WorldWideScience

Sample records for vlf atmospheric noise

  1. Initial Results from SQUID Sensor: Analysis and Modeling for the ELF/VLF Atmospheric Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Hao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the amplitude probability density (APD of the wideband extremely low frequency (ELF and very low frequency (VLF atmospheric noise is studied. The electromagnetic signals from the atmosphere, referred to herein as atmospheric noise, was recorded by a mobile low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID receiver under magnetically unshielded conditions. In order to eliminate the adverse effect brought by the geomagnetic activities and powerline, the measured field data was preprocessed to suppress the baseline wandering and harmonics by symmetric wavelet transform and least square methods firstly. Then statistical analysis was performed for the atmospheric noise on different time and frequency scales. Finally, the wideband ELF/VLF atmospheric noise was analyzed and modeled separately. Experimental results show that, Gaussian model is appropriate to depict preprocessed ELF atmospheric noise by a hole puncher operator. While for VLF atmospheric noise, symmetric α-stable (SαS distribution is more accurate to fit the heavy-tail of the envelope probability density function (pdf.

  2. A Global Survey of ELF/VLF Radio Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-30

    Smith, 2002]. Finally, our participation in one of the HAARP experimental programs, during which we made much use of the ELF/VLF radio noise data...Porrat, Teague, and Fraser-Smith, 1999]. Our objective was to make the first long-distance detection of ELF signals generated by the HAARP ...ionospheric heater; we did not succeed, but the continuing improve- ments to the HAARP heating facility in Alaska will ultimately lead to the routine

  3. Characteristic of Tweek Atmospherics Observed in Mid-latitude using AWESOME VLF Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbayah Yusop

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the analysis of tweek atmospherics received by AWESOME VLF receiver at station of Gakona (62.71°N, 143.99°W during four months observation from January to April 2011. Tweek which originates from lightning discharge are used to monitor the nighttime D-region ionosphere using the fundamental cut-off frequency to measure the variations of the lower ionosphere’s reflection height, the equivalent electron density at the reflection height and the propagation distance travel by tweeks. In this study, a total of 1316 tweeks are analyzed and from the analysis, it shows that equinox’s season has the highest tweek occurrence compared to winter season in March and April. The maximum harmonic (m of t weeks is found to be up to fourth ( m = 4 and tweeks with mode number one (m = 1 are more dominantly occurred. Our observations indicate that the equivalent electron densities for tweeks varies from 22-27 eL/cm3 in the altitude ranged of 75 to 91 km and demonstrate that these ELF/VLF signals travel considerable distances up to 6700 km from the causative lightning discharges. The ionospheric parameters for three locations (high, middle and low latitude respectively were compared and the results show that they are almost consistent for all the locations.

  4. 大气噪声对甚低频通信系统干扰仿真分析%Simulation and Analysis of Almospheric Noise Interference on VLF/LF Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施意; 张爽; 张昕

    2013-01-01

    甚低频通信又称为长波通信,具有传播距离远,水下传播,传播信号稳定、衰减小等特点,大气噪声会对甚低频通信系统产生严重影响,结合大气噪声经典模型和CCIR 322报告中多年的测量结果,对大气噪声干扰下的甚低频通信系统进行仿真,得出在不同强度的大气噪声干扰下,甚低频通信系统的误码率,验证了大气噪声中的主要为脉冲噪声对甚低频通信系统产生严重影响。%The very low frequency/low frequency communication systems althrough greatly influenced by atmospheric noise generally has the features of long propagation distance, stable propagation signal, low attenuation and underwater propagation. In combination of classical model of atmospheric noise and observational data from CCIR Report 322, the simulation on VLF/LF communication with atmospheric noise is done, and this simulation indicates that the impulse noise in the atmospheric noise has a serious impact on VLF communication system.

  5. Lightning and ionospheric remote sensing using VLF/ELF radio atmospherics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummer, Steven Andrew

    Lightning discharges radiate the bulk of their electromagnetic energy in the Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3- 30 kHz) and Extremely Low Frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) frequency ranges. This energy, contained in impulse-like signals called radio atmospherics or sferics, is guided for long distances by multiple reflections from the ground and lower ionosphere. These two facts suggest that observed sferic waveforms radiated from lightning contain a great deal of information about both the state of the ionosphere along the propagation path and the dynamics of the current in the lightning return stroke. The aim of this dissertation is to develop and implement the necessary techniques to use sferic observations to determine the characteristics of the ionosphere and lightning. In this work, a quantitative model of sferic propagation is developed, and with it the spectral characteristics of VLF (> 1.5 kHz) sferics are shown to depend primarily on the propagation-path-averaged ionospheric D region electron density profile. Using this propagation model, a parameterized ionosphere is iteratively varied to find the theoretical sferic spectrum that agrees best with an observed sferic spectrum composed of the average of many individual sferic spectra. In most nighttime cases, the quality of the agreement allows the height of an exponentially-varying electron density profile to be inferred with a precision of 0.2 km. Since the general sferic waveform depends on the source current-moment waveform as well as the ionospherically- controlled propagation, the former quantity can be measured for individual discharges from observed sferics. Of particular interest are those lightning discharges associated with mesospheric optical emissions known as sprites. By using a robust deconvolution technique, source current-moment waveforms are extracted from individual observed ELF (< 1.5 kHz) sferics. The cases studied in detail show that optical emissions are sometimes produced with a smaller vertical

  6. Seismo-electromagnetic VLF link calibration in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Hans; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Wolbang, Daniel; Besser, Bruno P.; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Stachel, Manfred; Prattes, Gustav; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Aydogar, Özer; Zehetleitner, Sigrid; Grill, Claudia; Jernej, Irmgard

    2015-04-01

    The general background is the investigation of seismic activity with electromagnetic signals, i.e. to disentangle amplitude and phase modifications from a variety of sources. This work focus on characterisation of very low frequency (VLF) radio links between several transmitters and the Graz receiver in the current active solar cycle. Particular emphasis is on solar flares related disturbances in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, an important dayside non-seismic influence on the VLF paths. These variations can serve as a calibration tool of the facility even for nighttime periods when different seismo-electromagnetic (SEM) methods are applied, e.g. terminator time or nighttime amplitude. Supporting data are the GOES X-ray flux measurements. As immediate objective we study individual C/M/X-class solar flare events in the sub-ionospheric VLF waveguide (amplitude fluctuations) and calculate statistical parameters with the C-class population. The used system, which is part of a broader network of receiving stations, is primarily dedicated to investigate earthquake related phenomena and associated lithospheric atmospheric ionospheric coupling mechanisms. We receive simultaneously 12 VLF transmitters (amplitude and phase measurements) from the northern hemisphere with a selected temporal resolution of 20 seconds. We conclude that the numerous C/M/X-class solar flare events, together with the the high signal-to-noise ratio of the facility, are a valuable combination for short-term VLF path characterisation in a robust manner. As outlook, due to the steady VLF measurements, a monitoring service for certain lower atmospheric variations can be envisaged.

  7. Further study on the role of atmospheric gravity waves on the seismo-ionospheric perturbations as detected by subionospheric VLF/LF propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Muto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available As the target earthquake we have taken a huge earthquake (EQ named Miyagi-oki earthquake on 16 August 2005 (with magnitude of 7.2 and we have analyzed the 4 month period including the date of this EQ. In addition to our previous analysis on the nighttime average amplitude (trend and nighttime fluctuation, we have proposed the use of fluctuation power spectra in the frequency rage of atmospheric gravity waves (period=10 min to 100 min as a third parameter of subionospheric VLF/LF propagation characteristics. Then it is found that this third parameter would be of additional importance in confirming the presence of seismo-ionospheric perturbations. Finally, we have discovered an important role of lunar tidal effect in the VLF/LF data, which appears one and two months before this large EQ.

  8. The combined study of the middle atmosphere meteorological parameters and lower ionosphere dynamics over Europe by means of remote VLF-LF measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetzer, J. I.; Lyakhov, A.; Yakymenko, K.

    2012-12-01

    The results of comprehensive analysis of long-term records of VLF-LF European transmitters by means of Mikhnevo geophysical observatory (Institute of Geospheres Dynamics), SID station A118 (France) and a number of AWESOM receivers are presented. In the previous study (A.A.Egoshin et al., Izvestiya, Physics of the Solid Earth, 2012, Vol. 48, No. 3, pp. 275-286) the results obtained under the minimum solar activity were presented that have shown the link between the lower ionosphere parameters and meteorological fields of the middle atmosphere. The current study expands the evidence to the increased solar activity level as well as the number of receivers, thus allowing more dense coverage of the Europe by the radio paths. Middle atmosphere data under study were provided by the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder. These asynoptic data, in turn, were processed by the space-time spectral analysis on various pressure levels for various window lengths. The results are presented for the spatial structure of wave-like perturbations in the VLF-LF signal strength, which result from the lower ionosphere disturbances on various radio paths. Special short-windowed space-time study was evaluated for the periods of anomalous temporal behavior of the VLF-LF signals and the results of the altitude-latitude mode structures of the geopotential height, neutral temperature, water and ozone constituents are presented. It is shown that the spatial properties of the lower ionosphere can vary significantly at relatively small scale. Moreover, the altitude-latitude mode structures do not coincide in space as well as in time, thus, complicating the lower ionosphere response to the meteorological variations of the middle atmosphere. The analysis of all assembled data proves two main points. At first, it is possible to evaluate synoptic long-term monitoring of the middle atmosphere via the lower ionosphere perturbations as seen by VLF-LF receivers. At second, the theoretical models of the lower

  9. Characterisation of very low frequency (VLF) fluctuations at the Graz receiver knot in the INFREP system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, H. U.; Prattes, G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Wolbang, D.; Boudjada, M. Y.; Rozhnoi, A.; Solovieva, M.; Biagi, P. F.; Maggipinto, T.; Stachel, M.; Jernej, I.; Aydogar, Ö.; Besser, B. P.

    2012-04-01

    In the frame of the European VLF/LF radio receiver network (International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors - INFREP) we investigate radio paths between several transmitters and receivers, among them the Graz VLF facility. For this knot the data coverage spans more than two years of continuous samples from 11 transmitters with a network wide 20 seconds temporal resolution. The main scientific objective is the characterisation of VLF fluctuations in amplitude and phase related with artificial and natural sources, e.g. disturbances due to seismic phenomena. Examples of VLF disturbances due to seismic activity are given by Rozhnoi et al. (2009) and complementary investigations are carried out by Prattes et al. (2011). For VLF usually the (i) nighttime amplitude variations and (ii) terminator time methods are used. They have been regularly applied in data analysis of seismic events mainly in Asian area. Paths crossing the earthquake preparation zone and control links are used for earthquake events. Various VLF waveguide properties are important, e.g. the length of the individual paths, the lower lithospheric-surface boundary and the upper {day, night}-time ionospheric {D, E}-layer physics. Beside the nominal diurnal and seasonal behaviour we are measuring natural variations, e.g. solar flare effects and manmade noise, i.e. local disturbances related with the urban environment of the receiver location. Measurements indicate that above a threshold of magnitude M 5 the methods are successful applicable. We show for a time span of more than two years how VLF fluctuations and their seasonal variations relate with atmospheric parameters, e.g. temperatures, zonal wind, and heat- and momentum-fluxes and discuss the impact on seismic event detection via VLF methods. Complementary ground- and satellite-based investigations, e.g. in nearby ULF or LF frequency ranges, are useful.

  10. Measurement of Noise Figure for a VLF LNA%甚低频低噪声放大器噪声系数测量*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈传克; 蒋宇中; 张曙霞

    2015-01-01

    A VLF low‐noise amplifier in a multi combination way can achieve lower noise figure .It has great signifi‐cance for deep water radio receiver .This kind of amplifier's noise voltage is about 3nv/sqrt(Hz) ,can't be measured directly due to the value is far less than the commonly used spectrum analyzer's sensitivity .Allowing for its particularity ,a redesign of the noise coefficient measurement is in demand .In this paper ,the factors affecting the noise coefficient measurement of LNA are discussed in detail ,such as impedance matching ,RF signal generator's background interference etc .Eventually a new means of measuring the noise coefficient ,with thorough scheme and implementation steps is proposed .%使用晶体管多管组合构成甚低频低噪声放大器可以获得较低的噪声系数,在深水无线电接收中有重要应用。这种放大器噪声电压约为3nv/sqrt(Hz),其指标已经远小于常用的频谱分析仪灵敏度指标,难以实现直接测量。正是由于其特殊性,甚低频低噪声放大器噪声系数的测量方案必须重新设计。论文详细讨论了影响低噪声放大器噪声系数测量的各种因素,包括阻抗匹配、射频信号发生器的背景干扰等因素,提出了完整的测量方案及实施步骤。

  11. ELF and VLF radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, R.; Jones, D. L.; Rodger, C. J.

    2000-11-01

    This review covers developments in ELF and VLF radio-wave propagation research over the last 50 years of the Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics. A review of such a large field, over such a long period, cannot be fully comprehensive and the authors have therefore covered important areas which have they themselves have found interesting. The survey begins with a review of work on natural and man made sources of ELF and VLF radiation. This is followed by sections on experimental and theoretical studies of unperturbed (ambient) ELF and VLF radio propagation. Schumann resonance research, which is currently undergoing a renaissance, is then reviewed. A review of research into transient perturbations of ELF and VLF propagation follows, extending from the early work on nuclear explosions up to the current work on sprites. The review concludes with a brief summary of the VLF navigation systems of the USSR and USA, (Alpha and Omega) whose development and life-span covered most of the last 50 years.

  12. Building and Testing a Portable VLF Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Robert; Krause, L.

    2014-01-01

    Unwanted emissions or signal noise is a major problem for VLF radio receivers. These can occur from man made sources such as power line hum, which can be prevalent for many harmonics after the fundamental 50 or 60 Hz AC source or from VLF radio transmissions such as LORAN, used for navigation and communications. Natural emissions can also be detrimental to the quality of recordings as some of the more interesting natural emissions such as whistlers or auroral chorus may be drowned out by the more common sferic emissions. VLF receivers must selectively filter out unwanted emissions and amplify the filtered signal to a record-able level without degrading the quality.

  13. Whistler-triggered VLF noise bursts observed on the DE-1 satellite and simultaneously at Antarctic ground stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. J.; Carpenter, D. L.; Inan, U. S.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of whistler-triggered very low-frequency noise bursts on the ground at Anarctic stations, Halley and Siple, and on the high-altitude satellite DE-1 are reported. Results of a case study from June 25, 1982 in which the satellite data were recorded near 25 deg south magnetic latitude and the L = 4.7 magnetic shell, are presented. Analysis indicates that the chorus bursts that are triggered in whistler ducts travel downwards in the ducts to low altitudes in the ionosphere, and that propagation to DE-1 is by upward reflection into a nonducted mode. A means of estimating the propagation characteristics of the wave bursts is provided by comparisons of nonducted signals from the Siple transmitter and discrete periodic emissions. The ducted-nonducted mode conversion process is a mechanism for the large-scale spreading into the magnetosphere of coherent whistler-mode wave energy which is generated, amplified, or triggered in small localized ducts. The DE-1 data show that a strong interaction exists between whistler-triggered noise bursts and prevailing hiss levels.

  14. Development of ground-based ELF/VLF receiver system in Wuhan and its first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanping; Yang, Guobin; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu; Gu, Xudong; Zhou, Chen; Wang, Feng

    2016-05-01

    A new digital low-frequency receiver system has been developed at Wuhan University for sensitive reception of low-latitude broadband Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves originating from either natural or artificial sources. These low-frequency radio waves are useful for ionospheric remote sensing, geospace environment monitoring, and submarine communications. This paper presents the principle and architecture of the system framework, including magnetic loop antenna design, low-noise analog front-end and digital receiver with data sampling and transmission. A new structure is adopted in the analog front end to provide high common-mode rejection and to reduce interference. On basis of field programmable gate array (FPGA) device and Universal Serial Bus (USB) architecture, the digital receiver is developed along with time keeping and synchronization module. The validity and feasibility of the self-developed ground-based ELF/VLF receiver system is evaluated by first results of experimental data that show the temporal variation of broadband ELF/VLF wave spectral intensity in Wuhan (30.54 °N, 114.37 °E). In addition to the acquisition of VLF transmitter signals at various frequencies, tweek atmospherics are also clearly captured to occur at multiple modes up to n = 6.

  15. Studies of Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Noise Above Mauna Kea

    CERN Document Server

    Sayers, J; Ade, P A R; Aguirre, J E; Bock, J J; Edgington, S F; Glenn, J; Goldin, A; Haig, D; Lange, A E; Laurent, G T; Mauskopf, P D; Nguyen, H T; Rossinot, P; Schlaerth, J

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of the fluctuations in atmospheric emission (atmospheric noise) above Mauna Kea recorded with Bolocam at 143 and 268 GHz from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The 143 GHz data were collected during a 40 night observing run in late 2003, and the 268 GHz observations were made in early 2004 and early 2005 over a total of 60 nights. Below 0.5 Hz, the data time-streams are dominated by atmospheric noise in all observing conditions. The atmospheric noise data are consistent with a Kolmogorov-Taylor (K-T) turbulence model for a thin wind-driven screen, and the median amplitude of the fluctuations is 260 mK^2 rad^(-5/3) at 143 GHz and 5900 mK^2 rad^(-5/3) at 268 GHz. Comparing our results with previous ACBAR data, we find that the normalization of the power spectrum of the atmospheric noise fluctuations is a factor of 120 larger above Mauna Kea than above the South Pole at millimeter wavelengths. Most of this difference is due to the fact that the atmosphere above the South Pole is...

  16. Estimating atmospheric parameters and reducing noise for multispectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-02-25

    A method and system for estimating atmospheric radiance and transmittance. An atmospheric estimation system is divided into a first phase and a second phase. The first phase inputs an observed multispectral image and an initial estimate of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band and calculates the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band, which can be used to generate a "corrected" multispectral image that is an estimate of the surface multispectral image. The second phase inputs the observed multispectral image and the surface multispectral image that was generated by the first phase and removes noise from the surface multispectral image by smoothing out change in average deviations of temperatures.

  17. Nighttime D region electron density measurements from ELF-VLF tweek radio atmospherics recorded at low latitudes

    OpenAIRE

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Maurya, Ajeet K.; Veenadhari, B. ; Singh, Rajesh ; Kumar, Sushil ; Cohen, M. B. ; Selvakumaran, R. ; Gokani, Sneha ; Pant, P.; Singh, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersive atmospherics (tweeks) observed during 2010 simultaneously at two low-latitude stations, Allahabad (geomagnetic latitude, 16.05 N) and Nainital (geomagnetic latitude, 20.48 N), have been used to estimate the nighttime D region electron density at the ionospheric reflection height under the local nighttime propagation (21:00–02:00 LT or 15:30–20:30 UT). The analysis of simultaneously recorded tweeks at both the stations on five international quiet days during one month...

  18. Coordinated study of non-seismic and weak seismic events (magnitude M less than 5) using VLF radio links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbang, Daniel; Biernat, Helfried K.; Friedrich, Martin; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Besser, B. P.; Eichelberger, Hans; Prattes, Gustav; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.

    In this study we analyze low seismicity earthquakes (EQs) with magnitudes M earthquake precursor phenomena generated in the lithosphere and then propagating in the atmosphere / ionosphere [1]. The major challenge of this seismo-electromagnetic (SEM) method is to differentiate parameter variations and disentangle seismic from non-seismic sources. In the course of the European radio receiver network (International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors, INFREP) radio signals in the VLF/LF frequency range are continuously recorded by dedicated, distributed transmitters. The major VLF receiving station for this study (10-50 kHz, Graz, Austria) operates continuously throughout the year, the selected network-wide temporal resolution is 20 sec, 12 transmitters, located mainly in Europe, are received (amplitude and phase). The facility has a proven high reliability and availability. The VLF links from the transmitters to the receivers are sometimes more, sometimes less influenced by various disturbances. In case the signal is crossing an EQ preparation zone, we are in principle able to detect seismic activity if the signal to noise ratio is high enough [2]. Generally we distinguish between ionospheric or atmospheric disturbances, influences which depend on the EQ properties, and transmitter variations itself. Ionospheric / Atmospheric variations can be generated, e.g. by geomagnetic storms, solar flares or waves in the troposphere. The properties of the sub-ionospheric VLF waveguide are affected by the length of the radio path, the distance to the EQ preparation zone, the parameters of the earthquake (magnitude, depth, type), and daytime / nighttime disturbances. In order to minimize ionospheric influences on the radio path we are considering mainly nighttime periods. Beside the terminator time method, where only the VLF sunrise and sunset period is analyzed, we are using the residual method (2 hours before and after local midnight), where the difference

  19. Nighttime D-region electron density measurements from ELF-VLF tweek radio atmospherics recorded at low latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, A. K.; Veenadhari, B.; Singh, R.; Kumar, S.; Cohen, M.

    2012-12-01

    Dispersive atmospherics (tweeks) observed during 2010 simultaneously at two low latitude stations, Allahabad (geomagnetic lat., 16.79° N) and Nainital (geomagnetic lat. 20.48° N), have been utilized to estimate the nighttime D-region electron density at the ionospheric reflection height under the local nighttime propagation (21:00 - 02:00 LT or 15:30 - 20:30 UT). The analysis of simultaneously recorded tweeks at both the stations on five international quiet days during one month each from summer (June), winter (January) and equinox (March) seasons shows that the D-region electron density varies 21.5-24.5 cm-3 over the ionospheric reflection height of 85-95 km. The average values of Wait lower ionospheric parameters: ionospheric reference height h‧ and sharpness factor β are almost same during winter (86.1-85.9 km, 0.51-0.52 km-1) and equinox (85.6-85.7 km, 0.54 km-1) seasons. The values of h‧ and β during summer season are about 83.5 km and 0.60 km-1 at both stations. Overall, equivalent electron density profile obtained using tweek method shows lower values of electron density by about 5-60% than those obtained using IRI-2007 model and lower/higher by 2-68% than those obtained using rocket technique. The electron density estimated using all three techniques (tweek, IRI 2007, Rocket) is consistent in the altitude range of 82-98 km. The estimated geographic locations of causative lightnings of tweeks were matched with the locations and times of lightnings detected by the World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). The WWLLN detected about 27.5% of causative lightnings of tweeks simultaneously observed at both the stations.

  20. Internal atmospheric noise characteristics in twentieth century coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfescu, Ioana; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2017-09-01

    The statistical characteristics of the atmospheric internal variability (hereafter internal atmospheric noise) for surface pressure (PS) in twentieth century simulations of a coupled general circulation model are documented. The atmospheric noise is determined from daily post-industrial (1871-1998) Community Climate System Model 3 simulations by removing the SST and externally forced responses from the total fields. The forced responses are found from atmosphere-only simulations forced by the SST and external forcing of the coupled runs. However, we do not address the influence of the SST variability on the synoptic scale high frequency weather noise.The spatial patterns of the main seasonal modes of atmospheric noise variability are found for boreal winter and summer from empirical orthogonal function analyses performed globally and for various regions, including the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, and the equatorial Pacific. The temporal characteristics of the modes are illustrated by power spectra and probability density functions (PDF) of the principal components (PC). Our findings show that, for two different realizations of noise, the variability is dominated by large scale spatial structures of the atmospheric noise that resemble observed patterns, and that their relative amplitudes in the CGCM and AGCM simulations are very similar. The regional expression of the dominant global mode, a seasonally dependent AO-like or AAO-like pattern is also found in the regional analyses, with similar time dependence. The PCs in the CGCM and the corresponding SST forced AGCM simulations are uncorrelated, but the spectra and PDFs of the CGCM and AGCM PCs are similar.The temporal structures of the noise PCs are white at timescales larger than few months, so that these modes can be thought of as stochastic forcings (in time) for the climate system. The PDFs of the noise PCs are not statistically distinguishable from Gaussian distributions with the same standard deviation

  1. Volcanic jet noise: infrasonic source processes and atmospheric propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoza, R. S.; Fee, D.; Ogden, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruption columns are complex flows consisting of (possibly supersonic) injections of ash-gas mixtures into the atmosphere. A volcanic eruption column can be modeled as a lower momentum-driven jet (the gas-thrust region), which transitions with altitude into a thermally buoyant plume. Matoza et al. [2009] proposed that broadband infrasonic signals recorded during this type of volcanic activity represent a low-frequency form of jet noise. Jet noise is produced at higher acoustic frequencies by smaller-scale man-made jet flows (e.g., turbulent jet flow from jet engines and rockets). Jet noise generation processes could operate at larger spatial scales and produce infrasonic frequencies in the lower gas-thrust portion of the eruption column. Jet-noise-like infrasonic signals have been observed at ranges of tens to thousands of kilometers from sustained volcanic explosions at Mount St. Helens, WA; Tungurahua, Ecuador; Redoubt, AK; and Sarychev Peak, Kuril Islands. Over such distances, the atmosphere cannot be considered homogeneous. Long-range infrasound propagation takes place primarily in waveguides formed by vertical gradients in temperature and horizontal winds, and exhibits strong spatiotemporal variability. The timing and location of volcanic explosions can be estimated from remote infrasonic data and could be used with ash cloud dispersion forecasts for hazard mitigation. Source studies of infrasonic volcanic jet noise, coupled with infrasound propagation modeling, hold promise for being able to constrain more detailed eruption jet parameters with remote, ground-based geophysical data. Here we present recent work on the generation and propagation of volcanic jet noise. Matoza, R. S., D. Fee, M. A. Garcés, J. M. Seiner, P. A. Ramón, and M. A. H. Hedlin (2009), Infrasonic jet noise from volcanic eruptions, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L08303, doi:10.1029/2008GL036486.

  2. Pico Veleta Atmospheric Noise Limits at Millimeter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Dominic J.

    2010-01-01

    In November 2007 and October 2008, we demonstrated a new camera for the 2 mm wavelength band, GISMO (Goddard IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer), at the IRAM 30 m telescope in Spain. Based on a novel superconducting transition edge sensor bolometer array, GISMO features a compact optical design that should provide rapid imaging in its band. We detail the calculations made for GISMO to determine the atmospheric emission optical loading and resultant photon noise in the 2 mm band at Pico Veleta, and show confirming measurements obtained during the observing runs.

  3. Ionosphere-magnetosphere studies using ground based VLF radio propagation technique: an Indian example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Subhas

    sferics at least in some seasons providing a noise free environment for observing rare and new phenomena requiring better SNR to detect such changes, The VLF signals from the active seismic zones or other electro-geological sources would require high sensitivities of the system and suitable network of transmitting and receiv-ing stations designed for targeted data and applications. Some new results over Indian and other regions show evidences of earthquake related seismo-geological VLF emissions with the potential of being used as a prognostic tool, change in ozone and ion production in the night time middle atmosphere due to transit of stellar x-ray/γ ray sources. Results obtained on whistlers and related studies from a number of Indian stations covering geomagnetic latitude range between 13-24 N will be mentioned and reviewed in the background of theoretical understanding of the lightning return stroke signal elements, VLF propagation through cold plasma, ionospheric wave guide mode, electron precipitation due to cyclotron resonance and production of atomic oxygen O (3 P) and ionisation in the mesosphere due to solar/stellar UV/X/γrays. Use of future VLF techniques in terms of improving ground based observations, critical analysis of available satellite data in the context and real time moni-toring/modelling of earth's geosphere and space weather conditions will be considered for a possible programme of a developing country.

  4. Aircraft noise calculation and synthesis in a non-standard atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arntzen, M.

    2014-01-01

    The atmosphere modifies the emitted sound waves of an aircraft during propagation and is therefore important in the calculation of noise contours or synthesis. Noise contours present the resulting noise levels on the ground and are, as such, often applied for regulatory purposes. Aircraft noise synt

  5. INSPIRE: A VLF Radio Project for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jill A.; Pine, Bill; Taylor, William W. L.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1988 the Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionospheric Radio Experiment, or INSPIRE, has given students the opportunity to build research-quality VLF radio receivers and make observations of both natural and stimulated radio waves in the atmosphere. Any high school science class is eligible to join the INSPIRE volunteer observing network and…

  6. VLF Science at Indian Centre for Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has been monitoring VLF signals from stations around the world at its laboratories at Kolkata and Sitapur (Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre) as well as at several places throughout India when in a campaign mode. We have been interested to study high energy events from space, such as solar flares and gamma ray bursts. We have made studies during multiple solar eclipses and most importantly made substantial progress in the problem of lithosphere-ionosphere coupling while understanding various types of anomalies prior to major earthquakes. Other effects such as AGWs and LEPs are being studied. We have experience of two antarctic expedition and obtained VLF data from both Maitri and Bharati stations of India, which revealed, among other things, how the signal attenuation can indicate the extent of ice mass in Antarctica. We have been able to reproduce various VLF perturbation events using Atmospheric Chemical evolution model coupled with LWPC code. For instance we have reproduced solar flare induced VLF amplitude perturbation pattern by completely ab initio calculation. We also targeted the inverse problem, namely, deduction of the injected radiation spectra from space from the VLF signal alone, thereby establishing that the Earth can be used as a gigantic detector. These interesting results would be presented in my review talk.

  7. Catalogue of x-ray solar flare induced variations in sub-ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Hans; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Besser, Bruno P.; Wolbang, Daniel; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier F.; Stachel, Manfred; Prattes, Gustav; Aydogar, Özer; Muck, Cosima; Grill, Claudia; Jernej, Irmgard; Stachel, Thomas; Moro, Florian

    2017-04-01

    In this study we present a catalogue of solar flare induced very low frequency (VLF) variations along sub-ionospheric paths between several transmitters and the Graz seismo-electromagnetic UltraMSK receiving station. These measurements of non-seismic disturbances are important in order to carefully characterise the Earth-ionosphere VLF waveguide and disentangle possible earthquake related phenomena from natural and man-made ambient VLF amplitude and phase modifications. The period of investigation is from Jan. 2010 to April 2016, i.e. largely covers the sunspot cycle 24. In total we've 373 VLF amplitude and phase fluctuations related with C/M/X-class solar flare events (the data are from NOAA GOES x-ray flux measurements). We obtain the statistics (dependence on VLF signal vs. x-ray flux variations) for high signal-to-noise ratio VLF links under consideration of the zenith angle. We conclude, that with the mid-latitude Graz VLF knot, a part of the European receiver network, a reliable service for solar flare induced variations of the VLF waveguide can be established. In addition to complementary region-wide network multi-parameter observations this could be a crucial step towards a full characterisation of the behaviour of sub-ionospheric VLF paths including modifications related to seismic activity.

  8. VLF Remote -Sensing of the Lower Ionosphere with AWESOME Receivers: Solar Flares, Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation, Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances, Sprites, Gravity Waves and Gamma-ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, U. S.; Cohen, M.; Scherrer, P.; Scherrer, D.

    2006-11-01

    Stanford University Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio receivers have been used extensively for remote sensing of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Among the phenomena that can be uniquely measured via VLF receivers are radio atmospherics, whistlers, electron precipitation, solar flares, sudden ionospheric disturbances, gravity waves, sprites, and cosmic gamma-ray flares. With the use of simple square air-core magnetic loop antennas of a couple of meters in size, the sensitivity of these instruments allows the measurement of magnetic fields as low as several tens of femtoTesla per root Hz, in the frequency range of ~300 Hz to 50 kHz. This sensitivity well exceeds that required to detect any event above the ambient atmospheric noise floor, determined by the totality of lightning activity on this planet. In recent years, as cost of production, timing accuracy (due to low cost GPS cards), and data handling flexibility of the systems has improved, it has become possible to distribute many of these instruments in the form of arrays, to perform interferometric and holographic imaging of the lower ionosphere. These goals can be achieved using the newest version of the Stanford VLF receiver, known as AWESOME: Atmospheric Weather Educational System for Observation and Modeling of Electromagnetics. In the context of the IHY/UNBSS program for 2007, the AWESOME receivers can be used extensively as part of the United Nations initiative to place scientific instruments in developing countries. Drawing on the Stanford experiences from setting up arrays of VLF receivers, including an interferometer in Alaska, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric and Lightning research (HAIL) consisting of instruments at 13 different high schools in mid-western United States, a broader set of ELF/VLF receivers in Alaska, and various receivers abroad, including in France, Japan, Greece, Turkey, and India, a global network of ELF/VLF receivers offer possibilities for a wide range of scientific topics

  9. Observations of the impenetrable barrier, the plasmapause, and the VLF bubble during the 17 March 2015 storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Mishin, E. V.; Fennel, J. F.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Van Allen Probes observations during the 17 March 2015 major geomagnetic storm strongly suggest that VLF transmitter-induced waves play an important role in sculpting the earthward extent of outer zone MeV electrons. A magnetically confined bubble of very low frequency (VLF) wave emissions of terrestrial, human-produced origin surrounds the Earth. The outer limit of the VLF bubble closely matches the position of an apparent barrier to the inward extent of multi-MeV radiation belt electrons near 2.8 Earth radii. When the VLF transmitter signals extend beyond the eroded plasmapause, electron loss processes set up near the outer extent of the VLF bubble create an earthward limit to the region of local acceleration near L = 2.8 as MeV electrons are scattered into the atmospheric loss cone.

  10. Analysis of 31.4GHz Atmospheric Noise Temperature Measurements at Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambayati, S.; Keihm, S.

    1998-01-01

    The atmospheric noise temperature at 31.4GHz was measured at NASA's Deep Space Communications Complex at Madrid from September 1990 to December 1996 excluding February 1991 and May 1992 using a Water Vapor Radiometer.

  11. Ionospheric disturbances in D-layer recorded by VLF receiver at Tashkent IHY station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedov, Bobomurat

    Tashkent International Heliophysical Year (IHY) station is a member of Atmospheric Weather Electromagnetic System for Observation, Modeling and Education (AWESOME) network being operated globally to study the ionosphere and the magnetosphere with the help of electromagnetic waves in Very Low Frequency (VLF) band. Regular monitoring of the D- and F-layers of ionosphere over Central Asia territory is being performed on the permanent basis starting year 2008. Solar flare events are permanently observed and the analysis showed that there is simultaneous correlation between the times of change of amplitude of the waves and the Solar flares. Features of the lightning discharge generated by radio atmospherics are studied and its effectiveness in D-region ionosphere diagnostics is explained. We have studied VLF amplitude anomalies related to the earthquakes (EQs) occurred in the recent years with magnitude more than 5 on the path way from the VLF transmitters to the Tashkent station assuming that propagation of VLF ground-based transmitters signals can be perturbed by EQ preparation can be detectable from the ground-based measurements in the VLF bands. For analyzing narrowband data we have used the Nighttime Fluctuation (NF) method paying attention to the data obtained during the local nighttime (20:00 LT-04:00 LT). The mean nighttime amplitude (or trend) and nighttime fluctuation are found to increase significantly before the EQ occurred on the path way from the transmitters to the receiver. The obtained results have revealed an agreement with VLF amplitude anomalies observed in Tashkent VLF station during the strong EQs occurred on the path way from the transmitters to the receiver. Some results are presented to show the probing potentiality of VLF waves to predict short term EQs with high magnitude.

  12. SEPERATION OF IKONOS SENSOR’S ELECTRONIC NOISE FROM ATMOSPHERIC INDUCED EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Mobashery

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of satellite images has always been of particular importance in remote sensing. Signals received from satellite sensors include some signals other than those of target signal that may be classified totally as the atmospheric effect and the sensor induced noise. Separating non-target signals and attempting in removing them from images is essential. One method for measuring and removing non-target signals is that of atmospheric correction by Dark Object Subtraction (DOS. This method is based on the sensor’s output for the targets that should have almost zero reflectance in a given band. Next, the obtained value will be deducted from the remaining pixels values; regardless of the type of the sensors. Each Charge-Coupled Device (CCD has its own noise behavior; therefore, the amount deducted values from each pixel can be different for each CCD unit and type. Among the various noises of the CCD and their related electronic circuits, dark current noise, non-uniform pixels noise and read noise were selected to be studied in this paper. The data were obtained from multispectral sensor images of IKONOS. This sensor can provide images in two forms of Panchromatic (PAN and Multispectral (MS. The results of this study showed that the amount of dark object pixels and the total amount of CCD noises in each band are different. Separation of the noises introduced in this paper from the amount of dark object pixel values can result in an upgraded method for image atmosphere corrections.

  13. VLF Remote Sensing of the Lower Ionosphere: Solar Flares, Electron Precipitation, Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances, Sprites, Gravity Waves and Gamma-ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J. H.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U. S.; Scherrer, P. H.; Scherrer, D.

    2005-12-01

    Stanford University Very Low Frequency (VLF) and Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) radio receivers have been used extensively for remote sensing of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Among the phenomena that can be uniquely measured via ELF/VLF receivers are radio atmospherics, whistlers, electron precipitation, solar flares, sudden ionospheric disturbances, gravity waves, sprites, and cosmic gamma-ray flares. With the use of simple square air-core magnetic loop antennas of a couple of meters in size, the sensitivity of these instruments allows the measurement of magnetic fields as low as several tens of femtoTesla per root-Hz, in the frequency range of ~30 Hz to 50 kHz. This sensitivity well exceeds that required to detect any event above the ambient atmospheric noise floor, determined by the totality of lightning activity on the planet. In recent years, as cost of production, timing accuracy (due to low cost GPS clocks), and data handling flexibility of the systems has improved, it has become possible to distribute many of these instruments in the form of arrays, to perform interferometric and holographic imaging of the lower ionosphere. In the context of the IHY in 2007, the ELF/VLF receiver can used extensively as part of the United Nations initiative to place scientific instruments in developing countries. Stanford University's past experiences setting up arrays of ELF/VLF receivers include an interferometer in Alaska, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric and Lightning research (HAIL) consisting of instruments at 13 different high schools in mid-western United States, a broader set of ELF/VLF receivers in Alaska, and various receivers abroad, including in France, Japan, Greece, Turkey, Ireland, and India. A global network of ELF/VLF receivers offer possibilities for a wide range of scientific topics, as well as serving as a means for educational outreach. These goals will be achieved using the newest version of the Stanford VLF receiver, known as AWESOME

  14. Penetration Characteristics of VLF Wave From Atmosphere Into the Lower Ionosphere%VLF波从大气层到低电离层的传输特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵庶凡; 申旭辉; 潘威炎; 张学民

    2011-01-01

    Many papers have indicated that earthquake happens associated with a width frequency band of VLF (Very Low Frequency), ULF (Ultra Low Frequency), ELF (Extremely Low Frequency)electromagnetic radiation, which have been recorded by satellites in the ionosphere and low magnetosphere.In this paper, the reflection and transmission coefficient of the homogeneous half-space ionosphere has been calculated using propagation matrix method.Simultaneously the Booker quartic equation is solved to get the refractive index in the ionosphere.The analysis of the factors which influence the reflection and transmission coefficient of the ionosphere and the propagation characteristics in the ionosphere of VLF wave have been performed, such as wave frequency, incident angle, geomagnetic inclination, electron density and collision frequency in the ionosphere to provide fundamental basis for further studies on numerical calculation of propagation of ULF/VLF waves in the stratified ionosphere and support the study of seismo-ionosphere coupling mechanism.The results show that it is easier for the TE (Traverse Electric) wave radiated by vertical electric dipole to penetrate into the ionosphere, but the TM (Traverse Magnetic) wave radiated by horizontal electric dipole is reflected again and again in the ground-ionosphere waveguide.It is easier to observe the VLF wave anomaly when the electron density is lower or at the high-latitude region.The O wave experiences severer attenuation than X wave, so X wave is a penetration mode whereas O wave is a non penetration mode in the ionosphere.The attenuation of the two characteristic wave decrease as the decrease of the angle between the geomagnetic field and wave vector, that is to say the attenuation is the smallest when longitudinal propagation.When the geomagnetic field is considered, the ULF/VLF wave related with earthquake can penetrate into the ionosphere which is confirmed by the satellite observation.But the further physical mechanism will

  15. VLF signal anomalies dues to TS and Hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait Amor, Samir

    2017-04-01

    VLF signal propagates by multiples reflection in the Earth-Ionosphere wave guide. It constitutes a powerful tool to study the lower region of the ionosphere, the D region. This technique was applied to study perturbations related to the solar flares effect, TGF, the connection between TLEs and Early events.... In this contribution I will present a new results on the evidence of signal perturbations associated with TS and Hurricanes. A wavelet spectral analysis is applied to the signal amplitude to search for eventual Atmospheric Gravity wave which may be the origin of the signal perturbations.

  16. Terrestrial VLF transmitter injection into the magnetosphere

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial VLF transmitter injection into the magnetosphere M. B. Cohen1 and U. S. Inan1,2 Received 1 June 2012; revised 15 June 2012; accepted 18 June 2012; published 9 August 2012. [1] Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3–30 kHz) radio waves emitted from ground sources (transmitters and lightning) strongly impact the radiation belts, driving electron precipitation via whistler-electron gyroresonance, and contributing to the formation of the slot region. However, calculations of the...

  17. Sensitivity of earthquake source inversions to atmospheric noise and corrections of InSAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chelsea Phipps; Lohman, Rowena Benfer

    2016-05-01

    Tropospheric phase delays pose a major challenge to InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar)-based studies of tectonic deformation. One approach to the mitigation of effects from tropospheric noise is the application of elevation-dependent corrections based on empirical fits between elevation and interferometric phase. We quantify the effects of corrections with a range of complexity on inferred earthquake source parameters using synthetic interferograms with known atmospheric characteristics. We infer statistical properties of the stratified component of the atmosphere using pressure, temperature, and water vapor data from the North America Regional Reanalysis model over our region of interest in the Basin and Range province of the western United States. The statistics of the simulated atmospheric turbulence are estimated from InSAR and Global Positioning System data. We demonstrate potentially significant improvements in the precision of earthquake magnitude, depth, and dip estimates for several synthetic earthquake focal mechanisms following a correction for spatially variable atmospheric characteristics, relative to cases where the correction is based on a uniform delay versus elevation relationship or where no correction is applied. We apply our approach to the 1992 M5.6 Little Skull Mountain, Nevada, earthquake and demonstrate that the earthquake source parameter error bounds decrease in size after applying the atmospheric corrections. Our approach for evaluating the impact of atmospheric noise on inferred fault parameters is easily adaptable to other regions and source mechanisms.

  18. Covert communications using random noise signals: effects of atmospheric propagation nulls and rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Karen M.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2005-06-01

    In military communications, there exist numerous potential threats to message security. Ultra-wideband (UWB) signals provide secure communications because they cannot, in general, be detected using conventional receivers and they can be made relatively immune from jamming. The security of an UWB signal can be further improved by mixing it with random noise. By using a random noise signal, the user can conceal the message signal within the noise waveform and thwart detection by hostile forces. This paper describes a novel spread spectrum technique that can be used for secure and covert communications. The technique is based on the use of heterodyne correlation techniques to inject coherence in a random noise signal. The modulated signal to be transmitted containing the coherent carrier is mixed with a sample of an ultra-wideband (UWB) random noise signal. The frequency range of the UWB noise signal is appropriately chosen so that the lower sideband of the mixing process falls over the same frequency range. Both the frequency-converted noise-like signal and the original random noise signal are simultaneously transmitted on orthogonally polarized channels through a dual-polarized transmitting antenna. The receiver consists of a similar dual-polarized antenna that simultaneously receives the two orthogonally polarized transmitted signals, amplifies each in a minimum phase limiting amplifier, and mixes these signals in a double sideband upconverter. The upper sideband of the mixing process recovers the modulated signal, which can then be demodulated. The advantage of this technique lies in the relative immunity of the random noise-like unpolarized transmit signal from detection and jamming. Since the transmitted signal "appears" totally unpolarized and noise-like, linearly polarized receivers are unable to identify, decode, or otherwise extract useful information from the signal. The system is immune from interference caused by high power linearly polarized signal

  19. A new type of daytime high-frequency VLF emissions at auroral latitudes ("bird emissions")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, J.; Turunen, T.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Gromova, L. I.; Kozlovskii, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a new, previously unknown type of high-frequency (above 4 kHz) VLF emissions that were detected during winter VLF campaigns in Kannuslehto ( L 5.5), Finland. These previously unknown emissions have been discovered as a result of the application of special digital filtering: it clears the VLF records from pulse signals of intensive atmospherics, which prevent other kinds of VLF emissions in the same frequency range from being seen on spectrograms. As it appears, aside from wellknown bursts of auroral hisses and discrete quasiperiodic emissions, a previously unknown type of daytime right-hand polarized VLF waves is also present at frequencies above 4 kHz. These emissions can persist for several hours as series of separate short discrete wideband (from 4 to 10 kHz and higher) signals, each with a duration between one and several minutes. It has been found that such signals can be observed almost daily in winter. These emissions sound like bird's chirping to a human ear; for that reason, they were called "bird emissions." The dynamic spectra of individual signals often resemble flying birds. The signals are observed during daytime, more often in magnetically quiet conditions preceded by geomagnetic disturbances. As a rule, the occurrence of these bird emissions is accompanied by a slight increase in electron density in the lower ionosphere, which is evidence of the precipitation of energetic (>30 keV) electrons. This raises a number of questions as to where and how the VLF bird emissions are generated and how such emissions, at frequencies greatly exceeding half the electron equatorial gyrofrequency at L 5.5, can reach the Earth's surface.

  20. Noise generation in the solid Earth, oceans, and atmosphere, from non-linear interacting surface gravity waves in finite depth

    CERN Document Server

    Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    Oceanic observations, even in very deep water, and atmospheric pressure or seismic records, from anywhere on Earth, contain noise with dominant periods between 3 and 10 seconds, that can be related to surface gravity waves in the oceans. This noise is consistent with a dominant source explained by a nonlinear wave-wave interaction mechanism, and takes the form of surface gravity waves, acoustic or seismic waves. Previous theoretical works on seismic noise focused on surface (Rayleigh) waves, and did not consider finite depth effects on the generating wave kinematics. These finite depth effects are introduced here, which requires the consideration of the direct wave-induced pressure at the ocean bottom, a contribution previously overlooked in the context of seismic noise. That contribution can lead to a considerable reduction of the seismic noise source, which is particularly relevant for noise periods larger than 10 s. The theory is applied to acoustic waves in the atmosphere, extending previous theories that...

  1. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  2. SNR changes of VLF radio signals detected onboard the DEMETER satellite and their possible relationship to the Wenchuan earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.; Parrot

    2009-01-01

    Here we used the VLF signal data received by the DEMETER satellite, transmitted from various ground VLF transmitters which are located around China, to study the changes in the signal to noise ratio (SNR) before and after the Wenchuan earthquake, which had a magnitude of 8.0. We also found that the SNRs of different frequency signals decreased significantly over the epicenter region before the earthquake, and reverted to their original levels after the earthquake. This phenomenon may be related to the earthquake.

  3. Characterization of prerusted steels in some Ibero-American atmospheres by electrochemical potential noise measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, E. [INETI/IMP Lab. de Tintas e Revestimentos, Lisboa (Portugal); Mariaca, L.; Rodriguez, A.; Chavarin, J.U.; Veloz, M.A. [IIE Dept. de Fisicoquimica Aplicada, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of the MICAT project (Ibero-American Map of Atmospheric Corrosiveness) was to foster collaborative ventures between groups conducting research on atmospheric corrosion. Overall, 14 Ibero-American countries, including Spain and Portugal, are involved with a network of 71 test stations distributed throughout the region and on 4 continents. These test stations represent a broad spectrum of climatological and atmospheric pollution conditions. The objective of the MICAT electrochemical studies was to characterize the protective properties of the corrosion products formed during atmospheric exposure at the different test sites. Prerusted carbon steel specimens at different locations were immersed in a sodium sulfate solution. Some specimens were rust pretreated in phosphoric acid solution with additions of aluminum hydroxide (rust converters) electrochemically evaluated. Electrochemical noise measurements (ENM) and linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements were performed for different times of immersion. Corrosion rates were related to the presence of the oxides that were initially formed. For specimens rusted in marine atmospheres, the presence of chlorides in the corrosion products promotes localized attack. As to the different rust-converted specimens, ENM revealed the pretreatment evolution and corrosion performance over time. ENM was able to characterize and evaluate the protective properties of oxides and pretreatments according to the nature and environmental conditions to which specimens were exposed.

  4. Tilt - ellips and rho - phase modelling of VLF EM and VLF R in Candi Umbul Magelang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affanti, Adella Putri; Niasari, Sintia Windhi

    2017-07-01

    A research for geothermal energy is increased due to the need of green energy. The presence of geothermal manifestations indicate the existence of geothermal system. One of the geothermal manifestations is warm spring. CandiUmbul area which located in Telomoyo, Magelang has warm spring as the geothermal manifestation. Very Low Frequency (VLF) is one of geophysical method that can be used to map the subsurface in Candi Umbul, Telomoyo. VLF is a method using electromagnetic field that powered and transferred by the transmitter. The receiver read the electromagnetic signal which induce the rock and give information about the conductivity as the physical property measurred. In this research, after collecting and processing data, we modeled tilt-ellips data of VLF-EM and rho-phase data of VLF-R to explain the geothermal system of Candi Umbul. Both VLF-EM and VLF-R model were correlated for the interpretation. The model showed an anomalous conductive feature beneath the research area. The result of this research showed that the anomaly is oriented in NW-SE direction. This direction is assumed as a fluid path way of Candi Umbul which became the outflow of Telomoyo geothermal system. To prove the early deduction this research is still on going.

  5. Separating Noise from the Infrasonic Wave Field in the Lower Atmosphere Using Free Flying Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, K. T.; Bowman, D. C.; Lees, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Historically, acoustic arrays have been concentrated at or near the ground surface, yielding only a 2D representation of the infrasonic wave field. Free flying arrays can quantify sound waves at different elevations in the atmosphere, providing a unique opportunity for recording and modelling acoustic fields far from the earth's surface. In 2014 and 2015, acoustic arrays were deployed aboard HASP (High Altitude Student Platforms) flights in order to explore low frequency acoustic signals in the lower atmosphere. These data, along with data collected in the 1960s, suggest that signal sources include wind turbulence, ocean microbaroms and city HVAC systems. Signals appear to have a strong microbarom peak 3-7 seconds, as well as longer period signals associated with the vertical displacement of the balloon payload. Furthermore, numerous higher frequency (2-20Hz) periodic signals are present in both HASP flights. In August/September 2016, new experimental arrays will be launched on two separate NASA high altitude balloons. The aim of these new experiments are to determine variables that influence the detection of the ocean microbarom, and eliminate suspected electronic noise interference from other scientific payloads and communication electronics. Isolating electrical noise is critical for distinguishing natural and anthropogenic signals. The new data will be compared to earlier flights analyzing and modelling the frequency and amplitude of the acoustic wave field, including known signals (chemical explosions) and any potentially new identifiable signals.

  6. Atmospheric contamination in the city of Valencia: relation to noise and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Suárez-Varela, M M; Escrivá-Peyró, C; Orden-Gil, A L; Mañes-Vinuesa, J; Font, G; Llopis-González, A

    1990-01-01

    A qualitative and quantitative study is made of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitrogen oxide, and sulfur dioxide in the atmosphere of the city of Valencia for the period 1988-1989; an analysis is made of their concentrations during the year in terms of season and noise levels. Eleven sampling points in the city were used to determine PAH composition by reverse-phase, high-resolution liquid chromatography with fluorimetric detection, employing an acetonitrile-water gradient; nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide were determined by the Valencia city government. Environmental noise levels were determined using a BK 2221 integrated precision sonometer, and temperature values were obtained from the city Meteorological Institute. Daily PAH values varied between 0.1769 and 2.0916 micrograms/m3, whereas the figures for nitrogen oxide were between 91.5 and 100.67 micrograms/m3 during 1982-1989 (only one value, 58.01 micrograms/m3, is available for 1988-1989, corresponding to the Mercadona sampling point), and between 17.33 and 129.36 micrograms/m3 for sulfur dioxide for a total of 9 sampling points; the highest concentrations were recorded in the winter and spring months, the association between PAH and temperature being statistically significant (p less than or equal to .05). The relation to noise was also significant (p less than or equal to .005), Fluoranthene was the predominant PAH in all samples analyzed.

  7. Study of Ionospheric Perturbations in D-Layer Using Awesome VLF Receiver Data at Tashkent Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedov, Bobomurat

    2012-07-01

    One VLF receiver and two SuperSID receivers were provided to Uzbekistan IHY cite by Stanford University and are operating in Tashkent, under the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). The results obtained at Tashkent IHY station are applied to earthquake electromagnetic precursors, lightning, and solar flares and to ionospheric disturbances originating from gamma ray flares of Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters connected with evolution of strongly magnetized neutron stars believed as magnetars. Regular monitoring of the D-layer of ionosphere over Central Asia territory has been performed on the permanent basis. Few Solar flare events are observed during February in 2010-2011 years and the analysis showed that there is simultaneous correlation between the times of change of amplitude of the waves and the Solar flares. Features of the lightning discharge generated by radio atmospherics are studied and its effectiveness in D-region ionosphere diagnostics is explained. Assuming that earthquakes (EQs) can be preceded by the electromagnetic signals in the VLF bands detectable from ground-based measurements we have studied VLF amplitude anomalies related to the earthquakes occurred in 2009-2010 years with magnitude more than 5 on the path way from the VLF transmitters to the Tashkent station. For analysing narrowband data we have used the Nighttime Fluctuation (NF) method paying attention to the data obtained during the local nighttime (18:00 LT-06:00 LT). The amplitude data are analysed only for the reason that perturbations are identified more clearly in the amplitude data than in phase data. The mean nighttime amplitude (or trend) and normalized trend are found to increase significantly before the EQ with the same tendency as the NF and normalized NF. The obtained results have revealed a fine agreement with VLF amplitude anomalies observed in Tashkent VLF station during the strong earthquakes occurred on the path way from the transmitters to the receiver. Some of the initial

  8. Seasonal Changes in Atmospheric Noise Levels and the Annual Variation in Pigeon Homing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrum, J. T.; McIsaac, H. P.; Drob, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The remarkable navigational ability of homing pigeons (Columba livia) is influenced by a number of factors, an unknown one of which causes the "Wintereffekt"1 or annual variation in homing performance. Minima in homeward orientation and return speeds have been observed in winter, with maxima in summer, during repetitive pigeon releases from single sites near experimental lofts in Wilhelmshaven, Göttingen, and Munich, Germany, and near Pisa, Italy1-4. Overall the annual variation is more pronounced in northern Germany than Italy4, and both mature and juvenile cohorts respond to this seasonal factor. Older, more experienced pigeons are better at compensating for its effects than naïve ones, but are still affected after numerous releases. The narrow low-frequency band of atmospheric background noise (microbaroms; 0.1-0.3 Hz) also varies with an annual cycle that generally has higher amplitudes in winter than in summer depending on location5. In addition, homing pigeons, and possibly other birds, apparently use infrasonic signals of similar frequency as navigational cues6, and a seasonal variation in background noise levels could cause corresponding changes in signal-to-noise ratios and thus in homing performance. The annual variation in homing performance, however, was not observed during long-term pigeon releases at two sites in eastern North America. The annual and geographic variability in homing performance in the northern hemisphere can be explained to a first order by seasonal changes in infrasonic noise sources related to ocean storm activity, and to the direction and intensity of stratospheric winds. In addition, increased dispersion in departure bearings of individual birds for some North American releases were likely caused by additional infrasonic noise associated with severe weather events during tornado and Atlantic hurricane seasons. 1Kramer, G. & von Saint Paul, U., J. Ornithol. 97, 353-370 (1956); 2Wallraff, H. G., Z. Tierpsychol. 17, 82-113 (1960

  9. Statistical correlation of spectral broadening in VLF transmitter signal and low-frequency ionospheric turbulence from observation on DEMETER satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rozhnoi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In our earlier papers we have found the effect of VLF transmitter signal depression over epicenters of the large earthquakes from observation on the French DEMETER satellite that can be considered as new method of global diagnostics of seismic influence on the ionosphere. At present paper we investigate a possibility VLF signal-ionospheric turbulence interaction using additional characteristic of VLF signal-spectrum broadening. This characteristic is important for estimation of the interaction type: linear or nonlinear scattering. Our main results are the following:
    – There are two zones of increased spectrum broadening, which are centered near magnetic latitudes Φ=±10° and Φ=±40°. Basing on the previous case study research and ground ionosonde registrations, probably it is evidence of nonlinear (active scattering of VLF signal on the ionospheric turbulence. However occurrence rate of spectrum broadening in the middle-latitude area is higher than in the near-equatorial zone (~15–20% in comparison with ~100% in former area that is probably coincides with the rate of ionospheric turbulence.
    – From two years statistics of observation in the selected 3 low-latitude regions and 1 middle-latitude region inside reception area of VLF signal from NWC transmitter we find a correlation of spectrum broadening neither with ion-cyclotron noise (f=150–500 Hz, which possibly means poor representation of the turbulence by the noise due to its mixture with natural ELF emission (which correlates with whistler, nor with magnetic storm activity.
    – We find rather evident correlation of ion-cyclotron frequency noise, VLF signal depression and weak correlation of spectrum broadening with seismicity in the middle-latitude region over Japan. But in the low-latitude regions we do not find such a correlation. Statistical decrease of VLF signal supports our previous case study results. However rather weak spectrum broadening

  10. ELF/VLF Perturbations Above the Haarp Transmitter Recorded by the Demeter Satellite in the Upper Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, E. E.; Demekhov, A. G.; Mochalov, A. A.; Gvozdevsky, B. B.; Mogilevsky, M. M.; Parrot, M.

    2015-08-01

    In the studies of the data received from DEMETER (orbit altitude above the Earth is about 700 km), we detected for the first time electromagnetic perturbations, which are due to the ionospheric modification by HAARP, a high-power high-frequency transmitter, simultaneously in the extremely low-frequency (ELF, below 1200 Hz) and very low-frequency (VLF, below 20 kHz) ranges. Of the thirteen analyzed flybys of the satellite above the heated area, the ELF/VLF signals were detected in three cases in the daytime (LT = 11-12 h), when the minimum distance between the geomagnetic projections of the satellite and the heated area center on the Earth's surface did not exceed 31 km. During the nighttime flybys, the ELF/VLF perturbations were not detected. The size of the perturbed region was about 100 km. The amplitude, spectrum, and polarization of the ELF perturbations were analyzed, and their comparison with the characteristics of natural ELF noise above the HAARP transmitter was performed. In particular, it was shown that in the daytime the ELF perturbation amplitude above the heated area can exceed by a factor of 3 to 8 the amplitude of natural ELF noise. The absence of the nighttime records of artificial ELF/VLF perturbations above the heated area can be due to both the lower frequency of the heating signal, at which the heating occurs in the lower ionosphere, and the higher level of natural noise. The spectrum of the VLF signals related to the HAARP transmitter operation had two peaks at frequencies of 8 to 10 kHz and 15 to 18 kHz, which are close to the first and second harmonics of the lower-hybrid resonance in the heated area. The effect of the whistler wave propagation near the lower-hybrid resonance region on the perturbation spectrum recorded in the upper ionosphere for these signals has been demonstrated. In particular, some of the spectrum features can be explained by assuming that the VLF signals propagate in quasiresonance, rather than quasilongitudinal, regime

  11. Transionospheric Propagation of VLF Transmitter Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M.; Inan, U. S.; Lehtinen, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters may play a significant role in precipitation of inner belt (L<2.5) energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the total contribution of VLF transmitters utilized models of transionospheric propagation, but some recent studies have suggested that those models may overestimate (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. One possible cause of this discrepancy was suggested to be conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes in the D, E, and F regions, from ionospheric density irregularities, either natural or generated by the transmitter heating itself. The DEMETER satellite built a six year history of continuous and global survey mode data which, when combined, yields detailed pictures of the radiation pattern from many transmitters into space at 680 km, with 25 km resolution, and clear features like the interference pattern on the ground mapped upwards. With both E and B survey mode data, we can also directly approximate the total power injected into the magnetosphere from each transmitter, separately for day and night, as well as the power arriving at the conjugate region. We find no detectable variation of signal intensity with geomagnetic conditions. We find evidence of transmitter heating affecting the transionospheric propagation of other transmitters. We find that the power reaching the conjugate region is a large fraction of the power injected above the transmitter. We then employ a full wave model to simulate VLF transmitter transionospheric propagation, calculating the electromagnetic fields and power flux injected into the magnetosphere. Although the model does not include ionospheric irregularities, the radiation pattern largely matches the observed one, and the total power calculated is within 6 dB of observations for every transmitter, both day and night, and across a range of low to middle latitudes and transmitter powers. We thus conclude that the effect of

  12. Coseismic deformation observed with radar interferometry: Great earthquakes and atmospheric noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chelsea Phipps

    Spatially dense maps of coseismic deformation derived from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) datasets result in valuable constraints on earthquake processes. The recent increase in the quantity of observations of coseismic deformation facilitates the examination of signals in many tectonic environments associated with earthquakes of varying magnitude. Efforts to place robust constraints on the evolution of the crustal stress field following great earthquakes often rely on knowledge of the earthquake location, the fault geometry, and the distribution of slip along the fault plane. Well-characterized uncertainties and biases strengthen the quality of inferred earthquake source parameters, particularly when the associated ground displacement signals are near the detection limit. Well-preserved geomorphic records of earthquakes offer additional insight into the mechanical behavior of the shallow crust and the kinematics of plate boundary systems. Together, geodetic and geologic observations of crustal deformation offer insight into the processes that drive seismic cycle deformation over a range of timescales. In this thesis, I examine several challenges associated with the inversion of earthquake source parameters from SAR data. Variations in atmospheric humidity, temperature, and pressure at the timing of SAR acquisitions result in spatially correlated phase delays that are challenging to distinguish from signals of real ground deformation. I characterize the impact of atmospheric noise on inferred earthquake source parameters following elevation-dependent atmospheric corrections. I analyze the spatial and temporal variations in the statistics of atmospheric noise from both reanalysis weather models and InSAR data itself. Using statistics that reflect the spatial heterogeneity of atmospheric characteristics, I examine parameter errors for several synthetic cases of fault slip on a basin-bounding normal fault. I show a decrease in uncertainty in fault

  13. Prediction of the Nighttime VLF Subionospheric Signal Amplitude by Using Nonlinear Autoregressive with Exogenous Input Neural Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, H.; Hobara, Y.; Balikhin, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) waves have been proposed as an approach to study and monitor the lower ionospheric conditions. The ionospheric perturbations are identified in relation with thunderstorm activity, geomagnetic storm and other factors. The temporal dependence of VLF amplitude has a complicated and large daily variabilities in general due to combinations of both effects from above (space weather effect) and below (atmospheric and crustal processes) of the ionosphere. Quantitative contributions from different external sources are not known well yet. Thus the modelling and prediction of VLF wave amplitude are important issues to study the lower ionospheric responses from various external parameters and to also detect the anomalies of the ionosphere. The purpose of the study is to model and predict nighttime average amplitude of VLF wave propagation from the VLF transmitter in Hawaii (NPM) to receiver in Chofu (CHO) Tokyo, Japan path using NARX neural network. The constructed model was trained for the target parameter of nighttime average amplitude of NPM-CHO path. The NARX model, which was built based on daily input variables of various physical parameters such as stratosphere temperature, cosmic rays and total column ozone, possessed good accuracies. As a result, the constructed models are capable of performing accurate multistep ahead predictions, while maintaining acceptable one step ahead prediction accuracy. The results of the predicted daily VLF amplitude are in good agreement with observed (true) value for one step ahead prediction (r = 0.92, RMSE = 1.99), multi-step ahead 5 days prediction (r = 0.91, RMSE = 1.14) and multi-step ahead 10 days prediction (r = 0.75, RMSE = 1.74). The developed model indicates the feasibility and reliability of predicting lower ionospheric properties by the NARX neural network approach, and provides physical insights on the responses of lower ionosphere due to various external forcing.

  14. Effect of atmospheric interference and sensor noise in retrieval of optically active materials in the ocean by hyperspectral remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Iosif M; Levina, Elizaveta

    2007-10-01

    We present a method to construct the best linear estimate of optically active material concentration from ocean radiance spectra measured through an arbitrary atmosphere layer by a hyperspectral sensor. The algorithm accounts for sensor noise. Optical models of seawater and maritime atmosphere were used to obtain the joint distribution of spectra and concentrations required for the algorithm. The accuracy of phytoplankton retrieval is shown to be substantially lower than that of sediment and dissolved matter. In all cases, the sensor noise noticeably reduces the retrieval accuracy. Additional errors due to atmospheric interference are analyzed, and possible ways to increase the accuracy of retrieval are suggested, such as changing sensor parameters and including a priori information about observation conditions.

  15. Electrochemical noise evaluation of anodized aluminum. Comparative study against corrosion behaviour in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betancourt, N.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the evaluation of aluminum and anodized aluminum by electrochemical noise, as a part of the PATINA/CYTED project of the working group Nº 5. A visual examination is also made. The samples were exposed at several Ibero-American atmospheres up to 2 years of exposure. Different thickness of anodized aluminum were evaluated. The electrochemical potential noise of the 5 μm unexposed sample (pattern showed a different behaviour to that showed by the other anodized specimens. This could be due to a slower sealed of the samples of higher thickness. The same behaviour was observed on the samples exposed at the rural station El Pardo. According to the visual examination, the samples of bare aluminum and those of anodized 5 μm thickness were the most affected by pitting corrosion in the highly polluted atmospheres. A good correlation between corrosion behaviour determined by visual examination and EN was obtained.

    Como parte de las investigaciones de la Red PATINA el grupo de trabajo Nº 5 dedicó su atención al comportamiento del aluminio desnudo y anodizado con diferentes espesores en diferentes atmósferas de Iberoamérica. En el presente trabajo se presenta una evaluación de patrones de aluminio 99,5 % de pureza desnudo y anodizado con espesores de 15 y 25 μm, mediante ruido electroquímico. Los resultados obtenidos se comparan con el comportamiento determinado en diferentes atmósferas durante un período de 2 años. El ruido de voltaje del patrón de 5 μm de espesor presenta un comportamiento diferente al de los restantes espesores, lo que coincide con una mayor susceptibilidad a la corrosión picadura de este primer anodizado. Se reportan también algunas diferencias en el ruido de corriente. Se concluye que mediante la utilización del ruido electroquímico es posible caracterizar el aluminio con respecto a su sensibilidad a la corrosión picadura en condiciones atmosféricas.

  16. VLF emissions from ionospheric/magnetospheric plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R P Patel; R P Singh

    2001-05-01

    VLF emissions such as hiss, chorus, oscillating tones, hiss-triggered chorus and whistler triggered emissions have been observed at low latitude Indian stations. In this paper we present dynamic spectra of these emissions and discuss their various observed features. It is argued that most of the emissions are generated during Doppler shifted cyclotron resonance interaction between the whistler mode wave and counter streaming energetic electrons. Resonance energy of the participating electron and interaction length are evaluated to explain the generation mechanism of some of these emissions observed at Indian stations.

  17. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Cetacean and Sound Mapping Effort: Continuing Forward with an Integrated Ocean Noise Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jolie; Ferguson, Megan; Gedamke, Jason; Hatch, Leila; Southall, Brandon; Van Parijs, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    To help manage chronic and cumulative impacts of human activities on marine mammals, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) convened two working groups, the Underwater Sound Field Mapping Working Group (SoundMap) and the Cetacean Density and Distribution Mapping Working Group (CetMap), with overarching effort of both groups referred to as CetSound, which (1) mapped the predicted contribution of human sound sources to ocean noise and (2) provided region/time/species-specific cetacean density and distribution maps. Mapping products were presented at a symposium where future priorities were identified, including institutionalization/integration of the CetSound effort within NOAA-wide goals and programs, creation of forums and mechanisms for external input and funding, and expanded outreach/education. NOAA is subsequently developing an ocean noise strategy to articulate noise conservation goals and further identify science and management actions needed to support them.

  18. Reconciling the signal and noise of atmospheric warming on decadal timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roger N.; Ricketts, James H.

    2017-03-01

    Interactions between externally forced and internally generated climate variations on decadal timescales is a major determinant of changing climate risk. Severe testing is applied to observed global and regional surface and satellite temperatures and modelled surface temperatures to determine whether these interactions are independent, as in the traditional signal-to-noise model, or whether they interact, resulting in step-like warming. The multistep bivariate test is used to detect step changes in temperature data. The resulting data are then subject to six tests designed to distinguish between the two statistical hypotheses, hstep and htrend. Test 1: since the mid-20th century, most observed warming has taken place in four events: in 1979/80 and 1997/98 at the global scale, 1988/89 in the Northern Hemisphere and 1968-70 in the Southern Hemisphere. Temperature is more step-like than trend-like on a regional basis. Satellite temperature is more step-like than surface temperature. Warming from internal trends is less than 40 % of the total for four of five global records tested (1880-2013/14). Test 2: correlations between step-change frequency in observations and models (1880-2005) are 0.32 (CMIP3) and 0.34 (CMIP5). For the period 1950-2005, grouping selected events (1963/64, 1968-70, 1976/77, 1979/80, 1987/88 and 1996-98), the correlation increases to 0.78. Test 3: steps and shifts (steps minus internal trends) from a 107-member climate model ensemble (2006-2095) explain total warming and equilibrium climate sensitivity better than internal trends. Test 4: in three regions tested, the change between stationary and non-stationary temperatures is step-like and attributable to external forcing. Test 5: step-like changes are also present in tide gauge observations, rainfall, ocean heat content and related variables. Test 6: across a selection of tests, a simple stepladder model better represents the internal structures of warming than a simple trend, providing strong

  19. Seeing the Forest Through the Trees: Investigating Signal to Noise Problems in Regional Atmospheric Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A. S.; Corbin, K. D.; Uliasz, M.; Zupanski, D.; Parazoo, N. C.

    2007-12-01

    Estimation of regional carbon fluxes from sparse atmospheric data by transport inversion is complicated by high- frequency variations in surface fluxes in both space and time. We assume that a forward coupled model of the vegetated land surface and atmosphere adequately captures most of the high-frequency variations (SiB-RAMS) as a `preprocessor` of input data from remote sensing and large-scale weather. We then use continuous CO2 observations and backward-in-time Lagrangian particle modeling to estimate persistent multiplicative biases in photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration, constraining the temporal pattern of these fluxes with the forward model. With a sparse network of continuous observing sites in North America, the inverse problem is still badly underconstrained for flux biases on the model grid scale. Previous studies have reduced the dimensionality of this problem by using large `regions` such as biomes or ecoregions, or by seeking a smooth solution in space. This could introduce substantial bias in the solution because the actual flux biases are likely to be quite heterogeneous. We have evaluated the degree to which carbon flux over large regions (500 to 1500 km) can be recovered when the true spatial pattern is not smooth. We performed ensembles of inversions for a 4-month case study in May- August, 2004 over North America with synthetic mid-day CO2 observations from a network of 8 towers. A smooth regional field of model biases was superposed with ensembles of various degrees of grid-scale `noise,` and these were then used to create synthetic concentration data. The pseudodata were then inverted to estimate gridded values of the biases, which were then combined with time-varying model fluxes to create regional maps of sources and sinks. We found that the degree to which corrections in regional fluxes are possible will depend on the relative amount of variance in the regional vs grid scales, but that the system is quite successful in estimating

  20. An Analysis of Linear and Non-Linear Coherent Detection in Atmospheric Noise at Very Low Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    Bestimmte Integrale (Integral Table, Second Part , Definite Integrals), Fourth Edition, Springer-Verlag, Vienna (Austria), 1966. 20. Hall, Harry M., "A New...close agreement with the computational results of the analyses. The first part of the analysis is a survey of atmospheric noise representations. This...derived error rate perfomance data is presented which shows close agreement with the computational results of the analyses. The first part of the

  1. Possibility of Earthquake-prediction by analyzing VLF signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta

    2016-07-01

    Prediction of seismic events is one of the most challenging jobs for the scientific community. Conventional ways for prediction of earthquakes are to monitor crustal structure movements, though this method has not yet yield satisfactory results. Furthermore, this method fails to give any short-term prediction. Recently, it is noticed that prior to any seismic event a huge amount of energy is released which may create disturbances in the lower part of D-layer/E-layer of the ionosphere. This ionospheric disturbance may be used as a precursor of earthquakes. Since VLF radio waves propagate inside the wave-guide formed by lower ionosphere and Earth's surface, this signal may be used to identify ionospheric disturbances due to seismic activity. We have analyzed VLF signals to find out the correlations, if any, between the VLF signal anomalies and seismic activities. We have done both the case by case study and also the statistical analysis using a whole year data. In both the methods we found that the night time amplitude of VLF signals fluctuated anomalously three days before the seismic events. Also we found that the terminator time of the VLF signals shifted anomalously towards night time before few days of any major seismic events. We calculate the D-layer preparation time and D-layer disappearance time from the VLF signals. We have observed that this D-layer preparation time and D-layer disappearance time become anomalously high 1-2 days before seismic events. Also we found some strong evidences which indicate that it may possible to predict the location of epicenters of earthquakes in future by analyzing VLF signals for multiple propagation paths.

  2. Study of Ionospheric Perturbations in D-Layer Using VLF Receiver at Tashkent IHY Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedov, Bobomurat

    2016-07-01

    Tashkent International Heliophysical Year (IHY) station is a member of Atmospheric Weather Electromagnetic System for Observation, Modeling and Education (AWESOME) network being operated globally to study the ionosphere and the magnetosphere with the help of electromagnetic waves in Very Low Frequency (VLF) band. Regular monitoring of the D- and F-layers of ionosphere over Central Asia territory is being performed on the permanent basis starting year 2008 when one VLF receiver and two SuperSID receivers were provided to Uzbekistan IHY cite by Stanford University. The results obtained at Tashkent IHY station are applied to earthquake electromagnetic precursors, lightning, and Solar flares and to ionospheric disturbances originating from gamma ray flares of Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters connected with evolution of strongly magnetized neutron stars believed as magnetars. Regular monitoring of the D-layer of ionosphere over Central Asia territory has been performed on the permanent basis. Several Solar events are observed and the analysis has shown that there is simultaneous correlation between the times of change of amplitude of the waves and the Solar flares. Features of the lightning discharge generated by radio atmospherics are studied and its effectiveness in D-region ionosphere diagnostics is examined.

  3. Investigations of natural and artificial disturbances in the Earth-ionosphere cavity via VLF radio links for the time span 2009-2015 (sunspot cycle 24)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Hans; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Besser, B. P.; Prattes, Gustav; Aydogar; Wolbang, Daniel; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Boudjada, Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    We focus on natural disturbances of the sub-ionospheric VLF waveguide in the time span 2009 to 2015 (sunspot cycle 24), i.e. variations in amplitude and phase measurements of the radio paths are considered. In particular we're investigating numerous solar flares (up to X-class), geomagnetic storms and substorms, therefore discuss how to discriminate natural from artificial variations between different transmitters and receivers. Meteorological effects could be important [1] and we estimate the possibility to detect the influence of lithospheric sources in the VLF radio links. As part of the VLF multistation network we're using the single receiver mid-latitude station in Graz, Austria. This facility receives up to 12 transmitter simultaneously (frequency range 10-50 kHz), has 20 sec temporal resolution, and is running continuously since 2009 [2]. We obtain the statistics relating VLF amplitude and phase fluctuations with C/M/X-class solar flares, and characterise night time fluctuations in connection with enhanced particle precipitation in the northern latitude path (Iceland transmitter). The statistics is important to improve the quality of seismo-electromagnetic studies. We conclude that for ionospheric perturbations (D-layer), e.g. solar flares, a reliable real time monitoring service can be established. Atmospheric and lithospheric variations are generally difficult to characterise, it's harder to distinguish between natural and man made signals, therefore - as a future outlook - complementary ground and satellite based measurements can deliver valuable additional information for environmental monitoring. References: [1] A. Rozhnoi et al.: Meteorological effects in the lower ionosphere as based on VLF/LF signal observations, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 14, 2671-2679, 2014. [2] K. Schwingenschuh et al.: The Graz seismo-electromagnetic VLF facility, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 1121-1127, 2011.

  4. Optimizing an ELF/VLF Phased Array at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaru, S.; Moore, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study is to maximize the amplitude of 1-5 kHz ELF/VLF waves generated by ionospheric HF heating and measured at a ground-based ELF/VLF receiver. The optimization makes use of experimental observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Observatory in Gakona, Alaska. During these experiments, the amplitude, phase, and propagation delay of the ELF/VLF waves were carefully measured. The HF beam was aimed at 15 degrees zenith angle in 8 different azimuthal directions, equally spaced in a circle, while broadcasting a 3.25 MHz (X-mode) signal that was amplitude modulated (square wave) with a linear frequency-time chirp between 1 and 5 kHz. The experimental observations are used to provide reference amplitudes, phases, and propagation delays for ELF/VLF waves generated at these specific locations. The presented optimization accounts for the trade-off between duty cycle, heated area, and the distributed nature of the source region in order to construct a "most efficient" phased array. The amplitudes and phases generated by modulated heating at each location are combined in post-processing to find an optimal combination of duty cycle, heating location, and heating order.

  5. Do outdoor environmental noise and atmospheric NO2 levels spatially overlap in urban areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenailleau, Quentin M; Bernard, Nadine; Pujol, Sophie; Parmentier, Anne-Laure; Boilleaut, Mathieu; Houot, Hélène; Joly, Daniel; Mauny, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    The urban environment holds numerous emission sources for air and noise pollution, creating optimum conditions for environmental multi-exposure situations. Evaluation of the joint-exposure levels is the main obstacle for multi-exposure studies and one of the biggest challenges of the next decade. The present study aims to describe the noise/NO2 multi-exposure situations in the urban environment by exploring the possible discordant and concordant situations of both exposures. Fine-scale diffusion models were developed in the European medium-sized city of Besançon (France), and a classification method was used to evaluate the multi-exposure situations in the façade perimeter of 10,825 buildings. Although correlated (Pearson's r = 0.64, p noise and NO2 around buildings do not overlap, and 30% of the buildings were considered to be discordant in terms of the noise and NO2 exposure levels. This discrepancy is spatially structured and associated with variables describing the building's environment. Our results support the presence of several co-existing, multi-exposure situations across the city impacted by both the urban morphology and the emission and diffusion/propagation phases of each pollutant. Identifying the mechanisms of discrepancy and convergence of multi-exposure situations could help improve the health risk assessment and public health.

  6. Modeling of the lower ionospheric response and VLF signal modulation during a total solar eclipse using ionospheric chemistry and LWPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Palit, Sourav; Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-02-01

    The variation in the solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation flux by any measure is the most dominant natural source to produce perturbations or modulations in the ionospheric chemical and plasma properties. A solar eclipse, though a very rare phenomenon, is similarly bound to produce a significant short time effect on the local ionospheric properties. The influence of the ionizing solar flux reduction during a solar eclipse on the lower ionosphere or, more precisely, the D-region, can be studied with the observation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio wave signal modulation. The interpretation of such an effect on VLF signals requires a knowledge of the D-region ion chemistry, which is not well studied till date. Dominant parameters which govern the ion chemistry, such as the recombination coefficients, are poorly known. The occurrence of events such as a solar eclipse provides us with an excellent opportunity to investigate the accuracy of our knowledge of the chemical condition in this part of Earth's atmosphere and the properties which control the ionospheric stability under such disturbances. In this paper, using existing knowledge of the lower ionospheric chemical and physical properties we carry out an interpretation of the effects obtained during the total solar eclipse of 22 of July 2009 on the VLF signal. Data obtained from a week long campaign conducted by the Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) over the Indian subcontinent has been used for this purpose. Both positive and negative amplitude changes during the eclipse were observed along various receiver locations. In this paper, data for a propagation path between a Indian Navy VLF transmitter named VTX3 and a pair of receivers in India are used. We start from the observed solar flux during the eclipse and calculate the ionization during the whole time span over most of the influenced region in a range of height. We incorporate a D-region ion-chemistry model to find the equilibrium ion density over

  7. Full-wave model of D-region upward VLF coupling to whistlers in the plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Shao, X.; Lay, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric-lightning-to-plasmasphere VLF coupling via whistlers is key to understanding the problem of radiation-belt losses and the slot region. In the lowermost ionosphere, the "D-region" (roughly 60 - 100 km altitude), the coupling occurs between the VLF incident from the "vacuum" below, to the electron whistler capable of transiting upward through the E- and F-regions above. We have modified our successful and data-validated D-region VLF downward-reflection model to predict upward-coupled whistler waveforms recorded on topside satellites. The model has been run in production mode for predicting downward-reflected waveforms recorded at ground stations, but the model's internal calculation also fully describes the "penetrating" solution that merges into the oblique electron whistler. We have begun to test the model against VLF, three-dimensional electric-field recordings from the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) [Pfaff et al., 2010] on the C/NOFS satellite. VEFI's broadband recording and large on-board memory serendipitously provide an excellent platform for studying lightning whistlers in the plasmasphere. We have already demonstrated [Jacobson et al., 2011] that VEFI is superbly suited for testing transionospheric propagation, in conjunction with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN; see www.wwlln.net) to provide groundtruth location/time of the lightning strokes. This poster will describe latest results. Jacobson, A. R., R. H. Holzworth, R. F. Pfaff, and M. P. McCarthy (2011), Study of oblique whistlers in the low-latitude ionosphere, jointly with the C/NOFS satellite and the World-Wide Lightning Location Network, Annales Geophysicae, 29, 851-863. Pfaff, R., D. Rowland, H. Freudenreich, K. Bromund, K. Le, M. Acuna, J. Klenzing, C. Liebrecht, S. Martin, W. J. Burke, N. C. Maynard, D. E. Hunton, P. A. Roddy, J. O. Ballenthin, and G. R. Wilson (2010), Observations of DC electric fields in the low-latitude ionosphere and their variations with

  8. In connection with identification of VLF emissions before L'Aquila earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Kachakhidze

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with an attempt to check the theoretical model of self-generated seismo-electromagnetic oscillations of LAI system on the basis of retrospective data.

    Application of the offered simple model enables one to explain qualitatively the mechanism of VLF electromagnetic emission initiated in the process of an earthquake preparation. Besides, the model enables us to associate telluric character geoelectric and geomagnetic perturbations incited by rock polarization and self-generated electromagnetic oscillations of lithosphere-atmosphere system.

    L'Aquila earthquake taken as an example to isolate reliably the Earth VLF emission from the magnetospheric electromagnetic emission of the same frequency range, MHD criterion is offered together with geomagnetic activity indexes.

    On the basis of the considered three earthquakes, according to the opinion of authors the model of self-generated seismo-electromagnetic oscillations of the LAI system will enable us to approach the problem of resolution of earthquake prediction with certain accuracy.

  9. Optimization of structures undergoing harmonic or stochastic excitation. Ph.D. Thesis; [atmospheric turbulence and white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The optimal design was investigated of simple structures subjected to dynamic loads, with constraints on the structures' responses. Optimal designs were examined for one dimensional structures excited by harmonically oscillating loads, similar structures excited by white noise, and a wing in the presence of continuous atmospheric turbulence. The first has constraints on the maximum allowable stress while the last two place bounds on the probability of failure of the structure. Approximations were made to replace the time parameter with a frequency parameter. For the first problem, this involved the steady state response, and in the remaining cases, power spectral techniques were employed to find the root mean square values of the responses. Optimal solutions were found by using computer algorithms which combined finite elements methods with optimization techniques based on mathematical programming. It was found that the inertial loads for these dynamic problems result in optimal structures that are radically different from those obtained for structures loaded statically by forces of comparable magnitude.

  10. Models of ionospheric VLF absorption of powerful ground based transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters play a role in precipitation of energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the contribution of VLF transmitters to radiation belt losses were based on early models of trans-ionospheric propagation known as the Helliwell absorption curves, but some recent studies have found that the model overestimates (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. It was subsequently suggested that conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes may be responsible for the error. We utilize a newly available extensive record of VLF transmitter energy reaching the magnetosphere, taken from the DEMETER satellite, and perform a direct comparison with a sophisticated full wave model of trans-ionospheric propagation. Although the model does not include the effect of ionospheric irregularities, it correctly predicts the average total power injected into the magnetosphere within several dB. The results, particularly at nighttime, appear to be robust against the variability of the ionospheric electron density. We conclude that the global effect of irregularity scattering on whistler mode conversion to quasi-electrostatic may be no larger than 6 dB.

  11. An aerostat-supported ELF/VLF transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, E. C., Jr.; Kies, L. R.; Bannister, P. R.; Ingram, R. F.; Hopkins, W. D.; Roberts, M. A.

    1989-03-01

    A demonstration of an aerostat-supported extremely low frequency/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) transmitting antenna was performed. At ELF the vertical electric dipole (VED) antenna radiated at least 100,000 times more power than would a horizontal electric dipole having the same moment. That efficiency was achieved with an altitude of 12,500 feet (3810 m). Calculations show that the radiated power will increase as the fourth power of aerostat altitude. The tether antenna exhibited a corona onset voltage of 180 kV and was resistant to the degrading effects of ELF corona. Prolonged in-corona operation is therefore possible. The antenna was continuously tuned, despite changes in height and capacitance caused by the aerostat flight dynamics. The huge 300-H ELF tuning inductor posed no problem. Enhanced VED moments were achieved at ELF by operation at voltages up to 260 kV, 40% above the corona onset voltage. At VLF the antenna emulated a monopole that had a radiation efficiency greater than 90%. The measured bandwidths were large: 1.5 kHz at 23 kHz and 3.5 kHz at 34 kHz. The antenna height exceeded one-quarter wavelength at VLF, so the antenna could be tuned capacitively and required relatively low base voltages. At both VLF and ELF the measured fields agreed closely with predictions.

  12. The European VLF/LF radio network: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Ermini, A.

    2014-11-01

    For several years researches about correlation between seismicity and disturbances in radio broadcasting are being carried out: in particular, the Japanese Pacific VLF radio network and the European VLF-LF radio network have been developed during the last years. The European network has been developed starting from two LF receivers located in central Italy in 1996. Up to now, 11 receivers of a new type, able to sample the VLF and LF intensity of ten radio signals, are being into operation in different European countries. The daily updating of data is effective and the data bank is located at the Department of Physics of the University of Bari (Italy) which is the central node of the network. In order to discover anomalies, the software able to carry out automatically a daily data analysis by the Wavelet spectra method has been planned and realized. At the moment, the software operates on four signals (two LF and two VLF) collected by one of the receiver located in Italy. If the anomaly is particularly strong a warning system gives an advise on the work station into operation in the central node of the Network. In any case, before assuming an anomaly as a seismic anomaly, geomagnetic and meteorological data must be checked as well as any possible instrumental malfunction. At present these controls are carried out only discontinuously by the researchers of the Bari Team.

  13. Solution uniquity of an inverse VLF problem: A case-study of the polar, ground-based, VLF radio signal disturbances caused by the ultra-energetic relativistic electron precipitations and of their southern boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenets, G. F.; Astafiev, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Here we present the results of a case study of the rare, abnormal, qualitatively specific behavior of Aldra (northern Norway) and GBR (UK) VLF transmitter signals (10-16 kHz) received at Kola Peninsula. The abnormal amplitude and the phase disturbances of signals were used as a proxy for ultra-energetic relativistic (solar?) electron precipitation (URE, ∼100 MeV) into the middle polar atmosphere. The disturbances have been observed under quiet or moderately disturbed geomagnetic activity. Based on bearing results, it was established that the abnormal variations of the electric conductivity of ionized middle atmosphere (of a sporadic Ds layer under the regular ionosphere D layer) were characterized by the following: (i) the time function of height h(t) of an effective spherical waveguide between the Earth surface and the sporadic Ds layer shows a minimum value equal to ∼30 km and (ii) the reflection coefficient R(t) of radio wave with a grazing angle of incidence from a virtual boundary with height h(t) has a minimum value equal to ∼0.4. The southern boundaries of the ultra-energetic relativistic electron precipitations have been found as well. They turned out to be not southerly than 61 degree of magnetic latitude and similar to the ones obtained in our previous study of the events for other dates under the similar geophysical conditions although we do not know anything definite about the rigidity and density of the electron fluxes. A used calculation method of analysis is based on a necessary condition that a number n of input data should be greater than a number m of output parameter-functions. We have stated by numerical testing that a decrease of n from 6 to 4 generates a lack of uniqueness of an inverse VLF problem solution for m = 2. It is important for future VLF ground-based monitoring of the URE precipitation events.

  14. An Artificial Particle Precipitation Technique Using HAARP-Generated VLF Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-02

    AFRL-VS-HA-TR-2007-1021 An Artificial Particle Precipitation Technique Using HAARP -Generated VLF Waves O o o r- Q M. J. Kosch T. Pedersen J...Artificial Particle Precipitation Technique Using HAARP Generated VLF Waves. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62101F...model. The frequency-time modulated VLF wave patterns have been successfully implemented at the HAARP ionospheric modification facility in Alaska

  15. VLF wave injection experiments from Siple Station, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    R.A., Helliwell

    1987-01-01

    The background of VLF wave-particle experiments from Siple Station, Antarctica, including wave-induced precipitation is briefly reviewed. Single frequency ducted signals that exceed a certain 'threshold' intensity are observed at the conjugate point (Roberval, Quebec) to be amplified 30-50dB, with temporal growth rates of 30-200dB/s. Following saturation, variable frequency emissions are triggered. When a second signal is added to the first, with a frequency spacing Df

  16. Applications of the VLF-EM method for rapid Sumatran fault identification in Leuser national park, Aceh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwandi, Marwan, Muksin, Fashbir

    2017-07-01

    Aceh is an area which is located at volcanically active region and at the meeting point of the Eurasian and the Indo-Australian plates. Many mountain formations and folds are formed as a result of the meeting of these plates. One of the mountains in Aceh is The Gunung Leuser, the highest mountain in the province with altitude of 3,404 m. The active geodynamic conditions could lead to the formation of potentially active faults which produce earthquakes. Due to safety reason, there are few researches done to identify active faults in the LE (Leuser Ecosystem). Therefore, we propose a preliminary study to identify morphological patterns of the fault system from the topography data of SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission). Having obtained the approximate location of fault, then a Very Low Frequency method is applied to determine the detail characteristic of the fault. This method can determine the subsurface structure to a depth of 50 m without digging or drilling. In this study, we measure three profiles with length of each profile of 12-16 km. Along profile 1, the VLF data fluctuated due to relatively high iron deposition along the line. For profile 2, the results are very consistent with the adjacent to the fault Blangkejeren which is the main part of the Sumatran Fault. Profile 3 Lokop - Kutacane fault also shows the correction of the topography. In general, VLF method is relatively influenced by noise as the consequences of the passive electromagnetic measurement. Thus, it is important to develop an analysis method of VLF data that includes the topographical correction so that better lateral anomaly map can be created.

  17. Optical Spatial Filter to Suppress Beam Wander and Spatial Noise Induced by Atmospheric Turbulence in Free-Space Optical Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ucuk Darusalam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an optical spatial filter (OSF method to suppress beam wander and spatial noise effects. Signal from random displacements of the focus spot around the optical axis within the constricted area is collected. This method advantageously suppresses fluctuations in signal intensity. The OSF consists of a pinhole and cone reflector. The pinhole produces Fresnel diffraction on the focus spot. The cone reflector provides directed reflectance onto the pinhole for random focus spot displacements due to beam wander. The calculations of signal power are based on fluctuations of signal intensity that are minimized by the circular aperture function of the pinhole and the cosine of the reflectance angle from the cone reflector. The method is applied to free-space optical communications at a wavelength of 1.55 μm with an atmospheric chamber to provide optical propagation media. Based on calculations, the beam wander angles that can be received by the OSF are from 14.0° to 28.0°. Moreover, based on experiment, the OSF with a pinhole diameter of 20.0 μm and cone reflector diameter of 1.5 mm produces signal power of −15.3 dBm. Both calculations and experiment show that the OSF enhances the received signal power in the presence of turbulence.

  18. VLF Tan Delta Measurement for Used XLPE Power Cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Woo Sang; Ha, Che Wung; Joo, Kwang Ho [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Medium voltage power cables in nuclear power plants are currently managed through the visual inspection or by monitoring environmental factors such as the temperature and radiation levels. However, these methods are insufficient to monitor aging degradation of power cables. The NRC requires an additional monitoring program to detect the aged degradation, especially for safety-related power cables which are inaccessible or installed underground. EPRI suggested that very low frequency (VLF) tan {delta} test be included in MV power cable diagnostic programs. In addition, the VLF tan {delta} test was recently adopted for domestic submarine distribution cable diagnostics. KEPRI suggested that the impacts of leakage current should be controlled in VLF tan {delta} test for the submarine cables. As a pre-process to develop such a program, tan {delta} tests have been performed for 4.16 kV cables which were removed from the domestic nuclear power plant after approximate 30 years of service to analyze the degradation of long time serviced cables and the effect of leakage current from the both ends of cables

  19. Physics based model of D-region variability related to VLF propagation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, S. C.

    2012-07-01

    D-region (~60-85 km) electron density profiles measured using large number of sounding rocket experiments carried out from two Indian low latitude stations show large variations with solar zenith angle, season and solar activity. Similarly the ground based multi frequency radio wave absorption technique has provided continuous data on the morphology of the hourly electron density variations. However suitable models of the D-region electron density profile variations both during quiet and disturbed solar conditions over the Indian region are lacking. The renewed interest in the study of the VLF/LF propagation anomalies taking place through perturbations in the D-region electron densities due to various geophysical phenomena requires the availability of a baseline D-region model over low latitudes. The purpose of this paper is to critically review the physical processes of D-region production and loss of free electrons, dynamical coupling due to variety of vertically propagating atmospheric waves, sudden changes brought about by the solar energetic events like CMEs and different categories of X-ray flares. Low latitude region is not likely to be affected by the PMSE or PCA type of events but the changes due to lightning induced mesospheric red sprites and LEPs need to be considered. Based on this analysis, a preliminary low latitude D-region electron density profile model development is proposed. Sample results would illustrate key requirements from such a model in terms of its effectiveness to simulate the low latitude observations of VLF/LF amplitude and phase variations using waveguide propagation models like LWPC.

  20. VLF observations of ionospheric disturbances in association with TLEs from the EuroSprite-2007 campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NaitAmor, S.; AlAbdoadaim, M. A.; Cohen, M. B.

    2010-01-01

    Two Very Low Frequency (VLF) AWESOME remote sensing systems located at Algiers, Algeria (36.45°N, 3.28°E) and Sebha, Libya (27.02°N, 14.26°E) monitor VLF signal perturbations for evidence of ionospheric disturbances. During the EuroSprite-2007 campaign a number of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs...

  1. The Search for VLF Precursors to Major Earthquakes: A Case Study with the M9.0 Earthquake of 11-Mar-2011 (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M.; Kosovichev, P.; Marshall, R. A.; Droscoll, A.; Scherrer, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    It has been proposed that Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio remote sensing may be used to detect ionospheric changes which may precede major earthquakes by hours or days. We report the results of a search for VLF precursors to the M9.0 Tohoku earthquake of 11-Mar-2011, the fifth most powerful earthquake in recorded history. Broadband and narrowband radio recordings were made at a site in Onagawa, Japan located ~102 km from the epicenter. The receiver operated for about two minutes after the start of the earthquake, after which the receiver lost power. Examination of the VLF data shows no radio emissions preceding or coincident with the onset of the earthquake. However, once the secondary seismic waves reached the receiver, a number of impulses and diffuse noise bands arose which may result from the entire power grid shaking or from radio emissions from compressing or fracturing rocks. Examination of the ELF data (0.2-1 kHz) shows no precursor effect in the hours preceding the seismic activity. We also examine the amplitudes of VLF subionospherically propagating transmitter signals going back months before the earthquake. We apply previously proposed techniques to extract properties of the diurnal amplitude profile that have been thought to correlate with earthquake precursors, but find no anomalous effect despite the remarkable intensity of the earthquake and proximity of the receiver to the epicenter. In general there are anomalous deviations but they cannot be reliably correlated with seismic activity. We also report the results of a global search for a lightning precursor effect on lightning flash rates, using the GLD360 network.

  2. Multi Station Frequency Response and Polarization of ELF/VLF Signals Generated via Ionospheric Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxworth, Ashanthi; Golkowski, Mark; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    ELF/VLF wave generation via HF modulated ionospheric heating has been practiced for many years as a unique way to generate waves in the ELF/VLF band (3 Hz - 30 kHz). This paper presents experimental results and associated theoretical modeling from work performed at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. An experiment was designed to investigate the modulation frequency dependence of the generated ELF/VLF signal amplitudes and polarization at multiple sites at distances of 37 km, 50 km and 99 km from the facility. While no difference is observed for X mode versus O mode modulation of the heating wave, it is found that ELF/VLF amplitude and polarization as a function of modulated ELF/VLF frequency is different for each site. An ionospheric heating code is used to determine the primary current sources leading to the observations.

  3. The VLF fingerprint of elves: Step-like and long-recovery early VLF perturbations caused by powerful ±CG lightning EM pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldoupis, Christos; Cohen, Morris; Arnone, Enrico; Cotts, Benjamin; Dietrich, Stefano

    2013-08-01

    Subionospheric VLF recordings are investigated in relation with intense cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data. Lightning impacts the lower ionosphere via heating and ionization changes which produce VLF signal perturbations known as early VLF events. Typically, early events recover in about 100 s, but a small subclass does not recover for many minutes, known as long-recovery early events (LORE). In this study, we identify LORE as a distinct category of early VLF events, whose signature may occur either on its own or alongside the short-lived typical early VLF event. Since LORE onsets coincide with powerful lightning strokes of either polarity (±), we infer that they are due to long-lasting ionization changes in the uppermost D region ionosphere caused by electromagnetic pulses emitted by strong ± CG lightning peak currents of typically > 250 kA, which are also known to generate elves. The LORE perturbations are detected when the discharge is located within ~250 km from the great circle path of a VLF transmitter-receiver link. The probability of occurrence increases with stroke intensity and approaches unity for discharges with peak currents ≥ ~300 kA. LOREs are nighttime phenomena that occur preferentially, at least in the present regional data set, during winter when strong ± CG discharges are more frequent and intense. The evidence suggests LORE as a distinct signature representing the VLF fingerprint of elves, a fact which, although was predicted by theory, it escaped identification in the long-going VLF research of lightning effects in the lower ionosphere.

  4. ELF/VLF wave generation from the beating of two HF ionospheric heating sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Moore, R. C.; Golkowski, M.; Lehtinen, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established that Extremely Low Frequency (ELF, 0.3-3 kHz) and Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio waves can be generated via modulated High Frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) heating of the lower ionosphere (60-100 km). The ionospheric absorption of HF power modifies the conductivity of the lower ionosphere, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, creates an `antenna in the sky.' We utilize a theoretical model of the HF to ELF/VLF conversion and the ELF/VLF propagation, and calculate the amplitudes of the generated ELF/VLF waves when two HF heating waves, separated by the ELF/VLF frequency, are transmitted from two adjacent locations. The resulting ELF/VLF radiation pattern exhibits a strong directional dependence (as much as 15 dB) that depends on the physical spacing of the two HF sources. This beat wave source can produce signals 10-20 dB stronger than those generated using amplitude modulation, particularly for frequencies greater than 5-10 kHz. We evaluate recent suggestions that beating two HF waves generates ELF/VLF waves in the F-region (>150 km), and conclude that those experimental results may have misinterpreted, and can be explained strictly by the much more well established D region mechanism.

  5. The sound of high winds : The effect of atmospheric stability on wind turbine sound and microphone noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This is the story of the discovery of a new phenomenon: why wind turbines sound different at night time. This discovery was related to a problem in society, namely that of perceived noise by residents living close to such turbines.

  6. The physical principles of the combined ELF/VLF method for single-station global location of lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtak, V.; Price, C.; Williams, E.

    Single -station electromagnetic methods for global lightning location are based on specific features of ELF wave propagation. First, ELF waves propagate with an extremely low attenuation not exceeding 1.5 dB/Mm up to 100 Hz. For this reason, the propagation has a resonant character (the Schumann resonance phenomena) imparting a unique pattern to the spectrum of a lightning waveform depending on the parent lightning's location relative to the given observer. The wave impedance technique realized by Kemp and Jones (1971) and widely adopted afterwards eliminates any need for the frequency dependence of the spectral density of the source's current moment for the location purpose. At the same time, an adequate single-mode propagation model can be applied for recovering this dependence and providing additional information about the source. As the only shortcoming of ELF location procedure, considerable error in estimates of the arrival directions of lightning waveforms was revealed by means of the satellite (OTD) identification of parent lightning events. These azimuthal deviations result in global location accuracies of 1-2 Mm (Boccippio et al, 1998) hardly acceptable in many geophysical problems. Price et al. (2002) found similar azimuthal errors in the ELF technique by means of the ground-truth (NLDN) identification of sprite-producing thunderstorms in Colorado when observing atmospherics in the Negev Desert, Israel. The location accuracy had been essentially improved - to better than 0.2 Mm on this 11 Mm path - by combining ELF distance estimates with VLF direction finding. Theoretical considerations show that this improvement is to be explained by a distinction between the ELF and VLF refraction effects at the day-night boundary of the Earth- ionosphere waveguide. While the difference between the day-time and night-time values of the phase velocity in the ELF range reaches 15%, it does not exceed 1% in the VLF range, with a corresponding diminishment of azimuthal

  7. Electric and VLF-MT survey of Tegatayama tunnel; Tegatayama tunnel no denki tansa oyobi VLF tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishitani, T. [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Mining College

    1997-05-27

    To survey the structure at the depth between 20 and 30 m, field tests were conducted by means of vertical electric and VFL-MT (magnetotelluric) survey. Tegatayama tunnel has a total length of 276 m, width of 7.5 m, and height of 4.7 m, and the depth from the surface is about 28 m near the top of mountain. Near the tunnel, the thickness of surface soil is about 60 cm, which consists of clay soil including soft mudstone gravel. It was found that terrace deposit is distributed up to the depth of 8 m, and that mudstone is distributed below the depth of 8 m. Weighted four-electrode method was adopted for the vertical electrical survey. Measurements were conducted at the immediately above the tunnel, 10 m apart from the center of tunnel in the right and left, and 20 m apart from the center in the east. For the VLF-MT method, component of frequency 22.2 kHz was used. As a result of the tests, it was difficult to illustrate the existence of tunnel from the vertical electrical survey only at one point. Feature of the tunnel could be well illustrated by means of the VLF-MT method. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Interpretation of VLF-EM & VLF-R data using tipper and impedance analyses: A case study from Candi Umbul-Telomoyo, Magelang, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastyani, Erina; Niasari, Sintia Windhi

    2017-07-01

    The goal of all geophysical survey techniques is to image the properties of the Earth's subsurface. Very Low Frequency (VLF) is one of the geophysical survey technique that has been commonly used for ore exploration and mapping faults or fracture zones. Faults or fracture zones are necessary components in providing the fluid pathway in geothermal systems. The Candi Umbul-Telomoyo is one of the geothermal prospect sites in Indonesia, which is located in Magelang, Central Java. Recent studies hypothesized that this site was an outflow area of Telomoyo volcano geothermal complex. We used the VLF-EM and VLF-R techniques to infer faults or fracture zones that might be a path for geothermal fluids in the Candi Umbul-Telomoyo. From the measurements, we got tilt angle, ellipticity, primary and secondary magnetic fieldfor VLF-EM data; and apparent resistivity, phase angle, electric and magnetic field for VLF-R data. To interpret the data, we used tipper and impedance analyses. The result of both analyses show similarities in the directions and positions of anomalous current concentrations. We conclude these anomalous current concentrations as faults. Our interpretation is agreeing with the Geologic Map of the Semarang and Magelang Quadrangles that shows the expected fault beneath the Mt. Telomoyo.

  9. VLF/ELF wave activity in the vicinity of the polar cusp: Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lin

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Observations by the Cluster spacecraft of VLF/ELF wave activity show distinct signatures for different regions in the vicinity of high altitude polar cusps, which are identified by using magnetic field and plasma data along spacecraft trajectories. These waves include: (1 Broad band magnetic noise observed in the polar cusp at frequencies from several Hz to ~100 Hz, below the local electron cyclotron frequency, fce. Similar magnetic noise is also observed in the high latitude magnetosheath and the magnetopause boundary layer. (2 Strong broad band electrostatic emissions observed in the cusp, in the magnetosheath, and in the high latitude magnetopause boundary layer, at frequencies extending from several Hz to tens of kHz, with maximum intensities below ~100 Hz. (3 Narrow-band electromagnetic whistler waves at frequencies ~0.2–0.6 fce, frequently observed in the closed boundary layer (CBL adjacent to the polar cusp. These waves are for the first time observed in this region to be accompanied by counter-streaming electron beams of ~100 eV, which suggests that the waves are excited by these electrons through wave-particle interaction. (4 Narrow-band electrostatic waves observed slightly above the local fce in the CBL. (5 Lion roars, observed in the high latitude magnetosheath, often in magnetic troughs of mirror mode oscillations. The above wave signatures can serve as indicators of the regions in the vicinity of the magnetospheric cusp.

  10. Decrease of VLF transmitter signal and Chorus-whistler waves before l'Aquila earthquake occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Boudjada

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the VLF emissions observed by the Instrument Champ Electrique (ICE experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We analyze intensity level variation 10 days before and after the occurrence of l'Aquila earthquake (EQ. We found a clear decrease of the VLF received signal related to ionospheric whistler mode (mainly Chorus emission and to signal transmitted by the DFY VLF station in Germany, few days (more than one week before the earthquake. The VLF power spectral density decreases of more than two orders of magnitude until the EQ, and it recovers to normal levels just after the EQ occurrence. The geomagnetic activity is principally weak four days before EQ and increases again one day before l'Aquila seismic event. Our results are discussed in the frame of short- and long-terms earthquakes prediction focusing on the crucial role of the magnetic field of the Earth.

  11. In situ calibration of atmospheric-infrasound sensors including the effects of wind-noise-reduction pipe systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielson, Thomas B

    2011-09-01

    A worldwide network of more than 40 infrasound monitoring stations has been established as part of the effort to ensure compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Each station has four to eight individual infrasound elements in a kilometer-scale array for detection and bearing determination of acoustic events. The frequency range of interest covers a three-decade range-roughly from 0.01 to 10 Hz. A typical infrasound array element consists of a receiving transducer connected to a multiple-inlet pipe network to average spatially over the short-wavelength turbulence-associated "wind noise." Although the frequency response of the transducer itself may be known, the wind-noise reduction system modifies that response. In order to understand the system's impact on detection and identification of acoustical events, the overall frequency response must be determined. This paper describes a technique for measuring the absolute magnitude and phase of the frequency response of an infrasound element including the wind-noise-reduction piping by comparison calibration using ambient noise and a reference-microphone system. Measured coherence between the reference and the infrasound element and the consistency between the magnitude and the phase provide quality checks on the process. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  12. More evidence for a one-to-one correlation between Sprites and Early VLF perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldoupis, C.; Amvrosiadi, N.; Cotts, B. R. T.;

    2010-01-01

    Past studies have shown a correlation between sprites and early VLF perturbations, but the reported correlation varies widely from ∼50% to 100%. The present study resolves these large discrepancies by analyzing several case studies of sprite and narrowband VLF observations, in which multiple...... for this option to be resolved we need more studies using highly sensitive optical systems capable of detecting weaker sprites, sprite halos and elves....

  13. Lightning Location With Single-Station Observation of VLF Spherics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, I.; Yagitani, S.; Komonmae, H.; Takezono, N.

    2001-12-01

    Most of the lightning location systems recently available require the simultaneous reception of lightning-generated radio pulses (spherics) at multiple stations. In this work, we develop a lightning location system to determine both the direction and range of a lightning stroke with a single-station observation of VLF spherics. The technique used here is a rather classical one, but we try to improve the ranging accuracy by applying sophisticated signal processing techniques, and our final goal is to develop a portable lightning locator. We observe wave forms of two horizontal magnetic fields and one vertical electric field of VLF spherics, each of which usually consists of a couple of sequential pulses. The first pulse comes directly from a lightning return stroke, and is used for the direction finding of the stroke. On the other hand, the second and later pulses are the multiple reflections of the first pulse inside the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Since the time-of-arrival (ToA) of each pulse is determined by its propagation path length in the waveguide, by using the observed difference in ToA of two or more pulses, we can inversely estimate not only the reflection height at the ionosphere but also the range of the lightning stroke. By installing the developed system at Kanazawa University, we have been observing lightning-generated spherics since April, 2000. Compared with the lightning location data provided by a local power company, preliminary analysis shows that this system can locate each lightning stroke within several hundred km with a sufficient accuracy.

  14. The impact of PMSE and NLC particles on VLF propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nunn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available PMSE or Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes are a well-known phenomenon in the summer northern polar regions, in which anomalous VHF/UHF radar echoes are returned from heights ~85km. Noctilucent clouds and electron density biteouts are two phenomena that sometimes occur together with PMSE. Electron density biteouts are electron density depletion layers of up to 90%, which may be several kms thick. Using the NOSC Modefndr code based on Wait's modal theory for subionospheric propagation, we calculate the shifts in received VLF amplitude and phase that occur as a result of electron density biteouts. The code assumes a homogeneous background ionosphere and a homogeneous biteout layer along the Great Circle Path (GCP corridor, for transmitter receiver path lengths in the range of 500–6000km.

    For profiles during the 10h about midnight and under quiet geomagnetic conditions, where the electron density at 85km would normally be less than 500el/cc, it was found that received signal perturbations were significant, of the order of 1–4dB and 5–40° of phase. Perturbation amplitudes increase roughly as the square root of frequency. At short range perturbations are rather erratic, but more consistent at large ranges, readily interpretable in terms of the shifts in excitation factor, attenuation factor and v/c ratios for Wait's modes. Under these conditions such shifts should be detectable by a well constituted experiment involving multiple paths and multiple frequencies in the north polar region in summer. It is anticipated that VLF propagation could be a valuable diagnostic for biteout/PMSE when electron density at 85km is under 500el/cc, under which circumstances PMSE are not directly detectable by VHF/UHF radars.

    Key words. Electromagnetism (wave propagation – Ionosphere (polar ionosphere – Radioscience (ionospheric propagation

  15. One day prediction of nighttime VLF amplitudes using nonlinear autoregression and neural network modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, H.; Hobara, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The electric field amplitude of very low frequency (VLF) transmitter from Hawaii (NPM) has been continuously recorded at Chofu (CHF), Tokyo, Japan. The VLF amplitude variability indicates lower ionospheric perturbation in the D region (60-90 km altitude range) around the NPM-CHF propagation path. We carried out the prediction of daily nighttime mean VLF amplitude by using Nonlinear Autoregressive with Exogenous Input Neural Network (NARX NN). The NARX NN model, which was built based on the daily input variables of various physical parameters such as stratospheric temperature, total column ozone, cosmic rays, Dst, and Kp indices possess good accuracy during the model building. The fitted model was constructed within the training period from 1 January 2011 to 4 February 2013 by using three algorithms, namely, Bayesian Neural Network (BRANN), Levenberg Marquardt Neural Network (LMANN), and Scaled Conjugate Gradient (SCG). The LMANN has the largest Pearson correlation coefficient (r) of 0.94 and smallest root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.19 dB. The constructed models by using LMANN were applied to predict the VLF amplitude from 5 February 2013 to 31 December 2013. As a result the one step (1 day) ahead predicted nighttime VLF amplitude has the r of 0.93 and RMSE of 2.25 dB. We conclude that the model built according to the proposed methodology provides good predictions of the electric field amplitude of VLF waves for NPM-CHF (midlatitude) propagation path.

  16. A multiple receiver - multiple transmitter VLF high-order differential analysis evaluation network for near real-time detection and discrimination of seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeberis, Christos; Zaharis, Zaharias; Xenos, Thomas; Spatalas, Spyridon; Stratakis, Dimitrios; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Biagi, Pier francesco

    2016-04-01

    This study provides an evaluation of the application of high-order differential analysis on VLF signals on a multiple-receiver multiple-transmitter network. This application provides a method for near-real-time detection of disturbances that can be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena and can discriminate disturbances that could be classified as false positives and thus should be attributed to other geomagnetic influences. VLF data acquired in Thessaloniki, Greece (40.59N, 22,78E) Herakleion, Greece (35.31N, 25.10E), Nicosia, Cyprus (35.17N, 33.35E), Italy (42.42N, 13.08E) and transmitted by the VLF station in Tavolara, Italy (ICV station 40.923N, 9.731E) and the station in Keflavik, Iceland (ICE 64.02N, 22.57W) from January 2015 to January 2016 were used for the purpose of this paper. The receivers have been developed by Elettronika Srl and are part of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). The process applied for this study has been further developed and is based on differential analysis. The signals undergo transformation using an enhanced version of the Hilbert Huang Transform, and relevant spectra are produced. On the product of this process, differential analysis is applied. Finally, the method produces the correlation coefficient of signals that are on the same path over an earthquake epicenter in order to highlight disturbances, and on the opposite can make comparisons with unrelated transmitted signals of different paths to eliminate disturbances that are not localized to the area of interest. This improvement provides a simple method of noise cancellation to signals that would otherwise be considered as false positives. A further evaluation of the method is provided with the presentation and discussion of sample results. The method seems to be a robust tool of analysis of VLF signals and also an automatic detection tool with built-in noise cancellation of outside disturbances.

  17. On the effectiveness of the vlf-em method For ground water prospecting in the Basement terrains, Sinai, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Shendi, El-Arabi Hendi [العربيى هندي شندي

    1997-01-01

    The VLF-EM method is proved to be an effective, fast and inexpensive tool for ground water prospecting in the basement terrains of Southern Sinai. The resistive shallow alluvial deposits increase the penetration depth of the received VLF waves to as deep as 40 meters which is very reasonable to detect the water bearing alluvium in the studied areas. The measured horizontal and vertical components of the resultant VLF-EM field were used to calculate the apparent resistivities of the conductive...

  18. Building and the analysis of two radio antennas (SSRT) in vlf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbouti, Marjan; Khakian Ghomi, Mehdi; Salmanpour Paeen Afrakati, Mohammad Reza; Riahi, Jahad; Ghanbari, Keyvan; Moradi Khanghahi, Abolfazl; Nahavandi, Behzad

    This design is a joint project between telecommunication and astrophysics subjects carried out for the first time in Iran. In this article, we engage in building of two looped antennas (SSRT) that the first type of it is a SSRT (octagonal looped antenna) with an outer filter system of 80 cm diameter, cable thickness of 0.55 mm, inductance 38.24 MH and capacitor’s capacitance of 919 pf. The software of Spectrum lab and SSRT Robot2 were used for software section and to store the related information. While second antenna type is a SSRT (two interconnected square type loop antennas) with inner filter system in the form of two interconnected squares with beveled corners such that the number of windings for outer square are (larger) 60 rounds, while for inner square (smaller) 95 rounds. The CATIA software was used to design the antenna structure and “Protel Dxp’’ software has been used to design its circuit. A program has been designed with C# language for receiving section and processing of data. Considering the closeness of Turkey transmitter to the city of Tehran (test location), the designed SSRTs are responsible for receiving the frequency of 26.7 kHz while TBB (Bafa, Turkey) is considered the frequency producing source for it. In the continuation of project, we started to store our receiving data from SSRTs following the calibration, average taking as well as noise elimination that was produced due to different factors such as the noises caused by electrical equipment and the everyday activities of telecommunication devices. In this stage, we were observing our receiving coincidences with all SSRTs as well as the Goes satellite. Afterwards, we dealt with the analysis of solar flares, sunrise-sunset effects and electrical disturbances. Then, in a separate project, the received data secured from 8 different VLF receivers were studied and examined, by means of Mr. Loudet receiver located in France, for the years of 2010, 2011 and 2012 and we attained the

  19. Global Existence and Regularity for the 3D Stochastic Primitive Equations of the Ocean and Atmosphere with Multiplicative White Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Debussche, Arnaud; Glatt-Holtz, Nathan; Temam, Roger; ZIANE, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    The Primitive Equations are a basic model in the study of large scale Oceanic and Atmospheric dynamics. These systems form the analytical core of the most advanced General Circulation Models. For this reason and due to their challenging nonlinear and anisotropic structure the Primitive Equations have recently received considerable attention from the mathematical community. In view of the complex multi-scale nature of the earth's climate system, many uncertainties appear that should be account...

  20. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G.; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  1. Robust corrections for topographically-correlated atmospheric noise in InSAR data from large deforming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekaert, David; Walters, Richard; Hooper, Andrew; Wright, Tim; Parker, Doug

    2014-05-01

    For Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) the atmosphere forms one of the biggest challenges when it comes to the extraction of small-magnitude long-wavelength tectonic signals. Spatio-temporal variation of water vapour, pressure and temperature in the troposphere is the main cause of these signals, introducing apparent differential path delays in interferograms of up to 15 cm. Several correction techniques have been applied in the past that rely on external data from weather models, GPS or spectrometer data, but these are typically limited by the lower spatial resolution of the auxiliary data. Alternatively, time-series InSAR techniques and filtering of the interferometric phase in space and time can be applied, but separating atmospheric delays from non-linear deformation is challenging. Another method, which can be applied to individual interferograms, is to estimate the correlation between interferometric phase and topography, either in a non-deforming area or using a frequency band insensitive to deformation. While this method can be successful for small areas, it does not account for spatial variation of atmospheric properties, which can be significant across regions larger than 100 km. While the slope relating phase and topography can be reliably estimated for subregions, the intercept cannot, as it is biased by the presence of unrelated signals. The intercept cannot however be neglected, as the mean height of each subregion typically varies, leading to a different intercept for each window. Here we present a new power-law representation of the topographically-correlated phase delay that can be applied locally and which is able to account for these spatial variations in atmospheric properties. We estimate the power-law from sounding data to fit altitudes of up to 4 km, as this includes the topography range in most regions of interest. We also constrain the power-law by specifying the height above which the relative tropospheric delays are

  2. 100 Days of ELF/VLF Generation via HF Heating with HAARP (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M.; Golkowski, M.

    2013-12-01

    ELF/VLF radio waves are difficult to generate with conventional antennas. Ionospheric HF heating facilities generate ELF/VLF waves via modulated heating of the lower ionosphere. HF heating of the ionosphere changes the lower ionospheric conductivity, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, creates an antenna in the sky when heating is modulated at ELF/VLF frequencies. We present a summary of nearly 100 days of ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the 3.6 MW HAARP facility near Gakona, Alaska, and provide a baseline reference of ELF/VLF generation capabilities with HF heating. Between February 2007 and August 2008, HAARP was operated on close to 100 days for ELF/VLF wave generation experiments, at a variety of ELF/VLF frequencies, seasons and times of day. We present comprehensive statistics of generated ELF/VLF magnetic fields observed at a nearby site, in the 500-3500 Hz band. Transmissions with a specific HF beam configuration (3.25 MHz, vertical beam, amplitude modulation) are isolated so the data comparison is self-consistent, across nearly 5 million individual measurements of either a tone or a piece of a frequency-time ramp. There is a minimum in the average generation close to local midnight. It is found that generation during local nighttime is on average weaker, but more highly variable, with a small number of very strong generation periods. Signal amplitudes from day to day may vary by as much as 20-30 dB. Generation strengthens by ~5 dB during the first ~30 minutes of transmission, which may be a signature of slow electron density changes from sustained HF heating. Theoretical calculations are made to relate the amplitude observed to the power injected into the waveguide and reaching 250 km. The median power generated by HAARP and injected into the waveguide is ~0.05-0.1 W in this base-line configuration (vertical beam, 3.25 MHz, amplitude modulation), but may have generated hundreds of Watts for brief durations

  3. TLEs and early VLF events: Simulating the important impact of transmitter-disturbance-receiver geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaitAmor, S.; Ghalila, H.; Cohen, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    Early very low frequency (VLF) events are perturbations to subionospherically propagating VLF radio transmitters which sometimes occur when lightning activity is near the transmitter-receiver path. They are often correlated to Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). Recent analysis have focused on a new type of early events whose recovery time persists for many minutes, called LOng Recovery Events (LOREs). The underlying cause of these events is still unclear. Curiously, LOREs sometimes appear on only one path, while the same event observed on a different transmitter-receiver path does not indicate a LORE. In this paper we observe and simulate two cases of early signal perturbations: The first is a typical early VLF event, and the second is a LORE. Both were recorded by two AWESOME VLF receivers in North Africa on 12 December 2009, during the EuroSprite campaign. We combine observations with theoretical modeling to infer the electron density change that most closely reproduces the observed perturbation. Our results explain the cases where LOREs are detected on only one path as resulting from transmitter-receiver geometry significantly which impacts the modal content and therefore the observed VLF recovery time.

  4. The European VLF/LF Radio Network: the current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Schiavulli, Luigi; Ligonzo, Teresa; Colella, Roberto; Ermini, Anita; Martinelli, Giovanni; Palangio, Paolo; Moldovan, Iren; Silva, Hugo; Contadakis, Michael; Frantzis, Xenophon; Katzis, Konstantinos; Buyuksarac, Aydin; D'Amico, Sebastiano

    2014-05-01

    Since 2009 a network of VLF (20-60 kHz) and LF (150-300 kHz) radio receivers has been put into operation in Europe in order to study earthquakes precursors. At the moment the network consists of eleven receivers four of which are located in Italy, two in Greece and one in Portugal, Romania, Malta, Cyprus and Turkey. The data (sampling rate of 1min) are downloaded automatically at the end of each day and they are stored in the server located at the Department of Physics of the University of Bari (Italy), that is the central node of the network. Still, in some case, problems of connection exist. The different trends are open and visible on the web site: http://beta.fisica.uniba.it/infrep/Hom.aspx. The data files can be downloaded by the same web site but they are protected by username and password. Among the different methods of data analysis the Wavelet spectra appear to be the most sensitive ones. The software able to apply this technique on the radio data automatically at the end of each day has been planned and realized. At the moment it operates on four signals collected by one of the Italian receivers; if an anomaly stands up and it is over a fixed threshold a warning advise appears. In the web site, this activity is protected by a specific username and password.

  5. Covariance estimation for dInSAR surface deformation measurements in the presence of anisotropic atmospheric noise

    KAUST Repository

    Knospe, Steffen H G

    2010-04-01

    We study anisotropic spatial autocorrelation in differential synthetic aperture radar interferometric (dInSAR) measurements and its impact on geophysical parameter estimations. The dInSAR phase acquired by the satellite sensor is a superposition of different contributions, and when studying geophysical processes, we are usually only interested in the surface deformation part of the signal. Therefore, to obtain high-quality results, we would like to characterize and/or remove other phase components. A stochastic model has been found to be appropriate to describe atmospheric phase delay in dInSAR images. However, these phase delays are usually modeled as being isotropic, which is a simplification, because InSAR images often show directional atmospheric anomalies. Here, we analyze anisotropic structures and show validation results using both real and simulated data. We calculate experimental semivariograms of the dInSAR phase in several European Remote Sensing satellite-1/2 tandem interferograms. Based on the theory of random functions (RFs), we then fit anisotropic variogram models in the spatial domain, employing Matérn-and Bessel-family correlation functions in nested models to represent complex dInSAR covariance structures. The presented covariance function types, in the statistical framework of stationary RFs, are consistent with tropospheric delay models. We find that by using anisotropic data covariance information to weight dInSAR measurements, we can significantly improve both the precision and accuracy of geophysical parameter estimations. Furthermore, the improvement is dependent on how similar the deformation pattern is to the dominant structure of the anisotropic atmospheric signals. © 2009 IEEE.

  6. Subionospehric VLF perturbations of red sprites: 3D FDTD modeling and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, M.; Hobara, Y.; Ohta, K.; Minatohara, T.; Otsuyama, T.; Hayakawa, M.

    2012-04-01

    Majority of red sprites occurs in association with large positive cloud to ground discharges. Although the red sprite consists of highly ionized structure, physical properties of the ionization columns such as electron density and spatial extent have not understood well. In this paper 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method carried out to compute the subionospheric VLF signal perturbations due to the sprite ionization columns. Spatial scales of columns are determined by the sprite images obtained from our optical observations during winter lightning activities over the sea of Japan. Numerical results indicate that the multiple sprites generate the complicated scattering pattern of the VLF transmitter waves depending on special orientation and extent of sprite ionization columns. Spatial dependence of the scattered amplitude are compared with those from the experimental results of VLF observation network.

  7. ELF/VLF wave disturbances detected by the DEMETER satellite over the HAARP transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, Elena; Demekhov, Andrei; Parrot, Michel; Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Mochalov, Alexey; Pashin, Anatoly

    We report observations of electromagnetic the ELF/VLF wave disturbances by the DEMETER satellite (670 km altitude) overflying the HAARP heating facility (62.39(°) N, 145.15(°) W, L = 4.9). The HAARP HF transmitter operated at the maximum available power of 3.6 MW, O-mode polarization, and the beam directed towards the magnetic zenith. ELF/VLF waves caused by the HAARP heating are detected by the DEMETER satellite when the HF radio wave frequency was close to the critical frequency (foF2) of the ionospheric F2 layer but below it. ELF/VLF wave disturbances observed above the HAARP transmitter were detected by electrical antennas in an area with characteristic size 10 (2) km. We analyze amplitude and polarization spectra of the ELF disturbances and compare them with the characteristics of natural ELF hiss above HAARP. The VLF wave disturbances in the topside ionosphere above the HAARP transmitter were detected in the frequency ranges 8-17 kHz and 15-18 kHz which are close to the lower hybrid resonance frequency f _LHR in the heating region and its second harmonic (2f _LHR), respectively. In the case where the HAARP HF power was modulated, the detected VLF waves were also modulated with the same frequency whereas in the ELF frequency range the modulation period of the HAARP power was not observed. Possible mechanisms of generation of the ELF/VLF disturbances produced by the HAARP transmitter in the topside ionosphere are discussed.

  8. Combined ULF and VLF observations of seismo-electro-magnetic phenomena in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Eichelberger, Hans; Wolbang, Daniel; Prattes, Gustav; Besser, Bruno; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Stangl, Günter; Magnes, Werner; Berghofer, Gerhard; Aydogar, Özer; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Vellante, Massimo; Villante, Umberto; Biagi, Pier F.

    2014-05-01

    A combined analysis of magnetic ultra-low-frequency (ULF) and electromagnetic very-low-frequency (VLF) fluctuations before, during and after earthquakes in south and south-east Europe is presented. The magnetic fluctuations are studied in the frame of the South European Geomagnetic Array (SEGMA) network. The fluxgate and searchcoil magnetometers, located in Italy, Bulgaria and Hungary perform measurements of fluctuations in the pico-Tesla and nano-Tesla range from milli-Hertz to 100 Hz. The properties of VLF radio links (10 kHz - 50 kHz) are studied in the frame of the European VLF/LF radio receiver network (INFREP). Single parameter studies of ULF and VLF variations in the vicinity of earthquakes in Europe have been performed in the last decade (Villante et al. 2010, Rozhnoi et al. 2009). We present the first results of a dual parameter study based on single parameter ULF and VLF observations. The proposed method provides the opportunity to decrease the number of false alerts. A dual parameter seismo-electro-magnetic reliability number is developed and compared with single parameter quality numbers. References: Rozhnoi, A., Solovieva, M., Molchanov, O., Schwingenschuh, K., Boudjada, M., Biagi, P. F., Maggipinto, T., Castellana, L., Ermini, A., and Hayakawa, M.: Anomalies in VLF radio signals prior the Abruzzo earthquake (M=6.3) on 6 April 2009, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 9, 1727-1732, doi:10.5194/nhess-9-1727-2009, 2009. Villante, U., De Lauretis, M., De Paulis, C., Francia, P., Piancatelli, A., Pietropaolo, E., Vellante, M., Meloni, A., Palangio, P., Schwingenschuh, K., Prattes, G., Magnes, W., and Nenovski, P.: The 6 April 2009 earthquake at L'Aquila: a preliminary analysis of magnetic field measurements, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 203-214, doi:10.5194/nhess-10-203-2010, 2010.

  9. Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters

    OpenAIRE

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Graf, K. L.; Spasojevic, M.; Marshall, R. A.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Foust, F. R.

    2013-01-01

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 7783–7797, doi:10.1002/2013JA019337, 2013 Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters K. L. Graf,1 M. Spasojevic,1 R. A. Marshall,2 N. G. Lehtinen,1 F. R. Foust,1 and U. S. Inan1,3 Received 16 August 2013; revised 9 October 2013; accepted 11 November 2013; published 3 December 2013. [1] The effects of ground-based very low frequency (VLF) transmitters on the lower ionospher...

  10. Quasi-periodic VLF emissions observed during daytime at a low latitude Indian ground station Jammu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Singh; J Singh; R P Patel; A K Singh; R P Singh; Rejesh Singh; P A Ganai

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports quasi-periodic pulsing hiss emissions recorded during daytime in the frequency range of 50 Hz –15 kHz at low latitude station Jammu (geomag.lat.=22° 26′N; =1.17). It is noted that pulsing VLF emissions are a rare phenomena at low latitudes.The various spectrograms of pulsing VLF hiss emissions presented in this paper clearly show band limited spectrums regularly pulsing with almost equal period of the order of few seconds in the frequency range of ∼3-8 kHz. Generation and propagation mechanism of these emissions are briefly discussed.

  11. Subionospheric VLF signatures and their association with sprites observed during EuroSprite 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mika, A.; Haldoupis, C.; Marshall, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    to sprites. Bandpass filtering of the broadband VLF signal revealed that only about 5% of the sprites were escorted by early VLF perturbations, possibly due to backscatter. Finally, by using all 131 sprites captured during EuroSprite-2003, the time lags of the sprites to the preceding +/- CG discharges were...... computed and analyzed. The time-lag distribution had a well defined tail suggesting that at least one third of the sprites observed were lagging the +/- CG discharges by more than 30 up to 300 ms. In addition these "long-delayed" sprites were not accompanied by any radio-sferics during the sprite...

  12. Similar Data Retrieval from Enormous Datasets on ELF/VLF Wave Spectrum Observed by Akebono

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Kasahara

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As the total amount of data measured by scientific spacecraft is drastically increasing, it is necessary for researchers to develop new computation methods for efficient analysis of these enormous datasets. In the present study, we propose a new algorithm for similar data retrieval. We first discuss key descriptors that represent characteristics of the VLF/ELF waves observed by the Akebono spacecraft. Second, an algorithm for similar data retrieval is introduced. Finally, we demonstrate that the developed algorithm works well for the retrieval of the VLF spectrum with a small amount of CPU load.

  13. On the numerical modelling of VLF chorus dynamical spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nunn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the use of a one-dimensional Vlasov Hybrid Simulation (VHS computer code to simulate the dynamical spectra (i.e. frequency versus time spectrograms of ELF/VLF chorus signals (from ~a fraction to ~10 kHz. Recently excellent measurements of chorus have been made in the source region close to the geomagnetic equator aboard the four spacecraft Cluster mission. Using Cluster data for wave amplitude, which is up to 300 pT, local gyrofrequency, cold plasma density, and L-shell, observed chorus signals are reproduced with remarkable fidelity and, in particular, sweep rates in the range 1–10 kHz result as observed. Further, we find that the sweep rate is a falling function of increasing cold plasma density, again in accord with observations. Finally, we have satisfactorily simulated the rather rare falling frequency elements of chorus which are sometimes observed aboard Cluster in the generation region. For both rising and falling chorus we have presented detailed structural analyses of the generation regions. The main contributor to the frequency sweep rate is primarily the establishment of wave number/frequency gradients across the generation region by the out of phase component of the resonant particle current. The secondary contributor is the shortening of the wavelength of resonant particle current relative to that of the wave field. In view of the close agreement between observation and simulation, we conclude that nonlinear electron cyclotron resonance is indeed the mechanism underlying the generation of chorus signals just outside the plasmasphere.

  14. VLF P-Static Noise Reduction In Aircraft. Volume I. Current Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    to the (grounded) probe. (For portable operation, an alligator clamp lead is provided for connection to a suitable ground reference.) It may also be...of patents or other rights of third WetCatMdWsTea penies wiief may result from its ue. No license is granted by imnpi a- Ws os i-i ea tion or

  15. Cluster observations of ELF/VLF signals generated by modulated heating of the lower ionosphere with the HAARP HF transmitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Platino

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that amplitude modulated HF transmissions into the ionosphere can be used to generate ELF/VLF signals using the so-called "electrojet antenna". Although most observations of the generated ELF/VLF signals have been made on the ground, several low and high-altitude satellite observations have also been reported (James et al., 1990. One of the important unknowns in the physics of ELF/VLF wave generation by ionospheric heating is the volume of the magnetosphere illuminated by the ELF/VLF waves. In an attempt to investigate this question further, ground-satellite conjunction experiments have recently been conducted using the four Cluster satellites and the HF heater of the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP facility in Gakona, Alaska. Being located on largely closed field lines at L≈4.9, HAARP is currently also being used for ground-to-ground type of ELF/VLF wave-injection experiments, and will be increasingly used for this purpose as it is now being upgraded for higher power operation. In this paper, we describe the HAARP installation and present recent results of the HAARP-Cluster experiments. We give an overview of the detected ELF/VLF signals at Cluster, and a possible explanation of the spectral signature detected, as well as the determination of the location of the point of injection of the HAARP ELF/VLF signals into the magnetosphere using ray tracing.

  16. The development of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP) by designing new analysing software and by setting up new recording locations of radio VLF/LF signals in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Petruta Constantin, Angela; Emilian Toader, Victorin; Toma-Danila, Dragos; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Dolea, Paul; Septimiu Moldovan, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Based on scientific evidences supporting the causality between earthquake preparatory stages, space weather and solar activity and different types of electromagnetic (EM) disturbances together with the benefit of having full access at ground and space based EM data, INFREP proposes a complex and cross correlated investigation of phenomena that occur in the coupled system Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionsophere in order to identify possible causes responsible for anomalous effects observed in the propagation characteristics of radio waves, especially at low (LF) and very low frequency (VLF). INFREP, a network of VLF (20-60 kHz) and LF (150-300 kHz) radio receivers, was put into operation in Europe in 2009, having as principal goal, the study of disturbances produced by the earthquakes on the propagation properties of these signals. The Romanian NIEP VLF / LF monitoring system consisting in a radio receiver -made by Elettronika S.R.L. (Italy) and provided by the Bari University- and the infrastructure that is necessary to record and transmit the collected data, is a part of the international initiative INFREP. The NIEP VLF / LF receiver installed in Romania was put into operation in February 2009 in Bucharest and relocated to the Black-Sea shore (Dobruja Seismologic Observatory) in December 2009. The first development of the Romanian EM monitoring system was needed because after changing the receiving site from Bucharest to Eforie we obtained unsatisfactory monitoring data, characterized by large fluctuations of the received signals' intensities. Trying to understand this behavior has led to the conclusion that the electric component of the electromagnetic field was possibly influenced by the local conditions. Starting from this observation we have run some tests and changed the vertical antenna with a loop-type antenna that is more appropriate in highly electric-field polluted environments. Since the amount of recorded data is huge, for streamlining the research process

  17. Comparative Analysis of VLF Signal Variation along Trajectory Induced by X-ray Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Kolarski; D. Grubor

    2015-12-01

    Comparative qualitative analysis of amplitude and phase delay variations was carried out along the trajectory of GQD/22.1 kHz and NAA/24.0 kHz VLF signal traces, propagating from Skelton (UK) and Maine (USA) toward Belgrade, induced by four isolated solar X-ray flare events occurred during the period from September 2005 to December 2006. For monitoring, recording and for storage of VLF data at the Institute of Physics in Belgrade, Serbia, the AbsPAL system was used. For modeling purposes of propagating conditions along GQD and NAA signal propagation paths, LWPCv21 program code was used. Occurred solar flare events induced lower ionosphere electron density height profile changes, causing perturbations in VLF wave propagation within Earth-ionosphere waveguides. As analyzed VLF signals characterize by different propagation parameters along trajectories from their transmitters to the Belgrade receiver site, their propagation is affected in different ways for different solar flare events and also for the same solar flare events.

  18. Investigation of TEC and VLF space measurements associated to L'Aquila (Italy earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stangl

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report on Total Electron Content (TEC and Very Low Frequency (VLF space measurements derived from Global Positioning System (GPS and DEMETER satellites, respectively. These measurements are associated with the earthquake (EQ of a magnitude of 6.3, which occurred on 6 April 2009, in L'Aquila (Italy. Anomaly features are derived from the analysis of TEC and VLF observations recorded two weeks before and after the seismic event occurrence. A TEC map with an interpolated regional pixel resolution of 1° × 1° × 15 min in latitude, longitude and time was generated, allowing for the checking of a possible presence of disturbances over the L'Aquila region. This analysis is combined with the study of the time profile associated to the VLF flux density variations recorded by the Instrument Champ Electrique (ICE experiment on-board DEMETER satellite. We discuss, on the one hand, the combination efficiency of the electronic density and the VLF electromagnetic measurements and, on the other hand, the difficulty to distinguish between global effects and regional ones related to the earthquake.

  19. Study of latitudinal effects on VLF transmitter signals recorded by DEMETER/ICE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Berthelier, J. J.; Döller, R.; Galopeau, P. H. M.; Parrot, M.; Stangl, G.; Biernat, H.; Voller, W.; Besser, B.

    2010-05-01

    We report on VLF transmitter signals observed by the ‘Instrument Capteur Electrique' (ICE) experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. The DEMETER polar and circular sun-synchronous orbits lead to cover an invariant latitude range between -65° and +65° where up- and down-going half-orbits correspond to night-time (22:00 LT) and day-time (10:00 LT), respectively. The DEMETER orbit features permit to record signals emitted by some VLF ground-stations and detected by ICE experiment. We consider three transmitter signals emitted by stations in Europe (Germany, DFY, 16.58 kHz), in Asia (Japan, JP, 17.8 kHz) and in Australia (Australia, NWC, 19.8 kHz). We study the variation of these VLF signals taking into consideration the DEMETER satellite latitudes .We emphasis on latitudes where the satellite is close to the Earth's sub-auroral regions. We discuss particularly the presence, or not, of auroral magnetic activity effect on the VLF transmitter signals.

  20. Comparative Analysis of VLF Signal Variation along Trajectory Induced by X-ray Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarski, A.; Grubor, D.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative qualitative analysis of amplitude and phase delay variations was carried out along the trajectory of GQD/22.1 kHz and NAA/24.0 kHz VLF signal traces, propagating from Skelton (UK) and Maine (USA) toward Belgrade, induced by four isolated solar X-ray flare events occurred during the period from September 2005 to December 2006. For monitoring, recording and for storage of VLF data at the Institute of Physics in Belgrade, Serbia, the AbsPAL system was used. For modeling purposes of propagating conditions along GQD and NAA signal propagation paths, LWPCv21 program code was used. Occurred solar flare events induced lower ionosphere electron density height profile changes, causing perturbations in VLF wave propagation within Earth-ionosphere waveguides. As analyzed VLF signals characterize by different propagation parameters along trajectories from their transmitters to the Belgrade receiver site, their propagation is affected in different ways for different solar flare events and also for the same solar flare events.

  1. Cluster observations of ELF/VLF signals generated by modulated heating of the lower ionosphere with the HAARP HF transmitter

    OpenAIRE

    Platino, M.; Inan, U.S.; Bell, T. F.; Pickett, J; Kennedy, E J; Trotignon, J. G.; Rauch, J. L.; Canu, P.

    2004-01-01

    It is now well known that amplitude modulated HF transmissions into the ionosphere can be used to generate ELF/VLF signals using the so-called "electrojet antenna". Although most observations of the generated ELF/VLF signals have been made on the ground, several low and high-altitude satellite observations have also been reported (James et al., 1990). One of the important unknowns in the physics of ELF/VLF wave generation by ionospheric heating is the volume of the magnetosphere ill...

  2. Cluster observations of ELF/VLF signals generated by modulated heating of the lower ionosphere with the HAARP HF transmitter

    OpenAIRE

    Platino, M.; U. S. Inan; Bell, T.F.; Pickett, J.; Kennedy, E.J.; J. G. Trotignon; Rauch, J.L.; P. Canu

    2004-01-01

    It is now well known that amplitude modulated HF transmissions into the ionosphere can be used to generate ELF/VLF signals using the so-called "electrojet antenna". Although most observations of the generated ELF/VLF signals have been made on the ground, several low and high-altitude satellite observations have also been reported (James et al., 1990). One of the important unknowns in the physics of ELF/VLF wave generation by ionospheric heating is the volume of the magnetosphere ill...

  3. 100 days of ELF/VLF generation via HF heating with HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Gołkowski, M.

    2013-10-01

    Extremely low frequency/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) radio waves are difficult to generate with conventional antennas. Ionospheric high frequency (HF) heating facilities generate ELF/VLF waves via modulated heating of the lower ionosphere. HF heating of the ionosphere changes the lower ionospheric conductivity, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet creates an antenna in the sky when heating is modulated at ELF/VLF frequencies. We present a summary of nearly 100 days of ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the 3.6 MW High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility near Gakona, Alaska, at a variety of ELF/VLF frequencies, seasons, and times of day. We present comprehensive statistics of generated ELF/VLF magnetic fields observed at a nearby site, in the 500-3500 Hz band. Transmissions with a specific HF beam configuration (3.25 MHz, vertical beam, amplitude modulation) are isolated so the data comparison is self-consistent, across nearly 5 million individual measurements of either a tone or a piece of a frequency-time ramp. There is a minimum in the average generation close to local midnight. It is found that generation during local nighttime is on average weaker but more highly variable, with a small number of very strong generation periods. Signal amplitudes from day to day may vary by as much as 20-30 dB. Generation strengthens by ˜5 dB during the first ˜30 min of transmission, which may be a signature of slow electron density changes from sustained HF heating. Theoretical calculations are made to relate the amplitude observed to the power injected into the waveguide and reaching 250 km. The median power generated by HAARP and injected into the waveguide is ˜0.05-0.1 W in this baseline configuration (vertical beam, 3.25 MHz, amplitude modulation) but may have generated hundreds of watts for brief durations. Several efficiency improvements have improved the ELF/VLF wave generation efficiency further.

  4. Intra-plasmaspheric wave power density deduced from long-term DEMETER measurements of terrestrial VLF transmitter wave amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauben, D.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U.

    2012-12-01

    We deduce the 3d intra-plasmaspheric distribution of VLF wave power between conjugate regions of strong VLF wave amplitudes as measured by DEMETER for high-power terrestrial VLF transmitters during its ~6-yr lifetime. We employ a mixed WKB/full-wave technique to solve for the primary and secondary electromagnetic and electrostatic waves which are transmitted and reflected from strong cold-plasma density gradients and posited irregularities, in order to match the respective end-point measured amplitude distributions. Energy arriving in the conjugate region and also escaping to other regions of the magnetosphere is note. The resulting 3d distribution allows improved estimates for the long-term average particle scattering induced by terrestrial VLF transmitters.

  5. Electromagnetic Wave-filled Cavities Observed by the GEODESIC Sounding Rocket: A Direct Encounter with VLF Saucer Source Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabirzadeh, Rasoul

    The GEODESIC sounding rocket encountered hundreds of localized, VLF-wave-filled density depletions in an auroral return current region at altitudes between 900--1000 km. While these are similar to well-studied lower-hybrid "spikelets", which are electrostatic, many of the GEODESIC events exhibited strong VLF magnetic field enhancements as well. In the present study we show that these magnetic field fluctuations can be interpreted as the result of geomagnetic field-aligned electron currents driven by fluctuating electric fields parallel to the geomagnetic field lines. This observation suggests that the electromagnetic wave-filled cavities are signatures of unstable filaments of return current fluctuating at VLF frequencies. We argue that the cavities' spatial dimensions, their location inside the return current region and their total radiated power are consistent with the properties of VLF saucer source regions inferred from earlier satellite observations taken at higher altitudes.

  6. Van Allen Probes observations of prompt MeV radiation belt electron acceleration in nonlinear interactions with VLF chorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Omura, Y.; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Prompt recovery of MeV (millions of electron Volts) electron populations in the poststorm core of the outer terrestrial radiation belt involves local acceleration of a seed population of energetic electrons in interactions with VLF chorus waves. Electron interactions during the generation of VLF rising tones are strongly nonlinear, such that a fraction of the relativistic electrons at resonant energies are trapped by waves, leading to significant nonadiabatic energy exchange. Through detailed examination of VLF chorus and electron fluxes observed by Van Allen Probes, we investigate the efficiency of nonlinear processes for acceleration of electrons to MeV energies. We find through subpacket analysis of chorus waveforms that electrons with initial energy of hundreds of keV to 3 MeV can be accelerated by 50 keV-200 keV in resonant interactions with a single VLF rising tone on a time scale of 10-100 ms.

  7. Response of low latitude D-region ionosphere to the Total Solar Eclipse of 22 July 2009, deduced from ELF/VLF analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Singh, R.; Singh, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    increase in the effective width of the earth-ionosphere waveguide [Clivered et al., 2001] hence VLF reflection height. An increase in the height of this reflecting surface causes the waveguide "cutoff" frequency to decrease with a resulting decrease in phase velocity and increase in phase delay. Thus, the phase of the signal "lags," in accord with the observations. However, because of the 'decrease in "cutoff" frequency, the attenuation in the waveguide decreases, i.e., the amplitude of the signals increases. This is in accordance with the observed enhancement of the atmospherics/tweeks and increased amplitude strength. REFERENCES: Clilverd, M.A., C. J. Rodger, N. R. Thomsone, J. Lichtenberger, P. Steinbach, P. Cannon, and M. J. Angling, Total solar eclipse effects on VLF signals: Observations and modeling, Radio Sci. 36(4), 773 -788, 2001. Smith, L.G. (1972), Rocket observations of solar UV radiation during the eclipse of 7 March 1970, J. Atmos. Terr. Phys., 3(1), 601-611.

  8. ELF/VLF/LF Radio Propagation and Systems Aspects (La Propagation des Ondes Radio ELF/VLF/LF et les Aspects Systemes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Umime 11uld sb’ngft R11111M fgM 7-1 INVESTIGATIONS OF EQUATORIAL IONOSPHERE NIGHTTIME MODE CONVERSION AT VLF* Verne Hildebrand IWG Corporation, 1940 Fifth...uniform, Symposium), supposing that has an length equal to Ŗa" and it is MIT, Cambridge oriented on the zz direction (fig.8). USA, Julio 1991 Let us...about 10 to 14 years. My from the floor, would someone like to start off? own experience as a systems engineer is that Verne Hildebrand the systems have

  9. Latest progress on interactions between VLF/ELF waves and energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between very/extremely low frequency (VLF/ELF) waves and energetic electrons play a fundamental role in dynamics occurring in the inner magnetosphere. Here, we briefly discuss global properties of VLF/ELF waves, along with the variability of the electron radiation belts associated with wave-particle interactions and radial diffusion. We provide cases of electron loss and acceleration as a result of wave-particle interactions primarily due to such waves, and particularly some preliminary results of 3D evolution of phase space density from our currently developing 3D code. We comment on the existing mechanisms responsible for acceleration and loss, and identify several critical issues that need to be addressed. We review latest progress and suggest open questions for future investigation.

  10. Excitation of VLF quasi-electrostatic oscillations in the ionospheric plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lundin

    Full Text Available A numerical solution of the dispersion equation for electromagnetic waves in a hot magnetized collisionless plasma has shown that, in a current-free ionospheric plasma, the distortion of the electron distribution function reproducing the downward flow of a thermal electron component and the compensating upward flow of the suprathermal electrons, which are responsible for the resulting heat flux, can destabilize quasi-electrostatic ion sound waves. The numerical analysis, performed with ion densities and electron temperature taken from the data recorded by the Interkosmos-24 (IK-24, Aktivny satellite, is compared with a VLF spectrum registered at the same time on board. This spectrum shows a wide frequency band emission below the local ion plasma frequency. The direction of the electron heat flux inherent to the assumed model of VLF emission generation is discussed

  11. Prediction Capabilities of VLF/LF Emission as the Main Precursor of Earthquake

    CERN Document Server

    Kachakhidze, Manana

    2013-01-01

    Recent satellite and ground-based observations proved that in earthquake preparation period in the seismogenic area we have VLF/LF and ULF electromagnetic emissions. According to the opinion of the authors of the present paper this phenomenon is more universal and reliable than other earthquake indicators. Hypothetically, in case of availability of adequate methodological grounds, in the nearest future, earth VLF/LF electromagnetic emission might be declared as the main precursor of earthquake. In particular, permanent monitoring of frequency spectrum of earth electromagnetic emission generated in the earthquake preparation period might turn out very useful with the view of prediction of large (M 5) inland earthquakes. The present paper offers a scheme of the methodology according to which the reality of the above given hypothesis can be checked up. To prove the prediction capabilities of earth electromagnetic emission we have used avalanche-like unstable model of fault formation and an analogous model of ele...

  12. Electron dispersion events in the morningside auroral zone and their relationship with VLF emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, David A.; Burke, William J.; Villalon, Elena

    1990-05-01

    This paper reports on observations of electron precipitation bursts observed in the morningside auroral zone with the J sensor, an electron detector aboard the Hilat satellite. The characteristics of these precipitation events are documented, and a theoretical explanation that could account for the observed properties is presented. According to this model, the dispersion events result from impulsive interactions of the electrons with intense asymmetric packets of VLF waves via the nonlinear ponderomotive force.

  13. Unusually high frequency natural VLF radio emissions observed during daytime in Northern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Jyrki; Turunen, Tauno; Kleimenova, Natalia; Rycroft, Michael; Gromova, Liudmila; Sirviö, Iina

    2016-12-01

    Geomagnetic field variations and electromagnetic waves of different frequencies are ever present in the Earth’s environment in which the Earth’s fauna and flora have evolved and live. These waves are a very useful tool for studying and exploring the physics of plasma processes occurring in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Here we present ground-based observations of natural electromagnetic emissions of magnetospheric origin at very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz), which are neither heard nor seen in their spectrograms because they are hidden by strong impulsive signals (sferics) originating in lightning discharges. After filtering out the sferics, peculiar emissions are revealed in these digital recordings, made in Northern Finland, at unusually high frequencies in the VLF band. These recently revealed emissions, which are observed for several hours almost every day in winter, contain short (˜1-3 min) burst-like structures at frequencies above 4-6 kHz, even up to 15 kHz; fine structure on the 1 s time scale is also prevalent. It seems that these whistler mode emissions are generated deep inside the magnetosphere, but the detailed nature, generation region and propagation behaviour of these newly discovered high latitude VLF emissions remain unknown; however, further research on them may shed new light on wave-particle interactions occurring in the Earth’s radiation belts.

  14. Study of long path VLF signal propagation characteristics as observed from Indian Antarctic station, Maitri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmal, Sudipta; Pal, Sujay; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2014-10-01

    To examine the quality and propagation characteristics of the Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves in a very long propagation path, Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata, participated in the 27th Indian scientific expedition to Antarctica during 2007-2008. One Stanford University made AWESOME VLF receiving system was installed at the Indian Antarctic station Maitri and about five weeks of data were recorded successfully from the Indian transmitter VTX and several other transmitting stations worldwide. The quality of the signal from the VTX transmitter was found to be very good, consistent and highly stable in day and night. The signal shows the evidences of the presence of the 24 h solar radiation in the Antarctic region during local summer. Here we report the both narrow band and broadband VLF observations from this site. The diurnal variations of VTX signal (18.2 kHz) are presented systematically for Antarctica path and also compared the same with the variations for a short propagation path (VTX-Kolkata). We compute the spatial distribution of the VTX signal along the VTX-Antarctica path using the most well-known LWPC model for an all-day and all-night propagation conditions. The calculated signal amplitudes corresponding to those conditions relatively corroborate the observations. We also present the attenuation rate of the dominant waveguide modes corresponding to those propagation conditions where the effects of the Antarctic polar ice on the attenuation of different propagating waveguide modes are visible.

  15. Study of the effect of solar flares on VLF signals during D-layer preparation or disappearance time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Palit, Sourav

    2016-07-01

    "Very Low Frequency" (VLF) is one of the bands of the Radio waves having frequency 3-30 KHz, which propagates through the Earth-ionosphere wave-guide. In relation to propagation of radio waves through ionosphere, low mass and high mobility cause electrons to play a vital role. Electrons are not distributed uniformly in the ionosphere and depending on this factor, ionosphere has different layers namely D, E and F. Different ionospheric layers generally exist during day and night time. During day-time when the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere is Sun, the lower most layer of ionosphere is D-layer. But during the night-time when Sun is absent and cosmic ray is the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere, this D-layer disappears and E-layer becomes the lower most region of the ionosphere. Normally, patterns of VLF signal depend on regular solar flux variations. However, during solar flares extra energetic particles are released from Sun, which makes the changes in the ionization of the ionosphere and these changes can perturb VLF signal amplitude. Usually if a solar flare occurs during any time of day, it only affects the amplitude and phase of the VLF signals. But in the present work, we found the if the flare occurs during D-layer preparation / disappearance time, then it will not only affect to amplitude and phase of the VLF signals but also to terminator times of VLF signals. We have observed that the sun set terminator time of the VLF signals shifted towards night time due to the effect of a M-class solar flare which occurred during the D-layer disappearance time. The shift is so high that it crossed 5σ level. We are now trying to a make model using the ion-chemistry and LWPC code to explain this observed effect.

  16. Resonant scattering of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt by HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shanshan; Zhu, Zhengping; Ni, Binbin; Cao, Xing; Luo, Weihua

    2016-10-01

    Several extremely low-frequency (ELF)/very low-frequency (VLF) wave generation experiments have been performed successfully at High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility and the artificial ELF/VLF signals can leak into the outer radiation belt and contribute to resonant interactions with energetic electrons. Based on the artificial wave properties revealed by many of in situ observations, we implement test particle simulations to evaluate the effects of energetic electron resonant scattering driven by the HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves. The results indicate that for both single-frequency/monotonic wave and multi-frequency/broadband waves, the behavior of each electron is stochastic while the averaged diffusion effect exhibits temporal linearity in the wave-particle interaction process. The computed local diffusion coefficients show that, the local pitch-angle scattering due to HARRP-induced single-frequency ELF/VLF whistlers with an amplitude of ∼10 pT can be intense near the loss cone with a rate of ∼10-2 rad2 s-1, suggesting the feasibility of HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves for removal of outer radiation belt energetic electrons. In contrast, the energy diffusion of energetic electrons is relatively weak, which confirms that pitch-angle scattering by artificial ELF/VLF waves can dominantly lead to the precipitation of energetic electrons. Moreover, diffusion rates of the discrete, broadband waves, with the same amplitude of each discrete frequency as the monotonic waves, can be much larger, which suggests that it is feasible to trigger a reasonable broadband wave instead of the monotonic wave to achieve better performance of controlled precipitation of energetic electrons. Moreover, our test particle scattering simulation show good agreement with the predictions of the quasi-linear theory, confirming that both methods are applied to evaluate the effects of resonant interactions between radiation belt electrons and artificially generated

  17. New Generation of ELF/VLF Wave Injection Experiments for HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Reddy, A.; Watkins, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    We present a ray tracing study to investigate the feasibility of a new generation of wave injection experiments from HAARP transmitter (L 4.9). Highly successful whistler mode wave injection experiments from SIPLE station, Antarctica, have established the importance of such experiments to study magnetospheric wave-particle interactions, and for cold and hot plasma diagnostics [Helliwell and Katsufrakis, 1974; Carpenter and Miller, 1976; Sonwalkar et al., 1997]. Modulated heating experiments from HAARP have shown that it is possible to launch ELF/VLF waves into the magnetosphere that can be observed on the ground after one-, two-, and multi-hop ducted propagation [Inan et al., 2004]. Recent research has also shown that ionospheric heating experiments using HAARP can lead to the formation of magnetospheric ducts [e.g. Milikh et al., 2010; Fallen et al., 2011]. Collectively, these results indicate that the HAARP (or similar) transmitter can be used first to form ducts on nearby L shells, and then to inject and trap transmitter generated ELF/VLF waves in those ducts. Ray tracing studies using a model magnetosphere shows that ELF/VLF waves in a few kilohertz range can be trapped in ducts with L shells near the HAARP transmitter. For example, 1.5 kHz waves injected from L shell = 4.9 and altitude = 200 km can be trapped in ducts located within 0.3 L of the transmitter L-shell. The duct parameters needed for ray-trapping are typically duct width dL 0.1-0.3 and duct enhancement factor dNe/Ne 10-20% or more. The location of plasmapause with respect to transmitter plays a role in the nature of trapping. The duct locations and parameters required for trapping ELF/VLF waves inside the ducts are consistent with past observations of ducts generated by the HAARP transmitter. Ray tracing calculations provide trapped wave normal angles, time delays, resonant energetic electron energy, estimates of wave intensity inside the duct, on the ground, and on satellites such DEMETER, Van

  18. Features of discrete VLF emissions observed at Gulmarg, India during the magnetic storm of 6–7 March, 1986

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Singh; A K Singh; D Siingh; R P Singh

    2007-12-01

    During the analysis of archived VLF data from Indian low latitude ground stations, some discrete VLF emissions recorded at the low latitude ground station Gulmarg (geomagnetic latitude 24°26′N; geomagnetic longitude 147° 09′E, L = 1.28) during moderate magnetic storm activity ( $K^{−}_{P}$} = 32, index varies from 4 to 6 during the observation period) on 6/7 March, 1986 are presented in this paper. The dynamic spectra of these discrete VLF emissions were observed along with tweeks and its harmonics, which is interesting and complex to explain. In most of the events the harmonic frequency of tweeks correlates with the starting frequency of harmonics of discrete emissions. In order to explain the observed features of discrete VLF emissions, we propose cyclotron resonance interaction between whistler mode wave and energetic electrons of inner radiation belt as possible generation mechanism. An attempt is also made to determine parallel energy, anisotropy and wave growth relevant to the generation process of VLF emissions.

  19. A comparative study of measured amplitude and phase perturbations of VLF and LF radio signals induced by solar flares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šulić D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Very Low Frequency (VLF and Low Frequency (LF signal perturbations were examined to study ionospheric disturbances induced by solar X-ray flares in order to understand processes involved in propagation of VLF/LF radio signals over short paths and to estimate specific characteristics of each short path. The receiver at the Belgrade station is constantly monitoring the amplitude and phase of a coherent and subionospherically propagating LF signal operated in Sicily NSC at 45.90 kHz, and a VLF signal operated in Isola di Tavolara ICV at 20.27 kHz, with the great circle distances of 953 km and 976 km, respectively. A significant number of similarities between these short paths is a direct result of both transmitters and the receiver’s geographic location. The main difference is in transmitter frequencies. From July 2008 to February 2014 there were about 200 events that were chosen for further examination. All selected examples showed that the amplitude and phase of VLF and LF signals were perturbed by solar X-ray flares occurrence. This six-year period covers both minimum and maximum of solar activity. Simultaneous measurement of amplitude and phase of the VLF/LF signals during a solar flare occurrence was applied to evaluate the electron density profile versus altitude, to carry out the function of time over the middle Europe. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176002 i br. III4402

  20. VLF/LF EM emissions as main precursor of earthquakes and their searching possibilities for Georgian s/a region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachakhidze, Manana; Kachakhidze, Nino

    2016-04-01

    Authors of abstract have created work which offers model of earth electromagnetic emissions generation detected in the process of earthquake preparation on the basis of electrodynamics. The model gives qualitative explanation of a mechanism of generation of electromagnetic waves emitted in the earthquake preparation period. Besides, scheme of the methodology of earthquake forecasting is created based on avalanche-like unstable model of fault formation and an analogous model of electromagnetic contour, synthesis of which, is rather harmonious. According to the authors of the work electromagnetic emissions in radiodiapason is more universal and reliable than other anomalous variations of various geophysical phenomena in earthquake preparation period; Besides, VLF/LF electromagnetic emissions might be declared as the main precursor of earthquake because it might turn out very useful with the view of prediction of large (M ≥5) inland earthquakes and to govern processes going on in lithosphere-atmosphere - ionosphere coupling (LAIC) system. Since the other geophysical phenomena, which may accompany earthquake preparation process and expose themselves several months, weeks or days prior to earthquakes are less informative with the view of earthquake forecasting, it is admissible to consider them as earthquake indicators. Physical mechanisms of mentioned phenomena are explained on the basis of the model of generation of electromagnetic emissions detected before earthquake, where a process of earthquake preparation and its realization are considered taking into account distributed and conservative systems properties. Up to these days electromagnetic emissions detection network did not exist in Georgia. European colleagues helped us (Prof. Dr. PF Biagi, Prof. Dr. Aydın BÜYÜKSARAÇ) and made possible the installation of a receiver. We are going to develop network and put our share in searching of earthquakes problem. Participation in conference is supported by financial

  1. Application of gamma ray spectrometric measurements and VLF-EM data for tracing vein type uranium mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Gaafar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to use the gamma ray spectrometric measurements and VLF-EM data to identify the subsurface structure and map uranium mineralization along El Sela shear zone, South Eastern Desert of Egypt. Many injections more or less mineralized with uranium and associated with alteration processes were recorded in El Sela shear zone. As results from previous works, the emplacement of these injections is structurally controlled and well defined by large shear zones striking in an ENE–WSW direction and crosscut by NW–SE to NNW–SSE fault sets. VLF method has been applied to map the structure and the presence of radioactive minerals that have been delineated by the detection of high uranium mineralization. The electromagnetic survey was carried out to detect the presence of shallow and deep conductive zones that cross the granites along ENE–WSW fracturing directions and to map its spatial distribution. The survey comprised seventy N–S spectrometry and VLF-EM profiles with 20 m separation. The resulted data were displayed as composite maps for K, eU and eTh as well as VLF-Fraser map. Twelve profiles with 100 m separation were selected for detailed description. The VLF-EM data were interpreted qualitatively as well as quantitatively using the Fraser and the Karous–Hjelt filters. Fraser filtered data and relative current density pseudo-sections indicate the presence of shallow and deep conductive zones that cross the granites along ENE–WSW shearing directions. High uranium concentrations found just above the higher apparent current-density zones that coincide with El-Sela shear zone indicate a positive relation between conductivity and uranium minerals occurrence. This enables to infer that the anomalies detected by VLF-EM data are due to the highly conductive shear zone enriched with uranium mineralization extending for more than 80 m.

  2. Detecting leachate plumes and groundwater pollution at Ruseifa municipal landfill utilizing VLF-EM method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tarazi, E.; Abu Rajab, J.; Al-Naqa, A.; El-Waheidi, M.

    2008-09-01

    A Very Low Frequency-Electromagnetic (VLF-EM) survey was carried out in two sites of domestic waste of old and recent landfills. The landfill structures lie on a major highly fractured limestone aquifer of shallow groundwater less than 30 m, which is considered as the main source of fresh water in Amman-Zarqa region. A total of 18 VLF-EM profiles were conducted with length ranges between 250 and 1500 m. Hydrochemical and biochemical analysis of water samples, taken from wells in the region, has also been conducted. The integrated results of previous DC resistivity method of the same study area and the outcomes of the 2-D tipper inversion of VLF-EM data proved the efficiency of this method in locating shallow and deep leachate plume with resistivity less than 20 Ω m, and enabling the mapping of anomalous bodies and their extensions down to 40 m depth. The sign of groundwater contamination was noticed in many surrounding wells resulting in the high number of fecal coliform bacteria and total coliform bacteria and the increase in inorganic parameters such as chloride (Cl). The pollution of groundwater wells in the landfill area is attributed to the leachate bodies which flow through the upper part of Wadi Es Sir (A7) or Amman-Wadi Es Sir Aquifer (B2/A7). Furthermore, several structural features were detected and the direction of local groundwater movement has been determined. The structural features have been found to have critical effects on the flowing of leachate plume towards north-northeast and west-southwest of the potable aquifer in the area.

  3. Numerical simulation of whistler-triggered VLF emissions observed in Antartica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunn, D. [Southhampton Univ., Southhampton (United Kingdom); Smith, A.J. [British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    The authors have extracted from VLF databases from British Antarctica Survey data taken at Halley and Faraday stations, examples of whistler-triggered emissions (WTE). The WTE are relatively narrow band emissions triggered by natural background whistlers undergoing nonlinear wave particle interactions generally in the equatorial regions. They occur with either rising or falling frequency relative to the triggering waves. Using a Vlasov type code the authors are able to simulate the types of emissions which are observed. 24 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Circuit Methods for VLF Antenna Couplers. [for use in Loran or Omega receiver systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The limitations of different E-field antenna coupler or preamplifier circuits are presented. All circuits were evaluated using actual Loran or Omega signals. Electric field whip or wire antennas are the simplest types which can be used for reception of VLF signals in the 10 to 100 kHz range. JFET or MOSFET transistors provide impedance transformation and some voltage gain in simple circuits where the power for operating the preamplifier uses the same coaxial cable that feeds the signal back to the receiver. The circuit techniques provide useful alternative methods for Loran-Omega receiver system designers.

  5. LINFOMA RELACIONADO AO VÍRUS DA LEUCEMIA FELINA (VLF) – RELATO DE CASO

    OpenAIRE

    Eleutério, Daniela Aparecida Sampaio; Faculdade Dr. Francisco Maeda - FAFRAM

    2014-01-01

    O presente trabalho tem como objetivo relatar um caso de linfoma relacionado ao vírus da leucemia felina (VLF) ocorrido na cidade de Uberlândia-MG. Um felino, macho, de três anos de idade, foi encaminhado ao Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, apresentando-se apático, dispneico, com alterações oculares, mucosas hipocoradas e linfonodos reativos. O hemograma do animal indicou anemia normocítica. No exame radiográfico observou deslocamento da traquéia dorsalmente e não f...

  6. Characteristics of VLF/LF Sferics from Elve-producing Lightning Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaes, P.; Zoghzoghy, F. G.; Marshall, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Lightning return strokes radiate an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) which interacts with the D-region ionosphere; the largest EMPs produce new ionization, heating, and optical emissions known as elves. Elves are at least six times more common than sprites and other transient luminous events. Though the probability that a lightning return stroke will produce an elve is correlated with the return stroke peak current, many large peak current strokes do not produce visible elves. Apart from the lightning peak current, elve production may depend on the return stroke speed, lightning altitude, and ionospheric conditions. In this work we investigate the detailed structure of lightning that gives rise to elves by analyzing the characteristics of VLF/LF lightning sferics in conjunction with optical elve observations. Lightning sferics were observed using an array of six VLF/LF receivers (1 MHz sample-rate) in Oklahoma, and elves were observed using two high-speed photometers pointed over the Oklahoma region: one located at Langmuir Laboratory, NM and the other at McDonald Observatory, TX. Hundreds of elves with coincident LF sferics were observed during the summer months of 2013. We present data comparing the characteristics of elve-producing and non-elve producing lightning as measured by LF sferics. In addition, we compare these sferic and elve observations with FDTD simulations to determine key properties of elve-producing lightning.

  7. Solar flare induced D-region ionospheric perturbations evaluated from VLF measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashutosh K.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Rajesh; Singh, R. P.

    2014-03-01

    The results of very low frequency (VLF) wave amplitude measurements carried out at the low latitude station Varanasi (geom. lat. 14∘55'N, long. 154∘E), India during solar flares are presented for the first time. The VLF waves (19.8 kHz) transmitted from the NWC-transmitter, Australia propagated in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide to long distances and were recorded at Varanasi. Data are analyzed and the reflection height H' and the sharpness factor β are evaluated. It is found that the reflection height decreases whereas sharpness factor increases with the increase of solar flare power. The H' is found to be higher and β smaller at low latitudes than the corresponding values at mid and high latitudes. The sunspot numbers were low during the considered period 2011-2012, being the rising phase of solar cycle 24 and as a result cosmic rays may impact the D-region ionosphere. The increased ionization from the flare lowers the effective reflecting height, H', of the D-region roughly in proportion to the logarithm of the X-ray flare intensity from a typical mid-day unperturbed value of about 71-72 km down to about 65 km for an X class flare. The sharpness ( β) of the lower edge of the D-region is also significantly increased by the flare but reaches a clear saturation value of about 0.48 km-1 for flares of magnitude greater than about X1 class.

  8. Some unusual discrete VLF emissions observed at a low-latitude ground station at Agra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Singh

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis of the VLF emissions data obtained during occasional whistler campaigns at the low-latitude ground station Agra (geomagnetic latitude 17°1' N, L = 1.15 has yielded some unusual discrete VLF emissions of the rising type. These include (1 emissions occurring at time intervals increasing in ge ommetrical progression, (2 emissions occuring simulta neously in different frequency ranges and (3 emissions observed during daytime. In the present study, the observed characteristics of these emissions are described and interpreted. It is shown that the increasing time delay between different components of the emissions match closely with the propagation time delays between different hops of a whistler of dispersion 19 s1/2, the unusual occurrence of the emissions in two different frequency ranges approximately at the same time may possibly be linked with their generation at two different locations, and the occurrence of emissions during daytime may be due to propagation under the influence of equatorial anomaly.

  9. In connection with identification of VLF emissions before L'Aquila earthquake

    CERN Document Server

    Kachakhidze, M; Kachakhidze, N

    2012-01-01

    The present paper deals with an attempt to check up the theoretical model of self-generated seismo-electromagnetic oscillations of LAI system on the basis of retrospective data. Application of the offered simple model enables one to explain qualitatively the mechanism of VLF electromagnetic emission initiated in the process of an earthquake preparation. It is worth to pay attention to the fact that frequency changes from MHz to kHz in electromagnetic emission spectrum comes to a good agreement with avalanche-like unstable model of fault formation. L'Aquila earthquake taken as an example to isolate reliably the Earth VLF emission from the magnetospheric electromagnetic emission of the same frequency range, MHD criterion is offered together with geomagnetic activity indexes. On the basis of the considered three earthquakes, according to the opinion of authors the model of self-generated seismo-electromagnetic oscillations of the LAI system will enable us to approach the problem of resolution of earthquake predi...

  10. Orbiting transmitter and antenna for spaceborne communications at ELF/VLF to submerged submarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, P. R.; Harrison, J. K.; Rupp, C. C.; King, R. W. P.; Cosmo, M. L.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Dyer, C. J.; Grossi, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    An orbital emplacement for the transmitter and the antenna of a communications link at ELF (30 to 300 Hz) and VLF (3 kHz to 30 kHz) to submerged submarines has been considered since the very inception of the space age. However, only recently has space technology reached a sufficient level of maturity for system designers to undertake serious studies of this link configuration. The optimistic outlook stems from recent space technology developments, such as the design and construction by NASA of long orbiting tethers, and the testing, onboard Shuttle Orbiter ATLANTIS, of the first spaceborne 20 km metal wire. This is known as the Tethered Satellite System-1 (TSS-1), a space mission that might be possibly followed by other flights, with tether lengths that could reach 100 km. Once deployed at a height of, say, 300 km, from a Shuttle Orbiter, or from another suitable platform, a long, thin tether aligns itself along the local vertical by virtue of the gradient of the Earth gravity field. If made of metal, the tether can function as a VED (Vertical Electric Dipole) transmitting antenna at ELF and VLF.

  11. Statistical study of seismo-ionospheric perturbations around Japan by using VLF/LF transmitters with a focal mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Tomoki; Hobara, Yasuhide; Tatsuta, Kenshin

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we perform the statistical analysis to study the response of the lower ionosphere prior to major seismic activities focusing on different earthquake types. The lower ionospheric condition is represented by daily averaged nighttime electric amplitude from various VLF/LF transmitter signals received in Japan by UEC team. Six-year record of ionospheric conditions are used for our data analysis. Over 200 earthquakes occurred around the VLF/LF transmitter - receiver paths during the time period of analysis. They are characterized into three different groups based on the Centroid-Moment-Tensor (CMT) solution such as reverse fault type, normal fault type and stress slip type. The ionospheric anomaly is identified by a large change (2 sigma criteria) in the VLF/LF daily nighttime amplitude. As a result, the highest occurrence rate of ionospheric anomaly is obtained for reverse type fault for both sea and ground earthquakes. The occurrence rate for these earthquakes are statistically significant because they are significantly large in comparison to those calculated from random test. The difference of occurrence rate of the ionospheric perturbations may indicate the coupling efficiency of seismic activity into the overlaying ionosphere originated from the pre-seismic condition of earth's crust. We also perform the trend-based earthquake prediction. Alarm threshold in nighttime VLF amplitude with -3.5 sigma is found to be most effective and significant for the earthquake prediction by using lower ionospheric perturbations.

  12. ELF/VLF signatures of sprite-producing lightning discharges observed during the 2005 EuroSprite campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenberg, E.; Price, C.; Yair, Y.

    2009-01-01

    During the summer of 2005, transient luminous events were optically imaged from the French Pyrénées as part of the EuroSprite campaign. Simultaneously, extremely low frequency (ELF: 3–3000 Hz) and broadband very low frequency (VLF: 3–30 kHz) data were recorded continuously at two separate receive...

  13. Detector of Optical Vortices as the Main Element of the System of Data Transfer: Principles of Operation, Numerical Model, and Influence of Noise and Atmospheric Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii Aksenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The method is proposed of optical vortex topological charge detection along with a design of a corresponding detector. The developed technique is based on measurements of light field intensity. Mathematical model simulating performance of the detector is described in the paper, and results of numerical experiments are presented which illustrate recognition of a vortex in a turbulent medium and in the presence of amplitude and phase noise in the registered radiation. Influence of shifts of the system optical axis on precision of registration is also considered in the paper.

  14. Unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV): Flight testing and evaluation of two-channel E-field very low frequency (VLF) instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Using VLF frequencies, transmitted by the Navy`s network, for airborne remote sensing of the earth`s electrical, magnetic characteristics was first considered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) around the mid 1970s. The first VLF system was designed and developed by the USGS for installation and operation on a single engine, fixed wing aircraft used by the Branch of Geophysics for geophysical surveying. The system consisted of five channels. Two E-field channels with sensors consisting of a fixed vertical loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on top of the fuselage and a gyro stabilized horizontal loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on a tail boom. The three channel magnetic sensor consisted of three orthogonal coils mounted on the same gyro stabilized platform as the horizontal E-field antenna. The main features of the VLF receiver were: narrow band-width frequency selection using crystal filters, phase shifters for zeroing out system phase variances, phase-lock loops for generating real and quadrature gates, and synchronous detectors for generating real and quadrature outputs. In the mid 1990s the Branch of Geophysics designed and developed a two-channel E-field ground portable VLF system. The system was built using state-of-the-art circuit components and new concepts in circuit architecture. Small size, light weight, low power, durability, and reliability were key considerations in the design of the instrument. The primary purpose of the instrument was for collecting VLF data during ground surveys over small grid areas. Later the system was modified for installation on a Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV). A series of three field trips were made to Easton, Maryland for testing and evaluating the system performance.

  15. Characteristics of VLF wave propagation in the Earth's magnetosphere in the presence of an artificial density duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasmanik, Dmitry; Demekhov, Andrei

    We study the propagation of VLF waves in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere in the presence of large-scale artificial plasma inhomogeneities which can be created by HF heating facilities like HAARP and ``Sura''. A region with enhanced cold plasma density can be formed due to the action of HF heating. This region is extended along geomagnetic field (up to altitudes of several thousand km) and has rather small size across magnetic field (about 1 degree). The geometric-optical approximation is used to study wave propagation. The plasma density and ion composition are calculated with the use of SAMI2 model, which was modified to take the effect of HF heating into account. We calculate ray trajectories of waves with different initial frequency and wave-normal angles and originating at altitudes of about 100 km in the region near the heating area. The source of such waves could be the lightning discharges, modulated HF heating of the ionosphere, or VLF transmitters. Variation of the wave amplitude along the ray trajectories due to refraction is considered and spatial distribution of wave intensity in the magnetosphere is analyzed. We show that the presence of such a density disturbances can lead to significant changes of wave propagation trajectories, in particular, to efficient guiding of VLF waves in this region. This can result in a drastic increase of the VLF-wave intensity in the density duct. The dependence of wave propagation properties on parameters of heating facility operation regime is considered. We study the variation of the spatial distribution of VLF wave intensity related to the slow evolution of the artificial inhomogeneity during the heating.

  16. Multifractal variability of Very Low Frequency (VLF) signal during Earthquakes (M greater than 5) occurred at Greece during the year 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Verma, Shivali; Kasde, Satish Kumar; Sonakia, Anjana

    In this work Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima (WTMM) based multifractal analysis method is used to extracts the earthquake precursory signatures from scaling characteristics of subionospheric Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals. We found specific dynamics of their fractal characteristics before the earthquake, appearance of the spike in the signal and increase of the fractal dimension. We analyze VLF signals of famous Turkey Bafa transmitter (N 370 24’, E 27019’) recorded by sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID) monitoring station located at South of France during the Earthquake occurred at Greece during the year 2011-2012. The analysis of VLF signal during some days before and after the occurrence of earthquake has been done. Keywords: Multifractal analysis, VLF signal, Sudden Ionospheric disturbances

  17. VLF signal perturbation due to the total solar eclipse of March 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait Amor, Samir; Bouderba, Yasmina

    2016-07-01

    On March 20 2015 a total Solar eclipse occurred and covered several regions in north America, Greenland, west of Europe and north Africa with different occultation rates. During this event, many VLF paths recorded at Algiers receiver were perturbed. In this contribution, we will present a qualitative analysis of two paths (GQD and DHO) which were disturbed differently since the occultation rate at the transmitter locations was different. In addition to the qualitative study, we determined the newly formed reference height and β values at different times during the eclipse transit. From these determined parameters the time profile of the electron density is then deduced. The results showed that the new reference height, β and the electron density are different from one transmitter analysis to other due to the occultation rate difference.

  18. Effect of the total solar eclipse of March 20, 2015, on VLF/LF propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovieva, M. S.; Rozhnoi, A. A.; Fedun, V.; Schwingenschuh, K.

    2016-05-01

    The analyzed amplitude and phase variations in electromagnetic VLF and LF signals at 20-45 kHz, received in Moscow, Graz (Austria), and Sheffield (UK) during the total solar eclipse of March 20, 2015, are considered. The 22 analyzed paths have lengths of 200—6100 km, are differently oriented, and cross 40-100% occultation regions. Fifteen paths crossed the region where the occultation varied from 40 to 90%. Solar eclipse effects were found only on one of these paths in the signal phase (-50°). Four long paths crossed the 90-100% occultation region, and signal amplitude and phase anomalies were detected for all four paths. Negative phase anomalies varied from-75° to-90°, and the amplitude anomalies were both positive and negative and were not larger than 5 dB. It was shown that the effective height of the ionosphere varied from 6.5 to 11 km during the eclipse.

  19. Several rotor noise sources and treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangler, J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Noise has been a design consideration in the development of advanced blades and turbines at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. During atmospheric testing associated with these efforts various types of aeroacoustic noise have been encountered. This presentation discusses several of these noise sources and treatments used to mitigate or eliminate the noise. Tonal noise resulting from tip-vortex/trailing-edge interaction and laminar separation bubbles was found to be easily eliminated. Impulsive noise resulting from blade/vortex interaction for rotors that furl and that due to tower shadow can be mitigated by various means. (au)

  20. Measurement of electromagnetic waves in ELF and VLF bands to monitor lightning activity in the Maritime Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kozo; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Ohya, Hiroyo; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Sato, Mitsuteru; Matsumoto, Jun

    2013-04-01

    Data of lightning discharge has been focused on as an effective way for monitoring and nowcasting of thunderstorm activity which causes extreme weather. Spatial distribution of lightning discharge has been used as a proxy of the presence or absence of deep convection. Latest observation shows that there is extremely huge lightning whose scale is more than hundreds times bigger than that of averaged event. This result indicates that lightning observation should be carried out to estimate not only existence but also scale for quantitative evaluation of atmospheric convection. In this study, lightning observation network in the Maritime Continent is introduced. This network is consisted of the sensors which make possible to measure electromagnetic wave radiated from lightning discharges. Observation frequency is 0.1 - 40 kHz for the measurement of magnetic field and 1 - 40 kHz for that of electric field. Sampling frequency is 100 kHz. Waveform of electromagnetic wave is recorded by personal computer. We have already constructed observation stations at Tainan in Taiwan (23.1N, 121.1E), Saraburi in Thailand (14.5N, 101.0E), and Pontianak in Indonesia (0.0N, 109.4E). Furthermore, we plan to install the monitoring system at Los Banos in Philippines (14.18, 121.25E) and Hanoi in Viet Nam. Data obtained by multipoint observation is synchronized by GPS receiver installed at each station. By using data obtained by this network, location and scale of lightning discharge can be estimated. Location of lightning is determined based on time of arrival method. Accuracy of geolocation could be less than 10km. Furthermore, charge moment is evaluated as a scale of each lightning discharge. It is calculated from electromagnetic waveform in ELF range (3-30 kHz). At the presentation, we will show the initial result about geolocation for source of electromagnetic wave and derivation of charge moment value based on the measurement of ELF and VLF sferics.

  1. Electron dispersion events in the morningside auroral zone and their relationship with VLF emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, D.A.; Burke, W.J. (Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)); Villalon, E. (Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States))

    1990-05-01

    Energy/time dispersion events have been observed in the precipitating electron data in the energy range from 630 eV to 20 keV recorded by the J sensor on the low-altitude, polar-orbiting HILAT satellite. The dispersions are such that the higher-energy electrons are observed earlier in time than the lower-energy electrons The time interval for single dispersion event is from 1 to 2 s. Within an auroral pass in which such energy/time dispersion events are observed, there are typically several such events, and they can be spaced within the pass in either a periodic or aperiodic manner. The events are typically observed within and toward the equatorward edge of the region of diffuse auroral electron precipitation. During a given pass the events can be observed over a wide range of L shells. The occurrence of these events maximizes in the interval 0600-1,200 hours MLT. The energy/time dispersion is generally consistent with the electrons originating from a common source. The events are seen at L shells from 3.7 to greater than 15. The source distance for the electrons is inferred to be generally beyond the equator for events at L shells less than approximately 8 and before the equator for events at higher L shells. Because of the low energies at which the dispersions are observed, it is unlikely that their occurrence can be explained by resonant interaction with VLF waves. Based on circumstantial evidence from other reported observations common to the morning sector, and alternative theoretical explanation is presented. According to this model the dispersion events result from impulsive interactions of the electrons with intense, asymmetric packets of VLF waves via the nonlinear, ponderomotive force.

  2. Cone structure and focusing of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves at high altitudes in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Ya. L.; Green, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and angle dependencies of the electric field radiated by an electric dipole E = E(sub 0) cos omega(t) are studied through numerical calculations of absolute value of E in the VLF and LF frequency bands where F is less than or equal 0.02 to 0.05 f(sub b) in a model ionosphere over an altitude region of 800-6000 km where the wave frequency and electron gyrofrequency varies between F approximately 4-500 kHz and f(sub b) is approximately equal (1.1 to 0.2) MHz respectively. It is found that the amplitudes of the electric field have large maxima in four regions: close to the direction of the Earth magnetic field line B(sub 0) (it is called the axis field E(sub 0), in the Storey E(sub St), reversed Storey E(sub RevSt), and resonance E(sub Res) cones. The maximal values of E(sub 0), E(sub Res), and E(sub RevSt) are the most pronounced close to the lower hybrid frequency, F approximately F(sub L). The flux of the electric field is concentrated in very narrow regions, with the apex angles of the cones Delta-B is approximately (0.1-1) deg. The enhancement and focusing of the electric field increases with altitude starting at Z greater than 800 km. At Z greater than or equal to 1000 up to 6000 km, the relative value of absolute value of E, in comparison with its value at Z = 800 km is about (10(exp 2) to 10(exp 4)) times larger. Thus the flux of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves generated at high altitudes in the Earth's ionosphere are trapped into very narrow conical beams similar to laser beams.

  3. Cone structure and focusing of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves at high altitudes in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Ya. L.; Green, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and angle dependencies of the electric field radiated by an electric dipole E = E(sub 0) cos omega(t) are studied through numerical calculations of absolute value of E in the VLF and LF frequency bands where F is less than or equal 0.02 to 0.05 f(sub b) in a model ionosphere over an altitude region of 800-6000 km where the wave frequency and electron gyrofrequency varies between F approximately 4-500 kHz and f(sub b) is approximately equal (1.1 to 0.2) MHz respectively. It is found that the amplitudes of the electric field have large maxima in four regions: close to the direction of the Earth magnetic field line B(sub 0) (it is called the axis field E(sub 0), in the Storey E(sub St), reversed Storey E(sub RevSt), and resonance E(sub Res) cones. The maximal values of E(sub 0), E(sub Res), and E(sub RevSt) are the most pronounced close to the lower hybrid frequency, F approximately F(sub L). The flux of the electric field is concentrated in very narrow regions, with the apex angles of the cones Delta-B is approximately (0.1-1) deg. The enhancement and focusing of the electric field increases with altitude starting at Z greater than 800 km. At Z greater than or equal to 1000 up to 6000 km, the relative value of absolute value of E, in comparison with its value at Z = 800 km is about (10(exp 2) to 10(exp 4)) times larger. Thus the flux of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves generated at high altitudes in the Earth's ionosphere are trapped into very narrow conical beams similar to laser beams.

  4. C/NOFS-VEFI results on magnetic-latitude control over coupling of lightning-generated VLF into zero-hop whistlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Holzworth, R.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Heelis, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    The C/NOFS satellite had a low-inclination (13 deg) orbit and provided multi-year observations (2008 - 2015) of the innermost plasmasphere within 26 deg of the magnetic equator. We report on VEFI (Vector Electric Field Instrument) recordings of zero-hop whistler-wave electric fields in this low-latitude region. We describe evidence regarding the VLF coupling variabilities, in particular versus magnetic latitude. We rely critically on data provided by the CINDI (C/NOFS Ion and Neutral Drift Investigation) measurements of the ion-composition, and by WWLLN (World-Wide Lightning-Location Network) groundtruthing of lightning-VLF source location, energy, and time. This low-latitude region has been predicted to permit only reduced VLF coupling, due essentially to a Snell's Law total reflection from the underside of the ionosphere. Nonetheless various studies of VLF coupling at discrete frequencies (from naval VLF transmitters) indicate that there is some intermittent, anomalous coupling not predicted by a simple Snell's Law. We address this problem using broadband illumination by lightning-generated VLF.

  5. BER performance of MSK in ground-to-satellite uplink optical communication under the influence of atmospheric turbulence and detector noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jiachen; Li, Mi; Tang, Minghui; Li, Yan; Song, Yuejiang

    2013-09-15

    Minimum shift keying (MSK) has been widely used in fiber optical communication and free-space optical communication. In order to introduce MSK into satellite laser communication, the bit-error rate (BER) performance of the MSK scheme is investigated in uplink communications under the influence of atmospheric turbulence consisting of weak fluctuation and beam wander. Numerical results indicate that the BER performance of MSK is much better than the performance of on-off keying (OOK). With the laser power being 4 W, the improvement is 5 dB in coherent demodulation and 15 dB in delay coherent demodulation. Furthermore, compared with OOK, optimal values of the divergence angle, receiver diameter, and transmitter beam radius are easier and more practical to achieve in the MSK scheme. The work can benefit ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system design.

  6. Correlation of VLF-EM Data with Radiometric Measurements: Implications for Uranium Exploration around Beldih, South Purulia Shear Zone, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to correlate VLF-EM data with the radiometric measurements to decipher the subsurface structure and to locate uranium mineralization in the shear zone. The study area is around Beldih mine which is an open cast apatite mine located on the South Purulia Shear Zone. VLF method has been applied to map the structure and the presence of radioactive minerals has been delineated by the detection of high α and γ counts with respect to the background radiations. High radiation counts and high surface γ activity are found just above the higher apparent current-density zones in all the profiles studied, at various locations, indicating uranium and/or thorium mineralization as well as good correlation between these techniques.

  7. Uncorrelated Noise in Turbulence Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Lenschow, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    effect is smeared across the entire power spectrum. For this reason, quantities such as variance dissipation may be more conveniently estimated from the structure function than from the spectrum. The modeling results are confirmed by artificially modifying a test time series with Poisson noise......We show that the error variance contributed by random uncorrelated measurement noise can be merged with the error variance contributed by real variation in the atmosphere to obtain a single expression for the total error variance when the sampling time is much less than the integral scale...... of atmospheric variability. The authors assume that the measured signal is a representation of a variable that is continuous on the scale of interest in the atmosphere. Uncorrelated noise affects the autovariance function (or, equivalently, the structure function) only between zero and the first lag, while its...

  8. On the occurrence of ground observations of ELF/VLF magnetospheric amplification induced by the HAARP facility

    OpenAIRE

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M. B.; Carpenter, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    The ionospheric heating facility of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) has been used extensively in the last 3 years for injection of ELF/VLF waves into the magnetosphere via modulated heating of the overhead auroral electrojet currents. Of particular interest are waves that are observed to be nonlinearly amplified after interaction with hot plasma electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. Past results have shown HAARP to be an effective platform for controlled studies...

  9. New type of ensemble of quasi-periodic, long-lasting VLF emissions at the auroral zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manninen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new type of the series of quasi-periodic (QP very low frequency (VLF emissions in frequency range of 1–5 kHz, and not associated with geomagnetic pulsations, has been discovered at auroral latitudes (L = 5.3 during the Finnish VLF campaign (held in December 2011. At least five unusually spectacular events, each with a duration of several hours, have been observed during the night under conditions of quiet geomagnetic activity (Kp = 0–1, although QPs usually occur during the daytime. Contrary to the QP emissions typically occurring during the day, the spectral structure of these QP events represented an extended, complicated sequence of repeated discrete rising VLF signals. Their duration was about 2–3 min each, with the repetition periods ranging from ~1 min to ~10 min. Two such nighttime non-typical events are reported in this paper. The fine structure of the separated QP elements may represent a mixture of the different frequency band signals, which seem to have independent origins. It was found that the periodic signals with lower frequency appear to trigger the strong dispersive upper frequency signals. The temporal dynamics of the spectral structure of the QPs studied were significantly controlled by some disturbances in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. This finding is very important for future theoretical investigations because the generation mechanism of this new type of QP emissions is not yet understood.

  10. Numerical modelling of VLF radio wave propagation through earth-ionosphere waveguide and its application to sudden ionospheric disturbances

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Sujay

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we theoretically predict the normal characteristics of Very Low Frequency (3~30 kHz) radio wave propagation through Earth-ionosphere waveguide corresponding to normal behavior of the D-region ionosphere. We took the VLF narrow band data from the receivers of Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) to validate our models. Detection of sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) are common to all the measurements. We apply our theoretical models to infer the D-region characteristics and to reproduce the observed VLF signal behavior corresponding to such SIDs. We develop a code based on ray theory to simulate the diurnal behavior of VLF signals over short propagation paths (2000~3000 km). The diurnal variation from this code are comparable to the variation obtained from a more general Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) code which is based on mode theory approach. We simulate the observational results obtained during the Total Solar Eclipse of July 22, 2009 in India. We also report and simulate a h...

  11. Noise Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Clean Air Act Overview Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Clean Air Act Title IV - ... noises in the community (from your neighbor, boom cars, lawn equipment, etc.) and from commercial businesses (factory, ...

  12. VLF Perturbations Associated with Solar Eclipses of November 2012 and may 2013 IN the South Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Kumar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-ionospheric VLF signals from the NWC (19.8 kHz), NPM (21.4 kHz) and NLK (24.8 kHz) MSK VLF transmitters are monitored at Suva, Fiji, with a time resolution of 0.1s using GPS based timing and SoftPAL VLF system. Here one minute averaged amplitude and phase data have been used for analysis. We present perturbations in VLF propagation and D-region changes associated with 13 November 2012 total solar eclipse (SE) and 9-10 May 2013 annular SE using VLF observations at Suva, Fiji. During 13-14 November 2012 total SE, the totality shadow intercepted NWC-Suva path and NWC signal amplitude and phase decreased by about 0.70 dB and 23°, respectively. NPM signal amplitude during 9-10 May 2013 SE decreased by about 2.0 dB. The amplitude perturbation of ~1.8 dB on NLK signal was measured from the unperturbed level associated with 9-10 May 2013 SE. The decrease in the amplitude at the site can be understood in terms of destructive interference of modes converted at the discontinuity created by the eclipse intercepting the different Transmitter-receiver great circle paths (TRGCPs) and changes in the propagation conditions along TRGCPs. The decrease in the amplitude and phase of NWC signal for 13-14 November 2012 SE has been modeled using Long Wave Propagation Capability code to estimate the changes in D-region reflection height (H') and sharpness factor (β) which shows that H' and β were increased by 0.95 km and 0.01 km-1, respectively. The phase changes on NWC signal associated with 9-10 May 2013 SE have been used to estimate the recombination coefficient value, for 75 km height where electron density reduction due to SE was about 40%. The changes in the D-region parameters and the electron density are due to sudden decrease of the photo-ionization creating nighttime like conditions in the D-region ionosphere.

  13. The Effect of Recent Venus Transit on Earths Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    H. P. Sardar; Mandal, S. K.; Mandal, P. K.; Guha, A.; Sarkar, S. K.; Sarkar, B. K.; Adhikari, S. K.; De, B. K.; S S; Ray, M.

    2006-01-01

    Some experiments on June 8, 2004, the day of transit of Venus across the Sun, were undertaken at Kolkata (latitude: 23034? N) to observe effect, if any, of transit of Venus on FWF, ELF and VLF amplitudes. The result shows good correlation between their temporal variations during the transit. The observation was unbelievable as the Venus subtends only 1/32th of the cone subtended by Sun on Earth. This anomaly may be explained on the assumption that the height of Venusian atmosphere with high c...

  14. The effect of recent Venus transit on Earths atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    H. P. Sardar; Mandal, S. K.; Mandal, P. K.; Guha, A.; Sarkar, S. K.; Sarkar, B. K.; Adhikari, S. K.; De, B. K.; S S; Ray, M.

    2006-01-01

    Some experiments on June 8, 2004, the day of transit of Venus across the Sun, were undertaken at Kolkata (latitude: 22°34lN) to observe the effect, if any, of transit of Venus on FWF, ELF and VLF amplitudes. The result shows a good correlation between their temporal variations during the transit. The observation was unbelievable as the Venus subtends only 1/32th of the cone subtended by Sun on Earth. This anomaly may be explained on the assumption that the height of Venusian atmosphere with h...

  15. A study of VLF signals variations associated with the changes of ionization level in the D-region in consequence of solar conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Sulic, D M; Mihajlov, A A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we confine our attention to the analysis of amplitude and phase data acquired by monitoring VLF/LF radio signals emitted by four European transmitters during a seven-year period (2008-2014). All the data were recorded at a Belgrade site (44.85$^{0}$ N, 20.38$^{0}$ E) by the Stanford University ELF/VLF receiver AWESOME. Propagation of VLF/LF radio signal takes place in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and strongly depends on ionization level of the D-region, which means that it is mainly controlled by solar conditions. Some results of amplitude and phase variations on GQD/22.10 kHz, DHO/23.40 kHz, ICV/20.27 kHz and NSC/45.90 kHz radio signals measurements at short distances ($D < 2$ Mm) over Central Europe and their interpretation are summarized in this paper. Attention is restricted to regular diurnal, seasonal and solar variations including sunrise and sunset effects on propagation characteristics of four VLF/LF radio signals. We study VLF/LF propagation over short path as a superposition of d...

  16. A Probe of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling using Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Signal from North-West Cape (Australia) to Kolkata (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    Very low frequency (VLF) radio waves has been employed for the detection and study of various terrestrial and extra-terrestrial high energy phenomena such as solar flares, solar eclipse, gamma ray burst, lightning induced electron precipitation etc., and the subsequent variations in the lower ionosphere driven by these events. In this study, we exploit the propagation characteristics of VLF signal through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, to probe changes in ionospheric signatures, induced by solar driven variations in magnetospheric conditions. Our study is based on the VLF signal (amplitude and phase) received at the Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre (IERC), Sitapur, under Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP), which is transmitted by the Australian NWC station at about 19.8kHz.

  17. Resistivity soundings and VLF profiles for siting groundwater wells in a fractured basement aquifer in the Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, A. I.; Kruse, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal shortages of groundwater are common in parts of the Arabian Shield, where complex basement hydrogeology can make siting of water wells difficult. To identify optimal production well locations, six 200-400 m-long Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic traverses and ten Vertical Electrical Soundings (VESes) were run at the western edge of the Arabian Shield near At-Taif town, Saudi Arabia. Here wadi sediments overlie fractured Precambrian basement, which in turn overlies unfractured basement. The fractured basement forms the water supply aquifer. Both VLF and VES data indicate significant lateral heterogeneity in the electrical conductivity of both wadi and basement deposits over lengths scales as small as ∼100 m. VES results correlate closely with data from two wells in the study area. The change in resistivity at the wadi-to-fractured basement contact is relatively subtle, but the transition from low resistivity fractured basement to high resistivity unfractured basement is well resolved. Inferred wadi thicknesses range from 0 to 14 m; the electrically conductive fractured basement extends from wadi down to 12-32 m depth. VES data indicate the fractured basement aquifer thickens progressively to the south in this area. A production well, sited on the basis of the VES analysis, successfully yielded 70m3/day. The relationship between VLF and VES data is complex, suggesting that the terrain is heterogeneous on the scale of the different effective sampling volumes of the two methods, and/or that fracture azimuth is locally heterogeneous. Overall resistivities in this study are similar to those observed at other locations in Saudi Arabia, suggesting these methods may be widely applicable for siting of groundwater wells in the complex basement of the Arabian Shield.

  18. Characterization and applications of VLF/LF source locations from lightning using the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Phillip M.; Christian, Hugh J.; Stewart, Mike; Burchfield, Jeff; Podgorny, Scott; Corredor, David; Hall, John; Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Franklin, Veronica

    2013-04-01

    Arrays that detect and locate the four-dimensional spacetime positions of radiation sources from lightning have largely utilized sensors sensitive to the very high frequency (VHF) regime with ˜ 15 km baselines or very low frequency/low frequency (VLF/LF) regime with ˜ 100 km baselines. This paper details initial results from the newly developed Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA), consisting of Marx meters (electric field change meters) sensitive to a frequency band ˜ 1 Hz to 400 kHz. The arrival time of HAMMA waveforms due to radiation sources from lightning are used to determine the spacetime position of these sources. The locations are compared with two well-documented and operational arrays, the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NLDN locations of return strokes is 305 and 266 m in x and y, respectively, while the standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NALMA sources is 237, 226, and 688 m in x, y and z, respectively. We further show that NLDN intracloud locations differ in horizontal distance from the corresponding HAMMA locations by a median value of 479 m. In addition, we use HAMMA source locations to map several lightning flashes in the VLF/LF and show HAMMA sources largely map out the same electrical extent as VHF sources and provide unique insights to the properties of the discharges occurring. Finally, we show that VLF/LF sources can determine the leader polarity in several example flashes but not necessarily whether a flash comes to ground. Copyright 2013 American Geophysical Union. All rights reserved.

  19. Earth's Atmospheric Electricity Parameter Response During Venus Transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syam Sundar De

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Venus transited across the Sun on 06 June 2012, introducing significant contribution to the tidal characteristics of the solar atmosphere. _ atmosphere was perturbed due to an anomalous Coronal Mass Ejection (CME and γ-radiationγ-radiation influenced by the solar tide due to Venus transit, thereby the Earth-ionosphere waveguide characteristics were changed. In this anomalous situation we measured some atmospheric electricity parameters such as Schumann resonance (SR amplitude, very low frequency (VLF sferics, subionospheric transmitted signals and the point discharge current (PDC along with the vertical electrical potential gradient (PG at the ground surface on the day of transit. The results showed some remarkable variations during the transit as well as pre- and post-transit periods. The observed anomalies in the recorded data were interpreted in terms of the anomalous solar tidal effects initiated due to Venus transit.

  20. Low noise road surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bolčina, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Noise is everywhere. Noise is a sound that makes people stressful and irritate. It often couses sleep disorders and also health problems like different cardiovascular disorders, hearing loss…In most cases traffic noise is the most disturbing. There are different ways to prevent people from traffic noise like building noise barriers and insulation of facades. However noise barriers and insulation of facades do not prevent noise formation, but are lowering existing noise. Another disadvantage i...

  1. Ionospheric perturbations in possible association with the 2010 Haiti earthquake, as based on medium-distance subionospheric VLF propagation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric perturbations in possible association with the 2010 Haiti earthquake occurred on 12 January 2010 (with a magnitude of 7.0 and depth of 10 km are investigated on the basis of subionospheric propagation data from the NAA transmitter on the east coast of the USA to a VLF receiving station in Peru. The local nighttime VLF amplitude data are extensively investigated during the period from the beginning of October 2009 to the end of March 2010, in which the trend (nighttime average amplitude, dispersion and nighttime fluctuation are analysed. It is found that a clear precursory ionosphere perturbation is detected just around New Years day of 2010, about 12 days before the main shock, which is characterised by the simultaneous decrease in the trend and the increases in dispersion and nighttime fluctuation. An additional finding might be the presence of the effect of the Earth's tide one and two months before the main shock, which can only be seen for a huge EQ.

  2. Modeling of very low frequency (VLF radio wave signal profile due to solar flares using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation coupled with ionospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Palit

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photons emitted during solar flares cause ionization in the lower ionosphere (~60 to 100 km in excess of what is expected to occur due to a quiet sun. Very low frequency (VLF radio wave signals reflected from the D-region of the ionosphere are affected by this excess ionization. In this paper, we reproduce the deviation in VLF signal strength during solar flares by numerical modeling. We use GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code to compute the rate of ionization due to a M-class flare and a X-class flare. The output of the simulation is then used in a simplified ionospheric chemistry model to calculate the time variation of electron density at different altitudes in the D-region of the ionosphere. The resulting electron density variation profile is then self-consistently used in the LWPC code to obtain the time variation of the change in VLF signal. We did the modeling of the VLF signal along the NWC (Australia to IERC/ICSP (India propagation path and compared the results with observations. The agreement is found to be very satisfactory.

  3. A Study On The Final Phase Of The Bardarbunga Volcano Of 2015 Using Vlf Wave Of Nrk Signal Of Iceland Received At Kiel Longwave Monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govinda Sharma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismo-ionospheric changes often affect the VLF waves resulting in possible changes in the terminator times and often lead to night time fluctuations. The Bardarbunga volcano which started on 2014 ended on the last days of February of 2015. In this paper we present the results of the VLF analysis of the first three months of 2015 using a signal of 37.50 KHz where an analysis on the sunset terminator time D-layer dissipation time daytime fluctuation and night time fluctuation of the VLF amplitude was done. We contrasted the values of these parameters for the first two months of 2015 where the volcano was active with third month of 2015 when the volcano had completely subsided. The Sunset terminator time and the daytime fluctuations in the VLF amplitude for the first two months showed no major anomalies. The anomaly in the D-layer disappearance time and night time fluctuation count reached its peak values for the volcanically active months.

  4. Aircraft Noise Prediction Program theoretical manual: Propeller aerodynamics and noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorumski, W. E. (Editor); Weir, D. S. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The prediction sequence used in the aircraft noise prediction program (ANOPP) is described. The elements of the sequence are called program modules. The first group of modules analyzes the propeller geometry, the aerodynamics, including both potential and boundary-layer flow, the propeller performance, and the surface loading distribution. This group of modules is based entirely on aerodynamic strip theory. The next group of modules deals with the first group. Predictions of periodic thickness and loading noise are determined with time-domain methods. Broadband noise is predicted by a semiempirical method. Near-field predictions of fuselage surface pressrues include the effects of boundary layer refraction and scattering. Far-field predictions include atmospheric and ground effects.

  5. Inhibitory noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Destexhe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vivo may operate in high-conductance states, in which the major part of the neuron's input conductance is due to synaptic activity, sometimes several-fold larger than the resting conductance. We examine here the contribution of inhibition in such high-conductance states. At the level of the absolute conductance values, several studies have shown that cortical neurons in vivo are characterized by strong inhibitory conductances. However, conductances are balanced and spiking activity is mostly determined by fluctuations, but not much is known about excitatory and inhibitory contributions to these fluctuations. Models and dynamic-clamp experiments show that, during high-conductance states, spikes are mainly determined by fluctuations of inhibition, or by inhibitory noise. This stands in contrast to low-conductance states, in which excitatory conductances determine spiking activity. To determine these contributions from experimental data, maximum likelihood methods can be designed and applied to intracellular recordings in vivo. Such methods indicate that action potentials are indeed mostly correlated with inhibitory fluctuations in awake animals. These results argue for a determinant role for inhibitory fluctuations in evoking spikes, and do not support feed-forward modes of processing, for which opposite patterns are predicted.

  6. Occupational noise management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-06-15

    Occupational noise is a frequently encountered on-the-job health hazard. This guide presented the responsibilities and regulatory requirements related to business activities where noise above 80 decibels is present. The guide provided a definition of noise and discussed noise hazards, types of noise, and on-the-job noise exposure. A risk assessment to noise in the work environment was also discussed. A guide to a hearing conservation program was also included. The main purpose of a hearing conservation program is the prevention of noise induced hearing loss for employees exposed to occupational noise. The components of such a program were outlined, with particular reference to noise monitoring; noise exposure control; worker education and training; hearing (audiometric) testing; and annual program review and record keeping. It was concluded that in terms of record keeping, it can be very helpful to file noise exposure assessments, particularly personal exposure measurements, with hearing test records to facilitate for future reference. refs., appendices.

  7. Noise and Hearing Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Noise and Hearing Protection Noise and Hearing Protection Patient ... it is. How can I tell if a noise is dangerous? People differ in their sensitivity to ...

  8. Noise exposure under hyperbaric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Objective evidence exists that divers demonstrate a hearing deficit greater than would be expected from ageing effects alone. Deafness in divers may be caused by a number of factors other than exposure to excessive noise levels, eg barotrauma, ear infection etc. This review concentrates on the concern that exposure of commercial divers to noise while at work may cause a hearing deficit. Sound pressure levels recorded both underwater and in diving chambers often exceed those allowable to workers onshore. However, the sound perceived by the diver is modified both in amplitude and in frequency when he is either underwater or in pressurised chambers. Broadly the effect of this modification is to attenuate the sound and thus offer some protection from high noise levels. The degree of attentuation varies with the frequency of the sound, however it is also possible under specific conditions associated with gas density for the sensitivity to particular frequencies to be amplified above that for normal atmospheric air. The levels of sound observed from some underwater tools are of concern even after allowing for a significant de-sensitisation of the divers` hearing. Reports of tinnitus and temporary hearing loss following a dive are sure signs that the noise levels have been harmful. It is not possible at present to describe risk criteria for hearing damage due to noise exposure associated with diving. (author)

  9. Implementation of Wavelet-Based Neural Network for the detection of Very Low Frequency (VLF) Whistlers Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Verma, Shivali; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    Abstract: In this paper, a wavelet-based neural network system for the detection and identification of four types of VLF whistler’s transients (i.e. dispersive, diffuse, spiky and multipath) is implemented and tested. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) technique is integrated with the feed forward neural network (FFNN) model to construct the identifier. First, the multi-resolution analysis (MRA) technique of DWT and the Parseval’s theorem are employed to extract the characteristics features of the transients at different resolution levels. Second, the FFNN identifies these extracted features to identify the transients according to the features extracted. The proposed methodology can reduce a great quantity of the features of transients without losing its original property; less memory space and computing time are required. Various transient events are tested; the results show that the identifier can detect whistler transients efficiently. Keywords: Discrete wavelets transform, Multi-resolution analysis, Parseval’s theorem and Feed forward neural network

  10. Evolution of magnetotelluric, total magnetic field, and VLF field parameters in Central Italy. Relations to local seismic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meloni, A.; Di Mauro, D.; Mele, G.; Palangio, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Ernst, T.; Teisseyre, R. [Institute of Geophysics, Warszawa (Poland)

    2001-04-01

    Magnetotelluric data were collected at Collemeluccio (41.72{sup 0}N, 14.37{sup 0}E) in Central Italy from summer 1991 to spring 1998. Analyzed by means of tensor decomposition on the geoelectric potential and robust estimation on the geomagnetic field, this set of data allowed the investigation of the electromagnetic induction, is presented here in its time evolution and compared to local and regional seismic activity. Tecto magnetic field observations from absolute magnetic field level in Central Italy were also made on data simultaneously recorded at four magnetometer stations, using L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory as a reference for differentiation. Recent results gathered from a system of two VLF search coil wide-band antennas, installed in the L'Aquila Observatory, are also discussed in relation to local seismic activity.

  11. Survey of ELF-VLF plasma waves in outer radiation belt observed by Cluster STAFF-SA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pokhotelov

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Various types of plasma waves have profound effects on acceleration and scattering of radiation belt particles. For the purposes of radiation belt modeling it is necessary to know statistical distributions of plasma wave parameters. This paper analyzes four years of plasma wave observations in the Earth's outer radiation belt obtained by the STAFF-SA experiment on board Cluster spacecraft. Statistical distributions of spectral density of different plasma waves observed in ELF-VLF range (chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic waves are presented as a function of magnetospheric coordinates and geomagnetic activity indices. Comparison with other spacecraft studies supports some earlier conclusions about the distribution of chorus and hiss waves and helps to remove the long-term controversy regarding the distribution of equatorial magnetosonic waves. This study represents a step towards the development of multi-spacecraft database of plasma wave activity in radiation belts.

  12. Multiple-Station Observation of Frequency Dependence and Polarization Characteristics of ELF/VLF waves generated via Ionospheric Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxworth, A. S.; Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals through ionospheric modification has been practiced for many years. Heating the lower ionosphere with high power HF waves allows for modulation of natural current systems. Our experiments were carried out at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. In this experiment, the ionosphere was heated with a vertical amplitude modulating signal and the modulation frequency was changed sequentially within an array of 40 frequencies followed by a frequency ramp. The observed magnetic field amplitude and polarization of the generated ELF/VLF signals were analyzed for multiple sites and as a function of modulation frequency. Our three observation sites: Chistochina, Paxson and Paradise are located within 36km (azimuth 47.7°), 50.2km (azimuth -20°) and 99km (azimuth 80.3°) respectively. We show that the peak amplitudes observed as a function of frequency result from vertical resonance in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and can be used to diagnose the D-region profile. Polarization analysis showed that out of the three sites Paxson shows the highest circularity in the magnetic field polarization, compared to Chistochina and Paradise which show highly linear polarizations. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical simulation model results and it was clear that in both cases, the modulated Hall current dominates the observed signals at Chistochina and Paradise sites and at Paxson there is an equal contribution from Hall and Pedersen currents. The Chistochina site shows the highest magnetic field amplitudes in both experimental and simulation environments. Depending upon the experimental and simulation observations at the three sites, a radiation pattern for the HAARP ionospheric heater can be mapped

  13. Hydrogeologic Prospection With Vlf (very Low Frequency) In A Low Potential Hard Rock Aquifer Near Beja (south Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, J.

    The use of geophysics prospection in hydrogeology is widely used as a way to find groundwater under difficult hydrogeologic potential rocks. The porphyric rocks lay- ered in the northern part of Beja city, are the most unproductive regional aquifer. Usu- ally this aquifer has an upper layer of 5 to 15 meters deep of weathered rock and a second layer build by fractures rock till 30 metres deep. Above this deep the probabil- ity to find groundwater is extremely low. For instance it is a very superficial aquifer that usually accomplish the topographic surface. The water use is essential for human purposes and here are used mainly for human and cattle supply. In order verify the goodness of a geophysic method and at the same time to supply a large farm called Herdade da Apariça, it was performed the geophysical method of Very Low Frequency (VLF-EM) with ABEM (WADI) equipment, in three areas previously defined by inter- pretation of aerial photography, as zones that have relative hydrogeological potential. It was performed a total of 5 profiles with 1970 m. The geophysic prospecting and hydrogeologic research allowed to drill 5 boreholes, being 4 extraction wells and 1 piezometric well. The productivity of the abstraction wells are between 2,000 L/h and 10,000 L/h, which is a very good yield when compared with the other yield values get from wells inside this aquifer. VLF proved in this conditions to be an essential tool to increment the tax success of drilling wells.

  14. Mathematical modeling of complex noise barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayek, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the noise reduction efficiency of highway noise barriers depends on the shape and absorptivity of the barrier, the influence of the impedance of the ground under the receiver, the atmospheric conditions as well as traffic details. The mathematical model for a barrier's noise reduction requires the knowledge of point-to-point acoustic diffraction models. In many instances, the shape of the barrier is simple; such as thin wall (edge), sharp wedge, and cylindrically topped berms. However, new designs of more efficient barriers have been investigated recently.

  15. Can Noise Kill People?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲娣

    2007-01-01

    Someone is singing next door,but you feel unhappy because her singing is just making a noise.We know that too much noise makes people feel terrible. Scientists are still trying to find out more about noise,but already it is known that a noise of over 85 decibels can make some people tired and anxious.

  16. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  17. Mechanics of underwater noise

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Donald

    1976-01-01

    Mechanics of Underwater Noise elucidates the basic mechanisms by which noise is generated, transmitted by structures and radiated into the sea. Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with a description of noise, decibels and levels, significance of spectra, and passive sonar equation. Subsequent chapters discuss sound waves in liquids; acoustic radiation fundamentals; wind-generated ocean ambient noise; vibration isolation and structural damping; and radiation by plate flexural vibrations. Other chapters address cavitation, propeller cavitation noise, radiation by fluctuating-force (dipo

  18. Horizontal Ionospheric Electron Density Gradients Observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC TIP: Spatial Distributions and Effects on VLF Wave Propagation at Mid-Latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien H. Chua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial variability of electron densities in the nightside ionosphere and its effects on very-low frequency (VLF wave propagation using a suite of instruments from the FORMOSAT-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC spacecraft.We use observations from the Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP instruments to infer the horizontal electron density gradients along each satellite track. We demonstrate that the OI 1356 _ radiance measured by the TIP instruments tracks the horizontal electron density structure well with high spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity. Accurate measurements of the horizontal electron density gradients are important for improving retrieved electron density profiles from GPS occultation and other tomographic remote sensing techniques. The processes underlying the variability in the large-scale, nightside electron density gradients are the main drivers of ionospheric weather. TIP observations reveal significant variability in both the small and large scale structure of the nightside ionosphere. The relative intensities, relative widths, and latitudinal separation of the northern and southern ionization crests of the Appleton anomalies show a high degree of longitudinal variation.We demonstrate how the TIP observations can be used to measure the horizontal gradient of the refractive index of whistler-mode VLF waves propagating in a cold, collisionless plasma. These measurements are critical for understanding how gradients in electron density associated with ionospheric structure such as depletions and the Appleton anomalies affect VLF wave propagation through the equatorial and mid-latitude ionosphere.

  19. Lightning driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: regional and global estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examine energetic electron precipitation fluxes driven by lightning, in order to determine the global distribution of energy deposited into the middle atmosphere. Previous studies using lightning-driven precipitation burst rates have estimated losses from the inner radiation belts. In order to confirm the reliability of those rates and the validity of the conclusions drawn from those studies, we have analyzed New Zealand data to test our global understanding of troposphere to magnetosphere coupling. We examine about 10000h of AbsPAL recordings made from 17 April 2003 through to 26 June 2004, and analyze subionospheric very-low frequency (VLF perturbations observed on transmissions from VLF transmitters in Hawaii (NPM and western Australia (NWC. These observations are compared with those previously reported from the Antarctic Peninsula. The perturbation rates observed in the New Zealand data are consistent with those predicted from the global distribution of the lightning sources, once the different experimental configurations are taken into account. Using lightning current distributions rather than VLF perturbation observations we revise previous estimates of typical precipitation bursts at L~2.3 to a mean precipitation energy flux of ~1×10-3 ergs cm-2s-1. The precipitation of energetic electrons by these bursts in the range L=1.9-3.5 will lead to a mean rate of energy deposited into the atmosphere of 3×10-4 ergs cm-2min-1, spatially varying from a low of zero above some ocean regions to highs of ~3-6×10-3 ergs cm-2min-1 above North America and its conjugate region.

  20. VLF signal modulations during the total solar eclipse of 22nd July, 2009: model using D region ion chemistry and LWPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Palit, Sourav; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    One of the major sources of ionospheric perturbations is variations in solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation flux. Solar eclipse is a phenomenon which is capable of producing significant effects on the physical and chemical properties of the ionospheric plasma. During a solar eclipse, the solar radiation flux reduces considerably for a limited period of time over specific locations on the Earth. This induces certain changes within the ionosphere or more precisely, in the D-region which can be studied with the observation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio signal modulations. The parameters which mainly govern the ion-chemistry, such as the recombination coefficients are poorly known till date. Solar eclipse provides us with an excellent opportunity to study these parameters as its time of occurrence is known beforehand and thus we can equip ourselves accordingly. In the present study we considered the Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) that occurred on 22nd July, 2009 within the Indian subcontinent. Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) conducted a week long campaign during the eclipse and data were recorded from dozens of places within India and abroad. Both positive and negative changes in VLF signal amplitude were observed. In this paper, data for a propagation path between Indian Navy VLF transmitter named VTX3 and a pair of receivers in India, namely Malda and Kolkata are used. We start with calculating the obscuration function for these two places to find the variations in ionization flux within the period of the eclipse. After this, we incorporated the D region ion chemistry model to find the equilibrium ion density over the region and employ the LWPC code to find the VLF signal amplitude. We varied the values of recombination coefficients to achieve desired accuracy in our results. In doing so, we achieved two goals: First, we have been able to reproduce the trend of variation in VLF signal amplitude (both positive and negative) at both the receiving locations

  1. SELF and VLF electromagnetic emissions that preceded the M6.2 Central Italy earthquake occurred on August 24, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldi, Daniele; Cataldi, Gabriele; Straser, Valentino

    2017-04-01

    On August 24, 2016 at 01:36:32 UTC a destructive earthquake hit Central Italy with a magnitude of M6.2. The authors of this study have recorded some electromagnetic signals that have preceded this strong earthquake. These signals were recorded through two electromagnetic monitoring stations realized by Gabriele Cataldi and Daniele Cataldi, located near the town of Albano Laziale (Rome, Italy) and near the city of Lariano (Rome, Italy) and can monitor the radio spectrum 24h7 between 0.001 Hz and 96 kHz (SELF-LF band). The electromagnetic monitoring allowed to identify two interesting types of electromagnetic anomalies: the first electromagnetic anomaly was recorded on August 18, 2016 between 02:47 UTC and 06:21 UTC, in the VLF band prevalently between 18kHz and 26kHz; the second electromagnetic anomaly was registered between 08:00 UTC on August 23, 2016 and 05:00 UTC on August 24, 2016, prevalently between 0.01 and 0.7Hz: the most intense signals were recorded at 08:50 UTC on August 23, 2016 and approximately 1 hour before the strong earthquake. The Earth's electromagnetic background monitoring in the SELF-VLF band (0Hztechnological) have allowed us to understand that there are actually two families of pre-seismic radio emissions: 1) radio emissions identified as Earth's geomagnetic field disturbances related to "near Earth" solar wind proton density increase variations, and for this reason it can be seen from any point on the Earth (this is "no local" type emissions); 2) radio signals are not connected directly to the solar and geomagnetic activity: these radio signals are probably generated by piezoelectricity phenomena occurring near the focal area of the earthquake and are detectable near earthquake epicenter (this is a "local" type emissions). It is therefore clear that the monitoring of solar activity and Earth's geomagnetic activity is an activity of fundamental importance to be able to have a general understanding of pre-seismic radio signals nature. In fact

  2. Exos-B/Siple Station VLF wave-particle interaction experiments: 1. General description and wave-particle correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, I.; Hashimoto, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Mukai, T.; Bell, T.F.; Inan, U.S.; Helliwell, R.A.; Katsufrakis, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    In situ measurements of both energetic particles and VLF waves have been carried out in a joint program involving the Japanese satellite EXOS-B and the Siple Station VLF transmitter. A general description of the experiment is given as well as some results concerning wave-particle correlations. Detailed analysis of the observed wave characteristics is given in a companion paper. Correlations of electron flux and pitch angle anisotropy in the energy range from 85 eV to 6.9 keV with waves in a range from 300 Hz to 9 kHz are examined. These electrons sometimes have a pitch angle distributions with a peak flux at 90/sup 0/ pitch angle (so-called pancake distribution). On five passes out of a total of 50 during the summer campaign in 1979, the energy of the electrons that showed a high pitch angle anisotropy shifted upward as the satellite moved into the plasmasphere, crossing the plasmapause in the equatorial region. In two cases out of five, strong Siple signals were observed in the geomagnetic equatorial region just outside the plasmapause, in association with such a pancake pitch angle distribution of electrons. The Siple signals are most likely amplified by the cyclotron instability due to the high pitch angle anisotropy (HPAA), although the flux of resonant electrons was relatively small. For three other cases of HPAA, the satellite location was so far away from the Siple meridian that the signal level, even if amplified, was too weak to be detected by the satellite. Emissions associated with Siple signals were detected on five (two equatorial and three high latitude) passes, which were all confined on 6 days after a large magnetic storm. On the days when the Siple triggered emissions were observed, the pitch angle anisotropy was low, but the electron flux at resonant energies in the equatorial region was four or five times larger than that on other non-triggering days in all energy channels from 85 eV to 6.9 keV.

  3. Solar noise storms

    CERN Document Server

    Elgaroy, E O

    2013-01-01

    Solar Noise Storms examines the properties and features of solar noise storm phenomenon. The book also presents some theories that can be used to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. The coverage of the text includes topics that cover the features and behavior of noise storms, such as the observable features of noise storms; the relationship between noise storms and the observable features on the sun; and ordered behavior of storm bursts in the time-frequency plane. The book also covers the spectrum, polarization, and directivity of noise storms. The text will be of great use to astr

  4. Helicopter Noise And Noise Abatement Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borivoj Galović

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The helicopter generated noise at and around the airports islower than the noise generated by aeroplanes, since their numberof operations, i. e. the number of takeoffs and landings ismuch lower than the takeoffs and landings of the aeroplanes.Out of some hundred operations a day, helicopters participatewith approximately 15%, but the very impact of noise is by nomeans negligible, since the number of helicopter flights aboveurban areas is constantly increasing.This paper attempts to analyse this phenomenon and thetype of helicopter generated noise, its negative impacts, to explainthe flight procedures and the operative procedures duringtakeoff, landing and overflight of helicopters in operations inthe vicinity and outside airports, as well as the methods of measuringand determining the limit of noise [eve~ and the resultingproblems.

  5. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  6. Noise-Measuring Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J. M.

    1965-01-01

    A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test....

  7. Introductory guide to noise

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ferreira, T.M

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available The difference between sound and noise varies from one human being to another. Noise, then, is simply unwanted sound and to understand how it can be combatted we must know more about its nature. A guide of acceptable levels of noise are investigated....

  8. A Study of Artificial Modification of the VLF Propagation Characteristics of the Plasmasphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    belig deselored 2. IIKI I )1\\t’ss1 s DsIM ’s s IIL stItIO\\ it , t + It I lie eqi’ititus dtecrihng tine dill’sioin1 Of ’seseral g uses ll in .u iniiilt...atmosphere control , the floss, a stale of dilf u- hesgi-lrs The~c lhi’tttat Aiti Lie thi, e rok co"- . r sis e expansion csists. intei "it isle ItuIincal...size of the hole is controlled by the expansion and trans- Cobhustion port of the injected exhaust vapors. All of the temnperature ("L) 3250 2869

  9. Long-period fading in atmospherics during severe meteorological activity and associated solar geophysical phenomena at low latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available The records of VLF atmospherics over Calcutta and then over Kalyani (West Bengal during the torrential rainfall, caused by violent monsoon and post-monsoon depressions, exhibit distinct long-period fadings both at day and night. Interesting results obtained from an analysis of round-the-clock atmospherics data and associated meteorological parameters are reported in this paper. A possible correlation between the severe meteorological activity with the solar geophysical phenomena was studied. The results are indicative of an interesting sequence of solar-terrestrial events. A tentative conclusion is reached, suggesting an origin of the fading from atmospheric gravity waves generated in the centre of activity of the depressions concerned.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · Lightning · Precipitation

  10. Adaptive Noise Reduction System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Ropuš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is an all-present environment pollutant, considered to be one of the greatest contemporary pollutants. World-wide, co-ordinated actions are conducted in order to develop systems which minimise the noise influence onto society.In this article we argue that novel approach to suppression of influence of noise is useful. Furthermore, we argue that the efficient approach is formulation of the efficient, broadly applicable, ubiquituous, adaptive noise-protection system. The approach combines the natural noise-protection form based on plants with the artificially formed coatings.Elements of the system are discussed, its formation and maintenance analysed and perspectives conjectured.

  11. Effects of a Solar Eclipse on the Propagation of VLF-LF Signals: Observations and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barin Kumar De

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results from the measurements of some of the fundamental parameters (amplitude of sferics and transmitted signal, conductivity of lower ionosphere of the ionospheric responses to the 22 July 2009 solar eclipse (partial: 91.7% are shown. This study summarizes our results from sferics signals at 81 kHz and subionospheric transmitted signals at 19.8 and 40 kHz recorded at Agartala, Tripura (latitude: 23¢XN, longitude: 91.4¢XE. We observed significant absorption in amplitude of these signals during the eclipse period compared to their ambient values for the same period during the adjacent 7 days. The signal strength along their propagation paths was controlled by the eclipse associated decrease in ionization in the D-region of the ionosphere. Waveguide mode theory calculations show that the elevation of the height of lower ionosphere boundary of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide to a value where the conductivity parameter was 106 unit. The absorption in 81 kHz sferics amplitude is high compared to the absorption in the amplitude of 40 kHz signal transmitted from Japan. The simultaneous changes in the amplitudes of sferics and in the amplitude of transmitted signals assert some sort of coupling between the upper atmosphere and the Earth¡¦s near-surface atmosphere prevailing clouds during solar eclipse.

  12. A Tool for Low Noise Procedures Design and Community Noise Impact Assessment: The Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, David A.; Page, Juliet A.

    2002-01-01

    To improve aircraft noise impact modeling capabilities and to provide a tool to aid in the development of low noise terminal area operations for rotorcraft and tiltrotors, the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM) was developed by the NASA Langley Research Center and Wyle Laboratories. RNM is a simulation program that predicts how sound will propagate through the atmosphere and accumulate at receiver locations located on flat ground or varying terrain, for single and multiple vehicle flight operations. At the core of RNM are the vehicle noise sources, input as sound hemispheres. As the vehicle "flies" along its prescribed flight trajectory, the source sound propagation is simulated and accumulated at the receiver locations (single points of interest or multiple grid points) in a systematic time-based manner. These sound signals at the receiver locations may then be analyzed to obtain single event footprints, integrated noise contours, time histories, or numerous other features. RNM may also be used to generate spectral time history data over a ground mesh for the creation of single event sound animation videos. Acoustic properties of the noise source(s) are defined in terms of sound hemispheres that may be obtained from theoretical predictions, wind tunnel experimental results, flight test measurements, or a combination of the three. The sound hemispheres may contain broadband data (source levels as a function of one-third octave band) and pure-tone data (in the form of specific frequency sound pressure levels and phase). A PC executable version of RNM is publicly available and has been adopted by a number of organizations for Environmental Impact Assessment studies of rotorcraft noise. This paper provides a review of the required input data, the theoretical framework of RNM's propagation model and the output results. Code validation results are provided from a NATO helicopter noise flight test as well as a tiltrotor flight test program that used the RNM as a tool to aid in

  13. Low-noise amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Gulkov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of signal and noise processing device is considered in this article. It contains two channels: the main channel (MC contains the mixture of signal and noise, and compensation channel (CC that extracts just a noise from the mixture. The feature of the processing circuit is that the mixture samples are formed by short impulses at the moments of passing signal through zero. Further antiphase noise is set in the channels, adder by which the noise is removed from mixture is set on the cannels output. Study of the described device was carried out for simulated AM signal and white Gaussian noise in simulation environment Matlab. The results are shown, that device reduces noise by 16 dB of power.

  14. Characterizing global infrasonic ocean ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pichon, Alexis; Stutzman, Eleonore; Arduin, Fabrice; Sylvain, Leon

    2017-04-01

    The ability of the International Monitoring System (IMS) global infrasound network to detect atmospheric explosions and events of interest strongly depends on station specific ambient noise which includes both incoherent wind noise and real coherent infrasonic waves. To characterize the coherent ambient noise, a broadband array processing was performed on 10 years of continuous recordings at IMS stations. Multi-year comparisons between the observed and modeled directional microbarom amplitude variations at several IMS stations using two-dimensional wave energy spectrum ocean wave products are performed to build of a reference database of infrasound oceanic sources. Microseisms are attributed the same source processes as microbaroms, involving the interaction of standing ocean waves. To further evaluate oceanic wave action models, the infrasound analysis will be supplemented with several other approaches including microseisms collected at seismic instrumentation (single stations and arrays). The expected benefits of such studies concern the use of multi-year complementary data to finely characterize coupling mechanisms at the ocean-atmosphere interface. In return, a better knowledge of the source of the ambient ocean noise opens new perspectives by providing additional integrated constraints on the dynamics of the middle atmosphere and its disturbances where data coverage is sparse.

  15. Noise from wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegeant, Olivier [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Building Sciences

    2002-02-01

    A rapid growth of installed wind power capacity is expected in the next few years. However, the siting of wind turbines on a large scale raises concerns about their environmental impact, notably with respect to noise. To this end, variable speed wind turbines offer a promising solution for applications in densely populated areas like the European countries, as this design would enable an efficient utilisation of the masking effect due to ambient noise. In rural and recreational areas where wind turbines are sited, the ambient noise originates from the action of wind on the vegetation and about the listener's ear (pseudo-noise). It shows a wind speed dependence similar to that of the noise from a variable speed wind turbine and can therefore mask the latter for a wide range of conditions. However, a problem inherent to the design of these machines is their proclivity to pure tone generation, because of the enhanced difficulty of avoiding structural resonances in the mechanical parts. Pure tones are deemed highly annoying and are severely regulated by most noise policies. In relation to this problem, the vibration transmission of structure-borne sound to the tower of the turbine is investigated, in particular when the tower is stiffened at its upper end. Furthermore, since noise annoyance due to wind turbine is mostly a masking issue, the wind-related sources of ambient noise are studied and their masking potentials assessed. With this aim, prediction models for wind-induced vegetation noise and pseudo-noise have been developed. Finally, closely related to the effect of masking, is the difficulty, regularly encountered by local authorities and wind farm developers, to measure noise immission from wind turbines. A new measurement technique has thus been developed in the course of this work. Through improving the signal-to-noise ratio between wind turbine noise and ambient noise, the new technique yields more accurate measurement results.

  16. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...... localities of tensions between matter and the immaterial, the practical and the ideal, and subject and object. In the colloquial language there can, moreover, often seem to be something authentic or genuine about atmosphere, juxtaposing it to staging, which is implied to be something simulated or artificial....... This introduction seeks to outline how a number of scholars have addressed the relationship between staged atmospheres and experience, and thus highlight both the philosophical, social and political aspects of atmospheres...

  17. Ionosperic anomaly due to seismic activities – Part 1: Calibration of the VLF signal of VTX 18.2 KHz station from Kolkata and deviation during seismic events

    OpenAIRE

    Sasmal, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.

    2009-01-01

    VLF signals are long thought to give away important information about the lithosphere-ionosphere coupling. In order to establish co-relations, if any, between the ionospheric activities and the earthquakes, we need to understand what the reference signals are, throughout the year. The best opportunity to do this is during the period of solar minimum where the number of flares and sunspots are negligible and the data would be primarily affected by the sun and variation would be due to normal s...

  18. Ionospheric perturbations related to the earthquake in Vrancea area on November 22, 2014, as detected by electromagnetic VLF/LF frequency signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Solovieva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Data from the European network of very low/ low frequency (VLF/LF receivers has been used to study the response of the lower ionosphere to the earthquake of magnitude 5.5 in Vrancea area on November 22, 2014. Negative amplitude anomalies have been observed during 3 days before the earthquake and two days after, on the LF (45.9 kHz signal passed above the seismic area. No perturbations have been found for the same signal in control paths during this period. Other possible influences both from above and below which can produce perturbations in the ionosphere have been taken into consideration.

  19. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    sawmill noise on the metropolis was developed. the metropolis was ... INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION ... auditory fatigue and hearing loss, and indirect n auditory effects such as speech interfere annoyance .... acoustic environment for workers [29]. In particular, ..... and corn mills”, African Journal of Health Science,. Vol.

  20. Measured Noise from Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph; McSwain, Robert; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Proposed uses of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), including home package delivery, have the potential to expose large portions of communities to a new noise source. This paper discusses results of flyover noise measurements of four small UAVs, including an internal combustion-powered model airplane and three battery-powered multicopters. Basic noise characteristics of these vehicles are discussed, including spectral properties and sound level metrics such as sound pressure level, effective perceived noise level, and sound exposure level. The size and aerodynamic characteristics of the multicopters in particular make their flight path susceptible to atmospheric disturbances such as wind gusts. These gusts, coupled with a flight control system that varies rotor speed to maintain vehicle stability, create an unsteady acoustic signature. The spectral variations resulting from this unsteadiness are explored, in both hover and flyover conditions for the multicopters. The time varying noise, which differs from the relatively steady noise generated by large transport aircraft, may complicate the prediction of human annoyance using conventional sound level metrics.

  1. Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of the first discovery of exoplanets orbiting sun-like stars in the mid-1990s, few believed that observations of exoplanet atmospheres would ever be possible. After the 2002 Hubble Space Telescope detection of a transiting exoplanet atmosphere, many skeptics discounted it as a one-object, one-method success. Nevertheless, the field is now firmly established, with over two dozen exoplanet atmospheres observed today. Hot Jupiters are the type of exoplanet currently most amenable to study. Highlights include: detection of molecular spectral features; observation of day-night temperature gradients; and constraints on vertical atmospheric structure. Atmospheres of giant planets far from their host stars are also being studied with direct imaging. The ultimate exoplanet goal is to answer the enigmatic and ancient question, "Are we alone?" via detection of atmospheric biosignatures. Two exciting prospects are the immediate focus on transiting super Earths orbiting in the habitable zone of M-dwarfs, and u...

  2. Adaptive noise cancellation

    CERN Document Server

    Akram, N

    1999-01-01

    In this report we describe the concept of adaptive noise canceling, an alternative method of estimating signals corrupted by additive noise of interference. The method uses 'primary' input containing the corrupted signal and a 'reference' input containing noise correlated in some unknown way with the primary noise, the reference input is adaptively filtered and subtracted from the primary input to obtain the signal estimate. Adaptive filtering before subtraction allows the treatment of inputs that are deterministic or stochastic, stationary or time variable. When the reference input is free of signal and certain other conditions are met then noise in the primary input can be essentially eliminated without signal distortion. It is further shown that the adaptive filter also acts as notch filter. Simulated results illustrate the usefulness of the adaptive noise canceling technique.

  3. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...... experience in space, presented as middle ground experience. In the field of HCI, middle ground experiences complete the unarticulated spectrum between designing for foreground of attention or background awareness. When “Articulating Atmospheres through Middle Ground Experiences in Interaction Design...

  4. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Kajita

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses...

  5. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes;

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjec...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  6. Noise at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The notion of noise occupies a contested territory, in which it is framed as pollution and detritus even as it makes its opposite a possibility - noise is always defined in opposition to something else, even if this ‘other’ is not quite clear. This paper explores noise in the context of ‘the inte...... interface’ asking what its affordances as an idea may contribute to our understanding of interface. I draw historically on information theory in particular to initiate this exploration....

  7. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses atmospheric neutrino experiments and the neutrino oscillation studies with these neutrinos.

  8. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  9. Landing gear noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  10. Noise and Health: How does noise affect us?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Noise annoyance is a primary indication that noise is a problem, and by itself noise annoyance means that the quality of life is adversely affected. Results from noise annoyance research are presented that make possible a detailed evaluation of noise exposures with respect to the annoyance induced.

  11. Ranking of Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances by Means of the Duration of Vlf Perturbed Signal in Agreement with Satellite X-Ray Flux Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ionosphere undergoes permanently solar flares that quickly change its properties inducing sometime unwanted effects. These changes, or events, are known as Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (SIDs and the knowledge of their magnitude may be of great interest to anticipate probable damages. Currently, there does not exist any classification of these ionospheric changes based on their amplitude due to the wide variability of its responses. The only way to surmise their importance is to study them indirectly, throughout the classification of the X-ray flux intensity recorded by satellites. An attempt of classification based on their duration was proposed by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO but it is not very accurate because SID’s duration is measured directly from the raw signal of the Very Low Frequency (VLF signal and/or the Low Frequency (LF signal. The aim of this work is to investigate, through a set of simple mathematical techniques applied to VLF/LF signals recorded by ground based receivers, the best method to estimate SIDs durations and then propose a new classification based on these durations.

  12. Bispectrum Analysis of Non-linear wave-wave Interaction between VLF Transmitter signal and ELF emission on the Basis of DEMETER satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Symmetric sidebands are observed in the ionosphere by the DEMETER (Detection of Electromagnetic Radiation Transmitted through Earthquake Region) satellite, when it passes above the Indian VLF transmitter, named VTX (18.2 kHz), located near Kanyakumari, India. The spectral boarding phenomena may be divided into two types: (1) spectrally broadened components occurring without any association with ELF/VLF emissions under disturbed ionospheric condition, (2) Spectrally broadened components with predominant side band structure in association with ELF emission. Generally spectral analysis at second order (Power spectrum) is used to analyze the frequency component of signal, but it losses the phase information among the different Fourier components. To retain this information the bispectrum (third order) and/or the bicoherence (normalized bispectrum) are used. Results suggest a non-linear mode coupling between the transmitter signal and ELF emission which produces sidebands that are quasi-electrostatic in nature. However, faint spectral broadened components in both types 1 and 2 may be connected with Doppler shift of quasi-electrostatic, whistler mode waves with a broad spectrum near resonance cone, due to scattering of the transmitter signals from ionospheric irregularities in the F-region. Keywords: spectral boarding, wave-wave Interaction, whistler mode waves and Doppler shift

  13. Investigating the source of contaminated plumes downstream of the Alborz Sharghi coal washing plant using EM34 conductivity data, VLF-EM and DC-resistivity geophysical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraz, Farzin Amirkhani; Ardejani, Faramarz Doulati; Moradzadeh, Ali; Arab-Amiri, Ali Reza

    2013-01-01

    Coal washing factories may create serious environmental problems due to pyrite oxidation and acid mine drainage generation from coal waste piles on nearby land. Infiltration of pyrite oxidation products through the porous materials of the coal waste pile by rainwater cause changes in the conductivity of underground materials and groundwater downstream of the pile. Electromagnetic and electrical methods are effective for investigation and monitoring of the contaminated plumes caused by coal waste piles and tailings impoundments. In order to investigate the environmental impact from a coal waste pile at the Alborz Sharghi coal washing plant, an EM34 ground conductivity meter was used on seven parallel lines in an E-W direction, downstream of the waste pile. Two-dimensional resistivity models obtained by the inversion of EM34 conductivity data identified conductive leachate plumes. In addition, quasi-3D inversion of EM34 data has confirmed the decreasing resistivity at depth due to the contaminated plumes. Comparison between EM34, VLF and DC-resistivity datasets, which were acquired for similar survey lines, agree well in identifying changes in the resistivity trend. The EM34 and DC-resistivity sections have greater similarity and better smoothness rather than those of the VLF model. Two-dimensional inversion models of these methods have shown some contaminated plumes with low resistivity.

  14. Investigation of VLF and HF waves showing seismo-ionospheric anomalies induced by the 29 September 2009 Samoa earthquake (Mw=8.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In Samoa Islands, a powerful earthquake took place at 17:48:10.99 UTC (06:48:10.99 LT on 29 September 2009 with a magnitude Mw=8.1. Using ICE (Instrument Champ Electrique and IMSC (Instrument Magnetic Search Coil experiments onboard the DEMETER (Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite we have surveyed possible variations in electromagnetic signals transmitted by the ground-based VLF transmitter NPM in Hawaii and in HF plasma waves close to the Samoa earthquake during the seismic activity. The indices Dst and Kp were used to distinguish pre-earthquake anomalies from the other anomalies related to the geomagnetic activities. In a previous study we have shown that anomalies in IAP (plasma analyzer and ISL (Langmuir probe experiments onboard the DEMETER and also TEC (Total Electron Content data appear 1 to 5 days before the Samoa earthquake. In this paper we show that the anomalies in the VLF transmitter signal and in the HF range appear with the same time scale. The lack of significant geomagnetic activities indicates that these anomalous behaviors could be regarded as seismo-ionospheric precursors. It is also shown that comparative analysis is more effective in seismo-ionospheric studies.

  15. A multiple-mode three-dimensional model of VLF propagation in the earth-ionosphere waveguide in the presence of localized D region disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, William L.; Inan, Umran S.; Bell, Timothy F.

    1993-01-01

    Transient localized D region disturbances, such as those associated with lightning discharges, affect the characteristics of VLF waves propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. In particular, both phase and amplitude changes in the subionospheric signal can be observed at receiving sites as a result of the wave scattering that takes place in the disturbed region. In the present paper we present a multiple-mode three-dimensional model of VLF propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide in the presence of localized D region disturbances. The model takes into account great circle (GC) propagation paths with realistic ground and ionospheric conductivity changes that result in mode conversion along the path. It is assumed that conductivity changes transverse to the GC paths are negligible except in the vicinity of the D region disturbance and that mode coupling is negligible within the disturbed region. This new model is applied to experimental observations and is found to be in general agreement. The diagnostics potential of the model for characterizing energetic particle precipitation events is discussed.

  16. Studies on different geophysical and extra-terrestrial events within the Earth-ionosphere cavity in terms of ULF/ELF/VLF radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfui, Minu; Haldar, D. K.; Biswas, Debasish

    2016-10-01

    The space between the two spherical conducting shells, Earth surface and the lower boundary of the ionosphere, behaves as a spherical cavity in which some electromagnetic signals can propagate a long distance and is called Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Through this waveguide ultra low frequency (ULF), extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) signals can propagate efficiently with low attenuation. Resonances which occur for ELF waves due to round-the-world propagation interfering with 2n π phase difference are called Schumann resonances. Lightnings are the main sources of energy continuously producing these electromagnetic radiations from the troposphere. Some fixed frequency signals are also transmitted through the waveguide from different stations for navigation purposes. The intensity and phase of these signals at a particular position depend on the waveguide characteristics which are highly influenced by different natural events. Thus the signatures of different geophysical and extra-terrestrial events may be investigated by studying these signals through proper monitoring of the time series data using suitable techniques. In this article, we provide a review on ULF, ELF and VLF signals within the waveguide in terms of different geophysical and extra-terrestrial events like lightning, earthquakes, Leonid meteor shower, solar flares, solar eclipse, geomagnetic storms, and TLEs etc.

  17. Masking of Wind Turbine Noise: Influence of wind turbulence on ambient noise fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegeant, Olivier

    2002-07-01

    In the issue of noise annoyance generated by wind turbines, masking by ambient noise is of great importance. At wind turbine sites, the main source of ambient noise arises from the wind blowing on the vegetation. However, natural wind can barely be described as a steady flow and 'lulls' and 'gusts' are words used to describe its unsteady component. This latter, also called wind turbulence, may affect the masking effect, as the wind turbine may become audible during short laps of time of low wind speed, that is of low ambient noise. The aim of the present report is to study the influence of wind turbulence on ambient noise fluctuations. It is shown that these latter are governed not only by the turbulence intensity, but also by its temporal and spatial structure. This report provides some elements of atmospheric turbulence as well as techniques for the simulation of turbulent wind fields. Simulation results are given that illustrate how the standard deviation of the vegetation noise can vary as function of the canopy size and turbulence spatial patterns. Finally, ambient noise fluctuations and their statistical descriptions are also discussed, based on both theoretical considerations and empirical results.

  18. Wind turbines. Unsteady aerodynamics and inflow noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riget Broe, B.

    2009-12-15

    Aerodynamical noise from wind turbines due to atmospheric turbulence has the highest emphasis in semi-empirical models. However it is an open question whether inflow noise has a high emphasis. This illustrates the need to investigate and improve the semi-empirical model for noise due to atmospheric turbulence. Three different aerodynamical models are investigated in order to estimate the lift fluctuations due to unsteady aerodynamics. Two of these models are investigated to find the unsteady lift distribution or pressure difference as function of chordwise position on the aerofoil. An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input. The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models for lift distribution is for completely anisotropic turbulence and the other for perfectly isotropic turbulence, and so is also the corresponding models for the lift fluctuations derived from the models for lift distribution. The models for lift distribution and lift are compared with pressure data which are obtained by microphones placed flush with the surface of an aerofoil. The pressure data are from two experiments in a wind tunnel, one experiment with a NACA0015 profile and a second with a NACA63415 profile. The turbulence is measured by a triple wired hotwire instrument in the experiment with a NACA0015 profile. Comparison of the aerodynamical models with data shows that the models capture the general characteristics of the measurements, but the data are hampered by background noise from the fan propellers in the wind tunnel. The measurements are in between the completely anisotropic turbulent model and the perfectly isotropic turbulent model. This indicates that the models capture the aerodynamics well. Thus the measurements suggest that the noise due to atmospheric turbulence can be described and modeled by the two models for lift distribution. It was not possible to test the acoustical model by the measurements

  19. Ionospheric turbulence from TEC variations and VLF/LF transmitter signal observations before and during the destructive seismic activity of August and October 2016 in Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contadakis, Michael E.; Arabelos, Demetrios N.; Vergos, George; Spatala, Spyrous; Skeberis, Christos; Xenos, Tomas D.; Biagi, Pierfrancesco; Scordilis, Emmanuel M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the ionospheric turbulence from TEC variations and VLF/LF transmitter signal observations before and during the disastrous seismic activity of August and October 2016 in Central Italy . The Total Electron Content (TEC) data of 8 Global Positioning System (GPS) stations of the EUREF network, which are being provided by IONOLAB (Turkey), were analysed using Discrete Fourier Analysis in order to investigate the TEC variations (Contadakis et al. 2009, Contadakis et al. 2012, Contadakis et al. 2015). The data acquired for VLF/LF signal observations are from the receiver of Thessaloniki(40.59N, 22,78E), Greece (Skeberis et al. 2015) which monitor the VLF/LF transmitters of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). A method of normalization according to the distance between the receiver and the transmitter is applied on the above data and then they are processed by the Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT) to produce the corresponding spectra for visual analysis. The results of this investigation indicate that the High- Frequency limit fo, of the ionospheric turbulence content, increases as the site and the moment of the earthquake occurrence is approaching, pointing to the earthquake locus. In accordence ,the analyzed data from the receiver of INFREP network in Thessaloniki, Greece show that the signals from the two VLF European transmitters, Tavolara ( Italy) and Le Blanc (France), for wich the transmission path crosses the epicentral zones, indicate enhanced high frequency variations, the last ten days before the moment of the earthquake occurrence. We conclude that the LAIC mechanism through acoustic or gravity wave could explain this phenomenology. Reference Contadakis, M.E., Arabelos, D.N., Asteriadis, G., Spatalas, S.D., Pikridas, C. TEC variations over the Mediterranean during the seismic activity period of the last quarter of 2005 in the area of Greece, Nat. Hazards and Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 1267

  20. Mediality is Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    This PhD is concerned with the use of noise as a material within media arts practice, especially in ‘post-digital’ contexts such as glitch electronica, glitch art and uses of old media. It examines the relationship between informational culture and noise, exploring the ways in which the structuring...

  1. Sounding Off about Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpton, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Noise in a community college library can be part of the nature of the environment. It can also become a huge distraction for those who see the library as their sanctuary for quiet study and review of resources. This article describes the steps that should be taken by library staff in order to be proactive about noise and the library environment,…

  2. Effects of traffic noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlob, D.

    1986-02-01

    One of the main sources of noise is road traffic. In 1984 there were over 25 million cars, 1.2 million lorries, 1.3 million motor cycles and 1.6 million mopeds using our roads. Opinion polls showed that 21% of the population felt that they were affected by traffic noise as a nuisance factor. An outline of the effects of this noise on the affected population is given, illustrated by diagrams. Details about noise emissions (drive-past level) of the different types of vehicles in city traffic are stated and the effects of noise described. The author goes into the nuisance effect (noise is not a physical factor, but a psychosocial one), changes in behaviour (ways of speaking, reduction of stress on households in proportion to rising income and higher educational levels) and the consequences for health (the reaction of the body to noise is primarily a consequence of the psychosomatic organisation of ow bodies). In conclusion, the author deals with the subjective efficiency of noise protection measures. (HWJ).

  3. Speech communications in noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    The physical characteristics of speech, the methods of speech masking measurement, and the effects of noise on speech communication are investigated. Topics include the speech signal and intelligibility, the effects of noise on intelligibility, the articulation index, and various devices for evaluating speech systems.

  4. Noise in Coevolving Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Diakonova, Marina; Miguel, Maxi San

    2014-01-01

    Coupling dynamics of the states of the nodes of a network to the dynamics of the network topology leads to generic absorbing and fragmentation transitions. The coevolving voter model is a typical system that exhibits such transitions at some critical rewiring. We study the robustness of these transitions under two distinct ways of introducing noise. Noise affecting all the nodes destroys the absorbing-fragmentation transition, giving rise in finite-size systems to two regimes: bimodal magnetisation and dynamic fragmentation. Noise Targeting a fraction of nodes preserves the transitions but introduces shattered fragmentation with its characteristic fraction of isolated nodes and one or two giant components. Both the lack of absorbing state for homogenous noise and the shift in the absorbing transition to higher rewiring for targeted noise are supported by analytical approximations.

  5. The VLA Atmospheric Phase Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Keith

    2014-05-01

    The Atmospheric Phase Interferometer (API) is a two-element atmospheric seeing monitor located at the Very Large Array (VLA) site. The instrument measures turbulent refractive index variation through the atmosphere by examining phase differences in a satellite beacon signal detected at two (or more) antennas. With this measurement, the VLA scheduling software is able to consider atmospheric stability when determining which frequency observation to schedule next. We are in the process of extending this two-element interferometer to four elements, which will allow us to measure the turbulence in two dimensions and at multiple length scales. This thesis will look at some statistical properties of turbulence, the effects of atmospheric stability on radio interferometric observations, and discuss details of the instrument and the data that it collects. The thesis will also cover some techniques and principles of signal processing, and an analysis of some data from the instrument. The results demonstrate that other surface atmospheric variables (e.g. windspeed, water vapor pressure) show the same structure function exponent as the atmospheric phase fluctuations. In particular, the structure functions of water vapor partial pressure and wind speed show the same exponent as the phase. Though the agreement between meteorological variables and atmospheric phase is scientifically satisfying, these surface measurements are not nearly as sensitive as the API saturation phase measurement, and therefore cannot be used to schedule telescope time in its stead. What is informative about these results is that the similar structure functions for API and meteorological data are detecting reinforce the claim that both measurements represent turbulent transport, and not instrumental noise. Data from the instrument reveals that measurements are consistent with both Kolmogorov turbulence theory, and with prior observations. The API predominately measures three-dimensional isotropic

  6. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Worker ... noise levels cannot be adequately reduced. Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog Read and comment ...

  7. Atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's atmosphere is made up of a number of gases in different relative amounts. Near sea level and up to about 90 km, the amount of these atmospheric gases in clean, relatively dry air is practically constant. Four of these gases, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, make up 99.99 percent by volume of the atmosphere. Two gases, ozone and water vapor, change in relative amounts, but the total amount of these two is very small compared to the amount of the other gases. The atmospheric composition shown in a table can be considered valid up to 90 km geometric altitude. Above 90 km, mainly because of molecular dissociation and diffusive separation, the composition changes.

  8. Atmospheric Dispositifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    , the conceptual foundations and protocols for the production of atmosphere in architecture might be found beneath the surface of contemporary debates. In this context, the notion of atmospheric dispositif – illustrated through an oeuvre of the German architect Werner Ruhnau and its theoretical and historical...... as a spatial phenomenon, exploring a multiplicity of conditions that constitute their resonant origins – i.e. the production sites from and within they have emerged. The intention is also to argue that despite the fact that atmosphere as an aesthetic category has crystallised over the last few decades...... contextualisation – provides a platform for revealing productive entanglements between heterogeneous elements, disciplines and processes. It also allows rendering atmosphere as a site of co-production open to contingencies and affective interplay on multiples levels: at the moment of its conceptualisation...

  9. FET noise studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucel, R. A.

    1981-03-01

    The GaAs FET oscillator is an alternative device for voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) applications because of its inherent wide-band electronic tunability, the variety of operating modes possible such as common source, common gate, etc., and the ease of circuit design. However, it has one major drawback, namely, its high near-carrier 1/f noise which makes it unsuitable for many applications, such as radar systems. This report describes the progress made during the report period in understanding the physical mechanisms responsible for this noise. During this period, an extensive experimental study was made of the 1/f noise properties of a variety of oscillators constructed of FET chips fabricated under controlled conditions. Using in-house grown epitaxial wafers, FET's were fabricated from both buffered and unbuffered active layers, with and without epitaxially grown contact layers, and with and without surface passivation. The experimental results show a good correlation between the trap-generated 1/f baseband noise and the near-carrier 1/f FM noise. The primary sources of the noise are presumed to be either deep traps within the depletion layer under the gate or surface states at the gate-semiconductor interface, probably the latter. An improvement of the order of 10 dB in the near carrier FM noise level is obtained when a buffer layer separates the active layer from the substrate. Optical experiments indicated an electron trap level approximately 0.41 eV below the conduction band. A noise model was devised to explain the modulation process for upconverting baseband 1/f noise to the carrier band by depletion layer modulation.

  10. Criteria for environmental noise assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Hadzi-Nikolova, Marija; Mirakovski, Dejan; Doneva, Nikolinka

    2015-01-01

    The noise assessment generally refers to the assessment of noise impact from a specific source, such as noise originating from certain industrial plants, road traffic, and this is not always an easy task. Practically in every surrounding, a number of different sources contribute to the ambiental noise at a certain point. Standardization of noise level includes recommendations for noise level prescribed by legislation, which are enabling stay in the environment without danger to human heal...

  11. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  12. Application of an Automated System for the Processing of VLF signals to Detect, Analyze and Classify Seismic-Ionospheric Precursor Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeberis, Christos; Xenos, Thomas; Contadakis, Michael; Arabelos, Dimitrios; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso

    2013-04-01

    This paper studies the development and application of an automated system based on Predictive Modular Neural Networks (PREMONNs) and Self Organizing Maps (SOMs) along with the necessary backend development of database classification required to provide a fully integrated system for detecting disturbances that can be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena using VLF radio signals. The aforementioned system can analyze all the relevant data and bring forth and adaptively discriminate different characteristics in the received signals, in real time in order to provide data segments of interest that can be correlated to subsequent seismic phenomena and can be classified with respect to pre-recorded samples of previous points of interest (POIs). PREMONNs as it was demonstrated in previous studies can be used for time-series switching detection and can be applied to the detection of POIs , whereas SOMs have been extensively used in unsupervised pattern recognition and classification of datasets. For the purpose of this paper, data acquired in Thessaloniki (40.59N, 22,78E) from the VLF station in Tavolara, Italy (ICV station Lat 40.923, Lon. 9.731) for over two years (December 2010 - December 2012) are used. The receiver was developed by Elettronika Srl, and is part of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). The received VLF signal is normalized and then processed using the Empirical Mode Decomposition Method (EMD). The resulting data are passed to an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based on PREMONNs trained specifically for this purpose and the output from that stage is passed onto a classifier based on SOMs to compare and classify points of interest based on a current database of received signals and identifying and storing new ones for future reference. The efficacy of the detection and the results of the aforementioned process is then discussed and results are presented. Therefore, based on the results it may be

  13. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  14. Noise upon the Sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    Sinusoids are used for making harmonic and other sounds. In order to having life in the sounds and adding a wide variety of noises, irregularities are inserted in the frequency and amplitudes. A simple and intuitive noise model is presented, consisting of a low-pass filtered noise, and having...... control for strength and bandwidth. The noise is added on the frequency and amplitudes of the sinusoids, and the resulting irregularity’s (jitter and shimmer) bandwidth is derived. This, together with an overview of investigation methods of the jitter and shimmer results in an analysis of the necessary...... samplerate of the shimmer and jitter. A harmonic model introduces individual and common irregularity, and adds a correlation control. The model has been implemented in max/msp and used in contemporary music compositions....

  15. Noise upon the sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    Sinusoids are used for making harmonic and other Sounds. In order to having life in the sounds and adding a wide variety of noises, irregularities are inserted in the frequency and amplitudes. A simple and intuitive noise model is presented, consisting of a low-pass filtered noise, and having...... control for strength and bandwidth. The noise is added on the frequency and amplitudes of the sinusoids, and the resulting irregularity's (jitter and shimmer) bandwidth is derived. This, together with an overview of investigation methods of the jitter and shimmer results in an analysis of the necessary...... samplerate of the shimmer and jitter. A harmonic model introduces individual and common irregularity, and adds a correlation control. The model has been implemented in max/msp and used in contemporary Music compositions....

  16. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  17. Conservative Noise Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M.Jamjoom

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Noisy training data have a huge negative impact on machine learning algorithms. Noise-filtering algorithms have been proposed to eliminate such noisy instances. In this work, we empirically show that the most popular noise-filtering algorithms have a large False Positive (FP error rate. In other words, these noise filters mistakenly identify genuine instances as outliers and eliminate them. Therefore, we propose more conservative outlier identification criteria that improve the FP error rate and, thus, the performance of the noise filters. With the new filter, an instance is eliminated if and only if it is misclassified by a mutual decision of Naïve Bayesian (NB classifier and the original filtering criteria being used. The number of genuine instances that are incorrectly eliminated is reduced as a result, thereby improving the classification accuracy.

  18. Noise and Neuronal Heterogeneity

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We consider signal transaction in a simple neuronal model featuring intrinsic noise. The presence of noise limits the precision of neural responses and impacts the quality of neural signal transduction. We assess the signal transduction quality in relation to the level of noise, and show it to be maximized by a non-zero level of noise, analogous to the stochastic resonance effect. The quality enhancement occurs for a finite range of stimuli to a single neuron; we show how to construct networks of neurons that extend the range. The range increases more rapidly with network size when we make use of heterogeneous populations of neurons with a variety of thresholds, rather than homogeneous populations of neurons all with the same threshold. The limited precision of neural responses thus can have a direct effect on the optimal network structure, with diverse functional properties of the constituent neurons supporting an economical information processing strategy that reduces the metabolic costs of handling a broad...

  19. Characterizing local variability in long‐period horizontal tilt noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, M.D.; Ringler, Adam; Hutt, Charles R.; Wilson, David; Holland, Austin; Sandoval, L.D; Storm, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal seismic data are dominated by atmospherically induced tilt noise at long periods (i.e., 30 s and greater). Tilt noise limits our ability to use horizontal data for sensitive seismological studies such as observing free earth modes. To better understand the local spatial variability of long‐period horizontal noise, we observe horizontal noise during quiet time periods in the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) underground vault using four small‐aperture array configurations. Each array comprises eight Streckeisen STS‐2 broadband seismometers. We analyze the spectral content of the data using power spectral density and magnitude‐squared coherence (γ2‐coherence). Our results show a high degree of spatial variability and frequency dependence in the long‐period horizontal wavefield. The variable nature of long‐period horizontal noise in the ASL vault suggests that it might be highly local in nature and not easily characterized by simple physical models when overall noise levels are low, making it difficult to identify locations in the vault with lower horizontal noise. This variability could be limiting our ability to apply coherence analysis for estimating horizontal sensor self‐noise and could also complicate various indirect methods for removing long‐period horizontal noise (e.g., collocated rotational sensor or microbarograph).

  20. Jet Engine Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Technology Solutions, Lockheed Martin Robert S. Carnes , M.D. NRAC Member, Battelle Memorial Institute MajGen Paul A. Fratarangelo, USMC (Ret) NRAC...Development, Acquisition) (VADM Architzel). The Naval Research Advisory Committee members (Bowes, Bowler, Carnes and Fratarangelo) have broad...Lockheed Martin ADP Boeing: Jet Engine Noise Reduction for Tactical Fighter Aircraft Mr. Tom Kaemming, K. Viswanathan, Ph . D. Tactical Jet Noise

  1. Active noise control primer

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Scott D

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control - the reduction of noise by generating an acoustic signal that actively interferes with the noise - has become an active area of basic research and engineering applications. The aim of this book is to present all of the basic knowledge one needs for assessing how useful active noise control will be for a given problem and then to provide some guidance for designing, setting up, and tuning an active noise-control system. Written for students who have no prior knowledge of acoustics, signal processing, or noise control but who do have a reasonable grasp of basic physics and mathematics, the book is short and descriptive. It leaves for more advanced texts or research monographs all mathematical details and proofs concerning vibrations, signal processing and the like. The book can thus be used in independent study, in a classroom with laboratories, or in conjunction with a kit for experiment or demonstration. Topics covered include: basic acoustics; human perception and sound; sound intensity...

  2. Noise composed of multiplication of two dichotomous noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jing-Hui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a noise which is composed of multiplication of two dichotomous noises, and derive the probability density and the statistical properties of this noise. The obtained results can help study the resonant activation phenomenon, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance, the transport of particles, and the nonequilibrium (phase) transition for the systems driven by this noise.

  3. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  4. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  5. Ionospheric turbulence from ground-based and satellite VLF/LF transmitter signal observations for the Simushir earthquake (November 15, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Francesco Biagi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Signals from very low frequency (VLF/ low frequency (LF transmitters recorded on the ground station at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and on board the French DEMETER satellite were analyzed for the Simushir earthquake (M 8.3; November 15, 2006. The period of analysis was from October 1, 2006, to January 31, 2007. The ground and satellite data were processed by a method based on the difference between the real signal at night-time and the model signal. The model for the ground observations was the monthly averaged signal amplitudes and phases, as calculated for the quiet days of every month. For the satellite data, a two-dimensional model of the signal distribution over the selected area was constructed. Preseismic effects were found several days before the earthquake, in both the ground and satellite observations.

     

  6. NASA's Aeroacoustic Tools and Methods for Analysis of Aircraft Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Lopes, Leonard V.; Burley, Casey L.

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft community noise is a significant concern due to continued growth in air traffic, increasingly stringent environmental goals, and operational limitations imposed by airport authorities. The ability to quantify aircraft noise at the source and ultimately at observers is required to develop low noise aircraft designs and flight procedures. Predicting noise at the source, accounting for scattering and propagation through the atmosphere to the observer, and assessing the perception and impact on a community requires physics-based aeroacoustics tools. Along with the analyses for aero-performance, weights and fuel burn, these tools can provide the acoustic component for aircraft MDAO (Multidisciplinary Design Analysis and Optimization). Over the last decade significant progress has been made in advancing the aeroacoustic tools such that acoustic analyses can now be performed during the design process. One major and enabling advance has been the development of the system noise framework known as Aircraft NOise Prediction Program2 (ANOPP2). ANOPP2 is NASA's aeroacoustic toolset and is designed to facilitate the combination of acoustic approaches of varying fidelity for the analysis of noise from conventional and unconventional aircraft. The toolset includes a framework that integrates noise prediction and propagation methods into a unified system for use within general aircraft analysis software. This includes acoustic analyses, signal processing and interfaces that allow for the assessment of perception of noise on a community. ANOPP2's capability to incorporate medium fidelity shielding predictions and wind tunnel experiments into a design environment is presented. An assessment of noise from a conventional and Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft using medium fidelity scattering methods combined with noise measurements from a model-scale HWB recently placed in NASA's 14x22 wind tunnel are presented. The results are in the form of community noise metrics and

  7. Noise sensitivity and sleep disturbance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laszlo, H.E.; Janssen, S.A.; Babisch, W.; Hansell, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that noise induced health effects are strongly related to non-acoustical factors such as noise sensitivity. It is a stable personality trait and it can be conceptualised as a causal pathway confounder and/or effect modifier between noise and health. Furthermore noise sensitivity pa

  8. Community response to tramway noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Berg, R. van den

    1988-01-01

    A study concerning tramway noise is described and results are presented. The study consisted of a social survey and a noise measurement program. It appeared that tramway noise does not contribute to the annoyance of the total noise if tramway annoyance is substantially below road traffic annoyance

  9. Community response to tramway noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Berg, R. van den

    1988-01-01

    A study concerning tramway noise is described and results are presented. The study consisted of a social survey and a noise measurement program. It appeared that tramway noise does not contribute to the annoyance of the total noise if tramway annoyance is substantially below road traffic annoyance (

  10. 电离层人工调制激发的下行ELF/VLF波辐射%The downward ELF/VLF waves radiation excited by ionospheric artificial modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常珊珊; 赵正予; 汪枫

    2011-01-01

    By heating the ionosphere with large ELF/VLF-modulated HF wave, a virtual antenna is produced in the ionosphere, which is an effective means to radiate ELF/VLF waves. This paper uses the modulated-heating models of Wang Feng (2009) to calculate the strength of the LF radiation source produced by HF heating, uses full-wave model to analyze attenuation and reflection of the LF wave transmitting downward, and with HAARP experiment parameter, simulates magnetic field of the LF signals on the sea, which is in PT order, according with the experimental data.%通过大功率ELF/VLF调幅高频波对电离层进行加热,形成电离层虚拟天线,可以作为发射ELF/VLF波的一种有效手段.本文使用汪枫(2009)的调制加热模型,计算高频加热电离层产生的低频辐射源强度,采用全波解算法分析辐射的低频波向下传播过程中的衰减和反射问题,并采用HAARP实验参数,模拟出在海面上接收到的低频信号强度为PT量级,与实验数据一致.模拟结果表明,加热泵波功率、低频调制波频率、以及加热纬度位置是影响ELF/VLF波辐射和传播的三个主要因素.

  11. Numerical modeling of wind turbine aerodynamic noise in the time domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghoon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Soogab

    2013-02-01

    Aerodynamic noise from a wind turbine is numerically modeled in the time domain. An analytic trailing edge noise model is used to determine the unsteady pressure on the blade surface. The far-field noise due to the unsteady pressure is calculated using the acoustic analogy theory. By using a strip theory approach, the two-dimensional noise model is applied to rotating wind turbine blades. The numerical results indicate that, although the operating and atmospheric conditions are identical, the acoustical characteristics of wind turbine noise can be quite different with respect to the distance and direction from the wind turbine.

  12. On INM's Use of Corrected Net Thrust for the Prediction of Jet Aircraft Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAninch, Gerry L.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration s (FAA) Integrated Noise Model (INM) employs a prediction methodology that relies on corrected net thrust as the sole correlating parameter between aircraft and engine operating states and aircraft noise. Thus aircraft noise measured for one set of atmospheric and aircraft operating conditions is assumed to be applicable to all other conditions as long as the corrected net thrust remains constant. This hypothesis is investigated under two primary assumptions: (1) the sound field generated by the aircraft is dominated by jet noise, and (2) the sound field generated by the jet flow is adequately described by Lighthill s theory of noise generated by turbulence.

  13. Radar antenna pointing for optimized signal to noise ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Marquette, Brandeis

    2013-01-01

    The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of a radar echo signal will vary across a range swath, due to spherical wavefront spreading, atmospheric attenuation, and antenna beam illumination. The antenna beam illumination will depend on antenna pointing. Calculations of geometry are complicated by the curved earth, and atmospheric refraction. This report investigates optimizing antenna pointing to maximize the minimum SNR across the range swath.

  14. Atmospheric Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calculations of atmospheric refraction are generally based on a simplified model of atmospheric density in the troposphere which assumes that the temperature decreases at a constant lapse rate from sea level up to a height equal to eleven km, and that afterwards it remains constant. In this model, the temperature divided by the lapse rate determines the length scale in the calculations for altitudes less than this height. But daily balloon measurements across the U.S.A. reveal that in some cases the air temperature actually increases from sea level up to a height of about one km, and only after reaching a plateau, it decreases at an approximately constant lapse rate. Moreover, in three examples considered here, the temperature does not remain constant at eleven km , but continues to decreases to a minimum at about sixteen kilometers , and then increases at higher altitudes at a lower rate. Calculations of atmospheric refraction based on this atmospheric data is compared with the results of simplified models.

  15. Airport noise and teratogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, L.D.; Layde, P.M.; Erickson, J.D.

    1979-07-01

    It has been suggested that exposure to high-noise levels near major airports may cause increased incidence of birth defects in the offspring of parents residing near these airports. Using data gathered in Metropolitan Atlanta during 1970 to 1972, we compared the rates of seventeen categories of defects in high- and low-noise census tracts. No significant differences were observed. However, when we subdivided the category of central nervous system defects into several subcategories of specific defects, we noted a significantly increased incidence of spina bifida without hydrocephalus in the high-noise areas. Because of the small number of cases associated with this finding we did a matched case-control study using all cases of central nervous system defects born during the years 1968 to 1976. No significantly increased risk for residents in the high-noise areas was noted in this study. It is our opinion that noise or other factors associated with residence near airports are unlikely to be important environmental teratogens.

  16. Noise and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Noise is widely understood to be something that interferes with a signal or process. Thus, it is generally thought to be destructive, obscuring signals and interfering with function. However, early in the 20th century, mechanical engineers found that mechanisms inducing additional vibration in mechanical systems could prevent sticking and hysteresis. This so-called "dither" noise was later introduced in an entirely different context at the advent of digital information transmission and recording in the early 1960s. Ironically, the addition of noise allows one to preserve information that would otherwise be lost when the signal or image is digitized. As we shall see, the benefits of added noise in these contexts are closely related to the phenomenon which has come to be known as stochastic resonance, the original version of which appealed to noise to explain how small periodic fluctuations in the eccentricity of the earth's orbit might be amplified in such a way as to bring about the observed periodic transiti...

  17. Lower Hearing Threshold by Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙长才; 邵峰; 张燕萍; 秦佑国

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate that noise can be a benefit factor that enables us to hear weaker signals. We measured the hearing thresholds of subjects for pure tone in different noise levels. The results show that pure tone thresholds with noise of some levels are lower than that without noise. The largest down-shift of the threshold by noise among the examined subjects is 5. 7dB, and the smallest is 1.7dB.

  18. Road Traffic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckenbauer, Thomas

    Road traffic is the most interfering noise source in developed countries. According to a publication of the European Union (EU) at the end of the twentieth century [1], about 40% of the population in 15 EU member states is exposed to road traffic noise at mean levels exceeding 55 dB(A). Nearly 80 million people, 20% of the population, are exposed to levels exceeding 65 dB(A) during daytime and more than 30% of the population is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during night time. Such high noise levels cause health risks and social disorders (aggressiveness, protest, and helplessness), interference of communication and disturbance of sleep; the long- and short-term consequences cause adverse cardiovascular effects, detrimental hormonal responses (stress hormones), and possible disturbance of the human metabolism (nutrition) and the immune system. Even performance at work and school could be impaired.

  19. Noise and Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Adel Ghahraman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus from the Latin word tinnire meaning ringing is the perception of sound within the human ear in the absence of corresponding external sound. The most common cause is noise induced hearing loss. Tinnitus may be induced by an acoustic trauma or a permanent noise in the workplace. In case that Tinnitus is induced by acoustic trauma the site of lesion is commonly the base of the cochlea. Tinnitus in the senile population is mostly accompanying presbycusis. Although the incidence of permanent tinnitus following noise exposure is high, little is published about this issue. In the current article we are aimed at studying the prevalence of tinnitus in Minoo and other manufactures.

  20. ECG De-noising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kevin; Jensen, Søren Hjøllund; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a widely used noninvasive method to study the rhythmic activity of the heart and thereby to detect the abnormalities. However, these signals are often obscured by artifacts from various sources and minimization of these artifacts are of paramount important. This paper...... proposes two adaptive techniques, namely the EEMD-BLMS (Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition in conjunction with the Block Least Mean Square algorithm) and DWT-NN (Discrete Wavelet Transform followed by Neural Network) methods in minimizing the artifacts from recorded ECG signals, and compares...... their performance. These methods were first compared on two types of simulated noise corrupted ECG signals: Type-I (desired ECG+noise frequencies outside the ECG frequency band) and Type-II (ECG+noise frequencies both inside and outside the ECG frequency band). Subsequently, they were tested on real ECG recordings...

  1. Natural and man-made terrestrial electromagnetic noise: an outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Meloni

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial environment is continuously exposed to electromagnetic radiations which set up a «background» electromagnetic noise. Within the Non Ionizing Radiation band (NIR, i.e. for frequencies lower than 300 GHz, this background can have a natural or an artificial origin. Natural origins of electromagnetic radiations are generally atmospheric or cosmic while artificial origins are technological applications, power transmission, communications, etc. This paper briefly describes the natural and man-made electromagnetic noise in the NIR band. Natural noise comes from a large variety of sources involving different physical phenomena and covering a wide range of frequencies and showing various propagation characteristics with an extremely broad range of power levels. Due to technological growth man-made electromagnetic noise is nowadays superimposed on natural noise almost everywhere on Earth. In the last decades man-made noise has increased dramatically over and above the natural noise in residential and business areas. This increase has led some scientists to consider possible negative effects of electromagnetic waves on human life and living systems in general. Accurate measurements of natural and man-made electromagnetic noise are necessary to understand the relative power levels in the different bands and their influence on life.

  2. Noise Source Location Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed O’Keefe

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a method to determine locations of noise sources that minimize modal coupling in complex acoustic volumes. Using the acoustic source scattering capabilities of the boundary element method, predictions are made of mode shape and pressure levels due to various source locations. Combining knowledge of the pressure field with a multivariable function minimization technique, the source location generating minimum pressure levels can be determined. The analysis also allows for an objective comparison of “best/worst” locations. The technique was implemented on a personal computer for the U.S. Space Station, predicting 5–10 dB noise reduction using optimum source locations.

  3. Community response to noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Takashi; Gjestland, Truls; Lee, Soogab

    2012-01-01

    Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI) and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI) were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate combined noise model. Furthermore, not only negative, but also positive aspects of sound were discussed as soundscape studies. Finally, seven items were listed as future team activities.

  4. Community response to noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate combined noise model. Furthermore, not only negative, but also positive aspects of sound were discussed as soundscape studies. Finally, seven items were listed as future team activities.

  5. Noise Elimination Study for a Single Station Magnetotelluric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengül, Ebru; Uǧur Ulugergerli, Emin; Göktaş, Hilal

    2010-05-01

    Five components of the natural electromagnetic field relating to underground conductivity distribution on Earth are measured as a time series in the Magnetotelluric (MT) method. E (Ex, Ey) and H (Hx, Hy, Hz) components of the electromagnetic field suffers from noise contamination. The noise, in general, can be classified as random and systematic noise. Random noise disrupts the pattern of data such as sudden signal peaks and/or step structures called impulsive effect. This type of noise usually is dominant in some parts of the time series. The sources of random noise vary; some of the sources are instrumental problems and atmospheric events. On the other hand, systematic noise occurs at certain frequencies and is added to the data. Industrial activities cause such type of the noise and can corrupt all the data set. The estimation of the impedance tensor from single-station MT data is subject to this study. The proposed method uses statistical approaches focused on the noise elimination techniques. Noise elimination from MT time series is very important particularly to achieve repeatable impedance values using single station MT data. The conventional impedance estimation technique requires solution of a linear equation system (E = ZH) based on Gaussian statistical model which requires the noise of electric channels should obey Gaussian distribution and magnetic channels should be noise free. In fact, measured data never provides this ideal condition. Therefore, noise elimination techniques are very important step in data processing works in MT method. Random noise such as spikes makes deviations in impedance values, resistivity and phase curves. Random noise should be eliminated to correct of these deviations in the data. For this purpose firstly, all data are divided into time windows. Each window consists of 512 values. After that, spikes are removed and missing data are regenerated by using interpolation technique for each window in time domain. Then, data are

  6. Effects on atmospherics at 6 kHz and 9 kHz recorded at Tripura during the India-Pakistan Border earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, S. S.; de, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, B.; Paul, S.; Haldar, D. K.; Bhowmick, A.; Barui, S.; Ali, R.

    2010-04-01

    The outcome of the results of some analyses of electromagnetic emissions recorded by VLF receivers at 6 kHz and 9 kHz over Agartala, Tripura, the North-Eastern state of India (Lat. 23° N, Long. 91.4° E) during the large earthquake at Muzaffarabad (Lat. 34.53° N, Long. 73.58° E) at Kashmir under Pakistan have been presented here. Spiky variations in integrated field intensity of atmospherics (IFIA) at 6 and 9 kHz have been observed 10 days prior (from midnight of 28 September 2005) to the day of occurrence of the earthquake on 8 October 2005 and the effect continued, decayed gradually and eventually ceased on 16 October 2005. The spikes distinctly superimposed on the ambient level with mutual separation of 2-5 min. Occurrence number of spikes per hour and total duration of their occurrence have been found remarkably high on the day of occurrence of the earthquake. The spike heights are higher at 6 kHz than at 9 kHz. The results have been explained on the basis of generation of electromagnetic radiation associated with fracture of rocks, their subsequent penetration into the Earth's atmosphere and finally their propagation between Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The present observation shows that VLF anomaly is well-confined between 6 and 9 kHz.

  7. Atmospheric materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    A disjunction between the material and the immaterial has been at the heart of the architectural debate for decades. In this dialectic tension, the notion of atmosphere which increasingly claims attention in architectural discourse seems to be parallactic, leading to the re-evaluation of perceptual...... experience and, consequently, to the conceptual and methodological shifts in the production of space, and hence in the way we think about materiality. In this context, architectural space is understood as a contingent construction – a space of engagement that appears to us as a result of continuous...... and complex interferences revealed through our perception; ‘the atmospheric’ is explored as a spatial and affective quality as well as a sensory background, and materiality as a powerful and almost magical agency in shaping of atmosphere. Challenging existing dichotomies and unraveling intrinsic...

  8. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2016-01-01

    In view of the observation by IceCube of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos, it is important to quantify the uncertainty in the background of atmospheric neutrinos. There are two sources of uncertainty, the imperfect knowledge of the spectrum and composition of the primary cosmic rays that produce the neutrinos and the limited understanding of hadron production, including charm, at high energy. This paper is an overview of both aspects.

  9. Psychoacoustic study on contribution of fan noise to engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhong; Liu, Hai; Bi, Fengrong; Ni, Guangjian; Zhang, Guichang; Lin, Jiewei; Yu, Hanzhengnan

    2012-07-01

    There are more researches on engine fan noise control focusing on reducing fan noise level through optimizing fan structure, and a lot of research achievements have been obtained. However, researches on the effect of fan noise to engine noise quality are lacking. The influences of the effects of fan structure optimization on the engine noise quality are unclear. Thus, there will be a decline in fan noise level, but the deterioration of engine noise quality. Aiming at the above problems, in consideration of fan structure design and engine noise quality, an innovative method to analyze the contribution of fan noise to engine noise quality using psychoacoustic theory is proposed. The noises of diesel engine installing different cooling fans are measured by using the acoustic pressure method. The experiment results are regarded as analysis samples. The model of sensory pleasantness is used to analyze the sound quality of a diesel engine with different cooling fans. Results show that after installing 10-blade fan in medium diameter the sensory pleasantness at each test point is increased, and the increase is 13.53% on average, which indicate the improvement of the engine noise quality. In order to verify the psychoacoustical analysis, the subjective assessment is carried out. The test result shows the noise quality of engine installed 10-blade fan in medium diameter is most superior. 1/3 octave frequency spectrum analysis is used to study the reason of the improvement of engine noise quality. It is found that after installing proper cooling fan the sound pressure level below 400 Hz are obviously increased, the frequency assignment and spectral envelope are more reasonable and a proper cooling fan can optimize the spectrum structure of the engine noise. The psychoacoustic study is applied in the contribution of fan noise to engine noise, and the idea of engine sound quality improvement through the structure optimization is proposed.

  10. Noise sources and noise suppression in CMOS imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Hancock, Bruce R.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms for noise coupling in CMOS imagers are complex, since unlike a CCD, a CMOS imager has to be considered as a full digital-system-on-a-chip, with a highly sensitive front-end. In this paper, we analyze the noise sources in a photodiode CMOS imager, and model their propagation through the signal chain to determine the nature and magnitude of noise coupling. We present methods for reduction of noise, and present measured data to show their viability. For temporal read noise reduction, we present pixel signal chain design techniques to achieve near 2 electrons read noise. We model the front-end reset noise both for conventional photodiode and CTIA type of pixels. For the suppression of reset noise, we present a column feedback-reset method to reduce reset noise below 6 electrons. For spatial noise reduction, we present the design of column signal chain that suppresses both spatial noise and power supply coupling noise. We conclude by identifying problems in low-noise design caused by dark current spatial distribution.

  11. Aircraft Noise Simulation for a Virtual Reality Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arntzen, M.; Van Veen, T.A.; Visser, H.G.; Simons, D.G.

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft noise annoyance predictions based on traditional tools lack fidelity when modelling a single aircraft flyover. For evaluating annoyance of new procedures, different aircraft types or changing atmospheric conditions, a new modelling approach is necessary. A research effort has been initiated

  12. Curing the noise epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, Susan

    2005-09-01

    The argument is made that design does not stop when the fixed architectural and acoustical components are in place. Spaces live and breathe with the people who reside in them. Research and examples are presented that show that noise, auditory clutter, thrives on itself in hospitals. Application of the Lombard reflex studies fit into the hospital setting, but do not offer solutions as to how one might reduce the impact. In addition, the basis for looking at the noise component as a physical as well cultural dynamic will be addressed. Whether the result of the wrong conversation in the wrong place or the right conversation in an unfortunate place, talk mixed with sounds of technology is shown to cause its own symptoms. From heightened anxiety and stress to medical errors, staff burnout, or HIPAA violations, the case is made that noise is pandemic in hospitals and demands financial and operational investment. An explanation of how to reduce noise by design of the dynamic environment - equipment, technology, staff protocols is also provided.

  13. Spectrum analysis of rectangular pulse in the atmospheric turbulence propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Ni, Xiaolong; Jiang, Huilin; Wang, Junran; Liu, Zhi

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric turbulence has a great influence on the performance of the atmospheric laser communication system reducing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and increasing the bit error rate (BER). However, there is rarely study on the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the power spectrum of the rectangular pulse. In this paper, a spectral analyzing method is used to analyze the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the signal. An experiment of laser beam propagation characteristic is carried out on a 6km horizontal atmospheric link, the wavelength is 808 nm. The signal is 100MHz rectangular pulse. The waveform of the rectangular pulse is collected by the oscilloscope, and the power spectral density of the signal is calculated and analyzed by the method of periodogram. Experimental results show that the response and noise characteristics of the laser and photoelectric detector have a great influence on the signal power spectrum distribution which can increase the noise component in the 10^6 Hz frequency range. After the atmospheric turbulence propagation, the signal power decreases in the whole frequency range. However, as the existence of atmospheric turbulence, the signal power increases in the atmospheric turbulence characteristic frequency (tens to hundreds of Hz). The noise power increases in the high frequency range (10^7 10^8 Hz).

  14. Tandem Cylinder Noise Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; CHoudhari, Meelan M.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to better understand landing-gear noise sources, we have been examining a simplified configuration that still maintains some of the salient features of landing-gear flow fields. In particular, tandem cylinders have been studied because they model a variety of component level interactions. The present effort is directed at the case of two identical cylinders spatially separated in the streamwise direction by 3.7 diameters. Experimental measurements from the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have provided steady surface pressures, detailed off-surface measurements of the flow field using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), hot-wire measurements in the wake of the rear cylinder, unsteady surface pressure data, and the radiated noise. The experiments were conducted at a Reynolds number of 166 105 based on the cylinder diameter. A trip was used on the upstream cylinder to insure a fully turbulent shedding process and simulate the effects of a high Reynolds number flow. The parallel computational effort uses the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver CFL3D with a hybrid, zonal turbulence model that turns off the turbulence production term everywhere except in a narrow ring surrounding solid surfaces. The current calculations further explore the influence of the grid resolution and spanwise extent on the flow and associated radiated noise. Extensive comparisons with the experimental data are used to assess the ability of the computations to simulate the details of the flow. The results show that the pressure fluctuations on the upstream cylinder, caused by vortex shedding, are smaller than those generated on the downstream cylinder by wake interaction. Consequently, the downstream cylinder dominates the noise radiation, producing an overall directivity pattern that is similar to that of an isolated cylinder. Only calculations based on the full length of the model span were able to

  15. Reduction of turbomachinery noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitz, Ian A. (Inventor); Brookfield, John M. (Inventor); Sell, Julian (Inventor); Hayden, Belva J. (Inventor); Ingard, K. Uno (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    In the invention, propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise characteristic of interaction of a turbomachine blade wake, produced by a turbomachine blade as the blade rotates, with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade, are reduced. This is accomplished by injection of fluid into the blade wake through a port in the rotor blade. The mass flow rate of the fluid injected into the blade wake is selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake. With this fluid injection, reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved. In a further noise reduction technique, boundary layer fluid is suctioned into the turbomachine blade through a suction port on the side of the blade that is characterized as the relatively low-pressure blade side. As with the fluid injection technique, the mass flow rate of the fluid suctioned into the blade is here selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake; reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved with this suction technique. Blowing and suction techniques are also provided in the invention for reducing noise associated with the wake produced by fluid flow around a stationary blade upstream of a rotating turbomachine.

  16. Active Noise Sources Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microwave radiometry is a well-known and extremely useful method to study the chemistry and dynamics of the Earth's atmosphere. For accurate long term measurements,...

  17. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, F.R.; Poulsen, Torben

    2001-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises were...

  18. Evaluating noise abatement measures using strategic noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Laan, W.P.N. van der; Lohman, W.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Noise annoyance due to transportation is widespread in industrialized countries and in urban areas in the developing countries. The European Noise Directive (END) requires an assessment of the noise situation as well as the formulation of action plans for the reduction of the number of people

  19. Evaluating noise abatement measures using strategic noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Laan, W.P.N. van der; Lohman, W.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Noise annoyance due to transportation is widespread in industrialized countries and in urban areas in the developing countries. The European Noise Directive (END) requires an assessment of the noise situation as well as the formulation of action plans for the reduction of the number of people harmfu

  20. Rating environmental noise on the basis of noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Borst, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    A system that rates noise on the basis of noise maps has been developed which is based on empirical exposure-response relationships, so that effects in the community will be lower if the system gives a better rating. It is consistent with noise metrics and effect endpoint chosen in the EU, i.e., it

  1. Noise sensitivity and reactions to noise and other environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Vos, H.

    2003-01-01

    This article integrates findings from the literature and new results regarding noise sensitivity. The new results are based on analyses of 28 combined datasets (N=23 038), and separate analyses of a large aircraft noise study (N=10939). Three topics regarding noise sensitivity are discussed, namely,

  2. Synthesis of Virtual Environments for Aircraft Community Noise Impact Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2005-01-01

    A new capability has been developed for the creation of virtual environments for the study of aircraft community noise. It is applicable for use with both recorded and synthesized aircraft noise. When using synthesized noise, a three-stage process is adopted involving non-real-time prediction and synthesis stages followed by a real-time rendering stage. Included in the prediction-based source noise synthesis are temporal variations associated with changes in operational state, and low frequency fluctuations that are present under all operating conditions. Included in the rendering stage are the effects of spreading loss, absolute delay, atmospheric absorption, ground reflections, and binaural filtering. Results of prediction, synthesis and rendering stages are presented.

  3. Atmospheric Smell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenslund, Anette

    their attention away from smell – as skilled inattentive noses – in order to focus on their more important work. Intruding body odours breaching the uniform ‘scentless silence’ of the environment, however, provoked explicit handlings to avoid discomfort observed in the interaction between nurses and patients...... revealed how a museum-staged hospital atmosphere of an art installation was directly addressed owing to its smell. Curiously, this observation speaks against prevailing literature portraying smell as the ‘mute sense’, and what is more, the museum display did not alter smell curatorially. Rather, smell...

  4. Alarming atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Kinch, Sofie

    2014-01-01

    . As a response to this situation, our design artefact, the interactive furniture Kidkit, invites children to become accustomed to the alarming sounds sampled from the ward while they are waiting in the waiting room. Our design acknowledges how atmospheres emerge as temporal negotiations between the rhythms......, a familiar relationship with the alarming sounds in the ward, enabling her to focus later more on the visit with the relative. The article discusses the proposed design strategy behind this solution and the potentiality for its use in hospital environments in general....

  5. Alarming atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Kinch, Sofie

    2014-01-01

    Nurses working in the Neuro-Intensive Care Unit at Aarhus University Hospital lack the tools to prepare children for the alarming atmosphere they will enter when visiting a hospitalised relative. The complex soundscape dominated by alarms and sounds from equipment is mentioned as the main stressor...... of the body and the environment in conjunction with our internalised perception of the habituated background. By actively controlling the sounds built into Kidkit, the child can habituate them through a process of synchronising them with her own bodily rhythms. Hereby the child can establish, in advance...

  6. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... America Information For… Media Policy Makers Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing plays ... sounds over an extended period. Preventing Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Hearing loss caused by exposure to loud sound ...

  7. Tropical Pacific internal atmospheric dynamics and resolution in a coupled GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Hosmay; Kirtman, Ben P.

    2015-01-01

    A noise reduction technique, namely the interactive ensemble (IE) approach is adopted to reduce noise at the air-sea interface due to internal atmospheric dynamics in a state-of-the-art coupled general circulation model (CGCM). The IE technique uses multiple realization of atmospheric general circulation models coupled to a single ocean general circulation model. The ensembles mean fluxes from the atmospheric simulations are communicated to the ocean component. Each atmospheric simulation receives the same SST coming from the ocean component. The only difference among the atmospheric simulations comes from perturbed initial conditions, thus the atmospheric states are, in principle synoptically independent. The IE technique can be used to better understand the importance of weather noise forcing of natural variability such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). To study the impact of weather noise and resolution in the context of a CGCM, two IE experiments are performed at different resolutions. Atmospheric resolution is an important issue since the noise statistics will depend on the spatial scales resolved. A simple formulation to extract atmospheric internal variability is presented. The results are compared to their respective control cases where internal atmospheric variability is left unchanged. The noise reduction has a major impact on the coupled simulation and the magnitude of this effect strongly depends on the horizontal resolution of the atmospheric component model. Specifically, applying the noise reduction technique reduces the overall climate variability more effectively at higher resolution. This suggests that "weather noise" is more important in sustaining climate variability as resolution increases. ENSO statistics, dynamics, and phase asymmetry are all modified by the noise reduction, in particular ENSO becomes more regular with less phase asymmetry when noise is reduced. All these effects are more marked for the higher resolution case. In

  8. Noise Measurement in Microsensor Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Moghaddam, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    In this research, spectral coherence noise measurement technique is used to measure noise of capacitive accelerometers, based on measuring the spectral coherence and outputs of two identical sensors exposed to the same input stimulus. This effective technique can be applied to any sensor characterization problem where there is interest in distinguishing instrumental noise from background noise. The simulation study has been done in MATLAB to verify the proposed method reliability to calculate...

  9. 甚低频拖曳天线的稳态动力学研究%Research on the Steady Dynamic of VLF Trailing Antenna on an Aircraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑小洪; 侯志强; 韩维; 李冀鑫

    2012-01-01

    甚低频(Very low frequency,VLF)拖曳天线力学特征和控制是飞机对潜通信系统进一步深入论证需要解决的关键问题之一,而对其稳态动力学研究是进行甚低频拖曳天线力学特征和控制研究的基础.通过对载机盘旋时甚低频天线运动状态及其受力进行分析,应用牛顿定律建立机载甚低频拖曳天线稳态动力学模型.运用打靶法对其稳态动力学模型进行求解,分析载机速度、倾斜角和天线末端锥袋质量对天线末端锥袋量纲一半径和天线垂直度的影响.仿真结果表明在阻力系数较小时,在一定的倾斜角和载机飞行速度范围内其垂直度和天线末端量纲一半径存在多值情况,会导致拖曳天线系统的不稳定;在一定的阻力系数下,减小飞机速度,增加载机的倾斜角,能够提高甚低频拖曳天线的垂直度;单一增加天线末端锥袋质量来提高垂直度是不可行的.%The dynamic character and control of very low frequency(VLF) trailing antenna on a aircraft is one of most important problems which needs to research. The steady dynamic is the base of the dynamic character and control of the VLF trailing antenna. The mathematics model based Newton law of the trailing antenna is founded, and solved via a shooting technique. The influences of the angle of bank and the velocity of aircraft to the non-dismensionalization end radius and verticality are researched. The result shows that under the low drag, for certain ranges of the angle of bank and the velocity, the equilibrium solution is multi volume; under certain ranges of air drag, it is possible to descend the velocity of the aircraft and increase the bank angle to improve the verticality of the antenna. But it's impossible to increase the mass of the drogue only to improve the verticality of the antenna.

  10. Practical ranges of loudness levels of various types of environmental noise, including traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.; Janssen, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noi

  11. Low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    In Denmark and in other industrialized countries there are cases where people complain about annoying low-frequency or infrasonic noise in their homes. Besides noise annoyance people often report other adverse effects such as insomnia, headache, lack of concentration etc. In many cases the noise...

  12. Seismic Noise Characterization in the Northern Mississippi Embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, S.; Deshon, H. R.; Boyd, O. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present a study of seismic noise sources present within the northern Mississippi embayment near the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). The northern embayment contains up to 1 km of unconsolidated coastal plain sediments overlying bedrock, making it an inherently noisy environment for seismic stations. The area is known to display high levels of cultural noise caused by agricultural activity, passing cars, trains, etc. We characterize continuous broadband seismic noise data recorded for the months of March through June 2009 at six stations operated by the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Network. We looked at a single horizontal component of data during nighttime hours, defined as 6:15PM to 5:45AM Central Standard Time, which we determined to be the lowest amplitude period of noise for the region. Hourly median amplitudes were compared to daily average wind speeds downloaded from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We find a correlation between time periods of increased noise and days with high wind speeds, suggesting that wind is likely a prevalent source of seismic noise in the area. The effects of wind on seismic recordings may result from wind induced tree root movement which causes ground motion to be recorded at the vaults located ~3m below ground. Automated studies utilizing the local network or the EarthScope Transportable Array, scheduled to arrive in the area in 2010-11, should expect to encounter wind induced noise fluctuations and must account for this in their analysis.

  13. NOISE IN TEXTILE MILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Meshgi

    1977-06-01

    Full Text Available The mean noise levels were measured in the different sections of six representative mills in the Isfahan area, and audiometric measurements were made in 282 male workers employed in these mills. The mean noise levels were on average 95 dBA in the weaving sections and 88 d BA in the spinning sections. The audiometric findings showed a significant loss of gearing in the textile workers as compared to controls who were employed in a quiet environment. The study indicated that noisiness depended; on the whole, on the age and number of machines deployed per unit area of shop-floor. On the basis of this study certain recommendations were made to improve the working conditions.

  14. Ex / Noise / CERN / Deerhoof

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN, SM18,

    2015-01-01

    Indie rockers Deerhoof battled with the noise of CERN’s magnet test facilities on 30 August 2015. The band visited CERN at the invitation of ATLAS physicist James Beacham, whose pilot project Ex/Noise/CERN collides experimental music artists with experimental particle physics. Credits: -Producer- CERN Video Productions James Beacham François Briard -Director- Noemi Caraban -Camera- Yann Krajewski Piotr Traczyk Noemi Caraban -Crane operator- Antonio Henrique Jorge-Costa -Live recording at CERN- Mixing at Rec studio/Geneva By Serge Morattel -Infography- Daniel Dominguez Noemi Caraban -Deerhoof- John Dieterich Satomi Matsuzaki Ed Rodriguez Greg Saunier w/Deron Pulley SPECIAL THANKS TO: Michal Strychalski Marta Bajko Maryline Charrondiere Luca Bottura Christian Giloux Rodrigue Faes Mariane Catallon Georgina Hobgen Hailey Reissman Marine Bass

  15. Strategies for Railway Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovey, E. C.

    1996-05-01

    Strategies are much talked about, but frequently lack any substance. The general concepts of strategic planning are discussed and the need for it to have a focus, i.e., a clear objective, are emphasized. A structural approach to strategic plan development is advocated, with a definition of the relevant issues being a prerequisite for success. Strategies, however, must be flexible and constantly reviewed even though the measures of success are often blurred. Railway noise is clearly amenable to strategic planning, but the issues will vary depending on the objectives of the organization. It is evident that railway noise technology, application and development, while important, needs to be substantially supplemented by other factors such as logistics and management issues to form an effective strategy in this domain.

  16. Noise Phobia in Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangle

    Full Text Available Fear of thunderstorms and other forms of noise phobia are common problems in dogs. Administering medications along with changing the pet’s environment, and using behavior modification techniques can help ease the fear. Above all, do not give your pet any attention or reward when he is showing signs of fear; this will only reinforce the fearful behavior. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(11.000: 351-352

  17. Aircraft Noise Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This contribution addresses the state-of-the-art in the field of aircraft noise prediction, simulation and minimisation. The point of view taken in this context is that of comprehensive models that couple the various aircraft systems with the acoustic sources, the propagation and the flight trajectories. After an exhaustive review of the present predictive technologies in the relevant fields (airframe, propulsion, propagation, aircraft operations, trajectory optimisation), the paper add...

  18. Model of flicker noise effects on phase noise in oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centurelli, Francesco; Ercolani, Alessandro; Tommasino, Pasquale; Trifiletti, Alessandro

    2003-05-01

    Phase noise models that describe the near-carrier spectrum in an accurate but insightful way are needed, to better optimize the oscillator design. In this paper we present a model to describe the effect of flicker noise sources on the phase noise of an oscillator, that can be applied both to linear oscillators and to nonlinear structures like relaxation and ring oscillators, so extending previous works that considered only the effect of the flicker noise superimposed to the control voltage of a VCO. In the phase noise of an oscillator we can separate the effect of high frequency noise sources, that can be described by a short-time-constant system, and the effect of low frequency noises (mostly flicker sources), described by a system with time constants much slower than the oscillation period. Flicker noise has been considered to cause a change in the circuit bias point; this bias point change can be mapped in a shift of the oscillation frequency by exploiting Barkhausen conditions (for linear oscillators) or obtaining this link by simulations. The power spectral density of the oscillator can then be obtained as the probability distribution of the oscillation frequency, starting from the flicker noise probability distribution. If the effect of high frequency noise sources is also taken into account, the overall oscillator spectrum can be obtained as a convolution of the spectrum due to flicker sources with the Lorentzian-shaped spectrum due to white noise sources, in analogy with the description of inhomogeneous broadening of laser linewidth.

  19. Noise Analysis of MAIA System and Possible Noise Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Svihlik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the noise analysis and noise suppression in a system for double station observation of the meteors now known as MAIA (Meteor Automatic Imager and Analyzer. The noise analysis is based on acquisition of testing video sequences in different light conditions and their further statistical evaluation. The main goal is to find a suitable noise model and subsequently determine if the noise is signal dependent or not. Noise and image model in the wavelet domain should be based on Gaussian mixture model (GMM or Generalized Laplacian Model (GLM and the model parameters should be estimated by moment method. Furthermore, noise should be modeled by GMM or GLM also in the space domain. GMM and GLM allow to model various types of probability density functions. Finally the advanced denoising algorithm using Bayesian estimator is applied and its performance is verified.

  20. Physical Mechanisms of Seismometer Site Noise and Self-Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, G. S.; Parker, T.; Townsend, B.; Upadhyaya, S.

    2016-12-01

    Ideally any seismometer installation should have a noise level corresponding to a predefined specification, to ensure the noise level is below the signals of interest. In practice seismic data may contain unforeseen noise artifacts and may vary widely in quality from one station to another due to particular site conditions, problematic installation methods, or a defective or unsuitable instrument. Also some modes of ground motion can be considered as noise, for example local vibration or tilt motion obscuring teleseismic signals. In this study we present an analysis of the physical phenomena which most commonly cause noise artifacts in broadband seismic data, based on data from controlled laboratory experiments as well as field installations. Each different physical mechanism gives rise to noise with particular distinguishing characteristics which can enable the user to diagnose noise symptoms, trace them to a root cause, take corrective action, and evolve towards best practices for particular environments and use cases.

  1. Ambiguity functions and noise floor suppression in random noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Sune R. J.

    2006-09-01

    Noise radar can be used in a great number of applications including SAR. The non-periodic waveform suppresses the range ambiguity and reduces the probability of intercept and interference. Due to the randomness of the waveform, a noise floor limiting the possible side lobe suppression accompanies the correlation integral involved. In strong clutter scenes with dominant reflectors, the induced noise floor can be too high and further suppression is needed. In this paper, the ambiguity function of random noise waveforms is first analyzed, and an improved formulation is introduced to include the noise floor effect. The use of mismatched filtering for improved sidelobe suppression is then discussed. Finally, an iterative subtraction algorithm is analyzed for noise floor cancellation in the presence of dominating reflectors. This method is successfully tested on random step frequency radar data and noise sodar data.

  2. Aircraft noise prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippone, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    This contribution addresses the state-of-the-art in the field of aircraft noise prediction, simulation and minimisation. The point of view taken in this context is that of comprehensive models that couple the various aircraft systems with the acoustic sources, the propagation and the flight trajectories. After an exhaustive review of the present predictive technologies in the relevant fields (airframe, propulsion, propagation, aircraft operations, trajectory optimisation), the paper addresses items for further research and development. Examples are shown for several airplanes, including the Airbus A319-100 (CFM engines), the Bombardier Dash8-Q400 (PW150 engines, Dowty R408 propellers) and the Boeing B737-800 (CFM engines). Predictions are done with the flight mechanics code FLIGHT. The transfer function between flight mechanics and the noise prediction is discussed in some details, along with the numerical procedures for validation and verification. Some code-to-code comparisons are shown. It is contended that the field of aircraft noise prediction has not yet reached a sufficient level of maturity. In particular, some parametric effects cannot be investigated, issues of accuracy are not currently addressed, and validation standards are still lacking.

  3. Noise tolerant spatiotemporal chaos computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kia, Behnam; Kia, Sarvenaz; Ditto, William L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Lindner, John F. [Physics Department, The College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio 44691 (United States); Sinha, Sudeshna [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Mohali, Punjab 140306 (India)

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and design a noise tolerant chaos computing system based on a coupled map lattice (CML) and the noise reduction capabilities inherent in coupled dynamical systems. The resulting spatiotemporal chaos computing system is more robust to noise than a single map chaos computing system. In this CML based approach to computing, under the coupled dynamics, the local noise from different nodes of the lattice diffuses across the lattice, and it attenuates each other's effects, resulting in a system with less noise content and a more robust chaos computing architecture.

  4. Noise tolerant spatiotemporal chaos computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Behnam; Kia, Sarvenaz; Lindner, John F; Sinha, Sudeshna; Ditto, William L

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and design a noise tolerant chaos computing system based on a coupled map lattice (CML) and the noise reduction capabilities inherent in coupled dynamical systems. The resulting spatiotemporal chaos computing system is more robust to noise than a single map chaos computing system. In this CML based approach to computing, under the coupled dynamics, the local noise from different nodes of the lattice diffuses across the lattice, and it attenuates each other's effects, resulting in a system with less noise content and a more robust chaos computing architecture.

  5. Noise-induced coherent switch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Taking the famous genetic toggle switch as an example,we numerically investigated the effect of noise on bistability.We found that extrinsic noise resulting from stochastic fluctuations in synthesis and degradation rates and from the environmental fluctuation in gene regulatory processes can induce coherent switch,and that there is an optimal noise intensity such that the noise not only can induce this switch,but also can amplify a weak input signal.In addition,we found that the intrinsic noise introduced through the Poisson τ-leap algorithm cannot induce such a switch.

  6. Noise-Mediated Generalized Synchronization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yue-Hua; WU Zhi-Yuan; YANG Jun-Zhong

    2007-01-01

    @@ We investigate a drive-response system by considering the impacts of noise on generalized synchronization (GS).It is found that a small amount of noise can turn the system from desynchronization to the GS state in the resonant case no matter how noise is injected into the system. In the non-resonant case, noise with intensity in a certain range is helpful in building GS only when the noise is injected to the driving system. The mechanism behind the observed phenomena is discussed.

  7. Noise Emission from Laboratory Air Blowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Windham, Betty

    1978-01-01

    Product noise ratings for a number of laboratory air blowers are reported and several recommendations for reducing laboratory noise from air blowers are given. Relevant noise ratings and methods for measuring noise emission of appliances are discussed. (BB)

  8. Calculation Model for the Propagation of Audible Noise from High Voltage Transmission Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuebao; CUI Xiang; LU Tiebing; HE Jiamei

    2013-01-01

    Audible noise from high voltage transmission lines' corona discharge has become one of the decisive factors affecting design of high voltage transmission lines,thus it is very important to study the spatial propagation characteristics of audible noise for its accurate prediction.A calculation model for the propagation of audible noise is presented in this paper,which is based on the basic equation of the sound wave and can involve the influences of the atmosphere absorption and ground effects.The effects of different ground impedances and the atmospheric attenuation on the distribution of sound pressure level are discussed in this paper.The results show that the atmospheric absorption may increase the attenuation of the audible noise,and the ground surface affects both the amplitude and phase of the sound.The spatial distribution fluctuates considering the ground effects.The atmospheric attenuation and the ground effect are closely related to the frequency of the noise.In the frequency range of the audible noise,the influence of atmospheric attenuation on the spatial propagation characteristics is more obvious in high frequency while ground has significant influences in low frequency.

  9. The Effects of Numerical Noise on Perturbation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancell, B. C.

    2016-12-01

    Perturbation experiments are used widely within numerical weather prediction models to investigate the effects of initial condition error and data assimilation on atmospheric forecasts. It has been discovered that perturbations within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model create numerical noise that propagates horizontally at speeds substantially faster than any realistic physical mode. This noise is very small, and likely does not affect the atmospheric state within model simulations in areas where dry dynamics dominate. However, in areas of moist convection or precipitation, the noise can grow rapidly through chaotic processes to significantly alter the state, potentially growing upscale. The growth of noise thus has the ability to cause a misinterpretation of the realistic effects of the perturbation in the first place. This work details the propagation and growth of numerical noise in the WRF model for a simulation of convection, and compares it to a number of perturbation experiments for which realistic perturbation growth is expected. The implications of these results in the greater body of literature is discussed.

  10. Variations of VLF/LF signals observed on the ground and satellite during a seismic activity in Japan region in May–June 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rozhnoi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Signals of two Japanese transmitters (22.2 kHz and 40 kHz recorded on the ground VLF/LF station in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and on board the DEMETER French satellite have been analyzed during a seismic activity in Japan in May–June 2008. The period of analysis was from 18 April to 27 June. During this time two rather large earthquakes occurred in the north part of Honshu Island – 7 May (M=6.8 and 13 June (M=6.9. The ground and satellite data were processed by a method based on the difference between the real signal in nighttime and the model one. For ground observations a clear decrease in both signals has been found several days before the first earthquake. For the second earthquake anomalies were detected only in JJI signal. The epicenters of earthquakes were in reliable reception zone of 40 kHz signal on board the DEMETER. Signal enhancement above the seismic active region and significant signal intensity depletion in the magnetically conjugate area has been found for satellite observation before the first earthquake. Anomalies in satellite data coincide in time with those in the ground-based observation.

  11. An Investigation into Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Steven

    Wind turbine acoustic noise has been the subject of significant research in recent decades due to rapid growth in the wind energy industry. Available space with a reliable wind resource and that does not reside near populated areas is becoming extremely scarce, particularly in Europe. This decline in available space then results in a heightened need for wind turbine designs to be optimized for both acoustic emission and power-performance. Due to highly variable operating conditions, wind turbine acoustic noise emission may deviate from design levels, causing irritation to local residents and requiring reduced power production of the contributing turbines. The objective of this dissertation is to investigate two parameters that contribute to this variability--atmospheric turbulence in the inflow field, and aerodynamic flow separation--such that they may be more fully understood and properly accounted for in design. Results are achieved through an extensive experimental campaign on a full-scale turbine equipped with a thorough sensor network. Several novel flow characterization methods are developed, including a method of in-situ turbulence measurement using blade-mounted accelerometers. Turbulent inflow noise is shown to dominate the low frequency portion of the emitted spectrum for normal turbine operation and increases levels by as much as 6 dB for the conditions observed at the research facility. Experimental observations are typically within 2-3 dB of a commonly implemented noise prediction model. Finally, a study into the effects of high angle of attack operation shows that aerodynamic flow separation--detected using static pressure sensors along one blade of the turbine--can increase overall noise levels by more than 10 dB, thus dominating turbulent inflow noise at low frequencies. The studies of both turbulent inflow noise and flow separation noise represent the most thorough experimental observations and analysis of the respective noise mechanisms on a full

  12. Calibration of an audio frequency noise generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, Joseph M.

    1966-01-01

    A noise generator of known output is very convenient in noise measurement. At low audio frequencies, however, all devices, including noise sources, may be affected by excess noise (1/f noise). It is therefore very desirable to be able to check the spectral density of a noise source before it is u...

  13. Application of lightning discharge generated radio atmospherics/tweeks in lower ionospheric plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, A K; Singh, R; Veenadhari, B [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai - 410 218 (India); Pant, P [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital - 263129, Uttrakhand (India); Singh, A K, E-mail: ajeet.iig@gmail.co, E-mail: akmaurya@iigs.iigm.res.i [Physics Department, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi - 221005 (India)

    2010-02-01

    Lightning discharges during thunderstorm are the significant natural source of electromagnetic waves. They generate electromagnetic pulses, which vary from few Hz to tens of MHz, but the maximum radiated energy is confined in extremely low (ELF: 3-3000Hz) and very low (VLF: 3-30 KHz) frequency band. These pulsed signals with frequency dispersion are known as radio atmospherics or tweeks. These waves propagate through the process of multiple reflections in the earth-ionosphere waveguide over long distances with very low attenuation (2-3 dB/1000km). Since these waves are reflected by lower boundary of ionosphere, these are used extensively for probing the D-region ionosphere. D-region is important to the space weather, as well as the submarine communication and navigational aid. In this perspective the measurement of electron density profiles of the D-region is undoubtedly of great interest to both the development of reliable models and radio wave propagation. Earlier work on the tweeks is mainly focused to the theoretical considerations related to polarization, waveform analysis, and occurrence time and propagation mechanism. In this study we investigate tweeks to determine the equivalent night time electron densities at reflection height of the D-region. Distance traveled by the VLF waves from the causative lightning discharges to the receiving station has also been calculated. Tweeks recorded at a low latitude ground station of Allahabad (Geomag. lat. 16.05{sup 0} N) during the night of 23 March 2007 have been used in the present analysis. Based on the analysis of the fundamental cut-off frequency of tweeks, the estimated equivalent electron density of the D-region has been found to be in the range of {approx}20 to 25 el/cm{sup 3} at ionospheric reflection height of {approx}80 to 95 km respectively. Propagation distance in Earth-Ionosphere wave guide (EIWG) from causative lightning source to experimental site varies from {approx}1500 to 8000 km.

  14. Dynamical decoupling noise spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Gonzalo A

    2011-01-01

    Decoherence is one of the most important obstacles that must be overcome in quantum information processing. It depends on the qubit-environment coupling strength, but also on the spectral composition of the noise generated by the environment. If the spectral density is known, fighting the effect of decoherence can be made more effective. Applying sequences of inversion pulses to the qubit system, we generate effective filter functions that probe the environmental spectral density. Comparing different pulse sequences, we recover the complete spectral density function and distinguish different contributions to the overall decoherence.

  15. Noise hazard course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A 1/2 day course to promote awareness of the risks incurred by noise at the work place and recommendations to settle them. Next course Wednesday 24th September 2003. Costs are covered by TIS, Jacques Coillard from Bureau Véritas will present the course. Registration is obligatory. For more information and to enrol on this course go to the safety section of Human Resources Training and Development web pages, or contact : Ana-Paula Bernardes/TIS-GS (71385) or e-mail Ana-Paula.Bernardes@cern.ch

  16. Noise hazard course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A 1/2 day course to promote awareness of the risks incurred by noise at the work place and recommendations to settle them. Next course Wednesday 24th September 2003. Costs are covered by TIS, Jacques Coillard from Bureau Véritas will present the course. Registration is obligatory. For more information and to enrol on this course go to the safety section of Human Resources Training and Development web pages, or contact: Ana-Paula Bernardes/TIS-GS (71385) or e-mail Ana-Paula.Bernardes@cern.ch

  17. Monitoring of Noise During Ganeshotsav

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs. P. Saler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sound is a form of energy emitted by a vibrating body causing change in pressure of the surrounding elastic medium through which energy is transmitted. Noise has been defined as unwanted sound. Noise is a disturbance to the human environment which is escalating at a high rate. There are numerous effects of noise on human and environment due to the increase in noise pollution slowly, insensibly; we seem to accept noise and the physiological and psychological deterioration that accompanies it as an inevitable part of our lives. Althoughattempts have been made to regulate noise pollution by setting standards for some of the major sources of noise, we often are unable to monitor them. One such source of noise in India is celebration of festival and especially in Maharashtra, the biggest festival- Ganeshostav. The way noise levels are increasing year by year during this festival, it seems we enjoy these sounds, though it has harmful effects on Human Health and Environment. This paper focuses on study of noise pollution during Ganesh Festival and also its other causes and effects.

  18. Occupational noise in printing companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Grujic, Selena D; Kiurski, Jelena; Krstic, Jelena; Oros, Ivana; Kovacevic, Ilija

    2011-10-01

    The extent of noise in five printing companies in Novi Sad, Serbia, was determined using TES-1358A Sound Analyzer with RS-232 Interface. The data on equivalent A-level (dBA), as well as, maximum and minimum sound pressure levels were collected. It was found that folders and offset printing units are the predominant noise sources, with the average L (eq) levels of 87.66 and 82.7 dBA, respectively. Forty percent of the machines produced noise levels above the limiting threshold level of 85 dBA, allowed by law. The noise in all printing companies was dominated by higher frequency noise, and the maximum level mostly appeared at 4,000 Hz. For offset printing machines and folders, the means of L (eq) levels exceeded the permissible levels given by NR-80 curve at higher frequencies. There are no published studies of occupational noise and hearing impairment of workers exposed to hazardous noise in printing industry in Serbia. More extensive studies are needed to determine the exact impact of noise on the workers. Technical and organizational measures in order to control noise and prevent noise exposure, and general hearing conservation program to protect workers, should be introduced in printing industry.

  19. Atmospheric Gravity Waves (AGWs) as the driver of seismo-ionospheric coupling: recent major earthquakes of Nepal and Imphal - case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta

    2016-07-01

    An important channel of the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling (LAIC) is the acoustic and gravity wave channel where the atmospheric gravity waves (AGW) play the most important part. Atmospheric waves are excited due to seismic gravitational vibrations before earthquakes and their effects on the atmosphere are the sources for seismo-ionospheric coupling which are manifested as perturbations in Very Low Frequency (VLF)/Low Frequency (LF) signal (amplitude/phase). For our study, we chose the recent major earthquakes that took place in Nepal and Imphal. The Nepal earthquake occurred on 12th May, 2015 at 12:50 pm local time (07:05 UTC) with Richter scale magnitude of M = 7.3 and depth 10 km (6.21 miles) at southeast of Kodari. The Imphal earthquake occurred on 4th January, 2016 at 4:35 am local time (23:05 UTC , 3rd January, UTC) with Richter scale magnitude of M = 6.7 and depth 55 km (34.2 miles). The data has been collected from Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre (IERC) of Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) transmitted from JJI station of Japan. We performed both Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and wavelet analysis on the VLF data for a couple of days before and after the major earthquakes. For both earthquakes, we observed wave like structures with periods of almost an hour before and after the earthquake day. The wave like oscillations after the earthquake may be due to the aftershock effects. We also observed that the amplitude of the wave like structures depends on the location of the epicenter between the transmitting and the receiving points and also on the depth of the earthquake.

  20. Development of Active Noise Control System for Quieting Transformer Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bok Kyu; Song, Seik Young; Choi, Huo Yul [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Dae Hea; Lee, Hyuk Jae [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The passive noise control technique made use of sound-absorbing or soundproofing materials, so it required a large area and high cost for installation and had a drawback of poor performance at low frequency. Compared to this, the Active Noise Control attenuates noise sound pressure by using secondary source which has same performance ay low-frequency. Furthermore, it is able to save space and expenses. - research on adaptive algorithms - evaluation of global attenuation of the control - computer simulation - real-time Active Noise Control System Hardware Implementation - ANC system setting in the noisy area.

  1. Development of Active Noise Control System for Quieting Transformer Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bok Kyu; Song, Seik Young; Choi, Huo Yul [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Dae Hea; Lee, Hyuk Jae [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The passive noise control technique made use of sound-absorbing or soundproofing materials, so it required a large area and high cost for installation and had a drawback of poor performance at low frequency. Compared to this, the Active Noise Control attenuates noise sound pressure by using secondary source which has same performance ay low-frequency. Furthermore, it is able to save space and expenses. - research on adaptive algorithms - evaluation of global attenuation of the control - computer simulation - real-time Active Noise Control System Hardware Implementation - ANC system setting in the noisy area.

  2. Noise in Lead Beta Alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    single crystal and ceramic samples. The temperature dependance for diffusion noise (I>O,1OHz) is greater than can be accounted for by Equation (1). This...3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 1000/T IN 1/9 Figure 2. Temperature Dependance of Nyqutst Noise (5kHz) and Diffusion Noise (lOHz) of Single Crystal and

  3. Noise of sliding rough contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bot, Alain

    2017-01-01

    This article is a discussion about the origin of friction noise produced when rubbing solids having rough surfaces. We show that noise emerges from numerous impacts into the contact between antagonist asperities of surfaces. Prediction of sound sources reduces to a statistical problem of contact mechanics. On the other hand, contact is also responsible of dissipation of vibration. This leads to the paradoxical result that the noise may not be proportional to the number of sources.

  4. Road traffic noise and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Hvidberg, Martin; Andersen, Zorana J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to road traffic noise increases the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between exposure to road traffic noise and risk for stroke, which has not been studied before.......Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to road traffic noise increases the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between exposure to road traffic noise and risk for stroke, which has not been studied before....

  5. Noise Pollution and Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geravandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Noise pollution is of particular importance due to the physical and psychological effects on humans. Noise is a stressor that affects the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Noise is also a threat to marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Health risks from noise are correlated with road traffic. In other words, noise health effects are the health consequences of elevated sound levels. Objectives This study aims to determine the effect of noise pollution (near roadways on health issues in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, equivalent sound pressure level were measured by sound level meters TES-1353 in 75 locations around 4 roadways, which had a high load of traffic in Ahvaz City during day time. During the study, 820 measurements were recorded at measuring stations, for 7 days per week with 1-hour interval between each measurement. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS software. Results According to the research findings, the equivalent sound pressure levels in all stations were 76.28 ± 3.12 dB (Mean ± SD. According to sound measurements and the survey questionnaire, noise pollution is higher than EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency and Iran standard level. Based on result of this study the worst noise health effects were the nervousness and sleep quality during 2012. Conclusions According to the results of this study, with increasing load of traffic, there is an increasing need for proper consideration plans to control noise pollution and prevent its effects.

  6. Adjusting phenotypes by noise control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung H Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically identical cells can show phenotypic variability. This is often caused by stochastic events that originate from randomness in biochemical processes involving in gene expression and other extrinsic cellular processes. From an engineering perspective, there have been efforts focused on theory and experiments to control noise levels by perturbing and replacing gene network components. However, systematic methods for noise control are lacking mainly due to the intractable mathematical structure of noise propagation through reaction networks. Here, we provide a numerical analysis method by quantifying the parametric sensitivity of noise characteristics at the level of the linear noise approximation. Our analysis is readily applicable to various types of noise control and to different types of system; for example, we can orthogonally control the mean and noise levels and can control system dynamics such as noisy oscillations. As an illustration we applied our method to HIV and yeast gene expression systems and metabolic networks. The oscillatory signal control was applied to p53 oscillations from DNA damage. Furthermore, we showed that the efficiency of orthogonal control can be enhanced by applying extrinsic noise and feedback. Our noise control analysis can be applied to any stochastic model belonging to continuous time Markovian systems such as biological and chemical reaction systems, and even computer and social networks. We anticipate the proposed analysis to be a useful tool for designing and controlling synthetic gene networks.

  7. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  8. A new approach of drawing airport noise contours on computer based on Surfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bang-jun; GUO Chun-yan; Di Guo-qing

    2004-01-01

    Noise contours are used to describe the extent of airport noise pollution and to plan land use around airports. The LwEcPN (weighted equivalent continuous perceive noise level) recommended by ICAO(International Civil Aviation Organization ) is adopted as airport noise rating parameter in this paper. With the help of various mathematical models in the software Surfer, noise contours can be drawn automatically by the completed program in Visual C++ Code. Corrections for thrust, velocity, atmospheric temperature, humidity and lateral ground attenuation are also considered in the new method, which can improve the efficiency of drawing contours. An example of its use for drawing noise contours of an airport in Zhejiang Province of China is proposed and the predictions and the measurements show agreements well.

  9. Comparison of the scintillation noise above different observatories measured with MASS instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Kornilov, V; Tokovinin, A; Travouillon, T; Voziakova, O

    2012-01-01

    Scintillation noise is a major limitation of ground base photometric precision. An extensive dataset of stellar scintillation collected at 11 astronomical sites world-wide with MASS instruments was used to estimate the scintillation noise of large telescopes in the case of fast photometry and traditional long-exposure regime. Statistical distributions of the corresponding parameters are given. The scintillation noise is mostly determined by turbulence and wind in the upper atmosphere and comparable at all sites, with slightly smaller values at Mauna Kea and largest noise at Tolonchar in Chile. We show that the classical Young's formula under-estimates the scintillation noise.The temporal variations of the scintillation noise are also similar at all sites, showing short-term variability at time scales of 1 -- 2 hours and slower variations, including marked seasonal trends (stronger scintillation and less clear sky during local winter). Some correlation was found between nearby observatories.

  10. Physiological, Psychological, and Social Effects of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryter, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    The physiological, and behavioral effects of noise on man are investigated. Basic parameters such as definitions of noise, measuring techniques of noise, and the physiology of the ear are presented prior to the development of topics on hearing loss, speech communication in noise, social effects of noise, and the health effects of noise pollution. Recommendations for the assessment and subsequent control of noise is included.

  11. Quantum Noise Locking

    CERN Document Server

    McKenzie, K; Goda, K; Lam, P K; Grosse, N; Gray, M B; Mavalvala, N; McClelland, D E; Kenzie, Kirk Mc; Mikhailov, Eugeniy; Goda, Keisuke; Lam, Ping Koy; Grosse, Nicolai; Gray, Malcolm B.; Mavalvala, Nergis; Clelland, David E. Mc

    2005-01-01

    Quantum optical states which have no coherent amplitude, such as squeezed vacuum states, can not rely on standard readout techniques to generate error signals for control of the quadrature phase. Here we investigate the use of asymmetry in the quadrature variances to obtain a phase-sensitive readout and to lock the phase of a squeezed vacuum state, a technique which we call noise locking (NL). We carry out a theoretical derivation of the NL error signal and the associated stability of the squeezed and anti-squeezed lock points. Experimental data for the NL technique both in the presence and absence of coherent fields are shown, including a comparison with coherent locking techniques. Finally, we use NL to enable a stable readout of the squeezed vacuum state on a homodyne detector.

  12. Quantum noise locking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Kirk [Center for Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Mikhailov, Eugeniy E [LIGO Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Goda, Keisuke [LIGO Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lam, Ping Koy [Quantum Optics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Grosse, Nicolai [Quantum Optics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Gray, Malcolm B [Center for Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Mavalvala, Nergis [LIGO Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); McClelland, David E [Center for Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2005-10-01

    Quantum optical states which have no coherent amplitude, such as squeezed vacuum states, cannot rely on standard readout techniques to generate error signals for control of the quadrature phase. Here we investigate the use of asymmetry in the quadrature variances to obtain a phase-sensitive readout and to lock the phase of a squeezed vacuum state, a technique which we call noise locking (NL). We carry out a theoretical derivation of the NL error signal and the associated stability of the squeezed and anti-squeezed lock points. Experimental data for the NL technique both in the presence and absence of coherent fields are shown, including a comparison with coherent locking techniques. Finally, we use NL to enable a stable readout of the squeezed vacuum state on a homodyne detector.

  13. Active Noise Control of Radiated Noise from Jets Originating NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Michael J.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Turner, Travis L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of jet noise using a closed-loop active noise control system with highbandwidth active chevrons was investigated. The high frequency energy introduced by piezoelectrically-driven chevrons was demonstrated to achieve a broadband reduction of jet noise, presumably due to the suppression of large-scale turbulence. For a nozzle with one active chevron, benefits of up to 0.8 dB overall sound pressure level (OASPL) were observed compared to a static chevron nozzle near the maximum noise emission angle, and benefits of up to 1.9 dB OASPL were observed compared to a baseline nozzle with no chevrons. The closed-loop actuation system was able to effectively reduce noise at select frequencies by 1-3 dB. However, integrated OASPL did not indicate further reduction beyond the open-loop benefits, most likely due to the preliminary controller design, which was focused on narrowband performance.

  14. Seasonal Predictability in a Model Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai

    2001-07-01

    The predictability of atmospheric mean-seasonal conditions in the absence of externally varying forcing is examined. A perfect-model approach is adopted, in which a global T21 three-level quasigeostrophic atmospheric model is integrated over 21 000 days to obtain a reference atmospheric orbit. The model is driven by a time-independent forcing, so that the only source of time variability is the internal dynamics. The forcing is set to perpetual winter conditions in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and perpetual summer in the Southern Hemisphere.A significant temporal variability in the NH 90-day mean states is observed. The component of that variability associated with the higher-frequency motions, or climate noise, is estimated using a method developed by Madden. In the polar region, and to a lesser extent in the midlatitudes, the temporal variance of the winter means is significantly greater than the climate noise, suggesting some potential predictability in those regions.Forecast experiments are performed to see whether the presence of variance in the 90-day mean states that is in excess of the climate noise leads to some skill in the prediction of these states. Ensemble forecast experiments with nine members starting from slightly different initial conditions are performed for 200 different 90-day means along the reference atmospheric orbit. The serial correlation between the ensemble means and the reference orbit shows that there is skill in the 90-day mean predictions. The skill is concentrated in those regions of the NH that have the largest variance in excess of the climate noise. An EOF analysis shows that nearly all the predictive skill in the seasonal means is associated with one mode of variability with a strong axisymmetric component.

  15. A review and tutorial discussion of noise and signal-to-noise ratios in analytical spectrometry—III. Multiplicative noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, C.T.J.; Snelleman, W.; Boutilier, G.D.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, signal-to-noise ratios are discussed in a tutorial fashion for the case of multiplicative noise. Multiplicative noise is introduced simultaneously with the analyte signal and is therefore much more difficult to reduce than additive noise. The sources of noise, the mathematical repres

  16. Prediction of the far field noise from wind energy farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, K. P.; Hubbard, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic physical factors involved in making predictions of wind turbine noise and an approach which allows for differences in the machines, the wind energy farm configurations and propagation conditions are reviewed. Example calculations to illustrate the sensitivity of the radiated noise to such variables as machine size, spacing and numbers, and such atmosphere variables as absorption and wind direction are presented. It is found that calculated far field distances to particular sound level contours are greater for lower values of atmospheric absorption, for a larger total number of machines, for additional rows of machines and for more powerful machines. At short and intermediate distances, higher sound pressure levels are calculated for closer machine spacings, for more powerful machines, for longer row lengths and for closer row spacings.

  17. Atmosphere: Power, Critique, Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This paper hans three interrelated parts. First, atmosphere is approached through the concept of power. Atmospheres 'grip' us directly or mediate power indirectly by manipulating moods and evoking emotions. How does atmosphere relate to different conceptions of power? Second, atmospheric powers m...... be critiqued. Which conception of critique can be involved? Third, critiquing atmospheric powers can generate political conflict. How does atmospheric disputes relate to conceptions of politics and the political?...

  18. Ionosperic anomaly due to seismic activities – Part 1: Calibration of the VLF signal of VTX 18.2 KHz station from Kolkata and deviation during seismic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sasmal

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available VLF signals are long thought to give away important information about the lithosphere-ionosphere coupling. In order to establish co-relations, if any, between the ionospheric activities and the earthquakes, we need to understand what the reference signals are, throughout the year. The best opportunity to do this is during the period of solar minimum where the number of flares and sunspots are negligible and the data would be primarily affected by the sun and variation would be due to normal sunset and sunrise effects. In this paper, we present the result of the sunrise and sunset terminators as a function of the day of the year for a period of four years, viz, 2005–2008 when the solar activity was very low. The terminators are for the 18.2 KHz VTX signal of the Indian Navy as observed from Indian Centre for Space Physics receiving station located in Kolkata. A total of 624 days of data have been used to obtain the mean plot. Any deviation of observations from this so-called the standardized calibration curve would point to influences by terrestrial (such as earthquakes and extra-terrestrial events (such as solar activities. We present examples of deviations which occur in a period of 16 months and show that the correlation with seismic events is significant and typically the highest deviation takes place up to a couple of days prior to the seismic event. Simultaneous observations of such deviations from more than one station could improve the predictability of earthquakes.

  19. Ionosperic anomaly due to seismic activities - Part 1: Calibration of the VLF signal of VTX 18.2 KHz station from Kolkata and deviation during seismic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmal, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.

    2009-08-01

    VLF signals are long thought to give away important information about the lithosphere-ionosphere coupling. In order to establish co-relations, if any, between the ionospheric activities and the earthquakes, we need to understand what the reference signals are, throughout the year. The best opportunity to do this is during the period of solar minimum where the number of flares and sunspots are negligible and the data would be primarily affected by the sun and variation would be due to normal sunset and sunrise effects. In this paper, we present the result of the sunrise and sunset terminators as a function of the day of the year for a period of four years, viz, 2005-2008 when the solar activity was very low. The terminators are for the 18.2 KHz VTX signal of the Indian Navy as observed from Indian Centre for Space Physics receiving station located in Kolkata. A total of 624 days of data have been used to obtain the mean plot. Any deviation of observations from this so-called the standardized calibration curve would point to influences by terrestrial (such as earthquakes) and extra-terrestrial events (such as solar activities). We present examples of deviations which occur in a period of 16 months and show that the correlation with seismic events is significant and typically the highest deviation takes place up to a couple of days prior to the seismic event. Simultaneous observations of such deviations from more than one station could improve the predictability of earthquakes.

  20. Fast High-Quality Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Wyvill, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    At the moment the noise functions available in a graphics programmer's toolbox are either slow to compute or they involve grid-line artifacts making them of lower quality. In this paper we present a real-time noise computation with no grid-line artifacts or other regularity problems. In other wor...

  1. Consumer oriented product noise testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Les

    2005-09-01

    This paper explores the need for product noise measurements and how best to meet that need in the near future. Currently there is only a small market place for quieter consumer products. This is not because of lack of interest. No one really wants to announce to everyone in their house that they just flushed the toilet, few really want the entire neighborhood to know they are mowing their yard, etc. The small market place is primarily due to a lack of regulations on product noise, a lack of information easily available to consumers about which products are quieter, and market consolidation resulting in fewer manufacturers, most of whom are unwilling to emphasize their quieter products at the risk of eroding sales of their noisier ones (that currently have greater market share). In the absence of the EPA fulfilling its statutory requirement to regulate and label product noise under the Noise Control Act of 1972, and with the unwillingness of most industries to voluntarily publish accurate product noise data, there is a significant role for ``Consumer Oriented Product Noise Testing.'' This paper explores the Noise Pollution Clearinghouse's ongoing and planned product noise testing, evaluating its advantages, disadvantages, and limitations.

  2. Noise and health of children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, W.

    2000-01-01

    The world of the child is becoming noisier and noisier. Compared to the mid-fifties environ-mental noise levels (sources such as road traffic, aircraft) increased substantially, causing higher noise levels during day- and night-time at home, at school and during out- and indoors leisure time activit

  3. Generation of spatiotemporal colored noise

    OpenAIRE

    García Ojalvo, Jordi; Ramírez de la Piscina Millán, Laureano; Sancho, Jose Maria

    1992-01-01

    We develop an algorithm to simulate a Gaussian stochastic process that is non-δ-correlated in both space and time coordinates. The colored noise obeys a linear reaction-diffusion Langevin equation with Gaussian white noise. This equation is exactly simulated in a discrete Fourier space. Peer Reviewed

  4. Divide and conquer spot noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, W.C. de; Liere, R. van

    1997-01-01

    The design and implementation of an interactive spot noise algorithm is presented. Spot noise is a technique which utilizes texture for the visualization of flow fields. Various design tradeoffs are discussed that allow an optimal implementation on a range of high end graphical workstations. Two app

  5. Noise exposure and public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier-Vermeer, W.; Passchier, W.F.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to noise constitutes a health risk. There is sufficient scientific evidence that noise exposure can induce hearing impairment, hypertension and ischemic heart disease, annoyance, sleep disturbance, and decreased school performance. For other effects such as changes in the immune system and

  6. Predicting Noise From Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1990-01-01

    Computer program WINDY predicts broadband noise spectra of horizontal-axis wind-turbine generators. Enables adequate assessment of impact of broadband wind-turbine noise. Effects of turbulence, trailing-edge wakes, and bluntness taken into account. Program has practical application in design and siting of wind-turbine machines acceptable to community. Written in GW-Basic.

  7. On Physical Aeroacoustics with Some Implications for Low-Noise Aircraft Design and Airport Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís M. B. C. Campos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Air traffic is growing at a steady rate of 3% to 5% per year in most regions of the world, implying a doubling every 15–25 years. This requires major advances in aircraft noise reduction at airports, just not to increase the noise exposure due to the larger number of aircraft movements. In fact it can be expected, as a consequence of increased opposition to noise by near airport residents, that the overall noise exposure will have to be reduced, by bans, curfews, fines, and other means and limitations, unless significantly quieter aircraft operations are achieved. The ultimate solution is aircraft operations inaudible outside the airport perimeter, or noise levels below road traffic and other existing local noise sources. These substantial noise reductions cannot come at the expense of a degradation of cruise efficiency, that would affect not just economics and travel time, but would increase fuel consumption and emission of pollutants on a global scale. The paper reviews the: (i current knowledge of the aircraft noise sources; (ii the sound propagation in the atmosphere and ground effects that determine the noise annoyance of near-airport residents; (iii the noise mitigation measures that can be applied to current and future aircraft; (iv the prospects of evolutionary and novel aircraft designs towards quieter aircraft in the near term and eventually to operations inaudible outside the airport perimeter. The 20 figures and 1 diagram with their legends provide a visual summary of the review.

  8. Characterization of avalanche photodiodes for lidar atmospheric return signal detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antill, C. W., Jr.; Holloway, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from tests to characterize noise, dark current, overload, and gain versus bias, relationships of ten avalanche photodiodes. The advantages of avalanche photodiodes over photomultiplier tubes for given laser wavelengths and return signal amplitudes are outlined. The relationship between responsivity and temperature and dark current and temperature are examined. Also, measurements of the noise equivalent power, the excess noise factor, and linearity are given. The advantages of using avalanche photodiodes in the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment and the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment are discussed.

  9. Quantum noise in superluminescent diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuvek, A.M.; Taylor, H.F.; Goldberg, L.; Weller, J.F.; Dandridge, A.

    1986-04-01

    Intensity noise in a superluminescent diode (SLD) has been studied over the frequency range from 100 Hz to 2 MHz. The ''1/F'' noise which dominates at low frequencies (<59 kHz) is superceded by a flat ''white noise'' spectrum at higher frequencies (> 500 5Hz). A more extensive investigation has been carried out in this higher frequency regime, where the intensity noise is assumed to result from quantum fluctuation effects. For a given SLD driving current, the excess noise power is found to be a linear function of photodetector current to the maximum observed level of 12 db. These results agree well with the behavior predicted by a quantum amplifier model for the SLD.

  10. Recent Advances in Studies of Current Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanter, Yaroslav M.

    This is a brief review of recent activities in the field of current noise intended for newcomers. We first briefly discuss main properties of shot noise in nanostructures, and then turn to recent developments, concentrating on issues related to experimental progress: non-symmetrized cumulants and quantum noise; counting statistics; super-Poissonian noise; current noise and interferometry

  11. 23 CFR 772.19 - Construction noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Construction noise. 772.19 Section 772.19 Highways... ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.19 Construction noise. The following general... may be affected by noise from construction of the project. The identification is to be...

  12. Wind Turbines: Unsteady Aerodynamics and Inflow Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Brian Riget

    ; and Graham, J. M. R.: 1970, Lifting surface theory for the problem of an arbitrarily yawed sinusoidal gust incident on a thin aerofoil in incompressible flow). Two of these models are investigated to find the unsteady lift distribution or pressure difference as function of chordwise position on the aerofoil...... (Sears, W. R.: 1941; and Graham, J. M. R.: 1970). An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input (Amiet, R. K.: 1975, Acoustic radiation from an airfoil in a turbulent stream). The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models...... and the perfectly isotropic turbulent model. This indicates that the models capture the aerodynamics well. Thus the measurements suggest that the noise due to atmospheric turbulence can be described and modeled by the two models for lift distribution. It was not possible to test the acoustical model...

  13. Turbulence-noise in infrared lidar sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinandov, E. S.; Tsanev, V. I.; Todorov, B. O.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical description of the laser location (lidar) systems for investigation of two-dimensional distributions of the scattering properties of aerosol fields (natural or anthropogenic) in the infrared range has been made on the basis of the heuristic concept for the influence of the atmospheric turbulence (AT) on the transverse spatial structure of optical radiations. It has been shown that the influence of AT on the information carried by the lidar images is negative. It acts along the path "laser-sounded aerosol layer" only, i.e. when there is utter initial transverse coherency of the optical radiation. Explicit results for the stratifications of the coherency radii, the dispersion and contrast of the transverse spatial fluctuations of the intensity, the averaging action of the apertures of matrix photodetector elements on the corresponding radiant fluxes' turbulent fluctuations and the "signal-to-turbulence-noise" ratio have been derived.

  14. Active Noise Control for Vehicle Exhaust Noise Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克强; 杨殿阁; 郑四发; 连小珉; 田中丈晴

    2003-01-01

    An active noise control (ANC) method was developed for exhaust noise reduction for medium-duty diesel trucks. A modified variable step size least mean squares (LMS) algorithm was used for the controller in a variable environment that considered the vehicle's acceleration characteristics. The variable step size time-based synchronized filtered-x LMS method (SFX-TB) used an adaptive algorithm that was more efficient than the conventional filtered-x LMS algorithm. The simulation and the experimental tests show that the control trackability and stability provided by the algorithm during acceleration enable the ANC system to effectively reduce the vehicle exhaust noise.

  15. Noise exposure in oil mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Noise of machines in various agro-based industries was found to be the major occupational hazard for the workers of industries. The predominant noise sources need to be identified and the causes of high noise need to be studied to undertake the appropriate measures to reduce the noise level in one of the major agro-based industries, oil mills. Aims: To identify the predominant noise sources in the workrooms of oil mills. To study the causes of noise in oil mills. To measure the extent of noise exposure of oil mill workers. To examine the response of workers towards noise, so that appropriate measures can be undertaken to minimize the noise exposure. Settings and Design: A noise survey was conducted in the three renowned oil mills of north-eastern region of India. Materials and Methods: Information like output capacity, size of power source, maintenance condition of the machines and workroom configurations of the oil mills was collected by personal observations and enquiry with the owner of the mill. Using a Sound Level Meter (SLM (Model-824, Larson and Davis, USA, equivalent SPL was measured at operator′s ear level in the working zone of the workers near each machine of the mills. In order to study the variation of SPL in the workrooms of the oil mill throughout its operation, equivalent SPL was measured at two appropriate locations of working zone of the workers in each mill. For conducting the noise survey, the guidelines of Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS were followed. Grid points were marked on the floor of the workroom of the oil mill at a spacing of 1 m x 1 m. SPL at grid points were measured at about 1.5 m above the floor. The direction of the SLM was towards the nearby noisy source. To increase accuracy, two replications were taken at each grid point. All the data were recorded for 30 sec. At the end of the experiment, data were downloaded to a personal computer. With the help of utility software of

  16. Thermal noise engines

    CERN Document Server

    Kish, Laszlo B

    2010-01-01

    Electrical heat engines driven by the Johnson-Nyquist noise of resistors are introduced. They utilize Coulomb's law and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem of statistical physics that is the reverse phenomenon of heat dissipation in a resistor. No steams, gases, liquids, photons, fuel, combustion, phase transition, or exhaust/pollution are present here. In these engines, instead of heat reservoirs, cylinders, pistons and valves, resistors, capacitors and switches are the building elements. For the best performance, a large number of parallel engines must be integrated and the characteristic size of the elementary engine must be at the 10 nanometers scale. At room temperature, in the most idealistic case, a two-dimensional ensemble of engines of 25 nanometer characteristic size integrated on a 2.5x2.5 cm silicon wafer with 12 Celsius degree temperature difference between the warm-source and the cold-sink would produce a specific power of about 0.8 Watt. Regular and coherent (correlated-cylinder states) version...

  17. Rocket noise - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerny, S. A.

    1990-10-01

    This paper reviews what is known about far-field rocket noise from the controlled studies of the late 1950s and 1960s and from launch data. The peak dimensionless frequency, the dependence of overall sound power on exhaust parameters, and the directivity of the overall sound power of rockets are compared to those of subsonic jets and turbo-jets. The location of the dominant sound source in the rocket exhaust plume and the mean flow velocity in this region are discussed and shown to provide a qualitative explanation for the low peak Strouhal number, fD(e)/V(e), and large angle of maximum directivity. Lastly, two empirical prediction methods are compared with data from launches of a Titan family vehicle (two, solid rocket motors of 5.7 x 10 to the 6th N thrust each) and the Saturn V (five, liquid oxygen/rocket propellant engines of 6.7 x 10 to the 6th N thrust, each). The agreement is favorable. In contrast, these methods appear to overpredict the far-field sound pressure levels generated by the Space Shuttle.

  18. Atmospheric contamination for CMB ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Errard, J; Akiba, Y; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Baccigalupi, C; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Delabrouille, J; Dobbs, M; Ducout, A; Elleflot, T; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Feeney, S; Gilbert, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Hill, C; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A H; Jeong, O; Katayama, N; Kaufman, J; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leon, D; Linder, E; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N J; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Okamura, T; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Puglisi, G; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K M; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tajima, O; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Whitehorn, N; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive an analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We compare our results to previous st...

  19. Signal with Flat Phase Noise Using a Carrier and the Power Spectral Density of White Noise for Phase Noise Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Ken-ichi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Ikegami, Takeshi; Iida, Hitoshi; Shimada, Yozo

    2012-01-01

    We have realized a phase noise standard of a signal with a -100 dBc/Hz flat phase noise at 10 MHz for Fourier frequencies of 1 Hz to 100 kHz, which ensures traceability to the International System of Units (SI). The flat phase noise signal is produced using a carrier combined with white noise. To ensure traceability, both the flat phase noise signal power and the power spectral density of white noise are determined with a calibrated power meter and the noise standard, respectively. The flatness of the phase noise standard is within ±0.7 dB.

  20. Noise in eukaryotic gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, William J.; KÆrn, Mads; Cantor, Charles R.; Collins, J. J.

    2003-04-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic cells has been described as quantal, with pulses of messenger RNA produced in a probabilistic manner. This description reflects the inherently stochastic nature of gene expression, known to be a major factor in the heterogeneous response of individual cells within a clonal population to an inducing stimulus. Here we show in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that stochasticity (noise) arising from transcription contributes significantly to the level of heterogeneity within a eukaryotic clonal population, in contrast to observations in prokaryotes, and that such noise can be modulated at the translational level. We use a stochastic model of transcription initiation specific to eukaryotes to show that pulsatile mRNA production, through reinitiation, is crucial for the dependence of noise on transcriptional efficiency, highlighting a key difference between eukaryotic and prokaryotic sources of noise. Furthermore, we explore the propagation of noise in a gene cascade network and demonstrate experimentally that increased noise in the transcription of a regulatory protein leads to increased cell-cell variability in the target gene output, resulting in prolonged bistable expression states. This result has implications for the role of noise in phenotypic variation and cellular differentiation.

  1. Pavement noise measurements in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zofka, Ewa; Zofka, Adam; Mechowski, Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of the On-Board Sound Intensity (OBSI) system to measure tire-pavement noise in Poland. In general, sources of noise emitted by the modern vehicles are the propulsion noise, aerodynamic resistance and noise generated at the tire-pavement interface. In order to capture tire-pavement noise, the OBSI system uses a noise intensity probe installed in the close proximity of that interface. In this study, OBSI measurements were performed at different types of pavement surfaces such as stone mastic asphalt (SMA), regular asphalt concrete (HMA) as well as Portland cement concrete (PCC). The influence of several necessary OBSI measurement conditions were recognized as: testing speed, air temperature, tire pressure and tire type. The results of this study demonstrate that the OBSI system is a viable and robust tool that can be used for the quality evaluation of newly built asphalt pavements in Poland. It can be also applied to generate reliable input parameters for the noise propagation models that are used to assess the environmental impact of new and existing highway corridors.

  2. Airframe-Jet Engine Integration Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Antcliff, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    It has been found experimentally that the noise radiated by a jet mounted under the wing of an aircraft exceeds that of the same jet in a stand-alone environment. The increase in noise is referred to as jet engine airframe integration noise. The objectives of the present investigation are, (1) To obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for jet engine airframe integration noise or installation noise. (2) To develop a prediction model for jet engine airframe integration noise. It is known that jet mixing noise consists of two principal components. They are the noise from the large turbulence structures of the jet flow and the noise from the fine scale turbulence. In this investigation, only the effect of jet engine airframe interaction on the fine scale turbulence noise of a jet is studied. The fine scale turbulence noise is the dominant noise component in the sideline direction. Thus we limit out consideration primarily to the sideline.

  3. Keeping Noise Down on the Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Do > Keeping Noise Down on the Farm Keeping Noise Down on the Farm SHARE Some people may ... risks permanent hearing damage. Take steps to reduce noise from machinery. Keep machinery running smoothly by replacing ...

  4. Noise-induced synchronization for phase turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaguchi, H.

    2003-01-01

    Phase turbulence is suppressed by applying common noise additively to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky type equation, and the noise-induced phase synchronization is realized. The noise strength necessary for the suppression of phase turbulence is evaluated theoretically.

  5. The role of Urbis' noise and noise effects maps in local policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.

    2001-01-01

    An important aspect of the EU noise policy is mapping of noise and noise effects and the formulation of noise action plans. In the Netherlands, due to the new policy on noise (MIG), the municipalities will be responsible for the formulation of a local noise policy. An instrument for the assessment o

  6. The Assessment of Noise Exposure and Noise Annoyance at a Petrochemical Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Farhang Dehghan

    2013-12-01

    .Conclusion: Based on the obtained results of investigating the noise level (objective exposure as well as the noise annoyance (subjective exposure at the studied company, it is necessary to adopt the management –technical noise reduction measures at manufacturing sectors as the personal noise exposure and environmental noise exposure and also noise personal exposure of administrative staff can be decreased.

  7. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English, which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment.

  8. Developing active noise control systems for noise attenuation in ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Rosely V.; Ivo, Rodrigo C.; Medeiros, Eduardo B.

    2002-11-01

    The present work describes some of the research effort on Active Noise Control (ANC) being jointly developed by the Catholic University of Minas Gerais (PUC-MINAS) and the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG). Considerations about the implementation of Digital Signal Processing for noise control in ducts has been presented. The objective is to establish a study on Active Noise Control in ducts combining geometry and acoustic parameters modification together with adaptive digital filtering implementation. Both algorithm and digital signal processing details are also discussed. The main results for a typical application where real attenuation has been obtained are presented and considered according to their use in developing real applications. The authors also believe that the present text should provide an interesting overview for both designers and students concerned about Active Noise Control in ducts. (To be presented in Portuguese.)

  9. Entangled light from white noise

    CERN Document Server

    Plenio, M B

    2002-01-01

    An atom that couples to two distinct leaky optical cavities is driven by an external optical white noise field. We describe how entanglement between the light fields sustained by two optical cavities arises in such a situation. The entanglement is maximized for intermediate values of the cavity damping rates and the intensity of the white noise field, vanishing both for small and for large values of these parameters and thus exhibiting a stochastic-resonance-like behaviour. This example illustrates the possibility of generating entanglement by exclusively incoherent means and sheds new light on the constructive role noise may play in certain tasks of interest for quantum information processing.

  10. Entangled light from white noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenio, M B; Huelga, S F

    2002-05-13

    An atom that couples to two distinct leaky optical cavities is driven by an external optical white noise field. We describe how entanglement between the light fields sustained by two optical cavities arises in such a situation. The entanglement is maximized for intermediate values of the cavity damping rates and the intensity of the white noise field, vanishing both for small and for large values of these parameters and thus exhibiting a stochastic-resonancelike behavior. This example illustrates the possibility of generating entanglement by exclusively incoherent means and sheds new light on the constructive role noise may play in certain tasks of interest for quantum information processing.

  11. Substrate noise coupling in RFICs

    CERN Document Server

    Helmy, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Substrate Noise Coupling in RFICs addresses substrate noise coupling in RF and mixed signal ICs when used in a system on chip (SoC) containing digital ICs as well. This trend of integrating RF, mixed signal ICs with large digital ICs is found in many of today's commercial ICs such as single chip Wi-Fi or Bluetooth solutions and is expected to grow rapidly in the future. The book reports modeling and simulation techniques for substrate noise coupling effects in RFICs and introduces isolation structures and design guides to mitigate such effects with the ultimate goal of enhancing the yield of R

  12. Flow noise in sonar applications

    CERN Document Server

    Henke, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation of flow noise in sonar applications. Based on a careful identification of the dominant coupling effects, the acoustic noise at the sensor position resulting from the turbulent wall pressure fluctuations is modelled with a system of hydrodynamic, bending and acoustic waves. We describe an analytical solution of the problem which is based on a coupled eigenfunction expansion method. Finally, it is demonstrated that the analytical solution describes the flow noise generation and propagation mechanisms of the considered sea trials.

  13. Efficient computational noise in GLSL

    CERN Document Server

    McEwan, Ian; Gustavson, Stefan; Richardson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We present GLSL implementations of Perlin noise and Perlin simplex noise that run fast enough for practical consideration on current generation GPU hardware. The key benefits are that the functions are purely computational, i.e. they use neither textures nor lookup tables, and that they are implemented in GLSL version 1.20, which means they are compatible with all current GLSL-capable platforms, including OpenGL ES 2.0 and WebGL 1.0. Their performance is on par with previously presented GPU implementations of noise, they are very convenient to use, and they scale well with increasing parallelism in present and upcoming GPU architectures.

  14. Space noise synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof S.

    2006-03-01

    The paper presents limitations of space borne synthetic aperture radars, caused by range and Doppler velocity ambiguities, and the concept of usage of the noise radar technology for creation of high-resolution space SAR images. The noise SAR is free from limitation caused by the periodicity of pulse waveform ambiguity function, and therefore this technology can be used in the future space missions. The basic concept of noise SAR image formation is also presented. The image formation algorithm has been verified using the simulated data produced by Raw Radar Data Simulator.

  15. The Effect of Blade Aeroelasticity and Turbine Parameters on Wind Turbine Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the demand for wind energy has dramatically increased as well as the number and size of commercial wind turbines. These large turbines are loud and can cause annoyance to nearby communities. Therefore, the prediction of large wind turbine noise over long distances is critical. The wind turbine noise prediction is a very complex problem since it has to account for atmospheric conditions (wind and temperature), ground absorption, un-even terrain, turbine wake, and blade deforma...

  16. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  17. Noise suppression by quantum control before and after the noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamura, Hiroaki; Kawakubo, Ryûitirô; Koike, Tatsuhiko

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the possibility of protecting the state of a quantum system that goes through noise by measurements and operations before and after the noise process. The aim is to seek the optimal protocol that makes the input and output states as close as possible and to clarify the role of the measurements therein. We consider two cases: one can perform quantum measurements and operations (i) only after the noise process and (ii) both before and after. We prove in a two-dimensional Hilbert space that, in case (i), the noise suppression is essentially impossible for all types of noise and, in case (ii), the optimal protocol for the depolarizing noise is either the "do nothing" protocol or the "discriminate and reprepare" protocol. These protocols are not "truly quantum" and can be considered as classical. They involve no measurement or only use the measurement outcomes. These results describe the fundamental limitations in quantum mechanics from the viewpoint of control theory. Finally, we conjecture that a statement similar to case (ii) holds for higher-dimensional Hilbert spaces and present some numerical evidence.

  18. Seismometer Self-Noise and Measuring Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, Adam; R. Sleeman,; Hutt, Charles R.; Gee, Lind S.

    2014-01-01

    Seismometer self-noise is usually not considered when selecting and using seismic waveform data in scientific research as it is typically assumed that the self-noise is negligibly small compared to seismic signals. However, instrumental noise is part of the noise in any seismic record, and in particular, at frequencies below a few mHz, the instrumental noise has a frequency-dependent character and may dominate the noise. When seismic noise itself is considered as a carrier of information, as in seismic interferometry (e.g., Chaput et al. 2012), it becomes extremely important to estimate the contribution of instrumental noise to the recordings.

  19. Noise-Enabled Optical Ratchets

    CERN Document Server

    León-Montiel, Roberto de J

    2016-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate single microparticle transport enabled by noise in a one dimensional optical lattice with periodic symmetric potentials and a small constant external force. The one dimensional lattice is implemented by six focused beams with holographic optical tweezers, where a microparticle is trapped in three dimensions. Transport initiates when dynamical disorder is added to the diffracted laser power at each trap ($\\pm 30\\%$) at a fixed frequency (0 to 35 Hz), while the direction of motion is set by the constant external force. We find that transport is only achieved within a narrow noise frequency range, which is consistent with simulations, and the predicted behavior and observations of noise-induced energy transport in quantum and classical systems. To our knowledge this is the first direct observation of noise-assisted transport in a colloidal system.

  20. Assessment of Traffic Noise Impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Jeppe Husted; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2004-01-01

    A steady growth in traffic intensities in most urban areas throughout the world has forced planners and politicians to seriously consider the resulting environmental impact, such as traffic noise, accidents and air pollution. The assessment of such negative factors is needed in order to reveal...... the true social benefit of infrastructure plans. The paper presents a noise assessment model for the Copenhagen region, which brings together GIS technology and non-linear hedonic regression models to reveal the implicit costs of traffic noise measured as the marginal percentage loss in property values...... with respect to the decibel traffic noise. The model distinguishes between houses and apartments and shows that the ability to include refined accessibility variables have significant impact on estimated prices....

  1. RADIO NOISE ADVANCES SEXUAL MATURITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ansistf-lewis

    Supplementary radio noise advances sexual maturity in domestic pullets exposed .... non-stimulatory photoperiod in some way provides a stimulus for initiating rapid gonadal development. However, the ..... Congress, New Delhi, India. Vol II ...

  2. The Effects of Ambient Conditions on Helicopter Harmonic Noise Radiation: Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of ambient atmospheric conditions, air temperature and density, on rotor harmonic noise radiation are characterized using theoretical models and experimental measurements of helicopter noise collected at three different test sites at elevations ranging from sea level to 7000 ft above sea level. Significant changes in the thickness, loading, and blade-vortex interaction noise levels and radiation directions are observed across the different test sites for an AS350 helicopter flying at the same indicated airspeed and gross weight. However, the radiated noise is shown to scale with ambient pressure when the flight condition of the helicopter is defined in nondimensional terms. Although the effective tip Mach number is identified as the primary governing parameter for thickness noise, the nondimensional weight coefficient also impacts lower harmonic loading noise levels, which contribute strongly to low frequency harmonic noise radiation both in and out of the plane of the horizon. Strategies for maintaining the same nondimensional rotor operating condition under different ambient conditions are developed using an analytical model of single main rotor helicopter trim and confirmed using a CAMRAD II model of the AS350 helicopter. The ability of the Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustics Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) technique to generalize noise measurements made under one set of ambient conditions to make accurate noise predictions under other ambient conditions is also validated.

  3. Noise Reduction in Car Speech

    OpenAIRE

    V. Bolom

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents properties of chosen multichannel algorithms for speech enhancement in a noisy environment. These methods are suitable for hands-free communication in a car cabin. Criteria for evaluation of these systems are also presented. The criteria consider both the level of noise suppression and the level of speech distortion. The performance of multichannel algorithms is investigated for a mixed model of speech signals and car noise and for real signals recorded in a car. 

  4. Anthropogenic noise changes arthropod abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkley, Jessie P; McClure, Christopher J W; Kawahara, Akito Y; Francis, Clinton D; Barber, Jesse R

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic noise is a widespread and growing form of sensory pollution associated with the expansion of human infrastructure. One specific source of constant and intense noise is that produced by compressors used for the extraction and transportation of natural gas. Terrestrial arthropods play a central role in many ecosystems, and given that numerous species rely upon airborne sounds and substrate-borne vibrations in their life histories, we predicted that increased background sound levels or the presence of compressor noise would influence their distributions. In the second largest natural gas field in the United States (San Juan Basin, New Mexico, USA), we assessed differences in the abundances of terrestrial arthropod families and community structure as a function of compressor noise and background sound level. Using pitfall traps, we simultaneously sampled five sites adjacent to well pads that possessed operating compressors, and five alternate, quieter well pad sites that lacked compressors, but were otherwise similar. We found a negative association between sites with compressor noise or higher levels of background sound and the abundance of five arthropod families and one genus, a positive relationship between loud sites and the abundance of one family, and no relationship between noise level or compressor presence and abundance for six families and two genera. Despite these changes, we found no evidence of community turnover as a function of background sound level or site type (compressor and noncompressor). Our results indicate that anthropogenic noise differentially affects the abundances of some arthropod families. These preliminary findings point to a need to determine the direct and indirect mechanisms driving these observed responses. Given the diverse and important ecological functions provided by arthropods, changes in abundances could have ecological implications. Therefore, we recommend the consideration of arthropods in the environmental

  5. Noise Reduction in Car Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bolom

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents properties of chosen multichannel algorithms for speech enhancement in a noisy environment. These methods are suitable for hands-free communication in a car cabin. Criteria for evaluation of these systems are also presented. The criteria consider both the level of noise suppression and the level of speech distortion. The performance of multichannel algorithms is investigated for a mixed model of speech signals and car noise and for real signals recorded in a car. 

  6. Design, Analysis, and Performance of a Noise Modulated Covert Communications System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram M. Narayanan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrawideband (UWB random noise signals provide secure communications because they cannot, in general, be detected using conventional receivers and are jam-resistant. We describe the theoretical underpinnings of a novel spread spectrum technique that can be used for covert communications using transmissions over orthogonal polarization channels. The noise key and the noise-like modulated signal are transmitted over orthogonal polarizations to mimic unpolarized noise. Since the transmitted signal is featureless and appears unpolarized and noise-like, linearly polarized receivers are unable to identify, detect, or otherwise extract useful information from the signal. The wide bandwidth of the transmitting signal provides significant immunity from interference. Dispersive effects caused by the atmosphere and other factors are significantly reduced since both polarization channels operate over the same frequency band. The received signals are mixed together to accomplish demodulation. Excellent bit error rate performance is achieved even under adverse propagation conditions.

  7. Design, Analysis, and Performance of a Noise Modulated Covert Communications System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Jack

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrawideband (UWB random noise signals provide secure communications because they cannot, in general, be detected using conventional receivers and are jam-resistant. We describe the theoretical underpinnings of a novel spread spectrum technique that can be used for covert communications using transmissions over orthogonal polarization channels. The noise key and the noise-like modulated signal are transmitted over orthogonal polarizations to mimic unpolarized noise. Since the transmitted signal is featureless and appears unpolarized and noise-like, linearly polarized receivers are unable to identify, detect, or otherwise extract useful information from the signal. The wide bandwidth of the transmitting signal provides significant immunity from interference. Dispersive effects caused by the atmosphere and other factors are significantly reduced since both polarization channels operate over the same frequency band. The received signals are mixed together to accomplish demodulation. Excellent bit error rate performance is achieved even under adverse propagation conditions.

  8. Low Noise Amplifiers for 140 Ghz Wide-Band Cryogenic Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkoski, Patricia V.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Samoska, Lorene; Lai, Richard; Sarkozy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    We report S-parameter and noise measurements for three different Indium Phosphide 35-nanometer-gate-length High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) designs operating in the frequency range centered on 140 gigahertz. When packaged in a Waveguide Rectangular-6.1 waveguide housing, the LNAs have an average measured noise figure of 3.0 decibels - 3.6 decibels over the 122-170 gigahertz band. One LNA was cooled to 20 degrees Kelvin and a record low noise temperature of 46 Kelvin, or 0.64 decibels noise figure, was measured at 152 gigahertz. These amplifiers can be used to develop receivers for instruments that operate in the 130-170 gigahertz atmospheric window, which is an important frequency band for ground-based astronomy and millimeter-wave imaging applications.

  9. Noise Tolerance under Risk Minimization

    CERN Document Server

    Manwani, Naresh

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore the problem of noise tolerant learning of classifiers. We formulate the problem as follows. We assume that there is an ${\\bf unobservable}$ training set which is noise-free. The actual training set given to the learning algorithm is obtained from this ideal data set by corrupting the class label of each example where the probability that the class label on an example is corrupted is a function of the feature vector of the example. This would account for almost all kinds of noisy data one may encounter in practice. We say that a learning method is noise tolerant if the classifiers learnt with the ideal noise-free data and with noisy data have the same classification accuracy on the noise-free data. In this paper we analyze the noise tolerant properties of risk minimization, which is a generic method for learning classifiers. We consider different loss functions such as 0-1 loss, hinge loss, exponential loss, squared error loss etc. We show that the risk minimization under 0-1 loss func...

  10. Atmospheric composition change: Ecosystems-Atmosphere interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fowler, D.; Pilegaard, K.; Sutton, M.A.; Ambus, P.; Raivonen, M.; Duyzer, J.; Simpson, D.; Fagerli, H.; Fuzzi, S.; Schjoerring, J.K.; Granier, C.; Neftel, A.; Isaksen, I.S.A.; Laj, P.; Maione, M.; Monks, P.S.; Burkhardt, J.; Daemmgen, U.; Neirynck, J.; Personne, E.; Wichink Kruit, R.J.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Flechard, C.; Tuovinen, J.P.; Coyle, M.; Gerosa, G.; Loubet, B.; Altimir, N.; Gruenhage, L.; Ammann, C.; Cieslik, S.; Paoletti, E.; Mikkelsen, T.N.; Ro-Poulsen, H.; Cellier, P.; Cape, J.N.; Horvath, L.; Loreto, F.; Niinemets, U.; Palmer, P.I.; Rinne, J.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Nilsson, D.; Pryor, S.; Gallagher, M.W.; Vesala, T.; Skiba, U.; Brueggemann, N.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Williams, J.; O'Dowd, C.; Facchini, M.C.; Leeuw, de G.; Flossman, A.; Chaumerliac, N.; Erisman, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystems and the atmosphere: This review describes the state of understanding the processes involved in the exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The gases covered include NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, NH3, SO2, DMS, Biogenic VOC, O-3, CH4, N2O and particles i

  11. Noise annoys: effects of noise on breeding great tits depend on personality but not on noise characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naguib, M.; Oers, van K.; Braakhuis, A.; Griffioen, M.; Goede, de P.; Waas, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise can have serious implications for animals, especially when they communicate acoustically. Yet, the impacts of noise may depend not only on noise characteristics but also on an individual's coping style or personality. We tested whether noise is more disturbing if it masks communi

  12. Effect of external pressure environment on the internal noise level due to a source inside a cylindrical tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Roussos, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    A small cylindrical tank was used to study the effect on the noise environment within a tank of conditions of atmospheric (sea level) pressure or vacuum environments on the exterior. Experimentally determined absorption coefficients were used to calculate transmission loss, transmissibility coefficients and the sound pressure (noise) level differences in the interior. The noise level differences were also measured directly for the two exterior environments and compared to various analytical approximations with limited agreement. Trend study curves indicated that if the tank transmission loss is above 25 dB, the difference in interior noise level between the vacuum and ambient pressure conditions are less than 2 dB.

  13. Multiwavelength micropulse lidar in atmospheric aerosol study: signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posyniak, Michal; Malinowski, Szymon P.; Stacewicz, Tadeusz; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Makuch, Przemyslaw

    2011-11-01

    Multiwavelength micropulse lidar (MML) designed for continuous optical sounding of the atmosphere is presented. A specific signal processing technique applying two directional Kalman filtering is introduced in order to enhance signal to noise ratio. Application of this technique is illustrated with profiles collected in course of COAST 2009 and WRNP 2010 research campaigns.

  14. The subjective importance of noise spectral content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Donald; Phillips, Jonathan; Denman, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents secondary Standard Quality Scale (SQS2) rankings in overall quality JNDs for a subjective analysis of the 3 axes of noise, amplitude, spectral content, and noise type, based on the ISO 20462 softcopy ruler protocol. For the initial pilot study, a Python noise simulation model was created to generate the matrix of noise masks for the softcopy ruler base images with different levels of noise, different low pass filter noise bandwidths and different band pass filter center frequencies, and 3 different types of noise: luma only, chroma only, and luma and chroma combined. Based on the lessons learned, the full subjective experiment, involving 27 observers from Google, NVIDIA and STMicroelectronics was modified to incorporate a wider set of base image scenes, and the removal of band pass filtered noise masks to ease observer fatigue. Good correlation was observed with the Aptina subjective noise study. The absence of tone mapping in the noise simulation model visibly reduced the contrast at high levels of noise, due to the clipping of the high levels of noise near black and white. Under the 34-inch viewing distance, no significant difference was found between the luma only noise masks and the combined luma and chroma noise masks. This was not the intuitive expectation. Two of the base images with large uniform areas, `restaurant' and `no parking', were found to be consistently more sensitive to noise than the texture rich scenes. Two key conclusions are (1) there are fundamentally different sensitivities to noise on a flat patch versus noise in real images and (2) magnification of an image accentuates visual noise in a way that is non-representative of typical noise reduction algorithms generating the same output frequency. Analysis of our experimental noise masks applied to a synthetic Macbeth ColorChecker Chart confirmed the color-dependent nature of the visibility of luma and chroma noise.

  15. Noise in the Library: Effects and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagan, Ann

    1991-01-01

    Describes the physiological and psychological effects of noise in libraries and suggests methods of controlling noise from telephones, computers, printers, and photocopiers. Hearing loss and stress-related problems are discussed, the effects of noise on performance are described, and planning is emphasized as a method of avoiding noise problems.…

  16. An adaptive algorithm for noise rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, D E; Knoebel, S B

    1978-01-01

    An adaptive algorithm for the rejection of noise artifact in 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings is described. The algorithm is based on increased amplitude distortion or increased frequency of fluctuations associated with an episode of noise artifact. The results of application of the noise rejection algorithm on a high noise population of test tapes are discussed.

  17. Numerical simulation of tyre/road noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, Jan Henk

    2011-01-01

    In modern society, traffic noise has become an important issue for mental health. A significant contributor to this noise pollution is exterior tyre/road noise, which is caused by the interaction between tyre and road surface and. In order to reduce tyre/road noise at the source, accurate numerical

  18. 32 CFR 989.32 - Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Noise. 989.32 Section 989.32 National Defense... ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.32 Noise. Aircraft noise data files used for analysis during EIAP will be... System for Aircraft Noise for military training routes and military operating areas. Guidance...

  19. Radiation characteristics of intermittence exhaust noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shengdun; SHANG Chunyang; ZHAO Zhigang; SHI Weixiang

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics, the noise characteristics in the course of intermittence exhaust are investigated and the expressions for sound pressure level of the noise generated by single-pole source and quadrupole source in the intermittence exhaust noise are established. The effects of all parameters in pneumatic system on the noise are also comprehensively studied.

  20. High-energy atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2010-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known...

  1. IMPROVED MLV FILTER TO REMOVE MULTIPLICATIVE NOISE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Weibin; Liu Fang; Jiao Licheng; Zhang Shuling; Li Zongling

    2006-01-01

    More methods can be used to remove the additive noise, such as the Mean of Least Variance (MLV)filter. When the signal is noised by the multiplicative noise, it is difficult to remove. The paper presents an improved filter to remove multiplicative noise by changing the multiplicative noise to the additive noise, and then using the MLV-like to remove the additive noise. The simulation results show that the performance is better than Minimum Coefficient of Variation (MCV) filter and MLV filter. Both one-dimension and image experiments demonstrate its theoretical performance.

  2. Implementasi Metode Kombinasi Mean Filter Dan Median Filter Untuk Mereduksi Gaussian Noise, Salt And Pepper Noise, Speckle Noise, Dan Exponential Noise Pada Citra Digital

    OpenAIRE

    Fadillah, Azhar

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of image as form of information is currently increasing. Poor quality of image can reduce its information contained in image. For example, the image contains noise so the information that contained in the image are not clear. Noise on the digital image can be either Gaussian noise, Salt and Pepper Noise, Speckle Noise, and Exponential Noise. One of the mechanisms used to reduce the noise is filtering. Mean Filter method and Median Filter method are a very good method to redu...

  3. Ambient noise near the sea-route

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Ambient noise data measured in an experiment conducted in shallow water near a sea-route were analyzed. It was observed that, at low frequency, the horizontal correlation has an obvious difference from that predicted by the classical ambient noise model. The theoretical analyses show that this phenomenon is caused by wind noise together with the discrete shipping noise nearby. An ambient noise model was proposed to include the effects caused by both the noise sources. Data measured at different times verify that the proposed model can be used to forecast the ambient noise field in shallow water near the sea-route.

  4. Ambient noise near the sea-route

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Li; LI ZhengLin; PENG ZhaoHui

    2009-01-01

    Ambient noise data measured in an experiment conducted in shallow water near a sea-route were analyzed. It was observed that, at low frequency, the horizontal correlation has an obvious difference from that predicted by the classical ambient noise model. The theoretical analyses show that this phenomenon is caused by wind noise together with the discrete shipping noise nearby. An ambient noise model was proposed to include the effects caused by both the noise sources. Data measured at different times verify that the proposed model can be used to forecast the ambient noise field in shal-low water near the sea-route.

  5. Planetary Atmospheric Electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Leblanc, F; Yair, Y; Harrison, R. G; Lebreton, J. P; Blanc, M

    2008-01-01

    This volume presents our contemporary understanding of atmospheric electricity at Earth and in other solar system atmospheres. It is written by experts in terrestrial atmospheric electricity and planetary scientists. Many of the key issues related to planetary atmospheric electricity are discussed. The physics presented in this book includes ionisation processes in planetary atmospheres, charge generation and separation, and a discussion of electromagnetic signatures of atmospheric discharges. The measurement of thunderstorms and lightning, including its effects and hazards, is highlighted by articles on ground and space based instrumentation, and new missions.Theory and modelling of planetary atmospheric electricity complete this review of the research that is undertaken in this exciting field of space science. This book is an essential research tool for space scientists and geoscientists interested in electrical effects in atmospheres and planetary systems. Graduate students and researchers who are new to t...

  6. Mirador - Atmospheric Composition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. Atmospheric Composition is focused on the composition of Earth's atmosphere in relation to climate prediction, solar effects,...

  7. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G; Antolini, R; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiarusi, T; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; Dekhissi, H; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; Derkauoi, J; De Vincenzi, M; Di Credico, A; Esposito, L; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kumar, A; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Mazziotta, M N; Mengucci, A; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R

    2005-01-01

    The latest results from the Soudan 2, MACRO and SuperKamiokande experiments on atmospheric neutrino oscillations are summarised and discussed. In particular a discussion is made on the Monte Carlo simulations used for the atmospheric neutrino flux.

  8. Noise induced intercellular propagation of calcium waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nchange, A. K.; Kepseu, W. D.; Woafo, P.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a bidirectional coupled chain of cells, in which a cell is subjected to an external noise. Noisy oscillations of calcium (Ca 2+), that is, a bursting-like phenomenon induced by noise with fluctuations in the baseline values of calcium, are induced in the first cell and propagated along the chain with noise suppression. This phenomenon of noise suppression is further investigated by computing the normalized fluctuation of pulse durations. It is therefore found that the noise induced coherence resonance phenomenon occurs at the cellular level. Coherence biresonance behaviour appears in the transmission of noise induced oscillations at appropriate noise intensity or noise coupling (for low noise intensity) and the information flow in each cell can be simultaneously optimized at the optimal value of noise or coupling.

  9. Health Effects of Noise Exposure in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfeld, Stephen; Clark, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    Environmental noise exposure, such as road traffic noise and aircraft noise, is associated with a range of health outcomes in children. Children demonstrate annoyance responses to noise, and noise is also related to lower well-being and stress responses, such as increased levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Noise does not cause more serious mental health problems, but there is growing evidence for an association with increased hyperactivity symptoms. Studies also suggest that noise might cause changes in cardiovascular functioning, and there is some limited evidence for an effect on low birth weight. There is robust evidence for an effect of school noise exposure on children's cognitive skills such as reading and memory, as well as on standardised academic test scores. Environmental noise does not usually reach levels that are likely to affect children's hearing; however, increasing use of personal electronic devices may leave some children exposed to harmful levels of noise.

  10. Vienna international airport noise abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidelinde Jelinek-Nigitz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: On the topic of sustainable aviation a study was carried out to measure the difference between the actual change in air traffic noise and the airport’s residents’ perception of the noise change at Vienna International Airport. Therefore, a questionnaire was developed in cooperation with the airport and an online survey was conducted. Design/methodology/approach: For the survey of the opinion of the affected population of the surrounding communities, a web based online questionnaire is created and distributed via various channels including e-mail, and online forums. After the basic structure of the questionnaire had been defined, the questions were developed in cooperation with employees form the environmental department of VIE, who had a sustainable influence on the questions’ order and formulation. As the survey was supposed to be answered by residents around VIE. Findings: Results of the online study show that only parts of the participants are affected by air traffic noise at VIE. Even less experienced a significant change over the last five years. About one third of the participants stated that they are affected by air traffic noise in one way or another. The majority of these people live in Lower Austria, the federal state in which the airport is located. The participants obviously judge air traffic noise during day time more importantly than air traffic noise at night. Research limitations/implications: Due to the low number of returns, no statistically relevant conclusions can be drawn, the results of the survey can be used to make some general statements. Originality/value: Economic growth and deregulation lead to growing aircraft operations. Vienna International Airport with its approximately 260,000 flight movements per year is the biggest airport in Austria and a major hub in Europe. The combination of constantly growing air transport and the resulting noise exposure, as well as the steadily increasing

  11. Planetary atmosphere processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorenkov, N.S.

    1991-01-01

    The papers presented in this volume focus on various atmospheric processes, including zonal circulation of the atmosphere, the quasi-biennial cycle, blocking processes, monsoon circulation, and the response of the atmosphere to solar corpuscular fluxes. Other topics discussed include climatic characteristics of atmospheric circulation in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, seasonal changes of the geopotential in the tropical stratosphere, and characteristics of the Southern Oscillation-El Nino phenomenon.

  12. Aero-acoustic noise of wind turbines. Noise prediction models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B. [ed.

    1997-12-31

    Semi-empirical and CAA (Computational AeroAcoustics) noise prediction techniques are the subject of this expert meeting. The meeting presents and discusses models and methods. The meeting may provide answers to the following questions: What Noise sources are the most important? How are the sources best modeled? What needs to be done to do better predictions? Does it boil down to correct prediction of the unsteady aerodynamics around the rotor? Or is the difficult part to convert the aerodynamics into acoustics? (LN)

  13. Noise Exclusion Ability in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geroldene Tsui

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An important perceptual ability is to filter out background distractions from relevant information. However, prior research has not identified when this begins in humans. Our study aims to investigate whether noise exclusion ability occurs in infancy. Infants' contrast sensitivity function (CSF was measured by a Baynesian adaptive inference method. Infants' attention was directed to the middle of a monitor where an 8.72 degree static Gabor grating was presented on the left or right side of the monitor. In half the trials, the grating was presented against a gray background; in the other half, against a 16% contrast random-dot noise background. The experimenter and two independent coders judged which side the infants gazed at (force-choice preferential looking paradigm. One-hundred babies aged from 4 to 10 months satisfied the 70% interrater consistency criterion for inclusion. Four parameters defined the best-fitted CSF for each infant. Of these, peak spatial frequency, bandwidth and truncation of CSF were similar in conditions with and without noise. The peak gain estimate was most significantly impaired by external noise, but a marked 31% improvement was observed in 7- to 10-month-olds. This may be the first sign of development of human's noise exclusion ability, and is worth further study.

  14. Modularity, noise, and natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroig, Gabriel; Melo, Diogo A R; Garcia, Guilherme

    2012-05-01

    Most biological systems are formed by component parts that are to some degree interrelated. Groups of parts that are more associated among themselves and are relatively autonomous from others are called modules. One of the consequences of modularity is that biological systems usually present an unequal distribution of the genetic variation among traits. Estimating the covariance matrix that describes these systems is a difficult problem due to a number of factors such as poor sample sizes and measurement errors. We show that this problem will be exacerbated whenever matrix inversion is required, as in directional selection reconstruction analysis. We explore the consequences of varying degrees of modularity and signal-to-noise ratio on selection reconstruction. We then present and test the efficiency of available methods for controlling noise in matrix estimates. In our simulations, controlling matrices for noise vastly improves the reconstruction of selection gradients. We also perform an analysis of selection gradients reconstruction over a New World Monkeys skull database to illustrate the impact of noise on such analyses. Noise-controlled estimates render far more plausible interpretations that are in full agreement with previous results. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Combined sensor noise-immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vladimir A. Shchurov; Alexander V. Shchurov

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents statistical analysis of combined sensor noise-immunity while recording fluctuating tone against underwater dynamic noise background. The experimental data used for the analysis have been collected by a pair of four-component combined sensors centered at two depths, 150 and 300 m in deep water. Expressions for combined sensor signalto-noise ratio (SNR) for cross-spectral levels of signal and noise for both wide and narrow frequency bands have been derived. A combined sensor gain has been introduced in terms of ordinary single-point coherence function between acoustic pressure and particle velocity in acoustic wave. The estimates obtained experimentally evidence that SNR for a combined sensor with multiplicative data processing may exceed SNR for a hydrophone-based sensor by 15 to 16 dB at most for the horizontal channel of the combined sensor, and by 30 dB at most for the vertical channel (when opposite energy flows of signal and noise compensate one another).

  16. Noise in Class AB translinear filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martini, G.; Svelto, V. [Pavia Univ. (Italy). Dip di Elettronica

    1998-07-01

    A specific statistical approach to describe the noise properties of non linear circuits is used. The noise properties of translinear filters operated in class AB are considered. This kind of filter has a dynamic range larger then the maximum signal to noise ratio, and exhibit signal to noise ratio saturation at high signal level. The paper shows how the noise properties depend on the circuit design parameters.

  17. Noise in space. [effect on Skylab astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, W. P.; Baratono, J.; Bandgren, H.; Erwin, R.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab program presented an excellent opportunity to investigate the effects of noise on man confined in limited space for long periods of time. This paper summarizes the results of a 4-year study to achieve a habitable noise environment for the Skylab astronauts. Noise control measures are described and noise measurements obtained during the Skylab missions are presented, as well as the astronauts' reactions to and evaluations of the noise environment.

  18. A New Phase Noise Detection Method

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Gangfeng

    2015-01-01

    Phase noise is one of the most important parameters in many oscillators. Detecting accurately phase noise for oscillators has importance significance. In this paper, based on correlation operation detection phase noise for oscillators was proposed. This method not only can save a high precision reference oscillator, but also can detect accurately the phase noise of measured oscillator in theory. Detected phase noise of oscillators using this method has very strong utility value.

  19. Atmospheric refraction : a history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, WH; van der Werf, S

    2005-01-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of un

  20. Atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoichiro [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida-City, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    Results from the atmospheric neutrino measurements are presented. Evidence for the {nu}{sub {tau}} appearance in the atmospheric neutrino events was shown by statistical methods. The long baseline oscillation experiment using man-made neutrinos has confirmed the atmospheric neutrino oscillation. The future accelerator experiments are briefly discussed.

  1. Atmospheric refraction : a history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, WH; van der Werf, S

    2005-01-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of

  2. Atmospheric Downscaling using Genetic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerenner, Tanja; Venema, Victor; Simmer, Clemens

    2013-04-01

    Coupling models for the different components of the Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-System requires up-and downscaling procedures. Subject of our work is the downscaling scheme used to derive high resolution forcing data for land-surface and subsurface models from coarser atmospheric model output. The current downscaling scheme [Schomburg et. al. 2010, 2012] combines a bi-quadratic spline interpolation, deterministic rules and autoregressive noise. For the development of the scheme, training and validation data sets have been created by carrying out high-resolution runs of the atmospheric model. The deterministic rules in this scheme are partly based on known physical relations and partly determined by an automated search for linear relationships between the high resolution fields of the atmospheric model output and high resolution data on surface characteristics. Up to now deterministic rules are available for downscaling surface pressure and partially, depending on the prevailing weather conditions, for near surface temperature and radiation. Aim of our work is to improve those rules and to find deterministic rules for the remaining variables, which require downscaling, e.g. precipitation or near surface specifc humidity. To accomplish that, we broaden the search by allowing for interdependencies between different atmospheric parameters, non-linear relations, non-local and time-lagged relations. To cope with the vast number of possible solutions, we use genetic programming, a method from machine learning, which is based on the principles of natural evolution. We are currently working with GPLAB, a Genetic Programming toolbox for Matlab. At first we have tested the GP system to retrieve the known physical rule for downscaling surface pressure, i.e. the hydrostatic equation, from our training data. We have found this to be a simple task to the GP system. Furthermore we have improved accuracy and efficiency of the GP solution by implementing constant variation and

  3. The collapse of Io's primary atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Constantine C. C.; Spencer, John R.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Richter, Matthew J.

    2016-08-01

    Volcanic outgassing due to tidal heating is the ultimate source of a tenuous SO2 atmosphere around Jupiter's moon Io. The question of whether SO2 frost on the surface plays a part, and to what degree, in maintaining Io's atmosphere with the constant volcanic outgassing is still debated. It is believed that for a sublimation-supported atmosphere, the primary atmosphere should collapse during eclipses by Jupiter, as the SO2 vapor pressure is strongly coupled to the temperature of the ice on the surface. No direct observations of Io's atmosphere in eclipse have previously been possible, due to the simultaneous need for high spectral and time sensitivity, as well as a high signal-to-noise ratio. Here we present the first ever high-resolution spectra at 19 µm of Io's SO2 atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse from the Gemini telescope. The strongest atmospheric band depth is seen to dramatically decay from 2.5 ± (0.08)% before the eclipse to 0.18 ± (0.16)% after 40 min in eclipse. Further modeling indicates that the atmosphere has collapsed shortly after eclipse ingress, implying that the atmosphere of Io has a strong sublimation-controlled component. The atmospheric column density—from pre-eclipse to in-eclipse—drops by a factor of 5 ± 2.

  4. Nonisothermal Pluto atmosphere models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, W.B.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The present thermal profile calculation for a Pluto atmosphere model characterized by a high number fraction of CH4 molecules encompasses atmospheric heating by solar UV flux absorption and conductive transport cooling to the surface of Pluto. The stellar occultation curve predicted for an atmosphere of several-microbar surface pressures (which entail the existence of a substantial temperature gradient close to the surface) agrees with observations and implies that the normal and tangential optical depth of the atmosphere is almost negligible. The minimum period for atmospheric methane depletion is calculated to be 30 years. 29 refs.

  5. Application of the Baseline Rotonet system to the prediction of helicopter tone noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, R. A.; Weir, D. S.; Tracy, M. B.

    1986-07-01

    The capabilities of the baseline Rotonet system designed to predict helicopter noise are analyzed. The modules of the system utilized for main and tail rotor geometry and blade section aerodynamic characteristics, for analyses, and for source-to-observer geometry, and atmospheric and ground effects calculations are described; a diagram of the system is provided. The Rotonet system produces axial force, tone noise, and sound pressure level information and a one third octave spectrum related to rotor tone noise and broadband noise sources. Main rotor noise predictions are compared with flight data. It is observed that both sets of data reveal increase loading on the advancing side and decrease loading on the retreating side. The tone noise and sound pressure levels for the first and second harmonics correlate well with the flight data; however, there is only fair agreement for the third harmonics of the sound pressure level. Analysis of the spectra display lower noise levels for higher altitudes and lower speeds. It is noted that the baseline Rotonet system is applicable for predicting performance and noise signatures for the lower harmonics. A phase II Rotonet system for evaluating higher harmonics is being developed.

  6. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Jack S.; Palmer, Paul I.; Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S.

    2017-02-01

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. To illustrate our model, we use a cool Y dwarf atmosphere, such as WISE J085510.83-0714442.5, whose 4.5-5.2 μm spectrum shows absorption features consistent with water vapor and clouds. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment, we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Based on a previously defined statistical approach, we infer that there are of the order of 109 cool Y brown dwarfs in the Milky Way, and likely a few tens of these objects are within 10 pc from Earth. Our work also has implications for exploring life in the atmospheres of temperate gas giants. Consideration of the habitable volumes in planetary atmospheres significantly increases the volume of habitable space in the galaxy.

  7. Stochastic noise in splicing machinery

    OpenAIRE

    Melamud, Eugene; Moult, John

    2009-01-01

    The number of known alternative human isoforms has been increasing steadily with the amount of available transcription data. To date, over 100 000 isoforms have been detected in EST libraries, and at least 75% of human genes have at least one alternative isoform. In this paper, we propose that most alternative splicing events are the result of noise in the splicing process. We show that the number of isoforms and their abundance can be predicted by a simple stochastic noise model that takes i...

  8. Detection of signals in noise

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Anthony D; Declaris, Nicholas

    1971-01-01

    Detection of Signals in Noise serves as an introduction to the principles and applications of the statistical theory of signal detection. The book discusses probability and random processes; narrowband signals, their complex representation, and their properties described with the aid of the Hilbert transform; and Gaussian-derived processes. The text also describes the application of hypothesis testing for the detection of signals and the fundamentals required for statistical detection of signals in noise. Problem exercises, references, and a supplementary bibliography are included after each c

  9. Removing Noise From Pyrosequenced Amplicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davenport Russell J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many environmental genomics applications a homologous region of DNA from a diverse sample is first amplified by PCR and then sequenced. The next generation sequencing technology, 454 pyrosequencing, has allowed much larger read numbers from PCR amplicons than ever before. This has revolutionised the study of microbial diversity as it is now possible to sequence a substantial fraction of the 16S rRNA genes in a community. However, there is a growing realisation that because of the large read numbers and the lack of consensus sequences it is vital to distinguish noise from true sequence diversity in this data. Otherwise this leads to inflated estimates of the number of types or operational taxonomic units (OTUs present. Three sources of error are important: sequencing error, PCR single base substitutions and PCR chimeras. We present AmpliconNoise, a development of the PyroNoise algorithm that is capable of separately removing 454 sequencing errors and PCR single base errors. We also introduce a novel chimera removal program, Perseus, that exploits the sequence abundances associated with pyrosequencing data. We use data sets where samples of known diversity have been amplified and sequenced to quantify the effect of each of the sources of error on OTU inflation and to validate these algorithms. Results AmpliconNoise outperforms alternative algorithms substantially reducing per base error rates for both the GS FLX and latest Titanium protocol. All three sources of error lead to inflation of diversity estimates. In particular, chimera formation has a hitherto unrealised importance which varies according to amplification protocol. We show that AmpliconNoise allows accurate estimates of OTU number. Just as importantly AmpliconNoise generates the right OTUs even at low sequence differences. We demonstrate that Perseus has very high sensitivity, able to find 99% of chimeras, which is critical when these are present at high

  10. The Hannover thermal noise experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonhardt, V; Ribichini, L; Lueck, H; Danzmann, K [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert-Einstein-Institute) and University of Hannover, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2004-03-07

    To analyse the thermal noise of the pendulum mode of a suspended mirror, we interferometrically detect the differential movement of two mirrors suspended as multiple-stage pendulums. We present the set-up of this experiment and the current sensitivity, and also the different steps that we took in the past to increase the sensitivity, which include an auto alignment of the laser beam into the resonator eigenmode, changes of the seismic isolation system to more damping stages and higher moments of inertia and an intensive noise hunting.

  11. Is freight traffic noise more annoying than passenger traffic noise?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, R.G. de; Miedema, H.M.E.

    1996-01-01

    In the Netherlands a new freight-only railway route, the "Betuweroute", is being planned to carry freight traffic from Rotterdam harbour east into Germany. Inhabitants of areas near the future route are concerned about noise and vibration, and question the relevance of current legislation for a

  12. Relationship between exposure to multiple noise sources and noise annoyance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Relationships between exposure to noise [metric: day-night level (DNL) or day-evening-night level (DENL)] from a single source (aircraft, road traffic, or railways) and annoyance based on a large international dataset have been published earlier. Also for stationary sources relationships have been

  13. The Problems with "Noise Numbers" for Wind Farm Noise Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Human perception responds primarily to sound character rather than sound level. Wind farms are unique sound sources and exhibit special audible and inaudible characteristics that can be described as modulating sound or as a tonal complex. Wind farm compliance measures based on a specified noise number alone will fail to address problems with noise…

  14. Observations, Thermochemical Calculations, and Modeling of Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Blecic, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation as a whole aims to provide means to better understand hot-Jupiter planets through observing, performing thermochemical calculations, and modeling their atmospheres. We used Spitzer multi-wavelength secondary-eclipse observations and targets with high signal-to-noise ratios, as their deep eclipses allow us to detect signatures of spectral features and assess planetary atmospheric structure and composition with greater certainty. Chapter 1 gives a short introduction. Chapter 2 presents the Spitzer secondary-eclipse analysis and atmospheric characterization of WASP-14b. WASP-14b is a highly irradiated, transiting hot Jupiter. By applying a Bayesian approach in the atmospheric analysis, we found an absence of thermal inversion contrary to theoretical predictions. Chapter 3 describes the infrared observations of WASP-43b Spitzer secondary eclipses, data analysis, and atmospheric characterization. WASP-43b is one of the closest-orbiting hot Jupiters, orbiting one of the coolest stars with a hot Ju...

  15. Effects of additive noise on the stability of glacial cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsui, Takahito

    2016-01-01

    It is well acknowledged that the sequence of glacial-interglacial cycles is paced by the astronomical forcing. However, how much is the sequence robust against natural fluctuations associated, for example, with the chaotic motions of atmosphere and oceans? In this article, the stability of the glacial-interglacial cycles is investigated on the basis of simple conceptual models. Specifically, we study the influence of additive white Gaussian noise on the sequence of the glacial cycles generated by stochastic versions of several low-order dynamical system models proposed in the literature. In the original deterministic case, the models exhibit different types of attractors: a quasiperiodic attractor, a piecewise continuous attractor, strange nonchaotic attractors, and a chaotic attractor. We show that the combination of the quasiperiodic astronomical forcing and additive fluctuations induce a form of temporarily quantised instability. More precisely, climate trajectories corresponding to different noise realiza...

  16. a Universal De-Noising Algorithm for Ground-Based LIDAR Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Xiang, Chengzhi; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Ground-based lidar, working as an effective remote sensing tool, plays an irreplaceable role in the study of atmosphere, since it has the ability to provide the atmospheric vertical profile. However, the appearance of noise in a lidar signal is unavoidable, which leads to difficulties and complexities when searching for more information. Every de-noising method has its own characteristic but with a certain limitation, since the lidar signal will vary with the atmosphere changes. In this paper, a universal de-noising algorithm is proposed to enhance the SNR of a ground-based lidar signal, which is based on signal segmentation and reconstruction. The signal segmentation serving as the keystone of the algorithm, segments the lidar signal into three different parts, which are processed by different de-noising method according to their own characteristics. The signal reconstruction is a relatively simple procedure that is to splice the signal sections end to end. Finally, a series of simulation signal tests and real dual field-of-view lidar signal shows the feasibility of the universal de-noising algorithm.

  17. Passenger comfort on high-speed trains: effect of tunnel noise on the subjective assessment of pressure variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanok, Sandra; Mendolia, Franco; Wittkowski, Martin; Rooney, Daniel; Putzke, Matthias; Aeschbach, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    When passing through a tunnel, aerodynamic effects on high-speed trains may impair passenger comfort. These variations in atmospheric pressure are accompanied by transient increases in sound pressure level. To date, it is unclear whether the latter influences the perceived discomfort associated with the variations in atmospheric pressure. In a pressure chamber of the DLR-Institute of Aerospace Medicine, 71 participants (M = 28.3 years ± 8.1 SD) rated randomised pressure changes during two conditions according to a crossover design. The pressure changes were presented together with tunnel noise such that the sound pressure level was transiently elevated by either +6 dB (low noise condition) or +12 dB (high noise condition) above background noise level (65 dB(A)). Data were combined with those of a recent study, in which identical pressure changes were presented without tunnel noise (Schwanitz et al., 2013, 'Pressure Variations on a Train - Where is the Threshold to Railway Passenger Discomfort?' Applied Ergonomics 44 (2): 200-209). Exposure-response relationships for the combined data set comprising all three noise conditions show that pressure discomfort increases with the magnitude and speed of the pressure changes but decreases with increasing tunnel noise. Practitioner Summary: In a pressure chamber, we systematically examined how pressure discomfort, as it may be experienced by railway passengers, is affected by the presence of tunnel noise during pressure changes. It is shown that across three conditions (no noise, low noise (+6 dB), high noise (+12 dB)) pressure discomfort decreases with increasing tunnel noise.

  18. Distributed fusion white noise deconvolution estimators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojun SUN; Zili DENG

    2009-01-01

    The white noise deconvolution or input white noise estimation problem has important applications in oil seismic exploration, communication and signal processing.By combining the Kalman filtering method with the modern time series analysis method, based on the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) innovation model, new distributed fusion white noise deconvolution estimators are presented by weighting local input white noise estimators for general multisensor systems with different local dynamic models and correlated noises. The new estimators can handle input white noise fused filtering,prediction and smoothing problems, and are applicable to systems with colored measurement noise. Their accuracy is higher than that of local white noise deconvolution estimators. To compute the optimal weights, the new formula for local estimation error cross-covariances is given. A Monte Carlo simulation for the system with Bemoulli-Gaussian input white noise shows their effec-tiveness and performance.

  19. Noise in a CMOS digital pixel sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chi; Yao Suying; Xu Jiangtao

    2011-01-01

    Based on the study of noise performance in CMOS digital pixel sensor (DPS),a mathematical model of noise is established with the pulse-width-modulation (PWM) principle.Compared with traditional CMOS image sensors,the integration time is different and A/D conversion is implemented in each PWM DPS pixel.Then,the quantitative calculating formula of system noise is derived.It is found that dark current shot noise is the dominant noise source in low light region while photodiode shot noise becomes significantly important in the bright region.In this model,photodiode shot noise does not vary with luminance,but dark current shot noise does.According to increasing photodiode capacitance and the comparator's reference voltage or optimizing the mismatch in the comparator,the total noise can be reduced.These results serve as a guideline for the design of PWM DPS.

  20. Noise mapping inside a car cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kim; Sjøj, Sidsel Marie Nørholm; Jacobsen, Finn

    The mapping of noise is of considerable interest in the car industry where a good noise mapping can make it much easier to identify the sources that generate the noise and eventually reduce the individual contributions to the noise. The methods used for this purpose include delay-and-sum beamform......The mapping of noise is of considerable interest in the car industry where a good noise mapping can make it much easier to identify the sources that generate the noise and eventually reduce the individual contributions to the noise. The methods used for this purpose include delay......-and-sum beamforming and spherical harmonics beamforming. These methods have a poor spatial esolution at low frequencies, and since much noise generated in cars is dominated by low frequencies the methods are not optimal. In the present paper the mapping is done by solving an inverse problem with a transfer matrix...

  1. Background noise spectra of global seismic stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, M.M.; Claassen, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Over an extended period of time station noise spectra were collected from various sources for use in estimating the detection and location performance of global networks of seismic stations. As the database of noise spectra enlarged and duplicate entries became available, an effort was mounted to more carefully select station noise spectra while discarding others. This report discusses the methodology and criteria by which the noise spectra were selected. It also identifies and illustrates the station noise spectra which survived the selection process and which currently contribute to the modeling efforts. The resulting catalog of noise statistics not only benefits those who model network performance but also those who wish to select stations on the basis of their noise level as may occur in designing networks or in selecting seismological data for analysis on the basis of station noise level. In view of the various ways by which station noise were estimated by the different contributors, it is advisable that future efforts which predict network performance have available station noise data and spectral estimation methods which are compatible with the statistics underlying seismic noise. This appropriately requires (1) averaging noise over seasonal and/or diurnal cycles, (2) averaging noise over time intervals comparable to those employed by actual detectors, and (3) using logarithmic measures of the noise.

  2. The Lowest Atmosphere: Atmospheric Boundary Layer Including Atmospheric Surface Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    of motion of the atmosphere— "second order closure"—to such applications as the SCIPUFF -PC code for tracer dispersion (see Sykes, 1994). Now, for...Turbulence, Methuen, London, 2nd Ed., 1955. Sykes, R.I., "The SCIPUFF -PC Code," ARAP Draft Report, 1994. Tennekes, H., "The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

  3. Remediation of radiation belt electrons caused by ground based man-made VLF wave%地基人工 VLF电波对辐射带电子的调制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王平; 徐岩冰; 于晓霞; 赵小芸; 吴峰; 王焕玉; 马宇蒨; 李新乔; 卢红; 孟祥承; 张吉龙; 王辉; 石峰

    2011-01-01

    辐射带电子的加速与沉降机理是空间物理研究的重要课题.法国DEMETER电磁卫星观测到了美国NPM发射站VLF信号及与之相关的高能电子沉降事例.本研究工作将根据基于回旋共振相互作用的准线性扩散理论,通过对局域投掷角扩散系数的计算,来说明受VLF影响的高能电子的投掷角分布与电子的能量及所处位置的关系.理论计算较好地解释了DEMETER卫星在NPM实验期间所观测到的电子沉降事例.在此基础上进一步讨论了通过人工方式对辐射带高能电子施加影响的效率问题.%The physics mechanisms of radiation belt electrons loss and acceleration are important issues in space physics research. Recently, France Microsatellite DEMETER has discovered the correlation between man- made VLF signals and radiation belt electrons precipitation in the NPM ( the U. S. VLF transmitter located at Lualualei ) experiment. Our research focuses on the explanation of the relation among affected pitch angle distribution, kinetic energy and position of electrons. This is achieved by calculating the local diffusion coeffcient based on the theory of qusi-linear diffusion with resonant interaction. Our result has a good explanation of radiation belt electron precipitation discovered by DEMETER during NPM experiment. Furthermore, we have discussed the effciency of radiation belt remediation in an artificial way.

  4. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 36 - Noise Requirements For Helicopters Under Subpart H

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... on the ground. H36.111Reporting and correcting measured data. H36.113Atmospheric attenuation of sound... line-of-sight obstructions across the flight path that encompasses the 10 dB down points. (c) Takeoff... 20 feet. (4) Each noise measuring station must be surrounded by terrain having no excessive sound...

  5. Optimum deconvolution algorithm for system with multiplicative white noise and additive correlative noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王会立; 陈希信

    2004-01-01

    The optimum state filter and fixed-interval smoother and the optimum deconvolution algorithm for system with multiplicative noise are derived upon the condition that the dynamic noise correlates itself in one-step and correlates with the measurement noise at the present step as well as one past step, and the multiplicative noise is white and statistically independent of the dynamic noise and the measurement noise. A simulation example demonstrates the effectiveness of the above-mentioned deconvolution algorithm.

  6. Noise performance of the multiwavelength sub/millimeter inductance camera (MUSIC) detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, S. R.

    2015-07-01

    MUSIC is a multi-band imaging camera that employs 2304 Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) in 576 spatial pixels to cover a 14 arc-minute field of view, with each pixel simultaneously sensitive to 4 bands centered at 0.87, 1.04, 1.33, and 1.98 mm. In April 2012 the MUSIC instrument was commissioned at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory with a subset of the full focal plane. We examine the noise present in the detector timestreams during observations taken in the first year of operation. We find that fluctuations in atmospheric emission dominate at long timescales (< 0.5 Hz), and fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of the probe signal due to readout electronics contribute significant 1/f-type noise at shorter timescales. We describe a method to remove the amplitude, phase, and atmospheric noise using the fact that they are correlated among carrier tones. After removal, the complex signal is decomposed, or projected, into dissipation and frequency components. White noise from the cryogenic HEMT amplifier dominates in the dissipation component. An excess noise is observed in the frequency component that is likely due to fluctuations in two-level system (TLS) defects in the device substrate. We compare the amplitude of the TLS noise with previous measurements.

  7. Radiated noise of ducted fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversman, Walter

    The differences in the radiated acoustic fields of ducted and unducted propellers of the same thrust operating under similar conditions are investigated. An FEM model is created for the generation, propagation, and radiation of steady, rotor alone noise and exit guide vane interaction noise of a ducted fan. For a specified number of blades, angular mode harmonic, and rotor angular velocity, the acoustic field is described in a cylindrical coordinate system reduced to only the axial and radial directions. It is found that, contrary to the usual understanding of the Tyler and Sofrin (1962) result, supersonic tip speed rotor noise can be cut off if the tip Mach number is only slightly in excess of unity and if the number of blades is relatively small. If there are many blades, the fundamental angular mode number is large, and the Tyler and Sofrin result for thin annuli becomes more relevant. Shrouding of subsonic tip speed propellers is a very effective means of controlling rotor alone noise.

  8. Physically Damped Noise Canceling Hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-24

    300075 1 of 10 PHYSICALLY DAMPED NOISE CANCELING HYDROPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be...transducer with an electromechanical driver comprising a plurality of single crystal piezoelectric elements joined to an inner surface and arranged to form...an electromechanical stack assembly. Each single crystal piezoelectric element has a surface, an opposite surface, and a Attorney Docket No

  9. Underwater noise due to precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crum, Lawrence A.; Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Prosperetti, Andrea;

    1989-01-01

    surface, both for individual and for multiple events such as those produced by artificial and natural rainfall, has been examined. The studies indicate that the major contribution to the underwater noise produced by both rain and snow is that associated with the oscillations of gas bubbles introduced...

  10. Noise Considerations in Resistance Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, Joseph M.

    1963-01-01

    A signal-to-noise analysis is made of the Wheatstone bridge, where the unknown and standard resistors may be at different temperatures, a situation which occurs in resistance thermometry. The limiting condition is assumed to be dissipation in the unknown resistor. It is shown that the ratio arms ...

  11. A Low Noise Electronic Circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annema, Anne J.; Leenaerts, Dominicus M.W.; de Vreede, Petrus W.H.

    2002-01-01

    An electronic circuit, which can be used as a Low Noise Amplifier (LNA), comprises two complementary Field Effect Transistors (M1, M2; M5, M6), each having a gate, a source and a drain. The gates are connected together as a common input terminal, and the drains are connected together as a

  12. Ground Attenuation of Railroad Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makarewicz, R.; Rasmussen, Karsten Bo; Kokowski, P.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of ground effect on railroad noise is described using the concept of the peak A-weighted sound exposure level, and A-weighted sound exposure level. The train is modelled by a continuous line of incoherent point sources that have a cosine directivity. The ground effect is included by...

  13. Introduction: Unsolved Problems on Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriols, X.; Ciliberto, S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper is an introduction to the special issue of the 7th Int. Conf. on Unsolved Problems on Noise (UPoN) that took place at Casa Convalescència in Barcelona (Spain) in July 2015. The aim of the UPoN conferences is to provide a forum for researchers working on different fields of noise, fluctuations and variability, where they present their scientific problems which resist solutions. The papers of this Special Issue reflect the interdisciplinary topics (physics, biology, circuits, financial markets, psychology, technology, etc) presented at the UPoN conference. Noise is not only a hindrance to signal detection, but it is indeed a valuable source of information (not present in the signal) that help us to get a deeper understanding on how Nature works. This special issue of the 7th International Conference on Unsolved Problems on Noise (UPoN) is dedicated to Laszlo Kish in the occasion of his 60th birthday. He organized the first edition of these UPoN conferences in Szeged (Hungary) in 1996. Many of us have greatly benefited from his ‘volcanic imagination in tackling new problems from unconventional points of views’.

  14. Noise Properties of Rectifying Nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, M R; Sa, N; Davenport, M; Healy, K; Vlassiouk, I; Letant, S E; Baker, L A; Siwy, Z S

    2011-02-18

    Ion currents through three types of rectifying nanoporous structures are studied and compared for the first time: conically shaped polymer nanopores, glass nanopipettes, and silicon nitride nanopores. Time signals of ion currents are analyzed by power spectrum. We focus on the low-frequency range where the power spectrum magnitude scales with frequency, f, as 1/f. Glass nanopipettes and polymer nanopores exhibit non-equilibrium 1/f noise, thus the normalized power spectrum depends on the voltage polarity and magnitude. In contrast, 1/f noise in rectifying silicon nitride nanopores is of equilibrium character. Various mechanisms underlying the voltage-dependent 1/f noise are explored and discussed, including intrinsic pore wall dynamics, and formation of vortices and non-linear flow patterns in the pore. Experimental data are supported by modeling of ion currents based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. We conclude that the voltage-dependent 1/f noise observed in polymer and glass asymmetric nanopores might result from high and asymmetric electric fields inducing secondary effects in the pore such as enhanced water dissociation.

  15. Instantaneous noise-based logic

    CERN Document Server

    Kish, Laszlo B; Peper, Ferdinand

    2010-01-01

    We show two universal, Boolean, deterministic logic schemes based on binary noise timefunctions that can be realized without time averaging units. The first scheme is based on a new bipolar random telegraph wave scheme and the second one makes use of the recent noise-based logic which is conjectured to be the brain's method of logic operations [Physics Letters A 373 (2009) 2338-2342, arXiv:0902.2033]. For binary-valued logic operations, the two simple Boolean schemes presented in this paper use zero (no noise) for the logic Low (L) state. In the random telegraph wave-based scheme, for multi-valued logic operations, additive superpositions of logic states must be avoided, while multiplicative superpositions utilizing hyperspace base vectors can still be utilized. These modifications, while keeping the information richness of multi-valued (noise-based) logic, result in a significant speedup of logic operations for the same signal bandwidth. The logic hyperspace of the first scheme results random telegraph waves...

  16. Hydrodynamic Noise and Surface Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-08

    Lighthill, 3,4 Ffowcs-Wiiliams, 5-7 and Morse and Ingard .8 Ffowcs-Williams’ 7 excellent review identifies five distinctly different theoretical...Williams, "Hydrodynamic Noise," Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics (Annual Reviews, Palo Alto, CA), vol. 1, 1969, pp. 197-222. 8. P. Morse and K. V. Ingard

  17. Shot noise in radiobiological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datesman, A

    2016-11-01

    As a model for human tissue, this report considers the rate of free radical generation in a dilute solution of water in which a beta-emitting radionuclide is uniformly dispersed. Each decay dissipates a discrete quantity of energy, creating a large number of free radicals in a short time within a small volume determined by the beta particle range. Representing the instantaneous dissipated power as a train of randomly-spaced pulses, the time-averaged dissipated power p¯ and rate of free radical generation g¯ are derived. The analogous result in the theory of electrical circuits is known as the shot noise theorem. The reference dose of X-rays Dref producing an identical rate of free radical generation and level of oxidative stress is shown a) to increase with the square root of the absorbed dose, D, and b) to be far larger than D. This finding may have important consequences for public health in cases where the level of shot noise exceeds some noise floor corresponding to equilibrium biological processes. An estimate of this noise floor is made using the example of potassium-40, a beta-emitting radioisotope universally present in living tissue.

  18. Noise Reduction in the SSNPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, M.; Roquemore, L.; Darrow, D.; Liu, D.

    2004-11-01

    A solid-state neutral particle analyzer (SSNPA) is being used to detect the escape of neutral particles on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The SSNPA has four channels, which view the horizontal midplane of NSTX. The output amplitude of the SSNPA is proportional to radiation energy. Neutral particles with energies up to 100 keV will be observed. The SSNPA is used to link changes in neutral particle flux with plasma events. The noise level associated with standard NIM electronics prevents this. Two solutions are proposed to fix this problem: 1) Increase the signal to noise ratio (S/N) in the system or 2) Ultra-fast digitization (UFD) of the signal. New electronics are being tested to increase the S/N. A close-coupled preamp/amplifier increase the gain by ˜1000, which increases the signal before noise is introduced. Ground loop problems are also being addressed. This system is presently being tested on NSTX. With UFD, the preamplifier will be connected to the digitizer and post-shot analysis will separate the signal from the noise using of PHA software. The above solutions will be discussed.

  19. Noise Exposures of Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humann, Michael; Sanderson, Wayne; Flamme, Greg; Kelly, Kevin M.; Moore, Genna; Stromquist, Ann; Merchant, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This project was conducted to characterize the noise exposure of adolescents living in rural and agricultural environments. Methods: From May to October, 25 adolescents ages 13 through 17, living either on a farm or a rural nonfarm, were enrolled in the study. Subjects received training on the correct operation and use of personal noise…

  20. Oscillator With Low Phase Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1987-01-01

    Phase errors cancelled for high frequency stability. Radio-frequency oscillator achieves high stability of frequency through parallel, two-amplifier configuration in which effects cause phase noise tend to cancel each other. Circuit includes two amplifiers with resonating elements, each constitutes part of feedback loop of other. Generate same frequency because each circuit provides other with conditions necessary for oscillation.

  1. Miniature Low-Noise G-Band I-Q Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Pukala, David M.; Gaier, Todd C.; Tanner, Alan B.; O'Dwyer, Ian J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjom H.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Lai, Richard; Mei, Xiaobing

    2010-01-01

    Weather forecasting, hurricane tracking, and atmospheric science applications depend on humidity sounding of atmosphere. Current instruments provide these measurements from groundbased, airborne, and low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites by measuring radiometric temperature on the flanks of the 183-GHz water vapor line. Miniature, low-noise receivers have been designed that will enable these measurements from a geostationary, thinned array sounder, which is based on hundreds of low-noise receivers that convert the 180-GHz signal directly to baseband in-phase and in-quadrature signals for digitization and correlation. The developed receivers provide a noise temperature of 450 K from 165 to 183 GHz (NF = 4.1 dB), and have a mass of 3 g while consuming 24 mW of power. These are the most sensitive broadband I-Q receivers at this frequency range that operate at room temperature, and are significantly lower in mass and power consumption than previously reported receivers.

  2. An Architecture for High Data Rate Very Low Frequency Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Very low frequency (VLF communication is used for long range shore-to-ship broadcasting applications. This paper proposes an architecture for high data rate VLF communication using Gaussian minimum shift keying (GMSK modulation and low delay parity check (LDPC channel coding. Non-data aided techniques are designed and used for carrier phase synchronization, symbol timing recovery, and LDPC code frame synchronization. These require the estimation of the operative Eb/N0 for which a kurtosis based algorithm is used. Also, a method for modeling the probability density function of the received signal under the bit condition is presented in this regard. The modeling of atmospheric radio noise (ARN that corrupts VLF signals is described and an algorithm for signal enhancement in the presence of ARN in given. The BER performance of the communication system is evaluated for bit rates of 400 bps, 600 bps, and 800 bps for communication bandwidth of ~200 Hz.

  3. Noise-based Stego-ECC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahardjo Budi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel method of inserting noise into stream of ciphered text is proposed. The goal of inserting noise is to increase the level of uncertainty, thus making it harder for an attacker to detect data and noise. This form of steganography is implemented using Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC. The process of embedding the noise to the message in the encryption process and removing the noise from the message in the decryption process is proposed in this work by modifying ElGamal to allow auto detection of data and noise.

  4. Noise radar with broadband microwave ring correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susek, Waldemar; Stec, Bronislaw

    2011-06-01

    A principle of quadrature correlation detection of noise signals using an analog broadband microwave correlator is presented in the paper. Measurement results for the correlation function of noise signals are shown and application of such solution in the noise radar for precise determination of distance changes and velocity of these changes is also presented. Results for short range noise radar operation are presented both for static and moving objects. Experimental results using 2,6 - 3,6 GHz noise like waveform for the signal from a breathing human is presented. Conclusions and future plans for applications of presented detection technique in broadband noise radars bring the paper to an end.

  5. VLF Force 1 V10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    TG:你们旗下已有Fisker—Karma改造而成的Destino V8,Force 1用意何在?HF:显而易见,Force1是我们阵中的跑车型号,设计大胆激进。我们尝试在赛车和豪华汽车之间探讨一些新事物。

  6. ELF noise fields: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mild, Kjell Hansson; Mattsson, Mats-Olof

    2010-08-01

    The debate as to whether low-level electromagnetic fields can affect biological systems and in the long term cause health effects has been going on for a long time. Yet the interaction of weak electromagnetic fields (EMF) with living cells, undoubtedly a most important phenomenon, is still not well understood. The exact mechanisms by which the effects are produced have not been identified. Furthermore, it is not possible to clearly define which aspects of an EMF exposure that constitute the "dose." One of the groups that contributed to solving this problem is the Bioelectromagnetics group at Catholic University of America (CUA), Washington, D.C. Their work has been devoted to investigating the physical parameters that are needed to obtain an effect of EMF exposure on biological systems, and also how to inhibit the effect. This is a review of their work on bioeffects caused by low-level EMF, their dependence on coherence time, constancy, spatial averaging, and also how the effects can be modified by an applied ELF noise magnetic field. The group has been using early chick embryos, and L929 and Daudi cells as their main experimental systems. The review also covers the work of other groups on low-level effects and the inhibition of the effects with an applied noise field. The group at CUA has shown that biological effects can be found after exposure to low-level ELF and RF electromagnetic fields, and when effects are observed, applying an ELF magnetic noise field inhibits the effects. Also, other research groups have tried to replicate the studies from the CUA group, or to apply EMF noise to suppress EMF-induced effects. Replications of the CUA effects have not always been successful. However, in all cases where the noise field has been applied to prevent an observed effect, it has been successful in eliminating the effect.

  7. Shot noise effect on noise source and noise parameter of 10-nm-scale quasi-ballistic n-/p-type MOS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jongwook; Kang, Myounggon

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigated the noise source and noise parameters of a quasi-ballistic MOSFET at the high-frequency regime. We presented the shot noise properties in the measured drain current noise and its impact on the induced gate noise and the noise parameters of 10-nm-scale n-/p-type MOS (N/PMOS) devices for the first time. The measured noise sources and noise parameters were carefully analyzed with the shot and thermal noise models in all operation regions. On the basis of the results, new noise parameter models are proposed and the noise performance improvement in the quasi-ballistic regime is shown.

  8. Mapping Urban Environmental Noise Using Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbo Zuo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Noise mapping is an effective method of visualizing and accessing noise pollution. In this paper, a noise-mapping method based on smartphones to effectively and easily measure environmental noise is proposed. By using this method, a noise map of an entire area can be created using limited measurement data. To achieve the measurement with certain precision, a set of methods was designed to calibrate the smartphones. Measuring noise with mobile phones is different from the traditional static observations. The users may be moving at any time. Therefore, a method of attaching an additional microphone with a windscreen is proposed to reduce the wind effect. However, covering an entire area is impossible. Therefore, an interpolation method is needed to achieve full coverage of the area. To reduce the influence of spatial heterogeneity and improve the precision of noise mapping, a region-based noise-mapping method is proposed in this paper, which is based on the distribution of noise in different region types tagged by volunteers, to interpolate and combine them to create a noise map. To validate the effect of the method, a comparison of the interpolation results was made to analyse our method and the ordinary Kriging method. The result shows that our method is more accurate in reflecting the local distribution of noise and has better interpolation precision. We believe that the proposed noise-mapping method is a feasible and low-cost noise-mapping solution.

  9. Noise can speed convergence in Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzke, Brandon; Kosko, Bart

    2011-10-01

    A new theorem shows that noise can speed convergence to equilibrium in discrete finite-state Markov chains. The noise applies to the state density and helps the Markov chain explore improbable regions of the state space. The theorem ensures that a stochastic-resonance noise benefit exists for states that obey a vector-norm inequality. Such noise leads to faster convergence because the noise reduces the norm components. A corollary shows that a noise benefit still occurs if the system states obey an alternate norm inequality. This leads to a noise-benefit algorithm that requires knowledge of the steady state. An alternative blind algorithm uses only past state information to achieve a weaker noise benefit. Simulations illustrate the predicted noise benefits in three well-known Markov models. The first model is a two-parameter Ehrenfest diffusion model that shows how noise benefits can occur in the class of birth-death processes. The second model is a Wright-Fisher model of genotype drift in population genetics. The third model is a chemical reaction network of zeolite crystallization. A fourth simulation shows a convergence rate increase of 64% for states that satisfy the theorem and an increase of 53% for states that satisfy the corollary. A final simulation shows that even suboptimal noise can speed convergence if the noise applies over successive time cycles. Noise benefits tend to be sharpest in Markov models that do not converge quickly and that do not have strong absorbing states.

  10. [Health effects of environmental noise exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röösli, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In the EU 27 countries about 100 million persons are exposed to road traffic noise above 55 dB (LDEN) according to the European Environment Agency. Exposure to railway noise affects 16 million individuals, aircraft noise 4 million and industry noise 1 million persons. Although the proportion of people reporting to be annoyed by noise exposure is substantial, health effects of noise is rarely an issue in general practitioners' consultations. According to stress models chronic noise exposure results in an increased allostatic load by direct physiological responses as well as psychological stress responses including sleep disturbances. In relation to acute and chronic noise exposure an increase of blood pressure was observed in epidemiological studies. An association between ischemic heart diseases and noise exposure was observed in various studies. However, the data is less consistent for other cardiovascular diseases and for cognitive effects in children. The association between metabolic syndrome and noise has rarely been investigated so far. Recently an association between road traffic noise and diabetes was observed in a Danish cohort study. Given the plausibility for a noise effect, general practitioners should consider noise exposure in patients with increased cardiometabolic risk.

  11. Measurement of the Atmospheric $\

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose1, D; Boser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegard, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glusenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Gora, D; Grant, D; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klas, J; Klein, S R; Kohne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Kopke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Meszaros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Perez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Radel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schoneberg, S; Schonherr, L; Schonwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoss, A; Strahler, E A; Strom, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge1, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report the first observation in a high energy neutrino telescope of cascades induced by atmospheric electron neutrinos and by neutral current interactions of atmospheric neutrinos of all flavors. Using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension, a sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data. The number of observed cascades is $N_{\\rm cascade} = 496 \\pm 66 (stat.) \\pm 88(syst.)$ and the rest of the sample consists of residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is determined in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV and is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos.

  12. Atmospheric Circulation of Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Showman, Adam P; Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    We survey the basic principles of atmospheric dynamics relevant to explaining existing and future observations of exoplanets, both gas giant and terrestrial. Given the paucity of data on exoplanet atmospheres, our approach is to emphasize fundamental principles and insights gained from Solar-System studies that are likely to be generalizable to exoplanets. We begin by presenting the hierarchy of basic equations used in atmospheric dynamics, including the Navier-Stokes, primitive, shallow-water, and two-dimensional nondivergent models. We then survey key concepts in atmospheric dynamics, including the importance of planetary rotation, the concept of balance, and scaling arguments to show how turbulent interactions generally produce large-scale east-west banding on rotating planets. We next turn to issues specific to giant planets, including their expected interior and atmospheric thermal structures, the implications for their wind patterns, and mechanisms to pump their east-west jets. Hot Jupiter atmospheric d...

  13. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, Jack S; Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. We illustrate this idea using the object WISE J085510.83-0714442.5, which is a cool, free-floating brown dwarf. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Ba...

  14. Development of a noise metric for assessment of exposure risk to complex noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiangdong; Kim, Jay H; Song, Won Joon; Murphy, William J; Song, Seongho

    2009-08-01

    Many noise guidelines currently use A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level L(Aeq) as the noise metric and the equal energy hypothesis to assess the risk of occupational noises. Because of the time-averaging effect involved with the procedure, the current guidelines may significantly underestimate the risk associated with complex noises. This study develops and evaluates several new noise metrics for more accurate assessment of exposure risks to complex and impulsive noises. The analytic wavelet transform was used to obtain time-frequency characteristics of the noise. 6 basic, unique metric forms that reflect the time-frequency characteristics were developed, from which 14 noise metrics were derived. The noise metrics were evaluated utilizing existing animal test data that were obtained by exposing 23 groups of chinchillas to, respectively, different types of noise. Correlations of the metrics with the hearing losses observed in chinchillas were compared and the most promising noise metric was identified.

  15. Innovative Control of Noise and Vibration of Industrial Equipments and Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owhor, Sampson Chisa,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Noise and Vibration of industrial equipment is the grave factor influencing its production state, working conditions of staff and job safety. In course of technology development the more potent machines are used, it is quite often accompanied by an increase of vibration and noise level. This is experienced by equipment as it is transmitted to building structures, environment and through staffs. The system of equation advocated in this research work has been permitted to evaluate reduction of machine vibrations caused by unbalance movement of its members, thereby transmitting it onto the floor and the environment. A noise problem generally consists of three inter-related elements- the source, the receiver and the transmission path. This transmission path is usually the atmosphere through which the sound is propagated, but can include structural materials of any building containing the receiver. The development of innovative noise control treatments provides opportunities for applying basic physics and engineering procedures.

  16. GIS-Based Noise Simulation Open Source Software: N-GNOIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Sharma, A.; Kumar, M.; Shende, V.; Chakrabarti, T.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Geographical information system (GIS)-based noise simulation software (N-GNOIS) has been developed to simulate the noise scenario due to point and mobile sources considering the impact of geographical features and meteorological parameters. These have been addressed in the software through attenuation modules of atmosphere, vegetation and barrier. N-GNOIS is a user friendly, platform-independent and open geospatial consortia (OGC) compliant software. It has been developed using open source technology (QGIS) and open source language (Python). N-GNOIS has unique features like cumulative impact of point and mobile sources, building structure and honking due to traffic. Honking is the most common phenomenon in developing countries and is frequently observed on any type of roads. N-GNOIS also helps in designing physical barrier and vegetation cover to check the propagation of noise and acts as a decision making tool for planning and management of noise component in environmental impact assessment (EIA) studies.

  17. Environmental Factors Having an Impact on the Noise Induced by Motor Vahicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa Akelaitytė

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The transport sector is rapidly developing industry in Lithuania. Over the past few years, a significant increase in motor vehicles on our roads can be noticed. Both light and heavy vehicles create economic benefits, and, at the same time, cause ecological and social problems such as noise, a growing number of accidents and environmental pollution. In order to reduce the rate of accidents, many places have been equipped with speed-limiting humps. However, the vehicles approaching them will increase noise levels. The article describes a calculation method of how to determine the influence of various factors caused by car noise. Reflections on the surface, the atmosphere and sound waves on road obstacles can increase or decrease sounds in the environment. The above introduced factors must be taken into account conducting noise measurement tests.Article in Lithuanian

  18. Signal to Noise Ratio Characterization of Coherent Doppler Lidar Backscattered Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelazim Sameh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An eye-safe coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL system for wind measurement was developed and tested at the Remote Sensing Laboratory of the City College of New York (CCNY. The system employs a 1542 nm fiber laser to leverage components’ availability and affordability of the telecommunication industry. A balanced detector with a bandwidth extending from dc to 125 MHz is used to eliminate the common mode relative intensity noise (RIN. The system is shot noise limited i.e., the dominant component of received signals’ noise is the shot noise. Wind velocity can be measured under nominal aerosol loading and atmospheric turbulence conditions for ranges up to 3 km while pointing vertically with 0.08 m/s precision.

  19. Signal to Noise Ratio Characterization of Coherent Doppler Lidar Backscattered Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelazim, Sameh; Santoro, David; Arend, Mark; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Sam

    2016-06-01

    An eye-safe coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) system for wind measurement was developed and tested at the Remote Sensing Laboratory of the City College of New York (CCNY). The system employs a 1542 nm fiber laser to leverage components' availability and affordability of the telecommunication industry. A balanced detector with a bandwidth extending from dc to 125 MHz is used to eliminate the common mode relative intensity noise (RIN). The system is shot noise limited i.e., the dominant component of received signals' noise is the shot noise. Wind velocity can be measured under nominal aerosol loading and atmospheric turbulence conditions for ranges up to 3 km while pointing vertically with 0.08 m/s precision.

  20. Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML) is one of the nation's leading research facilities for understanding aerosols, clouds, and their interactions. The AML...