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Sample records for vla radio telescope

  1. VLA Polarimetry of Two Extended Radio Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Junor, W; Morganti, R; Padrielli, L

    2000-01-01

    Multi-wavelength VLA observations of two extended radio galaxies, 0235-197and 1203+043 are presented. There is some evidence from earlier studies thatthese two sources exhibit low frequency (<1 GHz) variability. This work showsthat both sources have linear polarizations, if any, below the detection limitsat 320 MHz, so we cannot explain the variability as being due to instrumentalpolarization effects as has been suggested for 3C159. Refractive scintillationmay be the cause of the variability in 0235-197. This would require theexistence of a bright, compact component in one of the hot spots seen in theseobservations. This is not implausible but the resolution of this observationalprogram is insufficent to address that question. The radio source 1203+043lacks any bright compact component thereby ruling out a refractivescintillation mechanism for its variability. Consequently, it is possible thatclaims of variability in this source are spurious. However, the 320 MHz VLAobservations show that 1203+043 has an `...

  2. High-Fidelity VLA Imaging of the Radio Structure of 3C273

    CERN Document Server

    Perley, R A

    2016-01-01

    3C273, the nearest bright quasar, comprises a strong nuclear core and a bright, one-sided jet extending ~ 23 arcseconds to the SW. The source has been the subject of imaging campaigns in all wavebands. Extensive observations of this source have been made with the Very Large Array and other telescopes as part of a campaign to understand the jet emission mechanisms. Partial results from the VLA radio campaign have been published, but to date, the complete set of VLA imaging results has not been made available. We have utilized the VLA to determine the radio structure of 3C273 in Stokes I, Q, and U, over the widest possible frequency and resolution range. The VLA observed the source in all four of its configurations, and with all eight of its frequency bands, spanning 73.8 MHz to 43 GHz. The data were taken in a pseudo-spectral line mode to minimize the VLA's correlator errors, and were fully calibrated with subsequent self-calibration techniques to maximise image fidelity. Images in Stokes parameters I, Q, and ...

  3. Everyday Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Pranshu; Kumar, Pratik; Yelikar, Anjali; Soni, Kanchan; T, Vineeth Krishna

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an affordable, portable college level radio telescope for amateur radio astronomy which can be used to provide hands-on experience with the fundamentals of a radio telescope and an insight into the realm of radio astronomy. With our set-up one can measure brightness temperature and flux of the Sun at 11.2 GHz and calculate the beam width of the antenna. The set-up uses commercially available satellite television receiving system and parabolic dish antenna. We report the detection of point sources like Saturn and extended sources like the galactic arm of the Milky way. We have also developed python pipeline, which are available for free download, for data acquisition and visualization.

  4. Uzaybimer Radio Telescope Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbay, R.; Öz, G. K.; Arslan, Ö.; Özeren, F. F.; Küçük, İ.

    2016-12-01

    A 13 meters former NATO radar is being converted into a radio telescope. The radio telescope is controlled by a system which has been developed at UZAYBİMER. The Telescope Control System(TCS) has been designed using modern industrial systems. TCS has been developed in LabView platform in which works Windows embedded OS. The position feedback used on radio telescopes is an industrial EtherCAT standard. ASCOM library is used for astronomical calculations.

  5. Searching the Nearest Stars for Exoplanetary Radio Emission: VLA and LOFAR Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Mary; Winterhalter, Daniel; Lazio, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Six of the eight solar system planets and one moon (Ganymede) exhibit present-day dynamo magnetic fields. To date, however, there are no conclusive detections of exoplanetary magnetic fields. Low frequency radio emission via the cyclotron maser instability (CMI) from interactions between a planet and the solar/stellar wind is the most direct means of detecting and characterizing planetary/exoplanetary magnetic fields. We have undertaken a survey of the very nearest stars in low frequency radio (30 MHz - 4 GHz) in order to search for yet-undiscovered planets. The closest stars are chosen in order to reduce the attenuation of the magnetospheric radio signal by distance dilution, thereby increasing the chances of making a detection if a planet with a strong magnetic field is present. The VLA telescope (P-band: 230-470 MHz, L-band: 1-2 GHz, S-band: 2-4 GHz) and LOFAR telescope (LBA: 30-75 MHz) have been used to conduct this survey.This work focuses on VLA and LOFAR observations of an M-dwarf binary system: GJ 725. We present upper limits on radio flux as a function of frequency. Since the peak emission frequency of CMI-type emission is the local plasma frequency in the emission region, the peak frequency of planetary radio emission is a direct proxy for the magnetic field strength of the planet. Our spectral irradiance upper limits therefore represent upper limits on the magnetic field strengths of any planets in the GJ 725 system.Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Improved analysis of plasmasphere motion using the VLA radio interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Hoogeveen

    Full Text Available Observations using the very large (VLA radio interferometer during the past five years have enabled the discovery of a new type of plasmasphere disturbance, the magnetic eastward-directed wave. Previous work indicated these disturbances were likely frozen to the geomagnetic field as determined from their azimuth distributions. This work provides a method to explain more accurately the azimuth distribution, thereby allowing the calculation of the disturbances' location in the plasmasphere independently of the measured velocity. The measurable velocity due to corotation is calculated and subtracted from the measured trace velocity. This difference, or deviation from corotation, is attributed to electrodynamic convection; the measurement of plasmaspheric convection may lead to the eventual monitoring of mid-latitude electric fields. Disturbances are seen convecting predominantly westward, with the fastest having angular velocities greater than the anticorotating VLA line of sight. The direction of convection and conditions of observations indicate that the disturbances are likely the same phenomenon seen by the Los Alamos satellite beacon array.

  7. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A. [Physics Department, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Grandi, P. [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Bologna (Italy); Giovannini, G. [INAF, Istituto di Radioastronomia di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Montez, R., E-mail: kharb@cis.rit.edu [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the

  8. Properties and environment of radio-emitting galaxies in the VLA-zCOSMOS survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardelli, S.; Schinnerer, E.; Smolčic, V.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Mignoli, M.; Halliday, C.; Kovač, K.; Ciliegi, P.; Caputi, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bondi, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Vergani, D.; Pozzetti, L.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Lilly, S.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Coppa, G.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Pellò, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Ricciardelli, E.; Silverman, J. D.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Cimatti, A.; Guzzo, L.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Memeo, P.; Meneux, B.; Oesch, P.; Porciani, C.; Scaramella, R.; Capak, P.; Sanders, D.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Jahnke, K.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the properties and the environment of radio sources with optical counterparts from the combined VLA-COSMOS and zCOSMOS samples. The advantage of this sample is the availability of optical spectroscopic informations, high quality redshifts, and accurate density determination. Met

  9. The environment of radio sources in the VLA-COSMOS Survey field

    CERN Document Server

    Malavasi, Nicola; Ciliegi, Paolo; Ilbert, Olivier; Pozzetti, Lucia; Zucca, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This work studies the correlation among environmental density and radio AGN presence up to $z = 2$. Using data from the photometric COSMOS survey and its radio 1.4 GHz follow-up (VLA-COSMOS), a sample of radio AGNs has been defined. The environment was studied using the richness distributions inside a parallelepiped with base side of 1 Mpc and height proportional to the photometric redshift precision. Radio AGNs are found to be always located in environments significantly richer than those around galaxies with no radio emission. Moreover, a distinction based on radio AGN power shows that the significance of the environmental effect is only maintained for low-power radio sources. The results of this work show that denser environments play a significant role in enhancing the probability that a galaxy hosts a radio AGN and, in particular, low-power ones.

  10. The VLA-COSMOS Survey: III. Further Catalog Analysis and the Radio Source Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Bondi, M; Schinnerer, E; Smolcic, V; Jahnke, K; Carilli, C; Zamorani, G

    2008-01-01

    The VLA-COSMOS Large Project has imaged the 2 sq.deg. COSMOS field with a resolution of 1.5 arcsec and a sensitivity of about 11 microJy (1 sigma) yielding to a catalog of about 3600 radio sources. In this paper we present a further analysis of the VLA-COSMOS Large Project catalog of radio sources aimed to: 1) quantify and correct for the effect of bandwidth smearing in the catalog, 2) determine the incompleteness produced by the noise bias and the resolution bias in the new catalog and 3) derive the radio source counts at 1.4 GHz. The effect of bandwidth smearing on the radio sources in the catalog was quantified comparing the peak and total flux densities in the final mosaic and in each of the individual pointings where the source was closest to the center of the field. We find that the peak flux densities in the original VLA-COSMOS Large Project catalog have to be divided by a factor about 0.8 or 0.9, depending on the distance from the mosaic center. The completeness of the radio catalog has been tested us...

  11. The LWA1 Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingson, S W; Craig, J; Hartman, J; Dowell, J; Wolfe, C N; Clarke, T E; Hicks, B C; Kassim, N E; Ray, P S; Rickard, L J; Schinzel, F K; Weiler, K W

    2012-01-01

    LWA1 is a new radio telescope operating in the frequency range 10-88 MHz, located in central New Mexico. The telescope consists of 258 pairs of dipole-type antennas whose outputs are individually digitized and formed into beams. Simultaneously, signals from all dipoles can be recorded using one of the instrument's "all dipoles" modes, facilitating all-sky imaging. Notable features of the instrument include high intrinsic sensitivity (about 6 kJy zenith system equivalent flux density), large instantaneous bandwidth (up to 78 MHz), and 4 independently-steerable beams utilizing digital "true time delay" beamforming. This paper summarizes the design of LWA1 and its performance as determined in commissioning experiments. We describe the method currently in use for array calibration, and report on measurements of sensitivity and beamwidth.

  12. The Expanded Very Large Array: A Radio Telescope for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The world's most productive and widely-used radio telescope, the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA), can be improved tenfold with an expansion project proposed by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This project will ensure that the scientific community has a state-of-the-art research tool to meet the astronomical research challenges of the 21st Century," said Paul Vanden Bout, NRAO Director. Aerial View of the VLA Plans for the Expanded VLA (EVLA) and its potential for new scientific contributions were described today in a series of presentations at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Rochester, NY. The EVLA project plans to replace dated equipment left over from the VLA's original construction in the 1970s and add eight new radio- telescope dish antennas to the current, 27-dish system. It received a strong endorsement last month when the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee of the National Academy of Sciences gave the project one of its highest ratings as a priority for the next decade in its report entitled "Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium." "The Survey Committee's endorsement shows that the astronomical research community strongly supports the Expanded VLA," said NRAO astronomer Jim Ulvestad, who spoke to reporters at the AAS meeting. "The VLA has long been a unique and critical resource for all of astronomy, and we look forward to turning it into a dramatic, new research tool." The VLA Expansion Project will use modern electronics and computer technology to greatly improve the VLA's ability to observe faint celestial objects and to analyze their radio emissions. A set of eight new dish antennas, added to the current 27-antenna system, will allow the VLA to produce images with ten times greater detail. The project will build on the VLA's current infrastructure, including its 230-ton dish antennas, the railroad tracks for moving those antennas, and the existing buildings and access roads. The

  13. Can Radio Telescopes Find Axions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    axions. Now scientists Katharine Kelley and Peter Quinn at ICRAR, University of Western Australia, have explored how we might use next-generation radio telescopes to search for photons that were created by axions interacting with the magnetic fields of our galaxy.Hope for Next-Gen TelescopesPotential axion coupling strengths vs. mass (click for a closer look). The axion mass is thought to lie between a eV and a meV; two theoretical models are shown with dashed lines. The plot shows the sensitivity of the upcoming SKA and its precursors, ASKAP and MEERKAT. [KelleyQuinn 2017]By using a simple galactic halo model and reasonable assumptions for the central galactic magnetic field even taking into account the time dependence of the field Kelley and Quinn estimate the radio-frequency power density that we would observe at Earth from axions being converted to photons within the Milky Ways magnetic field.The authors then compare this signature to the detection capabilities of upcoming radio telescope arrays. They show that the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and its precursors should have the capability to detect signs of axions across large parts of parameter space.Kelley and Quinn conclude that theres good cause for optimism about future radio telescopes ability to detect axions. And if we did succeed in making a detection, it would be a triumph for both particle physics and astrophysics, finally providing an explanation for the universes dark matter.CitationKatharine Kelley and P. J. Quinn 2017 ApJL 845 L4. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa808d

  14. The VVDS-VLA Deep Field - IV: Radio-optical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Bardelli, S; Bolzonella, M; Ciliegi, P; Gregorini, L; Zamorani, G; Bondi, M; Zanichelli, A; Tresse, L; Vergani, D; Gavignaud, I; Bongiorno, A; Bottini, D; Garilli, B; Le Brun, V; Le Fèvre, O; MacCagni, D; Scaramella, R; Scodeggio, M; Vettolani, G; Adami, C; Arnouts, S; Cappi, A; Charlot, S; Contini, T; Foucaud, S; Franzetti, P; Guzzo, L; Ilbert, O; Iovino, A; Lamareille, F; McCracken, H J; Marano, B; Marinoni, C; Mazure, A; Meneux, B; Merighi, R; Paltani, S; Pello`, R; Pollo, A; Pozzetti, L; Radovich, M; Abbas, U; Brinchmann, J; Cucciati, O; De la Torre, S; de Ravel, L; Memeo, P; Pérez-Montero, E; Mellier, Y; Merluzzi, P; Temporin, S; De Ruiter, H R; Parma, P

    2008-01-01

    (abridged) We use the 1.4 GHz VIMOS-VLA Deep Survey and the optical VVDS and the CFHT-LS to compare the properties of radio loud galaxies with respect to the whole population of optical galaxies. The availability of multiband photometry and high quality photometric redshifts allows to derive rest frame colors and radio luminosity functions down to a limit of a B rest-frame magnitude of M=-20. Galaxy properties and luminosity functions (LFs) are estimated up to z~1 for radio loud and radio quiet early and late type galaxies. Radio loud late type galaxies are redder than radio quiet objects of the same class and this is an effect related to the presence of more dust in stronger star forming galaxies. Moreover, we estimate optical LFs, stellar masses and star formation rate distributions for radio sources and compare them with those derived for a well defined control sample, finding that the probability for a galaxy to be a radio emitter significantly increases at high values of these parameters. Radio loud earl...

  15. Astronomers Make First Images With Space Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Marking an important new milestone in radio astronomy history, scientists at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, have made the first images using a radio telescope antenna in space. The images, more than a million times more detailed than those produced by the human eye, used the new Japanese HALCA satellite, working in conjunction with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and Very Large Array (VLA) ground-based radio telescopes. The landmark images are the result of a long-term NRAO effort supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). "This success means that our ability to make detailed radio images of objects in the universe is no longer limited by the size of the Earth," said NRAO Director Paul Vanden Bout. "Astronomy's vision has just become much sharper." HALCA, launched on Feb. 11 by Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), is the first satellite designed for radio astronomy imaging. It is part of an international collaboration led by ISAS and backed by NRAO; Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); the Canadian Space Agency; the Australia Telescope National Facility; the European VLBI Network and the Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry in Europe. On May 22, HALCA observed a distant active galaxy called PKS 1519-273, while the VLBA and VLA also observed it. Data from the satellite was received by a tracking station at the NRAO facility in Green Bank, West Virginia. Tape-recorded data from the satellite and from the radio telescopes on the ground were sent to NRAO's Array Operations Center (AOC) in Socorro, NM. In Socorro, astronomers and computer scientists used a special-purpose computer to digitally combine the signals from the satellite and the ground telescopes to make them all work together as a single, giant radio telescope. This dedicated machine, the VLBA Correlator, built as

  16. VLA survey of the CDFS: the nature of faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Tozzi, P; Fomalont, E; Miller, N; Norman, C; Mainieri, V; Padovani, P; Rosati, P

    2009-01-01

    We present the multiwavelength properties of 266 cataloged radio sources identified with 20 and 6 cm VLA deep observations of the CDFS at a flux density limit of 42 \\mu Jy at the field centre at 1.4 GHz. These new observations probe the faint end of both the star formation and radio galaxy/AGN population. X-ray data, including upper limits, turn out to be a key factor in establishing the nature of faint radio sources. We find that, while the well-known flattening of the radio number counts below 1 mJy is mostly due to star forming galaxies, these sources and AGN make up an approximately equal fraction of the sub--millijansky sky, contrary to some previous results. We have also uncovered a population of distant AGN systematically missing from many previous studies of sub-millijansky radio source identifications. The AGN include radio galaxies, mostly of the low-power, Fanaroff-Riley I type, and a significant radio-quiet component, which amounts to approximately one fifth of the total sample. We also find that ...

  17. Multifrequency VLA observations of PKS 0745 - 191 - The archetypal 'cooling flow' radio source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Ninety-, 20-, 6- and 2-cm VLA observations of the high-radio-luminosity cooling-flow radio source PKS 0745 - 191 are presented. The radio source was found to have a core with a very steep spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5) and diffuse emission with an even steeper spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5 to -2.3) without clear indications of the jets, hotspots, or double lobes found in the other radio sources of comparable luminosity. It is inferred that the energy to power the radio source comes from the central engine, but the source's structure may be heavily influenced by the past history of the galaxy and the inflowing intracluster medium. It is shown that, while the radio source is energetically unimportant for the cluster as a whole, it is important on the scale of the cooling flow. The mere existence of cosmic rays and magnetic fields within a substantial fraction of the volume inside the cooling radius has important consequences for cooling-flow models.

  18. A VLA Search for Radio Signals from M31 and M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Robert H.; Mooley, Kunal

    2017-03-01

    Observing nearby galaxies would facilitate the search for artificial radio signals by sampling several billions of stars simultaneously, but few efforts have been made to exploit this opportunity. An added attraction is that the Milky Way is the second largest member of the Local Group, so our galaxy might be a probable target for hypothetical broadcasters in nearby galaxies. We present the first relatively high spectral resolution (radio signals of complete galaxies in the Local Group with the Jansky VLA, observing the galaxies M31 (Andromeda) and M33 (Triangulum)—the first and third largest members of the group, respectively—sampling more stars than any prior search of this kind. We used 122 Hz channels over a 1 MHz spectral window in the target galaxy velocity frame of reference, and 15 Hz channels over a 125 kHz window in our local standard of rest. No narrowband signals were detected above a signal-to-noise ratio of 7, suggesting the absence of continuous narrowband flux greater than approximately 0.24 and 1.33 Jy in the respective spectral windows illuminating our part of the Milky Way during our observations in 2014 December and 2015 January. This is also the first study in which the upgraded VLA has been used for SETI.

  19. Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Mary; MacLaren, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) project as a way of teaching astronomy concepts to middle school students. The project provides students opportunities to work with professional scientists. (SOE)

  20. Properties and environment of Radio Emitting Galaxies in the VLA-zCOSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bardelli, S; Smolcic, V; Zamorani, G; Zucca, E; Mignoli, M; Halliday, C; Kovac, K; Ciliegi, P; Caputi, K; Koekemoer, A M; Bongiorno, A; Bondi, M; Bolzonella, M; Vergani, D; Pozzetti, L; Carollo, C M; Contini, T; Kneib, J -P; LeFevre, O; Lilly, S; Mainieri, V; Renzini, A; Scodeggio, M; Coppa, G; Cucciati, O; delaTorre, S; deRavel, L; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Iovino, A; Kampczyk, P; Knobel, C; Lamareille, F; LeBorgne, J -F; Le Brun, V; Maier, C; Pello`, R; Peng, Y; Pérez-Montero, E; Ricciardelli, E; Silverman, J D; Tanaka, M; Tasca, L; Tresse, L; Abbas, U; Bottini, D; Cappi, A; Cassata, P; Cimatti, A; Guzzo, L; Leauthaud, A; MacCagni, D; Marinoni, C; McCracken, H J; Memeo, P; Meneux, B; Oesch, P; Porciani, C; Scaramella, R; Capak, P; Sanders, D; Scoville, N; Taniguchi, Y; Jahnke, K

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the properties and the environment of radio sources with optical counterpart from the combined VLA-COSMOS and zCOSMOS samples. The advantage of this sample is the availability of optical spectroscopic information, high quality redshifts, and accurate density determination. By comparing the star formation rates estimated from the optical spectral energy distribution with those based on the radio luminosity, we divide the radio sources in three families, passive AGN, non-passive AGN and star forming galaxies. These families occupy specific regions of the 8.0-4.5 $\\mu$m infrared color--specific star formation plane, from which we extract the corresponding control samples. Only the passive AGN have a significantly different environment distribution from their control sample. The fraction of radio-loud passive AGN increases from ~2% in underdense regions to ~15% for overdensities (1+delta) greater than 10. This trend is also present as a function of richness of the groups hosting the radio sources. ...

  1. Radio Telescopes Will Add to Cassini-Huygens Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    accuracy. They expect to measure the probe's position within two-thirds of a mile (1 kilometer) at a distance of nearly 750 million miles. "That's like being able to sit in your back yard and watch the ball in a ping-pong game being played on the Moon," said Leonid Gurvits of JIVE. Both the JPL and JIVE teams will record the data collected by the radio telescopes and process it later. In the case of the Doppler measurements, some real-time information may be available, depending on the strength of the signal, but the scientists on this team also plan to do their detailed analysis on recorded data. The JPL team is utilizing special instrumentation from the Deep Space Network called Radio Science Receivers. One will be loaned to the GBT and another to the Parkes radio observatory. "This is the same instrument that allowed us to support the challenging communications during the landing of the Spirit and Opportunity Mars rovers as well as the Cassini Saturn Orbit Insertion when the received radio signal was very weak," said Sami Asmar, the JPL scientist responsible for the data recording. When the Galileo spacecraft's probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere in 1995, a JPL team used the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico to directly track the probe's signal. Adding the data from the VLA to that experiment dramatically improved the accuracy of the wind-speed measurements. "The Galileo probe gave us a surprise. Contrary to some predictions, we learned that Jupiter's winds got stronger as we went deeper into its atmosphere. That tells us that those deeper winds are not driven entirely by sunlight, but also by heat coming up from the planet's core. If we get lucky at Titan, we'll get surprises there, too," said Robert Preston, another JPL scientist. The Huygens probe is a spacecraft built by the European Space Agency (ESA). In addition to the NRAO telescopes, the JPL Doppler Wind Experiment will use the Australia Telescope National Facility and other radio

  2. A VLA Survey For Faint Compact Radio Sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Sheehan, Patrick D; Mann, Rita K; Williams, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    We present Karl G. Janksy Very Large Array (VLA) 1.3 cm, 3.6 cm, and 6 cm continuum maps of compact radio sources in the Orion Nebular Cluster. We mosaicked 34 square arcminutes at 1.3 cm, 70 square arcminutes at 3.6 cm and 109 square arcminutes at 6 cm, containing 778 near-infrared detected YSOs and 190 HST-identified proplyds (with significant overlap between those characterizations). We detected radio emission from 175 compact radio sources in the ONC, including 26 sources that were detected for the first time at these wavelengths. For each detected source we fit a simple free-free and dust emission model to characterize the radio emission. We extrapolate the free-free emission spectrum model for each source to ALMA bands to illustrate how these measurements could be used to correctly measure protoplanetary disk dust masses from sub-millimeter flux measurements. Finally, we compare the fluxes measured in this survey with previously measured fluxes for our targets, as well as four separate epochs of 1.3 cm ...

  3. Weak and Compact Radio Emission in Early High-Mass Star Forming Regions: I. VLA Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rosero, V; Claussen, M; Kurtz, S; Cesaroni, R; Araya, E D; Carrasco-González, C; Rodríguez, L F; Menten, K M; Wyrowski, F; Loinard, L; Ellingsen, S P

    2016-01-01

    We present a high sensitivity radio continuum survey at 6 and 1.3$\\,$cm using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array towards a sample of 58 high-mass star forming regions. Our sample was chosen from dust clumps within infrared dark clouds with and without IR sources (CMC-IRs, CMCs, respectively), and hot molecular cores (HMCs), with no previous, or relatively weak radio continuum detection at the $1\\,$mJy level. Due to the improvement in the continuum sensitivity of the VLA, this survey achieved map rms levels of $\\sim$ 3-10 $\\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ at sub-arcsecond angular resolution. We extracted 70 centimeter continuum sources associated with 1.2$\\,$mm dust clumps. Most sources are weak, compact, and are prime candidates for high-mass protostars. Detection rates of radio sources associated with the mm dust clumps for CMCs, CMC-IRs and HMCs are 6$\\%$, 53$\\%$ and 100$\\%$, respectively. This result is consistent with increasing high-mass star formation activity from CMCs to HMCs. The radio sources located within HMCs...

  4. VLA H53alpha radio recombination line observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp~220

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Rico, C A; Viallefond, F; Zhao, J H; Gómez, Y; Anantharamaiah, K R

    2005-01-01

    We present high angular resolution (0.7'') observations made with the Very Large Array (VLA) of the radio recombination line (RRL) H53alpha and radio continuum emission at 43 GHz from the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp 220. The 43 GHz continuum emission shows a compact structure (~2'') with two peaks separated by ~1'', the East (E) and West (W) components, that correspond to each galactic nucleus of the merger. The spectral indices for both the E and W components, using radio continuum images at 8.3 and 43 GHz are typical of synchrotron emission (alpha ~ -1.0). Our 43 GHz continuum and H53alpha line observations confirm the flux densities predicted by the models proposed by Anantharamaiah et al. This agreement with the models implies the presence of high-density (~ 100,000 cm^-3) compact HII regions (~ 0.1 pc) in Arp~220. The integrated H53alpha line emission is stronger toward the non-thermal radio continuum peaks, which are also coincident with the peaks of molecular emission of the H2CO. The coi...

  5. New insights into the evolution of the FR I radio galaxy 3C 270 (NGC 4261) from VLA and GMRT radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kolokythas, Konstantinos; Giacintucci, Simona; Raychaudhury, Somak; Ishwara-Chandra, C H; Worrall, Diana M; Birkinshaw, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) 240 MHz observations of the nearby luminous FR I radio source 3C 270, in the group-central elliptical NGC 4261. Combining these data with reprocessed Very Large Array (VLA) 1.55 and 4.8 GHz observations, we produce spectral index maps that reveal a constant spectral index along the jets and a gradual steepening from the ends of the jets through the lobes towards the nucleus. A Jaffe & Perola (JP) model fitted to the integrated spectrum of the source gives an asymptotic low-frequency index of $\\alpha_{inj}=0.53_{-0.02}^{+0.01}$, while JP models fitted to the observed spectral index trend along the lobes allow us to estimate radiative ages of $\\sim29$ Myr and $\\sim37$ Myr for the west and east lobes respectively. Our age estimates are a factor of two lower than the 75-Myr upper limit derived from X-ray data (O'Sullivan et al. 2011). We find unlikely the scenario of an early supersonic phase in which the lobe expanded into the ISM at approximately Mach 6 (350...

  6. Undergraduate Research with a Small Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, P. L.; Williams, G. J.

    2001-11-01

    We describe the construction of a small radio telescope system at ULM and the role of radio astronomy in undergraduate education. The heart of the system is the Small Radio Telescope (SRT), which is a modified satellite TV antenna and custom receiver purchased from MIT Haystack Observatory. This telescope measures the brightness of many celestial objects at wavelengths near 21 cm. The system consists of various components to control dish movement, as well as perform analog to digital conversions allowing analysis of collected data. Undergraduate students have participated in the construction of the hardware and the task of interfacing the hardware to software on two GNU/Linux computer systems. The construction of the telescope and analysis of data allow the students to employ key concepts from mechanics, optics, electrodynamics, and thermodynamics, as well as computer and electronics skills. We will report preliminary results of solar observations conducted with this instrument and with the MIT Haystack Observatory 37m radio telescope. This work was supported by Louisiana Board of Regents grant LEQSF-ENH-UG-16, NASA/LaSPACE LURA R109139 and ULM Development Foundation Grant 97317.

  7. Teaching radio astronomy with Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    A simple, easy to build and portable radio telescope, called Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT), has been developed by the Radio Physics Laboratory (RPL), a radio astronomy teaching unit associated with the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (TIFR) and Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), which are two premier astronomy institutes in India. ASRT consists of off-the-shelf available Direct to Home television dishes and is easy to assemble. Our design is scalable from simple very low cost telescope to more complex yet moderately costing instrument. ASRT provides a platform for demonstrating radio physics concepts through simple hands-on experiment as well as for carrying out solar monitoring by college/University students. The presentation will highlight the concept of ASRT and the different experiments that can be carried out using it. The solar monitoring observations will be discussed along-with details of methods for calibrating these measurements. The pedagogical usefulness of ASRT in introducing undergraduatephysics students to astrophysics, measurements and analysis methods used in radio astronomy will also be discussed. Use of ASRT in the last three years in the programs of RPL, namely the annual Radio Astronomy Winter School for College students (RAWSC) and Pulsar Observing for Students (POS) is also presented. This year a new program was initiated to form a virtual group of an ASRT community, which will not only share their measurements, but also think of improving the pedagogical usefulness of ASRT by innovative experiments. This initiative is presented with the best practices drawn from our experience in using ASRT as a tool for student training in space sciences. The talk will also point out future ideas in involving a larger body of students in simple radio astronomy experiments with the ASRT, which RPL is likely to nucleate as part of its mandate.

  8. South African Student Constructed Indlebe Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGruder, Charles H.; MacPherson, Stuart; Janse Van Vuuren, Gary Peter

    2017-01-01

    The Indlebe Radio Telescope (IRT) is a small transit telescope with a 5 m diameter parabolic reflector working at 21 cm. It was completely constructed by South African (SA) students from the Durban University of Technology (DUT), where it is located. First light occurred on 28 July 2008, when the galactic center, Sagittarius A, was detected. As a contribution to the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, staff members in the Department of Electronic Engineering at DUT in 2006 decided to have their students create a fully functional radio telescope by 2009. The specific project aims are to provide a visible project that could generate interest in science and technology in high school students and to provide a real world system for research in radio astronomy in general and an optimization of low noise radio frequency receiver systems in particular. These aims must be understood in terms of the SA’s government interests in radio astronomy. SA is a partner in the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) project, has constructed the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT) and MeerKat, which is the largest and most sensitive radio telescope in the southern hemisphere. SA and its partners in Africa are investing in the construction of the African Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (AVN), an array of radio telescopes throughout Africa as an extension of the existing global Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (VLBI). These projects will allow SA to make significant contributions to astronomy and enable astronomy to contribute to the scientific education and development goals of the country. The IRT sees on a daily basis the transit of Sag A. The transit time is influenced by precession, nutation, polar motion, aberration, celestial pole offset, proper motion, length of the terrestrial day and variable ionospheric refraction. Of these eight factors six are either predictable or measureable. To date neither celestial pole offset nor variable ionospheric refraction are predicable

  9. LOFAR, a new low frequency radio telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Röttgering, H J A

    2003-01-01

    LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a large radio telescope consisting of approximately 100 soccer-field sized antenna stations spread over a region of 400 km in diameter. It will operate at frequencies from ~10 to 240 MHz, with a resolution at 240 MHz of better than an arcsecond. Its superb sensitivity will allow for studies of a broad range of astrophysical topics, including reionisation, transient radio sources and cosmic rays, distant galaxies and AGNs. In this contribution a status rapport of the LOFAR project and an overview of the science case is presented.

  10. Astrophysical results of the Mauritius radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somanah, R.; Issur, N.; Oozeer, N.

    2013-04-01

    One of the first scientific justifications of building the Mauritius Radio Telescope (hereafter referred to as MRT) was to complement the Cambridge 6C survey, which is a radio map of most of the northern sky at 150 MHz [1]; the MRT would then be the equivalent of the 6C survey for the southern sky and together we would obtain a whole sky radio map at 150 MHz. When the MRT was built, there were no radio surveys of the southern sky at frequencies less than 408 MHz; the frequency of 150 MHz was also chosen to complement the other radio surveys of the southern sky, which have been done at higher frequencies. Furthermore low radio frequencies like 150 MHz are bound to see new sources that would have been missed at higher frequencies due to the form of their spectra. Interesting features of resolved objects can also be studied in more details. In this paper, a brief description of the MRT will be made as well as the observations and imaging with the MRT data, and some astrophysical results obtained since its commissioning in 1992 (20 years of existence this year 2012).

  11. New Radio Telescope Makes First Scientific Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    The world's two largest radio telescopes have combined to make detailed radar images of the cloud-shrouded surface of Venus and of a tiny asteroid that passed near the Earth. The images mark the first scientific contributions from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) new Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia, which worked with the NSF's recently-upgraded Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico. The project used the radar transmitter on the Arecibo telescope and the huge collecting areas of both telescopes to receive the echoes. GBT-Arecibo Radar Image of Maxwell Montes on Venus "These images are the first of many scientific contributions to come from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a great way for it to begin its scientific career," said Paul Vanden Bout, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "Our congratulations go to the scientists involved in this project as well as to the hard-working staffs at Green Bank and Arecibo who made this accomplishment possible," Vanden Bout added. To the eye, Venus hides behind a veil of brilliant white clouds, but these clouds can be penetrated by radar waves, revealing the planet's surface. The combination of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), the world's largest fully-steerable radio telescope, and the Arecibo telescope, the world's most powerful radar, makes an unmatched tool for studying Venus and other solar-system bodies. "Having a really big telescope like the new Green Bank Telescope to receive the radar echoes from small asteroids that are really close to the Earth and from very distant objects like Titan, the large moon of Saturn, will be a real boon to radar studies of the solar system." said Cornell University professor Donald Campbell, leader of the research team. Ten years ago, the radar system on NASA's Magellan spacecraft probed though the clouds of Venus to reveal in amazing detail the surface of the Earth's twin planet. These new studies using the GBT and Arecibo, the

  12. A VLA Survey for Faint Compact Radio Sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A.; Mann, Rita K.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2016-11-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 1.3, 3.6, and 6 cm continuum maps of compact radio sources in the Orion Nebular Cluster (ONC). We mosaicked 34 arcmin2 at 1.3 cm, 70 arcmin2 at 3.6 cm and 109 arcmin2 at 6 cm, containing 778 near-infrared detected young stellar objects and 190 Hubble Space Telescope-identified proplyds (with significant overlap between those characterizations). We detected radio emission from 175 compact radio sources in the ONC, including 26 sources that were detected for the first time at these wavelengths. For each detected source, we fitted a simple free-free and dust emission model to characterize the radio emission. We extrapolate the free-free emission spectrum model for each source to ALMA bands to illustrate how these measurements could be used to correctly measure protoplanetary disk dust masses from submillimeter flux measurements. Finally, we compare the fluxes measured in this survey with previously measured fluxes for our targets, as well as four separate epochs of 1.3 cm data, to search for and quantify the variability of our sources.

  13. THE ABUNDANCE OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES. I. VLA SURVEY OF 52 SOURCES WITH OFF-AXIS DISTORTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David H.; Cohen, Jake P.; Lu, Jing [Department of Physics MS-057, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02454-0911 (United States); Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi, E-mail: roberts@brandeis.edu [Raman Research Institute, C. V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Cheung identified a sample of 100 candidate X-shaped radio galaxies using the NRAO FIRST survey; these are small-axial-ratio extended radio sources with off-axis emission. Here, we present radio images of 52 of these sources that have been made from archival Very Large Array data with resolution of about 1″. Fifty-one of the 52 were observed at 1.4 GHz, 7 were observed at 1.4 and 5 GHz, and 1 was observed only at 5 GHz. We also present overlays of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey red images for 48 of the sources, and DSS II overlays for the remainder. Optical counterparts have been identified for most sources, but there remain a few empty fields. Our higher resolution VLA images along with FIRST survey images of the sources in the sample reveal that extended extragalactic radio sources with small axial ratios are largely (60%) cases of double radio sources with twin lobes that have off-axis extensions, usually with inversion-symmetric structure. The available radio images indicate that at most 20% of sources might be genuine X-shaped radio sources that could have formed by a restarting of beams in a new direction following an interruption and axis flip. The remaining 20% are in neither of these categories. The implications of this result for the gravitational wave background are discussed in Roberts et al.

  14. Beam calibration of radio telescopes with drones

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Chihway; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Glauser, Adrian; Casura, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-frequency far-field beam map for the 5m dish telescope at the Bleien Observatory measured using a commercially available drone. We describe the hexacopter drone used in this experiment, the design of the flight pattern, and the data analysis scheme. This is the first application of this calibration method to a single dish radio telescope in the far-field. The high signal-to-noise data allows us to characterise the beam pattern with high accuracy out to at least the 4th side-lobe. The resulting 2D beam pattern is compared with that derived from a more traditional calibration approach using an astronomical calibration source. We discuss the advantages of this method compared to other beam calibration methods. Our results show that this drone-based technique is very promising for ongoing and future radio experiments, where the knowledge of the beam pattern is key to obtaining high-accuracy cosmological and astronomical measurements.

  15. Beam Calibration of Radio Telescopes with Drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chihway; Monstein, Christian; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Glauser, Adrian; Casura, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    We present a multi-frequency far-field beam map for the 5m dish telescope at the Bleien Observatory measured using a commercially available drone. We describe the hexacopter drone used in this experiment, the design of the flight pattern, and the data analysis scheme. This is the first application of this calibration method to a single dish radio telescope in the far-field. The high signal-to-noise data allows us to characterise the beam pattern with high accuracy out to at least the 4th side-lobe. The resulting 2D beam pattern is compared with that derived from a more traditional calibration approach using an astronomical calibration source. We discuss the advantages of this method compared to other beam calibration methods. Our results show that this drone-based technique is very promising for ongoing and future radio experiments, where the knowledge of the beam pattern is key to obtaining high-accuracy cosmological and astronomical measurements.

  16. Abu Simbel Radio Telescope Project in the upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.

    1999-03-01

    This paper shows the importance of building a radio telescope at Abu Simbel in the south of Egypt as part of the European VLBI Network (EVN) to cover the gap between the radio telescopes in Western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebeesthoek in South Africa. The telescope can be used for solar and stellar observations at wavelengths ranging between centimetres and millimetres, and for geodetic VLBI studies. The suggested diameter is 32 meters for the telescope and it is expected to work in the frequency range from 1.4 to 43 GHz. Abu Simbel is characterised by excellent atmospheric transparency, dry climate, and low population without any artificial interference.

  17. The Abundance of X-Shaped Radio Sources I. VLA Survey of 52 Sources With Off-Axis Distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, David H; Lu, Jing; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Cheung (2007) identified a sample of 100 candidate X-shaped radio galaxies using the NRAO FIRST survey; these are small-axial-ratio extended radio sources with off-axis emission. Here we present radio images of 52 of these sources that have been made from archival Very Large Array data with resolution of about 1 arcsec. Fifty-one of the 52 were observed at 1.4 GHz, seven were observed at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz, and one was observed only at 5 GHz. We also present overlays of the SDSS red images for 41 of the sources, and DSS II overlays for the remainder. Optical counterparts have been identified for most sources, but there remain a few empty fields. Our higher resolution VLA images along with FIRST survey images of the sources in the sample reveal that extended extragalactic radio sources with small axial ratios are largely (60%) cases of double radio sources with twin lobes that have off-axis extensions, usually with inversion-symmetric structure. The available radio images indicate that at most 20% sources might...

  18. Integrated modeling of submillimeter radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Dan; Andersen, Torben

    2002-07-01

    Integrated models are inherently complex and often obscure to any but those who write them. Their usefulness can be greatly enhanced through well-structured, object-oriented design. A robust and computationally efficient Simulink/C++ library of optics, control, finite-element, and visualization routines for modeling radio telescope performance under various operating conditions is being developed and is described. The library is being developed in conjunction with an end-to-end model of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) antennas. The model includes the mechanical structure, optics, servos, and potential laser gyros, and can be used to investigate such issues as tracking performance, compliance with error budgets, wind sensitivity, and effectiveness of an internal metrology system. It will also be a good tool for comparison of different antenna designs.

  19. 32 Meter Radio Telescopes in the Arabian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.

    2002-06-01

    This paper presents the importance of building two new radio telescopes of diameter 32 meters to work in the frequency range from 1.4 to 43 GHz, one in the South of Egypt (Abu-Simbel), and the other in the South of the Arabian Peninsula. Both telescopes would be of great interest for the International Radio Astronomy Community from the beginning, especially for EVN.

  20. VLA observations of the wide-angle tailed radio source 1313+073

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patnaik, A.R.; Banhatti, D.G.; Subrahmanya, C.R. (Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Bangalore (India). Radio Astronomy Centre)

    1984-12-15

    VLA observations at 20 and 6 cm of the wide-angle tailed source 1313+073 are presented. It has an asymmetric structure with a sharp bend in the eastern tail and a gradual bend in the western. Both tails become diffuse after the bends. Several models are explored to explain this structure and it is concluded that the tails bend because of the motion of the parent cD galaxy through the ICM, which is possible if the cluster containing the source is dynamically young. Examination of the optical fields of 26 similar sources shows that in 20 of them the parent galaxies have a fainter companion (by approx. 2 mag), or are D, cD or db. This indicates that cannibalism may be important in the formation and powering of such sources.

  1. Construction of largest aperture radio telescope starts in southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ While observing the world around us via an optical telescope with information carried by visible light,which constitutes only a small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum,astronomers use the remainder of the spectrum to reveal extensive data about celestial objects. For instance,they use telescopes operating in the radio spectrum to explore the An artist's rendition of FAST.

  2. A Search for Rapidly Spinning Pulsars and Fast Transients in Unidentified Radio Sources with the NRAO 43-Meter Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Deborah; Langston, Glen; Gilpin, Claire

    2013-01-01

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g. sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a differe...

  3. Quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and VLA observation of the non-thermal radio emitter HD\\168112 (O5.5III(f^+))

    OpenAIRE

    De Becker, Michaël; Rauw, Grégor; Blomme, Ronny; Waldron, Wayne; Sana, Hugues; Pittard, Julian; Eenens, Philippe; Stevens, Ian Robert; Runacres, Mark; Van Loo, Sven; Pollock, Andy

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a multiwavelength study of the non-thermal radio emitter HD 168112 (O5.5III(f+)). The detailed analysis of two quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and VLA observations reveals strong variability of this star both in the X-ray and radio ranges. The X-ray observations separated by five months reveal a decrease of the X-ray flux of ˜30%. The radio emission on the other hand increases by a factor 5-7 between the two observations obtained roughly simultaneously with the XMM-Newt...

  4. Quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and VLA observation of the non-thermal radio emitter HD\\168112 (O5.5III(f^+))

    CERN Document Server

    De Becker, M; Blomme, R; Waldron, W L; Sana, H; Pittard, J M; Eenens, P; Stevens, I R; Runacres, M C; Van Loo, S; Pollock, A M T

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a multiwavelength study of the non-thermal radio emitter HD168112 (O5.5III(f^+)). The detailed analysis of two quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and VLA observations reveals strong variability of this star both in the X-ray and radio ranges. The X-ray observations separated by five months reveal a decrease of the X-ray flux of ~30%. The radio emission on the other hand increases by a factor 5-7 between the two observations obtained roughly simultaneously with the XMM-Newton pointings. The X-ray data reveal a hard emission that is most likely produced by a thermal plasma at kT ~2-3 keV while the VLA data confirm the non-thermal status of this star in the radio waveband. Comparison with archive X-ray and radio data confirms the variability of this source in both wavelength ranges over a yet ill defined time scale. The properties of HD168112 in the X-ray and radio domain point towards a binary system with a significant eccentricity and an orbital period of a few years. However, our optical s...

  5. Recent Radio Monitoring of Microquasars with RATAN-600 Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Trushkin, S A; Kotani, T; Nizhelskij, N A; Namiki, M; Tsuboi, M; Voitsik, P A

    2007-01-01

    We report about the multi-frequency (1-30 GHz) daily monitoring of the radio flux variability of the three microquasars: SS433, GRS1915+105 and Cyg X-3 during the period from September 2005 to May 2006. 1. We detected clear correlation of the flaring radio fluxes and X-rays 'spikes' at 2-12 keV emission detected in RXTE ASM from GRS1915+105 during eight relatively bright (200-600 mJy) radio flares in October 2005. The 1-22 GHz spectra of these flares in maximum were optically thick at frequencies lower 2.3 GHz and optically thin at the higher frequencies. During the radio flares the spectra of the X-ray spikes become softer than those of the quiescent phase. Thus these data indicated the transitions from very high/hard states to high/soft ones during which massive ejections are probably happened. These ejections are visible as the detected radio flares. 2. After of the quiescent radio emission we have detected a drop down of the fluxes (~20 mJy) from Cyg X-3. That is a sign of the following bright flare. Inde...

  6. The shape of the blue\\/UV continuum of B3-VLA radio quasars Dependence on redshift, blue\\/UV luminosity and radio power

    CERN Document Server

    Carballo, R; Benn, C R; Sánchez, S F; Vigotti, M

    1999-01-01

    UBVR photometry of a sample of B3-VLA radio quasars, about 80 per cent complete, is used to analyse their spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs are generally well fitted with power-laws, with an average slope alpha=-0.39 (S_nu propto nu^alpha). Two quasars appear clearly differenciated, exhibiting redder colours that the rest, and they have redshifts z=0.50 and 1.12. Broad-band composite SEDs in the range 1300-4500 AA were obtained from the remaining quasars and they show the CIV1549 line and a break at around 3000 A, where the SED changes from alpha_blue=0.11+-0.16 at lambda>3000 A to alpha_UV=-0.66+-0.15 at lambda1.2 alpha_UV is more flat, -0.48+-0.12. A similar trend is found between alpha_UV and luminosity at 2400 A, L_2400, with luminous quasars exhibiting a bluer spectrum. In addition, an intrinsic correlation is found between L_2400 and radio power at 408 MHz. The correlations alpha_UV-z, alpha_UV-L_2400 and L_2400-z are consistent with accretion disc models with approximately constant black hol...

  7. FPGA applications for single dish activity at Medicina radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolin, M.; Nald, G.; Mattan, A.; Maccaferr, A.; De Biagg, M.

    FPGA technologies are gaining major attention in the recent years in the field of radio astronomy. At Medicina radio telescopes, FPGAs have been used in the last ten years for a number of purposes and in this article we will take into exam the applications developed and installed for the Medicina Single Dish 32m Antenna: these range from high performance digital signal processing to instrument control developed on top of smaller FPGAs.

  8. Synergy Between Radio and Optical Telescopes: Optical Followup of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. H. Ishwara-Chandra

    2013-06-01

    Distance measurement is a must to characterize any source in the sky. In the radio band, it is rarely possible to get distance or redshift measurements. The optical band is the most used band to get distance estimate of sources, even for those originally discovered in other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. However, the spectroscopic redshift measurements even for fairly bright radio sample is grossly incomplete, implying un-explored discovery space. Here we discuss the scope of optical follow up of radio sources, in particular the radio loud AGNs, from the present generation radio telescopes.

  9. Solar system radio emissions studies with the largest low-frequency radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Litvinenko, G.; Kolyadin, V.; Zarka, P.; Mylostna, K.; Vasylieva, I.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Sidorchuk, M.; Rucker, H.; Fischer, G.; Cecconi, B.; Coffre, A.; Denis, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2014-04-01

    We describe the trends and tasks in the field of lowfrequency studies of radio emission from the Solar system's objects. The world's largest decameter radio telescopes UTR-2 and URAN have a unique combination of sensitivity and time/frequency resolution parameters, providing the capability of the most detailed studies of various types of solar and planetary emissions.

  10. The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Pan, Zhichen

    2016-07-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese megascience project funded by the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) of the People's Republic of China. The National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) is in charge of its construction and subsequent operation. Upon its expected completion in September 2016, FAST will surpass the 305 m Arecibo Telescope and the 100 m Green Bank Telescope in terms of absolute sensitivity in the 70 MHz to 3 GHz bands. In this paper, we report on the project, its current status, the key science goals, and plans for early science.

  11. A new method to separate star forming from AGN galaxies at intermediate redshift: The submillijansky radio population in the VLA-COSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Smolcic, V; Scodeggio, M; Franzetti, P; Aussel, H; Bondi, M; Brusa, M; Carilli, C L; Capak, P; Charlot, S; Ciliegi, P; Ilbert, O; Ivezic, Z; Jahnke, K; McCracken, H J; Obric, M; Salvato, M; Sanders, D B; Scoville, N; Trump, J R; Tremonti, C; Tasca, L; Walcher, C J; Zamorani, G

    2008-01-01

    We explore the properties of the submillijansky radio population at 20 cm by applying a newly developed optical color-based method to separate star forming (SF) from AGN galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z1.3) galaxies. We find, for the composition of the submillijansky radio population, that SF galaxies are not the dominant population at submillijansky flux levels, as previously often assumed, but that they make up an approximately constant fraction of 30-40% in the flux density range of ~50 microJy to 0.7 mJy. In summary, based on the entire VLA-COSMOS radio population at 20 cm, we find that the radio population at these flux densities is a mixture of roughly 30-40% of SF and 50-60% of AGN galaxies, with a minor contribution (~10%) of QSOs.

  12. Fundamental Imaging Limits of Radio Telescope Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnholds, Stefan J; 10.1109/JSTSP.2008.2004216

    2010-01-01

    The fidelity of radio astronomical images is generally assessed by practical experience, i.e. using rules of thumb, although some aspects and cases have been treated rigorously. In this paper we present a mathematical framework capable of describing the fundamental limits of radio astronomical imaging problems. Although the data model assumes a single snapshot observation, i.e. variations in time and frequency are not considered, this framework is sufficiently general to allow extension to synthesis observations. Using tools from statistical signal processing and linear algebra, we discuss the tractability of the imaging and deconvolution problem, the redistribution of noise in the map by the imaging and deconvolution process, the covariance of the image values due to propagation of calibration errors and thermal noise and the upper limit on the number of sources tractable by self calibration. The combination of covariance of the image values and the number of tractable sources determines the effective noise ...

  13. Radio continuum of galaxies with H2O megamaser disks: 33 GHz VLA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, F.; Henkel, C.; Brunthaler, A.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Menten, K. M.; Braatz, J. A.; Greene, J. E.; Reid, M. J.; Condon, J. J.; Lo, K. Y.; Kuo, C. Y.; Litzinger, E.; Kadler, M.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Galaxies with H2O megamaser disks are active galaxies in whose edge-on accretion disks 22 GHz H2O maser emission has been detected. Because their geometry is known, they provide a unique view into the properties of active galactic nuclei. Aims: The goal of this work is to investigate the nuclear environment of galaxies with H2O maser disks and to relate the maser and host galaxy properties to those of the radio continuum emission of the galaxy. Methods: The 33 GHz (9 mm) radio continuum properties of 24 galaxies with reported 22 GHz H2O maser emission from their disks are studied in the context of the multiwavelength view of these sources. The 29-37 GHz Ka-band observations are made with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array in B, CnB, or BnA configurations, achieving a resolution of 0.2-0.5 arcsec. Hard X-ray data from the Swift/BAT survey and 22 μm infrared data from WISE, 22 GHz H2O maser data and 1.4 GHz data from NVSS and FIRST surveys are also included in the analysis. Results: Eighty-seven percent (21 out of 24) galaxies in our sample show 33 GHz radio continuum emission at levels of 4.5-240σ. Five sources show extended emission (deconvolved source size larger than 2.5 times the major axis of the beam), including one source with two main components and one with three main components. The remaining detected 16 sources (and also some of the above-mentioned targets) exhibit compact cores within the sensitivity limits. Little evidence is found for extended jets (>300 pc) in most sources. Either they do not exist, or our chosen frequency of 33 GHz is too high for a detection of these supposedly steep spectrum features. In NGC 4388, we find an extended jet-like feature that appears to be oriented perpendicular to the H2O megamaser disk. NGC 2273 is another candidate whose radio continuum source might be elongated perpendicular to the maser disk. Smaller 100-300 pc sized jets might also be present, as is suggested by the beam-deconvolved morphology of our

  14. Five hundred meter aperture spherical radio telescope (FAST)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAN; Rendong

    2006-01-01

    Five hundred meter aperture spherical radio telescope (FAST) will be the largest radio telescope in the world. The innovative engineering concept and design pave a new road to realizing a huge single dish in the most effective way. Three outstanding features of the telescope are the unique karst depressions as the sites, the active main reflector which corrects spherical aberration on the ground to achieve full polarization and a wide band without involving a complex feed system, and the light focus cabin driven by cables and servomechanism plus a parallel robot as secondary adjustable system to carry the most precise parts of the receivers. Being the most sensitive radio telescope, FAST will enable astronomers to jumpstart many of the science goals, for example, the neutral hydrogen line surveying in distant galaxies out to very large redshifts, looking for the first shining star, detecting thousands of new pulsars, etc. Extremely interesting and exotic objects may yet await discovery by FAST. As a multi-science platform, the telescope will provide treasures to astronomers, as well as bring prosperity to other research, e.g. space weather study, deep space exploration and national security. The construction of FAST itself is expected to promote the development in high technology of relevant fields.

  15. A CHANDRA-VLA INVESTIGATION OF THE X-RAY CAVITY SYSTEM AND RADIO MINI-HALO IN THE GALAXY CLUSTER RBS 797

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Alberto [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Gitti, Myriam; Brighenti, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Ettori, Stefano [Astronomical Observatory of Bologna-INAF, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We present a study of the cavity system in the galaxy cluster RBS 797 based on Chandra and Very Large Array (VLA) data. RBS 797 (z = 0.35) is one of the most distant galaxy clusters in which two pronounced X-ray cavities have been discovered. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a cool core and indicate a higher metallicity along the cavity directions. This is likely due to the active galactic nucleus outburst, which lifts cool metal-rich gas from the center along the cavities, as seen in other systems. We find indications that the cavities are hotter than the surrounding gas. Moreover, the new Chandra images show bright rims contrasting with the deep, X-ray deficient cavities. The likely cause is that the expanding 1.4 GHz radio lobes have displaced the gas, compressing it into a shell that appears as bright cool arms. Finally, we show that the large-scale radio emission detected with our VLA observations may be classified as a radio mini-halo, powered by the cooling flow, as it nicely follows the trend P{sub radio} versus P{sub CF} predicted by the reacceleration model.

  16. A Chandra - VLA Investigation of the X-ray Cavity System and Radio Mini-Halo in the Galaxy Cluster RBS 797

    CERN Document Server

    Doria, Alberto; Ettori, Stefano; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Nulsen, Paul E J; McNamara, Brian R

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the cavity system in the galaxy cluster RBS 797 based on Chandra and VLA data. RBS 797 (z = 0.35), is one of the most distant galaxy clusters in which two pronounced X-ray cavities have been discovered. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a cool core and indicate an higher metallicity along the cavity directions. This is likely due to the AGN outburst, which lifts cool metal-rich gas from the center along the cavities, as seen in other systems. We find indications that the cavities are hotter than the surrounding gas. Moreover, the new Chandra images show bright rims contrasting with the deep, X-ray deficient cavities. The likely cause is that the expanding 1.4 GHz radio lobes have displaced the gas, compressing it into a shell that appears as bright cool arms. Finally we show that the large-scale radio emission detected with our VLA observations may be classified as a radio mini-halo, powered by the cooling flow (CF), as it nicely follows the trend P_radio vs. P_CF predicted by the...

  17. High-precision pointing with the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppi, Sergio; Pernechele, Claudio; Pisanu, Tonino; Morsiani, Marco

    2010-07-01

    We present here the systems aimed to measure and minimize the pointing errors for the Sardinia Radio Telescope: they consist of an optical telescope to measure errors due to the mechanical structure deformations and a lasers system for the errors due to the subreflector displacement. We show here the results of the tests that we have done on the Medicina 32 meters VLBI radio telescope. The measurements demonstrate we can measure the pointing errors of the mechanical structure, with an accuracy of about ~1 arcsec. Moreover, we show the technique to measure the displacement of the subreflector, placed in the SRT at 22 meters from the main mirror, within +/-0.1 mm from its optimal position. These measurements show that we can obtain the needed accuracy to correct also the non repeatable pointing errors, which arise on time scale varying from seconds to minutes.

  18. Launch Will Create a Radio Telescope Larger than Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    NASA and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory are joining with an international consortium of space agencies to support the launch of a Japanese satellite next week that will create the largest astronomical "instrument" ever built -- a radio telescope more than two-and-a-half times the diameter of the Earth that will give astronomers their sharpest view yet of the universe. The launch of the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Space Observatory Program (VSOP) satellite by Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) is scheduled for Feb. 10 at 11:50 p.m. EST (1:50 p.m. Feb. 11, Japan time.) The satellite is part of an international collaboration led by ISAS and backed by Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA; the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Socorro, NM; the Canadian Space Agency; the Australia Telescope National Facility; the European VLBI Network and the Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry in Europe. Very long baseline interferometry is a technique used by radio astronomers to electronically link widely separated radio telescopes together so they work as if they were a single instrument with extraordinarily sharp "vision," or resolving power. The wider the distance between telescopes, the greater the resolving power. By taking this technique into space for the first time, astronomers will approximately triple the resolving power previously available with only ground-based telescopes. The satellite system will have resolving power almost 1,000 times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope at optical wavelengths. The satellite's resolving power is equivalent to being able to see a grain of rice in Tokyo from Los Angeles. "Using space VLBI, we can probe the cores of quasars and active galaxies, believed to be powered by super massive black holes," said Dr. Robert Preston, project scientist for the U.S. Space Very Long

  19. An African VLBI network of radio telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Gaylard, M J; Combrinck, L; Booth, R S; Buchner, S J; Fanaroff, B L; MacLeod, G C; Nicolson, G D; Quick, J F H; Stronkhorst, P; Venkatasubramani, T L

    2014-01-01

    The advent of international wideband communication by optical fibre has produced a revolution in communications and the use of the internet. Many African countries are now connected to undersea fibre linking them to other African countries and to other continents. Previously international communication was by microwave links through geostationary satellites. These are becoming redundant in some countries as optical fibre takes over, as this provides 1000 times the bandwidth of the satellite links. In the 1970's and 1980's some two dozen large (30 m diameter class) antennas were built in various African countries to provide the satellite links. Twenty six are currently known in 19 countries. As these antennas become redundant, the possibility exists to convert them for radio astronomy at a cost of roughly one tenth that of a new antenna of similar size. HartRAO, SKA Africa and the South African Department of Science and Technology (DST) have started exploring this possibility with some of the African countries...

  20. Radio Telescopes "Save the Day," Produce Data on Titan's Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    In what some scientists termed "a surprising, almost miraculous turnabout," radio telescopes, including major facilities of the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), have provided data needed to measure the winds encountered by the Huygens spacecraft as it descended through the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan last month -- measurements feared lost because of a communication error between Huygens and its "mother ship" Cassini. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for GBT gallery) A global network of radio telescopes, including the NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia and eight of the ten antennas of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), recorded the radio signal from Huygens during its descent on January 14. Measurements of the frequency shift caused by the craft's motion, called Doppler shift, are giving planetary scientists their first direct information about Titan's winds. "When we began working with our international partners on this project, we thought our telescopes would be adding to the wind data produced by the two spacecraft themselves. Now, with the ground-based telescopes providing the only information about Titan's winds, we are extremely proud that our facilities are making such a key contribution to our understanding of this fascinating planetary body," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, Director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). Early analysis of the radio-telescope data shows that Titan's wind flows from west to east, in the direction of the moon's rotation, at all altitudes. The highest wind speed, nearly 270 mph, was measured at an altitude of about 75 miles. Winds are weak near Titan's surface and increase in speed slowly up to an altitude of about 37 miles, where the spacecraft encountered highly-variable winds that scientists think indicate a region of vertical wind shear. The ground-based Doppler

  1. Detecting cosmic rays with the LOFAR radio telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Schellart, P; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Frieswijk, W; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; James, C W; Krause, M; Mevius, M; Scholten, O; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Akker, M van den; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Avruch, I M; Bähren, L; Beck, R; Bell, M E; Bennema, P; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bregman, J; Breitling, F; Brentjens, M; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Ciardi, B; Coolen, A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; de Jong, A; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Ferrari, C; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Grit, T; Hamaker, J P; Hassall, T E; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Klijn, W; Kohler, J; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Macario, G; Mann, G; Markoff, S; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Miller-Jones, J C A; Mol, J D; Mulcahy, D D; Munk, H; Nijboer, R; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Overeem, R; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Renting, A; Romein, J W; Röttgering, H; Schoenmakers, A; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Sobey, C; Stappers, B W; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Toribio, C; van Leeuwen, J; van Nieuwpoort, R; van Weeren, R J; Vermaas, N; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Vogt, C; Wijers, R A M J; Wijnholds, S J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P; Zensus, A

    2013-01-01

    The low frequency array (LOFAR), is the first radio telescope designed with the capability to measure radio emission from cosmic-ray induced air showers in parallel with interferometric observations. In the first $\\sim 2\\,\\mathrm{years}$ of observing, 405 cosmic-ray events in the energy range of $10^{16} - 10^{18}\\,\\mathrm{eV}$ have been detected in the band from $30 - 80\\,\\mathrm{MHz}$. Each of these air showers is registered with up to $\\sim1000$ independent antennas resulting in measurements of the radio emission with unprecedented detail. This article describes the dataset, as well as the analysis pipeline, and serves as a reference for future papers based on these data. All steps necessary to achieve a full reconstruction of the electric field at every antenna position are explained, including removal of radio frequency interference, correcting for the antenna response and identification of the pulsed signal.

  2. SETI reloaded, Next Generation Radio Telescopes, Transients and Cognitive Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Garrett, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) using radio telescopes is an area of research that is now more than 50 years old. Thus far, both targeted and wide-area surveys have yet to detect artificial signals from intelligent civilisations. In this paper, I argue that the incidence of co-existing intelligent and communicating civilisations is probably small in the Milky Way. While this makes successful SETI searches a very difficult pursuit indeed, the huge impact of even a single detection requires us to continue the search. A substantial increase in the overall performance of radio telescopes (and in particular future wide-field instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array, SKA), provide renewed optimism in the field. Evidence for this is already to be seen in the success of SETI researchers in acquiring observations on some of the world's most sensitive radio telescope facilities via open, peer-reviewed processes. The increasing interest in the dynamic radio sky, and our ability to detect new a...

  3. The Allen Telescope Array: The First Widefield, Panchromatic, Snapshot Radio Camera for Radio Astronomy and SETI

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, Jack; Blitz, Leo; Bock, Douglas; Bower, Geoffrey C; Cheng, Calvin; Croft, Steve; Dexter, Matt; Engargiola, Greg; Fields, Ed; Forster, James; Gutierrez-Kraybill, Colby; Heiles, Carl; Helfer, Tamara; Jorgensen, Susanne; Keating, Garrett; Lugten, John; MacMahon, Dave; Milgrome, Oren; Thornton, Douglas; Urry, Lynn; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Werthimer, Dan; Williams, Peter H; Tarter, Melvin Wright Jill; Ackermann, Robert; Atkinson, Shannon; Backus, Peter; Barott, William; Bradford, Tucker; Davis, Michael; DeBoer, Dave; Dreher, John; Harp, Gerry; Jordan, Jane; Kilsdonk, Tom; Pierson, Tom; Randall, Karen; Ross, John; Fleming, Seth Shostak Matt; Cork, Chris; Wadefalk, Artyom Vitouchkine Niklas; Weinreb, Sander

    2009-01-01

    The first 42 elements of the Allen Telescope Array (ATA-42) are beginning to deliver data at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory in Northern California. Scientists and engineers are actively exploiting all of the flexibility designed into this innovative instrument for simultaneously conducting surveys of the astrophysical sky and conducting searches for distant technological civilizations. This paper summarizes the design elements of the ATA, the cost savings made possible by the use of COTS components, and the cost/performance trades that eventually enabled this first snapshot radio camera. The fundamental scientific program of this new telescope is varied and exciting; some of the first astronomical results will be discussed.

  4. Searching for Transient Pulses with the ETA Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, Cameron D; Martin, Brian S; Deshpande, Kshitija; Simonetti, John H; Kavic, Michael; Cutchin, Sean E

    2008-01-01

    Array-based, direct-sampling radio telescopes have computational and communication requirements unsuited to conventional computer and cluster architectures. Synchronization must be strictly maintained across a large number of parallel data streams, from A/D conversion, through operations such as beamforming, to dataset recording. FPGAs supporting multi-gigabit serial I/O are ideally suited to this application. We describe a recently-constructed radio telescope called ETA having all-sky observing capability for detecting low frequency pulses from transient events such as gamma ray bursts and primordial black hole explosions. Signals from 24 dipole antennas are processed by a tiered arrangement of 28 commercial FPGA boards and 4 PCs with FPGA-based data acquisition cards, connected with custom I/O adapter boards supporting InfiniBand and LVDS physical links. ETA is designed for unattended operation, allowing configuration and recording to be controlled remotely.

  5. The Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) Jupiter Radio Data: Online Access and Analysis Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arballo, J. K.; Levin, S.; Dorcey, R.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Leflang, J.; Jauncey, D.

    2016-12-01

    K-12 students have been collecting GHz radio data on Jupiter with a 34-meter dish in support of the Juno mission. These observations are part of the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) project and the raw data are now freely available online. In this poster we describe the newly developed data access and analysis tools which allow both students and professional astronomers to access and analyze the data.

  6. Control of active reflector system for radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guo-hua; Li, Guo-ping; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Zhen-chao

    2016-10-01

    According to the control requirements of the active reflector surface in the 110 m radio telescope at QiTai(QTT) Xinjiang, a new displacement actuator and a new displacement control system were designed and manufactured and then their characteristics were tested by a dual-frequency laser interferometer in the micro-displacement laboratory. The displacement actuator was designed by a scheme of high precision worm and roller screw structures, and the displacement control system was based on a ARM micro-processor. Finally, the S curve acceleration control methods were used to design the hardware platform and software algorithm for the active reflection surface of the control system. The test experiments were performed based on the laser metrology system on an active reflector close-loop antenna prototype for large radio telescope. Experimental results indicate that it achieves a 30 mm working stroke and 5 μm RMS motion resolution. The accuracy (standard deviation) is 3.67 mm, and the error between the determined and theoretical values is 0.04% when the rated load is 300 kg, the step is 2 mm and the stroke is 30mm. Furthermore, the active reflector integrated system was tested by the laser sensors with the accuracy of 0.25 μm RMS on 4-panel radio telescope prototype, the measurement results show that the integrated precision of the active reflector closed-loop control system is less than 5 μm RMS, and well satisfies the technical requirements of active reflector control system of the QTT radio telescope in 3 mm wavelength.

  7. An atmosphere monitoring system for the Sardinia radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, F.; Bolli, P.; Sanna, G.; Serra, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Sardinia radio telescope (SRT) is a new facility managed by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF). SRT will detect the extremely faint radio wave signals emitted by astronomical objects in a wide frequency range from decimeter to millimeter wavelengths. Especially at high frequencies (>10 GHz), specific weather conditions and interactions between signal and atmospheric constituents (mainly water and oxygen molecules) affect the radio astronomic observation reducing the antenna performances. Thus, modern ground-based telescopes are usually equipped with systems able to examine in real-time several atmospheric parameters (opacity, integrated water vapor, etc.), and in some cases to forecast the weather conditions (wind, rain, snow, etc.), in order to ensure the antenna safety and support the schedule of the telescope observations. Here, we describe the atmosphere monitoring system (AMS) realized with the aim to improve the SRT operative efficiency. It consists of a network of different sensors such as radiometers, radiosondes, weather stations, GPS and some well-established weather models. After a validation of the scheme, we successfully tested the AMS in two real practical scenarios, comparing the AMS outcomes with those of independent techniques. In the first one we were able to detect an incoming storm front applying different techniques (GPS, radiometer and the weather forecast model), while in the last one we modeled the SRT antenna system temperature at 22 GHz processing the AMS data set.

  8. Phase Retrieval for Radio Telescope and Antenna Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Phase-retrieval is a general term used in optics to describe the estimation of optical imperfections or "aberrations." The purpose of this innovation is to develop the application of phase retrieval to radio telescope and antenna control in the millimeter wave band. Earlier techniques do not approximate the incoherent subtraction process as a coherent propagation. This approximation reduces the noise in the data and allows a straightforward application of conventional phase retrieval techniques for radio telescope and antenna control. The application of iterative-transform phase retrieval to radio telescope and antenna control is made by approximating the incoherent subtraction process as a coherent propagation. Thus, for systems utilizing both positive and negative polarity feeds, this approximation allows both surface and alignment errors to be assessed without the use of additional hardware or laser metrology. Knowledge of the antenna surface profile allows errors to be corrected at a given surface temperature and observing angle. In addition to imperfections of the antenna surface figure, the misalignment of multiple antennas operating in unison can reduce or degrade the signal-to-noise ratio of the received or broadcast signals. This technique also has application to the alignment of antenna array configurations.

  9. Design and Commissioning of the LWA1 Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingson, S W; Dowell, J; Taylor, G B; Helmboldt, J F

    2013-01-01

    LWA1 is a new large radio telescope array operating in the frequency range 10-88 MHz, located in central New Mexico. The telescope consists of 260 pairs of dipole-type antennas whose outputs are individually digitized and formed into beams. Simultaneously, signals from all dipoles can be recorded using one of the telescope's "all dipoles" modes, facilitating all-sky imaging. Notable features of the instrument include four independently-steerable beams utilizing digital "true time delay" beamforming, high intrinsic sensitivity (about 6 kJy zenith system equivalent flux density), large instantaneous bandwidth (up to 78 MHz), and large field of view (about 3-10 degrees, depending on frequency and zenith angle of pointing). This paper summarizes the design of LWA1, its performance as determined in commissioning experiments, and results from early science observations demonstrating the capabilities of the instrument.

  10. The control software for the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlati, A.; Buttu, M.; Melis, A.; Migoni, C.; Poppi, S.; Righini, S.

    2012-09-01

    The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is a new 64-meter shaped antenna designed to carry out observations up to 100 GHz. This large instrument has been built in Sardinia, 35 km north of Cagliari, and is now facing the technical commissioning phase. This paper describes the architecture, the implementation solutions and the development status of NURAGHE, the SRT control software. Aim of the project was to produce a software which is reliable, easy to keep up to date and flexible against other telescopes. The most ambitious goal will be to install NURAGHE at all the three italian radio telescopes, allowing the astronomers to access these facilities through a common interface with very limited extra effort. We give a description of all the control software subsystems (servo systems, backends, receivers, etc.) focusing on the resulting design, which is based on the ACS (Alma Common Software) patterns and comes from linux-based, LGPL, Object-Oriented development technologies. We also illustrate how NURAGHE deals with higher level requirements, coming from the telescope management or from the system users.

  11. Observations of Supernova Remnants with the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Egron, E; Loru, S; Iacolina, M N; Marongiu, M; Righini, S; Mulas, S; Murtas, G; Bachetti, M; Concu, R; Melis, A; Trois, A; Ricci, R; Pilia, M

    2016-01-01

    In the frame of the Astronomical Validation activities for the 64m Sardinia Radio Telescope, we performed 5-22 GHz imaging observations of the complex-morphology supernova remnants (SNRs) W44 and IC443. We adopted innovative observing and mapping techniques providing unprecedented accuracy for single-dish imaging of SNRs at these frequencies, revealing morphological details typically available only at lower frequencies through interferometry observations. High-frequency studies of SNRs in the radio range are useful to better characterize the spatially-resolved spectra and the physical parameters of different regions of the SNRs interacting with the ISM. Furthermore, synchrotron-emitting electrons in the high-frequency radio band are also responsible for the observed high-energy phenomenology as -e.g.- Inverse Compton and bremsstrahlung emission components observed in gamma-rays, to be disentangled from hadron emission contribution (providing constraints on the origin of cosmic rays).

  12. Solar and Planetary Observations with a Lunar Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, N.; Weiler, K. W.; Lazio, J. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Jones, D. L.; Bale, S. D.; Demaio, L.; Kasper, J. C.

    2006-05-01

    Ground-based radio telescopes cannot observe at frequencies below about 10 MHz (wavelengths longer than 30 m) because of ionospheric absorption. The Lunar Imaging Radio Array (LIRA) is a mission concept in which an array of radio telescopes is deployed on the Moon, as part of the Vision for Space Exploration, with the aim of extending radio observations to lower frequencies than are possible from the Earth. LIRA would provide the capability for dedicated monitoring of solar and planetary bursts as well as the search for magnetospheric emissions from extrasolar planets. The highest sensitivity observations can be accomplished by locating LIRA on the far side of the Moon. The array would be composed of 10-12 radial arms, each 1-2 km in length. Each arm would have several hundred dipole antennas and feedlines printed on a very thin sheet of kapton with a total mass of about 300 kg. This would provide a convenient way to deploy thousands of individual antennas and a centrally condensed distribution of array baselines. The lunar farside provides shielding from terrestrial natural and technological radio interference and freedom from the corrupting influence of Earth's ionosphere. This paper will describe the science case for LIRA as well as various options for array deployment and data transmission to Earth. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Basic research in radio astronomy at the NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  13. Youngest Radio Pulsar Revealed with Green Bank Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's (NSF) newly commissioned Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have detected remarkably faint radio signals from an 820 year-old pulsar, making it the youngest radio-emitting pulsar known. This discovery pushes the boundaries of radio telescope sensitivity for discovering pulsars, and will enable scientists to conduct observations that could lead to a better understanding of how these stars evolve. The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope "Important questions about pulsars may be answered by long-term monitoring of objects such as the one we just detected," said Fernando Camilo of Columbia University in New York City. "Young pulsars are particularly rare, and being able to study such a young one at radio wavelengths provides an outstanding opportunity to learn critical facts about their evolution and workings." The results of this research, based on observations conducted on February 22-23, 2002, were accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Scientists have long suspected that a pulsar - a rapidly spinning, superdense neutron star - was born when a giant star ended its life in a cataclysmic supernova explosion observed in late summer of 1181, as suggested by Japanese and Chinese historical records. For the past 20 years, astronomers have searched this supernova remnant (3C58), located 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, for the telltale pulsations of a newly born pulsar. Late in 2001, data from NASA's Chandra X-ray satellite confirmed its existence, but it remained an elusive quarry for radio telescopes. "We believed from historical records and certainly knew from recent X-ray observations that this star was there," Camilo remarked, "but despite many attempts, no one had been able to find any radio pulsations from it because the signals are, it turns out, incredibly weak." For comparison, this pulsar's radio emission is some 250

  14. NRAO Makes Available VLA Sky Survey Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    An original and comprehensive data set potentially full of scientific surprises now is available to astronomers, students and the public through the information superhighway. Radio images of the sky produced by the Very Large Array radio telescope -- one of the premier astronomical instruments in the world -- as part of a massive survey now are stored in an electronic repository avail- able over the Internet computer communications network. "Each of these sensitive new sky maps shows about a thou- sand radio-emitting objects, most of which have never been seen before," said Dr. J. J. Condon, leader of the National Radio As- tronomy Observatory (NRAO) survey team. "We are releasing them as soon as they are completed because they contain more data than we could possibly analyze by ourselves." "By using electronic distribution, we can open this tre- mendous resource of information for computer analysis by all as- tronomers immediately, without waiting for traditional publication," Condon added. The radio images are copyright NRAO/ AUI. Permission is granted for use of the material without charge for scholarly, educational and private non-commercial purposes. "It is entirely conceivable -- even probable -- that valuable discoveries will be made by students or amateur astrono- mers who devote the time to study these maps carefully," said team member Dr. W. D. Cotton. "Making this new information available electronically means that more people can participate in adding to its scientific value." The maps are a product of the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), which began its observational phase in September of 1993 and will cover 82 percent of the sky when completed by the end of 1996. The NVSS is expected to produce a catalog of more than two million ra- dio-emitting objects in the sky, and it is the first sky survey sensitive to linearly polarized emission from radio sources beyond our own Milky Way galaxy. "The NVSS is being made as a service to the entire astronomical

  15. A SEARCH FOR RAPIDLY SPINNING PULSARS AND FAST TRANSIENTS IN UNIDENTIFIED RADIO SOURCES WITH THE NRAO 43 METER TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Deborah; Crawford, Fronefield; Gilpin, Claire [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Langston, Glen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g., sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a different epoch with a new 800 MHz backend on the NRAO 43 m Telescope at a center frequency of 1200 MHz. Our search was sensitive to sub-millisecond pulsars in highly accelerated binary systems and to short transient pulses. No periodic or transient signals were detected from any of the target sources. We conclude that diffractive scintillation, dispersive smearing, and binary acceleration are unlikely to have prevented detection of the large majority of the sources if they are pulsars, though we cannot rule out eclipsing, nulling or intermittent emission, or radio interference as possible factors for some non-detections. Other (speculative) possibilities for what these sources might include radio-emitting magnetic cataclysmic variables or older pulsars with aligned magnetic and spin axes.

  16. Scale challenges of the MeerKAT Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Ratcliffe, Simon

    2017-01-01

    A discussion on the MeerKAT Radio Telescope, currently nearing completion in the Karoo desert region of South Africa. This talk covers a quick introduction to radio astronomy data processing and the scale challenges inherent therein. The solutions to the challenges posed will be discussed, including coverage of our MESOS based execution framework and the role of the various data storage regimes in our processing and analysis pipelines. The final third will highlight our multiple uses of CEPH, including our self-build hardware, 20PB science archive. About the speakers Simon Ratcliffe has a background in astrophysics and computer science, and is currently the technical lead for scientific computing at SKA South Africa. In this role he oversees the architecture and technical direction of the science processor for the MeerKAT radio telescope. Thomas Bennett has a masters degree in electronic engineering and is currently a developer in the scientific computing as SKA South Africa. In this role he overs...

  17. A lunar radio experiment with the Parkes radio telescope for the LUNASKA project

    CERN Document Server

    Bray, J D; Roberts, P; Reynolds, J E; James, C W; Phillips, C J; Protheroe, R J; McFadden, R A; Aartsen, M G

    2014-01-01

    We describe an experiment using the Parkes radio telescope in the 1.2-1.5 GHz frequency range as part of the LUNASKA project, to search for nanosecond-scale pulses from particle cascades in the Moon, which may be triggered by ultra-high-energy astroparticles. Through the combination of a highly sensitive multi-beam radio receiver, a purpose-built backend and sophisticated signal-processing techniques, we achieve sensitivity to radio pulses with a threshold electric field strength of 0.0053 $\\mu$V/m/MHz, lower than previous experiments by a factor of three. We observe no pulses in excess of this threshold in observations with an effective duration of 127 hours. The techniques we employ, including compensating for the phase, dispersion and spectrum of the expected pulse, are relevant for future lunar radio experiments.

  18. Square Kilometre Array: The radio telescope of the XXI century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainge, K.; Alachkar, B.; Amy, Shaun; Barbosa, D.; Bommineni, M.; Boven, P.; Braddock, R.; Davis, J.; Diwakar, P.; Francis, V.; Gabrielczyk, R.; Gamatham, R.; Garrington, S.; Gibbon, T.; Gozzard, D.; Gregory, S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, Y.; Hammond, J.; Hindley, D.; Horn, U.; Hughes-Jones, R.; Hussey, M.; Lloyd, S.; Mammen, S.; Miteff, S.; Mohile, V.; Muller, J.; Natarajan, S.; Nicholls, J.; Oberland, R.; Pearson, M.; Rayner, T.; Schediwy, S.; Schilizzi, R.; Sharma, S.; Stobie, S.; Tearle, M.; Wang, B.; Wallace, B.; Wang, L.; Warange, R.; Whitaker, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Wingfield, N.

    2017-04-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the world's largest and most sensitive radio telescope. It will address fundamental unanswered questions about our Universe including how the first stars and galaxies formed after the Big Bang, how dark energy is accelerating the expansion of theUniverse, the role of magnetism in the cosmos, the nature of gravity, and the search for life beyond Earth. This project envisages the construction of 133 15-m antennas in South Africa and 131072 log-periodic antennas in Australia, together with the associated infrastructure in the two desert sites. In addition, the SKA is an exemplar Big Data project, with data rates of over 10 Tbps being transported from the telescope to HPC/HTC facilities.

  19. Probing Magnetic Fields using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Farnes, J S; Kantharia, N G

    2013-01-01

    We present the first spectropolarimetric radio observations that apply Rotation Measure (RM) Synthesis to interferometric data from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 610 MHz. Spectropolarimetry requires measurement of a large number of instrumental systematics so that their effects can be calibrated - a technical problem that is currently being faced by the upcoming SKA pathfinders. Our fully-calibrated data allow for the peak Faraday depth and polarisation fraction to be measured for sub-mJy compact sources in the field of M51 at 610 MHz. The diffuse extended emission in the interacting galaxy pair is shown to be depolarised below the sensitivity limit. A survey of linear polarisation with the GMRT is now feasible and could be used to place constraints on the prevailing depolarisation mechanisms at low frequencies - improving polarised source count estimates and constraining the RM-grid observable with next generation facilities such as the SKA.

  20. Engineering and science highlights of the KAT-7 radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, A. R.; Alberts, T.; Armstrong, R. P.; Barta, A.; Bauermeister, E. F.; Bester, H.; Blose, S.; Booth, R. S.; Botha, D. H.; Buchner, S. J.; Carignan, C.; Cheetham, T.; Cloete, K.; Coreejes, G.; Crida, R. C.; Cross, S. D.; Curtolo, F.; Dikgale, A.; de Villiers, M. S.; du Toit, L. J.; Esterhuyse, S. W. P.; Fanaroff, B.; Fender, R. P.; Fijalkowski, M.; Fourie, D.; Frank, B.; George, D.; Gibbs, P.; Goedhart, S.; Grobbelaar, J.; Gumede, S. C.; Herselman, P.; Hess, K. M.; Hoek, N.; Horrell, J.; Jonas, J. L.; Jordaan, J. D. B.; Julie, R.; Kapp, F.; Kotzé, P.; Kusel, T.; Langman, A.; Lehmensiek, R.; Liebenberg, D.; Liebenberg, I. J. V.; Loots, A.; Lord, R. T.; Lucero, D. M.; Ludick, J.; Macfarlane, P.; Madlavana, M.; Magnus, L.; Magozore, C.; Malan, J. A.; Manley, J. R.; Marais, L.; Marais, N.; Marais, S. J.; Maree, M.; Martens, A.; Mokone, O.; Moss, V.; Mthembu, S.; New, W.; Nicholson, G. D.; van Niekerk, P. C.; Oozeer, N.; Passmoor, S. S.; Peens-Hough, A.; Pińska, A. B.; Prozesky, P.; Rajan, S.; Ratcliffe, S.; Renil, R.; Richter, L. L.; Rosekrans, D.; Rust, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Schwardt, L. C.; Seranyane, S.; Serylak, M.; Shepherd, D. S.; Siebrits, R.; Sofeya, L.; Spann, R.; Springbok, R.; Swart, P. S.; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Theron, I. P.; Tiplady, A.; Toruvanda, O.; Tshongweni, S.; van den Heever, L.; van der Merwe, C.; van Rooyen, R.; Wakhaba, S.; Walker, A. L.; Welz, M.; Williams, L.; Wolleben, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Young, N. J.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-08-01

    The construction of the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scientific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular, we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stirling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Streaming Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used for scientific observations where it has a niche in mapping low surface-brightness continuum sources, some extended H I haloes and OH masers in star-forming regions. It can also be used to monitor continuum source variability, observe pulsars, and make Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations.

  1. A Small-Radio-Telescope Network for VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, D. B.; Cobb, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    In the last several years, high schools, colleges, universities, and even some private amateur radio astronomers have put some 120 copies of the commercially-available Haystack Small Radio Telescope (SRT) into operation. Haystack Observatory is now working on a new version of the SRT, designed to be used in an interferometer (see paper by Vats and Rogers, this conference). We show how the new SRT, or other similar small radio telescopes, could be adapted for educational and scientific VLBI observations of continuum and OH line sources, with a relatively small additional investment. We propose that one or more large radio telescopes join a network of the small antennas, so that fringes would be readily detected between the large antenna(s) and the small antennas. An 85-foot antenna such as those at PARI or the 40-meter antenna of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory would serve nicely as a base station. Eventually, as data storage and transmission capacity continue to improve, the small antennas should be able to operate on their own. Our emphasis is on a simple, inexpensive VLBI system. The most critical item is good frequency standard. For observations at 21 or 18 cm, a rubidium standard is good enough. (Inexpensive Rb standards can be found on E-bay!) Local time at each station would come from GPS receivers which readily provide sub-microsecond timing accuracy. One-bit data sampling at rates on the order of 10 megasamples per second could be performed with a simple box interfaced to a PC via USB. Sampled data would first be recorded to the PC hard drive, and then sent on CD-ROM or DVD through the mail or by internet to a central correlation facility. Correlation and data analysis for the network would be performed on PCs as well. We suggest an observing scenario comprised of scans that are several minutes long and taken several times per hour during the apparition of a compact source. The total data for the 10-12 hours that a source is "up" for a USA network would

  2. 20 cm VLA radio-continuum study of M31-images and point source catalogues DR2: Extraction of a supernova remnant sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvin T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Data Release 2 of the Point Source Catalogue created from a series of previously constructed radio-continuum images of M31 at λ=20 cm (v=1.4 GHz from archived VLA observations. In total, we identify a collection of 916 unique discrete radio sources across the field of M31. Comparing these detected sources to those listed by Gelfand et al. (2004 at λ=92 cm, the spectral index of 98 sources has been derived. The majority (73% of these sources exhibit a spectral index of α<-0.6, indicating that their emission is predominantly non-thermal in nature, which is typical for background objects and Supernova Remnants (SNRs. Additionally, we investigate the presence of radio counterparts for some 156 SNRs and SNR candidates, finding a total of only 13 of these objects in our images within a 500 search area. Auxiliary optical, radio and X-ray catalogues were cross referenced highlighting a small population of SNRs and SNR candidates common to multi frequency domains.

  3. Star-forming galaxies versus low- and high-excitation radio AGN in the VLA-COSMOS 3GHz Large Project

    CERN Document Server

    Baran, N; Novak, M; Delhaize, J; Delvecchio, I; Capak, P; Civano, F; Herrera-Ruiz, N; Ilbert, O; Laigle, C; Marchesi, S; McCracken, H J; Middelberg, E; Salvato, M; Schinnerer, E

    2016-01-01

    We study the composition of the faint radio population selected from the VLA-COSMOS 3GHz Large Project, a radio continuum survey performed at 10 cm wavelength. The survey covers the full 2 square degree COSMOS field with mean $rms\\sim2.3$ $\\mu$Jy/beam, cataloging 10,899 source components above $5\\times rms$. By combining these radio data with UltraVISTA, optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data, as well as X-ray data from the Chandra Legacy, and Chandra COSMOS surveys, we gain insight into the emission mechanisms within our radio sources out to redshifts of $z\\sim5$. From these emission characteristics we classify our souces as star forming galaxies or AGN. Using their multi-wavelength properties we further separate the AGN into sub-samples dominated by radiatively efficient and inefficient AGN, often referred to as high- and low-excitation emission line AGN. We compare our method with other results based on fitting of the sources' spectral energy distributions using both galaxy and AGN spec...

  4. 20 cm VLA Radio-Continuum Study of M31 - Images and Point Source Catalogues DR2: Extraction of a supernova remnant sample

    CERN Document Server

    Galvin, T J

    2014-01-01

    We present Data Release 2 of the Point Source Catalogue created from a series of previously constructed radio-continuum images of M31 at lambda=20 cm (nu=1.4 GHz) from archived VLA observations. In total, we identify a collection of 916 unique discrete radio sources across the field of M31. Comparing these detected sources to those listed by Gelfand et al. (2004) at lambda=92 cm, the spectral index of 98 sources has been derived. The majority (73%) of these sources exhibit a spectral index of alpha <-0.6, indicating that their emission is predominantly non-thermal in nature, which is typical for background objects and Supernova Remnants (SNRs). Additionally, we investigate the presence of radio counterparts for some 156 SNRs and SNR candidates, finding a total of only 13 of these object in our images within a 5 arcsec search area. Auxiliary optical, radio and X-ray catalogs were cross referenced highlighting a small population of SNR and SNR candidates common to multi-frequency domains.

  5. Thermal Design and Thermal Behaviour of Radio Telescopes and their Enclosures

    CERN Document Server

    Greve, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Radio telescopes as well as communication antennas operate under the influence of gravity, temperature and wind. Among those, temperature influences may degrade the performance of a radio telescope through transient changes of the focus, pointing, path length and sensitivity, often in an unpredictable way. Thermal Design and Thermal Behaviour of Radio Telescopes and their Enclosures reviews the design and construction principles of radio telescopes in view of thermal aspects and heat transfer with the variable thermal environment; it explains supporting thermal model calculations and the application and efficiency of thermal protection and temperature control; it presents many measurements illustrating the thermal behaviour of telescopes in the environment of their observatory sites. The book benefits scientists and radio/communication engineers, telescope designers and construction firms as well as telescope operators, observatory staff, but also the observing astronomer who is directly confronted with the t...

  6. Fine spectral structures in Jovian decametric radio emission observed by ground-based radio telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter with the largest planetary magnetosphere in the solar system emits intense coherent non-thermal radio emission in a wide frequency range. This emission is a result of a complicated interaction between the dynamic Jovian magnetosphere and energetic particles supplying the free energy from planetary rotation and the interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moons. Decametric radio emission (DAM) is the strongest component of Jovian radiation observed in a frequency range from few MHz up to 40 MHz. This emission is generated via cyclotron maser mechanism in sources located along Jovian magnetic field lines. Depending on the time scales the Jovian DAMexhibits different complex spectral structures. We present the observations of the Jovian decametric radio emission using the large ground-based radio telescope URAN- 2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. This telescope is one of the largest low frequency telescopes in Europe equipped with high performance digital radio spectrometers. The antenna array of URAN-2 consists of 512 crossed dipoles with an effective area of 28 000m2 and beam pattern size of 3.5 x 7 deg. (at 25 MHz). The instrument enables continuous observations of the Jovian radio during long period of times. Jovian DAM was observed continuously since Sep. 2012 (depending on Jupiter visibility) with relatively high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100ms) in the broad frequency range (8-32MHz). We have detected a big amount of the fine spectral structures in the dynamic spectra of DAM such as trains of S-bursts, quasi-continuous narrowband emission, narrow-band splitting events and zebra stripe-like patterns. We analyzed mainly the fine structures associated with non-Io controlled DAM. We discuss how the observed narrowband structures which most probably are related to the propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jupiter's ionosphere can be used to study the plasma parameters in the inner Jovian magnetosphere.

  7. LOFAR: A new radio telescope for low frequency radio observations: Science and project status

    CERN Document Server

    Röttgering, H J A; Fender, R P; Kuijpers, J; Van Haarlem, M P; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Miley, G K

    2003-01-01

    LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a large radio telescope consisting about 100 soccer field sized antenna stations spread over a region of 400 km in diameter. It will operate in the frequency range from ~10 to 240 MHz, with a resolution at 240 MHz of better than an arcsecond. Its superb sensitivity will allow for a broad range of astrophysical studies. In this contribution we first discuss four major areas of astrophysical research in which LOFAR will undoubtedly make important contributions: reionisation, distant galaxies and AGNs, transient radio sources and cosmic rays. Subsequently, we will discuss the technical concept of the instrument and the status of the LOFAR project

  8. Sardinia Radio Telescope: General Description, Technical Commissioning and First Light

    CERN Document Server

    Bolli, P; Stringhetti, L; Orfei, A; Righini, S; Ambrosini, R; Bartolini, M; Bortolotti, C; Buffa, F; Buttu, M; Cattani, A; D'Amico, N; Deiana, G; Fara, A; Fiocchi, F; Gaudiomonte, F; Maccaferri, A; Mariotti, S; Marongiu, P; Melis, A; Migoni, C; Morsiani, M; Nanni, M; Nasyr, F; Pellizzoni, A; Pisanu, T; Poloni, M; Poppi, S; Porceddu, I; Prandoni, I; Roda, J; Roma, M; Scalambra, A; Serra, G; Trois, A; Valente, G; Vargiu, G P; Zacchiroli, G

    2016-01-01

    In the period 2012 June - 2013 October, the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) went through the technical commissioning phase. The characterization involved three first-light receivers, ranging in frequency between 300MHz and 26GHz, connected to a Total Power back-end. It also tested and employed the telescope active surface installed in the main reflector of the antenna. The instrument status and performance proved to be in good agreement with the expectations in terms of surface panels alignment (at present 300 um rms to be improved with microwave holography), gain (~0.6 K/Jy in the given frequency range), pointing accuracy (5 arcsec at 22 GHz) and overall single-dish operational capabilities. Unresolved issues include the commissioning of the receiver centered at 350 MHz, which was compromised by several radio frequency interferences, and a lower-than-expected aperture efficiency for the 22-GHz receiver when pointing at low elevations. Nevertheless, the SRT, at present completing its Astronomical Validation ph...

  9. VLA-ANGST: A HIGH-RESOLUTION H I SURVEY OF NEARBY DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Juergen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Warren, Steven R.; Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); De Blok, W. J. G. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Oude Hoogeveensedijk 4, 7991 PD Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Koribalski, Baerbel [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); West, Andrew A., E-mail: jott@nrao.edu, E-mail: adrienne@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: warren@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: walter@mpia.de, E-mail: blok@astron.nl, E-mail: Baerbel.Koribalski@csiro.au, E-mail: aawest@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We present the 'Very Large Array survey of Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury galaxies (VLA-ANGST)'. VLA-ANGST is a National Radio Astronomy Observatory Large Program consisting of high spectral (0.6-2.6 km s{sup -1}) and spatial ({approx}6'') resolution observations of neutral, atomic hydrogen (H I) emission toward 35 nearby dwarf galaxies from the ANGST survey. ANGST is a systematic Hubble Space Telescope survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D {approx}< 4 Mpc). VLA-ANGST provides VLA H I observations of the sub-sample of ANGST galaxies with recent star formation that are observable from the northern hemisphere and that were not observed in the 'The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey' (THINGS). The overarching scientific goal of VLA-ANGST is to investigate fundamental characteristics of the neutral interstellar medium (ISM) of dwarf galaxies. Here we describe the VLA observations, the data reduction, and the final VLA-ANGST data products. We present an atlas of the integrated H I maps, the intensity-weighted velocity fields, the second moment maps as a measure for the velocity dispersion of the H I, individual channel maps, and integrated H I spectra for each VLA-ANGST galaxy. We closely follow the observational setup and data reduction of THINGS to achieve comparable sensitivity and angular resolution. A major difference between VLA-ANGST and THINGS, however, is the high velocity resolution of the VLA-ANGST observations (0.65 and 1.3 km s{sup -1} for the majority of the galaxies). The VLA-ANGST data products are made publicly available through a dedicated Web site (https://science.nrao.edu/science/surveys/vla-angst). With available star formation histories from resolved stellar populations and lower resolution ancillary observations from the far-infrared to the ultraviolet, VLA-ANGST will enable detailed studies of the

  10. Engineering and Science Highlights of the KAT-7 Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, A R; Armstrong, R P; Barta, A; Bauermeister, E F; Bester, H; Blose, S; Booth, R S; Botha, D H; Buchner, S J; Carignan, C; Cheetham, T; Cloete, K; Coreejes, G; Crida, R C; Cross, S D; Curtolo, F; Dikgale, A; de Villiers, M S; Toit, L J du; Esterhuyse, S W P; Fanaroff, B; Fender, R P; Fijalkowski, M; Fourie, D; Frank, B; George, D; Gibbs, P; Goedhart, S; Grobbelaar, J; Gumede, S C; Herselman, P; Hess, K M; Hoek, N; Horrell, J; Jonas, J L; Jordaan, J D B; Julie, R; Kapp, F; Kotzé, P; Kusel, T; Langman, A; Lehmensiek, R; Liebenberg, D; Liebenberg, I J V; Loots, A; Lord, R T; Lucero, D M; Ludick, J; Macfarlane, P; Madlavana, M; Magnus, L; Magozore, C; Malan, J A; Manley, J R; Marais, L; Marais, N; Marais, S J; Maree, M; Martens, A; Mokone, O; Moss, V; Mthembu, S; New, W; Nicholson, G D; van Niekerk, P C; Oozeer, N; Passmoor, S S; Peens-Hough, A; Pińska, A B; Prozesky, P; Rajan, S; Ratcliffe, S; Renil, R; Richter, L L; Rosekrans, D; Rust, A; Schröder, A C; Schwardt, L C; Seranyane, S; Serylak, M; Shepherd, D S; Siebrits, R; Sofeya, L; Spann, R; Springbok, R; Swart, P S; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L; Theron, I P; Tiplady, A; Toruvanda, O; Tshongweni, S; Heever, L van den; van der Merwe, C; van Rooyen, R; Wakhaba, S; Walker, A L; Welz, M; Williams, L; Wolleben, M; Woudt, P A; Young, N J; Zwart, J T L

    2016-01-01

    The construction of the KAT-7 array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scien- tific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stir- ling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Recon- figurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Stream- ing Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used f...

  11. A database of phase calibration sources and their radio spectra for the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Dubal, Shilpa S.; Sherkar, Sachin S.

    2016-12-01

    We are pursuing a project to build a database of phase calibration sources suitable for Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Here we present the first release of 45 low frequency calibration sources at 235 MHz and 610 MHz. These calibration sources are broadly divided into quasars, radio galaxies and unidentified sources. We provide their flux densities, models for calibration sources, ( u, v) plots, final deconvolved restored maps and clean-component lists/files for use in the Astronomical Image Processing System ( aips) and the Common Astronomy Software Applications ( casa). We also assign a quality factor to each of the calibration sources. These data products are made available online through the GMRT observatory website. In addition we find that (i) these 45 low frequency calibration sources are uniformly distributed in the sky and future efforts to increase the size of the database should populate the sky further, (ii) spectra of these calibration sources are about equally divided between straight, curved and complex shapes, (iii) quasars tend to exhibit flatter radio spectra as compared to the radio galaxies or the unidentified sources, (iv) quasars are also known to be radio variable and hence possibly show complex spectra more frequently, and (v) radio galaxies tend to have steeper spectra, which are possibly due to the large redshifts of distant galaxies causing the shift of spectrum to lower frequencies.

  12. A database of phase calibration sources and their radio spectra for the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Dubal, Shilpa S.; Sherkar, Sachin S.

    2016-10-01

    We are pursuing a project to build a database of phase calibration sources suitable for Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Here we present the first release of 45 low frequency calibration sources at 235 MHz and 610 MHz. These calibration sources are broadly divided into quasars, radio galaxies and unidentified sources. We provide their flux densities, models for calibration sources, (u,v) plots, final deconvolved restored maps and uc(clean)-component lists/files for use in the Astronomical Image Processing System (uc(aips)) and the Common Astronomy Software Applications (uc(casa)). We also assign a quality factor to each of the calibration sources. These data products are made available online through the GMRT observatory website. In addition we find that (i) these 45 low frequency calibration sources are uniformly distributed in the sky and future efforts to increase the size of the database should populate the sky further, (ii) spectra of these calibration sources are about equally divided between straight, curved and complex shapes, (iii) quasars tend to exhibit flatter radio spectra as compared to the radio galaxies or the unidentified sources, (iv) quasars are also known to be radio variable and hence possibly show complex spectra more frequently, and (v) radio galaxies tend to have steeper spectra, which are possibly due to the large redshifts of distant galaxies causing the shift of spectrum to lower frequencies.

  13. VLA's Sharpened Vision Shows Details of Still-Forming Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Using a new observing capability of the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, astronomers have discovered a solar-system-sized disk of gas and dust feeding material onto a young star with 8 to 10 times the mass of the Sun. This is the first time an inner "accretion disk" has been seen around such a massive star. The VLA images also revealed the inner portion of an energetic outflow of material powered by the accretion disk. Artist's conception "Disks and outflows in young stars increase dramatically in mass and energy as the mass of the young star increases. We don't know if the same process is at work in all young stars or how the disks can both power an outflow that extends more than 15 light-years and also start the process of forming planets," said Debra Shepherd, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. "By studying the birth of massive young stars, we're pushing the limits of our understanding and trying to learn if there are critical differences between the outflows from high and low mass young stars," she added Shepherd and Mark Claussen, also from the NRAO in Socorro, and Stan Kurtz of the National Autonomous University in Mexico, presented their findings today at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA. The scientists made the discovery using the VLA connected by a newly- operational fiber-optic link to one of the radio-telescope antennas of the NSF's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), located at Pie Town, NM, 32 miles away from the VLA. Linking the VLA to the Pie Town antenna almost doubled the resolving power, or ability to see fine detail, available to the astronomers. "We could not have seen these structures without using the Pie Town antenna connected to the VLA," said Claussen. Work on the VLA-Pie Town fiber-optic link, financed by the NSF and Associated Universities, Inc., which operates NRAO for the NSF, began in late 1997. The linked facilities first were

  14. The VLA Atmospheric Phase Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Keith

    2014-05-01

    The Atmospheric Phase Interferometer (API) is a two-element atmospheric seeing monitor located at the Very Large Array (VLA) site. The instrument measures turbulent refractive index variation through the atmosphere by examining phase differences in a satellite beacon signal detected at two (or more) antennas. With this measurement, the VLA scheduling software is able to consider atmospheric stability when determining which frequency observation to schedule next. We are in the process of extending this two-element interferometer to four elements, which will allow us to measure the turbulence in two dimensions and at multiple length scales. This thesis will look at some statistical properties of turbulence, the effects of atmospheric stability on radio interferometric observations, and discuss details of the instrument and the data that it collects. The thesis will also cover some techniques and principles of signal processing, and an analysis of some data from the instrument. The results demonstrate that other surface atmospheric variables (e.g. windspeed, water vapor pressure) show the same structure function exponent as the atmospheric phase fluctuations. In particular, the structure functions of water vapor partial pressure and wind speed show the same exponent as the phase. Though the agreement between meteorological variables and atmospheric phase is scientifically satisfying, these surface measurements are not nearly as sensitive as the API saturation phase measurement, and therefore cannot be used to schedule telescope time in its stead. What is informative about these results is that the similar structure functions for API and meteorological data are detecting reinforce the claim that both measurements represent turbulent transport, and not instrumental noise. Data from the instrument reveals that measurements are consistent with both Kolmogorov turbulence theory, and with prior observations. The API predominately measures three-dimensional isotropic

  15. The search of radio transients in the RATAN-600 radio telescope surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelenkova, Olga P.; Majorova, Elena K.

    2017-06-01

    We present the results of the search of variable sources and transient events in the archive data of the sky surveys conducted on 3.9 GHz on the RATAN-600 radio telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SAO RAS) in 1980-1994. 17% of the total studied sources can be attributed to the variables in radio range. About half of them has significant variations in optical brightness according to the data of the catalogs. At the level of 3-5 r.m.s. we found three transient events. Two weak events probably associated with AGN activities or with cataclysmic events such as GRB and a supernova flash. The nature of the third event has not been established. According to our estimation the surface density of radio transients is 0.03 on one square angular degree with the detection level 8-11 mJy on 3.94 GHz.

  16. A VLA (Very Large Array) Search for 5 GHz Radio Transients and Variables at Low Galactic Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Frail, D. A.; Breslauer, B.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Chandra, P.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a 5GHz survey with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the expanded VLA, designed to search for short-lived (approx 1.8mJy) = 0.039(exp +0.13,+0.18) (sub .0.032,.0.038) / sq. deg (1, 2 sigma confidence errors). This areal density is consistent with the sky surface density of transients from the Bower et al. survey extrapolated to 1.8mJy. Our observed transient areal density is consistent with a Neutron Stars (NSs) origin for these events. Furthermore, we use the data to measure the sources variability on days to years time scales, and we present the variability structure function of 5GHz sources. The mean structure function shows a fast increase on approximately 1 day time scale, followed by a slower increase on time scales of up to 10 days. On time scales between 10 - 60 days the structure function is roughly constant. We find that approx > 30% of the unresolved sources brighter than 1.8mJy are variable at the > 4-sigma confidence level, presumably due mainly to refractive scintillation.

  17. Coordinated observations using the world largest low-frequency radio telescopes and space misiions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Zarka, Ph.; Kolyadin, V. L.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Stepkin, S. V.; Panchenko, M.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Fischer, G.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Melnik, V. N.; Litvinenko, G. V.; Sidorchuk, M. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Vasilyeva, Ya. Yu.; Bojko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Mann, G.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Falkovich, I. S.; Koval, A. A.; Mylostna, K.; Pylaev, O. S.; Shepelev, V. A.; Reznik, A. P.

    2013-09-01

    The positive possibilities of astrophysical objects studies(including the Solar system investigations) using coordinated observations with the largest existing and coming low frequency radio telescopes are shown. The observations of the Sun, Jupiter, Saturn, ant others with UTR-2, URAN, NDA radio telescopes, and WIND, Cassini and STEREO space missions at frequencies lower than 40 MHz have been carried out.

  18. Using the Greenbank Telescope with Gravitational Lensing and the VLA to search for HI Beyond z=0.25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Lucas; Pisano, Daniel J.; Crawford, Steve; CHILES

    2017-01-01

    HI provides an important fuel for star formation, a good indicator of galactic environment, and more accurate information on mass, size, and velocity. Studies of Neutral Hydrogen (HI) in individual galaxies beyond z=0.25 have been limited by current technology. Most available telescopes do not have the frequency coverage, or sensitivity to detect the weak HI signal in a reasonable integration time. My thesis concentrates on pushing the limits on currently available telescopes to detect HI in individual sources out to higher redshifts. The COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES) team has pointed the JVLA toward the COSMOS field in a blind search of HI out to z=0.45. I am planning to use the data to study the HI properties of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies, a heterogenous class of galaxies with high star formation rates, and metallicity amongst an older stellar population. These objects are numerous have a star formation rate density roughly equal to grand-design spiral galaxies at z~1, but become rare at z=0. A number of local LCBGs have been studied to determine HI, H2, and dynamical mass, and gas depletion timescales, and with the information provided from CHILES I can compare the properties of local LCBGs to intermediate redshift LCBGs. In preparation for final data products, I have generated a Luminosity function for LCBGs in the COSMOS field to track the evolution of their number density, star formation rate density, and how much they contribute to the overall luminosity function. I have also attempted to detect HI in gravitationally lensed galaxies using the Green Bank Telescope. The magnification provided by strong gravitational lensing should allow us to determine the HI mass of a small number of galaxies out to z~0.8 and beyond.

  19. Lunar Radio Telescopes: A Staged Approach for Lunar Science, Heliophysics, Astrobiology, Cosmology, and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazio, Joseph; Bowman, Judd D.; Burns, Jack O.; Farrell, W. M.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Stewart, K. P.; Weiler, K.

    2012-01-01

    Observations with radio telescopes address key problems in cosmology, astrobiology, heliophysics, and planetary science including the first light in the Universe (Cosmic Dawn), magnetic fields of extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the lunar ionosphere. The Moon is a unique science platform because it allows access to radio frequencies that do not penetrate the Earth's ionosphere and because its far side is shielded from intense terrestrial emissions. The instrument packages and infrastructure needed for radio telescopes can be transported and deployed as part of Exploration activities, and the resulting science measurements may inform Exploration (e.g., measurements of lunar surface charging). An illustrative roadmap for the staged deployment of lunar radio telescopes

  20. L-band orthomode transducer for the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrini, Alessandro; Pisanu, Tonino

    2008-07-01

    We describe the design, construction, and characterization results of a compact L-band (1.3-1.8 GHz) Orthomode Transducer (OMT) for the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT), a 64 m diameter telescope which is being built in the Sardinia island, Italy. The OMT consists of three distinct mechanical parts connected through ultra low loss coaxial cables: a turnstile junction and two identical 180° hybrid power combiners. The turnstile junction is based on a circular waveguide input (diameter of 190 mm,) and on four WR650 rectangular waveguide cavities from which the RF signals are extracted using coaxial probes. The OMT was optimized using a commercial 3D electromagnetic simulator. The main mechanical part of the turnstile junction was machined out of an Aluminum block whose final external shape is a cylinder with diameter 450 mm and height 98 mm. From 1.3 to 1.8 GHz the measured reflection coefficient was less than -22 dB, the isolation between the outputs was less than -45 dB, and the cross polarization was less than -50 dB for both polarization channels.

  1. Thermal behavior of the Medicina 32-meter radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanu, Tonino; Buffa, Franco; Morsiani, Marco; Pernechele, Claudio; Poppi, Sergio

    2010-07-01

    We studied the thermal effects on the 32 m diameter radio-telescope managed by the Institute of Radio Astronomy (IRA), Medicina, Bologna, Italy. The preliminary results show that thermal gradients deteriorate the pointing performance of the antenna. Data has been collected by using: a) two inclinometers mounted near the elevation bearing and on the central part of the alidade structure; b) a non contact laser alignment optical system capable of measuring the secondary mirror position; c) twenty thermal sensors mounted on the alidade trusses. Two series of measurements were made, the first series was performed by placing the antenna in stow position, the second series was performed while tracking a circumpolar astronomical source. When the antenna was in stow position we observed a strong correlation between the inclinometer measurements and the differential temperature. The latter was measured with the sensors located on the South and North sides of the alidade, thus indicating that the inclinometers track well the thermal deformation of the alidade. When the antenna pointed at the source we measured: pointing errors, the inclination of the alidade, the temperature of the alidade components and the subreflector position. The pointing errors measured on-source were 15-20 arcsec greater than those measured with the inclinometer.

  2. Identifying the source of perytons at the Parkes radio telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Barr, E D; Reynolds, J E; Sarkissian, J; Edwards, P G; Stevens, J; Brem, C; Jameson, A; Burke-Spolaor, S; Johnston, S; Bhat, N D R; Chandra, P; Kudale, S; Bhandari, S

    2015-01-01

    "Perytons" are millisecond-duration transients of terrestrial origin, whose frequency-swept emission mimics the dispersion of an astrophysical pulse that has propagated through tenuous cold plasma. In fact, their similarity to FRB 010724 had previously cast a shadow over the interpretation of "fast radio bursts," which otherwise appear to be of extragalactic origin. Until now, the physical origin of the dispersion-mimicking perytons had remained a mystery. We have identified strong out-of-band emission at 2.3--2.5 GHz associated with several peryton events. Subsequent tests revealed that a peryton can be generated at 1.4 GHz when a microwave oven door is opened prematurely and the telescope is at an appropriate relative angle. Radio emission escaping from microwave ovens during the magnetron shut-down phase neatly explain all of the observed properties of the peryton signals. Now that the peryton source has been identified, we furthermore demonstrate that the microwaves on site could not have caused FRB 01072...

  3. Metric Observations of Saturn with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtin, R.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Gautier, D.; Zarka, P.; Hofstadter, M.; Hersant, F.; Girard, J.

    2015-12-01

    We used the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT, India) to observe Saturn in the metric domain – at 0.49 m (610 MHz), 1.28 m (235 MHz), and 2.0 m (150 MHz) -with the aim of constraining the deep atmospheric ammonia and water vapor concentrations around 10-20 kbar. We have obtained a clean detection at 610 MHz, with a disk brightness temperature Tb= 216 ± 32 K, and no significant emission outside of the disk, thus confirming model predictions about the weakness of synchrotron radiation by magnetospheric electrons (Lorenzato et al. 2012, Lorenzato et al. 2012). A marginal detection was obtained at 235 MHz, with Tb= 404 ± 249 K, while an upper limit of 1210 K was set at 150 MHz. Unfortunately, some of the GMRT measurements were affected by strong ionospheric scintillation or radio frequency interferences (RFI). Although the reduction of the LOFAR measurements is much more complex, results are expected in the near future and they will complement nicely with those obtained with the GMRT. We will discuss the constraints resulting from these observations on Saturn's deep atmospheric composition.

  4. The VLA-COSMOS Perspective on the IR-Radio Relation. I. New Constraints on Selection Biases and the Non-Evolution of the IR/Radio Properties of Star Forming and AGN Galaxies at Intermediate and High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Sargent, Mark T; Murphy, E; Aussel, H; Le Floc'h, E; Frayer, D T; Martínez-Sansigre, A; Oesch, P; Salvato, M; Smolcic, V; Zamorani, G; Brusa, M; Cappelluti, N; Carollo, C M; Ilbert, O; Kartaltepe, J; Koekemoer, A M; Lilly, S J; Sanders, D B; Scoville, N Z

    2010-01-01

    VLA 1.4 GHz (rms noise ~0.012 mJy) and MIPS 24 and 70 micron (rms noise ~0.02 and ~1.7 mJy, respectively) observations covering the 2 square degree COSMOS field are combined with an extensive multi-wavelength data set to study the evolution of the IR-radio relation at intermediate and high redshift. With ~4500 sources -- of which ~30% have spectroscopic redshifts -- the current sample is significantly larger than previous ones used for the same purpose. Both monochromatic IR/radio flux ratios (q24 & q70), as well as the ratio of the total IR and the 1.4 GHz luminosity (qTIR) are used as indicators for the IR/radio properties of star forming galaxies and AGN. Using a sample jointly selected at IR and radio wavelengths in order to reduce selection biases, we provide firm support for previous findings that the IR-radio relation remains unchanged out to at least z~1.4. Moreover, based on data from ~150 objects we also find that the local relation likely still holds at 2.5

  5. A Database of Phase Calibration Sources and their Radio Spectra for the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Lal, Dharam V; Sherkar, Sachin S

    2016-01-01

    We are pursuing a project to build a database of phase calibration sources suitable for Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Here we present the first release of 45 low frequency calibration sources at 235 MHz and 610 MHz. These calibration sources are broadly divided into quasars, radio galaxies and unidentified sources. We provide their flux densities, models for calibration sources, (u,v) plots, final deconvolved restored maps and clean-component lists/files for use in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS) and the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA). We also assign a quality factor to each of the calibration sources. These data products are made available online through the GMRT observatory website. In addition we find that (i) these 45 low frequency calibration sources are uniformly distributed in the sky and future efforts to increase the size of the database should populate the sky further, (ii) spectra of these calibration sources are about equally divided between straight, curve...

  6. INTERPLANETARY SCINTILLATION RADIO SOURCES DETECTED WITH THE MEXICAN ARRAY RADIO TELESCOPE (MEXART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia Ambriz, J. C.; Villanueva-Hernandez, P.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Andrade-Mascote, E.; Carrillo-Vargas, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) has an antenna composed by 4096 full-wavelength dipoles, covering about 9800 square meters. The instrument is primary devoted to carry out observations of compact stelar radio sources presenting Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) at 140 MHz. The IPS technique is a very useful tool to perform observations of large-scale solar wind density disturbances in the inner heliosphere at heliocentric ranges where no other instruments can cover. These observations can help to track the evolution of CMEs and shocks in the interplanetary medium. We present the first catalog of IPS sources detected with the MEXART. We show the power spectrum analysis to obtain information of solar wind velocity and density.

  7. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS observations of the host galaxies of powerful radio sources : Does size matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, WH; O'Dea, CP; Barthel, PD; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Lehnert, MD

    2000-01-01

    We present near-infrared J- and K-band imaging of a sample of powerful radio source host galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS2 camera. These sources have been selected on their double-lobed radio structure and include a wide range of projected radio source sizes. The largest projected

  8. Exploring the Dynamic Radio Sky with the Allen Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter Kelsey George

    The revolution in digital technology that has had so many obvious effects in recent decades has not spared the field of astronomy. It has led to an enormous improvement in astronomers' ability to study the "time domain," the expected and unexpected ways in which celestial objects change on timescales ranging from milliseconds to centuries. In the field of radio astronomy a variety of advances have led to a new breed of observatories that are orders of magnitude more efficient at surveying the sky than previous facilities. These new observatories produce data at prodigous rates, however, and require sophisticated analysis to take full advantage of their capabilities. With several major facilities coming online in the next few years, there is an urgent need to prove that terabytes of data can be reliably turned into genuine astrophysical results. This dissertation develops tools and techniques for coping with this challenge and applies them to data obtained with the Allen Telescope Array (ATA), a pioneering next-generation radio observatory located in Northern California. The ATA was built from the ground up to be a fast survey instrument, incorporating a suite of the new technologies that figure prominently in the new telescopes. I develop and describe miriad-python, a framework for the rapid development of interferometric analysis software that is used in a variety of ways in my subsequent research. I also present a robust software system for executing multiple observing campaigns cooperatively ("commensally") at the ATA. Data from the ATA are difficult to analyze due to nontraditional features such as a large instantaneous field of view; continuous coverage of a large, interference-prone frequency range; and broadband, movable feeds; I describe and implement several methods for coping with these challenges. This technical work is driven by the needs of a variety of astrophysical applications. I use broadband spectra of starforming galaxies to investigate the

  9. Radio continuum jet in NGC 7479

    OpenAIRE

    Laine, Seppo; Beck, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    The barred galaxy NGC 7479 hosts a remarkable jet-like radio continuum feature: bright, 12-kpc long in projection, and hosting an aligned magnetic field. The degree of polarization is 6%-8% along the jet, and remarkably constant, which is consistent with helical field models. The radio brightness of the jet suggests strong interaction with the ISM and hence a location near the disk plane. We observed NGC 7479 at four wavelengths with the VLA and Effelsberg radio telescopes. The equipartition ...

  10. Gravitational redshift test with the space radio telescope "RadioAstron"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biriukov, A. V.; Kauts, V. L.; Kulagin, V. V.; Litvinov, D. A.; Rudenko, V. N.

    2014-11-01

    The space radio telescope "RadioAstron" is equipped with a high performance hydrogen maser frequency standard and thus provides a unique opportunity for a gravitational redshift test. We consider various modes of operation of the on-board scientific equipment and their impact on accuracy of the anticipated experiment. We find that the accuracy of the test is limited by ˜10-2 for the hardware configuration routinely used in radio astronomical observations, which is a consequence of using ballistic data to remove the nonrelativistic Doppler frequency shift from the analyzed signal. On the other hand, the so-called "Semi-coherent" mode of the on-board hardware provides for combining the space and ground maser signals in such a way that the resulting signal carries information about the useful effect but is free from the nonrelativistic Doppler and tropospheric frequency shifts. The proposed compensation scheme, which is different from the one used in the Gravity Probe A experiment, allows for testing the gravitational redshift effect with ˜10-6 accuracy.

  11. Large Radio Telescopes for Anomalous Microwave Emission Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Battistelli, E S; de Bernardis, P; Masi, S

    2013-01-01

    We discuss in this paper the problem of the Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) in the light of ongoing or future observations to be performed with the largest fully steerable radio telescope in the world. High angular resolution observations of the AME will enable astronomers to drastically improve the knowledge of the AME mechanisms as well as the interplay between the different constituents of the interstellar medium in our galaxy. Extragalactic observations of the AME have started as well, and high resolution is even more important in this kind of observations. When cross-correlating with IR-dust emission, high angular resolution is also of fundamental importance in order to obtain unbiased results. The choice of the observational frequency is also of key importance in continuum observation. We calculate a merit function that accounts for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in AME observation given the current state-of-the-art knowledge and technology. We also include in our merit functions the frequency depen...

  12. Software Spectral Correlator for the 44-Element Ooty Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Peeyush

    2011-01-01

    A Spectral Correlator is the main component of the real time signal processing for a Radio Telescope array. The correlation of signals received at each element with every other element of the array is a classic case of an application requiring a complete graph connectivity between its data sources, as well as a very large number of simple operations to carry out the correlation. Datarates can be extremely large in order to achieve high sensitivities required for the detection of weak celestial signals. Hence, correlators are prime targets for HPC implementations. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a massively parallel software spectral Correlator for a 44 element array. The correlator handles ~735 MB/s of incoming data from the 44 spatially distributed sources, and concurrently sustains a computational load of ~100 Gflops. We first describe how we partition the large incoming data stream into grouped datasets suited for transport over high speed serial networks, as well as ideal for pr...

  13. System performance testing of the DVA1 radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee, Lewis B. G.; Baker, Lynn A.; Gray, Andrew D.; Hovey, Gary J.; Kesteven, Michael J.; Lacy, Gordon; Robishaw, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    DVA1 (Dish Verification Antenna 1) is a highly innovative rim-supported single-piece composite-material dish radio telescope developed at the National Research Council Canada (NRC). It has a feed-high offset Gregorian optical design with a primary effective diameter of 15 m. DVA1 has been undergoing mechanical and astronomical system tests since 2014. Astronomical measurements were made in L band using a prototype front end developed for MeerKAT by EMSS Antennas (South Africa), including aperture efficiency, beam profiles, sensitivity, and tipping curves. The clean shaped optics, careful attention to feed design, and high sensitivity of the L band receiver (Trx 6 K) yield a system with high aperture efficiency ( 0.8), excellent sensitivity ( 9 m2/K), and low spillover ( 4 K). Observations of 21 cm atomic hydrogen lines towards standard sources demonstrate the low stray radiation pickup of the antenna. Ku band holography has measured the effective surface accuracy and stability of the dual-reflector antenna. The effective RMS of 0.85 mm implies a Ruze efficiency of 0.88 at 10 GHz and 0.60 at 20 GHz. The surface is stable ( 10% variation in surface RMS) over the limited range of environmental conditions tested. Testing continues for characterization of pointing, low frequency performance (antenna, DVA3, which will have a more accurate surface and be usable at frequencies at least up to Q band (30 - 50 GHz).

  14. Conversion of a New Zealand 30-Metre Telecommunications Antenna into a Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodburn, Lewis; Natusch, Tim; Weston, Stuart; Thomasson, Peter; Godwin, Mark; Granet, Christophe; Gulyaev, Sergei

    2015-05-01

    The conversion of a former 100-foot (30-m) telecommunications antenna (Earth Station) in New Zealand into a radio telescope is described. A specification of the antenna and the priorities for its actual conversion are initially presented. In describing the actual conversion, particular emphasis is given to mechanical and electrical components, as well as to the design of the telescope control system, telescope networking for VLBI operations, and telescope maintenance. Plans for RF, front- and back-end developments based upon radio astronomical priorities are outlined.

  15. Gain and Polarization Properties of a Large Radio Telescope from Calculation and Measurement: The John A. Galt Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Xuan; Robishaw, Timothy; Gray, Andrew D; Douglas, Kevin A; Wolleben, Maik

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of the brightness temperature of extended radio emission demands knowledge of the gain (or aperture efficiency) of the telescope and measurement of the polarized component of the emission requires correction for the conversion of unpolarized emission from sky and ground to apparently polarized signal. Radiation properties of the John A. Galt Telescope at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory were studied through analysis and measurement in order to provide absolute calibration of a survey of polarized emission from the entire northern sky from 1280 to 1750 MHz, and to understand the polarization performance of the telescope. Electromagnetic simulators CST and GRASP-10 were used to compute radiation patterns of the telescope in all Stokes parameters, and aperture efficiency. Aperture efficiency was also evaluated using geometrical optics and was measured using Cyg A. Measured aperture efficiency varied smoothly with frequency between values of 0.49 and 0.54; GRASP-10 yielded values 6.5% high...

  16. Digital Receivers for Low-Frequency Radio Telescopes UTR-2, URAN, GURT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Zarka, P.; Ulyanov, O.; Sidorchuk, M.; Stepkin, S.; Koliadin, V.; Kalinichenko, N.; Stanislavsky, A.; Dorovskyy, V.; Shepelev, V.; Bubnov, I.; Yerin, S.; Melnik, V.; Koval, A.; Shevchuk, N.; Vasylieva, I.; Mylostna, K.; Shevtsova, A.; Skoryk, A.; Kravtsov, I.; Volvach, Y.; Plakhov, M.; Vasilenko, N.; Vasylkivskyi, Y.; Vavriv, D.; Vinogradov, V.; Kozhin, R.; Kravtsov, A.; Bulakh, E.; Kuzin, A.; Vasilyev, A.; Ryabov, V.; Reznichenko, A.; Bortsov, V.; Lisachenko, V.; Kvasov, G.; Mukha, D.; Litvinenko, G.; Brazhenko, A.; Vashchishin, R.; Pylaev, O.; Koshovyy, V.; Lozinsky, A.; Ivantyshyn, O.; Rucker, H. O.; Panchenko, M.; Fischer, G.; Lecacheux, A.; Denis, L.; Coffre, A.; Grießmeier, J.-M.

    This paper describes digital radio astronomical receivers used for decameter and meter wavelength observations. Since 1998, digital receivers performing on-the-fly dynamic spectrum calculations or waveform data recording without data loss have been used at the UTR-2 radio telescope, the URAN VLBI system, and the GURT new generation radio telescope. Here, we detail these receivers developed for operation in the strong interference environment that prevails in the decameter wavelength range. Data collected with these receivers allowed us to discover numerous radio astronomical objects and phenomena at low frequencies, a summary of which is also presented.

  17. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler, Torben; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Plötz, Christian; Neidhardt, Alexander; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bernhart, Simone; la Porta, Laura; Halsig, Sebastian; Nothnagel, Axel

    2015-07-30

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1), the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW) is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate.

  18. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Schüler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1, the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate.

  19. Multi-beaming propertieis of reflector antennas used in radio telescopes with wide field of view

    CERN Document Server

    Iupikov, O

    2016-01-01

    The given work is devoted to the modern developments in the field of radio astronomy instrumentation. In particular, the sensitivity of the multi-beam reflector radio telescope which is fed by phased array (PAF) is considered. Using PAF as reflector feed allows obtaining wide and continuous field of view (FOV) of the telescope. This has several advantages with compare to horn-cluster feeds which are described in this work. The sensitivity inside whole FOV was computed using three different beamforming schemes.

  20. Observation of two coronal mass ejections on April 7, 2011 by radio telescope URAN-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhenko, A.; Melnik, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Dorovskyy, V.; Vashchishin, V.; Franzusenko, A.; Rucker, H.

    2012-09-01

    Two CME's (coronal mass ejection) were registered by SOHO and STEREO on April 7, 2011. The results of observations obtained by radio telescope URAN-2 of different CME manifestations in radio emission at decameter wavelengths are discussed in this paper. Particularly we report about registration of new type of fine structure of type II bursts.

  1. Search for molecular bremsstrahlung radiation signals in Ku band with coincidental operations of radio telescopes with air shower detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukushima Masaki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Microwave radiation from extensive air showers is expected to provide a new technique to observe UHECR. We insatlled and operate radio telescopes in Osaka and at Telescope Array site in Utah, USA. In Osaka, we are coincidentally operating two Ku band radio telescopes with an air shower array which consists of nine plastic scintillators with about 10 m separation. In Utah, we installed two telescopes just beside the Black Rock Mesa fluorescence detector (FD station of the Telescope Array experiment, and we operated the radio telescopes coincidentally with FD event triggers. We report the experimental setups and the results of these measurements.

  2. Blind search for 21-cm absorption systems using a new generation of Chinese radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao-Ran; Pen, Ue-Li; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Li, Di; Chen, Xuelei

    2017-05-01

    Neutral hydrogen clouds are known to exist in the Universe, however their spatial distributions and physical properties are poorly understood. Such missing information can be studied by the new generation of Chinese radio telescopes through a blind search of 21-cm absorption systems. We forecast the capabilities of surveys of 21-cm absorption systems by two representative radio telescopes in China -the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) and Tianlai 21-cm cosmology experiment (Tianlai). Facilitated by either the high sensitivity (FAST) or wide field of view (Tianlai) of these telescopes, more than a thousand 21-cm absorption systems can be discovered in a few years, representing orders of magnitude improvement over the cumulative discoveries in the past half a century.

  3. Engineering and science highlights of the KAT-7 radio telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foley, A. R.; Alberts, T.; Armstrong, R. P.; Barta, A.; Bauermeister, E. F.; Bester, H.; Blose, S.; Booth, R. S.; Botha, D. H.; Buchner, S. J.; Carignan, C.; Cheetham, T.; Cloete, K.; Coreejes, G.; Crida, R. C.; Cross, S. D.; Curtolo, F.; Dikgale, A.; de Villiers, M. S.; du Toit, L. J.; Esterhuyse, S. W. P.; Fanaroff, B.; Fender, R. P.; Fijalkowski, M.; Fourie, D.; Frank, B.; George, D.; Gibbs, P.; Goedhart, S.; Grobbelaar, J.; Gumede, S. C.; Herselman, P.; Hess, K. M.; Hoek, N.; Horrell, J.; Jonas, J. L.; Jordaan, J. D. B.; Julie, R.; Kapp, F.; Kotzé, P.; Kusel, T.; Langman, A.; Lehmensiek, R.; Liebenberg, D.; Liebenberg, I. J. V.; Loots, A.; Lord, R. T.; Lucero, D. M.; Ludick, J.; Macfarlane, P.; Madlavana, M.; Magnus, L.; Magozore, C.; Malan, J. A.; Manley, J. R.; Marais, L.; Marais, N.; Marais, S. J.; Maree, M.; Martens, A.; Mokone, O.; Moss, V.; Mthembu, S.; New, W.; Nicholson, G. D.; van Niekerk, P. C.; Oozeer, N.; Passmoor, S. S.; Peens-Hough, A.; Pińska, A. B.; Prozesky, P.; Rajan, S.; Ratcliffe, S.; Renil, R.; Richter, L. L.; Rosekrans, D.; Rust, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Schwardt, L. C.; Seranyane, S.; Serylak, M.; Shepherd, D. S.; Siebrits, R.; Sofeya, L.; Spann, R.; Springbok, R.; Swart, P. S.; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Theron, I. P.; Tiplady, A.; Toruvanda, O.; Tshongweni, S.; van den Heever, L.; van der Merwe, C.; van Rooyen, R.; Wakhaba, S.; Walker, A. L.; Welz, M.; Williams, L.; Wolleben, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Young, N. J.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-01-01

    The construction of the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and

  4. Engineering and science highlights of the KAT-7 radio telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foley, A. R.; Alberts, T.; Armstrong, R. P.; Barta, A.; Bauermeister, E. F.; Bester, H.; Blose, S.; Booth, R. S.; Botha, D. H.; Buchner, S. J.; Carignan, C.; Cheetham, T.; Cloete, K.; Coreejes, G.; Crida, R. C.; Cross, S. D.; Curtolo, F.; Dikgale, A.; de Villiers, M. S.; du Toit, L. J.; Esterhuyse, S. W. P.; Fanaroff, B.; Fender, R. P.; Fijalkowski, M.; Fourie, D.; Frank, B.; George, D.; Gibbs, P.; Goedhart, S.; Grobbelaar, J.; Gumede, S. C.; Herselman, P.; Hess, K. M.; Hoek, N.; Horrell, J.; Jonas, J. L.; Jordaan, J. D. B.; Julie, R.; Kapp, F.; Kotzé, P.; Kusel, T.; Langman, A.; Lehmensiek, R.; Liebenberg, D.; Liebenberg, I. J. V.; Loots, A.; Lord, R. T.; Lucero, D. M.; Ludick, J.; Macfarlane, P.; Madlavana, M.; Magnus, L.; Magozore, C.; Malan, J. A.; Manley, J. R.; Marais, L.; Marais, N.; Marais, S. J.; Maree, M.; Martens, A.; Mokone, O.; Moss, V.; Mthembu, S.; New, W.; Nicholson, G. D.; van Niekerk, P. C.; Oozeer, N.; Passmoor, S. S.; Peens-Hough, A.; Pińska, A. B.; Prozesky, P.; Rajan, S.; Ratcliffe, S.; Renil, R.; Richter, L. L.; Rosekrans, D.; Rust, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Schwardt, L. C.; Seranyane, S.; Serylak, M.; Shepherd, D. S.; Siebrits, R.; Sofeya, L.; Spann, R.; Springbok, R.; Swart, P. S.; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Theron, I. P.; Tiplady, A.; Toruvanda, O.; Tshongweni, S.; van den Heever, L.; van der Merwe, C.; van Rooyen, R.; Wakhaba, S.; Walker, A. L.; Welz, M.; Williams, L.; Wolleben, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Young, N. J.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-01-01

    The construction of the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scienti

  5. Synchronized observations by using the STEREO and the largest ground-based decametre radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.; Mann, G.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Kaiser, M. L.; Briand, C.; Zarka, P.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Koval, A. A.; Mel'nik, V. N.; Mukha, D. V.; Panchenko, M.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the approach to simultaneous (synchronous) solar observations of radio emission by using the STEREO-WAVES instruments (frequency range 0.125-16 MHz) and the largest ground-based low-frequency radio telescope. We illustrate it by the UTR-2 radio telescope implementation (10-30 MHz). The antenna system of the radio telescope is a T-shape-like array of broadband dipoles and is located near the village Grakovo in the Kharkiv region (Ukraine). The third observation point on the ground in addition to two space-based ones improves the space-mission performance capabilities for the determination of radio-emission source directivity. The observational results from the high sensitivity antenna UTR-2 are particularly useful for analysis of STEREO data in the condition of weak event appearances during solar activity minima. In order to improve the accuracy of flux density measurements, we also provide simultaneous observations with a large part of the UTR-2 radio telescope array and its single dipole close to the STEREO-WAVES antennas in sensitivity. This concept has been studied by comparing the STEREO data with ground-based records from 2007-2011 and shown to be effective. The capabilities will be useful in the implementation of new instruments (LOFAR, LWA, MWA, etc.) and during the future Solar Orbiter mission.

  6. Probing Fine-Scale Ionospheric Structure with the Very Large Array Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, A S

    2009-01-01

    High resolution (~1 arcminute) astronomical imaging at low frequency (below 150 MHz) has only recently become practical with the development of new calibration algorithms for removing ionospheric distortions. In addition to opening a new window in observational astronomy, the process of calibrating the ionospheric distortions also probes ionospheric structure in an unprecedented way. Here we explore one aspect of this new type of ionospheric measurement, the differential refraction of celestial source pairs as a function of their angular separation. This measurement probes variations in the spatial gradient of the line-of-sight total electron content (TEC) to 0.001 TECU/km accuracy over spatial scales of under 10 km to over 100 km. We use data from the VLA Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS; Cohen et al. 2007, AJ 134, 1245), a nearly complete 74 MHz survey of the entire sky visible to the Very Large Array (VLA) telescope in Socorro, New Mexico. These data comprise over 500 hours of observations, all calibrated in...

  7. System of the optic-electronic sensors for control position of the radio telescope elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyakhin, Igor; Stepashkin, Ivan; Petrochenko, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    A promising area of modern astronomy is the study of the field of millimeter waves. The use of this band is due to a large extent the spectrum characteristics of the propagation of waves in the atmosphere, short wavelength. Currently, Russia jointly with Uzbekistan is implementing a project to build a radio astronomy observatory on the Suffa plateau (Uzbekistan). The main instrument of the observatory is fully steerable radio telescope RT-70 type. Main mirror telescope is a fragment of an axisymmetric parabolic with a focal length of 21 m, consisting of 1200 reflecting panels; main mirror diameter - 70 m; diameter of counter reflector - 3 m. A feature of the radio telescope as a means of research in the millimeter wavelength range are high for the quality requirements parabolic surface of the primary mirror (standard deviation of points on the surface of the theoretical parabolic is not more than 0.05 mm), to the stability of the mutual arrangement of the primary mirror and the counter reflector (not more than 0, 07 mm) for precision guidance in the corners of the mirror system azimuth and elevation (margin of error 1.5-2"). Weight of structure, temperature changes and air shock result in significant deformation elements radio telescope construction (progressive linear displacements of points of the surface of the main mirror), reaching in the marginal zone of 30 mm; counter reflector shift of up to 60 mm; Unlike the angular position of the axis of the beam pattern of the radio telescope of the measured angle transducers can reach 10 ". Therefore, to ensure the required quality of the reflective elements RT-70 systems, as well as the implementation of precision-guided munitions needs complex measuring deformation elements telescope design. This article deals with the construction of opto-electronic system of remote optoelectronic displacement sensor control elements mirror telescope system.

  8. A Study of the Fitting Accuracy of the Active Reflector for a Large Spherical Radio Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qiang Tang; Jin-Song Wang; Qi-Ming Wang

    2003-01-01

    We propose a spatial three-degree-of-freedom (DOF) parallel mechanism combining two degrees of rotations and one degree of translation to support the active reflector units of a large spherical radio telescope. The kinematics, workspace and accuracy of the mechanism are analyzed. One-dimensional and two-dimensional fitting errors to the working region of active reflector are investigated. Dimensional parameters of the mechanism and active reflector unit are examined with respect to the requirement of fitting accuracy. The result of accuracy analysis shows the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed mechanism, and gives a design rule to guarantee the highest working frequency required by large radio telescope.

  9. Surface Accuracy and Pointing Error Prediction of a 32 m Diameter Class Radio Astronomy Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azankpo, Severin

    2017-03-01

    The African Very-long-baseline interferometry Network (AVN) is a joint project between South Africa and eight partner African countries aimed at establishing a VLBI (Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry) capable network of radio telescopes across the African continent. An existing structure that is earmarked for this project, is a 32 m diameter antenna located in Ghana that has become obsolete due to advances in telecommunication. The first phase of the conversion of this Ghana antenna into a radio astronomy telescope is to upgrade the antenna to observe at 5 GHz to 6.7 GHz frequency and then later to 18 GHz within a required performing tolerance. The surface and pointing accuracies for a radio telescope are much more stringent than that of a telecommunication antenna. The mechanical pointing accuracy of such telescopes is influenced by factors such as mechanical alignment, structural deformation, and servo drive train errors. The current research investigates the numerical simulation of the surface and pointing accuracies of the Ghana 32 m diameter radio astronomy telescope due to its structural deformation mainly influenced by gravity, wind and thermal loads.

  10. The Position and Attitude of Sub-reflector Modeling for TM65 m Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z. X.; Chen, L.; Wang, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    In the course of astronomical observations, with changes in angle of pitch, the large radio telescope will have different degrees of deformation in the sub-reflector support, back frame, main reflector etc, which will lead to the dramatic decline of antenna efficiency in both high and low elevation. A sub-reflector system of the Tian Ma 65 m radio telescope has been installed in order to compensate for the gravitational deformations of the sub-reflector support and the main reflector. The position and attitude of the sub-reflector are variable in order to improve the pointing performance and the efficiency at different elevations. In this paper, it is studied that the changes of position and attitude of the sub-reflector have influence on the efficiency of antenna in the X band and Ku band. A model has been constructed to determine the position and attitude of the sub-reflector with elevation, as well as the point compensation model, by observing the radio source. In addition, antenna efficiency was tested with sub-reflector position adjusted and fixed. The results show that the model of sub-reflector can effectively improve the efficiency of the 65 m radio telescope. In X band, the aperture efficiency of the radio telescope reaches more than 60% over the entire elevation range.

  11. Visual Landing Aids (VLA) Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Visual Landing Aids (VLA) Laboratory serves to support fleet VLA systems by maintaining the latest service change configuration of currently deployed VLA...

  12. The Role of the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project in Promoting Scientific Efficacy among Middle and High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Mary; Deutscher, Rebecca

    This study investigated the effects on student scientific efficacy after participation in the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) project. In the GAVRT program, students use computers to record extremely faint radio waves collected by the telescope and analyze real data. Scientific efficacy is a type of self-knowledge a person uses to…

  13. Science with a Next-Generation VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Eric J.; Carilli, Chris Luke; ngVLA Science Working Groups

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by dramatic discoveries from the Jansky VLA and ALMA, a plan has been initiated to pursue a future large area radio interferometer that will open new discovery space from proto-planetary disks to distant galaxies. Building on the superb cm observing conditions and existing infrastructure of the VLA site, the current vision of ngVLA is an interferometric array with more than 10 times the effective collecting area and 10 times higher spatial resolution than the current VLA and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) that will operate at frequencies spanning ~1.2-116GHz. The ngVLA is optimized for observations at wavelengths between the exquisite performance of ALMA at submm wavelengths, and the future SKA-1 at few centimeter and longer wavelengths, thus lending itself to be highly complementary with these facilities. As such, the ngVLA will open a new window on the universe through ultra-sensitive imaging of thermal line and continuum emission down to milliarcecond resolution, as well as deliver unprecedented broad band continuum polarimetric imaging of non-thermal processes. The ngVLA will be the only facility in the world that can tackle a broad range of outstanding scientific questions in modern astronomy by simultaneously delivering the capability to: directly image planet formation in the terrestrial-zone; map dust-obscured star formation and the cosmic baryon cycle down to pc-scales out to the Virgo cluster; take a cosmic census of the molecular gas which fuels star formation back to first light and cosmic reionization; and carry out novel techniques for exploring temporal phenomena from milliseconds to years. In this poster we highlight a number of the tranformative science cases that are driving the design of the ngVLA.

  14. Calibration of low-frequency radio telescopes using the galactic background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulk, G. A.; Erickson, W. C.; Manning, R.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2001-01-01

    We consider the calibration of flux densities of radio bursts from decametric to kilometric wavelengths using ground-based and space-based data. The method we derive is applicable to low-frequency radio telescopes where galactic background radiation is the principal contribution to system temperature. It can be particularly useful for telescopes of low angular resolution observing spectra of radio bursts from the Sun and the planets because absolute calibration of these telescopes is very difficult with conventional techniques. Here we apply the method to observations from about 7 to 47 MHz that were made on the ground with the Bruny Island Radio Spectrometer located in Tasmania, Australia, and those from about 20 kHz to 13.8 MHz were made with the radio experiment WAVES on the WIND spacecraft. The spectrum of the galactic background radiation from 30 MHz has been carefully measured with low-resolution telescopes, starting more than a decade ago. We use this known spectrum to calibrate both BIRS and WAVES on an absolute scale. The accuracy we achieve is about a factor of two, whereas the flux densities of solar and planetary radio sources vary by many orders of magnitude. Our method permits inter-calibration of ground-based and space-based observations, and allows corrections to be made for instrumental uncertainties on both radio experiments. In addition, on the ground, it allows the spectra to be corrected for ionospheric absorption and partial ground reflections. As an application we show the spectrum of a solar type III burst observed from 47 MHz to 20 kHz. Its flux density was largest, S~ 10-17 W m-2 Hz-1, at about 3 MHz, while at 60 kHz and at 47 MHz it was lower by a factor of about 300.

  15. VLA Discovers Giant Rings Around Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have discovered giant, ring-like structures around a cluster of galaxies. The discovery provides tantalizing new information about how such galaxy clusters are assembled, about magnetic fields in the vast spaces between galaxy clusters, and possibly about the origin of cosmic rays. Radio-Optical Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (Radio/Optical) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Above, a combined radio/optical image shows the galaxy cluster Abell 3376 in visible light (blue) and radio (red) images. The giant radio arcs surrounding the cluster were discovered using the Very Large Array. The visible-light image is from the Digitized Sky survey. Below, an X-ray image of Abell 3376 made using the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton telescope shows a spectacular, bullet-shaped region of X-rays coming from gas heated to 60 million degrees Kelvin. The bullet shape results from the supersonic collision of a smaller smaller galaxy subcluster with the main body of the larger cluster. Click on images for larger version. X-Ray Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (X-Ray) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, ESA "These giant, radio-emitting rings probably are the result of shock waves caused by violent collisions of smaller groups of galaxies within the cluster," said Joydeep Bagchi, of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, who led an international research team. The scientists reported their findings in the November 3 edition of the journal Science. The newly-discovered ring segments, some 6 million light-years across, surround a galaxy cluster called Abell 3376, more than 600 million light-years from Earth. They were revealed because fast-moving electrons emitted radio waves as they spiraled around magnetic field lines in intergalactic space. "Even from this large distance, the feeble radio waves were easily picked up by the VLA

  16. Modelling high-resolution spatially-resolved Supernova Remnant spectra with the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Loru, Sara; Egron, Elise; Iacolina, Noemi; Righini, Simona; Marongiu, Marco; Mulas, Sara; Murtas, Giulia; Simeone, Davide; Pilia, Maura; Bachetti, Matteo; Trois, Alessio; Ricci, Roberto; Melis, Andrea; Concu, Raimondo

    2016-01-01

    Supernova Remnants (SNRs) exhibit spectra featured by synchrotron radio emission arising from the relativistic electrons, and high-energy emission from both leptonic (Bremsstrahlung and Inverse Compton) and hadronic processes (${\\pi}^0$ mesons decay) which are a direct signature of cosmic rays acceleration. Thanks to radio single-dish imaging observations obtained in three frequency bands (1.6, 7, 22 GHz) with the Sardinia Radio Telescope (www.srt.inaf.it), we can model different SNR regions separately. Indeed, in order to disentangle interesting and peculiar hadron contributions in the high-energy spectra (gamma-ray band) and better constrain SNRs as cosmic rays emitters, it is crucial to fully constrain lepton contributions first through radio-observed parameters. In particular, the Bremsstrahlung and Inverse Compton bumps observed in gamma-rays are bounded to synchrotron spectral slope and cut-off in the radio domain. Since these parameters vary for different SNR regions and electron populations, spatially...

  17. PuMa-II: A wide band pulsar machine for the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karuppusamy, R.; Stappers, B.; van Straten, W.

    2008-01-01

    The Pulsar Machine II (PuMa-II) is the new flexible pulsar processing back-end system at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), specifically designed to take advantage of the upgraded WSRT. The instrument is based on a computer cluster running the Linux operating system, with minimal custo

  18. Modelling, simulation and testing of an optomechatronics design of a large radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, B. Y.; Qiu, Y. Y.; Su, Y. X.; Wang, W. L.; Nan, R. D.; Peng, B.

    An innovative design for a feed support structure for the next generation large radio telescope, based on the idea of integrating mechanical, electronic and optical technologies (OPTOMECHATRONICS), is considered. Theoretical analyses and simulations are carried out. A 5 m experimental model is built to demonstrate the idea.

  19. Revealing the Hidden Wave: Using the Very Small Radio Telescope to Teach High School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael; Fish, Vincent L.; Needles, Madeleine

    2011-01-01

    Scientists and teachers have worked together to produce teaching materials for the Very Small Radio Telescope (VSRT), an easy-to-use, low-cost apparatus that can be used in multiple laboratory experiments in high school and university physics and astronomy classes. In this article, we describe the motivation for the VSRT and several of the…

  20. Communicating astronomy in a small island state: The unique role of the Mauritius Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddul-Hauzaree, S.

    2008-06-01

    The Mauritius Radio Telescope (MRT) is a 2 km x 1 km T-shaped aperture synthesis array that can generate radio images of the southern sky at 151.6 MHz. The sky surveyed can be in the declination range of -70o to -10o. It is located at Bras d'Eau, northeast of Mauritius at latitude 20oS and longitude 60oE. The MRT is a joint project of the University of Mauritius, the Indian Institute of Astrophysics and the Raman Research Institute. One of the main objectives of the MRT is to generate public interest in astronomy. Thus, it is involved in a wide range of onsite outreach activities for young school children. More mature students visiting the telescope learn about sky observation with a radio telescope, get to explore some sets of data, interact with the scientific personnel, get the opportunity to have hands-on experience with image manipulation and can ask a lot of questions on astronomy. This poster gives an overview of the Mauritius Radio Telescope and the attempts of MRT ito communicate astronomy to students as a process and not just as a vast expanse of knowledge. The challenges and dilemmas faced by MRT in conveying astronomy to the general public in a small island state are investigated and presented.

  1. The Allen Telescope Array : The First Widefield, Panchromatic, Snapshot Radio Camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, Joeri van

    2009-01-01

    The first 42 elements of the Allen Telescope Array (ATA-42) are beginning to deliver data at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory in Northern California. Scientists and engineers are actively exploiting all of the flexibility designed into this innovative instrument for simultaneously conducting panorami

  2. The Five-Hundred-Meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) Project

    CERN Document Server

    Nan, Rendong; Jin, Chengjin; Wang, Qiming; Zhu, Lichun; Zhu, Wenbai; Zhang, Haiyan; Yue, Youling; Qian, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese mega-science project to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. Its innovative engineering concept and design pave a new road to realize a huge single dish in the most effective way. FAST also represents Chinese contribution in the international efforts to build the square kilometer array (SKA). Being the most sensitive single dish radio telescope, FAST will enable astronomers to jump-start many science goals, for example, surveying the neutral hydrogen in the Milky Way and other galaxies, detecting faint pulsars, looking for the first shining stars, hearing the possible signals from other civilizations, etc. The idea of sitting a large spherical dish in a karst depression is rooted in Arecibo telescope. FAST is an Arecibo-type antenna with three outstanding aspects: the karst depression used as the site, which is large to host the 500-meter telescope and deep to allow a zenith angle of 40 degrees; the active main re...

  3. The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope project and its early science opportunities

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Di; Pan, Zhichen

    2012-01-01

    The National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science (NAOC), has started building the largest antenna in the world. Known as FAST, the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope is a Chinese mega-science project funded by the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC). FAST also represents part of Chinese contribution to the international efforts to build the square kilometer array (SKA). Upon its finishing around September of 2016, FAST will be the most sensitive single-dish radio telescope in the low frequency radio bands between 70 MHz and 3 GHz. The design specifications of FAST, its expected capabilities, and its main scientific aspirations were described in an overview paper by Nan et al. (2011). In this paper, we briefly review the design and the key science goals of FAST, speculate the likely limitations at the initial stages of FAST operation, and discuss the opportunities for astronomical discoveries in the so-called early science phase.

  4. Radio Telescope Focal Container for the Russian VLBI Network of New Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipatov, Alexander; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Cherepanov, Andrey; Chernov, Vitaly; Diky, Dmitry; Khvostov, Evgeny; Yevstigneyev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the development of the structure of receivers for Russian radio telescopes. The development of these radio telescopes is undertaken within the project for creating a Russian small-antenna-based radio interferometer of new generation. It is shown that for small antennas (10. 12 meter) the principal unit, which provides the best SNR, is the so-called focal container placed at primary focus. It includes the primary feed, HEMT LNA, and cryogenic cooling system down to 20. K. A new multi-band feed based on traveling wave resonators is used. It has small dimensions, low weight, and allows working with circular polarizations. Thus it can be placed into focal container and cooled with the LNA. A sketch of the focal container, with traveling-wave-resonator feed, and calculations of the expected parameters of the multi-band receiver are presented.

  5. A synthetic aperture radio telescope for ICME observations as a potential payload of SPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Sun, W.; Liu, H.; Xiong, M.; Liu, Y. D.; Wu, J.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a potential payload for the Solar Polar ORbit Telescope (SPORT), a space weather mission proposed by the National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This is a synthetic aperture radio imager designed to detect radio emissions from interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), which is expected to be an important instrument to monitor the propagation and evolution of ICMEs. The radio telescope applies a synthetic aperture interferometric technique to measure the brightness temperature of ICMEs. Theoretical calculations of the brightness temperature utilizing statistical properties of ICMEs and the background solar wind indicate that ICMEs within 0.35 AU from the Sun are detectable by a radio telescope at a frequency <= 150 MHz with a sensitivity of <=1 K. The telescope employs a time shared double rotation scan (also called a clock scan), where two coplanar antennas revolve around a fixed axis at different radius and speed, to fulfill sampling of the brightness temperature. An array of 4+4 elements with opposite scanning directions are developed for the radio telescope to achieve the required sensitivity (<=1K) within the imaging refreshing time (~30 minutes). This scan scheme is appropriate for a three-axis stabilized spacecraft platform while keeping a good sampling pattern. We also discuss how we select the operating frequency, which involves a trade-off between the engineering feasibility and the scientific goal. Our preliminary results indicate that the central frequency of 150 MHz with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, which requires arm lengths of the two groups of 14m and 16m, respectively, gives an angular resolution of 2°, a field of view of ×25° around the Sun, and a time resolution of 30 minutes.

  6. Probing Ionospheric Structures using the LOFAR radio telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Mevius, M; Pandey, V N; Vedantham, H K; Brentjens, M A; de Bruyn, A G; Abdalla, F B; Asad, K M B; Bregman, J D; Brouw, W N; Bus, S; Chapman, E; Ciardi, B; Fernandez, E R; Ghosh, A; Harker, G; Iliev, I T; Jelić, V; Kazemi, S; Koopmans, L V E; Noordam, J E; Offringa, A R; Patil, A H; van Weeren, R J; Wijnholds, S; Yatawatta, S; Zaroubi, S

    2016-01-01

    LOFAR is the LOw Frequency Radio interferometer ARray located at mid-latitude ($52^{\\circ} 53'N$). Here, we present results on ionospheric structures derived from 29 LOFAR nighttime observations during the winters of 2012/2013 and 2013/2014. We show that LOFAR is able to determine differential ionospheric TEC values with an accuracy better than 1 mTECU over distances ranging between 1 and 100 km. For all observations the power law behavior of the phase structure function is confirmed over a long range of baseline lengths, between $1$ and $80$ km, with a slope that is in general larger than the $5/3$ expected for pure Kolmogorov turbulence. The measured average slope is $1.89$ with a one standard deviation spread of $0.1$. The diffractive scale, i.e. the length scale where the phase variance is $1\\, \\mathrm{rad^2}$, is shown to be an easily obtained single number that represents the ionospheric quality of a radio interferometric observation. A small diffractive scale is equivalent to high phase variability ove...

  7. An efficient feedback calibration algorithm for direct imaging radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Adam P.; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Bowman, Judd D.; Morales, Miguel F.

    2017-10-01

    We present the E-field Parallel Imaging Calibration (EPICal) algorithm, which addresses the need for a fast calibration method for direct imaging radio astronomy correlators. Direct imaging involves a spatial fast Fourier transform of antenna signals, alleviating an O(Na ^2) computational bottleneck typical in radio correlators, and yielding a more gentle O(Ng log _2 Ng) scaling, where Na is the number of antennas in the array and Ng is the number of gridpoints in the imaging analysis. This can save orders of magnitude in computation cost for next generation arrays consisting of hundreds or thousands of antennas. However, because antenna signals are mixed in the imaging correlator without creating visibilities, gain correction must be applied prior to imaging, rather than on visibilities post-correlation. We develop the EPICal algorithm to form gain solutions quickly and without ever forming visibilities. This method scales as the number of antennas, and produces results comparable to those from visibilities. We use simulations to demonstrate the EPICal technique and study the noise properties of our gain solutions, showing they are similar to visibility-based solutions in realistic situations. By applying EPICal to 2 s of Long Wavelength Array data, we achieve a 65 per cent dynamic range improvement compared to uncalibrated images, showing this algorithm is a promising solution for next generation instruments.

  8. Implementation of an Optimised Cassegrain System for Radio Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Holler, C M; Jones, M E; Grainge, K; Kaneko, T

    2007-01-01

    We present the antenna design for a radio interferometer, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager, together with its beam pattern measurement. Our aim was to develop a low-cost system with high aperture efficiency and low ground-spill across the frequency range 12-18GHz. We use a modified cassegrain system consisting of a commercially-available paraboloidal primary mirror with a diameter of 3.7m, and a shaped secondary mirror. The secondary mirror is oversized with respect to a ray-optics design and has a surface that is bent towards the primary near its outer edge using a square term for the shaping. The antennas are simple to manufacture and therefore their cost is low. The design increased the antenna gain by approximately 10 per cent compared to a normal Cassegrain system while still maintaining low contamination from ground-spill and using a simple design for the horn.

  9. Simultaneous observations of periodic non-Io decametric radio emission by ground radio telescope URAN-2 and STEREO/WAVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Rucker, H. O.; Frantzusenko, A.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    Periodic bursts of the non-Io component of Jovian decametric radio emission (non-Io DAM) is observed as (1) series of arc-like radio bursts with negative frequency drift which reoccur with 1.5% longer period than the Jovian magnetosphere rotation rate, (2) series of bursts with positive frequency drift which reoccur with Jupiter's rotation period and (3) periodic non-arc like radio features [1, 2]. These bursts are typically detected during several Jupiter rotations in decametric frequency range from 4 MHz to 12 - 16 MHz between 300° and 60° of CML. We present simultaneous observations of the periodic non-Io controlled DAM performed by the WAVES radio experiment onboard the two STEREO spacecraft and the groundbased radio telescope URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. URAN-2 with an effective area of about 30000 m2 consists of 512 broadband crossed dipoles and equipped with the high performance digital radio spectrometer with polarization measurement capability. During the observation campaign Sep., 2012 - Apr., 2013 URAN-2 recorded a large amount of Jovian DAM events with the high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100 ms) in a frequency range 8-32 MHz. In the same time the two spatially separated STEREO spacecraft was able to observe DAM in the frequency range up to 16 MHz. The first analysis of the acquired stereoscopic observations is presented. In particular, we show one episode when the periodic non-arc DAM was recorded together with long lasting Jovian narrow band (NB) emissions. These NB emission was observed at the high frequency cutoff of DAM and can be interpreted as propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jovian ionosphere [3]. We discuss the possible relations between the observed NB events and the periodic non-Io controlled Jovian decametric radio emission.

  10. A High Speed Networked Signal Processing Platform for Multi-element Radio Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Peeyush; 10.1007/s10686-011-9216-7

    2011-01-01

    A new architecture is presented for a Networked Signal Processing System (NSPS) suitable for handling the real-time signal processing of multi-element radio telescopes. In this system, a multi-element radio telescope is viewed as an application of a multi-sensor, data fusion problem which can be decomposed into a general set of computing and network components for which a practical and scalable architecture is enabled by current technology. The need for such a system arose in the context of an ongoing program for reconfiguring the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) as a programmable 264-element array, which will enable several new observing capabilities for large scale surveys on this mature telescope. For this application, it is necessary to manage, route and combine large volumes of data whose real-time collation requires large I/O bandwidths to be sustained. Since these are general requirements of many multi-sensor fusion applications, we first describe the basic architecture of the NSPS in terms of a Fusion Tree ...

  11. Reducing Effects of Cross-Talk in a Radio Telescope Using Walsh Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Sandeep C.; Gupta, Yashwant; Kumar, Ajith; Shinde, Navnath D.; Gupta, Sweta; Vishwakarma, Ajay

    Traditional Walsh technique is used to eliminate cross-talk in a array of radio telescope where achieving synchronization between modulator and demodulator without compromising sensitivity is a real challenge. The paper describes a novel approach named Walsh Delay Hunting (WDH) to synchronize independently running modulator and demodulator with no additional hardware. This approach is unique and can easily be implemented in any existing radio telescope with minimal changes, thus by putting Walsh modulator at telescope and demodulation can be done in digital back-end. The scheme greatly reduces antenna electronics and overhead of sending synchronizing Walsh start pulse back to center station and vice versa. The paper describes WDH method and its feasibility study for Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) along with test results. The modulator is a low cost CPLD-based module and demodulation is done in a Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware (ROACH)-based digitizer and packetizer. The scheme requires noise injection facility before modulator, which GMRT has for antenna calibration.

  12. Modeling the rail surface unevenness of a high-precision radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Li, Peng; Wu, Jiang; Duan, Bao-Yan

    2017-02-01

    This study proposed a coarse-fine mixed model for describing the rail surface unevenness of an ultra-large fully steerable radio telescope (Qi Tai Telescope) with a diameter of 110 meters. The rail surface unevenness includes information on error arising from two different scales, i.e., the long-period-short-change and the short-period-long-change. Consequently, in this study an idea of a mixed model was proposed, in which trigonometric and fractal functions were, respectively, used to describe information on error from two scales. Key parameters were determined by using the least squares method and the wavelet transform method, and finally, a specific mathematical expression of the model was obtained by optimization. To validate the effectiveness of the new modeling method, the mixed model was then used to describe the rails of the Green Bank Telescope, the Large Millimeter Telescope, and a radio telescope in Miyun, Beijing. A comparative study revealed that the maximum error was less than 15%, thus the result was superior to those of existing modeling methods.

  13. RadioAstron -- a Telescope with a Size of 300 000 km: Main Parameters and First Observational Results

    CERN Document Server

    Kardashev, N S; 10.1134/S1063772913030025

    2013-01-01

    The Russian Academy of Sciences and Federal Space Agency, together with the participation of many international organizations, worked toward the launch of the RadioAstron orbiting space observatory with its onboard 10-m reflector radio telescope from the Baikonur cosmodrome on July 18, 2011. Together with some of the largest ground-based radio telescopes and a set of stations for tracking, collecting, and reducing the data obtained, this space radio telescope forms a multi-antenna ground-space radio interferometer with extremely long baselines, making it possible for the first time to study various objects in the Universe with angular resolutions a million times better than is possible with the human eye. The project is targeted at systematic studies of compact radio-emitting sources and their dynamics. Objects to be studied include supermassive black holes, accretion disks, and relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei, stellar-mass black holes, neutron stars and hypothetical quark stars, regions of format...

  14. Measurements of electronic properties of the Miyun 50 m Radio Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Zhen Zhang; Xin-Ying Zhu; De-Qing Kong; Lei Zheng; Cheng Yao; Hong-Bo Zhang; Yan Su; Ting-Yi Piao

    2009-01-01

    Measurement results of some properties of the Miyun 50 m radio telescope (MRT50) of the National Astronomical Observatories, such as pointing calibration, an-tenna beams, system noise temperature, gain and gain variations with elevation are intro-duced. By using a new de-convolution technique developed by our group, the broadening effect on measured beams caused by the width of an extended radio source has been re-moved so that we obtained higher accuracy on the measurements of MRT50 beams.

  15. Single-Dish Radio Polarimetry in the F-GAMMA Program with the Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beuchert Tobias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying the variability of polarized AGN jet emission in the radio band is crucial for understanding the dynamics of moving shocks as well as the structure of the underlying magnetic field. The 100-m Effelsberg Telescope is a high-quality instrument for studying the long-term variability of both total and polarized intensity as well as the electric-vector position angle. Since 2007, the F-GAMMA program has been monitoring the linear polarized emission of roughly 60 blazars at 11 frequencies between 2.7 and 43 GHz. Here, we describe the calibration of the polarimetric data at 5 and 10 GHz and the resulting F-GAMMA full-Stokes light curves for the exemplary case of the radio galaxy 3C 111.

  16. A survey of Radio Recombination Lines using Ooty Radio Telescope at 328 MHz in the Inner Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Baddi, Raju

    2012-01-01

    A survey of radio recombination lines in the Galactic plane with longitude $-32^o < l < +80^o$ and latitude $b<\\pm3^o$ using Ooty Radio Telescope(ORT) at 328 MHz has been reported. ORT observations were made using a New Digital Backend(NDB) augmented to it recently. With NDB ORT had a beam of $2^o.3 \\times 2^o.2 sec(\\delta)$ and a passband of $\\sim$1 MHz in the spectral line mode. The above mentioned Galactic region was divided into $\\sim 2^o \\times 2^o$ patches with the ORT beam pointed to the center. The ORT observations form a study of distribution of extended low-density warm-ionized medium(ELDWIM) in the inner Galaxy using H271$\\alpha$ RL. By obtaining kinematical distances using $V_{LSR}$ of the H271$\\alpha$ RLs the distribution of ELDWIM clouds within the inner Galaxy has been deduced for the region given above.

  17. Error analysis and distribution of the driving mechanism for large spherical radio telescope active reflector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Peng; Tang Xiaoqiang; Wang Liping; Yao Rui

    2008-01-01

    In order to reduce the cost, 3-PRS mechanism is introduced into the application of supporting the active reflector unit of large radio telescope. The kinematic model of 3-PRS mechanism with rotational joint errors is derived to solve the error problem in actual engineering application. Then based on the error model, inverse and forward kinematics are analyzed. Because the solutions can not be analytically expressed, a numerical method is applied. Afterwards, the parasitic motion errors are analyzed using search method and empirical formulas of the maximum parasitic motion error are put forward. Finally, the tolerance is distributed using empirical formulas to avoid interference between adjacent reflector units. The analyses provide a theoretical basis for the design and installation of large radio telescope active reflector.

  18. Correlated Oscillations Due to Similar Multipath Effects Seen in Two Widely Separated Radio Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, P. N.; Phuong, N. T.; Darriulat, P.; Nhung, P. T.; Anh, P. T.; Dong, P. N.; Hoai, D. T.; Thao, N. T.

    2014-07-01

    A multipath mechanism similar to that used in Australia sixty years ago by the Sea-cliff Interferometer is shown to generate correlations between the periods of oscillations observed by two distant radio telescopes pointed to the Sun. The oscillations are the result of interferences between the direct wave detected in the main antenna lobe and its reflection on ground detected in a side lobe. A model is made of such oscillations in the case of two observatories located at equal longitudes and opposite tropical latitudes, respectively in Ha Noi (Viet Nam) and Learmonth (Australia), where similar radio telescopes are operated at 1.4 GHz. Simple specular reflection from ground is found to give a good description of the observed oscillations and to explain correlations that had been previously observed and for which no satisfactory interpretation, instrumental or other, had been found.

  19. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Arun; Manoharan, P K; Krishnakumar, M A

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a b...

  20. Testing a modified ASKAP Mark II phased array feed on the 64 m Parkes radio telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Chippendale, A P; Deng, X; Leach, M; Reynolds, J E; Kramer, M; Tzioumis, T

    2016-01-01

    We present the first installation and characterization of a phased array feed (PAF) on the 64 m Parkes radio telescope. The combined system operates best between 0.8 GHz and 1.74 GHz where the beamformed noise temperature is between 45 K and 60 K, the aperture efficiency ranges from 70% to 80%, and the effective field of view is 1.4 deg$^2$ at 1310 MHz. After a 6-month trial observing program at Parkes, the PAF will be installed on the 100 m antenna at Effelsberg. This is the first time a PAF has been installed on a large single-antenna radio telescope and made available to astronomers.

  1. Correlated oscillations due to similar multi-path effects seen in two widely separated radio telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Diep, P N; Darriulat, P; Nhung, P T; Anh, P T; Dong, P N; Hoai, D T; Thao, N T

    2014-01-01

    A multipath mechanism similar to that used in Australia sixty years ago by the Sea-cliff Interferometer is shown to generate correlations between the periods of oscillations observed by two distant radio telescopes pointed to the Sun. The oscillations are the result of interferences between the direct wave detected in the main antenna lobe and its reflection on ground detected in a side lobe. A model is made of such oscillations in the case of two observatories located at equal longitudes and opposite tropical latitudes, respectively in Ha Noi (Viet Nam) and Learmonth (Australia), where similar radio telescopes are operated at 1.4 GHz. Simple specular reflection from ground is found to give a good description of the observed oscillations and to explain correlations that had been previously observed and for which no satisfactory interpretation, instrumental or other, had been found.

  2. Simultaneous observations of solar sporadic radio emission by the radio telescopes UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA within the frequency range 8-42 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Brazhenko, A.; Briand, C.; Dorovskyy, V.; Zarka, P.; Denis, L.; Bulatzen, V.; Frantzusenko, A.; Rucker, H.; Stanislavskyy, A.

    2012-09-01

    From 25 June till 12 August 2011 sporadic solar radio emission was observed simultaneously by three separate radio telescopes: UTR-2 (Kharkov, Ukraine), URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) and NDA (Nancay, France). During these observations some interesting phenomena were observed. Some of them are discussed in this paper.

  3. MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF ORBIT TRACKING MOVEMENT OF FEED SYSTEM IN LARGE SPHERICAL RADIO-TELESCOPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming-zhi; SHEN Yu-ru; LIU Jun; NA Bai

    2005-01-01

    The curve equation and its mechanics analysis of suspended-cable under the condition of end load are given. Then on the basis of it, the mechanical analysis of suspended-cable system for large spherical radio-telescope is studied, and procedures of the control for the orbit tracking movement of the line feed in large spherical radiotelescope are given. The validity of the results mentioned above is confirmed by means of computer simulations.

  4. Reliability-centered maintenance for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antenna arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, G.; Formentin, F.; Rampini, F.

    2014-07-01

    In the last years, EIE GROUP has been more and more involved in large optical telescopes and radio antennas array projects. In this frame, the paper describes a fundamental aspect of the Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) process, that is the application of the Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodology for the generation of maintenance plans for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antennas arrays. This helps maintenance engineers to make sure that the telescopes continue to work properly, doing what their users require them to do in their present operating conditions. The main objective of the RCM process is to establish the complete maintenance regime, with the safe minimum required maintenance, carried out without any risk to personnel, telescope and subsystems. At the same time, a correct application of the RCM allows to increase the cost effectiveness, telescope uptime and items availability, and to provide greater understanding of the level of risk that the organization is managing. At the same time, engineers shall make a great effort since the initial phase of the project to obtain a telescope requiring easy maintenance activities and simple replacement of the major assemblies, taking special care on the accesses design and items location, implementation and design of special lifting equipment and handling devices for the heavy items. This maintenance engineering framework is based on seven points, which lead to the main steps of the RCM program. The initial steps of the RCM process consist of: system selection and data collection (MTBF, MTTR, etc.), definition of system boundaries and operating context, telescope description with the use of functional block diagrams, and the running of a FMECA to address the dominant causes of equipment failure and to lay down the Critical Items List. In the second part of the process the RCM logic is applied, which helps to determine the appropriate maintenance tasks for each identified failure mode. Once

  5. New Mexico Fiber-Optic Link Marks Giant Leap Toward Future of Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    SOCORRO, NM -- Scientists and engineers at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) have made a giant leap toward the future of radio astronomy by successfully utilizing the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in conjunction with an antenna of the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) using the longest fiber-optic data link ever demonstrated in radio astronomy. The 65-mile fiber link will allow scientists to use the two National Science Foundation (NSF) facilities together in real time, and is the first step toward expanding the VLA to include eight proposed new radio-telescope antennas throughout New Mexico. LEFT: Miller Goss, NRAO's director of VLA/VLBA Operations, unveils graphic showing success of the Pie Town-VLA fiber link. The project, funded by the NSF and Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), which operates NRAO for the NSF, links the VLA and the VLBA antenna in Pie Town, NM, using a Western New Mexico Telephone Co. fiber-optic cable. The successful hookup was announced at a ceremony that also marked the 10th anniversary of NRAO's Operations Center in Socorro. "Linking the Pie Town antenna to the VLA quadruples the VLA's ability to make detailed images of astronomical objects," said Paul Vanden Bout, NRAO's Director. "This alone makes the link an advance for science, but its greater importance is that it clearly demonstrates the technology for improving the VLA's capabilities even more in the future." "Clearly, the big skies and wide open spaces in New Mexico create near perfect conditions for the incredible astronomical assets located in our state. This new fiber-optic link paves the way for multiplying the already breathtaking scientific capabilities of the VLA," Senator Pete Domenici (R-NM) said. The VLA is a system of 27 radio-telescope antennas distributed over the high desert west of Socorro, NM, in the shape of a giant "Y." Made famous in movies, commercials and numerous published photos, the VLA has been one of the most productive

  6. The Allen Telescope Array Twenty-centimeter Survey - A 690-Square-Degree, 12-Epoch Radio Dataset - I: Catalog and Long-Duration Transient Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Croft, Steve; Ackermann, Rob; Atkinson, Shannon; Backer, Don; Backus, Peter; Barott, William C; Bauermeister, Amber; Blitz, Leo; Bock, Douglas; Bradford, Tucker; Cheng, Calvin; Cork, Chris; Davis, Mike; DeBoer, Dave; Dexter, Matt; Dreher, John; Engargiola, Greg; Fields, Ed; Fleming, Matt; Forster, James R; Gutierrez-Kraybill, Colby; Harp, Gerry; Helfer, Tamara; Hull, Chat; Jordan, Jane; Jorgensen, Susanne; Keating, Garrett; Kilsdonk, Tom; Law, Casey; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Lugten, John; MacMahon, Dave; McMahon, Peter; Milgrome, Oren; Pierson, Tom; Randall, Karen; Ross, John; Shostak, Seth; Siemion, Andrew; Smolek, Ken; Tarter, Jill; Thornton, Douglas; Urry, Lynn; Vitouchkine, Artyom; Wadefalk, Niklas; Welch, Jack; Werthimer, Dan; Whysong, David; Williams, Peter K G; Wright, Melvyn

    2010-01-01

    We present the Allen Telescope Array Twenty-centimeter Survey (ATATS), a multi-epoch (12 visits), 690 square degree radio image and catalog at 1.4GHz. The survey is designed to detect rare, very bright transients as well as to verify the capabilities of the ATA to form large mosaics. The combined image using data from all 12 ATATS epochs has RMS noise sigma = 3.94mJy / beam and dynamic range 180, with a circular beam of 150 arcsec FWHM. It contains 4408 sources to a limiting sensitivity of S = 20 mJy / beam. We compare the catalog generated from this 12-epoch combined image to the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), a legacy survey at the same frequency, and find that we can measure source positions to better than ~20 arcsec. For sources above the ATATS completeness limit, the median flux density is 97% of the median value for matched NVSS sources, indicative of an accurate overall flux calibration. We examine the effects of source confusion due to the effects of differing resolution between ATATS and NVSS on our abi...

  7. First observations of the water masers with the Urumqi 25m radio telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new radio spectral receiving system has been installed on the 25 m radio telescope of the Urumqi Astronomical Observatory. The back end is a surface acoustic wave chirp transform spectrometer (SAW CZT), used for the first time in radio astronomy. The calibration of the line observations has carefully been investigated for the new-type spectrometer. In order to test the feasibility of the prototype spectrometer, we observed water maser emission from a number of known Galactic sources. We describe the observed spectra of W49N, W3(OH), 2248+600 and 1909+090. We found that W49N spectrum showed high-velocity features ranging from -330 to 146 km s-1. In comparison with the spectra observed by Medicina, the feature at the LSR velocity -52 km s-1 in the W3(OH) presented the rapid variation in flux density.

  8. The Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) Science Education Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, D. C.; Klein, M. J.; Wolff, S. E.

    2004-12-01

    The Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project (GAVRT) offers a unique opportunity for students in grades K through 12 to not only learn about science through radio astronomy, but to actually do it. GAVRT is a science education partnership involving NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Lewis Center for Educational Research (LCER). Following a preparation period using curriculum especially written for the Project, teachers connect to the Operations Control Center at LCER where trained operators assist the students to conduct remotely controlled radio astronomy observations using a 34-m diameter antenna located at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex. Students use computers to record extremely faint radio waves collected by the radio telescope and analyze real data. Scientists at JPL and other research institutions ultimately validate and incorporate the data into their research. Through this process students have the opportunity to become part of a science/education team, participating with scientists in ongoing missions and special observing campaigns. Their measurements are often included in papers appearing in major scientific journals. They learn that they can make valuable contributions to the world of science. This presentation will detail the types of data and the "campaigns" in which the students are conducting observations of the radiation belts of Jupiter, the deep atmosphere of Uranus and Saturn, and the time variations in the radio emission from distant Quasars. It will describe how the student-produced data are valued by the scientists and how the involvement of the scientists impacts the attitudes and abilities of students in the classroom. The JPL contribution to this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Division x: Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Russ; Chapman, Jessica; Rendong, Nan; Carilli, Christopher; Giovannini, Gabriele; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prajval

    2012-04-01

    This triennium has seen a phenomenal investment in development of observational radio astronomy facilities in all parts of the globe at a scale that significantly impacts the international community. This includes both major enhancements such as the transition from the VLA to the EVLA in North America, and the development of new facilities such as LOFAR, ALMA, FAST, and Square Kilometre Array precursor telescopes in Australia and South Africa. These developments are driven by advances in radio-frequency, digital and information technologies that tremendously enhance the capabilities in radio astronomy. These new developments foreshadow major scientific advances driven by radio observations in the next triennium. We highlight these facility developments in section 3 of this report. A selection of science highlight from this triennium are summarized in section 2.

  10. Identifying Hidden Supernova Remnants in M83 with the VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Bradley; Stockdale, Christopher; Blair, William P.; Cowan, John J.; Godfrey, Leith; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Maddox, Larry A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pritchard, Tyler A.; Soria, Roberto; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2017-01-01

    We present results of our analysis of C and L band observations of the grand design spiral galaxy, M83 made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). With recent optical (HST) and X-ray (Chandra) observations and utilizing the newly expanded bandwidth of the VLA, we are exploring the radio spectral properties of the historical radio point sources in M83 and have discovered more than 250 discrete radio sources. These observations allow us to probe the evolution of supernova remnants (SNRs) and to find previously undiscovered SNRs. These observations represent the fourth epoch of deep VLA observations of M83. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities.

  11. The Likelihood Ratio as a tool for Radio Continuum Surveys with SKA precursor telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    McAlpine, Kim; Jarvis, Matthew J; Bonfield, David G; Fleuren, Simone

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of the likelihood ratio method as a tool for identifying optical and infrared counterparts to proposed radio continuum surveys with SKA precursor and pathfinder telescopes. We present a comparison of the infrared counterparts identified by the likelihood ratio in the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey to radio observations with 6, 10 and 15 arcsec resolution. We cross-match a deep radio catalogue consisting of radio sources with peak flux density $>$ 60 $\\mu$Jy with deep near-infrared data limited to $K_{\\mathrm{s}}\\lesssim$ 22.6. Comparing the infrared counterparts from this procedure to those obtained when cross-matching a set of simulated lower resolution radio catalogues indicates that degrading the resolution from 6 arcsec to 10 and 15 arcsec decreases the completeness of the cross-matched catalogue by approximately 3 and 7 percent respectively. When matching against shallower infrared data, comparable to that achieved by the VISTA Hemisphere...

  12. A low frequency radio telescope at Mauritius for a Southern sky survey

    CERN Document Server

    Golap, K; Sachdev, S; Dodson, R; Sastry, C V; Sastry, Ch. V.

    1998-01-01

    A new, meter-wave radio telescope has been built in the North-East of Mauritius, an island in the Indian ocean, at a latitude of -20.14 deg. The Mauritius Radio Telescope (MRT) is a Fourier Synthesis T-shaped array, consisting of a 2048 m long East-West arm and a 880 m long South arm. In the East-West arm 1024 fixed helices are arranged in 32 groups and in the South arm 16 trolleys, with four helices on each, which move on a rail are used. A 512 channel digital complex correlation receiver is used to measure the visibility function. At least 60 days of observing are required for obtaining the visibilities up to 880 m spacing. The Fourier transform of the calibrated visibilities produces a map of the area of the sky under observation with a synthesized beam width 4'X 4.6'sec(dec+20.14) at 151.5 MHz. The primary objective of the telescope is to produce a sky survey in the declination range -70 deg to -10 deg with a point source sensitivity of about 200 mJy (3-sigma level). This will be the southern sky equivale...

  13. Discovery of two millisecond pulsars in Fermi sources with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Cognard, I; Johnson, T J; Smith, D A; Venter, C; Harding, A K; Wolff, M T; Cheung, C C; Donato, D; Abdo, A A; Ballet, J; Camilo, F; Desvignes, G; Dumora, D; Ferrara, E C; Freire, P C C; Grove, J E; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Michelson, P F; Parent, D; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Romani, R W; Parkinson, P M Saz; Stappers, B W; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of two millisecond pulsars in a search for radio pulsations at the positions of \\emph{Fermi Large Area Telescope} sources with no previously known counterparts, using the Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope. The two millisecond pulsars, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, have rotational periods of 2.896 and 5.192 ms and are both in binary systems with low-eccentricity orbits and orbital periods of 2.2 and 125.9 days respectively, suggesting long recycling processes. Gamma-ray pulsations were subsequently detected for both objects, indicating that they power the associated \\emph{Fermi} sources in which they were found. The gamma-ray light curves and spectral properties are similar to those of previously-detected gamma-ray millisecond pulsars. Detailed modeling of the observed radio and gamma-ray light curves shows that the gamma-ray emission seems to originate at high altitudes in their magnetospheres. Additionally, X-ray observations revealed the presence of an X-ray source at the position of PSR ...

  14. High-Redshift Radio Galaxies from Deep Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. H. Ishwara-Chandra; S. K. Sirothia; Y. Wadadekar; S. Pal

    2011-12-01

    Most of the radio galaxies with > 3 have been found using the red-shift spectral index correlation.We have started a programme with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to exploit this correlation at flux density levels about 100 times deeper than the known high-redshift radio galaxies, with an aim to detect candidate high-redshift radio galaxies. Here we present results from the deep 150 MHz observations of LBDS-Lynx field, which has been imaged at 327, 610 and 1412 MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and at 1400 and 4860 MHz with the Very Large Array (VLA). We find about 150 radio sources with spectra steeper than 1. About two-thirds of these are not detected in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), hence are strong candidate high-redshift radio galaxies, which need to be further explored with deep infra-red imaging and spectroscopy to estimate the red-shift.

  15. "RadioAstron"-A telescope with a size of 300 000 km: Main parameters and first observational results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardashev, N. S.; Khartov, V. V.; Abramov, V. V.; Avdeev, V. Yu.; Alakoz, A. V.; Aleksandrov, Yu. A.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Andreyanov, V. V.; Andrianov, A. S.; Antonov, N. M.; Artyukhov, M. I.; Arkhipov, M. Yu.; Baan, W.; Babakin, N. G.; Babyshkin, V. E.; Bartel', N.; Belousov, K. G.; Belyaev, A. A.; Berulis, J. J.; Burke, B. F.; Biryukov, A. V.; Bubnov, A. E.; Burgin, M. S.; Busca, G.; Bykadorov, A. A.; Bychkova, V. S.; Vasil'kov, V. I.; Wellington, K. J.; Vinogradov, I. S.; Wietfeldt, R.; Voitsik, P. A.; Gvamichava, A. S.; Girin, I. A.; Gurvits, L. I.; Dagkesamanskii, R. D.; D'Addario, L.; Giovannini, G.; Jauncey, D. L.; Dewdney, P. E.; D'yakov, A. A.; Zharov, V. E.; Zhuravlev, V. I.; Zaslavskii, G. S.; Zakhvatkin, M. V.; Zinov'ev, A. N.; Ilinen, Yu.; Ipatov, A. V.; Kanevskii, B. Z.; Knorin, I. A.; Casse, J. L.; Kellermann, K. I.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Kovalev, Yu. Yu.; Kovalenko, A. V.; Kogan, B. L.; Komaev, R. V.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Kopelyanskii, G. D.; Korneev, Yu. A.; Kostenko, V. I.; Kotik, A. N.; Kreisman, B. B.; Kukushkin, A. Yu.; Kulishenko, V. F.; Cooper, D. N.; Kut'kin, A. M.; Cannon, W. H.; Larionov, M. G.; Lisakov, M. M.; Litvinenko, L. N.; Likhachev, S. F.; Likhacheva, L. N.; Lobanov, A. P.; Logvinenko, S. V.; Langston, G.; McCracken, K.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Melekhin, M. V.; Menderov, A. V.; Murphy, D. W.; Mizyakina, T. A.; Mozgovoi, Yu. V.; Nikolaev, N. Ya.; Novikov, B. S.; Novikov, I. D.; Oreshko, V. V.; Pavlenko, Yu. K.; Pashchenko, I. N.; Ponomarev, Yu. N.; Popov, M. V.; Pravin-Kumar, A.; Preston, R. A.; Pyshnov, V. N.; Rakhimov, I. A.; Rozhkov, V. M.; Romney, J. D.; Rocha, P.; Rudakov, V. A.; Räisänen, A.; Sazankov, S. V.; Sakharov, B. A.; Semenov, S. K.; Serebrennikov, V. A.; Schilizzi, R. T.; Skulachev, D. P.; Slysh, V. I.; Smirnov, A. I.; Smith, J. G.; Soglasnov, V. A.; Sokolovskii, K. V.; Sondaar, L. H.; Stepan'yants, V. A.; Turygin, M. S.; Turygin, S. Yu.; Tuchin, A. G.; Urpo, S.; Fedorchuk, S. D.; Finkel'shtein, A. M.; Fomalont, E. B.; Fejes, I.; Fomina, A. N.; Khapin, Yu. B.; Tsarevskii, G. S.; Zensus, J. A.; Chuprikov, A. A.; Shatskaya, M. V.; Shapirovskaya, N. Ya.; Sheikhet, A. I.; Shirshakov, A. E.; Schmidt, A.; Shnyreva, L. A.; Shpilevskii, V. V.; Ekers, R. D.; Yakimov, V. E.

    2013-03-01

    The Russian Academy of Sciences and Federal Space Agency, together with the participation of many international organizations, worked toward the launch of the RadioAstron orbiting space observatory with its onboard 10-m reflector radio telescope from the Baikonur cosmodrome on July 18, 2011. Together with some of the largest ground-based radio telescopes and a set of stations for tracking, collecting, and reducing the data obtained, this space radio telescope forms a multi-antenna ground-space radio interferometer with extremely long baselines, making it possible for the first time to study various objects in the Universe with angular resolutions a million times better than is possible with the human eye. The project is targeted at systematic studies of compact radio-emitting sources and their dynamics. Objects to be studied include supermassive black holes, accretion disks, and relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei, stellar-mass black holes, neutron stars and hypothetical quark stars, regions of formation of stars and planetary systems in our and other galaxies, interplanetary and interstellar plasma, and the gravitational field of the Earth. The results of ground-based and inflight tests of the space radio telescope carried out in both autonomous and ground-space interferometric regimes are reported. The derived characteristics are in agreement with the main requirements of the project. The astrophysical science program has begun.

  16. GREEN BANK TELESCOPE AND SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE GALACTIC CENTER RADIO MAGNETAR SGR J1745–2900

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Ryan S.; Archibald, Robert F.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Scholz, Paul, E-mail: rlynch@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2015-06-20

    We present results from eight months of Green Bank Telescope 8.7 GHz observations and nearly 18 months of Swift X-ray telescope observations of the radio magnetar SGR J1745–2900. We tracked the radio and X-ray flux density, polarization properties, profile evolution, rotation, and single-pulse behavior. We identified two main periods of activity. The first is characterized by approximately 5.5 months of relatively stable evolution in radio flux density, rotation, and profile shape, while in the second these properties varied substantially. Specifically, a third profile component emerged and the radio flux also became more variable. The single pulse properties also changed, most notably with a larger fraction of pulses with pulse widths ∼5–20 ms in the erratic state. Bright single pulses are well described by a log-normal energy distribution at low energies, but with an excess at high energies. The 2–10 keV flux decayed steadily since the initial X-ray outburst, while the radio flux remained stable to within ∼20% during the stable state. A joint pulsar timing analysis of the radio and X-ray data shows a level of timing noise unprecedented in a radio magnetar, though during the time covered by the radio data alone the timing noise was at a level similar to that observed in other radio magnetars. While SGR J1745–2900 is similar to other radio magnetars in many regards, it differs by having experienced a period of relative stability in the radio that now appears to have ended, while the X-ray properties evolved independently.

  17. Radio properties of the magnetar near Sagittarius A* from observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, Ryan M

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out observations of the newly-discovered magnetar in the direction of Sagittarius A* using the Australia Telescope Compact Array in four frequency bands from 4.5 to 20 GHz. Radio pulsations are clearly detected at all frequencies. We measure the pulsar's dispersion measure to be 1650 +/- 50 cm^-3 pc, the highest of any of the known pulsars. Once Faraday rotation has been taken into account, the pulse profile is almost completely linearly polarized at all frequencies and has a small degree of circular polarization. The rotation measure of -67000 +/- 500 rad m^-2 is the largest ever measured in an astronomical object. The combination of the dispersion and rotation measures imples an integrated magnetic field strength of -50 uG along the line of sight. This object therefore joins the small class of radio emitting magnetars. Follow-up observations using single dishes are underway and will no doubt characterise this object further.

  18. A Real-Time, GPU-Based, Non-Imaging Back-End for Radio Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Magro, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of RRATs, interest in single pulse radio searches has increased dramatically. Due to the large data volumes generated by these searches, especially in planned surveys for future radio telescopes, such searches have to be conducted in real-time. This has led to the development of a multitude of search techniques and real-time pipeline prototypes. In this work we investigated the applicability of GPUs. We have designed and implemented a scalable, flexibile, GPU-based, transient search pipeline composed of several processing stages, including RFI mitigation, dedispersion, event detection and classification, as well as data quantisation and persistence. These stages are encapsulated as a standalone framework. The optimised GPU implementation of direct dedispersion achieves a speedup of more than an order of magnitude when compared to an optimised CPU implementation. We use a density-based clustering algorithm, coupled with a candidate selection mechanism to group detections caused by the same ...

  19. SPAN512: A new mid-latitude pulsar survey with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Desvignes, Gregory; Champion, David; Lazarus, Patrick; Lespagnol, Patrice; Smith, David A; Theureau, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    We present an ongoing survey with the Nan\\c{c}ay Radio Telescope at L-band. The targeted area is $74^\\circ \\lesssim l <150^\\circ$ and $3.5^\\circ < |b| < 5^\\circ$. This survey is characterized by a long integration time (18 min), large bandwidth (512 MHz) and high time and frequency resolution (64 $\\mu$s and 0.5 MHz) giving a nominal sensitivity limit of 0.055 mJy for long period pulsars. This is about 2 times better than the mid-latitude HTRU survey, and is designed to be complementary with current large scale surveys. This survey will be more sensitive to transients (RRATs, intermittent pulsars), distant and faint millisecond pulsars as well as scintillating sources (or any other kind of radio faint sources) than all previous short-integration surveys.

  20. Rayleigh beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padin, S

    2014-12-01

    Millimeter-wavelength Rayleigh scattering from water droplets in a cloud is proposed as a means of generating a bright beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope. A λ=3  mm transmitter, with an output power of a few watts, illuminating a stratiform cloud, can generate a beacon with the same flux as Mars in 10 GHz bandwidth, but the beacon has a narrow line width, so it is extremely bright. The key advantage of the beacon is that it can be used at any time, and positioned anywhere in the sky, as long as there are clouds.

  1. Design and implementation of an error-compensating subreflector for the NRAO 12-m radio telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, C. E.; Emerson, D. T.; Davis, J. H.

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes the measurement of the surface shape of the primary reflector of the NRAO 12-m radio telescope and the use of the measurements to machine the shape of a secondary mirror to compensate for the primary reflector errors. The method known as holography was used with the 38.04-GHz transmitter onboard the geosynchronous Lincoln Experimental Satellite to map the main reflector. The machining of the secondary compensated for the errors in the primary shape, and as a result, at 345 GHz, the axial gain of the instrument was increased by about 50% and the antenna pattern correspondingly improved.

  2. The OH Maser Line Receiving System for the Urumqi 25m Radio Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Bo Zhang; Jarken Esimbek; Jian-Jun Zhou; Xing-Wu Zhen; Xi-Zhen Zhang; Wen-Jie Yang

    2005-01-01

    A maser spectral line system is newly implemented on the Urumqi 25m Radio Telescope. The system consists mainly of a cooling receiver and a 4096channels digital correlation spectrometer. The frequency resolution of the spectrometer at the maximum signal bandwidth of 80 MHz is 19.5 kHz. After careful calibrations observation at the 1665MHz OH maser emission was made towards a number of sources, including W49N and W75N. The observed results demonstrate that the digital correlation spectrometer is suitable for astronomical spectral line observations.

  3. The control system of the 3 mm band SIS receiver for the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladu, A.; Ortu, P.; Saba, A.; Pili, M.; Guadiomonte, F.; Navarrini, A.; Urru, E.; Pisanu, T.; Valente, G.; Marongiu, P.; Mazzarella, G.

    2016-07-01

    We present the control system of the 84-116 GHz (3 mm band) Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) heterodyne receiver to be installed at the Gregorian focus of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT). The control system is based on a single-board computer from Raspberry, on microcontrollers from Arduino, and on a Python program for communication between the receiver and the SRT antenna control software, which remotely controls the backshorttuned SIS mixer, the receiver calibration system and the Local Oscillator (LO) system.

  4. Development of a Multi-frequency Interferometer Telescope for Radio Astronomy (MITRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingala, Dominique Guelord Kumamputu

    2015-03-01

    This dissertation describes the development and construction of the Multi-frequency Interferometer Telescope for Radio Astronomy (MITRA) at the Durban University of Technology. The MITRA station consists of 2 antenna arrays separated by a baseline distance of 8 m. Each array consists of 8 Log-Periodic Dipole Antennas (LPDAs) operating from 200 MHz to 800 MHz. The design and construction of the LPDA antenna and receiver system is described. The receiver topology provides an equivalent noise temperature of 113.1 K and 55.1 dB of gain. The Intermediate Frequency (IF) stage was designed to produce a fixed IF frequency of 800 MHz. The digital Back-End and correlator were implemented using a low cost Software Defined Radio (SDR) platform and Gnu-Radio software. Gnu-Octave was used for data analysis to generate the relevant received signal parameters including total power, real, and imaginary, magnitude and phase components. Measured results show that interference fringes were successfully detected within the bandwidth of the receiver using a Radio Frequency (RF) generator as a simulated source. This research was presented at the IEEE Africon 2013 / URSI Session Mauritius, and published in the proceedings.

  5. Non-thermal emission from extragalactic radio sources a high resolution broad band (radio to X-rays) approach

    CERN Document Server

    Brunetti, G

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the study of extragalactic radio sources, we will focus on the importance of the spatial resolution at different wavelengths, and of the combination of observations at different frequency bands. In particular, a substantial step forward in this field is now provided by the new generation X-ray telescopes which are able to image radio sources in between 0.1--10 keV with a spatial resolution comparable with that of the radio telescopes (VLA) and of the optical telescopes. After a brief description of some basic aspects of acceleration mechanisms and of the radiative processes at work in the extragalactic radio sources, we will focus on a number of recent radio, optical and X-ray observations with arcsec resolution, and discuss the deriving constraints on the physics of these sources.

  6. Back to the future: science and technology directions for radio telescopes of the twenty-first century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, James M.

    2009-08-01

    The early days of radio astronomy showed incredibly diverse experimentation in ways to sample the electromagnetic spectrum at radio wavelengths. In addition to obtaining adequate sensitivity by building large collection areas, a primary goal also was to achieve sufficient angular resolution to localize radio sources for multi-wavelength identification. This led to many creative designs and the invention of aperture synthesis and VLBI. Some of the basic telescope types remain to the present day, now implemented across the entire radio spectrum from wavelengths of tens of meters to submillimeter wavelengths. In recent years, as always, there is still the drive for greater sensitivity but a primary goal is now to achieve very large fields of view to complement high resolution and frequency coverage, leading to a new phase of experimentation. This is the “back to the future” aspect of current research and development for next-generation radio telescopes. In this paper I summarize the scientific motivations for development of new technology and telescopes since about 1990 and going forward for the next decade and longer. Relevant elements include highly optimized telescope optics and feed antenna designs, innovative fabrication methods for large reflectors and dipole arrays, digital implementations, and hardware vs. software processing. The emphasis will be on meter and centimeter wavelength telescopes but I include a brief discussion of millimeter wavelengths to put the longer wavelength enterprises into perspective. I do not discuss submillimeter wavelengths because they are covered in other papers.

  7. The Engineering Development Array: A Low Frequency Radio Telescope Utilising SKA Precursor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayth, Randall; Sokolowski, Marcin; Booler, Tom; Crosse, Brian; Emrich, David; Grootjans, Robert; Hall, Peter J.; Horsley, Luke; Juswardy, Budi; Kenney, David; Steele, Kim; Sutinjo, Adrian; Tingay, Steven J.; Ung, Daniel; Walker, Mia; Williams, Andrew; Beardsley, A.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Morales, M. F.; Pallot, D.; Trott, C. M.; Wu, C.

    2017-08-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Engineering Development Array, which is a low-frequency radio telescope comprising 256 dual-polarisation dipole antennas working as a phased array. The Engineering Development Array was conceived of, developed, and deployed in just 18 months via re-use of Square Kilometre Array precursor technology and expertise, specifically from the Murchison Widefield Array radio telescope. Using drift scans and a model for the sky brightness temperature at low frequencies, we have derived the Engineering Development Array's receiver temperature as a function of frequency. The Engineering Development Array is shown to be sky-noise limited over most of the frequency range measured between 60 and 240 MHz. By using the Engineering Development Array in interferometric mode with the Murchison Widefield Array, we used calibrated visibilities to measure the absolute sensitivity of the array. The measured array sensitivity matches very well with a model based on the array layout and measured receiver temperature. The results demonstrate the practicality and feasibility of using Murchison Widefield Array-style precursor technology for Square Kilometre Array-scale stations. The modular architecture of the Engineering Development Array allows upgrades to the array to be rolled out in a staged approach. Future improvements to the Engineering Development Array include replacing the second stage beamformer with a fully digital system, and to transition to using RF-over-fibre for the signal output from first stage beamformers.

  8. An innovative, highly sensitive receiver system for the Square Kilometre Array Mid Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Gie Han; Lehmensiek, Robert; Billade, Bhushan; Caputa, Krzysztof; Gauffre, Stéphane; Theron, Isak P.; Pantaleev, Miroslav; Ljusic, Zoran; Quertier, Benjamin; Peens-Hough, Adriaan

    2016-07-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Project is a global science and engineering project realizing the next-generation radio telescopes operating in the metre and centimetre wavelengths regions. This paper addresses design concepts of the broadband, exceptionally sensitive receivers and reflector antennas deployed in the SKA1-Mid radio telescope to be located in South Africa. SKA1-Mid (350 MHz - 13.8 GHz with an option for an upper limit of 24 GHz) will consist of 133 reflector antennas using an unblocked aperture, offset Gregorian configuration with an effective diameter of 15 m. Details on the unblocked aperture Gregorian antennas, low noise front ends and advanced direct digitization receivers, are provided from a system design perspective. The unblocked aperture results in increased aperture efficiency and lower side-lobe levels compared to a traditional on-axis configuration. The low side-lobe level reduces the noise contribution due to ground pick-up but also makes the antenna less susceptible to ground-based RFI sources. The addition of extra shielding on the sub-reflector provides a further reduction of ground pick-up. The optical design of the SKA1-Mid reflector antenna has been tweaked using advanced EM simulation tools in combination with sophisticated models for sky, atmospheric and ground noise contributions. This optimal antenna design in combination with very low noise, partially cryogenic, receivers and wide instantaneous bandwidth provide excellent receiving sensitivity in combination with instrumental flexibility to accommodate a wide range of astronomical observation modes.

  9. Measurements of Antenna Surface for Millimeter-Wave Space Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Doi, Akihiro; Sato, Eiichi

    2011-01-01

    In the construction of a space radio telescope, it is essential to use materials with a low noise factor and high mechanical robustness for the antenna surface. We present the results of measurements of the reflection performance of two candidates for antenna surface materials for use in a radio telescope installed in a new millimeter-wave astronomical satellite, ASTRO-G. To estimate the amount of degradation caused by fluctuations in the thermal environment in the projected orbit of the satellite, a thermal cycle test was carried out for two candidates, namely, copper foil carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and aluminum-coated CFRP. At certain points during the thermal cycle test, the reflection loss of the surfaces was measured precisely by using a radiometer in the 41-45 GHz band. In both candidates, cracks appeared on the surface after the thermal cycle test, where the number density of the cracks increased as the thermal cycle progressed. The reflection loss also increased in proportion to the number...

  10. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Arun; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Manoharan, P. K.; Krishnakumar, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a bandwidth of about four times larger (16 MHz) than that of the legacy system as well as its fluctuation spectrum with high temporal and frequency resolutions. The key point is that all the above modes operate in real time. This paper presents the design aspects of PONDER and outlines the design methodology for future similar backends. It also explains the principal operations of PONDER, illustrates its capabilities for a variety of pulsar and IPS observations and demonstrates its usefulness for a variety of astrophysical studies using the high sensitivity of the ORT.

  11. 21-cm Observations with the Morehead Radio Telescope: Involving Undergraduates in Observing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malphrus, B. K.; Combs, M. S.; Kruth, J.

    2000-12-01

    Herein we report astronomical observations made by undergraduate students with the Morehead Radio Telescope (MRT). The MRT, located at Morehead State University, Morehead, Kentucky, is small aperture (44-ft.) instrument designed by faculty, students, and industrial partners to provide a research instrument and active laboratory for undergraduate astronomy, physics, pre-engineering, and computer science students. Small aperture telescopes like the MRT have numerous advantages as active laboratories and as research instruments. The benefits to students are based upon a hands-on approach to learning concepts in astrophysics and engineering. Students are provided design and research challenges and are allowed to pursue their own solutions. Problem-solving abilities and research design skills are cultivated by this approach. Additionally, there are still contributions that small aperture centimeter-wave instruments can make. The MRT operates over a 6 MHz bandwidth centered at 1420 MHz (21-cm), which corresponds to the hyperfine transition of atomic hydrogen (HI). The HI spatial distribution and flux density associated with cosmic phenomena can be observed and mapped. The dynamics and kinematics of celestial objects can be investigated by observing over a range of frequencies (up to 2.5 MHz) with a 2048-channel back-end spectrometer, providing up to 1 KHz frequency resolution. The sensitivity and versatility of the telescope design facilitate investigation of a wide variety of cosmic phenomena, including supernova remnants, emission and planetary nebulae, extended HI emission from the Milky Way, quasars, radio galaxies, and the sun. Student observations of galactic sources herein reported include Taurus A, Cygnus X, and the Rosette Nebula. Additionally, we report observations of extragalactic phenomena, including Cygnus A, 3C 147, and 3C 146. These observations serve as a performance and capability test-bed of the MRT. In addition to the astronomical results of these

  12. Study on a novel panel support concept for radio telescopes with active surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dehua; Zhou, Guohua; Okoh, Daniel; Li, Guoping; Cheng, Jingquan

    2010-07-01

    Generally, panels of radio telescopes are mainly shaped in trapezoid and each is supported/positioned by four adjustors beneath its vertexes. Such configuration of panel supporting system is essentially hyper-static, and the panel is overconstrained from a kinematic point of view. When the panel is to be adjusted and/or actuated, it will suffer stress from its adjusters and hence its shape is to be distorted. This situation is not desirable for high precision panels, such as glass based panels especially used for sub-millimeter and shorter wavelength telescopes with active optics/active panel technology. This paper began with a general overview of panel patterns and panel supports of existing radio telescopes. Thereby, we proposed a preferable master-slave active surface concept for triangular and/or hexagonal panel pattern. In addition, we carry out panel error sensitivity analysis for all the 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) of a panel to identify what DOFs are most sensitive for an active surface. And afterwards, based on the error sensitivity analysis, we suggested an innovative parallel-series concept hexapod well fitted for an active panel to correct for all of its 6 rigid errors. A demonstration active surface using the master-slave concept and the hexapod manifested a great save in cost, where only 486 precision actuators are needed for 438 panels, which is 37% of those actuators needed by classic segmented mirror active optics. Further, we put forward a swaying-arm based design concept for the related connecting joints between panels, which ensures that all the panels attached on to it free from over-constraints when they are positioned and/or actuated. Principle and performance of the swaying-arm connecting mechanism are elaborated before a practical cablemesh based prototype active surface is presented with comprehensive finite element analysis and simulation.

  13. VLA Detection of RRLs from the radio nucleus of NGC 253 Ionization by a weak AGN, an obscured SSC or a compact SNR ?

    CERN Document Server

    Mohan, N R; Goss, W M; Mohan, Niruj R.

    2002-01-01

    We have imaged the H92alpha and H75alpha radio recombination line (RRL) emissions from the starburst galaxy NGC 253 with a resolution of ~4 pc. The peak of the RRL emission at both frequencies coincides with the unresolved radio nucleus. Both lines observed towards the nucleus are extremely wide, with FWHM of ~200 km /s. Modeling the RRL and radio continuum data for the radio nucleus shows that the lines arise in gas whose density is ~10^4 \\cc and mass is few thousand Msun, which requires an ionizing flux of (6-20)x10^{51} photons /s. We consider a SNR expanding in a dense medium, a star cluster and also an AGN as potential ionizing sources. Based on dynamical arguments, we rule out an SNR as a viable ionizing source. A star cluster model was considered and the dynamics of the ionized gas in a stellar-wind driven structure was investigated. Such a model is consistent with the properties of the ionized gas only for a cluster younger than ~10^5 years. The existence of such a young cluster at the nucleus seems i...

  14. Novel technology for the the Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope and MeerKAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Michael; Kraus, Alex; Wieching, Gundolf

    2015-08-01

    The 100-m radio telescope of the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR) is a unique European astronomical facility that combines superb sensitivity and wide frequency coverage (300 MHz - 95 GHz) with distinct versatility, making the telescope not only a cutting edge instrument for front-line research but also a testbed for emerging and future technology.Even more than 40 years old, the telescope has been continuously modernized and is heavily involved in various kinds of astronomical research as stand-alone instrument as well as in several VLBI networks. Currently, a large upgrade of the receiver suite at the telescope is ongoing. Several new, state-of-the-are broad-band receivers have been installed recently or are under constructions. Along with the new receivers, modern digital backends are being designed. We report on the current status of these upgrades by presenting some „highlights" and giving an outlook on the activities planned for the future.The technology developed and tested during these upgrades also finds application in the MeerKAT observatory in South Africa. MeerKAT is a fully funded radio observatory under construction in the Northern Cape of South Africa. When complete, MeerKAT’s 64 13.5-m dishes will form the - by far - most sensitive telescope in the Southern hemisphere, being equivalent to a 110 m dish. Due to the dish design with an offset Gregorian feed it will be 60%more sensitive than large center feed single dishes of comparable size.MPIfR is designing and constructing a 1.75- 3.44 GHz Receiver system for MeerKAT. The receiver will allow observations at a frequency range at currently unavailable sensitivity and spatial resolution in the Southern hemisphere. Combined with its powerful MPIfR Pulsar search backend it is expected to detect more than 1600 normal and 270 millisecond pulsars. In addition MeerKat will open up science that stays for its own but also prepares future observations with SKA and complements future SKA

  15. An Efficient Real-time Data Pipeline for the CHIME Pathfinder Radio Telescope X-Engine

    CERN Document Server

    Recnik, Andre; Denman, Nolan; Hincks, Adam D; Hinshaw, Gary; Klages, Peter; Vanderlinde, Keith

    2015-01-01

    The CHIME Pathfinder is a new interferometric radio telescope that uses a hybrid FPGA/GPU FX correlator. The GPU-based X-engine of this correlator processes over 819 Gb/s of 4+4-bit complex astronomical data from N=256 inputs across a 400 MHz radio band. A software framework is presented to manage this real-time data flow, which allows each of 16 processing servers to handle 51.2 Gb/s of astronomical data, plus 8 Gb/s of ancillary data. Each server receives data in the form of UDP packets from an FPGA F-engine over the eight 10 GbE links, combines data from these packets into large (32MB-256MB) buffered frames, and transfers them to multiple GPU co-processors for correlation. The results from the GPUs are combined and normalized, then transmitted to a collection server, where they are merged into a single file. Aggressive optimizations enable each server to handle this high rate of data; allowing the efficient correlation of 25 MHz of radio bandwidth per server. The solution scales well to larger values of N ...

  16. ALFABURST: A realtime fast radio burst monitor for the Arecibo telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth; MacMahon, David; Armour, Wes; Cobb, Jeff; Lorimer, Duncan; Rajwade, Kaustubh; Siemion, Andrew; Werthimer, Dan; Williams, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) constitute an emerging class of fast radio transient whose origin continues to be a mystery. Realizing the importance of increasing coverage of the search parameter space, we have designed, built, and deployed a realtime monitor for FRBs at the 305-m Arecibo radio telescope. Named 'ALFABURST', it is a commensal instrument that is triggered whenever the 1.4 GHz seven-beam Arecibo $L$-Band Feed Array (ALFA) receiver commences operation. The ongoing commensal survey we are conducting using ALFABURST has an instantaneous field of view of 0.02 sq. deg. within the FWHM of the beams, with the realtime software configurable to use up to 300 MHz of bandwidth. We search for FRBs with dispersion measure up to 2560 cm$^{-3}$ pc and pulse widths ranging from 0.128 ms to 16.384 ms. Commissioning observations performed over the past few months have demonstrated the capability of the instrument in detecting single pulses from known pulsars. In this paper, I describe the instrument and the associated ...

  17. Discovery and Follow-up of Rotating Radio Transients with the Green Bank and LOFAR Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Karako-Argaman, C; Lynch, R S; Hessels, J W T; Kondratiev, V I; McLaughlin, M A; Ransom, S M; Archibald, A M; Boyles, J; Jenet, F A; Kaplan, D L; Levin, L; Lorimer, D R; Madsen, E C; Roberts, M S E; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; van Leeuwen, J

    2015-01-01

    We have discovered 21 Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs) in data from the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) 350-MHz Drift-scan and the Green Bank North Celestial Cap pulsar surveys using a new candidate sifting algorithm. RRATs are pulsars with sporadic emission that are detected through their bright single pulses rather than Fourier domain searches. We have developed {\\tt RRATtrap}, a single-pulse sifting algorithm that can be integrated into pulsar survey data analysis pipelines in order to find RRATs and Fast Radio Bursts. We have conducted follow-up observations of our newly discovered sources at several radio frequencies using the GBT and Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), yielding improved positions and measurements of their periods, dispersion measures, and burst rates, as well as phase-coherent timing solutions for four of them. The new RRATs have dispersion measures (DMs) ranging from 15 to 97 pc cm$^{-3}$, periods of 240 ms to 3.4 s, and estimated burst rates of 20 to 400 pulses hr$^{-1}$ at 350 MHz. We use this ...

  18. The Morehead State University 21 M Space Tracking Antenna and Radio Telescope: an Instrument for Undergraduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malphrus, B. K.

    2004-12-01

    The Space Science Center at Morehead State University has developed a full motion 21-meter class radio telescope which is engaged in a rigorous research program in radio astronomy and also serves as a ground station with the capability to track low earth orbiting (LEO) satellites and as a test-bed for advanced RF systems. The new instrument achieved "First Light" in December 2004 and provides a unique educational tool that will serve as an active laboratory for students to have hands-on learning experiences with the intricacies of satellite telecommunications and radio astronomy. The instrument provides a state-of-the art laboratory for researchers and students in astrophysics, satellite telecommunications, engineering (including electrical, mechanical, and computer architecture), and software development. The 21 m telescope has achieved excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution and supports operations over a number of frequency regimes including: L-Band, S-Band, X-Band, Ku-Band, and ultimately Ka-Band. The gain of the large 21 meter antenna combined with a variety of state-of-the-art receivers and back-end electronics together provide a powerful telescope for teaching and research in radio frequency astrophysics. The 21 m telescope operates primarily in the radio regime at a central frequency of 1420 MHz (HI line) and ultimately at higher frequencies that will incorporate transition lines of hydroxyl, ammonia, and water. The sensitivity and versatility of the telescope design facilitate the investigation of a wide variety of astrophysically interesting phenomena. These objects include galactic sources such as supernova remnants, emission nebula, planetary nebula, extended HI emission from the Milky Way, and the sun. Extragalactic sources such as quasars, radio galaxies, and supernova remnants (SNRs) will also be observed. A long-term AGN monitoring campaign will be undertaken, beginning in 2005. Funding for the 21m telescope has been provided by NASA, the SBA

  19. ADDING CONTEXT TO JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE SURVEYS WITH CURRENT AND FUTURE 21 cm RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardsley, A. P.; Morales, M. F. [Department of Physics, University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lidz, A.; Malloy, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Sutter, P. M., E-mail: beards@phys.washington.edu [INFN - National Institute for Nuclear Physics via Valerio 2, I-34127, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-02-20

    Infrared and radio observations of the Epoch of Reionization promise to revolutionize our understanding of the cosmic dawn, and major efforts with the JWST, MWA, and HERA are underway. While measurements of the ionizing sources with infrared telescopes and the effect of these sources on the intergalactic medium with radio telescopes should be complementary, to date the wildly disparate angular resolutions and survey speeds have made connecting proposed observations difficult. In this paper we develop a method to bridge the gap between radio and infrared studies. While the radio images may not have the sensitivity and resolution to identify individual bubbles with high fidelity, by leveraging knowledge of the measured power spectrum we are able to separate regions that are likely ionized from largely neutral, providing context for the JWST observations of galaxy counts and properties in each. By providing the ionization context for infrared galaxy observations, this method can significantly enhance the science returns of JWST and other infrared observations.

  20. An integral monitoring of GRS1915+105: simultaneous observations with INTEGRAL, RXTE, the Ryle and Nancay radio telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, J; Hannikainen, D C; Lehto, H J

    2006-01-01

    Since the launch of INTEGRAL in late 2002 we have monitored the Galactic microquasar GRS 1915+105 with long exposures (~100 ks) pointings. All the observations have been conducted simultaneously with other instruments, in particular RXTE and the Ryle Telescope, and in some cases with others (Spitzer, Nancay, GMRT, Suzaku,...). We report here the results of 3 observations performed simultaneously with INTEGRAL, RXTE, the Ryle and Nancay radio telescopes. These observations show the so-called $\

  1. The Hitachi and Takahagi 32 m radio telescopes: Upgrade of the antennas from satellite communication to radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekura, Yoshinori; Saito, Yu; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Soon, Kang Lou; Momose, Munetake; Yokosawa, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Hideo; Kimura, Kimihiro; Abe, Yasuhiro; Nishimura, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Fujisawa, Kenta; Ohyama, Tomoaki; Kono, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Honma, Mareki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Sato, Katsuhisa; Ueno, Yuji; Jike, Takaaki; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Hirota, Tomoya; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Niinuma, Kotaro; Sorai, Kazuo; Takaba, Hiroshi; Hachisuka, Kazuya; Kondo, Tetsuro; Sekido, Mamoru; Murata, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Naomasa; Omodaka, Toshihiro

    2016-10-01

    The Hitachi and Takahagi 32 m radio telescopes (former satellite communication antennas) were so upgraded as to work at 6, 8, and 22 GHz. We developed the receiver systems, IF systems, back-end systems (including samplers and recorders), and reference systems. We measured the performance of the antennas. The system temperature including the atmosphere toward the zenith, T_sys^{ast }, is measured to be ˜30-40 K for 6 GHz and ˜25-35 K for 8 GHz. T_sys^{ast } for 22 GHz is measured to be ˜40-100 K in winter and ˜150-500 K in summer seasons, respectively. The aperture efficiency is 55%-75% for Hitachi at 6 GHz and 8 GHz, and 55%-65% for Takahagi at 8 GHz. The beam sizes at 6 GHz and 8 GHz are ˜4.6° and ˜3.8°, respectively. The side-lobe level is less than 3%-4% at 6 and 8 GHz. Pointing accuracy was measured to be better than ˜0.3° for Hitachi and ˜0.6° for Takahagi. We succeeded in VLBI observations in 2010 August, indicating good performance of the antenna. We started single-dish monitoring observations of 6.7 GHz methanol maser sources in 2012 December, and found several new sources showing short-term periodic variation of the flux density.

  2. The Morehead State University 18 Meter Radio Telescope Project: Involving Undergraduates in Observational Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malphrus, B. K.; Combs, M. S.; Kruth, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Space Science Center at Morehead State University is in the process of developing a large aperture (18-21 meter) cm-wave radio telescope, the Morehead Radio Telescope (MRT). The telescope will be located in the mountainous region of Eastern Kentucky. The instrument will serve as a research instrument and active laboratory for undergraduate astronomy, physics, pre-engineering, and computer science students. The antenna system will be engaged in science programs (in astrophysics) and in satellite mission support services (telemetry, tracking, and control). The benefits to students are based upon a hands-on approach to learning concepts in astrophysics and engineering. Additionally, there are still research contributions that small aperture centimeter-wave instruments can make including long-term observations of microvariability in AGNs, observations of transient events, and surveys. The MRT will operate three receiver systems including an L-band receiver (1.4-1.7 GHz) covering the "water hole", an S-band receiver (2.2-2.4 GHz) and a Ku-band receiver (11.2- 12.7 GHz) for continuum observations and satellite telemetry. The technical specifications for the instrument have been developed and an RFP has been issued inviting antenna vendors to submit proposals. The reflector will have a surface accuracy of 0.020 inches RMS over the entire surface, which will support relatively high frequency (Ku-band) observations. The antenna system will be full-motion and have a slew speed of 2 deg per second and an acceleration of 2 deg per second2. The HI and OH spatial distribution associated with cosmic phenomena will be investigated as well as dynamics and kinematics (particularly in HI) by observing over a range of frequencies (up to 2.5 MHz) with a 2048-channel back-end spectrometer, providing up to 1 KHz frequency resolution. The sensitivity and versatility of the telescope design will facilitate investigation of a wide variety of cosmic phenomena. The MRT is funded by

  3. The radio/gamma-ray connection in Active Galactic Nuclei in the era of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M; Allafort, A; Angelakis, E; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Cannon, A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cutini, S; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Escande, L; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fuhrmann, L; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grandi, P; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Healey, S E; J, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kn, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Lee, S -H; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makeev, A; Max-Moerbeck, W; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Nishino, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Pavlidou, V; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rain, S; Razzano, M; Readhead, A; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Richards, J L; Romani, R W; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Scargle, J D; Sgr, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Taylor, G B; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Troja, E; Vandenbroucke, J; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Ziegler, M

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of the correlation between radio and gamma-ray emission of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) detected by Fermi during its first year of operation, with the largest datasets ever used for this purpose. We use both archival interferometric 8.4 GHz data (from the VLA and ATCA, for the full sample of 599 sources) and concurrent single-dish 15 GHz measurements from the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO, for a sub sample of 199 objects). Our unprecedentedly large sample permits us to assess with high accuracy the statistical significance of the correlation, using a surrogate-data method designed to simultaneously account for common-distance bias and the effect of a limited dynamical range in the observed quantities. We find that the statistical significance of a positive correlation between the cm radio and the broad band (E>100 MeV) gamma-ray energy flux is very high for the whole AGN sample, with a probability <1e-7 for the correlation appearing by chance. Using the...

  4. Deep 610-MHz Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of the Spitzer extragalactic First Look Survey field - III. The radio properties of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Garn, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of source which are bright at radio frequencies, but do not appear in deep infrared images. We report the detection of 14 IFRSs within the Spitzer extragalactic First Look Survey field, eight of which are detected near to the limiting magnitude of a deep R-band image of the region, at R ~ 24.5. Sensitive Spitzer Space Telescope images are stacked in order to place upper limits on their mid-infrared flux densities, and using recent 610-MHz and 1.4-GHz observations we find that they have spectral indices which vary between alpha = 0.05 and 1.38, where we define alpha such that S = S_0 nu^(- alpha), and should not be thought of as a single source population. We place constraints on the luminosity and linear size of these sources, and through comparison with well-studied local objects in the 3CRR catalogue demonstrate that they can be modelled as being compact ( 4).

  5. Variable Correlation Digital Noise Source on FPGA — A Versatile Tool for Debugging Radio Telescope Backends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Kaushal D.; Gupta, Yashwant; Ajith Kumar, B.

    Contemporary wideband radio telescope backends are generally developed on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) or hybrid (FPGA+GPU) platforms. One of the challenges faced while developing such instruments is the functional verification of the signal processing backend at various stages of development. In the case of an interferometer or pulsar backend, the typical requirement is for one independent noise source per input, with provision for a common, correlated signal component across all the inputs, with controllable level of correlation. This paper describes the design of a FPGA-based variable correlation Digital Noise Source (DNS), and its applications to built-in testing and debugging of correlators and beamformers. This DNS uses the Central Limit Theorem-based approach for generation of Gaussian noise, and the architecture is optimized for resource requirements and ease of integration with existing signal processing blocks on FPGA.

  6. A Generic and Efficient E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator for Next-Generation Radio Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Bowman, Judd D; Morales, Miguel F

    2015-01-01

    Modern radio telescopes are favoring densely packed array layouts consisting of large numbers of antennas ($N_\\textrm{a}\\gtrsim 1000$). Since the complexity of traditional correlators scales as $\\mathcal{O}(N_\\textrm{a}^2)$, there will be a steep cost for realizing the full imaging potential of these powerful instruments. Through our generic and efficient E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator (EPIC), we present the first software demonstration of a generalized direct imaging algorithm known as the Modular Optimal Frequency Fourier (MOFF) imager. It takes advantage of the multiplication-convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. Not only does it bring down the cost for dense layouts to $\\mathcal{O}(N_\\textrm{a}\\log_2 N_\\textrm{a})$ but can also image from irregularly arranged heterogeneous antenna arrays. EPIC is highly modular and parallelizable, implemented in object oriented Python, and publicly available. We have verified the images produced to be equivalent to those produced using traditional techniques. We...

  7. A limit on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux from lunar observations with the Parkes radio telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Bray, J D; Roberts, P; Reynolds, J E; James, C W; Phillips, C J; Protheroe, R J; McFadden, R A; Aartsen, M G

    2015-01-01

    We report a limit on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux based on a non-detection of radio pulses from neutrino-initiated particle cascades in the Moon, in observations with the Parkes radio telescope undertaken as part of the LUNASKA project. Due to the improved sensitivity of these observations, which had an effective duration of 127 hours and a frequency range of 1.2-1.5 GHz, this limit extends to lower neutrino energies than those from previous lunar radio experiments, with a detection threshold below 10^20 eV. The calculation of our limit allows for the possibility of lunar-origin pulses being misidentified as local radio interference, and includes the effect of small-scale lunar surface roughness. The targeting strategy of the observations also allows us to place a directional limit on the neutrino flux from the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A.

  8. A Radio-Selected Black Hole X-ray Binary Candidate in the Milky Way Globular Cluster M62

    CERN Document Server

    Chomiuk, Laura; Maccarone, Thomas J; Miller-Jones, James C A; Heinke, Craig; Noyola, Eva; Seth, Anil C; Ransom, Scott

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a candidate stellar-mass black hole in the Milky Way globular cluster M62. We detected the black hole candidate, which we term M62-VLA1, in the core of the cluster using deep radio continuum imaging from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. M62-VLA1 is a faint source, with a flux density of 18.7 +/- 1.9 microJy at 6.2 GHz and a flat radio spectrum (alpha=-0.24 +/- 0.42, for S_nu = nu^alpha). M62 is the second Milky Way cluster with a candidate stellar-mass black hole; unlike the two candidate black holes previously found in the cluster M22, M62-VLA1 is associated with a Chandra X-ray source, supporting its identification as a black hole X-ray binary. Measurements of its radio and X-ray luminosity, while not simultaneous, place M62-VLA1 squarely on the well-established radio--X-ray correlation for stellar-mass black holes. In archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging, M62-VLA1 is coincident with a star near the lower red giant branch. This possible optical counterpart shows a blue exce...

  9. Calibrating high-precision Faraday rotation measurements for LOFAR and the next generation of low-frequency radio telescopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotomayor-Beltran, C.; Sobey, C.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Bruyn, de G.; Noutsos, A.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I.M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M.E.; Bell, M.R.; Bentum, M.J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brouw, W.N.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Gasperin, de F.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Duin, van A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R.A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M.A.; Griessmeier, J.; Grit, T.; Gunst, A.W.; Hassall, T.E.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Keane, E.; Kohler, J; Kramer, M.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Leeuwen, van J.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Markoff, S.; McKean, J.P.; Mulcahy, D.D.; Munk, H.; Orrú, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pilia, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Serylak, M.; Sluman, J.; Stappers, B.W.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Veen, ter S.; Vermeulen, R.; Weeren, van R.J.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Wijnholds, S.J.; Wise, M.W.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.

    2013-01-01

    Faraday rotation measurements using the current and next generation of low-frequency radio telescopes will provide a powerful probe of astronomical magnetic fields. However, achieving the full potential of these measurements requires accurate removal of the time-variable ionospheric Faraday rotation

  10. Calibrating high-precision Faraday rotation measurements for LOFAR and the next generation of low-frequency radio telescopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotomayor-Beltran, C.; et al., [Unknown; Hessels, J.W.T.; Alexov, A.; van Leeuwen, J.; Markoff, S.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Wise, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    Faraday rotation measurements using the current and next generation of low-frequency radio telescopes will provide a powerful probe of astronomical magnetic fields. However, achieving the full potential of these measurements requires accurate removal of the time-variable ionospheric Faraday rotation

  11. Primary Beam and Dish Surface Characterization at the Allen Telescope Array by Radio Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Atkinson, Shannon; Backus, P R; Barott, William; Bauermeister, Amber; Blitz, Leo; Bock, D C -J; Bower, Geoffrey C; Bradford, Tucker; Cheng, Calvin; Croft, Steve; Dexter, Matt; Dreher, John; Engargiola, Greg; Fields, Ed; Heiles, Carl; Helfer, Tamara; Jordan, Jane; Jorgensen, Susan; Kilsdonk, Tom; Gutierrez-Kraybill, Colby; Keating, Garrett; Law, Casey; Lugten, John; MacMahon, D H E; McMahon, Peter; Milgrome, Oren; Siemion, Andrew; Smolek, Ken; Thornton, Douglas; Pierson, Tom; Randall, Karen; Ross, John; Shostak, Seth; Tarter, J C; Urry, Lynn; Werthimer, Dan; Williams, Peter K G; Whysong, David; Harp, G R; Ackermann, R F; Nadler, Z J; Blair, Samantha K; Davis, M M; Wright, M C H; Forster, J R; DeBoer, D R; Welch, W J

    2012-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a cm-wave interferometer in California, comprising 42 antenna elements with 6-m diameter dishes. We characterize the antenna optical accuracy using two-antenna interferometry and radio holography. The distortion of each telescope relative to the average is small, with RMS differences of 1 percent of beam peak value. Holography provides images of dish illumination pattern, allowing characterization of as-built mirror surfaces. The ATA dishes can experience mm-scale distortions across -2 meter lengths due to mounting stresses or solar radiation. Experimental RMS errors are 0.7 mm at night and 3 mm under worst case solar illumination. For frequencies 4, 10, and 15 GHz, the nighttime values indicate sensitivity losses of 1, 10 and 20 percent, respectively. The ATA.s exceptional wide-bandwidth permits observations over a continuous range 0.5 to 11.2 GHz, and future retrofits may increase this range to 15 GHz. Beam patterns show a slowly varying focus frequency dependence. We prob...

  12. Panel positioning error and support mechanism for a 30-m THz radio telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Hua Yang; Daniel Okoh; Guo-Hua Zhou; Ai-Hua Li; Guo-Ping Li; Jing-Quan Cheng

    2011-01-01

    A 30-m TeraHertz (THz) radio telescope is proposed to operate at 200 μm with an active primary surface. This paper presents sensitivity analysis of active surface panel positioning errors with optical performance in terms of the Strehl ratio.Based on Ruze's surface error theory and using a Monte Carlo simulation, the effects of six rigid panel positioning errors, such as piston, tip, tilt, radial, azimuthal and twist displacements, were directly derived. The optical performance of the telescope was then evaluated using the standard Strehl ratio. We graphically illustrated the various panel error effects by presenting simulations of complete ensembles of full reflector surface errors for the six different rigid panel positioning errors. Study of the panel error sensitivity analysis revealed that the piston error and tilt/tip errors are dominant while the other rigid errors are much less important. Furthermore, as indicated by the results, we conceived of an alternative Master-Slave Concept-based (MSC-based) active surface by implementating a special Series-Parallel Concept-based (SPC-based) hexapod as the active panel support mechanism. A new 30-m active reflector based on the two concepts was demonstrated to achieve correction for all the six rigid panel positioning errors in an economically feasible way.

  13. The Standing Wave Phenomenon in Radio Telescopes; Frequency Modulation of the WSRT Primary Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Popping, Attila

    2007-01-01

    Inadequacies in the knowledge of the primary beam response of current interferometric arrays often form a limitation to the image fidelity. We hope to overcome these limitations by constructing a frequency-resolved, full-polarization empirical model for the primary beam of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). Holographic observations, sampling angular scales between about 5 arcmin and 11 degrees, were obtained of a bright compact source (3C147). These permitted measurement of voltage response patterns for seven of the fourteen telescopes in the array and allowed calculation of the mean cross-correlated power beam. Good sampling of the main-lobe, near-in, and far-side-lobes out to a radius of more than 5 degrees was obtained. A robust empirical beam model was detemined in all polarization products and at frequencies between 1322 and 1457 MHz with 1 MHz resolution. Substantial departures from axi-symmetry are apparent in the main-lobe as well as systematic differences between the polarization proper...

  14. Observations of IntraDay Variable sources with the Effelsberg and Urumqi Radio Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Marchili, N; Liu, X; Song, H G; Gabányi, K É; Fuhrmann, L; Müller, P; Witzel, A; Zensus, J A; Han, J L

    2008-01-01

    A sample of classical IntraDay Variable (IDV) and IDV candidate sources has been monitored with the Urumqi 25m telescope and the Effelsberg 100m telescope. Aim of the project is to investigate the origin of IntraDay Variability, a phenomenon which has been observed in about 30% of flat spectrum radio quasars. Simultaneous Effelsberg-Urumqi observations demonstrated that the Urumqi antenna, although relatively small in diameter, is well suitable for IDV experiments. A few Urumqi datasets, however, turned out to be affected by a spurious $\\sim 24$ hours modulation, an effect which has been removed by means of a new procedure for data reduction. In about 14 months, 12 epochs of observation have been collected, for a total observing time of more than 45 days. The epochs are regularly distributed over the whole year, in order to check for the presence of systematic annual changes in the variability time scales - a crucial test for verifying the consistency of source-extrinsic models of the variability. Preliminary...

  15. Detection, Excision and Statistics of Interference at the Mauritius Radio Telescope

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Sachdev; N. Udaya Shankar

    2001-06-01

    A technique to detect man-made interference in the visibility data of the Mauritius Radio Telescope (MRT) has been developed. This technique is based on the understanding that the interference is generally ‘spiky’ in nature and has Fourier components beyond the maximum frequency which can arise from the radio sky and can therefore be identified. We take the sum of magnitudes of visibilities on all the baselines measured at a given time to improve detectability. This is then high-pass filtered to get a time series from which the contribution of the sky is removed. Interference is detected in the high-pass data using an iterative scheme. In each iteration, interference with amplitudes beyond a certain threshold is detected. These points are then removed from the original time series and the resulting data are high-pass filtered and the process repeated. We have also studied the statistics of the strength, numbers, time of occurrence and duration of the interference at the MRT. The statistics indicate that most often the interference excision can be carried out while post-integrating the visibilities by giving a zero weight to the interference points.

  16. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: measuring radio galaxy bias through cross-correlation with lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Allison, Rupert; Sherwin, Blake D; de Bernardis, Francesco; Bond, J Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Devlin, Mark J; Dunkley, Joanna; Gallardo, Patricio; Henderson, Shawn; Hincks, Adam D; Hlozek, Renee; Jarvis, Matt; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Madhavacheril, Mathew; McMahon, Jeff; Moodley, Kavilan; Naess, Sigurd; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima; Spergel, David N; Staggs, Suzanne T; van Engelen, Alexander; Wollack, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    We correlate the positions of radio galaxies in the FIRST survey with the CMB lensing convergence estimated from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope over 470 square degrees to determine the bias of these galaxies. We remove optically cross-matched sources below redshift $z=0.2$ to preferentially select Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We measure the angular cross-power spectrum $C_l^{\\kappa g}$ at $4.4\\sigma$ significance in the multipole range $100radio-loud AGN: we find $\\l...

  17. How many radio-loud quasars can be detected by the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope?

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Xinwu

    2007-01-01

    In the unification scheme, radio quasars and FR II radio galaxies come from the same parent population, but viewed at different angles. Based on the Comptonization models for the gamma-ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we estimate the number of radio quasars and FR II radio galaxies to be detected by the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) using the luminosity function (LF) of their parent population derived from the flat-spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) LF. We find that ~1200 radio quasars will be detected by GLAST, if the soft seed photons for Comptonization come from the regions outside the jets. We also consider the synchrotron self-Comptonization (SSC) model, and find it unlikely to be responsible for gamma-ray emission from radio quasars. We find that no FR II radio galaxies will be detected by GLAST. Our results show that most radio AGNs to be detected by GLAST will be FSRQs (~99 % for the external Comptonization model, EC model), while the remainder (~1 %) will be steep-spectrum ra...

  18. The large adaptive reflector: a 200-m diameter wideband centimeter- to meter-wave radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Brent; Bauwens, Luc; Belostotski, Leonid; Cannon, Elizabeth; Chang, Ya-Ying; Deng, Xiaohui; Dewdney, Peter E.; Fitzsimmons, Joeleff T.; Halliday, David; Kuerschner, Kai; Lachapelle, Gerard; Lo, David; Mousavi, Pedram; Nahon, Meyer; Shafai, Lot; Stiemer, Sigfried F.; Taylor, Russell; Veidt, Bruce

    2000-07-01

    The Large Adaptive Reflector (LAR) is a concept for a low- cost, large aperture, wideband, radio telescope, designed to operate over the wavelength range from 2 m to 1.4 cm. It consists of a 200-m diameter actuated-surface parabolic reflector with a focal length of 500 m, mounted flat on the ground. The feed is held in place by a tension-structure, consisting of three or more tethers tensioned by the lift of a large, helium-filled aerostat -- a stiff structure that effectively resists wind forces. The telescope is steered by simultaneously changing the lengths of the tethers with winches (thus the position of the feed) and by modifying the shape of the reflector. At all times the reflector configuration is that of an offset parabolic antenna, with the capability to point anywhere in the sky above approximately 15 degree Elevation Angle. At mid-range wavelengths, the feed is a multi-beam prime-focus phased array, about 5 m diameter; at meter wavelengths, it is a single-beam phased array of up to 10 m diameter. Simulations have shown that in operating wind conditions (10 m/s average speed with 2.5 m/s gusts), the position of the feed platform can be stabilized to within a few cm over time scales of approximately 20 s. Research indicates that the telescope concept is feasible and that an order of magnitude improvement in cost per m2 of collecting area over traditional designs of large parabolic antennas can be achieved.

  19. Conversion of a 30-m former satellite communications antenna to a radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboer, David R.; Steffes, Paul G.; Glowacki, John M.

    1998-05-01

    A class of large satellite communication antennas built in the mid-1970's comprise a potential set of large antennas available for use by radio astronomers upon upgrade. With the advent of low noise technology these facilities have been superseded in the communications industry by smaller, more manageable facilities. Although many have sat idle and decaying over the intervening years, these facilities remain a potential resource for research and education. A pair of such dishes has been acquired by Georgia Tech and one of the 30 meter antennas has been completely mechanically and electrically stripped and new mechanical, control, RF, and electrical systems installed. The antenna is now driven by four continuous-speed vector-controlled three-phase AC induction motors with variable frequency vector motor drives. Sixteen bit resolution optical absolute position encoders on each axis provide telescope pointing data. Sixteen bit resolution optical absolute position encoders on each axis provide telescope pointing data. A programmable logic controller provides interlock monitoring and control. The antenna is controllable both manually via a portable remote control unit and via a Pentium PC running control software on a real-time UNIX-based platform. The manual unit allows limited control at two user-selectable speeds while computer control allows full tracking capability with accuracies of better than 0.3 arcminutes. The facility can be remotely controlled via the internet, although currently only a dedicated line is used. The antenna has been refitted with an ultra-broadband feed system capable of operating from 1-7 GHz.

  20. A Generic and Efficient E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator for Next-Generation Radio Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Beardsley, Adam P.; Bowman, Judd D.; Morales, Miguel F.

    2017-05-01

    Modern radio telescopes are favouring densely packed array layouts with large numbers of antennas (NA ≳ 1000). Since the complexity of traditional correlators scales as O(N_A^2), there will be a steep cost for realizing the full imaging potential of these powerful instruments. Through our generic and efficient E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator (epic), we present the first software demonstration of a generalized direct imaging algorithm, namely the Modular Optimal Frequency Fourier imager. Not only does it bring down the cost for dense layouts to O(N_A log _2N_A) but can also image from irregular layouts and heterogeneous arrays of antennas. epic is highly modular, parallelizable, implemented in object-oriented python, and publicly available. We have verified the images produced to be equivalent to those from traditional techniques to within a precision set by gridding coarseness. We have also validated our implementation on data observed with the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). We provide a detailed framework for imaging with heterogeneous arrays and show that epic robustly estimates the input sky model for such arrays. Antenna layouts with dense filling factors consisting of a large number of antennas such as LWA, the Square Kilometre Array, Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, and Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment will gain significant computational advantage by deploying an optimized version of epic. The algorithm is a strong candidate for instruments targeting transient searches of fast radio bursts as well as planetary and exoplanetary phenomena due to the availability of high-speed calibrated time-domain images and low output bandwidth relative to visibility-based systems.

  1. A Generic and Efficient E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator for Next-Generation Radio Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Beardsley, Adam P.; Bowman, Judd D.; Morales, Miguel F.

    2017-01-01

    Modern radio telescopes are favouring densely packed array layouts with large numbers of antennas (NA ≳ 1000). Since the complexity of traditional correlators scales as O(N_{A}^2), there will be a steep cost for realizing the full imaging potential of these powerful instruments. Through our generic and efficient E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator (EPIC), we present the first software demonstration of a generalized direct imaging algorithm, namely, the Modular Optimal Frequency Fourier (MOFF) imager. Not only does it bring down the cost for dense layouts to O(N_{A} log _2N_{A}) but can also image from irregular layouts and heterogeneous arrays of antennas. EPIC is highly modular, parallelizable, implemented in object-oriented Python, and publicly available. We have verified the images produced to be equivalent to those from traditional techniques to within a precision set by gridding coarseness. We have also validated our implementation on data observed with the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). We provide a detailed framework for imaging with heterogeneous arrays and show that EPIC robustly estimates the input sky model for such arrays. Antenna layouts with dense filling factors consisting of a large number of antennas such as LWA, the Square Kilometre Array, Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, and Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment will gain significant computational advantage by deploying an optimized version of EPIC. The algorithm is a strong candidate for instruments targeting transient searches of Fast Radio Bursts (FRB) as well as planetary and exoplanetary phenomena due to the availability of high-speed calibrated time-domain images and low output bandwidth relative to visibility-based systems.

  2. Resolving the Shocks in Radio Galaxy Nebulae: Hubble Space Telescope and Radio Imaging of 3C 171, 3C 277.3, and PKS 2250-41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilak, Avanti; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Tadhunter, Clive; Wills, Karen; Morganti, Raffaella; Baum, Stefi A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Dallacasa, Daniele

    2005-12-01

    We present the results of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 medium-band and narrowband imaging and Very Large Array and MERLIN2 radio imaging of three powerful radio galaxies: 3C 171, 3C 277.3, and PKS 2250-41. We obtained images of the rest frame [O III] λ5007 and [O II] λ3727 line emission using the linear ramp filters on WFPC2. The correlations of the emission-line morphology and the [O III]/[O II] line ratios with the radio emission seen in ground-based observations are clarified by the HST imaging. We confirm that the radio lobes and hot spots are preferentially associated with lower ionization gas. The galaxy 3C 171 exhibits high surface brightness emission-line gas mainly along the radio source axis. The lowest ionization gas is seen at the eastern hot spot. In 3C 277.3 there is bright high-ionization gas (and continuum) offset just to the east of the radio knot K1. Our observations are consistent with previous work suggesting that this emission is produced by precursor gas ionized by the shock being driven into the cloud by the deflected radio jet. In PKS 2250-41 we resolve the emission-line arc that wraps around the outer rim of the western lobe. The lower ionization [O II] emission is nested just interior to the higher ionization [O III] emission, suggesting that we have resolved the cooling region behind the bow shock. We also detect possible continuum emission from the secondary hot spot. Thus, our observations support the hypothesis that in these sources the interaction between the expanding radio source and the ambient gas strongly influences the morphology, kinematics, and ionization of the gas. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with program 6657 (principal investigator C. Tadhunter).

  3. Sardinia Radio Telescope wide-band spectral-polarimetric observations of the galaxy cluster 3C 129

    CERN Document Server

    Murgia, M; Carretti, E; Melis, A; Concu, R; Trois, A; Loi, F; Vacca, V; Tarchi, A; Castangia, P; Possenti, A; Bocchinu, A; Burgay, M; Casu, S; Pellizzoni, A; Pisanu, T; Poddighe, A; Poppi, S; D'Amico, N; Bachetti, M; Corongiu, A; Egron, E; Iacolina, N; Ladu, A; Marongiu, P; Migoni, C; Perrodin, D; Pilia, M; Valente, G; Vargiu, G

    2016-01-01

    We present new observations of the galaxy cluster 3C 129 obtained with the Sardinia Radio Telescope in the frequency range 6000-7200 MHz, with the aim to image the large-angular-scale emission at high-frequency of the radio sources located in this cluster of galaxies. The data were acquired using the recently-commissioned ROACH2-based backend to produce full-Stokes image cubes of an area of 1 deg x 1 deg centered on the radio source 3C 129. We modeled and deconvolved the telescope beam pattern from the data. We also measured the instrumental polarization beam patterns to correct the polarization images for off-axis instrumental polarization. Total intensity images at an angular resolution of 2.9 arcmin were obtained for the tailed radio galaxy 3C 129 and for 13 more sources in the field, including 3C 129.1 at the galaxy cluster center. These data were used, in combination with literature data at lower frequencies, to derive the variation of the synchrotron spectrum of 3C 129 along the tail of the radio source...

  4. Spectropolarimetry with the Allen Telescope Array: Faraday Rotation toward Bright Polarized Radio Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Law, C J; Bower, G C; Backer, D C; Bauermeister, A; Croft, S; Forster, R; Gutierrez-Kraybill, C; Harvey-Smith, L; Heiles, C; Hull, C; Keating, G; MacMahon, D; Whysong, D; Williams, P K G; Wright, M

    2010-01-01

    We have observed 37 bright, polarized radio sources with the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) to present a novel analysis of their Faraday rotation properties. Each source was observed during the commissioning phase with 2 to 4 100-MHz bands at frequencies ranging from 1 to 2 GHz. These observations demonstrate how the continuous frequency coverage of the ATA's log-periodic receiver can be applied to the study of Faraday rotation measures (RMs). We use RM synthesis to show that wide-bandwidth data can find multiple RM components toward a single source. Roughly a quarter of the sources studied have extra RM components with high confidence (brighter than ~40 mJy), when observing with a RM resolution of roughly 100 rad/m2. These extra components contribute 10%-70% of the total polarized flux. This is the first time multiple RM components have been identified in a large sample of point sources. For our observing configuration, these extra RM components bias the measurement of the peak RM by 10-15 rad/m2 ; more general...

  5. 12 GHz Radio-Holographic surface measurement of the RRI 10.4 m telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Balasubramanyam, Ramesh; Raju, Sharath B

    2009-01-01

    A modern Q-band low noise amplifier (LNA) front-end is being fitted to the 10.4 m millimeter-wave telescope at the Raman Research Institute (RRI) to support observations in the 40-50 GHz frequency range. To assess the suitability of the surface for this purpose, we measured the deviations of the primary surface from an ideal paraboloid using radio holography. We used the 11.6996 GHz beacon signal from the GSAT3 satellite, a 1.2 m reference antenna, commercial Ku-band Low Noise Block Convereters (LNBC) as the receiver front-ends and a Stanford Research Systems (SRS) lock-in amplifier as the backend. The LNBCs had independent free-running first local oscillators (LO). Yet, we recovered the correlation by using a radiatively injected common tone that served as the second local oscillator. With this setup, we mapped the surface deviations on a 64 x 64 grid and measured an rms surface deviation of ~350 um with a measurement accuracy of ~50 um.

  6. A Real-time Coherent Dedispersion Pipeline for the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    De, Kishalay

    2015-01-01

    A fully real-time coherent dedispersion system has been developed for the pulsar back-end at the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The dedispersion pipeline uses the single phased array voltage beam produced by the existing GMRT software back-end (GSB) to produce coherently dedispersed intensity output in real time, for the currently operational bandwidths of 16 MHz and 32 MHz. Provision has also been made to coherently dedisperse voltage beam data from observations recorded on disk. We discuss the design and implementation of the real-time coherent dedispersion system, describing the steps carried out to optimise the performance of the pipeline. Presently functioning on an Intel Xeon X5550 CPU equipped with a NVIDIA Tesla C2075 GPU, the pipeline allows dispersion free, high time resolution data to be obtained in real-time. We illustrate the significant improvements over the existing incoherent dedispersion system at the GMRT, and present some preliminary results obtained from studies of pulsars using t...

  7. The Role of Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project in Promoting Scientific Efficacy Among Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, M.; Deutscher, R.

    2004-12-01

    This study investigated the effects on student scientific efficacy after participation in the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) project. In the GAVRT program, students use computers to record extremely faint radio waves collected by the telescope and analyze real data. Scientific efficacy is a type of self-knowledge a person uses to determine his or her ability to understand and work within the scientific community. An attitudinal survey was administered to all students nationwide who participated in the GAVRT program during the 2000-2001 and 2001-2002 years and had 480 and 562 respondents respectively. The students completed a pre-survey prior to beginning the GAVRT program and then completed a follow-up survey immediately after working on the Jupiter Quest GAVRT program. Between the pre- and post- surveys, students received instruction in the GAVRT curriculum and participated in operation of the radio telescope. During the 2000-2001 school year, increases in students' scientific efficacy occurred in their feelings of efficacy associated with the value they placed on the work they produced in science. During the 2001-2002 school year, the following areas of efficacy increased: students' perceived ability to use scientific equipment, students' feelings about how other people valued their work and students' abilities to think scientifically.

  8. Discovery of the Millisecond Pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a Fermi Source with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Cognard, I.; Johnson, T. J.; Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Desvignes, G.; Camilo, F.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a search of a Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source with no known associations, with the Nancay Radio Telescope. The new pulsar, confirmed with the Green Bank Telescope, has a spin period of 2.38 ms, is relatively nearby (d approx. system have made PSR J2043+1711 one of the first new Fermi-selected millisecond pulsars to be added to pulsar gravitational wave timing arrays. It has also allowed a significant measurement of relativistic delays in the times of arrival of the pulses due to the curvature of space-time near the companion, but not yet with enough precision to derive useful masses for the pulsar and the companion. Nevertheless, a mass for the pulsar between 1.7 and 2.0 solar Mass can be derived if a standard millisecond pulsar formation model is assumed. In this paper, we also present a comprehensive summary of pulsar searches in Fermi LAT sources with the Nancay Radio Telescope to date.

  9. Radio Follow-up on All Unassociated Gamma-Ray Sources from the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzel, Frank K.; Petrov, Leonid; Taylor, Gregory B.; Edwards, Philip G.

    2017-04-01

    The third Fermi Large Area Telescope γ-ray source catalog (3FGL) contains over 1000 objects for which there is no known counterpart at other wavelengths. The physical origin of the γ-ray emission from those objects is unknown. Such objects are commonly referred to as unassociated and mostly do not exhibit significant γ-ray flux variability. We performed a survey of all unassociated γ-ray sources found in 3FGL using the Australia Telescope Compact Array and Very Large Array in the range 4.0–10.0 GHz. We found 2097 radio candidates for association with γ-ray sources. The follow-up with very long baseline interferometry for a subset of those candidates yielded 142 new associations with active galactic nuclei that are γ-ray sources, provided alternative associations for seven objects, and improved positions for another 144 known associations to the milliarcsecond level of accuracy. In addition, for 245 unassociated γ-ray sources we did not find a single compact radio source above 2 mJy within 3σ of their γ-ray localization. A significant fraction of these empty fields, 39%, are located away from the Galactic plane. We also found 36 extended radio sources that are candidates for association with a corresponding γ-ray object, 19 of which are most likely supernova remnants or H ii regions, whereas 17 could be radio galaxies.

  10. Spectral Index Studies of the Diffuse Radio Emission in Abell 2256: Implications to Merger Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Ruta, Kale

    2010-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the merging rich cluster of galaxies Abell 2256. We have observed A2256 at 150 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and successfully detected the diffuse radio halo and the relic emission over an extent $\\sim1.2$ Mpc$^2$. Using this 150 MHz image and the images made using archival observations from the VLA (1369 MHz) and the WSRT (350 MHz), we have produced spectral index images of the diffuse radio emission in A2256. These spectral index images show a distribution of flat spectral index (S$\\propto\

  11. Measuring gravitational lens time delays using low-resolution radio monitoring observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gurkan, G; Koopmans, L V E; Fassnacht, C D; Alba, A Berciano

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining lensing time delay measurements requires long-term monitoring campaigns with a high enough resolution (< 1 arcsec) to separate the multiple images. In the radio, a limited number of high-resolution interferometer arrays make these observations difficult to schedule. To overcome this problem, we propose a technique for measuring gravitational time delays which relies on monitoring the total flux density with low-resolution but high-sensitivity radio telescopes to follow the variation of the brighter image. This is then used to trigger high-resolution observations in optimal numbers which then reveal the variation in the fainter image. We present simulations to assess the efficiency of this method together with a pilot project observing radio lens systems with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) to trigger Very Large Array (VLA) observations. This new method is promising for measuring time delays because it uses relatively small amounts of time on high-resolution telescopes. This will b...

  12. A real-time coherent dedispersion pipeline for the giant metrewave radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Kishalay; Gupta, Yashwant

    2016-02-01

    A fully real-time coherent dedispersion system has been developed for the pulsar back-end at the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The dedispersion pipeline uses the single phased array voltage beam produced by the existing GMRT software back-end (GSB) to produce coherently dedispersed intensity output in real time, for the currently operational bandwidths of 16 MHz and 32 MHz. Provision has also been made to coherently dedisperse voltage beam data from observations recorded on disk. We discuss the design and implementation of the real-time coherent dedispersion system, describing the steps carried out to optimise the performance of the pipeline. Presently functioning on an Intel Xeon X5550 CPU equipped with a NVIDIA Tesla C2075 GPU, the pipeline allows dispersion free, high time resolution data to be obtained in real-time. We illustrate the significant improvements over the existing incoherent dedispersion system at the GMRT, and present some preliminary results obtained from studies of pulsars using this system, demonstrating its potential as a useful tool for low frequency pulsar observations. We describe the salient features of our implementation, comparing it with other recently developed real-time coherent dedispersion systems. This implementation of a real-time coherent dedispersion pipeline for a large, low frequency array instrument like the GMRT, will enable long-term observing programs using coherent dedispersion to be carried out routinely at the observatory. We also outline the possible improvements for such a pipeline, including prospects for the upgraded GMRT which will have bandwidths about ten times larger than at present.

  13. Commensal low frequency observing on the NRAO VLA: VLITE status and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Tracy E.; Kassim, Namir E.; Brisken, Walter; Helmboldt, Joseph; Peters, Wendy; Ray, Paul S.; Polisensky, Emil; Giacintucci, Simona

    2016-08-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory's 27 antenna Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (NRAO VLA) has been successfully transitioned to a broadband system. As part of this transition, the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) worked with NRAO to develop, install, and commission a new commensal low frequency system on the VLA. The VLA Low-band Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) has dedicated samplers and uses spare NRAO optical fibers to transmit the signal from 10 low band receivers on VLA antennas to a dedicated real-time DiFX correlator. For these 10 antennas, this observing mode provides simultaneous data from both the low frequency receivers through the VLITE correlator and from the VLA higher frequencies receivers (1-50 GHz) through the NRAO WIDAR correlator. During the first 1.5 years of operation, VLITE recorded data at roughly 70% wall-time, providing 64 MHz of bandwidth centered at 352 MHz with 2s sample time and 100 kHz spectral resolution. VLITE operations require no additional resources from the VLA system and greatly expand the capabilities of the VLA through value-added PI science, stand-alone astrophysics, the opening of a new window on transient searches, and serendipity. We present an overview of the VLITE program, discuss the sky coverage and depth obtained during the first 1.5 years of operation, and brie y outline a possible path forward to a full 27 antenna LOw Band Observatory (LOBO) which could run commensally with all VLA operations.

  14. Inspiring the next generation of scientists with their observations of quasars, black holes, Jupiter, and SETI with the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope, GAVRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauncey, D. L.; Levin, S.; Teitelbaum, L.; Hofstadter, M.; Arballo, J.; McConnell, S.; Dorcey, R.; Cole, K.; Kreuser-Jenkins, N.; Leflang, J.; Kruzins, E.; Ricardo, L.; Horiuchi, S.; Nagle, G.; Miro, C. G.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes a radio astronomy programfor schools, the Goldstone-AppleValley Radio Telescope,GAVRT. The GAVRT program is designed to bring the inspiration and enthusiasm to a younger generation of teachers and children who learn about science by doing real science, just as Iosif Shklovsky brought to an older generation.

  15. Exploring Systems Engineering (and the Universe) Through the RadioJOVE telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditi Raj, Anya

    2017-01-01

    Amateur projects in radio astronomy are popular methods to engage in what often seems to be an inaccessible field, and pre-made kits are becoming increasingly available to hobbyists and educators. One such kit is the RadioJOVE, which is attractive due to its simplicity, accessibility and its extensive support network and community of users. When coupled with an education in project management, building the RadioJOVE provides a perfect framework to learn about best practices in completing a project. We will primarily discuss the use of the RadioJOVE project to enhance study in project management and systems engineering. We also intend to discuss the importance of amateur projects such as the RadioJOVE in gaining a holistic understanding of radio astronomy and the project’s potential to spark interest in radio astronomy in students of various disciplines.

  16. Gamma-ray Bursts: Radio Afterglow and Host Galaxy Study with The FAST Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. B.; Huang, Y. F.; Kong, S. W.; Zhang, Z. B.; Li, D.; Luo, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    For four types of GRBs, namely high-luminosity, low-luminosity, standard and failed GRBs, we calculated their radio afterglow light curves. Meanwhile, considering contributions from host galaxies in radio bands, we statistically investigated the effect of hosts on radio afterglows. It is found that a tight anti-correlation exists between the ratio of radio flux (RRF) of host galaxy to the total radio afterglow peak flux and the observed frequency. Using this method, the host flux densities of those bursts without host measurements can be estimated at low or medium frequencies. We predicted that almost all types of radio afterglows, except that of low-luminosity GRBs, can be observed by FAST up to z = 15 or even more. FAST is expected to significantly expand the samples of GRB radio afterglows and host galaxies.

  17. Deep GMRT 150 MHz Observations of the DEEP2 Fields: Searching for High Red-Shift Radio Galaxies Revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susanta K. Bisoi; C. H. Ishwara-Chandra; S. K. Sirothia; P. Janardhan

    2011-12-01

    High red-shift radio galaxies are best searched at low radio frequencies, due to its steep radio spectra. Here we present preliminary results from our programme to search for high red-shift radio galaxies to ∼ 10 to 100 times fainter than the known population till date. We have extracted ultra-steep spectrum (USS) samples from deep 150 MHz Giant Meter-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations from one of the three well-studied DEEP2 fields to this effect. From correlating these radio sources with respect to the high-frequency catalogues such as VLA, FIRST and NVSS at 1.4 GHz, we find ∼ 100 steep spectrum (spectral index, > 1) radio sources, which are good candidates for high red-shift radio galaxies.

  18. Study on the temperature field effect analysis and test of the five-hundred-meter aperture spherical radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li-qiang; Wang, Qi-ming

    2016-10-01

    The thermal problem is one of the important research contents of the design and operation about giant radio antenna. This kind of influence to the antenna has been concerned in the astronomy field. Due to the instantaneous temperature load and uncertainty, it is difficult to accurately analysis and effectively control about its effect. It has important significance to analyze the thermal problem of giant radio antenna to its design and operation. The research of solar cookers and temperature field on Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) were preceded in detail. The tests of temperature distribute about 30 meters antenna in Mi-yun observatory station were performed. The research work including the parameters related to the sun, the flow algorithm of telescope site, mathematical model of solar cooker, analysis results of temperature field and corresponding control strategy, the temperature distribution test of 30 meters model. The results showed that: solar cookers could be weakened and controlled effectively of FAST. This work will provide a reference to design and operation of the FAST and same big antenna. It has certain theory significance, engineering significance and application value.

  19. Parameter Estimation Using VLA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Willem C.

    The main objective of this dissertation is to extract parameters from multiple wavelength images, on a pixel-to-pixel basis, when the images are corrupted with noise and a point spread function. The data used are from the field of radio astronomy. The very large array (VLA) at Socorro in New Mexico was used to observe planetary nebula NGC 7027 at three different wavelengths, 2 cm, 6 cm and 20 cm. A temperature model, describing the temperature variation in the nebula as a function of optical depth, is postulated. Mathematical expressions for the brightness distribution (flux density) of the nebula, at the three observed wavelengths, are obtained. Using these three equations and the three data values available, one from the observed flux density map at each wavelength, it is possible to solve for two temperature parameters and one optical depth parameter at each pixel location. Due to the fact that the number of unknowns equal the number of equations available, estimation theory cannot be used to smooth any noise present in the data values. It was found that a direct solution of the three highly nonlinear flux density equations is very sensitive to noise in the data. Results obtained from solving for the three unknown parameters directly, as discussed above, were not physical realizable. This was partly due to the effect of incomplete sampling at the time when the data were gathered and to noise in the system. The application of rigorous digital parameter estimation techniques result in estimated parameters that are also not physically realizable. The estimated values for the temperature parameters are for example either too high or negative, which is not physically possible. Simulation studies have shown that a "double smoothing" technique improves the results by a large margin. This technique consists of two parts: in the first part the original observed data are smoothed using a running window and in the second part a similar smoothing of the estimated parameters

  20. Europe, Japan and North America Prepare for Joint Construction of the Giant Radio Telescope "ALMA" in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    Caption : PR Photo 14/01 shows how the ALMA facility may look like when it is ready at Chajnantor. Courtesy NAOJ . Representatives from Europe, Japan, and North America met in Tokyo today and signed a Resolution affirming their mutual intent to construct and operate a giant radio telescope in co-operation with the Republic of Chile, where the telescope will be located. The Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) is conceived as a radio telescope comprised of sixty-four transportable 12-meter diameter antennas distributed over an area 14 km in extent. Japanese participation will allow enhanced imaging and spectroscopy, especially at submillimeter wavelengths. By pointing all the antennas in unison toward a single astronomical object, and combining the signals detected by all the antennas with a super-fast digital signal processor, this gigantic radio telescope achieves an imaging detail 10 times better than that of the Hubble Space Telescope. The combined area of all 64 antennas used to collect signals from celestial objects is more than 40 times larger than that available to astronomers using existing submillimeter telescopes. ALMA will be built on the Andean plateau at 5,000 meters altitude near the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. This site provides the exceptionally dry atmospheric conditions necessary for astronomical observations at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths (wavelengths between the radio and far-infrared spectral regions). Observations with this telescope will have a profound impact on virtually all fields of astrophysical research. The most important targets include the most distant (i.e., the youngest) galaxies as they emerged in the early Universe. These are expected to have become rapidly enshrouded in the dust produced by the first stars; the dust absorbs much of the starlight making the galaxies difficult to see in the optical wavebands, but these same galaxies shine brightly at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. In

  1. Calibrating High-Precision Faraday Rotation Measurements for LOFAR and the Next Generation of Low-Frequency Radio Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Sotomayor-Beltran, C; Hessels, J W T; de Bruyn, G; Noutsos, A; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Birzan, L; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brouw, W N; Brueggen, M; Ciardi, B; de Gasperin, F; Dettmar, R -J; van Duin, A; Duscha, S; Eisloeffel, J; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Griessmeier, J; Grit, T; Gunst, A W; Hassall, T E; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Keane, E; Kohler, J; Kramer, M; Kondratiev, V I; Koopmans, L V E; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Maat, P; Macario, G; Markoff, S; McKean, J P; Mulcahy, D D; Munk, H; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pilia, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Roettgering, H; Serylak, M; Sluman, J; Stappers, B W; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Vermeulen, R; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wijnholds, S J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P; 10.1051/0004-6361/201220728

    2013-01-01

    Faraday rotation measurements using the current and next generation of low-frequency radio telescopes will provide a powerful probe of astronomical magnetic fields. However, achieving the full potential of these measurements requires accurate removal of the time-variable ionospheric Faraday rotation contribution. We present ionFR, a code that calculates the amount of ionospheric Faraday rotation for a specific epoch, geographic location, and line-of-sight. ionFR uses a number of publicly available, GPS-derived total electron content maps and the most recent release of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field. We describe applications of this code for the calibration of radio polarimetric observations, and demonstrate the high accuracy of its modeled ionospheric Faraday rotations using LOFAR pulsar observations. These show that we can accurately determine some of the highest-precision pulsar rotation measures ever achieved. Precision rotation measures can be used to monitor rotation measure variations - e...

  2. Measurements of Antenna Surface for a Millimeter-Wave Space Radio Telescope II; Metal Mesh Surface for Large Deployable Reflector

    CERN Document Server

    Kamegai, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Large deployable antennas with a mesh surface woven by fine metal wires are an important technology for communications satellites and space radio telescopes. However, it is difficult to make metal mesh surfaces with sufficient radio-frequency (RF) performance for frequencies higher than millimeter waves. In this paper, we present the RF performance of metal mesh surfaces at 43 GHz. For this purpose, we developed an apparatus to measure the reflection coefficient, transmission coefficient, and radiative coefficient of the mesh surface. The reflection coefficient increases as a function of metal mesh surface tension, whereas the radiative coefficient decreases. The anisotropic aspects of the reflection coefficient and the radiative coefficient are also clearly seen. They depend on the front and back sides of the metal mesh surface and the rotation angle. The transmission coefficient was measured to be almost constant. The measured radiative coefficients and transmission coefficients would cause significant degr...

  3. Single dish performance of KVN 21-m radio telescopes:Simultaneous observations at 22 and 43 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sang-Sung; Oh, Chung Sik; Han, Seog-Tae; Je, Do-Heung; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wi, Seog-Oh; Cho, Se-Hyung; Sohn, Bong Won; Kim, Jaeheon; Lee, Jeewon; Oh, Se-Jin; Song, Min-Gyu; Kang, Jiman; Jung, Moon-Hee; Lee, Jeong Ae; Oh, Junghwan; Bae, Jae-Han; Yun, So-Young; Lee, Jung-Won; Kim, Bong Gyu; Chung, Hyunsoo; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hyo Ryoung; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Jung, Taehyun; Park, Pulun; Kim, Min Joong; Yoon, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Won-Ju

    2011-01-01

    We report simultaneous multi-frequency observing performance at 22 and 43 GHz of the 21-m shaped-Cassegrain radio telescopes of the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). KVN is the first millimeter-dedicated VLBI network in Korea having a maximum baseline length of 480 km. It currently operates at 22 and 43 GHz and planed to operate in four frequency bands, 22, 43, 86, and 129 GHz. The unique quasioptics of KVN enable simultaneous multi-frequency observations based on efficient beam filtering and accuarate antenna-beam alignment at 22 and 43 GHz. We found that the offset of the beams is within 20 degrees.

  4. The panels for primary and secondary mirror reflectors and the Active Surface System for the new Sardinia Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacchiroli, G.; Fiocchi, F.; Maccaferri, G.; Morsiani, M.; Orfei, A.; Pernechele, C.; Pisanu, T.; Roda, J.; Vargiu, G.

    In this paper we will describe the panels for the primary and secondary mirror reflectors and the active surface system that will be provided on the Sardinia Radio Telescope. The panels for the primary and secondary mirror have been designed to allow an operating frequency up to 100 GHz. The active surface system will be used to overcome the effect of gravity deformation on the antenna gain and to re-shape the primary mirror in a parabolic form, in order to avoid large phase error contribution on the gain for the highest frequencies placed in the primary focus.

  5. Fermi Large Area Telescope Detection of Extended Gamma-Ray Emission from the Radio Galaxy Fornax A

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of extended gamma-ray emission from the lobes of the radio galaxy Fornax A using 6.1 years of Pass 8 data. After Centaurus A, this is now the second example of an extended gamma-ray source attributed to a radio galaxy. Both an extended flat disk morphology and a morphology following the extended radio lobes were preferred over a point-source description, and the core contribution was constrained to be 100 MeV gamma-ray emission established, we model the source broadband emission considering currently available total lobe radio and millimeter flux measurements, as well as X-ray detections attributed to inverse Compton (IC) emission off the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Unlike the Centaurus A case, we find that a leptonic model involving IC scattering of CMB and extragalactic background light (EBL) photons underpredicts the gamma-ray fluxes by factors of about ~ 2 - 3, depending on the EBL model adopted. An additional gamma-ray spectral component is thus ...

  6. Terrestrial monitoring of a radio telescope reference point using comprehensive uncertainty budgeting. Investigations during CONT14 at the Onsala Space Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösler, Michael; Haas, Rüdiger; Eschelbach, Cornelia

    2016-05-01

    During the 15-day-long global very long baseline interferometry campaign CONT14, a terrestrial monitoring campaign was carried out at the Onsala Space Observatory. The goal of these efforts was to monitor the reference point of the Onsala 20 m radio telescope during normal telescope operations. Parts of the local site network as well as a number of reflectors that were mounted on the 20 m radio telescope were observed in an automated and continual way using the in-house-developed software package HEIMDALL. The analysis of the observed data was performed using a new concept for a coordinate-based network adjustment to allow the full adjustment process in a true Cartesian global reference frame. The Akaike Information Criterion was used to select the preferable functional model for the network adjustment. The comprehensive stochastic model of this network adjustment process considers over 25 parameters, and, to describe the persistence of the observations performed during the monitoring with a very high measurement frequency, includes also time-dependent covariances. In total 15 individual solutions for the radio telescope reference point were derived, based on monitoring observations during the normal operation of the radio telescope. Since the radio telescope was moving continually, the influence of timing errors was studied and considered in the adjustment process. Finally, recursive filter techniques were introduced to combine the 15 individual solutions. Accuracies at the sub-millimeter level could be achieved for the radio telescope reference point. Thus, the presented monitoring concept fulfills the requirement proposed by the global geodetic observing system.

  7. On the radio properties of the intermediate-mass black hole candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1

    CERN Document Server

    Cseh, D; Godet, O; Barret, D; Corbel, S; Coriat, M; Falcke, H; Farrell, S A; Koerding, E; Lenc, E; Wrobel, J M

    2014-01-01

    We present follow-up radio observations of ESO 243-49 HLX-1 from 2012 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We report the detection of radio emission at the location of HLX-1 during its hard X-ray state using the ATCA. Assuming that the `Fundamental Plane' of accreting black holes is applicable, we provide an independent estimate of the black hole mass of $M_{\\rm{BH}}\\leq2.8^{+7.5}_{-2.1} \\times 10^{6}$ M$_{\\odot}$ at 90% confidence. However, we argue that the detected radio emission is likely to be Doppler-boosted and our mass estimate is an upper limit. We discuss other possible origins of the radio emission such as being due to a radio nebula, star formation, or later interaction of the flares with the large-scale environment. None of these were found adequate. The VLA observations were carried out during the X-ray outburst. However, no new radio flare was detected, possibly due to a sparse time sampling. The deepest, combined VLA data suggests a ...

  8. VLA-ANGST: A high-resolution HI Survey of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Juergen; Warren, Steven R; Skillman, Evan D; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Walter, Fabian; de Blok, W J G; Koribalski, Baerbel; West, Andrew A

    2012-01-01

    We present the "Very Large Array survey of Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury galaxies (VLA-ANGST)." VLA-ANGST is a National Radio Astronomy Observatory Large Program consisting of high spectral (0.6-2.6 km/s) and spatial (~6") resolution observations of neutral, atomic hydrogen (HI) emission toward 35 nearby dwarf galaxies from the ANGST survey. ANGST is a systematic HST survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D\\lesssim4 Mpc). VLA-ANGST provides VLA HI observations of the sub-sample of ANGST galaxies with recent star formation that are observable from the northern hemisphere and that were not observed in the "The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey" (THINGS). The overarching scientific goal of VLA-ANGST is to investigate fundamental characteristics of the neutral interstellar medium (ISM) of dwarf galaxies. Here we describe the VLA observations, the data reduction, and the final VLA-ANGST data products. We pre...

  9. Beaming structures of Jupiter's decametric common S-bursts observed from LWA1, NDA, and URAN2 radio telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Imai, Masafumi; Clarke, Tracy E; Higgins, Charles A; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Dowell, Jayce; Imai, Kazumasa; Brazhenko, Anatolii I; Frantsuzenko, Anatolii V; Konovalenko, Alexandr A

    2016-01-01

    On 2015 February 21, simultaneous observations of Jupiter's decametric radio emission between 10 and 33 MHz were carried out using three powerful low-frequency radio telescopes: Long Wavelength Array Station One (LWA1) in USA; Nan\\c{c}ay Decameter Array (NDA) in France; and URAN2 telescope in Ukraine. We measure lag times of short-bursts (S-bursts) for 105-minutes of data over effective baselines up to 8460 km by using cross-correlation analysis of the spectrograms from each instrument. Of particular interest is the measurement of the beaming thickness of S-bursts, testing if either flashlight- or beacon-like beaming is emanating from Jupiter. We find that the lag times for all pairs drift slightly as time elapses, in agreement with expectations from the flashlight-like beaming model. This leads to a new constraint of the minimum beaming thickness of 2.66". Also, we find that most of the analyzed data abound with S-bursts, whose occurrence probability peaks at 17-18 MHz.

  10. a Simulation Tool Assisting the Design of a Close Range Photogrammetry System for the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, F.; Pinna, A.; Sanna, G.

    2016-06-01

    The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is a 64 m diameter antenna, whose primary mirror is equipped with an active surface capable to correct its deformations by means of a thick network of actuators. Close range photogrammetry (CRP) was used to measure the self-load deformations of the SRT primary reflector from its optimal shape, which are requested to be minimized for the radio telescope to operate at full efficiency. In the attempt to achieve such performance, we conceived a near real-time CRP system which requires the cameras to be installed in fixed positions and at the same time to avoid any interference with the antenna operativeness. The design of such system is not a trivial task, and to assist our decision we therefore developed a simulation pipeline to realistically reproduce and evaluate photogrammetric surveys of large structures. The described simulation environment consists of (i) a detailed description of the SRT model, included the measurement points and the camera parameters, (ii) a tool capable of generating realistic images accordingly to the above model, and (iii) a self-calibrating bundle adjustment to evaluate the performance in terms of RMSE of the camera configurations.

  11. Infrared-faint radio sources are at high redshifts. Spectroscopic redshift determination of infrared-faint radio sources using the Very Large Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Sharp, R.; Spitler, L. R.; Parker, Q. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between the two classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study difficult. Prior to this work, no redshift was known for any IFRS in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) fields which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims: This work aims at measuring the first redshifts of IFRS in the ATLAS fields. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that IFRS are similar to HzRGs, that they are higher-redshift or dust-obscured versions of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and Low Dispersion Spectrograph 2 (FORS2) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The data were calibrated based on the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) and redshifts extracted from the final spectra, where possible. This information was then used to calculate rest-frame luminosities, and to perform the first spectral energy distribution modelling of IFRS based on redshifts. Results: We found redshifts of 1.84, 2.13, and 2.76, for three IFRS, confirming the suggested high-redshift character of this class of object. These redshifts and the resulting luminosities show IFRS to be similar to HzRGs, supporting our hypothesis. We found further evidence that fainter IFRS are at even higher redshifts. Conclusions: Considering the similarities between IFRS and HzRGs substantiated in this work, the detection of IFRS, which have a significantly higher sky density than HzRGs, increases the number of active galactic nuclei in the early universe and adds to the problems of explaining the formation of

  12. System and method for phase retrieval for radio telescope and antenna control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein are systems, methods, and non-transitory computer-readable storage media for radio phase retrieval. A system practicing the method gathers first data from radio waves associated with an object observed via a first aperture, gathers second data from radio waves associated with the object observed via an introduced second aperture associated with the first aperture, generates reduced noise data by incoherently subtracting the second data from the first data, and performs phase retrieval for the radio waves by modeling the reduced noise data using a single Fourier transform. The first and second apertures are at different positions, such as side by side. This approach can include determining a value Q which represents a ratio of wavelength times a focal ratio divided by pixel spacing. This information can be used to accurately measure and correct alignment errors or other optical system flaws in the apertures.

  13. Practical Limits in the Sensitivity-Linearity Trade-off for Radio Telescope Front Ends in the HF and VHF-low Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Tillman, R H; Brendler, J

    2016-01-01

    Radio telescope front ends must have simultaneously low noise and sufficiently-high linearity to accommodate interfering signals. Typically these are opposing design goals. For modern radio telescopes operating in the HF (3-30 MHz) and VHF-low (30-88 MHz) bands, the problem is more nuanced in that front end noise temperature may be a relatively small component of the system temperature, and increased linearity may be required due to the particular interference problems associated with this spectrum. In this paper we present an analysis of the sensitivity-linearity trade off at these frequencies, applicable to existing commercially-available monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers in single-ended, differential, and parallelized configurations. This analysis and associated findings should be useful in the design and upgrade of front ends for low frequency radio telescopes. The analysis is demonstrated explicitly for one of the better-performing amplifiers encountered in this study, the Mini-Ci...

  14. Near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope polarimetry of a complete sample of narrow-line radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ramírez, E A; Axon, D; Batcheldor, D; Packham, C; Lopez-Rodriguez, E; Sparks, W; Young, S

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of 2.05 $\\mu$m Hubble Space Telescope (HST) polarimetric data for a sample of 13 nearby Fanaroff-Riley type II (FRII) 3CR radio sources ($0.03radio galaxies (NLRG) at optical wavelengths. We find that the compact cores of the NLRG in our sample are intrinsically highly polarised in the near-IR ($6 < P_{2.05\\mu m} < 60$ per cent), with the electric-vector (E-vector) perpendicular to the radio axis in 54 per cent of the sources. The levels of extinction required to produce near-infrared polarisation by the dichroic extinction mechanism are consistent with the measured values reported in Ram\\'irez et al. (2014), provided that this mechanism has its maximum efficiency. This consistency suggests that the nuclear polarisation could be due to dichroic extinction. In this case, toroidal magnetic fields that are highly coherent would be required in the circumnuclear tori to align the elongated dust grains responsible for the dichroic extin...

  15. Effect of the rail unevenness on the pointing accuracy of large radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Wu, Jiang; Duan, Bao-Yan; Wang, Cong-Si

    2017-03-01

    Considering the stringent requirement of the pointing accuracy up to 2.5″ of the World largest full steerable telescope, this paper presents a coarse-fine mixed model to describe the azimuth rail unevenness. First, the coarse-fine mixed model is proposed. In the model, the trigonometric function is utilized to describe the error with long wavelength whilst the fractal function is used for the short wavelength errors, separately. Then the mathematic model of the pointing accuracy is developed mathematically. Finally, the coarse-fine model and point accuracy model are applied to Green Bank Telescope with valuable result. This paved the way for predicting point error of Qi Tai Telescope.

  16. Simultaneous observations of solar sporadic radio emission by the radio telescopes UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA within the frequency range 8-41MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Briand, C.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Zarka, P.; Denis, L.; Bulatzen, V. G.; Frantzusenko, A. V.; Stanislavskyy, A. A.

    2012-04-01

    From 25 June till 12 August 2011 sporadic solar radio emission was observed simultaneously by three separate radio telescopes: UTR-2 (Kharkov, Ukraine), URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) and NDA (Nancay, France). During these observations several type II bursts with double and triple harmonics were registered, as well as type II bursts with complex herringbone structure. The events of particular interest were type II bursts registered on 9 and 11 August 2011. These bursts had opposite sign of circular polarization at different parts of their dynamic spectra. In our opinion we registered the emissions, which came from the different parts of the shock propagating through the solar corona. We have observed also groups of type III bursts merged into one burst, type III bursts with triple harmonics and type III bursts with "split" polarization. In addition some unusual solar bursts were registered: storms of strange narrow-band (up to 500kHz) bursts with high polarization degree (about 80%), decameter spikes of extremely short durations (200-300ms), "tadpole-like" bursts with durations of 1-2s and polarization degree up to 60%.

  17. Imaging of SNR IC443 and W44 with the Sardinia Radio Telescope at 1.5 and 7 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, E.; Pellizzoni, A.; Iacolina, M. N.; Loru, S.; Marongiu, M.; Righini, S.; Cardillo, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mulas, S.; Murtas, G.; Simeone, D.; Concu, R.; Melis, A.; Trois, A.; Pilia, M.; Navarrini, A.; Vacca, V.; Ricci, R.; Serra, G.; Bachetti, M.; Buttu, M.; Perrodin, D.; Buffa, F.; Deiana, G. L.; Gaudiomonte, F.; Fara, A.; Ladu, A.; Loi, F.; Marongiu, P.; Migoni, C.; Pisanu, T.; Poppi, S.; Saba, A.; Urru, E.; Valente, G.; Vargiu, G. P.

    2017-09-01

    Observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) are a powerful tool for investigating the later stages of stellar evolution, the properties of the ambient interstellar medium and the physics of particle acceleration and shocks. For a fraction of SNRs, multiwavelength coverage from radio to ultra-high energies has been provided, constraining their contributions to the production of Galactic cosmic rays. Although radio emission is the most common identifier of SNRs and a prime probe for refining models, high-resolution images at frequencies above 5 GHz are surprisingly lacking, even for bright and well-known SNRs such as IC443 and W44. In the frameworks of the Astronomical Validation and Early Science Program with the 64-m single-dish Sardinia Radio Telescope, we provided, for the first time, single-dish deep imaging at 7 GHz of the IC443 and W44 complexes coupled with spatially resolved spectra in the 1.5-7 GHz frequency range. Our images were obtained through on-the-fly mapping techniques, providing antenna beam oversampling and resulting in accurate continuum flux density measurements. The integrated flux densities associated with IC443 are S1.5 GHz = 134 ± 4 Jy and S7 GHz = 67 ± 3 Jy. For W44, we measured total flux densities of S1.5 GHz = 214 ± 6 Jy and S7 GHz = 94 ± 4 Jy. Spectral index maps provide evidence of a wide physical parameter scatter among different SNR regions: a flat spectrum is observed from the brightest SNR regions at the shock, while steeper spectral indices (up to ˜ 0.7) are observed in fainter cooling regions, disentangling in this way different populations and spectra of radio/gamma-ray-emitting electrons in these SNRs.

  18. A New Astronomical Facility for Peru: Converting a Telecommunication's 32 Meter Parabolic Antenna into a Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitsuka, J. K.; Ishitsuka, M.; Inoue, M.; Kaifu, N.; Miyama, S.; Tsuboi, M.; Ohishi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kasuga, T.; Kondo, T.; Horiuchi, S.; Umemoto, T.; Miyoshi, M.; Miyazawa, K.; Bushimata, T.; Vidal, E. D.

    2006-08-01

    In 1984 Nippon Electric Company constructed an INTELSAT antenna at 3,370 meters above the sea level on the Peruvian Andes. Entel Peru, the Peruvian telecommunications company, managed the antenna station until 1993. This year the government transferred the station to a private telecommunications company, Telefónica del Peru. Since the satellite communications were rapidly replaced by transoceanic fiber optics, the beautiful 32 meters parabolic antenna has been unused since 2002.. In cooperation with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan we began to convert the antenna into a radio telescope. Because researches on interstellar medium around Young Stellar Objects (YSO) will be able to observe the methanol masers that emit at 6.7 GHz, initially we will monitor the 6.7 GHz methanol masers and survey the southern sky. An ambient temperature receiver with Trx= 60 K was developed at Nobeyama Radio Observatory and is ready to be installed. The antenna control system is the Field System FS9 software installed in a Linux PC. An interface between the antenna and the PC was developed at Kashima Space Research Center in Japan. In the near future we plan to install the 2 GHz, 8 GHz, 12 GHz and 22 GHz receivers. The unique location and altitude of the Peruvian Radio Observatory will be useful for VLBI observations in collaboration with global arrays such as the VLBA array for astronomical observation and geodetic measurements. For Peru where few or almost no astronomical observational instruments are available for research, the implementation of the first radio observatory is a big and challenging step, and foster sciences at graduate and postgraduate levels of universities. Worldwide telecommunications antennas possibly are unused and with relative few investment could be transformed into a useful observational instrument.

  19. No Radio Flaring Detected from Cygnus X-3 at 3 GHz by Allen Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. K. G.; Bower, G. C.; Tomsick, J. A.; Bodaghee, A.; Corbet, R. H. D.

    2011-01-01

    Following the announcement of a 98 GHz flare from the microquasar Cygnus X-3 (ATel #3130), we observed it with the Allen Telescope Array (Welch et al., 2009 Proc. IEEE 97 1438 for 2.5 hours beginning at 2011 January 28.848 UT (MJD 55589.848), about 4.0 hours after the 98 GHz observations concluded.

  20. Ray-tracing and physical-optics analysis of the aperture efficiency in a radio telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmi, Luca; Bolli, Pietro

    2007-07-01

    The performance of telescope systems working at microwave or visible-IR wavelengths is typically described in terms of different parameters according to the wavelength range. Most commercial ray-tracing packages have been specifically designed for use with visible-IR systems and thus, though very flexible and sophisticated, do not provide the appropriate parameters to fully describe microwave antennas and to compare with specifications. We demonstrate that the Strehl ratio is equal to the phase efficiency when the apodization factor is taken into account. The phase efficiency is the most critical contribution to the aperture efficiency of an antenna and the most difficult parameter to optimize during the telescope design. The equivalence between the Strehl ratio and the phase efficiency gives the designer/user of the telescope the opportunity to use the faster commercial ray-tracing software to optimize the design. We also discuss the results of several tests performed to check the validity of this relationship that we carried out using a ray-tracing software, ZEMAX, and a full Physical Optics software, GRASP9.3, applied to three different telescope designs that span a factor of approximately 10 in terms of D/lambda. The maximum measured discrepancy between phase efficiency and Strehl ratio varies between approximately 0.4% and 1.9% up to an offset angle of >40 beams, depending on the optical configuration, but it is always less than 0.5% where the Strehl ratio is >0.95.

  1. Monitoring of Cyg X-3 giant flare with Medicina and the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, E.; Pellizzoni, A.; Giroletti, M.; Righini, S.; Orlati, A.; Iacolina, M. N.; Navarrini, A.; Buttu, M.; Migoni, C.; Melis, A.; Concu, R.; Vargiu, G. P.; Bachetti, M.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Loru, S.; Marongiu, M.

    2016-09-01

    Following the detection of Cyg X-3 entering in an ultra soft X-ray state, a forthcoming giant flare was predicted by Trushkin et al. (ATel #9416). In fact, a significant radio flux increase was detected three weeks later, on 14-16 September 2016 (ATel #9502).

  2. Big-Data Perspective to Operating an SKA-Type Synthesis Array Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugha Sundaram, GA

    2015-08-01

    Of the two forerunner sites, viz. Australia and South Africa, where pioneering advancements to state-of-the-art in synthesis array radio astronomy instrumentation are being attempted in the form of pathfinders to the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), for its eventual deployment, a diversity of site-dependent topology and design metrics exists. Towards addressing some of the fundamental mysteries in physics at the micro- and macro-cosm levels, that form the Key Science Projects (KSPs) for the SKA, and interfacing them to an optimally designed array conguration, a critical evaluation of their radio imaging capabilities and metrics becomes paramount. Here, the various KSPs and instrument design specifications are discussed, for relative merits and adaptability to either site, from invoking well-founded and established array-design and optimization principles designed into a customized software tool. Since the problem of array design is one that encompasses variables on several scales such as separation distances between the radio interferometric pair (termed the baseline), factors such as redundancy, flux and phase calibration, bandwidth, integration time, clock synchronization for the correlation process at the detector, and many other ambient-defined parameters, there is a significant component of big data involved in the complex visibilities that are to be Fourier transformed from the spatial to the radio-sky domain (to generate a radio sky map) using vast computational infrastructure, with robust data connectivity and data handling facilities to support this. A crucial requirement exists to make the general public aware of the implications of such a massive scale scientific and technological venture, which shall be the focus of this presentation.

  3. Prospects for Detecting the 326.5MHz Redshifted 21-cm HI Signal with the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sk. Saiyad Ali; Somnath Bharadwaj

    2014-06-01

    Observations of the redshifted 21-cm HI fluctuations promise to be an important probe of the post-reionization era ( ≤ 6). In this paper we calculate the expected signal and foregrounds for the upgraded Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) which operates at frequency = 326.5MHz which corresponds to redshift = 3.35. Assuming that the visibilities contain only the HI signal and system noise, we show that a 3 detection of the HI signal (∼ 1 mK) is possible at angular scales 11' to 3° with ≈ 1000 h of observation. Foreground removal is one of the major challenges for a statistical detection of the redshifted 21 cm HI signal. We assess the contribution of different foregrounds and find that the 326.5MHz sky is dominated by the extragalactic point sources at the angular scales of our interest. The expected total foregrounds are 104−105 times higher than the HI signal.

  4. An evaluation of the effectiveness of observation camera placement within the MeerKAT radio telescope project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyns, Andries

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A recent development within the MeerKAT sub-project of the Square Kilometre Array radio telescope network was the placement of a network of three observation cameras in pursuit of two specific visibility objectives. In this paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of the locations of the MeerKAT observation camera network according to a novel multi-objective geographic information systems-based facility location framework. We find that the configuration chosen and implemented by the MeerKAT decision-makers is of very high quality, although we are able to uncover slightly superior alternative placement configurations. A significant amount of time and effort could, however, have been saved in the process of choosing the appropriate camera sites, had our solutions been available to the decision-makers.

  5. Australia telescope compact array observations of radio recombination lines toward 30 Doradus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peck, AB; Goss, WM; Dickel, HR; Roelfsema, PR; Kesteven, MJ; Dickel, [No Value; Milne, DK; Points, SD

    1997-01-01

    Three hydrogen recombination lines-H90 alpha at 8.9 GHz, H92 alpha at 8.3 GHz, and H109 alpha at 5.0 GHz-have been observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array toward the 30 Doradus Nebula, the giant H II region in the Large Magellanic Cloud. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the more sens

  6. Low Cost 1.2 to 116 GHz Receivers for the ngVLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, Sander; Soliman, Ahmed; Mani, Hamdi

    2017-01-01

    The next-generation VLA (ngVLA) is a major new radio telescope that is being considered for implementation is the southwest US in the 2020 decade. The general parameters which have been discussed in science and technology workshops in the past 18 months are an array with 10 times the sensitivity and resolution of the current JVLA and operating in the 1.2 to 116 GHz range which is the approximate frequency gap between the SKA and ALMA. This can be implemented with 256 x 18m antennas at fixed locations within a 300km maximum baseline.A major requirement for this instrument is affordable capital and operating cost. This poster addresses a receiver design to minimize these costs. A goal is an operating cost no larger than the current JVLA. An important parameter in the operating cost both for electric power and maintenance is the number of cryogenic coolers and vacuum dewars. The JVLA has 8 such systems on 27 telescopes and our goal is 1 cryogenic dewar on each of the 256 telescopes to give approximately the same total number of cryogenic systems.Key questions are the number and frequency range of the receivers packaged as one system. Much work has been done in the past several years on wideband antenna feeds and low noise amplifiers and the important question is the sensitivity as measured by effective area divided by system noise compared to this figure of merit for narrow band receivers. We consider that the 70-116 GHz range will be covered by one conventional bandwidth receiver, the 50 to 70 GHz range range will be skipped due to atmospheric oxygen absorption, and 1.2 to 50 GHz will be covered by 3 to 5 receivers depending upon performance studies and science needs.This poster presents constraints on the reflector shaped Gregorian optics to allow the feeds to be completely cooled in one package, possible layout of the cryogenic dewar, cooling power requirements, and a current estimate of performance.

  7. Analysis of the GPS Observations of the Site Survey at Sheshan 25-m Radio Telescope in August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Cheng, Z. Y.; Li, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The processing of the GPS observations of the site survey at Sheshan 25-m radio telescope in August 2008 is reported. Because each session in this survey is only about six hours, not allowing the subdaily high frequency variations in the station coordinates to be reasonably smoothed, and because there are serious cycle slips in the observations and a large volume of data would be rejected during the software automatic adjustment of slips, the ordinary solution settings of GAMIT needed to be adjusted by loosening the constraints in the a priori coordinates to 10 m, adopting the "quick" mode in the solution iteration, and combining Cview manual operation with GAMIT automatic fixing of cycle slips. The resulting coordinates of the local control polygon in ITRF2005 are then compared with conventional geodetic results. Due to large rotations and translations in the two sets of coordinates (geocentric versus quasi-topocentric), the seven transformation parameters cannot be solved for directly. With various trial solutions it is shown that with a partial pre-removal of the large parameters, high precision transformation parameters can be obtained with post-fit residuals at the millimeter level. This analysis is necessary to prepare the follow-on site and transformation survey of the VLBI and SLR telescopes at Sheshan

  8. A return to strong radio flaring by Circinus X-1 observed with the Karoo Array Telescope test array KAT-7

    CERN Document Server

    Armstrong, R P; Nicolson, G D; Ratcliffe, S; Linares, M; Horrell, J; Richter, L; Schurch, M P E; Coriat, M; Woudt, P; Jonas, J; Booth, R; Fanaroff, B

    2013-01-01

    Circinus X-1 is a bright and highly variable X-ray binary which displays strong and rapid evolution in all wavebands. Radio flaring, associated with the production of a relativistic jet, occurs periodically on a ~17-day timescale. A longer-term envelope modulates the peak radio fluxes in flares, ranging from peaks in excess of a Jansky in the 1970s to an historic low of milliJanskys during the years 1994 to 2007. Here we report first observations of this source with the MeerKAT test array, KAT-7, part of the pathfinder development for the African dish component of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), demonstrating successful scientific operation for variable and transient sources with the test array. The KAT-7 observations at 1.9 GHz during the period 13 December 2011 to 16 January 2012 reveal in temporal detail the return to the Jansky-level events observed in the 1970s. We compare these data to contemporaneous single-dish measurements at 4.8 and 8.5 GHz with the HartRAO 26-m telescope and X-ray monitoring from...

  9. New millisecond pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and the radio/gamma-ray connection

    CERN Document Server

    Espinoza, C M; Celik, O; Weltevrede, P; Stappers, B W; Smith, D A; Kerr, M; Zavlin, V E; Cognard, I; Eatough, R P; Freire, P C C; Janssen, G H; Camilo, F; Desvignes, G; Hewitt, J W; Hou, X; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A; Manchester, R N; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Shannon, R; Theureau, G; Webb, N

    2012-01-01

    We report on the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing ephemerides provided by various radio observatories. We also present confirmation of the gamma-ray pulsations from a sixth source, PSR J2051-0827. Five of these six MSPs are in binary systems: PSRs J1713+0747, J1741+1351, J1600-3053 and the two black widow binary pulsars PSRs J0610-2100 and 2051-0827. The only isolated MSP is the nearby PSR J1024-0719, which is also known to emit X-rays. We present X-ray observations in the direction of PSRs J1600-3053 and J2051-0827. While the latter is firmly detected, we an only give upper limits for the X-ray flux of the former. There are no dedicated X-ray observations available for the other 3 objects. The MSPs mentioned above, together with most of the MSPs detected by Fermi, are used to put together a sample of 30 gamma-ray MSPs which is used to study the morphology and phase connection of radio and gamma-ray pulse profiles. We ...

  10. Systematic Search of the Nearest Stars for Exoplanetary Radio Emission: Preliminary results from LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, Daniel; Knapp, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Radio observations have been used as a tool to search for exoplanets since before the confirmed discovery of the first extrasolar planet. To date, neither targeted observations of known exoplanets nor surveys have produced definitive detections of exoplanetary radio emission. We present the framework for, and initial results from, a blind radio survey of the nearest star systems for exoplanetary radio emission. The very closest stars were chosen to minimize the dilution of potential radio signals by distance and thereby increase the probability of a detection. The goal of this survey is to obtain, at minimum, physically meaningful upper limits on radio emission from (or modulated by) substellar companions of the nearest stars. The target selection criteria for this survey are restricted to distance, observability for LOFAR and the VLA, and data quality metrics only. Stellar properties are not considered because preconceptions about the types of systems most likely to exhibit radio emission have not been observationally confirmed and may be incorrect. Two survey targets, GJ 411 and GJ 725A/B, have been observed with the LOFAR telescope LBA (30-75 MHz) system. A series of 4 2-hour integrations and 1 3-hour integration were made for each target of a period of approximately 2 weeks. Additional observations are underway with LOFAR as well as the VLA. Preliminary results from the first LOFAR observations are presented.

  11. Formation and evolution of the water maser outflow event in AFGL 2591 VLA 3-N

    CERN Document Server

    Trinidad, M A; Estalella, R; Cantó, J; Raga, A; Torrelles, J M; Patel, N A; Gómez, J F; Anglada, G; Carrasco-González, C; Rodríguez, L F

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we analyze multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) water maser observations carried out with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) toward the high-mass star-forming region AFGL 2591. We detected maser emission associated with the radio continuum sources VLA 2 and VLA 3. In addition, a water maser cluster, VLA 3-N, was detected ~ 0.5" north of VLA 3. We concentrate the discussion of this paper on the spatio-kinematical distribution of the water masers towards VLA 3-N. The water maser emission toward the region VLA 3-N shows two bow shock-like structures, Northern and Southern, separated from each other by ~ 100 mas (~ 330 AU). The spatial distribution and kinematics of the water masers in this cluster have persisted over a time span of seven years. The Northern bow shock has a somewhat irregular morphology, while the Southern one has a remarkably smooth morphology. We measured the proper motions of 33 water maser features, which have an average proper motion velocity of ~ 1.3 mas/yr (~...

  12. The VLA Low Band Ionospheric and Transient Experiment (VLITE): A Commensal Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Tracy; Polisensky, Emil; Peters, Wendy; Giacintucci, Simona; Hyman, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    The US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) have collaborated to develop, install, and commission a new commensal system on the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). The VLA Low Band Ionospheric and Transient Experiment (VLITE) makes use of dedicated samplers and fibers to tap the signal from 10 VLA low band receivers and correlate those through a real-time DiFX correlator. VLITE allows for the simultaneous use of the VLA to observe primary science using the higher frequencies receivers (1-50 GHz) through the NRAO WIDAR correlator and lower frequencies through the DiFX correlator. VLITE operates during nearly all observing programs and provides 64 MHz of bandwidth centered at 352 MHz. The operation of VLITE requires no additional resources from the VLA system running the primary science and produces an ad-hoc sky survey. The commensal system greatly expands the capabilities of the VLA through value-added PI science, stand-alone astrophysics, the opening of a new...

  13. Providing hydrogen maser timing stability to orbiting VLBI radio telescope observations by post-measurement compensation of linked frequency standard imperfections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springett, James C.

    1994-01-01

    Orbiting VLBI (OVLBI) astronomical observations are based upon measurements acquired simultaneously from ground-based and earth-orbiting radio telescopes. By the mid-1990s, two orbiting VLBI observatories, Russia's Radioastron and Japan's VSOP, will augment the worldwide VLBI network, providing baselines to earth radio telescopes as large as 80,000 km. The challenge for OVLBI is to effectuate space to ground radio telescope data cross-correlation (the observation) to a level of integrity currently achieved between ground radio telescopes. VLBI radio telescopes require ultrastable frequency and timing references in order that long term observations may be made without serious cross-correlation loss due to frequency source drift and phase noise. For this reason, such instruments make use of hydrogen maser frequency standards. Unfortunately, space-qualified hydrogen maser oscillators are currently not available for use on OVLBI satellites. Thus, the necessary long-term stability needed by the orbiting radio telescope may only be obtained by microwave uplinking a ground-based hydrogen maser derived frequency to the satellite. Although the idea of uplinking the frequency standard intrinsically seems simple, there are many 'contaminations' which degrade both the long and short term stability of the transmitted reference. Factors which corrupt frequency and timing accuracy include additive radio and electronic circuit thermal noise, slow or systematic phase migration due to changes of electronic circuit temporal operating conditions (especially temperature), ionosphere and troposphere induced scintillations, residual Doppler-incited components, and microwave signal multipath propagation. What is important, though, is to realize that ultimate stability does not have to be achieved in real-time. Instead, information needed to produce a high degree of coherence in the subsequent cross-correlation operation may be derived from a two-way coherent radio link, recorded and later

  14. The software system ``Evolution of radio galaxies''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Kopylov, A. I.; Zhelenkova, O. P.; Verkhodanova, N. V.; Chernenkov, V. N.; Parijskij, Yu. N.; Soboleva, N. S.; Temirova, A. V.

    The project of the informational system creation on the problem of evolution of radio galaxies is described. This system, being developed at present at the server http://sed.sao.ru, allows a user to operate with simulated curves of spectral energy distributions (SED) and to estimate ages and redshifts by photometric data using χ2-method. Authors use SEDs of several models (GISSEL'98 (Bruzual, Charlot, 1996), PEGASE (Fioc, Rocca-Volmerange, 1996, 1998)) for different types of galaxies. Synthetic spectra are smoothed by the filter sensetivity curves before the procedure of age estimation. There is a possibility to calculate extictions in different filters using infrared maps. The server containes full archive of RC-catalog radio galaxy images obtained with 6 m telescope of SAO and VLA data. Modes of HTTP, FTP and FTP access, formats of output result (TABLE and GNUPLOT graphic) and additional functions are described.

  15. System to Study Evolution of Radio Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhodanova, N. V.; Verkhodanov, O. V.; Kopylov, A. I.; Zhelenkova, O. P.; Chernenkov, V. N.; Parijskij, Yu. N.; Soboleva, N. S.; Temirova, A. V.

    The project of the informational system creation on the problem of evolution of radio galaxies is described. This system, being developed at present at the server http:// sed.sao.ru, allows a user to operate with simulated curves of spectral energy distributions (SED) and to estimate ages and redshifts by photometric data using χ2-method. Authors use SEDs of several models (GISSEL'98 (Bruzual, Charlot, 1996), PEGASE (Fioc, Rocca-Volmerange, 1996, 1998)) for different types of galaxies. Synthetic spectra are smoothed by the filter sensetivity curves before the procedure of age estimation. There is a possibility to calculate extictions in different filters using infrared maps. The server containes full archive of RC-catalog radio galaxy images obtained with 6 m telescope of SAO and VLA data. Modes of HTTP, FTP and FTP access, formats of output result (TABLE and GNUPLOT graphic) and additional functions are described.

  16. Intraday Variability in Northern Hemisphere Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Krichbaum, T P; Fuhrmann, L; Cimo, G; Witzel, A

    2001-01-01

    We summarize results from flux density monitoring campaigns performed with the 100 meter radio-telescope at Effelsberg and the VLA during the past 15 yrs. We briefly discuss some of the statistical properties of the rapid variability from now more than 40 high declination sources, which show Intraday Variability (IDV). In general, IDV is more pronounced for sources with flat radio spectra and compact VLBI structures. The frequency dependence of the variability pattern varies with source and observing time. For 0917+62, we present new VLBI images, which suggest that the variability pattern is modified by the occurrence of new jet components. For 0716+71, we show the first detection of IDV at millimeter wavelengths (32 GHz). For the physical interpretation of the IDV phenomenon, a complex source and frequency dependent superposition of interstellar scintillation and source intrinsic variability should be considered.

  17. Tracing low-mass galaxy clusters with radio relics: the discovery of Abell 3527-bis

    CERN Document Server

    de Gasperin, F; Ridl, J; Salvato, M; van Weeren, R; Bonafede, A; Greiner, J; Cassano, R; Bruggen, M

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters undergo mergers that can generate extended radio sources called radio relics. Radio relics are the consequence of merger-induced shocks that propagate in the intra cluster medium (ICM). In this paper we analyse the radio, optical and X-ray data from a candidate galaxy cluster that has been selected from the radio emission coming from a candidate radio relic detected in NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). Our aim is to clarify the nature of this source and prove that under certain conditions radio emission from radio relics can be used to trace relatively low-mass galaxy clusters. We have observed the candidate galaxy cluster with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at three different frequencies. These datasets have been analysed together with archival data from ROSAT in the X-ray and with archival data from the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) telescope in four different optical bands. We confirm the presence of a 1 Mpc long radio relic located in the outskirts of a previ...

  18. The nature of composite LINER/H II galaxies as revealed from high-resolution VLA observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filho, ME; Barthel, PD; Ho, LC

    2000-01-01

    A sample of 37 nearby galaxies displaying composite LINER/H II and pure H II spectra was observed with the VLA in an investigation of the nature of their weak radio emission. The resulting radio contour maps overlaid on optical galaxy images are presented here, together with an extensive literature

  19. New technologies and new performances of the JCMT radio-telescope: a preliminary design study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, S.; De Lorenzi, S.; Ghedin, L.; Rampini, F.; Marchiori, G.; Craig, S.

    2012-09-01

    With a diameter of 15m the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) is the largest astronomical telescope in the world designed specifically to operate in the submillimeter wavelength region of the spectrum. It is situated close to the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, at an altitude of 4092m. Its primary reflector currently consists of a steel geodesic supporting structure and pressed aluminium panels on a passive mount. The major issues of the present reflector are its thermal stability and its panels deterioration. A preliminary design study for the replacement of the JCMT antenna dish is here presented. The requested shape error for the new reflector is antenna performance in terms of both stiffness and thermal stability, so that the required surface accuracy of the primary can be achieved even by adopting a passive panels system. Moreover thanks to CFRP, a considerable weight reduction of the elevation structure can be attained. The performance of the proposed solution for the JCMT antenna has been investigated through FE analyses and the assessed deformation of the structure under different loading cases has been taken into account for subsequent error budgeting. Results show that the proposed solution is in line with the requested performance. With this new backing structure, the JCMT would have the largest CFRP reflector ever built.

  20. The TexOx Survey of Radio-Selected Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Croft, S; Hill, G J; Gay, P L; Tufts, J R; Croft, Steve; Rawlings, Steve; Hill, Gary J.; Gay, Pamela L.; Tufts, Joseph R.

    2001-01-01

    We present some initial results from the TexOx (Texas-Oxford) Cluster (TOC) survey - a new method of selecting distant galaxy clusters. The cosmic evolution of the radio source population suggests that some massive clusters at high redshift will contain several radio-loud AGN. We searched for extreme over-densities at ~mJy levels in 7' x 7' boxes within the NVSS radio catalogue, covering a large (~1100 square degree) sky area. We have acquired optical images for ~130 cluster candidates, and followed up a subset of these with the VLA, and with Calar Alto near-IR imaging. Ryle Telescope observations have yielded at least one Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) detection of a massive z~1 system. Spectroscopic follow-up with 8-m class telescopes is in progress.

  1. Analysis of Segmented Reflector Antenna for a Large Millimeter Wave Radio Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Medellin, German

    1993-11-01

    We have developed a computational tool which serves to characterize the performance of large segmented reflector antennas under different sets of conditions. We have applied this tool to the characterization of a large millimeter telescope. A 50 meter diameter instrument of this type specified to operate to wavelengths as short as 1 mm is being design with an actively controlled main surface consisting of 126 hexagonal segments. To simulate the effect of the necessarily imperfect control system, we generate samples of tilt and piston errors for the segments from which the antenna radiation patterns and aperture efficiencies are calculated. We make a comparison of these results with models of antenna tolerance theory developed by Ruze, which relates the aperture efficiency to the rms phase error. We find that Ruze's formula have a different range of validity when the aperture rms phase error, rather than the rms surface error, is used as a parameter. When appreciable tilt errors are present in large segmented antennas, the aperture rms phase error tends to a constant value, independent of the aperture illumination and of the shape of the segments. We conclude that the antenna rms surface error is a better tracer of the aperture efficiency than is the aperture rms phase error when Ruze's formula is used. We find that this well -known expression stands as a lower limit to the performance of large segmented reflector antennas. We have analyzed the effect that gaps between the segments of the active surface of this antenna as well as the imperfect positioning of the subreflector surface have on the aperture efficiency, antenna gain and radiation pattern of this antenna. We have found that the gaps produce a series of grating lobes distributed in a regular pattern in the far field of this antenna, whose relative position is correlated with the size and shape of the segments. We have found that the large millimeter telescope is very sensitive to axial subreflector

  2. EVOLUTION OF THE WATER MASER EXPANDING SHELL IN W75N VLA 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Sang Joon [School of Space Science, Kyunghee University, Seocheon-dong, Giheung-si, Gyeonggi-do, 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon-Wook [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Kurayama, Tomoharu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Honma, Mareki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sasao, Tesuo [Yaeyama Star Club, Ookawa, Ishigaki, Okinawa 904-0022 (Japan); Surcis, Gabriele [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Canto, Jorge [Instituto de Astronomia (UNAM), Apartado 70-264, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Torrelles, Jose M., E-mail: evony@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: skim@kasi.re.kr [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (CSIC)-UB/IEEC, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-04-10

    We present Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers in the high-mass star-forming region of W75N, carried out with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) for three epochs in 2007 with an angular resolution of {approx}1 mas. We detected H{sub 2}O maser emission toward the radio jet in VLA 1 and the expanding shell-like structure in VLA 2. The spatial distribution of the H{sub 2}O masers detected with VERA and measured proper motions around VLA 1 and VLA 2 are similar to those found with previous VLBI observations in epochs 1999 and 2005, with the masers in VLA 1 mainly distributed along a linear structure parallel to the radio jet and, on the other hand, forming a shell-like structure around VLA 2. We have made elliptical fits to the VLA 2 H{sub 2}O maser shell-like structure observed in the different epochs (1999, 2005, and 2007), and found that the shell is still expanding eight years after its discovery. From the difference in the size of the semi-major axes of the fitted ellipses in epochs 1999 ({approx_equal}71 {+-} 1 mas), 2005 ({approx_equal}97 {+-} 3 mas), and 2007 ({approx_equal}111 {+-} 1 mas), we estimate an average expanding velocity of {approx}5 mas yr{sup -1}, similar to the proper motions measured in the individual H{sub 2}O maser features. A kinematic age of {approx}20 yr is derived for this structure. In addition, our VERA observations indicate an increase in the ellipticity of the expanding shell around VLA 2 from epochs 1999 to 2007. In fact, the elliptical fit of the VERA data shows a ratio of the minor and major axes of {approx}0.6, in contrast with an almost circular shape for the shell detected in 1999 and 2005 (b/a {approx} 0.9). This suggests that we are probably observing the formation of a jet-driven H{sub 2}O maser structure in VLA2, evolving from a non-collimated pulsed-outflow event during the first stages of evolution of a massive young stellar object (YSO). This may support predictions made

  3. A 3mm band dual polarization MMIC receiver for the 30-m Pico Veleta Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serres, Patrice; Garnier, Olivier; Bortolotti, Yves; Navarro, Santiago; John, Dave; Pissard, Bruno; Navarrini, Alessandro; Schuster, Karl F.

    2012-09-01

    We present the design, construction and test results of a prototype MMIC receiver for the 3 mm band (84-116 GHz). The receiver cryogenic module consists of a single corrugated feed horn cascaded with an Ortho Mode Traducer (OMT) that splits the two incoming linear polarized signals in two independent single-mode rectangular waveguides. Low noise MMIC HEMT amplification modules, attached to the OMT WR10 waveguide outputs, amplify the signal of each polarization channel. Outside the dewar, each signal is filtered, down-converted, and further amplified to provide a final 8 GHz IF bandwidth across 4-12 GHz. The receiver was installed on the Pico Veleta 30 m telescope in August 2010 where it was used to perform spectral line surveys of astronomical sources. The measured receiver noise temperature was below 75 K with an average value of ~55 K for both polarization channels across 84-116 GHz.

  4. The Progress of Science Preparation for the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    By early 2015, the FAST project has reached a major landmark-finishing laying its cable-mesh system.The primary panels, actuators, and the first receiver platform will be in place by early 2016. We expect an intense period of system testing followed by the first light toward the end of 2016. The early science focus will be to explore opportunities provided by two main receivers, the L-band system and the ultra-wide band receiver covering 280 MHz to 1.6 GHz.I will report here the progress being made in early science project definition, including a pathfinding pulsar search, quasar absorption studies, radio-band line surveys, and megamaser surveys.

  5. Radio Astronomy Data Model for Single-Dish Multiple-Feed Telescopes, and Robledo Archive Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Santander-Vela, J D; Gómez, J F; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Leon, S; Gutíerrez, R; Rodrigo, C; Morata, O; Solano, E; Suárez, O

    2008-01-01

    All the effort that the astrophysical community has put into the development of the Virtual Observatory (VO) has surpassed the non-return point: the VO is a reality today, and an initiative that will self-sustain, and to which all archival projects must adhere. We have started the design of the scientific archive for the DSS-63 70-m antenna at NASA's DSN station in Robledo de Chavela (Madrid). Here we show how we can use all VO proposed data models to build a VO-compliant single-dish, multiple-feed, radio astronomical archive data model (RADAMS) suitable for the archival needs of the antenna. We also propose an exhaustive list of Universal Content Descriptors (UCDs) and FITS keywords for all relevant metadata. We will further refine this data model with the experience that we will gain from that implementation.

  6. First observations of the water masers with the Urumqi 25m radio telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Xingwu

    2001-01-01

    [1]Moran, J. M., Cosmic masers—— A powerful tool for astrophysics, in Modern Radio Science (ed. Hamelin, J. H.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996, 275.[2]Miyoshi, M., Moran, J. M., Herrnstein J. Et al., Evidence for a massive black hole from high rotational velocities in a sub-parsec region of NGC 4258, Nature, 1995, 373: 127.[3]Comoretto, G., Palagi, F., Cesaroni, R. Et al., The Arccetri atlas of H2O maser sources, A & As, 1996, 84: 17.[4]Braatz, J. A., Wilson, A. S., Henkel, C., A survey for H2O megamasers in active galactic nuclei, ApJS, 1996, 106: 51.[5]Wang, J., Zheng, X., Liang, Z. Et al., Interstellar H2O masers a tracer of galactic spiral structure, Ap. & Sp. S., 1992, 200: 163.[6]Greenhill, L. J., Hernstein, J. R., Moran, J. M. Et al., A search for H2O maser emission toward AGN, Ap. J., 1997, 481: L23.[7]Jack, M. A., Paige, E. G. S., Fourier transformation processors based on surface acoustic wave chirp filters, Wave Electronics, 1978, 3: 329.[8]Jack, M. A., Grant, P. M., Collins, J. H., The theory, design, and application of surface-acoustic-wave Fourier-transform processor, Proc. Of IEEE, 1989, 68: 4.[9]Liljestrom, T., Mattila, K., Toriseva, M. Et al., W49N water maser: spectral atlas of time variability during 1981-1985, A & Ap. Sup., 1989, 79: 19-39.[10]Chen, D., Gong, J., Zhou, X. Et al., A new type of radio astronomical spectrometer-saw spectrometer, Acta Astrophysica Sinica, 1990, 13: 85.

  7. A Semi-automatic Search for Giant Radio Galaxy Candidates and their Radio-Optical Follow-up

    CERN Document Server

    Santiago-Bautista, I del C; Andernach, H; Coziol, R; Torres-Papaqui, J P; Andrade, E F Jimenez; Plauchu-Frayn, I; Momjian, E

    2015-01-01

    We present results of a search for giant radio galaxies (GRGs) with a projected largest linear size in excess of 1 Mpc. We designed a computational algorithm to identify contiguous emission regions, large and elongated enough to serve as GRG candidates, and applied it to the entire 1.4-GHz NRAO VLA Sky survey (NVSS). In a subsequent visual inspection of 1000 such regions we discovered 15 new GRGs, as well as many other candidate GRGs, some of them previously reported, for which no redshift was known. Our follow-up spectroscopy of 25 of the brighter hosts using two 2.1-m telescopes in Mexico, and four fainter hosts with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), yielded another 24 GRGs. We also obtained higher-resolution radio images with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array for GRG candidates with inconclusive radio structures in NVSS.

  8. "Normal" FRII Radio Galaxies as a Probe of the Nature of X-Shaped Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lal, Dharam Vir; Kraft, Ralph P

    2008-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength radio study of a sample of nearby Fanaroff-Riley class II (FRII) radio galaxies, matched with the sample of known X-shaped radio sources in size, morphological properties and redshift, using new Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data and archival data from the Very Large Array (VLA). Our principal aim in this paper is to provide a control sample for earlier studies of samples of `X-shaped' radio sources, which have similar luminosities and small-scale radio structures to our targets but exhibit large-scale extensions to their lobes that more typical FRII sources lack; earlier spectral work with the GMRT has suggested that these `wings' sometimes have flat spectral indices at low frequencies, in contrast to expectations from models in which the wings are formed hydrodynamically or by jet reorientation. In our new observations we find that almost all of our target FRII radio galaxies show standard spectral steepening as a function of distance from the hotspot at the low frequen...

  9. All-Stokes Parameterization of the Main Beam and First Sidelobe for the Arecibo Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Heiles, C; Nolan, M L; Lorimer, D; Bhat, R; Ghosh, T K; Howell, E; Lewis, M; O'Neil, K; Salter, C; Stanimirovic, S; Heiles, Carl; Perillat, Phil; Nolan, Michael; Lorimer, Duncan; Bhat, Ramesh; Ghosh, Tapasi; Howell, Ellen; Lewis, Murray; Neil, Karen O'; Salter, Chris; Stanimirovic, Snezana

    2001-01-01

    We describe a scheme that characterizes the main beam and sidelobe in all Stokes parameters employing parameters that allow reconstruction of the complete beam patterns and, also, afford an easy way to see how the beam changes with azimuth, zenith angle, and time. For the main beam in Stokes I the parameters include the beam width, ellipticity and its orientation, coma and its orientation, the point-source gain, the integrated gain (or, equivalently, the main beam efficiency); for the other Stokes parameters the beam parameters include beam squint and beam squash. For the first sidelobe ring in Stokes I the parameters include an 8-term Fourier series describing the height, radius, and radial width; for the other Stokes parameters they include only the sidelobe's fractional polarization. We illustrate the technique by applying it to the Arecibo telescope. The main beam width is smaller and the sidelobe levels higher than for a uniformly-illuminated aperture of the same effective area. These effects are modeled...

  10. Analysis of active surface reflector antenna for a large millimeter wave radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Medellin, G.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    1994-02-01

    The authors analyze the effects of imperfect segment alignment on the aperture efficiency of a large millimeter telescope. A 50 meter diameter instrument of this type specified to operate to wavelengths as short as 1 mm is being designed with an actively controlled main surface. By simulating the performance of the control system, they generate samples of tilt and piston errors for the segments from which the antenna radiation patterns and aperture efficiencies are calculated. They make a comparison of these results with models of antenna tolerance theory developed by Ruze (1966), which relate the aperture efficiency to the RMS phase error. They find that Ruze's formulas have a different range of validity when the aperture RMS phase error, rather than the RMS surface error, is used as a parameter. When appreciable tilt errors are present in large segmented antennas, the aperture RMS phase error tends to a constant value, independent of the aperture illumination and of the shape of the segments. They conclude that the antenna RMS surface error is a better tracer of the aperture efficiency than is the aperture RMS phase error when Ruze's formula is used. They find that this well-known expression stands as a lower limit to the performance of large segmented reflector antennas.

  11. Modeling and optimization of the antenna system with focal plane array for the new generation radio telescopes with wide field of view

    CERN Document Server

    Iupikov, O

    2016-01-01

    The model of the reflector antenna system with focal plane array, low-noise amplifier and beamformer is developed in the work. The beamformer strategy is suggested to reduce the receiving sensitivity ripple inside field of view of the telescope, while the sensitivity itself drops slightly (less than 10%). The system APERTIF (which is currently under development in Netherlands Institute For Radioastronomy, ASTRON) has been analyzed using developed model, and numerical results are presented. The obtained numerical results have been verified experimentally in anechoic chamber as well as on one of the dishes of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (all measurements have been done in ASTRON).

  12. Study of galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void. VI. HI-observations with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Pustilnik, S A

    2016-01-01

    Context. Void population consists mainly of late-type and low surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxies whose atomic hydrogen is the main component of their baryonic matter. Therefore, observations of void galaxy HI are mandatory in order to understand their evolution and dynamics. Aims. Our aim was to obtain integrated HI parameters for a fainter part of the nearby Lynx-Cancer void galaxy sample (total of 45 objects) with the Nancay Radio Telescope (NRT) and to conduct the comparative analysis of all the 103 void galaxies with known HI data with a sample of similar galaxies residing in denser environments of the Local Volume. Methods. For HI observations we used the NRT with its sensitive antenna/receiver system FORT and standard processing. The comparison of the void and control samples on the parameter M(HI)/L_B is conducted with the non-parametric method `The 2x2 Contingency Table test'. Results. We obtained new HI data for about 40% of the Lynx-Cancer galaxy sample. Along with data from the literature, we ...

  13. The initial characterization of a revised 10-Gsps analog-to-digital converter board for radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiango, Homin; Liuo, Howard; Guzzino, Kim

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the design of a 4 bit, 10-gigasamples-per-second analog-to-digital converter (ADC) printed circuit board assembly (PCBA) was revised, manufactured, and tested. It is used for digitizing radio telescopes. An Adsantec ANST7120-KMA flash ADC chip was used, as in the original design. Associated with the field-programmable gate array platform developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research community, the developed PCBA provides data acquisition systems with a wider bandwidth and simplifies the intermediate frequency section. The current version of the PCBA exhibits an analog bandwidth of up to 10 GHz (3 dB loss), and the chip exhibits an analog bandwidth of up to 18 GHz. This facilitates second and third Nyquist sampling. The following worstcase performance parameters were obtained from the revised PCBA at over 5 GHz: spurious-free dynamic range of 12 dB, signal-to-noise and distortion ratio of 2 dB, and effective number of bits of 0.7. The design bugs in the ADC chip caused the poor performance. The vendor created a new batch run and confirmed that the ADC chips of the new batch will meet the specifications addressed in its data sheet.

  14. Bent-Tailed Radio Sources in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey of the Chandra Deep Field-South

    CERN Document Server

    Dehghan, Siamak; Franzen, Thomas M O; Norris, Ray P; Miller, Neal A

    2015-01-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS), supplemented with the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDFS). Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 bent-tailed sources, four diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (one relic, two halos, and one unclassified object), and a further seven complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range $10^{22} \\leq$ $\\textrm{P}_{1.4 \\textrm{ GHz}} \\leq 10^{26}$ W Hz$^{-1}$, redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kpc up to about one Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here one is the most distant bent-tailed source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be as...

  15. A 65 nm CMOS broadband self-calibrated power detector for the square kilometre array radio telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 65 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS broadband self-calibrated high-sensitivity power detector for use in the Square Kilometre Array (SKA, the next-generation high-sensitivity radio telescope, is presented. The power detector calibration is performed by adjusting voltages at the bulk terminals of the input transistors to compensate for mismatches in the output voltages because of process, voltage and temperature variations. Measurements show that the power detector, preceded by an input power-match circuit with 6 dB gain, has an input signal range from −48 to −11 dBm over which a 0.95 dB maximum error in the detected power is observed when the calibration rate is 20 kHz. The proposed broadband power detector has a 3 dB upper band edge of 1.8 GHz, which adequately covers the midband SKA frequency range from 0.7 to 1.4 GHz. The settling time and the calibration time are both <5 μs. The circuit consumes 1.2 mW from a 1.2 V power supply and the input-match circuit consumes another 5.8 mW. The presented power detector achieves the best combination of the detection range and sensitivity of previously published circuits.

  16. Methanol Masers Observations in the 3-mm Bandwidth at the Radio Telescope RT-22 CrAO

    CERN Document Server

    Zubrin, S Yu; Myshenko, V V; Shulga, V M

    2007-01-01

    We report the beginning of the astronomical masers investigations in the 3-mm bandwidth at the radio telescope RT-22 (CrAO, Ukraine). For this purpose the special complex for maser lines investigation in 85...115 GHz frequency band is developed. It is made on the base of the low noise cryogenic Shottky-diode receiver and the high resolution Fourier-spectrometer. The cryogenic receiver has the DSB noise temperature less than 100K. The spectral channel separation of the Fourier-spectrometer is about 4kHz and the spectrometer bandwidth is 8 MHz. Results of maser observations of 8$^{0}-7^{1} $A$^{+}$ transition of methanol (95.169 GHz) towards DR-21(OH), DR-21W and NGC7538 are in good agreement with early obtained results by other authors. On the basis of the analysis of the location of masers in the NGC7538 direction we can assume that the origin of all known class I methanol masers in this region is connected with existing molecular outflows from young stars.

  17. Europe and US to Collaborate on the Design and Development of a Giant Radio Telescope Project in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    High Goals for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Representatives from the U.S. and Europe signed an agreement today in Washington to continue collaboration on the first phase of a giant new telescope project. The telescope will image the Universe with unprecedented sensitivity and sharpness at millimeter wavelengths (between the radio and infrared spectral regions). It will be a major step for astronomy, making it possible to study the origins of galaxies, stars and planets. This project is a prime example of a truly global project, an essential development in view of the ever-increasing complexity and cost of front-line astronomical facilities. The U.S. side of the project is run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) , operated by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF). The European side of the project is a collaboration between the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) , the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (MPG) , the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy (NFRA) and Nederlandse Onderzoekschool Voor Astronomie (NOVA) , and the United Kingdom Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC). The Europe-U.S. agreement signed today may be formally extended in the very near future to include Japan, following an already existing tripartite declaration of intent. Dr. Robert Eisenstein, NSF's Assistant Director Mathematical and Physical Sciences, called the project "a path-breaking international partnership that will open far-reaching opportunities for astronomical observations. This array would enable astronomers to explore the detailed processes through which the stars and planets form and give us a vastly improved understanding of the formation of the first galaxies in the very early universe." Eisenstein welcomed the collaboration with Europe and Japan's interest in becoming a major partner. Speaking on behalf of

  18. Simultaneous Observations of Giant Pulses from the Crab Pulsar, with the Murchison Widefield Array and Parkes Radio Telescope: Implications for the Giant Pulse Emission Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Oronsaye, S I; Bhat, N D R; Tremblay, S E; McSweeney, S J; Tingay, S J; van Straten, W; Jameson, A; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Deshpande, A A; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Lonsdale, C J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Prabu, T; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2015-01-01

    We report on observations of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar performed simultaneously with the Parkes radio telescope and the incoherent combination of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) antenna tiles. The observations were performed over a duration of approximately one hour at a center frequency of 1382 MHz with 340 MHz bandwidth at Parkes, and at a center frequency of 193 MHz with 15 MHz bandwidth at the MWA. Our analysis has led to the detection of 55 giant pulses at the MWA and 2075 at Parkes above a threshold of 3.5$\\sigma$ and 6.5$\\sigma$ respectively. We detected 51$\\%$ of the MWA giant pulses at the Parkes radio telescope, with spectral indices in the range of $-3.6>\\alpha> -4.9$ ($S_{\\rm \

  19. The VLA-COSMOS Survey: II. Source Catalog of the Large Project

    CERN Document Server

    Schinnerer, E; Carilli, C L; Bondi, M; Ciliegi, P; Jahnke, K; Scoville, N Z; Aussel, H; Bertoldi, F; Blain, A W; Impey, C D; Koekemoer, A M; Lefèvre, O; Urry, C M

    2006-01-01

    The VLA-COSMOS large project is described and its scientific objective is discussed. We present a catalog of ~ 3,600 radio sources found in the 2deg^2 COSMOS field at 1.4 GHz. The observations in the VLA A and C configuration resulted in a resolution of 1.5''x1.4'' and a mean rms noise of ~ 10.5(15) uJy/beam in the central 1(2)deg^2. 80 radio sources are clearly extended consisting of multiple components, and most of them appear to be double-lobed radio galaxies. The astrometry of the catalog has been thoroughly tested and the uncertainty in the relative and absolute astrometry are 130mas and <55mas, respectively.

  20. Calibrating short-timescale tropospheric phase fluctuations seen by a radio telescope: Limits from subreflector and Cassegrain feed ring radiometer placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linfield, Roger

    2002-10-01

    Water vapor radiometers (WVRs) measure tropospheric brightness temperatures and use those measurements to infer path delay. Calibration of short-timescale phase fluctuations at a radio telescope requires that the WVR and radio telescope sample a similar volume of the troposphere. Using a statistical (Kolmogorov frozen flow) model of tropospheric fluctuations, the short-timescale calibration capability of two WVR configurations has been quantified. The first configuration is a WVR mounted, with its own antenna, on the back side of the main radio telescope subreflector, giving a conical beam that is coaxial with the main cylindrical near-field beam of the large telescope. The second configuration uses a Cassegrain feed ring, with the WVR and radio astronomy feeds at different positions on the ring. This second configuration gives a cylindrical calibration near-field beam, offset in angle to the main cylindrical beam. An important application of short-timescale phase calibration is improving the coherence of high-frequency interferometric observations. For two cases of current/near future interest (86 GHz very long baseline interferometry with the Very Long Baseline Array; 350 GHz observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array, ALMA), useful calibration could be achieved with either geometry (coaxial conical beam or offset cylindrical beam). For a coaxial conical beam, a 2° WVR beam width would allow significant coherence improvement, but a beam width performance. For an offset cylindrical beam, the desired angular offset (on the sky) is 43 GHz Very Large Array observations, or <=0.3° for 350 GHz ALMA observations.

  1. LOFAR, VLA, and Chandra observations of the Toothbrush galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    van Weeren, R J; Brüggen, M; Andrade-Santos, F; Ogrean, G A; Williams, W L; Röttgering, H J A; Dawson, W A; Forman, W R; de Gasperin, F; Hardcastle, M J; Jones, C; Miley, G K; Rafferty, D A; Rudnick, L; Sabater, J; Sarazin, C L; Shimwell, T W; Bonafede, A; Best, P N; Bîrzan, L; Cassano, R; Chyży, K T; Croston, J H; Dijkema, T J; Ensslin, T; Ferrari, C; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horellou, C; Jarvis, M J; Kraft, R P; Mevius, M; Intema, H T; Murray, S S; Orrú, E; Pizzo, R; Sridhar, S S; Simionescu, A; Stroe, A; van der Tol, S; White, G J

    2016-01-01

    We present deep LOFAR observations between 120-181 MHz of the "Toothbrush" (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of $\\alpha = -0.8 \\pm 0.1$ at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening towards the south to $\\alpha \\approx - 2$. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform ($\\alpha = -1.16$, with an intrinsic scatter of $\\leq 0.04$). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of $\\mathcal{M} = 2.8^{+0.5}_{-0.3}$, assuming diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio r...

  2. Prospects for detection of the lunar Cerenkov emission by the UHE Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos using the GMRT and the Ooty Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Swarup, Govind

    2008-01-01

    Searching for the Ultra high energy Cosmic rays and Neutrinos of $> 10^{20} eV$ is of great cosmological importance. A powerful technique is to search for the \\v{C}erenkov radio emission caused by UHECR or UHE neutrinos impinging on the lunar regolith. We examine in this paper feasibility of detecting these events by observing with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) which has a large collecting area and operates over a wide frequency range with an orthogonal polarisation capability. We discuss here prospects of observations of the \\v{C}erenkov radio emission with the GMRT at 140 MHZ with 32 MHz bandwidth using the incoherent array and also forming 25 beams of the Central Array to cover the moon. We also consider using the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) which was specially designed in 1970 for tracking the Moon. With the ORT (530m long and 30m wide parabolic cylinder) it becomes possible to track the Moon for 9.5 hours on a given day by a simple rotation along the long axis of the parabolic cylinder. ORT o...

  3. Non-thermal radio emission from O-type stars. II. HD 167971

    CERN Document Server

    Blomme, R; Runacres, M C; Van Loo, S; Gunawan, D Y A S

    2006-01-01

    HD 167971 is a triple system consisting of a 3.3-day eclipsing binary (O5-8 V + O5-8 V) and an O8 supergiant. It is also a well known non-thermal radio emitter. We observed the radio emission of HD 167971 with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). By combining these data with VLA archive observations we constructed a radio lightcurve covering a 20-yr time-range. We searched for, but failed to find, the 3.3-day spectroscopic period of the binary in the radio data. This could be due to the absence of intrinsic synchrotron radiation at the colliding-wind region between the two components of the eclipsing binary, or due to the large amount of free-free absorption that blocks the synchrotron radiation. We are able to explain many of the observed characteristics of the radio data if the non-thermal emission is produced in a colliding-wind region between the supergiant and the combined winds of the binary. Furthermore, if the system is gravitationally bound, the orbital motion ...

  4. LOFAR, VLA, and Chandra Observations of the Toothbrush Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Brunetti, G.; Brüggen, M.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; Williams, W. L.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Dawson, W. A.; Forman, W. R.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jones, C.; Miley, G. K.; Rafferty, D. A.; Rudnick, L.; Sabater, J.; Sarazin, C. L.; Shimwell, T. W.; Bonafede, A.; Best, P. N.; Bîrzan, L.; Cassano, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Croston, J. H.; Dijkema, T. J.; Enßlin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kraft, R. P.; Mevius, M.; Intema, H. T.; Murray, S. S.; Orrú, E.; Pizzo, R.; Sridhar, S. S.; Simionescu, A.; Stroe, A.; van der Tol, S.; White, G. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep LOFAR observations between 120 and 181 MHz of the “Toothbrush” (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of α =-0.8+/- 0.1 at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening toward the south to α ≈ -2. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform (α =-1.16, with an intrinsic scatter of ≤slant 0.04). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of { M }={2.8}-0.3+0.5, assuming diffusive shock acceleration. However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio relic implies a much weaker shock ({ M }≈ 1.2, with an upper limit of { M }≈ 1.5). The discrepancy between the Mach numbers calculated from the radio and X-rays can be explained if either (i) the relic traces a complex shock surface along the line of sight, or (ii) if the radio relic emission is produced by a re-accelerated population of fossil particles from a radio galaxy. Our results highlight the need for additional theoretical work and numerical simulations of particle acceleration and re-acceleration at cluster merger shocks.

  5. Saturn's rings resolved by the VLA. [Very Larg Array (VLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depater, I.; Dickel, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution radio data of Saturn were obtained at 1.3, 2, 6, and 21 cm, at different inclination angles of the ring plane. Results on optical depth measurements in the rings are described. There is no wavelength dependence in the optical depth of the rings between 1.3 and 6 cm. This indicates that there are not many small particles (sizes of a few centimeters) in the B-ring, which ring is responsible for most of the observed obscuration. This result agrees with the Voyager radio occultation experiment.

  6. Seeking Fast Radio Burst Origins Using the Very Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Bridget Clare; Spolaor, Sarah; Demorest, Paul; Realfast

    2017-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are transient pulses of radio emission lasting on the order of milliseconds. There have been ~25 FRB sources discovered to date with pulse widths ranging from 1 to 15 ms, and flux densities typically ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 Jy (Petroff et al. 2016). These FRBs have dispersion measures (DMs) on the order of hundreds of pc/cc, well in excess of the expected Galactic contribution. This has lead many to believe that FRBs are extragalactic in origin, with leading progenitor theories suggesting some connection to neutron star related events. However, plausible origin theories remain numerous (Popov & Pshirkov 2016). Thus, localization will be a critical contribution to our understanding of FRBs. Spatial identification of a progenitor would not only help us whittle down origin theories but also allow us to utilize FRBs as invaluable cosmological probes of the intergalactic medium. All reported FRBs to date have been discovered with single dish telescopes that have insufficient resolution for confident localization. In contrast, the Very Large Array (VLA) has the capability to detect and localize FRBs to arcsecond precision. Project realfast takes advantage of this unique localization capability to conduct FRB searches at the VLA in quasi-real-time. We present recent realfast data, including the development of FRB visualization using interferometric imaging, and a discussion of thermal noise candidates and common types of radio frequency interference detected by realfast software. We also present the results of the FRB candidate search for the most recent 150 hour VLA observing campaign. This campaign focused on observations of nearby galaxies with high star-formation rates, and we are thus able to perform a sharp test on any correlation between FRB rates and star-forming galaxies, as might be expected if FRBs originate from neutron stars in nearby galaxies. This analysis allows us to put a lower limit on the characteristic distance to FRBs.

  7. Division x: Radio Astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, Russ; Chapman, Jessica; Rendong, Nan; Carilli, Christopher; Giovannini, Gabriele; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prajval

    This triennium has seen a phenomenal investment in development of observational radio astronomy facilities in all parts of the globe at a scale that significantly impacts the international community. This includes both major enhancements such as the transition from the VLA to the EVLA in North

  8. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope Monitoring of the Black Hole X-Ray Binary, V404 Cygni during Its 2015 June Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Poonam; Kanekar, Nissim

    2017-09-01

    We report results from a Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) monitoring campaign of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cygni during its 2015 June outburst. The GMRT observations were carried out at observing frequencies of 1280, 610, 325, and 235 MHz, and extended from June 26.89 UT (a day after the strongest radio/X-ray outburst) to July 12.93 UT. We find the low-frequency radio emission of V404 Cygni to be extremely bright and fast-decaying in the outburst phase, with an inverted spectrum below 1.5 GHz and an intermediate X-ray state. The radio emission settles to a weak, quiescent state ≈11 days after the outburst, with a flat radio spectrum and a soft X-ray state. Combining the GMRT measurements with flux density estimates from the literature, we identify a spectral turnover in the radio spectrum at ≈1.5 GHz on ≈ June 26.9 UT, indicating the presence of a synchrotron self-absorbed emitting region. We use the measured flux density at the turnover frequency with the assumption of equipartition of energy between the particles and the magnetic field to infer the jet radius (≈4.0 × 1013 cm), magnetic field (≈0.5 G), minimum total energy (≈7 × 1039 erg), and transient jet power (≈8 × 1034 erg s‑1). The relatively low value of the jet power, despite V404 Cygni’s high black hole spin parameter, suggests that the radio jet power does not correlate with the spin parameter.

  9. VLA-Max '91 tests of high energy flare physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.; Willson, Robert F.

    1989-01-01

    The potential for the Very Large Array (VLA) contributions during the coming maximum in solar activity is illustrated by unpublished observations of solar flares on 28 May, 8 June, 24 June, and 30 September 1988. Some of this data appears in the two papers by Willson et al., referenced in this article. The VLA can be used to spatially resolve flaring active regions and their magnetic fields. These results can be compared with simultaneous x ray and gamma ray observations from space. Examples are provided in which spatially separated radio sources are resolved for the pre-burst, impulsive and decay phases of solar flares. The emergence of precursor coronal loops probably triggers the release of stored magnetic energy in adjacent coronal loops. Noise storm enhancements can originate in large-scale coronal loops on opposite sides of the visible solar disk. An interactive feedback mechanism may exist between activity in high-lying 90 cm coronal loops and lower-lying 20 cm ones.

  10. GMRT and VLA Observations at 49 cm and 20 cm of the HII Region near = 24.8°, = 0.1°

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. G. Kantharia; W. M. Goss; D. Anish Roshi; Niruj R. Mohan; Francois Viallefond

    2007-03-01

    We report multi-frequency radio continuum and hydrogen radio recombination line observations of HII regions near = 24.8°, = 0.1° using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope(GMRT) at 1.28 GHz ( = 172), 0.61 GHz ( = 220) and the Very Large Array (VLA) at 1.42 GHz ( = 166). The region consists of a large number of resolved HII regions and a few compact HII regions as seen in our continuum maps, many of which have associated infrared (IR) point sources. The largest HII region at = 24.8° and = 0.1° is a few arcmins in size and has a shell-type morphology. It is a massive HII region enclosing ∼ 550 M⊙ with a linear size of 7 pc and an rms electron density of ∼ 110 cm-3 at a kinematic distance of 6 kpc. The required ionization can be provided by a single star of spectral type O5.5. We also report detection of hydrogen recombination lines from the HII region at = 24.8° and = 0.1° at all observed frequencies near = 100 km s-1. We model the observed integrated line flux density as arising in the diffuse HII region and find that the best fitting model has an electron density comparable to that derived from the continuum.We also report detection of hydrogen recombination lines from two other HII regions in the field.

  11. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Young Radio Pulsar PSR J1028-5819 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Baring, Matthew G.; /Rice U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Caliandro, G.A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /NASA, Goddard /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz) in the error circle of the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of {gamma}-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The {gamma}-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 {+-} 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 {+-} 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known {gamma}-ray pulsars. The measured {gamma}-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of {approx}10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT enables the disentanglement of the previous COS-B and EGRET source detections into at least two distinct sources, one of which is now identified as PSR J1028-5819.

  12. Connecting low- and high-mass star formation: the intermediate-mass protostar IRAS 05373+2349 VLA 2

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, G M; Hoare, M G; Lumsden, S L

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, there have been few studies of the protostellar evolution of intermediate-mass (IM) stars, which may bridge the low- and high-mass regimes. This paper aims to investigate whether the properties of an IM protostar within the IRAS 05373+2349 embedded cluster are similar to that of low- and/or high-mass protostars. We carried out Very Large Array as well as Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy continuum and 12CO(J=1-0) observations, which uncover seven radio continuum sources (VLA 1-7). The spectral index of VLA 2, associated with the IM protostar is consistent with an ionised stellar wind or jet. The source VLA 3 is coincident with previously observed H2 emission line objects aligned in the north-south direction (P.A. -20 to -12 deg), which may be either an ionised jet emanating from VLA 2 or (shock-)ionised cavity walls in the large-scale outflow from VLA 2. The position angle between VLA 2 and 3 is slightly misaligned with the large-scale outflow we map at ~5-arcsec resolution i...

  13. A New 100-GHz Band Two-Beam Sideband-Separating SIS Receiver for Z-Machine on the NRO 45-m Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, Taku; Nishimura, Atsushi; Iwashita, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Chieko; Sakai, Takeshi; Iono, Daisuke; Kohno, Kotaro; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kuno, Nario; Ogawa, Hideo; Asayama, Shin'ichiro; Tamura, Tomonori; Noguchi, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a two-beam waveguide-type dual-polarization sideband-separating SIS receiver system in the 100-GHz band for {\\it z}-machine on the 45-m radio telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. The receiver is intended for astronomical use in searching for highly redshifted spectral lines from galaxies of unknown redshift. This receiver has two beams, which have 45$^{\\prime\\prime}$ of beam separation and allow for observation with the switch in the on-on position. The receiver of each beam is composed of an ortho-mode transducer and two sideband-separating SIS mixers, which are both based on a waveguide technique, and the receiver has four intermediate frequency bands of 4.0--8.0 GHz. Over the radio frequency range of 80--116 GHz, the single-sideband receiver noise temperature is lower than about 50 K, and the image rejection ratios are greater than 10 dB in most of the same frequency range. The new receiver system has been installed in the telescope, and we successfully observed a $^{12}$CO ({\\it ...

  14. Computing Architecture for the ngVLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jeffrey S.; Glendenning, Brian; Hiriart, R.

    2017-01-01

    Computing challenges for the Next Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) are not always the ones that first come to mind. Current design concepts have visibility data rates which allow the permanent storage of the raw visibility data, and although challenging, the calibration and imaging processing for the ngVLA is not beyond the capabilities of existing systems (let alone those that will exist when ngVLA construction is completed). Design goals include a system that supports a wide range of PI-driven projects, end to end data management, and the production of science ready data products. This should be accomplished while minimizing the operating costs of an array consisting of hundreds of elements distributed over an area of nearly 100,000 km2. We discuss a proposed architecture of the computing system, design constraints for a detailed design, and some possible design choices and their implications.

  15. Deep 1.4 GHZ Follow Up of the Steep Spectrum Radio Halo in Abell 521

    CERN Document Server

    Dallacasa, D; Giacintucci, S; Cassano, R; Venturi, T; Macario, G; Kassim, N E; Lane, W; Setti, G

    2009-01-01

    In a recent paper we reported on the discovery of a radio halo with very steep spectrum in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 521 through observations with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We showed that the steep spectrum of the halo is inconsistent with a secondary origin of the relativistic electrons and supports a turbulent acceleration scenario. At that time, due to the steep spectrum, the available observations at 1.4 GHz (archival NRAO - Very Large Array - VLA CnB-configuration data) were not adequate to accurately determine the flux density associated with the radio halo. In this paper we report the detection at 1.4 GHz of the radio halo in Abell 521 using deep VLA observations in the D-configuration. We use these new data to confirm the steep-spectrum of the object. We consider Abell 521 the prototype of a population of very-steep spectrum halos. This population is predicted assuming that turbulence plays an important role in the acceleration of relativistic particles in galaxy clusters, and...

  16. Innovative and Improved Efficiency on the Design of a control System SOftware for CBSS 6m Radio Telescope using LabView in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    EKEOMA Opara, Fidelis

    2015-08-01

    Software has been provided for controlling the antenna and selection of sources in a 6m radio telescope. In this work the most challenging aspect is the maintainance of the pointing accuracy of the final structure with pointing tolerance of about 0.0003 or 1 arcsecond. Using LabView, the voltage through the I/Q is read with a DAQ virtual instrument. The values are then calculated with the dish at its zero position, hence the control system is fully implemented and tested to work at full efficiency.

  17. Tracing low-mass galaxy clusters using radio relics: the discovery of Abell 3527-bis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gasperin, F.; Intema, H. T.; Ridl, J.; Salvato, M.; van Weeren, R.; Bonafede, A.; Greiner, J.; Cassano, R.; Brüggen, M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters undergo mergers that can generate extended radio sources called radio relics. Radio relics are the consequence of merger-induced shocks that propagate in the intra cluster medium (ICM). Aims: In this paper we analyse the radio, optical and X-ray data from a candidate galaxy cluster that has been selected from the radio emission coming from a candidate radio relic detected in NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). Our aim is to clarify the nature of this source and prove that under certain conditions radio emission from radio relics can be used to trace relatively low-mass galaxy clusters. Methods: We observed the candidate galaxy cluster with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at three different frequencies. These datasets have been analysed together with archival data from ROSAT in the X-ray and with archival data from the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) telescope in four different optical bands. Results: We confirm the presence of a 1 Mpc long radio relic located in the outskirts of a previously unknown galaxy cluster. We confirm the presence of the galaxy cluster through dedicated optical observations and using archival X-ray data. Due to its proximity and similar redshift to a known Abell cluster, we named it Abell 3527-bis. The galaxy cluster is amongst the least massive clusters known to host a radio relic. Conclusions: We showed that radio relics can be effectively used to trace a subset of relatively low-mass galaxy clusters that might have gone undetected in X-ray or Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys. This technique might be used in future deep, low-frequency surveys such as those carried on by the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), the Upgraded GMRT (uGMRT) and, ultimately, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).

  18. On the relationship between BL Lacertae objects and radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Landt, Hermine

    2008-01-01

    We present deep radio images at 1.4 GHz of a large and complete sample of BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) selected from the Deep X-ray Radio Blazar Survey (DXRBS). We have observed 24 northern sources with the Very Large Array (VLA) in both its A and C configurations and 15 southern sources with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) in its largest configuration. We find that in the DXRBS, as in the 1-Jy survey, which has a radio flux limit roughly ten times higher than the DXRBS, a considerable number (about a third) of BL Lacs can be identified with the relativistically beamed counterparts of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies. We attribute the existence of FR II-BL Lacs, which is not accounted for by current unified schemes, to an inconsistency in our classification scheme for radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN). Taking the extended radio power as a suitable measure of intrinsic jet power, we find similar average values for low- (LBL) and high-energy peaked BL Lacs (HBL), contrary to the...

  19. An elusive radio halo in the merging cluster Abell 781?

    CERN Document Server

    Venturi, T; Dallacasa, D; Brunetti, G; Cassano, R; Macario, G; Athreya, R

    2011-01-01

    Deep radio observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 781 have been carried out using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 325 MHz and have been compared to previous 610 MHz observations and to archival VLA 1.4 GHz data. The radio emission from the cluster is dominated by a diffuse source located at the outskirts of the X-ray emission, which we tentatively classify as a radio relic. We detected residual diffuse emission at the cluster centre at the level of S(325 MHz)~15-20 mJy. Our analysis disagrees with Govoni et al. (2011), and on the basis of simple spectral considerations we do not support their claim of a radio halo with flux density of 20-30 mJy at 1.4 GHz. Abell 781, a massive and merging cluster, is an intriguing case. Assuming that the residual emission is indicative of the presence of a radio halo barely detectable at our sensitivity level, it could be a very steep spectrum source.

  20. Infrared Imaging of z = 2.43 Radio Galaxy B3 0731+438 with the Subaru Telescope Detection of H$\\alpha$ Ionization Cones of a Powerful Radio Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Motohara, K; Terada, H; Goto, M; Iwai, J; Tanabe, H; Taguchi, T; Hata, R; Maihara, T; Oya, S; Iye, M; Kosugi, G; Noumaru, J; Ogasawara, R; Sasaki, T; Takata, T; Motohara, Kentaro; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Terada, Hiroshi; Goto, Miwa; Iwai, Jun'ichi; Tanabe, Hirohisa; Taguchi, Tomoyuki; Hata, Ryuji; Maihara, Toshinori; Oya, Shin; Iye, Masanori; Kosugi, George; Noumaru, Jun'ichi; Ogasawara, Ryusuke; Sasaki, Toshinori; Takata, Tadafumi

    2000-01-01

    We report on infrared imaging observations of the z=2.429 radio galaxy B3 0731+438 with the Subaru telescope. The images were taken with the K'-band filter and the 2.25 um narrow-band filter to examine the structure and properties of the Ha+[N II] 6548,6583 emission-line components. The Ha+[N II] emission-line image shows biconical lobes with an extent of 40 kpc, which are aligned with the radio axis. The rest-frame equivalent widths of the emission lines at these cones are as large as 1100 AA, and can be well explained by a gas-cloud model photoionized by power-law continuum radiation. The isotropic ionizing photon luminosity necessary to ionize the hydrogen gas in these cones amounts to 1e57(photons/s), which is larger than that in the majority of radio-loud QSOs. From these results, we propose that the Ha alignment effect in this object is produced by biconical gas clouds, which are swept up by the passage of radio jets, and are ionized by strong UV radiation from a hidden AGN. The continuum image consists...

  1. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Young Radio Pulsar PSR J1028-5819 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz)in the error circle of the EGRET source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 +- 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 +- 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known $\\gamma$-ray pulsars. The measured gamma-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of 10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT ena...

  2. Robust constraint on a drifting proton-to-electron mass ratio at z=0.89 from methanol observation at three radio telescopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdonaite, J; Daprà, M; Jansen, P; Bethlem, H L; Ubachs, W; Muller, S; Henkel, C; Menten, K M

    2013-12-06

    A limit on a possible cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ is derived from methanol (CH3OH) absorption lines in the benchmark PKS1830-211 lensing galaxy at redshift z=0.89 observed with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope, the Institute de Radio Astronomie Millimétrique 30-m telescope, and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Ten different absorption lines of CH3OH covering a wide range of sensitivity coefficients K(μ) are used to derive a purely statistical 1σ constraint of Δμ/μ=(1.5±1.5)×10(-7) for a lookback time of 7.5 billion years. Systematic effects of chemical segregation, excitation temperature, frequency dependence, and time variability of the background source are quantified. A multidimensional linear regression analysis leads to a robust constraint of Δμ/μ=(-1.0±0.8(stat)±1.0(sys))×10(-7).

  3. The Beaming Structures of Jupiter’s Decametric Common S-bursts Observed from the LWA1, NDA, and URAN2 Radio Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Masafumi; Lecacheux, Alain; Clarke, Tracy E.; Higgins, Charles A.; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Dowell, Jayce; Imai, Kazumasa; Brazhenko, Anatolii I.; Frantsuzenko, Anatolii V.; Konovalenko, Alexandr A.

    2016-08-01

    On 2015 February 21, simultaneous observations of Jupiter's decametric radio emission between 10 and 33 MHz were carried out using three powerful low-frequency radio telescopes: the Long Wavelength Array Station One in the USA, the Nançay Decameter Array in France, and the URAN2 telescope in Ukraine. We measured the lag times of short-bursts (S-bursts) for 105 minutes of data over effective baselines of up to 8460 km by using cross-correlation analysis of the spectrograms from each instrument. Of particular interest is the measurement of the beaming thickness of S-bursts, testing if either flashlight- or beacon-like beaming is emanating from Jupiter. We find that the lag times for all pairs drift slightly as time elapses, in agreement with expectations from the flashlight-like beaming model. This leads to a new constraint of the minimum beaming thickness of 2.″66. Also, we find that most of the analyzed data abound with S-bursts, whose occurrence probability peaks at 17-18 MHz.

  4. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  5. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  6. SPAM: A data reduction recipe for high-resolution, low-frequency radio-interferometric observations

    CERN Document Server

    Intema, H T

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution astronomical imaging at sub-GHz radio frequencies has been available for more than 15 years, with the VLA at 74 and 330 MHz, and the GMRT at 150, 240, 330 and 610 MHz. Recent developments include wide-bandwidth upgrades for VLA and GMRT, and commissioning of the aperture-array-based, multi-beam telescope LOFAR. A common feature of these telescopes is the necessity to deconvolve the very many detectable sources within their wide fields-of-view and beyond. This is complicated by gain variations in the radio signal path that depend on viewing direction. One such example is phase errors due to the ionosphere. Here I discuss the inner workings of SPAM, a set of AIPS-based data reduction scripts in Python that includes direction-dependent calibration and imaging. Since its first version in 2008, SPAM has been applied to many GMRT data sets at various frequencies. Many valuable lessons were learned, and translated into various SPAM software modifications. Nowadays, semi-automated SPAM data reduction ...

  7. A low-frequency study of two asymmetric large radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pirya, A; Saikia, D J; Singh, M

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of multifrequency observations of two asymmetric, Mpc-scale radio sources with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and the Very Large Array (VLA). The radio luminosity of these two sources, J1211+743 and J1918+742, are in the Fanaroff-Riley class II (FRII) range, but have diffuse radio components on one side of the galaxy while the opposite component appears edge-brightened with a prominent hot-spot. Although the absence of a hot-spot is reminiscent of FRI radio galaxies, suggesting a hybrid morphology, the radio jet facing the diffuse lobe in J1211+743 is similar to those in FRII radio sources, and it is important to consider these aspects as well while classifying these sources in the FR scheme. The observed asymmetries in these Mpc-scale sources are likely to be largely intrinsic rather than being due to the effects of orientation and relativistic motion. The formation of a diffuse lobe facing the radio jet in J1211+743 is possibly due to the jet being highly dissipative. The ...

  8. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Pursimo, T. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope Apartado 474E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Jauncey, David L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Maslennikov, K. [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo, Pulkovskoye Shosse, 65/1, 196140, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Boldycheva, A., E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  9. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope detection of associated H I 21-cm absorption at z = 1.2230 towards TXS 1954+513

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, J. N. H. S.; Kanekar, Nissim; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Day, Brandon; Lynam, Paul; Cruz, Jocelyn

    2017-03-01

    We have used the 610-MHz receivers of the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to detect associated H I 21-cm absorption from the z = 1.2230 blazar TXS 1954+513. The GMRT H I 21-cm absorption is likely to arise against either the milliarcsecond-scale core or the one-sided milliarcsecond-scale radio jet, and is blueshifted by ≈328 km s-1 from the blazar redshift. This is consistent with a scenario in which the H I cloud giving rise to the absorption is being driven outwards by the radio jet. The integrated H I 21-cm optical depth is (0.716 ± 0.037) km s-1, implying a high H I column density, N_{H I} = (1.305 ± 0.067) × ({ T_s/100 K}) × 10^{20} cm-2, for an assumed H I spin temperature of 100 K. We use Nickel Telescope photometry of TXS 1954+513 to infer a high rest-frame 1216 Å luminosity of (4.1 ± 1.2) × 1023 W Hz-1. The z = 1.2230 absorber towards TXS 1954+513 is only the fifth case of a detection of associated H I 21-cm absorption at z > 1, and is also the first case of such a detection towards an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with a rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity ≫1023 W Hz-1, demonstrating that neutral hydrogen can survive in AGN environments in the presence of high UV luminosities.

  10. Atmospheric Refractions and Radio Telescope Pointing Corrections%大气折射对射电望远镜高精度指向的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖明; 王娜; 刘志勇

    2016-01-01

    针对中性大气的物理属性以及大气折射对射电望远镜指向的影响进行了模型分析和计算, 以改进型的 "三段式" 标准指向改正模型为基础, 着重研究了由大气折射造成高阶指向误差的改正方案, 目的是不断提高射电望远镜的指向精度, 尤其针对大口径、 高分辨率的射电望远镜. 在此模型的基础上, 模拟南山观测基地的气候特征, 给出合理的计算结果.通过分析和评估这些结果与射电望远镜指向精度的要求, 为将来大口径射电望远镜的指向修正提供参考.%In this article we discuss the effects of the atmospheric refraction, particularly, the method of accurate corrections to the pointing error of radio telescopes. The position of the telescope beam is somewhat different from the beam position as indicated by the encoders, which is due to the structural deformations caused by the wind, gravity, temperature, and the atmospheric distortion. Accurate refractive corrections which depend on astronomical pointing measurements are required by observations using large aperture radio telescopes, especially at higher frequency bands. This article presents the advanced model for atmospheric refraction corrections and shows the improvements compared to traditional methods, particularly at low elevations. In addition, the real-time refraction corrections, in which the higher-order refraction corrections of telescope pointing errors are involved, for example, the effect of the uneven temperature distribution over a wide scale range, or the differential refraction across a large aperture telescopes, are also analyzed in this article.

  11. Robust Constraint on a Drifting Proton-to-Electron Mass Ratio at z=0.89 from Methanol Observation at Three Radio Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Bagdonaite, Julija; Jansen, Paul; Bethlem, Hendrick L; Ubachs, Wim; Muller, Sébastien; Henkel, Christian; Menten, Karl M

    2013-01-01

    A limit on a possible cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio $\\mu$ is derived from methanol (CH$_3$OH) absorption lines in the benchmark PKS1830$-$211 lensing galaxy at redshift $z \\sim 0.89$ observed with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope, the IRAM 30-m telescope, and the ALMA telescope array. Ten different absorption lines of CH$_3$OH covering a wide range of sensitivity coefficients $K_{\\mu}$ are used to derive a purely statistical 1-$\\sigma$ constraint of $\\Delta\\mu/\\mu = (1.5 \\pm 1.5) \\times 10^{-7}$ for a lookback time of 7.5 billion years. Systematic effects of chemical segregation, excitation temperature, frequency dependence and time variability of the background source are quantified. A multi-dimensional linear regression analysis leads to a robust constraint of $\\Delta\\mu/\\mu = (-1.0 \\pm 0.8_{\\rm stat} \\pm 1.0_{\\rm sys}) \\times 10^{-7}$.

  12. The History of Radio Astronomy and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory: Evolution Toward Big Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malphrus, Benjamin Kevin

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the sequence of events that led to the establishment of the NRAO, the construction and development of instrumentation and the contributions and discovery events and to relate the significance of these events to the evolution of the sciences of radio astronomy and cosmology. After an overview of the resources, a brief discussion of the early days of the science is given to set the stage for an examination of events that led to the establishment of the NRAO. The developmental and construction phases of the major instruments including the 85-foot Tatel telescope, the 300-foot telescope, the 140-foot telescope, and the Green Bank lnterferometer are examined. The technical evolution of these instruments is traced and their relevance to scientific programs and discovery events is discussed. The history is told in narrative format that is interspersed with technical and scientific explanations. Through the use of original data technical and scientific information of historical concern is provided to elucidate major developments and events. An interpretive discussion of selected programs, events and technological developments that epitomize the contributions of the NRAO to the science of radio astronomy is provided. Scientific programs conducted with the NRAO instruments that were significant to galactic and extragalactic astronomy are presented. NRAO research programs presented include continuum and source surveys, mapping, a high precision verification of general relativity, and SETI programs. Cosmic phenomena investigated in these programs include galactic and extragalactic HI and HII, emission nebula, supernova remnants, cosmic masers, giant molecular clouds, radio stars, normal and radio galaxies, and quasars. Modern NRAO instruments including the VLA and VLBA and their scientific programs are presented in the final chapter as well as plans for future NRAO instruments such as the GBT.

  13. Connecting low- and high-mass star formation: the intermediate-mass protostar IRAS 05373+2349 VLA 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G. M.; Johnston, K. G.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, there have been few studies of the protostellar evolution of intermediate-mass (IM) stars, which may bridge the low- and high-mass regimes. This paper aims to investigate whether the properties of an IM protostar within the IRAS 05373+2349 embedded cluster are similar to that of low- and/or high-mass protostars. We carried out Very Large Array as well as Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy continuum and 12CO(J=1-0) observations, which uncover seven radio continuum sources (VLA 1-7). The spectral index of VLA 2, associated with the IM protostar is consistent with an ionized stellar wind or jet. The source VLA 3 is coincident with previously observed H2 emission line objects aligned in the north-south direction (P.A. -20 to -12°), which may be either an ionized jet emanating from VLA 2 or (shock-)ionized cavity walls in the large-scale outflow from VLA 2. The position angle between VLA 2 and 3 is slightly misaligned with the large-scale outflow we map at ˜5-arcsec resolution in 12CO (P.A. ˜ 30°), which in the case of a jet suggests precession. The emission from the mm core associated with VLA 2 is also detected; we estimate its mass to be 12-23 M⊙, depending on the contribution from ionized gas. Furthermore, the large-scale outflow has properties intermediate between outflows from low- and high-mass young stars. Therefore, we conclude that the IM protostar within IRAS 05373+2349 is phenomenologically as well as quantitatively intermediate between the low- and high-mass domains.

  14. CHANDRA/VLA Follow-up of TeV J2032+4131, the Only Unidentified TeV Gamma-ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Y; Combi, J; Corcoran, M; Dame, T M; Drake, J; Bernado, M M K; Milne, P; Miniati, F; Pohl, M; Reimer, O; Romero, G; Rupen, M P; Butt, Yousaf; Benaglia, Paula; Combi, Jorge; Corcoran, Michael; Dame, Thomas; Drake, Jeremy; Bernado, Marina Kaufman; Milne, Peter; Miniati, Francesco; Pohl, Martin; Reimer, Olaf; Romero, Gustavo; Rupen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The HEGRA Cherenkov telescope array group recently reported a steady and extended unidentified TeV gamma-ray source lying at the outskirts of Cygnus OB2. This is the most massive stellar association known in the Galaxy, estimated to contain ~2600 OB type members alone. It has been previously argued that the large scale shocks and turbulence in such associations may play a role in accelerating Galactic cosmic rays. Indeed, Cyg OB2 also coincides with the non-variable MeV-GeV range unidentified EGRET source, 3EG 2033+4118. We report on the near-simultaneous follow-up observations of the extended TeV source region with the CHANDRA X-ray Observatory and the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope obtained in order to explore this possibility. Analysis of the CO, HI, and IRAS 100 micron emissions shows that the TeV source region coincides with an outlying sub-group of powerful OB stars which have evacuated or destroyed much of the ambient atomic, molecular and dust material, and which may be related to the very hig...

  15. Deep radio images of the HEGRA and Whipple TeV sources in the Cygnus OB2 region

    CERN Document Server

    Marti, Josep; Ishwara Chandra C H; Bosch-Ramon, Valenti

    2007-01-01

    Context. The modern generation of Cherenkov telescopes has revealed a new population of gamma-ray sources in the Galaxy. Some of them have been identified with previously known X-ray binary systems while other remain without clear counterparts a lower energies. Our initial goal here was reporting on extensive radio observations of the first extended and yet unidentified source, namely TeV J2032+4130. This object was originally detected by the HEGRA telescope in the direction of the Cygnus OB2 region and its nature has been a matter of debate during the latest years. Aims. We aim to pursue our radio exploration of the TeV J2032+4130 position that we initiated in a previous paper but taking now into account the latest results from new Whipple and MILAGRO TeV telescopes. Methods. Our investigation is mostly based on interferometric radio observations with the Giant Metre Wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) close to Pune (India) and the Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico (USA). We also conducted near infrared observati...

  16. Evolution of the Water Maser Expanding Shell in W75N VLA 2

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jeong-Sook; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Honma, Mareki; Sasao, Tesuo; Surcis, Gabriele; Canto, Jorge; Torrelles, Jose M; Kim, Sang Joon

    2013-01-01

    We present Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of 22 GHz H$_2$O masers in the high-mass star-forming region of \\objectname{W75N}, carried out with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) for three-epochs in 2007 with an angular resolution of $\\sim$ 1 mas. We detected H$_2$O maser emission toward the radio jet in VLA 1 and the expanding shell-like structure in VLA 2. .......... We have made elliptical fits to the VLA 2 H$_2$O maser shell-like structure observed in the different epochs (1999, 2005, and 2007), and found that the shell is still expanding eight years after its discovery. From the difference in the size of the semi-major axes of the fitted ellipses in the epochs 1999 ($\\simeq$ 71$\\pm$1 mas), 2005 ($\\simeq$ 97$\\pm$3 mas), and 2007 ($\\simeq$ 111$\\pm$1 mas), we estimate an average expanding velocity of $\\sim$ 5 mas yr$^{-1}$, similar to the proper motions measured in the individual H$_2$O maser features. A kinematic age of $\\sim$ 20 yr is derived for this structure. In addition, ...

  17. Emerging Massive Star Clusters Revealed: High Resolution Imaging of NGC 4449 from the Radio to the Ultraviolet

    CERN Document Server

    Reines, Amy E; Goss, W M

    2008-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of embedded massive clusters in the nearby (3.9 Mpc) starburst galaxy NGC 4449 in an effort to uncover the earliest phases of massive cluster evolution. By combining high resolution imaging from the radio to the ultraviolet, we reveal these clusters in the process of emerging from their gaseous and dusty birth cocoons. We use Very Large Array (VLA) observations at centimeter wavelengths to identify young clusters surrounded by ultra-dense HII regions, detectable via their production of thermal free-free radio continuum. Ultraviolet, optical and infrared observations are obtained from the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope archives for comparison. We detect 39 compact radio sources towards NGC 4449 at 3.6 cm using the highest resolution (1.3") and sensitivity (RMS ~ 12 uJy) VLA image of the galaxy to date. We reliably identify 13 thermal radio sources and their physical properties are derived using both nebular emission from the HII regions and SED fitting to the stellar con...

  18. Dust in high-z radio-loud AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Cimatti, A; Röttgering, H J A; Ivison, R J; Mazzei, P; Cimatti, Andrea; Freudling, Wolfram; Roettgering, Huub; Ivison, Rob; Mazzei, Paola

    1997-01-01

    We present continuum observations of a small sample of high-redshift, radio-loud AGN (radio galaxies and quasars) aimed at the detection of thermal emission from dust. Seven AGN were observed with IRAM and SEST at 1.25mm; two of them, the radio galaxies 1243+036 ($z \\sim 3.6$) and MG1019+0535 ($z \\sim 2.8$) were also observed at 0.8mm with the JCMT submillimetre telescope. Additional VLA observations were obtained in order to derive the spectral shape of the synchrotron radiation of MG1019+0535 at high radio frequencies. MG1019+0535 and TX0211$-$122 were expected to contain a large amount of dust based on their depleted Ly$\\alpha$ emission. The observations suggest a clear 1.25-mm flux density excess over the synchrotron radiation spectrum of MG1019+0535, suggesting the presence of thermal emission from dust in this radio galaxy, whereas the observations of TX0211$-$122 were not sensitive enough to meaningfully constrain its dust content. On the other hand, our observations of 1243+036 provide a stringent upp...

  19. VLA and VLBI observations of core-dominated quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollgaard, R.I.

    1989-01-01

    High dynamic range VLA observations of the total intensity and linear polarization of 24 powerful, core dominated quasars have been made at 5 GHz, as well as the first millisecond linear polarization observations of 3C 273. For ten quasars the resolution of the VLA was sufficient to reveal details of the compact extended emission surrounding the bright cores. The former all exhibit one sided jets, and most show evidence of diffuse halos. The luminosity of the extended emission is sufficient for those to be Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio sources. This interpretation is confirmed by the linear polarization structure of the jets and terminal hotspots. If these quasars are similar to powerful lobe dominated sources but are oriented with jet axes close to the line of sight, the large degrees of polarization observed in the hotspots suggest that they are travelling at speeds {upsilon} > 0.5c. The superluminal quasar 3C 345 has been imaged with a variety of resolutions. In spite of the bending on the millisecond scale, the author finds that the jet of 3C 345 is very straight for the first 2 and then has two knots which show an abrupt shift in azimuth. The inferred magnetic field in the jet is offset {approximately}30{degree} from a perpendicular orientation with respect to the jet axis. This quasar also appears to have a faint counter jet, with the jet/counter jet luminosity ratio suggesting jet speeds {upsilon} > 0.56c. There is also an asymmetric diffuse halo. Milliarsecond polarization observations of 3C 273 show that the core (component D) is very weakly polarized. Appreciable polarized flux was detected from five of the superluminal components in the jet, with the fractional polarization increasing with distance from D.

  20. Radio Continuum Jet in NGC 7479

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Seppo

    2007-01-01

    The barred galaxy NGC 7479 hosts a remarkable jet-like radio continuum feature: bright, 12-kpc long in projection, and hosting an aligned magnetic field. The degree of polarization is 6%-8% along the jet, and remarkably constant, which is consistent with helical field models. The radio brightness of the jet suggests strong interaction with the ISM and hence a location near the disk plane. We observed NGC 7479 at four wavelengths with the VLA and Effelsberg radio telescopes. The equipartition strength is 35-40 micro-G for the total and >10 micro-G for the ordered magnetic field in the jet. The jet acts as a bright, polarized background. Faraday rotation between 3.5 and 6 cm and depolarization between 6 and 22 cm can be explained by magneto-ionic gas in front of the jet, with thermal electron densities of ~0.06 cm**(-3) in the bar and ~0.03 cm**(-3) outside the bar. The regular magnetic field along the bar points toward the nucleus on both sides. The regular field in the disk reveals multiple reversals, probabl...

  1. Nuclear Radio Continuum Emission of Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus NGC 4258

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Akihiro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kameno, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Hada, Kazuhiro; Sorai, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    The nearby low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) NGC 4258 has a weak radio continuum emission at the galactic center. Quasi-simultaneous multi-frequency observations using the Very Large Array (VLA) from 5 GHz (6 cm) to 22 GHz (1.3 cm) showed inverted spectra in all epochs, which were intra-month variable, as well as complicated spectral features that cannot be represented by a simple power law, indicating multiple blobs in nuclear jets. Using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array (NMA), we discovered a large amplitude variable emission at 100 GHz (3 mm), which had higher flux densities at most epochs than those of the VLA observations. A James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observation at 347 GHz (850 micron) served an upper limit of dust contamination. The inverted radio spectrum of the nucleus NGC 4258 is suggestive of an analogy to our Galactic center Sgr A*, but with three orders of magnitude higher radio luminosity. In addition to the LLAGN M 81, we discuss the nucleus of NGC 4258 as another up-scaled ...

  2. The VLA-COSMOS Survey: V. 324 MHz continuum observations

    CERN Document Server

    Smolcic, Vernesa; Jelic, Vibor; Bondi, Marco; Schinnerer, Eva; Carilli, Chris L; Riechers, Dominik A; Salvato, Mara; Brkovic, Alen; Capak, Peter; Ilbert, Olivier; Karim, Alexander; McCracken, Henry; Scoville, Nick Z

    2014-01-01

    We present 90 cm VLA imaging of the COSMOS field, comprising a circular area of 3.14 square degrees at 8.0"x6.0" angular resolution with an average rms of 0.5 mJy/beam. The extracted catalog contains 182 sources (down to 5.5sigma), 30 of which are multi-component sources. Using Monte Carlo artificial source simulations we derive the completeness of the catalog, and we show that our 90 cm source counts agree very well with those from previous studies. Using X-ray, NUV-NIR and radio COSMOS data to investigate the population mix of our 90 cm radio sample, we find that our sample is dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN). The average 90-20 cm spectral index (S_nu~nu**alpha, where S_nu is the flux density at frequency nu, and alpha the spectral index) of our 90 cm selected sources is -0.70, with an interquartile range of -0.90 to -0.53. Only a few ultra-steep-spectrum sources are present in our sample, consistent with results in the literature for similar fields. Our data do not show clear steepening of the spe...

  3. VLA observations of ultraluminous IRAS galaxies active nuclei or starbursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, T; Partridge, B; Strauss, M; Crawford, Thomas; Marr, Jon; Partridge, Bruce; Strauss, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We employed the Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in C configuration to map 39 ultraluminous IRAS galaxies at 6~cm and 20~cm, at resolutions of ~ 4" and 15", respectively, and 24 sources at 6~cm with in the A configuration with a resolution of ~0.5". Most of the sources have radio spectral indices indicative of synchrotron emission (alpha ~ -0.65). There is one source, however, that shows an inverted spectrum with alpha = +2.1; observations at higher frequencies show that the spectrum peaks between 5 and 8 GHz, as high as any of the ``gigahertz peaked spectrum'' sources studied by O'Dea etal. We discuss the implications of this source for observations of fluctuations in the CMB. Two of the sources show multiple unresolved components, another four are doubles with at least one resolved component, 14 show extended emission which could arise from a disk, and two show arc-second long jets. Our data fit the tight correlation found by Helou etal (1985) between far-infrared and micro...

  4. VLA Measurements of Faraday Rotation through Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kooi, Jason E; Buffo, Jacob J; Spangler, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun that play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation (FR) is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma such as a CME. FR observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch. We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August 2012. We made sensitive Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations using 1 - 2 GHz frequencies of a "constellation" of radio sources through the solar corona at heliocentric distances that ranged from 6 - 15 solar radii. Of the nine sources observed, three were occulted by CMEs: two sources (0842+1835 and 0900+1832) were occulted by a single CME and one source (0843+1547) was occulted by two CMEs. In addition to our radioastronomical observations, which represent one of the first active hunts for CME Faraday r...

  5. Deep images of cluster radio halos

    CERN Document Server

    Bacchi, M; Giovannini, G; Govoni, F

    2003-01-01

    New radio data are presented for the clusters A401, A545, A754, A1914, A2219 and A2390, where the presence of diffuse radio emission was suggested from the images of the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. Sensitive images of these clusters, obtained with the Very Large Array (VLA)at 20 cm confirm the existence of the diffuse sources and allow us to derive their fluxes and intrinsic parameters.The correlation between the halo radio power and cluster X-ray luminosity is derived for a large sample of halo clusters, and is briefly discussed.

  6. MERLIN and VLA Observations of VII Zw 19: Distant Cousin of M82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sara C.; Garrington, S. T.; Turner, Jean L.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2004-10-01

    We have observed the starburst dwarf galaxy VII Zw 19 at subarcsecond resolution with MERLIN and MERLIN+European VLBI Network (EVN) at 18 cm, with MERLIN at 6 cm, and with the Very Large Array (VLA) in the A configuration at 6 and 2 cm. The galaxy is detected at all VLA wavelengths and is resolved. It is also resolved at 18 cm by MERLIN but is not detected by the EVN or by MERLIN at 6 cm. VII Zw 19 has a complex structure of nonthermal radio emission at 18 cm extended over ~1200-1800 pc (4"-6"). That the EVN did not detect this emission indicates that there are no obvious point sources that could be radio supernovae. The 2 cm emission, predominantly thermal free-free emission, has a markedly different spatial distribution from the nonthermal emission. The radio colors show that the galaxy contains numerous supernova remnants, as well as many young H II regions, many of which are optically thick at 6 cm. Two extended regions of 2 cm emission have little 18 cm flux and are probably emission from young star clusters. VII Zw 19 resembles M82 in its radio and infrared spectrum, but the starburst region in VII Zw 19 is twice the size of the one in M82 and twice as luminous.

  7. Prediction of solar particle events and geomagnetic activity using interplanetary scintillation observations from the iowa cocoa-cross radio telescope. Final report April 1, 1976--March 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelof, E.C.; Gotwols, B.L.; Mitchell, D.G.; Cronyn, W.M.; Shawhan, S.D.

    1978-05-01

    Synoptic interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations were taken during the summer of 1976 and autumn of 1977 on the University of Iowa COCOA-Cross radio telescope (34.3 MHz), with supplementary observations from the University of Maryland TPT array (38 MHz). A new high sampling rate (10 times per second) digital system made it possible to reconstruct the IPS power spectrum between 0.1-3.0 Hz. The observations, combined with earlier (1974) measurements of integrated IPS power (scintillation index), have led to the conclusion (based on theoretical modelling) that prediction of activity and associated variations in energetic solar particle events is feasible with a lead time of about 24 hours. The technique depends on the observed broadening of the IPS power spectrum as solar wind density enhancements approach the earth. This effect has been documented for both co-rotating and solar flare-associated plasma disturbances.

  8. Developments of FPGA-based digital back-ends for low frequency antenna arrays at Medicina radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, G.; Bartolini, M.; Mattana, A.; Pupillo, G.; Hickish, J.; Foster, G.; Bianchi, G.; Lingua, A.; Monari, J.; Montebugnoli, S.; Perini, F.; Rusticelli, S.; Schiaffino, M.; Virone, G.; Zarb Adami, K.

    In radio astronomy Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology is largely used for the implementation of digital signal processing techniques applied to antenna arrays. This is mainly due to the good trade-off among computing resources, power consumption and cost offered by FPGA chip compared to other technologies like ASIC, GPU and CPU. In the last years several digital backend systems based on such devices have been developed at the Medicina radio astronomical station (INAF-IRA, Bologna, Italy). Instruments like FX correlator, direct imager, beamformer, multi-beam system have been successfully designed and realized on CASPER (Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research, https://casper.berkeley.edu) processing boards. In this paper we present the gained experience in this kind of applications.

  9. Search for 150 MHz radio emission from extrasolar planets in the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirothia, S. K.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Gopal-Krishna; Kantharia, N. G.; Ishwar-Chandra, C. H.

    2014-02-01

    The ongoing radio continuum TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 150 MHz offers an unprecedented opportunity to undertake a fairly deep search for low-frequency radio emission from nearby extrasolar planets. Currently TGSS images are available for a little over a steradian, encompassing 175 confirmed exoplanetary systems. We have searched for their radio counterparts in the TGSS (150 MHz), supplemented with a search in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the VLA FIRST survey at 1.4 GHz. For 171 planetary systems, we find no evidence of radio emission in the TGSS maps, placing a 3σ upper limit between 8.7 mJy and 136 mJy (median ~24.8 mJy) at 150 MHz. These non-detections include the 55 Cnc system for which we place a 3σ upper limit of 28 mJy at 150 MHz. Nonetheless, for four of the extrasolar planetary systems, we find TGSS radio sources coinciding with or located very close to their coordinates. One of these is 61 Vir: for this system a large radio flux density was predicted in the scenario involving magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and rotation-induced radio emission. We also found 150 MHz emissions toward HD 86226 and HD 164509, where strong radio emission can be produced by the presence of a massive satellite orbiting a rapidly rotating planet. We also detected 150 MHz emission within a synthesized beam from 1RXS1609 b, a pre-main-sequence star harboring a ~14 Jupiter mass planet (or a brown dwarf). With a bright X-ray-UV star and a high mass, the planet 1RXS1609 b presents the best characteristics for rotation-induced emissions with high radio power. Deeper high-resolution observations toward these planetary systems are needed to discriminate between the possibilities of background radio-source and radio-loud planets. At 1.4 GHz, radio emission toward the planet-harboring pulsar PSR B1620-26 is detected in the NVSS. Emissions at 1.4 GHz are also detected toward the very-hot-Jupiter WASP-77A b (in the FIRST survey

  10. Associated Absorption Lines in the Radio-Loud Quasar 3C 351 Far-Ultraviolet Echelle Spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Q; Brotherton, M; Tripp, T M; Kaiser, M E; Kriss, G A

    2002-01-01

    As one of the most luminous radio-loud quasars showing intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray absorption, 3C 351 provides a laboratory for studying the kinematics and physical conditions of such ionized absorbers. We present an analysis of the intrinsic absorption lines in the high-resolution ($\\sim$ 7 km/s) far-UV spectrum which was obtained from observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The spectrum spans wavelengths from 1150 \\AA to 1710 \\AA, and shows strong emission lines from O VI and Ly$\\alpha$. Associated absorption lines are present on the blue wings of the high-ionization emission doublets O VI $\\lambda\\lambda$ 1032,1038 and N V $\\lambda\\lambda$ 1238,1242, as well as the Lyman lines through Ly$\\epsilon$. These intrinsic absorption features are resolved into several distinct kinematic components, covering rest-frame velocities from -40 to -2800 km/s, with respect to the systemic redshift of $z_{em}=0.3721$. For the majority of these abs...

  11. H I observations of galaxies in the southern filament of the Virgo Cluster with the Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder KAT-7 and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgho, A.; Hess, K.; Carignan, C.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    We map the H I distribution of galaxies in a ˜1.5 × 2.5° region located at the virial radius south of the Virgo Cluster using the KAT-7 and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope interferometers. Because of the different beam sizes of the two telescopes, a similar column density sensitivity of NH I ˜ 1 × 1018 atoms cm- 2 was reached with the two observations over 16.5 km s-1. We pioneer a new approach to combine the observations and take advantage of their sensitivity to both the large- and small-scale structures. Out to an unprecedented extent, we detect an H I tail of ˜60 kpc being stripped off NGC 4424, a peculiar spiral galaxy. The properties of the galaxy, together with the shape of the tail, suggest that NGC 4424 is a post-merger galaxy undergoing ram pressure stripping as it falls towards the centre of the Virgo Cluster. We detect a total of 14 galaxies and three H I clouds lacking optical counterparts. One of the clouds is a new detection with an H I mass of 7 × 107 M⊙ and a strong H I profile with W50 = 73 km s-1. We find that 10 out of the 14 galaxies present H I deficiencies not higher than those of the cluster's late spirals, suggesting that the environmental effects are not more pronounced in the region than elsewhere in the cluster.

  12. Radio imaging of core-dominated high redshift quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthel, Peter D.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Lonsdale, Colin J.

    1999-01-01

    VLA imaging at kiloparsec-scale resolution of sixteen core-dominated radio-loud QSOs is presented. Many objects appear to display variable radio emission and their radio morphologies are significantly smaller than those of steep-spectrum quasars, consistent with these objects being observed...

  13. A deep Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope 610-MHz survey of the 1H XMM-Newton/Chandra survey field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, D.; Seymour, N.; McHardy, I. M.; Dwelly, T.; Page, M. J.; Loaring, N. S.

    2007-07-01

    We present the results of a deep 610-MHz survey of the 1H XMM-Newton/Chandra survey area with the Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope. The resulting maps have a resolution of ~7 arcsec and an rms noise limit of 60 μJy. To a 5σ detection limit of 300 μJy, we detect 223 sources within a survey area of 64 arcmin in diameter. We compute the 610-MHz source counts and compare them to those measured at other radio wavelengths. The well-known flattening of the Euclidean-normalized 1.4-GHz source counts below ~2 mJy, usually explained by a population of starburst galaxies undergoing luminosity evolution, is seen at 610 MHz. The 610-MHz source counts can be modelled by the same populations that explain the 1.4-GHz source counts, assuming a spectral index of -0.7 for the starburst galaxies and the steep spectrum active galactic nucleus (AGN) population. We find a similar dependence of luminosity evolution on redshift for the starburst galaxies at 610 MHz as is found at 1.4 GHz (i.e. `Q' = 2.45+0.3-0.4).

  14. Development of a Smooth Taper Double-Ridge Waveguide Orthomode Transducer for a New 100 GHz Band Z-Machine Receiver for the NRO 45-m Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayama, Shin’ichiro; Nakajima, Taku

    2013-02-01

    A smooth taper double-ridge waveguide orthomode transducer (OMT) has been designed for the new 100 GHz band receiver system on the Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO) 45-m radio telescope. The OMT consists of a smooth taper double-ridge waveguide followed by a Bøifot type junction with a main arm and two side arms. The main arm output is a smoothed tapered transformer followed by an E-plane bend and an oval waveguide. This design facilitates the fabrication of the OMT using split blocks machined on a CNC (computer numerical control) machine. The OMT shows a return loss of better than 18 dB, a polarization isolation of better than 28 dB, and an insertion loss of less than 0.5 dB across the 74–116 GHz, and also demonstrated the excellent performance on the NRO 45-m radio telescope.

  15. VLA Observations of Solar Decimetric Spike Bursts: Direct Signature of Accelerated Electrons in Reconnection Outflow Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Bastian, T.; Gary, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Solar decimetric spike bursts, which appear in a radio dynamic spectrum as a cluster of short-lived and narrowband brightenings, have been suggested as a possible signature of many, "elementary" particle accelerations at or near a magnetic reconnection site. Their dynamic spectral feature can be potentially used to diagnose important parameters of the reconnection site such as plasma density and spatial size of the fragmentation. Yet direct observational evidence supporting this scenario has been elusive mainly due to the lack of imaging observations. The upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) provides the first opportunity of performing simultaneous radio imaging and dynamic spectroscopy, which allows radio sources to be imaged at every spatio-temporal pixel in the dynamic spectrum. Here we report Jansky VLA observations of decimetric spike bursts recorded during an eruptive solar limb flare. Combined with EUV and X-ray data from SDO and RHESSI, we show that the spike bursts coincide spatially with a loop-top hard X-ray source, which are located in a region where supra-arcade downflows meet the underlying hot, EUV/X-ray loops. We interpret the observed spike bursts as a direct signature of non-thermal electrons accelerated by turbulences and/or shocks in the reconnection outflow region.

  16. MERLIN and VLA Observations of VII Zw 19: Distant Cousin of M82

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, S C; Turner, J L; Van Dyk, S D

    2004-01-01

    We have observed the starburst dwarf galaxy VII Zw 19 at subarcsecond resolution with the MERLIN and MERLIN+EVN networks at 18 cm, with MERLIN at 6 cm, and with the VLA in A array at 6 and 2 cm. The galaxy is detected at all VLA wavelengths and is resolved. It is also resolved at 18 cm by MERLIN, but is not detected by the EVN nor by MERLIN at 6 cm. VII Zw 19 has a complex structure of nonthermal radio emission at 18 cm extended over ~1200-1800 pc (4-6''). That the EVN did not detect this emission indicates that there are no obvious point sources that could be radio supernovae. The 2 cm emission, predominantly thermal free-free emission, has a markedly different spatial distribution from the nonthermal emission. The radio colors show that the galaxy contains numerous supernova remnants, as well as many young HII regions, many of which are optically thick at 6 cm. Two extended regions of 2 cm emission have little 18 cm flux and are probably emission from young star clusters. VII Zw 19 resembles M82 in its radi...

  17. A Sensitive VLA Search for Small-Scale Glycine Emission Toward OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, J. M.; Pedelty, J. A.; Snyder, L. E.; Jewell, P. R.; Lovas, F. J.; Palmer, Patrick; Liu, S.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted a deep Q-band (lambda-7 mm) search with the Very Large Array (VLA) toward OMC-1 for the lowest energy conformation (conformer I) of glycine (NH2CH2COOH) in four rotational transitions: the 6(sub 15)- 5(sub 14), 6(sub 24)-5(sub 23), 7(sub 17- 6(sub 16), and 7(sub 07)-6(sub 06). Our VLA observations sample the smallest-scale structures to date in the search for glycine toward OMC-1. No glycine emission features were detected. Thus if glycine exists in OMC-1, either it is below our detection limit, or it is more spatially extended than other large molecules in this source, or it is primarily in its high energy form (conformer II). Our VLA glycine fractional abundance limits in OMC-1 are comparable to those determined from previous IRAM 30m measurements -- somewhat better or worse depending on the specific source model -- and the entire approximately 1 foot primary beam of the VLA was searched while sensitive to an areal spatial scale approximately 150 times smaller than the 24 inch beam of the IRAM single-element telescope. In the course of this work, we detected and imaged the 4(sub 14)-3(sub 13) A and E transitions of methyl formate (HCOOCH3) and also the 2(sub 02) - 1(sub 01) transition of formic acid (HCOOH). Since formic acid is a possible precursor to glycine, our glycine limits and formic acid results provide a constraint on this potential formation chemistry route for glycine in OMC-1.

  18. A Comprehensive Study of the Radio Properties of Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, M T; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Grainge, K J B; Hamer, S L; Mahony, E K; Russell, H R; Fabian, A C; McNamara, B R; Wilman, R J

    2015-01-01

    We examine the radio properties of the Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in a large sample of X-ray selected galaxy clusters comprising the Brightest Cluster Sample (BCS), the extended BCS (eBCS) and ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray (REFLEX) cluster catalogues. We have multi-frequency radio observations of the BCG using a variety of data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) telescopes. The radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these objects are decomposed into a component attributed to on-going accretion by the active galactic nuclei (AGN) that we refer to as the 'core', and a more diffuse, ageing component we refer to as the 'non-core'. These BCGs are matched to previous studies to determine whether they exhibit emission lines (principally H-alpha), indicative of the presence of a strong cooling cluster core. We consider how the radio properties of the BCGs vary with cluster environmental factors. Line emitting BCGs are shown...

  19. Research on large radio telescope structure scheme%大型射电望远镜结构总体方案研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘岩; 钱宏亮; 范峰

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at the 110 m fully-steerable radio telescope(which is called QTT for short ) to be built in the future, in order to improve the main reflector precision, the traditional structural concepts were analyzed based on the best fit paraboloid. It is the uneven deformation of the reflector that results in the lower precision. It is mainly due to the following three aspects: the concentrated loads exist on the main reflecting surface, the back frame supporting system is unreasonable and the back frame structure has a poor performance. Based on this, the catching points of the secondary reflector supporting legs were changed, the space truss structure combining cones and quadrangular pyramids were adopted as the back frame structure design, and a kind of polar symmetry umbrella structure was proposed as the supporting system for the back frame structure. Finally the introduced scheme for the fully-steerable radio telescope significantly improved the main reflector precision, its maximal RMS was reduced to 0.306 mm. Compared with the fully-steerable radio telescope GBT which has the largest diameter in the world, the reflective surface area of QTT increases 10%, the surface precision improves 12.6% and the total weightdecreases 40%. The QTT performance reaches the international advanced level.%针对我国待建的110 m全可动射电望远镜(QTT)的工作特点,以提高主反射面精度为目标,以最佳吻合抛物面为拟合标准,分析了传统结构方案致使精度较低的本质原因为反射体变形不均匀,主要源于如下三方面:主反射面存在集中荷载作用、背架结构支承方案不合理、背架结构体系空间受力性能不佳。基于此,改变副反射面撑腿坐落位置,对背架结构采用三角锥、四角锥相结合的网架式结构方案,并对其引入一种高度极对称的伞撑式支承方案。最终提出的全可动望远镜结构总体方案显著提高了主反射面

  20. The VLA Low-frequency Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, A S; Cotton, W D; Kassim, N E; Lazio, T J W; Perley, R A; Condon, J J; Erickson, W C

    2007-01-01

    The Very Large Array (VLA) Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) has imaged 95% of the 3*pi sr of sky north of declination = -30 degrees at a frequency of 74 MHz (4 meter wavelength). The resolution is 80" (FWHM) throughout, and the typical RMS noise level is ~0.1 Jy/beam. The typical point-source detection limit is 0.7 Jy/beam and so far nearly 70,000 sources have been catalogued. This survey used the 74 MHz system added to the VLA in 1998. It required new imaging algorithms to remove the large ionospheric distortions at this very low frequency throughout the entire ~11.9 degree field of view. This paper describes the observation and data reduction methods used for the VLSS and presents the survey images and source catalog. All of the calibrated images and the source catalog are available online (http://lwa.nrl.navy.mil/VLSS) for use by the astronomical community.

  1. International Agreement Will Advance Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Two of the world's leading astronomical institutions have formalized an agreement to cooperate on joint efforts for the technical and scientific advancement of radio astronomy. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in the United States and the Max-Planck Institute for Radioastronomy (MPIfR) in Germany concluded a Memorandum of Understanding outlining planned collaborative efforts to enhance the capabilities of each other's telescopes and to expand their cooperation in scientific research. The VLBA The VLBA CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF In the first project pursued under this agreement, the MPIfR will contribute $299,000 to upgrade the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array's (VLBA) capability to receive radio emissions at a frequency of 22 GHz. This improvement will enhance the VLBA's scientific productivity and will be particularly important for cutting-edge research in cosmology and enigmatic cosmic objects such as gamma-ray blazars. "This agreement follows many years of cooperation between our institutions and recognizes the importance of international collaboration for the future of astronomical research," said Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. "Our two institutions have many common research goals, and joining forces to keep all our telescopes at the forefront of technology will be highly beneficial for the science," said Anton Zensus, Director at MPIfR. In addition to the VLBA, the NRAO operates the Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico and the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The MPIfR operates the 100-meter Effelsberg Radio Telescope in Germany and the 12-meter APEX submillimeter telescope in 5100 m altitude in the Cilean Atacama desert (together with the European Southern Observatory and the Swedish Onsala Space Observatory). With the 100-meter telescope, it is part of the VLBA network in providing transatlantic baselines. Both institutions are members of a global network of telescopes (the Global VLBI Network) that uses simultaneous

  2. Astronomers Make "Movie" of Radio Images Showing Supernova Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Astronomers using an international network of radio telescopes have produced a "movie" showing details of the expansion of debris from an exploding star. Their sequence of images constitutes the best determination yet made of the details of a new supernova remnant, and already has raised new questions about such events. The scientists used radio telescopes in Europe and the United States, including the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), to make very high- resolution images of Supernova 1993J, which was discovered by a Spanish amateur astronomer on March 28, 1993 in the galaxy M81, some 11 million light-years distant in the constellation Ursa Major. Their results are reported in the December 1 issue of the journal Science. The "movie" is based on five images of the supernova, made during 1993 and 1994. The work was done by: Jon Marcaide and Eduardo Ros of the University of Valencia, Spain; Antxon Alberdi of the Special Laboratory for Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics of Madrid, Spain and the Institute of Astrophysics at Andalucia, Spain; Philip Diamond of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM; Irwin Shapiro of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA; Jose-Carlos Guirado, Dayton Jones and Robert Preston of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA; Thomas Krichbaum and Arno Witzel of the Max-Planck Institute for Radioastronomy in Bonn, Germany; Franco Mantovani of the Institute of Radioastronomy in Bologna, Italy; Antonio Rius of the Special Laboratory for Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics of Madrid, Spain and the Center for Advanced Studies at Blanes, Spain; Richard Schilizzi of the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe and Leiden Observatory in the Netherlands; Corrado Trigilio of the Institute of Radioastronomy in Noto, Italy; and Alan Whitney of the MIT- Haystack Observatory in Massachusetts. The capability to make such high-quality images with widely

  3. The Allen Telescope Array Twenty-centimeter Survey -- A 700-Square-Degree, Multi-Epoch Radio Dataset -- II: Individual Epoch Transient Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Croft, Steve; Keating, Garrett; Law, Casey; Whysong, David; Williams, Peter K G; Wright, Melvyn

    2011-01-01

    We present our second paper on the Allen Telescope Array Twenty-centimeter Survey (ATATS), a multi-epoch, ~700 sq. deg. radio image and catalog at 1.4 GHz. The survey is designed to detect rare, bright transients as well as to commission the ATA's wide-field survey capabilities. ATATS explores the challenges of multi-epoch transient and variable source surveys in the domain of dynamic range limits and changing (u,v) coverage. Here we present images made using data from the individual epochs, as well as a revised image combining data from all ATATS epochs. The combined image has RMS noise 3.96 mJy / beam, with a circular beam of 150 arcsec FWHM. The catalog, generated using a false detection rate algorithm, contains 4984 sources, and is >90% complete to 37.9 mJy. The catalogs generated from snapshot images of the individual epochs contain between 1170 and 2019 sources over the 564 sq. deg. area in common to all epochs. The 90% completeness limits of the single epoch catalogs range from 98.6 to 232 mJy. We comp...

  4. The 26 December 2001 Solar Event Responsible for GLE63. I. Observations of a Major Long-Duration Flare with the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Grechnev, V V

    2016-01-01

    Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) of cosmic-ray intensity occur, on average, once a year. Due to their rareness, studying the solar sources of GLEs is especially important to approach understanding their origin. The SOL2001-12-26 eruptive-flare event responsible for GLE63 seems to be challenging in some aspects. Deficient observations limited its understanding. Analysis of extra observations found for this event provided new results shading light on the flare. This article addresses the observations of this flare with the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT). Taking advantage of its instrumental characteristics, we analyze the detailed SSRT observations of a major long-duration flare at 5.7 GHz without cleaning the images. The analysis confirms that the source of GLE63 was associated with an event in active region 9742 that comprised two flares. The first flare (04:30-05:03 UT) reached a GOES importance of about M1.6. Two microwave sources were observed, whose brightness temperatures at 5.7 GHz exceeded 10 MK...

  5. Imaging of the solar atmosphere by the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope at 5.7 GHz with an enhanced dynamic range

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanov, Alexey; Prosovetsky, Dmitry; Rudenko, George; Grechnev, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) is a solar-dedicated directly-imaging interferometer observing the Sun at 5.7 GHz. The SSRT operates in the two-dimensional mode since 1996. The imaging principle of the SSRT restricts its opportunities in observations of very bright flare sources, while it is possible to use `dirty' images in studies of low brightness features, which do not overlap with side lobes from bright sources. The interactive CLEAN technique routinely used for the SSRT data provides imaging of active regions but consumes much time and efforts and does not reveal low-brightness features below the CLEAN threshold. The newly developed technique combines the CLEAN routine with the directly imaging capability of the SSRT and provides clean images with an enhanced dynamic range automatically. These elaborations considerably extend the range of tasks, which can be solved with the SSRT. We show some examples of the present opportunities of the SSRT and compare its data with the images produced by the...

  6. Essential roles of VLA-4 in the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yoichi; Shimaoka, Motomu; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2010-05-01

    Integrins are one of the major families of adhesion molecules and make various kinds of biological effects by mediating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Among integrins, VLA-4 is expressed on many types of hematopoietic cells including stem/progenitor cells and it is considered as a critical regulator of adult hematopoiesis. Recent studies revealed that VLA-4 is not necessarily required for the development or maintenance of adult hematopoietic cells. On the other hand, it was proved that VLA-4 is essential for homeostasis of distribution of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and mature lymphocytes in the body. The dynamic regulation of VLA-4 function is mediated by its conformational change, which is strictly linked to the interaction between alpha and beta cytoplasmic domains. The study using knockin mice showed that GFFKR sequence, a well-preserved motif in the alpha cytoplasmic domain of VLA-4, is critical for binding of alpha and beta cytoplasmic domains as well as regulation of hematopoietic cell distribution. Small molecules targeting this cytoplasmic interaction or ligand-VLA-4 interaction may become good candidates of new drugs for mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells. Several studies have suggested the impact of VLA-4 on chemotherapy sensitivity and prognosis in hematological malignancies, which awaits further investigations.

  7. The VLA Survey of the Chandra Deep Field South. IV. Source Population

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Tozzi, P; Kellermann, K I; Fomalont, E B; Miller, N; Rosati, P; Shaver, P

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of 256 radio sources from our deep (flux density limit of 42 microJy at the field centre at 1.4 GHz) Chandra Deep Field South 1.4 and 5 GHz VLA survey. The radio population is studied by using a wealth of multi-wavelength information in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. The availability of redshifts for ~ 80% of the sources in our complete sample allows us to derive reliable luminosity estimates for the majority of the objects. X-ray data, including upper limits, for all our sources turn out to be a key factor in establishing the nature of faint radio sources. Due to the faint optical levels probed by this study, we have uncovered a population of distant Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) systematically missing from many previous studies of sub-millijansky radio source identifications. We find that, while the well-known flattening of the radio number counts below 1 mJy is mostly due to star forming galaxies, these sources and AGN make up an approximately equal fraction of the sub-m...

  8. Radio and Optical Observations of DG Tau B

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, Luis F; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis A; Raga, Alejandro C; Cantó, Jorge; Riera, Angels

    2012-01-01

    DG Tau B is a Class I young stellar source that drives the asymmetric HH 159 bipolar jet. At optical wavelengths it is obscured by circumstellar optically-thick material. Using VLA and JVLA observations, we determine for the first time the proper motions of this source and find them to be consistent, within error, with those of the nearby young star DG Tau. We also discuss an ejection event that is evident in the 1994 VLA data. As the optical and molecular outflows, this ejection traced in the radio continuum is markedly asymmetric and was detected only to the NW of the star. We propose that this knot, no longer detectable in the radio, could be observed in future optical images of DG Tau B. The positions of the VLA source and of a nearby infrared object are not coincident and we suggest that the VLA source traces the exciting object, while the infrared source could be a reflection lobe.

  9. The peculiar radio galaxy 4C 35.06: a case for recurrent AGN activity?

    CERN Document Server

    Shulevski, A; Barthel, P D; Murgia, M; van Weeren, R J; White, G J; Brüggen, M; Kunert-Bajraszewska, M; Jamrozy, M; Best, P N; Röttgering, H J A; Chyzy, K T; de Gasperin, F; Bîrzan, L; Brunetti, G; Brienza, M; Rafferty, D A; Anderson, J; Beck, R; Deller, A; Zarka, P; Schwarz, D; Mahony, E; Orrú, E; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Butcher, H R; Carbone, D; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Horneffer, A; van der Horst, A J; Intema, H; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Meulman, H; Mulcahy, D D; Munk, H; Norden, M J; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Rowlinson, A; Scaife, A M M; Serylak, M; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wijers, R A M J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O

    2015-01-01

    Using observations obtained with the LOw Fequency ARray (LOFAR), the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and archival Very Large Array (VLA) data, we have traced the radio emission to large scales in the complex source 4C 35.06 located in the core of the galaxy cluster Abell 407. At higher spatial resolution (~4"), the source was known to have two inner radio lobes spanning 31 kpc and a diffuse, low-brightness extension running parallel to them, offset by about 11 kpc (in projection). At 62 MHz, we detect the radio emission of this structure extending out to 210 kpc. At 1.4 GHz and intermediate spatial resolution (~30"), the structure appears to have a helical morphology. We have derived the characteristics of the radio spectral index across the source. We show that the source morphology is most likely the result of at least two episodes of AGN activity separated by a dormant period of around 35 Myr. The AGN is hosted by one of the galaxies located in the cluster core of Abell 407. We propose that it ...

  10. A Radio and X-ray Study of the Merging Cluster A2319

    CERN Document Server

    Storm, Emma; Rudnick, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    A2319 is a massive, merging galaxy cluster with a previously detected radio halo that roughly follows the X-ray emitting gas. We present the results from recent observations of A2319 at 20 cm with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and a re-analysis of the X-ray observations from XMM-Newton, to investigate the interactions between the thermal and nonthermal components of the ICM . We confirm previous reports of an X-ray cold front, and report on the discovery of a distinct core to the radio halo, 800 kpc in extent, that is strikingly similar in morphology to the X-ray emission, and drops sharply in brightness at the cold front. We detect additional radio emission trailing off from the core, which blends smoothly into the 2 Mpc halo detected with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT; Farnsworth et al., 2013). We speculate on the possible mechanisms for such a two-component radio halo, with sloshing playing a dominant role in the core. By directly comparing the X-ray and radio emission, we find that a hadronic origin f...

  11. The Type Ia Supernova Rate in Radio and Infrared Galaxies from the CFHT Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, M L; Sullivan, M; Howell, D A; Gwyn, S D J; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Balam, D; Fabbro, S; Hsiao, E Y; Mourao, A; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perlmutter, S; Ruhlman-Kleider, V; Suzuki, N; Fakhouri, H K; Walker, E S

    2009-01-01

    We have combined the large SN Ia database of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and catalogs of galaxies with photometric redshifts, VLA 1.4 GHz radio sources, and Spitzer infrared sources. We present eight SNe Ia in early-type host galaxies which have counterparts in the radio and infrared source catalogs. We find the SN Ia rate in subsets of radio and infrared early-type galaxies is ~1-5 times the rate in all early-type galaxies, and that any enhancement is always <~ 2 sigma. Rates in these subsets are consistent with predictions of the two component "A+B" SN Ia rate model. Since infrared properties of radio SN Ia hosts indicate dust obscured star formation, we incorporate infrared star formation rates into the "A+B" model. We also show the properties of SNe Ia in radio and infrared galaxies suggest the hosts contain dust and support a continuum of delay time distributions for SNe Ia, although other delay time distributions cannot be ruled out based on our data.

  12. The Multiwavelength Study of Two Unique Radio Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nectaria A. B. Gizani; M. A. Garrett; J. P. Leahy

    2002-03-01

    We present the usage of multi-frequency and multi-band radio, VLA, observations as well as X-ray observations in order to study the environment around two powerful radio galaxies, namely Hercules A and 3 C310. We study their environment both in pc- and kpc-scales. We have chosen these two radio galaxies as they present similar and unique characteristics, compared to the ones from our general knowledge about double radio galaxies associated with active galactic nuclei.

  13. New insights from deep VLA data on the potentially recoiling black hole CID-42 in the COSMOS field

    CERN Document Server

    Novak, Mladen; Civano, Francesca; Bondi, Marco; Ciliegi, Paolo; Wang, Xiawei; Loeb, Abraham; Banfield, Julie; Bourke, Stephen; Elvis, Martin; Hallinan, Gregg; Intema, Huib T; Klockner, Hans-Rainer; Mooley, Kunal; Navarrete, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    We present deep 3 GHz VLA observations of the potentially recoiling black hole CID-42 in the COSMOS field. This galaxy shows two optical nuclei in the HST/ACS image and a large velocity offset of ~ 1300 km/s between the broad and narrow H beta emission line although the spectrum is not spacially resolved (Civano et al. 2010). The new 3 GHz VLA data has a bandwidth of 2 GHz and to correctly interpret the flux densities imaging was done with two different methods: multi-scale multi-frequency synthesis and spectral windows stacking. The final resolutions and sensitivities of these maps are 0.7" with rms = 4.6 muJy/beam and 0.9" with rms = 4.8 muJy/beam respectively. With a 7 sigma detection we find that the entire observed 3 GHz radio emission can be associated with the South-Eastern component of CID-42, coincident with the detected X-ray emission. We use our 3 GHz data combined with other radio data from the literature ranging from 320 MHz to 9 GHz, which include the VLA, VLBA and GMRT data, to construct a radi...

  14. Radio spectra and polarisation properties of a bright sample of Radio-Loud Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bruni, G; Salerno, E; Montenegro-Montes, F M; Carballo, R; Benn, C R; González-Serrano, J I; Holt, J; Jiménez-Luján, F

    2012-01-01

    The origin of broad-absorption-line quasars (BAL QSOs) is still an open issue. Accounting for ~20% of the QSO population, these objects present broad absorption lines in their optical spectra generated from outflows with velocities up to 0.2c. In this work we present the results of a multi-frequency study of a well-defined radio-loud BAL QSO sample, and a comparison sample of radio-loud non-BAL QSOs, both selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We aim to test which of the currently-popular models for the BAL phenomenon - `orientation' or 'evolutionary' - best accounts for the radio properties of BAL quasars. Observations from 1.4 to 43 GHz have been obtained with the VLA and Effelsberg telescopes, and data from 74 to 408 MHz have been compiled from the literature. The fractions of candidate GHz-peaked sources are similar in the two samples (36\\pm12% vs 23\\pm8%), suggesting that BAL QSOs are not generally younger than non-BAL QSOs. BAL and non-BAL QSOs show a large range of spectral indices, consist...

  15. A new search for distant radio galaxies in the southern hemisphere - I. Sample definition and radio properties

    CERN Document Server

    Broderick, J W; Hunstead, R W; Sadler, E M; Murphy, T

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a new program to find high-redshift radio galaxies in the southern hemisphere through ultra-steep spectrum (USS) selection. We define a sample of 234 USS radio sources with spectral indices alpha_408^843 200 mJy in a region of 0.35 sr, chosen by cross-correlating the revised 408 MHz Molonglo Reference Catalogue, the 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey and the 1400 MHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey in the overlap region -40 deg < delta < -30 deg. We present Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) high-resolution 1384 and 2368 MHz radio data for each source, which we use to analyse the morphological, spectral index and polarization properties of our sample. We find that 85 per cent of the sources have observed-frame spectral energy distributions that are straight over the frequency range 408-2368 MHz, and that, on average, sources with smaller angular sizes have slightly steeper spectral indices and lower fractional linear polarization. Fractional polarization is anti-correlated wi...

  16. Zooming in on the peculiar radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy, J1100+4421

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabányu, K. É.; Frey, S.; Paragi, Z.; Tar, I.; An, T.; Tanaka, M.; Morokuma, T.

    2016-08-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1) are interesting subsamples of active galactic nuclei, which are typically thought to contain a relatively smaller supermassive black holes (10^6-10^8 solar masses) and show quite high accretion rate. Only 7% of them are detected in radio. The radio structure of the objects in the extremely radio-loud NLS1 subsample indicates the presence of relativistically beamed jets. Some radio-loud NLS1s were detected even at high energies with the Fermi Large Array Telescope. Therefore these sources are often suggested to be the low-luminosity and younger counterparts of blazars. SDSS J110006.07+442144.3 was identified as an NLS1 at z=0.84 after its dramatic optical brightening discovered by Tanaka et al. (2014) Our dual-frequency (1.6 and 5 GHz) European VLBI Network observations taken one year after this event show a compact structre with brightness temperature of 6 x 10^9 K and a flat spectral index indicating the presence of a compact synchrotron self-absorbed core. Compared with low resolution VLA-FIRST data, the large-scale structure seen there is resolved out in the EVN observation. However the recovered flux density in our L-band EVN observation is significantly higher than the FIRST flux density, which is indicative of brightening in the radio regime. All these results fit into the picture where radio-loud NLS1s are described as faint blazars.

  17. A new search for distant radio galaxies in the Southern hemisphere -- II. 2.2 micron imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, J J; Johnston, H M; Hunstead, R W; Gaensler, B M; De Breuck, C

    2009-01-01

    We have compiled a sample of 234 ultra-steep-spectrum (USS) selected radio sources in order to find high-redshift radio galaxies. The sample covers the declination range -40deg < DEC < -30deg in the overlap region between the 1400-MHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey, 408-MHz Revised Molonglo Reference Catalogue and the 843-MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (the MRCR-SUMSS sample). This is the second in a series of papers on the MRCR-SUMSS sample, and here we present the K-band (2.2 micron) imaging of 173 of the sources primarily from the Magellan and the Anglo-Australian Telescopes. We detect a counterpart to the radio source in 93% of the new K-band images which, along with previously published data, makes this the largest published sample of K-band counterparts to USS-selected radio galaxies. The location of the K-band identification has been compared to the features of the radio emission for the double sources. We find that the identification is most likely to lie near the midpoint of the radio lobes rat...

  18. The Africa Millimetre Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, M.; Müller, C.; Conway, J. E.; Deane, R.; Evans, R.; Falcke, H.; Fraga-Encinas, R.; Goddi, C.; Klein Wolt, M.; Krichbaum, T. P.; MacLeod, G.; Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Roelofs, F.; Shen, Z. Q.; van Langevelde, H. J.

    It is believed that supermassive black holes are found in the centres of galaxies, including the Milky Way. Still, only indirect evidence has been gathered for the existence of these enigmatic objects that are predicted by the general theory of relativity. With the Event Horizon Telescope, a Very Long Baseline Interferometry network of millimetre-wave (radio) telescopes, it will be possible to directly image the 'shadow' of the event horizon of the black hole at the centre of the Milky Way, Sgr A*. Although the Event Horizon Telescope utilises an extensive network of telescopes, there is a huge gap in the coverage of the u-v-plane for these observations across Africa. We discuss the benefits of adding the Africa Millimetre Telescope to the Event Horizon Telescope and present Mt. Gamsberg in Namibia as the best site for this new and first mm-wave telescope in Africa.

  19. The Double–Double Radio Galaxy 3C293

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. A. Joshi; S. Nandi; D. J. Saikia; C. H. Ishwara-Chandra; C. Konar

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of radio continuum observations at frequencies ranging from ∼ 150–5000 MHz of the misaligned double–double radio galaxy (DDRG) 3C293 (J1352+3126) using the GMRT and the VLA, and estimate the time-scale of interruption of jet activity to be less than ∼ 0.1 Myr.

  20. Intermittent Jet Activity in the Radio Galaxy 4C29.30?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamrozy, M.; /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Konar, C.; Saikia, D.J.; /NCRA, Ganeshkhind; Stawarz, L.; /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Mack,; /Bologna, Ist. Radioastronomia; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-04-02

    We present radio observations at frequencies ranging from 240 to 8460 MHz of the radio galaxy 4C29.30 (J0840+2949) using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Effelsberg telescope. We report the existence of weak extended emission with an angular size of {approx} 520 arcsec (639 kpc) within which a compact edge-brightened double-lobed source with a size of 29 arcsec (36 kpc) is embedded. We determine the spectrum of the inner double from 240 to 8460 MHz and show that it has a single power-law spectrum with a spectral index is {approx} 0.8. Its spectral age is estimated to be 33 Myr. The extended diffuse emission has a steep spectrum with a spectral index of {approx} 1.3 and a break frequency 240 MHz. The spectral age is {approx}>200 Myr, suggesting that the extended diffuse emission is due to an earlier cycle of activity. We reanalyze archival x-ray data from Chandra and suggest that the x-ray emission from the hotspots consists of a mixture of nonthermal and thermal components, the latter being possibly due to gas which is shock heated by the jets from the host galaxy.

  1. The continuum radio emission from the Sy 1.5 galaxy NGC 5033

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Torres, Miguel A

    2007-01-01

    We present new continuum VLA observations of the nearby Sy 1.5 galaxy NGC 5033, made at 4.9 and 8.4 GHz on 8 April 2003. Combined with VLA archival observations at 1.4 and 4.9 GHz made on 7 August 1993, 29 August 1999, and 31 October 1999, we sample the galaxy radio emission at scales ranging from the nuclear regions (<~ 100 pc) to the outer regions of the disk (~ 40 kpc). The high-resolution VLA images show a core-jet structure for the Sy 1.5 nucleus. While the core has a moderately steep non-thermal radio spectrum (S_\

  2. The two-component giant radio halo in the galaxy cluster Abell 2142

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, T.; Rossetti, M.; Brunetti, G.; Farnsworth, D.; Gastaldello, F.; Giacintucci, S.; Lal, D. V.; Rudnick, L.; Shimwell, T. W.; Eckert, D.; Molendi, S.; Owers, M.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We report on a spectral study at radio frequencies of the giant radio halo in A 2142 (z = 0.0909), which we performed to explore its nature and origin. The optical and X-ray properties of the cluster suggest that A 2142 is not a major merger and the presence of a giant radio halo is somewhat surprising. Methods: We performed deep radio observations of A 2142 with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 608 MHz, 322 MHz, and 234 MHz and with the Very Large Array (VLA) in the 1-2 GHz band. We obtained high-quality images at all frequencies in a wide range of resolutions, from the galaxy scale, i.e. 5'', up to 60'' to image the diffuse cluster-scale emission. The radio halo is well detected at all frequencies and extends out to the most distant cold front in A 2142, about 1 Mpc away from the cluster centre. We studied the spectral index in two regions: the central part of the halo, where the X-ray emission peaks and the two brightest dominant galaxies are located; and a second region, known as the ridge (in the direction of the most distant south-eastern cold front), selected to follow the bright part of the halo and X-ray emission. We complemented our deep observations with a preliminary LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) image at 118 MHz and with the re-analysis of archival VLA data at 1.4 GHz. Results: The two components of the radio halo show different observational properties. The central brightest part has higher surface brightess and a spectrum whose steepness is similar to those of the known radio halos, i.e. α1.78 GHz118 MHz = 1.33 ± 0.08 . The ridge, which fades into the larger scale emission, is broader in size and has considerably lower surface brightess and a moderately steeper spectrum, i.e. α1.78 GHz118 MHz 1.5. We propose that the brightest part of the radio halo is powered by the central sloshing in A 2142, in a process similar to what has been suggested for mini-halos, or by secondary electrons generated by hadronic collisions in the ICM. On

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Arp 220 LOFAR radio images at 150MHz (Varenius+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenius, E.; Conway, J. E.; Marti-Vidal, I.; Aalto, S.; Barcos-Munoz, L.; Koenig, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Deller, A. T.; Moldon, J.; Gallagher, J. S.; Yoast-Hull, T. M.; Horellou, C.; Morabito, L. K.; Alberdi, A.; Jackson, N.; Beswick, R.; Carozzi, T. D.; Wucknitz, O.; Ramirez-Olivencia, N.

    2016-07-01

    The 1.4GHz FITS image was obtained by combining data from the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) arrays. The 150MHz image was obtained from data taken by the International LOFAR telescope, and image using the Multi-Frequency-Synthesis algorithm as implemented in the task CLEAN in CASA 4.5.2 using 2 Taylor terms, which also produced a spectral index map and a spectral index error map. These two FITS images are also included in addition to the continuum image. Using these four FITS images, as well as the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) maps in Konig et al. (2012ApJ...754...58K) and 6GHz and 33GHz images in Barcos-Munoz et al. (2015. Cat. J/ApJ/799/10), it is possible to reproduce the figures in the paper. (2 data files).

  4. 中阿40m射电望远镜选址与电磁环境监测%Site Testing and RFI Measurements for China-Argentina Radio Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵卫普; 夏跃兵; MALLAMACI CC; PODESTA RC; PACHECO AM; ACTIS E; CASTRO JI; ALVIS RH; LOPEZ CE; FRANCILE C; PODESTA F; 李建斌; PEREZ J; 李金增; 孙建民; 齐力; 罗滔; 马晓耘; 莫铠玮; 李鹏程

    2014-01-01

    优良站址的选择是射电望远镜完成既定科学目标并实现高效运行的重要保障。影响射电望远镜选址的主要因素包括电磁环境、水文、气象、地质条件、隔离性与可及性等。对于射电天文观测而言,来自宇宙天体的射电信号往往极其微弱,对望远镜系统及设备的灵敏度要求极高。然而,随着人类活动的不断加强,人们日常工作和生活中使用的电子通讯设备越来越多,无线电干扰源呈爆炸式涌现。在射电望远镜选址工作中,进行电磁环境监测,选择一个电磁环境良好的站址,对于射电望远镜实现常规观测运行、获取有效数据资料至关重要。同时,电磁环境监测结果也是射电望远镜接收机系统研制、站址电磁环境及无线电宁静区立法保护的重要依据。中阿天文学者和技术人员历时1年半完成了16个候选站址的初步勘察,并对优选出的3个主要候选站址进行了深入细致的电磁环境监测工作,获得了大量可靠数据。中阿双方依据电磁环境监测结果并结合各主要候选站址的水文、气象、地质及道路等条件,最终将位于Talacasto戈壁的3号候选站址确定为中阿CART射电望远镜的建设站点。%The China-Argentina Radio Telescope (CART) with a diameter of 40-m will be located in the San Juan province of Argentina. CART is destined to be eventually equipped with L, S, C, X, Ku, K, Ka, and possibly also Q bands. Up to date, radio telescopes are usually designed with high sensitivities eligible for detecting extremely weak radio signals from astronomical ob jects. However, the explosive utilization of large mass of electronics and radio communication facilities in human activities has significantly ruined the working environment of radio telescopes. Therefore, the selection of a radio quiet site is one of the most critical issues for locating radio telescopes such as CART. Measurements of

  5. Extracellular matrix proteins, integrin receptors (VLA-beta 1, VLA-alpha 2 and VLA-alpha 5) and growth fraction in atypical macroregenerative nodules of the liver: an immunocytochemical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriarca, C; Roncalli, M; Viale, G; Alfano, R M; Braidotti, P; Guddo, F; Coggi, G

    1994-08-01

    A case of cirrhotic liver harbouring three atypical macroregenerative nodules and an hepatocellular carcinoma was immunocytochemically investigated for the expression of VLA-beta 1, VLA-alpha 2 and VLA-alpha 5 integrins and for different extracellular matrix (ECM) components (collagen I, collagen IV, laminin, fibronectin and tenascin). In addition, the proliferative activity within the nodules was evaluated, using the MIB 1 monoclonal antibody (MAb). The cirrhotic liver disclosed a continuous staining pattern of the ECM proteins investigated, as well as a "sinusoidal" immunostaining of VLA-beta 1, VLA-alpha 2 and VLA-alpha 5. The macroregenerative nodules showed a discontinued immunoreactivity for ECM proteins while maintaining a VLA-beta 1 sinusoidal immunostaining, coupled with intercellular immunostaining. VLA-alpha 2 and VLA-alpha 5 expression was lacking. The growth fraction was low in both the above pathological conditions. The hepatocellular carcinoma was devoid of any ECM immunostaining. VLA-beta 1 immunoreactivity exhibited a honeycomb pattern of staining, whereas VLA alpha subunits were absent. MIB1 expression was high, being present in 30% of neoplastic nuclei. A possible relationship between atypical macroregenerative nodules and hepatocellular carcinoma is discussed.

  6. Shoestring Budget Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoot, John E.

    2017-06-01

    The commercial exploitation of microwave frequencies for cellular, WiFi, Bluetooth, HDTV, and satellite digital media transmission has brought down the cost of the components required to build an effective radio telescope to the point where, for the cost of a good eyepiece, you can construct and operate a radio telescope. This paper sets forth a family of designs for 1421 MHz telescopes. It also proposes a method by which operators of such instruments can aggregate and archive data via the Internet. With 90 or so instruments it will be possible to survey the entire radio sky for transients with a 24 hour cadence.

  7. Dwingeloo - the golden radio telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woerden, H.; Strom, R. G.

    2007-01-01

    The Dwingeloo 25-m telesope, inaugurated in 1956, has played a major role in research for half a century. We trace its history back to its conception in 1944, and summarize its main achievements. (c) 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  8. Kinematics of the Local Universe XIV. Measurements from the 21 cm line and the HI mass function from a homogeneous catalog gathered with the Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Theureau, Gilles; Hallet, Nicole; Hanski, Mikko; Poulain, Mélina

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents 828 new 21 cm neutral hydrogen line measurements carried out with the FORT receiver of the meridian transit Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope (NRT) in the years 2000 -- 2007. This observational program was part of a larger project aimed at collecting an exhaustive and magnitude-complete HI extragalactic catalog for Tully-Fisher applications. Through five massive data releases, the KLUN series has collected a homogeneous sample of 4876 HI-spectra of spiral galaxies, complete down to a flux of 5 Jy.km.s^{-1} and with declination delta > -40{\\deg}. We publish here the last release of the KLUN HI observational program, corresponding to the faint end of the survey, with HI masses ranging from 5 10^8 to 5 10^{10} solar masses. The size of this final sample is comparable to the catalogs based on the Arecibo and Parkes radio telescope campaigns, and it allows general HI mass distribution studies from a set of homogeneous radio measurements.

  9. Kinematics of the Local Universe. XIV. Measurements from the 21 cm line and the HI mass function from a homogeneous catalog gathered with the Nançay radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theureau, G.; Coudreau, N.; Hallet, N.; Hanski, M. O.; Poulain, M.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: This paper presents 828 new 21 cm neutral hydrogen line measurements carried out with the FORT receiver of the meridian transit Nançay radio telescope (NRT) in the years 2000-2007. Methods: This observational program was part of a larger project aimed at collecting an exhaustive and magnitude-complete HI extragalactic catalog for Tully-Fisher applications. Through five massive data releases, the KLUN series has collected a homogeneous sample of 4876 HI-spectra of spiral galaxies, complete down to a flux of 5 Jy km s-1 and with declination δ > -40°. Results: We publish here the last release of the KLUN HI observational program, corresponding to the faint end of the survey, with HI masses ranging from 5 × 108 to 5 × 1010 solar masses. The size of this final sample is comparable to the catalogs based on the Arecibo and Parkes radio telescope campaigns, and it allows general HI mass distribution studies from a set of homogeneous radio measurements. Full Tables 2 and 3, together with HI profiles in ascii format, are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A104

  10. Associated H{\\sc i} absorption towards the core of the radio galaxy 3C 321

    CERN Document Server

    Chandola, Yogesh; Saikia, D J; Gupta, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations of H{\\sc i} absorption towards the FRII radio galaxy 3C321 (J1531+2404), which is associated with an active galaxy interacting with a companion. The absorption profile towards the radio core is well resolved and consists three components, of which the two prominent ones are red-shifted by 186 and 235 km s$^{-1}$ relative to the optical systemic velocity. The neutral hydrogen column density towards the core is estimated to be $N$(H{\\sci})=9.23$\\times10^{21}$(${T}_{\\rm s}$/100)($f_{c}$/1.0) cm$^{-2}$, where ${T}_{\\rm s}$ and $f_c$ are the spin temperature and covering factor of the background source respectively. We also present radio continuum observations of the source with both the GMRT and the Very Large Array (VLA) in order to understand the properties of a plume of emission at an angle of $\\sim30^\\circ$ to the source axis. This feature appears to have a steep high-frequency spectrum. The current hotspots and jet are active and se...

  11. The Lyman Alpha Reference Sample: III. Properties of the Neutral ISM from GBT and VLA Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Pardy, Stephen A; Östlin, Göran; Hayes, Matthew; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger; Sandberg, Andreas; Adamo, Angela; Freeland, Emily; Heren, E Christian; Guaita, Lucia; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Mas-Hesse, J M; Melinder, Jens; Orlitová, Ivana; Otí-Floranes, Héctor; Puschnig, Johannes; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We present new H I imaging and spectroscopy of the 14 UV-selected star-forming galaxies in the Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS), aimed for a detailed study of the processes governing the production, propagation, and escape of Ly$\\alpha$ photons. New H I spectroscopy, obtained with the 100m Green Bank Telescope (GBT), robustly detects the H I spectral line in 11 of the 14 observed LARS galaxies (although the profiles of two of the galaxies are likely confused by other sources within the GBT beam); the three highest redshift galaxies are not detected at our current sensitivity limits. The GBT profiles are used to derive fundamental H I line properties of the LARS galaxies. We also present new pilot H I spectral line imaging of 5 of the LARS galaxies obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). This imaging localizes the H I gas and provides a measurement of the total H I mass in each galaxy. In one system, LARS 03 (UGC 8335 or Arp 238), VLA observations reveal an enormous tidal structure that ext...

  12. VLA HI Imaging of the LARS+eLARS Galaxies: Tidally Interacting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Bridget; Eisner, Brian Andrew; Cannon, John M.; Hayes, Matthew; Melinder, Jens; Östlin, Göran; Pardy, Stephen; LARS Team

    2017-01-01

    The Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS) and its extension (eLARS) form the most comprehensive effort to date to study the details of Lyman Alpha radiative transfer in galaxies. Direct imaging of Lyman Alpha emission from the Hubble Space Telescope is supplemented by a wealth of multi-wavelength observations designed to probe the complex processes that contribute to the escape or destruction of Lyman Alpha photons as they resonantly scatter in the neutral ISM. The 42 LARS+eLARS galaxies span a range of physical properties, including mass and star formation rate. A companion poster presents VLA HI imaging of 32 LARS+eLARS galaxies. In this work, we present new VLA D-configuration HI imaging of selected LARS+eLARS galaxies that are well-resolved or tidally interacting. HI column density and velocity field images are compared to SDSS imaging. We interpret the results in the context of tidal interactions shifting the HI gas out of resonance and increasing the likelihood of Lyman Alpha photons escaping the galaxy.

  13. Simulations of cm-wavelength Sunyaev-Zel'dovich galaxy cluster and point source blind sky surveys and predictions for the RT32/OCRA-f and the Hevelius 100-m radio telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, Bartosz; Kus, Andrzej [Toruń Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 11, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Birkinshaw, Mark [HH Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Peter, E-mail: blew@astro.uni.torun.pl, E-mail: Mark.Birkinshaw@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: peter.wilkinson@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: ajk@astro.uni.torun.pl [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of blind surveys for radio sources and galaxy cluster thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects (TSZEs) using the four-pair, beam-switched OCRA-f radiometer on the 32-m radio telescope in Poland. The predictions are based on mock maps that include the cosmic microwave background, TSZEs from hydrodynamical simulations of large scale structure formation, and unresolved radio sources. We validate the mock maps against observational data, and examine the limitations imposed by simplified physics. We estimate the effects of source clustering towards galaxy clusters from NVSS source counts around Planck-selected cluster candidates, and include appropriate correlations in our mock maps. The study allows us to quantify the effects of halo line-of-sight alignments, source confusion, and telescope angular resolution on the detections of TSZEs. We perform a similar analysis for the planned 100-m Hevelius radio telescope (RTH) equipped with a 49-beam radio camera and operating at frequencies up to 22 GHz.We find that RT32/OCRA-f will be suitable for small-field blind radio source surveys, and will detect 33{sup +17}{sub −11} new radio sources brighter than 0.87 mJy at 30 GHz in a 1 deg{sup 2} field at > 5σ CL during a one-year, non-continuous, observing campaign, taking account of Polish weather conditions. It is unlikely that any galaxy cluster will be detected at 3σ CL in such a survey. A 60-deg{sup 2} survey, with field coverage of 2{sup 2} beams per pixel, at 15 GHz with the RTH, would find <1.5 galaxy clusters per year brighter than 60 μJy (at 3σ CL), and would detect about 3.4 × 10{sup 4} point sources brighter than 1 mJy at 5σ CL, with confusion causing flux density errors ∼< 2% (20%) in 68% (95%) of the detected sources.A primary goal of the planned RTH will be a wide-area (π sr) radio source survey at 15 GHz. This survey will detect nearly 3 × 10{sup 5} radio sources at 5σ CL down to 1.3 mJy, and tens of galaxy

  14. Research and design on solar radio telescope observations automatic control platform%太阳射电望远镜自动观测控制平台的研究与设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冉; 殷兴辉

    2015-01-01

    In order to achieve an observer sitting in front of a computer without leaving home can be completed using a radio telescope observations the astronomical, based on laboratory radio spectrum analyzer, we propose an automatic observing solar radio telescope control platform for the overall solution. In VC++6.0 designed PC interface , MSP430F169 MCU as the next crew, PC control of MCU, lower machine control laboratory antenna azimuth and elevation movement, truly achieve the automatic control for the telescope. Experimental results show that the system is stable, we can achieve the purpose of the design.%为了实现观测者足不出户的坐在计算机面前就可以完成使用射电望远镜观测天体的任务,在实验室射电频谱仪的基础上,提出了一种太阳射电望远镜自动观测控制平台的整体解决方案。以 VC++6.0设计上位机界面,以MSP430F169单片机为下位机,上位机控制下位机使其控制实验室电机方位和俯仰的转动,真正实现对望远镜的自动控制。实验结果表明,该系统工作稳定,可以达到设计的目的。

  15. Unveiling the radio cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinde, Keith

    2017-02-01

    Using a radio telescope with no moving parts, the dark energy speeding up the expansion of the Universe can be probed in unprecedented detail, says Keith Vanderlinde, on behalf of the CHIME collaboration.

  16. Radio Emission from Globular Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Radio emission of globular clusters is studied by analyzing the VLA radio survey data of the NVSS and FIRST. We find that 13 clusters have radio sources within their half-mass radii of clusters. Sources detected previously in NGC 7078and NGC 6440 are identified. Pulsars in NGC 6121, NGC 6440 and NGC 7078cannot be detected because of the insufficient survey sensitivity and resolution.There may be a pulsar in the core of Terzan 1. The nature of the extended radio source near the core of NGC 6440 remains unclear. In the core of a globular cluster,there may be many neutron stars or an intermediate mass black hole, but this cannot be clarified with the current radio observations.

  17. VLA HI Imaging of the LARS+eLARS Galaxies: Global HI Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Brian Andrew; Reilly, Bridget; Cannon, John M.; Hayes, Matthew; Melinder, Jens; Östlin, Göran; Pardy, Stephen; LARS Team

    2017-01-01

    The Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS) and its extension (eLARS) form the most comprehensive effort to date to study the details of Lyman Alpha radiative transfer in galaxies. Direct imaging of Lyman Alpha emission from the Hubble Space Telescope is supplemented by a wealth of multi-wavelength observations designed to probe the complex processes that contribute to the escape or destruction of Lyman Alpha photons as they resonantly scatter in the neutral ISM. The 42 LARS+eLARS galaxies span a range of physical properties, including mass and star formation rate. In this work, we present new VLA D-configuration HI imaging of 32 LARS+eLARS galaxies designed to localize the HI gas and to measure the total HI mass. HI column density images and velocity fields are compared to SDSS imaging. Most galaxies are unresolved at this angular resolution; a companion poster presents imaging of interacting galaxies that are well-resolved.

  18. No radio emission from SN 2006X after 2 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Poonam; Chevalier, Roger; Patat, Ferdinando

    2008-02-01

    We observed Type Ia supernova SN 2006X (IAUC 8667) with the VLA for 2 hours in 8.46 GHz band at 2008 Feb 19.47 UT mean time. We did not detect any radio emission, indicating it to be a normal Type Ia supernova. The map rms is 18 uJy and the flux density at the supernova position is 4 +/-18 uJy. We thank VLA staff for making this observation possible. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  19. Astronomers Detect Powerful Bursting Radio Source Discovery Points to New Class of Astronomical Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Astronomers at Sweet Briar College and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have detected a powerful new bursting radio source whose unique properties suggest the discovery of a new class of astronomical objects. The researchers have monitored the center of the Milky Way Galaxy for several years and reveal their findings in the March 3, 2005 edition of the journal, “Nature”. This radio image of the central region of the Milky Way Galaxy holds a new radio source, GCRT J1745-3009. The arrow points to an expanding ring of debris expelled by a supernova. CREDIT: N.E. Kassim et al., Naval Research Laboratory, NRAO/AUI/NSF Principal investigator, Dr. Scott Hyman, professor of physics at Sweet Briar College, said the discovery came after analyzing some additional observations from 2002 provided by researchers at Northwestern University. “"We hit the jackpot!” Hyman said referring to the observations. “An image of the Galactic center, made by collecting radio waves of about 1-meter in wavelength, revealed multiple bursts from the source during a seven-hour period from Sept. 30 to Oct. 1, 2002 — five bursts in fact, and repeating at remarkably constant intervals.” Hyman, four Sweet Briar students, and his NRL collaborators, Drs. Namir Kassim and Joseph Lazio, happened upon transient emission from two radio sources while studying the Galactic center in 1998. This prompted the team to propose an ongoing monitoring program using the National Science Foundation’s Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which operates the VLA, approved the program. The data collected, laid the groundwork for the detection of the new radio source. “Amazingly, even though the sky is known to be full of transient objects emitting at X- and gamma-ray wavelengths,” NRL astronomer Dr. Joseph Lazio pointed out, “very little has been done to look for radio bursts, which are often easier for astronomical objects to produce

  20. Radio Emission from Exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    George, Samuel J.; Stevens, Ian R.

    2008-01-01

    We present results from new low frequency observations of two extrasolar planetary systems (Epsilon Eridani and HD128311) taken at 150 MHz with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We do not detect either system, but are able to place tight upper limits on their low frequency radio emission.

  1. Simultaneous Chandra, CSO and VLA Observations of Sgr A*: The Nature of Flaring Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Heinke, C; Dowell, C D; Roberts, D; Baganoff, F K; Bower, G C

    2007-01-01

    Sgr A*, the massive black hole at the center of the Galaxy, varies in radio through X-ray emission on hourly time scales. The flare activity is thought to arise from the innermost region of an accretion flow onto Sgr A*. We present simultaneous light curves of Sgr A* in radio, sub-mm and X-rays that show a possible time delay of 110$\\pm17$ minutes between X-ray and 850 $\\mu$m suggesting that the sub-mm flare emission is optically thick. At radio wavelengths, we detect time lags of of $20.4\\pm6.8, 30\\pm12$ and 20$\\pm6$ minutes between the flare peaks observed at 13 and 7 mm in three different epochs using the VLA. Linear polarization of 1$\\pm0.2$% and 0.7$\\pm0.1$% is detected at 7 and 13 mm, respectively, when averaged over the entire observation on 2006 July 17. A simple picture of an expanding bubble of synchrotron emitting hot plasma can explain the time delay between various wavelengths, the asymmetric shape of the light curves, and the observed polarization of the flare emission at 43 and 22 GHz. The deri...

  2. Radio Continuum Observations towards Optical and Molecular Outflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Girart

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos observaciones de continuo en varias frecuencias, realizadas con el VLA, en ocho regiones de formación estelar asociadas con flujos moleculares y ópticos: L1489, HH 68{69, HH 94{95, NGC 2264D, L1681B, L778, MWC 1080 y V645 Cyg. Detectamos tres chorros térmicos de radio, L1489, YLW 16A en L1681B y NGC 2264D VLA 7, asociados con ujos moleculares y/o flujos HH. Los chorros térmicos de radio en L1489 y NGC 2264D VLA 7 aparecen colimados en la dirección del ujo a mayor escala. Presentamos la primera detección tentativa de un chorro no térmico de radio, L778 VLA 5, asociado con una protoestrella de baja masa de clase I y con un flujo molecular. En HH 68{69, HH 94{95 y en el ujo molecular en NGC 2264D no hemos podido identificar las fuentes de excitación de estos flujos. La emisión de radio asociada con V645 Cyg es bastante extendida, 0:1 pc y variable. Detectamos tres radio fuentes en la región de MWC 1080 que podrán estar asociadas a fuentes jóvenes.

  3. Radio observations of Planck clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Ruta

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a number of new galaxy clusters have been detected by the ESA-Planck satellite, the South Pole Telescope and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Several of the newly detected clusters are massive, merging systems with disturbed morphology in the X-ray surface brightness. Diffuse radio sources in clusters, called giant radio halos and relics, are direct probes of cosmic rays and magnetic fields in the intra-cluster medium. These radio sources are found to occur mainly in massive merging clusters. Thus, the new SZ-discovered clusters are good candidates to search for new radio halos and relics. We have initiated radio observations of the clusters detected by Planck with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. These observations have already led to the detection of a radio halo in PLCKG171.9-40.7, the first giant halo discovered in one of the new Planck clusters.

  4. Radio monitoring of the hard state jets in the 2011 outburst of MAXI J1836-194

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, T D; Curran, P A; Soria, R; Altamirano, D; Corbel, S; Coriat, M; Moin, A; Russell, D M; Sivakoff, G R; Slaven-Blair, T J; Belloni, T M; Fender, R P; Heinz, S; Jonker, P G; Krimm, H A; Kording, E G; Maitra, D; Markoff, S; Middleton, M; Migliari, S; Remillard, R A; Rupen, M P; Sarazin, C L; Tetarenko, A J; Torres, M A P; Tudose, V; Tzioumis, A K

    2015-01-01

    MAXI J1836-194 is a Galactic black hole candidate X-ray binary that was discovered in 2011 when it went into outburst. In this paper, we present the full radio monitoring of this system during its `failed' outburst, in which the source did not complete a full set of state changes, only transitioning as far as the hard intermediate state. Observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) show that the jet properties changed significantly during the outburst. The VLA observations detected linearly polarised emission at a level of ~1% early in the outburst, increasing to ~3% as the outburst peaked. High-resolution images with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) show a ~15 mas jet along the position angle $-21 \\pm 2^\\circ$, in agreement with the electric vector position angle found from our polarisation results ($-21 \\pm 4^\\circ$), implying that the magnetic field is perpendicular to the jet. Astrometric observations suggest that the system required an asymme...

  5. Exploring thc Radio Sky with an Giant Eye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAN Rendong

    2011-01-01

    With eyes, mankind look at the world. With telescopes, we look into the universe. Radio telescopes are special eyes of mankind with special vision. In particular, large radio telescopes are super eyes built by radio astronomers aiming tbr a clear vision of the distant universe.

  6. Unveiling the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources III: gamma-ray blazar-like counterparts at low radio frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F; Giroletti, M; Paggi, A; Masetti, N; Tosti, G; Nori, M; Funk, S

    2013-01-01

    About one third of the gamma-ray sources listed in the second Fermi LAT catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies so being classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) in the northern hemisphere. First we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of gamma-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO VLA Sky survey (NVSS). We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the gamma-ray blazar candidates selected with the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the ...

  7. Nuclear Radio Jet from Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus in NGC 4258

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Akihiro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kameno, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Hada, Kazuhiro; Sorai, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The nearby low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) NGC 4258 has a weak radio continuum component at the galactic center. We investigate its radio spectral properties on the basis of our new observations using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array at 100 GHz and archival data from the Very Large Array (VLA) at 1.7-43 GHz and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at 347 GHz. The NGC 4258 nuclear component exhibits (1) an intra-month variable and complicated spectral feature at 5-22 GHz and (2) a slightly inverted spectrum at 5-100 GHz (a spectral index of ~0.3) in a time-averaged flux density, which are also apparent in the closest LLAGN M81. These similarities between NGC 4258 and M81 in radio spectral natures in addition to previously known core shift in their AU-scale jet structures produce evidence that the same mechanism drives their nuclei. We interpret the observed spectral property as the superposition of emission spectra originating at different locations with frequency-dependent opacity along the nuclear jet. ...

  8. Morphologies of Radio, X-Ray, and Mid-Infrared Selected AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Griffith, Roger L

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the optical morphologies of candidate active galaxies identified at radio, X-ray, and mid-infrared wavelengths. We use the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog (ACS-GC) to identify 372, 1360, and 1238 AGN host galaxies from the VLA, XMM-Newton and Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the COSMOS field, respectively. We investigate both quantitative (GALFIT) and qualitative (visual) morphologies of these AGN host galaxies, split by brightness in their selection band. We find that the radio-selected AGN are most distinct, with a very low incidence of having unresolved optical morphologies and a high incidence of being hosted by early-type galaxies. In comparison to X-ray selected AGN, mid-IR selected AGN have a slightly higher incidence of being hosted by disk galaxies. These morphological results conform with the results of Hickox et al. 2009 who studied the colors and large-scale clustering of AGN, and found a general association of radio-selected AGN with ``red sequence'' galaxies, mi...

  9. Non-thermal radio emission from O-type stars. I. HD 168112

    CERN Document Server

    Blomme, R; De Becker, M; Rauw, G; Runacres, M C; Gunawan, D Y A S; Chapman, J M

    2005-01-01

    We present a radio lightcurve of the O5.5 III(f+) star HD 168112, based on archive data from the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The fluxes show considerable variability and a negative spectral index, thereby confirming that HD 168112 is a non-thermal radio emitter. The non-thermal radio emission is believed to be due to synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons that have been Fermi accelerated in shocks. For HD 168112, it is not known whether these shocks are due to a wind-wind collision in a binary system or to the intrinsic instability of the stellar wind driving mechanism. Assuming HD 168112 to be a single star, the Van Loo et al. (2005) synchrotron model shows that the velocity jump of the shocks should be very high, or there should be a very large number of shocks in the wind. Neither of these is compatible with time-dependent hydrodynamical calculations of O star winds. If, on the other hand, we assume that HD 168112 is a binary, the high velocity jump i...

  10. Next-generation radio telescope of the 12- to 15-m class for the future large-interferometer arrays in the southern hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plathner, Dietmar E.

    1998-07-01

    Based on the quality proven technologies applied on the IRAM 15 m Plateau de Bure telescopes strategies have been developed to design antennas for the future large arrays in the southern hemisphere which shall operate at frequencies as high as 850 GHz and have a very large collecting area. For this type of antenna space frames were applied wherever possible as the full cross-section of their push-pull members is used for load transfer. Thus giving maximum stiffness at minimum weight to the proposed telescope structures. The lowest eigenfrequency is therefore predicted to be in the order of 12 Hz. Similar high performances are expected under the specified windloads at the chosen site in the Atacama Desert probably at an altitude of 5000 m. Such an exposed location requires simple, low maintenance telescopes despite of their high performance requirements, so that e.g. all active thermal stabilization is avoided by the use of low expansion carbon fiber composite material for critical members. Finally an opto-mechanical metrology system is applied which replaces the standard 'on- bord' encoders and makes the control of the telescopes independent of structural deformations in the mount. An overall surface error of 25 micrometer rms for a 12 to 15 m class telescope can be obtained and the resulting pointing error under wind load is in the order of 0.4 arcsec.

  11. XMM-Newton and VLA Observations of the Variable Wolf-Rayet Star EZ CMa Evidence for a Close Companion?

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, S L; Güdel, M; Schmutz, W

    2002-01-01

    We present new X-ray and radio observations of the WR star EZ CMa (HD 50896) obtained with XMM-Newton and the VLA. This WN4 star shows optical/UV variability at a period of 3.76 d whose cause is unknown. VLA flux measurements at five frequencies show the radio spectral energy distribution is well-described by a power law with spectral index +0.69 (+-0.05), as expected for free-free wind emission. The derived ionized mass loss rate allowing for distance uncertainties is M(dot) = 3.8 (+-2.6)e-5 M_sun/yr. The CCD X-ray spectra show prominent Si XIII and S XV emission lines and can be acceptably modeled as an absorbed multi-temperature optically thin plasma. Nonsolar abundances are inferred with Fe notably deficient. The X-ray emission is dominated by cool plasma at kT_cool = 0.6 keV, but a harder component is also detected with a derived temperature kT_hot = 3.0 - 4.2 keV if the emission is thermal. This is too high to be explained by radiative wind shock models and the luminosity of the hard component is 3 orde...

  12. The Principles of Astronomical Telescope Design

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Jingquan

    2009-01-01

    Presents a summary of the author's twenty five years of experience in telescope design. This work provides a general introduction to various aspects of telescope design. It discusses the theory behind telescope design. It covers Radio, Infrared, Optical, X-Ray and Gamma-Ray wavelengths

  13. Tools of radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Thomas L; Hüttemeister, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This 6th edition of “Tools of Radio Astronomy”, the most used introductory text in radio astronomy, has been revised to reflect the current state of this important branch of astronomy. This includes the use of satellites, low radio frequencies, the millimeter/sub-mm universe, the Cosmic Microwave Background and the increased importance of mm/sub-mm dust emission. Several derivations and presentations of technical aspects of radio astronomy and receivers, such as receiver noise, the Hertz dipole and  beam forming have been updated, expanded, re-worked or complemented by alternative derivations. These reflect advances in technology. The wider bandwidths of the Jansky-VLA and long wave arrays such as LOFAR and mm/sub-mm arrays such as ALMA required an expansion of the discussion of interferometers and aperture synthesis. Developments in data reduction algorithms have been included. As a result of the large amount of data collected in the past 20 years, the discussion of solar system radio astronomy, dust em...

  14. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUADRUPLE LENS 1608+656

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SNELLEN, IAG; DEBRUYN, AG; SCHILIZZI, RT; MILEY, GK; MYERS, ST

    1995-01-01

    VLA observations at 8.4 and 15 GHz of a sample of 119 inverted-spectrum radio sources revealed that one object, 1608+656, consists of four components in a configuration suggestive of gravitational lensing. The maximum separation between individual components is 2''.1. An independent discovery of thi

  15. A Multifrequency Study of Five Large Radio Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Pirya; S. Nandi; D. J. Saikia; C. Konar; M. Singh

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of GMRT and VLA observations of five large radio sources over a wide frequency range to investigate their structural and spectral asymmetries. The hot-spot brightness ratios suggest intrinsic source asymmetries, while the spectral indices show evidence of re-acceleration of particles.

  16. The radio properties of composite liner/H II galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filho, ME; Barthel, PD; Ho, LC

    2002-01-01

    Arcsecond-resolution VLA observations newly obtained as well as published of 40 nearby galaxies are discussed, completing a study of the radio properties of a magnitude-limited sample of nearby galaxies of the composite LINER/H II type. Our results reveal an overall detection rate of at least 25% ac

  17. A Multiwavelength Study of RZ Cassiopeiae: The XMM-Newton/VLA Campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Audard, M; Güdel, M; Audard, Marc; Donisan, Julius R.; Guedel, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    XMM-Newton and the VLA simultaneously observed the eclipsing Algol-type binary RZ Cassiopeiae in August 2003. The secondary eclipse (K3 IV companion behind the A3 V primary) was placed at the center of the 15-hour radio campaign, while the X-ray satellite monitored a full 1.2-day orbital period. We present results of the X-ray and radio campaigns. The X-ray light curve shows significant modulation probably related to rotational modulation and active region evolution, and even small flares. However, the X-ray eclipse is not deep, implying that the coronal X-ray emitting material is spatially extended. The Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectrum shows a variety of bright emission lines from Fe, Ne, O, N. A strong [C/N] depletion probably reflects the surface composition of the secondary which fills its Roche lobe and loses material onto the primary. The O~\\textsc{vii} He-like triplet reflects a low forbidden-to-intercombination ratio; while it generally suggests high electron densities, the ratio is here...

  18. Space Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    This pamphlet describes the Space Telescope, an unmanned multi-purpose telescope observatory planned for launch into orbit by the Space Shuttle in the 1980s. The unique capabilities of this telescope are detailed, the major elements of the telescope are described, and its proposed mission operations are outlined. (CS)

  19. The dust un-biased cosmic star formation history from the 20 cm VLA-COSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Smolcic, V; Zamorani, G; Bell, E F; Bondi, M; Carilli, C L; Ciliegi, P; Mobasher, B; Paglione, T; Scodeggio, M; Scoville, N

    2008-01-01

    We derive the cosmic star formation history (CSFH) out to z=1.3 using a sample of ~350 radio-selected star-forming galaxies, a far larger sample than in previous, similar studies. We attempt to differentiate between radio emission from AGN and star-forming galaxies, and determine an evolving 1.4 GHz luminosity function based on these VLA-COSMOS star forming galaxies. We precisely measure the high-luminosity end of the star forming galaxy luminosity function (SFR>100 M_Sol/yr; equivalent to ULIRGs) out to z=1.3, finding a somewhat slower evolution than previously derived from mid-infrared data. We find that more stars are forming in luminous starbursts at high redshift. We use extrapolations based on the local radio galaxy luminosity function; assuming pure luminosity evolution, we derive $L_* \\propto (1+z)^{2.1 \\pm 0.2}$ or $L_* \\propto (1+z)^{2.5 \\pm 0.1}$, depending on the choice of the local radio galaxy luminosity function. Thus, our radio-derived results independently confirm the ~1 order of magnitude de...

  20. Ultraviolet and radio flares from UX Arietis and HR 1099

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.; Willson, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of the RS CVn systems UX Ari and HR 1099 with the IUE satellite and the VLA are presented. Flaring activity is observed at ultraviolet wavelengths with the IUE when none is detected at radio wavelengths with the VLA. Radio flares with no detectable ultraviolet activity have also been observed. Thus, flares in the two spectral regions are either uncorrelated or weakly correlated. The flaring emission probably originates in different regions at the two wavelengths. Radio flares from RS CVn stars may originate in sources that are larger than, or comparable to, a star in size. This is in sharp contrast to compact, coherent radio flares from dwarf M stars. The ultraviolet flares from RS CVn stars probably originate in sources that are smaller than a component star.

  1. 射电望远镜天线副反射面并联调整机构设计%Configuration Design of the Adjusting Parallel Mechanism for Sub-Reflector of Antenna of Radio Telescope Antenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段艳宾; 李建军; 侯雨雷; 赵永生

    2013-01-01

    According to the specific requirements of the sub-reflector adjustment mechanism when the 65m diameter round movable radio telescope system observes,the Stewart platform as the Shanghai 65m radio telescope antenna sub-reflector adjustment system is proposed.Based on the optimal force of the rods when the main reflector and the sub-reflector is on the whole workspace,the configuration parameters integrated design method about the consideration to the workspace and to avoid interference between the bar and other factors is researched.Configuration parameters met the real requirements are obtained.The workspace is solved under the configuration.And the feasibility of the project is verified compared to the required workspace.The research work has an important significance in the parallel mechanism for engineering practice.%紧密结合上海天文台65m射电望远镜副反射面位姿调整任务要求,提出采用并联式Stewart平台作为副反射面调整机构,基于天线主面和副面全位姿工作状态下各杆受力最优,并兼顾工作空间及避免杆件间干涉等因素,开展副面调整机构构型综合设计,获得了满足预期性能要求的机构构型参数,并求解出该构型下机构的工作空间,验证了构型参数综合设计方法的有效性.面向实际任务进行机构设计,研究内容对并联机构真正应用于工程实践具有重要的指导意义.

  2. LUNASKA simultaneous neutrino searches with multiple telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Bray, J D; James, C W; Roberts, P; Brown, A; Phillips, C J; Protheroe, R J; Reynolds, J E; McFadden, R A; Aartsen, M

    2011-01-01

    The most sensitive method for detecting neutrinos at the very highest energies is the lunar Cherenkov technique, which employs the Moon as a target volume, using conventional radio telescopes to monitor it for nanosecond-scale pulses of Cherenkov radiation from particle cascades in its regolith. Multiple-antenna radio telescopes are difficult to effectively combine into a single detector for this purpose, while single antennas are more susceptible to false events from radio interference, which must be reliably excluded for a credible detection to be made. We describe our progress in excluding such interference in our observations with the single-antenna Parkes radio telescope, and our most recent experiment (taking place the week before the ICRC) using it in conjunction with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, exploiting the advantages of both types of telescope.

  3. An Initial Look at the Far Infrared-Radio Correlation within Nearby Star-forming Galaxies using the Spitzer Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, E J; Helou, G; Armus, L; Kenney, J D P; Gordon, K D; Bendo, G J; Dale, D A; Walter, F; Oosterloo, T A; Kennicutt, R C; Calzetti, D; Cannon, J M; Draine, B T; Engelbracht, C W; Hollenbach, D J; Jarrett, T H; Kewley, L J; Leitherer, C; Li, A; Meyer, M J; Regan, M W; Rieke, G H; Rieke, M J; Roussel, H; Sheth, K; Smith, J D T; Thornley, M D

    2006-01-01

    (Abridged) We present an initial look at the far infrared-radio correlation within the star-forming disks of four nearby, nearly face-on galaxies (NGC 2403, NGC 3031, NGC 5194, and NGC 6946). Using Spitzer MIPS imaging and WSRT radio continuum data, observed as part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), we are able to probe variations in the logarithmic 24mu/22cm (q_24) and 70mu/22cm (q_70) surface brightness ratios across each disk at sub-kpc scales. We find general trends of decreasing q_24 and q_70 with declining surface brightness and with increasing radius. The residual dispersion around the trend of q_24 and q_70 versus surface brightness is smaller than the residual dispersion around the trend of q_24 and q_70 versus radius, on average by ~0.1 dex, indicating that the distribution of star formation sites is more important in determining the infrared/radio disk appearance than the exponential profiles of disks. We have also performed preliminary phenomenological modeling of cosmic ray ...

  4. Cosmological simulations of the high-redshift radio universe

    OpenAIRE

    Kawata, Daisuke; Gibson, Brad K.; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2004-01-01

    Using self-consistent cosmological simulations of disc galaxy formation, we analyse the 1.4 GHz radio flux from high-redshift progenitors of present-day normal spirals within the context of present-day and planned next-generation observational facilities. We demonstrate that while current radio facilities such as the Very Large Array (VLA) are unlikely to trace these progenitors beyond redshifts z

  5. The jet of the BL Lacertae object PKS 2201+044: MAD near-IR adaptive optics observations and comparison with optical, radio and X-ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuzzo, E.; Falomo, R.; Treves, A.; Donato, D.; Sambruna, M.; Arcidiacono, C.; Giovannini, G.; Farinato, J.; Moretti, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Diolaiti, E.; Lombini, M.; Brast, R.; Donaldson, R.; Kolb, J.; Marchetti, E.; Tordo, S.

    2011-04-01

    Context. Relativistic jets are a common feature of radio loud active galactic nuclei. Multifrequency observations are a unique tool to constrain their physics. Aims: We report on a detailed study of the properties of the jet of the nearby BL Lac object PKS 2201+044, one of the rare cases where the jet is detected from radio to X-rays. Methods: We use new adaptive optics near-IR observations of the source, obtained with the ESO multi-conjugated adaptive optics demonstrator (MAD) at the Very Large Telescope. These observations acquired in Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics mode are combined with images previously achieved by HST, VLA and Chandra to perform a morphological and photometric study of the jet. Results: We find a noticeable similarity in the morphology of the jet at radio, near-IR and optical wavelengths. We construct the spectral shape of the main knot of jet that appears dominated by synchrotron radiation. Conclusions: On the basis of the jet morphology and the weak lines spectrum we suggest that PKS 2201+044 belongs to the class of radio sources intermediate between FRIs and FRIIs.

  6. Subarcsecond international LOFAR radio images of Arp 220 at 150 MHz: A kpc-scale star forming disk surrounding nuclei with shocked outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Varenius, E; Martí-Vidal, I; Aalto, S; Barcos-Muñoz, L; König, S; Pérez-Torres, M A; Deller, A T; Moldón, J; Gallagher, J S; Yoast-Hull, T M; Horellou, C; Morabito, L K; Alberdi, A; Jackson, N; Beswick, R; Carozzi, T D; Wucknitz, O; Ramírez-Olivencia, N

    2016-01-01

    We analyse new observations with the International Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) telescope, and archival data from the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We model the spatially resolved radio spectrum of Arp 220 from 150 MHz to 33 GHz. We present an image of Arp 220 at 150 MHz with resolution $0.65''\\times0.35''$, sensitivity 0.15 mJy beam$^{-1}$, and integrated flux density $394\\pm59$ mJy. More than 80% of the detected flux comes from extended ($6''\\approx$2.2 kpc) steep spectrum ($\\alpha=-0.7$) emission, likely from star formation in the molecular disk surrounding the two nuclei. We find elongated features extending $0.3''$ (110 pc) and $0.9''$ (330 pc) from the eastern and western nucleus respectively, which we interpret as evidence for outflows. The extent of radio emission requires acceleration of cosmic rays far outside the nuclei. We find that a simple three component model can explain most of the observed radio spectrum of the galaxy...

  7. WISEP J060738.65+242953.4: A Nearby. Pole-On L8 Brown Dwarf with Radio Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Gizis, John E; Burgasser, Adam J; Libralato, Mattia; Nardiello, Domenico; Piotto, Giampaolo; Bedin, Luigi R; Berger, Edo; Paudel, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    We present a simultaneous, multi-wavelength campaign targeting the nearby (7.2 pc) L8/L9 (optical/near-infrared) dwarf WISEP J060738.65+242953.4 in the mid-infrared, radio, and optical. Spitzer Space Telescope observations show no variability at the 0.2% level over 10 hours each in the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands. Kepler K2 monitoring over 36 days in Campaign 0 rules out stable periodic signals in the optical with amplitudes great than 1.5% and periods between 1.5 hours and 2 days. Non-simultaneous Gemini optical spectroscopy detects lithium, constraining this L dwarf to be less than ~2 Gyr old, but no Balmer emission is observed. The low measured projected rotation velocity (v sin i < 6 km/s) and lack of variability are very unusual compared to other brown dwarfs, and we argue that this substellar object is likely viewed pole-on. We detect quiescent (non-bursting) radio emission with the VLA. Amongst radio detected L and T dwarfs, it has the lowest observed L_nu and the lowest v sin i. We discuss the implica...

  8. 3D reconstruction methods of coronal structures by radio observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; White, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to carry out the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of structures in the solar corona would represent a major advance in the study of the physical properties in active regions and in flares. Methods which allow a geometric reconstruction of quasistationary coronal structures (for example active region loops) or dynamic structures (for example flaring loops) are described: stereoscopy of multi-day imaging observations by the VLA (Very Large Array); tomography of optically thin emission (in radio or soft x-rays); multifrequency band imaging by the VLA; and tracing of magnetic field lines by propagating electron beams.

  9. Update on the Commensal VLA Low-band Ionospheric and Transient Experiment (VLITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Ray, Paul S.; Polisensky, Emil; Peters, Wendy M.; Giacintucci, Simona; Helmboldt, Joseph F.; Hyman, Scott D.; Brisken, Walter; Hicks, Brian; Deneva, Julia S.

    2017-01-01

    The JVLA Low-band Ionospheric and Transient Experiment (VLITE) is a commensal observing system on the NRAO JVLA. The separate optical path of the prime-focus sub-GHz dipole feeds and the Cassegrain-focus GHz feeds provided an opportunity to expand the simultaneous frequency operation of the JVLA through joint observations across both systems. The low-band receivers on 10 JVLA antennas are outfitted with dedicated samplers and use spare fibers to transport the 320-384 MHz band to the VLITE correlator. The initial phase of VLITE uses a custom-designed real-time DiFX software correlator to produce autocorrelations, as well as parallel and cross-hand cross-correlations from the linear dipole feeds. NRL and NRAO have worked together to explore the scientific potential of the commensal low frequency system for ionospheric remote sensing, astrophysics and transients. VLITE operates at nearly 70% wall time with roughly 6200 hours of JVLA time recorded each year.VLITE data are used in real-time for ionospheric research and are transferred daily to NRL for processing in the astrophysics and transient pipelines. These pipelines provide automated radio frequency interference excision, calibration, imaging and self-calibration of data.We will review early scientific results from VLITE across all three science focus areas, including the ionosphere, slow (> 1 sec) transients, and astrophysics. We also discuss the future of the project, that includes its planned expansion to eVLITE including the addition of more antennas, and a parallel capability to search for fast (< 1 sec), dispersed transients, such as Fast Radio Bursts and Rotating Radio Transients. We will also present early results of commissioning tests to utilize VLITE data products to complement NRAO’s 3 GHz VLA Sky Survey (VLASS). Revised pipelines are under development for operation during the on-the-fly operation mode of the sky survey.

  10. VLA-MAC: A Variable Load Adaptive MAC Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guoliang; Liu, Hao; Chen, Hao; Shi, Longxin

    This letter presents VLA-MAC, a novel adaptive MAC protocol for wireless sensor networks that can achieve high energy efficiency and low latency in variable load conditions. In VLA-MAC, traffic load is measured online and utilized for adaptive adjustment. VLA-MAC transmits packets via a burst style to alleviate packets accumulation problem and achieve low latency in high load condition. Furthermore, it also saves obvious energy by removing unnecessary listen period in low load condition. Unlike current approach, VLA-MAC does not need to adjust duty-cycle according to load online. Simulation results based on ns-2 show the performance improvements of our protocol.

  11. VLA and GBT Observations of Orion B (NGC 2024, W12) : Photo-dissociation Region Properties and Magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Roshi, D Anish; Jeyakumar, S

    2014-01-01

    We present images of C110$\\alpha$ and H110$\\alpha$ radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 4.8 GHz and images of H166$\\alpha$, C166$\\alpha$ and X166$\\alpha$ RRL emission at 1.4 GHz, observed toward the starforming region NGC 2024. The 1.4 GHz image with angular resolution $\\sim$ 70\\arcsec\\ is obtained using VLA data. The 4.8 GHz image with angular resolution $\\sim$ 17\\arcsec\\ is obtained by combining VLA and GBT data. The similarity of the LSR velocity (10.3 \\kms\\) of the C110$\\alpha$ line to that of lines observed from molecular material located at the far side of the \\HII\\ region suggests that the photo dissociation region (PDR) responsible for C110$\\alpha$ line emission is at the far side. The LSR velocity of C166$\\alpha$ is 8.8 \\kms. This velocity is comparable with the velocity of molecular absorption lines observed from the foreground gas, suggesting that the PDR is at the near side of the \\HII\\ region. Non-LTE models for carbon line forming regions are presented. Typical properties of the foreground...

  12. Swift observations of unidentified radio sources in the revised Third Cambridge Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, A.; Massaro, F.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Liuzzo, E.; Tremblay, G. R.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated a group of unassociated radio sources included in the Third Cambridge Catalogue (3CR) to increase the multifrequency information on them and possibly obtain an identification. We have carried out an observational campaign with the Swift satellite to observe with the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) the field of view of 21 bright NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) sources within the positional uncertainty region of the 3CR sources. Furthermore, we have searched in the recent AllWISE Source Catalogue for infrared sources matching the position of these NVSS sources. We have detected significant emission in the soft X-ray band for nine of the investigated NVSS sources. To all of them, and in four cases with no soft X-ray association, we have associated a Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared counterpart. Eight of these infrared candidates have not been proposed earlier in the literature. In the five remaining cases our candidate matches one among a few optical candidates suggested for the same 3CR source in previous studies. No source has been detected in the UVOT filters at the position of the NVSS objects, confirming the scenario that all of them are heavily obscured. With this in mind, a spectroscopic campaign, preferably in the infrared band, will be necessary to establish the nature of the sources that we have finally identified.

  13. TESTING THE MAGNETAR MODEL VIA LATE-TIME RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF TWO MACRONOVA CANDIDATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horesh, Assaf [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Hotokezaka, Kenta; Piran, Tsvi [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Nakar, Ehud [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Hancock, Paul [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845 (Australia)

    2016-03-10

    Compact binary mergers may have already been observed as they are the leading model for short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). Radioactive decay within the ejecta from these mergers is expected to produce an infrared flare, dubbed macronova (or kilonova), on a timescale of a week. Recently, two such macronova candidates were identified in followup observations of sGRBs, strengthening the possibility that those indeed arise from mergers. The same ejecta will also produce long-term (months to years) radio emission due to its interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium. In the search for this emission, we observed the two macronova candidates, GRB 130603B and GRB 060614, with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Our observations resulted in null-detections, putting strong upper limits on the kinetic energy and mass of the ejecta. A possible outcome of a merger is a highly magnetized neutron star (a magnetar), which has been suggested as the central engine for GRBs. Such a magnetar will deposit a significant fraction of its energy into the ejecta leading to a brighter radio flare. Our results, therefore, rule out magnetars in these two events.

  14. Neutrino telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, J

    2002-01-01

    This review presents the scientific objectives and status of Neutrino Telescope Projects. The science program of these projects covers: neutrino astronomy, dark matter searches and measurements of neutrino oscillations. The two neutrino telescopes in operation: AMANDA and BAIKAL will be described together with the ANTARES neutrino telescope being built in the Mediterranean. (18 refs).

  15. Telescopes and Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchin, C R

    2013-01-01

    Telescopes and Techniques has proved itself in its first two editions, having become probably one of the most widely used astronomy texts, both for amateur astronomers and astronomy and astrophysics undergraduates. Both earlier editions of the book were widely used for introductory practical astronomy courses in many universities. In this Third Edition the author guides the reader through the mathematics, physics and practical techniques needed to use today's telescopes (from the smaller models to the larger instruments installed in many colleges) and how to find objects in the sky. Most of the physics and engineering involved is described fully and requires little prior knowledge or experience. Both visual and electronic imaging techniques are covered, together with an introduction to how data (measurements) should be processed and analyzed. A simple introduction to radio telescopes is also included. Brief coverage of the more advanced topics of photometry and spectroscopy are included, but mainly to enable ...

  16. A Radio Astronomy Science Education Partnership - GAVRT and Radio JOVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, C. A.; Thieman, J. R.; Bunnell, K.; Soholt, G.

    2009-12-01

    The planet Jupiter provides an excellent subject to educate, engage, and inspire students and teachers to learn science. The Goldstone Apple-Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) program (http://www.lewiscenter.org/gavrt) and The Radio JOVE project (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) each have a long history of allowing students and teachers to interact with scientists and real radio telescopes. The upcoming Juno mission to Jupiter (2011 launch) allows both GAVRT and Radio JOVE to combine efforts and engage with the NASA Juno mission, thus increasing the excitement and learning potential for teachers, students, and the general public. Teachers can attend workshops for training to operate a 34-meter radio telescope and/or build their own simple radio telescope, both of which can be used directly in the classroom. We will overview some classroom activities and highlight some teacher-student experiences. In addition, we will update our efforts on greater Web-based control of the radio telescopes, as well as highlight our upcoming workshops to allow better access for teachers in different parts of the Country.

  17. 2 years of INTEGRAL monitoring of GRS 1915+105. I. Multiwavelength coverage with INTEGRAL, RXTE, and the Ryle radio telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, J.; Hannikainen, D.C.; Shaw, S.E.;

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of simultaneous monitoring observations of the Galactic microquasar GRS 1915+105 with INTEGRAL and RXTE from 3 up to similar to 300 keV, and the Ryle Telescope at 15 GHz. We first identify the classes of variability in which GRS 1915+105 is found, and report some direct...... generalize the fact that a (nonmajor) discrete ejection always occurs, in GRS 1915+105, as a response to an X-ray sequence composed of a spectrally hard X-ray dip terminated by an X-ray spike marking the disappearance of the emission above 18 keV. We identify the trigger of the ejection as the X-ray spike...

  18. An Accurate and Efficient Algorithm for Detection of Radio Bursts with an Unknown Dispersion Measure, for Single-dish Telescopes and Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackay, Barak; Ofek, Eran O.

    2017-01-01

    Astronomical radio signals are subjected to phase dispersion while traveling through the interstellar medium. To optimally detect a short-duration signal within a frequency band, we have to precisely compensate for the unknown pulse dispersion, which is a computationally demanding task. We present the “fast dispersion measure transform” algorithm for optimal detection of such signals. Our algorithm has a low theoretical complexity of 2{N}f{N}t+{N}t{N}{{Δ }}{{log}}2({N}f), where Nf, Nt, and NΔ are the numbers of frequency bins, time bins, and dispersion measure bins, respectively. Unlike previously suggested fast algorithms, our algorithm conserves the sensitivity of brute-force dedispersion. Our tests indicate that this algorithm, running on a standard desktop computer and implemented in a high-level programming language, is already faster than the state-of-the-art dedispersion codes running on graphical processing units (GPUs). We also present a variant of the algorithm that can be efficiently implemented on GPUs. The latter algorithm’s computation and data-transport requirements are similar to those of a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform, indicating that incoherent dedispersion can now be considered a nonissue while planning future surveys. We further present a fast algorithm for sensitive detection of pulses shorter than the dispersive smearing limits of incoherent dedispersion. In typical cases, this algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than enumerating dispersion measures and coherently dedispersing by convolution. We analyze the computational complexity of pulsed signal searches by radio interferometers. We conclude that, using our suggested algorithms, maximally sensitive blind searches for dispersed pulses are feasible using existing facilities. We provide an implementation of these algorithms in Python and MATLAB.

  19. Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 166 9. Space telescopes Figure 9.1: Paraboloid telescope. In the following sections, NI...planets nearby a brighter star. Normal-incidence telescopes One-mirror telescope The one-mirror telescope (mostly an off-axis paraboloid ; Figure 9.1) has...rotation of the whole instrument (see SUMER/SOHO, Wilhelm et al (1995) and EIS/Hinode, Culhane et al (2007)). The paraboloid field curvature (Petzval

  20. VLA observations of the "water fountain" IRAS 16552-3050

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez, Olga; Gómez, J. F.; Miranda, L. F.

    2008-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the water maser emission towards IRAS 16552-3050. The maser emission shows a velocity spread of ~170 km/s, and a bipolar distribution with a separation between the red and blueshifted groups of ~0.08". These observations and the likely post-AGB nature of the source indicate that IRAS 16552-3050 can be considered as a member of the "water fountain" class of sources (evolved stars showing H2O maser emission with a velocity spread $\\ga$ 100 km/s,...

  1. Preliminary Antenna Concept for the ngVLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, James; Selina, Robert; Grammer, Wes; McKinnon, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    The preliminary concept for a Next Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) calls for an interferometric array having an effective collecting area and spatial resolution that are both 10 times better than that of the current VLA and operating over a frequency range of 1.2-116 GHz. Given the large number of antennas needed to meet the collecting area goal, the ngVLA antenna concept must strike a balance between competing science requirements and the programmatic targets for the array’s life cycle cost.Antenna diameters currently under consideration for the ngVLA are in the range of 12-25 m, with a nominal 18-m diameter aperture used for the conceptual design. Currently, the optimization for operations and construction cost suggests that a smaller number of larger apertures is preferable.The surface accuracy goal for the antennas is 185 µm rms (λ/16 @ 100 GHz) for the primary and subreflector combined under optimal environmental conditions. The subreflector will be optimized for performance above 10 GHz, with some degradation in aperture efficiency accepted at lower frequencies.For high dynamic range imaging, particularly at the low end of the ngVLA’s frequency range, the optimum optical configuration is likely an offset geometry. An unblocked aperture will minimize scattering, spillover, and sidelobe pickup. Both performance and maintenance requirements favor a receiver feedarm on the low side of the reflector.High pointing accuracy will also be necessary to provide the imaging dynamic range required of the system. With an unblocked aperture, variations in the antenna gain pattern are expected to be dominated by pointing errors. Preliminary requirements are for an absolute pointing accuracy of 40” RMS, with referenced pointing of 3” RMS (FWHM/10 at 10 GHz and 120 GHz, respectively, for an 18-m diameter dish).The antenna mount is expected to be a typical altitude-azimuth design. Both pedestal bearing and rail-based azimuth drives are under consideration. If fast

  2. VLA and Swift XRT Observations of PTF12os in NGC 5806

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, C. J.; Immler, S.; Horesh, A.; Kasliwal, M.; Ryder, S. D.; Weiler, K. W.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Panagia, N.; Bauer, F. E.; Marcaide, J. M.; Pooley, D.; Sramek, R. A.; Williams, C. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of radio emission near the position of the type-IIb supernova PTF2012os (ATEL #3881) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array radio telescope in the DnC configuration: A flux density of 0.44 ± 0.05 mJy was measured at 5.02 GHz (wavelength 6.0 cm) on 2012 Jan. 22.42 UT. The measured position of the radio emission of R.A. = 14h59m59.s12, Decl. = +01d53m23s.3, equinox 2000.0 is in good agreement with the measured optical position of (ending digits) R.A.

  3. AGN physics - The Jet-driven Outflow in the Radio Galaxy 3C305 and the Use of Hardness Ratio Maps to Constrain Spectral Parameters of Low Brightness Regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, D. E.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Massaro, F.; Baum, S. A.; Bianchi, S.; Chiaberge, M.; Morganti, R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Siemiginowska, A.

    2012-01-01

    From Chandra X-ray and VLA radio observations of the radio galaxy 3C305, we can make a self-consistent model in which the X-ray-emitting plasma is responsible for the depolarization of some regions of the radio emission from the jets and hotspots. On the assumption that the X-ray-emitting material,

  4. Wideband VLA Observations of Abell 2256 I: Continuum, Rotation Measure and Spectral Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Frazer; Eilek, Jean; Rau, Urvashi; Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Kogan, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    We report new observations of Abell 2256 with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at frequencies between 1 and 8 GHz. These observations take advantage of the 2:1 bandwidths available for a single observation to study the spectral index, polarization and Rotation Measure as well as using the associated higher sensitivity to image total intensity features down to ~0.5" resolution. We find the Large Relic, which dominates the cluster, is made up of a complex of filaments which show correlated distributions in intensity, spectral index, and fractional polarization. The Rotation Measure varies across the face of the Large Relic but is not well correlated with the other properties of the source. The shape of individual filaments suggests that the Large Relic is at least 25 kpc thick. We detect a low surface brightness arc connecting the Large Relic to the Halo and other radio structures suggesting a physical connection between these features. The center of the F-complex is dominated by a very steep-spectrum,...

  5. Tracing the Baryon Cycle within Nearby Galaxies with a next-generation VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Leroy, Adam; Murphy, Eric J.; ngVLA Baryon Cycle Science Working Group

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of galaxies over cosmic time is shaped by the cycling of baryons through these systems, namely the inflow of atomic gas, the formation of molecular structures, the birth of stars, and the expulsion of gas due to associated feedback processes. The best way to study this cycle in detail are observations of nearby galaxies. These systems provide a complete picture of baryon cycling over a wide range of astrophysical conditions. In the next decade, higher resolution/sensitivity observations of such galaxies will fundamentally improve our knowledge of galaxy formation and evolution, allowing us to better interpret higher redshift observations of sources that were rapidly evolving at epochs soon after the Big Bang. In particular, the centimeter-to-millimeter part of the spectrum provides critical diagnostics for each of the key baryon cycling processes and access to almost all phases of gas in galaxies: cool and cold gas (via emission and absorption lines), ionized gas (via free-free continuum and recombination lines), cosmic rays and hot gas (via synchrotron emission and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect). This poster highlights a number of key science problems in this area whose solutions require a next-generation radio-mm interferometer such as the next-generation VLA.

  6. A VLA H92alpha Study of the Arched Filament Complex Near the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, C C; Lang, Cornelia C.

    2001-01-01

    The VLA has been used at 8.3 GHz in the DnC and CnB array configurations to carry out an H92alpha recombination line study (at 8.3 GHz) of the ionized gas in the Arched Filaments H II complex, which defines the western edge of the Galactic center Radio Arc. The H92alpha line properties of the ionized gas are consistent with photoionization from hot stars,and consistent with the physical properties of other Galactic center H II regions. The LTE electron temperatures vary only slightly across the entire extent of the source, and have an average value of 6200 K. The velocity field is very complex, with velocities ranging from +15 to - 70 km/s and the majority of velocities having negative values. Large velocity gradients (2-7 km/s/pc, with gradients in some regions >10 km/s/pc) occur along each of the filaments, with the velocities becoming increasingly negative with decreasing distance from the Galactic center. The magnitudes of the velocity gradient are consistent with the cloud residing on an inner, elongated...

  7. A study of the distant activity of comet C/2006 W3 (Christensen) using Herschel and ground-based radio telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Bockelée-Morvan, D; Crovisier, J; Vandenbussche, B; Swinyard, B M; Biver, N; Lis, D C; Jarchow, C; Moreno, R; Hutsemékers, D; Jehin, E; Küppers, M K; Lara, L M; Lellouch, E; Manfroid, J; de Val-Borro, M; Szutowicz, S; Banaszkiewicz, M; Bensch, F; Blecka, M I; Emprechtinger, M; Encrenaz, T; Fulton, T; Kidger, M; Rengel, M; Waelkens, C; Bergin, E; Blake, G A; Blommaert, J A D L; Cernicharo, J; Decin, L; Encrenaz, P; de Graauw, T; Leeks, S; Medvedev, A S; Naylor, D; Schieder, R; Thomas, N

    2010-01-01

    Comet C/2006 W3 (Christensen) was observed in November 2009 at 3.3 AU from the Sun with Herschel. The PACS instrument acquired images of the dust coma in 70- and 160-micrometers filters, and spectra covering several H2O rotational lines. Spectra in the range 450-1550 GHz were acquired with SPIRE. The comet emission continuum from 70 to 672 micrometers was measured, but no lines were detected. The spectral energy distribution indicates thermal emission from large particles and provides a measure of the size distribution index and dust production rate. The upper limit to the water production rate is compared to the production rates of other species (CO, CH3OH, HCN, H2S, OH) measured with the IRAM 30-m and Nancay telescopes. The coma is found to be strongly enriched in species more volatile than water, in comparison to comets observed closer to the Sun. The CO to H2O production rate ratio exceeds 220%. The dust to gas production rate ratio is on the order of 1.

  8. ALMA and VLA Observations of Proplyd Candidates near Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Cotton, William D.; Royster, Marc; Kunneriath, Devaky; Wardle, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Wootten, Al; Schoedel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Using the VLA, we recently detected a large number of protoplanetary disk (proplyd) candidates lying within a couple of light years of the massive black hole Sgr A*. The bow-shock appearance of proplyd candidates point toward the young massive stars located near Sgr A*. Similar to Orion proplyds, the strong UV radiation from the cluster of massive stars at the Galactic center is expected to photoevaporate and photoionize the circumstellar disks around young, low mass stars, thus allowing detection of the ionized outflows. To confirm this interpretation, ALMA observations detect millimeter emission at 226 GHz from five proplyd candidates that had been detected at 44 and 34 GHz with the VLA. We determine the mass of protoplanetary disks from cool dust emission. These measurements show the presence of on-going star formation with the implication that gas clouds can survive near Sgr A* and the relative importance of high vs low-mass star formation in the strong tidal and radiation fields of the Galactic center.

  9. Dual frequency observations of flares with the VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulk, G. A.; Bastian, T. S.; Hurford, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Observations are presented of two subflares near the limb on 21 and 22 November 1981 and an M7.7 flare on 8 May 1981 made at 5 and 15 GHz using the VLA. One of the November flares produced no 5 GHz radiation, while the 15 GHz radiation in the other flare emanated from a source which was smaller, lower, and displaced from the 5 GHz source. The flare occurring on 8 May was intense and complex, and contained two or more sources at both 5 and 15 GHz. Prior to the peak of the flare, the sources were found to grow in size, after which time only weak subsources were visible to the VLA. These subsources were found to be located between or at the edge of the H-alpha ribbons and the two hard X-ray sources imaged by the Hinotori satellite. Highly polarized, bursty radiation was observed at 1 and 2 GHz, which indicated that an electron-cyclotron maser operated during the flare. The maximum field strength in flaring loops is estimated to be 360-600 gauss.

  10. A Search for TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from High-Peaked Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars Using the Whipple Air-Cherenkov Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Falcone, A D; Boyle, P J; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Celik, O; Cui, W; Dowdall, C; Duke, C; Fegan, D J; La Perez, I C; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Fortson, L F; Gaidos, J A; Gibbs, K; Gammell, S; Hall, J; Hall, T A; Hillas, A M; Holder, J; Horan, D; Jordan, M; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Kildea, J; Knapp, J; Kosack, K; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Le Bohec, S; Linton, E T; Lloyd-Evans, J; Moriarty, P; Müller, D; Nagai, T N; Ong, R A; Page, M; Pallassini, R; Petry, D; Power-Mooney, B; Quinn, J; Rebillot, P; Reynolds, P T; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Swordy, S P; Vasilev, V V; Wakely, S P; Walker, G; Weekes, T C

    2004-01-01

    Blazars have traditionally been separated into two broad categories based upon their optical emission characteristics; BL Lacs, with faint or no emission lines, and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) with prominent, broad emission lines. The spectral energy distribution of FSRQs has generally been thought of as being more akin to the low-peaked BL Lacs, which exhibit a peak in the infrared region of the spectrum, as opposed to high-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs), which exhibit a peak in UV/X-ray region of the spectrum. All blazars currently confirmed as sources of TeV emission are HBLs. Recent surveys have found several FSRQs exhibiting spectral properties similar to HBLs, particularly the synchrotron peak frequency. These objects are potential sources of TeV emission according to several models of blazar jet emission and blazar evolution. Measurements of TeV flux or upper limits could impact existing theories explaining the links between different blazar types and could have a significant impact on our understanding...

  11. An accurate and efficient algorithm for detection of radio bursts with an unknown dispersion measure, for single dish telescopes and interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Zackay, Barak

    2014-01-01

    Astronomical radio bursts disperse while traveling through the interstellar medium. To optimally detect a short-duration signal within a frequency band, we have to precisely compensate for the pulse dispersion, which is a computationally demanding task. We present the Fast Dispersion Measure Transform (FDMT) algorithm for optimal detection of such signals. Our algorithm has a low theoretical complexity of 2N_f N_t+ N_t N_d log_2(N_f) where N_f, N_t and N_d are the numbers of frequency bins, time bins, and dispersion measure bins, respectively. Unlike previously suggested fast algorithms our algorithm conserves the sensitivity of brute force dedispersion. Our tests indicate that this algorithm, running on a standard desktop computer, and implemented in a high-level programming language, is already faster than the state of the art dedispersion codes running on graphical processing units (GPUs). We also present a variant of the algorithm that can be efficiently implemented on GPUs. The latter algorithm's computa...

  12. The AGN content of deep radio surveys and radio emission in radio-quiet AGN. Why every astronomer should care about deep radio fields

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Miller, N; Kellermann, K I; Mainieri, V; Rosati, P; Tozzi, P; Vattakunnel, S

    2014-01-01

    We present our very recent results on the sub-mJy radio source populations at 1.4 GHz based on the Extended Chandra Deep Field South VLA survey, which reaches ~ 30 {\\mu}Jy, with details on their number counts, evolution, and luminosity functions. The sub-mJy radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of star-forming galaxies and radio-quiet AGN evolving at a similar, strong rate and declining radio-loud AGN. While the well-known flattening of the radio number counts below 1 mJy is mostly due to star-forming galaxies, these sources and AGN make up an approximately equal fraction of the sub-mJy sky. Our results shed also light on a fifty-year-old issue, namely radio emission from radio-quiet AGN, and suggest that it is closely related to star formation, at least at z ~ 1.5 - 2. The implications of our findings for future, deeper radio surveys, including those with the Square Kilometre Array, are also discussed. One of the main messages, especially to non-radio astronomers, is that radio surveys are reaching such f...

  13. A 20-year H2O maser monitoring program with the Medicina 32-m telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J.; Felli, M.; Cesaroni, R.; Codella, C.; Comoretto, G.; Di Franco, S.; Massi, F.; Moscadelli, L.; Nesti, R.; Olmi, L.; Palagi, F.; Palla, F.; Panella, D.; Valdettaro, R.

    2007-03-01

    The Arcetri/Bologna H2O maser group has been monitoring the 1.3-cm water maser emission from a sample of 43 star-forming regions (SFRs) and 22 late-type stars for about 20 years at a sampling rate of 4-5 observations each year, using the 32-m Medicina Radio Telescope (HPBW 1.‧9 at 22 GHz). For the late-type stars we observe representative samples of OH/IR-stars, Mira's, semi-regular variables, and supergiants. The SFR-sample spans a large interval in FIR luminosity of the associated Young Stellar Object (YSO), from 20 L to 1.5 × 106 L, and offers a unique data base for the study of the long-term (years) variability of the maser emission in regions of star formation. This presentation concerns only the masers in SFRs. The information obtained from single-dish monitoring is complementary to what is extracted from higher-resolution (VLA and VLBI) observations, and can better explore the velocity domain and the long-term variability therein. We characterize the variability of the sources in various ways and we study how it depends on the luminosity and other properties of the associated YSO and its environment.

  14. Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation at the WSRT

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, P A; Millenaar, R P

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity of radio astronomical stations is often limited by man-made radio frequency interference (RFI) due to a variety of terrestrial activities. An RFI mitigation subsystem (RFIMS) based on real-time digital signalprocessing is proposed here for the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope based on a powerful field programmable gate array processor. In this system the radio astronomy signals polluted by RFI are "cleaned" with the RFIMS before routine back-end correlation processing takes place. The high temporal and frequency resolution of RFIMS allows the detection and excision of RFI better than do standard radio telescope back-end configurations.

  15. Research on the Resultant Actions of the Stewart Platform of a Large Radio Telescope%Stewart平台对大型射电望远镜反作用力的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇原鹰; 段宝岩; 魏强; 彭勃; 南仁东

    2001-01-01

    Stewart平台作为馈源位置和姿态精调系统被安装在大型射电望远镜的悬挂馈源舱中。本文推导了计算馈源舱中的Stewart平台对舱体反作用力的公式,分析了馈源舱体姿态,Stewart平台的质量、调整速度与反作用力间的关系。研究结果为设计馈源舱与Stewart平台的质量比,消除平台对舱体的动力影响打下了基础。%A Stewart platform is assembled in the suspended feed cabin of the large radio telescope as a precise adjusting system for the position and orientation of the feed. The formulae are deduced to calculate the resultant actions of the Stewart platform to the feed cabin. Furthermore the effects of the orientation of the cabin, the adjusting velocity and the mass of the Stewart platform to the resultant actions are analyzed. The research serves as a foundation for designing the mass ratio between the feed cabin and the Stewart platform to eliminate the dynamic effect of the Stewart platform on the feed cabin.

  16. Fast radio flashes observed with LOFAR prototypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigl, A.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis consists of a detailed analysis of several observations with prototype stations of the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). Chapter 1 introduces the field of radio astronomy, briefly describes the radio telescopes which were used and discusses radio frequency interference (RFI) and important too

  17. The radio structure of NGC 1275

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedlar, A.; Ghataure, H.S.; Davies, R.D.; Harrison, B.A. (Nuffield Radio Astronomy Labs., Jodrell Bank (UK)); Perley, R.; Crane, P.C. (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM. (USA)); Unger, S.W. (Royal Greenwich Observatory, Hailsham (UK))

    1990-10-01

    We present high dynamic range VLA and MERLIN images of NGC 1275 at wavelengths of 18, 22, 90 and 199 cm with angular resolutions ranging from 0.3 to 40 arcsec. Over the central 30 arcsec there is evidence for collimated ejection mainly in PA 160{sup o}. Outside this region the radio structure shows evidence of a sharp change in direction to approximately PA 235{sup o}, before merging into the 10-arcmin radio halo. On arcsec and arcmin angular scales, there is considerable asymmetry between the structure north and south of the active nucleus. We consider the radio source structure to be consistent with an asymmetrical Fanaroff-Riley type I source, with the jet collimation axis close to the line-of-sight. The radio 'halo' consists of the outer lobes of this structure. (author).

  18. Radio spectral index from NVSS and TGSS

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    We extract the radio spectral index, $\\alpha$, from the 541,195 common sources observed in 150 MHz TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) and 1.4 GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). These catalogs cover about $80\\%$ of the sky and represent the largest radio population. We confirm the steepening of $\\alpha$ with increasing flux density. Further, we observe an increase in $\\alpha$ with source size (TGSS measured) saturating araound size 50 arcsec to $0.83\\pm0.01$. From this saturated value, we constrain the electron energy injection spectral index, $\\gamma$, and the fractional contribution of supernova remnants to the total radio flux. Our results indicate relatively low $\\gamma \\sim 1.8-1.9$ and a large supernova remnants contribution ($\\sim 15-25\\%$). For very compact sources the convection and the thermal radio emission are likely to be important.

  19. A Search for Radio Emission at the Bottom of the Main Sequence and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthi, A; Linsky, J L; Krishnamurthi, Anita; Leto, Giuseppe; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    We have used the VLA to conduct a deep search for 3.6 cm radio emission from nearby very low mass stars and brown dwarfs. The Gudel-Benz relation is used to predict radio luminosities for some very low mass stars and candidate brown dwarfs with measured X-ray fluxes. The predicted radio fluxes are quite small, whereas the measured radio flux from the brown dwarf candidate Rho Oph GY 31 is relatively strong. In light of our new observations, this object remains an anomaly. We present upper limits for our measured radio fluxes at 3.6 cm for our targets.

  20. A Search for Radio Emission at the Bottom of the Main Sequence and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Anita; Leto, Giuseppe; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1999-09-01

    We have used the VLA to conduct a deep search for 3.6 cm radio emission from nearby very low mass stars and brown dwarfs. The Güdel-Benz relation is used to predict radio luminosities for some very low mass stars and candidate brown dwarfs with measured X-ray fluxes. The predicted radio fluxes are quite small, whereas the measured radio flux from the brown dwarf candidate GY 31 in the rho Oph cloud is relatively strong. In light of our new observations, this object remains an anomaly. We present upper limits for our measured radio fluxes at 3.6 cm for our targets.

  1. Radio emission from rapidly-rotating cool giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Walter, Frederick M.; Florkowski, David R.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a VLA program are reported to examine the radio continuum emission from 11 rapidly-rotating cool giant stars, all of which were originally believed to be single stars. Six of the 11 stars were detected as radio sources, including FK Com and HR 9024, for which there exist multifrequency observations. HD 199178, UZ Lib (now known to be a binary system), and HD 82558, for which there is only 6-cm data. The radio properties of these stars are compared with those of the active, rapidly rotating evolved stars found in the RS CVn binary systems.

  2. First Science Verification of the VLA Sky Survey Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Amy

    2017-01-01

    My research involved analyzing test images by Steve Myers for the upcoming VLA Sky Survey. This survey will cover the entire sky visible from the VLA site in S band (2-4 GHz). The VLA will be in B configuration for the survey, as it was when the test images were produced, meaning a resolution of approximately 2.5 arcseconds. Conducted using On-the-Fly mode, the survey will have a speed of approximately 20 deg2 hr-1 (including overhead). New Python imaging scripts are being developed and improved to process the VLASS images. My research consisted of comparing a continuum test image over S band (from the new imaging scripts) to two previous images of the same region of the sky (from the CNSS and FIRST surveys), as well as comparing the continuum image to single spectral windows (from the new imaging scripts and of the same sky region). By comparing our continuum test image to images from CNSS and FIRST, we tested on-the-Fly mode and the imaging script used to produce our images. Another goal was to test whether individual spectral windows could be used in combination to calculate spectral indices close to those produced over S band (based only on our continuum image). Our continuum image contained 64 sources as opposed to the 99 sources found in the CNSS image. The CNSS image also had lower noise level (0.095 mJy/beam compared to 0.119 mJy/beam). Additionally, when our continuum image was compared to the CNSS image, separation showed no dependence on total flux density (in our continuum image). At lower flux densities, sources in our image were brighter than the same ones in the CNSS image. When our continuum image was compared to the FIRST catalog, the spectral index difference showed no dependence on total flux (in our continuum image). In conclusion, the quality of our images did not completely match the quality of the CNSS and FIRST images. More work is needed in developing the new imaging scripts.

  3. The variability of the Crab Nebula in radio: No radio counterpart to gamma-ray flares

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Michael F; Buehler, R; Lobanov, A P; Blandford, R

    2014-01-01

    We present new Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) radio images of the Crab Nebula at 5.5 GHz, taken at two epochs separated by 6 days about two months after a gamma-ray flare in 2012 July. We find no significant change in the Crab's radio emission localized to a region of <2 light-months in radius, either over the 6-day interval between our present observations or between the present observations and ones from 2001. Any radio counterpart to the flare has a radio luminosity of <~ $2 \\times 10^{-4}$ times that of the nebula. Comparing our images to one from 2001, we do however find changes in radio brightness, up to 10% in amplitude, which occur on decade timescales throughout the nebula. The morphology of the changes is complex suggesting both filamentary and knotty structures. The variability is stronger, and the timescales likely somewhat shorter, nearer the centre of the nebula. We further find that even with the excellent uv~coverage and signal-to-noise of the VLA, deconvolution errors are much larger tha...

  4. A giant radio halo in the low luminosity X-ray cluster Abell 523

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, G; Girardi, M; Govoni, F; Murgia, M; Vacca, V; Bagchi, J

    2011-01-01

    Radio halos are extended and diffuse non-thermal radio sources present at the cluster center, not obviously associated with any individual galaxy. A strong correlation has been found between the cluster X-ray luminosity and the halo radio power. We observe and analyze the diffuse radio emission present in the complex merging structure Abell 523, classified as a low luminosity X-ray cluster, to discuss its properties in the context of the halo total radio power versus X-ray luminosity correlation. We reduced VLA archive observations at 1.4 GHz to derive a deep radio image of the diffuse emission, and compared radio, optical, and X-ray data. Low-resolution VLA images detect a giant radio halo associated with a complex merging region. The properties of this new halo agree with those of radio halos in general discussed in the literature, but its radio power is about a factor of ten higher than expected on the basis of the cluster X-ray luminosity. Our study of this giant radio source demonstrates that radio halos...

  5. Radio outburst of BL Lacertae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemi, C. S.; Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Giroletti, M.; Orienti, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Bach, U.

    2013-04-01

    We report on extremely high radio flux of BL Lacertae at 43 and 8 GHz. Observations at 43 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Noto (Italy) revealed a flux density of 10.5 +/- 0.2 Jy on 2013 April 10.65, while observations at 8 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Medicina (Italy) detected a flux density of 8.2 +/- 0.7 Jy on April 12.22. These extremely high radio fluxes show that the radio activity likely correlated to the strong optical, near-infrared, and gamma-ray activity of 2011-2012 (see ATels #4028, #4031, #4155, #4271, #4277, #4349, #4565, #4600), and X-ray activity of late 2012 (ATels #4557, #4627), is far to be exhausted.

  6. THE LARGE MILLIMETER TELESCOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Hughes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, presented on behalf of the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT project team, describes the status and near-term plans for the telescope and its initial instrumentation. The LMT is a bi-national collaboration between M xico and the USA, led by the Instituto Nacional de Astrof sica, ptica y Electr nica (INAOE and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, to construct, commission and operate a 50 m diameter millimeterwave radio telescope. Construction activities are nearly complete at the LMT site, at an altitude of 4600 m on the summit of Sierra Negra, an extinct volcano in the Mexican state of Puebla. Full movement of the telescope, under computer control in both azimuth and elevation, has been achieved. First-light at centimeter wavelengths on astronomical sources was obtained in November 2006. Installation of precision surface segments for millimeter-wave operation is underway, with the inner 32 m diameter of the surface now complete and ready to be used to obtain rst-light at millimeter wavelengths in 2008. Installation of the remainder of the re ector will continue during the next year and be completed in 2009 for nal commissioning of the antenna. The full LMT antenna, out ted with its initial complement of scienti c instruments, will be a world-leading scienti c research facility for millimeter-wave astronomy.

  7. The Broad Line Radio Galaxy J2114+820

    CERN Document Server

    Lara, L; Cotton, W D; Feretti, L; Giovannini, G; Marcaide, J M; Venturi, T

    1998-01-01

    In the frame of the study of a new sample of large angular size radio galaxies selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, we have made radio observations of J2114+820, a low power radio galaxy with an angular size of 6'. Its radio structure basically consists of a prominent core, a jet directed in north-west direction and two extended S-shaped lobes. We have also observed the optical counterpart of J2114+820, a bright elliptical galaxy with a strong unresolved central component. The optical spectrum shows broad emission lines. This fact, together with its low radio power and FR-I type morphology, renders J2114+820 a non-trivial object from the point of view of the current unification schemes of radio loud active galactic nuclei.

  8. Radio Emission from the Be/Black Hole Binary MWC 656

    CERN Document Server

    Dzib, S A; Jaron, F

    2015-01-01

    Context. MWC 656 is the recently discovered first binary system case composed of a Be-type star and an accreting black hole. Its low X-ray luminosity indicates that the system is in a quiescent X-ray state. Aims. The aim of our investigation is to establish if the MWC 656 system has detectable radio emission and if the radio characteristics are consistent with those of quiescent black hole systems. Methods.We used three archived VLA data sets, one hour each, at 3 GHz and seven new VLA observations, two hours each, at 10 GHz to produce very high sensitivity images, down to $\\sim$1$\\,\\mu$Jy. Results.We detected the source twice in the new observations: in the first VLA run, at periastron passage, with a flux density of 14.2$\\,\\pm\\,$2.9 $\\mu$Jy and by combining all together the other six VLA runs, with a flux density of $3.7 \\pm 1.4$ $\\mu$Jy. The resulting combined map of the archived observations has the sensitivity of $1 \\sigma = 6.6\\, \\mu Jy$ but no radio emission is there detected. Conclusions. The radio and...

  9. Radio upper limits for the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J17511-3057

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller-Jones, J.C.A.; Russell, D.M.; Migliari, S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on recent radio observations of the newly-detected accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar, IGR J17511-3057 (ATels #2196, #2197, #2198, #2199, #2215, #2216, #2220, #2221). We used the Very Large Array (VLA) to observe the source under observing program AM971. The array was in its relatively com

  10. The extreme flare in III Zw 2: evolution of a radio jet in a Seyfert galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunthaler, A.; Falcke, H.D.E.; Bower, G.C.; Aller, M.F.; Aller, H.D.; Teräsranta, H.

    2005-01-01

    A very detailed monitoring of a radio flare in the Seyfert I galaxy III Zw 2 with the VLA and the VLBA is presented. The relative astrometry in the VLBA observations was precise to a few muas. The spectral and spatial evolutions of the source are closely linked, and these observations allowed us to

  11. The extreme flare in III Zw 2: evolution of a radio jet in a Seyfert galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunthaler, A.; Falcke, H.D.E.; Bower, G.C.; Aller, M.F.; Aller, H.D.; Teräsranta, H.

    2005-01-01

    A very detailed monitoring of a radio flare in the Seyfert I galaxy III Zw 2 with the VLA and the VLBA is presented. The relative astrometry in the VLBA observations was precise on a level of a few microarcseconds. Spectral and spatial evolution of the source are closely linked and these observation

  12. The Population of KPC-Scale Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Pedro; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Browne, Ian W. A.

    In this paper we present a subsample of 55 flat-spectrum radio sources dominated by (~ 100 mas) kpc-scale structure, selected from a parent sample of 1665 VLA sources. Most are core-jets and 23 are CSO/MSO candidates. Properties of the subsample are discussed.

  13. Star formation in nearby early-type galaxies: the radio continuum perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyland, Kristina; Young, Lisa M.; Wrobel, Joan M.; Davis, Timothy A.; Bureau, Martin; Alatalo, Katherine; Morganti, Raffaella; Duc, Pierre-Alain; de Zeeuw, P. T.; McDermid, Richard M.; Crocker, Alison F.; Oosterloo, Tom

    2017-01-01

    We present a 1.4 GHz Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) study of a sample of early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the ATLAS3D survey. The radio morphologies of these ETGs at a resolution of θFWHM ≈ 5 arcsec include sources that are compact on sub-kpc scales, resolved structures similar to those seen i

  14. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 4 REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Eun, E-mail: minho@kasi.re.kr [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Star formation activities in the NGC 2024 FIR 4 region were studied by imaging centimeter continuum sources and water maser sources using several archival data sets from the Very Large Array. The continuum source VLA 9 is elongated in the northwest–southeast direction, consistent with the FIR 4 bipolar outflow axis, and has a flat spectrum in the 6.2–3.6 cm interval. The three water maser spots associated with FIR 4 are also distributed along the outflow axis. One of the spots is located close to VLA 9, and another one is close to an X-ray source. Examinations of the positions of compact objects in this region suggest that the FIR 4 cloud core contains a single low-mass protostar. VLA 9 is the best indicator of the protostellar position. VLA 9 may be a radio thermal jet driven by this protostar, and it is unlikely that FIR 4 contains a high-mass young stellar object (YSO). A methanol 6.7 GHz maser source is located close to VLA 9, at a distance of about 100 AU. The FIR 4 protostar must be responsible for the methanol maser action, which suggests that methanol class II masers are not necessarily excited by high-mass YSOs. Also discussed are properties of other centimeter continuum sources in the field of view and the water masers associated with FIR 6n. Some of the continuum sources are radio thermal jets, and some are magnetically active young stars.

  15. A Multiple System of Radio Sources at the Core of the L723 Multipolar Outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Gonzalez, Carlos; Rodriguez, Luis F; Torrelles, Jose M; Osorio, Mayra; Girart, Jose M

    2007-01-01

    We present high angular resolution Very Large Array multi-epoch continuum observations at 3.6 cm and 7 mm towards the core of the L723 multipolar outflow revealing a multiple system of four radio sources suspected to be YSOs in a region of only ~4 arcsecs (1200 AU) in extent. The 3.6 cm observations show that the previously detected source VLA 2 contains a close (separation ~0.29 arcsecs or ~90 AU) radio binary, with components (A and B) along a position angle of ~150 degrees. The northern component (VLA 2A) of this binary system is also detected in the 7 mm observations, with a positive spectral index between 3.6 cm and 7 mm. In addition, the source VLA 2A is associated with extended emission along a position angle of ~115 degrees, that we interpret as outflowing shock-ionized gas that is exciting a system of HH objects with the same position angle. A third, weak 3.6 cm source, VLA 2C, that is detected also at 7 mm, is located ~0.7 arcsecs northeast of VLA 2A, and is possibly associated with the water maser ...

  16. SNAP telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampton, Michael L.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis,R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar,A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland,S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.G.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder, E.V.; Loken,S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi,H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto,E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will require a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction limited images spanning a one degree field in the visible and near infrared wavelength regime. This requirement, equivalent to nearly one billion pixel resolution, places stringent demands on its optical system in terms of field flatness, image quality, and freedom from chromatic aberration. We discuss the advantages of annular-field three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) telescopes for applications such as SNAP, and describe the features of the specific optical configuration that we have baselined for the SNAP mission. We discuss the mechanical design and choice of materials for the telescope. Then we present detailed ray traces and diffraction calculations for our baseline optical design. We briefly discuss stray light and tolerance issues, and present a preliminary wavefront error budget for the SNAP Telescope. We conclude by describing some of tasks to be carried out during the upcoming SNAP research and development phase.

  17. 中德亚毫米波望远镜的伺服系统设计%Servo System Design for Sino-German Sub-millimeter Wave Radio Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑万章

    2014-01-01

    According to the high performance specification requirement of Sino-German Sub-millimeter Wave Radio Telescope,after a mass of research and simulation analysis,the two axes design schemebased on German Rexroth AC servo is selected for antenna servo system. The main framework of this system is based on motion logical controller and full digital AC drive,and reinforced by security protection device. Azimuth and elevation axis both adopt PID controlled force moment difference anti-backlash technique, improving antenna motion accuracy and stability. This design utilizes the powerful performance of the motion logical controller to realize trajectory tracking function,which solvesa key technical problem of antenna software.%针对中德亚毫米波望远镜的高性能指标要求,经过大量的调研和仿真分析,天线伺服系统采用了基于德国Rexroth交流伺服的两轴设计方案。系统以运动逻辑控制器和全数字交流驱动器为主体框架,并附加了安全保护措施装置。方位轴和俯仰轴均采用对力矩差值进行PID控制的双电机消隙技术,提高了天线运动的精度和天线转向时的平稳性。利用运动逻辑控制器强大的性能设计了轨迹跟踪功能,解决了天线软件部分的关键技术难题。

  18. A Search for Radio Transients and Variables in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neureuther, J. L.; Hyman, S. D.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Nord, M. E.; Kassim, N. E.

    2002-12-01

    We report on a search for radio transients in the Galactic center using a number of 327 MHz VLA observations made during the 1990's, and from a series of monthly VLA observations made during Spring and Summer 2002. A typical yield of compact sources in a given epoch is roughly 200. We have detected at least one new radio transient located only 1.1 degrees north of the Galactic center (AJ, 2002, vol. 123, pg. 1497). Other candidate sources are also presented. We use these observations to constrain the timescale(s) and nature of radio transients and variables in the Galactic center. Basic research in radio astronomy at the NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research, and at Sweet Briar College by Research Corporation, the Jeffress Memorial Trust, and the National Science Foundation.

  19. The Radio Properties of Composite LINER/HII Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Filho, M E; Ho, L C; Filho, Mercedes E.; Barthel, Peter D.; Ho, Luis C.

    2002-01-01

    Arcsec-resolution VLA observations -- newly obtained as well as published -- of 40 nearby galaxies are discussed, completing a study of the radio properties of a magnitude-limited sample of nearby galaxies of the composite LINER/HII type. Our results reveal an overall detection rate of at least 25% AGN candidates among these composite sources. The general properties of these AGN candidates, as compared to non-AGN composite sources and HII galaxies, are discussed.

  20. Unseen cosmos the universe in radio

    CERN Document Server

    Graham-Smith, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Radio telescopes have transformed our understanding of the Universe. Pulsars, quasars, Big Bang cosmology: all are discoveries of the new science of radio astronomy. Here, Francis Graham-Smith describes the birth, development, and maturity of radio astronomy, from the first discovery of cosmic radio waves to its present role as a major part of modern astronomy. Radio is part of the electromagnetic spectrum, covering infra-red, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma-rays, and Graham-Smith explains why it is that radio waves give us a unique view of the Universe. Tracing the development o

  1. CHILES Con Pol: Probing galaxy evolution, the dark Universe, and cosmic magnetism with a deep 1000 hour Jansky VLA survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Chiles Con Pol Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We recently started a 1000 hour campaign to observe 0.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field in full polarization continuum at 1.4 GHz with the Jansky VLA, as part of a joint program with the spectral line COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES). When complete, we expect our CHILES Continuum Polarization (CHILES Con Pol) survey to reach an unprecedented SKA-era sensitivity of 0.7 uJy per 4 arcsecond FWHM beam. Here we present the key goals of CHILES Con Pol, which are to (i) produce a source catalog of legacy value to the astronomical community, (ii) measure differential source counts in total intensity, linear polarization, and circular polarization in order to constrain the redshift and luminosity distributions of source populations, (iii) perform a novel weak lensing study using radio polarization as an indicator of intrinsic alignment to better study dark energy and dark matter, and (iv) probe the unknown origin of cosmic magnetism by measuring the strength and structure of intergalactic magnetic fields in the filaments of large scale structure. The CHILES Con Pol source catalog will be a useful resource for upcoming wide-field surveys by acting as a training set for machine learning algorithms, which can then be used to identify and classify radio sources in regions lacking deep multiwavelength coverage.

  2. The VLA 1.4GHz Survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: Second Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, N A; Fomalont, E B; Kellermann, K I; Mainieri, V; Padovani, P; Rosati, P; Tozzi, P; Vattakunnel, S

    2013-01-01

    Deep radio observations at 1.4GHz for the Extended Chandra Deep Field South were performed in June through September of 2007 and presented in a first data release (Miller et al. 2008). The survey was made using six separate pointings of the Very Large Array (VLA) with over 40 hours of observation per pointing. In the current paper, we improve on the data reduction to produce a second data release (DR2) mosaic image. This DR2 image covers an area of about a third of a square degree and reaches a best rms sensitivity of 6 uJy and has a typical sensitivity of 7.4 uJy per 2.8" by 1.6" beam. We also present a more comprehensive catalog, including sources down to peak flux densities of five or more times the local rms noise along with information on source sizes and relevant pointing data. We discuss in some detail the consideration of whether sources are resolved under the complication of a radio image created as a mosaic of separate pointings each suffering some degree of bandwidth smearing, and the accurate eval...

  3. Spitzer observations of Abell 1763 - II: Constraining the nature of activity in the cluster-feeding filament with VLA and XMM-Newton data

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, Louise O V; Frayer, David T; Neto, Gastao B Lima; Durret, Florence

    2010-01-01

    The Abell 1763 superstructure at z=0.23 contains the first galaxy filament to be directly detected using mid-infrared observations. Our previous work has shown that the frequency of starbursting galaxies, as characterized by 24{\\mu}m emission is much higher within the filament than at either the center of the rich galaxy cluster, or the field surrounding the system. New VLA and XMM-Newton data are presented here. We use the radio and X-ray data to examine the fraction and location of active galaxies, both active galactic nuclei (AGN) and starbursts. The radio far-infrared correlation, X-ray point source location, IRAC colors, and quasar positions are all used to gain an understanding of the presence of dominant AGN. We find very few MIPS-selected galaxies that are clearly dominated by AGN activity. Most radio selected members within the filament are starbursts. Within the supercluster, 3 of 8 spectroscopic members detected both in the radio and in the mid-infrared are radio-bright AGN. They are found at or ne...

  4. Radio data archiving system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapic, C.; Zanichelli, A.; Dovgan, E.; Nanni, M.; Stagni, M.; Righini, S.; Sponza, M.; Bedosti, F.; Orlati, A.; Smareglia, R.

    2016-07-01

    Radio Astronomical Data models are becoming very complex since the huge possible range of instrumental configurations available with the modern Radio Telescopes. What in the past was the last frontiers of data formats in terms of efficiency and flexibility is now evolving with new strategies and methodologies enabling the persistence of a very complex, hierarchical and multi-purpose information. Such an evolution of data models and data formats require new data archiving techniques in order to guarantee data preservation following the directives of Open Archival Information System and the International Virtual Observatory Alliance for data sharing and publication. Currently, various formats (FITS, MBFITS, VLBI's XML description files and ancillary files) of data acquired with the Medicina and Noto Radio Telescopes can be stored and handled by a common Radio Archive, that is planned to be released to the (inter)national community by the end of 2016. This state-of-the-art archiving system for radio astronomical data aims at delegating as much as possible to the software setting how and where the descriptors (metadata) are saved, while the users perform user-friendly queries translated by the web interface into complex interrogations on the database to retrieve data. In such a way, the Archive is ready to be Virtual Observatory compliant and as much as possible user-friendly.

  5. High School Students Discover Neutron Star Using Chandra and VLA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Three high school students, using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA), have found the first evidence of a neutron star in the nearby supernova remnant IC443, a system long studied by professional astronomers. This remarkable discovery has led the team to the national finals and a 1st place finish in the team competition at the Siemens-Westinghouse Science and Technology Competition held today in Washington, DC. Charles Olbert (age 18), Christopher Clearfield (age 18), and Nikolas Williams (age 16), all of the North Carolina School for Science and Mathematics (NCSSM) in Durham, NC, found a point-like source of X rays embedded in the remains of the stellar explosion, or supernova. Based on both the X-ray and radio data, the students determined that the central object in IC443 is most likely a young and rapidly rotating neutron star -- an object known as a "pulsar." "This is a really solid scientific finding," said Bryan Gaensler of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a noted pulsar expert who reviewed the paper for the team. "Everyone involved should be really proud of this accomplishment." Taking advantage of Chandra's superior angular resolution, the North Carolina students found the source embedded in IC443, a region known to be emitting particularly high-energy X rays. In a highly unusual situation, the students got access to the Chandra data from their science teacher, Dr. Jonathan Keohane. Keohane applied for the observation time while still associated with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. "The students really went through the whole analysis process themselves," said Keohane. "And, they even lived together all summer near the school to complete the research." In order to confirm the evidence from Chandra, the students turned to the National Radio Observatory's Dale Frail who gave the student team VLA data on IC443. While the radio data did not reveal any periodicity, the VLA

  6. Testing the Magnetar Model via Late Time Radio Observations of Two Macronova Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Horesh, Assaf; Piran, Tsvi; Nakar, Ehud; Hancock, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Compact binary mergers may have already been observed as they are the leading model for short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). Radioactive decay within the ejecta from these mergers is expected to produce an infra-red flare, dubbed macronova (or kilonova), on a time scale of a week. Recently two such macronova candidates were identified in followup observations of sGRBs, strengthening the possibility that those indeed arise from mergers. The same ejecta will also produce a long term (months to years) radio emission due to its interaction with the surrounding ISM. In search for this emission, we observed the two macronova candidates, GRB 130603B and GRB 060614 with the Jansky very large array (VLA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Our observations resulted in null-detections, putting strong upper limits on the kinetic energy and mass of the ejecta. A possible outcome of a merger is a highly magnetized neutron star (a magnetar), which has been suggested as the central engine for GRBs. Such a magnetar ...

  7. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  8. Radio emission from RS CVn binary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doiron, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The RS CVn binary stellar systems UX Ari, HR 1099, AR Lac, HR 5110, II Peg, lambda And, and SZ Psc were investigated by use of radio interferometry during the period from July 1982 through August 1983. Interferometry took two forms: Very Large Array (VLA) observations and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). The VLA observations determined the characteristic polarization and flux behavior of the centimeter wavelength radio emission. The observed spectral index was near zero during quiescent periods, rising to between 0.5 and 1.0 during active periods. No net linear polarization is observed to a limit of 1.7%. This is expected since the Faraday depth of thermal electrons deduced from x-ray observations is approx. 10/sup 5/. Circular polarization is observed to be less than 20% at all frequencies often with a helicity reversal between 1.6 GHz and 5 GHz. The VLBI observations have shown that the brightness temperatures are often T/sub B/ approx.> 10/sup 10/ /sup 0/K and size sources smaller than or comparable to the overall size of the binary system. These data are consistent with incoherent gyrosynchrotron emission from mildly relativistic electrons which are optically thick to their own radiation at 1.6 GHz and optically thin at 5 GHz and above. The spectral behavior suggests that the radio emission is due to a power-law distribution of electrons.

  9. Radio Detection of A Candidate Neutron Star Associated with Galactic Center Supernova Remnant Sagittarius A East

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Goss, W M

    2013-01-01

    We report the VLA detection of the radio counterpart of the X-ray object referred to as the "Cannonball", which has been proposed to be the remnant neutron star resulting from the creation of the Galactic Center supernova remnant, Sagittarius A East. The radio object was detected both in our new VLA image from observations in 2012 at 5.5 GHz and in archival VLA images from observations in 1987 at 4.75 GHz and in the period from 1990 to 2002 at 8.31 GHz. The radio morphology of this object is characterized as a compact, partially resolved point source located at the northern tip of a radio "tongue" similar to the X-ray structure observed by Chandra. Behind the Cannonball, a radio counterpart to the X-ray plume is observed. This object consists of a broad radio plume with a size of 30\\arcsec$\\times$15\\arcsec, followed by a linear tail having a length of 30\\arcsec. The compact head and broad plume sources appear to have relatively flat spectra ($\\propto\

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The population of compact radio sources in ONC (Forbrich+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbrich, J.; Rivilla, V. M.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Wolk, S. J.; Meingast, S.

    2016-08-01

    The observations were carried out with the Karl G. Jansky VLA of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory on 2012 September 30, October 2-5 under project code SD630. Data were taken using the VLA's C-band (4-8GHz) receivers in full polarization mode, with two 1GHz basebands centered at 4.736 and 7.336GHz to provide a good baseline for source spectral index determination. Apart from the first epoch, the field was simultaneously observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Mostly of interest for variability information, these data will be presented as part of a follow-up paper. (1 data file).

  11. VLA+WSRT HI Imaging of Two "Almost Dark" Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Catie; Singer, Quinton; Cannon, John M.; Leisman, Luke; Haynes, Martha P.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; Bernal Neira, David; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Janesh, William; Janowiecki, Steven; Jozsa, Gyula; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John Joseph

    2017-01-01

    We present sensitive HI imaging of the "Almost Dark" galaxies AGC229385 and AGC229101. Selected from the ALFALFA survey, "Almost Dark" galaxies have significant HI reservoirs but lack an obvious stellar counterpart in survey-depth ground-based optical imaging. Deeper ground- and space-based imaging reveals very low surface brightness optical counterparts in both systems. The resulting M_HI/L_B ratios are among the highest ever measured for individual galaxies. Here we combine VLA and WSRT imaging of these two systems, allowing us to preserve surface brightness sensitivity while working at high angular resolution. The resulting maps of HI mass surface density, velocity field, and velocity dispersion are compared to deep optical and ultraviolet imaging. In both systems the highest column density HI gas is clumpy and resolved into multiple components. In the case of AGC229385, the kinematics are inconsistent with a simple rotating disk and may be the result of either an infall episode or an interaction between two HI-rich disks.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant 1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  12. VLASSICK: The VLA Sky Survey in the Central Kiloparsec

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, E A C; Kruijssen, J M D; Sjouwerman, L; Lang, C C; Mao, S A; Walsh, A; Su, M; Longmore, S N; Zhao, J-H; Meier, D; Morris, M R

    2014-01-01

    At a distance of 8 kpc, the center of our Galaxy is the nearest galactic nucleus, and has been the subject of numerous key projects undertaken by great observatories such as Chandra, Spitzer, and Herschel. However, there are still no surveys of molecular gas properties in the Galactic center with less than 30" (1 pc) resolution. There is also no sensitive polarization survey of this region, despite numerous nonthermal magnetic features apparently unique to the central 300 parsecs. In this paper, we outline the potential the VLASS has to fill this gap. We assess multiple considerations in observing the Galactic center, and recommend a C-band survey with 10 micro-Jy continuum RMS and sensitive to molecular gas with densities greater than 10^4 cm^{-3}, covering 17 square degrees in both DnC and CnB configurations ( resolution ~5"), totaling 750 hours of observing time. Ultimately, we wish to note that the upgraded VLA is not just optimized for fast continuum surveys, but has a powerful correlator capable of simu...

  13. A Rotation Measure Gradient on the M87 VLA Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algaba Juan Carlos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rotation measures (RMs have proven to be an excellent tool to study magnetic field structures in AGNs. Here we study RM properties on kiloparsec scales of theM87 jet via stacked multi wavelength polarized VLA observations. Our results show for the first time an indication of the RM gradient transverse to the jet in knot A, and possibly knot C and HST-1. Motivated by the shape of the RM in knots A and B, we discuss that part of it may be a filamentary structure of higher RM due to an external Faraday screen, although we consider this unlikely The data presented here can be easily explained by a helical magnetic field. By combining this result together with polarization direction plus the shape and degree of the fractional polarization across the jet, we can fairly conclude the presence of systematically wrapped, possibly helical, magnetic fields tightly wounded in knots A and C, in agreement with an MHD quad shock model.

  14. A Search for Radio Gravitational Lenses, Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Very Large Array

    CERN Document Server

    Boyce, E R; Bolton, A S; Hewitt, J N; Burles, S; Boyce, Edward R.; Bowman, Judd D.; Bolton, Adam S.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Burles, Scott

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel search for radio gravitational lenses. Using the Very Large Array, we imaged ten candidates with both dual redshifts in Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and 1.4 GHz radio flux >2 mJy in the FIRST survey. The VLA maps show that in each case the radio emission is associated with the foreground galaxy rather than being lensed emission from the background galaxy, although at least four of our targets are strong lenses at optical wavelengths. These SDSS dual-redshift systems do not have lensed radio emission at the sensitivity of current radio surveys.

  15. Very large Arecibo-type telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frank D.

    1988-03-01

    The Arecibo-type radio telescope, based on a fixed spherical reflector, is a very effective design for a large radio telescope on the Moon. In such telescopes, major structural members are provided by the ground on which they are built, and thus are provided at no cost in materials or transportation. The strong compression members, the tall towers which support the suspended platform, are an expensive part of the Arecibo telescope. The need for such towers can be eliminated if a suitable valley or crater can be found wherein the rim of the depression can be used as the support point for the cables which support the suspended platform. With an Arecibo-type radio telescope on the Moon, there are no changing gravity loads because of the design and no changing wind loads because of the location; therefore, the only source of time variation in the telescope geometry is thermal changes. Calculations show that with conventional materials, such as steel, it should be possible to construct an Arecibo-type telescope with a reflector diameter of some 30 km on the Moon, and with a reflector diameter of some 60 to 90 km if materials of high specific strength are used.

  16. Powerful Activity in the Bright Ages. I. A Visible/IR Survey of High Redshift 3C Radio Galaxies and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hilbert, Bryan; Kotyla, JohnPaul; Tremblay, Grant R; Stanghellini, Carlo; Sparks, William B; Baum, Stefi A; Capetti, Alessandro; Macchetto, F Duccio; Miley, George K; O'Dea, Christopher P; Perlman, Eric S; Quillen, Alice C

    2016-01-01

    We present new rest frame UV and visible observations of 22 high-redshift (1 < z < 2.5) 3C radio galaxies and QSOs obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument. Using a custom data reduction strategy in order to assure the removal of cosmic rays, persistence signal, and other data artifacts, we have produced high-quality science-ready images of the targets and their local environments. We observe targets with regions of UV emission suggestive of active star formation. In addition, several targets exhibit highly distorted host galaxy morphologies in the rest frame visible images. Photometric analyses reveals that brighter QSOs tend to be generally redder than their dimmer counterparts. Using emission line fluxes from the literature, we estimate that emission line contamination is relatively small in the rest frame UV images for the QSOs. Using archival VLA data, we have also created radio map overlays for each of our targets, allowing for analysis of the optical ...

  17. Selecting Your First Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Sherwood

    1982-01-01

    Designed for first-time telescope purchasers, provides information on how a telescope works; major telescope types (refractors, reflectors, compound telescopes); tripod, pier, altazimuth, and equatorial mounts; selecting a telescope; visiting an astronomy club; applications/limitations of telescope use; and tips on buying a telescope. Includes a…

  18. Radio Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, John R.; Bittner, Denise A.

    This book, a how-to-do-it guide for the novice and the professional alike, deals with several aspects of radio journalism: producing documentaries, preparing and announcing radio news, ethics and responsibility, regulation of radio journalism, and careers. It traces the history and growth of radio news, shows its impact on the public, and…

  19. Comets at radio wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Crovisier, Jacques; Colom, Pierre; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Comets are considered as the most primitive objects in the Solar System. Their composition provides information on the composition of the primitive solar nebula, 4.6 Gyr ago. The radio domain is a privileged tool to study the composition of cometary ices. Observations of the OH radical at 18 cm wavelength allow us to measure the water production rate. A wealth of molecules (and some of their isotopologues) coming from the sublimation of ices in the nucleus have been identified by observations in the millimetre and submillimetre domains. We present an historical review on radio observations of comets, focusing on the results from our group, and including recent observations with the Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope, the IRAM antennas, the Odin satellite, the Herschel space observatory, ALMA, and the MIRO instrument aboard the Rosetta space probe.

  20. Connecting Gas Dynamics and Star Formation Histories in Nearby Galaxies: The VLA-ANGST Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Juergen; Dalcanton, Julianne; Walter, Fabian; Stilp, Adrienne; Koribalski, Baerbel; West, Andrew; Warren, Steven

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, HST revolutionized the field of star formation in nearby galaxies. Due to its high angular resolution it has now become possible to construct star formation histories of individual stellar populations on scales of a few arcseconds spanning a range of up to ~600 Myr. This method will be applied to the ANGST galaxies, a large HST volume limited survey to map galaxies up to distances of 3.5-4.0 Mpc (excluding the Local Group). The ANGST sample is currently followed--up by high, ~6'' resolution VLA observations of neutral, atomic hydrogen (HI) in the context of VLA-ANGST, an approved Large VLA Project. The VLA resolution is well matched to that of the spatially resolved star formation history maps. The combination of ANGST and VLA-ANGST data will provide a new, promising approach to study essential fields of galaxy evolution such as the triggering of star formation, the feedback of massive stars into the interstellar medium, and the structure and dynamics of the interstellar medium.