Singh; J Singh; R P Patel; A K Singh; R P Singh; Rejesh Singh; P A Ganai

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports quasi-periodic pulsing hiss emissions recorded during daytime in the frequency range of 50 Hz –15 kHz at low latitude station Jammu (geomag.lat.=22° 26′N; =1.17). It is noted that pulsing VLF emissions are a rare phenomena at low latitudes.The various spectrograms of pulsing VLF hiss emissions presented in this paper clearly show band limited spectrums regularly pulsing with almost equal period of the order of few seconds in the frequency range of ∼3-8 kHz. Generation and propagation mechanism of these emissions are briefly discussed.

  5. Bispectrum Analysis of Non-linear wave-wave Interaction between VLF Transmitter signal and ELF emission on the Basis of DEMETER satellite observations

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Symmetric sidebands are observed in the ionosphere by the DEMETER (Detection of Electromagnetic Radiation Transmitted through Earthquake Region) satellite, when it passes above the Indian VLF transmitter, named VTX (18.2 kHz), located near Kanyakumari, India. The spectral boarding phenomena may be divided into two types: (1) spectrally broadened components occurring without any association with ELF/VLF emissions under disturbed ionospheric condition, (2) Spectrally broadened components with predominant side band structure in association with ELF emission. Generally spectral analysis at second order (Power spectrum) is used to analyze the frequency component of signal, but it losses the phase information among the different Fourier components. To retain this information the bispectrum (third order) and/or the bicoherence (normalized bispectrum) are used. Results suggest a non-linear mode coupling between the transmitter signal and ELF emission which produces sidebands that are quasi-electrostatic in nature. However, faint spectral broadened components in both types 1 and 2 may be connected with Doppler shift of quasi-electrostatic, whistler mode waves with a broad spectrum near resonance cone, due to scattering of the transmitter signals from ionospheric irregularities in the F-region. Keywords: spectral boarding, wave-wave Interaction, whistler mode waves and Doppler shift

  6. A new type of daytime high-frequency VLF emissions at auroral latitudes ("bird emissions")

    Manninen, J.; Turunen, T.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Gromova, L. I.; Kozlovskii, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a new, previously unknown type of high-frequency (above 4 kHz) VLF emissions that were detected during winter VLF campaigns in Kannuslehto ( L 5.5), Finland. These previously unknown emissions have been discovered as a result of the application of special digital filtering: it clears the VLF records from pulse signals of intensive atmospherics, which prevent other kinds of VLF emissions in the same frequency range from being seen on spectrograms. As it appears, aside from wellknown bursts of auroral hisses and discrete quasiperiodic emissions, a previously unknown type of daytime right-hand polarized VLF waves is also present at frequencies above 4 kHz. These emissions can persist for several hours as series of separate short discrete wideband (from 4 to 10 kHz and higher) signals, each with a duration between one and several minutes. It has been found that such signals can be observed almost daily in winter. These emissions sound like bird's chirping to a human ear; for that reason, they were called "bird emissions." The dynamic spectra of individual signals often resemble flying birds. The signals are observed during daytime, more often in magnetically quiet conditions preceded by geomagnetic disturbances. As a rule, the occurrence of these bird emissions is accompanied by a slight increase in electron density in the lower ionosphere, which is evidence of the precipitation of energetic (>30 keV) electrons. This raises a number of questions as to where and how the VLF bird emissions are generated and how such emissions, at frequencies greatly exceeding half the electron equatorial gyrofrequency at L 5.5, can reach the Earth's surface.

  7. Observations of the impenetrable barrier, the plasmapause, and the VLF bubble during the 17 March 2015 storm

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Mishin, E. V.; Fennel, J. F.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Van Allen Probes observations during the 17 March 2015 major geomagnetic storm strongly suggest that VLF transmitter-induced waves play an important role in sculpting the earthward extent of outer zone MeV electrons. A magnetically confined bubble of very low frequency (VLF) wave emissions of terrestrial, human-produced origin surrounds the Earth. The outer limit of the VLF bubble closely matches the position of an apparent barrier to the inward extent of multi-MeV radiation belt electrons near 2.8 Earth radii. When the VLF transmitter signals extend beyond the eroded plasmapause, electron loss processes set up near the outer extent of the VLF bubble create an earthward limit to the region of local acceleration near L = 2.8 as MeV electrons are scattered into the atmospheric loss cone.

  8. Prediction Capabilities of VLF/LF Emission as the Main Precursor of Earthquake

    Kachakhidze, Manana

    2013-01-01

    Recent satellite and ground-based observations proved that in earthquake preparation period in the seismogenic area we have VLF/LF and ULF electromagnetic emissions. According to the opinion of the authors of the present paper this phenomenon is more universal and reliable than other earthquake indicators. Hypothetically, in case of availability of adequate methodological grounds, in the nearest future, earth VLF/LF electromagnetic emission might be declared as the main precursor of earthquake. In particular, permanent monitoring of frequency spectrum of earth electromagnetic emission generated in the earthquake preparation period might turn out very useful with the view of prediction of large (M 5) inland earthquakes. The present paper offers a scheme of the methodology according to which the reality of the above given hypothesis can be checked up. To prove the prediction capabilities of earth electromagnetic emission we have used avalanche-like unstable model of fault formation and an analogous model of ele...

  9. Lightning Location With Single-Station Observation of VLF Spherics

    Nagano, I.; Yagitani, S.; Komonmae, H.; Takezono, N.

    2001-12-01

    Most of the lightning location systems recently available require the simultaneous reception of lightning-generated radio pulses (spherics) at multiple stations. In this work, we develop a lightning location system to determine both the direction and range of a lightning stroke with a single-station observation of VLF spherics. The technique used here is a rather classical one, but we try to improve the ranging accuracy by applying sophisticated signal processing techniques, and our final goal is to develop a portable lightning locator. We observe wave forms of two horizontal magnetic fields and one vertical electric field of VLF spherics, each of which usually consists of a couple of sequential pulses. The first pulse comes directly from a lightning return stroke, and is used for the direction finding of the stroke. On the other hand, the second and later pulses are the multiple reflections of the first pulse inside the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Since the time-of-arrival (ToA) of each pulse is determined by its propagation path length in the waveguide, by using the observed difference in ToA of two or more pulses, we can inversely estimate not only the reflection height at the ionosphere but also the range of the lightning stroke. By installing the developed system at Kanazawa University, we have been observing lightning-generated spherics since April, 2000. Compared with the lightning location data provided by a local power company, preliminary analysis shows that this system can locate each lightning stroke within several hundred km with a sufficient accuracy.

  10. Statistical correlation of spectral broadening in VLF transmitter signal and low-frequency ionospheric turbulence from observation on DEMETER satellite

    A. Rozhnoi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In our earlier papers we have found the effect of VLF transmitter signal depression over epicenters of the large earthquakes from observation on the French DEMETER satellite that can be considered as new method of global diagnostics of seismic influence on the ionosphere. At present paper we investigate a possibility VLF signal-ionospheric turbulence interaction using additional characteristic of VLF signal-spectrum broadening. This characteristic is important for estimation of the interaction type: linear or nonlinear scattering. Our main results are the following:
    – There are two zones of increased spectrum broadening, which are centered near magnetic latitudes Φ=±10° and Φ=±40°. Basing on the previous case study research and ground ionosonde registrations, probably it is evidence of nonlinear (active scattering of VLF signal on the ionospheric turbulence. However occurrence rate of spectrum broadening in the middle-latitude area is higher than in the near-equatorial zone (~15–20% in comparison with ~100% in former area that is probably coincides with the rate of ionospheric turbulence.
    – From two years statistics of observation in the selected 3 low-latitude regions and 1 middle-latitude region inside reception area of VLF signal from NWC transmitter we find a correlation of spectrum broadening neither with ion-cyclotron noise (f=150–500 Hz, which possibly means poor representation of the turbulence by the noise due to its mixture with natural ELF emission (which correlates with whistler, nor with magnetic storm activity.
    – We find rather evident correlation of ion-cyclotron frequency noise, VLF signal depression and weak correlation of spectrum broadening with seismicity in the middle-latitude region over Japan. But in the low-latitude regions we do not find such a correlation. Statistical decrease of VLF signal supports our previous case study results. However rather weak spectrum broadening

  11. Subionospheric VLF signatures and their association with sprites observed during EuroSprite 2003

    Mika, A.; Haldoupis, C.; Marshall, R.A.;

    2005-01-01

    In this study, VLF observations during EuroSprite-2003 are analyzed in connection with many sprites observed above thunderstorms in central France. The sprites were detected with a sensitive camera from the Observatoire du Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees overlooking storms monitored by the French...

  12. Similar Data Retrieval from Enormous Datasets on ELF/VLF Wave Spectrum Observed by Akebono

    Y Kasahara

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As the total amount of data measured by scientific spacecraft is drastically increasing, it is necessary for researchers to develop new computation methods for efficient analysis of these enormous datasets. In the present study, we propose a new algorithm for similar data retrieval. We first discuss key descriptors that represent characteristics of the VLF/ELF waves observed by the Akebono spacecraft. Second, an algorithm for similar data retrieval is introduced. Finally, we demonstrate that the developed algorithm works well for the retrieval of the VLF spectrum with a small amount of CPU load.

  13. Combined ULF and VLF observations of seismo-electro-magnetic phenomena in Europe

    Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Eichelberger, Hans; Wolbang, Daniel; Prattes, Gustav; Besser, Bruno; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Stangl, Günter; Magnes, Werner; Berghofer, Gerhard; Aydogar, Özer; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Vellante, Massimo; Villante, Umberto; Biagi, Pier F.

    2014-05-01

    A combined analysis of magnetic ultra-low-frequency (ULF) and electromagnetic very-low-frequency (VLF) fluctuations before, during and after earthquakes in south and south-east Europe is presented. The magnetic fluctuations are studied in the frame of the South European Geomagnetic Array (SEGMA) network. The fluxgate and searchcoil magnetometers, located in Italy, Bulgaria and Hungary perform measurements of fluctuations in the pico-Tesla and nano-Tesla range from milli-Hertz to 100 Hz. The properties of VLF radio links (10 kHz - 50 kHz) are studied in the frame of the European VLF/LF radio receiver network (INFREP). Single parameter studies of ULF and VLF variations in the vicinity of earthquakes in Europe have been performed in the last decade (Villante et al. 2010, Rozhnoi et al. 2009). We present the first results of a dual parameter study based on single parameter ULF and VLF observations. The proposed method provides the opportunity to decrease the number of false alerts. A dual parameter seismo-electro-magnetic reliability number is developed and compared with single parameter quality numbers. References: Rozhnoi, A., Solovieva, M., Molchanov, O., Schwingenschuh, K., Boudjada, M., Biagi, P. F., Maggipinto, T., Castellana, L., Ermini, A., and Hayakawa, M.: Anomalies in VLF radio signals prior the Abruzzo earthquake (M=6.3) on 6 April 2009, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 9, 1727-1732, doi:10.5194/nhess-9-1727-2009, 2009. Villante, U., De Lauretis, M., De Paulis, C., Francia, P., Piancatelli, A., Pietropaolo, E., Vellante, M., Meloni, A., Palangio, P., Schwingenschuh, K., Prattes, G., Magnes, W., and Nenovski, P.: The 6 April 2009 earthquake at L'Aquila: a preliminary analysis of magnetic field measurements, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 203-214, doi:10.5194/nhess-10-203-2010, 2010.

  14. Electron dispersion events in the morningside auroral zone and their relationship with VLF emissions

    Hardy, David A.; Burke, William J.; Villalon, Elena

    1990-05-01

    This paper reports on observations of electron precipitation bursts observed in the morningside auroral zone with the J sensor, an electron detector aboard the Hilat satellite. The characteristics of these precipitation events are documented, and a theoretical explanation that could account for the observed properties is presented. According to this model, the dispersion events result from impulsive interactions of the electrons with intense asymmetric packets of VLF waves via the nonlinear ponderomotive force.

  15. In connection with identification of VLF emissions before L'Aquila earthquake

    Kachakhidze, M; Kachakhidze, N

    2012-01-01

    The present paper deals with an attempt to check up the theoretical model of self-generated seismo-electromagnetic oscillations of LAI system on the basis of retrospective data. Application of the offered simple model enables one to explain qualitatively the mechanism of VLF electromagnetic emission initiated in the process of an earthquake preparation. It is worth to pay attention to the fact that frequency changes from MHz to kHz in electromagnetic emission spectrum comes to a good agreement with avalanche-like unstable model of fault formation. L'Aquila earthquake taken as an example to isolate reliably the Earth VLF emission from the magnetospheric electromagnetic emission of the same frequency range, MHD criterion is offered together with geomagnetic activity indexes. On the basis of the considered three earthquakes, according to the opinion of authors the model of self-generated seismo-electromagnetic oscillations of the LAI system will enable us to approach the problem of resolution of earthquake predi...

  16. Cluster observations of ELF/VLF signals generated by modulated heating of the lower ionosphere with the HAARP HF transmitter

    M. Platino

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that amplitude modulated HF transmissions into the ionosphere can be used to generate ELF/VLF signals using the so-called "electrojet antenna". Although most observations of the generated ELF/VLF signals have been made on the ground, several low and high-altitude satellite observations have also been reported (James et al., 1990. One of the important unknowns in the physics of ELF/VLF wave generation by ionospheric heating is the volume of the magnetosphere illuminated by the ELF/VLF waves. In an attempt to investigate this question further, ground-satellite conjunction experiments have recently been conducted using the four Cluster satellites and the HF heater of the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP facility in Gakona, Alaska. Being located on largely closed field lines at L≈4.9, HAARP is currently also being used for ground-to-ground type of ELF/VLF wave-injection experiments, and will be increasingly used for this purpose as it is now being upgraded for higher power operation. In this paper, we describe the HAARP installation and present recent results of the HAARP-Cluster experiments. We give an overview of the detected ELF/VLF signals at Cluster, and a possible explanation of the spectral signature detected, as well as the determination of the location of the point of injection of the HAARP ELF/VLF signals into the magnetosphere using ray tracing.

  17. In connection with identification of VLF emissions before L'Aquila earthquake

    M. K. Kachakhidze

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with an attempt to check the theoretical model of self-generated seismo-electromagnetic oscillations of LAI system on the basis of retrospective data.

    Application of the offered simple model enables one to explain qualitatively the mechanism of VLF electromagnetic emission initiated in the process of an earthquake preparation. Besides, the model enables us to associate telluric character geoelectric and geomagnetic perturbations incited by rock polarization and self-generated electromagnetic oscillations of lithosphere-atmosphere system.

    L'Aquila earthquake taken as an example to isolate reliably the Earth VLF emission from the magnetospheric electromagnetic emission of the same frequency range, MHD criterion is offered together with geomagnetic activity indexes.

    On the basis of the considered three earthquakes, according to the opinion of authors the model of self-generated seismo-electromagnetic oscillations of the LAI system will enable us to approach the problem of resolution of earthquake prediction with certain accuracy.

  18. Study of long path VLF signal propagation characteristics as observed from Indian Antarctic station, Maitri

    Sasmal, Sudipta; Pal, Sujay; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2014-10-01

    To examine the quality and propagation characteristics of the Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves in a very long propagation path, Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata, participated in the 27th Indian scientific expedition to Antarctica during 2007-2008. One Stanford University made AWESOME VLF receiving system was installed at the Indian Antarctic station Maitri and about five weeks of data were recorded successfully from the Indian transmitter VTX and several other transmitting stations worldwide. The quality of the signal from the VTX transmitter was found to be very good, consistent and highly stable in day and night. The signal shows the evidences of the presence of the 24 h solar radiation in the Antarctic region during local summer. Here we report the both narrow band and broadband VLF observations from this site. The diurnal variations of VTX signal (18.2 kHz) are presented systematically for Antarctica path and also compared the same with the variations for a short propagation path (VTX-Kolkata). We compute the spatial distribution of the VTX signal along the VTX-Antarctica path using the most well-known LWPC model for an all-day and all-night propagation conditions. The calculated signal amplitudes corresponding to those conditions relatively corroborate the observations. We also present the attenuation rate of the dominant waveguide modes corresponding to those propagation conditions where the effects of the Antarctic polar ice on the attenuation of different propagating waveguide modes are visible.

  19. Van Allen Probes observations of prompt MeV radiation belt electron acceleration in nonlinear interactions with VLF chorus

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Omura, Y.; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Prompt recovery of MeV (millions of electron Volts) electron populations in the poststorm core of the outer terrestrial radiation belt involves local acceleration of a seed population of energetic electrons in interactions with VLF chorus waves. Electron interactions during the generation of VLF rising tones are strongly nonlinear, such that a fraction of the relativistic electrons at resonant energies are trapped by waves, leading to significant nonadiabatic energy exchange. Through detailed examination of VLF chorus and electron fluxes observed by Van Allen Probes, we investigate the efficiency of nonlinear processes for acceleration of electrons to MeV energies. We find through subpacket analysis of chorus waveforms that electrons with initial energy of hundreds of keV to 3 MeV can be accelerated by 50 keV-200 keV in resonant interactions with a single VLF rising tone on a time scale of 10-100 ms.

  20. VLF observation during Leonid Meteor Shower-2002 from Kolkata

    Chakrabarti, S K; Acharyya, K; Mandal, S; Chakrabarti, S; Khan, R; Bose, B; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2002-01-01

    Using a Gyrator-II Loop antenna tuned at 19.0Khz, we monitored the meteor shower during 17-24th November, 2002. We observe the primary peak at 3h58m (UT) on the 19th of November, 2002. We distinctly observed several `beadlike' and `exponentially dropping' signals. The `beadlike' signals were more in abundance on the 18th of November, 2002, one day prior to the actual encounter.

  1. Electron dispersion events in the morningside auroral zone and their relationship with VLF emissions

    Hardy, D.A.; Burke, W.J. (Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)); Villalon, E. (Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States))

    1990-05-01

    Energy/time dispersion events have been observed in the precipitating electron data in the energy range from 630 eV to 20 keV recorded by the J sensor on the low-altitude, polar-orbiting HILAT satellite. The dispersions are such that the higher-energy electrons are observed earlier in time than the lower-energy electrons The time interval for single dispersion event is from 1 to 2 s. Within an auroral pass in which such energy/time dispersion events are observed, there are typically several such events, and they can be spaced within the pass in either a periodic or aperiodic manner. The events are typically observed within and toward the equatorward edge of the region of diffuse auroral electron precipitation. During a given pass the events can be observed over a wide range of L shells. The occurrence of these events maximizes in the interval 0600-1,200 hours MLT. The energy/time dispersion is generally consistent with the electrons originating from a common source. The events are seen at L shells from 3.7 to greater than 15. The source distance for the electrons is inferred to be generally beyond the equator for events at L shells less than approximately 8 and before the equator for events at higher L shells. Because of the low energies at which the dispersions are observed, it is unlikely that their occurrence can be explained by resonant interaction with VLF waves. Based on circumstantial evidence from other reported observations common to the morning sector, and alternative theoretical explanation is presented. According to this model the dispersion events result from impulsive interactions of the electrons with intense, asymmetric packets of VLF waves via the nonlinear, ponderomotive force.

  2. Characteristic of Tweek Atmospherics Observed in Mid-latitude using AWESOME VLF Receiver

    Norbayah Yusop

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the analysis of tweek atmospherics received by AWESOME VLF receiver at station of Gakona (62.71°N, 143.99°W during four months observation from January to April 2011. Tweek which originates from lightning discharge are used to monitor the nighttime D-region ionosphere using the fundamental cut-off frequency to measure the variations of the lower ionosphere’s reflection height, the equivalent electron density at the reflection height and the propagation distance travel by tweeks. In this study, a total of 1316 tweeks are analyzed and from the analysis, it shows that equinox’s season has the highest tweek occurrence compared to winter season in March and April. The maximum harmonic (m of t weeks is found to be up to fourth ( m = 4 and tweeks with mode number one (m = 1 are more dominantly occurred. Our observations indicate that the equivalent electron densities for tweeks varies from 22-27 eL/cm3 in the altitude ranged of 75 to 91 km and demonstrate that these ELF/VLF signals travel considerable distances up to 6700 km from the causative lightning discharges. The ionospheric parameters for three locations (high, middle and low latitude respectively were compared and the results show that they are almost consistent for all the locations.

  3. VLF observations of ionospheric disturbances in association with TLEs from the EuroSprite-2007 campaign

    NaitAmor, S.; AlAbdoadaim, M. A.; Cohen, M. B.

    2010-01-01

    Two Very Low Frequency (VLF) AWESOME remote sensing systems located at Algiers, Algeria (36.45°N, 3.28°E) and Sebha, Libya (27.02°N, 14.26°E) monitor VLF signal perturbations for evidence of ionospheric disturbances. During the EuroSprite-2007 campaign a number of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs...

  4. Whistler-triggered emissions observed by ISIS satellites

    Nakamura, Y.; Ondoh, T.

    1989-01-01

    A statistical examination has been conducted of the ducted and nonducted whistler-triggered emissions (WTEs) observed by the ISIS satellites in the 1979-1981 period. Most WTEs are observed with simultaneous lower hybrid resonance in the topside ionosphere. The VLF emissions triggered by ducted whistlers frequently occur at L of 2-3, while those triggered by nonducted whistlers occur in the wider latitudinal regions at L of 2.2-4.3.

  5. VLF/LF EM emissions as main precursor of earthquakes and their searching possibilities for Georgian s/a region

    Kachakhidze, Manana; Kachakhidze, Nino

    2016-04-01

    Authors of abstract have created work which offers model of earth electromagnetic emissions generation detected in the process of earthquake preparation on the basis of electrodynamics. The model gives qualitative explanation of a mechanism of generation of electromagnetic waves emitted in the earthquake preparation period. Besides, scheme of the methodology of earthquake forecasting is created based on avalanche-like unstable model of fault formation and an analogous model of electromagnetic contour, synthesis of which, is rather harmonious. According to the authors of the work electromagnetic emissions in radiodiapason is more universal and reliable than other anomalous variations of various geophysical phenomena in earthquake preparation period; Besides, VLF/LF electromagnetic emissions might be declared as the main precursor of earthquake because it might turn out very useful with the view of prediction of large (M ≥5) inland earthquakes and to govern processes going on in lithosphere-atmosphere - ionosphere coupling (LAIC) system. Since the other geophysical phenomena, which may accompany earthquake preparation process and expose themselves several months, weeks or days prior to earthquakes are less informative with the view of earthquake forecasting, it is admissible to consider them as earthquake indicators. Physical mechanisms of mentioned phenomena are explained on the basis of the model of generation of electromagnetic emissions detected before earthquake, where a process of earthquake preparation and its realization are considered taking into account distributed and conservative systems properties. Up to these days electromagnetic emissions detection network did not exist in Georgia. European colleagues helped us (Prof. Dr. PF Biagi, Prof. Dr. Aydın BÜYÜKSARAÇ) and made possible the installation of a receiver. We are going to develop network and put our share in searching of earthquakes problem. Participation in conference is supported by financial

  6. Decrease of VLF transmitter signal and Chorus-whistler waves before l'Aquila earthquake occurrence

    M. Y. Boudjada

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the VLF emissions observed by the Instrument Champ Electrique (ICE experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We analyze intensity level variation 10 days before and after the occurrence of l'Aquila earthquake (EQ. We found a clear decrease of the VLF received signal related to ionospheric whistler mode (mainly Chorus emission and to signal transmitted by the DFY VLF station in Germany, few days (more than one week before the earthquake. The VLF power spectral density decreases of more than two orders of magnitude until the EQ, and it recovers to normal levels just after the EQ occurrence. The geomagnetic activity is principally weak four days before EQ and increases again one day before l'Aquila seismic event. Our results are discussed in the frame of short- and long-terms earthquakes prediction focusing on the crucial role of the magnetic field of the Earth.

  7. Survey of ELF-VLF plasma waves in outer radiation belt observed by Cluster STAFF-SA experiment

    D. Pokhotelov

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Various types of plasma waves have profound effects on acceleration and scattering of radiation belt particles. For the purposes of radiation belt modeling it is necessary to know statistical distributions of plasma wave parameters. This paper analyzes four years of plasma wave observations in the Earth's outer radiation belt obtained by the STAFF-SA experiment on board Cluster spacecraft. Statistical distributions of spectral density of different plasma waves observed in ELF-VLF range (chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic waves are presented as a function of magnetospheric coordinates and geomagnetic activity indices. Comparison with other spacecraft studies supports some earlier conclusions about the distribution of chorus and hiss waves and helps to remove the long-term controversy regarding the distribution of equatorial magnetosonic waves. This study represents a step towards the development of multi-spacecraft database of plasma wave activity in radiation belts.

  8. Hiss emissions during quiet and disturbed periods

    D K Singh; R P Singh

    2002-10-01

    The characteristic features of VLF hiss emissions during quiet and disturbed conditions observed at ground stations and on-board satellites are summarized. The increased intensity of the hiss emissions during magnetic storm period is explained by considering the enhanced flux of energetic electrons during magnetic storm period. The generation and propagation mechanism of VLF hiss are also briefly discussed.

  9. Horizontal Ionospheric Electron Density Gradients Observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC TIP: Spatial Distributions and Effects on VLF Wave Propagation at Mid-Latitudes

    Damien H. Chua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial variability of electron densities in the nightside ionosphere and its effects on very-low frequency (VLF wave propagation using a suite of instruments from the FORMOSAT-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC spacecraft.We use observations from the Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP instruments to infer the horizontal electron density gradients along each satellite track. We demonstrate that the OI 1356 _ radiance measured by the TIP instruments tracks the horizontal electron density structure well with high spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity. Accurate measurements of the horizontal electron density gradients are important for improving retrieved electron density profiles from GPS occultation and other tomographic remote sensing techniques. The processes underlying the variability in the large-scale, nightside electron density gradients are the main drivers of ionospheric weather. TIP observations reveal significant variability in both the small and large scale structure of the nightside ionosphere. The relative intensities, relative widths, and latitudinal separation of the northern and southern ionization crests of the Appleton anomalies show a high degree of longitudinal variation.We demonstrate how the TIP observations can be used to measure the horizontal gradient of the refractive index of whistler-mode VLF waves propagating in a cold, collisionless plasma. These measurements are critical for understanding how gradients in electron density associated with ionospheric structure such as depletions and the Appleton anomalies affect VLF wave propagation through the equatorial and mid-latitude ionosphere.

  10. VLF wave injection experiments from Siple Station, Antarctica

    R.A., Helliwell

    1987-01-01

    The background of VLF wave-particle experiments from Siple Station, Antarctica, including wave-induced precipitation is briefly reviewed. Single frequency ducted signals that exceed a certain 'threshold' intensity are observed at the conjugate point (Roberval, Quebec) to be amplified 30-50dB, with temporal growth rates of 30-200dB/s. Following saturation, variable frequency emissions are triggered. When a second signal is added to the first, with a frequency spacing Df

  11. ELF/VLF signatures of sprite-producing lightning discharges observed during the 2005 EuroSprite campaign

    Greenberg, E.; Price, C.; Yair, Y.;

    2009-01-01

    During the summer of 2005, transient luminous events were optically imaged from the French Pyrénées as part of the EuroSprite campaign. Simultaneously, extremely low frequency (ELF: 3–3000 Hz) and broadband very low frequency (VLF: 3–30 kHz) data were recorded continuously at two separate receive...

  12. Whistler emissions in the magnetosphere - satellite observations and numerical modeling

    Chum, J.; Jiricek, F.; Shklyar, D. R.

    The investigation of ionospheric and magnetospheric wave phenomena related to lightning strokes began from classical research by Eckersley (Nature, Lond., 135, 104, 1935) and Storey (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond., A246, 908, 113-141, 1953) among others, and it has continued up to the present. VLF spectrograms from the MAGION 4 and MAGION 5 satellites contain most of the known types of VLF emissions, as well as some new ones not discussed previously. A partial list of the observed emissions involving nonducted propagation includes: magnetospherically reflected (MR) whistlers (and their subclass, Nu whistlers) predicted by Kimura (Radio Sci., 1, 3, 269-283, 1966) and then found by Smith and Angerami in the spectrograms of wave data from OGO 1 and 3 (J. Geophys. Res., 73, 1, 1-20, 1968); lower hybrid resonance (LHR) noise bands; LHR whistlers and LHR spherics; and oblique noise bands above the local LHR frequency. Recently, a new line of investigation was initiated by numerical modeling of VLF spectrograms of nonducted emissions caused by lightning. For such emissions, as observed by a satellite in the magnetosphere, the spectrograms depend on several factors: the properties of the source, the geomagnetic field structure and the cold plasma distribution which jointly influence the wave propagation, and the resonant interactions of the waves with energetic particles. Therefore, numerical modeling of spectrograms and comparing them with real ones may serve as an indirect tool for investigating the factors mentioned above and any other processes that affect the spectrograms. This tool is especially effective when the source of the emission is known, in particular with lightning-induced emissions. The main features of our numerical method for modeling spectrograms include: a) representation of the wave field as the sum of wave packets treatable by geometrical optics; b) construction of a frequency-time plot based on the notion of a group front; c) calculation of the

  13. Effects of a Solar Eclipse on the Propagation of VLF-LF Signals: Observations and Results

    Barin Kumar De

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results from the measurements of some of the fundamental parameters (amplitude of sferics and transmitted signal, conductivity of lower ionosphere of the ionospheric responses to the 22 July 2009 solar eclipse (partial: 91.7% are shown. This study summarizes our results from sferics signals at 81 kHz and subionospheric transmitted signals at 19.8 and 40 kHz recorded at Agartala, Tripura (latitude: 23¢XN, longitude: 91.4¢XE. We observed significant absorption in amplitude of these signals during the eclipse period compared to their ambient values for the same period during the adjacent 7 days. The signal strength along their propagation paths was controlled by the eclipse associated decrease in ionization in the D-region of the ionosphere. Waveguide mode theory calculations show that the elevation of the height of lower ionosphere boundary of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide to a value where the conductivity parameter was 106 unit. The absorption in 81 kHz sferics amplitude is high compared to the absorption in the amplitude of 40 kHz signal transmitted from Japan. The simultaneous changes in the amplitudes of sferics and in the amplitude of transmitted signals assert some sort of coupling between the upper atmosphere and the Earth¡¦s near-surface atmosphere prevailing clouds during solar eclipse.

  14. A generation mechanism for discrete very low frequency emissions observed at Varanasi

    A K Singh; S B Singh; R P Singh

    2005-12-01

    A new type of discrete VLF emissions recorded at the low-latitude ground station Varanasi (geomag. lat. 14° 55'$ N, geomag. long. 154°E; = 1.07) during the strong magnetic activity on 29–30 April 1990 have been reported. A generation mechanism for various temporal and spectral features of discrete VLF emissions recorded at Varanasi is presented on the basis of cyclotron resonance interaction between whistler mode wave and energetic electrons ejected by substorm electric fields. An attempt is also made to determine parallel energy and wave growth relevant to the generation process of discrete VLF emissions. Finally, our results are discussed with other published works.

  15. Ionospheric turbulence from ground-based and satellite VLF/LF transmitter signal observations for the Simushir earthquake (November 15, 2006

    Pier Francesco Biagi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Signals from very low frequency (VLF/ low frequency (LF transmitters recorded on the ground station at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and on board the French DEMETER satellite were analyzed for the Simushir earthquake (M 8.3; November 15, 2006. The period of analysis was from October 1, 2006, to January 31, 2007. The ground and satellite data were processed by a method based on the difference between the real signal at night-time and the model signal. The model for the ground observations was the monthly averaged signal amplitudes and phases, as calculated for the quiet days of every month. For the satellite data, a two-dimensional model of the signal distribution over the selected area was constructed. Preseismic effects were found several days before the earthquake, in both the ground and satellite observations.

     

  16. Variations of VLF/LF signals observed on the ground and satellite during a seismic activity in Japan region in May–June 2008

    A. Rozhnoi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Signals of two Japanese transmitters (22.2 kHz and 40 kHz recorded on the ground VLF/LF station in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and on board the DEMETER French satellite have been analyzed during a seismic activity in Japan in May–June 2008. The period of analysis was from 18 April to 27 June. During this time two rather large earthquakes occurred in the north part of Honshu Island – 7 May (M=6.8 and 13 June (M=6.9. The ground and satellite data were processed by a method based on the difference between the real signal in nighttime and the model one. For ground observations a clear decrease in both signals has been found several days before the first earthquake. For the second earthquake anomalies were detected only in JJI signal. The epicenters of earthquakes were in reliable reception zone of 40 kHz signal on board the DEMETER. Signal enhancement above the seismic active region and significant signal intensity depletion in the magnetically conjugate area has been found for satellite observation before the first earthquake. Anomalies in satellite data coincide in time with those in the ground-based observation.

  17. Whistler-triggered VLF noise bursts observed on the DE-1 satellite and simultaneously at Antarctic ground stations

    Smith, A. J.; Carpenter, D. L.; Inan, U. S.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of whistler-triggered very low-frequency noise bursts on the ground at Anarctic stations, Halley and Siple, and on the high-altitude satellite DE-1 are reported. Results of a case study from June 25, 1982 in which the satellite data were recorded near 25 deg south magnetic latitude and the L = 4.7 magnetic shell, are presented. Analysis indicates that the chorus bursts that are triggered in whistler ducts travel downwards in the ducts to low altitudes in the ionosphere, and that propagation to DE-1 is by upward reflection into a nonducted mode. A means of estimating the propagation characteristics of the wave bursts is provided by comparisons of nonducted signals from the Siple transmitter and discrete periodic emissions. The ducted-nonducted mode conversion process is a mechanism for the large-scale spreading into the magnetosphere of coherent whistler-mode wave energy which is generated, amplified, or triggered in small localized ducts. The DE-1 data show that a strong interaction exists between whistler-triggered noise bursts and prevailing hiss levels.

  18. Possibility of Earthquake-prediction by analyzing VLF signals

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta

    2016-07-01

    Prediction of seismic events is one of the most challenging jobs for the scientific community. Conventional ways for prediction of earthquakes are to monitor crustal structure movements, though this method has not yet yield satisfactory results. Furthermore, this method fails to give any short-term prediction. Recently, it is noticed that prior to any seismic event a huge amount of energy is released which may create disturbances in the lower part of D-layer/E-layer of the ionosphere. This ionospheric disturbance may be used as a precursor of earthquakes. Since VLF radio waves propagate inside the wave-guide formed by lower ionosphere and Earth's surface, this signal may be used to identify ionospheric disturbances due to seismic activity. We have analyzed VLF signals to find out the correlations, if any, between the VLF signal anomalies and seismic activities. We have done both the case by case study and also the statistical analysis using a whole year data. In both the methods we found that the night time amplitude of VLF signals fluctuated anomalously three days before the seismic events. Also we found that the terminator time of the VLF signals shifted anomalously towards night time before few days of any major seismic events. We calculate the D-layer preparation time and D-layer disappearance time from the VLF signals. We have observed that this D-layer preparation time and D-layer disappearance time become anomalously high 1-2 days before seismic events. Also we found some strong evidences which indicate that it may possible to predict the location of epicenters of earthquakes in future by analyzing VLF signals for multiple propagation paths.

  19. Transionospheric Propagation of VLF Transmitter Signals

    Cohen, M.; Inan, U. S.; Lehtinen, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters may play a significant role in precipitation of inner belt (L<2.5) energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the total contribution of VLF transmitters utilized models of transionospheric propagation, but some recent studies have suggested that those models may overestimate (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. One possible cause of this discrepancy was suggested to be conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes in the D, E, and F regions, from ionospheric density irregularities, either natural or generated by the transmitter heating itself. The DEMETER satellite built a six year history of continuous and global survey mode data which, when combined, yields detailed pictures of the radiation pattern from many transmitters into space at 680 km, with 25 km resolution, and clear features like the interference pattern on the ground mapped upwards. With both E and B survey mode data, we can also directly approximate the total power injected into the magnetosphere from each transmitter, separately for day and night, as well as the power arriving at the conjugate region. We find no detectable variation of signal intensity with geomagnetic conditions. We find evidence of transmitter heating affecting the transionospheric propagation of other transmitters. We find that the power reaching the conjugate region is a large fraction of the power injected above the transmitter. We then employ a full wave model to simulate VLF transmitter transionospheric propagation, calculating the electromagnetic fields and power flux injected into the magnetosphere. Although the model does not include ionospheric irregularities, the radiation pattern largely matches the observed one, and the total power calculated is within 6 dB of observations for every transmitter, both day and night, and across a range of low to middle latitudes and transmitter powers. We thus conclude that the effect of

  20. ELF and VLF radio waves

    Barr, R.; Jones, D. L.; Rodger, C. J.

    2000-11-01

    This review covers developments in ELF and VLF radio-wave propagation research over the last 50 years of the Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics. A review of such a large field, over such a long period, cannot be fully comprehensive and the authors have therefore covered important areas which have they themselves have found interesting. The survey begins with a review of work on natural and man made sources of ELF and VLF radiation. This is followed by sections on experimental and theoretical studies of unperturbed (ambient) ELF and VLF radio propagation. Schumann resonance research, which is currently undergoing a renaissance, is then reviewed. A review of research into transient perturbations of ELF and VLF propagation follows, extending from the early work on nuclear explosions up to the current work on sprites. The review concludes with a brief summary of the VLF navigation systems of the USSR and USA, (Alpha and Omega) whose development and life-span covered most of the last 50 years.

  1. INSPIRE: A VLF Radio Project for High School Students

    Marshall, Jill A.; Pine, Bill; Taylor, William W. L.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1988 the Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionospheric Radio Experiment, or INSPIRE, has given students the opportunity to build research-quality VLF radio receivers and make observations of both natural and stimulated radio waves in the atmosphere. Any high school science class is eligible to join the INSPIRE volunteer observing network and…

  2. Observing BVOC emissions from Space

    Oetjen, Hilke; Hewson, William; Comyn-Platt, Edward M.; Barkley, Michael P.; Bösch, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is formed in the atmosphere as an intermediate from the oxidation of methane and other hydrocarbons such as isoprene, but also from combustion processes. Further, global and accurate measurements of HCHO from space are important since they can be used to infer global isoprene emission (e.g. Barkley et al., 2013), the primary biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) that cannot be monitored from space directly. However, isoprene is an important source of ozone and secondary organic aerosol, and a sink for the hydroxyl radical. HCHO absorbs in the ultraviolet wavelengths range and can therefore be detected by scattered sunlight absorption spectroscopy. Here we present measurements with the GOME-2 instrument. The first of the 3 GOME-2 instruments has been flying on MetOp-A since 2006 and MetOp-B has been launched in 2012. MetOp-C is expected to be launched in 2018. The University of Leicester retrieval (Hewson et al., 2015) is a well characterised state-of-the-art algorithm which has been used to infer HCHO vertical columns from MetOp-A, and more recently from MetOp-B. The results have been employed for creating a global, multi-year time series. This dataset has been exploited to analyse regional year-to-year variations in HCHO abundances and also to test emission models via comparisons to GEOS-Chem simulations. Barkley, M. P., et al. (2013), J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 118, 6849-6868, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50552 Hewson, W., et al. (2015), Atmos. Meas. Tech., 8, 4055-4074, doi:10.5194/amt-8-4055-2015

  3. Characteristics of VLF/LF Sferics from Elve-producing Lightning Discharges

    Blaes, P.; Zoghzoghy, F. G.; Marshall, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Lightning return strokes radiate an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) which interacts with the D-region ionosphere; the largest EMPs produce new ionization, heating, and optical emissions known as elves. Elves are at least six times more common than sprites and other transient luminous events. Though the probability that a lightning return stroke will produce an elve is correlated with the return stroke peak current, many large peak current strokes do not produce visible elves. Apart from the lightning peak current, elve production may depend on the return stroke speed, lightning altitude, and ionospheric conditions. In this work we investigate the detailed structure of lightning that gives rise to elves by analyzing the characteristics of VLF/LF lightning sferics in conjunction with optical elve observations. Lightning sferics were observed using an array of six VLF/LF receivers (1 MHz sample-rate) in Oklahoma, and elves were observed using two high-speed photometers pointed over the Oklahoma region: one located at Langmuir Laboratory, NM and the other at McDonald Observatory, TX. Hundreds of elves with coincident LF sferics were observed during the summer months of 2013. We present data comparing the characteristics of elve-producing and non-elve producing lightning as measured by LF sferics. In addition, we compare these sferic and elve observations with FDTD simulations to determine key properties of elve-producing lightning.

  4. Observation of very low frequency emissions at Indian Antarctic station, Maitri

    R P Patel; R P Singh; Ashok K Singh; A K Gwal; D Hamar

    2003-10-01

    Recently, we have succeeded in recording VLF emissions at the Indian Antarctic station, Maitri (geom. lat. 62° S, geom. long. 57.23°E, =4.5) using a T-type antenna, pre/main amplifiers and digital audio tape recorder. VLF hiss in the frequency ranges 11–13 kHz and 13–14.5 kHz and some riser-type emissions in the frequency range 3–5 kHz and magnetospheric lines at about 6.2, 8.0 and 9.2 kHz are reported for the first time. The generation and propagation mechanism of these emissions are discussed briefly.

  5. Constraining CO emission estimates using atmospheric observations

    Hooghiemstra, P. B.

    2012-06-01

    We apply a four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system to optimize carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and to reduce the uncertainty of emission estimates from individual sources using the chemistry transport model TM5. In the first study only a limited amount of surface network observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) is used to test the 4D-Var system. Uncertainty reduction up to 60% in yearly emissions is observed over well-constrained regions and the inferred emissions compare well with recent studies for 2004. However, since the observations only constrain total CO emissions, the 4D-Var system has difficulties separating anthropogenic and biogenic sources in particular. The inferred emissions are validated with NOAA aircraft data over North America and the agreement is significantly improved from the prior to posterior simulation. Validation with the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument shows a slight improved agreement over the well-constrained Northern Hemisphere and in the tropics (except for the African continent). However, the model simulation with posterior emissions underestimates MOPITT CO total columns on the remote Southern Hemisphere (SH) by about 10%. This is caused by a reduction in SH CO sources mainly due to surface stations on the high southern latitudes. In the second study, we compare two global inversions to estimate carbon monoxide (CO) emissions for 2004. Either surface flask observations from NOAA or CO total columns from the MOPITT instrument are assimilated in a 4D-Var framework. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH) three important findings are reported. First, due to their different vertical sensitivity, the stations-only inversion increases SH biomass burning emissions by 108 Tg CO/yr more than the MOPITT-only inversion. Conversely, the MOPITT-only inversion results in SH natural emissions

  6. Multi-spacecraft observations of quasiperiodic emissions

    Nemec, Frantisek; Pickett, Jolene S.; Hospodarsky, George; Santolik, Ondrej; Bezdekova, Barbora; Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Parrot, Michel; Kurth, William; Kletzing, Craig

    2016-04-01

    Whistler mode electromagnetic waves observed in the inner magnetosphere at frequencies of a few kilohertz sometimes exhibit a nearly periodic modulation of the wave intensity. The modulation periods may range from several tens of seconds up to a few minutes, and such emissions are usually called quasiperiodic (QP) emissions. The origin of these events is still unclear, but it seems that their generation might be related to compressional ULF magnetic field pulsations which periodically modulate resonance conditions in the source region. From an observational point of view, single-point measurements are quite insufficient, as they do not allow us to distinguish between spatial and temporal variations of the emissions. Multipoint observations of these events are, on the other hand, rather rare. We present several QP wave events observed simultaneously by several different spacecraft (Cluster, Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, DEMETER). We demonstrate that although the quasiperiodic modulation is observed over a huge spatial region, individual spacecraft do not see the QP elements at exactly the same times. Moreover, when an event is observed simultaneously on the dawnside and on the duskside, the modulation period observed on the duskside is about twice larger than the modulation period observed on the dawnside. We present a qualitative explanation of these phenomena.

  7. More evidence for a one-to-one correlation between Sprites and Early VLF perturbations

    Haldoupis, C.; Amvrosiadi, N.; Cotts, B. R. T.;

    2010-01-01

    Past studies have shown a correlation between sprites and early VLF perturbations, but the reported correlation varies widely from ∼50% to 100%. The present study resolves these large discrepancies by analyzing several case studies of sprite and narrowband VLF observations, in which multiple...... for this option to be resolved we need more studies using highly sensitive optical systems capable of detecting weaker sprites, sprite halos and elves....

  8. NERO-The Neutron Emission Ratio Observer

    Lorusso, Giuseppe; Pereira, Jorque; Hosmer, Paul; Kratz, Karl Ludvig; Montes, Fernando; Reeder, Paul; Santi, Peter; Schatz, Hendrik

    2007-10-01

    The Neutron Emission Ratio Observer (NERO), has been constructed for the use at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory to work in conjunction with the NSCL Beta Counting System in order to detect β-delayed neutrons. The design of the detector provides high and flat efficiency for a wide range of neutron energies, as well as a low neutron background.

  9. Observations of Diffuse Ultraviolet Emission from Draco

    Sujatha, N V; Suresh, Rahul; Henry, Richard Conn; Bianchi, Luciana

    2010-01-01

    We have studied small scale (2 arcmin) spatial variation of the diffuse UV radiation using a set of 11 GALEX deep observations in the constellation of Draco. We find a good correlation between the observed UV background and the IR 100 micron flux, indicating that the dominant contributor of the diffuse background in the field is the scattered starlight from the interstellar dust grains. We also find strong evidence of additional emission in the FUV band which is absent in the NUV band. This is most likely due to Lyman band emission from molecular hydrogen in a ridge of dust running through the field and to line emissions from species such as C IV (1550 A) and Si II (1533 A) in the rest of the field. A strong correlation exists between the FUV/NUV ratio and the FUV intensity in the excess emission regions in the FUV band irrespective of the optical depth of the region. The optical depth increases more rapidly in the UV than the IR and we find that the UV/IR ratio drops off exponentially with increasing IR due ...

  10. Thermal emission spectrometer experiment - Mars Observer mission

    Christensen, Philip R.; Anderson, Donald L.; Chase, Stillman C.; Clark, Roger N.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Malin, Michael C.; Pearl, John C.; Carpenter, James; Bandiera, Nuno; Brown, F. G.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the thermal emission spectrometer (TES) designed for the Mars Observer mission. The TES measurements of the surface and the atmosphere of Mars will be used to determine and map the composition of the surface rocks, minerals, and the condensates. Examples of information that will be obtained from TES data include mineral abundance maps, condensate properties and their distribution in time and space, aerosol properties and their distribution in time and space, the rock abundance, the polar energy balance, and properties of gaseous species. Where appropriate, these derived parameters will be distributed in the form of gridded map, to allow direct comparison with other derived data sets.

  11. TLEs and early VLF events: Simulating the important impact of transmitter-disturbance-receiver geometry

    NaitAmor, S.; Ghalila, H.; Cohen, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    Early very low frequency (VLF) events are perturbations to subionospherically propagating VLF radio transmitters which sometimes occur when lightning activity is near the transmitter-receiver path. They are often correlated to Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). Recent analysis have focused on a new type of early events whose recovery time persists for many minutes, called LOng Recovery Events (LOREs). The underlying cause of these events is still unclear. Curiously, LOREs sometimes appear on only one path, while the same event observed on a different transmitter-receiver path does not indicate a LORE. In this paper we observe and simulate two cases of early signal perturbations: The first is a typical early VLF event, and the second is a LORE. Both were recorded by two AWESOME VLF receivers in North Africa on 12 December 2009, during the EuroSprite campaign. We combine observations with theoretical modeling to infer the electron density change that most closely reproduces the observed perturbation. Our results explain the cases where LOREs are detected on only one path as resulting from transmitter-receiver geometry significantly which impacts the modal content and therefore the observed VLF recovery time.

  12. Terrestrial VLF transmitter injection into the magnetosphere

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial VLF transmitter injection into the magnetosphere M. B. Cohen1 and U. S. Inan1,2 Received 1 June 2012; revised 15 June 2012; accepted 18 June 2012; published 9 August 2012. [1] Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3–30 kHz) radio waves emitted from ground sources (transmitters and lightning) strongly impact the radiation belts, driving electron precipitation via whistler-electron gyroresonance, and contributing to the formation of the slot region. However, calculations of the...

  13. New Observations of UV Emissions from Europa

    McGrath, Melissa; Sparks, William

    2009-01-01

    The recent top prioritization of the Europa Jupiter System Mission for the next outer solar system flagship mission is refocusing attention on Europa and the other Galilean satellites and their contextual environments in the Jupiter system. Surface sputtering by magnetospheric plasma generates a tenuous atmosphere for Europa, dominated by 02 gas. This tenuous gas is in turn excited by plasma electrons, producing ultraviolet and visible emissions. Two sets of imaging observations have been published to date, UV images from the Hubble Space Telescope, and visible eclipse images from Cassini. Three additional sets of HST UV observations were acquired in February 2007, April 2007 and June 2009. The signal to noise ratio in these data are not high, however, given the paucity of data and its increasing importance in terms of planning for EJSM, we have attempted to extract as much new information as possible from these data. This talk will summarize our analysis to date, and discuss them in terms of existing models, which attempt to explain the image morphology either in terms of the underlying source production and loss processes, or in terms of the plasma interaction with the exosphere.

  14. ARCADE 2 Observations of Galactic Radio Emission

    Kogut, A; Levin, S M; Limon, M; Lubin, P M; Mirel, P; Seiffert, M; Singal, J; Villela, T; Wollack, E; Wünsche, C A

    2009-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data from the ARCADE 2 flight in July 2006 to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index beta_synch = -2.5 +/- 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 +/- 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc|b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of CII emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power-law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission towards the north polar cap T_Gal = 0.498 +/- 0.028 K and spectral index beta = -2.55 +/- 0.03 at reference frequency 1 GHz. The well calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emi...

  15. Constraining CO emission estimates using atmospheric observations

    Hooghiemstra, P.B.

    2012-01-01

    We apply a four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system to optimize carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and to reduce the uncertainty of emission estimates from individual sources using the chemistry transport model TM5. In the first study only a limited amount of surface network obs

  16. ULF/ELF emissions observed in Japan, possibly associated with the Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan

    K. Ohta

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available ULF/ELF emission observation has been performed at Nakatsugawa observatory (geographic coordinates; 35.4° N, 137.5° E, Gifu prefecture since January 1999. The equipment consists of three-orthogonal magnetic sensors (induction coils, amplifiers, A/D converters and the data logger with a computer. The frequency range of observation is from 0.001 Hz to 50 Hz. The serious changes in ELF magnetic field intensity were detected on 20 September 1999, in such a way that the ELF noise level is found to increase by more than 5 dB from the normal level for about 1.5 h during 21:30–23:00 Japanese Standard Time on 20 September and also the upper limit extends up to 50 Hz. A careful comparison with the nearby lightning as detected by VLF, enables us to confirm that this abnormal ELF noise level increase is not due to the nearby lightning. The phase difference of these ELF emissions (BX , BY was measured, and indicates that these ELF emissions are linearly polarized, suggesting that they have propagated in the subionospheric waveguide over long distances. This polarization result enables us to perform goniometric direction finding and the result shows that the main direction of these ULF/ELF emissions is toward Taiwan. Hence, it is likely that such ULF/ELF emissions are associated with the Chi-Chi earth-quake in Taiwan at 02:27 Japanese Standard Time on 21 September 1999 (M = 7.6; depth 11 km.

  17. Evaluating NOx Emissions Using Satellite Observations

    Frost, G. J.; Kim, S.; Brioude, J.; McKeen, S. A.; Trainer, M.; Heckel, A.; Hilboll, A.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Gleason, J. F.; Boersma, K. F.; Hsie, E.; Lee, S.; Angevine, W. M.; Granier, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric NO2 columns retrieved from satellites can provide a useful top-down assessment of bottom-up NOx emissions inventories. We present three case studies of an approach to evaluate NOx emissions at a sector level by comparing satellite retrievals to regional chemical-transport model calculations of NO2 columns. In the first example, the atmospheric impact of implementing NOx controls at eastern US power plants is demonstrated. In the second study, we use NOx monitors at western US power plants to calibrate our satellite-model comparisons. We then apply our approach to evaluate bottom-up estimates of NOx emissions from western US cities. In the third example, we validate our satellite-model approach using in-situ aircraft measurements and assess NOx emissions from power plants, cities, industrial facilities, and ports in eastern Texas. We conclude with some general insights on the usefulness of this approach and suggestions for future areas of research.

  18. Lightning and ionospheric remote sensing using VLF/ELF radio atmospherics

    Cummer, Steven Andrew

    Lightning discharges radiate the bulk of their electromagnetic energy in the Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3- 30 kHz) and Extremely Low Frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) frequency ranges. This energy, contained in impulse-like signals called radio atmospherics or sferics, is guided for long distances by multiple reflections from the ground and lower ionosphere. These two facts suggest that observed sferic waveforms radiated from lightning contain a great deal of information about both the state of the ionosphere along the propagation path and the dynamics of the current in the lightning return stroke. The aim of this dissertation is to develop and implement the necessary techniques to use sferic observations to determine the characteristics of the ionosphere and lightning. In this work, a quantitative model of sferic propagation is developed, and with it the spectral characteristics of VLF (> 1.5 kHz) sferics are shown to depend primarily on the propagation-path-averaged ionospheric D region electron density profile. Using this propagation model, a parameterized ionosphere is iteratively varied to find the theoretical sferic spectrum that agrees best with an observed sferic spectrum composed of the average of many individual sferic spectra. In most nighttime cases, the quality of the agreement allows the height of an exponentially-varying electron density profile to be inferred with a precision of 0.2 km. Since the general sferic waveform depends on the source current-moment waveform as well as the ionospherically- controlled propagation, the former quantity can be measured for individual discharges from observed sferics. Of particular interest are those lightning discharges associated with mesospheric optical emissions known as sprites. By using a robust deconvolution technique, source current-moment waveforms are extracted from individual observed ELF (< 1.5 kHz) sferics. The cases studied in detail show that optical emissions are sometimes produced with a smaller vertical

  19. Study of the effect of solar flares on VLF signals during D-layer preparation or disappearance time

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Palit, Sourav

    2016-07-01

    "Very Low Frequency" (VLF) is one of the bands of the Radio waves having frequency 3-30 KHz, which propagates through the Earth-ionosphere wave-guide. In relation to propagation of radio waves through ionosphere, low mass and high mobility cause electrons to play a vital role. Electrons are not distributed uniformly in the ionosphere and depending on this factor, ionosphere has different layers namely D, E and F. Different ionospheric layers generally exist during day and night time. During day-time when the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere is Sun, the lower most layer of ionosphere is D-layer. But during the night-time when Sun is absent and cosmic ray is the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere, this D-layer disappears and E-layer becomes the lower most region of the ionosphere. Normally, patterns of VLF signal depend on regular solar flux variations. However, during solar flares extra energetic particles are released from Sun, which makes the changes in the ionization of the ionosphere and these changes can perturb VLF signal amplitude. Usually if a solar flare occurs during any time of day, it only affects the amplitude and phase of the VLF signals. But in the present work, we found the if the flare occurs during D-layer preparation / disappearance time, then it will not only affect to amplitude and phase of the VLF signals but also to terminator times of VLF signals. We have observed that the sun set terminator time of the VLF signals shifted towards night time due to the effect of a M-class solar flare which occurred during the D-layer disappearance time. The shift is so high that it crossed 5σ level. We are now trying to a make model using the ion-chemistry and LWPC code to explain this observed effect.

  20. Fast Emission Estimates in China Constrained by Satellite Observations (Invited)

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R.

    2013-12-01

    Emission inventories of air pollutants are crucial information for policy makers and form important input data for air quality models. Unfortunately, bottom-up emission inventories, compiled from large quantities of statistical data, are easily outdated for an emerging economy such as China, where rapid economic growth changes emissions accordingly. Alternatively, top-down emission estimates from satellite observations of air constituents have important advantages of being spatial consistent, having high temporal resolution, and enabling emission updates shortly after the satellite data become available. Constraining emissions from concentration measurements is, however, computationally challenging. Within the GlobEmission project of the European Space Agency (ESA) a new algorithm has been developed, specifically designed for fast daily emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric species on a mesoscopic scale (0.25 × 0.25 degree) from satellite observations of column concentrations. The algorithm needs only one forward model run from a chemical transport model to calculate the sensitivity of concentration to emission, using trajectory analysis to account for transport away from the source. By using a Kalman filter in the inverse step, optimal use of the a priori knowledge and the newly observed data is made. We apply the algorithm for NOx emission estimates in East China, using the CHIMERE model together with tropospheric NO2 column retrievals of the OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments. The observations are used to construct a monthly emission time series, which reveal important emission trends such as the emission reduction measures during the Beijing Olympic Games, and the impact and recovery from the global economic crisis. The algorithm is also able to detect emerging sources (e.g. new power plants) and improve emission information for areas where proxy data are not or badly known (e.g. shipping emissions). The new emission estimates result in a better

  1. Turbulent Plasmaspheric Boundary Layer: Observables and Consequences

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    In situ satellite observations reveal strong lower hybrid/fast magnetosonic turbulence and broadband hiss-like VLF waves in the substorm subauroral geospace at and earthward of the electron plasmasheet boundary. These coincide with subauroral ion drifts/polarization streams (SAID/SAPS) in the plasmasphere and topside ionosphere. SAID/SAPS appear in ~10 min after the substorm onset consistent with the fast propagation of substorm injection fronts. The SAID channel follows the dispersionless cutoff of the energetic electron flux at the plasmapause. This indicates that the cold plasma maintains charge neutrality within the channel, thereby short-circuiting the injected plasma jet (injection fronts over the plasmasphere. Plasma turbulence leads to the circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion as well as significant electron heating and acceleration. As a result, a turbulent boundary layer forms between the inner edge of the electron plasmasheet and plasmasphere. The SAID/SAPS-related VLF emissions appear to constitute a distinctive subset of substorm/storm-related VLF activity in the region co-located with freshly injected energetic ions inside the plasmasphere. Significant pitch-angle diffusion coefficients suggest that substorm SAID/SAPS-related VLF waves could be responsible for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms. Supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  2. Study of latitudinal effects on VLF transmitter signals recorded by DEMETER/ICE experiment

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Berthelier, J. J.; Döller, R.; Galopeau, P. H. M.; Parrot, M.; Stangl, G.; Biernat, H.; Voller, W.; Besser, B.

    2010-05-01

    We report on VLF transmitter signals observed by the ‘Instrument Capteur Electrique' (ICE) experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. The DEMETER polar and circular sun-synchronous orbits lead to cover an invariant latitude range between -65° and +65° where up- and down-going half-orbits correspond to night-time (22:00 LT) and day-time (10:00 LT), respectively. The DEMETER orbit features permit to record signals emitted by some VLF ground-stations and detected by ICE experiment. We consider three transmitter signals emitted by stations in Europe (Germany, DFY, 16.58 kHz), in Asia (Japan, JP, 17.8 kHz) and in Australia (Australia, NWC, 19.8 kHz). We study the variation of these VLF signals taking into consideration the DEMETER satellite latitudes .We emphasis on latitudes where the satellite is close to the Earth's sub-auroral regions. We discuss particularly the presence, or not, of auroral magnetic activity effect on the VLF transmitter signals.

  3. Investigation of TEC and VLF space measurements associated to L'Aquila (Italy earthquakes

    G. Stangl

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report on Total Electron Content (TEC and Very Low Frequency (VLF space measurements derived from Global Positioning System (GPS and DEMETER satellites, respectively. These measurements are associated with the earthquake (EQ of a magnitude of 6.3, which occurred on 6 April 2009, in L'Aquila (Italy. Anomaly features are derived from the analysis of TEC and VLF observations recorded two weeks before and after the seismic event occurrence. A TEC map with an interpolated regional pixel resolution of 1° × 1° × 15 min in latitude, longitude and time was generated, allowing for the checking of a possible presence of disturbances over the L'Aquila region. This analysis is combined with the study of the time profile associated to the VLF flux density variations recorded by the Instrument Champ Electrique (ICE experiment on-board DEMETER satellite. We discuss, on the one hand, the combination efficiency of the electronic density and the VLF electromagnetic measurements and, on the other hand, the difficulty to distinguish between global effects and regional ones related to the earthquake.

  4. Resonant scattering of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt by HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves

    Chang, Shanshan; Zhu, Zhengping; Ni, Binbin; Cao, Xing; Luo, Weihua

    2016-10-01

    Several extremely low-frequency (ELF)/very low-frequency (VLF) wave generation experiments have been performed successfully at High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility and the artificial ELF/VLF signals can leak into the outer radiation belt and contribute to resonant interactions with energetic electrons. Based on the artificial wave properties revealed by many of in situ observations, we implement test particle simulations to evaluate the effects of energetic electron resonant scattering driven by the HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves. The results indicate that for both single-frequency/monotonic wave and multi-frequency/broadband waves, the behavior of each electron is stochastic while the averaged diffusion effect exhibits temporal linearity in the wave-particle interaction process. The computed local diffusion coefficients show that, the local pitch-angle scattering due to HARRP-induced single-frequency ELF/VLF whistlers with an amplitude of ∼10 pT can be intense near the loss cone with a rate of ∼10-2 rad2 s-1, suggesting the feasibility of HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves for removal of outer radiation belt energetic electrons. In contrast, the energy diffusion of energetic electrons is relatively weak, which confirms that pitch-angle scattering by artificial ELF/VLF waves can dominantly lead to the precipitation of energetic electrons. Moreover, diffusion rates of the discrete, broadband waves, with the same amplitude of each discrete frequency as the monotonic waves, can be much larger, which suggests that it is feasible to trigger a reasonable broadband wave instead of the monotonic wave to achieve better performance of controlled precipitation of energetic electrons. Moreover, our test particle scattering simulation show good agreement with the predictions of the quasi-linear theory, confirming that both methods are applied to evaluate the effects of resonant interactions between radiation belt electrons and artificially generated

  5. Egret observations of the extragalactic gamma-ray emission

    Sreekumar, P.; Bertsch, D.L.; Dingus, B.L.

    1998-01-01

    with the local interstellar gas and radiation, as well as an almost uniformly distributed component that is generally believed to originate outside the Galaxy. Through a careful study and removal of the Galactic diffuse emission, the flux, spectrum, and uniformity of the extragalactic emission are deduced......The all-sky survey in high-energy gamma rays (E > 30 MeV) carried out by EGRET aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory provides a unique opportunity to examine in detail the diffuse gamma-ray emission. The observed diffuse emission has a Galactic component arising from cosmic-ray interactions...

  6. Observation of Polarised Microwave Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    Smida, R; Engel, R; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kroemer, O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Mathys, S; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Neunteufel, P; Oehlschlaeger, J; Palmieri, N; Pekala, J; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Riegel, M; Roth, M; Salamida, F; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Stasielak, J; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Unger, M; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wilczynski, H; Will, M; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first direct measurement of the basic features of microwave radio emission from extensive air showers. Using a trigger provided by the KASCADE-Grande air shower array, the signals of the microwave antennas of the CROME (Cosmic-Ray Observation via Microwave Emission) experiment have been read out and searched for signatures of radio emission by high-energy air showers. Microwave signals have been detected for more than 30 showers with energies above $3\\times10^{16}$\\,eV. The observations presented in this Letter are consistent with a mainly forward-beamed, coherent and polarised emission process in the GHz frequency range. An isotropic, unpolarised radiation is disfavoured as the dominant emission model. The measurements show that microwave radiation offers a new means of studying air showers at very high energy.

  7. Investigation of EM Emissions by the Electrodynamic Tether, Inclusive of an Observational Program (EMET)

    Estes, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    Our TSS-1/R investigation, which we shall refer to as EMET in this report, was an integral part of the effort by the TSS-1/R Investigators' Working Group (IWG) to come to an understanding of the complex interaction between the tethered satellite system and the ionosphere. All of the space-borne experiments were designed to collect data relevant to the local interaction. Only the ground- based experiments, EMET and its Italian counterpart Observations on the Earth's Surface of Electromagnetic Emissions (OESEE), held out any hope of characterizing the long range effects of the interaction. This was to be done by detecting electromagnetic waves generated by the system in the ionosphere, assuming the signal reached the Earth's surface with sufficient amplitude. As the type of plasma waves excited to carry charge away from the charge-exchange regions of the system at each end of the tether is one of the theoretical points about which there is greatest disagreement, a definitive identification of tether-generated waves could mark significant progress in the so-called current closure problem of electrodynamic tethers. Dr. Mario Grossi of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) initiated the investigation, and his experience in the field of ULF-ELF waves and their detection was invaluable throughout its course. Rice University had the responsibility of setting up the EMET ULF-VLF ground stations under a subcontract from SAO. Principal Investigator (PI) for the Rice effort was Prof. William E. Gordon, who was primary observer at the Arecibo Observatory during TSS-LR. Dr. Steve Noble handled major day-to-day operations, training, and planning for the ground-based measurements. Dr. James McCoy of NASA JSC, a member of the Mona/Arecibo team, was pilot for the numerous flights ferrying personnel and equipment between Puerto Rico and Mona Island. Final responsibility for the measurements rested with SAO, and the activities of field personnel and SAO investigators were

  8. Upper Limits on O VI Emission from Voyager Observations

    Jayant Murthy

    2002-03-01

    We have examined 426 Voyager fields distributed across the sky for O VI ( 1032/1038 Å) emission from the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium. No such emission was detected in any of our observed fields. Our most constraining limit was a 90% confidence upper limit of 2600 photons cm-2 sr-1 s-1 on the doublet emission in the direction (l, b) = (117.3, 50.6). Combining this with an absorption line measurement in nearly the same direction allows us to place an upper limit of 0.01 cm-3 on the electron density of the hot gas in this direction. We have placed 90% confidence upper limits of less than or equal to 10,000 photons cm-2 sr-1 s-1 on the O VI emission in 16 of our 426 observations.

  9. SCIAMACHY formaldehyde observations: constraint for isoprene emission estimates over Europe?

    G. Dufour

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde (HCHO is an important intermediate compound in the degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the troposphere. Sources of HCHO are largely dominated by its secondary production from VOC oxidation, methane and isoprene being the main precursors in unpolluted areas. As a result of the moderate lifetime of HCHO, its spatial distribution is determined by reactive hydrocarbon emissions. We focus here on Europe and investigate the influence of the different emissions on HCHO tropospheric columns with the CHIMERE chemical transport model in order to interpret the comparisons between SCIAMACHY and simulated HCHO columns. Europe was never specifically studied before for these purposes using satellite observations. The bias between measurements and model is less than 20% on average. The differences are discussed according to the errors on the model and the observations and remaining discrepancies are attributed to a misrepresentation of biogenic emissions. This study requires the characterisation of: (1 the model errors and performances concerning formaldehyde. The errors on the HCHO columns, mainly related to chemistry and mixed emission types, are evaluated to 2×1015 molecule/cm2 and the model performances evaluated using surface measurements are satisfactory (~13%; (2 the observation errors that define the needs in spatial and temporal averaging for meaningful comparisons. Using SCIAMACHY observations as constraint for biogenic isoprene emissions in an inverse modelling scheme reduces their uncertainties by about a factor of two in region of intense emissions. The retrieved correction factors for the isoprene emissions range from a factor of 0.15 (North Africa to a factor of 2 (Poland, the United Kingdom depending on the regions.

  10. Prediction of the Nighttime VLF Subionospheric Signal Amplitude by Using Nonlinear Autoregressive with Exogenous Input Neural Network Model

    Santosa, H.; Hobara, Y.; Balikhin, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) waves have been proposed as an approach to study and monitor the lower ionospheric conditions. The ionospheric perturbations are identified in relation with thunderstorm activity, geomagnetic storm and other factors. The temporal dependence of VLF amplitude has a complicated and large daily variabilities in general due to combinations of both effects from above (space weather effect) and below (atmospheric and crustal processes) of the ionosphere. Quantitative contributions from different external sources are not known well yet. Thus the modelling and prediction of VLF wave amplitude are important issues to study the lower ionospheric responses from various external parameters and to also detect the anomalies of the ionosphere. The purpose of the study is to model and predict nighttime average amplitude of VLF wave propagation from the VLF transmitter in Hawaii (NPM) to receiver in Chofu (CHO) Tokyo, Japan path using NARX neural network. The constructed model was trained for the target parameter of nighttime average amplitude of NPM-CHO path. The NARX model, which was built based on daily input variables of various physical parameters such as stratosphere temperature, cosmic rays and total column ozone, possessed good accuracies. As a result, the constructed models are capable of performing accurate multistep ahead predictions, while maintaining acceptable one step ahead prediction accuracy. The results of the predicted daily VLF amplitude are in good agreement with observed (true) value for one step ahead prediction (r = 0.92, RMSE = 1.99), multi-step ahead 5 days prediction (r = 0.91, RMSE = 1.14) and multi-step ahead 10 days prediction (r = 0.75, RMSE = 1.74). The developed model indicates the feasibility and reliability of predicting lower ionospheric properties by the NARX neural network approach, and provides physical insights on the responses of lower ionosphere due to various external forcing.

  11. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  12. A New Solar Radio Emission Component Observed at Hectometric Wavelengths

    Reiner, M.; Kaiser, M.; Fainberg, J.

    2003-04-01

    From May 17 to 22, 2002 a highly circularly polarized solar radio source was observed by the WAVES receivers on the Wind spacecraft. This unique event, which became quite intense and definite after May 19 and which was observed continuously for 6 days, was characterized by fine frequency structures, 1 to 2 hour amplitude periodicities, and a peaked frequency spectrum. Indeed, this emission has characteristics more typical of planetary emissions than of solar emissions. This is the only such event observed by Wind/WAVES in its 8 years of operation. (The only other example of an event of similar nature may have been observed more than 20 years ago by the ISEE-3 spacecraft.) The direction-finding analysis for this event indicates a relatively small radio source that may lie somewhere between 0.06 and 0.36 AU from the sun. The radiation from this event was very weak at the onset, being nearly an order of magnitude below the galactic background radiation level. It is speculated that this radio event may be a unique hectometric manifestation of a moving type IV burst. The radiation mechanism is unknown--possibilities include plasma emission, gyro-synchrotron, and cyclotron maser.

  13. Ground-Based Observations of Unusual Atmospheric Light Emissions

    杨静; 陆高鹏; 杜艰; 潘蔚琳

    2014-01-01

    Unusual atmospheric light emissions were observed from a station located in Shandong Province of East China. The main morphology of these events includes a bright glowing spot, which differs distinctly from any type of transient luminous events (TLEs) well recognized in literature, such as sprites, halos, elves, gigantic jets, blue jets, and blue starters. A comparison between the observations of four such light emission events and the data from lightning detection networks reveals no correlation between these events and the intense lightning activity in the adjacent area. The events reported in this paper may imply the existence of a new phenomenon with a mechanism that remains to be investigated with further observation and complementary lightning measurement.

  14. Biogenic nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions estimated from tethered balloon observations

    Davis, K. J.; Lenschow, D. H.; Zimmerman, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique for estimating surface fluxes of trace gases, the mixed-layer gradient technique, is used to calculate isoprene and terpene emissions from forests. The technique is applied to tethered balloon measurements made over the Amazon forest and a pine-oak forest in Alabama at altitudes up to 300 m. The observations were made during the dry season Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2A) and the Rural Oxidants in the Southern Environment 1990 experiment (ROSE I). Results from large eddy simulations of scalar transport in the clear convective boundary layer are used to infer fluxes from the balloon profiles. Profiles from the Amazon give a mean daytime emission of 3630 +/- 1400 micrograms isoprene sq m/h, where the uncertainty represents the standard deviation of the mean of eight flux estimates. Twenty profiles from Alabama give emissions of 4470 +/- 3300 micrograms isoprene sq m/h, 1740 +/- 1060 micrograms alpha-pinene sq m/h, and 790 +/- 560 micrograms beta-pinene sq m/h, respectively. These results are in agreement with emissions derived from chemical budgets. The emissions may be overestimated because of uncertainty about how to incorporate the effects of the canopy on the mixed-layer gradients. The large variability in these emission estimates is probably due to the relatively short sampling times of the balloon profiles, though spatially heterogeneous emissions may also play a role. Fluxes derived using this technique are representative of an upwind footprint of several kilometers and are independent of hydrocarbon oxidation rate and mean advection.

  15. VLF/LF High-Voltage Design and Testing

    2003-09-01

    large valley span type and had both arc type and alternator type transmitters. The U.S. Navy later built similar valley span antennas at Haiku , HI...and a valley span VLF transmitting system at Haiku on the Hawaiian Island of Oahu. These VLF systems provided reliable long-range communications to...one at the Na site in Balboa, Panama. As time went on, Bal Navy’s station at Haiku (Oahu, HI) was converted to Omega. Omega went operational in

  16. Deep 1.4-GHz observations of diffuse polarized emission

    Carretti, E; Reich, W; Reich, P; Fürst, E; Bernardi, G; Cortiglioni, S; Sbarra, C

    2006-01-01

    Polarized diffuse emission observations at 1.4-GHz in a high Galactic latitude area of the northern Celestial hemisphere are presented. The 3.2 X 3.2 deg^2 field, centred at RA = 10h 58m, Dec = +42deg 18' (B1950), has Galactic coordinates l~172deg, b~+63deg and is located in the region selected as northern target of the BaR-SPOrt experiment. Observations have been performed with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope. We find that the angular power spectra of the E- and B-modes have slopes of beta_E = -1.79 +/- 0.13 and beta_B = -1.74 +/- 0.12, respectively. Because of the very high Galactic latitude and the smooth emission, a weak Faraday rotation action is expected, which allows both a fair extrapolation to Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) frequencies and an estimate of the contamination by Galactic synchrotron emission. We extrapolate the E-mode spectrum up to 32-GHz and confirm the possibility to safely detect the CMBP E-mode signal in the Ka band found in another low emission region (Carretti et a...

  17. Large Radio Telescopes for Anomalous Microwave Emission Observations

    Battistelli, E S; de Bernardis, P; Masi, S

    2013-01-01

    We discuss in this paper the problem of the Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) in the light of ongoing or future observations to be performed with the largest fully steerable radio telescope in the world. High angular resolution observations of the AME will enable astronomers to drastically improve the knowledge of the AME mechanisms as well as the interplay between the different constituents of the interstellar medium in our galaxy. Extragalactic observations of the AME have started as well, and high resolution is even more important in this kind of observations. When cross-correlating with IR-dust emission, high angular resolution is also of fundamental importance in order to obtain unbiased results. The choice of the observational frequency is also of key importance in continuum observation. We calculate a merit function that accounts for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in AME observation given the current state-of-the-art knowledge and technology. We also include in our merit functions the frequency depen...

  18. XMM-Newton Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton spectrum of diffuse X-ray emission from within the solar system. The spectrum is dominated by O VII and O VIII lines at 0.57 keV and 0.65 keV, O VIII (and possibly Fe XVII) lines at approximately 0.8 keV, Ne IX lines at approximately 0.92 keV, and Mg XI lines at approximately 1.35 keV. This spectrum is consistent with what is expected from charge exchange emission between the highly ionized solar wind and either interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere or material from Earth's exosphere. The emission is clearly seen as a low-energy ( E less than 1.5 keV) spectral enhancement in one of a series of observations of the Hubble Deep Field North. The X-ray enhancement is concurrent with an enhancement in the solar wind measured by the ACE satellite. The solar wind enhancement reaches a flux level an order of magnitude more intense than typical fluxes at 1 AU, and has ion ratios with significantly enhanced higher ionization states. Whereas observations of the solar wind plasma made at a single point reflect only local conditions which may only be representative of solar wind properties with spatial scales ranging from less than half of an Earth radii (approximately 10 s) to 100 Earth radii, X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange are remote sensing measurements which may provide observations which are significantly more global in character. Besides being of interest in its own right for studies of the solar system, this emission can have significant consequences for observations of more cosmological objects. It can provide emission lines at zero redshift which are of particular interest (e.g., O VII and O VIII) in studies of diffuse thermal emission, and which can therefore act as contamination in objects which cover the entire detector field of view. We propose the use of solar wind monitoring data, such as from the ACE and Wind spacecraft, as a diagnostic to screen for such possibilities.

  19. Demonstration of fluorine emission by observation and analysis of vegetation

    Impens, R.; Paul, R.

    1976-01-01

    Several studies were performed in Maurienne (France), in a forest exposed to industrial emissions, in order to investigate the effects of fluorine on plants. Some plant species, for instance Hypericum perforatum L., are very good indicators of fluorine in air. Introduction of these plants in suspect areas observation of necroses and analysis of fluorine content in dry matter, allowed the authors to identify damages among crops and forests.

  20. Coherent whistler emissions in the magnetosphere – Cluster observations

    I. Dandouras

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The STAFF-SC observations complemented by the data from other instruments on Cluster spacecraft were used to study the main properties of magnetospheric lion roars: sporadic bursts of whistler emissions at f~0.1–0.2fe where fe is the electron gyrofrequency. Magnetospheric lion roars are shown to be similar to the emissions in the magnetosheath while the conditions for their generation are much less favorable: the growth rate of the cyclotron temperature anisotropy instability is much smaller due to a smaller number of the resonant electrons. This implies a nonlinear mechanism of generation of the observed wave emissions. It is shown that the observed whistler turbulence, in reality, consists of many nearly monochromatic wave packets. It is suggested that these structures are nonlinear Gendrin's whistler solitary waves. Properties of these waves are widely discussed. Since the group velocity of Gendrin's waves is aligned with the magnetic field, these well guided wave packets can propagate through many magnetic "bottles" associated with mirror structures, without being trapped.

  1. Observation of microwave emission from extensive air showers with CROME

    Wilczyński H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the measurement of microwave radio signals from air showers with the CROME (Cosmic Ray Observation via Microwave Emission experiment. CROME is located in the center of the KASCADE-Grande air shower array. The radio signals of the CROME antennas are stored for each high-energy trigger from the KASCADE-Grande array and matched offine with the KASCADE-Grande data. After almost one year of data taking microwave signals have been observed for more than ten air showers.

  2. Observations of the spectrum of the interplanetary dust emission

    Salama, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Moreno, G.

    Published data from satellite (IRAS), rocket-borne (ZIP), and balloon-borne (ARGO) spectroscopic observations of interplanetary dust emission in the FIR are compiled and analyzed, extending the spatial-distribution results of Salama et al. (1986) to evaluate the possible role of silicate and graphite grains in determining the FIR spectrum. The zodiacal dust spectra in the ecliptic plane at solar elongations epsilon = 45 and 90 deg are calculated on the basis of theoretical models and compared with the observations. A model based on a flat distribution of 10-micron-diameter silicate grains is shown to reproduce the observed spectrum at epsilon = 45 deg but not at epsilon = 90 deg, where a model with a mixture of silicate and graphite grains gives a better, but still unsatisfactory fit to the observations.

  3. Adjoint inversion modeling of Asian dust emission using lidar observations

    K. Yumimoto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var data assimilation system for a regional dust model (RAMS/CFORS-4DVAR; RC4 is applied to an adjoint inversion of a heavy dust event over eastern Asia during 20 March–4 April 2007. The vertical profiles of the dust extinction coefficients derived from NIES Lidar network are directly assimilated, with validation using observation data. Two experiments assess impacts of observation site selection: Experiment A uses five Japanese observation sites located downwind of dust source regions; Experiment B uses these and two other sites near source regions. Assimilation improves the modeled dust extinction coefficients. Experiment A and Experiment B assimilation results are mutually consistent, indicating that observations of Experiment A distributed over Japan can provide comprehensive information related to dust emission inversion. Time series data of dust AOT calculated using modeled and Lidar dust extinction coefficients improve the model results. At Seoul, Matsue, and Toyama, assimilation reduces the root mean square differences of dust AOT by 35–40%. However, at Beijing and Tsukuba, the RMS differences degrade because of fewer observations during the heavy dust event. Vertical profiles of the dust layer observed by CALIPSO are compared with assimilation results. The dense dust layer was trapped at potential temperatures (θ of 280–300 K and was higher toward the north; the model reproduces those characteristics well. Latitudinal distributions of modeled dust AOT along the CALIPSO orbit paths agree well with those of CALIPSO dust AOT, OMI AI, and MODIS coarse-mode AOT, capturing the latitude at which AOTs and AI have high values. Assimilation results show increased dust emissions over the Gobi Desert and Mongolia; especially for 29–30 March, emission flux is about 10 times greater. Strong dust uplift fluxes over the Gobi Desert and Mongolia cause the heavy dust event. Total optimized dust emissions are 57

  4. Recent reduction in NO x emissions over China: synthesis of satellite observations and emission inventories

    Liu, Fei; Zhang, Qiang; van der A, Ronald J.; Zheng, Bo; Tong, Dan; Yan, Liu; Zheng, Yixuan; He, Kebin

    2016-11-01

    Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) column densities detected from space are widely used to infer trends in terrestrial nitrogen oxide (NO x ) emissions. We study changes in NO2 column densities using the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) over China from 2005 to 2015 and compare them with the bottom-up inventory to examine NO x emission trends and their driving forces. From OMI measurements we detect the peak of NO2 column densities at a national level in the year 2011, with average NO2 column densities deceasing by 32% from 2011 to 2015 and corresponding to a simultaneous decline of 21% in bottom-up emission estimates. A significant variation in the peak year of NO2 column densities over regions is observed. Because of the reasonable agreement between the peak year of NO2 columns and the start of deployment of denitration devices, we conclude that power plants are the primary contributor to the NO2 decline, which is further supported by the emission reduction of 56% from the power sector in the bottom-up emission inventory associated with the penetration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) increasing from 18% to 86% during 2011-2015. Meanwhile, regulations for vehicles also make a significant contribution to NO x emission reductions, in particular for a few urbanized regions (e.g., Beijing and Shanghai), where they implemented strict regulations for vehicle emissions years before the national schedule for SCR installations and thus reached their NO2 peak 2-3 years ahead of the deployment of denitration devices for power plants.

  5. FERMI Observations of Gamma -Ray Emission From the Moon

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwoo, W. B.; Baldini, I.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Gehrels, N.; Hays, E.; Thompson, D. J.; McEnery, J. E.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the detection of high-energy ? -ray emission from the Moon during the first 24 months of observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This emission comes from particle cascades produced by cosmicray (CR) nuclei and electrons interacting with the lunar surface. The differential spectrum of the Moon is soft and can be described as a log-parabolic function with an effective cutoff at 2-3 GeV, while the average integral flux measured with the LAT from the beginning of observations in 2008 August to the end of 2010 August is F(greater than100 MeV) = (1.04 plus or minus 0.01 [statistical error] plus or minus 0.1 [systematic error]) × 10(sup -6) cm(sup -2) s(sup -1). This flux is about a factor 2-3 higher than that observed between 1991 and 1994 by the EGRET experiment on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, F(greater than100 MeV)˜5×10(sup -7) cm(sup -2) s(sup -1), when solar activity was relatively high. The higher gamma -ray flux measured by Fermi is consistent with the deep solar minimum conditions during the first 24 months of the mission, which reduced effects of heliospheric modulation, and thus increased the heliospheric flux of Galactic CRs. A detailed comparison of the light curve with McMurdo Neutron Monitor rates suggests a correlation of the trends. The Moon and the Sun are so far the only known bright emitters of gamma-rays with fast celestial motion. Their paths across the sky are projected onto the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes as well as onto other areas crowded with high-energy gamma-ray sources. Analysis of the lunar and solar emission may thus be important for studies of weak and transient sources near the ecliptic.

  6. VLF Science at Indian Centre for Space Physics

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has been monitoring VLF signals from stations around the world at its laboratories at Kolkata and Sitapur (Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre) as well as at several places throughout India when in a campaign mode. We have been interested to study high energy events from space, such as solar flares and gamma ray bursts. We have made studies during multiple solar eclipses and most importantly made substantial progress in the problem of lithosphere-ionosphere coupling while understanding various types of anomalies prior to major earthquakes. Other effects such as AGWs and LEPs are being studied. We have experience of two antarctic expedition and obtained VLF data from both Maitri and Bharati stations of India, which revealed, among other things, how the signal attenuation can indicate the extent of ice mass in Antarctica. We have been able to reproduce various VLF perturbation events using Atmospheric Chemical evolution model coupled with LWPC code. For instance we have reproduced solar flare induced VLF amplitude perturbation pattern by completely ab initio calculation. We also targeted the inverse problem, namely, deduction of the injected radiation spectra from space from the VLF signal alone, thereby establishing that the Earth can be used as a gigantic detector. These interesting results would be presented in my review talk.

  7. Airborne observations of vegetation and implications for biogenic emission characterization.

    Hawes, Amy K; Solomon, Susan; Portmann, Robert W; Daniel, John S; Langford, Andrew O; Miller, H LeRoy; Eubank, Charles S; Goldan, Paul; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Atlas, Elliot; Hansel, Armin; Wisthaler, Armin

    2003-12-01

    Measuring hydrocarbons from aircraft represents one way to infer biogenic emissions at the surface. The focus of this paper is to show that complementary remote sensing information can be provided by optical measurements of a vegetation index, which is readily measured with high temporal coverage using reflectance data. We examine the similarities between the vegetation index and in situ measurements of the chemicals isoprene, methacrolein, and alpha-pinene to estimate whether the temporal behavior of the in situ measurements of these chemicals could be better understood by the addition of the vegetation index. Data were compared for flights conducted around Houston in August and September 2000. The three independent sets of chemical measurements examined correspond reasonably well with the vegetation index curves for the majority of flight days. While low values of the vegetation index always correspond to low values of the in situ chemical measurements, high values of the index correspond to both high and low values of the chemical measurements. In this sense it represents an upper limit when compared with in situ data (assuming the calibration constant is adequately chosen). This result suggests that while the vegetation index cannot represent a purely predictive quantity for the in situ measurements, it represents a complementary measurement that can be useful in understanding comparisons of various in situ observations, particularly when these observations occur with relatively low temporal frequency. In situ isoprene measurements and the vegetation index were also compared to an isoprene emission inventory to provide additional insight on broad issues relating to the use of vegetation indices in emission database development.

  8. Seismo-electromagnetic VLF link calibration in Europe

    Eichelberger, Hans; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Wolbang, Daniel; Besser, Bruno P.; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Stachel, Manfred; Prattes, Gustav; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Aydogar, Özer; Zehetleitner, Sigrid; Grill, Claudia; Jernej, Irmgard

    2015-04-01

    The general background is the investigation of seismic activity with electromagnetic signals, i.e. to disentangle amplitude and phase modifications from a variety of sources. This work focus on characterisation of very low frequency (VLF) radio links between several transmitters and the Graz receiver in the current active solar cycle. Particular emphasis is on solar flares related disturbances in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, an important dayside non-seismic influence on the VLF paths. These variations can serve as a calibration tool of the facility even for nighttime periods when different seismo-electromagnetic (SEM) methods are applied, e.g. terminator time or nighttime amplitude. Supporting data are the GOES X-ray flux measurements. As immediate objective we study individual C/M/X-class solar flare events in the sub-ionospheric VLF waveguide (amplitude fluctuations) and calculate statistical parameters with the C-class population. The used system, which is part of a broader network of receiving stations, is primarily dedicated to investigate earthquake related phenomena and associated lithospheric atmospheric ionospheric coupling mechanisms. We receive simultaneously 12 VLF transmitters (amplitude and phase measurements) from the northern hemisphere with a selected temporal resolution of 20 seconds. We conclude that the numerous C/M/X-class solar flare events, together with the the high signal-to-noise ratio of the facility, are a valuable combination for short-term VLF path characterisation in a robust manner. As outlook, due to the steady VLF measurements, a monitoring service for certain lower atmospheric variations can be envisaged.

  9. On the numerical modelling of VLF chorus dynamical spectra

    D. Nunn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the use of a one-dimensional Vlasov Hybrid Simulation (VHS computer code to simulate the dynamical spectra (i.e. frequency versus time spectrograms of ELF/VLF chorus signals (from ~a fraction to ~10 kHz. Recently excellent measurements of chorus have been made in the source region close to the geomagnetic equator aboard the four spacecraft Cluster mission. Using Cluster data for wave amplitude, which is up to 300 pT, local gyrofrequency, cold plasma density, and L-shell, observed chorus signals are reproduced with remarkable fidelity and, in particular, sweep rates in the range 1–10 kHz result as observed. Further, we find that the sweep rate is a falling function of increasing cold plasma density, again in accord with observations. Finally, we have satisfactorily simulated the rather rare falling frequency elements of chorus which are sometimes observed aboard Cluster in the generation region. For both rising and falling chorus we have presented detailed structural analyses of the generation regions. The main contributor to the frequency sweep rate is primarily the establishment of wave number/frequency gradients across the generation region by the out of phase component of the resonant particle current. The secondary contributor is the shortening of the wavelength of resonant particle current relative to that of the wave field. In view of the close agreement between observation and simulation, we conclude that nonlinear electron cyclotron resonance is indeed the mechanism underlying the generation of chorus signals just outside the plasmasphere.

  10. Modeling of the lower ionospheric response and VLF signal modulation during a total solar eclipse using ionospheric chemistry and LWPC

    Chakraborty, Suman; Palit, Sourav; Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-02-01

    The variation in the solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation flux by any measure is the most dominant natural source to produce perturbations or modulations in the ionospheric chemical and plasma properties. A solar eclipse, though a very rare phenomenon, is similarly bound to produce a significant short time effect on the local ionospheric properties. The influence of the ionizing solar flux reduction during a solar eclipse on the lower ionosphere or, more precisely, the D-region, can be studied with the observation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio wave signal modulation. The interpretation of such an effect on VLF signals requires a knowledge of the D-region ion chemistry, which is not well studied till date. Dominant parameters which govern the ion chemistry, such as the recombination coefficients, are poorly known. The occurrence of events such as a solar eclipse provides us with an excellent opportunity to investigate the accuracy of our knowledge of the chemical condition in this part of Earth's atmosphere and the properties which control the ionospheric stability under such disturbances. In this paper, using existing knowledge of the lower ionospheric chemical and physical properties we carry out an interpretation of the effects obtained during the total solar eclipse of 22 of July 2009 on the VLF signal. Data obtained from a week long campaign conducted by the Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) over the Indian subcontinent has been used for this purpose. Both positive and negative amplitude changes during the eclipse were observed along various receiver locations. In this paper, data for a propagation path between a Indian Navy VLF transmitter named VTX3 and a pair of receivers in India are used. We start from the observed solar flux during the eclipse and calculate the ionization during the whole time span over most of the influenced region in a range of height. We incorporate a D-region ion-chemistry model to find the equilibrium ion density over

  11. Space shuttle observation of an unusual transient atmospheric emission

    Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Ziv, Baruch; Israelevich, Peter L.; Sentman, Davis D.; São-Sabbas, Fernanda T.; Devir, Adam D.; Sato, Mitsuteru; Rodger, Craig J.; Moalem, Meir; Greenberg, Eran; Yaron, Ofer

    2005-01-01

    We report an observation of an unusual transient luminous event (TLE) detected in the near IR, south of Madagascar above the Indian Ocean. The event was imaged from the space shuttle Columbia during the MEIDEX sprite campaign [Yair et al., 2004]. It was delayed 0.23 seconds from a preceding visual lightning flash which was horizontally displaced >1000 km from the event. The calculated brightness in the 860 (+/-50) nm filter was ~310 +/- 30 kR, and the morphology of the emitting volume did not resemble any known class of TLE (i.e., sprites, ELVES or halos). This TIGER event (Transient Ionospheric Glow Emission in Red) may constitute a new class of TLE, not necessarily induced by a near-by thunderstorm. We discuss possible generation mechanisms, including the conjugate sprite hypothesis caused by lightning at the magnetic mirror point, lightning-induced electron precipitation and an extraterrestrial source, meteoric or cometary.

  12. Observations of Microwave Continuum Emission from Air Shower Plasmas

    Gorham, P W; Varner, G S; Beatty, J J; Connolly, A; Chen, P; Conde, M E; Gai, W; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Miki, C; Konecny, R; Kowalski, J; Ng, J; Power, J G; Reil, K; Saltzberg, D; Stokes, B T; Walz, D

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a possible new technique for microwave measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) extensive air showers which relies on detection of expected continuum radiation in the microwave range, caused by free-electron collisions with neutrals in the tenuous plasma left after the passage of the shower. We performed an initial experiment at the AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator) laboratory in 2003 and measured broadband microwave emission from air ionized via high energy electrons and photons. A follow-up experiment at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) in summer of 2004 confirmed the major features of the previous AWA observations with better precision and made additional measurements relevant to the calorimetric capabilities of the method. Prompted by these results we built a prototype detector using satellite television technology, and have made measurements indicating possible detection of cosmic ray extensive air showers. The method, if confirmed by experiments now in progress, cou...

  13. Analysis and Modeling of Jovian Radio Emissions Observed by Galileo

    Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    Our studies of Jovian radio emission have resulted in the publication of five papers in refereed journals, with three additional papers in progress. The topics of these papers include the study of narrow-band kilometric radio emission; the apparent control of radio emission by Callisto; quasi-periodic radio emission; hectometric attenuation lanes and their relationship to Io volcanic activity; and modeling of HOM attenuation lanes using ray tracing. A further study of the control of radio emission by Jovian satellites is currently in progress. Abstracts of each of these papers are contained in the Appendix. A list of the publication titles are also included.

  14. Investigations of natural and artificial disturbances in the Earth-ionosphere cavity via VLF radio links for the time span 2009-2015 (sunspot cycle 24)

    Eichelberger, Hans; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Besser, B. P.; Prattes, Gustav; Aydogar; Wolbang, Daniel; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Boudjada, Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    We focus on natural disturbances of the sub-ionospheric VLF waveguide in the time span 2009 to 2015 (sunspot cycle 24), i.e. variations in amplitude and phase measurements of the radio paths are considered. In particular we're investigating numerous solar flares (up to X-class), geomagnetic storms and substorms, therefore discuss how to discriminate natural from artificial variations between different transmitters and receivers. Meteorological effects could be important [1] and we estimate the possibility to detect the influence of lithospheric sources in the VLF radio links. As part of the VLF multistation network we're using the single receiver mid-latitude station in Graz, Austria. This facility receives up to 12 transmitter simultaneously (frequency range 10-50 kHz), has 20 sec temporal resolution, and is running continuously since 2009 [2]. We obtain the statistics relating VLF amplitude and phase fluctuations with C/M/X-class solar flares, and characterise night time fluctuations in connection with enhanced particle precipitation in the northern latitude path (Iceland transmitter). The statistics is important to improve the quality of seismo-electromagnetic studies. We conclude that for ionospheric perturbations (D-layer), e.g. solar flares, a reliable real time monitoring service can be established. Atmospheric and lithospheric variations are generally difficult to characterise, it's harder to distinguish between natural and man made signals, therefore - as a future outlook - complementary ground and satellite based measurements can deliver valuable additional information for environmental monitoring. References: [1] A. Rozhnoi et al.: Meteorological effects in the lower ionosphere as based on VLF/LF signal observations, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 14, 2671-2679, 2014. [2] K. Schwingenschuh et al.: The Graz seismo-electromagnetic VLF facility, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 1121-1127, 2011.

  15. Emission Patterns of Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft Rj = Ij /[Sigma]Ij (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of approximately 2 deg and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from [approx] -100 deg to approximately 100 deg. The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  16. Source location of chorus emissions observed by Cluster

    M. Parrot

    Full Text Available One of the objectives of the Cluster mission is to study sources of various electromagnetic waves using the four satellites. This paper describes the methods we have applied to data recorded from the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. This spectral matrix is analysed to determine, for each satellite, the direction of the wave normal relative to the Earth’s magnetic field as a function of frequency and of time. Due to the Cluster orbit, chorus emissions are often observed close to perigee, and the data analysis determines the direction of these waves. Three events observed during different levels of magnetic activity are reported. It is shown that the component of the Poynting vector parallel to the magnetic field changes its sense when the satellites cross the magnetic equator, which indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from the equator. Detailed analysis indicates that the source is located in close vicinity of the plane of the geomagnetic equator.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms; Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities

  17. The European VLF/LF radio network: current status

    Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Ermini, A.

    2014-11-01

    For several years researches about correlation between seismicity and disturbances in radio broadcasting are being carried out: in particular, the Japanese Pacific VLF radio network and the European VLF-LF radio network have been developed during the last years. The European network has been developed starting from two LF receivers located in central Italy in 1996. Up to now, 11 receivers of a new type, able to sample the VLF and LF intensity of ten radio signals, are being into operation in different European countries. The daily updating of data is effective and the data bank is located at the Department of Physics of the University of Bari (Italy) which is the central node of the network. In order to discover anomalies, the software able to carry out automatically a daily data analysis by the Wavelet spectra method has been planned and realized. At the moment, the software operates on four signals (two LF and two VLF) collected by one of the receiver located in Italy. If the anomaly is particularly strong a warning system gives an advise on the work station into operation in the central node of the Network. In any case, before assuming an anomaly as a seismic anomaly, geomagnetic and meteorological data must be checked as well as any possible instrumental malfunction. At present these controls are carried out only discontinuously by the researchers of the Bari Team.

  18. An aerostat-supported ELF/VLF transmitter

    Field, E. C., Jr.; Kies, L. R.; Bannister, P. R.; Ingram, R. F.; Hopkins, W. D.; Roberts, M. A.

    1989-03-01

    A demonstration of an aerostat-supported extremely low frequency/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) transmitting antenna was performed. At ELF the vertical electric dipole (VED) antenna radiated at least 100,000 times more power than would a horizontal electric dipole having the same moment. That efficiency was achieved with an altitude of 12,500 feet (3810 m). Calculations show that the radiated power will increase as the fourth power of aerostat altitude. The tether antenna exhibited a corona onset voltage of 180 kV and was resistant to the degrading effects of ELF corona. Prolonged in-corona operation is therefore possible. The antenna was continuously tuned, despite changes in height and capacitance caused by the aerostat flight dynamics. The huge 300-H ELF tuning inductor posed no problem. Enhanced VED moments were achieved at ELF by operation at voltages up to 260 kV, 40% above the corona onset voltage. At VLF the antenna emulated a monopole that had a radiation efficiency greater than 90%. The measured bandwidths were large: 1.5 kHz at 23 kHz and 3.5 kHz at 34 kHz. The antenna height exceeded one-quarter wavelength at VLF, so the antenna could be tuned capacitively and required relatively low base voltages. At both VLF and ELF the measured fields agreed closely with predictions.

  19. Models of ionospheric VLF absorption of powerful ground based transmitters

    Cohen, M. B.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters play a role in precipitation of energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the contribution of VLF transmitters to radiation belt losses were based on early models of trans-ionospheric propagation known as the Helliwell absorption curves, but some recent studies have found that the model overestimates (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. It was subsequently suggested that conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes may be responsible for the error. We utilize a newly available extensive record of VLF transmitter energy reaching the magnetosphere, taken from the DEMETER satellite, and perform a direct comparison with a sophisticated full wave model of trans-ionospheric propagation. Although the model does not include the effect of ionospheric irregularities, it correctly predicts the average total power injected into the magnetosphere within several dB. The results, particularly at nighttime, appear to be robust against the variability of the ionospheric electron density. We conclude that the global effect of irregularity scattering on whistler mode conversion to quasi-electrostatic may be no larger than 6 dB.

  20. Full-wave model of D-region upward VLF coupling to whistlers in the plasmasphere

    Jacobson, A. R.; Shao, X.; Lay, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric-lightning-to-plasmasphere VLF coupling via whistlers is key to understanding the problem of radiation-belt losses and the slot region. In the lowermost ionosphere, the "D-region" (roughly 60 - 100 km altitude), the coupling occurs between the VLF incident from the "vacuum" below, to the electron whistler capable of transiting upward through the E- and F-regions above. We have modified our successful and data-validated D-region VLF downward-reflection model to predict upward-coupled whistler waveforms recorded on topside satellites. The model has been run in production mode for predicting downward-reflected waveforms recorded at ground stations, but the model's internal calculation also fully describes the "penetrating" solution that merges into the oblique electron whistler. We have begun to test the model against VLF, three-dimensional electric-field recordings from the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) [Pfaff et al., 2010] on the C/NOFS satellite. VEFI's broadband recording and large on-board memory serendipitously provide an excellent platform for studying lightning whistlers in the plasmasphere. We have already demonstrated [Jacobson et al., 2011] that VEFI is superbly suited for testing transionospheric propagation, in conjunction with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN; see www.wwlln.net) to provide groundtruth location/time of the lightning strokes. This poster will describe latest results. Jacobson, A. R., R. H. Holzworth, R. F. Pfaff, and M. P. McCarthy (2011), Study of oblique whistlers in the low-latitude ionosphere, jointly with the C/NOFS satellite and the World-Wide Lightning Location Network, Annales Geophysicae, 29, 851-863. Pfaff, R., D. Rowland, H. Freudenreich, K. Bromund, K. Le, M. Acuna, J. Klenzing, C. Liebrecht, S. Martin, W. J. Burke, N. C. Maynard, D. E. Hunton, P. A. Roddy, J. O. Ballenthin, and G. R. Wilson (2010), Observations of DC electric fields in the low-latitude ionosphere and their variations with

  1. Plasma waves observed by the IRM and UKS spacecraft during the AMPTE solar wind lithium releases - Overview

    Haeusler, B.; Woolliscroft, L. J.; Anderson, R. R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Holzworth, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    The wave measurements from the Ion Release Module and the United Kingdom Satellite in the diamagnetic cavity, the transition region, and the upstream region are examined. Solar wind conditions during the releases on September 11 and 20, 1984 are described. The quasi-static electric field, wideband, high-frequency waves, and medium and VLF waves observations are analyzed. The data reveal that extremely low levels of wave activity are observed in the boundary between the diamagnetic cavity and external magnetic field, medium and VLF waves in the ion acoustic electrostatic cyclotron harmonic modes are detected in the transition region from the diamagnetic cavity to the solar wind, and decay in the magnetic field strength and density, and an increase in the quasi-static electric field is seen in the upstream edge of the transition region. The emissions observed are related to the different phases of the Li cloud development and different spatial regimes of the Li plasma-solar wind interaction.

  2. Numerical modelling of VLF radio wave propagation through earth-ionosphere waveguide and its application to sudden ionospheric disturbances

    Pal, Sujay

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we theoretically predict the normal characteristics of Very Low Frequency (3~30 kHz) radio wave propagation through Earth-ionosphere waveguide corresponding to normal behavior of the D-region ionosphere. We took the VLF narrow band data from the receivers of Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) to validate our models. Detection of sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) are common to all the measurements. We apply our theoretical models to infer the D-region characteristics and to reproduce the observed VLF signal behavior corresponding to such SIDs. We develop a code based on ray theory to simulate the diurnal behavior of VLF signals over short propagation paths (2000~3000 km). The diurnal variation from this code are comparable to the variation obtained from a more general Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) code which is based on mode theory approach. We simulate the observational results obtained during the Total Solar Eclipse of July 22, 2009 in India. We also report and simulate a h...

  3. A generation mechanism for chorus emission

    V. Y. Trakhtengerts

    Full Text Available A chorus generation mechanism is discussed, which is based on interrelation of ELF/VLF noise-like and discrete emissions under the cyclotron wave-particle interactions. A natural ELF/VLF noise radiation is excited by the cyclotron instability mechanism in ducts with enhanced cold plasma density or at the plasmapause. This process is accompanied by a step-like deformation of the energetic electron distribution function in the velocity space, which is situated at the boundary between resonant and nonresonant particles. The step leads to the strong phase correlation of interacting particles and waves and to a new backward wave oscillator (BWO regime of wave generation, when an absolute cyclotron instability arises at the central cross section of the geomagnetic trap, in the form of a succession of discrete signals with growing frequency inside each element. The dynamical spectrum of a separate element is formed similar to triggered ELF/VLF emission, when the strong wavelet starts from the equatorial plane. The comparison is given of the model developed using some satellite and ground-based data. In particular, the appearance of separate groups of chorus signals with a duration 2-10 s can be connected with the preliminary stage of the step formation. BWO regime gives a succession period smaller than the bounce period of energetic electrons between the magnetic mirrors and can explain the observed intervals between chorus elements.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Energetic particles · trapped. Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions; waves and instabilities

  4. A generation mechanism of chorus emissions using BWO theory

    Singh, Ashutosh K; Singh, K K; Singh, A K; Patel, R P [Department of Physics, M. M. H. P. G. College, Ghaziabad (India); Singh, R, E-mail: abhay_s@rediffmail.co [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India)

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, discrete VLF chorus emissions recorded at low latitude ground station Jammu (geomag. Lat. = 22{sup 0} 26{sup /} N, L = 1.17) are reported and their characteristics based on complete spectral analysis have been carried out. These discrete chorus emissions are generated during a strong geomagnetic storm period of 2-7 May, 1998. We have computed the sweep rate, repetition period, source region, and drift rate of the individual chorus elements. It is observed that the sweep rate increases with time. To explain the various temporal and spectral features of these emissions, a possible generation mechanism has been presented based on the backward wave oscillator (BWO) regime in the magnetospheric cyclotron maser. On the basis of this model, we have computed some discrete chorus emission parameters as well as magnetospheric parameters relevant to the generation process. A comparison of the computed and observed magnetospheric parameters has been presented. These results show a good agreement with the BWO model.

  5. Estimation of emission cone wall thickness of Jupiter's decametric radio emission using stereoscopic STEREO/WAVES observations

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H. O.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: Stereoscopic observations by the WAVES instrument onboard two STEREO spacecraft have been used with the aim of estimating wall thickness of an emission cone of Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). Methods: Stereoscopic observations provided by STEREO-A and -B facilitate unambiguous recognition of the Jovian DAM in observed dynamic spectra as well as identification of its components (Io DAM or non-Io DAM). The dynamic spectra of radio emissions recorded by STEREO/WAVES have been analyzed using the method of cross-correlation of the radio dynamic spectra. Results: Altogether, 139 radio events, in particular 91 Io- and 48 non-Io-related radio events were observed. The averaged width of the emission cone wall for Io-DAM as well as for non-Io DAM is about 1.1° ± 0.2°. These results are in agreement with previous findings.

  6. Mapping man-made CO2 emissions using satellite-observed nighttime lights

    Oda, T.; Maksyutov, S. S.; Andres, R. J.; Elvidge, C.; Baugh, K.; Hsu, F. C.; Roman, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    The Open-Data Inventory for Anthropogenic Carbon dioxide (ODIAC) is a global high spatial resolution (1x1km) emission dataset for CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. The original version of ODIAC was developed at the Japanese Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT) project to prescribe their inverse model. ODIAC first introduced the combined use of satellite-observed nighttime light data and individual power plant emission/geolocation information to estimate the spatial extent of fossil fuel CO2. The ODIAC emission data has been widely used by the international carbon cycle research community and appeared in a number of publications in the literature. Since its original publication in 2011, we have made numerous modifications to the ODIAC emission model and the emission data have been updated on annual basis. We are switching from BP statistical data based emission estimates to estimates made by Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In recent versions of ODIAC data, the emission seasonality has been adopted from the CDIAC monthly emission dataset. The emissions from international bunkers, which are not included in the CDIAC gridded emission data, are estimated using the UN Energy Database and included with the spatial distributions. In the next version of ODIAC emission model, we will explore the use of satellite data collected by the NASA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite. We will estimate emission spatial distributions using global 500x500m nighttime lights data created from VIIRS data. We will also utilize a combustion detection algorithm Nightfire developed at NOAA National Geophysical Data Center to map gas flaring emissions. We also plan to expand our two emission sector emission distributing approach (power plant emission and non-point source emissions) by introducing a transportation emission sector which should improve emission distributions in urban and rural areas.

  7. Modeling of very low frequency (VLF radio wave signal profile due to solar flares using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation coupled with ionospheric chemistry

    S. Palit

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photons emitted during solar flares cause ionization in the lower ionosphere (~60 to 100 km in excess of what is expected to occur due to a quiet sun. Very low frequency (VLF radio wave signals reflected from the D-region of the ionosphere are affected by this excess ionization. In this paper, we reproduce the deviation in VLF signal strength during solar flares by numerical modeling. We use GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code to compute the rate of ionization due to a M-class flare and a X-class flare. The output of the simulation is then used in a simplified ionospheric chemistry model to calculate the time variation of electron density at different altitudes in the D-region of the ionosphere. The resulting electron density variation profile is then self-consistently used in the LWPC code to obtain the time variation of the change in VLF signal. We did the modeling of the VLF signal along the NWC (Australia to IERC/ICSP (India propagation path and compared the results with observations. The agreement is found to be very satisfactory.

  8. Microprocessor implementation of an FFT for ionospheric VLF observations

    Elvidge, J.; Kintner, P.; Holzworth, R.

    1984-01-01

    A fast Fourier transform algorithm is implemented on a CMOS microprocessor for application to very low-frequency electric fields (less than 10 kHz) sensed on high-altitude scientific balloons. Two FFT's are calculated simultaneously by associating them with conjugate symmetric and conjugate antisymmetric results. One goal of the system was to detect spectral signatures associated with fast time variations present in natural signals such as whistlers and chorus. Although a full evaluation of the system was not possible for operational reasons, a measure of the system's success has been defined and evaluated.

  9. VLF Tan Delta Measurement for Used XLPE Power Cables

    Lim, Woo Sang; Ha, Che Wung; Joo, Kwang Ho [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Medium voltage power cables in nuclear power plants are currently managed through the visual inspection or by monitoring environmental factors such as the temperature and radiation levels. However, these methods are insufficient to monitor aging degradation of power cables. The NRC requires an additional monitoring program to detect the aged degradation, especially for safety-related power cables which are inaccessible or installed underground. EPRI suggested that very low frequency (VLF) tan {delta} test be included in MV power cable diagnostic programs. In addition, the VLF tan {delta} test was recently adopted for domestic submarine distribution cable diagnostics. KEPRI suggested that the impacts of leakage current should be controlled in VLF tan {delta} test for the submarine cables. As a pre-process to develop such a program, tan {delta} tests have been performed for 4.16 kV cables which were removed from the domestic nuclear power plant after approximate 30 years of service to analyze the degradation of long time serviced cables and the effect of leakage current from the both ends of cables

  10. Satellite observations indicate substantial spatiotemporal variability in biomass burning NOx emission factors for South America

    P. Castellanos

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning is an important contributor to global total emissions of NOx (NO + NO2. Generally bottom-up fire emissions models calculate NOx emissions by multiplying fuel consumption estimates with static biome specific emission factors, defined in units of grams of NO per kilogram of dry matter consumed. Emission factors are a significant source of uncertainty in bottom-up fire emissions modeling because relatively few observations are available to characterize the large spatial and temporal variability of burning conditions. In this paper we use NO2 tropospheric column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI from the year 2005 over South America to calculate monthly NOx emission factors for four fire types: deforestation, savanna/grassland, woodland, and agricultural waste burning. In general, the spatial trends in NOx emission factors calculated in this work are consistent with emission factors derived from in situ measurements from the region, but are more variable than published biome specific global average emission factors widely used in bottom up fire emissions inventories such as the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED v3. Satellite based NOx emission factors also indicate substantial temporal variability in burning conditions. Overall, we found that deforestation fires have the lowest NOx emission factors, on average 30 % lower than the emission factors used in GFED v3. Agricultural fire NOx emission factors were the highest, on average a factor of 2 higher than GFED v3 values. For savanna, woodland, and deforestation fires early dry season NOx emission factors were a factor of ~1.5–2.0 higher than late dry season emission factors. A minimum in the NOx emission factor seasonal cycle for deforestation fires occurred in August, the time period of severe drought in South America in 2005. Our results support the hypothesis that prolonged dry spells may lead to an increase in the contribution of smoldering combustion

  11. VLF Perturbations Associated with Solar Eclipses of November 2012 and may 2013 IN the South Pacific Region

    Kumar, S.; Kumar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-ionospheric VLF signals from the NWC (19.8 kHz), NPM (21.4 kHz) and NLK (24.8 kHz) MSK VLF transmitters are monitored at Suva, Fiji, with a time resolution of 0.1s using GPS based timing and SoftPAL VLF system. Here one minute averaged amplitude and phase data have been used for analysis. We present perturbations in VLF propagation and D-region changes associated with 13 November 2012 total solar eclipse (SE) and 9-10 May 2013 annular SE using VLF observations at Suva, Fiji. During 13-14 November 2012 total SE, the totality shadow intercepted NWC-Suva path and NWC signal amplitude and phase decreased by about 0.70 dB and 23°, respectively. NPM signal amplitude during 9-10 May 2013 SE decreased by about 2.0 dB. The amplitude perturbation of ~1.8 dB on NLK signal was measured from the unperturbed level associated with 9-10 May 2013 SE. The decrease in the amplitude at the site can be understood in terms of destructive interference of modes converted at the discontinuity created by the eclipse intercepting the different Transmitter-receiver great circle paths (TRGCPs) and changes in the propagation conditions along TRGCPs. The decrease in the amplitude and phase of NWC signal for 13-14 November 2012 SE has been modeled using Long Wave Propagation Capability code to estimate the changes in D-region reflection height (H') and sharpness factor (β) which shows that H' and β were increased by 0.95 km and 0.01 km-1, respectively. The phase changes on NWC signal associated with 9-10 May 2013 SE have been used to estimate the recombination coefficient value, for 75 km height where electron density reduction due to SE was about 40%. The changes in the D-region parameters and the electron density are due to sudden decrease of the photo-ionization creating nighttime like conditions in the D-region ionosphere.

  12. Emission of linalool from Valencia orange blossoms and its observation in ambient air

    Arey, Janet; Corchnoy, Stephanie B.; Atkinson, Roger

    Emission measurements made over a 5-month period of a Valencia orange tree showed the significant emission of the terpenoid linalool (C 10H 18O) from Valencia orange blossoms. The average annual emission rate of this Olinda Valencia orange, derived from emission measurements which include the blossoming season, is a factor of ˜10 higher than the average annual emission rate derived from measurements taken outside of the blossom season. Ambient monoterpene and linalool concentrations were measured in Riverside, California, in the spring and supported the chamber plant emissions data, with linalool concentrations as high as 17 μg m -3 being observed in an orange grove. These results show that current biogenic emission inventories which are formulated from limited survey data, generally not including seasonal variations in the vegetative emissions, can be subject to large uncertainties.

  13. The Search for VLF Precursors to Major Earthquakes: A Case Study with the M9.0 Earthquake of 11-Mar-2011 (Invited)

    Cohen, M.; Kosovichev, P.; Marshall, R. A.; Droscoll, A.; Scherrer, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    It has been proposed that Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio remote sensing may be used to detect ionospheric changes which may precede major earthquakes by hours or days. We report the results of a search for VLF precursors to the M9.0 Tohoku earthquake of 11-Mar-2011, the fifth most powerful earthquake in recorded history. Broadband and narrowband radio recordings were made at a site in Onagawa, Japan located ~102 km from the epicenter. The receiver operated for about two minutes after the start of the earthquake, after which the receiver lost power. Examination of the VLF data shows no radio emissions preceding or coincident with the onset of the earthquake. However, once the secondary seismic waves reached the receiver, a number of impulses and diffuse noise bands arose which may result from the entire power grid shaking or from radio emissions from compressing or fracturing rocks. Examination of the ELF data (0.2-1 kHz) shows no precursor effect in the hours preceding the seismic activity. We also examine the amplitudes of VLF subionospherically propagating transmitter signals going back months before the earthquake. We apply previously proposed techniques to extract properties of the diurnal amplitude profile that have been thought to correlate with earthquake precursors, but find no anomalous effect despite the remarkable intensity of the earthquake and proximity of the receiver to the epicenter. In general there are anomalous deviations but they cannot be reliably correlated with seismic activity. We also report the results of a global search for a lightning precursor effect on lightning flash rates, using the GLD360 network.

  14. Lion roar emissions observed by the CLUSTER and THEMIS spacecraft

    Krupar, V.; Santolik, O.; Maksimovic, M.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Angelopoulos, V.; Le Contel, O.; Bonnell, J.; Auster, U.

    2008-12-01

    Lion roars are intense, narrow-band whistler-mode emissions sporadically occurring in the Earth's magnetosheath. We present a statistical study based on the CLUSTER data recorded during years 2001 and 2005. We have used the spectral analyzer STAFF-SA which is processing signals from three magnetic and two electric sensors. Frequency and power properties of lion roars have been investigated and generally correspond to previous results. We have also studied their spatial distribution. We have compared the field-aligned component of the Poynting flux and the local magnetic field in order to predict the source region. Our result shows that lion roars are mainly propagating toward the Earth. We thus expect that the source region is more often close to the bow shock. The SCM and EFI instruments on-board THEMIS provide measurements of all six components of the magnetic and electric field. It allows us to investigate properties of lion roar emissions. We present case studies of selected events.

  15. Regional nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia observed from space

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R. J.; Zhang, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Due to changing economic activity, emissions of air pollutants in East Asia are changing rapidly in space and time. Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides derived from satellite observations provide valuable insight into the evolution of anthropogenic activity on a regional scale. We present the first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emissions of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a mesoscopic scale (~ 0.25° × 0.25°). The algorithm is used to construct a monthly NOx emission time series for the period 2007-2011 from tropospheric NO2 observations of GOME-2 for East Chinese provinces and surrounding countries. The new emission estimates correspond well with the bottom-up inventory of EDGAR v4.2, but are smaller than the inventories of INTEX-B and MEIC. They reveal a strong positive trend during 2007-2011 for almost all Chinese provinces, related to the country's economic development. We find a 41% increment of NOx emissions in East China during this period, which shows the need to update emission inventories in this region on a regular basis. Negative emission trends are found in Japan and South Korea, which can be attributed to a combined effect of local environmental policy and global economic crises. Analysis of seasonal variation distinguishes between regions with dominant anthropogenic or biogenic emissions. For regions with a mixed anthropogenic and biogenic signature, the opposite seasonality can be used for an estimation of the separate emission contributions. Finally, the non-local concentration/emission relationships calculated by the algorithm are used to quantify the direct effect of regional NOx emissions on tropospheric NO2 concentrations outside the region. For regions such as North Korea and the Beijing municipality, a substantial part of the tropospheric NO2 originates from emissions elsewhere.

  16. Regional nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia observed from space

    B. Mijling

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to changing economic activity, emissions of air pollutants in East Asia change rapidly in space and time. Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides derived from satellite observations provide valuable insight in the evolution of anthropogenic activity on a regional scale. We present the first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emissions of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a~mesoscopic scale (~ 0.25° × 0.25°. The algorithm is used to construct a monthly NOx emission time series for 2007–2011 from tropospheric NO2 observations of GOME-2 for East Chinese provinces and surrounding countries. The new emission estimates correspond well with the bottom-up inventory of EDGAR v4.2, but are smaller than the inventories of INTEX-B and MEIC. They reveal a strong positive trend during 2007–2011 for almost all Chinese provinces, related to the country's economic development. We find a 41% increment of NOx emissions in East China during this period, which shows the need to update emission inventories in this region on a regular basis. Negative emission trends are found in Japan and South Korea, which can be attributed to a combined effect of local environmental policy and global economic crises. Analysis of seasonal variation distinguishes between regions with dominant anthropogenic or biogenic emissions. For regions with a mixed anthropogenic and biogenic signature, the opposite seasonality can be used for an estimation of the separate emission contributions. Finally, the non-local concentration/emission relationships calculated by the algorithm are used to quantify the direct effect of regional NOx emissions on tropospheric NO2 concentrations outside the region. For regions such as North Korea and Beijing province, a substantial part of the tropospheric NO2 originates from emissions elsewhere.

  17. First observation of proton emission from 117La

    Soramel, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; Stroe, L.; Müller, L.; Bonetti, R.; Malerba, F.; Poli, G. L.; Boiano, C.; Andrighetto, A.; Li, Z. C.; Scarlassara, F.; Signorini, C.; Bello, A. Dal; Isocrate, R.; Liu, Z. H.; Ruan, M.; Ivascu, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Broude, C.

    2000-05-01

    We report the first measurement, at the XTU Tandem+LINAC accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, of the decay of the very neutron deficient nucleus 117La using a 310 MeV 58Ni beam on a 64Zn target; the 117La nucleus was populated via the (p, 4n) evaporation channel. The Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) was used to select M/q=117/30 recoils that were implanted in a (40×40) mm2 Double Sided Silicon Strip Detector (DSSD) detector. The analysis has revealed that 117La decays to 116Ba via proton emission with Ep=(783±6)keV and T1/2=(20±5) ms. From this result deformation parameters of β2=0.3 and β4=0.1 have been deduced for the 117La ground state which was assigned to Jπ=3/2+.

  18. Optimizing the emission inventory of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on network observations

    Chen, Sheng-Po; Liu, Wen-Tzu; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Chang, Julius S.; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2014-02-01

    Hourly observations of 56 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) performed by a network of photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) at 11 locations across Taiwan were used to evaluate 56 speciated emissions and the resulting simulations of an air quality model. Based on the PAMS observations at two urban sites, emission modification was made for the 56 PAMS species in the model. To further test the applicability of this emission correction approach, the same modified emissions were subject to seven different meteorological conditions and comparison with observations of all the 11 PAMS sites. Originally there was a minimum of only 8 of 56 species showed agreement with observations for the worst of the 11 PAMS sites and 28 of 56 species for the best site. With modified emissions, the number increased to 13-52 species across the 11 PAMS sites, demonstrating that the simple urban based correction procedure has broad applicability. When applying this modification of PAMS emissions to the simulations of other air quality gases, SO2 and NOx showed small changes compared with observations (-0.27% and -2.51%, respectively), while total VOC concentrations showed significant changes (+15.28%) as a result of the adjustment in VOC emissions (+26.7%). Although VOCs are the precursor of ozone, the relatively large changes in VOC did not seem to affect ozone formation to the similar extent, only resulting in the changes of average O3 by 2.9 ppb (+9.41%). It shows that although the emission modification improves individual VOC simulations, the performance in oxidant simulation is still largely unaltered. Although the original U.S. VOC emission profiles can capture the general features of ambient VOCs, further optimization of emissions may still be needed by referencing extensive observations, so that emissions can better fit domestic conditions and accuracy in model simulations can be improved.

  19. First Observation of Proton Emission from {sup 117}La

    Soramel, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; Stroe, L.; Muller, L.; Bonetti, R.; Malerba, F.; Poli, G.L.; Boiano, C.; Andrighetto, A.; Li, Z.C.; Scarlassara, F.; Signorini, C.; Dal Bello, A.; Isocrate, R.; Liu, Z.H.; Ruan, M.; Ivascu, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Broude, C.

    2000-12-31

    We report the first measurement, at the XTU Tandem + LINAC accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, of the decay of the very neutron deficient nucleus {sup 117}La using a 310 MeV {sup 58}Ni beam on a {sup 64}Zn target; the {sup 117}La nucleus was populated via the (p,4n) evaporation channel. The Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) was used to select M/q = 117/30 recoils that were implanted in a (40x40) mm{sup 2} Double Sided Silicon Strip Detector (DSSD) detector. The analysis has revealed that {sup 117}La decays to {sup 116}Ba via proton emission with E{sub p} = (783{+-}6)keV and T{sub 1/2} = (20{+-}5) ms. From this result deformation parameters of {beta}{sub 2} = 0.3 and {beta}{sub 4} = 0.1 have been deduced for the {sup 117}La ground state which was assigned to J{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +}.

  20. Evolution of chorus emissions into plasmaspheric hiss observed by Van Allen Probes

    Zhou, Qinghua; Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; He, Yihua; Wygant, J. R.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-05-01

    The two classes of whistler mode waves (chorus and hiss) play different roles in the dynamics of radiation belt energetic electrons. Chorus can efficiently accelerate energetic electrons, and hiss is responsible for the loss of energetic electrons. Previous studies have proposed that chorus is the source of plasmaspheric hiss, but this still requires an observational confirmation because the previously observed chorus and hiss emissions were not in the same frequency range in the same time. Here we report simultaneous observations form Van Allen Probes that chorus and hiss emissions occurred in the same range ˜300-1500 Hz with the peak wave power density about 10-5 nT2/Hz during a weak storm on 3 July 2014. Chorus emissions propagate in a broad region outside the plasmapause. Meanwhile, hiss emissions are confined inside the plasmasphere, with a higher intensity and a broader area at a lower frequency. A sum of bi-Maxwellian distribution is used to model the observed anisotropic electron distributions and to evaluate the instability of waves. A three-dimensional ray tracing simulation shows that a portion of chorus emission outside the plasmasphere can propagate into the plasmasphere and evolve into plasmaspheric hiss. Moreover, hiss waves below 1 kHz are more intense and propagate over a broader area than those above 1 kHz, consistent with the observation. The current results can explain distributions of the observed hiss emission and provide a further support for the mechanism of evolution of chorus into hiss emissions.

  1. Emission Flux Measurement Error with a Mobile DOAS System and Application to NOx Flux Observations.

    Wu, Fengcheng; Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Chen, Hao; Hu, Zhaokun; Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2017-01-25

    Mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (mobile DOAS) is an optical remote sensing method that can rapidly measure trace gas emission flux from air pollution sources (such as power plants, industrial areas, and cities) in real time. Generally, mobile DOAS is influenced by wind, drive velocity, and other factors, especially in the usage of wind field when the emission flux in a mobile DOAS system is observed. This paper presents a detailed error analysis and NOx emission with mobile DOAS system from a power plant in Shijiazhuang city, China. Comparison of the SO₂ emission flux from mobile DOAS observations with continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) under different drive speeds and wind fields revealed that the optimal drive velocity is 30-40 km/h, and the wind field at plume height is selected when mobile DOAS observations are performed. In addition, the total errors of SO₂ and NO₂ emissions with mobile DOAS measurements are 32% and 30%, respectively, combined with the analysis of the uncertainties of column density, wind field, and drive velocity. Furthermore, the NOx emission of 0.15 ± 0.06 kg/s from the power plant is estimated, which is in good agreement with that from CEMS observations of 0.17 ± 0.07 kg/s. This study has significantly contributed to the measurement of the mobile DOAS system on emission from air pollution sources, thus improving estimation accuracy.

  2. Emission Flux Measurement Error with a Mobile DOAS System and Application to NOx Flux Observations

    Fengcheng Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (mobile DOAS is an optical remote sensing method that can rapidly measure trace gas emission flux from air pollution sources (such as power plants, industrial areas, and cities in real time. Generally, mobile DOAS is influenced by wind, drive velocity, and other factors, especially in the usage of wind field when the emission flux in a mobile DOAS system is observed. This paper presents a detailed error analysis and NOx emission with mobile DOAS system from a power plant in Shijiazhuang city, China. Comparison of the SO2 emission flux from mobile DOAS observations with continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS under different drive speeds and wind fields revealed that the optimal drive velocity is 30–40 km/h, and the wind field at plume height is selected when mobile DOAS observations are performed. In addition, the total errors of SO2 and NO2 emissions with mobile DOAS measurements are 32% and 30%, respectively, combined with the analysis of the uncertainties of column density, wind field, and drive velocity. Furthermore, the NOx emission of 0.15 ± 0.06 kg/s from the power plant is estimated, which is in good agreement with that from CEMS observations of 0.17 ± 0.07 kg/s. This study has significantly contributed to the measurement of the mobile DOAS system on emission from air pollution sources, thus improving estimation accuracy.

  3. Emission Flux Measurement Error with a Mobile DOAS System and Application to NOx Flux Observations

    Wu, Fengcheng; Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Chen, Hao; Hu, Zhaokun; Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2017-01-01

    Mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (mobile DOAS) is an optical remote sensing method that can rapidly measure trace gas emission flux from air pollution sources (such as power plants, industrial areas, and cities) in real time. Generally, mobile DOAS is influenced by wind, drive velocity, and other factors, especially in the usage of wind field when the emission flux in a mobile DOAS system is observed. This paper presents a detailed error analysis and NOx emission with mobile DOAS system from a power plant in Shijiazhuang city, China. Comparison of the SO2 emission flux from mobile DOAS observations with continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) under different drive speeds and wind fields revealed that the optimal drive velocity is 30–40 km/h, and the wind field at plume height is selected when mobile DOAS observations are performed. In addition, the total errors of SO2 and NO2 emissions with mobile DOAS measurements are 32% and 30%, respectively, combined with the analysis of the uncertainties of column density, wind field, and drive velocity. Furthermore, the NOx emission of 0.15 ± 0.06 kg/s from the power plant is estimated, which is in good agreement with that from CEMS observations of 0.17 ± 0.07 kg/s. This study has significantly contributed to the measurement of the mobile DOAS system on emission from air pollution sources, thus improving estimation accuracy. PMID:28125054

  4. ELF/VLF wave generation from the beating of two HF ionospheric heating sources

    Cohen, M. B.; Moore, R. C.; Golkowski, M.; Lehtinen, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established that Extremely Low Frequency (ELF, 0.3-3 kHz) and Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio waves can be generated via modulated High Frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) heating of the lower ionosphere (60-100 km). The ionospheric absorption of HF power modifies the conductivity of the lower ionosphere, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, creates an `antenna in the sky.' We utilize a theoretical model of the HF to ELF/VLF conversion and the ELF/VLF propagation, and calculate the amplitudes of the generated ELF/VLF waves when two HF heating waves, separated by the ELF/VLF frequency, are transmitted from two adjacent locations. The resulting ELF/VLF radiation pattern exhibits a strong directional dependence (as much as 15 dB) that depends on the physical spacing of the two HF sources. This beat wave source can produce signals 10-20 dB stronger than those generated using amplitude modulation, particularly for frequencies greater than 5-10 kHz. We evaluate recent suggestions that beating two HF waves generates ELF/VLF waves in the F-region (>150 km), and conclude that those experimental results may have misinterpreted, and can be explained strictly by the much more well established D region mechanism.

  5. Factorization of air pollutant emissions: projections versus observed trends in Europe.

    Rafaj, Peter; Amann, Markus; Siri, José G

    2014-10-01

    This paper revisits the emission scenarios of the European Commission's 2005 Thematic Strategy on Air Pollution (TSAP) in light of today's knowledge. We review assumptions made in the past on the main drivers of emission changes, i.e., demographic trends, economic growth, changes in the energy intensity of GDP, fuel-switching, and application of dedicated emission control measures. Our analysis shows that for most of these drivers, actual trends have not matched initial expectations. Observed ammonia and sulfur emissions in European Union in 2010 were 10% to 20% lower than projected, while emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter exceeded estimates by 8% to 15%. In general, a higher efficiency of dedicated emission controls compensated for a lower-than-expected decline in total energy consumption as well as a delay in the phase-out of coal. For 2020, updated projections anticipate lower sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions than those under the 2005 baseline, whereby the degree to which these emissions are lower depends on what assumptions are made for emission controls and new vehicle standards. Projected levels of particulates are about 10% higher, while smaller differences emerge for other pollutants. New emission projections suggest that environmental targets established by the TSAP for the protection of human health, eutrophication and forest acidification will not be met without additional measures.

  6. Directly observing continuum emission from self-gravitating spiral waves

    Hall, Cassandra; Rice, Ken; Harries, Tim J; Klaassen, Pamela D; Biller, Beth

    2016-01-01

    We use a simple, self-consistent, self-gravitating semi-analytic disc model to conduct an examination of the parameter space in which self-gravitating discs may exist. We then use Monte-Carlo radiative transfer to generate synthetic ALMA images of these self-gravitating discs to determine the subset of this parameter space in which they generate non-axisymmetric structure that is potentially detectable by ALMA. Recently, several transition discs have been observed to have non-axisymmetric structure that extends out to large radii. It has been suggested that one possible origin of these asymmetries could be spiral density waves induced by disc self-gravity. We use our simple model to see if these discs exist in the region of parameter space where self-gravity could feasibly explain these spiral features. We find that for self-gravity to play a role in these systems typically requires a disc mass around an order of magnitude higher than the observed disc masses for the systems. The spiral amplitudes produced by...

  7. Solution uniquity of an inverse VLF problem: A case-study of the polar, ground-based, VLF radio signal disturbances caused by the ultra-energetic relativistic electron precipitations and of their southern boundaries

    Remenets, G. F.; Astafiev, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Here we present the results of a case study of the rare, abnormal, qualitatively specific behavior of Aldra (northern Norway) and GBR (UK) VLF transmitter signals (10-16 kHz) received at Kola Peninsula. The abnormal amplitude and the phase disturbances of signals were used as a proxy for ultra-energetic relativistic (solar?) electron precipitation (URE, ∼100 MeV) into the middle polar atmosphere. The disturbances have been observed under quiet or moderately disturbed geomagnetic activity. Based on bearing results, it was established that the abnormal variations of the electric conductivity of ionized middle atmosphere (of a sporadic Ds layer under the regular ionosphere D layer) were characterized by the following: (i) the time function of height h(t) of an effective spherical waveguide between the Earth surface and the sporadic Ds layer shows a minimum value equal to ∼30 km and (ii) the reflection coefficient R(t) of radio wave with a grazing angle of incidence from a virtual boundary with height h(t) has a minimum value equal to ∼0.4. The southern boundaries of the ultra-energetic relativistic electron precipitations have been found as well. They turned out to be not southerly than 61 degree of magnetic latitude and similar to the ones obtained in our previous study of the events for other dates under the similar geophysical conditions although we do not know anything definite about the rigidity and density of the electron fluxes. A used calculation method of analysis is based on a necessary condition that a number n of input data should be greater than a number m of output parameter-functions. We have stated by numerical testing that a decrease of n from 6 to 4 generates a lack of uniqueness of an inverse VLF problem solution for m = 2. It is important for future VLF ground-based monitoring of the URE precipitation events.

  8. The observation of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions in the laboratory and in the night airglow

    W. F. J. Evans

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding of an orange spectral feature in OSIRIS/Odin spectra of the night airglow near 87 km has raised interest in the origin of the emission. The feature was positively identified as the chemiluminescent FeO* emission where the iron is of meteoric origin. Since the meteorite source of atomic metals in the mesosphere contains both iron and nickel, with Ni being typically 6 % of Fe, it is expected that faint emissions involving Ni should also be present in the night airglow. The present study summarizes the laboratory observations of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions and includes a search for the NiO* signature in the night airglow. A very faint previously unidentified "continuum" extending longwave of 440 nm has been detected in the night airglow spectra obtained with two space-borne limb viewing instruments. Through a comparison with laboratory spectra this continuum is identified as arising from the NiO* emission. The altitude profile of the new airglow emission has also been measured. The similarity of the altitude profiles of the FeO* and NiO* emissions also suggests the emission is NiO as both can originate from reaction of the metal atoms with mesospheric ozone. The observed NiO* to FeO* ratio exhibits considerable variability; possible causes of this observed variation are briefly discussed.

  9. Assessing Greenhouse Gas emissions in the Greater Toronto Area using atmospheric observations (Invited)

    Vogel, F. R.; Chan, E.; Huang, L.; Levin, I.; Worthy, D.

    2013-12-01

    Urban areas are said to be responsible for approximately 75% of anthropogenic Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) emissions while comprising only two percent of the land area [1]. This limited spatial expansion should facilitate a monitoring of anthropogenic GHGs from atmospheric observations. As major sources of emissions, cities also have a huge potential to drive emissions reductions. To effectively manage emissions, cities must however, first measure and report these publicly [2]. Modelling studies and measurements of CO2 from fossil fuel burning (FFCO2) in densely populated areas does, however, pose several challenges: Besides continuous in-situ observations, i.e. finding an adequate atmospheric transport model, a sufficiently fine-grained FFCO2 emission model and the proper background reference observations to distinguish the large-scale from the local/urban contributions to the observed FFCO2 concentration offsets ( ΔFFCO2) are required. Pilot studies which include the data from two 'sister sites*' in the vicinity of Toronto, Canada helped to derive flux estimates for Non-CO2 GHGs [3] and improve our understanding of urban FFCO2 emissions. Our 13CO2 observations reveal that the contribution of natural gas burning (mostly due to domestic heating) account for 80%×7% of FFCO2 emissions in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) during winter. Our 14CO2 observations in the GTA, furthermore, show that the local offset of CO2 (ΔCO2) between our two sister sites can be largely attributed to urban FFCO2 emissions. The seasonal cycle of the observed ΔFFCO2 in Toronto, combined with high-resolution atmospheric modeling, helps to independently assess the contribution from different emission sectors (transportation, primary energy and industry, domestic heating) as predicted by a dedicated city-scale emission inventory, which deviates from a UNFCCC-based inventory. [1] D. Dodman. 2009. Blaming cities for climate change? An analysis of urban greenhouse gas emissions inventories

  10. Gamma Ray and Very Low Frequency Radio Observations from a Balloon-Borne Platform

    Quinn, C.; Sheldon, A.; Cully, C. M.; Davalos, A.; Osakwe, C.; Galts, D.; Delfin, J.; Duffin, C.; Mansell, J.; Russel, M.; Bootsma, M.; Williams, R.; Patrick, M.; Mazzino, M. L.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Calgary's Student Organization for Aerospace Research (SOAR) built an instrument to participate in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) initiative organized by Louisiana State University and supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office (BPO) and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSPACE). The HASP platform will be launched in early September 2015 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico and will reach heights of 36 kilometers with a flight duration of 15 to 20 hours. The instrument, Atmospheric Phenomenon Observer Gamma/VLF Emissions Experiment (APOGEE), measures Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and sferics from lightning strikes with the use of Geiger tubes and a VLF detector. TGFs, which are quick bursts of high energy radiation that can occur alongside lightning, are believed to be the result of Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA). RREA occurs when a large number of relativistic electrons overcome atmospheric frictional forces and accelerate to relativistic velocities which excite secondary electrons that collide with the atmosphere causing bremsstrahlung radiation. Lightning strikes also produce sferics within the Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) bands which can be detected and used to locate the strikes. The goal of APOGEE is to further investigate the link between TGFs and RREA. These phenomena are very difficult to measure together as Bremsstrahlung radiation is easily detected from space but ionospheric reflection facilitates surface detection of sferics. A high altitude balloon provides a unique opportunity to study both phenomena using one instrument because both phenomena can easily be detected from its altitude. APOGEE has been designed and built by undergraduate students at the University of Calgary with faculty assistance and funding, and is equipped with three devices for data collection: a camera to have visual conformation of events, a series of Geiger Tubes to obtain directional gamma readings, and

  11. Observing the Plasma-Physical Processes of Pulsar Radio Emission with Arecibo

    Rankin, Joanna M.

    2017-01-01

    With their enormous densities and fields, neutron stars entail some of the most exotic physics in the cosmos. Similarly, the physical mechanisms of pulsar radio emission are no less exotic, and we are only now beginning to understand them. The talk will provide an introduction to the phenomenology of radio pulsar emission and focus on those aspects of the exquisite Arecibo observations that bear on their challenging emission physics.The commonalities of the radio beamforms of most slow pulsars (and some millisecond pulsars) argue strongly that their magnetic fields have a nearly dipolar structure at the height of their radio emission regions. These heights can often be determined by aberration/retardation analyses. Similarly, measurement of the orientation of the polarized radio emission with respect to the emitting magnetic field facilitates identification of the physical(X/O) emission modes and study of the plasma coupling to the electromagnetic radiation.While the physics of primary plasma generation above the pulsar polar cap is only beginning to be understood, it is clear that the radio pulsars we see are able to generate copious amounts of electron-positron plasma in their emission regions. Within the nearly dipolar field structure of these emission regions, the plasma density is near to that of the Goldreich-Julian model, and so the physical conditions in these regions can be accurately estimated.These conditions show that the plasma frequencies in the emission regions are much higher than the frequency of the emitted radiation, such that the plasma couples most easily to the extraordinary mode as observed. Therefore, the only surviving emission mechanism is curvature radiation from charged solitons, produced by the two-stream instability. Such soliton emission has probably been observed directly in the Crab pulsar; however, a physical theory of charged soliton radiation does not yet exist.

  12. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; Molina, M. J.; Molina, L. T.

    2009-01-01

    The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio. This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM) and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM) in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with NOx emission reductions and decrease linearly with VOC emission reductions only up to 30% from the

  13. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    M. Zavala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NOx suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio.

    This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with

  14. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    M. Zavala

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NOx suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio.

    This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with

  15. Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

  16. Spitzer observations of the thermal emission from WASP-43b

    Blecic, Jasmina; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Stevenson, Kevin B; Hardy, Ryan A; Cubillos, Patricio E; Hardin, Matthew; Nymeyer, Sarah; Anderson, David R; Hellier, Coel; Smith, Alexis M S; Cameron, Andrew Collier

    2013-01-01

    WASP-43b (Hellier et al.; Gillon et al.) is one of the closest-orbiting hot Jupiters, with a semimajor axis a = 0.01526 +/- 0.00018 AU and a period of only 0.81 days. However, it orbits one of the coolest stars with a hot Jupiter (K7V, Tstar = 4520 +/- 120 K), giving the planet a modest equilibrium temperature of Teq = 1440 +/- 40 K, assuming zero Bond albedo and uniform planetary energy redistribution. This has resulted in strong signal-to-noise-ratio (S/N) observations and deep eclipses in both Warm Spitzer channels (3.6 and 4.5 microns). The eclipse depths and brightness temperatures from our jointly fit model are 0.346 +/- 0.013% and 1684 +/- 24 K at 3.6 microns and 0.382 +/- 0.015% and 1485 +/- 24 K at 4.5 microns. The eclipse timings improved the estimate of the orbital period, P, by a factor of three (P = 0.81347459 +/- 2.1x10-7 days) compared to Gillon et al. and put an upper limit on the eccentricity (e = 0.007+0.013-0.004). We use our Spitzer eclipse depths with two previously reported ground-based ...

  17. Resistivity soundings and VLF profiles for siting groundwater wells in a fractured basement aquifer in the Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    Ammar, A. I.; Kruse, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal shortages of groundwater are common in parts of the Arabian Shield, where complex basement hydrogeology can make siting of water wells difficult. To identify optimal production well locations, six 200-400 m-long Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic traverses and ten Vertical Electrical Soundings (VESes) were run at the western edge of the Arabian Shield near At-Taif town, Saudi Arabia. Here wadi sediments overlie fractured Precambrian basement, which in turn overlies unfractured basement. The fractured basement forms the water supply aquifer. Both VLF and VES data indicate significant lateral heterogeneity in the electrical conductivity of both wadi and basement deposits over lengths scales as small as ∼100 m. VES results correlate closely with data from two wells in the study area. The change in resistivity at the wadi-to-fractured basement contact is relatively subtle, but the transition from low resistivity fractured basement to high resistivity unfractured basement is well resolved. Inferred wadi thicknesses range from 0 to 14 m; the electrically conductive fractured basement extends from wadi down to 12-32 m depth. VES data indicate the fractured basement aquifer thickens progressively to the south in this area. A production well, sited on the basis of the VES analysis, successfully yielded 70m3/day. The relationship between VLF and VES data is complex, suggesting that the terrain is heterogeneous on the scale of the different effective sampling volumes of the two methods, and/or that fracture azimuth is locally heterogeneous. Overall resistivities in this study are similar to those observed at other locations in Saudi Arabia, suggesting these methods may be widely applicable for siting of groundwater wells in the complex basement of the Arabian Shield.

  18. Electric and VLF-MT survey of Tegatayama tunnel; Tegatayama tunnel no denki tansa oyobi VLF tansa

    Nishitani, T. [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Mining College

    1997-05-27

    To survey the structure at the depth between 20 and 30 m, field tests were conducted by means of vertical electric and VFL-MT (magnetotelluric) survey. Tegatayama tunnel has a total length of 276 m, width of 7.5 m, and height of 4.7 m, and the depth from the surface is about 28 m near the top of mountain. Near the tunnel, the thickness of surface soil is about 60 cm, which consists of clay soil including soft mudstone gravel. It was found that terrace deposit is distributed up to the depth of 8 m, and that mudstone is distributed below the depth of 8 m. Weighted four-electrode method was adopted for the vertical electrical survey. Measurements were conducted at the immediately above the tunnel, 10 m apart from the center of tunnel in the right and left, and 20 m apart from the center in the east. For the VLF-MT method, component of frequency 22.2 kHz was used. As a result of the tests, it was difficult to illustrate the existence of tunnel from the vertical electrical survey only at one point. Feature of the tunnel could be well illustrated by means of the VLF-MT method. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  19. VSA Observations of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus Region

    Tibbs, Christopher T; Dickinson, Clive; Davies, Rodney D; Davis, Richard J; del Burgo, Carlos; Franzen, Thomas M O; Génova-Santos, Ricardo; Grainge, Keith; Hobson, Michael P; Padilla-Torres, Carmen P; Rebolo, Rafael; Rubiño-Martín, Jóse Alberto; Saunders, Richard D E; Scaife, Anna M M; Scott, Paul F

    2009-01-01

    The dust feature G159.6--18.5 in the Perseus region has previously been observed with the COSMOSOMAS experiment \\citep{Watson:05} on angular scales of $\\approx$ 1$^{\\circ}$, and was found to exhibit anomalous microwave emission. We present new observations of this dust feature, performed with the Very Small Array (VSA) at 33 GHz, to help increase the understanding of the nature of this anomalous emission. On the angular scales observed with the VSA ($\\approx$ 10 -- 40$^{\\prime}$), G159.6--18.5 consists of five distinct components, each of which have been individually analysed. All five of these components are found to exhibit an excess of emission at 33 GHz, and are found to be highly correlated with far-infrared emission. We provide evidence that each of these compact components have anomalous emission that is consistent with electric dipole emission from very small, rapidly rotating dust grains. These components contribute $\\approx$ 10 % to the flux density of the diffuse extended emission detected by COSMO...

  20. Patterns in atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols in China: emission estimates and observed concentrations

    H. Cui

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available China is experiencing severe carbonaceous aerosol pollution driven mainly by large emissions resulting from intensive use of solid fuels. To gain a better understanding of the levels and trends of carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resulting ambient concentrations at the national scale, we update an emission inventory of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC and employ existing observational studies to analyze characteristics of these aerosols including temporal, spatial, and size distributions, and the levels and shares of secondary organic carbon (SOC in total OC. We further use ground observations to test the levels and inter-annual trends of the calculated national and provincial emissions of carbonaceous aerosols, and propose possible improvements in emission estimation for the future. The national OC emissions are estimated to have increased 29% from 2000 (2127 Gg to 2012 (2749 Gg and EC by 37% (from 1356 to 1857 Gg. The residential, industrial, and transportation sectors contributed an estimated 76 ± 2, 19 ± 2 and 5 ± 1% of the total emissions of OC, respectively, and 52 ± 3, 32 ± 2 and 16 ± 2% of EC. Updated emission factors based on the most recent local field measurements, particularly for biofuel stoves, lead to considerably lower emissions of OC compared to previous inventories. Compiling observational data across the country, higher concentrations of OC and EC are found in northern and inland cities, while larger OC/EC and SOC/OC ratios are found in southern cities, due to the joint effects of primary emissions and meteorology. Higher SOC/OC ratios are estimated at rural and remote sites compared to urban ones, attributed to more emissions of OC from biofuel use, more biogenic emissions of volatile organic compound (VOC precursors to SOC, and/or transport of aged aerosols. For most sites, higher concentrations of OC, EC, and SOC are observed in colder seasons, while SOC/OC is reduced, particularly at

  1. Jiamusi Pulsar Observations: I. Abnormal emission events of PSR B0919+06

    Han, Jun; Peng, Ling-Xiang; Tang, De-Yu; Wang, Jun; Li, Jun-Qiang; Wang, Chen; Yu, Ye-Zhao; Dong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    PSR B0919+06 generally radiates radio pulses in a normal phase range. It has been known for its occasional perplexing abnormal emission events wherein individual pulses come to an earlier phase range for a few tens of periods and then returns to its usual phase. Heretofore, only a few such events have been available for study. We observed PSR B0919+06 for about 30 hours using the Jiamusi 66-m telescope at Jiamusi Deep Space Station at S-band, and detected 92 abnormal emission events. We identify four types of events based on the abrupted or gradual phase-shifting of individual pulses. The abnormal emission events are seen to occur randomly some every 1000 to 3000 periods, and they affect the leading edge of the mean profile by up to 2\\% in amplitude. The abnormal emission events are probably related to gradual changes of emission processing in the pulsar magnetosphere.

  2. Observations of oxidation products above a forest imply biogenic emissions of very reactive compounds

    R. Holzinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical gradients of mixing ratios of volatile organic compounds have been measured in a Ponderosa pine forest in Central California (38.90° N, 120.63° W, 1315m. These measurements reveal large quantities of previously unreported oxidation products of short lived biogenic precursors. The emission of biogenic precursors must be in the range of 13-66µmol m-2h-1 to produce the observed oxidation products. That is 6-30 times the emissions of total monoterpenes observed above the forest canopy on a molar basis. These reactive precursors constitute a large fraction of biogenic emissions at this site, and are not included in current emission inventories. When oxidized by ozone they should efficiently produce secondary aerosol and hydroxyl radicals.

  3. Observations of a seasonal cycle in NOx emissions from fires in the African savanna

    Mebust, A. K.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from wildfires account for ~15% of the global total, inducing large fluctuations in the chemical production and loss rates of O3 and CH4 and thereby affecting Earth's radiative balance. NOx emissions from fires depend on fuel N content, combustion stage, and total biomass burned; sparse observations limit current understanding of the variability in these factors across biomes. Here we use satellite-based measurements to study emission coefficients (ECs), a value proportional to emission factors i.e. NOx emitted per unit of biomass burned, from fires in African savannas. NOx ECs decrease steadily across the fire season, rather than remaining constant as is currently assumed. We speculate that this is due to reallocation of nutrients, including N, to plant roots after the growing season. We account for the observed cycle in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to show the impacts on monthly tropospheric ozone.

  4. O vi Emission from the Supernovae-regulated Interstellar Medium: Simulation versus Observation

    Li, Miao; Bryan, Greg L.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2017-01-01

    The O vi λλ1032, 1038 Å doublet emission traces collisionally ionized gas with T≈ {10}5.5 K, where the cooling curve peaks for metal-enriched plasma. This warm-hot phase is usually not well-resolved in numerical simulations of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM), but can be responsible for a significant fraction of the emitted energy. Comparing simulated O vi emission to observations is therefore a valuable test of whether simulations predict reasonable cooling rates from this phase. We calculate O vi λ1032 Å emission, assuming collisional ionization equilibrium, for our small-box simulations of the stratified ISM regulated by supernovae. We find that the agreement is very good for our solar neighborhood model, both in terms of emission flux and mean O vi density seen in absorption. We explore runs with higher surface densities and find that, in our simulations, the O vi emission from the disk scales roughly linearly with the star formation rate. Observations of O vi emission are rare for external galaxies, but our results do not show obvious inconsistency with the existing data. Assuming the solar metallicity, O vi emission from the galaxy disk in our simulations accounts for roughly 0.5% of supernovae heating.

  5. VSA Observations of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus Region

    2009-01-01

    The dust feature G159.6--18.5 in the Perseus region has previously been observed with the COSMOSOMAS experiment \\citep{Watson:05} on angular scales of $\\approx$ 1$^{\\circ}$, and was found to exhibit anomalous microwave emission. We present new observations of this dust feature, performed with the Very Small Array (VSA) at 33 GHz, to help increase the understanding of the nature of this anomalous emission. On the angular scales observed with the VSA ($\\approx$ 10 -- 40$^{\\prime}$), G159.6--18....

  6. On the emissivity of wire-grid polarizers for astronomical observations at mm-wavelengths

    Schillaci, Alessandro; Alessandro, Giuseppe D'; de Bernardis, Paolo; Masi, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    We have measured, using a custom setup, the emissivity of metallic wire-grids, suitable for polarimeters and interferometers at mm and far infrared wavelengths. We find that the effective emissivity of these devices is of the order of a few %, depending on fabrication technology and aging. We discuss their use in astronomical instruments, with special attention to Martin Puplett Interferometers in low-background applications, like astronomical observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  7. Biomass burning emissions estimated with a global fire assimilation system based on observed fire radiative power

    Kaiser, J.W.; Heil, A.; Andreae, M.O.; Benedetti, A.; Chubarova, N.; Jones, L.; Morcrette, J.J.; Razinger, M.; Schultz, M.G.; Suttie, M.; Werf, van der G.R.

    2012-01-01

    The Global Fire Assimilation System (GFASv1.0) calculates biomass burning emissions by assimilating Fire Radiative Power (FRP) observations from the MODIS instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. It corrects for gaps in the observations, which are mostly due to cloud cover, and filters spu

  8. Atmospheric observations and emissions estimates of methane and nitrous oxide from regional to global scale

    Kort, Eric Adam

    2011-12-01

    Methane (CH4) and Nitrous Oxide (N2O) are the two most significant anthropogenic, long-lived, non-CO2 greenhouse gases, together perturbing the earth's energy balance by an amount comparable to that of CO2. This dissertation will focus on the use of atmospheric observations to quantify emissions of CH4 and N2O. First top-down emissions constraints on the regional scale, covering large areas of the U.S and southern Canada, are derived from airborne observations made in Spring of 2003. Using a receptor-oriented Lagrangian particle dispersion model provides robust validation of bottom-up emission estimates from EDGAR 32FT2000 and GEIA inventories. It is found that EDGAR CH4 emission rates are slightly low by a factor of 1.08 +/- 0.15 (2 sigma), while both EDGAR and GEIA N2O emissions are significantly too low, by factors of 2.62 +/- 0.50 and 3.05 +/- 0.61 respectively. This analysis is then extended over a full calendar year in 2004 with observations from NOAA's tall tower and aircraft profile network. EDGAR 32FT2000 CH 4 emissions are found to be consistent with observations, though the newer EDGAR v4.0 reduces CH4 emissions by 30%, and this reduction is not consistent with this study. Scaling factors found for N2O in May/June of 2003 (2.62 & 3.05) are found to hold for February-May of 2004, suggesting inventories are significantly too low in primary growing season coincident with significant fertilizer inputs. A new instrument for airborne observation of CO2, CH 4, N2O, and CO is introduced, and its operation and in-field performance are highlighted (demonstrated 1-sec precisions of 20 ppb, 0.5 ppb, 0.09 ppb, and 0.15 ppb respectively). Finally, global N2O observations collected with this sensor on the HIPPO (Hlaper Pole to Pole Observations) campaign are assessed. Comparison with a global model and subsequent inversion indicates strong, episodic inputs of nitrous oxide from tropical regions are necessary to bring observations and model in agreement. Findings

  9. Estimating Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) emissions in China using atmospheric observations and inverse modeling

    Fang, X.; Thompson, R.; Saito, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Li, S.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Graziosi, F.; Stohl, A.

    2013-12-01

    With a global warming potential of around 22800 over a 100-year time horizon, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the greenhouse gases regulated under the Kyoto Protocol. Global SF6 emissions have been increasing since circa the year 2000. The reason for this increase has been inferred to be due to rapidly increasing emissions in developing countries that are not obligated to report their annual emissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, notably China. In this study, SF6 emissions during the period 2006-2012 for China and other East Asian countries were determined using in-situ atmospheric measurements and inverse modeling. We performed various inversion sensitivity tests, which show the largest uncertainties in the a posteriori Chinese emissions are associated with the a priori emissions used and their uncertainty, the station network, as well as the meteorological input data. The overall relative uncertainty of the a posteriori emissions in China is estimated to be 17% in 2008. Based on sensitivity tests, we employed the optimal parameters in our inversion setup and performed yearly inversions for the study period. Inversion results show that the total a posteriori SF6 emissions from China increased from 1420 × 245 Mg/yr in 2006 to 2741 × 472 Mg/yr in 2009 and stabilized thereafter. The rapid increase in emissions reflected a fast increase in SF6 consumption in China, a result also found in bottom-up estimates. The a posteriori emission map shows high emissions concentrated in populated parts of China. During the period 2006-2012, emissions in northwestern and northern China peaked around the year 2009, while emissions in eastern, central and northeastern China grew gradually during almost the whole period. Fluctuating emissions are observed for southwestern China. These regional differences should be caused by changes of provincial SF6 usage and by shifts of usage among different sectors. Fig. 1. Footprint emission sensitivity

  10. Earth observations for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation in developing countries

    DeFries, R. [Department of Geography and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Achard, F. [Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission 21020 Ispra, VA (Italy); Brown, S. [Winrock International, Ecosystem Services Unit 1621 N. Kent Street, Suite 1200, Arlington, VA 22207 (United States); Herold, M. [Department of Geography, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Loebdergraben 32, 07743 Jena (Germany); Murdiyarso, D. [Center for International Forestry Research, P.O. Box 6596, JKPWB, Jakarta 10065 (Indonesia); Schlamadinger, B. [Joanneum Research, Elisabethstrasse 5, 8010 Graz (Austria); De Souza, C. Jr [Instituto Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazonia, Imazon, Caixa Postal 5101, Belem, PA 66613-397 (Brazil)

    2007-06-15

    In response to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process investigating the technical issues surrounding the ability to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from deforestation in developing countries, this paper reviews technical capabilities for monitoring deforestation and estimating emissions. Implementation of policies to reduce emissions from deforestation require effective deforestation monitoring systems that are reproducible, provide consistent results, meet standards for mapping accuracy, and can be implemented at the national level. Remotely sensed data supported by ground observations are key to effective monitoring. Capacity in developing countries for deforestation monitoring is well-advanced in a few countries and is a feasible goal in most others. Data sources exist to determine base periods in the 1990s as historical reference points. Forest degradation (e.g. from high impact logging and fragmentation) also contribute to greenhouse gas emissions but it is more technically challenging to measure than deforestation. Data on carbon stocks, which are needed to estimate emissions, cannot currently be observed directly over large areas with remote sensing. Guidelines for carbon accounting from deforestation exist and are available in approved Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports and can be applied at national scales in the absence of forest inventory or other data. Key constraints for implementing programs to monitor greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation are international commitment of resources to increase capacity, coordination of observations to ensure pan-tropical coverage, access to free or low-cost data, and standard and consensual protocols for data interpretation and analysis.

  11. The impact of PMSE and NLC particles on VLF propagation

    D. Nunn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available PMSE or Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes are a well-known phenomenon in the summer northern polar regions, in which anomalous VHF/UHF radar echoes are returned from heights ~85km. Noctilucent clouds and electron density biteouts are two phenomena that sometimes occur together with PMSE. Electron density biteouts are electron density depletion layers of up to 90%, which may be several kms thick. Using the NOSC Modefndr code based on Wait's modal theory for subionospheric propagation, we calculate the shifts in received VLF amplitude and phase that occur as a result of electron density biteouts. The code assumes a homogeneous background ionosphere and a homogeneous biteout layer along the Great Circle Path (GCP corridor, for transmitter receiver path lengths in the range of 500–6000km.

    For profiles during the 10h about midnight and under quiet geomagnetic conditions, where the electron density at 85km would normally be less than 500el/cc, it was found that received signal perturbations were significant, of the order of 1–4dB and 5–40° of phase. Perturbation amplitudes increase roughly as the square root of frequency. At short range perturbations are rather erratic, but more consistent at large ranges, readily interpretable in terms of the shifts in excitation factor, attenuation factor and v/c ratios for Wait's modes. Under these conditions such shifts should be detectable by a well constituted experiment involving multiple paths and multiple frequencies in the north polar region in summer. It is anticipated that VLF propagation could be a valuable diagnostic for biteout/PMSE when electron density at 85km is under 500el/cc, under which circumstances PMSE are not directly detectable by VHF/UHF radars.

    Key words. Electromagnetism (wave propagation – Ionosphere (polar ionosphere – Radioscience (ionospheric propagation

  12. One day prediction of nighttime VLF amplitudes using nonlinear autoregression and neural network modeling

    Santosa, H.; Hobara, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The electric field amplitude of very low frequency (VLF) transmitter from Hawaii (NPM) has been continuously recorded at Chofu (CHF), Tokyo, Japan. The VLF amplitude variability indicates lower ionospheric perturbation in the D region (60-90 km altitude range) around the NPM-CHF propagation path. We carried out the prediction of daily nighttime mean VLF amplitude by using Nonlinear Autoregressive with Exogenous Input Neural Network (NARX NN). The NARX NN model, which was built based on the daily input variables of various physical parameters such as stratospheric temperature, total column ozone, cosmic rays, Dst, and Kp indices possess good accuracy during the model building. The fitted model was constructed within the training period from 1 January 2011 to 4 February 2013 by using three algorithms, namely, Bayesian Neural Network (BRANN), Levenberg Marquardt Neural Network (LMANN), and Scaled Conjugate Gradient (SCG). The LMANN has the largest Pearson correlation coefficient (r) of 0.94 and smallest root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.19 dB. The constructed models by using LMANN were applied to predict the VLF amplitude from 5 February 2013 to 31 December 2013. As a result the one step (1 day) ahead predicted nighttime VLF amplitude has the r of 0.93 and RMSE of 2.25 dB. We conclude that the model built according to the proposed methodology provides good predictions of the electric field amplitude of VLF waves for NPM-CHF (midlatitude) propagation path.

  13. Simultaneous ground- and satellite-based observation of MF/HF auroral radio emissions

    Sato, Yuka; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Katoh, Yuto; Shinbori, Atsuki; Kadokura, Akira; Ogawa, Yasunobu

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first simultaneous measurements of medium-high frequency (MF/HF) auroral radio emissions (above 1 MHz) by ground- and satellite-based instruments. Observational data were obtained by the ground-based passive receivers in Iceland and Svalbard, and by the Plasma Waves and Sounder experiment (PWS) mounted on the Akebono satellite. We observed two simultaneous appearance events, during which the frequencies of the auroral roar and MF bursts detected at ground level were different from those of the terrestrial hectometric radiation (THR) observed by the Akebono satellite passing over the ground-based stations. This frequency difference confirms that auroral roar and THR are generated at different altitudes across the F peak. We did not observe any simultaneous observations that indicated an identical generation region of auroral roar and THR. In most cases, MF/HF auroral radio emissions were observed only by the ground-based detector, or by the satellite-based detector, even when the satellite was passing directly over the ground-based stations. A higher detection rate was observed from space than from ground level. This can primarily be explained in terms of the idea that the Akebono satellite can detect THR emissions coming from a wider region, and because a considerable portion of auroral radio emissions generated in the bottomside F region are masked by ionospheric absorption and screening in the D/E regions associated with ionization which results from auroral electrons and solar UV radiation.

  14. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  15. On the effectiveness of the vlf-em method For ground water prospecting in the Basement terrains, Sinai, Egypt

    Shendi, El-Arabi Hendi [العربيى هندي شندي

    1997-01-01

    The VLF-EM method is proved to be an effective, fast and inexpensive tool for ground water prospecting in the basement terrains of Southern Sinai. The resistive shallow alluvial deposits increase the penetration depth of the received VLF waves to as deep as 40 meters which is very reasonable to detect the water bearing alluvium in the studied areas. The measured horizontal and vertical components of the resultant VLF-EM field were used to calculate the apparent resistivities of the conductive...

  16. CARMA Observations of Galactic Cold Cores: Searching for Spinning Dust Emission

    Tibbs, C T; Cleary, K; Muchovej, S J C; Scaife, A M M; Stevenson, M A; Laureijs, R J; Ysard, N; Grainge, K J B; Perrott, Y C; Rumsey, C; Villadsen, J

    2015-01-01

    We present the first search for spinning dust emission from a sample of 34 Galactic cold cores, performed using the CARMA interferometer. For each of our cores we use photometric data from the Herschel Space Observatory to constrain N_{H}, T_{d}, n_{H}, and G_{0}. By computing the mass of the cores and comparing it to the Bonnor-Ebert mass, we determined that 29 of the 34 cores are gravitationally unstable and undergoing collapse. In fact, we found that 6 cores are associated with at least one young stellar object, suggestive of their proto-stellar nature. By investigating the physical conditions within each core, we can shed light on the cm emission revealed (or not) by our CARMA observations. Indeed, we find that only 3 of our cores have any significant detectable cm emission. Using a spinning dust model, we predict the expected level of spinning dust emission in each core and find that for all 34 cores, the predicted level of emission is larger than the observed cm emission constrained by the CARMA observa...

  17. High sensitive observations of the planetary radio emission in decameter wavelength

    Litvinenko, Galina; Zakharenko, Vyacheslav; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander; Shaposhnikov, Vladimir; Zarka, Philippe; Griessmeier, Jean-M.; Fisher, Georg; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Mylostna, Krystyna

    2013-04-01

    The progress of the ground-based low frequency radio astronomy has opened a new approach to the study of planetary radio emission in the solar system and beyond. This is manifested in the study of the Jupiter (detection of various types of the sporadic emission), of the Saturn (investigation of the electrostatic discharges emission, SED), as well as other planets and exoplanets. High efficiency decameter wavelength radio telescope UTR-2 and modern registration systems (effective area is more than 100 000 sq.m., instant frequency band is 8-33 MHz, dynamic range is about 90 dB, the frequency resolution is about 1 kHz, the temporal resolution is about 1 microsecond) allow for a new observation and detect many interesting phenomena. This includes the detection of superfine time-frequency structures and new types of the modulations effects in the Jovian radio emission, the detection of microsecond scales in the SED emission of the Saturn, and dispersion delay of the SED signals in the interplanetary medium. In addition, the described above method of observation of the planetary signals allowed for the first time to start ground-based searching radio emission from Uranus, Venus, Mars and exoplanets.

  18. Validation of the Swiss methane emission inventory by atmospheric observations and inverse modelling

    Henne, Stephan; Brunner, Dominik; Oney, Brian; Leuenberger, Markus; Eugster, Werner; Bamberger, Ines; Meinhardt, Frank; Steinbacher, Martin; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric inverse modelling has the potential to provide observation-based estimates of greenhouse gas emissions at the country scale, thereby allowing for an independent validation of national emission inventories. Here, we present a regional-scale inverse modelling study to quantify the emissions of methane (CH4) from Switzerland, making use of the newly established CarboCount-CH measurement network and a high-resolution Lagrangian transport model. In our reference inversion, prior emissions were taken from the "bottom-up" Swiss Greenhouse Gas Inventory (SGHGI) as published by the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment in 2014 for the year 2012. Overall we estimate national CH4 emissions to be 196 ± 18 Gg yr-1 for the year 2013 (1σ uncertainty). This result is in close agreement with the recently revised SGHGI estimate of 206 ± 33 Gg yr-1 as reported in 2015 for the year 2012. Results from sensitivity inversions using alternative prior emissions, uncertainty covariance settings, large-scale background mole fractions, two different inverse algorithms (Bayesian and extended Kalman filter), and two different transport models confirm the robustness and independent character of our estimate. According to the latest SGHGI estimate the main CH4 source categories in Switzerland are agriculture (78 %), waste handling (15 %) and natural gas distribution and combustion (6 %). The spatial distribution and seasonal variability of our posterior emissions suggest an overestimation of agricultural CH4 emissions by 10 to 20 % in the most recent SGHGI, which is likely due to an overestimation of emissions from manure handling. Urban areas do not appear as emission hotspots in our posterior results, suggesting that leakages from natural gas distribution are only a minor source of CH4 in Switzerland. This is consistent with rather low emissions of 8.4 Gg yr-1 reported by the SGHGI but inconsistent with the much higher value of 32 Gg yr-1 implied by the EDGARv4.2 inventory for

  19. A multi-scale comparison of modeled and observed seasonal methane emissions in northern wetlands

    Xu, Xiyan; Riley, William J.; Koven, Charles D.; Billesbach, Dave P.; Chang, Rachel Y.-W.; Commane, Róisín; Euskirchen, Eugénie S.; Hartery, Sean; Harazono, Yoshinobu; Iwata, Hiroki; McDonald, Kyle C.; Miller, Charles E.; Oechel, Walter C.; Poulter, Benjamin; Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Sweeney, Colm; Torn, Margaret; Wofsy, Steven C.; Zhang, Zhen; Zona, Donatella

    2016-09-01

    Wetlands are the largest global natural methane (CH4) source, and emissions between 50 and 70° N latitude contribute 10-30 % to this source. Predictive capability of land models for northern wetland CH4 emissions is still low due to limited site measurements, strong spatial and temporal variability in emissions, and complex hydrological and biogeochemical dynamics. To explore this issue, we compare wetland CH4 emission predictions from the Community Land Model 4.5 (CLM4.5-BGC) with site- to regional-scale observations. A comparison of the CH4 fluxes with eddy flux data highlighted needed changes to the model's estimate of aerenchyma area, which we implemented and tested. The model modification substantially reduced biases in CH4 emissions when compared with CarbonTracker CH4 predictions. CLM4.5 CH4 emission predictions agree well with growing season (May-September) CarbonTracker Alaskan regional-level CH4 predictions and site-level observations. However, CLM4.5 underestimated CH4 emissions in the cold season (October-April). The monthly atmospheric CH4 mole fraction enhancements due to wetland emissions are also assessed using the Weather Research and Forecasting-Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (WRF-STILT) model coupled with daily emissions from CLM4.5 and compared with aircraft CH4 mole fraction measurements from the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) campaign. Both the tower and aircraft analyses confirm the underestimate of cold-season CH4 emissions by CLM4.5. The greatest uncertainties in predicting the seasonal CH4 cycle are from the wetland extent, cold-season CH4 production and CH4 transport processes. We recommend more cold-season experimental studies in high-latitude systems, which could improve the understanding and parameterization of ecosystem structure and function during this period. Predicted CH4 emissions remain uncertain, but we show here that benchmarking against observations across spatial scales can

  20. Observationally constraining gravitational wave emission from short gamma-ray burst remnants

    Lasky, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Observations of short gamma-ray bursts indicate ongoing energy injection following the prompt emission, with the most likely candidate being the birth of a rapidly rotating, highly magnetised neutron star. We utilise X-ray observations of the burst remnant to constrain properties of the nascent neutron star, including its magnetic field-induced ellipticity and the saturation amplitude of various oscillation modes. Moreover, we derive strict upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from these objects by looking only at the X-ray light curve, showing the burst remnants are unlikely to be detected in the near future using ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as Advanced LIGO.

  1. First MERLIN Observations of Line Emission from the OH Megamaser toward IRAS 10173+0828

    Zhi-Yao Yu

    2005-01-01

    Many galaxies are thought to contain massive black holes, with masses in excess of ten million solar masses, at their centres and warped circumnuclear toruses. The best evidence comes from observing gas or masers rotating rapidly within a circumnuclear torus surrounding a central body. Here we report on the first MERLIN observations of line emission from the OH megamaser toward IRAS 10173+0828. The position of peak flux contours of the OH megamaser is consistent with that of the continuum in IRAS 10173+0828. This means that the OH megamaser is a diffuse unsaturated maser which could amplify the diffuse 18 cm continuum emission with an amplification factor of order unity.

  2. In Situ Observation of Dark Current Emission in a High Gradient rf Photocathode Gun

    Shao, Jiahang; Shi, Jiaru; Antipov, Sergey P.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Wang, Faya; Wisniewski, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Undesirable electron field emission (also known as dark current) in high gradient rf photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of the photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (˜100 μ m ) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L -band photocathode gun operating at ˜100 MV /m of surface gradient. Scattered strong emission areas with high current have been observed on the cathode. The field enhancement factor β of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. The postexaminations with scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry reveal the origins of ˜75 % strong emission areas overlap with the spots where rf breakdown has occurred.

  3. Observed effects of soil organic matter content on the microwave emissivity of soils

    O'Neill, P. E.; Jackson, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine the significance of organic matter content on the microwave emissivity of soils when estimating soil moisture, field experiments were conducted in which 1.4 GHz microwave emissivity data were collected over test plots of sandy loam soil with different organic matter levels (1.8, 4.0, and 6.1 percent) for a range of soil moisture values. Analyses of the observed data show only minor variation in microwave emissivity due to a change in organic matter content at a given moisture level for soils with similar texture and structure. Predictions of microwave emissivity made using a dielectric model for aggregated soils exhibit the same trends and type of response as the measured data when appropriate values for the input parameters were utilized.

  4. Observations of the 12.3 micron Mg I emission line during a major solar flare

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Osherovich, Vladimir; Wiedemann, Gunter; Hewagama, Tilak

    1990-01-01

    The extremely Zeeman-sensitive 12.32 micron Mg I solar emission line was observed during a 3B/X5.7 solar flare on October 24, 1989. When compared to postflare values, Mg I emission-line intensity in the penumbral flare ribbon was 20 percent greater at the peak of the flare in soft X-rays, and the 12 micron continuum intensity was 7 percent greater. The flare also excited the emission line in the umbra where it is normally absent. The umbral flare emission exhibits a Zeeman splitting 200 G less than the adjacent penumbra, suggesting that it is excited at higher altitude. The absolute penumbral magnetic field strength did not change by more than 100 G between the flare peak and postflare period. However, a change in the inclination of the field lines, probably related to the formation and development of the flare loop system, was seen.

  5. Worldwide biogenic soil NOx emissions inferred from OMI NO2 observations

    G. C. M. Vinken

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic NOx emissions from soils are a large natural source with substantial uncertainties in global bottom-up estimates (ranging from 4 to 27 Tg N yr−1. We reduce this range in emission estimates, and present a top-down soil NOx emission inventory for 2005 based on retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. We used a state-of-science soil NOx emission inventory (Hudman et al., 2012 as a priori in the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model to identify 11 regions where tropospheric NO2 columns are dominated by soil NOx emissions. Strong correlations between soil NOx emissions and simulated NO2 columns indicated that spatial patterns in simulated NO2 columns in these regions indeed reflect the underlying soil NOx emissions. Subsequently, we used a mass-balance approach to constrain emissions for these 11 regions on all major continents using OMI observed and GEOS-Chem simulated tropospheric NO2 columns. We found that responses of simulated NO2 columns to changing NOx emissions were suppressed over low NOx regions, and accounted for these non-linearities in our inversion approach. In general, our approach suggests that emissions need to be increased in most regions. Our OMI top-down soil NOx inventory amounts to 10.0 Tg N for 2005 when only constraining the 11 regions, and 12.9 Tg N when extrapolating the constraints globally. Substantial regional differences exist (ranging from −40% to +90%, and globally our top-down inventory is 4–35% higher than the GEOS-Chem a priori (9.6 Tg N yr−1. We evaluated NO2 concentrations simulated with our new OMI top-down inventory against surface NO2 measurements from monitoring stations in Africa, the USA, and Europe. Although this comparison is complicated by several factors, we find an encouraging improved agreement when using the OMI top-down inventory compared to using the a priori inventory. To our knowledge, this study provides, for the first time, specific constraints

  6. Estimation of Swiss methane emissions by near surface observations and inverse modeling

    Henne, Stephan; Brian, Oney; Leuenberger, Markus; Bamberger, Ines; Eugster, Werner; Steinbacher, Martin; Meinhardt, Frank; Brunner, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    On a global scale methane (CH4) is the second most important long-lived greenhouse gas. It is released from both natural and anthropogenic processes and its atmospheric burden has more than doubled since preindustrial times. Current CH4 emission estimates are associated with comparatively large uncertainties both globally and regionally. For example, the Swiss national greenhouse gas inventory assigns an uncertainty of 18% to the country total anthropogenic CH4 emissions as compared to only 3% for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. In Switzerland, CH4 is thought to be mainly released by agricultural activities (ruminants and manure management >80%), while natural emissions from wetlands and wild animals represent a minor source (~3 %). The country total and especially the spatial distribution of CH4 emission within Switzerland strongly differs between the national and different European scale inventories. To validate the 'bottom-up' Swiss CH4 emission estimate and to reduce its uncertainty both in total and spatially, 'top-down' methods combining atmospheric CH4 observations and regional scale transport simulations can be used. Here, we analyse continuous, near surface observations of CH4 concentrations as collected within the newly established CarboCountCH measurement network (http://www.carbocount.ch). The network consists of 4 sites situated on the Swiss Plateau, comprising a tall tower site (217 m), two elevated (mountaintop) sites and a small tower site (32 m) in flat terrain. In addition, continuous CH4 observations from the nearby high-altitude site Jungfraujoch (Alps) and the mountaintop site Schauinsland (Germany) were used. Two inversion frameworks were applied to the CH4 observations in combination with source sensitivities (footprints) calculated with the regional scale version of the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. One inversion system was based on a Bayesian framework, while the other utilized an extended Kalman filter approach. The transport

  7. Estimating methane emissions in California's urban and rural regions using multitower observations

    Jeong, Seongeun; Newman, Sally; Zhang, Jingsong; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Bagley, Justin; Cui, Xinguang; Graven, Heather; Kim, Jooil; Salameh, Peter; LaFranchi, Brian W.; Priest, Chad; Campos-Pineda, Mixtli; Novakovskaia, Elena; Sloop, Christopher D.; Michelsen, Hope A.; Bambha, Ray P.; Weiss, Ray F.; Keeling, Ralph; Fischer, Marc L.

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis of methane (CH4) emissions using atmospheric observations from 13 sites in California during June 2013 to May 2014. A hierarchical Bayesian inversion method is used to estimate CH4 emissions for spatial regions (0.3° pixels for major regions) by comparing measured CH4 mixing ratios with transport model (Weather Research and Forecasting and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport) predictions based on seasonally varying California-specific CH4 prior emission models. The transport model is assessed using a combination of meteorological and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements coupled with the gridded California Air Resources Board (CARB) CO emission inventory. The hierarchical Bayesian inversion suggests that state annual anthropogenic CH4 emissions are 2.42 ± 0.49 Tg CH4/yr (at 95% confidence), higher (1.2-1.8 times) than the current CARB inventory (1.64 Tg CH4/yr in 2013). It should be noted that undiagnosed sources of errors or uncaptured errors in the model-measurement mismatch covariance may increase these uncertainty bounds beyond that indicated here. The CH4 emissions from the Central Valley and urban regions (San Francisco Bay and South Coast Air Basins) account for 58% and 26% of the total posterior emissions, respectively. This study suggests that the livestock sector is likely the major contributor to the state total CH4 emissions, in agreement with CARB's inventory. Attribution to source sectors for subregions of California using additional trace gas species would further improve the quantification of California's CH4 emissions and mitigation efforts toward the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (Assembly Bill 32).

  8. Fire emissions simulated by prescribing burned area observations in a global vegetation model

    Khlystova, Iryna G.; Wilkenskjeld, Stiig; Kloster, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    The emissions of trace gases and aerosols from large vegetation fires into the atmosphere have an important climate impact. In this study we integrate observed burned area into a global vegetation model to derive global fire emissions. A global continuous burned area products provided by GFED (Global Fire Emissions Dataset) were obtained from MODIS (and pre-MODIS) satellites and are available for the time period 1997-2011. We integrate the global burned area product into the global vegetation model JSBACH, a land part of the Earth-System model developed at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology. JSBACH simulates land biomass in terms of carbon, which can be combined with the satellite burned area information to derive fire carbon emissions. Some assumptions on fire fuel consumptions have to be made during the integration of satellite burned area into the JSBACH. This includes processes such as tree mortality and combustion completeness, i.e. how much of the vegetation biomass gets combusted during a fire. Partially, this information can be also obtained from measurements. In this study we follow closely the approach of GFED, incorporating also GFED supplemental information, to simulate fuel consumption in JSBACH. And we compare simulated by this approach fire carbon emissions with the fire emissions from GFED. Global vegetation models often use prescribed land cover maps. The simulated in the JSBACH vegetation biomass and thus the simulated fire carbon emissions critically depend on the land cover distribution. In our study we derive fire carbon emissions using two different land cover parameterizations, based on two different satellite datasets. We will present the results obtained from simulations using the JSBACH standard MODIS based vegetation distribution and compare them to the results derived using the recently released ESA CCI land cover satellite product to demonstrate the sensitivity of simulated fire carbon emissions to the underlying land cover

  9. How do Biomass Burning Carbon Monixide Emissions from South America influence Satellite Observed Columns over Africa?

    Krol, M. C.; van Leeuwen, T. T.; Aouizerats, B.; van der Werf, G.

    2015-12-01

    Large amounts of Carbon Monoxide (CO) are emitted during biomass burning events. These emissions severely perturb the atmospheric composition. For this reason, satellite observations of CO can help to constrain emissions from biomass burning. Other sources of CO, such as the production of CO from naturally emitted non-methane hydrocarbons, may interfere with CO from biomass burning and inverse modeling efforts to estimate biomass burning emissions have to account for these CO sources. The atmospheric lifetime of CO varies from weeks to months, depending on the availability of atmospheric OH for atmospheric oxidation of CO to carbon dioxide. This means that CO can be transported over relatively long distances. It also implies that satellite-observed CO does not necessarily originate from the underlying continent, but may be caused by distant emissions transported to the observation location. In this presentation we focus on biomass burning emissions from South America and Southern Africa during 2010. This year was particularly dry over South America with a large positive anomaly in biomass burning in the 2010 burning season (July-October). We will adress the question how CO plumes from South America biomass burning influence satellite observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument over Southern Africa. For this we employ the TM5 atmospheric chemistry model, with 1x1 degree zoom resolutions over Africa and South America. Also, we use the TM5-4DVAR code to estimate CO biomass burning emissions using IASI CO observations. The accompanying image shows IASI CO oberservations over Africa on August 27, 2010, compared to the columns simulated with TM5. Clear signs of intercontinental transport from South America are visible over the Southermost region.

  10. Fine spectral structures in Jovian decametric radio emission observed by ground-based radio telescope.

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter with the largest planetary magnetosphere in the solar system emits intense coherent non-thermal radio emission in a wide frequency range. This emission is a result of a complicated interaction between the dynamic Jovian magnetosphere and energetic particles supplying the free energy from planetary rotation and the interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moons. Decametric radio emission (DAM) is the strongest component of Jovian radiation observed in a frequency range from few MHz up to 40 MHz. This emission is generated via cyclotron maser mechanism in sources located along Jovian magnetic field lines. Depending on the time scales the Jovian DAMexhibits different complex spectral structures. We present the observations of the Jovian decametric radio emission using the large ground-based radio telescope URAN- 2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. This telescope is one of the largest low frequency telescopes in Europe equipped with high performance digital radio spectrometers. The antenna array of URAN-2 consists of 512 crossed dipoles with an effective area of 28 000m2 and beam pattern size of 3.5 x 7 deg. (at 25 MHz). The instrument enables continuous observations of the Jovian radio during long period of times. Jovian DAM was observed continuously since Sep. 2012 (depending on Jupiter visibility) with relatively high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100ms) in the broad frequency range (8-32MHz). We have detected a big amount of the fine spectral structures in the dynamic spectra of DAM such as trains of S-bursts, quasi-continuous narrowband emission, narrow-band splitting events and zebra stripe-like patterns. We analyzed mainly the fine structures associated with non-Io controlled DAM. We discuss how the observed narrowband structures which most probably are related to the propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jupiter's ionosphere can be used to study the plasma parameters in the inner Jovian magnetosphere.

  11. High performance field emission and Nottingham effect observed from carbon nanotube yarn

    Choi, Young Chul; Kang, Jun-Tae; Park, Sora; Go, Eunsol; Jeon, Hyojin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Park, Kyung-Ho; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2017-02-01

    Vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized on a four inch wafer, followed by the preparation of a CNT yarn. The yarn emitter was found to have an extremely high field enhancement factor, which was confirmed to have originated from multi-stage effect. In addition to superb field emission characteristics, the energy exchange during field emission, called Nottingham effect, was observed from the CNT yarn emitter. A CNT yarn was attached to the thermistor whose resistance depends on temperature. Then, the change of resistance was monitored during the field emission, which enabled us to calculate the energy exchange. It was found that the observed heating originated from both Nottingham and Joule heating. Nottingham heating was dominant at low current region while Joule heating became larger contribution at high current region. Very large Nottingham region of up to 33.35 mA was obtained, which is due presumably to the high performance field emission characteristics of a CNT yarn. This is believed to be an important observation for developing reliable field emission devices with suppressed Joule heating effect.

  12. Can the envisaged reductions of fossil fuel CO2 emissions be detected by atmospheric observations?

    Levin, Ingeborg; Rödenbeck, Christian

    2008-03-01

    The lower troposphere is an excellent receptacle, which integrates anthropogenic greenhouse gases emissions over large areas. Therefore, atmospheric concentration observations over populated regions would provide the ultimate proof if sustained emissions changes have occurred. The most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO(2)), also shows large natural concentration variations, which need to be disentangled from anthropogenic signals to assess changes in associated emissions. This is in principle possible for the fossil fuel CO(2) component (FFCO(2)) by high-precision radiocarbon ((14)C) analyses because FFCO(2) is free of radiocarbon. Long-term observations of (14)CO(2) conducted at two sites in south-western Germany do not yet reveal any significant trends in the regional fossil fuel CO(2) component. We rather observe strong inter-annual variations, which are largely imprinted by changes of atmospheric transport as supported by dedicated transport model simulations of fossil fuel CO(2). In this paper, we show that, depending on the remoteness of the site, changes of about 7-26% in fossil fuel emissions in respective catchment areas could be detected with confidence by high-precision atmospheric (14)CO(2) measurements when comparing 5-year averages if these inter-annual variations were taken into account. This perspective constitutes the urgently needed tool for validation of fossil fuel CO(2) emissions changes in the framework of the Kyoto protocol and successive climate initiatives.

  13. Tropospheric methanol observations from space: constraints on the seasonality of biogenic emissions

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Xiao, Y.; Razavi, A.; Clerbaux, C.

    2011-12-01

    Methanol is the most abundant non-methane organic compound in the atmosphere, and is an important precursor of atmospheric pollutants such as CO and formaldehyde. The recent development of methanol retrievals from nadir-viewing satellite-based platforms offers powerful new information for quantifying methanol emissions on a global scale. This study uses methanol observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Aura satellite and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp-A satellite, in conjunction with aircraft data, to investigate methanol emissions from major plant functional types in the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (driven with MEGAN biogenic emissions). We first evaluate the TES methanol retrievals by comparing to simulation results and flight observations from several North American field campaigns. Results show that the retrieval performs well when the degrees of freedom for signal are above 0.5. We analyze one full year of TES and IASI observations and find a persistent model underestimate in springtime, and make recommendations for an improved seasonal distribution of biogenic methanol emissions over temperate regions of the globe.

  14. VLF signal modulations during the total solar eclipse of 22nd July, 2009: model using D region ion chemistry and LWPC

    Chakraborty, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Palit, Sourav; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    One of the major sources of ionospheric perturbations is variations in solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation flux. Solar eclipse is a phenomenon which is capable of producing significant effects on the physical and chemical properties of the ionospheric plasma. During a solar eclipse, the solar radiation flux reduces considerably for a limited period of time over specific locations on the Earth. This induces certain changes within the ionosphere or more precisely, in the D-region which can be studied with the observation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio signal modulations. The parameters which mainly govern the ion-chemistry, such as the recombination coefficients are poorly known till date. Solar eclipse provides us with an excellent opportunity to study these parameters as its time of occurrence is known beforehand and thus we can equip ourselves accordingly. In the present study we considered the Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) that occurred on 22nd July, 2009 within the Indian subcontinent. Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) conducted a week long campaign during the eclipse and data were recorded from dozens of places within India and abroad. Both positive and negative changes in VLF signal amplitude were observed. In this paper, data for a propagation path between Indian Navy VLF transmitter named VTX3 and a pair of receivers in India, namely Malda and Kolkata are used. We start with calculating the obscuration function for these two places to find the variations in ionization flux within the period of the eclipse. After this, we incorporated the D region ion chemistry model to find the equilibrium ion density over the region and employ the LWPC code to find the VLF signal amplitude. We varied the values of recombination coefficients to achieve desired accuracy in our results. In doing so, we achieved two goals: First, we have been able to reproduce the trend of variation in VLF signal amplitude (both positive and negative) at both the receiving locations

  15. Observed Arctic sea-ice loss directly follows anthropogenic CO2 emission

    Notz, Dirk; Stroeve, Julienne

    2016-11-01

    Arctic sea ice is retreating rapidly, raising prospects of a future ice-free Arctic Ocean during summer. Because climate-model simulations of the sea-ice loss differ substantially, we used a robust linear relationship between monthly-mean September sea-ice area and cumulative carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to infer the future evolution of Arctic summer sea ice directly from the observational record. The observed linear relationship implies a sustained loss of 3 ± 0.3 square meters of September sea-ice area per metric ton of CO2 emission. On the basis of this sensitivity, Arctic sea ice will be lost throughout September for an additional 1000 gigatons of CO2 emissions. Most models show a lower sensitivity, which is possibly linked to an underestimation of the modeled increase in incoming longwave radiation and of the modeled transient climate response.

  16. Probing 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's Electron Environment Through Ultraviolet Emission by Rosetta Alice Observations

    Schindhelm, Eric; Noonan, John; Keeney, Brian A.; Broiles, Thomas; Bieler, Andre; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Steffl, Andrew Joseph; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    The Alice Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) Spectrograph onboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has observed the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from far approach in summer 2014 until the end of mission in September 2016. We present an overall perspective of the bright FUV emission lines (HI 1026 Å, OI 1302/1305/1306 Å multiplet, OI] 1356 Å, CO 1510 (1-0) Å, and CI 1657 Å) above the sunward hemisphere, detailing their spatial extent and brightness as a function of time and the heliocentric distance of the comet. We compare our observed gas column densities derived using electron temperatures and densities from the Ion Electron Sensor (IES) with those derived using the Inner Coma Environment Simulator (ICES) models in periods when electron-impact excited emission dominates over solar fluorescence emission. The electron population is characterized with 2 three-dimensional kappa functions, one dense and warm, one rarefied and hot.

  17. Observation of Fluorescence Emissions from Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence in Water doped with Quinine

    Lu, J Q; Lin, F K; Liu, Y H

    2005-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is a phenomenon involving the transduction of sound into light. The detailed mechanism as well as the energy-focusing potentials are not yet fully explored and understood. So far only optical photons are observed, while emissions in the ultra-violet range are only inferred. By doping the fluorescent dye quinine into water with dilute sulphuric acid, the high energy photons can be converted into the optical photons with slower decay constants. These sonoluminescence and fluorescent emissions were observed in coincidence, and the emitted energy of the two modes can be differentiated by their respective timing profiles. Plans for using this technique as a diagnostic tool to quantitatively study ultra-violet and other high energy emissions in sonoluminescence are discussed.

  18. Observation of the Emission Spectra of an Atmospheric Pressure Radio-frequency Plasma Jet

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using radio-frequency (13.56 MHz)power has been developed to produce homogeneous glow discharge at low temperature. With optical emission spectroscopy, we observed the excited species (atomic helium, atomic oxygen and metastable oxygen) generated in this APPJ and their dependence on gas composition ratio and RF power. O and O2(b1∑g+) are found in the effluent outside the jet by measuring the emission spectra of effluent perpendicular to the jet. An interesting phenomenon is found that there is an abnormal increase of O emission intensity (777.4 nm) between 10 mm and 40 mm away from the nozzle. This observation result is very helpful in practical operation.

  19. Biomass burning emissions estimated with a global fire assimilation system based on observed fire radiative power

    J. W. Kaiser

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Global Fire Assimilation System (GFASv1.0 calculates biomass burning emissions by assimilating Fire Radiative Power (FRP observations from the MODIS instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. It corrects for gaps in the observations, which are mostly due to cloud cover, and filters spurious FRP observations of volcanoes, gas flares and other industrial activity. The combustion rate is subsequently calculated with land cover-specific conversion factors. Emission factors for 40 gas-phase and aerosol trace species have been compiled from a literature survey. The corresponding daily emissions have been calculated on a global 0.5° × 0.5° grid from 2003 to the present. General consistency with the Global Fire Emission Database version 3.1 (GFED3.1 within its accuracy is achieved while maintaining the advantages of an FRP-based approach: GFASv1.0 makes use of the quantitative information on the combustion rate that is contained in the observations, and it detects fires in real time at high spatial and temporal resolution. GFASv1.0 indicates omission errors in GFED3.1 due to undetected small fires. It also exhibits slightly longer fire seasons in South America and North Africa and a slightly shorter fire season in Southeast Asia. GFASv1.0 has already been used for atmospheric reactive gas simulations in an independent study, which found good agreement with atmospheric observations. We have performed simulations of the atmospheric aerosol distribution with and without the assimilation of MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD. They indicate that the emissions of particulate matter need to be boosted with a factor of 2–4 to reproduce the global distribution of organic matter and black carbon. This discrepancy is also evident in the comparison of previously published top-down and bottom-up estimates. For the time being, a global enhancement of the particulate matter emissions by 3.4 is recommended. Validation with independent AOD and PM10

  20. Constraining atmospheric ammonia emissions through new observations with an open-path, laser-based sensor

    Sun, Kang

    As the third most abundant nitrogen species in the atmosphere, ammonia (NH3) is a key component of the global nitrogen cycle. Since the industrial revolution, humans have more than doubled the emissions of NH3 to the atmosphere by industrial nitrogen fixation, revolutionizing agricultural practices, and burning fossil fuels. NH3 is a major precursor to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which has adverse impacts on air quality and human health. The direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcings currently constitute the largest uncertainties for future climate change predictions. Gas and particle phase NH3 eventually deposits back to the Earth's surface as reactive nitrogen, leading to the exceedance of ecosystem critical loads and perturbation of ecosystem productivity. Large uncertainties still remain in estimating the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of NH3 emissions from all sources and over a range of scales. These uncertainties in emissions also propagate to the deposition of reactive nitrogen. To improve our understanding of NH3 emissions, observational constraints are needed from local to global scales. The first part of this thesis is to provide quality-controlled, reliable NH3 measurements in the field using an open-path, quantum cascade laser-based NH3 sensor. As the second and third part of my research, NH3 emissions were quantified from a cattle feedlot using eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements, and the similarities between NH3 turbulent fluxes and those of other scalars (temperature, water vapor, and CO2) were investigated. The fourth part involves applying a mobile laboratory equipped with the open-path NH3 sensor and other important chemical/meteorological measurements to quantify fleet-integrated NH3 emissions from on-road vehicles. In the fifth part, the on-road measurements were extended to multiple major urban areas in both the US and China in the context of five observation campaigns. The results significantly improved current urban NH3

  1. FUSE Observations of the Cygnus Loop OVI Emission from a Nonradiative Shock

    Sankrit, R; Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.

    2001-01-01

    We present Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of a Balmer filament in the northeast region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. The data consist of one spectrum obtained through the 30"x30" (LWRS) aperture and three spectra at adjacent positions obtained through the 4"x20" (MDRS) aperture. The nonradiative shocks in the region giving rise to these faint optical filaments produce strong OVI 1032,1038 emission, which is detected in all the spectra. The OVI emission is resolved by FUSE into a strong component centered at 0 km/s, and weaker components centered at +/- 140 km/s. The MDRS spectra allow us to study the variation of OVI emission in the post-shock structure. We find that the zero velocity emission is associated directly with the Balmer filament shock, while the high velocity emission comes from a more uniformly distributed component elsewhere along the line of sight. We also find that the shocks producing the emission at +/- 140 km/s have velocities between 180 km/s and 220 km/...

  2. The observation of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions in the laboratory and in the night airglow

    A. L. Broadfoot

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding of an orange spectral feature in OSIRIS/Odin spectra of the night airglow near 85 km has raised interest in the origin of the emission. The feature was positively identified as the chemiluminescent FeO* emission where the iron is of meteoric origin. Since the meteorite source of atomic metals in the mesosphere contains both iron and nickel, with Ni being typically 6% of Fe, it is expected that faint emissions involving Ni should also be present in the night airglow. The present study summarizes the laboratory observations of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions and includes a search for the NiO* signature in the night airglow. A faint previously unidentified "continuum" extending longwave of 440 nm has been identified in night airglow spectra obtained with two space-borne limb viewing instruments and through a comparison with laboratory spectra this continuum is identified as arising from the NiO* emission. The FeO* and NiO* emissions both originate from a reaction of the metal atoms with mesospheric ozone and so support the presence of NiO* in the night airglow.

  3. Mid-infrared emission of galactic nuclei - TIMMI2 versus ISO observations and models

    Siebenmorgen, R; Krugel, E; Spoon, HWW

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the mid-infrared radiation of galaxies that are powered by a starburst or by an AGN. For this end, we compare the spectra obtained at different spatial scales in a sample of infrared bright galaxies. ISO observations which include emission of the nucleus as well as most of the host ga

  4. Accuracy of core mass estimates in simulated observations of dust emission

    Malinen, J; Collins, D C; Lunttila, T; Padoan, P

    2010-01-01

    We study the use of sub-millimetre dust emission in the estimation of the masses of molecular cloud cores. We want to determine the reliability of the mass estimates and at what level the observational biases are visible in the derived clump mass spectra. We use magnetohydrodynamic simulations and radiative transfer calculations to produce synthetic observations of dust emission. The synthetic maps have a spatial resolution and noise levels typical of the current Herschel surveys. Based on these data we estimate the dust temperatures and the column densities and compare the 'observed' core masses to the true values. We study the effects of spatial variations of dust properties. With high resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations we also investigate how protostellar sources embedded in the cores affect the mass estimates. The shape, although not the position, of the mass spectrum is very reliable against observational errors. However, the core masses will be strongly underestimated in cores that have opt...

  5. Observational constraints on the external shock prior emission hypothesis of GRBs

    Birnbaum, Tesla; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Liang, En-Wei

    2011-01-01

    An intriguing hypothesis, i.e. there exists a decaying X-ray emission component before the GRB trigger, has been suggested to interpret the shallow decay phase of the X-ray afterglow detected in many {\\em Swift} GRBs. If this "prior emission" is from an external shock, one would expect a corresponding optical emission component during the GRB prompt emission phase. In this paper we apply the available prompt optical emission data (both detections and upper limits) to constrain such a scenario. We fit the shallow and normal decay segments of the XRT light curves with a $T_0$-shifted single power law, and extrapolate the X-ray flux back to the time of the early optical observations. We then use the synchrotron spectrum predicted by the standard external shock model to extrapolate from the X-ray flux to the optical band, and obtain the possible range of the predicted optical flux. Finally, we compare the predictions with the observations. In the cases where later optical data are available, we also compare the s...

  6. Space-based observations of fire NOx emission coefficients: a global biome-scale comparison

    A. K. Mebust

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning represents both a significant and highly variable source of NOx to the atmosphere. This variability stems from both the episodic nature of fires, and from fire conditions such as the modified combustion efficiency of the fire, the nitrogen content of the fuel and possibly other factors that have not been identified or evaluated by comparison with observations. Satellite instruments offer an opportunity to observe emissions from wildfires, providing a large suite of measurements which allow us to study mean behavior and variability on the regional scale in a statistically rigorous manner. Here we use space-based measurements of fire radiative power from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer in combination with NO2 tropospheric column densities from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument to measure mean emission coefficients (ECs in g NO MJ−1 from fires for global biomes, and across a wide range of smaller-scale ecoregions, defined as spatially-distinct clusters of fires with similar fuel type. Mean ECs for all biomes fall between 0.250–0.362 g NO MJ−1, a range that is smaller than found in previous studies of biome-scale emission factors. The majority of ecoregion ECs fall within or near this range, implying that under most conditions, mean fire emissions per unit energy are similar between different regions regardless of fuel type or spatial variability. In contrast to these similarities, we find that about 24% of individual ecoregion ECs deviate significantly (p x emissions.

  7. Radio Emission from 3D Relativistic Hydrodynamic Jets Observational Evidence of Jet Stratification

    Aloy, M A; Ibáñez, J M; Martí, J M; Müller, E; Aloy, Miguel-Angel; Gomez, Jose-Luis; Ibanez, Jose-Maria; Marti, Jose-Maria; Mueller, Ewald

    1999-01-01

    We present the first radio emission simulations from high resolution three dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic jets, which allow for a study of the observational implications of the interaction between the jet and external medium. This interaction gives rise to a stratification of the jet where a fast spine is surrounded by a slow high energy shear layer. The stratification, and in particular the large specific internal energy and slow flow in the shear layer largely determines the emission from the jet. If the magnetic field in the shear layer becomes helical (e.g., resulting from an initial toroidal field and an aligned field component generated by shear) the emission shows a cross section asymmetry, in which either the top or the bottom of the jet dominates the emission. This, as well as limb or spine brightening, is a function of the viewing angle and flow velocity, and the top/bottom jet emission predominance can be reversed if the jet changes direction with respect to the observer, or presents a chang...

  8. Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula Observed with Suzaku

    Hamaguchi, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    A number of giant HII regions are associated with soft diffuse X-ray emission. Among these, the Carina nebula possesses the brightest soft diffuse emission. The required plasma temperature and thermal energy can be produced by collisions or termination of fast winds from main-sequence or embedded young O stars, but the extended emission is often observed from regions apart from massive stellar clusters. The origin of the X-ray emission is unknown. The XIS CCD camera onboard Suzaku has the best spectral resolution for extended soft sources so far, and is therefore capable of measuring key emission lines in the soft band. Suzaku observed the core and the eastern side of the Carina nebula (Car-D1) in 2005 Aug and 2006 June, respectively. Spectra of the south part of the core and Car-D1 similarly showed strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while in the north of the core these lines were much weaker. Fitting the spectra with an absorbed thin-thermal plasma model showed kT~0.2, 0.6 k...

  9. Observation of thermally induced tuning of lasing emission from melamine–formaldehyde resin microspheres

    Li, Hanyang; Liu, Shuangqiang; Peng, Feng; Yang, Jun; Li, Jin; Zhang, Yundong

    2017-03-01

    We report on the observation of the thermally induced tuning of the whispering gallery mode lasing emission from active microcavities. Melamine–formaldehyde resin microspheres were doped with a fluorescent dye and pumped by a 532 nm pulse laser. We show that microspheres with different sizes display lasing emissions in different parts of the spectrum, with a varying number of lasing modes present in the spectrum. The dominant thermo-optic effect leads to a blue shift of the whispering gallery mode lasing. The thermal sensing with a sensitivity of 0.33 nm/°C is higher than that of conventional polymer microcavities.

  10. Direct space-based observations of anthropogenic CO2 emission areas from OCO-2

    Hakkarainen, J.; Ialongo, I.; Tamminen, J.

    2016-11-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion have large impacts on climate. In order to monitor the increasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere, accurate spaceborne observations—as available from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2)—are needed. This work provides the first direct observation of anthropogenic CO2 from OCO-2 over the main pollution regions: eastern USA, central Europe, and East Asia. This is achieved by deseasonalizing and detrending OCO-2 CO2 observations to derive CO2 anomalies. Several small isolated emission areas (such as large cities) are detectable from the anomaly maps. The spatial distribution of the CO2 anomaly matches the features observed in the maps of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument NO2 tropospheric columns, used as an indicator of atmospheric pollution. The results of a cluster analysis confirm the spatial correlation between CO2 and NO2 data over areas with different amounts of pollution. We found positive correlation between CO2 anomalies and emission inventories. The results demonstrate the power of spaceborne data for monitoring anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  11. P-MaNGA Galaxies: Emission Lines Properties - Gas Ionisation and Chemical Abundances from Prototype Observations

    Belfiore, F; Bundy, K; Thomas, D; Maraston, C; Wilkinson, D; Sánchez, S F; Bershady, M; Blanc, G A; Bothwell, M; Cales, S L; Coccato, L; Drory, N; Emsellem, E; Fu, H; Gelfand, J; Law, D; Masters, K; Parejko, J; Tremonti, C; Wake, D; Weijmans, A; Yan, R; Xiao, T; Zhang, K; Zheng, T; Bizyaev, D; Kinemuchi, K; Oravetz, D; Simmons, A

    2014-01-01

    MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is a SDSS-IV survey that will obtain spatially resolved spectroscopy from 3600 \\AA\\ to 10300 \\AA\\ for a representative sample of over 10000 nearby galaxies. In this paper we present the analysis of nebular emission line properties using observations of 14 galaxies obtained with P-MaNGA, a prototype of the MaNGA instrument. By using spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams we find extended star formation in galaxies that are centrally dominated by Seyfert/LINER-like emission, illustrating that galaxy characterisations based on single fibre spectra are necessarily incomplete. We observe extended (up to $\\rm 1 R_{e}$) LINER-like emission in the central regions of three galaxies. We make use of the $\\rm EW(H \\alpha)$ to argue that the observed emission is consistent with ionisation from hot evolved stars. Using stellar population indices we conclude that galactic regions which are ionised by a Seyfert/LINER-like radiation field are also devoid of recent st...

  12. Direct observation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol from biomass-burning emissions

    Gilardoni, Stefania; Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Giulianelli, Lara; Carbone, Claudio; Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Sandrini, Silvia; Costabile, Francesca; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Chiara Pietrogrande, Maria; Visentin, Marco; Scotto, Fabiana; Fuzzi, Sandro; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are an important subject of ongoing research for both air quality and climate. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that reactions taking place in the atmospheric liquid phase represent a potentially significant source of SOA mass. Here, we report direct ambient observations of SOA mass formation from processing of biomass-burning emissions in the aqueous phase. Aqueous SOA (aqSOA) formation is observed both in fog water and in wet aerosol. The aqSOA from biomass burning contributes to the “brown” carbon (BrC) budget and exhibits light absorption wavelength dependence close to the upper bound of the values observed in laboratory experiments for fresh and processed biomass-burning emissions. We estimate that the aqSOA from residential wood combustion can account for up to 0.1-0.5 Tg of organic aerosol (OA) per y in Europe, equivalent to 4-20% of the total OA emissions. Our findings highlight the importance of aqSOA from anthropogenic emissions on air quality and climate.

  13. Nine years of global hydrocarbon emissions based on source inversion of OMI formaldehyde observations

    Bauwens, Maite; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Müller, Jean-François; De Smedt, Isabelle; Van Roozendael, Michel; van der Werf, Guido R.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Sindelarova, Katerina; Guenther, Alex

    2016-08-01

    As formaldehyde (HCHO) is a high-yield product in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by fires, vegetation, and anthropogenic activities, satellite observations of HCHO are well-suited to inform us on the spatial and temporal variability of the underlying VOC sources. The long record of space-based HCHO column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is used to infer emission flux estimates from pyrogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on the global scale over 2005-2013. This is realized through the method of source inverse modeling, which consists in the optimization of emissions in a chemistry-transport model (CTM) in order to minimize the discrepancy between the observed and modeled HCHO columns. The top-down fluxes are derived in the global CTM IMAGESv2 by an iterative minimization algorithm based on the full adjoint of IMAGESv2, starting from a priori emission estimates provided by the newly released GFED4s (Global Fire Emission Database, version 4s) inventory for fires, and by the MEGAN-MOHYCAN inventory for isoprene emissions. The top-down fluxes are compared to two independent inventories for fire (GFAS and FINNv1.5) and isoprene emissions (MEGAN-MACC and GUESS-ES). The inversion indicates a moderate decrease (ca. 20 %) in the average annual global fire and isoprene emissions, from 2028 Tg C in the a priori to 1653 Tg C for burned biomass, and from 343 to 272 Tg for isoprene fluxes. Those estimates are acknowledged to depend on the accuracy of formaldehyde data, as well as on the assumed fire emission factors and the oxidation mechanisms leading to HCHO production. Strongly decreased top-down fire fluxes (30-50 %) are inferred in the peak fire season in Africa and during years with strong a priori fluxes associated with forest fires in Amazonia (in 2005, 2007, and 2010), bushfires in Australia (in 2006 and 2011), and peat burning in Indonesia (in 2006 and 2009), whereas generally increased fluxes

  14. Efficiency and Sensitivity Analysis of Observation Networks for Atmospheric Inverse Modelling with Emissions

    Wu, Xueran; Jacob, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The controllability of advection-diffusion systems, subject to uncertain initial values and emission rates, is estimated, given sparse and error affected observations of prognostic state variables. In predictive geophysical model systems, like atmospheric chemistry simulations, different parameter families influence the temporal evolution of the system.This renders initial-value-only optimisation by traditional data assimilation methods as insufficient. In this paper, a quantitative assessment method on validation of measurement configurations to optimize initial values and emission rates, and how to balance them, is introduced. In this theoretical approach, Kalman filter and smoother and their ensemble based versions are combined with a singular value decomposition, to evaluate the potential improvement associated with specific observational network configurations. Further, with the same singular vector analysis for the efficiency of observations, their sensitivity to model control can be identified by deter...

  15. Non-thermal emission from high-energy binaries through interferometric radio observations

    Marcote, B

    2016-01-01

    High-mass binary systems involve extreme environments that produce non-thermal emission from radio to gamma rays. Only three types of these systems are known to emit persistent gamma-ray emission: colliding-wind binaries, high-mass X-ray binaries and gamma-ray binaries. This thesis is focused on the radio emission of high-mass binary systems through interferometric observations, and we have explored several of these sources with low- and high-frequency radio observations, and very high-resolution VLBI ones. We have studied two gamma-ray binaries, LS 5039 and LS I +61 303, at low frequencies. We have obtained their light-curves and spectra, and we have determined the physical properties of their radio emitting regions. We have also studied the gamma-ray binary HESS J0632+057 through VLBI observations. A new colliding wind binary, HD 93129A, has been discovered through VLBI and optical observations. Finally, we have conducted radio observations of two sources that were candidates to be gamma-ray binaries.

  16. Observational Characteristics of Radio Emission Related to Multi-polar Magnetic Configuration

    Min Wang; Rui-Xiang Xie; Chun Xu; Shuo-Biao Shi; Yi-Hua Yan

    2005-01-01

    We present a large complex radio burst and its associated fast time structures observed on 2001 April 10 in the frequency range of 0.65-7.6 GHz. The NoRH radio image observation shows very complex radio source structures which include preexisting, newly emerging, submerging/cancelling polarities and a biposuggests that the radio burst is generated from a very complicated loop structure.According to the spectral and image observations, we assume that the beginning connection structure. A composite of radio continuum and fast time structures is contained in this flare. The various fast radio emission phenomena include normal and reverse drifting type Ⅲ bursts, and slowly drifting and no-drift structures.ture, which is an important source of the various types of fast time structures.The two-loop reconnection model can lead simultaneously to electron acceleration and corona heating. We have also analyzed the behaviors of coronal magnetic polarities and the emission processes of different types radio emission qualitatively.Interactions of a bipolar or multi-polar loop are consistent with our observational results. Our observations favor the magnetic reconnection configurations of the lar).

  17. Observations of volatile organic compounds during ARCTAS – Part 1: Biomass burning emissions and plume enhancements

    A. Hills

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mixing ratios of a large number of volatile organic compounds (VOCs were observed by the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA on board the NASA DC-8 as part of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS field campaign. Many of these VOCs were observed concurrently by one or both of two other VOC measurement techniques on board the DC-8: proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS and whole air canister sampling (WAS. A comparison of these measurements to the data from TOGA indicates good agreement for the majority of co-measured VOCs. The ARCTAS study, which included both spring and summer deployments, provided opportunities to sample a large number of biomass burning (BB plumes with origins in Asia, California and Central Canada, ranging from very recent emissions to plumes aged one week or more. For this analysis, identified BB plumes were grouped by flight, source region and, in some cases, time of day, generating 40 individual plume groups, each consisting of one or more BB plume interceptions. Normalized excess mixing ratios (EMRs to CO were determined for each of the 40 plume groups for up to 19 different VOCs or VOC groups, many of which show significant variability, even within relatively fresh plumes. This variability demonstrates the importance of assessing BB plumes both regionally and temporally, as emissions can vary from region to region, and even within a fire over time. Comparisons with literature confirm that variability of EMRs to CO over an order of magnitude for many VOCs is consistent with previous observations. However, this variability is often diluted in the literature when individual observations are averaged to generate an overall regional EMR from a particular study. Previous studies give the impression that emission ratios are generally consistent within a given region, and this is not necessarily the case, as our results show. For some VOCs, earlier assumptions

  18. Estimating aerosol emissions by assimilating observed aerosol optical depth in a global aerosol model

    N. Huneeus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates the emission fluxes of a range of aerosol species and aerosol precursor at the global scale. These fluxes are estimated by assimilating daily total and fine mode aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS into a global aerosol model of intermediate complexity. Monthly emissions are fitted homogenously for each species over a set of predefined regions. The performance of the assimilation is evaluated by comparing the AOD after assimilation against the MODIS observations and against independent observations. The system is effective in forcing the model towards the observations, for both total and fine mode AOD. Significant improvements for the root mean square error and correlation coefficient against both the assimilated and independent datasets are observed as well as a significant decrease in the mean bias against the assimilated observations. The assimilation is more efficient over land than over ocean. The impact of the assimilation of fine mode AOD over ocean demonstrates potential for further improvement by including fine mode AOD observations over continents. The Angström exponent is also improved in African, European and dusty stations. The estimated emission flux for black carbon is 14.5 Tg yr−1, 119 Tg yr−1 for organic matter, 17 Pg yr−1 for sea salt, 82.7 TgS yr−1 for SO2 and 1383 Tg yr−1 for desert dust. They represent a difference of +45%, +40%, +26%, +13% and −39% respectively, with respect to the a priori values. The initial errors attributed to the emission fluxes are reduced for all estimated species.

  19. Estimating aerosol emissions by assimilating observed aerosol optical depth in a global aerosol model

    N. Huneeus

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates the emission fluxes of a range of aerosol species and one aerosol precursor at the global scale. These fluxes are estimated by assimilating daily total and fine mode aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS into a global aerosol model of intermediate complexity. Monthly emissions are fitted homogenously for each species over a set of predefined regions. The performance of the assimilation is evaluated by comparing the AOD after assimilation against the MODIS observations and against independent observations. The system is effective in forcing the model towards the observations, for both total and fine mode AOD. Significant improvements for the root mean square error and correlation coefficient against both the assimilated and independent datasets are observed as well as a significant decrease in the mean bias against the assimilated observations. These improvements are larger over land than over ocean. The impact of the assimilation of fine mode AOD over ocean demonstrates potential for further improvement by including fine mode AOD observations over continents. The Angström exponent is also improved in African, European and dusty stations. The estimated emission flux for black carbon is 15 Tg yr−1, 119 Tg yr−1 for particulate organic matter, 17 Pg yr−1 for sea salt, 83 TgS yr−1 for SO2 and 1383 Tg yr−1 for desert dust. They represent a difference of +45 %, +40 %, +26 %, +13 % and −39 % respectively, with respect to the a priori values. The initial errors attributed to the emission fluxes are reduced for all estimated species.

  20. Constraints on ship NOx emissions in Europe using OMI NO2 observations

    Vinken, G. C. M.; Boersma, K. F.

    2012-04-01

    About 90% of world trade is transported by oceangoing ships, and seaborne trade has been shown to have increased by about 5% per year in the past decade. Global ship traffic is currently not regulated under international treaties (e.g. Kyoto protocol) and ships are still allowed to burn low-grade bunker fuel. As a result, ships emit large quantities of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2), important precursors for ozone (O3) and particulate matter formation. Previous studies indicated that the global NOx emissions from shipping are in the range 3.0-10.4 Tg N per year (15-30% of total global NOx emissions). Because most ships sail within 400 km of the coast, it is important to understand the contribution of ship emissions to atmospheric composition in the densely populated coastal regions. Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs), in combination with emission inventories, are used to simulate atmospheric concentrations of air pollutants to assess the impact of ship emissions. However, these bottom-up inventories, based on extrapolation of a few engine measurements and strong assumptions, suffer from large uncertainties. In this study we provide top-down constraints on ship NOx emissions in Europe using satellite observations of NO2 columns. We use the nested version of the GEOS-Chem model (0.5°-0.667°) to simulate tropospheric NO2 columns over Europe for the years 2005-2006, using our plume-in-grid treatment of ship NOx emissions. We improve the NO2 retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI v2.0) by replacing the coarse a priori (TM4) vertical NO2 profiles (2°-3°) with the high-resolution GEOS-Chem profiles. This ensures consistency between the retrievals and model simulations. GEOS-Chem simulations of tropospheric NO2 columns show remarkable quantitative agreement with the observed OMI columns over Europe (R2=0.89, RMS difference < 0.2-1015 molec. cm-2), providing confidence in the ability of the model to simulate NO2 pollution over the European mainland. We

  1. Anthropogenic emissions and space-borne observations of carbon monoxide over South Asia

    Ul-Haq, Zia; Tariq, Salman; Ali, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this study is to understand anthropogenic emissions, spatiotemporal variability and trends of carbon monoxide (CO) over South Asia by using datasets from MACCity (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate, MACC and megaCITY - Zoom for the Environment, CityZEN), REAS (Regional Emission inventory in Asia), AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) and SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY). MACCity anthropogenic emissions show an overall increase of 16.5% during 2000-2010. Elevated levels of MACCity CO are found in Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB), eastern mining region of India, Bangladesh and large urban areas. Some of the major contributors of these emissions have been identified as agricultural waste burning, land transport, industrial production, and energy generation and distribution. An area averaged mean value of AIRS CO at 600 hPa is found to be 114 ± 2 ppbv (slope -0.48 ± 0.2 ppbv yr-1, y-intercept 117 ± 1 ppbv and r = 0.68) with a minor declining trend at -0.41 ± 0.18% yr-1 over the region during 2003-2015. A strong seasonality in AIRS CO concentration is observed with spring season peak in March 129 ± 1.9 ppbv, whereas low values have been observed in summer monsoon with sturdy dip in July 99.6 ± 1.94 ppbv. AIRS CO and SCIAMACHY CO Total Column (CO TC) over the study region show spatial patterns similar to MACCity and REAS emissions. An analysis of SCIAMACHY CO TC tendencies has been performed which indicates minor rising trends over some parts of the region. Background CO, Recent Emissions (RE), and spatial anomalies in RE over high anthropogenic activity zones of Indus Basin, Ganges Basin and Eastern Region were analyzed using AIRS and SCIAMACHY CO data.

  2. The European VLF/LF Radio Network: the current status

    Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Schiavulli, Luigi; Ligonzo, Teresa; Colella, Roberto; Ermini, Anita; Martinelli, Giovanni; Palangio, Paolo; Moldovan, Iren; Silva, Hugo; Contadakis, Michael; Frantzis, Xenophon; Katzis, Konstantinos; Buyuksarac, Aydin; D'Amico, Sebastiano

    2014-05-01

    Since 2009 a network of VLF (20-60 kHz) and LF (150-300 kHz) radio receivers has been put into operation in Europe in order to study earthquakes precursors. At the moment the network consists of eleven receivers four of which are located in Italy, two in Greece and one in Portugal, Romania, Malta, Cyprus and Turkey. The data (sampling rate of 1min) are downloaded automatically at the end of each day and they are stored in the server located at the Department of Physics of the University of Bari (Italy), that is the central node of the network. Still, in some case, problems of connection exist. The different trends are open and visible on the web site: http://beta.fisica.uniba.it/infrep/Hom.aspx. The data files can be downloaded by the same web site but they are protected by username and password. Among the different methods of data analysis the Wavelet spectra appear to be the most sensitive ones. The software able to apply this technique on the radio data automatically at the end of each day has been planned and realized. At the moment it operates on four signals collected by one of the Italian receivers; if an anomaly stands up and it is over a fixed threshold a warning advise appears. In the web site, this activity is protected by a specific username and password.

  3. Observations of artificial and natural optical emissions at the HAARP facility

    T. Pedersen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Extensive optical observations have been carried out at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP ionospheric heating facility since it began operations in 1999. A number of modern optical diagnostic instruments are hosted at remote sites as well as the main transmitter facility, which has recently been expanded from the initial 960 kW prototype configuration to its full 3.6 MW design capability. Upgrades to optical diagnostics have allowed a number of interesting new observations to be made at the 960 kW power level since 2004. Systematic beam-swinging experiments generating quantifiable levels of optical emission at various regions in the sky for the first time clearly show that emission intensity is very sensitive to distance from the magnetic zenith, and drops off rapidly at about 15° zenith angle in directions other than magnetic south. High temporal resolution measurements of emissions in the 557.7 nm green line at start-up and in short transmitter pulses demonstrate that localized irregularities are preferentially excited in the initial seconds of heating, with evolution into a more homogenous spot occurring over a period of about 1 min. High-quality emission altitude profiles at both 630.0 and 557.7 nm have recently been isolated from side-looking data, spanning an altitude extent of over 200 km, which has allowed determination of the effective lifetime of O (1D over an unprecedented altitude range. An innovative automated remote imager network utilizing low-cost mirror optics has been designed and deployed to make such measurements routinely. Observations of natural optical emissions at the site have revealed the common presence of highly structured but faint co-rotating subauroral precipitation that acts to suppress excitation of artificial F region optical emissions in areas of active precipitation. The observed spatial modulation of artificial optical emissions by structured precipitation is consistent

  4. The long-wavelength thermal emission of the Pluto-Charon system from Herschel observations. Evidence for emissivity effects

    Lellouch, E; Fornasier, S; Lim, T; Stansberry, J; Vilenius, E; Kiss, Cs; Müller, T; Marton, G; Protopapa, S; Panuzzo, P; Moreno, R

    2016-01-01

    Thermal observations of the Pluto-Charon system acquired by the Herschel Space Observatory in February 2012 are presented. They consist of photometric measurements with the PACS and SPIRE instruments (nine visits to the Pluto system each), covering six wavelengths from 70 to 500 $\\mu$m altogether. The thermal light curve of Pluto-Charon is observed in all filters, albeit more marginally at 160 and especially 500 $\\mu$m. Putting these data into the context of older ISO, Spitzer and ground-based observations indicates that the brightness temperature (T$_B$) of the system (rescaled to a common heliocentric distance) drastically decreases with increasing wavelength, from $\\sim$53 K at 20 $\\mu$m to $\\sim$35 K at 500 $\\mu$m, and perhaps ever less at longer wavelengths. Considering a variety of diurnal and/or seasonal thermophysical models, we show that T$_B$ values of 35 K are lower than any expected temperature for the dayside surface or subsurface of Pluto and Charon, implying a low surface emissivity. Based on m...

  5. Herschel HIFI observations of O{sub 2} toward Orion: special conditions for shock enhanced emission

    Chen, Jo-Hsin; Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Snell, Ronald [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, LGRT-B 619E, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Lis, Dariusz C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benz, Arnold [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bergin, Edwin [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Black, John; Hjalmarson, Åke [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Caselli, Paola [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith [LRA/LERMA, CNRS, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris and École Normale Supérieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Goicoechea, Javier R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), E-28049, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Hollenbach, David [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Kaufman, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San José State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Melnick, Gary [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 66, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Neufeld, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pagani, Laurent [LERMA and UMR8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014, Paris (France); and others

    2014-10-01

    We report observations of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O{sub 2} lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km s{sup –1} with line widths ∼3 km s{sup –1}; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O{sub 2} emission is ≅9'' (6 × 10{sup 16} cm) in size, and is located close to the H {sub 2} Peak 1 position (where vibrationally excited H{sub 2} emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23'' away. The peak O{sub 2} column density is ≅1.1 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}. The line velocity is close to that of the 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line of sight. The enhanced O{sub 2} abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C shock through a clump with preshock density 2 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O{sub 2} can explain the emission from the source if its line-of-sight dimension is ≅10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O{sub 2} emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.

  6. Simultaneous optical/gamma-ray observations of GRB 121217's prompt emission

    Elliott, J; Schmidl, S; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Oates, S; Kobayashi, S; Zhang, B; Cummings, J R; Filgas, R; Gehrels, N; Grupe, D; Kann, D A; Klose, S; Krühler, T; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Rau, A; Rossi, A; Siegel, M; Schady, P; Sudilovsky, V; Tanga, M; Varela, K

    2013-01-01

    Since the advent of the Swift satellite it has been possible to obtain precise localisations of GRB positions of sub-arcsec accuracy within seconds, facilitating ground-based robotic telescopes to automatically slew to the target within seconds. This has yielded a plethora of observational data for the afterglow phase of the GRB, but the quantity of data (<2 keV) covering the initial prompt emission still remains small. Only in a handful of cases has it been possible obtain simultaneous coverage of the prompt emission in a multi-wavelength regime (gamma-ray to optical), as a result of: observing the field by chance prior to the GRB (e.g. 080319B/naked-eye burst), long-prompt emission (e.g., 080928, 110205A) or triggered on a pre-cursor (e.g., 041219A, 050820A, 061121). This small selection of bursts have shown both correlated and uncorrelated gamma-ray and optical light curve behaviour, and the multi-wavelength emission mechanism remains far from resolved (i.e. single population synchrotron self-Component,...

  7. Observations of Ellerman bomb emission features in He I D3 and He I 10830 {\\AA}

    Libbrecht, Tine; Rodríguez, Jaime de la Cruz; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Ramos, Andrés Asensio

    2016-01-01

    Context. Ellerman bombs (EBs) are short-lived emission features, characterized by extended wing emission in hydrogen Balmer lines. Until now, no distinct signature of EBs has been found in the He I 10830 {\\AA} line, and conclusive observations of EBs in He I D 3 have never been reported. Aims. We aim to study the signature of EBs in neutral helium triplet lines. Methods. The observations consist of 10 consecutive SST/TRIPPEL raster scans close to the limb, featuring the H$\\beta$, He I D3 and He I 10830 {\\AA} spectral regions. We also obtained raster scans with IRIS and make use of the SDO/AIA 1700 {\\AA} channel. We use Hazel to invert the neutral helium triplet lines. Results. Three EBs in our data show distinct emission signatures in neutral helium triplet lines, most prominently visible in the He I D3 line. The helium lines have two components: a broad and blue-shifted emission component associated with the EB, and a narrower absorption component formed in the overlying chromosphere. One of the EBs in our d...

  8. The physical principles of the combined ELF/VLF method for single-station global location of lightning

    Mushtak, V.; Price, C.; Williams, E.

    Single -station electromagnetic methods for global lightning location are based on specific features of ELF wave propagation. First, ELF waves propagate with an extremely low attenuation not exceeding 1.5 dB/Mm up to 100 Hz. For this reason, the propagation has a resonant character (the Schumann resonance phenomena) imparting a unique pattern to the spectrum of a lightning waveform depending on the parent lightning's location relative to the given observer. The wave impedance technique realized by Kemp and Jones (1971) and widely adopted afterwards eliminates any need for the frequency dependence of the spectral density of the source's current moment for the location purpose. At the same time, an adequate single-mode propagation model can be applied for recovering this dependence and providing additional information about the source. As the only shortcoming of ELF location procedure, considerable error in estimates of the arrival directions of lightning waveforms was revealed by means of the satellite (OTD) identification of parent lightning events. These azimuthal deviations result in global location accuracies of 1-2 Mm (Boccippio et al, 1998) hardly acceptable in many geophysical problems. Price et al. (2002) found similar azimuthal errors in the ELF technique by means of the ground-truth (NLDN) identification of sprite-producing thunderstorms in Colorado when observing atmospherics in the Negev Desert, Israel. The location accuracy had been essentially improved - to better than 0.2 Mm on this 11 Mm path - by combining ELF distance estimates with VLF direction finding. Theoretical considerations show that this improvement is to be explained by a distinction between the ELF and VLF refraction effects at the day-night boundary of the Earth- ionosphere waveguide. While the difference between the day-time and night-time values of the phase velocity in the ELF range reaches 15%, it does not exceed 1% in the VLF range, with a corresponding diminishment of azimuthal

  9. Observations of solar radio emissions in meter wavelengths carried by CALLISTO-BR

    Fernandes, F. C. R.; Silva, R. D. C.; Sodré, Z. A. L.; Costa, J. E. R.; Sawant, H. S.

    2012-04-01

    Two Callisto-type (Compound Astronomical Low-cost Low frequency Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatory) spectrographs are in operation in Cachoeira Paulista, Brazil, since 2010. The CALLISTO-BR integrates the e-Callisto network consisting of several radio spectrographs distributed around the world, for provide continuous monitoring (24 hours) of the solar activity in the meter frequency range of 45 - 870 MHz. The solar radio emissions observations carried out by Callisto can be used as a diagnostic of several physical processes on the Sun. Here, we present the observations of several bursts recorded by CALLISTO-BR, such as type I bursts associated with a long lasting noise storm, recorded on March 30, 2010 in the typical frequency band around 200 MHz; a group of normal drifting type III bursts recorded in March 31, 2010 and also in February 15, 2011 and a rarely observed broadband (~180 - 800 MHz) continuum emission presenting positive frequency drifting (from low to high frequencies), suggesting the source is moving towards photosphere. Observations of type II and type IV bursts were also recorded. Details of these and many other solar radio emissions recorded by CALLISTO-BR will be presented and their implications for the solar activity and space weather investigations will be discussed.

  10. Sensitivity of wetland methane emissions to model assumptions: application and model testing against site observations

    L. Meng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane emissions from natural wetlands and rice paddies constitute a large proportion of atmospheric methane, but the magnitude and year-to-year variation of these methane sources are still unpredictable. Here we describe and evaluate the integration of a methane biogeochemical model (CLM4Me; Riley et al., 2011 into the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4CN in order to better explain spatial and temporal variations in methane emissions. We test new functions for soil pH and redox potential that impact microbial methane production in soils. We also constrain aerenchyma in plants in always-inundated areas in order to better represent wetland vegetation. Satellite inundated fraction is explicitly prescribed in the model, because there are large differences between simulated fractional inundation and satellite observations, and thus we do not use CLM4-simulated hydrology to predict inundated areas. A rice paddy module is also incorporated into the model, where the fraction of land used for rice production is explicitly prescribed. The model is evaluated at the site level with vegetation cover and water table prescribed from measurements. Explicit site level evaluations of simulated methane emissions are quite different than evaluating the grid-cell averaged emissions against available measurements. Using a baseline set of parameter values, our model-estimated average global wetland emissions for the period 1993–2004 were 256 Tg CH4 yr−1 (including the soil sink and rice paddy emissions in the year 2000 were 42 Tg CH4 yr−1. Tropical wetlands contributed 201 Tg CH4 yr−1, or 78% of the global wetland flux. Northern latitude (>50 N systems contributed 12 Tg CH4 yr−1. However, sensitivity studies show a large range (150–346 Tg CH4 yr−1 in predicted global methane emissions (excluding emissions from rice paddies. The large range is

  11. Synchrotron emission in GRBs observed by Fermi: Its limitations and the role of the photosphere

    Iyyani, S; Burgess, J M; Pe'er, A; egué, D B\\'

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts consists of several components giving rise to the observed spectral shape. Here we examine a sample of the 8 brightest, single pulsed {\\it Fermi} bursts whose spectra are modelled by using synchrotron emission as one of the components. Five of these bursts require an additional photospheric component (blackbody). In particular, we investigate the inferred properties of the jet and the physical requirements set by the observed components for these five bursts, in the context of a baryonic dominated outflow, motivated by the strong photospheric component. We find similar jet properties for all five bursts: the bulk Lorentz factor decreases monotonously over the pulses and lies between 1000 and 100. This evolution is robust and can neither be explained by a varying radiative efficiency nor a varying magnetisation of the jet assuming the photosphere radius is above the coasting radius. Such a behaviour challenges several dissipation mechanisms, e....

  12. Observations of the Prompt Gamma-Ray Emission of GRB 070125

    Bellm, Eric C; Pal'shin, Valentin; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Bandstra, Mark E; Boggs, Steven E; Hong, Soojing; Kodaka, Natsuki; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Mitrofanov, I G; Nakagawa, Yujin E; Ohno, Masanori; Onda, Kaori; Sanin, A B; Sugita, Satoshi; Tashiro, Makoto; Tretyakov, V I; Urata, Yuji; Wigger, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    The long, bright gamma-ray burst GRB 070125 was localized by the Interplanetary Network. We present light curves of the prompt gamma-ray emission as observed by Konus-WIND, RHESSI, Suzaku-WAM, and Swift-BAT. We detail the results of joint spectral fits with Konus and RHESSI data. The burst shows moderate hard-to-soft evolution in its multi-peaked emission over a period of about one minute. The total burst fluence as observed by Konus is $1.75 \\times 10^{-4}$ erg/cm$^2$ (20 keV-10 MeV). Using the spectroscopic redshift z = 1.547, we find that the burst is consistent with the Amati $E_{peak,i}-E_{iso}$ and the Ghirlanda $E_{peak,i}-E_\\gamma$ correlations.

  13. The benefits of China's efforts on gaseous pollutant control indicated by the bottom-up emissions and satellite observation

    Xia, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of national policies of air pollution control, the emissions of SO2, NOX, CO and CO2 in China are estimated with a bottom-up method from 2000 to 2014, and vertical column densities (VCD) from satellite observation are used to evaluate the inter-annual trends and spatial distribution of emissions and the temporal and spatial patterns of ambient levels of gaseous pollutants across the country. In particular, an additional emission case named STD case, which combines the most recent issued emission standards for specific industrial sources, is developed for 2012-2014. The inter-annual trends in emissions and VCDs match well except for SO2, and the revised emissions in STD case improve the comparison, implying the benefits of emission control for most recent years. Satellite retrieval error, underestimation of emission reduction and improved atmospheric oxidization caused the differences between emissions and VCDs trend of SO2. Coal-fired power plants play key roles in SO2 and NOX emission reduction. As suggested by VCD and emission inventory, the control of CO in 11th five year plan (FYP) period was more effective than that in the 12th FYP period, while the SO2 appeared opposite. As the new control target added in 12th FYP, NOX emissions have been clearly decreased 4.3 Mt from 2011 to 2014, in contrast to the fast growth before 2011. The inter-annual trends in NO2 VCDs has the poorest correlation with vehicle ownership (R=0.796), due to the staged emission standard of vehicles. In developed regions, transportation has become the main pollutants emission source and we prove this by comparing VCDs of NO2 to VCDs of SO2. Moreover, air quality in mega cities has been evaluated based on satellite observation and emissions, and results indicate that Beijing suffered heavily from the emissions from Hebei and Tianjin, while the local emissions tend to dominate in Shanghai.

  14. Herschel HIFI observations of O$_2$ toward Orion: special conditions for shock enhanced emission

    Chen, Jo-Hsin; Viti, Serena; Snell, Ronald; Lis, Dariusz C; Benz, Arnold; Bergin, Edwin; Black, John; Caselli, Paola; Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith; Goicoechea, Javier R; Hjalmarson, Ake; Hollenbach, David; Kaufman, Michael; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pagani, Laurent; van der Tak, Floris; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Yildiz, Umut A

    2014-01-01

    We report observations of molecular oxygen (O$_2$) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km/s with line widths 3 km/s; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O$_2$ emission is 9" (6e16 cm) in size, and is located close to the H2 Peak 1position (where vibrationally-excited H$_2$ emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23" away. The peak O2 column density is 1.1e18/cm2. The line velocity is close to that of 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line-of-sight. The enhanced O$_2$ abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velo...

  15. Topographic Effects on the Surface Emissivity of a Mountainous Area Observed by a Spaceborne Microwave Radiometer

    Frank S. Marzano

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A simulation study to understand the influence of topography on the surfaceemissivity observed by a satellite microwave radiometer is carried out. We analyze theeffects due to changes in observation angle, including the rotation of the polarization plane.A mountainous area in the Alps (Northern Italy is considered and the information on therelief extracted from a digital elevation model is exploited. The numerical simulation refersto a radiometric image, acquired by a conically-scanning radiometer similar to AMSR-E,i.e., flying at 705 km of altitude with an observation angle of 55°. To single out the impacton surface emissivity, scattering of the radiation due to the atmosphere or neighboringelevated surfaces is not considered. C and X bands, for which atmospheric effects arenegligible, and Ka band are analyzed. The results indicate that the changes in the localobservation angle tend to lower the apparent emissivity of a radiometric pixel with respectto the corresponding flat surface characteristics. The effect of the rotation of thepolarization plane enlarges (vertical polarization, or attenuates (horizontal polarizationthis decrease. By doing some simplifying assumptions for the radiometer antenna, theconclusion is that the microwave emissivity at vertical polarization is underestimated,whilst the opposite occurs for horizontal polarization, except for Ka band, for which bothunder- and overprediction may occur. A quantification of the differences with respect to aflat soil and an approximate evaluation of their impact on soil moisture retrieval areyielded.

  16. Evolution of magnetotelluric, total magnetic field, and VLF field parameters in Central Italy. Relations to local seismic activity

    Meloni, A.; Di Mauro, D.; Mele, G.; Palangio, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Ernst, T.; Teisseyre, R. [Institute of Geophysics, Warszawa (Poland)

    2001-04-01

    Magnetotelluric data were collected at Collemeluccio (41.72{sup 0}N, 14.37{sup 0}E) in Central Italy from summer 1991 to spring 1998. Analyzed by means of tensor decomposition on the geoelectric potential and robust estimation on the geomagnetic field, this set of data allowed the investigation of the electromagnetic induction, is presented here in its time evolution and compared to local and regional seismic activity. Tecto magnetic field observations from absolute magnetic field level in Central Italy were also made on data simultaneously recorded at four magnetometer stations, using L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory as a reference for differentiation. Recent results gathered from a system of two VLF search coil wide-band antennas, installed in the L'Aquila Observatory, are also discussed in relation to local seismic activity.

  17. A Chandra Observation of the Diffuse Emission in the Face-on Spiral NGC 6946

    Schlegel, E M; Petre, R

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the {\\it Chandra} observation of the diffuse emission in the face-on spiral NGC 6946. Overlaid on optical and H${\\alpha}$ images, the diffuse emission follows the spiral structure of the galaxy. An overlay on a 6 cm polarized radio intensity map confirms the phase offset of the polarized emission. We then extract and fit the spectrum of the unresolved emission with several spectral models. All model fits show a consistent continuum thermal temperature with a mean value of 0.25$\\pm$0.03 keV. Additional degrees of freedom are required to obtain a good fit and any of several models satisfy that need; one model uses a second continuum component with a temperature of 0.70$\\pm$0.10 keV. An abundance measure of 3$^{+1.95}_{-1.90}$ for Si differs from the solar value at the 90% confidence level; the net diffuse spectrum shows the line lies above the instrumental Si feature. For Fe, the abundance measure of 0.67$\\pm$0.13 is significant at 99%. Multiple gaussians also provide a good fit. Two of the...

  18. A Suzaku Observation of the Low-Ionization Fe-Line Emission from RCW 86

    Ueno, M; Kataoka, J; Bamba, A; Harrus, I; Hiraga, J; Hughes, J P; Kilbourne, C A; Koyama, K; Kokubun, M; Nakajima, H; Ozaki, M; Petre, R; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tomida, H; Yamaguchi, H; Ueno, Masaru; Sato, Rie; Kataoka, Jun; Bamba, Aya; Harrus, Ilana; Hiraga, Junko; Hughes, John P.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Koyama, Katsuji; Kokubun, Motohide; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Petre, Robert; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tomida, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2006-01-01

    The newly operational X-ray satellite Suzaku observed the southwestern quadrant of the supernova remnant (SNR) RCW 86 in February 2006 to study the nature of the 6.4 keV emission line first detected with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astronomy (ASCA). The new data confirm the existence of the line, localizing it for the first time; most of the line emission is adjacent and interior to the forward shock and not at the locus of the continuum hard emission. We also report the first detection of a 7.1 keV line that we interpret as the K-beta emission from low-ionization iron. The Fe-K line features are consistent with a non-equilibrium plasma of Fe-rich ejecta with n_{e}t <~ 10^9 cm^-3 s and kT_{e} ~ 5 keV. This combination of low n_{e}t and high kT_{e} suggests collisionless electron heating in an SNR shock. The Fe K-alpha line shows evidence for intrinsic broadening, with a width of 47 (34--59) eV (99% error region). The difference of the spatial distributions of the hard continuum above 3 keV and...

  19. Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Graf, K. L.; Spasojevic, M.; Marshall, R. A.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Foust, F. R.

    2013-01-01

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 7783–7797, doi:10.1002/2013JA019337, 2013 Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters K. L. Graf,1 M. Spasojevic,1 R. A. Marshall,2 N. G. Lehtinen,1 F. R. Foust,1 and U. S. Inan1,3 Received 16 August 2013; revised 9 October 2013; accepted 11 November 2013; published 3 December 2013. [1] The effects of ground-based very low frequency (VLF) transmitters on the lower ionospher...

  20. Dark matter line emission constraints from NuSTAR observations of the Bullet Cluster

    Riemer-Sørensen, S.; Wik, D.; Madejski, G.

    2015-01-01

    Some dark matter candidates, e.g., sterile neutrinos, provide observable signatures in the form of mono-energetic line emission. We present the first search for dark matter line emission in the range in a pointed observation of the Bullet Cluster with NuSTAR. We do not detect any significant line...

  1. Simulations and observations of plasma depletion, ion composition, and airglow emissions in two auroral ionospheric depletion experiments

    Yau, A. W.; Whalen, B. A.; Harris, F. R.; Gattinger, R. L.; Pongratz, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of plasma depletion, ion composition modification, and airglow emissions in the Waterhole experiments are presented. The detailed ion chemistry and airglow emission processes related to the ionospheric hole formation in the experiment are examined, and observations are compared with computer simulation results. The latter indicate that the overall depletion rates in different parts of the depletion region are governed by different parameters.

  2. Fluorescent H_2 Emission Lines from the Reflection Nebula NGC 7023 Observed with IGRINS

    Le, Huynh Anh N; Kaplan, Kyle F; Mace, Gregory N; Lee, Sungho; Pavel, Michael D; Jeong, Ueejeong; Oh, Heeyoung; Lee, Hye-In; Chun, Moo-Young; Yuk, In-Soo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Hwang, Narae; Kim, Kang-Min; Park, Chan; Oh, Jae Sok; Yu, Young S; Park, Byeong-Gon; Minh, Young Chol; Jaffe, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed the temperature, velocity and density of H_2 gas in NGC 7023 with a high-resolution near-infrared spectrum of the northwestern filament of the reflection nebula. By observing NGC 7023 in the H and K bands at R ~ 45,000 with the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrograph (IGRINS), we detected 70 H_2 emission lines within the 1" x 15" slit. The diagnostic ratios of 2-1 S(1)/1-0 S(1) are 0.39-0.54. In addition, the estimated ortho-to-para ratios (OPR) are 1.57-1.62, indicating that the H_2 transitions in the observed regions are mostly from UV fluorescence. Gradients in the temperature, velocity, and OPR of the observed areas imply motion of the photodissociation region (PDR) relative to the molecular cloud. In addition, we derive the column density of H_2 from the observed emission lines and compare these results with PDR models in the literature covering a range of densities and incident UV field intensities. The notable difference between PDR model predictions and the observed data, in high rota...

  3. Study of the NWC electrons belt observed on DEMETER Satellite

    Li, Xinqiao; Wang, Ping; Wang, Huanyu; Lu, Hong; Zhang, Xuemin; Huang, Jianping; Shi, Feng; Yu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Yanbing; Meng, Xiangcheng; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Parrot, M

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the data from 2007 to 2008, which is observed by IDP onboard DEMETER satellite, during ten months of NWC working and seven months of NWC shutdown. The characteristic of the space instantaneous electron belts, which come from the influence of the VLF transmitted by NWC, is studied comprehensively. The main distribution region of the NWC electron belts and the flux change are given. We also studied the distribution characteristic of the average energy spectrum in different magnetic shell at the height of DEMETER orbit and the difference of the average energy spectrum of the electrons in the drift loss-cone between day and night. As a result, the powerful power of NWC transmitter and the 19.8 kHz narrow bandwidth VLF emission not only created a momentary electrons enhancement region, which strides 180 degree in them longitude direction and from 1.6 to 1.9 in L value, with the rise of the electrons flux reaching to 3 orders of magnitude mostly, but also induced the enhancement or loss of electrons in ...

  4. What would dense atmospheric observation networks bring to the quantification of city CO2 emissions?

    Wu, Lin; Broquet, Grégoire; Ciais, Philippe; Bellassen, Valentin; Vogel, Felix; Chevallier, Frédéric; Xueref-Remy, Irène; Wang, Yilong

    2016-06-01

    Cities currently covering only a very small portion ( global energy-related CO2, but they are associated with 71-76 % of CO2 emissions from global final energy use. Although many cities have set voluntary climate plans, their CO2 emissions are not evaluated by the monitoring, reporting, and verification (MRV) procedures that play a key role for market- or policy-based mitigation actions. Here we analyze the potential of a monitoring tool that could support the development of such procedures at the city scale. It is based on an atmospheric inversion method that exploits inventory data and continuous atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements from a network of stations within and around cities to estimate city CO2 emissions. This monitoring tool is configured for the quantification of the total and sectoral CO2 emissions in the Paris metropolitan area (˜ 12 million inhabitants and 11.4 TgC emitted in 2010) during the month of January 2011. Its performances are evaluated in terms of uncertainty reduction based on observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs). They are analyzed as a function of the number of sampling sites (measuring at 25 m a.g.l.) and as a function of the network design. The instruments presently used to measure CO2 concentrations at research stations are expensive (typically ˜ EUR 50 k per sensor), which has limited the few current pilot city networks to around 10 sites. Larger theoretical networks are studied here to assess the potential benefit of hypothetical operational lower-cost sensors. The setup of our inversion system is based on a number of diagnostics and assumptions from previous city-scale inversion experiences with real data. We find that, given our assumptions underlying the configuration of the OSSEs, with 10 stations only the uncertainty for the total city CO2 emission during 1 month is significantly reduced by the inversion by ˜ 42 %. It can be further reduced by extending the network, e.g., from 10 to 70 stations, which is

  5. HST WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-Line Galaxies from IR Grism Observations

    Straughn, A N; Kuemmel, M; Walsh, J R; Cohen, S H; Gardner, J P; Windhorst, R A; O'Connell, R W; Pirzkal, N; Meurer, G; McCarthy, P J; Hathi, N P; Malhotra, S; Rhoads, J; Balick, B; Bond, H E; Calzetti, D; Disney, M J; Dopita, M A; Frogel, J A; Hall, D N B; Holtzman, J A; Kimble, R A; Luppino, G; Paresce, F; Saha, A; Silk, J I; Trauger, J T; Walker, A R; Whitmore, B C; Young, E T

    2010-01-01

    We present grism spectra of emission--line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6--1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L (0.6--0.95 micron) grism data in GOODS--South, extending the wavelength covereage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the \\Ha, \\OIII, and \\OII\\ emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2$\\cle$z$\\cle$1.6, 1.2$\\cle$z$\\cle$2.4 and 2.0$\\cle$z$\\cle$3.6 respectively in the G102 (0.8--1.1 microns; R$\\sim$210) and G141 (1.1--1.6 microns; R$\\sim$130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., \\SII\\ and \\SIII\\ lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star--formation rates, and grism s...

  6. UV and EUV Emissions at the Flare Foot-points Observed by AIA

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W; James,; Klimchuk, A; Wen-Juan,; Liu,

    2013-01-01

    A solar flare is composed of impulsive energy release events by magnetic reconnection, which forms and heats flare loops. Recent studies have revealed a two-phase evolution pattern of UV 1600\\AA\\ emission at the feet of these loops: a rapid pulse lasting for a few seconds to a few minutes, followed by a gradual decay on timescales of a few tens of minutes. Multiple band EUV observations by AIA further reveal very similar signatures. These two phases represent different but related signatures of an impulsive energy release in the corona. The rapid pulse is an immediate response of the lower atmosphere to an intense thermal conduction flux resulting from the sudden heating of the corona to high temperatures (we rule out energetic particles due to a lack of significant hard X-ray emission). The gradual phase is associated with the cooling of hot plasma that has been evaporated into the corona. The observed footpoint emission is again powered by thermal conduction (and enthalpy), but now during a period when appr...

  7. Imaging Observations of Quasi-Periodic Pulsatory Non-Thermal Emission in Ribbon Solar Flares

    Zimovets, I V

    2008-01-01

    Using RHESSI and some auxiliary observations we examine possible connections between spatial and temporal morphology of the sources of non-thermal hard X-ray (HXR) emission which revealed minute quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the two-ribbon flares on 2003 May 29 and 2005 January 19. Microwave emission also reveals the same quasi-periodicity. The sources of non-thermal HXR emission are situated mainly inside the footpoints of the flare arcade loops observed by the TRACE and SOHO instruments. At least one of the sources moves systematically both during the QPP-phase and after it in each flare that allows to examine the sources velocities and the energy release rate via the process of magnetic reconnection. The sources move predominantly parallel to the magnetic inversion line or the appropriate flare ribbon during the QPP-phase whereas the movement slightly changes to more perpendicular regime after the QPPs. Each QPP is emitted from its own position. It is also seen that the velocity and the energy re...

  8. Time-monitoring Observations of Br$\\gamma$ Emission from Young Stars

    Eisner, J A; Rieke, M J; Flaherty, K M; Stone, Jordan M; Arnold, T J; Cortes, S R; Cox, E; Hawkins, C; Cole, A; Zajac, S; Rudolph, A L

    2014-01-01

    We present multiple epochs of near-IR spectroscopy for a sample of 25 young stars, including T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be, and FU Ori objects. Using the FSPEC instrument on the Bok 90-inch telescope, we obtained K-band spectra of the BrGamma transition of hydrogen, with a resolution of ~3500. Epochs were taken over a span of >1 year, sampling time-spacings of roughly one day, one month, and one year. The majority of our targets show BrGamma emission, and in some cases these are the first published detections. Time-variability is seen in approximately half of the targets showing BrGamma emission. We compare the observed variability with expectations for rotationally-modulated accretion onto the central stars and time-variable continuum emission or extinction from matter in the inner disk. Our observations are not entirely consistent with models of rotationally-modulated magnetospheric accretion. Further monitoring, over a larger number of epochs, will facilitate more quantitative constraints on variability timescales...

  9. Molecular Hydrogen Emission Lines in Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations of Mira B

    Wood, B E; Wood, Brian E.; Karovska, Margarita

    2004-01-01

    We present new Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of Mira A's wind-accreting companion star, Mira B. We find that the strongest lines in the FUSE spectrum are H2 lines fluoresced by H I Lyman-alpha. A previously analyzed Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectrum also shows numerous Lyman-alpha fluoresced H2 lines. The HST lines are all Lyman band lines, while the FUSE H2 lines are mostly Werner band lines, many of them never before identified in an astrophysical spectrum. We combine the FUSE and HST data to refine estimates of the physical properties of the emitting H2 gas. We find that the emission can be reproduced by an H2 layer with a temperature and column density of T=3900 K and log N(H2)=17.1, respectively. Another similarity between the HST and FUSE data, besides the prevalence of H2 emission, is the surprising weakness of the continuum and high temperature emission lines, suggesting that accretion onto Mira B has weakened dramatically. The UV fluxes observed by HST on 1999 August ...

  10. Observation of Extended VHE Emission from the Supernova Remnant IC 443 with VERITAS

    Acciari, V A; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Bautista, M; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Butt, Y; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Celik, O; Cesarini, A; Chow, Y C; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Colin, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M K; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Dwarkadas, V V; Ergin, T; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Hays, E; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, Philip; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Kildea, J; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Toner, J A; Valcarcel, L; Varlotta, A; Vasilev, V V; Vincent, S; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Wood, M; Zitzer, B

    2009-01-01

    We present evidence that the very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission coincident with the supernova remnant IC 443 is extended. IC 443 contains one of the best-studied sites of supernova remnant/molecular cloud interaction and the pulsar wind nebula CXOU J061705.3+222127, both of which are important targets for VHE observations. VERITAS observed IC 443 for 37.9 hours during 2007 and detected emission above 300 GeV with an excess of 247 events, resulting in a significance of 8.3 standard deviations (sigma) before trials and 7.5 sigma after trials in a point-source search. The emission is centered at 06 16 51 +22 30 11 (J2000) +- 0.03_stat +- 0.08_sys degrees, with an intrinsic extension of 0.16 +- 0.03_stat +- 0.04_sys degrees. The VHE spectrum is well fit by a power law (dN/dE = N_0 * (E/TeV)^-Gamma) with a photon index of 2.99 +- 0.38_stat +- 0.3_sys and an integral flux above 300 GeV of (4.63 +- 0.90_stat +- 0.93_sys) * 10^-12 cm^-2 s^-1. These results are discussed in the context of existing ...

  11. Searching the Nearest Stars for Exoplanetary Radio Emission: VLA and LOFAR Observations

    Knapp, Mary; Winterhalter, Daniel; Lazio, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Six of the eight solar system planets and one moon (Ganymede) exhibit present-day dynamo magnetic fields. To date, however, there are no conclusive detections of exoplanetary magnetic fields. Low frequency radio emission via the cyclotron maser instability (CMI) from interactions between a planet and the solar/stellar wind is the most direct means of detecting and characterizing planetary/exoplanetary magnetic fields. We have undertaken a survey of the very nearest stars in low frequency radio (30 MHz - 4 GHz) in order to search for yet-undiscovered planets. The closest stars are chosen in order to reduce the attenuation of the magnetospheric radio signal by distance dilution, thereby increasing the chances of making a detection if a planet with a strong magnetic field is present. The VLA telescope (P-band: 230-470 MHz, L-band: 1-2 GHz, S-band: 2-4 GHz) and LOFAR telescope (LBA: 30-75 MHz) have been used to conduct this survey.This work focuses on VLA and LOFAR observations of an M-dwarf binary system: GJ 725. We present upper limits on radio flux as a function of frequency. Since the peak emission frequency of CMI-type emission is the local plasma frequency in the emission region, the peak frequency of planetary radio emission is a direct proxy for the magnetic field strength of the planet. Our spectral irradiance upper limits therefore represent upper limits on the magnetic field strengths of any planets in the GJ 725 system.Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  12. Observation of Nonthermal Emission from the Supernova Remnant IC443 with RXTE

    Sturner, S. J.; Keohane, J. W.; Reimer, O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present analysis of X-ray spectra from the supernova remnant IC443 obtained using the PCA on RXTE. The spectra in the 3 - 20 keV band are well fit by a two-component model consisting of thermal and nonthermal components. We compare these results with recent results of other X-ray missions and discuss the need for a cut-off in the nonthermal spectrum. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations suggest that much of the nonthermal emission from IC443 can be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula. We present the results of our search for periodic emission in the RXTE PCA data. We then discuss the origin o f the nonthermal component and its possible association with the unidentified EGRET source.

  13. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from Solar flares

    Pesce Rollins, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the active Sun provide the largest sample of detected solar flares with emission greater than 30 MeV to date. These include detections of impulsive and sustained emission, extending up to 20 hours in the case of the 2012 March 7 X-class flares. These high-energy flares are coincident with GOES X-ray flares of X, M and C classes as well as very fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CME). We will present results from the First Fermi-LAT solar flare catalog covering the majority of Solar Cycle 24 including correlation studies with the associated Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and CMEs.

  14. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  15. In situ Observation of Dark Current Emission in a High Gradient RF Photocathode Gun

    Shao, Jiahang; Baryshev, Sergey V; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Faya; Wisniewski, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Undesirable electron field emission (a.k.a. dark current) in high gradient RF photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (~100 um) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L-band photocathode gun operating at ~100 MV/m of surface gradient. Dark current from the cathode has been observed to be dominated by several separated strong emitters. The field enhancement factor, beta, of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. The post scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and white light interferometer (WLI) surface examinations reveal the origins of ~75% strong emitters overlap with the spots where rf breakdown have occurred.

  16. Search for extended gamma ray emission in Markarian 421 using VERITAS observations

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Very high energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma rays coming from AGN can pair-produce on the intergalactic background light generating an electromagnetic cascade. If the Intergalactic Magnetic Field (IGMF) is sufficiently strong, this cascade may result in an extended isotropic emission of photons around the source, or halo. Using VERITAS observations of the blazar Markarian 421, we search for extended emission by comparing the source angular distribution (${\\theta}^2$) from a quiescent period with one coming from a flare period, which can be considered as halo-free. ${\\chi}^2$ test showed no significant statistical differences between the samples, suggesting that the effect is either non-existent or too weak to be detected. We calculated upper limits for the extended flux considering different angle ranges, the most stringent being <8% of the Crab Nebulae flux (C.U), in the range $0\\deg \\leq {\\theta} \\leq 0.1\\deg$ .

  17. Submillimetre continuum emission from Class 0 sources: Theory, Observations, and Modelling

    Rengel, M; Fröbrich, D; Wolf, S; Eislöffel, J; Rengel, Miriam; Hodapp, Klaus; Froebrich, Dirk; Wolf, Sebastian; Eisloeffel, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    We report on a study of the thermal dust emission of the circumstellar envelopes of a sample of Class 0 sources. The physical structure (geometry, radial intensity profile, spatial temperature and spectral energy distribution) and properties (mass, size, bolometric luminosity (L_bol) and temperature (T_ bol), and age) of Class 0 sources are derived here in an evolutionary context. This is done by combining SCUBA imaging at 450 and 850 microm of the thermal dust emission of envelopes of Class 0 sources in the Perseus and Orion molecular cloud complexes with a model of the envelope, with the implementation of techniques like the blackbody fitting and radiative transfer calculations of dusty envelopes, and with the Smith evolutionary model for protostars. The modelling results obtained here confirm the validity of a simple spherical symmetric model envelope, and the assumptions about density and dust distributions following the standard envelope model. The spherically model reproduces reasonably well the observe...

  18. EMISSION HEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE-LIGHT EMISSION OBSERVED BY HINODE/SOT FROM THE 2012 JANUARY 27 X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimizu, Toshifumi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Masuda, Satoshi [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Ohno, Masanori, E-mail: watanabe.kyoko@isas.jaxa.jp [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8516 (Japan)

    2013-10-20

    White-light emissions were observed from an X1.7 class solar flare on 2012 January 27, using three continuum bands (red, green, and blue) of the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. This event occurred near the solar limb, and so differences in the locations of the various emissions are consistent with differences in heights above the photosphere of the various emission sources. Under this interpretation, our observations are consistent with the white-light emissions occurring at the lowest levels of where the Ca II H emission occurs. Moreover, the centers of the source regions of the red, green, and blue wavelengths of the white-light emissions are significantly displaced from each other, suggesting that those respective emissions are emanating from progressively lower heights in the solar atmosphere. The temperature distribution was also calculated from the white-light data, and we found the lower-layer emission to have a higher temperature. This indicates that high-energy particles penetrated down to near the photosphere, and deposited heat into the ambient lower layers of the atmosphere.

  19. Emission Height and Temperature Distribution of White-Light Emission Observed by Hinode/SOT from the 2012 January 27 X-class Solar Flare

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Masuda, Satoshi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    White-light emissions were observed from an X1.7 class solar flare on 27 January 2012, using three continuum bands (red, green, and blue) of the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode satellite. This event occurred near the solar limb, and so differences in locations of the various emissions are consistent with differences in heights above the photosphere of the various emission sources. Under this interpretation, our observations are consistent with the white-light emissions occurring at the lowest levels of where the Ca II H emission occurs. Moreover, the centers of the source regions of the red, green, and blue wavelengths of the white-light emissions are significantly displaced from each other, suggesting that those respective emissions are emanating from progressively lower heights in the solar atmosphere. The temperature distribution was also calculated from the white-light data, and we found the lower-layer emission to have a higher temperature. This indicates that high-energy particles penet...

  20. Sensitivity of wetland methane emissions to model assumptions: application and model testing against site observations

    L. Meng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Methane emissions from natural wetlands and rice paddies constitute a large proportion of atmospheric methane, but the magnitude and year-to-year variation of these methane sources is still unpredictable. Here we describe and evaluate the integration of a methane biogeochemical model (CLM4Me; Riley et al., 2011 into the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4CN in order to better explain spatial and temporal variations in methane emissions. We test new functions for soil pH and redox potential that impact microbial methane production in soils. We also constrain aerenchyma in plants in always-inundated areas in order to better represent wetland vegetation. Satellite inundated fraction is explicitly prescribed in the model because there are large differences between simulated fractional inundation and satellite observations. A rice paddy module is also incorporated into the model, where the fraction of land used for rice production is explicitly prescribed. The model is evaluated at the site level with vegetation cover and water table prescribed from measurements. Explicit site level evaluations of simulated methane emissions are quite different than evaluating the grid cell averaged emissions against available measurements. Using a baseline set of parameter values, our model-estimated average global wetland emissions for the period 1993–2004 were 256 Tg CH4 yr−1, and rice paddy emissions in the year 2000 were 42 Tg CH4 yr−1. Tropical wetlands contributed 201 Tg CH4 yr−1, or 78 % of the global wetland flux. Northern latitude (>50 N systems contributed 12 Tg CH4 yr−1. We expect this latter number may be an underestimate due to the low high-latitude inundated area captured by satellites and unrealistically low high-latitude productivity and soil carbon predicted by CLM4. Sensitivity analysis showed a large range (150–346 Tg CH4 yr−1 in

  1. Investigation of VLF and HF waves showing seismo-ionospheric anomalies induced by the 29 September 2009 Samoa earthquake (Mw=8.1

    M. Parrot

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In Samoa Islands, a powerful earthquake took place at 17:48:10.99 UTC (06:48:10.99 LT on 29 September 2009 with a magnitude Mw=8.1. Using ICE (Instrument Champ Electrique and IMSC (Instrument Magnetic Search Coil experiments onboard the DEMETER (Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite we have surveyed possible variations in electromagnetic signals transmitted by the ground-based VLF transmitter NPM in Hawaii and in HF plasma waves close to the Samoa earthquake during the seismic activity. The indices Dst and Kp were used to distinguish pre-earthquake anomalies from the other anomalies related to the geomagnetic activities. In a previous study we have shown that anomalies in IAP (plasma analyzer and ISL (Langmuir probe experiments onboard the DEMETER and also TEC (Total Electron Content data appear 1 to 5 days before the Samoa earthquake. In this paper we show that the anomalies in the VLF transmitter signal and in the HF range appear with the same time scale. The lack of significant geomagnetic activities indicates that these anomalous behaviors could be regarded as seismo-ionospheric precursors. It is also shown that comparative analysis is more effective in seismo-ionospheric studies.

  2. BeppoSAX Observations of Synchrotron X-ray Emission from Radio Quasars

    Padovani, P; Ghisellini, G; Giommi, P; Perlman, E

    2002-01-01

    We present new BeppoSAX LECS, MECS, and PDS observations of four flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) having effective spectral indices alpha_ro and alpha_ox typical of high-energy peaked BL Lacs. Our sources have X-ray-to-radio flux ratios on average ~ 70 times larger than ``classical'' FSRQ and lie at the extreme end of the FSRQ X-ray-to-radio flux ratio distribution. The collected data cover the energy range 0.1 - 10 keV (observer's frame), reaching ~ 100 keV for one object. The BeppoSAX band in one of our sources, RGB J1629+4008, is dominated by synchrotron emission peaking at ~ 2 x 10^16 Hz, as also shown by its steep (energy index alpha_x ~ 1.5) spectrum. This makes this object the FIRST known FSRQ whose X-ray emission is not due to inverse Compton radiation. Two other sources display a flat BeppoSAX spectrum (alpha_x ~ 0.7), with weak indications of steepening at low X-ray energies. The combination of BeppoSAX and ROSAT observations, (non-simultaneous) multifrequency data, and a synchrotron inverse Compt...

  3. Milagro Observations of TeV Emission from Galactic Sources in the Fermi Bright Source List

    Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Chen, C; Christopher, G E; DeYoung, T; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Huentemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Morgan, T; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Pretz, J; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2009-01-01

    We present the result of a search of Milagro sky map for spatial correlations with sources from a subset of the recent Fermi Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL consists of the 205 most significant sources detected above 100 MeV by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We select sources based on their categorization in the BSL, taking all confirmed or possible Galactic sources in the field of view of Milagro. Of the 34 Fermi sources selected, 14 are observed by Milagro at a significance of 3 standard deviations or more. We conduct this search with a new analysis which employs newly-optimized gamma-hadron separation and utilizes the full 8-year Milagro dataset. Milagro is sensitive to gamma rays above 1 TeV and these results extend the observation of these sources far above the Fermi energy band. With the new analysis and additional data, TeV emission is definitively observed associated with the Fermi pulsar J2229.0+6114, in the the Boomerang Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN). Furthermore, an extended region of TeV emission is...

  4. A Highly Circularly Polarized Solar Radio Emission Component Observed at Hectometric Wavelengths

    Reiner, M. J.; Kaiser, M. L.; Fainberg, J.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2006-04-01

    We report here the observation of a rare solar radio event at hectometric wavelengths that was characterized by essentially 100% circularly polarized radiation and that was observed continuously for about six days, from May 17 to 23, 2002. This was the first time that a solar source with significantly polarized radiation was detected by the WAVES experiment on the Wind spacecraft. From May 19 to 22, the intense polarized radio emissions were characterized by quasi-periodic intensity variations with periods from one to two hours and with superposed drifting, narrowband, fine structures. The bandwidth of this radiation extended from about 400 kHz to 7 MHz, and the peak frequency of the frequency spectrum slowly decreased from 2 MHz to about 0.8 MHz over the course of four days. The radio source, at each frequency, was observed to slowly drift from east to west about the Sun, as viewed from the Earth and was estimated to lie between 26 and 82 R ⊙ ( R ⊙ = 696 000 km). We speculate that this unusual event may represent an interplanetary manifestation of a moving type IV burst and discuss possible radio emission mechanisms. The ISEE-3 spacecraft may possibly have detected a similar event some 26 years ago.

  5. X-ray emission on hybird stars: ROSAT observations of alpha Trianguli Australis and iota Aurigae

    Kashyap, V.; Rosner, R.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.

    1994-01-01

    We report on deep ROSAT observations of two Hybrid atmosphere stars, alpha TrA and iota Aur, and our analysis of these observations. We detect high-energy transient phenomena on alpha TrA and consider the implications of this discovery to the atmospheres of Hybrid stars. We detect iota Aur in the high-energy passband of ROSAT, implying the existence of multimillion degree plasma on the star. Our major results include the following: discovery of two large flare events, detected during pointed observations of alpha TrA; the demonstration that the flare emission most likely comes from the giant itself, rather than from a previously unseen low-mass companion star; the demonstration that the plasma characteristics associated with the flares and with the 'quiescent' component are essentially indistinguishable; and that the geometric dimensions of the emitting plasma are considerably smaller than the critical dimension characterizing stable 'hot' coronal loop structures. Our results suggest that alpha TrA does not have any steady X-ray emission consistent with theoretical expectations, and support the argument that Hybrid stars constitute a transitional type of object in which large-scale magnetic dynamo activity ceases, and the dominant spatial scales characterizing coronal structure rapidly decline as such stars evolve across the X-ray 'Dividing Line' in the H-R diagram.

  6. Evaluation of a plot-scale methane emission model using eddy covariance observations and footprint modelling

    A. Budishchev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Most plot-scale methane emission models – of which many have been developed in the recent past – are validated using data collected with the closed-chamber technique. This method, however, suffers from a low spatial representativeness and a poor temporal resolution. Also, during a chamber-flux measurement the air within a chamber is separated from the ambient atmosphere, which negates the influence of wind on emissions. Additionally, some methane models are validated by upscaling fluxes based on the area-weighted averages of modelled fluxes, and by comparing those to the eddy covariance (EC flux. This technique is rather inaccurate, as the area of upscaling might be different from the EC tower footprint, therefore introducing significant mismatch. In this study, we present an approach to validate plot-scale methane models with EC observations using the footprint-weighted average method. Our results show that the fluxes obtained by the footprint-weighted average method are of the same magnitude as the EC flux. More importantly, the temporal dynamics of the EC flux on a daily timescale are also captured (r2 = 0.7. In contrast, using the area-weighted average method yielded a low (r2 = 0.14 correlation with the EC measurements. This shows that the footprint-weighted average method is preferable when validating methane emission models with EC fluxes for areas with a heterogeneous and irregular vegetation pattern.

  7. SMA Observations of the Extended CO(6-5) Emission in the Starburst Galaxy NGC253

    Krips, Melanie; Peck, Alison; Sakamoto, Kazushi; Neri, Roberto; Gurwell, Mark; Petitpas, Glen; Zhao, Jun-Hui

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the $^{12}$CO(6-5) line and 686GHz continuum emission in NGC253 with the Submillimeter Array at an angular resolution of ~4arcsec. The $^{12}$CO(6-5) emission is clearly detected along the disk and follows the distribution of the lower $^{12}$CO line transitions with little variations of the line ratios in it. A large-velocity gradient analysis suggests a two-temperature model of the molecular gas in the disk, likely dominated by a combination of low-velocity shocks and the disk wide PDRs. Only marginal $^{12}$CO(6-5) emission is detected in the vicinity of the expanding shells at the eastern and western edges of the disk. While the eastern shell contains gas even warmer (T$_{\\rm kin}$>300~K) than the hot gas component (T$_{\\rm kin}$=300K) of the disk, the western shell is surrounded by gas much cooler (T$_{\\rm kin}$=60K) than the eastern shell but somewhat hotter than the cold gas component of the disk (for similar H$_2$ and CO column densities), indicative of different (or differe...

  8. Correcting atmospheric effects in thermal ground observations for hyperspectral emissivity estimation

    Timmermans, Joris; Buitrago, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of Land surface temperature is of crucial importance in energy balance studies and environmental modeling. Accurate retrieval of land surface temperature (LST) demands detailed knowledge of the land surface emissivity. Measured radiation by remote sensing sensors to land surface temperature can only be performed using a-priori knowledge of the emissivity. Uncertainties in the retrieval of this emissivity can cause huge errors in LST estimations. The retrieval of emissivity (and LST) is per definition an underdetermined inversion, as only one observation is made while two variables are to be estimated. Several researches have therefore been performed on measuring emissivity, such as the normalized emissivity method, the temperature-emissivity separation (TES) using the minimum and maximum difference of emissivity and the use of vegetation indices. In each of these approaches atmospherically corrected radiance measurements by remote sensing sensors are correlated to ground measurements. Usually these ground measurements are performed with the ground equivalent of the remote sensing sensors; the CIMEL 312-2 has the same spectral bands as ASTER. This way parameterizations acquired this way are only usable for specific sensors and need to be redone for newer sensors. Recently hyperspectral thermal radiometers, such as the MIDAC, have been developed that can solve this problem. By using hyperspectral observations of emissivity, together with sensor simulators, ground measurements of different satellite sensor can be simulated. This facilitates the production of validation data for the different TES algorithms. However before such measurements can be performed extra steps of processing need to be performed. Atmospheric correction becomes more important in hyperspectral observations than for broadband observations, as energy levels measured per band is lower. As such the atmosphere has a relative larger contribution if bandwidths become smaller. The goal of this

  9. Observation of field-induced electron emission in porous polycrystalline silicon nano-structured diode

    Lee, Joo Won; Kim, Hoon; Ju, Byeong Kwon [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Hi [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jin [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Field-induced electron emission properties of porous poly-silicon nano-structured (PNS) diodes were investigated as a function of anodizing conditions, including morphological analysis, various kinds of top electrode thickness and the measuring substrate temperature. Also, the vacuum packaging process was performed by the normal glass frit method. The PNS layer was formed on heavily-dope n-type <100> Si substrate. Non-doped poly-silicon layer was grown by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) to a thickness of 2mm. Subsequently, the poly-silicon layer was anodized in a mixed solution HF (50 wt%): ethanol(99.8 wt%) = 1:1 as a function of anodizing condition. After anodizing, the PNS layer was thermally oxidized for 1 hr at 900 .deg. C. Subsequently, the top electrode was deposited as a function of Au thickness using E-beam evaporator and, in order to establish ohmic contact, thermally evaporated Al was deposited on the back side of a Si substrate. The prepared PNS diode was packaged using the normal vacuum sealing method. After the vacuum sealing process, the PNS diode was mounted on the PC measurement table. When a positive bias was applied to the top electrode, the electron emission was observed, which was caused by field-induced electron emission through the top metal.

  10. Ground-based observation of emission lines from the corona of a red-dwarf star.

    Schmitt, J H; Wichmann, R

    2001-08-02

    All 'solar-like' stars are surrounded by coronae, which contain magnetically confined plasma at temperatures above 106 K. (Until now, only the Sun's corona could be observed in the optical-as a shimmering envelope during a total solar eclipse.) As the underlying stellar 'surfaces'-the photospheres-are much cooler, some non-radiative process must be responsible for heating the coronae. The heating mechanism is generally thought to be magnetic in origin, but is not yet understood even for the case of the Sun. Ultraviolet emission lines first led to the discovery of the enormous temperature of the Sun's corona, but thermal emission from the coronae of other stars has hitherto been detectable only from space, at X-ray wavelengths. Here we report the detection of emission from highly ionized iron (Fe XIII at 3,388.1 A) in the corona of the red-dwarf star CN Leonis, using a ground-based telescope. The X-ray flux inferred from our data is consistent with previously measured X-ray fluxes, and the non-thermal line width of 18.4 km s-1 indicates great similarities between solar and stellar coronal heating mechanisms. The accessibility and spectral resolution (45,000) of the ground-based instrument are much better than those of X-ray satellites, so a new window to the study of stellar coronae has been opened.

  11. Development of ground-based ELF/VLF receiver system in Wuhan and its first results

    Chen, Yanping; Yang, Guobin; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu; Gu, Xudong; Zhou, Chen; Wang, Feng

    2016-05-01

    A new digital low-frequency receiver system has been developed at Wuhan University for sensitive reception of low-latitude broadband Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves originating from either natural or artificial sources. These low-frequency radio waves are useful for ionospheric remote sensing, geospace environment monitoring, and submarine communications. This paper presents the principle and architecture of the system framework, including magnetic loop antenna design, low-noise analog front-end and digital receiver with data sampling and transmission. A new structure is adopted in the analog front end to provide high common-mode rejection and to reduce interference. On basis of field programmable gate array (FPGA) device and Universal Serial Bus (USB) architecture, the digital receiver is developed along with time keeping and synchronization module. The validity and feasibility of the self-developed ground-based ELF/VLF receiver system is evaluated by first results of experimental data that show the temporal variation of broadband ELF/VLF wave spectral intensity in Wuhan (30.54 °N, 114.37 °E). In addition to the acquisition of VLF transmitter signals at various frequencies, tweek atmospherics are also clearly captured to occur at multiple modes up to n = 6.

  12. Comparative Analysis of VLF Signal Variation along Trajectory Induced by X-ray Solar Flares

    Kolarski, A.; Grubor, D.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative qualitative analysis of amplitude and phase delay variations was carried out along the trajectory of GQD/22.1 kHz and NAA/24.0 kHz VLF signal traces, propagating from Skelton (UK) and Maine (USA) toward Belgrade, induced by four isolated solar X-ray flare events occurred during the period from September 2005 to December 2006. For monitoring, recording and for storage of VLF data at the Institute of Physics in Belgrade, Serbia, the AbsPAL system was used. For modeling purposes of propagating conditions along GQD and NAA signal propagation paths, LWPCv21 program code was used. Occurred solar flare events induced lower ionosphere electron density height profile changes, causing perturbations in VLF wave propagation within Earth-ionosphere waveguides. As analyzed VLF signals characterize by different propagation parameters along trajectories from their transmitters to the Belgrade receiver site, their propagation is affected in different ways for different solar flare events and also for the same solar flare events.

  13. Observation of narrow isotopic optical magnetic resonances in individual emission spectral lines of neon

    Saprykin, E G [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sorokin, V A; Shalagin, A M [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-31

    Narrow resonances are observed in the course of recording the individual emission lines of the glow discharge in the mixture of isotopes {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne, depending on the strength of the longitudinal magnetic field. The position of resonances in the magnetic scale corresponds to the compensation of the isotopic shift for certain spectral lines due to the Zeeman effect. It is found that the contrast of the resonances is higher for the transitions between the highly excited energy levels, and the resonances themselves are formed in the zone of longitudinal spatial nonuniformity of the magnetic field. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. The Neutron Emission Ratio Observer NERO at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    Pereira, Jorge; Hosmer, Paul; Lorusso, Giuseppe; Santi, Peter; Del Santo, Marcelo; Herlitzius, Clemens; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig; Montes, Fernando; Schatz, Hendrik; Schertz, Florian; Schnorrenberger, Linda; Smith, Karl; Wiescher, Michael

    2009-10-01

    The new neutron counter NERO (Neutron Emission Ratio Observer) was built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) for measuring Pn values of neutron-rich nuclei produced as fast fragmentation beams. The design was motivated by the requirement of being coupled to the NSCL beta counting system, so that β-decay particles and neutrons emitted from implanted nuclei can be measured simultaneously, while keeping a high efficiency. The detector's performance and main features will be discussed, as well as recent measurements done at NSCL for astrophysical studies of the r-process.

  15. NuSTAR observations of the bullet cluster: constraints on inverse Compton emission

    Wik, Daniel R.; Zhang, W. W. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hornstrup, A.; Westergaard, N. J.; Ferreira, D. D. M.; Pedersen, K.; Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F. [IASF-Milano, INAF, Via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Madejski, G. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Madsen, K. K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zoglauer, A.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kitaguchi, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stern, D., E-mail: daniel.r.wik@nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The search for diffuse non-thermal inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been undertaken with many instruments, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Because all prior telescopes sensitive at E > 10 keV do not focus light and have degree-scale fields of view, their backgrounds are both high and difficult to characterize. The associated uncertainties result in lower sensitivity to IC emission and a greater chance of false detection. In this work, we present 266 ks NuSTAR observations of the Bullet cluster, which is detected in the energy range 3-30 keV. NuSTAR's unprecedented hard X-ray focusing capability largely eliminates confusion between diffuse IC and point sources; however, at the highest energies, the background still dominates and must be well understood. To this end, we have developed a complete background model constructed of physically inspired components constrained by extragalactic survey field observations, the specific parameters of which are derived locally from data in non-source regions of target observations. Applying the background model to the Bullet cluster data, we find that the spectrum is well—but not perfectly—described as an isothermal plasma with kT = 14.2 ± 0.2 keV. To slightly improve the fit, a second temperature component is added, which appears to account for lower temperature emission from the cool core, pushing the primary component to kT ∼ 15.3 keV. We see no convincing need to invoke an IC component to describe the spectrum of the Bullet cluster, and instead argue that it is dominated at all energies by emission from purely thermal gas. The conservatively derived 90% upper limit on the IC flux of 1.1 × 10{sup –12} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} (50-100 keV), implying a lower limit on B ≳ 0.2 μG, is barely consistent with detected fluxes previously reported. In addition to discussing the possible origin of this discrepancy, we remark on the

  16. On the dependence of the OH* Meinel emission altitude on vibrational level: SCIAMACHY observations and model simulations

    J. P. Burrows

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the OH Meinel emissions in the terrestrial nightglow are one of the standard ground-based techniques to retrieve upper mesospheric temperatures. It is often assumed that the emission peak altitudes are not strongly dependent on the vibrational level, although this assumption is not based on convincing experimental evidence. In this study we use Envisat/SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY observations in the near-IR spectral range to retrieve vertical volume emission rate profiles of the OH(3-1, OH(6-2 and OH(8-3 Meinel bands in order to investigate, whether systematic differences in emission peak altitudes can be observed between the different OH Meinel bands. The results indicate that the emission peak altitudes are different for the different vibrational levels, with bands originating from higher vibrational levels having higher emission peak altitudes. It is shown that this finding is consistent with the majority of the previously published results. The SCIAMACHY observations yield differences in emission peak altitudes of up to about 4 km between the OH(3-1 and the OH(8-3 band. The observations are complemented by model simulations of the fractional population of the different vibrational levels and of the vibrational level dependence of the emission peak altitude. The model simulations well reproduce the observed vibrational level dependence of the emission peak altitude – both qualitatively and quantitatively – if quenching by atomic oxygen as well as multi-quantum collisional relaxation by O2 is considered. If a linear relationship between emission peak altitude and vibrational level is assumed, then a peak altitude difference of roughly 0.5 km per vibrational level is inferred from both the SCIAMACHY observations and the model simulations.

  17. On the Possibility of Observing H2 Emission from Primordial Molecular Cloud Kernels

    Kamaya, H; Kamaya, Hideyuki; Silk, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    We study the prospects for observing H$_2$ emission during the assembly of primordial molecular cloud kernels. The primordial molecular cloud cores, which resemble those at the present epoch, can emerge around $1+z=20$ according to recent numerical simulations. The kernels form inside the cores, and the first stars will appear inside the kernels. A kernel typically contracts to form one of the first generation stars with an accretion rate that is as large as $\\sim 0.01 M_\\odot$ year$^{-1}$. This occurs due to the primordial abundances that result in a kernel temperature of order 1000K, and the collapsing kernel emits H$_2$ line radiation at a rate $\\sim 10^{35}$ erg sec$^{-1}$. Principally $J=5-3$ (v=0) rotational emission of H$_2$ is expected. At redshift $1+z=20$, the expected flux is $\\sim 0.01~\\mu$Jy for a single kernel. While an individual object is not observable by any facilities available in the near future, the expected assembly of primordial star clusters on sub-galactic scales can result in fluxes ...

  18. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  19. First experiment of spectrometric observation of hydroxyl emission and rotational temperature in the mesopause in China

    ZHU YaJun; XU JiYao; YUAN Wei; LIU Xiao

    2012-01-01

    A SpectroMeter of Atmospheric RadiaTion (SMART) was developed and installed at the Xinglong station of the National Astronomical Observatories in Hebei province,China,which was supported by the Meridian Project [ 1].The experimental tests of spectrometric observation of the hydroxyl emission and rotational temperature in China were conducted for the first time on the night of February 23,2011 and the night of April 27,2011,respectively.OH 6-2 band and OH 8-3 band spectra were measured and the rotational temperature was retrieved.Hourly average temperatures (186.82+-6.40) K of OH 8-3 band and (178.07±6.73) K of OH 6-2 band were derived from the spectra observed on the night of February 23,2011.Intensities and rotational temperature against local time were determined by the spectra measured in the whole night of April 27,2011.The rotational temperature was consistent with the spatial average temperature of NRLMSISE00 empirical model at height 83-91 km and the average temperature of TIMED/SABER from April to May of seven years at height 83-91 km,with some discrepancies.The results showed that the new instrument and the retrieval method of the rotational temperature can give reasonable results of the airglow emission of OH and the temperature of mesopause.

  20. Observations and modeling of forward and reflected chorus waves captured by THEMIS

    O. Agapitov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Discrete ELF/VLF chorus emissions are the most intense electromagnetic plasma waves observed in the radiation belts of the Earth's magnetosphere. Chorus emissions, whistler-mode wave packets propagating roughly along magnetic field lines from a well-localized source in the vicinity of the magnetic equator to polar regions, can be reflected at low altitudes. After reflection, wave packets can return to the equatorial plane region. Understanding of whistler wave propagation and reflection is critical to a correct description of wave-particle interaction in the radiation belts. We focus on properties of reflected chorus emissions observed by the THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms spacecraft Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM and Electric Field Instrument (EFI at ELF/VLF frequencies up to 4 kHz at L≥8. We determine the direction of the Poynting flux and wave vector distribution for forward and reflected chorus waves. Although both types of chorus waves were detected near the magnetic equator and have similar, discrete structure and rising tones, reflected waves are attenuated by a factor of 10–30 and have 10% higher frequency than concurrently-observed forward waves. Modeling of wave propagation and reflection using geometrical optics ray-tracing allowed us to determine the chorus source region location and explain observed propagation characteristics. We find that reflected wave attenuation at a certain spatial region is caused by divergence of the ray paths of these non-ducted emissions, and that the frequency shift is caused by generation of the reflected waves at lower L-shells where the local equatorial gyrofrequency is larger.

  1. Theoretical analysis of conditions for observation of plasma oscillations in semiconductors from pulsed terahertz emission

    Reklaitis, Antanas, E-mail: reklaitis@pfi.lt [Semiconductor Physics Institute, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, A. Goshtauto 11, Vilnius 01108 (Lithuania)

    2014-08-28

    Oscillations of electron-hole plasma generated by femtosecond optical pulse in freestanding semiconductor are studied using hydrodynamic model and Monte Carlo simulations. The conditions required for the observation of coherent plasma oscillations in THz emission from semiconductor are determined. It is shown that several conditions have to be fulfilled in order to observe coherent plasma oscillations. First, the intensity of the optical pulse must exceed some threshold value. Second, the optical absorption depth must exceed the thickness of the built-in electric field region. Third, the generation of electron-hole pairs with uniform illumination is required, i.e., the laser beam with the flattop intensity profile has to be used. It is found that the duration of the optical pulse does not play a vital role in the development of plasma oscillations.

  2. Soft X-ray Observation of the Prompt Emission of GRB100418A

    Imatani, Ritsuko; Nakahira, Satoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Arimoto, Makoto; Morooka, Yoshitaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the prompt emission of GRB100418A, from its beginning by the MAXI/SSC (0.7-7 keV) on board the International Space Station followed by the Swift/XRT (0.3-10 keV) observation. The light curve can be fitted by a combination of a power law component and an exponential component (decay constant is $31.6\\pm 1.6$). The X-ray spectrum is well expressed by the Band function with $E_{\\rm p}\\leq$8.3 keV. This is the brightest GRB showing a very low value of $E_{\\rm p}$. It is also consistent with the Yonetoku-relation ($E_{\\rm p}$-$L_{\\rm p}$) while it is not clear with the Amati-relation ($E_{\\rm p}$-$E_{\\rm iso}$).

  3. Fermi Observations of high-energy gamma-ray emissions from GRB 080916C

    Abdo, A A; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, Guido; Baring, Matthew G; Bastieri, Denis; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, Elliott D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, Thompson H; Burrows, David N; Busetto, Giovanni; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, Annalisa; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C.C.Teddy; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Cominsky, Lynn R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; DeKlotz, M; Dermer, C D; De Angelis, Alessandro; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto e Silva, Eduardo; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, Justin D; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, Thomas Lynn; Godfrey, Gary L; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J.Eric; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, Alice K; Hayashida, M; Hays, Elizabeth A; Hernando Morata, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knodlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, Frederick Gabriel Ivar; Kuss, Michael; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, Pasquale; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, Sheila; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Miszaros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, Igor Vladimirovich; Murgia, Simona; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okumura, Akira; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, Vahe; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, Troy A; Preece, R; Rainr, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, Soebur; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, Thierry; Reyes, Luis C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P.M.Saz; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgro, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, Jean-Luc; Stecker, Floyd William; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, Daniel J; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, Diego F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.

  4. Supermassive binary black holes - possible observational effects in the x-ray emission

    Jovanović Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we discuss the possible observational effects in the X-ray emission from two relativistic accretion disks in a supermassive binary black hole system. For that purpose we developed a model and performed numerical simulations of the X-ray radiation from a relativistic accretion disk around a supermassive black hole, based on the ray-tracing method in the Kerr metric, and applied it to the case of the close binary supermassive black holes. Our results indicate that the broad Fe Kα line is a powerful tool for detecting such systems and studying their properties. The most favorable candidates for observational studies are the supermassive binary black holes in the galactic mergers during the phase when the orbital velocities of their components are very large and exceed several thousand kms -1. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176003: Gravitation and the Large Scale Structure of the Universe i br. 176001: Astrophysical Spectroscopy of Extragalactic Objects

  5. Soft X-ray observation of the prompt emission of GRB 100418A

    Imatani, Ritsuko; Tomida, Hiroshi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Arimoto, Makoto; Morooka, Yoshitaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    We have observed the prompt emission of GRB 100418A from its beginning captured by the MAXI SSC (0.7-7 keV) on board the International Space Station followed by the Swift XRT (0.3-10 keV) observation. The light curve can be fitted by a combination of a power-law component and an exponential component (the decay constant is 31.6 ± 1.6 s). The X-ray spectrum is well expressed by the Band function with Ep ≤ 8.3 keV. This is the brightest gamma-ray burst showing a very low value of Ep. It satisfies the Yonetoku relation (Ep-Lp). It is also consistent with the Amati relation (Ep-Eiso) within a 2.5σ level.

  6. LOW-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSIENT QUASI-PERIODIC RADIO EMISSION FROM THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Sasikumar Raja, K.; Ramesh, R., E-mail: sasikumar@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India)

    2013-09-20

    We report low-frequency observations of quasi-periodic, circularly polarized, harmonic type III radio bursts whose associated sunspot active regions were located close to the solar limb. The measured periodicity of the bursts at 80 MHz was ≈5.2 s, and their average degree of circular polarization (dcp) was ≈0.12. We calculated the associated magnetic field B (1) using the empirical relationship between the dcp and B for the harmonic type III emission, and (2) from the observed quasi-periodicity of the bursts. Both the methods result in B ≈ 4.2 G at the location of the 80 MHz plasma level (radial distance r ≈ 1.3 R{sub ☉}) in the active region corona.

  7. Observations of X-rays and Thermal Dust Emission from the Supernova Remnant Kes 75

    Morton, T D; Borkowski, K J; Reynolds, S P; Helfand, D J; Gaensler, B M; Hughes, J P

    2007-01-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the composite Galactic supernova remnant Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). We use the detected flux at 24 microns and hot gas parameters from fitting spectra from new, deep X-ray observations to constrain models of dust emission, obtaining a dust-to-gas mass ratio M_dust/M_gas ~0.001. We find that a two-component thermal model, nominally representing shocked swept-up interstellar or circumstellar material and reverse-shocked ejecta, adequately fits the X-ray spectrum, albeit with somewhat high implied densities for both components. We surmise that this model implies a Wolf-Rayet progenitor for the remnant. We also present infrared flux upper limits for the central pulsar wind nebula.

  8. Low frequency observations of transient quasi-periodic radio emission from the solar atmosphere

    Raja, K Sasikumar

    2016-01-01

    We report low frequency observations of the quasi-periodic, circularly polarized, harmonic type III radio bursts whose associated sunspot active regions were located close to the solar limb. The measured periodicity of the bursts at 80 MHz was $\\approx$ 5.2 s and their average degree of circular polarization ($dcp$) was $\\approx 0.12$. We calculated the associated magnetic field $B$ : (1) using the empirical relationship between the $dcp$ and $B$ for the harmonic type III emission, and (2) from the observed quasi-periodicity of the bursts. Both the methods result in $B \\approx$ 4.2 G at the location of the 80 MHz plasma level (radial distance $r \\approx 1.3~\\rm R_{\\odot}$) in the active region corona.

  9. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE CONTINUUM AND WATER MASER EMISSION IN THE IRAS 19217+1651 REGION

    Rodriguez-Esnard, T.; Trinidad, M. A. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo Postal 144, Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico CP 36000 (Mexico); Migenes, V., E-mail: tatiana@iga.cu, E-mail: trinidad@astro.ugto.mx, E-mail: vmigenes@byu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, ESC-N145, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We report interferometric observations of the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 19217+1651. We observed the radio continuum (1.3 cm and 3.6 cm) and water maser emission using the Very Large Array (VLA-EVLA) in transition mode (configuration A). Two radio continuum sources were detected at both wavelengths, I19217-A and I19217-B. In addition, 17 maser spots were observed distributed mainly in two groups, M1 and M2, and one isolated maser. This latter could be indicating the relative position of another continuum source which we did not detect. The results indicate that I19217-A appears to be consistent with an ultracompact H II region associated with a zero-age main-sequence B0-type star. Furthermore, the 1.3 cm continuum emission of this source suggests a cometary morphology. In addition, I19217-B appears to be an H II region consisting of at least two stars, which may be contributing to its complex structure. It was also found that the H{sub 2}O masers of the group M1 are apparently associated with the continuum source I19217-A. These are tracing motions which are not gravitationally bound according to their spatial distribution and kinematics. They also seem to be describing outflows in the direction of the elongated cometary region. On the other hand, the second maser group, M2, could be tracing the base of a jet. Finally, infrared data from Spitzer, Midcourse Space Experiment, and IRIS show that IRAS 19217+1651 is embedded inside a large open bubble, like a broken ring, which possibly has affected the morphology of the cometary H II region observed at 1.3 cm.

  10. Dust emissions of organic soils observed in the field and laboratory

    Zobeck, T. M.; Baddock, M. C.; Guo, Z.; Van Pelt, R.; Acosta-Martinez, V.; Tatarko, J.

    2011-12-01

    . In the laboratory wind tunnel, samples with the same ratio of erodible to non-erodible aggregates as the field soils were abraded and dust emissions were observed with the same sampling system as used in the field wind tunnel. In the dust generator, 5 gm samples emission rates with the laboratory results will be presented.

  11. The development of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP) by designing new analysing software and by setting up new recording locations of radio VLF/LF signals in Romania

    Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Petruta Constantin, Angela; Emilian Toader, Victorin; Toma-Danila, Dragos; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Dolea, Paul; Septimiu Moldovan, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Based on scientific evidences supporting the causality between earthquake preparatory stages, space weather and solar activity and different types of electromagnetic (EM) disturbances together with the benefit of having full access at ground and space based EM data, INFREP proposes a complex and cross correlated investigation of phenomena that occur in the coupled system Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionsophere in order to identify possible causes responsible for anomalous effects observed in the propagation characteristics of radio waves, especially at low (LF) and very low frequency (VLF). INFREP, a network of VLF (20-60 kHz) and LF (150-300 kHz) radio receivers, was put into operation in Europe in 2009, having as principal goal, the study of disturbances produced by the earthquakes on the propagation properties of these signals. The Romanian NIEP VLF / LF monitoring system consisting in a radio receiver -made by Elettronika S.R.L. (Italy) and provided by the Bari University- and the infrastructure that is necessary to record and transmit the collected data, is a part of the international initiative INFREP. The NIEP VLF / LF receiver installed in Romania was put into operation in February 2009 in Bucharest and relocated to the Black-Sea shore (Dobruja Seismologic Observatory) in December 2009. The first development of the Romanian EM monitoring system was needed because after changing the receiving site from Bucharest to Eforie we obtained unsatisfactory monitoring data, characterized by large fluctuations of the received signals' intensities. Trying to understand this behavior has led to the conclusion that the electric component of the electromagnetic field was possibly influenced by the local conditions. Starting from this observation we have run some tests and changed the vertical antenna with a loop-type antenna that is more appropriate in highly electric-field polluted environments. Since the amount of recorded data is huge, for streamlining the research process

  12. Satellite observations indicate substantial spatiotemporal variability in biomass burning NOx emission factors for South America

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K.F.; Werf, van de G.R.

    2014-01-01

    Biomass burning is an important contributor to global total emissions of NOx (NO+NO2). Generally bottom-up fire emissions models calculate NOx emissions by multiplying fuel consumption estimates with static biome-specific emission factors, defined in units of grams of NO per kilogram of dry matter c

  13. Generation mechanism of whistler-mode chorus emissions

    Omura, Yoshiharu

    We describe the nonlinear dynamics of resonant electrons interacting with a coherent whistler-mode wave and the formation of electromagnetic electron holes or hills in the velocity phase space. In the presence of the inhomogeneity due to the frequency variation and the gradient of the magnetic field, the electron holes or hills result in resonant currents generating rising-tone emissions (1, 2) or falling-tone emissions (3), respectively. After formation of a coherent wave at the maximum linear growth rate, triggering of the nonlinear wave growth takes place when the wave amplitude is close to the optimum wave amplitude (4). The wave amplitude also has to be above the threshold amplitude (2) so that the nonlinear wave growth can occur as an absolute instability at the magnetic equator. The triggering process is repeated at progressively higher frequencies in the case of a rising-tone emission, generating subpackets of a chorus element. We also describe the mechanism of nonlinear wave damping due to quasi-oblique propagation from the equator (2), which results in the formation of a gap at half the electron cyclotron frequency, separating a long rising-tone chorus emission into the upper-band and lower-band chorus emissions (5). *References (1) Y. Omura,Y. Katoh, and D. Summers, Theory and simulation of the generation of whistler-mode chorus, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A04223, 2008. (2) Y. Omura, , M. Hikishima, Y. Katoh, D. Summers, and S. Yagitani, Nonlinear mechanisms of lower band and upper band VLF chorus emissions in the magnetosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 114, A07217, 2009. (3) Nunn, D., and Y. Omura, A computational and theoretical analysis of falling frequency VLF emissions, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A08228, 2012. (4) Omura, Y., and D. Nunn, Triggering process of whistler mode chorus emissions in the magnetosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 116, A05205, 2011. (5) S. Kurita, Y. Katoh, Y. Omura, V. Angelopoulos, C. M. Cully, O. Le Contel, and H. Misawa, THEMIS observation of

  14. Fracture induced electromagnetic emissions: extending laboratory findings by observations at the geophysical scale

    Potirakis, Stelios M.; Contoyiannis, Yiannis; Kopanas, John; Kalimeris, Anastasios; Antonopoulos, George; Peratzakis, Athanasios; Eftaxias, Konstantinos; Nomicos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Under natural conditions, it is practically impossible to install an experimental network on the geophysical scale using the same instrumentations as in laboratory experiments for understanding, through the states of stress and strain and their time variation, the laws that govern the friction during the last stages of EQ generation, or to monitor (much less to control) the principal characteristics of a fracture process. Fracture-induced electromagnetic emissions (EME) in a wide range of frequency bands are sensitive to the micro-structural chances. Thus, their study constitutes a nondestructive method for the monitoring of the evolution of damage process at the laboratory scale. It has been suggested that fracture induced MHz-kHz electromagnetic (EM) emissions, which emerge from a few days up to a few hours before the main seismic shock occurrence permit a real time monitoring of the damage process during the last stages of earthquake preparation, as it happens at the laboratory scale. Since the EME are produced both in the case of the laboratory scale fracture and the EQ preparation process (geophysical scale fracture) they should present similar characteristics in these two scales. Therefore, both the laboratory experimenting scientists and the experimental scientists studying the pre-earthquake EME could benefit from each- other's results. Importantly, it is noted that when studying the fracture process by means of laboratory experiments, the fault growth process normally occurs violently in a fraction of a second. However, a major difference between the laboratory and natural processes is the order-of-magnitude differences in scale (in space and time), allowing the possibility of experimental observation at the geophysical scale for a range of physical processes which are not observable at the laboratory scale. Therefore, the study of fracture-induced EME is expected to reveal more information, especially for the last stages of the fracture process, when it

  15. Response of low latitude D-region ionosphere to the Total Solar Eclipse of 22 July 2009, deduced from ELF/VLF analysis

    Singh, A. K.; Singh, R.; Singh, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Response of the D-region of the ionosphere to the total solar eclipse of 22 July 2009 at low latitude, Varanasi (geomagnetic lat = 140 55'N, longitude = 1540 E, dip. angle = 37.30) was investigated using ELF/VLF radio signal. The solar eclipse started at 05:30:04.4 hrs IST and lasted up to 07:27 hrs IST with totally from 6.25 IST to 6.27 IST.The changes in D-region ionospheric VLF reflection heights and electron density during eclipse have been estimated from tweek analysis. The reflection height increased from ~90 km from the first occurrence of tweek to about 93-94 km at the totality and then decreased to ~89 km at the end of the eclipse. The reflection heights are lower by 2-3 km as compared to the usual nighttime tweek reflection heights. The electron density is found to vary between 25-27 cm-3 at the reflection heights. The significant increase in tweek reflection height of about 15 km during the eclipse as compared to the daytime (morning) reflection heights of ~ 78 km is observed. Observations suggest that about 30-40% obscuration of solar disc can lead to the tweeks occurrence which otherwise occur only in the nighttime. A significant increase of 3dB in the strength of the amplitude of VLF signal is observed around the time of TSE as compared to a control day. These low latitude ionospheric perturbations on the eclipse day are discussed and compared with other normal days. During a solar eclipse, the decrease in solar flux due to moon's shadow causes sudden change in the D-region physical and chemical processes. During the totality due to blocking of Lyman-α 1215Å (major D-region ionizing radiation) by moon's umbral shadow, the electron density decreases drastically towards the nighttime values [Smith, 1972]. During the TSE, there was no production of ionization in the ionosphere and the ions and electrons in the lowest part of it recombined at a rapid rate resulting a depletion in the electron density in the 'D' region of the Ionosphere and hence an

  16. Copernicus observations of Ly-alpha and Mg II emission from HR 1099 /V711 Tauri/ and UX Ari

    Weiler, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of two RS CVn binaries obtained with Copernicus are described. High-resolution (0.05 A) U1 observations indicate that both HR 1099 and UX Ari display broad Ly-alpha emission. The Ly-alpha emission strength from HR 1099 is variable and seems to be correlated with orbital phase, while the UX Ari results indicate no significant variation. Moderate resolution (0.51 A) V2 scans of both systems show variable Mg II h and k emission-line profiles which usually matched the velocity of the more active star in each binary. Additionally, displaced emission components were seen at velocities of up to + or - 250 km/s, indicative of high-velocity gas motions. The radial velocities of these emission features from HR 1099 are marginally correlated with orbital phase. Highly active and variable chromospheric phenomena are found to be the most consistent explanation of these results.

  17. Intra-plasmaspheric wave power density deduced from long-term DEMETER measurements of terrestrial VLF transmitter wave amplitudes

    Lauben, D.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U.

    2012-12-01

    We deduce the 3d intra-plasmaspheric distribution of VLF wave power between conjugate regions of strong VLF wave amplitudes as measured by DEMETER for high-power terrestrial VLF transmitters during its ~6-yr lifetime. We employ a mixed WKB/full-wave technique to solve for the primary and secondary electromagnetic and electrostatic waves which are transmitted and reflected from strong cold-plasma density gradients and posited irregularities, in order to match the respective end-point measured amplitude distributions. Energy arriving in the conjugate region and also escaping to other regions of the magnetosphere is note. The resulting 3d distribution allows improved estimates for the long-term average particle scattering induced by terrestrial VLF transmitters.

  18. Quantifying the Seasonal and Interannual Variability of North American Isoprene Emissions Using Satellite Observations of the Formaldehyde Column

    Palmer, Paul I.; Abbot, Dorian S.; Fu, Tzung-May; Jacob, Daniel J.; Chance, Kelly; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Guenther, Alex; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Stanton, Jenny C.; Pilling, Michael J.; Pressley, Shelley N.; Lamb, Brian; Sumner, Anne Louise

    2006-01-01

    Quantifying isoprene emissions using satellite observations of the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns is subject to errors involving the column retrieval and the assumed relationship between HCHO columns and isoprene emissions, taken here from the GEOS-CHEM chemical transport model. Here we use a 6-year (1996-2001) HCHO column data set from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument to (1) quantify these errors, (2) evaluate GOME-derived isoprene emissions with in situ flux measurements and a process-based emission inventory (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature, MEGAN), and (3) investigate the factors driving the seasonal and interannual variability of North American isoprene emissions. The error in the GOME HCHO column retrieval is estimated to be 40%. We use the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) to quantify the time-dependent HCHO production from isoprene, alpha- and beta-pinenes, and methylbutenol and show that only emissions of isoprene are detectable by GOME. The time-dependent HCHO yield from isoprene oxidation calculated by MCM is 20-30% larger than in GEOS-CHEM. GOME-derived isoprene fluxes track the observed seasonal variation of in situ measurements at a Michigan forest site with a -30% bias. The seasonal variation of North American isoprene emissions during 2001 inferred from GOME is similar to MEGAN, with GOME emissions typically 25% higher (lower) at the beginning (end) of the growing season. GOME and MEGAN both show a maximum over the southeastern United States, but they differ in the precise location. The observed interannual variability of this maximum is 20-30%, depending on month. The MEGAN isoprene emission dependence on surface air temperature explains 75% of the month-to-month variability in GOME-derived isoprene emissions over the southeastern United States during May-September 1996-2001.

  19. A multiple-mode three-dimensional model of VLF propagation in the earth-ionosphere waveguide in the presence of localized D region disturbances

    Poulsen, William L.; Inan, Umran S.; Bell, Timothy F.

    1993-01-01

    Transient localized D region disturbances, such as those associated with lightning discharges, affect the characteristics of VLF waves propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. In particular, both phase and amplitude changes in the subionospheric signal can be observed at receiving sites as a result of the wave scattering that takes place in the disturbed region. In the present paper we present a multiple-mode three-dimensional model of VLF propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide in the presence of localized D region disturbances. The model takes into account great circle (GC) propagation paths with realistic ground and ionospheric conductivity changes that result in mode conversion along the path. It is assumed that conductivity changes transverse to the GC paths are negligible except in the vicinity of the D region disturbance and that mode coupling is negligible within the disturbed region. This new model is applied to experimental observations and is found to be in general agreement. The diagnostics potential of the model for characterizing energetic particle precipitation events is discussed.

  20. Building and the analysis of two radio antennas (SSRT) in vlf zone

    Marbouti, Marjan; Khakian Ghomi, Mehdi; Salmanpour Paeen Afrakati, Mohammad Reza; Riahi, Jahad; Ghanbari, Keyvan; Moradi Khanghahi, Abolfazl; Nahavandi, Behzad

    This design is a joint project between telecommunication and astrophysics subjects carried out for the first time in Iran. In this article, we engage in building of two looped antennas (SSRT) that the first type of it is a SSRT (octagonal looped antenna) with an outer filter system of 80 cm diameter, cable thickness of 0.55 mm, inductance 38.24 MH and capacitor’s capacitance of 919 pf. The software of Spectrum lab and SSRT Robot2 were used for software section and to store the related information. While second antenna type is a SSRT (two interconnected square type loop antennas) with inner filter system in the form of two interconnected squares with beveled corners such that the number of windings for outer square are (larger) 60 rounds, while for inner square (smaller) 95 rounds. The CATIA software was used to design the antenna structure and “Protel Dxp’’ software has been used to design its circuit. A program has been designed with C# language for receiving section and processing of data. Considering the closeness of Turkey transmitter to the city of Tehran (test location), the designed SSRTs are responsible for receiving the frequency of 26.7 kHz while TBB (Bafa, Turkey) is considered the frequency producing source for it. In the continuation of project, we started to store our receiving data from SSRTs following the calibration, average taking as well as noise elimination that was produced due to different factors such as the noises caused by electrical equipment and the everyday activities of telecommunication devices. In this stage, we were observing our receiving coincidences with all SSRTs as well as the Goes satellite. Afterwards, we dealt with the analysis of solar flares, sunrise-sunset effects and electrical disturbances. Then, in a separate project, the received data secured from 8 different VLF receivers were studied and examined, by means of Mr. Loudet receiver located in France, for the years of 2010, 2011 and 2012 and we attained the

  1. Efficiency of cold pool outflows in dust emission: central Saharan observations from Fennec

    Allen, Christopher; Washington, Richard; Engelstaedter, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The Fennec project has, for the first time, provided high quality high resolution instrument observations of the remote central Saharan atmosphere. Fennec Supersite 1 at Bordj-Badji Mokhtar (BBM) in south-west Algeria is located very close to the boreal summer global dust maximum and is an ideal location from which to investigate dust production mechanisms. A detailed analysis of observations taken during the 2011 intensive observation period (IOP) allows the dust to be partitioned by emission mechanism. Cold pool outflows are the most important mechanism, responsible for up to 65% of the dust during the IOP, followed by low level jets (LLJs) and dry convective plumes. This ranking is maintained whether the partitioning is done using lidar backscatter, nephelometer scattering or uplift potential. It is also consistent with aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements: the dustiest cold pool AOTs are always 3.0 or over, the dustiest LLJ AOTs are between 1.0 and 2.0 and the dustiest dry convective plume has an AOT of 1.25. The reason cold pool outflows raise more dust than the other two mechanisms is examined further. For locally emitting dust events, there is a positive correlation between lidar backscatter and wind speed at BBM as expected, but it is not particularly strong (r=0.4688, pcup anemometers do not provide three-dimensional wind measurements. Shear velocity (u*), a common metric used for calculating thresholds for erosion and sediment transport, does not take it into account. Model parameterizations of uplift are often based around u* and also do not account for the direction of vertical wind. Data from BBM suggest that these emission schemes may have missing processes.

  2. VHE gamma-ray emission from the FSRQs observed by the MAGIC telescopes

    Lindfors, E; de Almeida, U Barres; Mazin, D; Paneque, D; Saito, K; Gonzalez, J Becerra; Berger, K; De Caneva, G; Schultz, C; Sitarek, J; Stamerra, A; Tavecchio, F; Buson, S; D'Ammando, F; Hayashida, M; Tornikoski, M; Hovatta, T

    2013-01-01

    Among more than fifty blazars detected in very high energy (VHE, E>100GeV) gamma-rays, only three belong to the subclass of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs): PKS 1510-089, PKS 1222+216 and 3C 279. The detection of FSRQs in the VHE range is challenging, mainly because of their steep soft spectra in the GeV-TeV regime. MAGIC has observed and detected all FSRQs known to be VHE emitters up to now and found that they exhibit very different behavior. The 2010 discovery of PKS 1222+216 (z = 0.432) with the fast variability observed, challenges simple one-zone emission models and more complicated scenarios have been proposed. 3C 279 is the most distant VHE gamma-ray emitting AGN (z = 0.536), which was discovered by MAGIC in 2006 and detected again in 2007. In 2011 MAGIC observed 3C 279 two times: first during a monitoring campaign and later observations were triggered by a flare detected with Fermi-LAT. We present the MAGIC results and the multiwavelength behavior during this flaring epoch. Finally, we report the ...

  3. Field Observations of Methane Emissions from Unconventional and Conventional Fossil Fuel Exploration

    Dubey, M.; Lindenmaier, R.; Arata, C.; Costigan, K. R.; Frankenberg, C.; Kort, E. A.; Rahn, T. A.; Henderson, B. G.; Love, S. P.; Aubrey, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Energy from methane (CH4) has lower carbon dioxide and air pollutant emissions per unit energy produced than coal or oil making it a desirable fossil fuel. Hydraulic fracturing is allowing United States to harvest the nation's abundant domestic shale gas reservoirs to achieve energy independence. However, CH4 is a gas that is hard to contain during mining, processing, transport and end-use. Therefore fugitive CH4 leaks occur that are reported in bottom up inventories by the EPA. Recent targeted field observations at selected plays have provided top down CH4 leak estimates that are larger than the reported EPA inventories. Furthermore, no long-term regional baselines are available to delineate leaks from unconventional mining operations from historical conventional mining. We will report and compare observations of fugitive CH4 leaks from conventional and unconventional mining to understand changes from technology shifts. We will report in situ and regional column measurements of CH4, its isotopologue 13CH4 and ethane (C2H6) at our Four Corners site near Farmington, NM. The region has substantial coal bed methane, conventional oil and gas production, processing and distribution with minimal hydraulic fracturing activity. We observe large enhancements in in situ and regional column CH4 with distinct time dependence. Our in situ 13CH4 observations and remote C2H6/CH4 provide strong evidence of thermogenic sources. Comparisons of WRF-simulations with emissions inventory (Edgar) with our observations show that the fugitive CH4 leaks from conventional mining are 3 times greater than reported. We also compare in situ mobile surveys of fugitive CH4 and 13CH4 leak signals in basins with conventional (San Juan) mining and unconventional (Permian and Powder River) mining. A large number of active and closed wells were sampled in these regions. Furthermore, play scale surveys on public roads allowed us to gain a regional perspective. The composition of atmospheric 13CH4

  4. Derivation of an observation-based map of North African dust emission

    Evan, Amato T.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Zhao, Chun; Menut, Laurent; Schepanski, Kerstin; Flamant, C.; Doherty, Owen

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the emission, transport and deposition of aeolian dust have profound effects on regional climate, so that characterizing the lifecycle of dust in observations and improving the representation of dust in global climate models is necessary. A fundamental aspect of characterizing the dust cycle is quantifying surface dust fluxes, yet no spatially explicit estimates of this flux exist for the World’s major source regions. Here we present a novel technique for creating a map of the annual mean emitted dust flux for North Africa based on retrievals of dust storm frequency from the Meteosat Second Generation Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the relationship between dust storm frequency and emitted mass flux derived from the output of five models that simulate dust. Our results suggest that 64 (±16)% of all dust emitted from North Africa is from the Bodélé depression, and that 13 (±3)% of the North African dust flux is from a depression lying in the lee of the Aïr and Hoggar Mountains, making this area the second most important region of emission within North Africa.

  5. observations of hot molecular gas emission from embedded low-mass protostars

    Visser, R.; Kristensen, L. E.; Bruderer, S.;

    2012-01-01

    the observations quantitatively, to investigate the origin of the emission, and to use the lines as probes of the various heating mechanisms. Methods. The model consists of a spherical envelope with a power-law density structure and a bipolar outflow cavity. Three heating mechanisms are considered: passive heating...... such as luminosity and envelope mass. Results. The bulk of the gas in the envelope, heated by the protostellar luminosity, accounts for 3–10% of the CO luminosity summed over all rotational lines up to J = 40–39; it is best probed by low-J CO isotopologue lines such as C18O 2–1 and 3–2. The UV-heated gas and the C......-type shocks, probed by 12CO 10–9 and higher-J lines, contribute 20–80% each. The model fits show a tentative evolutionary trend: the CO emission is dominated by shocks in the youngest source and by UV-heated gas in the oldest one. This trend is mainly driven by the lower envelope density in more evolved...

  6. SOFIA observations of CO(12-11) emission along the L1157 bipolar outflow

    Eislöffel, Jochen; Güsten, Rolf; Wiesemeyer, Helmut; Gusdorf, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide is an excellent tracer of the physical conditions of gas in molecular outflows from young stars. To understand the outflow mechanism we need to investigate the origin of the molecular emission and the structure and interaction of the outflowing molecular gas. Deriving the physical parameters of the gas will help us to trace and understand the various gas components in the flow. We observed CO(12-11) line emission at various positions along the L1157 bipolar outflow with GREAT aboard SOFIA. Comparing these new data with CO(2-1), we find basically constant line ratios along the outflow and even at the position of the source. These line ratios lead us to estimates of 10^5 to 10^6 cm^-3 for the gas density and 60 to 100 K for the gas temperature of the outflowing gas. The constrained density and temperature values indicate that we are mostly tracing a low-velocity gas component everywhere along the outflow, which is intermediate between the already known cold gas component, which gets entrained in...

  7. Observed spectral energy distribution of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b

    Chen, Guo; Wang, Hongchi; Nikolov, Nikolay; Seemann, Ulf; Henning, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We aim to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED) for the emission from the dayside atmosphere of the hot Jupiter WASP-46b and to investigate its energy budget. We observed a secondary eclipse of WASP-46b simultaneously in the g'r'i'z'JHK bands using the GROND instrument on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope. Eclipse depths of the acquired light curves were derived to infer the brightness temperatures at multibands that cover the SED peak. We report the first detection of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b in the K band at 4.2-sigma level and tentative detections in the H (2.5-sigma) and J (2.3-sigma) bands, with flux ratios of 0.253 +0.063/-0.060%, 0.194 +/- 0.078%, and 0.129 +/- 0.055%, respectively. The derived brightness temperatures (2306 +177/-187K, 2462 +245/-302K, and 2453 +198/-258K, respectively) are consistent with an isothermal temperature profile of 2386K, which is significantly higher than the dayside-averaged equilibrium temperature, indicative of very poor heat redistribution eff...

  8. Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Galactic Foreground Emission

    Gold, B; Weiland, J L; Hill, R S; Kogut, A; Bennett, C L; Hinshaw, G; Dunkley, J; Halpern, M; Jarosik, N; Komatsu, E; Larson, D; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Nolta, M R; Page, L; Smith, K M; Spergel, D N; Tucker, G S; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] We present updated estimates of Galactic foreground emission using seven years of WMAP data. Using the power spectrum of differences between multi-frequency template-cleaned maps, we find no evidence for foreground contamination outside of the updated (KQ85y7) foreground mask. We place a 15 microKelvin upper bound on rms foreground contamination in the cleaned maps used for cosmological analysis. We find no indication in the polarization data of an extra "haze" of hard synchrotron emission from energetic electrons near the Galactic center. We provide an updated map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the internal linear combination (ILC) method, updated foreground masks, and updates to point source catalogs with 62 newly detected sources. Also new are tests of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) foreground fitting procedure against systematics in the time-stream data, and tests against the observed beam asymmetry. Within a few degrees of the Galactic plane, WMAP total intensity data show...

  9. Constraints on Anthropogenic NOx Emissions from Geostationary Satellite Observations in a Regional Chemical Data Assimilation System: Evaluation Using Observing System Simulation Experiments

    Liu, X.; Mizzi, A. P.; Anderson, J. L.; Fung, I. Y.; Cohen, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2) control the tropospheric ozone (O3) budget, the abundance of the hydroxyl radical (OH), the formation of organic and inorganic nitrate aerosol, and therefore affect air quality and climate. There remain significant uncertainties in the processes responsible for NOx emissions and subsequent mixing and chemical removal. NOx has a short lifetime and its emissions show high spatiotemporal variability at urban scale. Future geostationary satellite instruments including TEMPO, GEMS and Sentinel-4 will provide hourly time resolution and high spatial resolution observations providing maps of NO2 on diurnal and local scales. Here we determine the extent to which a TEMPO like instrument can quantify urban-scale NOx emissions using a regional data assimilation (DA) system comprising of a chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, a TEMPO simulator and the DART Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter. We generate synthetic TEMPO observations by sampling from a nature run on an urban scale domain. We consider the effect of albedo, surface pressure, solar and viewing angles and a priori NO2 profiles on the TEMPO NO2 averaging kernel to achieve scene-dependent instrument sensitivity. We estimate NOx emissions using DART in a state augmentation approach by including NOx emissions in the state vector being analyzed. The ensemble-based statistical estimation of error correlations between concentrations and emissions are critical as they determine the impact of assimilated observations. We describe observing system simulation experiments to explore the optimal approach in the ensemble-based DA system to estimate hourly-resolved NOx emissions from TEMPO NO2 observations. Several case studies will be presented examining the role of covariance localization length and chemical perturbations on the success of the approach.

  10. Ionospheric Perturbations Possibly Caused by Preseismic Electromagnetic Emissions

    Sgrigna, V.; Conti, L.; Corsi, M.; Galper, A. M.; Malvezzi, V.; Picozza, P.; Scrimaglio, R.; Stagni, L.; Zilpimiani, D.

    2001-05-01

    The seismicity is one of the main manifestations of the dynamical processes into the lithosphere. Electromagnetic emissions (EME) in the ULF/ELF/VLF/LF/HF range, that are related to the seismic activity, are known since a long time, but their generation mechanisms are not well understood. Two types of emissions can be considered. First, precursory emissions observed in a large frequency range, from some fraction of Hz up to several MHz, which occur a few hours before earthquakes and related to the rock microfracturing in the preparation focal area. Second, emissions observed after a shock and generally attributed to the propagation of acoustic-gravity waves. Several mechanisms have been proposed for the ionospheric perturbations caused by EME: ionospheric motion; Joule heating; plasma instabilities; precipitations of high energy charged particles (particle bursts) from the radiation belt. The explanation of the last phenomenon is connected with a disturbance of the particle flux in the lower radiation belt caused by the ULF EME waves generated in the forthcoming earthquake hypocenter and propagated upwards into the near Earth space. ULF EME interact with charged particles trapped by the Geomagnetic field modifying their pitch angle and provoking the precipitation of such particles from the radiation belt. The precipitated particle bursts (PB) drift around the Earth along the L-shell which corresponds to the earthquake epicenter. The results of correlations between PBs and earthquakes will be reported.

  11. Recent Large Reduction in Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Chinese Power Plants Observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    Li, Can; Zhang, Qiang; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Streets, David G.; He, Kebin; Tsay, Si-Chee; Gleason, James F.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard NASA's Aura satellite observed substantial increases in total column SO2 and tropospheric column NO2 from 2005 to 2007, over several areas in northern China where large coal-fired power plants were built during this period. The OMI-observed SO2/NO2 ratio is consistent with the SO2/ NO2, emissions estimated from a bottom-up approach. In 2008 over the same areas, OMI detected little change in NO2, suggesting steady electricity output from the power plants. However, dramatic reductions of S0 2 emissions were observed by OMI at the same time. These reductions confirm the effectiveness of the flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) devices in reducing S02 emissions, which likely became operational between 2007 and 2008. This study further demonstrates that the satellite sensors can monitor and characterize anthropogenic emissions from large point sources.

  12. Seasonal and diurnal variation of ELF emission occurrences at 750-Hz band observed at geomagnetically conjugate stations

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki (Yamagata Univ. (Japan)); Sato, Natsuo (National Inst. of Polar Research, Tokyo (Japan))

    1987-06-01

    Statistical characteristics of emission occurrence are examined, using digital data of 750-Hz intensity records obtained at the conuugate pai of statins, Syowa Station in Antarrctica and Husafell in Iceland. The geographic local time at Syowa and Husafell is magnetic local time plus 3 hours and minur 1 hour, respectively. The following notable diurnal variations and seasonal variations were found: (1) The emissions were mostly observed during the daytime in the conjugate region. However, the magnetic local time when the emission occurrence rate reached maximum at Husafell was 2-3 hours later than that at Syowa. (2) The seasonal variations of emission occurrence showed the same tendency at the conjugate stations. The emission intensities showed a maximum during local summer and a minimum during local winter in both hemispheres. The ratio fo average emission intensity in each season to the intensity in winter is approximately 2.1-2.2 for summer, 1.7-1.9 for autumn, and 1.7 for spring. From these statistical characteristics, ELF emission intensity strongly depends on not only magnetic local time but also geographic local time and seasons, suggesting that ELF emissions observed on the ground are strongly controlled by the sunlight effects. The sunlight may affect the asymmetry of wave duct enhancement and wave propagation from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere in both hemisphers. Other effects are also discussed in this paper.

  13. Occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane observed in stormwater biofiltration systems

    Grover, Samantha P.P., E-mail: samantha.grover@monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Cohan, Amanda, E-mail: acoh5@student.monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Chan, Hon Sen, E-mail: hon.sen.chan@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Livesley, Stephen J., E-mail: sjlive@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, Richmond, Victoria, 3121 (Australia); Beringer, Jason, E-mail: jason.beringer@monash.edu [School of Geography and Environmental Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Monash Water for Liveability, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Daly, Edoardo, E-mail: edoardo.daly@monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Monash Water for Liveability, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia)

    2013-11-01

    inflow events, which were not seen in other urban systems. CO{sub 2} fluxes increased with soil temperature in both cells, and in the cell without the saturated zone CO{sub 2} fluxes decreased as soil moisture increased. Other studies of CO{sub 2} fluxes from urban soils have found both similar and larger CO{sub 2} emissions than those measured in the biofilter. The results of this study suggest that the greenhouse gas footprint of stormwater treatment warrant consideration in the planning and implementation of engineered green infrastructures. - Highlights: ► First study of greenhouse gas fluxes from a stormwater biofilter. ► Observed occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane. ► Biofilter designs with and without a saturated zone were net sinks for methane. ► Carbon dioxide emissions were four times less than those from lawns.

  14. Observations of the Quadrantid meteor shower from 2008 to 2012: Orbits and emission spectra

    Madiedo, José M.; Espartero, Francisco; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Pujols, Pep; Pastor, Sensi; de los Reyes, José A.; Rodríguez, Diego

    2016-09-01

    The activity of the Quadrantids in January during several years (2008, 2010, 2011 and 2012) has been investigated in the framework of the SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN). For this purpose, an array of high-sensitivity CCD video devices and CCD all-sky cameras have been used to obtain multi-station observations of these meteors. These allowed to obtain precise radiant and orbital information about this meteoroid stream. This paper presents a large set of orbital data (namely, 85 orbits) of Quadrantid meteoroids. Most meteors produced by these particles were recorded during the activity peak of this shower. Besides, we discuss four Quadrantid emission spectra. The tensile strength of Quadrantid meteoroids has been also obtained.

  15. Observations of the Quadrantid meteor shower from 2008 to 2012: orbits and emission spectra

    Madiedo, José M; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J; Pujols, Pep; Pastor, Sensi; Reyes, José A de los; Rodríguez, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The activity of the Quadrantids in January during several years (2008, 2010, 2011 and 2012) has been investigated in the framework of the SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN). For this purpose, an array of high-sensitivity CCD video devices and CCD all-sky cameras have been used to obtain multi-station observations of these meteors. These allowed us to obtain precise radiant and orbital information about this meteoroid stream. This paper presents a large set of orbital data (namely, 85 orbits) of Quadrantid meteoroids. Most meteors produced by these particles were recorded during the activity peak of this shower. Besides, we discuss four Quadrantid emission spectra. The tensile strength of Quadrantid meteoroids has been also obtained.

  16. Observation of field emission from GeSn nanoparticles epitaxially grown on silicon nanopillar arrays

    Di Bartolomeo, Antonio; Passacantando, Maurizio; Niu, Gang; Schlykow, Viktoria; Lupina, Grzegorz; Giubileo, Filippo; Schroeder, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We apply molecular beam epitaxy to grow GeSn-nanoparticles on top of Si-nanopillars patterned onto p-type Si wafers. We use x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm a metallic behavior of the nanoparticle surface due to partial Sn segregation as well as the presence of a superficial Ge oxide. We report the observation of stable field emission (FE) current from the GeSn-nanoparticles, with turn on field of 65 {{V}} μ {{{m}}}-{{1}} and field enhancement factor β ˜ 100 at anode-cathode distance of ˜0.6 μm. We prove that FE can be enhanced by preventing GeSn nanoparticles oxidation or by breaking the oxide layer through electrical stress. Finally, we show that GeSn/p-Si junctions have a rectifying behavior.

  17. XMM-Newton Observation of Fe K(alpha) Emission from a BAL QSO: Mrk 231

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from a 20 ksec XMM-Newton observation of Mrk 231. EPIC spectral data reveal strong line emission due to Fe K alpha, which has rarely been detected in this class, as BAL QSOs are very faint in the X-ray band. The line energy is consistent with an origin in neutral Fe. The width of the line is equivalent to a velocity dispersion approximately 18,000 kilometers per second and thus the line may be attributed to transmission and/or reflection from a distribution of emitting clouds. If, instead, the line originates in the accretion disk then the line strength and flat X-ray continuum support some contribution from a reflected component, although the data disfavor a model where the hard X-ray band is purely reflected X-rays. The line parameters are similar to those obtained for the Fe Ka line detected in another BAL QSO, H1413 + 117.

  18. Analysis of particulate emissions from tropical biomass burning using a global aerosol model and long-term surface observations

    Reddington, Carly L.; Spracklen, Dominick V.; Artaxo, Paulo; Ridley, David A.; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Arana, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    We use the GLOMAP global aerosol model evaluated against observations of surface particulate matter (PM2.5) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) to better understand the impacts of biomass burning on tropical aerosol over the period 2003 to 2011. Previous studies report a large underestimation of AOD over regions impacted by tropical biomass burning, scaling particulate emissions from fire by up to a factor of 6 to enable the models to simulate observed AOD. To explore the uncertainty in emissions we use three satellite-derived fire emission datasets (GFED3, GFAS1 and FINN1). In these datasets the tropics account for 66-84 % of global particulate emissions from fire. With all emission datasets GLOMAP underestimates dry season PM2.5 concentrations in regions of high fire activity in South America and underestimates AOD over South America, Africa and Southeast Asia. When we assume an upper estimate of aerosol hygroscopicity, underestimation of AOD over tropical regions impacted by biomass burning is reduced relative to previous studies. Where coincident observations of surface PM2.5 and AOD are available we find a greater model underestimation of AOD than PM2.5, even when we assume an upper estimate of aerosol hygroscopicity. Increasing particulate emissions to improve simulation of AOD can therefore lead to overestimation of surface PM2.5 concentrations. We find that scaling FINN1 emissions by a factor of 1.5 prevents underestimation of AOD and surface PM2.5 in most tropical locations except Africa. GFAS1 requires emission scaling factor of 3.4 in most locations with the exception of equatorial Asia where a scaling factor of 1.5 is adequate. Scaling GFED3 emissions by a factor of 1.5 is sufficient in active deforestation regions of South America and equatorial Asia, but a larger scaling factor is required elsewhere. The model with GFED3 emissions poorly simulates observed seasonal variability in surface PM2.5 and AOD in regions where small fires dominate, providing

  19. Radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts and its correlation with optical observations

    Takano, T.; Maki, K.; Yamori, A.

    This paper describes the most interesting phenomena of radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts. A projectile of polycarbonate with 1.1 g weight was accelerated by a rail gun to 3.8 km/sec, and hit two targets which are a 2 mm thick aluminum plate upstream and a 45 mm diameter aluminum column downstream, respectively. The projectile first breaks wires to give a triggering signal to a data recorder, then penetrates the aluminum plate, and finally hit the column, The emitted radio-waves propagate through the chamber window, and are received by antennas at each frequency band. The receivers in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands consist of a low noise amplifier, a mixer, a local oscillator and an IF amplifier , respectively. The receiver in 1 MHz-band is a simple RF amplifier. The outputs of all receivers are fed to a data recorder which is actually a high-speed digital oscilloscope with a large amount of memory. The radio-waves were successfully recorded in 22 GHz-band with 500 MHz bandwidth, in 2 GHz-band with 300 MHz bandwidth, and in 1MHz-band. The waveforms in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands coincide well each other, and are composed of two groups of sharp impulses with a separation of about 20 micro seconds. The width of an impulse is less than 2 n sec. which is the resolution limit of the data recorder. We carried out optical observations using an ultra-high speed camera simultaneously through another window of the chamber. The time interval between scenes is 2 micro sec. We can see a faint light of the projectile before the first impact to the plate, and then a brilliant gas exploding backward from the plate and forward to the column. After hitting the column target, the brilliant gas flows to the chamber wall and is reflected back to make a mixture with dark gas in the chamber. Excellent correlation between radio-wave emission and the observed optical phenomena was obtained in the experiment. It is easily conceived that the radio-waves consist of quite a wide frequency

  20. CO2 non-LTE limb emissions in Mars' atmosphere as observed by OMEGA/Mars Express

    Piccialli, A.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Määttänen, A.; González-Galindo, F.; Audouard, J.; Altieri, F.; Forget, F.; Drossart, P.; Gondet, B.; Bibring, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    We report on daytime limb observations of Mars upper atmosphere acquired by the OMEGA instrument on board the European spacecraft Mars Express. The strong emission observed at 4.3 μm is interpreted as due to CO2 fluorescence of solar radiation and is detected at a tangent altitude in between 60 and 110 km. The main value of OMEGA observations is that they provide simultaneously spectral information and good spatial sampling of the CO2 emission. In this study we analyzed 98 dayside limb observations spanning over more than 3 Martian years, with a very good latitudinal and longitudinal coverage. Thanks to the precise altitude sounding capabilities of OMEGA, we extracted vertical profiles of the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) emission at each wavelength and we studied their dependence on several geophysical parameters, such as the solar illumination and the tangent altitude. The dependence of the non-LTE emission on solar zenith angle and altitude follows a similar behavior to that predicted by the non-LTE model. According to our non-LTE model, the tangent altitude of the peak of the CO2 emission varies with the thermal structure, but the pressure level where the peak of the emission is found remains constant at ˜0.03 ± 0.01 Pa, . This non-LTE model prediction has been corroborated by comparing SPICAM and OMEGA observations. We have shown that the seasonal variations of the altitude of constant pressure levels in SPICAM stellar occultation retrievals correlate well with the variations of the OMEGA peak emission altitudes, although the exact pressure level cannot be defined with the spectroscopy for the investigation of the characteristics of the atmosphere of Venus (SPICAM) nighttime data. Thus, observed changes in the altitude of the peak emission provide us information on the altitude of the 0.03 Pa pressure level. Since the pressure at a given altitude is dictated by the thermal structure below, the tangent altitude of the peak emission represents

  1. Observational Constraints on Radio Transient Emissions from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Papadopoulos, Joanna; Dispoto, D.; Cardena, B.; Kavic, M.; Ellingson, S.; Simonetti, J.; Cutchin, S.; Patterson, C.

    2012-01-01

    The merger of a binary neutron star pair is expected to generate a strong transient radio signal. This emission will be strongest at low-frequency and will disperse as it transverses the interstellar medium arriving at Earth after coincidentally emitted gravitational or (higher frequency) electromagnetic signals. The rate of compact object merger events is poorly constrained by observations. The Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) telescope is a low-frequency radio telescope initially located at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), which is sensitive to a frequency range of 29-47 MHz. It is being upgraded and relocated to western Virginia where it will continue to conduct low frequency observations. This instrument is an all-sky instrument designed to detect astronomical sources of radio transients. Using a series of observations taken during the ETA's first science run, we were able to constrain the rate of such merger events to <1.3 x 10-5 Mpc-3/yr.

  2. XMM-Newton Observations of MBM 12: More Constraints on the Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Bubble Emissions

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Smith, Randall K.; Edgar, Richard J.; Kuntz, Kip D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first analysis of an XMM-Newton observation of the nearby molecular cloud MBM 12. We find that in the direction of MBM 12 the total O VII (0.57 keV) triplet emission is 1.8(+0.5/-0.6) photons/sq cm/s/sr (or Line Units - LU) while for the O VIII (0.65 keV) line emission we find a 3(sigma) upper limit of Newton observations. This comparison provides new constraints on the relative heliospheric and Local Bubble contributions to the local diffuse X-ray background. The heliospheric SWCX model predicts 0.82 LU for O VII, which accounts for approx. 46+/-15% of the observed value, and 0.33 LU for the O VIII line emission consistent with the XMM-Newton observed value. We discuss our results in combination with previous observations of the MBM 12 with CHANDRA and Suzaku.

  3. Ranking of Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances by Means of the Duration of Vlf Perturbed Signal in Agreement with Satellite X-Ray Flux Classification

    Ammar Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ionosphere undergoes permanently solar flares that quickly change its properties inducing sometime unwanted effects. These changes, or events, are known as Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (SIDs and the knowledge of their magnitude may be of great interest to anticipate probable damages. Currently, there does not exist any classification of these ionospheric changes based on their amplitude due to the wide variability of its responses. The only way to surmise their importance is to study them indirectly, throughout the classification of the X-ray flux intensity recorded by satellites. An attempt of classification based on their duration was proposed by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO but it is not very accurate because SID’s duration is measured directly from the raw signal of the Very Low Frequency (VLF signal and/or the Low Frequency (LF signal. The aim of this work is to investigate, through a set of simple mathematical techniques applied to VLF/LF signals recorded by ground based receivers, the best method to estimate SIDs durations and then propose a new classification based on these durations.

  4. Development of a method for estimating emissions from oil and gas production sites utilizing remote observations

    There is a lack of information on emissions of ozone precursors, hazardous air pollutants, and greenhouse gases from oil and gas production operations, and measurement of these emissions presents many challenges. Assessment is complicated by the fugitive nature ofthe emissions, v...

  5. ELF/VLF/LF Radio Propagation and Systems Aspects (La Propagation des Ondes Radio ELF/VLF/LF et les Aspects Systemes)

    1993-05-01

    Umime 11uld sb’ngft R11111M fgM 7-1 INVESTIGATIONS OF EQUATORIAL IONOSPHERE NIGHTTIME MODE CONVERSION AT VLF* Verne Hildebrand IWG Corporation, 1940 Fifth...uniform, Symposium), supposing that has an length equal to Ŗa" and it is MIT, Cambridge oriented on the zz direction (fig.8). USA, Julio 1991 Let us...about 10 to 14 years. My from the floor, would someone like to start off? own experience as a systems engineer is that Verne Hildebrand the systems have

  6. Constraints on ship NOx emissions in Europe using GEOS-Chem and OMI satellite NO2 observations

    G. C. M. Vinken

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a top-down ship NOx emission inventory for the Baltic Sea, North Sea, Bay of Biscay and Mediterranean Sea, based on satellite observed tropospheric NO2 columns of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI for 2005–2006. We improved the representation of ship emissions in the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model, and compared simulated NO2 columns to consistent satellite observations. Relative differences between simulated and observed NO2 columns have been used to constrain ship emissions in four European seas (Baltic Sea, North Sea, Bay of Biscay and Mediterranean Sea. The constrained ship tracks account for 39% of total top-down European ship NOx emissions, which amounts to 0.96 Tg N for 2005, and 1.0 Tg N for 2006 (11–15% lower than the bottom-up EMEP ship emission inventory. Our results indicate that EMEP emissions in the Mediterranean Sea are too high (by 60% and misplaced by up to 150 km, which can have important consequences for local air quality simulations. In the North Sea, our top-down emissions amount to 0.05 Tg N for 2005 (35% lower than EMEP. Increased top-down emissions were found for the Baltic Sea and Bay of Biscay, with emission totals of 0.05 Tg N (131% higher than EMEP and 0.08 Tg N for 2005 (128% higher than EMEP, respectively. Our study explicitly accounts for the (non-linear sensitivity of satellite retrievals to changes in the a priori NO2 profiles. Although the effect of this sensitivity might be minor for small emission increments, our findings stress the need for consistent information in satellite retrieval and model, as satellite observations are never fully independent of model information (i.e. assumptions on vertical NO2 profiles. Our study provides for the first time a space-based top-down ship NOx emission inventory, and can serve as a framework for future studies to constrain ship emissions using satellite NO2 observations in other seas.

  7. Airborne observations of mercury emissions from the Chicago/Gary urban/industrial area during the 2013 NOMADSS campaign

    Gratz, L. E.; Ambrose, J. L.; Jaffe, D. A.; Knote, C.; Jaeglé, L.; Selin, N. E.; Campos, T.; Flocke, F. M.; Reeves, M.; Stechman, D.; Stell, M.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Tyndall, G. S.; Mauldin, R. L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Blake, N. J.

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric emissions from the Chicago/Gary urban/industrial area significantly enhance ambient mercury (Hg) concentrations and lead to increased levels of atmospheric Hg deposition within the Lake Michigan Basin. We use airborne observations collected over Lake Michigan during the 2013 Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury, and Aerosol Distributions, Sources, and Sinks (NOMADSS) campaign to quantify the outflow of total Hg (THg) emissions from the Chicago/Gary urban/industrial area. We use concurrent airborne measurements of THg, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) to calculate measured enhancement ratios and to characterize Chicago/Gary emissions with respect to the 2011 U.S. EPA National Emissions Inventory. We determine the observed THg/CO enhancement ratio in outflow from Chicago/Gary to be 0.21 ± 0.09 × 10-6 mol mol-1 (ppqv/ppbv), which is comparable to observations reported for other major U.S. urban/industrial areas. We also employ the FLEXPART Lagrangian transport and dispersion model to simulate air mass transport during plume encounters and to compare our observations to inventoried emission ratios. We find that our observed THg/CO enhancement ratios are 63-67% greater than the transport-corrected emission ratios for the Chicago/Gary area. Our results suggest that there are many small emission sources that are not fully accounted for within the inventory, and/or that the re-emission of legacy Hg is a significant source of THg to the atmosphere in this region.

  8. Growing season methane emissions from a permafrost peatland of northeast China: Observations using open-path eddy covariance method

    Yu, Xueyang; Song, Changchun; Sun, Li; Wang, Xianwei; Shi, Fuxi; Cui, Qian; Tan, Wenwen

    2017-03-01

    The mid-high latitude permafrost peatlands in the Northern Hemisphere is a major natural source of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Ecosystem scale CH4 emissions from a typical permafrost peatland in the Great Hing'an Mountains were observed during the growing season of 2014 and 2015 using the open-path eddy covariance method. Relevant environmental factors such as temperature and precipitation were also collected. There was a clear diurnal variation in methane emissions in the second half of each growing season, with significantly higher emission rates in the wet sector of study area. The daily CH4 exchange ranged from 1.8 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 to 40.2 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 in 2014 and ranged from -3.9 to 15.0 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 in 2015. There were no peaks of CH4 fluxes during the spring thawing period. However, large peaks of CH4 emission were found in the second half of both growing seasons. The CH4 emission after Jul 25th accounted for 77.9% of total growing season emission in 2014 and 85.9% in 2015. The total CH4 emission during the growing season of 2014 and 2015 was approximately 1.52 g CH4 m-2 and 0.71 g CH4 m-2, respectively. CH4 fluxes during the growing seasons were significantly correlated with thawing depth (R2 = 0.71, P growing season CH4 emissions in permafrost peatlands. Our multiyear observations indicate that the time-lagged volume of precipitation during the growing season is a key factor in interpreting locally inter-annual variations in CH4 emissions. Our results suggested that the low temperature in the deep soil layers effectively restricts methane production and emission rates; these conditions may create significant positive feedback under global climate change.

  9. Latest progress on interactions between VLF/ELF waves and energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between very/extremely low frequency (VLF/ELF) waves and energetic electrons play a fundamental role in dynamics occurring in the inner magnetosphere. Here, we briefly discuss global properties of VLF/ELF waves, along with the variability of the electron radiation belts associated with wave-particle interactions and radial diffusion. We provide cases of electron loss and acceleration as a result of wave-particle interactions primarily due to such waves, and particularly some preliminary results of 3D evolution of phase space density from our currently developing 3D code. We comment on the existing mechanisms responsible for acceleration and loss, and identify several critical issues that need to be addressed. We review latest progress and suggest open questions for future investigation.

  10. Spatial Scaling of Snow Observations and Microwave Emission Modeling During CLPX and Appropriate Satellite Sensor Resolution

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Accurate estimates of snow water equivalent and other properties play an important role in weather, natural hazard, and hydrological forecasting and climate modeling over a range of scales in space and time. Remote sensing-derived estimates have traditionally been of the "snapshot" type, but techniques involving models with assimilation are also being explored. In both cases, forward emission models are useful to understand the observed passive microwave signatures and developing retrieval algorithms. However, mismatches between passive microwave sensor resolutions and the scales of processes controlling subpixel heterogeneity can affect the accuracy of the estimates. Improving the spatial resolution of new passive microwave satellite sensors is a major desire in order to (literally) resolve such subpixel heterogeneity, but limited spacecraft and mission resources impose severe constraints and tradeoffs. In order to maximize science return while mitigating risk for a satellite concept, it is essential to understand the scaling behavior of snow in terms of what the sensor sees (brightness temperature) as well as in terms of the actual variability of snow. NASA's Cold Land Processes Experiment-1 (CLPX-1: Colorado, 2002 and 2003) was designed to provide data to measure these scaling behaviors for varying snow conditions in areas with forested, alpine, and meadow/pasture land cover. We will use observations from CLPX-1 ground, airborne, and satellite passive microwave sensors to examine and evaluate the scaling behavior of observed and modeled brightness temperatures and observed and retrieved snow parameters across scales from meters to 10's of kilometers. The conclusions will provide direct examples of the appropriate spatial sampling scales of new sensors for snow remote sensing. The analyses will also illustrate the effects and spatial scales of the underlying phenomena (e.g., land cover) that control subpixel heterogeneity.

  11. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    Odegard, N; Chuss, D T; Miller, N J

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for CMB measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 millimeters to 100 microns and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anticorrelation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenologic...

  12. Locating the Polar Cap Boundary of Postnoon Sector from Observations of 630.0 nm Auroral Emission at Zhongshan Station

    2002-01-01

    We studied the ground observations of 630. 0 nm auroral emission at Zhongshan Station to de-termine the polar cap boundary with the latitudinal profile of emission intensity. The open-closed field lineboundary is assumed to lie at the boundary between polar rain and plasma sheet precipitation. We assumethat nonprecipitation-dependent sources of 630. 0 nm emission cause a spatially uniform luminosity in thepolar cap and that auroral zone luminosity is also spatially uniform. Therefore we determine the locationof the polar cap boundary of postnoon sector from the auroral emission data each time by finding the bestfit of the observations to a step function in latitude and we produce a time series of the location of the polarcap boundary. The average error of the practice in the paper is less than 0. 8 degree.

  13. Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California

    Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

    2009-01-09

    In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California

  14. Characteristics of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Emissions: Observations and Models

    Liu, Wei

    2007-05-01

    The main theme of this dissertation is the investigation of the physics of acceleration and transport of particles in solar flares and their radiative signatures. The observational studies, using hard X-rays (HXRs) observed by RHESSI, concentrate on four flares, which support the classical magnetic reconnection model of flares in various ways. In the 11/03/2003 X3.9 flare, there is an upward motion of the loop-top source, accompanied by a systematic increase in the separation of the foot-point sources at a comparable speed. This is consistent with the reconnection model with an inverted-Y geometry. The 04/30/2002 M1.3 event exhibits rarely observed two coronal sources, with very similar spectra and their higher-energy emission being close together. This suggests that reconnection occurs between the two sources. In the 10/29/2003 X10 flare, the logarithmic total HXR flux of the two foot-points correlates with their mean magnetic field. The foot-points show asymmetric HXR fluxes, qualitatively consistent with the magnetic mirroring effect. The 11/13/2003 M1.7 flare reveals evidence of chromospheric evaporation directly imaged by RHESSI for the first time. The emission centroids move toward the loop-top, indicating a density increase in the loop. The theoretical modeling of this work combines the Stanford stochastic acceleration model with the NRL hydrodynamic model to study the interplay of the particle acceleration, transport, and radiation effects and the atmospheric response to the energy deposition by electrons. I find that low-energy electrons in the quasi-thermal portion of the spectrum affects the hydrodynamics by producing more heating in the corona than the previous models that used a power-law spectrum with a low-energy cutoff. The Neupert effect is found to be present and effects of suppression of thermal conduction are tested in the presence of hydrodynamic flows. I gratefully thank my adviser, Prof. Vahe' Petrosian, my collaborators, and funding support

  15. A flare observed in coronal, transition region, and helium I 10830 Å emissions

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Qiu, Jiong [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Judge, Philip G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 June 17, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broadband TiO at 706 nm (bandpass: 10 Å) and He I 10830 Å narrow band (bandpass: 0.5 Å, centered 0.25 Å to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 Å data, which were obtained over a 90''×90'' field of view with a cadence of 10 s. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the '0D' enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model code, indicate that the triplet states of the 10830 Å multiplet are populated by photoionization of chromospheric plasma followed by radiative recombination. Surprisingly, the He II 304 Å line is reasonably well matched by standard emission measure calculations, along with the C IV emission which dominates the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly 1600 Å channel during flares. This work lends support to some of our previous work combining X-ray, EUV, and UV data of flares to build models of energy transport from corona to chromosphere.

  16. Statistical correlation of low-altitude ENA emissions with geomagnetic activity from IMAGE/MENA observations

    Mackler, D. A.; Jahn, J.-M.; Perez, J. D.; Pollock, C. J.; Valek, P. W.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma sheet particles transported Earthward during times of active magnetospheric convection can interact with exospheric/thermospheric neutrals through charge exchange. The resulting Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) are free to leave the influence of the magnetosphere and can be remotely detected. ENAs associated with low-altitude (300-800 km) ion precipitation in the high-latitude atmosphere/ionosphere are termed low-altitude emissions (LAEs). Remotely observed LAEs are highly nonisotropic in velocity space such that the pitch angle distribution at the time of charge exchange is near 90°. The Geomagnetic Emission Cone of LAEs can be mapped spatially, showing where proton energy is deposited during times of varying geomagnetic activity. In this study we present a statistical look at the correlation between LAE flux (intensity and location) and geomagnetic activity. The LAE data are from the MENA imager on the IMAGE satellite over the declining phase of solar cycle 23 (2000-2005). The SYM-H, AE, and Kp indices are used to describe geomagnetic activity. The goal of the study is to evaluate properties of LAEs in ENA images and determine if those images can be used to infer properties of ion precipitation. Results indicate a general positive correlation to LAE flux for all three indices, with the SYM-H showing the greatest sensitivity. The magnetic local time distribution of LAEs is centered about midnight and spreads with increasing activity. The invariant latitude for all indices has a slightly negative correlation. The combined results indicate LAE behavior similar to that of ion precipitation.

  17. Method for correction of errors in observation angles for limb thermal emission measurements. [for satellite sounding of atmosphere

    Abbas, M. M.; Shapiro, G. L.; Conrath, B. J.; Kunde, V. G.; Maguire, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal emission measurements of the earth's stratospheric limb from space platforms require an accurate knowledge of the observation angles for retrieval of temperature and constituent distributions. Without the use of expensive stabilizing systems, however, most observational instruments do not meet the required pointing accuracies, thus leading to large errors in the retrieval of atmospheric data. This paper describes a self-constituent method of correcting errors in pointing angles by using information contained in the observed spectrum. Numerical results based on temperature inversions of synthetic thermal emission spectra with assumed random errors in pointing angles are presented.

  18. Solar Flare Chromospheric Line Emission: Comparison Between IBIS High-resolution Observations and Radiative Hydrodynamic Simulations

    da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Petrosian, Vahé; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Liu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares involve impulsive energy release, which results in enhanced radiation in a broad spectral and at a wide height range. In particular, line emission from the chromosphere (lower atmosphere) can provide critical diagnostics of plasma heating processes. Thus, a direct comparison between high-resolution spectroscopic observations and advanced numerical modeling results can be extremely valuable, but has not been attempted so far. We present in this paper such a self-consistent investigation of an M3.0 flare observed by the Dunn Solar Telescope's (DST) Interferometric Bi-dimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) on 2011 September 24 that we have modeled with the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN (Carlsson & Stein 1992, 1997; Abbett & Hawley 1999; Allred et al. 2005). We obtained images and spectra of the flaring region with IBIS in H$\\alpha$ 6563 \\AA\\ and Ca II 8542 \\AA, and with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in X-rays. The latter was used to infer the non-thermal elect...

  19. New radio observations of anomalous microwave emission in the HII region RCW175

    Battistelli, E S; Cruciani, A; de Bernardis, P; Genova-Santos, R; Masi, S; Naldi, A; Paladini, R; Piacentini, F; Tibbs, C T; Verstraete, L; Ysard, N

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the HII region RCW175 with the 64m Parkes telescope at 8.4GHz and 13.5GHz in total intensity, and at 21.5GHz in both total intensity and polarization. High angular resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization capability enable us to perform a detailed study of the different constituents of the HII region. For the first time, we resolve three distinct regions at microwave frequencies, two of which are part of the same annular diffuse structure. Our observations enable us to confirm the presence of anomalous microwave emission (AME) from RCW175. Fitting the integrated flux density across the entire region with the currently available spinning dust models, using physically motivated assumptions, indicates the presence of at least two spinning dust components: a warm component with a relatively large hydrogen number density n_H=26.3/cm^3 and a cold component with a hydrogen number density of n_H=150/cm^3. The present study is an example highlighting the potential of using high angular-resolutio...

  20. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    Effenberger, Frederic; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  1. First observation of 54Zn and its decay by two-proton emission

    Blank, B; Canchel, G; Dossat, C; Fleury, A; Giovinazzo, J; Matea, I; Adimi, N; De Oliveira, F; Stefan, I; Georgiev, G; Grévy, S; Thomas, J C; Borcea, C; Cortina-Gil, D; Caamano, M; Stanoiu, M; Aksouh, F; Brown, B A; Barker, F C; Richter, W A

    2005-01-01

    The nucleus 54Zn has been observed for the first time in an experiment at the SISSI/LISE3 facility of GANIL in the quasi-fragmentation of a 58Ni beam at 74.5 MeV/nucleon in a natNi target. The fragments were analysed by means of the ALPHA-LISE3 separator and implanted in a silicon-strip detector where correlations in space and time between implantation and subsequent decay events allowed us to generate almost background free decay spectra for about 25 different nuclei at the same time. Eight 54Zn implantation events were observed. From the correlated decay events, the half-life of 54Zn is determined to be 3.2 +1.8/-0.8 ms. Seven of the eight implantations are followed by two-proton emission with a decay energy of 1.48(2) MeV. The decay energy and the partial half-life are compared to model predictions and allow for a test of these two-proton decay models.

  2. High-resolution observations of gamma-ray line emission from SN 1987A

    Sandie, W. G.; Nakano, G. H.; Chase, L. F., Jr.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W. S.; Lasche, G. P.

    1988-11-01

    A balloon-borne gamma-ray spectrometer was flown from Alice springs, Australia, 1987 October 29 - 31, nominally 250 days after the supernova event. High-resolution data, typically 2.5 keV at 1.33 MeV, were obtained for two transits of the supernova. A significant net flux of gamma rays with energy 847 keV was observed from the direction of SN 1987A on each transit. No prominent gamma-ray features were seen at other energies. A preliminary estimate of the line flux is (5.1±1.7)×10-4photons cm-2s-1. The net flux observed in the first supernova transit extends from 838 keV to 850 keV and may be evidence of dynamical broadening of the 847 keV line. The total excess flux from 838 keV to 850 keV corresponds to (1.0±0.28)×10-3photons cm-2s-1. This line may be interpreted as emission from the first excited state of 56Fe due to the radioactive decay of 56Co.

  3. AN OBSERVED CORRELATION BETWEEN THERMAL AND NON-THERMAL EMISSION IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Michael Burgess, J.; Preece, Robert D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Ryde, Felix; Axelsson, Magnus [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Veres, Peter; Mészáros, Peter [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Bhat, P. N.; Pelassa, Veronique [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Pe' er, Asaf [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Iyyani, Shabnam [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Goldstein, Adam [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Byrne, David; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne [University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Kocevski, Daniel; Omodei, Nicola [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Paciesas, William S., E-mail: jmichaelburgess@gmail.com, E-mail: rob.preece@nasa.gov, E-mail: felix@particle.kth.se, E-mail: veres@gwu.edu, E-mail: npp@astro.psu.edu [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); and others

    2014-04-01

    Recent observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have confirmed the existence of thermal and non-thermal components in the prompt photon spectra of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Through an analysis of six bright Fermi GRBs, we have discovered a correlation between the observed photospheric and non-thermal γ-ray emission components of several GRBs using a physical model that has previously been shown to be a good fit to the Fermi data. From the spectral parameters of these fits we find that the characteristic energies, E {sub p} and kT, of these two components are correlated via the relation E {sub p}∝T {sup α} which varies from GRB to GRB. We present an interpretation in which the value of the index α indicates whether the jet is dominated by kinetic or magnetic energy. To date, this jet composition parameter has been assumed in the modeling of GRB outflows rather than derived from the data.

  4. An Observed Correlation Between Thermal and Non-Thermal Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Burgess, J Michael; Ryde, Felix; Veres, Peter; Meszaros, Peter; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Pe'er, Asaf; Iyyani, Shabnam; Goldstein, Adam; Axelsson, Magnus; Baring, Matthew G; Bhat, P N; Byrne, David; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Kocevski, Daniel; Omodei, Nicola; Paciesas, William S; Pelassa, Veronique; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Xiong, Shaolin; Yu, Hoi-Fung; Zhang, Binbin; Zhu, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations by the $Fermi$ Gamma-ray Space Telescope have confirmed the existence of thermal and non-thermal components in the prompt photon spectra of some Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Through an analysis of six bright Fermi GRBs, we have discovered a correlation between the observed photospheric and non-thermal $\\gamma$-ray emission components of several GRBs using a physical model that has previously been shown to be a good fit to the Fermi data. From the spectral parameters of these fits we find that the characteristic energies, $E_{\\rm p}$ and $kT$, of these two components are correlated via the relation $E_{\\rm p} \\propto T^{\\alpha}$ which varies from GRB to GRB. We present an interpretation in which the value of index $\\alpha$ indicates whether the jet is dominated by kinetic or magnetic energy. To date, this jet composition parameter has been assumed in the modeling of GRB outflows rather than derived from the data.

  5. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    Kramar, M. [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 34 Ohia Ku Street, Pukalani, Maui, HI 96768 (United States); Tomczyk, S., E-mail: kramar@cua.edu, E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: tomczyk@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  6. COS-B observations of localized sources of gamma-ray emission

    1977-01-01

    In October 1975, the high-energy gamma-ray flux from the Vela pulsar measured by COS-B was found to be 1.6 to 2.1 times higher than the flux measured by SAS-2 in 1973. This factor is too large to be accounted for by error in the COS-B calibration or analysis. This is supported by a comparison of the COS-B measurement of the narrow-line component from the galactic center region with the flux derived from the measurements of SAS-2; the COS-B flux comes out about 15 percent lower than the SAS-2 figure. It is interesting to note that a glitch in the pulsar period took place about 1 month prior to the COS-B observation; the previous glitch occurred about 1.5 years before the SAS-2 observation. The increased rotational energy loss after the glitch cannot simply explain the increased gamma-ray luminosity. If the two phenomena are related, the gamma-ray emission, absorption, or beaming process must be extremely sensitive to changes in rotational parameters. The existence is confirmed of a second region of enhanced radiation in the galactic anticenter in addition to that from the Crab pulsar.

  7. Aura OMI observations of changes in SO2 and NO2 emissions at local, regional and global scales

    Krotkov, N. A.; McLinden, C. A.; Li, C.; Lamsal, L. N.; Celarier, E. A.; Marchenko, S. V.; Swartz, W.; Bucsela, E. J.; Joiner, J.; Duncan, B. N.; Boersma, K. F.; Veefkind, P.; Levelt, P.; Fioletov, V.; Dickerson, R. R.; He, H.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Space-based pollution monitoring from current and planned satellite UV-Vis spectrometers play an increasingly important role in studies of tropospheric chemistry and also air quality applications to help mitigate anthropogenic and natural impacts on sensitive ecosystems, and human health. We present long-term changes in tropospheric SO2 and NO2 over some of the most polluted industrialized regions of the world observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA's Aura satellite. Using OMI data, we identified about 400 SO2 "hot spots" and estimated emissions from them. In many regions emissions and their ambient pollution levels have decreased significantly, such as over eastern US, Europe and China. OMI observed about 50% reduction in SO2 and NO2 pollution over the North China plain in 2012-2014 that can be attributed to both government efforts to restrain emissions from the power and industrial sectors and the economic slowdown. While much smaller, India's SO2 and NO2 emissions from coal power plants and smelters are growing at a fast pace, increasing by about 200% and 50% from 2005 to 2014. Over Europe and the US OMI-observed trends agree well with those from available in situ measurements of surface concentrations, deposition and emissions data. However, for some regions (e.g., Mexico, Middle East) the emission inventories may be incomplete and OMI can provide emission estimates for missing sources, such as SO2 sources observed over the Persian Gulf. It is essential to continue long-term overlapping satellite data records of air quality with increased spatial and temporal resolution to resolve point pollution sources using oversampling technique. We discuss how Aura OMI pollution measurements and emission estimates will be continued with the US JPSS and European Sentinel series for the next 20 years and further enhanced by the addition of three geostationary UV-VIS instruments.

  8. Observed spectral energy distribution of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b

    Chen, G.; van Boekel, R.; Wang, H.; Nikolov, N.; Seemann, U.; Henning, Th.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We aim to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED) for the emission from the dayside atmosphere of the hot Jupiter WASP-46b and to investigate its energy budget. Methods: We observed a secondary eclipse of WASP-46b simultaneously in the g'r'i'z'JHK bands using the GROND instrument on the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope. Eclipse depths of the acquired light curves were derived to infer the brightness temperatures at multibands that cover the SED peak. Results: We report the first detection of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b in the K band at 4.2σ level and tentative detections in the H (2.5σ) and J (2.3σ) bands, with flux ratios of 0.253 +0.063-0.060%, 0.194 ± 0.078%, and 0.129 ± 0.055%, respectively. The derived brightness temperatures (2306 +177-187 K, 2462 +245-302 K, and 2453 +198-258 K, respectively) are consistent with an isothermal temperature profile of 2386 K, which is significantly higher than the dayside-averaged equilibrium temperature, indicative of very poor heat redistribution efficiency. We also investigate the tentative detections in the g'r'i' bands and the 3σ upper limit in the z' band, which might indicate the existence of reflective clouds if these tentative detections do not arise from systematics. Based on observations collected with the Gamma Ray burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND) on the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. Program 088.A-9016 (PI: Chen).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgPhotometric time series are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/567/A8

  9. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from behind-the-limb solar flares

    Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe'; Liu, Wei; da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Allafort, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Fermi-LAT >30 MeV observations have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. These sample both the impulsive and long duration phases of GOES M and X class flares. Of particular interest is the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources and implications for the particle acceleration mechanisms.

  10. Free-free and H42alpha emission from the dusty starburst within NGC 4945 as observed by ALMA

    Bendo, G J; D'Cruze, M J; Dickinson, C; Fuller, G A; Karim, A

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the 85.69 GHz continuum emission and H42alpha line emission from the central 30 arcsec within NGC 4945. Both sources of emission originate from nearly identical structures that can be modelled as exponential discs with a scale length of ~2.1 arcsec (or ~40 pc). An analysis of the spectral energy distribution based on combining these data with archival data imply that 84% +/- 10% of the 85.69 GHz continuum emission originates from free-free emission. The electron temperature is 5400 +/- 600 K, which is comparable to what has been measured near the centre of the Milky Way Galaxy. The star formation rate (SFR) based on the H42alpha and 85.69 GHz free-free emission (and using a distance of 3.8 Mpc) is 4.35 +/- 0.25 M/yr. This is consistent with the SFR from the total infrared flux and with previous measurements based on recombination line emission, and it is within a factor of ~2 of SFRs derived from radio data. The Spitzer Space Telescope 24 micron data and Wide-field Infrared Survey E...

  11. HST-COS Observations of Hydrogen, Helium, Carbon and Nitrogen Emission from the SN 1987A Reverse Shock

    France, Kevin; Penton, Steven V; Kirshner, Robert P; Challis, Peter; Laming, J Martin; Bouchet, Patrice; Chevalier, Roger; Fransson, Claes; Garnavich, Peter M; Heng, Kevin; Larsson, Josefin; Lawrence, Stephen; Lundqvist, Peter; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S J; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Sonneborn, George; Sugerman, Ben; Wheeler, J Craig

    2011-01-01

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow (dv \\sim 300 km/s) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad (dv \\sim 10 -- 20 x 10^3 km/s) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise (> 40 per resolution element) broad LyA emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at \\lambda > 1350A can be explained by HI 2-photon emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of NV \\lambda 1240 emission from the reverse shock and we present the first detections of broad HeII \\lambda1640, CIV \\lambda1550, and NIV] \\lambda1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 +/- 0.06. The NV/H-alpha line ratio requires partial ion-electron e...

  12. Global Partitioning of NOx Sources Using Satellite Observations: Relative Roles of Fossil Fuel Combustion, Biomass Burning and Soil Emissions

    Jaegle, Lyatt; Steinberger, Linda; Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the following abstract for the paper "Global partitioning of NOx sources using satellite observations: Relative roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and soil emissions." Satellite observations have been used to provide important new information about emissions of nitrogen oxides. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are significant in atmospheric chemistry, having a role in ozone air pollution, acid deposition and climate change. We know that human activities have led to a three- to six-fold increase in NOx emissions since pre-industrial times, and that there are three main surface sources of NOx: fuel combustion, large-scale fires, and microbial soil processes. How each of these sources contributes to the total NOx emissions is subject to some doubt, however. The problem is that current NOx emission inventories rely on bottom-up approaches, compiling large quantities of statistical information from diverse sources such as fuel and land use, agricultural data, and estimates of burned areas. This results in inherently large uncertainties. To overcome this, Lyatt Jaegle and colleagues from the University of Washington, USA, used new satellite observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) instrument. As the spatial and seasonal distribution of each of the sources of NOx can be clearly mapped from space, the team could provide independent topdown constraints on the individual strengths of NOx sources, and thus help resolve discrepancies in existing inventories. Jaegle's analysis of the satellite observations, presented at the recent Faraday Discussion on "Atmospheric Chemistry", shows that fuel combustion dominates emissions at northern mid-latitudes, while fires are a significant source in the Tropics. Additionally, she discovered a larger than expected role for soil emissions, especially over agricultural regions with heavy fertilizer use. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  13. Satellite observations of peroxyacetyl nitrate from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer

    Payne, V. H.; Alvarado, M. J.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Worden, J. R.; Kulawik, S. S.; Fischer, E. V.

    2014-11-01

    We present a description of the algorithm used to retrieve peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) concentrations from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). We describe the spectral microwindows, error analysis, and the utilization of a priori and initial guess information provided by the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. The TES PAN retrievals contain up to one degree of freedom for signal. In general, the retrievals are most sensitive to PAN in the mid-troposphere. Estimated single-measurement uncertainties are on the order of 30 to 50%. The detection limit for a single TES measurement is dependent on the atmospheric and surface conditions as well as on the instrument noise. For observations where the cloud optical depth is less than 0.5, we find that the TES detection limit for PAN is in the region of 200 to 300 pptv. We show that PAN retrievals capture plumes associated with boreal burning. Retrievals over the Northern Hemisphere Pacific in springtime show spatial features that are qualitatively consistent with the expected distribution of PAN in outflow of Asian pollution.

  14. The faint intergalactic-medium red-shifted emission balloon: future UV observations with EMCCDs

    Kyne, Gillian; Hamden, Erika T.; Lingner, Nicole; Morrissey, Patrick; Nikzad, Shouleh; Martin, D. Christopher

    2016-08-01

    We present the latest developments in our joint NASA/CNES suborbital project. This project is a balloon-borne UV multi-object spectrograph, which has been designed to detect faint emission from the circumgalactic medium (CGM) around low redshift galaxies. One major change from FIREBall-1 has been the use of a delta-doped Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD). EMCCDs can be used in photon-counting (PC) mode to achieve extremely low readout noise (¡ 1e-). Our testing initially focused on reducing clock-induced-charge (CIC) through wave shaping and well depth optimisation with the CCD Controller for Counting Photons (CCCP) from Nüvü. This optimisation also includes methods for reducing dark current, via cooling and substrate voltage adjustment. We present result of laboratory noise measurements including dark current. Furthermore, we will briefly present some initial results from our first set of on-sky observations using a delta-doped EMCCD on the 200 inch telescope at Palomar using the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager (PCWI).

  15. Observations of free-free and anomalous microwave emission from LDN 1622 with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope

    Harper, S. E.; Dickinson, C.; Cleary, K.

    2015-11-01

    LDN 1622 has previously been identified as a possible strong source of dust-correlated anomalous microwave emission (AME). Previous observations were limited by resolution meaning that the radio emission could not be compared with current generation high-resolution infrared data from Herschel, Spitzer or Wide-field Infrared Sky Explorer. This paper presents arcminute resolution mapping observations of LDN 1622 at 4.85 and 13.7 GHz using the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The 4.85 GHz map reveals a corona of free-free emission enclosing LDN 1622 that traces the photodissociation region of the cloud. The brightest peaks of the 4.85 GHz map are found to be within ≈10 per cent agreement with the expected free-free predicted by Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas H α data of LDN 1622. At 13.7 GHz, the AME flux density was found to be 7.0 ± 1.4 mJy and evidence is presented for a rising spectrum between 13.7 and 31 GHz. The spinning dust model of AME is found to naturally account for the flux seen at 13.7 GHz. Correlations between the diffuse 13.7 GHz emission and the diffuse mid-infrared emission are used to further demonstrate that the emission originating from LDN 1622 at 13.7 GHz is described by the spinning dust model.

  16. Variations of the spectral index of dust emissivity from Hi-GAL observations of the Galactic plane

    Paradis, D; Noriega-Crespo, A; Paladini, R; Piacentini, F; Bernard, J P; de Bernardis, P; Calzoletti, L; Faustini, F; Martin, P; Masi, S; Montier, L; Natoli, P; Ristorcelli, I; Thompson, M A; Traficante, A; Molinari, S

    2010-01-01

    Variations in the dust emissivity are critical for gas mass determinations derived from far-infrared observations, but also for separating dust foreground emission from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Hi-GAL observations allow us for the first time to study the dust emissivity variations in the inner regions of the Galactic plane at resolution below 1 degree. We present maps of the emissivity spectral index derived from the combined Herschel PACS 160 \\mu m, SPIRE 250 \\mu m, 350 \\mu m, and 500 \\mu m data, and the IRIS 100 \\mu m data, and we analyze the spatial variations of the spectral index as a function of dust temperature and wavelength in the two Science Demonstration Phase Hi-GAL fields, centered at l=30{\\deg} and l=59{\\deg}. Applying two different methods, we determine both dust temperature and emissivity spectral index between 100 and 500 \\mu m, at an angular resolution of 4'. Combining both fields, the results show variations of the emissivity spectral index in the range 1.8-2.6 for temperature...

  17. Eddy covariance observations of methane and nitrous oxide emissions: Towards more accurate estimates from ecosystems

    Kroon-van Loon, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    About 30% of the increased greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are related to land use changes and agricultural activities. In order to select effective measures, knowledge is required about GHG emissions from these ecosystems and how these e

  18. Right-hand polarized 4fce auroral roar emissions: 1. Observations

    LaBelle, J.; Chen, Y.

    2016-08-01

    A receiving system installed at Sondrestrom, Greenland, was used to monitor all detectable auroral radio emissions at the fourth harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency (called 4fce roar emissions) between May 2015 and March 2016. Of 88 events detected, 86 occurred during daylit conditions and were left-hand polarized. Two occurred during darkness conditions and were right-hand polarized. The left-hand and right-hand polarized events had entirely different frequency distributions. One of the right-hand polarized 4fce emissions occurred at the same time as and at exactly twice the frequency of a second harmonic emission (2fce roar). The occurrence rate of 4fce emissions during premidnight hours under daylit conditions at Sondrestrom is 5%, comparable to previously reported occurrence rates of 2fce roar in darkness conditions at optimum latitudes of occurrence, but the occurrence rate of 4fce emissions during dark conditions is much lower, suggesting that if the right-hand polarized events arise from coalescence of 2fce waves, only for a small fraction of nighttime 2fce roar emissions does such a process yield 4fce emissions detectable at ground level.

  19. Characteristic properties of Nu whistlers as inferred from observations and numerical modelling

    D. R. Shklyar

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The properties of Nu whistlers are discussed in the light of observations by the MAGION 5 satellite, and of numerically simulated spectrograms of lightning-induced VLF emissions. The method of simulation is described in full. With the information from this numerical modelling, we distinguish the characteristics of the spectrograms that depend on the site of the lightning strokes from those that are determined mainly by the position of the satellite. Also, we identify the region in the magnetosphere where Nu whistlers are observed most often, and the geomagnetic conditions favouring their appearance. The relation between magnetospherically reflected (MR whistlers and Nu whistlers is demonstrated by the gradual transformation of MR whistlers into Nu whistlers as the satellite moves from the high-altitude equatorial region to lower altitudes and higher latitudes. The magnetospheric reflection of nonducted whistler-mode waves, which is of decisive importance in the formation of Nu whistlers, is discussed in detail.

  20. Development of a United States-Mexico Emissions Inventory for the Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) Study.

    Kuhns, Hampden; Knipping, Eladio M; Vukovich, Jeffrey M

    2005-05-01

    The Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) Study was commissioned to investigate the sources of haze at Big Bend National Park in southwest Texas. The modeling domain of the BRAVO Study includes most of the continental United States and Mexico. The BRAVO emissions inventory was constructed from the 1999 National Emission Inventory for the United States, modified to include finer-resolution data for Texas and 13 U.S. states in close proximity. The first regional-scale Mexican emissions inventory designed for air-quality modeling applications was developed for 10 northern Mexican states, the Tula Industrial Park in the state of Hidalgo, and the Popocatépetl volcano in the state of Puebla. Emissions data were compiled from numerous sources, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission (now Texas Commission on Environmental Quality), the Eastern Research Group, the Minerals Management Service, the Instituto Nacional de Ecología, and the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Geografía y Informática. The inventory includes emissions for CO, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ammonia, particulate matter (PM) < 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter, and PM < 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter. Wind-blown dust and biomass burning were not included in the inventory, although high concentrations of dust and organic PM attributed to biomass burning have been observed at Big Bend National Park. The SMOKE modeling system was used to generate gridded emissions fields for use with the Regional Modeling System for Aerosols and Deposition (REMSAD) and the Community Multiscale Air Quality model modified with the Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization and Dissolution (CMAQ-MADRID). The compilation of the inventory, supporting model input data, and issues encountered during the development of the inventory are documented. A comparison of the BRAVO emissions

  1. MIRO Observations of Millimeter-wave Emission from Large Dust Particles in the Coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Schloerb, F. Peter; Gulkis, Samuel; Biver, Nicolas; von Allmen, Paul; Beaudin, Gerard; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Choukroun, Mathieu; Crovisier, Jacques; Davidsson, Bjorn; Encrenaz, Pierre; Encrenaz, Therese A.; Frerking, Margaret; Hartogh, Paul; Ip, Wing-Huen; Janssen, Michael A.; Jarchow, Christopher; Kareta, Teddy; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Leyrat, Cedric; Rezac, Ladislav; Spilker, Thomas R.

    2016-10-01

    We present observations of dust emission from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko obtained by the Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO). MIRO is a millimeter-wave instrument with two continuum channels at wavelengths of 0.53 mm and 1.59 mm. The instrument has a 30cm-diameter antenna which provides resolution of about 217m and 690m at the respective wavelengths for a spacecraft-comet distance of 100km. During the months around the August 2015 perihelion of comet 67P, a small continuum emission excess was observed above the sunlit limb of the comet. The excess emission extends many beam widths off the dayside limb and is a persistent feature for months of observations. No excess above the noise limit of the instrument is observed above the nightside limb, and given the known strong day-night asymmetry of gas production from the nucleus, we interpret the observed continuum excess on the day side to result from thermal emission from dust. Typical antenna temperatures of the emission over the day side at a distance of 4 km from the center of the nucleus (approximately 2 km above the surface) are approximately 1K in both the submillimeter-wave (0.53 mm) and millimeter-wave (1.59 mm) channels, corresponding to likely dust column densities of ~0.1 kg m-2. The typical relative brightness of the 0.53 mm emission to the 1.59 mm emission is approximately 1.2. This result is most consistent with particle size distributions which extend up to radii of at least several centimeters and/or flatter particle size distributions than those often attributed to cometary dust. Maps of the emission show that the column density of dust decreases with distance from the nucleus following a power law with b-1.6 - b-2.0, where b is the impact parameter of the beam with respect to the nucleus. Models of dust outflow, in which particles are accelerated by the drag force of the outflowing gas, predict a column density falloff according to b-1.2. We find that to achieve the observed

  2. Estimating Amazonian methane emissions through 4D-Var inverse modelling with satellite observations from GOSAT and IASI

    Wilson, C. J.; Chipperfield, M.; Gloor, M.; McNorton, J.; Miller, J. B.; Gatti, L. V.; Siddans, R.; Bloom, A. A.; Basso, L. S.; Boesch, H.; Parker, R.; Monks, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is emitted from a range of anthropogenic and natural sources, and since the industrial revolution its mean atmospheric concentration has climbed dramatically. CH4 produces a relatively high radiative forcing effect upon the Earth's climate, and its atmospheric lifetime of approximately 10 years makes it an appealing target for the mitigation of climate change. However, the spatial and temporal variation of CH4 emissions are not well understood, though in recent years a number of top-down and bottom-up studies have attempted to construct improved emission budgets. However, some top-down studies suffer from poor observational coverage near the Amazon basin, particularly in the planetary boundary layer. Since emissions from this region, coming mainly from wetland and burning sources, are thought to be relatively high, additional observations in this region would greatly help to constrain the geographical distribution of the global CH4 emission budget. To this end, regular flask measurements of CH4 and other trace gases have been taken during flights over four Amazonian sites since 2010, as part of the AMAZONICA project. The GOSAT has been used to retrieve global column-average CH4 concentrations since mid-2009, whilst IASI, on-board Metop-A, has also been measuring atmospheric CH4 concentrations since its launch in 2006. We present an assessment of Amazonian methane emissions for 2010 and 2011 using the TOMCAT Chemical Transport Model and the new variational inverse model, INVICAT. These models are used to attribute methane variations at each Amazon site to a source type and region, to assess the ability of our current CH4 flux estimates to reproduce these observations and to produce improved posterior emission estimates through assimilation of atmospheric observations. This study represents the first use of the INVICAT scheme to constrain emissions of any atmospheric trace gas. Whilst there is generally good agreement between the model and the

  3. Observations of Ellerman bomb emission features in He i D3 and He i 10 830 Å

    Libbrecht, Tine; Joshi, Jayant; Rodríguez, Jaime de la Cruz; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Ramos, Andrés Asensio

    2017-01-01

    Context. Ellerman bombs (EBs) are short-lived emission features, characterised by extended wing emission in hydrogen Balmer lines. Until now, no distinct signature of EBs has been found in the He i 10 830 Å line, and conclusive observations of EBs in He i D3 have never been reported. Aims: We aim to study the signature of EBs in neutral helium triplet lines. Methods: The observations consisted of ten consecutive SST/TRIPPEL raster scans close to the limb, featuring the Hβ, He i D3 and He i 10 830 Å spectral regions. We also obtained raster scans with IRIS and made use of the SDO/AIA 1700 Å channel. We used Hazel to invert the neutral helium triplet lines. Results: Three EBs in our data show distinct emission signatures in neutral helium triplet lines, most prominently visible in the He i D3 line. The helium lines have two components: a broad and blueshifted emission component associated with the EB, and a narrower absorption component formed in the overlying chromosphere. One of the EBs in our data shows evidence of strong velocity gradients in its emission component. The emission component of the other two EBs could be fitted using a constant slab. Our analysis hints towards thermal Doppler motions having a large contribution to the broadening for helium and IRIS lines. We conclude that the EBs must have high temperatures to exhibit emission signals in neutral helium triplet lines. An order of magnitude estimate places our observed EBs in the range of T 2 × 104-105 K. Movies associated to Figs. 3-5 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  4. A comparative study of measured amplitude and phase perturbations of VLF and LF radio signals induced by solar flares

    Šulić D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Very Low Frequency (VLF and Low Frequency (LF signal perturbations were examined to study ionospheric disturbances induced by solar X-ray flares in order to understand processes involved in propagation of VLF/LF radio signals over short paths and to estimate specific characteristics of each short path. The receiver at the Belgrade station is constantly monitoring the amplitude and phase of a coherent and subionospherically propagating LF signal operated in Sicily NSC at 45.90 kHz, and a VLF signal operated in Isola di Tavolara ICV at 20.27 kHz, with the great circle distances of 953 km and 976 km, respectively. A significant number of similarities between these short paths is a direct result of both transmitters and the receiver’s geographic location. The main difference is in transmitter frequencies. From July 2008 to February 2014 there were about 200 events that were chosen for further examination. All selected examples showed that the amplitude and phase of VLF and LF signals were perturbed by solar X-ray flares occurrence. This six-year period covers both minimum and maximum of solar activity. Simultaneous measurement of amplitude and phase of the VLF/LF signals during a solar flare occurrence was applied to evaluate the electron density profile versus altitude, to carry out the function of time over the middle Europe. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176002 i br. III4402

  5. COS-B observations of gamma-ray emission from local galactic features

    Bignami, G. F.; Barbareschi, L.; Caraveo, P. A.; Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Hermsen, W.; Buccheri, R.; Kanbach, G.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Lebrun, F.; Paul, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Evidence for large scale correlations between the high-energy photon sky and the known local distribution of diffuse interstellar matter is discussed. Evidence is presented of correlations with the Gould's Belt and the Dolidze Belt. The correlations indicate that the emission of gamma rays at medium latitudes can be explained by the distribution of interstellar matter, and the interaction of CR with interstellar matter can explain the mechanism of the gamma-ray emission by regarding the emissivity as a global average of the two systems since they contain most of the local dense cloud.

  6. Chandra & XMM-Newton Observations of NGC5253. Analysis of the X-ray Emission from a Dwarf Starburst Galaxy

    Summers, L K; Strickland, D K; Heckman, T M; Summers, Lesley K.; Stevens, Ian R.; Strickland, David K.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    We present Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray data of NGC5253, a local starbursting dwarf elliptical galaxy, in the early stages of a starburst episode. Contributions to the X-ray emission come from discrete point sources and extended diffuse emission, in the form of what appear to be multiple superbubbles, and smaller bubbles probably associated with individual star clusters. Chandra detects 17 sources within the optical extent of NGC5253 down to a completeness level corresponding to a luminosity of 1.5E37 erg/s.The slope of the point source X-ray luminosity function is -0.54, similar to that of other nearby dwarf starburst galaxies. Several different types of source are detected within the galaxy, including X-ray binaries and the emission associated with star-clusters. Comparison of the diffuse X-ray emission with the observed Halpha emission shows similarities in their extent. The best spectral fit to the diffuse emission is obtained with an absorbed, two temperature model giving temperatures for the two gas com...

  7. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of High-Energy Gamma-ray Emission From Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    Omodei, Nicola; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Golenetskii, Sergei; Kashapova, Larisa; Krucker, Sam; Palshin, Valentin; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fermi LAT >30 MeV observations of the active Sun have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. Of particular interest are the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. These observations sample flares from active regions originating from behind both the eastern and western limbs and include an event associated with the second ground level enhancement event (GLE) of the 24th Solar Cycle. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. These detections present an unique opportunity to diagnose the mechanisms of high-energy emission and particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources.

  8. Observation and analysis of self-amplified spontaneous emission at the APS low-energy undulator test line

    Arnold, N D; Banks, G; Bechtold, R; Beczek, K; Benson, C; Berg, S; Berg, W; Biedron, S G; Biggs, J A; Boerste, K; Borland, M; Bosek, M; Brzowski, W R; Budz, J; Carwardine, J A; Castro, P; Chae, Y C; Christensen, S; Clark, C; Conde, M; Crosbie, E A; Decker, G A; Dejus, Roger J; Deleon, H; Den Hartog, P K; Deriy, B N; Dohan, D; Dombrowski, P; Donkers, D; Doose, C L; Dortwegt, R J; Edwards, G A; Eidelman, Y; Erdmann, M J; Error, J J; Ferry, R; Flood, R; Forrestal, J; Freund, H; Friedsam, H; Gagliano, J; Gai, W; Galayda, J N; Gerig, R; Gilmore, R L; Gluskin, E; Goeppner, G A; Goetzen, J; Gold, C; Grelick, A E; Hahne, M W; Hanuska, S; Harkay, K C; Harris, G; Hillman, A L; Hogrefe, R; Hoyt, J; Huang, Z; Jagger, J M; Jansma, W G; Jaski, M; Jones, S J; Keane, R T; Kelly, A L; Keyser, C; Kim, K J; Kim, S H; Kirshenbaum, M; Klick, J H; Knoerzer, K; Knott, M; Koldenhoven, R J; Labuda, S; Laird, R; Lang, J; Lenkszus, F R; Lessner, E S; Lewellen, J W; Li, Y; Lill, R M; Lumpkin, Alex H; Makarov, O A; Markovich, G M; McDowell, M; McDowell, W P; McNamara, P E; Meier, T; Meyer, D; Michalek, W; Milton, S V; Moe, H; Moog, E; Morrison, L; Nassiri, A; Noonan, J R; Otto, R; Pace, J; Pasky, S J; Penicka, J M; Pietryla, A F; Pile, G; Pitts, C; Power, J; Powers, T; Putnam, C C; Puttkammer, A J; Reigle, D; Reigle, L; Ronzhin, D; Rotela, E R; Russell, E F; Sajaev, Vadim; Sarkar, S; Scapino, J C; Schröder, K; Seglem, R A; Sereno, N S; Sharma, S K; Sidarous, J F; Singh, O; Smith, T L; Soliday, R; Sprau, G A; Stein, S J; Stejskal, B; Svirtun, V; Teng, L C; Theres, E; Thompson, K; Tieman, B J; Torres, J A; Trakhtenberg, E; Travish, G; Trento, G F; Vacca, J; Vasserman, I B; Vinokurov, N A; Walters, D R; Wang, J; Wang, X J; Warren, J; Wesling, S; Weyer, D L; Wiemerslage, G; Wilhelmi, K; Wright, R; Wyncott, D; Xu, S; Yang, B X; Yoder, W; Zabel, R B

    2001-01-01

    Exponential growth of self-amplified spontaneous emission at 530 nm was first experimentally observed at the Advanced Photon Source low-energy undulator test line in December 1999. Since then, further detailed measurements and analysis of the results have been made. Here, we present the measurements and compare these with calculations based on measured electron beam properties and theoretical expectations.

  9. Suzaku observations of X-ray excess emission in the cluster of galaxies A 3112

    Lehto, T.; Nevalainen, J.; Bonamente, M.; Ota, N.; Kaastra, J.

    2010-12-01

    Aims: We analysed the Suzaku XIS1 data of the A 3112 cluster of galaxies in order to examine the X-ray excess emission in this cluster reported earlier with the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites. Methods: We performed X-ray spectroscopy on the data of a single large region. We carried out simulations to estimate the systematic uncertainties affecting the X-ray excess signal. Results: The best-fit temperature of the intracluster gas depends strongly on the choice of the energy band used for the spectral analysis. This proves the existence of excess emission component in addition to the single-temperature MEKAL in A 3112. We showed that this effect is not an artifact due to uncertainties of the background modeling, instrument calibration or the amount of Galactic absorption. Neither does the PSF scatter of the emission from the cool core nor the projection of the cool gas in the cluster outskirts produce the effect. Finally we modeled the excess emission either by using an additional MEKAL or powerlaw component. Due to the small differencies between thermal and non-thermal model we can not rule out the non-thermal origin of the excess emission based on the goodness of the fit. Assuming that it has a thermal origin, we further examined the differential emission measure (DEM) models. We utilised two different DEM models, a Gaussian differential emission measure distribution (GDEM) and WDEM model, where the emission measure of a number of thermal components is distributed as a truncated power law. The best-fit XIS1 MEKAL temperature for the 0.4-7.0 keV band is 4.7 ± 0.1 keV, consistent with that obtained using GDEM and WDEM models.

  10. Free-free and H42α emission from the dusty starburst within NGC 4945 as observed by ALMA

    Bendo, G. J.; Henkel, C.; D'Cruze, M. J.; Dickinson, C.; Fuller, G. A.; Karim, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present observations of the 85.69 GHz continuum emission and H42α line emission from the central 30 arcsec within NGC 4945. Both sources of emission originate from nearly identical structures that can be modelled as exponential discs with scalelengths of ˜2.1 arcsec (or ˜40 pc). An analysis of the spectral energy distribution based on combining these data with archival data imply that 84 ± 10 per cent of the 85.69 GHz continuum emission originates from free-free emission. The electron temperature is 5400 ± 600 K, which is comparable to what has been measured near the centre of the Milky Way Galaxy. The star formation rate (SFR) based on the H42α and 85.69 GHz free-free emission (and using a distance of 3.8 Mpc) is 4.35 ± 0.25 M⊙ yr-1. This is consistent with the SFR from the total infrared flux and with previous measurements based on recombination line emission, and it is within a factor of ˜2 of SFRs derived from radio data. The Spitzer Space Telescope 24 μm data and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer 22 μm data yield SFRs ˜10× lower than the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array measurements, most likely because the mid-infrared data are strongly affected by dust attenuation equivalent to AV = 150. These results indicate that SFRs based on mid-infrared emission may be highly inaccurate for dusty, compact circumnuclear starbursts.

  11. Atmospheric observation-based global SF6 emissions – comparison of top-down and bottom-up estimates

    D. E. Worthy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of sulphur hexafluoride (SF6, one of the strongest greenhouse gases on a per molecule basis, are targeted to be collectively reduced under the Kyoto Protocol. Because of its long atmospheric lifetime (≈3000 years, the accumulation of SF6 in the atmosphere is a direct measure of its global emissions. Examination of our extended data set of globally distributed high-precision SF6 observations shows an increase in SF6 abundance from near zero in the 1970s to a global mean of 6.7 ppt by the end of 2008. In-depth evaluation of our long-term data records shows that the global source of SF6 decreased after 1995, most likely due to SF6 emission reductions in industrialised countries, but increased again after 1998. By subtracting those emissions reported by Annex I countries to the United Nations Framework Convention of Climatic Change (UNFCCC from our observation-inferred SF6 source leaves a surprisingly large gap of more than 70–80% of non-reported SF6 emissions in the last decade.

  12. Detection and characterization of a 500 mic dust emissivity excess in the Galactic Plane using Herschel/Hi-GAL observations

    Paradis, D; Noriega-Crespo, A; Mény, C; Piacentini, F; Thompson, M A; Marshall, D J; Veneziani, M; Bernard, J -P; Molinari, S

    2011-01-01

    Past and recent observations have revealed unexpected variations of the FIR-mm dust emissivity. In the Herschel spectral range, those are often referenced to as a 500 {\\mu}m emission excess. Several dust emission models have been developed to interpret astrophysical data in the FIR-mm domain. However, these are commonly not able to fully reconcile theoretical predictions with observations. On the contrary, the recently revised Two Level System (TLS) model seems to provide a promising way to interpret the existing data. The newly available Herschel Hi-GAL data which covers most of the inner Milky-Way offers a unique opportunity to investigate possible variations in the dust emission properties both with wavelength and the environment. By combining the IRIS 100 {\\mu}m with the Hi-GAL 160, 250, 350 and 500 {\\mu}m data, we model the dust emission spectra in each pixel of the Hi-GAL maps, using both the TLS model and, for comparison, a single modified black-body fit. The effect of temperature mixing along the line...

  13. New observations of VOC emissions and concentrations in, above, and around the Central Valley of California

    Goldstein, A. H.; Fares, S.; Gentner, D. R.; Park, J.; Weber, R.; Ormeno, E.; Holzinger, R.; Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T. R.; Guenther, A. B.; Fischer, M. L.; Harley, R. A.; Karlik, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    Large portions of the Central Valley of California are out of compliance with current state and federal air quality standards for ozone and particulate matter, and the relative importance of biogenic and anthropogenic VOC emissions to their photochemical production in this region remains uncertain. In 2009-2011 multiple measurement campaigns were completed investigating the VOC emission inventory and concentration distributions. In 2009 BVOC emissions from more than 20 species of major agricultural crops in California were measured in a greenhouse using branch enclosures by both PTRMS and in-situ GC. Overall, crops were found to emit low amounts of BVOC compared to the natural forests surrounding the valley. Crops mainly emitted methanol and terpenes, with a broad array of other species emitted at lower levels, and all the measured crops showed negligible emissions of isoprene. Navel oranges were the largest crop BVOC emitters measured so a full year of flux measurements were made in an orange grove near Visalia in 2010 by eddy covariance(EC)-PTRMS with two multi-week periods of concentration measurements by hourly in-situ GC, and one month of high mass resolution flux measurements by EC-PTR-TOF-MS. The dominant BVOC emissions from the orange grove were methanol and terpenes, followed by acetone, acetaldehyde, and a low level of emissions for many other species. In 2011 aircraft eddy covariance measurements of BVOC fluxes were made by EC-PTRMS covering a large area of California as part of the California Airborne Bvoc Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign aimed at improving BVOC emission models on regional scales, mainly profiling BVOC emissions from oak woodlands surrounding the Central Valley. In 2010, hourly in-situ VOC measurements were made via in-situ GC in Bakersfield, CA as part of the CalNex experiment. Additionally, in-situ measurements of fresh motor vehicle exhaust were made in Oakland's Caldecott tunnel. Measurements by

  14. XMM-Newton Observations of MBM 12: More Constraints on the Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Bubble Emissions

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Smith, Randall K.; Edgar, Richard J.; Kuntz, Kip D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first analysis of an XMM-Newton observation of the nearby molecular cloud MBM 12. We find that in the direction of MBM 12 the total O VII (0.57 keV) triplet emission is 1.8+0.5 -0.6 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 (or line units, LU) while for the O VIII (0.65 keV) line emission we find a 3σ upper limit of MBM 12 with Chandra and Suzaku.

  15. Application of gamma ray spectrometric measurements and VLF-EM data for tracing vein type uranium mineralization

    Ibrahim Gaafar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to use the gamma ray spectrometric measurements and VLF-EM data to identify the subsurface structure and map uranium mineralization along El Sela shear zone, South Eastern Desert of Egypt. Many injections more or less mineralized with uranium and associated with alteration processes were recorded in El Sela shear zone. As results from previous works, the emplacement of these injections is structurally controlled and well defined by large shear zones striking in an ENE–WSW direction and crosscut by NW–SE to NNW–SSE fault sets. VLF method has been applied to map the structure and the presence of radioactive minerals that have been delineated by the detection of high uranium mineralization. The electromagnetic survey was carried out to detect the presence of shallow and deep conductive zones that cross the granites along ENE–WSW fracturing directions and to map its spatial distribution. The survey comprised seventy N–S spectrometry and VLF-EM profiles with 20 m separation. The resulted data were displayed as composite maps for K, eU and eTh as well as VLF-Fraser map. Twelve profiles with 100 m separation were selected for detailed description. The VLF-EM data were interpreted qualitatively as well as quantitatively using the Fraser and the Karous–Hjelt filters. Fraser filtered data and relative current density pseudo-sections indicate the presence of shallow and deep conductive zones that cross the granites along ENE–WSW shearing directions. High uranium concentrations found just above the higher apparent current-density zones that coincide with El-Sela shear zone indicate a positive relation between conductivity and uranium minerals occurrence. This enables to infer that the anomalies detected by VLF-EM data are due to the highly conductive shear zone enriched with uranium mineralization extending for more than 80 m.

  16. Simultaneous observations of periodic non-Io decametric radio emission by ground radio telescope URAN-2 and STEREO/WAVES

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Rucker, H. O.; Frantzusenko, A.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    Periodic bursts of the non-Io component of Jovian decametric radio emission (non-Io DAM) is observed as (1) series of arc-like radio bursts with negative frequency drift which reoccur with 1.5% longer period than the Jovian magnetosphere rotation rate, (2) series of bursts with positive frequency drift which reoccur with Jupiter's rotation period and (3) periodic non-arc like radio features [1, 2]. These bursts are typically detected during several Jupiter rotations in decametric frequency range from 4 MHz to 12 - 16 MHz between 300° and 60° of CML. We present simultaneous observations of the periodic non-Io controlled DAM performed by the WAVES radio experiment onboard the two STEREO spacecraft and the groundbased radio telescope URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. URAN-2 with an effective area of about 30000 m2 consists of 512 broadband crossed dipoles and equipped with the high performance digital radio spectrometer with polarization measurement capability. During the observation campaign Sep., 2012 - Apr., 2013 URAN-2 recorded a large amount of Jovian DAM events with the high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100 ms) in a frequency range 8-32 MHz. In the same time the two spatially separated STEREO spacecraft was able to observe DAM in the frequency range up to 16 MHz. The first analysis of the acquired stereoscopic observations is presented. In particular, we show one episode when the periodic non-arc DAM was recorded together with long lasting Jovian narrow band (NB) emissions. These NB emission was observed at the high frequency cutoff of DAM and can be interpreted as propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jovian ionosphere [3]. We discuss the possible relations between the observed NB events and the periodic non-Io controlled Jovian decametric radio emission.

  17. Growth in NOx emissions from power plants in China: bottom-up estimates and satellite observations

    Y. Lei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument tropospheric NO2 columns and a nested-grid 3-D global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem, we investigated the growth in NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants and their contributions to the growth in NO2 columns in 2005–2007 in China. We first developed a unit-based power plant NOx emission inventory for 2005–2007 to support this investigation. The total capacities of coal-fired power generation have increased by 48.8% in 2005–2007, with 92.2% of the total capacity additions coming from generator units with size ≥300 MW. The annual NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants were estimated to be 8.11 Tg NO2 for 2005 and 9.58 Tg NO2 for 2007, respectively. The modeled summer average tropospheric NO2 columns were highly correlated (R2 = 0.79–0.82 with OMI measurements over grids dominated by power plant emissions, with only 7–14% low bias, lending support to the high accuracy of the unit-based power plant NOx emission inventory. The ratios of OMI-derived annual and summer average tropospheric NO2 columns between 2007 and 2005 indicated that most of the grids with significant NO2 increases were related to power plant construction activities. OMI had the capability to trace the changes of NOx emissions from individual large power plants in cases where there is less interference from other NOx sources. Scenario runs from GEOS-Chem model suggested that the new power plants contributed 18.5% and 10% to the annual average NO2 columns in 2007 in Inner Mongolia and North China, respectively. The massive new power plant NOx emissions significantly changed the local NO2 profiles, especially in less polluted areas. A sensitivity study found that changes of NO2 shape factors due to including new power plant emissions increased the summer average OMI tropospheric NO2 columns by 3.8–17.2% for six selected locations, indicating that the updated emission information could help to improve the satellite

  18. Growth in NOx emissions from power plants in China: bottom-up estimates and satellite observations

    Y. Lei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument tropospheric NO2 columns and a nested-grid 3-D global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem, we investigated the growth in NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants and their contributions to the growth in NO2 columns in 2005–2007 in China. We first developed a unit-based power plant NOx emission inventory for 2005–2007 to support this investigation. The total capacities of coal-fired power generation have increased by 48.8% in 2005–2007, with 92.2% of the total capacity additions coming from generator units with size ≥300 MW. The annual NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants were estimated to be 8.11 Tg NO2 for 2005 and 9.58 Tg NO2 for 2007, respectively. The modeled summer average tropospheric NO2 columns were highly correlated (R2 = 0.79–0.82 with OMI measurements over grids dominated by power plant emissions, with only 7–14% low bias, lending support to the high accuracy of the unit-based power plant NOx emission inventory. The ratios of OMI-derived annual and summer average tropospheric NO2 columns between 2007 and 2005 indicated that most of the grids with significant NO2 increases were related to power plant construction activities. OMI had the capability to trace the changes of NOx emissions from individual large power plants in cases where there is less interference from other NOx sources. Scenario runs from GEOS-Chem model suggested that the new power plants contributed 18.5% and 10% to the annual average NO2 columns in 2007 in Inner Mongolia and North China, respectively. The massive new power plant NOx emissions significantly changed the local NO2 profiles, especially in less polluted areas. A sensitivity study found that changes of NO2 shape factors due to including new power plant emissions increased the summer average OMI tropospheric NO2 columns by 3.8–17.2% for six selected locations, indicating that the updated emission information could help to improve the satellite

  19. Application of an Automated System for the Processing of VLF signals to Detect, Analyze and Classify Seismic-Ionospheric Precursor Phenomena

    Skeberis, Christos; Xenos, Thomas; Contadakis, Michael; Arabelos, Dimitrios; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso

    2013-04-01

    This paper studies the development and application of an automated system based on Predictive Modular Neural Networks (PREMONNs) and Self Organizing Maps (SOMs) along with the necessary backend development of database classification required to provide a fully integrated system for detecting disturbances that can be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena using VLF radio signals. The aforementioned system can analyze all the relevant data and bring forth and adaptively discriminate different characteristics in the received signals, in real time in order to provide data segments of interest that can be correlated to subsequent seismic phenomena and can be classified with respect to pre-recorded samples of previous points of interest (POIs). PREMONNs as it was demonstrated in previous studies can be used for time-series switching detection and can be applied to the detection of POIs , whereas SOMs have been extensively used in unsupervised pattern recognition and classification of datasets. For the purpose of this paper, data acquired in Thessaloniki (40.59N, 22,78E) from the VLF station in Tavolara, Italy (ICV station Lat 40.923, Lon. 9.731) for over two years (December 2010 - December 2012) are used. The receiver was developed by Elettronika Srl, and is part of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). The received VLF signal is normalized and then processed using the Empirical Mode Decomposition Method (EMD). The resulting data are passed to an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based on PREMONNs trained specifically for this purpose and the output from that stage is passed onto a classifier based on SOMs to compare and classify points of interest based on a current database of received signals and identifying and storing new ones for future reference. The efficacy of the detection and the results of the aforementioned process is then discussed and results are presented. Therefore, based on the results it may be

  20. First Spitzer Space Telescope Observations of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables: Evidence for Excess Emission at 3--8 microns

    Howell, S B; Hoard, D W; Wachter, S; Harrison, T; Thomas, H C B; Stefaniak, L; Ciardi, D R; Szkody, P; Van Belle, G T; Howell, Steve B.; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Wachter, Stefanie; Harrison, Thomas; Thomas, Howard Chun Beth; Stefaniak, Linda; Ciardi, David R.; Szkody, Paula; Belle, Gerard van

    2006-01-01

    We present the first observations of magnetic cataclysmic variables with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We used the Infrared Array Camera to obtain photometry of the polars EF Eri, GG Leo, V347 Pav, and RX J0154.0-5947 at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 $\\mu$m. In all of our targets, we detect excess mid-infrared emission over that expected from the component stars alone. We explore the origin of this IR excess by examining bremsstrahlung, cyclotron emission, circumbinary dust, and L/T brown dwarf secondary stars. Bremsstrahlung and cyclotron emission appear unlikely to be significant contributors to the observed fluxes. At present, the most likely candidate for the excess emission is dust that is probably located in a circumbinary disk with an inner temperature near 800 K. However, a simple dust disk plus any reasonable low mass or brown dwarf-like secondary star is unable to fully explain the observed flux densities in the 3--8 $\\mu$m region.

  1. Suzaku observations of X-ray excess emission in the cluster of galaxies A3112

    Lehto, T; Bonamente, M; Ota, N; Kaastra, J

    2010-01-01

    We analysed the Suzaku XIS1 data of the A3112 cluster of galaxies in order to examine the X-ray excess emission in this cluster reported earlier with the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites. The best-fit temperature of the intracluster gas depends strongly on the choice of the energy band used for the spectral analysis. This proves the existence of excess emission component in addition to the single-temperature MEKAL in A3112. We showed that this effect is not an artifact due to uncertainties of the background modeling, instrument calibration or the amount of Galactic absorption. Neither does the PSF scatter of the emission from the cool core nor the projection of the cool gas in the cluster outskirts produce the effect. Finally we modeled the excess emission either by using an additional MEKAL or powerlaw component. Due to the small differencies between thermal and non-thermal model we can not rule out the non-thermal origin of the excess emission based on the goodness of the fit. Assuming that it has a therma...

  2. All-sky Observational Evidence for An Inverse Correlation between Dust Temperature and Emissivity Spectral Index

    Liang, Z; Gold, B

    2012-01-01

    We show that a one-component variable-emissivity-spectral-index model (the free-{\\alpha} model) provides more physically motivated estimates of dust temperature at the Galactic polar caps than one- or two-component fixed-emissivity-spectral-index models (fixed-{\\alpha} models) for interstellar dust thermal emission at far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. For the comparison we have fit all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to a new and improved version of the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100 - 240 {\\mu}m maps from the COBE-DIRBE and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. The best model, the free-{\\alpha} model, is well constrained by data at 60-3000 GHz over 86 per cent of the total sky area. It predicts dust temperature (Tdust) to be 13.7-22.7 ({\\pm}1.3) K, the emissivity spectral index ({\\alpha}) to be 1.2 - 3.1 ({\\pm}0.3) and the optical depth ({\\tau}) to range 0.6 - 46 {\\times} 10^(-5) with a 23 per cent uncertainty. Using these estimates, w...

  3. Detecting leachate plumes and groundwater pollution at Ruseifa municipal landfill utilizing VLF-EM method

    Al-Tarazi, E.; Abu Rajab, J.; Al-Naqa, A.; El-Waheidi, M.

    2008-09-01

    A Very Low Frequency-Electromagnetic (VLF-EM) survey was carried out in two sites of domestic waste of old and recent landfills. The landfill structures lie on a major highly fractured limestone aquifer of shallow groundwater less than 30 m, which is considered as the main source of fresh water in Amman-Zarqa region. A total of 18 VLF-EM profiles were conducted with length ranges between 250 and 1500 m. Hydrochemical and biochemical analysis of water samples, taken from wells in the region, has also been conducted. The integrated results of previous DC resistivity method of the same study area and the outcomes of the 2-D tipper inversion of VLF-EM data proved the efficiency of this method in locating shallow and deep leachate plume with resistivity less than 20 Ω m, and enabling the mapping of anomalous bodies and their extensions down to 40 m depth. The sign of groundwater contamination was noticed in many surrounding wells resulting in the high number of fecal coliform bacteria and total coliform bacteria and the increase in inorganic parameters such as chloride (Cl). The pollution of groundwater wells in the landfill area is attributed to the leachate bodies which flow through the upper part of Wadi Es Sir (A7) or Amman-Wadi Es Sir Aquifer (B2/A7). Furthermore, several structural features were detected and the direction of local groundwater movement has been determined. The structural features have been found to have critical effects on the flowing of leachate plume towards north-northeast and west-southwest of the potable aquifer in the area.

  4. Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite Observations of Extended Water Emission in Orion

    Snell, R L; Ashby, M L N; Bergin, E A; Chin, G; Erickson, N R; Goldsmith, P F; Harwit, M; Kleiner, S C; Koch, D G; Neufeld, D A; Patten, B M; Plume, R; Schieder, R; Stauffer, J R; Tolls, V; Wang, Z; Winnewisser, G; Zhang, Y F; Melnick, G J

    2000-01-01

    We have used the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite to map the ground-state 1_{10}-1_{01} transition of ortho-water at 557 GHz in the Orion molecular cloud. Water emission was detected in Orion over an angular extent of about 20 arcmin, or nearly 3 pc. The water emission is relatively weak, with line widths (3-6 km s^{-1}) and V_{LSR} velocities (9-11 km s^{-1}) consistent with an origin in the cold gas of the molecular ridge. We find that the ortho-water abundance relative to H_2 in the extended gas in Orion varies between 1 and 8x10^{-8}, with an average of 3x10^{-8}. The absence of detectable narrow-line ortho-H_2^{18}O emission is used to set a 3-sigma upper limit on the relative ortho-water abundance of 7x10^{-8}.

  5. A multi-component Langmuir-mode source for the observed pulsar coherent emission

    Jones, P B

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of neutron star are sources of coherent emission at frequencies of 10^2 - 10^3 MHz: others are radio-quiet. The primary emission spectra are broadly universal in form over many orders of magnitude in rotation period and polar-cap magnetic flux density. The existence of nulls and mode-changes in some radio-loud pulsars can be understood only as a manifestation of magnetospherical bistability. An ion-proton plasma with a possible background of electron-positron pairs is formed at the polar caps of stars with positive corotational charge density and is shown here to be a physical basis for the presence or absence of coherent emission and a likely reason why bistability may be present in the later stages of a pulsar lifetime.

  6. SNR changes of VLF radio signals detected onboard the DEMETER satellite and their possible relationship to the Wenchuan earthquake

    M.; Parrot

    2009-01-01

    Here we used the VLF signal data received by the DEMETER satellite, transmitted from various ground VLF transmitters which are located around China, to study the changes in the signal to noise ratio (SNR) before and after the Wenchuan earthquake, which had a magnitude of 8.0. We also found that the SNRs of different frequency signals decreased significantly over the epicenter region before the earthquake, and reverted to their original levels after the earthquake. This phenomenon may be related to the earthquake.

  7. Observational studies on the near-infrared unidentified emission bands in galactic H II regions

    Mori, Tamami I.; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Ohsawa, Ryou; Bell, Aaron C. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ishihara, Daisuke [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Shimonishi, Takashi, E-mail: morii@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada Kobe 657-8501 Japan (Japan)

    2014-03-20

    Using a large collection of near-infrared spectra (2.5-5.4 μm) of Galactic H II regions and H II region-like objects, we perform a systematic investigation of astronomical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. Thirty-six objects were observed using the infrared camera on board the AKARI satellite as a part of a director's time program. In addition to the well known 3.3-3.6 μm features, most spectra show a relatively weak emission feature at 5.22 μm with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios, which we identify as the PAH 5.25 μm band (previously reported). By careful analysis, we find good correlations between the 5.25 μm band and both the aromatic hydrocarbon feature at 3.3 μm and the aliphatic hydrocarbon features at around 3.4-3.6 μm. The present results give us convincing evidence that the astronomical 5.25 μm band is associated with C-H vibrations, as suggested by previous studies, and show its potential to probe the PAH size distribution. The analysis also shows that the aliphatic-to-aromatic ratio of I {sub 3.4-3.6} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm} decreases against the ratio of the 3.7 μm continuum intensity to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub cont,} {sub 3.7} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}, which is an indicator of the ionization fraction of PAHs. The midinfrared color of I {sub 9} {sub μm}/I {sub 18} {sub μm} also declines steeply against the ratio of the hydrogen recombination line Brα at 4.05 μm to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub Brα}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}. These facts indicate possible dust processing inside or at the boundary of ionized gas.

  8. Multi-model simulation of CO and HCHO in the Southern Hemisphere: comparison with observations and impact of biogenic emissions

    Zeng, G.; Williams, J. E.; Fisher, J. A.; Emmons, L. K.; Jones, N. B.; Morgenstern, O.; Robinson, J.; Smale, D.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Griffith, D. W. T.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the impact of biogenic emissions on carbon monoxide (CO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), with simulations using two different biogenic emission inventories for isoprene and monoterpenes. Results from four atmospheric chemistry models are compared to continuous long-term ground-based CO and HCHO column measurements at the SH Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) sites, the satellite measurement of tropospheric CO columns from the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), and in situ surface CO measurements from across the SH, representing a subset of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Global Monitoring Division (NOAA GMD) network. Simulated mean model CO using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (v2.1) computed in the frame work of the Land Community Model (CLM-MEGANv2.1) inventory is in better agreement with both column and surface observations than simulations adopting the emission inventory generated from the LPJ-GUESS dynamical vegetation model framework, which markedly underestimate measured column and surface CO at most sites. Differences in biogenic emissions cause large differences in CO in the source regions which propagate to the remote SH. Significant inter-model differences exist in modelled column and surface CO, and secondary production of CO dominates these inter-model differences, due mainly to differences in the models' oxidation schemes for volatile organic compounds, predominantly isoprene oxidation. While biogenic emissions are a significant factor in modelling SH CO, inter-model differences pose an additional challenge to constrain these emissions. Corresponding comparisons of HCHO columns at two SH mid-latitude sites reveal that all models significantly underestimate the observed values by approximately a factor of 2. There is a much smaller impact on HCHO of the significantly different biogenic emissions in remote regions

  9. Non-thermal emission from Galaxy Clusters and future observations with the FERMI gamma-ray telescope and LOFAR

    Brunetti, G

    2008-01-01

    FERMI (formely GLAST) and LOFAR will shortly provide crucial information on the non-thermal components (relativistic particles and magnetic field) in galaxy clusters. After discussing observational facts that already put constraints on the properties and origin of non-thermal components, I will report on the emission spectrum from galaxy clusters as expected in the context of general calculations in which relativistic particles (protons and secondary electrons due to proton-proton collisions) interact with MHD turbulence generated in the cluster volume during cluster-cluster mergers. In this scenario (known as re-acceleration scenario) diffuse cluster-scale radio emission is produced in massive clusters during merging events, while gamma ray emission, at some level, is expected to be common in clusters. Expectations of interest for LOFAR and FERMI are also briefly discussed.

  10. NON-THERMAL EMISSION FROM GALAXY CLUSTERS AND FUTURE OBSERVATIONS WITH THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY TELESCOPE AND LOFAR

    G. Brunetti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available FERMI (formely GLAST and LOFAR will shortly provide crucial information on the non-thermal components (relativistic particles and magnetic eld in galaxy clusters. After discussing relevant observational facts that already put important constraints on the properties and origin of non-thermal components, I will report on the emission spectrum from galaxy clusters as expected in the context of general calculations in which relativistic particles (protons and secondary electrons due to proton-proton collisions interact with MHD turbulence generated in the cluster volume during cluster-cluster mergers. In this scenario (known as re-acceleration scenario di use cluster-scale radio emission is produced in massive clusters during merging events, while gamma ray emission, at some level, is expected to be common in clusters. Expectations of interest for LOFAR and FERMI are also brie y discussed.

  11. A 100-3000 GHz model of thermal dust emission observed by Planck, DIRBE and IRAS

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. (1999) two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck HFI maps. This parametrization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single modified blackbody (MBB) dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. (1999) based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.1' resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.1' FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration (2013) single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anistropy on small angular scales. We have recently released maps and associated software utilities for obtaining thermal dust emission and reddening predictions using our Planck-based two-component model.

  12. All-Sky Observational Evidence for An Inverse Correlation Between Dust Temperature and Emissivity Spectral Index

    Liang, Z.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gold, B.

    2012-01-01

    We show that a one-component variable-emissivity-spectral-index model (the free- model) provides more physically motivated estimates of dust temperature at the Galactic polar caps than one- or two-component fixed-emissivity-spectral-index models (fixed- models) for interstellar dust thermal emission at far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. For the comparison we have fit all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to a new and improved version of the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100-240 micrometer maps from the COBE-DIRBE and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. The best model, the free-alpha model, is well constrained by data at 60-3000 GHz over 86 per cent of the total sky area. It predicts dust temperature (T(sub dust)) to be 13.7-22.7 (plus or minus 1.3) K, the emissivity spectral index (alpha) to be 1.2-3.1 (plus or minus 0.3) and the optical depth (tau) to range 0.6-46 x 10(exp -5) with a 23 per cent uncertainty. Using these estimates, we present all-sky evidence for an inverse correlation between the emissivity spectral index and dust temperature, which fits the relation alpha = 1/(delta + omega (raised dot) T(sub dust) with delta = -.0.510 plus or minus 0.011 and omega = 0.059 plus or minus 0.001. This best model will be useful to cosmic microwave background experiments for removing foreground dust contamination and it can serve as an all-sky extended-frequency reference for future higher resolution dust models.

  13. Point source emission rate estimates from MAMAP airborne remote sensing total column observations of atmospheric CO2 and CH4

    Krings, Thomas; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Buchwitz, Michael; Hartmann, Jörg; Sachs, Torsten; Erzinger, Jörg; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2013-04-01

    Large parts of the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions of CO2 and CH4 are released from localised and point sources such as power plants or as fugitive emissions from fossil fuel mining and production sites. These emissions, however, are often not readily assessed by current measurement systems and networks. A tool developed to better understand point sources of CO2 and CH4 is the optical remote sensing instrument MAMAP (Methane Airborne MAPer), operated from aircraft. After a recent instrument modification, retrievals of the column averaged dry air mole fractions for methane XCH4 (or for carbon dioxide XCO2) derived from MAMAP observations in the short-wave infrared, have a precision of about 0.4% significantly improving data quality. MAMAP total column data also serve as a testbed for inversion concepts for greenhouse gas emissions from point sources using total column atmospheric concentration measurements. As information on wind speed is an important input parameter for the inference of emission rates using MAMAP data, recent measurement campaigns comprised an in-situ wind probe operated onboard the same aircraft. Incorporation of these wind measurements in combination with model data leads to a large reduction of uncertainties on the inversion result. Using the examples of two coal mine ventilation shafts in Western Germany as well as other anthropogenic targets, the value of high resolution total column data to obtain emission rate estimates is demonstrated. MAMAP has also been tested in sunglint geometry over the ocean and has therefore the potential for application also to offshore emission sites.

  14. HST-COS OBSERVATIONS OF HYDROGEN, HELIUM, CARBON, AND NITROGEN EMISSION FROM THE SN 1987A REVERSE SHOCK

    France, Kevin; Penton, Steven V. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); McCray, Richard [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Laming, Martin J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7674L, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Bouchet, Patrice [Service d' Astrophysique DSM/IRFU/SAp CEA - Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chevalier, Roger [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Garnavich, Peter M. [225 Nieuwland Science, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Lundqvist, Peter; Sollerman, Jesper [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Heng, Kevin [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Lawrence, Stephen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549 (United States); Panagia, Nino [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pun, Chun S. J. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road, Hong Kong (China); Smith, Nathan [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sonneborn, George [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sugerman, Ben, E-mail: kevin.france@colorado.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Goucher College, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road, Baltimore, MD 21204 (United States); and others

    2011-12-20

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow ({Delta}v {approx} 300 km s{sup -1}) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad ({Delta}v {approx} 10-20 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise ratio (>40 per resolution element) broad Ly{alpha} emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at {lambda} > 1350 A can be explained by H I two-photon (2s {sup 2} S{sub 1/2}-1s {sup 2} S{sub 1/2}) emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of N V {lambda}1240 emission from the reverse shock and present the first detections of broad He II {lambda}1640, C IV {lambda}1550, and N IV] {lambda}1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 {+-} 0.06. The N V/H{alpha} line ratio requires partial ion-electron equilibration (T{sub e} /T{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 0.14-0.35). We find that the N/C abundance ratio in the gas crossing the reverse shock is significantly higher than that in the circumstellar ring, a result that may be attributed to chemical stratification in the outer envelope of the supernova progenitor. The N/C abundance may have been stratified prior to the ring expulsion, or this result may indicate continued CNO processing in the progenitor subsequent to the expulsion of the circumstellar ring.

  15. HST-COS Observations on Hydrogen, Helium, Carbon, and Nitrogen Emission from the SN 1987A Reverse Shock

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Penton, Steven V.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter; Laming, J. Martin; Bouchet, Patrice; Chevalier, Roger; Garnavich, Peter M.; Fransson, Claes; Heng, Kevin; Larsson, Josefin; Lawrence, Stephen; Lundqvist, Peter; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S. J.; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Sonneborn, George; Sugerman, Ben; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2011-01-01

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987 A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow (Delta v approximates 300 km/s) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad Delta v approximates 10-20 x 10(exp 3) km/s) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise ratio (>40 per resolution element) broad Ly-alpha emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at lambda > 1350 A can be explained by H-I two-photon (2s(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)-l(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)) emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of N V lambda 1240 emission from the reverse shock and present the first detections of broad He II lambda1640, C IV lambda 1550, and N IV ] lambda1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 +/- 0.06. The N V /H alpha line ratio requires partial ion-electron equilibration (T(sub e)/T(sub p) approximately equal to 0.14-0.35). We find that the N/C abundance ratio in the gas crossing the reverse shock is significantly higher than that in the circumstellar ring, a result that may be attributed to chemical stratification in the outer envelope of the supernova progenitor. The N/C abundance may have been stratified prior to the ring expUlsion, or this result may indicate continued CNO processing in the progenitor subsequent to the expUlsion of the circumstellar ring.

  16. Circuit Methods for VLF Antenna Couplers. [for use in Loran or Omega receiver systems

    Burhans, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The limitations of different E-field antenna coupler or preamplifier circuits are presented. All circuits were evaluated using actual Loran or Omega signals. Electric field whip or wire antennas are the simplest types which can be used for reception of VLF signals in the 10 to 100 kHz range. JFET or MOSFET transistors provide impedance transformation and some voltage gain in simple circuits where the power for operating the preamplifier uses the same coaxial cable that feeds the signal back to the receiver. The circuit techniques provide useful alternative methods for Loran-Omega receiver system designers.

  17. Tracing jet emission at the base of a high-mass YSO. First AMBER/VLTI observations of the Br\\gamma emission in IRAS 13481-6124

    Garatti, A Caratti o; Weigelt, G; Schertl, D; Hofmann, K -H; Kraus, S; Oudmaijer, R D; de Wit, W J; Sanna, A; Lopez, R Garcia; Kreplin, A; Ray, T P

    2016-01-01

    To probe the circumstellar environment of IRAS 13481-6124, a 20 M_sun high-mass young stellar object (HMYSO) with a parsec-scale jet and accretion disc, we investigate the origin of its Br\\gamma-emission line through NIR interferometry. We present the first AMBER/VLTI observations of the Br\\gamma-emitting region in an HMYSO at R~1500. Our AMBER/VLTI observations reveal a spatially and spectrally resolved Br\\gamma-line in emission with a strong P Cygni profile, indicating outflowing matter with a terminal velocity of ~500 km/s. Visibilities, differential phases, and closure phases are detected in our observations within the spectral line and in the adjacent continuum. Both total visibilities (continuum plus line emitting region) and pure-line visibilities indicate that the Br\\gamma-emitting region is more compact (2-4 mas in diameter or ~6-13 au at 3.2 kpc) than the continuum-emitting region (~5.4 mas or ~17 au). The absorption feature is also spatially resolved at the longest baselines (81 and 85 m) and has a...

  18. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Avery@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348 (Belgium); Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Sehgal, Chandra M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  19. Observation of gamma-ray emission from the galaxy M87 above 250 GeV with VERITAS

    Acciari, V A; Blaylock, G; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Butt, Y; Celik, O; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Colin, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M K; Duke, C; Ergin, T; Falcone, A D; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortin, P; Fortson, L F; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Hays, E; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hughes, S B; Hui, M C; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, Philip; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D B; Kildea, J; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Lee, K; Maier, G; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nagai, T; Ong, R A; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Toner, A Syson J A; Valcarcel, L; Vasilev, V V; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; White, R J; Williams, D A; Wissel, S A; Wood, M D; Zitzer, B

    2008-01-01

    The multiwavelength observation of the nearby radio galaxy M87 provides a unique opportunity to study in detail processes occurring in Active Galactic Nuclei from radio waves to TeV gamma-rays. Here we report the detection of gamma-ray emission above 250 GeV from M87 in spring 2007 with the VERITAS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array and discuss its correlation with the X-ray emission. The gamma-ray emission is measured to be point-like with an intrinsic source radius less than 4.5 arcmin. The differential energy spectrum is fitted well by a power-law function: dPhi/dE=(7.4+-1.3_{stat}+-1.5_{sys})(E/TeV)^{-2.31+-0.17_{stat}+-0.2_{sys}} 10^{-9}m^{-2}s^{-1}TeV^{-1}. We show strong evidence for a year-scale correlation between the gamma-ray flux reported by TeV experiments and the X-ray emission measured by the ASM/RXTE observatory, and discuss the possible short-time-scale variability. These results imply that the gamma-ray emission from M87 is more likely associated with the core of the galaxy than with othe...

  20. Observation of the fine structure for rovibronic spectral lines in visible part of emission spectra of $D_2$

    Lavrov, B P; Zhukov, A S

    2011-01-01

    For the first time the fine structure of rovibronic spectral lines in visible part of emission spectra of $D_2$ molecule has been observed. Observed splitting in visible doublets is about 0.2 cm$^{-1}$ in good accordance with previous observations in the infrared part of the spectrum ($a^3\\Sigma_g^+ \\to c^3\\Pi_u$ electronic transition) by means of FTIR and laser spectroscopy. Relative intensities of the fine structure components are in agreement with our calculations of adiabatic line strengths for Hund's case "b" coupling scheme.

  1. FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY γ-RAY EMISSION TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER

    Ajello, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Kinard Lab of Physics, Clemson, SC 29634-0978 (United States); Albert, A.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Atwood, W. B.; Caputo, R. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bechtol, K. [Dept. of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bissaldi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bonino, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bregeon, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Université Montpellier, CNRS/IN2P3, Montpellier (France); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Buehler, R., E-mail: tporter@stanford.edu, E-mail: smurgia@uci.edu [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); and others

    2016-03-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has provided the most detailed view to date of the emission toward the Galactic center (GC) in high-energy γ-rays. This paper describes the analysis of data taken during the first 62 months of the mission in the energy range 1–100 GeV from a 15° × 15° region about the direction of the GC. Specialized interstellar emission models (IEMs) are constructed to enable the separation of the γ-ray emissions produced by cosmic ray particles interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation fields in the Milky Way into that from the inner ∼1 kpc surrounding the GC, and that from the rest of the Galaxy. A catalog of point sources for the 15° × 15° region is self-consistently constructed using these IEMs: the First Fermi-LAT Inner Galaxy Point Source Catalog (1FIG). The spatial locations, fluxes, and spectral properties of the 1FIG sources are presented, and compared with γ-ray point sources over the same region taken from existing catalogs. After subtracting the interstellar emission and point-source contributions a residual is found. If templates that peak toward the GC are used to model the positive residual the agreement with the data improves, but none of the additional templates tried account for all of its spatial structure. The spectrum of the positive residual modeled with these templates has a strong dependence on the choice of IEM.

  2. Spitzer observations of dust emission from H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Stephens, Ian W. [Now at Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA. (United States); Evans, Jessica Marie; Xue, Rui; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M., E-mail: ianws@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Massive stars can alter physical conditions and properties of their ambient interstellar dust grains via radiative heating and shocks. The H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) offer ideal sites to study the stellar energy feedback effects on dust because stars can be resolved, and the galaxy's nearly face-on orientation allows us to unambiguously associate H II regions with their ionizing massive stars. The Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the LMC provides multi-wavelength (3.6-160 μm) photometric data of all H II regions. To investigate the evolution of dust properties around massive stars, we have analyzed spatially resolved IR dust emission from two classical H II regions (N63 and N180) and two simple superbubbles (N70 and N144) in the LMC. We produce photometric spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of numerous small subregions for each region based on its stellar distributions and nebular morphologies. We use DustEM dust emission model fits to characterize the dust properties. Color-color diagrams and model fits are compared with the radiation field (estimated from photometric and spectroscopic surveys). Strong radial variations of SEDs can be seen throughout the regions, reflecting the available radiative heating. Emission from very small grains drastically increases at locations where the radiation field is the highest, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) appear to be destroyed. PAH emission is the strongest in the presence of molecular clouds, provided that the radiation field is low.

  3. Probing the origin of VHE emission from M 87 with MWL observations in 2010

    Raue, Martin; Mazin, Daniel; Colin, Pierre; Hui, Michelle; Beilicke, Matthias; Walker, Craig; MAGIC,; VERITAS,

    2012-01-01

    The large majority of extragalactic very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) sources belongs to the class of active galactic nuclei (AGN), in particular the BL Lac sub-class. AGNs are characterized by an extremely bright and compact emission region, powered by a super-massive black hole (SMBH) and an accretion disk, and relativistic outflows (jets) detected all across the electro-magnetic spectrum. In BL Lac sources the jet axis is oriented close to the line of sight, giving rise to a relativistic boosting of the emission. In radio galaxies, on the other hand, the jet makes a larger angle to the line of sight allowing to resolve the central core and the jet in great details. The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity (1 6Mpc) and its very massive black hole ((3-6) x 10^9 M_solar) provides a unique laboratory to investigate VHE emission in such objects and thereby probe particle acceleration to relativistic energies near SMBH and in jets. M 87 has been established as a VHE emitter since 2005. The VHE emission dis...

  4. NuSTAR observations of the bullet cluster: constraints on inverse compton emission

    Wik, Daniel R.; Hornstrup, Allan; Molendi, S.;

    2014-01-01

    The search for diffuse non-thermal inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been undertaken with many instruments, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Because all prior telescopes sensitive at E > 10 keV do not focus light a...

  5. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    Odegard, N.; Kogut, A.; Chuss, D. T.; Miller, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 mm to 100 μm and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems (TLS) model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anti-correlation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner et al. because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model that was recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenological model consisting of the sum of two graybody components. We find that the two-graybody model gives the best fit and the FDS model gives a significantly poorer fit than the other models. The Meisner and Finkbeiner model and the TLS model remain viable for use in Galactic foreground subtraction, but the FIRAS data do not have a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to provide a strong test of the predicted spectrum at millimeter wavelengths.

  6. High-spectral resolution observations of the 3.29 micron emission feature: Comparison to QCC and PAHs

    Tokunaga, Alan T.; Sellgren, Kris; Sakata, Akira; Wada, S.; Onaka, Takashi; Nakada, Y.; Nagata, T.

    1989-01-01

    Two of the most promising explanations for the origin of the interstellar emission features observed at 3.29, 3.4, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 microns are: quenched carbonaceous composite (QCC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). High resolution spectra are given of the 3.29 micron emission feature which were taken with the Cooled Grating Array Spectrometer at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and previously published. These spectra show that the peak wavelength of the 3.29 micron feature is located at 3.295 + or - 0.005 micron and that it is coincident with the peak absorbance of QCC. The peak wavelength of the 3.29 micron feature appears to be the same in all of the sources observed thus far. However, the width of the feature in HD 44179 and Elias 1 is only 0.023 micron, which is smaller than the 0.043 micron width in NGC 7027, IRAS 21282+5050, the Orion nebula, and BD+30 deg 3639. Spectra of NGC 7027, QCC, and PAHs is shown. QCC matches the 3.29 micron interstellar emission feature very closely in the wavelength of the peak, and it produces a single feature. On the other hand, PAHs rarely match the peak of the interstellar emission feature, and characteristically produce multiple features.

  7. Diagnostic Power of Broad Emission Line Profiles in Searches for Binary Supermassive Black Holes: Comparison of Models with Observations

    Nguyen, Khai; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Eracleous, Michael; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by observational searches for sub-parsec supermassive black hole binaries (SBHBs) we develop a semi-analytic model to describe the spectral emission line signatures of these systems. We are particularly interested in modeling the profiles of the broad emission lines, which have been used as a tool to search for SBHBs. The goal of this work is to test one of the leading models of binary accretion flows in the literature: SBHB in a circumbinary disk. In this context, we model SBHB accretion flows as a set of three accretion disks: two mini-disks that are gravitationally bound to the individual black holes and a circumbinary disk that forms a common envelope about a gravitationally bound binary. Our first generation model shows that emission line profiles tend to have different statistical properties depending on the semi-major axis, mass ratio, eccentricity of the binary, and the alignment of the triple-disk system, and can in principle be used to constrain the statistical distribution of these parameters. We present the results of a second generation model, which improves upon the treatment of radiative transfer by taking into account the effect of line-driven winds on the properties of the model emission line profiles. This improvement allows a preliminary comparison of the model profiles with the observed SBHB candidates and AGN population in general.

  8. Evaluating Observational Constraints on N2O Emissions via Information Content Analysis Using GEOS-Chem and its Adjoint

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; Griffis, T. J.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Prinn, R. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Weiss, R. F.; Dutton, G. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Steele, P.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a long-lived greenhouse gas with a global warming potential approximately 300 times that of CO2, and plays a key role in stratospheric ozone depletion. Human perturbation of the nitrogen cycle has led to a rise in atmospheric N2O, but large uncertainties exist in the spatial and temporal distribution of its emissions. Here we employ a 4D-Var inversion framework for N2O based on the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint to derive new constraints on the space-time distribution of global land and ocean N2O fluxes. Based on an ensemble of global surface measurements, we find that emissions are overestimated over Northern Hemisphere land areas and underestimated in the Southern Hemisphere. Assigning these biases to particular land or ocean regions is more difficult given the long lifetime of N2O. To quantitatively evaluate where the current N2O observing network provides local and regional emission constraints, we apply a new, efficient information content analysis technique involving radial basis functions. The technique yields optimal state vector dimensions for N2O source inversions, with model grid cells grouped in space and time according to the resolution that can actually be provided by the network of global observations. We then use these optimal state vectors in an analytical inversion to refine current top-down emission estimates.

  9. Serendipity observations of far infrared cirrus emission in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey: Analysis of far-infrared correlations

    Bot, Caroline; Boulanger, Francois; Lagache, Guilaine; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine; Draine, Bruce; Martin, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of far-infrared dust emission from diffuse cirrus clouds. This study is based on serendipitous observations at 160 microns at high galactic latitude with the Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope by the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). These observations are complemented with IRIS data at 100 and 60 microns and constitute one of the most sensitive and unbiased samples of far infrared observations at small scale of diffuse interstellar clouds. Outside regions dominated by the cosmic infrared background fluctuations, we observe a substantial scatter in the 160/100 colors from cirrus emission. We compared the 160/100 color variations to 60/100 colors in the same fields and find a trend of decreasing 60/100 with increasing 160/100. This trend can not be accounted for by current dust models by changing solely the interstellar radiation field. It requires a significant change of dust properties such as grain size distribution or emissivity or ...

  10. Renewed methane increase (2007-2014): contribution of oil and natural gas emissions determined from methane and ethane column observations

    Hausmann, Petra; Sussmann, Ralf; Smale, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Harmonized time series of column-averaged mole fractions of atmospheric methane and ethane over the period 1999-2014 are derived from solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements at the Zugspitze summit (47° N, 2964 m a.s.l.) and at Lauder (45° S, 370 m a.s.l.). Long-term trend analysis reveals a consistent renewed methane increase since 2007 of 6.2 [5.6, 6.9] ppb yr-1 at the Zugspitze and 6.0 [5.3, 6.7] ppb yr-1 at Lauder (95 % confidence intervals). Several recent studies provide pieces of evidence that the renewed methane increase is most likely driven by two main factors: (i) increased methane emissions from tropical wetlands, followed by (ii) increased thermogenic methane emissions due to growing oil and natural gas production. Here, we quantify the magnitude of the second class of sources, using long-term measurements of atmospheric ethane as tracer for thermogenic methane emissions. In 2007, after years of weak decline, the Zugspitze ethane time series shows the sudden onset of a significant positive trend (2.3 [1.8, 2.8] × 10-2 ppb yr-1 for 2007-2014), while a negative trend persists at Lauder after 2007 (-0.4 [-0.6, -0.1] × 10-2 ppb yr-1). Zugspitze methane and ethane time series are significantly correlated for the period 2007-2014 and can be assigned to thermogenic methane emissions with an ethane-to-methane ratio of 10-21 %. We present optimized emission scenarios for 2007-2014 derived from an atmospheric two-box model. From our trend observations we infer a total ethane emission increase over the period 2007-2014 from oil and natural gas sources of 1-11 Tg yr-1 along with an overall methane emission increase of 24-45 Tg yr-1. Based on these results, the oil and natural gas emission contribution C to the renewed methane increase is deduced using three different emission scenarios with dedicated ranges of methane-to-ethane ratios (MER). Reference scenario 1 assumes an oil and gas emission combination with MER = 3.3-7.6, which results in a

  11. Near infrared spectral and polarization imaging observation of coronal emission lines during the 2008 total solar eclipse

    2009-01-01

    During the 2008 total solar eclipse, the coronal emission lines were observed by using optical fibre spectrometric and polarization imaging system in near infrared waveband. The profiles of the coronal emission lines including Fe XIII 10747 , 10798  and He I 10830  were obtained with dispersion of 0.5 /pix. The intensity of Fe XIII 10747  remained unchanged in the two different coronal regions while the intensity of He I 10830  varied considerably in the two coronal locations no matter whether the prominence appeared or not. The coronal polarization images were observed at Fe XI 7892  with a bandpass of 30  in a series of exposure times.

  12. Near infrared spectral and polarization imaging observation of coronal emission lines during the 2008 total solar eclipse

    BAO XingMing; WANG XiaoFan; ZHANG ZhiYong; DENG Jian; HU KeLiang; XUAN WeiJia; LIU YangBing; ZHANG HongQi; DENG YuanYong; WANG DongGuang

    2009-01-01

    During the 2008 total solar eclipse, the coronal emission lines were observed by using optical fibre spectrometric and polarization imaging system in near infrared waveband. The profiles of the coronal emission lines Including Fe ⅩⅢ 10747 A, 10798 A and He 1 10830 A were obtained with dispersion of 0.5 A/pix. The intensity of Fe ⅩⅢ 10747 A remained unchanged In the two different coronal regions while the intensity of He I 10830 A varied considerably in the two coronal locations no matter whether the prominence appeared or not. The coronal polarization images were observed at Fe XI 7892 A with a bandpass of 30 A in a series of exposure times.

  13. An Ongoing Observational Study of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Boston Area

    Merrifield, A.; Prinn, R. G.; Ono, S.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations and their relationship to atmospheric conditions in major cities are an important component of current efforts to understand the effects of urbanization on anthropogenic sources of GHGs. One-minute CO2 mixing ratio measurements in the city of Cambridge, MA have been determined from air samples collected from an intake mounted at on the roof of MIT's Green building (99.0 m) since July 3, 2012. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations are governed by a diurnal cycle with July hourly average mixing ratios ranging from a minimum of 390.22 ± 9.22 ppm at 4:00PM to a maximum of 412.89 ± 16.78 ppm at 6:00AM. Occasional plume events, with mixing ratios exceeding 500 ppm, are seen in preliminary records especially in the morning hours (6:00AM-12:00PM). Small CO2 detectors also have been deployed at other locations on MIT's campus to determine CO2 mixing ratios to within 30 ppm at different elevations. These detectors provide a cost effective way to determine the spatial extent of plume events. To assess overall levels of GHGs in the Boston area, corresponding CO and N2O concentrations, obtained with a continuous wave, quantum cascade tunable infrared laser absorption spectrometer are used to determine source signatures during plume events. The potential exists to establish a baseline diurnal signal in the CO and N2O records similar to that of CO2 in the ongoing measurements. Further analyses will look to determine the existence and extent of an urban GHG dome over the city of Boston. Some unique source signatures are identified on the basis of their characteristic N2O-CO-CO2 ratios; this information will be used to evaluate the location of significant anthropogenic sources of GHGs in conjunction with wind direction and traffic flow data. Preliminary N2O/CO2 ratios, averaged over six hour periods, fall between (7.31 ± 0.31)*10-4 in the morning (6:00AM-12:00PM) and (8.34 ± 0.13)*10-4 in the evening (6:00PM - 12:00AM) are slightly

  14. In situ transmission electron microscopy observations of individually selected freestanding carbon nanotubes during field emission

    Kaiser, Monja [Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)]. E-mail: m.kaiser@philips.com; Doytcheva, Maya [Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Verheijen, Marcel [Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Jonge, Niels de [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    For the successful application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as electron sources in various applications it is important to understand the relation between the morphology of the CNT and its emission properties. A method was developed to study individual, freestanding and pre-selected CNTs with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The technique provided important parameters of the CNT, such as the number of carbon walls and the nature of its apex. The resolution with which the freestanding apices were imaged depended linearly on the ratio of the length and the radius. CNTs were also imaged in situ in the TEM while emitting electrons. It was found that the structure of a CNT was highly stable below a certain threshold emission current of typically 2 {mu}A, while various structural changes occurred above the threshold, leading to either damaging or repair of the structure at the apex of the CNT.

  15. Observation of β-delayed two-proton emission in the decay of 22Si

    X.X. Xu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The decay of the lightest nucleus with Tz=−3, 22Si, was studied by a silicon array. A charged-particle group at 5600 (70 keV in the decay-energy spectrum was identified experimentally as β-delayed two-proton emission from the isobaric analog state (IAS of 22Al. Experimental results of the IAS fed by a superallowed Fermi transition were compared with our large-scale shell-model calculations. The ground-state mass of 22Si was obtained indirectly in the experiment for the first time. Two-proton separation energy for 22Si is deduced to be −108 (125 keV, which indicates that it is a very marginal candidate for two-proton ground-state emission.

  16. Observation of Atomic Emission Enhancement by fs-ns Dual-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    YAN Li-Xin; ZHANG Yong-Sheng; ZHANG Li-Rong; LIU Jing-Ru; CHENG Jian-Ping; L(U) Min

    2006-01-01

    An experiment of a 500-fs KrF laser pulse incident upon a high density supersonic O2 gas jet synchronously with an ns frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser pulse is performed in orthogonal configuration.Significant atomic emission enhancement of over forty-fold is observed with an optical multi-channel analyser.The enhancement effect is probably attributed to the different ionization mechanisms between fs and ns laser pulses.

  17. Observation of quasi-periodic frequency sweeping in electron cyclotron emission of nonequilibrium mirror-confined plasma

    Viktorov, M E; Mansfeld, D A; Golubev, S V

    2016-01-01

    Chirping frequency patterns have been observed in the electron cyclotron emission from strongly nonequilibrium plasma confined in a table-top mirror magnetic trap. Such patterns are typical for the formation of nonlinear phase space structures in a proximity of the wave-particle resonances of a kinetically unstable plasma, also known as the "holes and clumps" mechanism. Our data provides the first experimental evidence for acting of this mechanism in the electron cyclotron frequency domain.

  18. Delayed Double Resonance Between Quadrupolar Levels: Observation of a Nuclear Spin Emission Signal in s-Triazine

    Manallah, B.

    1986-02-01

    A delayed double resonance experiment was carried out using a Robinson-type continuous wave spectrometer. The sample chosen was s-triazine at liquid helium temperature, where the relaxation times are of the order of ten hours. Line pairings between the two Nitrogen-14 NQR sites were confirmed. Emission signals from ν- transitions were observed after successively saturating first the ν- line and then the ν+ line. The results are understood in terms of a simple model of spin population dynamics.

  19. Observations of CO isotopic emission and the far-infrared continuum of Centaurus A

    Eckart, A.; Cameron, M.; Rothermel, H.; Wild, W.; Zinnecker, H.; Rydbeck, G.; Olberg, M.; Wiklind, T.

    1990-01-01

    Maps are presented of the (C-12)O (1-0) line and the 100 and 50 micron far-IR continuum emission of Centaurus A, along with measurements of the(C-12)O (2-1), (C-13)O, and the C(O-18) lines at selected positions. The molecular gas is concentrated in the dust lane of Cen A, and the center of the rotat

  20. The Protonics project: distributed observations of auroral dayside Doppler-shifted hydrogen emissions

    Holmes, Jeffrey Morgan

    2014-01-01

    The Protonics project is an effort to further understand the spatio-temporal dynamics of dayside auroral hydrogen emissions, also known as dayside proton aurorae. Spectrometers measuring dayside Balmer α (Hα) and Balmer β (Hβ) were deployed to two locations on Svalbard at Longyearbyen and Ny-Ålesund. Measured hydrogen Doppler profiles were analysed via a Monte Carlo model of proton precipitation, resulting in an estimate of characteristic energy of the precipitating proton/hydrogen population...

  1. Synthesis of silver hollow nanoparticles and observation of photoluminescence emission properties

    Desarkar, H.S. [Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, West Bengal 713209 (India); Kumbhakar, P., E-mail: nitdgpkumbhakar@yahoo.com [Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, West Bengal 713209 (India); Mitra, A.K. [Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, West Bengal 713209 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Preparation of hollow silver nanoparticles (HSNs) along-with solid silver nanoparticles are reported by Nd:YAG laser ablation of solid silver target immersed in water medium with a laser ablation time (LAT) duration of 50 min and with the incident laser fluence of 151 J/cm{sup 2}. It is found that only solid silver nanoparticles are produced when the experiment is carried out with smaller values of LAT duration. The synthesized samples are characterized by using transmission electron microscopy and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The UV-Visible absorption spectra of the samples show sharp absorptions in the ultraviolet and in visible regions due to interband transition and surface plasmon resonance oscillations in Ag nanoparticles, respectively. It is found that all samples exhibit photoluminescence (PL) emission, at room temperature, in the UV-Visible region peaked at {approx}346 nm, due to the recombination of electrons with holes from sp conduction band to d band of Ag. The sample containing HSNs exhibits strong PL emission and the value of peak PL emission intensity is enhanced by the factor of 2.4 in comparison to that obtained from the sample synthesized with LAT duration of 20 min. The synthesized HSNs may find applications in catalysis and in chemical sensing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hollow silver nanoparticles of 15-60 nm particle sizes are prepared by laser ablation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prepared Ag nanoparticles show sharp absorptions in the UV and visible regions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong interband transition along-with SPR oscillations is reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement (2.4 times) in photoluminescence emission in the UV region is reported.

  2. Satellite observation of pollutant emissions from gas flaring activities near the Arctic

    Li, Can; Hsu, N. Christina; Sayer, Andrew M.; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Fu, Joshua S.; Lamsal, Lok N.; Lee, Jaehwa; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2016-05-01

    Gas flaring is a common practice in the oil industry that can have significant environmental impacts, but has until recently been largely overlooked in terms of relevance to climate change. We utilize data from various satellite sensors to examine pollutant emissions from oil exploitation activities in four areas near the Arctic. Despite the remoteness of these sparsely populated areas, tropospheric NO2 retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is substantial at ˜1 × 1015 molecules cm-2, suggesting sizeable emissions from these industrial activities. Statistically significant (at the 95% confidence level, corresponding uncertainties in parentheses) increasing trends of 0.017 (±0.01) × 1015 and 0.015 (±0.006) × 1015 molecules cm-2 year-1 over 2004-2015 were found for Bakken (USA) and Athabasca (Canada), two areas having recently experienced fast expansion in the oil industry. This rapid change has implications for emission inventories, which are updated less frequently. No significant trend was found for the North Sea (Europe), where oil production has been declining since the 1990s. For northern Russia, the trend was just under the 95% significance threshold at 0.0057 (±0.006) × 1015 molecules cm-2 year-1. This raises an interesting inconsistency as prior studies have suggested that, in contrast to the continued, albeit slow, expansion of Russian oil/gas production, gas flaring in Russia has decreased in recent years. However, only a fraction of oil fields in Russia were covered in our analysis. Satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) data revealed similar tendencies, albeit at a weaker level of statistical significance, due to the longer lifetime of aerosols and contributions from other sources. This study demonstrates that synergetic use of data from multiple satellite sensors can provide valuable information on pollutant emission sources that is otherwise difficult to acquire.

  3. Suzaku Observation of Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Petre, Robert; Matsumoti, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Holt, Stephan S.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Soong, Yang; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Kokubun, Motohide

    2007-01-01

    We studied extended X-ray emission from the Carina Nebula taken with the Suzaku CCD camera XIS on 2005 Aug. 29. The X-ray morphology, plasma temperature and absorption to the plasma are consistent with the earlier Einstein results. The Suzaku spectra newly revealed emission lines from various spices including oxygen, but not from nitrogen. This result restricts the N/O ratio significantly low, compared with evolved massive stellar winds, suggesting that the diffuse emission is originated in an old supernova remnant or a super shell produced by multiple supernova remnants. The X-ray spectra from the north and south of eta Car showed distinct differences between 0.3-2 keV. The south spectrum shows strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while the north spectrum shows them weak in intensity. This means that silicon and iron abundances are a factor of 2-4 higher in the south region than in the north region. The abundance variation may be produced by an SNR ejecta, or relate to the dust formation around the star forming core.

  4. Suzaku Observation of Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula

    Hamaguchi, K; Matsumoto, H; Tsujimoto, M; Holt, S S; Ezoe, Y; Ozawa, H; Tsuboi, Y; Soong, Y; Kitamoto, S; Sekiguchi, A; Kokubun, M; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Petre, Robert; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Holt, Stephan S.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Soong, Yang; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Kokubun, Motohide

    2006-01-01

    We studied extended X-ray emission from the Carina Nebula taken with the Suzaku CCD camera XIS on 2005 Aug. 29. The X-ray morphology, plasma temperature and absorption to the plasma are consistent with the earlier Einstein results. The Suzaku spectra newly revealed emission lines from various species including oxygen, but not from nitrogen. This result restricts the N/O ratio significantly low, compared with evolved massive stellar winds, suggesting that the diffuse emission is originated in an old supernova remnant or a super shell produced by multiple supernova remnants. The X-ray spectra from the north and south of Eta Carinae showed distinct differences between 0.3-2 keV. The south spectrum shows strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while the north spectrum shows them weak in intensity. This means that silicon and iron abundances are a factor of 2-4 higher in the south region than in the north region. The abundance variation may be produced by an SNR ejecta, or relate to th...

  5. Orbiting transmitter and antenna for spaceborne communications at ELF/VLF to submerged submarines

    Bannister, P. R.; Harrison, J. K.; Rupp, C. C.; King, R. W. P.; Cosmo, M. L.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Dyer, C. J.; Grossi, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    An orbital emplacement for the transmitter and the antenna of a communications link at ELF (30 to 300 Hz) and VLF (3 kHz to 30 kHz) to submerged submarines has been considered since the very inception of the space age. However, only recently has space technology reached a sufficient level of maturity for system designers to undertake serious studies of this link configuration. The optimistic outlook stems from recent space technology developments, such as the design and construction by NASA of long orbiting tethers, and the testing, onboard Shuttle Orbiter ATLANTIS, of the first spaceborne 20 km metal wire. This is known as the Tethered Satellite System-1 (TSS-1), a space mission that might be possibly followed by other flights, with tether lengths that could reach 100 km. Once deployed at a height of, say, 300 km, from a Shuttle Orbiter, or from another suitable platform, a long, thin tether aligns itself along the local vertical by virtue of the gradient of the Earth gravity field. If made of metal, the tether can function as a VED (Vertical Electric Dipole) transmitting antenna at ELF and VLF.

  6. Solar flare induced D-region ionospheric perturbations evaluated from VLF measurements

    Singh, Ashutosh K.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Rajesh; Singh, R. P.

    2014-03-01

    The results of very low frequency (VLF) wave amplitude measurements carried out at the low latitude station Varanasi (geom. lat. 14∘55'N, long. 154∘E), India during solar flares are presented for the first time. The VLF waves (19.8 kHz) transmitted from the NWC-transmitter, Australia propagated in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide to long distances and were recorded at Varanasi. Data are analyzed and the reflection height H' and the sharpness factor β are evaluated. It is found that the reflection height decreases whereas sharpness factor increases with the increase of solar flare power. The H' is found to be higher and β smaller at low latitudes than the corresponding values at mid and high latitudes. The sunspot numbers were low during the considered period 2011-2012, being the rising phase of solar cycle 24 and as a result cosmic rays may impact the D-region ionosphere. The increased ionization from the flare lowers the effective reflecting height, H', of the D-region roughly in proportion to the logarithm of the X-ray flare intensity from a typical mid-day unperturbed value of about 71-72 km down to about 65 km for an X class flare. The sharpness ( β) of the lower edge of the D-region is also significantly increased by the flare but reaches a clear saturation value of about 0.48 km-1 for flares of magnitude greater than about X1 class.

  7. Penetration Characteristics of VLF Wave From Atmosphere Into the Lower Ionosphere%VLF波从大气层到低电离层的传输特性分析

    赵庶凡; 申旭辉; 潘威炎; 张学民

    2011-01-01

    Many papers have indicated that earthquake happens associated with a width frequency band of VLF (Very Low Frequency), ULF (Ultra Low Frequency), ELF (Extremely Low Frequency)electromagnetic radiation, which have been recorded by satellites in the ionosphere and low magnetosphere.In this paper, the reflection and transmission coefficient of the homogeneous half-space ionosphere has been calculated using propagation matrix method.Simultaneously the Booker quartic equation is solved to get the refractive index in the ionosphere.The analysis of the factors which influence the reflection and transmission coefficient of the ionosphere and the propagation characteristics in the ionosphere of VLF wave have been performed, such as wave frequency, incident angle, geomagnetic inclination, electron density and collision frequency in the ionosphere to provide fundamental basis for further studies on numerical calculation of propagation of ULF/VLF waves in the stratified ionosphere and support the study of seismo-ionosphere coupling mechanism.The results show that it is easier for the TE (Traverse Electric) wave radiated by vertical electric dipole to penetrate into the ionosphere, but the TM (Traverse Magnetic) wave radiated by horizontal electric dipole is reflected again and again in the ground-ionosphere waveguide.It is easier to observe the VLF wave anomaly when the electron density is lower or at the high-latitude region.The O wave experiences severer attenuation than X wave, so X wave is a penetration mode whereas O wave is a non penetration mode in the ionosphere.The attenuation of the two characteristic wave decrease as the decrease of the angle between the geomagnetic field and wave vector, that is to say the attenuation is the smallest when longitudinal propagation.When the geomagnetic field is considered, the ULF/VLF wave related with earthquake can penetrate into the ionosphere which is confirmed by the satellite observation.But the further physical mechanism will

  8. P-MaNGA Galaxies: emission-lines properties - gas ionization and chemical abundances from prototype observations

    Belfiore, F.; Maiolino, R.; Bundy, K.; Thomas, D.; Maraston, C.; Wilkinson, D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Bershady, M.; Blanc, G. A.; Bothwell, M.; Cales, S. L.; Coccato, L.; Drory, N.; Emsellem, E.; Fu, H.; Gelfand, J.; Law, D.; Masters, K.; Parejko, J.; Tremonti, C.; Wake, D.; Weijmans, A.; Yan, R.; Xiao, T.; Zhang, K.; Zheng, T.; Bizyaev, D.; Kinemuchi, K.; Oravetz, D.; Simmons, A.

    2015-05-01

    MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is a 6-yr Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) survey that will obtain spatially resolved spectroscopy from 3600 to 10 300 Å for a representative sample of over 10 000 nearby galaxies. In this paper, we present the analysis of nebular emission-line properties using observations of 14 galaxies obtained with P-MaNGA, a prototype of the MaNGA instrument. By using spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams, we find extended star formation in galaxies that are centrally dominated by Seyfert/LINER-like emission, which illustrates that galaxy characterizations based on single fibre spectra are necessarily incomplete. We observe extended low ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINER)-like emission (up to 1Re) in the central regions of three galaxies. We make use of the Hα equivalent width [EW(Hα)] to argue that the observed emission is consistent with ionization from hot evolved stars. We derive stellar population indices and demonstrate a clear correlation between Dn(4000) and EW(HδA) and the position in the ionization diagnostic diagram: resolved galactic regions which are ionized by a Seyfert/LINER-like radiation field are also devoid of recent star formation and host older and/or more metal-rich stellar populations. We also detect extraplanar LINER-like emission in two highly inclined galaxies, and identify it with diffuse ionized gas. We investigate spatially resolved metallicities and find a positive correlation between metallicity and star formation rate surface density. We further study the relation between N/O versus O/H on resolved scales. We find that, at given N/O, regions within individual galaxies are spread towards lower metallicities, deviating from the sequence defined by galactic central regions as traced by Sloan 3-arcsec fibre spectra. We suggest that the observed dispersion can be a tracer for gas flows in galaxies: infalls of pristine gas and/or the effect of a galactic fountain.

  9. Geocoronal Balmer-alpha Emission Observed by the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper During the Southern Sky Survey

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Haffner, L. M.; Nossal, S. M.; Wilson, M. L.; Freer, C. W.; Babler, B.; Gardner, D.; Roesler, F. L.

    2015-12-01

    After a successful eleven-year run at Kitt Peak Observatory (AZ), the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) was moved to Cerro Tololo (Chile) in 2009 to complete the southern portion of the Galactic Balmer-alpha survey. Although WHAM is primarily used for making observations of the interstellar medium, the terrestrial emission present in each of WHAM's astronomical spectra offers a rich resource for studying the Earth's atmosphere. Here we present an overview of the terrestrial Balmer-alpha emission collected during WHAM's first five years of operation under southern skies. Seasonal trends and comparisons with northern hemisphere observations will be discussed. WHAM can detect Balmer-alpha emission as faint as 0.05R in a 30s exposure, covering a 200 km/s (4.4 Angstrom) spectral region with 12 km/s spectral resolution from a 1 degree beam on the sky. With this sensitivity, hundreds of spectra can be collected in a single clear night. Although not capable of fully resolving the geocoronal Balmer-alpha line profile itself, WHAM's sensitivity makes it an exceptional instrument for geocoronal Balmer-alpha intensity observations. This work is supported by NSF award AGS-1352311 and AST-1108911.

  10. The primary photophysics of the Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 domain observed with time-resolved emission spectroscopy.

    van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Gauden, Magdalena; Crosson, Sean; van Grondelle, Rienk; Moffat, Keith; Kennis, John T M

    2011-01-01

    The phototropins are blue-light receptors that base their light-dependent action on the reversible formation of a covalent bond between a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor and a conserved cysteine in light, oxygen or voltage (LOV) domains. The primary reactions of the Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 domain were investigated by means of time-resolved and low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy. Synchroscan streak camera experiments revealed a fluorescence lifetime of 2.2 ns in LOV2. A weak long-lived component with emission intensity from 600 to 650 nm was assigned to phosphorescence from the reactive FMN triplet state. This observation allowed determination of the LOV2 triplet state energy level at physiological temperature at 16600 cm(-1). FMN dissolved in aqueous solution showed pH-dependent fluorescence lifetimes of 2.7 ns at pH 2 and 3.9-4.1 ns at pH 3-8. Here, too, a weak phosphorescence band was observed. The fluorescence quantum yield of LOV2 increased from 0.13 to 0.41 upon cooling the sample from 293 to 77 K. A pronounced phosphorescence emission around 600 nm was observed in the LOV2 domain between 77 and 120 K in the steady-state emission.

  11. Trends in OMI NO2 observations over the US: effects of emission control technology and the economic recession

    R. C. Cohen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations of tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities over the United States (US for 2005–2011 are evaluated using the OMI Berkeley High Resolution (BEHR retrieval algorithm. We assess changes in NO2 on day-of-week and interannual timescales to assess the impact of changes in emissions from mobile and non-mobile sources on the observed trends. We observe consistent decreases in cities across the US, with an average total reduction of 32 ± 7%. Changes for large power plants have been more variable (−26 ± 12% due to regionally-specific regulation policies. An increasing trend of 10–20% in background NO2 columns in the Northwestern US is observed. We examine the impact of the economic recession on emissions and find that decreases in NO2 column densities over cities were moderate prior to the recession (−6 ± 5 % yr−1, larger during the recession (−8 ± 5 % yr−1, and then smaller after the recession (−3 ± 4 % yr−1. Differences in the trends observed on weekdays and weekends indicate that prior to the economic recession, NO2 reductions were dominated by technological improvements to the light-duty vehicle fleet but that a decrease in diesel truck activity has dominated emission reductions since the recession. We use the satellite observations to estimate a 34% decrease in NO2 from mobile sources in cities for 2005–2011 and use that value to infer changes in non-mobile sources. We find that reductions in NO2 from non-mobile sources in cities have been more variable than NO2 reductions from mobile sources (−10 ± 13%.

  12. Trends in OMI NO2 observations over the United States: effects of emission control technology and the economic recession

    Russell, A. R.; Valin, L. C.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities over the United States (US) for 2005-2011 are evaluated using the OMI Berkeley High Resolution (BEHR) retrieval algorithm. We assess changes in NO2 on day-of-week and interannual timescales to assess the impact of changes in emissions from mobile and non-mobile sources on the observed trends. We observe consistent decreases in cities across the US, with an average total reduction of 32 ± 7% across the 7 yr. Changes for large power plants have been more variable (-26 ± 12%) due to regionally-specific regulation policies. An increasing trend of 10-20% in background NO2 columns in the northwestern US is observed. We examine the impact of the economic recession on emissions and find that decreases in NO2 column densities over cities were moderate prior to the recession (-6 ± 5% yr-1), larger during the recession (-8 ± 5% yr-1), and then smaller after the recession (-3 ± 4% yr-1). Differences in the trends observed on weekdays and weekends indicate that prior to the economic recession, NO2 reductions were dominated by technological improvements to the light-duty vehicle fleet but that a decrease in diesel truck activity has contributed to emission reductions since the recession. We use the satellite observations to estimate a 34% decrease in NO2 from mobile sources in cities for 2005-2011 and use that value to infer changes in non-mobile sources. We find that reductions in NO2 from non-mobile sources in cities have been both more modest and more variable than NO2 reductions from mobile sources (-10 ± 13%).

  13. DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 observations of lower hybrid waves excited by VLF whistler mode waves

    Bell, T. F; Inan, U. S.; Lauben, D.; Sonwalkar, V. S.; Helliwell, R. A.; Sobolev, Ya. P.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Gonzalez, S.

    1994-01-01

    Past work demostrates that strong lower hybrid (LH) waves can be excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves throughout large regions of the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere. The effects of the excited LH waves upon the suprathermal ion population in the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere depend upon the distribution of LH wave amplitude with wavelength lambda. The present work reports plasma wave data from the DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 spacecraft which suggests that the excited LH wave spectrum has components for which lambda less than or equal to 3.5 m when excitation occurs at a frequency roughly equal to the local lower hybrid resonance frequency. This wavelength limit is a factor of approximately 3 below that reported in past work and suggests that the excited LH waves can interact with suprathermal H(+) ions with energy less than or equal to 6 eV. This finding supports recent work concerning the heating of suprathermal ions above thunderstorm cells.

  14. Statistical study of seismo-ionospheric perturbations around Japan by using VLF/LF transmitters with a focal mechanism

    Kawano, Tomoki; Hobara, Yasuhide; Tatsuta, Kenshin

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we perform the statistical analysis to study the response of the lower ionosphere prior to major seismic activities focusing on different earthquake types. The lower ionospheric condition is represented by daily averaged nighttime electric amplitude from various VLF/LF transmitter signals received in Japan by UEC team. Six-year record of ionospheric conditions are used for our data analysis. Over 200 earthquakes occurred around the VLF/LF transmitter - receiver paths during the time period of analysis. They are characterized into three different groups based on the Centroid-Moment-Tensor (CMT) solution such as reverse fault type, normal fault type and stress slip type. The ionospheric anomaly is identified by a large change (2 sigma criteria) in the VLF/LF daily nighttime amplitude. As a result, the highest occurrence rate of ionospheric anomaly is obtained for reverse type fault for both sea and ground earthquakes. The occurrence rate for these earthquakes are statistically significant because they are significantly large in comparison to those calculated from random test. The difference of occurrence rate of the ionospheric perturbations may indicate the coupling efficiency of seismic activity into the overlaying ionosphere originated from the pre-seismic condition of earth's crust. We also perform the trend-based earthquake prediction. Alarm threshold in nighttime VLF amplitude with -3.5 sigma is found to be most effective and significant for the earthquake prediction by using lower ionospheric perturbations.

  15. ISO observations of 3 - 200 micron emission by three dust populations in an isolated local translucent cloud

    Rawlings, M G; Mattila, K; Lehtinen, K; Lemke, D

    2004-01-01

    We present ISOPHOT spectrophotometry of three positions within the isolated high latitude cirrus cloud G 300.2 - 16.8, spanning from the near- to far-infrared. The positions exhibit contrasting emission spectrum contributions from the UIBs, very small grains and large classical grains, and both semi-empirical and numerical models are presented. At all three positions, the UIB spectrum shapes are found to be similar, and the large grain emission may be fitted by an equilibrium temperature of ~17.5 K. The energy requirements of both the observed emission spectrum and optical scattered light are shown to be satisfied by the incident local ISRF. The FIR emissivity of dust in G 300.2 - 16.8 is found to be lower than in globules or dense clouds, and is even lower than model predictions for dust in the diffuse ISM. The results suggest physical differences in the ISM mixtures between positions within the cloud, possibly arising from grain coagulation processes.

  16. High Galactic latitude polarized emission at 1.4 GHz and implications for cosmic microwave background observations

    Carretti, E; Sault, R J; Cortiglioni, S; Poppi, S

    2005-01-01

    We analyse the polarized emission at 1.4 GHz in a 3x3 deg^2 area at high Galactic latitude (b ~ -40deg). The region, centred in (RA=5h, Dec=-49deg), was observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array radio-interferometer, whose 3-30 arcmin angular sensitivity range allows the study of scales appropriate for CMB Polarization (CMBP) investigations. The angular behavior of the diffuse emission is analysed through the E- and B-mode power spectra. These follow a power law $C^X_l \\propto l^{\\beta_X}$ with slopes \\beta_E = -1.97 \\pm 0.08 and \\beta_B = -1.98 \\pm 0.07. The emission is found to be about a factor 25 fainter than in Galactic plane regions. The comparison of the power spectra with other surveys indicates that this area is intermediate between strong and negligible Faraday rotation effects. A similar conclusion can be reached by analysing both the frequency and Galactic latitude behaviors of the diffuse Galactic emission of the 408-1411 MHz Leiden survey data. We present an analysis of the Faraday rot...

  17. Deep observations of CO line emission from star-forming galaxies in a cluster candidate at z=1.5

    Aravena, M; Salvato, M; Tanaka, M; Lentati, L; Schinnerer, E; Walter, F; Riechers, D; Smolcic, V; Capak, P; Aussel, H; Bertoldi, F; Chapman, S C; Farrah, D; Finoguenov, A; Floc'h, E Le; Lutz, D; Magdis, G; Oliver, S; Riguccini, L; Berta, S; Magnelli, B; Pozzi, F

    2012-01-01

    We report results from a deep Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) search for CO 1-0 line emission from galaxies in a candidate galaxy cluster at z~1.55 in the COSMOS field. We target 4 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts in the range z=1.47-1.59. Two of these 4 galaxies, ID51613 and ID51813, are nominally detected in CO line emission at the 3-4 sigma level. We find CO luminosities of 2.4x10^10 K km/s pc^2 and 1.3x10^10 K km/s pc^2, respectively. Taking advantage from the clustering and 2-GHz bandwidth of the JVLA, we perform a search for emission lines in the proximity of optical sources within the field of view of our observations. We limit our search to galaxies with K4 sigma) in the data cube, which we identify with the CO line emission. To test the reliability of the line peaks found, we performed a parallel search for line peaks using a Bayesian inference method. Monte Carlo simulations show that such associations are statistically significant, with probabilities of chance association of 3.5% and 10...

  18. Substantial Underestimation of Post-harvest Burning Emissions in East China as Seen by Multi-species Space Observations

    Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Bauwens, M.; De Smedt, I.; Lerot, C.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-12-01

    Crop residue burning is an important contributor to global biomass burning. In the North China Plain, one of the largest and densely populated world plains, post-harvest crop burning is a common agricultural management practice, allowing for land clearing from residual straw and preparation for the subsequent crop cultivation. The most extensive crop fires occur in the North China Plain in June after the winter wheat comes to maturity, and have been blamed for spikes in air pollution leading to serious health problems. Estimating harvest season burning emissions is therefore of primary importance to assess air quality and define best policies for its improvement in this sensitive region. Bottom-up approaches, either based on crop production and emission factors, or on satellite burned area and fire radiative power products, have been adopted so far, however, these methods crucially depend, among other assumptions, on the satellite skill to detect small fires, and could lead to underestimation of the actual emissions. The flux inversion of atmospheric observations is an alternative, independent approach for inferring the emissions from crop fires. Satellite column observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) exhibit a strong peak over the North China Plain in June, resulting from enhanced pyrogenic emissions of a large suite of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), precursors of HCHO. We use vertical columns of formaldehyde retrieved from the OMI instrument between 2005 and 2012 as constraints in an adjoint inversion scheme built on IMAGESv2 CTM, and perform the optimization of biogenic, pyrogenic, and anthropogenic emission parameters at the model resolution. We investigate the interannual variability of the top-down source, quantify its importance for the atmospheric composition on the regional scale, and explore its uncertainties. The OMI-based crop burning source is compared with the corresponding anthropogenic flux in the North China Plain, and is evaluated against HCHO

  19. TeV Gamma-Ray Emission Observed from Geminga with HAWC

    Baughman, B M

    2015-01-01

    Geminga is a radio-quiet pulsar ~250 parsecs from Earth that was first discovered as a GeV gamma-ray source and then identified as a pulsar. Milagro observed an extended TeV source spatially consistent with Geminga. HAWC observes a similarly extended source. Observations of Geminga's flux and extension will be presented.

  20. Identification of natural plasma emissions observed close to the plasmapause by the Cluster-Whisper relaxation sounder

    P. Canu

    Full Text Available We use the data collected by the Whisper instrument onboard the Cluster spacecraft for a first test of its capabilities in the identification of the natural plasma waves observed in the Earth’s magnetosphere. The main signatures observed at the plasma frequency, upper hybrid frequency, and electron Bernstein modes were often difficult to be reliably recognized on previous missions. We use here the characteristic frequencies provided by the resonances triggered by the relaxation sounder of Whisper to identify with good confidence the various signatures detected in the complex wave spectra collected close to the plasmapause. Coupled with the good sensitivity, frequency and time resolution of Whisper, the resonances detected by the sounder allow one to precisely spot these natural emissions. This first analysis seems to confirm the interpretation of Geos observations: the natural emissions observed in Bernstein modes above the plasma frequency, now widely observed onboard Cluster, are not modeled by a single Maxwellian electrons distribution function. Therefore, multi-temperature electron distribution functions should be considered.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (active perturbation experiments; waves and instabilities; instrument and techniques

  1. Observation of Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances over Istanbul in Response to X-Ray Flare Events

    Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, Emine; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul

    2016-07-01

    Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are the enhanced electron density structures in the D region ionosphere which occur in response to the increase in X-ray flares and EUV flux. SIDs can be monitored using Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio signals (3-30 kHz) which travel between the D-region and the surface of the Earth. In this study, we use SID monitors obtained from the Stanford University Solar Center and two antennas which were built at the Istanbul Technical University to track the ionospheric disturbances in the VLF range. Our antennas are capable of capturing signals from several VLF transmitting stations. In this work, we focus on the variations in the signal strength of the closest VLF transmitting station 'TBB' which is operating at 26.7 kHz frequency at BAFA, Turkey (37.43N, 27.15E). We present ITU SID observations from both antennas; show the daily variation, general structure and the typical patterns we observe as well as case studies of significant events. Our initial analysis shows close relationship between observed X-ray flares from geosynchronous GOES 13 and GOES 15 satellites and VLF station signal strength received by the monitors.

  2. High Resolution Spectral Analysis of Hiss and Chorus Emissions in Ground Based Data

    Hosseini Aliabad, S. P.; Golkowski, M.; Gibby, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic evolution of the radiation belts is believed to be controlled in large part by two separate but related classes of naturally occurring plasma waves: ELF/VLF chorus and hiss emissions. Although whistler mode chorus has been extensively studied since the first reports by Storey in 1953, the source mechanism and properties are still subjects of active research. Moreover, the origin of plasmaspheric hiss, the electromagnetic emission believed to be responsible for the gap between the inner and outer radiation belts, has been debated for over four decades. Although these waves can be observed in situ on spacecraft, ground-based observing stations can provide orders of magnitude higher data volumes and decades long data coverage essential for certain long-term and statistical studies of wave properties. Recent observational and theoretical works suggest that high resolution analysis of the spectral features of both hiss and chorus emissions can provide insight into generation processes and be used to validate existing theories. Application of the classic Fourier (FFT) technique unfortunately yields a tradeoff between time and frequency resolution. In additional to Fourier spectra, we employ novel methods to make spectrograms with high time and frequency resolutions, independently using minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR). These techniques are applied to ground based data observations of hiss and chorus made in Alaska. Plasmaspheric hiss has been widely regarded as a broadband, structure less, incoherent emission. We quantify the extent to which plasmaspheric hiss can be a coherent emission with complex fine structure. Likewise, to date, researchers have differentiated between hiss and chorus coherency primarily using qualitative "naked eye" approaches to amplitude spectra. Using a quantitative approach to observed amplitude and we present more rigorous classification criteria for these emissions.

  3. Lorentz microscopy observation of vortices in high-Tc superconductors using a 1-MV field emission transmission electron microscope.

    Harada, Ken

    2013-06-01

    Lorentz microscopy has opened the door to observing a single quantized magnetic flux line (i.e. a vortex) and its dynamic behavior inside a superconductor in real time. It resulted from the efforts of Dr Akira Tonomura and his collaborators, who developed a field emission electron microscope and advanced the technologies used for visualizing vortices (e.g. a low-temperature specimen stage and a magnetic-field application system). They used a 1-MV field emission transmission electron microscope with an electron beam that can penetrate thick specimens of high-temperature superconductors (Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and YB2C3O7-δ) to reveal the flux-line features inside materials and their interactions with defects. This memorial paper reviews the results of research in the area of vortex matter physics.

  4. Estimation of soil moisture-thermal infrared emissivity relation in arid and semi-arid environments using satellite observations

    Grazia Blasi, Maria; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Venafra, Sara; Liuzzi, Giuliano; Dini, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The retrieval of surface parameters is very important for various aspects concerning the climatological and meteorological context. At this purpose surface emissivity represents one of the most important parameters useful for different applications such as the estimation of climate changes and land cover features. It is known that thermal infrared (TIR) emissivity is affected by soil moisture, but there are very few works in literature on this issue. This study is aimed to analyze and find a relation between satellite soil moisture data and TIR emissivity focusing on arid and semi-arid environments. These two parameters, together with the land surface temperature, are fundamental for a better understanding of the physical phenomena implied in the soil-atmosphere interactions and the surface energy balance. They are also important in several fields of study, such as climatology, meteorology, hydrology and agriculture. In particular, there are several studies stating a correlation between soil moisture and the emissivity at 8-9 μm in desertic soils, which corresponds to the quartz Reststrahlen, a feature which is typical of sandy soils. We investigated several areas characterized by arid or semi-arid environments, focusing our attention on the Dahra desert (Senegal), and on the Negev desert (Israel). For the Dahra desert we considered both in situ, provided by the International Soil Moisture Network, and satellite soil moisture data, from ASCAT and AMSR-E sensors, for the whole year 2011. In the case of the Negev desert soil moisture data are derived from ASCAT observations and we computed a soil moisture index from a temporal series of SAR data acquired by the Cosmo-SkyMed constellation covering a period of six months, from June 2015 to November 2015. For both cases soil moisture data were related to the retrieved TIR emissivity from the geostationary satellite SEVIRI in three different spectral channels, at 8.7 μm, 10.8 μm and 12 μm. A Kalman filter physical

  5. Observation of local radio emission associated with type III radio bursts and Langmuir waves

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    The first clear detection of fundamental and harmonic radiation from the type III radio source region is presented. This radiation is characterized by its lack of frequency drift, its short rise and decay times, its relative weakness compared to the remotely observed radiation and its temporal coincidence with observed Langmuir waves. The observations were made with the radio and plasma frequency (URAP) receivers on the Ulysses spacecraft between about 1 and 2 AU from the Sun.

  6. Applying an Inverse Model to Estimate Ammonia Emissions at Cattle Feedlots Using Three Different Observation-Based Approaches

    Shonkwiler, K. B.; Ham, J. M.; Nash, C.

    2014-12-01

    Accurately quantifying emissions of ammonia (NH3) from confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) is vital not only to the livestock industry, but essential to understanding nitrogen cycling along the Front Range of Colorado, USA, where intensive agriculture, urban sprawl, and pristine ecosystems (e.g., Rocky Mtn Nat'l Park) lie within 100-km of each other. Most observation-based techniques for estimating NH3 emissions can be expensive and highly technical. Many methods rely on concentration observations on location, which implicitly depends on weather conditions. A system for sampling NH3 using on-site weather data was developed to allow remote measurement of NH3 in a simple, cost-effective way. These systems use passive diffusive cartridges (Radiello, Sigma-Aldrich) that provide time-averaged concentrations representative of a typical two-week deployment. Cartridge exposure is robotically managed so they are only visible when winds are 1.4 m/s or greater from the direction of the CAFO. These concentration data can be coupled with stability parameters (measured on-site) in a simple inverse model to estimate emissions (FIDES, UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures). Few studies have directly compared emissions estimates of NH3 using concentration data obtained from multiple measurement systems at different temporal and spatial scales. Therefore, in the summer and autumn of 2014, several conditional sampler systems were deployed at a 25,000-head cattle feedlot concomitant with an open-path infrared laser (GasFinder2, Boreal Laser Inc.) and a Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (CRDS) (G1103, Picarro Inc.) which each measured instantaneous NH3 concentrations. This study will test the sampler technology by first comparing concentration data from the three different methods. In livestock research, it is common to estimate NH3 emissions by using such instantaneous data in a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) model (WindTrax, Thunder Beach Sci.) Considering this, NH3 fluxes

  7. Broad Line Radio Galaxies Observed with Fermi-LAT: The Origin of the GeV Gamma-Ray Emission

    Kataoka, J.; /Waseda U., RISE; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Takahashi, Y.; /Waseda U., RISE; Cheung, C.C.; /Natl. Acad. Sci. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Hayashida, M.; /SLAC /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Grandi, P.; /Bologna Observ.; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Celotti, A.; /SISSA, Trieste; Fegan, S.J.; Fortin, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Maeda, K.; Nakamori, T.; /Waseda U., RISE; Taylor, G.B.; /New Mexico U.; Tosti, G.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Digel, S.W.; /SLAC /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; McConville, W.; /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U.; Finke, J.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; D' Ammando, F.; /IASF, Palermo /INAF, Rome

    2012-06-07

    We report on a detailed investigation of the {gamma}-ray emission from 18 broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) based on two years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. We confirm the previously reported detections of 3C 120 and 3C 111 in the GeV photon energy range; a detailed look at the temporal characteristics of the observed {gamma}-ray emission reveals in addition possible flux variability in both sources. No statistically significant {gamma}-ray detection of the other BLRGs was however found in the considered dataset. Though the sample size studied is small, what appears to differentiate 3C 111 and 3C 120 from the BLRGs not yet detected in {gamma}-rays is the particularly strong nuclear radio flux. This finding, together with the indications of the {gamma}-ray flux variability and a number of other arguments presented, indicate that the GeV emission of BLRGs is most likely dominated by the beamed radiation of relativistic jets observed at intermediate viewing angles. In this paper we also analyzed a comparison sample of high accretion-rate Seyfert 1 galaxies, which can be considered radio-quiet counterparts of BLRGs, and found none were detected in {gamma}-rays. A simple phenomenological hybrid model applied for the broad-band emission of the discussed radio-loud and radio-quiet type 1 active galaxies suggests that the relative contribution of the nuclear jets to the accreting matter is {ge} 1% on average for BLRGs, while {le} 0.1% for Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  8. A study of variation characteristics of Gobi broadband emissivity based on field observational experiments in northwestern China

    Zheng, Zhi-yuan; Wei, Zhi-gang; Wen, Zhi-ping; Dong, Wen-jie; Li, Zhen-chao; Wen, Xiao-hang; Zhu, Xian; Chen, Chen; Hu, Shan-shan

    2017-02-01

    Land surface emissivity is a significant variable in energy budgets, land cover assessments, and environment and climate studies. However, the assumption of an emissivity constant is being used in Gobi broadband emissivity (GbBE) parameterization scheme in numerical models because of limited knowledge surrounding the spatiotemporal variation characteristics of GbBE. To address this issue, we analyzed the variation characteristics of GbBE and possible impact factor-surface soil moisture based on long-term continuous and high temporal resolution field observational experiments over a typical Gobi underlying surface in arid and semiarid areas in northwestern China. The results indicate that GbBE has obvious daily and diurnal variation features, especially diurnal cycle characteristics. The multi-year average of the daily average of GbBE is in the range of 0.932 to 0.970 with an average of 0.951 ± 0.008, and the average diurnal GbBE is in the range of 0.880 to 0.940 with an average of 0.906 ± 0.018. GbBE varies with surface soil moisture content. We observed a slight decrease in GbBE with an increase in soil moisture, although this change was not very obvious because of the low soil moisture in this area. Nevertheless, we think that soil moisture must be one of the most significant impact factors on GbBE in arid and semiarid areas. Soil moisture must be taken into account into the parameterization schemes of bare soil broadband emissivity in land surface models. Additional field experiments and studies should be carried out in order to clarify this issue.

  9. XMM-Newton observations of the Galactic Centre Region - II. The soft-thermal emission

    Heard, V.; Warwick, R. S.

    2013-09-01

    We have extended our earlier study of the X-ray emission emanating from the central 100 pc × 100 pc region of our Galaxy to an investigation of several features prominent in the soft X-ray (2-4.5 keV) band. We focus on three specific structures: a putative bipolar outflow from the vicinity of Sgr A*; a high surface brightness region located roughly 12 arcmin (25 pc) to the north-east of Sgr A* and a lower surface brightness extended loop feature seen to the south of Sgr A*. We show, unequivocally, that all three structures are thermal in nature and have similar temperatures (kT ≈ 1 keV). The inferred X-ray luminosities lie in the range (2-10) × 1034 erg s-1. In the case of the bipolar feature we suggest that the hot plasma is produced by the shock heating of the winds from massive stars within the Central Cluster, possibly collimated by the Circumnuclear Disc. Alternatively the outflow may be driven by outbursts on Sgr A*, which follow tidal disruption events occurring at a rate of roughly one every 4000 yr. The north-east enhancement is centred on a candidate pulsar wind nebula which has a relatively hard non-thermal X-ray spectrum. We suggest that the coincident soft-thermal emission traces the core of a new thermal-composite supernova remnant, designated as SNR G0.13-0.12. There is no clear evidence for an associated radio shell but such a feature may be masked by the bright emission of the nearby Radio Arc and other filamentary structures. SNR G0.13-0.12 is very likely interacting with the nearby molecular cloud, G0.11-0.11, and linked to the Fermi source, 2FGL J1746.4-2851c. Finally we explore a previous suggestion that the elliptically shaped X-ray loop to the south of Sgr A*, of maximum extent ˜45 pc, represents the shell of a superbubble located in the GC region. Although plausible, the interpretation of this feature in terms a coherent physical structure awaits confirmation.

  10. An Anisotropic Ocean Surface Emissivity Model Based on WindSat Polarimetric Brightness Observations

    Smith, D. F.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Sandeep, S.; Weber, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this research has been to develop a standardized fast full-Stokes ocean surface emissivity model with Jacobian for a wind-driven ocean surface applicable at arbitrary microwave frequencies, polarizations, and incidence angles. The model is based on the Ohio State University (OSU) two-scale code for surface emission developed by Johnson (2006, IEEE TGRS, 44, 560) but modified as follows: (1) the Meissner-Wentz dielectric permittivity (2012, IEEE TGRS, 50, 3004) replaces the original permittivity, (2) the Elfouhaily sea surface spectrum (1997, JGR, 102, C7,15781) replaces the Durden-Vesecky spectrum (1985, IEEE TGRS, OE-10, 445), but the Durden-Vesecky angular spreading function is retained, (3) the high-frequency portion of the Elfouhaily spectrum is multiplied by the Pierson-Moskowitz shape spectrum to correct an error in the original paper, (4) the generalized Phillips-Kitaigorodskii equilibrium range parameter for short waves is modeled as a continuous function of the friction velocity at the water surface to eliminate a discontinuous jump in the original paper. A total of five physical tuning parameters were identified, including the spectral strength and the hydrodynamic modulation factor. The short wave part of the spectrum is also allowed to have an arbitrary ratio relative to the long wave part. The foam fraction is multiplied by a variable correction factor, and also modulated to allow an anisotropic foam fraction with more foam on the leeward side of a wave. The model is being tuned against multi-year sequences of WindSat and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI) data as analyzed by Meissner and Wentz (2012, IEEE TGRS, 50, 3004) for up to four Stokes brightnesses and in all angular harmonics up to two in twenty five wind bins from 0.5-25.5 m/s and of 1 m/s width. As a result there are 40 brightnesses per wind bin, for a total of 1000 brightnesses used to constrain the modified model. A chi-squared tuning criterion based on error standard

  11. Spatially resolving methane emissions in California: constraints from the CalNex aircraft campaign and from present (GOSAT, TES and future (TROPOMI, geostationary satellite observations

    K. J. Wecht

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We apply a continental-scale inverse modeling system for North America based on the GEOS-Chem model to optimize California methane emissions at 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution using atmospheric observations from the CalNex aircraft campaign (May–June 2010 and from satellites. Inversion of the CalNex data yields a best estimate for total California methane emissions of 2.86 ± 0.21 Tg yr−1, compared with 1.92 Tg yr−1 in the EDGAR v4.2 emission inventory used as a priori and 1.51 Tg yr−1 in the California Air Resources Board (CARB inventory used for state regulations of greenhouse gas emissions. These results are consistent with a previous Lagrangian inversion of the CalNex data. Our inversion provides 12 independent pieces of information to constrain the geographical distribution of emissions within California. Attribution to individual source types indicates dominant contributions to emissions from landfills/wastewater (1.1 Tg yr−1, livestock (0.87 Tg yr−1, and gas/oil (0.64 Tg yr−1. EDGAR v4.2 underestimates emissions from livestock while CARB underestimates emissions from landfills/wastewater and gas/oil. Current satellite observations from GOSAT can constrain methane emissions in the Los Angeles Basin but are too sparse to constrain emissions quantitatively elsewhere in California (they can still be qualitatively useful to diagnose inventory biases. Los Angeles Basin emissions derived from CalNex and GOSAT inversions are 0.42 ± 0.08 and 0.31 ± 0.08, respectively. An observation system simulation experiment (OSSE shows that the future TROPOMI satellite instrument (2015 launch will be able to constrain California methane emissions at a detail comparable to the CalNex aircraft campaign. Geostationary satellite observations offer even greater potential for constraining methane emissions in the future.

  12. Hot water epilepsy: Phenotype and single photon emission computed tomography observations

    Mehul Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the anatomical correlates of reflex hot water epilepsy (HWE using multimodality investigations viz. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, electroencephalography (EEG, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. Five men (mean age: 27.0 ΁ 5.8 years with HWE were subjected to MRI of brain, video-EEG studies, and SPECT scan. These were correlated with phenotypic presentations. Seizures could be precipitated in three patients with pouring of hot water over the head and semiology of seizures was suggestive of temporal lobe epilepsy. Ictal SPECT showed hyperperfusion in: left medial temporal - one, left lateral temporal - one, and right parietal - one. Interictal SPECT was normal in all five patients and did not help in localization. MRI and interictal EEG was normal in all the patients. The clinical and SPECT studies suggested temporal lobe as the seizure onset zone in some of the patients with HWE.

  13. The variable hard x-ray emission of NGC 4945 as observed by NUSTAR

    Puccetti, Simonetta; Comastri, Andrea; Fiore, Fabrizio;

    2014-01-01

    We present a broadband (~0.5-79 keV) spectral and temporal analysis of multiple NuSTAR observations combined with archival Suzaku and Chandra data of NGC 4945, the brightest extragalactic source at 100 keV. We observe hard X-ray (>10 keV) flux and spectral variability, with flux variations of a f...

  14. Contributions from DMS and ship emissions to CCN observed over the summertime North Pacific

    L. Phinney

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN made over the remote North Pacific Ocean in July 2002 are analysed with concurrent measurements of aerosol number, mass and composition. Overall the CCN are controlled by the sulphate, including one case of particle nucleation and growth resulting from dimethyl sulphide oxidation that enhanced CCN concentrations. Hourly CCN concentrations are correlated with concentrations of sulphate plus methanesulphonic acid (MSA over the entire study period (r2=0.43 and 0.52 for supersaturations of 0.34 and 0.19%, respectively, and are not well correlated with other organics (r2<0.2. One case study reveals elevated mass and number concentrations of ultrafine and fine organic particles due to regional ship emissions, during which organic mass concentrations (see Fig. 2. In Fig. 7c, the 80–90 nm particle concentrations are correlated with CCN values (r2=0.39 and 0.46 for supersaturations of 0.19 and 0.34%, respectively. The evolution of the time series and mass distributions of organics, sulphate and MSA over this timeframe indicate that the regional distribution of small, diffuse ship-sourced organic particles act as condensation sites for sulphur species, resulting in a subsequent increase in number concentrations of CCN. Direct emissions of organic particles may exert a strong control on marine CCN concentrations once diffused into the marine atmosphere by acting as condensation sites for biogenic and anthropogenic sulphur species.

  15. Contributions from DMS and ship emissions to CCN observed over the summertime North Pacific

    L. Langley

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN made over the North Pacific Ocean in July 2002 are analysed with concurrent measurements of aerosol number, mass and composition. Overall the CCN are controlled by the sulphate, including one case that suggests particle nucleation and growth resulting from dimethyl sulphide oxidation that enhanced CCN concentrations. Hourly CCN concentrations are correlated with concentrations of sulphate plus methanesulphonic acid (MSA over the entire study period (r2=0.43 and 0.52 for supersaturations of 0.34% and 0.19%, respectively, and are not well correlated with other organics (r2<0.2. One case study reveals elevated mass and number concentrations of ultrafine and fine organic particles due to regional ship emissions, identified through quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS measurements, during which organic mass concentrations are correlated with CCN values (r2=0.39 and 0.46 for supersaturations of 0.19% and 0.34%, respectively. The evolution of the time series and mass distributions of organics, sulphate and MSA over this timeframe indicate that the regional distribution of small, diffuse ship-sourced organic particles act as condensation sites for sulphur species, resulting in a subsequent increase in number concentrations of CCN. We conclude that, where present, direct emissions of anthropogenic organic particles may exert a strong control on marine CCN concentrations once diffused into the marine atmosphere, by acting as condensation sites for biogenic and anthropogenic sulphur species.

  16. Characterisation of Central-African emissions based on MAX-DOAS measurements, satellite observations and model simulations over Bujumbura, Burundi.

    Gielen, Clio; Hendrick, Francois; Pinardi, Gaia; De Smedt, Isabelle; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Yu, Huan; Fayt, Caroline; Hermans, Christian; Bauwens, Maité; Ndenzako, Eugene; Nzohabonayo, Pierre; Akimana, Rachel; Niyonzima, Sébastien; Müller, Jean-Francois; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Central Africa is known for its strong biogenic, pyrogenic, and to a lesser extent anthropogenic emissions. Satellite observations of species like nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde (HCHO), as well as inverse modelling results have shown that there are large uncertainties associated with the emissions in this region. There is thus a need for additional measurements, especially from the ground, in order to better characterise the biomass-burning and biogenic products emitted in this area. We present MAX-DOAS measurements of NO2, HCHO, and aerosols performed in Central Africa, in the city of Bujumbura, Burundi (3°S, 29°E, 850m). A MAX-DOAS instrument has been operating at this location by BIRA-IASB since late 2013. Aerosol-extinction and trace-gases vertical profiles are retrieved by applying the optimal-estimation-based profiling tool bePRO to the measured O4, NO2 and HCHO slant-column densities. The MAX-DOAS vertical columns and profiles are used for investigating the diurnal and seasonal cycles of NO2, HCHO, and aerosols. Regarding the aerosols, the retrieved AODs are compared to co-located AERONET sun photometer measurements for verification purpose, while in the case of NO2 and HCHO, the MAX-DOAS vertical columns and profiles are used for validating GOME-2 and OMI satellite observations. To characterise the biomass-burning and biogenic emissions in the Bujumbura region, the trace gases and aerosol MAX-DOAS retrievals are used in combination to MODIS fire counts/radiative-power and GOME-2/OMI NO2 and HCHO satellite data, as well as simulations from the NOAA backward trajectory model HYSPLIT. First results show that HCHO seasonal variation around local noon is driven by the alternation of rain and dry periods, the latter being associated with intense biomass-burning agricultural activities and forest fires in the south/south-east and transport from this region to Bujumbura. In contrast, NO2 is seen to depend mainly on local emissions close to the city, due

  17. Multifractal variability of Very Low Frequency (VLF) signal during Earthquakes (M greater than 5) occurred at Greece during the year 2011-2012

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Verma, Shivali; Kasde, Satish Kumar; Sonakia, Anjana

    In this work Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima (WTMM) based multifractal analysis method is used to extracts the earthquake precursory signatures from scaling characteristics of subionospheric Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals. We found specific dynamics of their fractal characteristics before the earthquake, appearance of the spike in the signal and increase of the fractal dimension. We analyze VLF signals of famous Turkey Bafa transmitter (N 370 24’, E 27019’) recorded by sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID) monitoring station located at South of France during the Earthquake occurred at Greece during the year 2011-2012. The analysis of VLF signal during some days before and after the occurrence of earthquake has been done. Keywords: Multifractal analysis, VLF signal, Sudden Ionospheric disturbances

  18. Observable Signatures of the low-z Circum-Galactic and Inter-Galactic Medium : UV Line Emission in Simulations

    Frank, S; Vibert, D; Milliard, B; Popping, A; Blaizot, J; Courty, S; Deharveng, J M; Peroux, C; Teyssier, R; Martin, C D

    2011-01-01

    We present for the first time predictions for UV line emission of intergalactic and circumgalactic gas from Adaptive Mesh Resolution (AMR) Large Scale Structure (LSS) simulations at redshifts 0.3observability with current and near-future UV instrumentation. In three transitions of interest (Lya, OVI and CIV) there is a clear bimodality in the type of objects : the overwhelming majority of flux stems from discrete, compact sources, while a much larger volume fraction is filled by more tenuous gas. We characterise both object types with regard to number density, physical size and shape, brightness, luminosity, velocity structure, mass, temperature, ionisation state, and metal content. Degrading AMR grids to characteristic resolutions of available (such as FIREBall) or foreseeable instrumentation, allows to assess which inferences can be drawn from currently possible observations, and set foundations to prepare observing strategies for future missions. In general, the fain...

  19. Combining Satellite Observations of Fire Activity and Numerical Weather Prediction to Improve the Prediction of Smoke Emissions

    Peterson, D. A.; Wang, J.; Hyer, E. J.; Ichoku, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Smoke emissions estimates used in air quality and visibility forecasting applications are currently limited by the information content of satellite fire observations, and the lack of a skillful short-term forecast of changes in fire activity. This study explores the potential benefits of a recently developed sub-pixel-based calculation of fire radiative power (FRPf) from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), which provides more precise estimates of the radiant energy (over the retrieved fire area) that in turn, improves estimates of the thermal buoyancy of smoke plumes and may be helpful characterizing the meteorological effects on fire activity for large fire events. Results show that unlike the current FRP product, the incorporation of FRPf produces a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.42) with smoke plume height data provided by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and several meteorological variables, such as surface wind speed and temperature, which may be useful for discerning cases where smoke was injected above the boundary layer. Drawing from recent advances in numerical weather prediction (NWP), this study also examines the meteorological conditions characteristic of fire ignition, growth, decay, and extinction, which are used to develop an automated, 24-hour prediction of satellite fire activity. Satellite fire observations from MODIS and geostationary sensors show that the fire prediction model is an improvement (RMSE reduction of 13 - 20%) over the forecast of persistence commonly used by near-real-time fire emission inventories. The ultimate goal is to combine NWP data and satellite fire observations to improve both analysis and prediction of biomass-burning emissions, through improved understanding of the interactions between fire activity and weather at scales appropriate for operational modeling. This is a critical step toward producing a global fire prediction model and improving operational forecasts of

  20. Soil Moisture Eff ects on Sand Saltation and Dust Emission Observed over the Horqin Sandy Land Area in China

    LI Xiaolan; ZHANG Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the eff ects of soil moisture on sand saltation and dust emission over the Horqin Sandy Land area are investigated, based on observations of three dust events in 2010. The minimum friction velocity initiating the motion of surface particles, namely, the threshold friction velocity, is estimated to be 0.34, 0.40, and 0.50 m s−1 under the very dry, dry, and wet soil conditions, respectively. In comparison with the observations during the dust events under the very dry and dry soil conditions, the dust emission fl ux during the wet event is smaller, but the saltation activities of sand particles (d≧50 µm) are stronger. The size distributions of airborne dust particles (0.1≦d≦20 µm) show that concentrations of the fi ner dust particles (0.1≦d≦0.3 µm) have a secondary peak under dry soil conditions, while they are absent under wet soil conditions. This suggests that the surface soil particle size distribution can be changed by soil moisture. Under wet soil conditions, the particles appear to have a larger size, and hence more potential saltating particles are available. This explains the occurrence of stronger saltation processes observed under wet soil conditions.

  1. Satellite observations of ethylene (C2H4) from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer: A scoping study

    Dolan, Wayana; Payne, Vivienne H.; Kualwik, Susan S.; Bowman, Kevin W.

    2016-09-01

    We present a study focusing on detection and initial quantitative estimates of ethylene (C2H4) in observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), a Fourier transform spectrometer aboard the Aura satellite that measures thermal infrared radiances with high spectral resolution (0.1 cm-1). We analyze observations taken in support of the 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) mission and demonstrate the feasibility of future development of C2H4 into a TES standard product. In the Northern Hemisphere, C2H4 is commonly associated with boreal fire plumes, motor vehicle exhaust and petrochemical emissions. It has a short lifetime (∼14-32 h) in the troposphere due to its reaction with OH and O3. Chemical destruction of C2H4 in the atmosphere leads to the production of ozone and other species such as carbon monoxide (CO) and formaldehyde. Results indicate a correlation between C2H4 and CO in boreal fire plumes. Quantitative C2H4 estimates are sensitive to assumptions about the plume height and width. We find that C2H4 greater than 2-3 ppbv can be detected in a single TES observation (for a fire plume at 3 km altitude and 1.5 km width). Spatial averaging will be needed for surface-peaking profiles where TES sensitivity is lower.

  2. The nature of the low-frequency emission of M51: First observations of a nearby galaxy with LOFAR

    Mulcahy, D D; Beck, R; Heald, G; Fletcher, A; Scaife, A; Adebahr, B; Anderson, J M; Bonafede, A; Brüggen, M; Brunetti, G; Chyży, K T; Conway, J; Dettmar, R-J; Enßlin, T; Haverkorn, M; Horellou, C; Iacobelli, M; Israel, F P; Junklewitz, H; Jurusik, W; Köhler, J; Kuniyoshi, M; Orrú, E; Paladino, R; Pizzo, R; Reich, W; Röttgering, H J A

    2014-01-01

    The grand-design spiral galaxy M51 was observed with the LOFAR High Frequency Antennas (HBA) and imaged in total intensity and polarisation. This observation covered the frequencies between 115 MHz and 175 MHz. We produced an image of total emission of M51 at the mean frequency of 151 MHz with 20 arcsec resolution and 0.3 mJy rms noise, which is the most sensitive image of a galaxy at frequencies below 300 MHz so far. The integrated spectrum of total radio emission is described well by a power law, while flat spectral indices in the central region indicate thermal absorption. We observe that the disk extends out to 16 kpc and see a break in the radial profile near the optical radius of the disk. Our main results, the scale lengths of the inner and outer disks at 151 MHz and 1.4 GHz, arm--interarm contrast, and the break scales of the radio--far-infrared correlations, can be explained consistently by CRE diffusion, leading to a longer propagation length of CRE of lower energy. The distribution of CRE sources d...

  3. Excited State Chemistry in the Free Stream of the NASA IHF Arc Jet Facility Observed by Emission Spectroscopy

    Winter, Michael W.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of non-equilibrium emission were made in the free stream of the 60 megawatts Interaction Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. In the visible near infrared wavelength region, the most prominent emission was from molecular N2, and in the ultra violet region, the spectra were dominated by emission from molecular NO. The only atomic lines observed were those of copper (an erosion product of the electrodes). The bands of the 1st Positive system of N2 (if B is true then A is true) differed significantly from spectra computed spectra assuming only thermal excitation, suggesting overpopulation of the high vibrational states of the B state of N2. Populations of these high vibrational levels (peaking at v (sub upper) equals 13) of the N2 B state were determined by scaling simulated spectra; calculations were performed for each upper vibrational state separately. The experimental-theoretical procedure was repeated for several radial positions away from the nozzle axis to obtain spatial distributions of the upper state populations; rotational symmetry of the flow was assumed in simulations. The overpopulation of the high vibrational levels has been interpreted as the effect of inverse pre-dissociation of neutral atoms in the N2 A state, which populates the N2 B state through a level crossing process at v (sub upper) is greater than 10.

  4. First Detection of UV emission from a Detached Dust Shell: GALEX Observations of the Carbon AGB Star U Hya

    Sanchez, E; Ramstedt, S; Stassun, K G

    2014-01-01

    We present the discovery of an extended ring of ultraviolet emission surrounding the AGB star U Hya in archival observations performed by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). This is the third discovery of extended UV emission from a carbon AGB star and the first from an AGB star with a detached shell. From imaging and photometric analysis of the FUV and NUV images, we determined that the ultraviolet ring has a radius of $\\sim 110^{\\prime\\prime}$, thus indicating that the emitting material is likely associated with the detached shell seen in the infrared. We find that scattering of the central point source of NUV and FUV emission by the dust shell is negligible. Moreover, we find that scattering of the interstellar radiation field by the dust shell can contribute at most $\\sim10%$ of the FUV flux. Morphological and photometric evidence suggests that shocks caused by the star's motion through space and, possibly, shock-excited H$_2$ molecules are the most likely origins of the UV flux. In contrast to previou...

  5. FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE {gamma}-RAY EMISSION: IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMIC RAYS AND THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Buehler, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: tporter@stanford.edu, E-mail: gudlaugu@glast2.stanford.edu, E-mail: aws@mpe.mpg.de [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2012-05-01

    The {gamma}-ray sky >100 MeV is dominated by the diffuse emissions from interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar gas and radiation fields of the Milky Way. Observations of these diffuse emissions provide a tool to study cosmic-ray origin and propagation, and the interstellar medium. We present measurements from the first 21 months of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) mission and compare with models of the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission generated using the GALPROP code. The models are fitted to cosmic-ray data and incorporate astrophysical input for the distribution of cosmic-ray sources, interstellar gas, and radiation fields. To assess uncertainties associated with the astrophysical input, a grid of models is created by varying within observational limits the distribution of cosmic-ray sources, the size of the cosmic-ray confinement volume (halo), and the distribution of interstellar gas. An all-sky maximum-likelihood fit is used to determine the X{sub CO} factor, the ratio between integrated CO-line intensity and H{sub 2} column density, the fluxes and spectra of the {gamma}-ray point sources from the first Fermi-LAT catalog, and the intensity and spectrum of the isotropic background including residual cosmic rays that were misclassified as {gamma}-rays, all of which have some dependency on the assumed diffuse emission model. The models are compared on the basis of their maximum-likelihood ratios as well as spectra, longitude, and latitude profiles. We also provide residual maps for the data following subtraction of the diffuse emission models. The models are consistent with the data at high and intermediate latitudes but underpredict the data in the inner Galaxy for energies above a few GeV. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed, including the contribution by undetected point-source populations and spectral variations of cosmic rays throughout the Galaxy. In the outer Galaxy, we find that the data prefer models with a flatter

  6. Observation of iron spin-states using tabletop x-ray emission spectroscopy and microcalorimeter sensors

    Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Fowler, J. W.; Jimenez, R.; Silverman, K. L.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful probe of the electronic and chemical state of elemental species embedded within complex compounds. X-ray sensors that combine high resolving power and high collecting efficiency are desirable for photon-starved XES experiments such as measurements of dilute, gaseous, and radiation-sensitive samples, time-resolved measurements, and in-laboratory XES. To assess whether arrays of cryogenic microcalorimeters will be useful in photon-starved XES scenarios, we demonstrate that these emerging energy-dispersive sensors can detect the spin-state of 3d electrons of iron in two different compounds, Fe2O3 and FeS2. The measurements were conducted with a picosecond pulsed laser-driven plasma as the exciting x-ray source. The use of this tabletop source suggests that time-resolved in-laboratory XES will be possible in the future. We also present simulations of {{K}}α and {{K}}β spectra that reveal the spin-state sensitivity of different combinations of sensor resolution and accumulated counts. These simulations predict that our current experimental apparatus can perform time-resolved XES measurements on some samples with a measurement time of a few 10 s of hours per time delay.

  7. XMM-Newton observations of the Galactic Centre Region - II: The soft thermal emission

    Heard, V

    2013-01-01

    We have extended our earlier study (Heard & Warwick 2013, Paper I) of the X-ray emission emanating from the central 100 pc x 100 pc region of our Galaxy to an investigation of several features prominent in the soft X-ray (2-4.5 keV) band. We focus on three specific structures: a putative bipolar outflow from the vicinity of Sgr A*; a high surface brightness region located roughly 12 arcmin to the north-east of Sgr A*; and a lower surface-brightness extended loop feature seen to the south of Sgr A*. We show that all three structures are thermal in nature and have similar temperatures (kT ~ 1 keV). The inferred X-ray luminosities lie in the range (2 - 10) x 10^34 erg s^-1. In the case of the bipolar feature we suggest that the hot plasma is produced by the shock-heating of the winds from massive stars within the Central Cluster, possibly collimated by the Circumnuclear Disc. Alternatively the outflow may be driven by outbursts on Sgr A*, which follow tidal disruption events occurring at a rate of roughly 1 ...

  8. Electron temperature fluctuation in the HT-7 tokamak plasma observed by electron cyclotron emission imaging

    Xu Xiao-Yuan; Wang Jun; Yu Yi; Wen Yi-Zhi; Yu Chang-Xuan; Liu Wan-Dong; Wan Bao-Nian; Gao Xiang; N. C. Luhmann; C. W. Domier; Jian Wang; Z. G. Xia; Zuowei Shen

    2009-01-01

    The fluctuation of the electron temperature has been measured by using the electron cyclotron emission imaging in the Hefei Tokamak-7 (HT-7) plasma. The electron temperature fluctuation with a broadband spectrum shows that it propagates in the electron diamagnetic drift direction, and the mean poloidal wave-number kg is calculated to be about 1.58 cm-1, or keps ≈0.34. It indicates that the fluctuation should come from the electron drift wave turbulence. The linear global scaling of the electron temperature fluctuation with the gradient of electron temperature is consistent with the mixing length scale qualitatively. Evolution of spectrum of the fluctuation during the sawtooth oscillation phases is investigated, and the fluctuation is found to increase with the gradient of electron temperature increasing during most phases of the sawtooth oscillation. The results indicate that the electron temperature gradient is probably the driver of the fluctuation enhancement. The steady heat flux driven by electron temperature fluctuation is estimated and compared with the results from power balance estimation.

  9. Effect of the total solar eclipse of March 20, 2015, on VLF/LF propagation

    Solovieva, M. S.; Rozhnoi, A. A.; Fedun, V.; Schwingenschuh, K.

    2016-05-01

    The analyzed amplitude and phase variations in electromagnetic VLF and LF signals at 20-45 kHz, received in Moscow, Graz (Austria), and Sheffield (UK) during the total solar eclipse of March 20, 2015, are considered. The 22 analyzed paths have lengths of 200—6100 km, are differently oriented, and cross 40-100% occultation regions. Fifteen paths crossed the region where the occultation varied from 40 to 90%. Solar eclipse effects were found only on one of these paths in the signal phase (-50°). Four long paths crossed the 90-100% occultation region, and signal amplitude and phase anomalies were detected for all four paths. Negative phase anomalies varied from-75° to-90°, and the amplitude anomalies were both positive and negative and were not larger than 5 dB. It was shown that the effective height of the ionosphere varied from 6.5 to 11 km during the eclipse.

  10. VLF signal perturbation due to the total solar eclipse of March 2015

    Nait Amor, Samir; Bouderba, Yasmina

    2016-07-01

    On March 20 2015 a total Solar eclipse occurred and covered several regions in north America, Greenland, west of Europe and north Africa with different occultation rates. During this event, many VLF paths recorded at Algiers receiver were perturbed. In this contribution, we will present a qualitative analysis of two paths (GQD and DHO) which were disturbed differently since the occultation rate at the transmitter locations was different. In addition to the qualitative study, we determined the newly formed reference height and β values at different times during the eclipse transit. From these determined parameters the time profile of the electron density is then deduced. The results showed that the new reference height, β and the electron density are different from one transmitter analysis to other due to the occultation rate difference.

  11. A direct link between chorus emissions and pulsating aurora on timescales from milliseconds to minutes: A case study at subauroral latitudes

    Ozaki, Mitsunori; Yagitani, Satoshi; Sawai, Kaoru; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Kataoka, Ryuho; Ieda, Akimasa; Ebihara, Yusuke; Connors, Martin; Schofield, Ian; Katoh, Yuto; Otsuka, Yuichi; Sunagawa, Naoki; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-11-01

    A correlation was observed between chorus emissions and pulsating aurora (PA) from observations at Athabasca (L≈4.3) in Canada at 9:00-9:20 UT on 7 February 2013, using an electron multiplying charge-coupled device camera and a VLF loop antenna with sampling rates of 110 Hz and 100 kHz, respectively. Pulsating aurora having a quasiperiodic variation in luminosity and a few hertz modulation was observed together with chorus emissions consisting of a group of successive rising-tone elements. The repetition period and modulation frequency of the PA are in good agreement with those of the modulated chorus. After 9:11 UT, the temporal features of the aurora became aperiodic PA of indistinct modulation. Simultaneously, the rising-tone chorus turned into chorus emissions consisting of numerous rising-tone elements. The equatorial geomagnetic field inhomogeneity calculated using the Tsyganenko 2002 model shows a decreasing trend during the period. This result is consistent with nonlinear wave growth theory having a small geomagnetic field inhomogeneity, which contributes to a decrease in the threshold amplitude to trigger discrete chorus elements. These observations show a close connection between chorus emissions and PA on timescales from milliseconds for generation of discrete chorus elements on the microphysics of wave-particle interaction to minutes for the variations of the geomagnetic field inhomogeneity related with the substorm activity.

  12. OBSERVATION OF REPETITION-RATE DEPENDANT EMISSION FROM AN UN-GATED THERMIONIC CATHODE RF GUN

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Sun, Y. [Argonne; Harris, J. R. [AFRL, NM; Lewellen, J. W. [Los Alamos Natl. Lab.

    2016-09-28

    Recent work at Fermilab in collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source and members of other national labs, designed an experiment to study the relationship between the RF repetition rate and the average current per RF pulse. While existing models anticipate a direct relationship between these two parameters we observed an inverse relationship. We believe this is a result of damage to the barium coating on the cathode surface caused by a change in back-bombardment power that is unaccounted for in the existing theories. These observations shed new light on the challenges and fundamental limitations associated with scaling an ungated thermionic cathode RF gun to high average current machines.

  13. Dark matter origin of the gamma ray emission from the galactic center observed by HESS

    Cembranos, J A R; Maroto, A L

    2012-01-01

    We show that the gamma ray spectrum observed with the HESS array of Cherenkov telescopes coming from the Galactic Center (GC) region and identified with the source HESS J1745-290, is well fitted by the secondary photons coming from dark matter (DM) annihilation over a diffuse power-law background. The amount of photons and morphology of the signal localized within a region of few parsecs, require compressed DM profiles as those resulting from baryonic contraction, which offer $\\sim 10^3$ enhancements in the signal over DM alone simulations. The fitted background from HESS data is consistent with recent Fermi-LAT observations of the same region.

  14. Cone structure and focusing of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves at high altitudes in the ionosphere

    Alpert, Ya. L.; Green, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and angle dependencies of the electric field radiated by an electric dipole E = E(sub 0) cos omega(t) are studied through numerical calculations of absolute value of E in the VLF and LF frequency bands where F is less than or equal 0.02 to 0.05 f(sub b) in a model ionosphere over an altitude region of 800-6000 km where the wave frequency and electron gyrofrequency varies between F approximately 4-500 kHz and f(sub b) is approximately equal (1.1 to 0.2) MHz respectively. It is found that the amplitudes of the electric field have large maxima in four regions: close to the direction of the Earth magnetic field line B(sub 0) (it is called the axis field E(sub 0), in the Storey E(sub St), reversed Storey E(sub RevSt), and resonance E(sub Res) cones. The maximal values of E(sub 0), E(sub Res), and E(sub RevSt) are the most pronounced close to the lower hybrid frequency, F approximately F(sub L). The flux of the electric field is concentrated in very narrow regions, with the apex angles of the cones Delta-B is approximately (0.1-1) deg. The enhancement and focusing of the electric field increases with altitude starting at Z greater than 800 km. At Z greater than or equal to 1000 up to 6000 km, the relative value of absolute value of E, in comparison with its value at Z = 800 km is about (10(exp 2) to 10(exp 4)) times larger. Thus the flux of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves generated at high altitudes in the Earth's ionosphere are trapped into very narrow conical beams similar to laser beams.

  15. Atmospheric observations of carbon monoxide and fossil fuel CO2 emissions from East Asia

    Turnbull, Jocelyn C.; Tans, Pieter P.; Lehman, Scott J.;

    2011-01-01

    Flask samples from two sites in East Asia, Tae-Ahn Peninsula, Korea (TAP), and Shangdianzi, China (SDZ), were measured for trace gases including CO2, CO and fossil fuel CO2(CO(2)ff, derived from Delta(CO2)-C-14 observations). The five-year TAP record shows high CO(2)ff when local air comes from t...

  16. Suzaku Observations of Luminous Quasars: Revealing the Nature of High-energy Blazar Emission in Low-level Activity States

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Antolini, E.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, A. W.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grandi, P.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nestoras, I.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sambruna, R.; Sander, A.; Sato, R.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Villata, M.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Tavecchio, F.; Sikora, M.; Schady, P.; Roming, P.; Chester, M. M.; Maraschi, L.

    2010-06-01

    We present the results from the Suzaku X-ray observations of five flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), namely PKS 0208-512, Q 0827+243, PKS 1127-145, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3. All these sources were additionally monitored simultaneously or quasi-simultaneously by the Fermi satellite in gamma rays and the Swift UVOT in the UV and optical bands, respectively. We constructed their broadband spectra covering the frequency range from 1014 Hz up to 1025 Hz, and those reveal the nature of high-energy emission of luminous blazars in their low-activity states. The analyzed X-ray spectra are well fitted by a power-law model with photoelectric absorption. In the case of PKS 0208-512, PKS 1127-145, and 3C 454.3, the X-ray continuum showed indication of hardening at low energies. Moreover, when compared with the previous X-ray observations, we see a significantly increasing contribution of low-energy photons to the total X-ray fluxes when the sources are getting fainter. The same behavior can be noted in the Suzaku data alone. A likely explanation involves a variable, flat-spectrum component produced via inverse-Compton emission, plus an additional, possibly steady soft X-ray component prominent when the source gets fainter. This soft X-ray excess is represented either by a steep power-law (photon indices Γ ~ 3-5) or a blackbody-type emission with temperatures kT ~ 0.1-0.2 keV. We model the broadband spectra of the five observed FSRQs using synchrotron self-Compton and/or external-Compton radiation models. Our modeling suggests that the difference between the low- and high-activity states in luminous blazars is due to the different total kinetic power of the jet, most likely related to varying bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow within the blazar emission zone.

  17. Radio emissions from double RHESSI TGFs

    Mezentsev, Andrew; Gjesteland, Thomas; Albrechtsen, Kjetil; Lehtinen, Nikolai; Marisaldi, Martino; Smith, David; Cummer, Steven

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) is performed in association with World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) sources and very low frequency (VLF) sferics recorded at Duke University. RHESSI clock offset is evaluated and found to experience changes on the 5 August 2005 and 21 October 2013, based on the analysis of TGF-WWLLN matches. The clock offsets were found for all three periods of observations with standard deviations less than 100 {\\mu}s. This result opens the possibility for the precise comparative analyses of RHESSI TGFs with the other types of data (WWLLN, radio measurements, etc.) In case of multiple-peak TGFs, WWLLN detections are observed to be simultaneous with the last TGF peak for all 16 cases of multipeak RHESSI TGFs simultaneous with WWLLN sources. VLF magnetic field sferics were recorded for two of these 16 events at Duke University. These radio measurements also attribute VLF sferics to the second pea...

  18. First LOFAR observations at very low frequencies of cluster-scale non-thermal emission: the case of Abell 2256

    van Weeren, R J; Rafferty, D A; Pizzo, R; Bonafede, A; Bruggen, M; Brunetti, G; Ferrari, C; Orru, E; Heald, G; McKean, J P; Tasse, C; de Gasperin, F; Birzan, L; van Zwieten, J E; van der Tol, S; Shulevski, A; Jackson, N; Offringa, A R; Conway, J; Intema, H T; Clarke, T E; van Bemmel, I; Miley, G K; White, G J; Hoeft, M; Cassano, R; Macario, G; Morganti, R; Wise, M W; Horellou, C; Valentijn, E A; Wucknitz, O; Kuijken, K; Ensslin, T A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Boonstra, A -J; Brentjens, M; van de Brink, R H; Broderick, J; Brouw, W N; Butcher, H R; van Cappellen, W; Ciardi, B; Eisloffel, J; Falcke, H; Fender, R; Garrett, M A; Gerbers, M; Gunst, A; Hassall, J P Hamaker T; Hessels, J W T; Koopmans, L V E; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Maat, P; Millenaar, R; Munk, H; Nijboer, R; Noordam, J E; Pandey, V N; Pandey-Pommier, M; Polatidis, A; Reich, W; Scaife, A M M; Schoenmakers, A; Sluman, J; Stappers, B W; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Vermeulen, R; de Vos, M

    2012-01-01

    Abell 2256 is one of the best known examples of a galaxy cluster hosting large-scale diffuse radio emission that is unrelated to individual galaxies. It contains both a giant radio halo and a relic, as well as a number of head-tail sources and smaller diffuse steep-spectrum radio sources. The origin of radio halos and relics is still being debated, but over the last years it has become clear that the presence of these radio sources is closely related to galaxy cluster merger events. Here we present the results from the first LOFAR Low band antenna (LBA) observations of Abell 2256 between 18 and 67 MHz. To our knowledge, the image presented in this paper at 63 MHz is the deepest ever obtained at frequencies below 100 MHz in general. Both the radio halo and the giant relic are detected in the image at 63 MHz, and the diffuse radio emission remains visible at frequencies as low as 20 MHz. The observations confirm the presence of a previously claimed ultra-steep spectrum source to the west of the cluster center w...

  19. In situ observation of modulated light emission of fiber fuse synchronized with void train over hetero-core splice point.

    Shin-ichi Todoroki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fiber fuse is a process of optical fiber destruction under the action of laser radiation, found 20 years ago. Once initiated, opical discharge runs along the fiber core region to the light source and leaves periodic voids whose shape looks like a bullet pointing the direction of laser beam. The relation between damage pattern and propagation mode of optical discharge is still unclear even after the first in situ observation three years ago. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fiber fuse propagation over hetero-core splice point (Corning SMF-28e and HI 1060 was observed in situ. Sequential photographs obtained at intervals of 2.78 micros recorded a periodic emission at the tail of an optical discharge pumped by 1070 nm and 9 W light. The signal stopped when the discharge ran over the splice point. The corresponding damage pattern left in the fiber core region included a segment free of periodicity. CONCLUSIONS: The spatial modulation pattern of the light emission agreed with the void train formed over the hetero-core splice point. Some segments included a bullet-shaped void pointing in the opposite direction to the laser beam propagation although the sequential photographs did not reveal any directional change in the optical discharge propagation.

  20. Sharing Low Frequency Radio Emissions in the Virtual Observatory: Application for JUNO-Ground-Radio Observations Support.

    Cecconi, B.; Savalle, R.; Zarka, P. M.; Anderson, M.; Andre, N.; Coffre, A.; Clarke, T.; Denis, L.; Ebert, R. W.; Erard, S.; Genot, V. N.; Girard, J. N.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Hess, S. L.; Higgins, C. A.; Hobara, Y.; Imai, K.; Imai, M.; Kasaba, Y.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Kumamoto, A.; Kurth, W. S.; Lamy, L.; Le Sidaner, P.; Misawa, H.; Nakajo, T.; Orton, G. S.; Ryabov, V. B.; Sky, J.; Thieman, J.; Tsuchiya, F.; Typinski, D.

    2015-12-01

    In the frame of the preparation of the NASA/JUNO and ESA/JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) missions, and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet-VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nancay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol, as well as data from the Iitate Low Frquency Radio Antenna, in Japan. Amateur radio data from the RadioJOVE project is also available. The attached figure shows data from those three providers. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets.

  1. 大气噪声对甚低频通信系统干扰仿真分析%Simulation and Analysis of Almospheric Noise Interference on VLF/LF Communication

    施意; 张爽; 张昕

    2013-01-01

    甚低频通信又称为长波通信,具有传播距离远,水下传播,传播信号稳定、衰减小等特点,大气噪声会对甚低频通信系统产生严重影响,结合大气噪声经典模型和CCIR 322报告中多年的测量结果,对大气噪声干扰下的甚低频通信系统进行仿真,得出在不同强度的大气噪声干扰下,甚低频通信系统的误码率,验证了大气噪声中的主要为脉冲噪声对甚低频通信系统产生严重影响。%The very low frequency/low frequency communication systems althrough greatly influenced by atmospheric noise generally has the features of long propagation distance, stable propagation signal, low attenuation and underwater propagation. In combination of classical model of atmospheric noise and observational data from CCIR Report 322, the simulation on VLF/LF communication with atmospheric noise is done, and this simulation indicates that the impulse noise in the atmospheric noise has a serious impact on VLF communication system.

  2. Observation of polarised hard X-ray emission from the Crab by the PoGOLite Pathfinder

    Chauvin, M; Jackson, M; Kamae, T; Kawano, T; Kiss, M; Kole, M; Mikhalev, V; Moretti, E; Olofsson, G; Rydström, S; Takahashi, H; Iyudin, A; Arimoto, M; Fukazawa, Y; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Mizuno, T; Ryde, F; Tajima, H; Takahashi, T; Pearce, M

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the linear polarisation of hard X-ray emission from the Crab in a previously unexplored energy interval, 20-120 keV. The introduction of two new observational parameters, the polarisation fraction and angle stands to disentangle geometrical and physical effects, thereby providing information on the pulsar wind geometry and magnetic field environment. Measurements are conducted using the PoGOLite Pathfinder - a balloon-borne polarimeter. Polarisation is determined by measuring the azimuthal Compton scattering angle of incident X-rays in an array of plastic scintillators housed in an anticoincidence well. The polarimetric response has been characterised prior to flight using both polarised and unpolarised calibration sources. We address possible systematic effects through observations of a background field. The measured polarisation fraction for the integrated Crab light-curve is ($18.4^{+9.8}_{-10.6}$)%, corresponding to an upper limit (99% credibility) of 42.4%, for a polarisation angle of ($...

  3. The variable hard X-ray emission of NGC 4945 as observed by NuSTAR

    Puccetti, Simonetta [ASDC-ASI, Via del Politecnico, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Comastri, Andrea [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Fiore, Fabrizio [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (RM) (Italy); Arévalo, Patricia; Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Risaliti, Guido [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Brandt, William N.; Luo, Bin [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Alexander, David M.; Gandhi, Poshak; Lansbury, George B. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Boggs, Steve E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Koss, Michael J. [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Madejski, Greg M. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Matt, Giorgio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universit' a Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); and others

    2014-09-20

    We present a broadband (∼0.5-79 keV) spectral and temporal analysis of multiple NuSTAR observations combined with archival Suzaku and Chandra data of NGC 4945, the brightest extragalactic source at 100 keV. We observe hard X-ray (>10 keV) flux and spectral variability, with flux variations of a factor of two on timescales of 20 ks. A variable primary continuum dominates the high-energy spectrum (>10 keV) in all states, while the reflected/scattered flux that dominates at E <10 keV stays approximately constant. From modeling the complex reflection/transmission spectrum, we derive a Compton depth along the line of sight of τ{sub Thomson} ∼ 2.9, and a global covering factor for the circumnuclear gas of ∼0.15. This agrees with the constraints derived from the high-energy variability, which implies that most of the high-energy flux is transmitted rather than Compton-scattered. This demonstrates the effectiveness of spectral analysis at constraining the geometric properties of the circumnuclear gas, and validates similar methods used for analyzing the spectra of other bright, Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The lower limits on the e-folding energy are between 200 and 300 keV, consistent with previous BeppoSAX, Suzaku, and Swift Burst Alert Telescope observations. The accretion rate, estimated from the X-ray luminosity and assuming a bolometric correction typical of type 2 AGN, is in the range ∼0.1-0.3 λ{sub Edd} depending on the flux state. The substantial observed X-ray luminosity variability of NGC 4945 implies that large errors can arise from using single-epoch X-ray data to derive L/L {sub Edd} values for obscured AGNs.

  4. The Variable Hard X-Ray Emission of NGC4945 as Observed by NuSTAR

    Puccetti, Simonetta; Comastri, Andrea; Fiore, Fabrizio; Arevalo, Patricia; Risaliti, Guido; Bauer, Franz E.; Brandt, William N.; Stern, Daniel; Harrison, Fiona A.; Alexander, David M.; Boggs, Steve E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Gandhi, Poshak; Hailey, Charles J.; Koss, Michael R.; Lansbury, George B.; Luo, Bin; Madejski, Greg M.; Matt, Giorgio; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, Will

    2014-01-01

    We present a broadband (approx. 0.5 - 79 keV) spectral and temporal analysis of multiple NuSTAR observations combined with archival Suzaku and Chandra data of NGC4945, the brightest extragalactic source at 100 keV. We observe hard X-ray (> 10 keV) flux and spectral variability, with flux variations of a factor 2 on timescales of 20 ksec. A variable primary continuum dominates the high energy spectrum (> 10 keV) in all the states, while the reflected/scattered flux which dominates at E< 10 keV stays approximately constant. From modelling the complex reflection/transmission spectrum we derive a Compton depth along the line of sight of Thomson approx.2.9, and a global covering factor for the circumnuclear gas of approx. 0.15. This agrees with the constraints derived from the high energy variability, which implies that most of the high energy flux is transmitted, rather that Compton-scattered. This demonstrates the effectiveness of spectral analysis in constraining the geometric properties of the circumnuclear gas, and validates similar methods used for analyzing the spectra of other bright, Compton-thick AGN. The lower limits on the e-folding energy are between 200 - 300 keV, consistent with previous BeppoSAX, Suzaku and Swift BAT observations. The accretion rate, estimated from the X-ray luminosity and assuming a bolometric correction typical of type 2 AGN, is in the range approx. 0.1 - 0.3 lambda(sub Edd) depending on the flux state. The substantial observed X-ray luminosity variability of NGC4945 implies that large errors can arise from using single-epoch X-ray data to derive L/L(sub Edd) values for obscured AGNs.

  5. Temperature Profiles and the Effect of AGN on Submillimeter Emission from BLAST Observations of Resolved Galaxies

    Wiebe, Donald V; Bock, James J; Chapin, Edward L; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Hughes, David H; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin B; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S; Viero, Marco P

    2009-01-01

    Over the course of two flights, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) made resolved maps of seven nearby (<25 Mpc) galaxies at 250, 350, and 500 microns. During its June 2005 flight from Sweden (BLAST05), BLAST observed a single nearby galaxy, NGC 4565. During the December 2006 flight from Antarctica (BLAST06), BLAST observed the nearby galaxies NGC 1097, NGC 1291, NGC 1365, NGC 1512, NGC 1566, and NGC 1808. We fit physical dust models to a combination of BLAST observations and other available data for the the galaxies with Spitzer data. We fit a modified blackbody to the remaining galaxies to obtain total dust mass and mean dust temperature. For the four galaxies with Spitzer data, we also produce maps and radial profiles of dust column density and temperature. We measure the fraction of BLAST detected flux originating from the central cores of these galaxies and use this to calculate a "core fraction", an upper limit on the "AGN fraction" of submillimeter detected galaxies. Fin...

  6. The nature of the low-frequency emission of M 51. First observations of a nearby galaxy with LOFAR

    Mulcahy, D. D.; Horneffer, A.; Beck, R.; Heald, G.; Fletcher, A.; Scaife, A.; Adebahr, B.; Anderson, J. M.; Bonafede, A.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Chyży, K. T.; Conway, J.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Enßlin, T.; Haverkorn, M.; Horellou, C.; Iacobelli, M.; Israel, F. P.; Junklewitz, H.; Jurusik, W.; Köhler, J.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Orrú, E.; Paladino, R.; Pizzo, R.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Low-frequency radio continuum observations (challenges of low-frequency radio interferometry. This is now changing with the start of operations of LOFAR. Aims: We aim to study the propagation of low-energy CRE in the interarm regions and the extended disk of the nearly face-on spiral galaxy Messier 51. We also search for polarisation in M 51 and other extragalactic sources in the field. Methods: The grand-design spiral galaxy M 51 was observed with the LOFAR High Frequency Antennas (HBA) and imaged in total intensity and polarisation. This observation covered the frequencies between 115 MHz and 175 MHz with 244 subbands of 8 channels each, resulting in 1952 channels. This allowed us to use RM synthesis to search for polarisation. Results: We produced an image of total emission of M 51 at the mean frequency of 151 MHz with 20'' resolution and 0.3 mJy rms noise, which is the most sensitive image of a galaxy at frequencies below 300 MHz so far. The integrated spectrum of total radio emission is described well by a power law, while flat spectral indices in the central region indicate thermal absorption. We observe that the disk extends out to 16 kpc and see a break in the radial profile near the optical radius of the disk. The radial scale lengths in the inner and outer disks are greater at 151 MHz, and the break is smoother at 151 MHz than those observed at 1.4 GHz. The arm-interarm contrast is lower at 151 MHz than at 1400 MHz, indicating propagation of CRE from spiral arms into interarm regions. The correlations between the images of radio emission at 151 MHz and 1400 MHz and the FIR emission at 70 μm reveal breaks on scales of 1.4 and 0.7 kpc, respectively. The total (equipartition) magnetic field strength decreases from about 28 μG in the central region to about 10 μG at 10 kpc radius. No significant polarisation was detected from M 51, owing to severe Faraday depolarisation. Six extragalactic sources are detected in polarisation in the M 51 field of 4

  7. A statistical study of EMIC rising and falling tone emissions observed by THEMIS

    Nakamura, Satoko; Omura, Yoshiharu; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2016-09-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves with rising or falling frequency variations have been studied intensively because of their effects on energetic particles in the Earth's magnetosphere. We develop an automated classification method of EMIC events based on the characteristics of frequency variations. We report some basic statistical properties of frequency variations in EMIC waves observed over 5-10 RE by three Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms probes from January 2012 to December 2014. We clarify whether rising tones or falling tones are observed in each chosen 20 min time segment. In the present analysis, we find that the occurrence rate of EMIC rising or falling tone events is more than 30% of the total EMIC wave events. The dayside magnetosphere is a preferential region for the EMIC frequency variations. The occurrence rate of rising tone events is slightly greater than that of falling tone events. We examine the relation between the frequency characteristics and the magnetospheric conditions. The solar wind pressure strongly controls the occurrence rates of frequency variations. We also calculate ranges of frequency variations. Large-amplitude EMIC waves tend to have wider frequency variations, and the range of frequency variation is largest around the prenoon region. In addition, rapid variations in wave amplitudes called "subpacket structures" are found in 70% of the EMIC rising or falling tone events in the dayside region. Subpacket structures appear mainly in large-amplitude EMIC rising or falling tones. These features are consistent with nonlinear wave growth theory.

  8. The variable hard X-ray emission of NGC4945 as observed by NuSTAR

    Puccetti, Simonetta; Fiore, Fabrizio; Arévalo, Patricia; Risaliti, Guido; Bauer, Franz E; Brandt, William N; Stern, Daniel; Harrison, Fiona A; Alexander, David M; Boggs, Steve E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Gandhi, Poshak; Hailey, Charles J; Koss, Michael R; Lansbury, George B; Luo, Bin; Madejski, Greg M; Matt, Giorgio; Walton, Dominic J; Zhang, Will

    2014-01-01

    We present a broadband (~0.5-79 keV) spectral and temporal analysis of multiple NuSTAR observations combined with archival Suzaku and Chandra data of NGC4945, the brightest extragalactic source at 100 keV. We observe hard X-ray (> 10 keV) flux and spectral variability, with flux variations of a factor 2 on timescales of 20 ksec. A variable primary continuum dominates the high energy spectrum (>10 keV) in all the states, while the reflected/scattered flux which dominates at E< 10 keV stays approximately constant. From modelling the complex reflection/transmission spectrum we derive a Compton depth along the line of sight of tau_Thomson ~ 2.9, and a global covering factor for the circumnuclear gas of ~ 0.15. This agrees with the constraints derived from the high energy variability, which implies that most of the high energy flux is transmitted, rather that Compton-scattered. This demonstrates the effectiveness of spectral analysis in constraining the geometric properties of the circumnuclear gas, and validat...

  9. A Cluster of CO2 Change Characteristics with GOSAT Observations for Viewing the Spatial Pattern of CO2 Emission and Absorption

    Da Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations can be used to detect the changes of CO2 concentration at global and regional scales. With the column-averaged CO2 dry-a