WorldWideScience

Sample records for vla radio observations

  1. Searching the Nearest Stars for Exoplanetary Radio Emission: VLA and LOFAR Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Mary; Winterhalter, Daniel; Lazio, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Six of the eight solar system planets and one moon (Ganymede) exhibit present-day dynamo magnetic fields. To date, however, there are no conclusive detections of exoplanetary magnetic fields. Low frequency radio emission via the cyclotron maser instability (CMI) from interactions between a planet and the solar/stellar wind is the most direct means of detecting and characterizing planetary/exoplanetary magnetic fields. We have undertaken a survey of the very nearest stars in low frequency radio (30 MHz - 4 GHz) in order to search for yet-undiscovered planets. The closest stars are chosen in order to reduce the attenuation of the magnetospheric radio signal by distance dilution, thereby increasing the chances of making a detection if a planet with a strong magnetic field is present. The VLA telescope (P-band: 230-470 MHz, L-band: 1-2 GHz, S-band: 2-4 GHz) and LOFAR telescope (LBA: 30-75 MHz) have been used to conduct this survey.This work focuses on VLA and LOFAR observations of an M-dwarf binary system: GJ 725. We present upper limits on radio flux as a function of frequency. Since the peak emission frequency of CMI-type emission is the local plasma frequency in the emission region, the peak frequency of planetary radio emission is a direct proxy for the magnetic field strength of the planet. Our spectral irradiance upper limits therefore represent upper limits on the magnetic field strengths of any planets in the GJ 725 system.Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Multifrequency VLA observations of PKS 0745 - 191 - The archetypal 'cooling flow' radio source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Ninety-, 20-, 6- and 2-cm VLA observations of the high-radio-luminosity cooling-flow radio source PKS 0745 - 191 are presented. The radio source was found to have a core with a very steep spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5) and diffuse emission with an even steeper spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5 to -2.3) without clear indications of the jets, hotspots, or double lobes found in the other radio sources of comparable luminosity. It is inferred that the energy to power the radio source comes from the central engine, but the source's structure may be heavily influenced by the past history of the galaxy and the inflowing intracluster medium. It is shown that, while the radio source is energetically unimportant for the cluster as a whole, it is important on the scale of the cooling flow. The mere existence of cosmic rays and magnetic fields within a substantial fraction of the volume inside the cooling radius has important consequences for cooling-flow models.

  3. VLA H53alpha radio recombination line observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp~220

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Rico, C A; Viallefond, F; Zhao, J H; Gómez, Y; Anantharamaiah, K R

    2005-01-01

    We present high angular resolution (0.7'') observations made with the Very Large Array (VLA) of the radio recombination line (RRL) H53alpha and radio continuum emission at 43 GHz from the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp 220. The 43 GHz continuum emission shows a compact structure (~2'') with two peaks separated by ~1'', the East (E) and West (W) components, that correspond to each galactic nucleus of the merger. The spectral indices for both the E and W components, using radio continuum images at 8.3 and 43 GHz are typical of synchrotron emission (alpha ~ -1.0). Our 43 GHz continuum and H53alpha line observations confirm the flux densities predicted by the models proposed by Anantharamaiah et al. This agreement with the models implies the presence of high-density (~ 100,000 cm^-3) compact HII regions (~ 0.1 pc) in Arp~220. The integrated H53alpha line emission is stronger toward the non-thermal radio continuum peaks, which are also coincident with the peaks of molecular emission of the H2CO. The coi...

  4. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A. [Physics Department, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Grandi, P. [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Bologna (Italy); Giovannini, G. [INAF, Istituto di Radioastronomia di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Montez, R., E-mail: kharb@cis.rit.edu [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the

  5. Weak and Compact Radio Emission in Early High-Mass Star Forming Regions: I. VLA Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rosero, V; Claussen, M; Kurtz, S; Cesaroni, R; Araya, E D; Carrasco-González, C; Rodríguez, L F; Menten, K M; Wyrowski, F; Loinard, L; Ellingsen, S P

    2016-01-01

    We present a high sensitivity radio continuum survey at 6 and 1.3$\\,$cm using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array towards a sample of 58 high-mass star forming regions. Our sample was chosen from dust clumps within infrared dark clouds with and without IR sources (CMC-IRs, CMCs, respectively), and hot molecular cores (HMCs), with no previous, or relatively weak radio continuum detection at the $1\\,$mJy level. Due to the improvement in the continuum sensitivity of the VLA, this survey achieved map rms levels of $\\sim$ 3-10 $\\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ at sub-arcsecond angular resolution. We extracted 70 centimeter continuum sources associated with 1.2$\\,$mm dust clumps. Most sources are weak, compact, and are prime candidates for high-mass protostars. Detection rates of radio sources associated with the mm dust clumps for CMCs, CMC-IRs and HMCs are 6$\\%$, 53$\\%$ and 100$\\%$, respectively. This result is consistent with increasing high-mass star formation activity from CMCs to HMCs. The radio sources located within HMCs...

  6. VLA observations of the wide-angle tailed radio source 1313+073

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patnaik, A.R.; Banhatti, D.G.; Subrahmanya, C.R. (Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Bangalore (India). Radio Astronomy Centre)

    1984-12-15

    VLA observations at 20 and 6 cm of the wide-angle tailed source 1313+073 are presented. It has an asymmetric structure with a sharp bend in the eastern tail and a gradual bend in the western. Both tails become diffuse after the bends. Several models are explored to explain this structure and it is concluded that the tails bend because of the motion of the parent cD galaxy through the ICM, which is possible if the cluster containing the source is dynamically young. Examination of the optical fields of 26 similar sources shows that in 20 of them the parent galaxies have a fainter companion (by approx. 2 mag), or are D, cD or db. This indicates that cannibalism may be important in the formation and powering of such sources.

  7. VLA Polarimetry of Two Extended Radio Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Junor, W; Morganti, R; Padrielli, L

    2000-01-01

    Multi-wavelength VLA observations of two extended radio galaxies, 0235-197and 1203+043 are presented. There is some evidence from earlier studies thatthese two sources exhibit low frequency (<1 GHz) variability. This work showsthat both sources have linear polarizations, if any, below the detection limitsat 320 MHz, so we cannot explain the variability as being due to instrumentalpolarization effects as has been suggested for 3C159. Refractive scintillationmay be the cause of the variability in 0235-197. This would require theexistence of a bright, compact component in one of the hot spots seen in theseobservations. This is not implausible but the resolution of this observationalprogram is insufficent to address that question. The radio source 1203+043lacks any bright compact component thereby ruling out a refractivescintillation mechanism for its variability. Consequently, it is possible thatclaims of variability in this source are spurious. However, the 320 MHz VLAobservations show that 1203+043 has an `...

  8. Quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and VLA observation of the non-thermal radio emitter HD\\168112 (O5.5III(f^+))

    OpenAIRE

    De Becker, Michaël; Rauw, Grégor; Blomme, Ronny; Waldron, Wayne; Sana, Hugues; Pittard, Julian; Eenens, Philippe; Stevens, Ian Robert; Runacres, Mark; Van Loo, Sven; Pollock, Andy

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a multiwavelength study of the non-thermal radio emitter HD 168112 (O5.5III(f+)). The detailed analysis of two quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and VLA observations reveals strong variability of this star both in the X-ray and radio ranges. The X-ray observations separated by five months reveal a decrease of the X-ray flux of ˜30%. The radio emission on the other hand increases by a factor 5-7 between the two observations obtained roughly simultaneously with the XMM-Newt...

  9. Quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and VLA observation of the non-thermal radio emitter HD\\168112 (O5.5III(f^+))

    CERN Document Server

    De Becker, M; Blomme, R; Waldron, W L; Sana, H; Pittard, J M; Eenens, P; Stevens, I R; Runacres, M C; Van Loo, S; Pollock, A M T

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a multiwavelength study of the non-thermal radio emitter HD168112 (O5.5III(f^+)). The detailed analysis of two quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and VLA observations reveals strong variability of this star both in the X-ray and radio ranges. The X-ray observations separated by five months reveal a decrease of the X-ray flux of ~30%. The radio emission on the other hand increases by a factor 5-7 between the two observations obtained roughly simultaneously with the XMM-Newton pointings. The X-ray data reveal a hard emission that is most likely produced by a thermal plasma at kT ~2-3 keV while the VLA data confirm the non-thermal status of this star in the radio waveband. Comparison with archive X-ray and radio data confirms the variability of this source in both wavelength ranges over a yet ill defined time scale. The properties of HD168112 in the X-ray and radio domain point towards a binary system with a significant eccentricity and an orbital period of a few years. However, our optical s...

  10. New insights into the evolution of the FR I radio galaxy 3C 270 (NGC 4261) from VLA and GMRT radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kolokythas, Konstantinos; Giacintucci, Simona; Raychaudhury, Somak; Ishwara-Chandra, C H; Worrall, Diana M; Birkinshaw, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) 240 MHz observations of the nearby luminous FR I radio source 3C 270, in the group-central elliptical NGC 4261. Combining these data with reprocessed Very Large Array (VLA) 1.55 and 4.8 GHz observations, we produce spectral index maps that reveal a constant spectral index along the jets and a gradual steepening from the ends of the jets through the lobes towards the nucleus. A Jaffe & Perola (JP) model fitted to the integrated spectrum of the source gives an asymptotic low-frequency index of $\\alpha_{inj}=0.53_{-0.02}^{+0.01}$, while JP models fitted to the observed spectral index trend along the lobes allow us to estimate radiative ages of $\\sim29$ Myr and $\\sim37$ Myr for the west and east lobes respectively. Our age estimates are a factor of two lower than the 75-Myr upper limit derived from X-ray data (O'Sullivan et al. 2011). We find unlikely the scenario of an early supersonic phase in which the lobe expanded into the ISM at approximately Mach 6 (350...

  11. Improved analysis of plasmasphere motion using the VLA radio interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Hoogeveen

    Full Text Available Observations using the very large (VLA radio interferometer during the past five years have enabled the discovery of a new type of plasmasphere disturbance, the magnetic eastward-directed wave. Previous work indicated these disturbances were likely frozen to the geomagnetic field as determined from their azimuth distributions. This work provides a method to explain more accurately the azimuth distribution, thereby allowing the calculation of the disturbances' location in the plasmasphere independently of the measured velocity. The measurable velocity due to corotation is calculated and subtracted from the measured trace velocity. This difference, or deviation from corotation, is attributed to electrodynamic convection; the measurement of plasmaspheric convection may lead to the eventual monitoring of mid-latitude electric fields. Disturbances are seen convecting predominantly westward, with the fastest having angular velocities greater than the anticorotating VLA line of sight. The direction of convection and conditions of observations indicate that the disturbances are likely the same phenomenon seen by the Los Alamos satellite beacon array.

  12. High-Fidelity VLA Imaging of the Radio Structure of 3C273

    CERN Document Server

    Perley, R A

    2016-01-01

    3C273, the nearest bright quasar, comprises a strong nuclear core and a bright, one-sided jet extending ~ 23 arcseconds to the SW. The source has been the subject of imaging campaigns in all wavebands. Extensive observations of this source have been made with the Very Large Array and other telescopes as part of a campaign to understand the jet emission mechanisms. Partial results from the VLA radio campaign have been published, but to date, the complete set of VLA imaging results has not been made available. We have utilized the VLA to determine the radio structure of 3C273 in Stokes I, Q, and U, over the widest possible frequency and resolution range. The VLA observed the source in all four of its configurations, and with all eight of its frequency bands, spanning 73.8 MHz to 43 GHz. The data were taken in a pseudo-spectral line mode to minimize the VLA's correlator errors, and were fully calibrated with subsequent self-calibration techniques to maximise image fidelity. Images in Stokes parameters I, Q, and ...

  13. Commensal low frequency observing on the NRAO VLA: VLITE status and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Tracy E.; Kassim, Namir E.; Brisken, Walter; Helmboldt, Joseph; Peters, Wendy; Ray, Paul S.; Polisensky, Emil; Giacintucci, Simona

    2016-08-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory's 27 antenna Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (NRAO VLA) has been successfully transitioned to a broadband system. As part of this transition, the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) worked with NRAO to develop, install, and commission a new commensal low frequency system on the VLA. The VLA Low-band Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) has dedicated samplers and uses spare NRAO optical fibers to transmit the signal from 10 low band receivers on VLA antennas to a dedicated real-time DiFX correlator. For these 10 antennas, this observing mode provides simultaneous data from both the low frequency receivers through the VLITE correlator and from the VLA higher frequencies receivers (1-50 GHz) through the NRAO WIDAR correlator. During the first 1.5 years of operation, VLITE recorded data at roughly 70% wall-time, providing 64 MHz of bandwidth centered at 352 MHz with 2s sample time and 100 kHz spectral resolution. VLITE operations require no additional resources from the VLA system and greatly expand the capabilities of the VLA through value-added PI science, stand-alone astrophysics, the opening of a new window on transient searches, and serendipity. We present an overview of the VLITE program, discuss the sky coverage and depth obtained during the first 1.5 years of operation, and brie y outline a possible path forward to a full 27 antenna LOw Band Observatory (LOBO) which could run commensally with all VLA operations.

  14. LOFAR, VLA, and Chandra observations of the Toothbrush galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    van Weeren, R J; Brüggen, M; Andrade-Santos, F; Ogrean, G A; Williams, W L; Röttgering, H J A; Dawson, W A; Forman, W R; de Gasperin, F; Hardcastle, M J; Jones, C; Miley, G K; Rafferty, D A; Rudnick, L; Sabater, J; Sarazin, C L; Shimwell, T W; Bonafede, A; Best, P N; Bîrzan, L; Cassano, R; Chyży, K T; Croston, J H; Dijkema, T J; Ensslin, T; Ferrari, C; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horellou, C; Jarvis, M J; Kraft, R P; Mevius, M; Intema, H T; Murray, S S; Orrú, E; Pizzo, R; Sridhar, S S; Simionescu, A; Stroe, A; van der Tol, S; White, G J

    2016-01-01

    We present deep LOFAR observations between 120-181 MHz of the "Toothbrush" (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of $\\alpha = -0.8 \\pm 0.1$ at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening towards the south to $\\alpha \\approx - 2$. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform ($\\alpha = -1.16$, with an intrinsic scatter of $\\leq 0.04$). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of $\\mathcal{M} = 2.8^{+0.5}_{-0.3}$, assuming diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio r...

  15. LOFAR, VLA, and Chandra Observations of the Toothbrush Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Brunetti, G.; Brüggen, M.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; Williams, W. L.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Dawson, W. A.; Forman, W. R.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jones, C.; Miley, G. K.; Rafferty, D. A.; Rudnick, L.; Sabater, J.; Sarazin, C. L.; Shimwell, T. W.; Bonafede, A.; Best, P. N.; Bîrzan, L.; Cassano, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Croston, J. H.; Dijkema, T. J.; Enßlin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kraft, R. P.; Mevius, M.; Intema, H. T.; Murray, S. S.; Orrú, E.; Pizzo, R.; Sridhar, S. S.; Simionescu, A.; Stroe, A.; van der Tol, S.; White, G. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep LOFAR observations between 120 and 181 MHz of the “Toothbrush” (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of α =-0.8+/- 0.1 at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening toward the south to α ≈ -2. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform (α =-1.16, with an intrinsic scatter of ≤slant 0.04). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of { M }={2.8}-0.3+0.5, assuming diffusive shock acceleration. However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio relic implies a much weaker shock ({ M }≈ 1.2, with an upper limit of { M }≈ 1.5). The discrepancy between the Mach numbers calculated from the radio and X-rays can be explained if either (i) the relic traces a complex shock surface along the line of sight, or (ii) if the radio relic emission is produced by a re-accelerated population of fossil particles from a radio galaxy. Our results highlight the need for additional theoretical work and numerical simulations of particle acceleration and re-acceleration at cluster merger shocks.

  16. VLA and VLBI observations of core-dominated quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollgaard, R.I.

    1989-01-01

    High dynamic range VLA observations of the total intensity and linear polarization of 24 powerful, core dominated quasars have been made at 5 GHz, as well as the first millisecond linear polarization observations of 3C 273. For ten quasars the resolution of the VLA was sufficient to reveal details of the compact extended emission surrounding the bright cores. The former all exhibit one sided jets, and most show evidence of diffuse halos. The luminosity of the extended emission is sufficient for those to be Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio sources. This interpretation is confirmed by the linear polarization structure of the jets and terminal hotspots. If these quasars are similar to powerful lobe dominated sources but are oriented with jet axes close to the line of sight, the large degrees of polarization observed in the hotspots suggest that they are travelling at speeds {upsilon} > 0.5c. The superluminal quasar 3C 345 has been imaged with a variety of resolutions. In spite of the bending on the millisecond scale, the author finds that the jet of 3C 345 is very straight for the first 2 and then has two knots which show an abrupt shift in azimuth. The inferred magnetic field in the jet is offset {approximately}30{degree} from a perpendicular orientation with respect to the jet axis. This quasar also appears to have a faint counter jet, with the jet/counter jet luminosity ratio suggesting jet speeds {upsilon} > 0.56c. There is also an asymmetric diffuse halo. Milliarsecond polarization observations of 3C 273 show that the core (component D) is very weakly polarized. Appreciable polarized flux was detected from five of the superluminal components in the jet, with the fractional polarization increasing with distance from D.

  17. VLA observations of ultraluminous IRAS galaxies active nuclei or starbursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, T; Partridge, B; Strauss, M; Crawford, Thomas; Marr, Jon; Partridge, Bruce; Strauss, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We employed the Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in C configuration to map 39 ultraluminous IRAS galaxies at 6~cm and 20~cm, at resolutions of ~ 4" and 15", respectively, and 24 sources at 6~cm with in the A configuration with a resolution of ~0.5". Most of the sources have radio spectral indices indicative of synchrotron emission (alpha ~ -0.65). There is one source, however, that shows an inverted spectrum with alpha = +2.1; observations at higher frequencies show that the spectrum peaks between 5 and 8 GHz, as high as any of the ``gigahertz peaked spectrum'' sources studied by O'Dea etal. We discuss the implications of this source for observations of fluctuations in the CMB. Two of the sources show multiple unresolved components, another four are doubles with at least one resolved component, 14 show extended emission which could arise from a disk, and two show arc-second long jets. Our data fit the tight correlation found by Helou etal (1985) between far-infrared and micro...

  18. VLA survey of the CDFS: the nature of faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Tozzi, P; Fomalont, E; Miller, N; Norman, C; Mainieri, V; Padovani, P; Rosati, P

    2009-01-01

    We present the multiwavelength properties of 266 cataloged radio sources identified with 20 and 6 cm VLA deep observations of the CDFS at a flux density limit of 42 \\mu Jy at the field centre at 1.4 GHz. These new observations probe the faint end of both the star formation and radio galaxy/AGN population. X-ray data, including upper limits, turn out to be a key factor in establishing the nature of faint radio sources. We find that, while the well-known flattening of the radio number counts below 1 mJy is mostly due to star forming galaxies, these sources and AGN make up an approximately equal fraction of the sub--millijansky sky, contrary to some previous results. We have also uncovered a population of distant AGN systematically missing from many previous studies of sub-millijansky radio source identifications. The AGN include radio galaxies, mostly of the low-power, Fanaroff-Riley I type, and a significant radio-quiet component, which amounts to approximately one fifth of the total sample. We also find that ...

  19. A VLA Search for Radio Signals from M31 and M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Robert H.; Mooley, Kunal

    2017-03-01

    Observing nearby galaxies would facilitate the search for artificial radio signals by sampling several billions of stars simultaneously, but few efforts have been made to exploit this opportunity. An added attraction is that the Milky Way is the second largest member of the Local Group, so our galaxy might be a probable target for hypothetical broadcasters in nearby galaxies. We present the first relatively high spectral resolution (radio signals of complete galaxies in the Local Group with the Jansky VLA, observing the galaxies M31 (Andromeda) and M33 (Triangulum)—the first and third largest members of the group, respectively—sampling more stars than any prior search of this kind. We used 122 Hz channels over a 1 MHz spectral window in the target galaxy velocity frame of reference, and 15 Hz channels over a 125 kHz window in our local standard of rest. No narrowband signals were detected above a signal-to-noise ratio of 7, suggesting the absence of continuous narrowband flux greater than approximately 0.24 and 1.33 Jy in the respective spectral windows illuminating our part of the Milky Way during our observations in 2014 December and 2015 January. This is also the first study in which the upgraded VLA has been used for SETI.

  20. The nature of composite LINER/H II galaxies as revealed from high-resolution VLA observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filho, ME; Barthel, PD; Ho, LC

    2000-01-01

    A sample of 37 nearby galaxies displaying composite LINER/H II and pure H II spectra was observed with the VLA in an investigation of the nature of their weak radio emission. The resulting radio contour maps overlaid on optical galaxy images are presented here, together with an extensive literature

  1. Properties and environment of radio-emitting galaxies in the VLA-zCOSMOS survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardelli, S.; Schinnerer, E.; Smolčic, V.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Mignoli, M.; Halliday, C.; Kovač, K.; Ciliegi, P.; Caputi, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bondi, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Vergani, D.; Pozzetti, L.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Lilly, S.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Coppa, G.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Pellò, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Ricciardelli, E.; Silverman, J. D.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Cimatti, A.; Guzzo, L.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Memeo, P.; Meneux, B.; Oesch, P.; Porciani, C.; Scaramella, R.; Capak, P.; Sanders, D.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Jahnke, K.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the properties and the environment of radio sources with optical counterparts from the combined VLA-COSMOS and zCOSMOS samples. The advantage of this sample is the availability of optical spectroscopic informations, high quality redshifts, and accurate density determination. Met

  2. The environment of radio sources in the VLA-COSMOS Survey field

    CERN Document Server

    Malavasi, Nicola; Ciliegi, Paolo; Ilbert, Olivier; Pozzetti, Lucia; Zucca, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This work studies the correlation among environmental density and radio AGN presence up to $z = 2$. Using data from the photometric COSMOS survey and its radio 1.4 GHz follow-up (VLA-COSMOS), a sample of radio AGNs has been defined. The environment was studied using the richness distributions inside a parallelepiped with base side of 1 Mpc and height proportional to the photometric redshift precision. Radio AGNs are found to be always located in environments significantly richer than those around galaxies with no radio emission. Moreover, a distinction based on radio AGN power shows that the significance of the environmental effect is only maintained for low-power radio sources. The results of this work show that denser environments play a significant role in enhancing the probability that a galaxy hosts a radio AGN and, in particular, low-power ones.

  3. The VLA-COSMOS Survey: III. Further Catalog Analysis and the Radio Source Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Bondi, M; Schinnerer, E; Smolcic, V; Jahnke, K; Carilli, C; Zamorani, G

    2008-01-01

    The VLA-COSMOS Large Project has imaged the 2 sq.deg. COSMOS field with a resolution of 1.5 arcsec and a sensitivity of about 11 microJy (1 sigma) yielding to a catalog of about 3600 radio sources. In this paper we present a further analysis of the VLA-COSMOS Large Project catalog of radio sources aimed to: 1) quantify and correct for the effect of bandwidth smearing in the catalog, 2) determine the incompleteness produced by the noise bias and the resolution bias in the new catalog and 3) derive the radio source counts at 1.4 GHz. The effect of bandwidth smearing on the radio sources in the catalog was quantified comparing the peak and total flux densities in the final mosaic and in each of the individual pointings where the source was closest to the center of the field. We find that the peak flux densities in the original VLA-COSMOS Large Project catalog have to be divided by a factor about 0.8 or 0.9, depending on the distance from the mosaic center. The completeness of the radio catalog has been tested us...

  4. MERLIN and VLA Observations of VII Zw 19: Distant Cousin of M82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sara C.; Garrington, S. T.; Turner, Jean L.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2004-10-01

    We have observed the starburst dwarf galaxy VII Zw 19 at subarcsecond resolution with MERLIN and MERLIN+European VLBI Network (EVN) at 18 cm, with MERLIN at 6 cm, and with the Very Large Array (VLA) in the A configuration at 6 and 2 cm. The galaxy is detected at all VLA wavelengths and is resolved. It is also resolved at 18 cm by MERLIN but is not detected by the EVN or by MERLIN at 6 cm. VII Zw 19 has a complex structure of nonthermal radio emission at 18 cm extended over ~1200-1800 pc (4"-6"). That the EVN did not detect this emission indicates that there are no obvious point sources that could be radio supernovae. The 2 cm emission, predominantly thermal free-free emission, has a markedly different spatial distribution from the nonthermal emission. The radio colors show that the galaxy contains numerous supernova remnants, as well as many young H II regions, many of which are optically thick at 6 cm. Two extended regions of 2 cm emission have little 18 cm flux and are probably emission from young star clusters. VII Zw 19 resembles M82 in its radio and infrared spectrum, but the starburst region in VII Zw 19 is twice the size of the one in M82 and twice as luminous.

  5. VLA Observations of Solar Decimetric Spike Bursts: Direct Signature of Accelerated Electrons in Reconnection Outflow Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Bastian, T.; Gary, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Solar decimetric spike bursts, which appear in a radio dynamic spectrum as a cluster of short-lived and narrowband brightenings, have been suggested as a possible signature of many, "elementary" particle accelerations at or near a magnetic reconnection site. Their dynamic spectral feature can be potentially used to diagnose important parameters of the reconnection site such as plasma density and spatial size of the fragmentation. Yet direct observational evidence supporting this scenario has been elusive mainly due to the lack of imaging observations. The upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) provides the first opportunity of performing simultaneous radio imaging and dynamic spectroscopy, which allows radio sources to be imaged at every spatio-temporal pixel in the dynamic spectrum. Here we report Jansky VLA observations of decimetric spike bursts recorded during an eruptive solar limb flare. Combined with EUV and X-ray data from SDO and RHESSI, we show that the spike bursts coincide spatially with a loop-top hard X-ray source, which are located in a region where supra-arcade downflows meet the underlying hot, EUV/X-ray loops. We interpret the observed spike bursts as a direct signature of non-thermal electrons accelerated by turbulences and/or shocks in the reconnection outflow region.

  6. VLA observations of the "water fountain" IRAS 16552-3050

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez, Olga; Gómez, J. F.; Miranda, L. F.

    2008-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the water maser emission towards IRAS 16552-3050. The maser emission shows a velocity spread of ~170 km/s, and a bipolar distribution with a separation between the red and blueshifted groups of ~0.08". These observations and the likely post-AGB nature of the source indicate that IRAS 16552-3050 can be considered as a member of the "water fountain" class of sources (evolved stars showing H2O maser emission with a velocity spread $\\ga$ 100 km/s,...

  7. THE ABUNDANCE OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES. I. VLA SURVEY OF 52 SOURCES WITH OFF-AXIS DISTORTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David H.; Cohen, Jake P.; Lu, Jing [Department of Physics MS-057, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02454-0911 (United States); Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi, E-mail: roberts@brandeis.edu [Raman Research Institute, C. V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Cheung identified a sample of 100 candidate X-shaped radio galaxies using the NRAO FIRST survey; these are small-axial-ratio extended radio sources with off-axis emission. Here, we present radio images of 52 of these sources that have been made from archival Very Large Array data with resolution of about 1″. Fifty-one of the 52 were observed at 1.4 GHz, 7 were observed at 1.4 and 5 GHz, and 1 was observed only at 5 GHz. We also present overlays of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey red images for 48 of the sources, and DSS II overlays for the remainder. Optical counterparts have been identified for most sources, but there remain a few empty fields. Our higher resolution VLA images along with FIRST survey images of the sources in the sample reveal that extended extragalactic radio sources with small axial ratios are largely (60%) cases of double radio sources with twin lobes that have off-axis extensions, usually with inversion-symmetric structure. The available radio images indicate that at most 20% of sources might be genuine X-shaped radio sources that could have formed by a restarting of beams in a new direction following an interruption and axis flip. The remaining 20% are in neither of these categories. The implications of this result for the gravitational wave background are discussed in Roberts et al.

  8. The VLA-COSMOS Survey: V. 324 MHz continuum observations

    CERN Document Server

    Smolcic, Vernesa; Jelic, Vibor; Bondi, Marco; Schinnerer, Eva; Carilli, Chris L; Riechers, Dominik A; Salvato, Mara; Brkovic, Alen; Capak, Peter; Ilbert, Olivier; Karim, Alexander; McCracken, Henry; Scoville, Nick Z

    2014-01-01

    We present 90 cm VLA imaging of the COSMOS field, comprising a circular area of 3.14 square degrees at 8.0"x6.0" angular resolution with an average rms of 0.5 mJy/beam. The extracted catalog contains 182 sources (down to 5.5sigma), 30 of which are multi-component sources. Using Monte Carlo artificial source simulations we derive the completeness of the catalog, and we show that our 90 cm source counts agree very well with those from previous studies. Using X-ray, NUV-NIR and radio COSMOS data to investigate the population mix of our 90 cm radio sample, we find that our sample is dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN). The average 90-20 cm spectral index (S_nu~nu**alpha, where S_nu is the flux density at frequency nu, and alpha the spectral index) of our 90 cm selected sources is -0.70, with an interquartile range of -0.90 to -0.53. Only a few ultra-steep-spectrum sources are present in our sample, consistent with results in the literature for similar fields. Our data do not show clear steepening of the spe...

  9. MERLIN and VLA Observations of VII Zw 19: Distant Cousin of M82

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, S C; Turner, J L; Van Dyk, S D

    2004-01-01

    We have observed the starburst dwarf galaxy VII Zw 19 at subarcsecond resolution with the MERLIN and MERLIN+EVN networks at 18 cm, with MERLIN at 6 cm, and with the VLA in A array at 6 and 2 cm. The galaxy is detected at all VLA wavelengths and is resolved. It is also resolved at 18 cm by MERLIN, but is not detected by the EVN nor by MERLIN at 6 cm. VII Zw 19 has a complex structure of nonthermal radio emission at 18 cm extended over ~1200-1800 pc (4-6''). That the EVN did not detect this emission indicates that there are no obvious point sources that could be radio supernovae. The 2 cm emission, predominantly thermal free-free emission, has a markedly different spatial distribution from the nonthermal emission. The radio colors show that the galaxy contains numerous supernova remnants, as well as many young HII regions, many of which are optically thick at 6 cm. Two extended regions of 2 cm emission have little 18 cm flux and are probably emission from young star clusters. VII Zw 19 resembles M82 in its radi...

  10. Dual frequency observations of flares with the VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulk, G. A.; Bastian, T. S.; Hurford, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Observations are presented of two subflares near the limb on 21 and 22 November 1981 and an M7.7 flare on 8 May 1981 made at 5 and 15 GHz using the VLA. One of the November flares produced no 5 GHz radiation, while the 15 GHz radiation in the other flare emanated from a source which was smaller, lower, and displaced from the 5 GHz source. The flare occurring on 8 May was intense and complex, and contained two or more sources at both 5 and 15 GHz. Prior to the peak of the flare, the sources were found to grow in size, after which time only weak subsources were visible to the VLA. These subsources were found to be located between or at the edge of the H-alpha ribbons and the two hard X-ray sources imaged by the Hinotori satellite. Highly polarized, bursty radiation was observed at 1 and 2 GHz, which indicated that an electron-cyclotron maser operated during the flare. The maximum field strength in flaring loops is estimated to be 360-600 gauss.

  11. ALMA and VLA Observations of Proplyd Candidates near Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Cotton, William D.; Royster, Marc; Kunneriath, Devaky; Wardle, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Wootten, Al; Schoedel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Using the VLA, we recently detected a large number of protoplanetary disk (proplyd) candidates lying within a couple of light years of the massive black hole Sgr A*. The bow-shock appearance of proplyd candidates point toward the young massive stars located near Sgr A*. Similar to Orion proplyds, the strong UV radiation from the cluster of massive stars at the Galactic center is expected to photoevaporate and photoionize the circumstellar disks around young, low mass stars, thus allowing detection of the ionized outflows. To confirm this interpretation, ALMA observations detect millimeter emission at 226 GHz from five proplyd candidates that had been detected at 44 and 34 GHz with the VLA. We determine the mass of protoplanetary disks from cool dust emission. These measurements show the presence of on-going star formation with the implication that gas clouds can survive near Sgr A* and the relative importance of high vs low-mass star formation in the strong tidal and radiation fields of the Galactic center.

  12. The Abundance of X-Shaped Radio Sources I. VLA Survey of 52 Sources With Off-Axis Distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, David H; Lu, Jing; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Cheung (2007) identified a sample of 100 candidate X-shaped radio galaxies using the NRAO FIRST survey; these are small-axial-ratio extended radio sources with off-axis emission. Here we present radio images of 52 of these sources that have been made from archival Very Large Array data with resolution of about 1 arcsec. Fifty-one of the 52 were observed at 1.4 GHz, seven were observed at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz, and one was observed only at 5 GHz. We also present overlays of the SDSS red images for 41 of the sources, and DSS II overlays for the remainder. Optical counterparts have been identified for most sources, but there remain a few empty fields. Our higher resolution VLA images along with FIRST survey images of the sources in the sample reveal that extended extragalactic radio sources with small axial ratios are largely (60%) cases of double radio sources with twin lobes that have off-axis extensions, usually with inversion-symmetric structure. The available radio images indicate that at most 20% sources might...

  13. The VVDS-VLA Deep Field - IV: Radio-optical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Bardelli, S; Bolzonella, M; Ciliegi, P; Gregorini, L; Zamorani, G; Bondi, M; Zanichelli, A; Tresse, L; Vergani, D; Gavignaud, I; Bongiorno, A; Bottini, D; Garilli, B; Le Brun, V; Le Fèvre, O; MacCagni, D; Scaramella, R; Scodeggio, M; Vettolani, G; Adami, C; Arnouts, S; Cappi, A; Charlot, S; Contini, T; Foucaud, S; Franzetti, P; Guzzo, L; Ilbert, O; Iovino, A; Lamareille, F; McCracken, H J; Marano, B; Marinoni, C; Mazure, A; Meneux, B; Merighi, R; Paltani, S; Pello`, R; Pollo, A; Pozzetti, L; Radovich, M; Abbas, U; Brinchmann, J; Cucciati, O; De la Torre, S; de Ravel, L; Memeo, P; Pérez-Montero, E; Mellier, Y; Merluzzi, P; Temporin, S; De Ruiter, H R; Parma, P

    2008-01-01

    (abridged) We use the 1.4 GHz VIMOS-VLA Deep Survey and the optical VVDS and the CFHT-LS to compare the properties of radio loud galaxies with respect to the whole population of optical galaxies. The availability of multiband photometry and high quality photometric redshifts allows to derive rest frame colors and radio luminosity functions down to a limit of a B rest-frame magnitude of M=-20. Galaxy properties and luminosity functions (LFs) are estimated up to z~1 for radio loud and radio quiet early and late type galaxies. Radio loud late type galaxies are redder than radio quiet objects of the same class and this is an effect related to the presence of more dust in stronger star forming galaxies. Moreover, we estimate optical LFs, stellar masses and star formation rate distributions for radio sources and compare them with those derived for a well defined control sample, finding that the probability for a galaxy to be a radio emitter significantly increases at high values of these parameters. Radio loud earl...

  14. Radio and Optical Observations of DG Tau B

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, Luis F; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis A; Raga, Alejandro C; Cantó, Jorge; Riera, Angels

    2012-01-01

    DG Tau B is a Class I young stellar source that drives the asymmetric HH 159 bipolar jet. At optical wavelengths it is obscured by circumstellar optically-thick material. Using VLA and JVLA observations, we determine for the first time the proper motions of this source and find them to be consistent, within error, with those of the nearby young star DG Tau. We also discuss an ejection event that is evident in the 1994 VLA data. As the optical and molecular outflows, this ejection traced in the radio continuum is markedly asymmetric and was detected only to the NW of the star. We propose that this knot, no longer detectable in the radio, could be observed in future optical images of DG Tau B. The positions of the VLA source and of a nearby infrared object are not coincident and we suggest that the VLA source traces the exciting object, while the infrared source could be a reflection lobe.

  15. Properties and environment of Radio Emitting Galaxies in the VLA-zCOSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bardelli, S; Smolcic, V; Zamorani, G; Zucca, E; Mignoli, M; Halliday, C; Kovac, K; Ciliegi, P; Caputi, K; Koekemoer, A M; Bongiorno, A; Bondi, M; Bolzonella, M; Vergani, D; Pozzetti, L; Carollo, C M; Contini, T; Kneib, J -P; LeFevre, O; Lilly, S; Mainieri, V; Renzini, A; Scodeggio, M; Coppa, G; Cucciati, O; delaTorre, S; deRavel, L; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Iovino, A; Kampczyk, P; Knobel, C; Lamareille, F; LeBorgne, J -F; Le Brun, V; Maier, C; Pello`, R; Peng, Y; Pérez-Montero, E; Ricciardelli, E; Silverman, J D; Tanaka, M; Tasca, L; Tresse, L; Abbas, U; Bottini, D; Cappi, A; Cassata, P; Cimatti, A; Guzzo, L; Leauthaud, A; MacCagni, D; Marinoni, C; McCracken, H J; Memeo, P; Meneux, B; Oesch, P; Porciani, C; Scaramella, R; Capak, P; Sanders, D; Scoville, N; Taniguchi, Y; Jahnke, K

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the properties and the environment of radio sources with optical counterpart from the combined VLA-COSMOS and zCOSMOS samples. The advantage of this sample is the availability of optical spectroscopic information, high quality redshifts, and accurate density determination. By comparing the star formation rates estimated from the optical spectral energy distribution with those based on the radio luminosity, we divide the radio sources in three families, passive AGN, non-passive AGN and star forming galaxies. These families occupy specific regions of the 8.0-4.5 $\\mu$m infrared color--specific star formation plane, from which we extract the corresponding control samples. Only the passive AGN have a significantly different environment distribution from their control sample. The fraction of radio-loud passive AGN increases from ~2% in underdense regions to ~15% for overdensities (1+delta) greater than 10. This trend is also present as a function of richness of the groups hosting the radio sources. ...

  16. Simultaneous Chandra, CSO and VLA Observations of Sgr A*: The Nature of Flaring Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Heinke, C; Dowell, C D; Roberts, D; Baganoff, F K; Bower, G C

    2007-01-01

    Sgr A*, the massive black hole at the center of the Galaxy, varies in radio through X-ray emission on hourly time scales. The flare activity is thought to arise from the innermost region of an accretion flow onto Sgr A*. We present simultaneous light curves of Sgr A* in radio, sub-mm and X-rays that show a possible time delay of 110$\\pm17$ minutes between X-ray and 850 $\\mu$m suggesting that the sub-mm flare emission is optically thick. At radio wavelengths, we detect time lags of of $20.4\\pm6.8, 30\\pm12$ and 20$\\pm6$ minutes between the flare peaks observed at 13 and 7 mm in three different epochs using the VLA. Linear polarization of 1$\\pm0.2$% and 0.7$\\pm0.1$% is detected at 7 and 13 mm, respectively, when averaged over the entire observation on 2006 July 17. A simple picture of an expanding bubble of synchrotron emitting hot plasma can explain the time delay between various wavelengths, the asymmetric shape of the light curves, and the observed polarization of the flare emission at 43 and 22 GHz. The deri...

  17. A VLA Survey For Faint Compact Radio Sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Sheehan, Patrick D; Mann, Rita K; Williams, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    We present Karl G. Janksy Very Large Array (VLA) 1.3 cm, 3.6 cm, and 6 cm continuum maps of compact radio sources in the Orion Nebular Cluster. We mosaicked 34 square arcminutes at 1.3 cm, 70 square arcminutes at 3.6 cm and 109 square arcminutes at 6 cm, containing 778 near-infrared detected YSOs and 190 HST-identified proplyds (with significant overlap between those characterizations). We detected radio emission from 175 compact radio sources in the ONC, including 26 sources that were detected for the first time at these wavelengths. For each detected source we fit a simple free-free and dust emission model to characterize the radio emission. We extrapolate the free-free emission spectrum model for each source to ALMA bands to illustrate how these measurements could be used to correctly measure protoplanetary disk dust masses from sub-millimeter flux measurements. Finally, we compare the fluxes measured in this survey with previously measured fluxes for our targets, as well as four separate epochs of 1.3 cm ...

  18. High spatial resolution VLA observations of the R Aquarii jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafatos, M.; Hollis, J. M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    The Very Large Array was used to observe the jet feature of the symbiotic variable R Aquarii. A steady emission at 6 cm was confirmed for the past year, with the jet located 6.4 arcsec from R Aquarii at 29.3 deg PA. A velocity for the jet has been calculated as 40 km/sec, and may be accompanied by an ejection velocity in the range of 760-1800 km/sec. Since R Aquarii is the closest known object with a jet, further monitoring is recommended in order to detect any episodic mass transfer in what may be a binary system. The mass transfer, monitored at various wavelengths, would account for the observed optical and radio properties.

  19. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUADRUPLE LENS 1608+656

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SNELLEN, IAG; DEBRUYN, AG; SCHILIZZI, RT; MILEY, GK; MYERS, ST

    1995-01-01

    VLA observations at 8.4 and 15 GHz of a sample of 119 inverted-spectrum radio sources revealed that one object, 1608+656, consists of four components in a configuration suggestive of gravitational lensing. The maximum separation between individual components is 2''.1. An independent discovery of thi

  20. A CHANDRA-VLA INVESTIGATION OF THE X-RAY CAVITY SYSTEM AND RADIO MINI-HALO IN THE GALAXY CLUSTER RBS 797

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Alberto [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Gitti, Myriam; Brighenti, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Ettori, Stefano [Astronomical Observatory of Bologna-INAF, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We present a study of the cavity system in the galaxy cluster RBS 797 based on Chandra and Very Large Array (VLA) data. RBS 797 (z = 0.35) is one of the most distant galaxy clusters in which two pronounced X-ray cavities have been discovered. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a cool core and indicate a higher metallicity along the cavity directions. This is likely due to the active galactic nucleus outburst, which lifts cool metal-rich gas from the center along the cavities, as seen in other systems. We find indications that the cavities are hotter than the surrounding gas. Moreover, the new Chandra images show bright rims contrasting with the deep, X-ray deficient cavities. The likely cause is that the expanding 1.4 GHz radio lobes have displaced the gas, compressing it into a shell that appears as bright cool arms. Finally, we show that the large-scale radio emission detected with our VLA observations may be classified as a radio mini-halo, powered by the cooling flow, as it nicely follows the trend P{sub radio} versus P{sub CF} predicted by the reacceleration model.

  1. A Chandra - VLA Investigation of the X-ray Cavity System and Radio Mini-Halo in the Galaxy Cluster RBS 797

    CERN Document Server

    Doria, Alberto; Ettori, Stefano; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Nulsen, Paul E J; McNamara, Brian R

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the cavity system in the galaxy cluster RBS 797 based on Chandra and VLA data. RBS 797 (z = 0.35), is one of the most distant galaxy clusters in which two pronounced X-ray cavities have been discovered. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a cool core and indicate an higher metallicity along the cavity directions. This is likely due to the AGN outburst, which lifts cool metal-rich gas from the center along the cavities, as seen in other systems. We find indications that the cavities are hotter than the surrounding gas. Moreover, the new Chandra images show bright rims contrasting with the deep, X-ray deficient cavities. The likely cause is that the expanding 1.4 GHz radio lobes have displaced the gas, compressing it into a shell that appears as bright cool arms. Finally we show that the large-scale radio emission detected with our VLA observations may be classified as a radio mini-halo, powered by the cooling flow (CF), as it nicely follows the trend P_radio vs. P_CF predicted by the...

  2. Wideband VLA Observations of Abell 2256 I: Continuum, Rotation Measure and Spectral Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Frazer; Eilek, Jean; Rau, Urvashi; Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Kogan, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    We report new observations of Abell 2256 with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at frequencies between 1 and 8 GHz. These observations take advantage of the 2:1 bandwidths available for a single observation to study the spectral index, polarization and Rotation Measure as well as using the associated higher sensitivity to image total intensity features down to ~0.5" resolution. We find the Large Relic, which dominates the cluster, is made up of a complex of filaments which show correlated distributions in intensity, spectral index, and fractional polarization. The Rotation Measure varies across the face of the Large Relic but is not well correlated with the other properties of the source. The shape of individual filaments suggests that the Large Relic is at least 25 kpc thick. We detect a low surface brightness arc connecting the Large Relic to the Halo and other radio structures suggesting a physical connection between these features. The center of the F-complex is dominated by a very steep-spectrum,...

  3. XMM-Newton and VLA Observations of the Variable Wolf-Rayet Star EZ CMa Evidence for a Close Companion?

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, S L; Güdel, M; Schmutz, W

    2002-01-01

    We present new X-ray and radio observations of the WR star EZ CMa (HD 50896) obtained with XMM-Newton and the VLA. This WN4 star shows optical/UV variability at a period of 3.76 d whose cause is unknown. VLA flux measurements at five frequencies show the radio spectral energy distribution is well-described by a power law with spectral index +0.69 (+-0.05), as expected for free-free wind emission. The derived ionized mass loss rate allowing for distance uncertainties is M(dot) = 3.8 (+-2.6)e-5 M_sun/yr. The CCD X-ray spectra show prominent Si XIII and S XV emission lines and can be acceptably modeled as an absorbed multi-temperature optically thin plasma. Nonsolar abundances are inferred with Fe notably deficient. The X-ray emission is dominated by cool plasma at kT_cool = 0.6 keV, but a harder component is also detected with a derived temperature kT_hot = 3.0 - 4.2 keV if the emission is thermal. This is too high to be explained by radiative wind shock models and the luminosity of the hard component is 3 orde...

  4. 3D reconstruction methods of coronal structures by radio observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; White, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to carry out the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of structures in the solar corona would represent a major advance in the study of the physical properties in active regions and in flares. Methods which allow a geometric reconstruction of quasistationary coronal structures (for example active region loops) or dynamic structures (for example flaring loops) are described: stereoscopy of multi-day imaging observations by the VLA (Very Large Array); tomography of optically thin emission (in radio or soft x-rays); multifrequency band imaging by the VLA; and tracing of magnetic field lines by propagating electron beams.

  5. VLA and GBT Observations of Orion B (NGC 2024, W12) : Photo-dissociation Region Properties and Magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Roshi, D Anish; Jeyakumar, S

    2014-01-01

    We present images of C110$\\alpha$ and H110$\\alpha$ radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 4.8 GHz and images of H166$\\alpha$, C166$\\alpha$ and X166$\\alpha$ RRL emission at 1.4 GHz, observed toward the starforming region NGC 2024. The 1.4 GHz image with angular resolution $\\sim$ 70\\arcsec\\ is obtained using VLA data. The 4.8 GHz image with angular resolution $\\sim$ 17\\arcsec\\ is obtained by combining VLA and GBT data. The similarity of the LSR velocity (10.3 \\kms\\) of the C110$\\alpha$ line to that of lines observed from molecular material located at the far side of the \\HII\\ region suggests that the photo dissociation region (PDR) responsible for C110$\\alpha$ line emission is at the far side. The LSR velocity of C166$\\alpha$ is 8.8 \\kms. This velocity is comparable with the velocity of molecular absorption lines observed from the foreground gas, suggesting that the PDR is at the near side of the \\HII\\ region. Non-LTE models for carbon line forming regions are presented. Typical properties of the foreground...

  6. Simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and Very Large Array (VLA) observations of solar active regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Very Large Array observations at 20 cm wavelength can detect the hot coronal plasma previously observed at soft x ray wavelengths. Thermal cyclotron line emission was detected at the apex of coronal loops where the magnetic field strength is relatively constant. Detailed comparison of simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Satellite and VLA data indicate that physical parameters such as electron temperature, electron density, and magnetic field strength can be obtained, but that some coronal loops remain invisible in either spectral domain. The unprecedent spatial resolution of the VLA at 20 cm wavelength showed that the precursor, impulsive, and post-flare components of solar bursts originate in nearby, but separate loops or systems of loops.. In some cases preburst heating and magnetic changes are observed from loops tens of minutes prior to the impulsive phase. Comparisons with soft x ray images and spectra and with hard x ray data specify the magnetic field strength and emission mechanism of flaring coronal loops. At the longer 91 cm wavelength, the VLA detected extensive emission interpreted as a hot 10(exp 5) K interface between cool, dense H alpha filaments and the surrounding hotter, rarefield corona. Observations at 91 cm also provide evidence for time-correlated bursts in active regions on opposite sides of the solar equator; they are attributed to flare triggering by relativistic particles that move along large-scale, otherwise-invisible, magnetic conduits that link active regions in opposite hemispheres of the Sun.

  7. 20 cm VLA radio-continuum study of M31-images and point source catalogues DR2: Extraction of a supernova remnant sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvin T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Data Release 2 of the Point Source Catalogue created from a series of previously constructed radio-continuum images of M31 at λ=20 cm (v=1.4 GHz from archived VLA observations. In total, we identify a collection of 916 unique discrete radio sources across the field of M31. Comparing these detected sources to those listed by Gelfand et al. (2004 at λ=92 cm, the spectral index of 98 sources has been derived. The majority (73% of these sources exhibit a spectral index of α<-0.6, indicating that their emission is predominantly non-thermal in nature, which is typical for background objects and Supernova Remnants (SNRs. Additionally, we investigate the presence of radio counterparts for some 156 SNRs and SNR candidates, finding a total of only 13 of these objects in our images within a 500 search area. Auxiliary optical, radio and X-ray catalogues were cross referenced highlighting a small population of SNRs and SNR candidates common to multi frequency domains.

  8. 20 cm VLA Radio-Continuum Study of M31 - Images and Point Source Catalogues DR2: Extraction of a supernova remnant sample

    CERN Document Server

    Galvin, T J

    2014-01-01

    We present Data Release 2 of the Point Source Catalogue created from a series of previously constructed radio-continuum images of M31 at lambda=20 cm (nu=1.4 GHz) from archived VLA observations. In total, we identify a collection of 916 unique discrete radio sources across the field of M31. Comparing these detected sources to those listed by Gelfand et al. (2004) at lambda=92 cm, the spectral index of 98 sources has been derived. The majority (73%) of these sources exhibit a spectral index of alpha <-0.6, indicating that their emission is predominantly non-thermal in nature, which is typical for background objects and Supernova Remnants (SNRs). Additionally, we investigate the presence of radio counterparts for some 156 SNRs and SNR candidates, finding a total of only 13 of these object in our images within a 5 arcsec search area. Auxiliary optical, radio and X-ray catalogs were cross referenced highlighting a small population of SNR and SNR candidates common to multi-frequency domains.

  9. Identifying Hidden Supernova Remnants in M83 with the VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Bradley; Stockdale, Christopher; Blair, William P.; Cowan, John J.; Godfrey, Leith; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Maddox, Larry A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pritchard, Tyler A.; Soria, Roberto; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2017-01-01

    We present results of our analysis of C and L band observations of the grand design spiral galaxy, M83 made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). With recent optical (HST) and X-ray (Chandra) observations and utilizing the newly expanded bandwidth of the VLA, we are exploring the radio spectral properties of the historical radio point sources in M83 and have discovered more than 250 discrete radio sources. These observations allow us to probe the evolution of supernova remnants (SNRs) and to find previously undiscovered SNRs. These observations represent the fourth epoch of deep VLA observations of M83. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities.

  10. The VLA-COSMOS Perspective on the IR-Radio Relation. I. New Constraints on Selection Biases and the Non-Evolution of the IR/Radio Properties of Star Forming and AGN Galaxies at Intermediate and High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Sargent, Mark T; Murphy, E; Aussel, H; Le Floc'h, E; Frayer, D T; Martínez-Sansigre, A; Oesch, P; Salvato, M; Smolcic, V; Zamorani, G; Brusa, M; Cappelluti, N; Carollo, C M; Ilbert, O; Kartaltepe, J; Koekemoer, A M; Lilly, S J; Sanders, D B; Scoville, N Z

    2010-01-01

    VLA 1.4 GHz (rms noise ~0.012 mJy) and MIPS 24 and 70 micron (rms noise ~0.02 and ~1.7 mJy, respectively) observations covering the 2 square degree COSMOS field are combined with an extensive multi-wavelength data set to study the evolution of the IR-radio relation at intermediate and high redshift. With ~4500 sources -- of which ~30% have spectroscopic redshifts -- the current sample is significantly larger than previous ones used for the same purpose. Both monochromatic IR/radio flux ratios (q24 & q70), as well as the ratio of the total IR and the 1.4 GHz luminosity (qTIR) are used as indicators for the IR/radio properties of star forming galaxies and AGN. Using a sample jointly selected at IR and radio wavelengths in order to reduce selection biases, we provide firm support for previous findings that the IR-radio relation remains unchanged out to at least z~1.4. Moreover, based on data from ~150 objects we also find that the local relation likely still holds at 2.5

  11. ALMA and VLA observations of the outflows in IRAS 16293-2422

    CERN Document Server

    Loinard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Luis F; Pech, Gerardo; Chandler, Claire J; Brogan, Crystal L; Wilner, David J; Ho, Paul T P; Parise, Berengere; Hartmann, Lee W; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Takahashi, Satoko; Trejo, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    We present ALMA and VLA observations of the molecular and ionized gas at 0.1-0.3 arcsec resolution in the Class 0 protostellar system IRAS 16293-2422. These data clarify the origins of the protostellar outflows from the deeply embedded sources in this complex region. Source A2 is confirmed to be at the origin of the well known large scale north-east--south-west flow. The most recent VLA observations reveal a new ejection from that protostar, demonstrating that it drives an episodic jet. The central compact part of the other known large scale flow in the system, oriented roughly east-west, is well delineated by the CO(6-5) emission imaged with ALMA and is confirmed to be driven from within component A. Finally, a one-sided blueshifted bubble-like outflow structure is detected here for the first time from source B to the north-west of the system. Its very short dynamical timescale (~ 200 yr), low velocity, and moderate collimation support the idea that source B is the youngest object in the system, and possibly...

  12. The Lyman Alpha Reference Sample: III. Properties of the Neutral ISM from GBT and VLA Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Pardy, Stephen A; Östlin, Göran; Hayes, Matthew; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger; Sandberg, Andreas; Adamo, Angela; Freeland, Emily; Heren, E Christian; Guaita, Lucia; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Mas-Hesse, J M; Melinder, Jens; Orlitová, Ivana; Otí-Floranes, Héctor; Puschnig, Johannes; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We present new H I imaging and spectroscopy of the 14 UV-selected star-forming galaxies in the Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS), aimed for a detailed study of the processes governing the production, propagation, and escape of Ly$\\alpha$ photons. New H I spectroscopy, obtained with the 100m Green Bank Telescope (GBT), robustly detects the H I spectral line in 11 of the 14 observed LARS galaxies (although the profiles of two of the galaxies are likely confused by other sources within the GBT beam); the three highest redshift galaxies are not detected at our current sensitivity limits. The GBT profiles are used to derive fundamental H I line properties of the LARS galaxies. We also present new pilot H I spectral line imaging of 5 of the LARS galaxies obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). This imaging localizes the H I gas and provides a measurement of the total H I mass in each galaxy. In one system, LARS 03 (UGC 8335 or Arp 238), VLA observations reveal an enormous tidal structure that ext...

  13. A Keplerian disk around a Class 0 source: ALMA observations of VLA1623A

    CERN Document Server

    Murillo, Nadia M; Bruderer, Simon; Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2013-01-01

    Context: Rotationally supported disks are critical in the star formation process. The questions of when do they form and what factors influence or hinder their formation have been studied but are largely unanswered. Observations of early stage YSOs are needed to probe disk formation. Aims: VLA1623 is a triple non-coeval protostellar system, with a weak magnetic field perpendicular to the outflow, whose Class 0 component, VLA1623A, shows a disk-like structure in continuum with signatures of rotation in line emission. We aim to determine whether this structure is in part or in whole a rotationally supported disk, i.e. a Keplerian disk, and what are its characteristics. Methods: ALMA Cycle 0 Early Science 1.3 mm continuum and C$^{18}$O (2-1) observations in the extended configuration are presented here and used to perform an analysis of the disk-like structure using PV diagrams and thin disk modelling with the addition of foreground absorption. Results: The PV diagrams of the C$^{18}$O line emission suggest the ...

  14. Radio continuum of galaxies with H2O megamaser disks: 33 GHz VLA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, F.; Henkel, C.; Brunthaler, A.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Menten, K. M.; Braatz, J. A.; Greene, J. E.; Reid, M. J.; Condon, J. J.; Lo, K. Y.; Kuo, C. Y.; Litzinger, E.; Kadler, M.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Galaxies with H2O megamaser disks are active galaxies in whose edge-on accretion disks 22 GHz H2O maser emission has been detected. Because their geometry is known, they provide a unique view into the properties of active galactic nuclei. Aims: The goal of this work is to investigate the nuclear environment of galaxies with H2O maser disks and to relate the maser and host galaxy properties to those of the radio continuum emission of the galaxy. Methods: The 33 GHz (9 mm) radio continuum properties of 24 galaxies with reported 22 GHz H2O maser emission from their disks are studied in the context of the multiwavelength view of these sources. The 29-37 GHz Ka-band observations are made with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array in B, CnB, or BnA configurations, achieving a resolution of 0.2-0.5 arcsec. Hard X-ray data from the Swift/BAT survey and 22 μm infrared data from WISE, 22 GHz H2O maser data and 1.4 GHz data from NVSS and FIRST surveys are also included in the analysis. Results: Eighty-seven percent (21 out of 24) galaxies in our sample show 33 GHz radio continuum emission at levels of 4.5-240σ. Five sources show extended emission (deconvolved source size larger than 2.5 times the major axis of the beam), including one source with two main components and one with three main components. The remaining detected 16 sources (and also some of the above-mentioned targets) exhibit compact cores within the sensitivity limits. Little evidence is found for extended jets (>300 pc) in most sources. Either they do not exist, or our chosen frequency of 33 GHz is too high for a detection of these supposedly steep spectrum features. In NGC 4388, we find an extended jet-like feature that appears to be oriented perpendicular to the H2O megamaser disk. NGC 2273 is another candidate whose radio continuum source might be elongated perpendicular to the maser disk. Smaller 100-300 pc sized jets might also be present, as is suggested by the beam-deconvolved morphology of our

  15. Science with a Next-Generation VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Eric J.; Carilli, Chris Luke; ngVLA Science Working Groups

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by dramatic discoveries from the Jansky VLA and ALMA, a plan has been initiated to pursue a future large area radio interferometer that will open new discovery space from proto-planetary disks to distant galaxies. Building on the superb cm observing conditions and existing infrastructure of the VLA site, the current vision of ngVLA is an interferometric array with more than 10 times the effective collecting area and 10 times higher spatial resolution than the current VLA and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) that will operate at frequencies spanning ~1.2-116GHz. The ngVLA is optimized for observations at wavelengths between the exquisite performance of ALMA at submm wavelengths, and the future SKA-1 at few centimeter and longer wavelengths, thus lending itself to be highly complementary with these facilities. As such, the ngVLA will open a new window on the universe through ultra-sensitive imaging of thermal line and continuum emission down to milliarcecond resolution, as well as deliver unprecedented broad band continuum polarimetric imaging of non-thermal processes. The ngVLA will be the only facility in the world that can tackle a broad range of outstanding scientific questions in modern astronomy by simultaneously delivering the capability to: directly image planet formation in the terrestrial-zone; map dust-obscured star formation and the cosmic baryon cycle down to pc-scales out to the Virgo cluster; take a cosmic census of the molecular gas which fuels star formation back to first light and cosmic reionization; and carry out novel techniques for exploring temporal phenomena from milliseconds to years. In this poster we highlight a number of the tranformative science cases that are driving the design of the ngVLA.

  16. VLA observations of ammonia in high-mass star formation regions

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Xing; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Wang, Junzhi; Gu, Qiusheng

    2014-01-01

    We report systematic mapping observations of the NH$_{3}$ (1,1) and (2,2) inversion lines towards 62 high-mass star-forming regions using VLA in its D and DnC array configurations. The VLA images cover a spatial dynamic range from 40$"$ to 3$"$, allowing us to trace gas kinematics from $\\sim$1 pc scales to $\\lesssim$0.1 pc scales. Based on the NH$_3$ morphology and the infrared nebulosity on 1\\,pc scales, we categorize three sub-classes in the sample: filaments, hot cores, and NH$_3$ dispersed sources. The ubiquitous gas filaments found on 1 pc scales have a typical width of $\\sim$0.1\\,pc and often contain regularly spaced fragments along the major axis. The spacing of the fragments and the column densities are consistent with the turbulent supported fragmentation of cylinders. Several sources show multiple filaments that converge toward a center, where the velocity field in the filaments is consistent with gas flows. We derive rotational temperature maps for the entire sample. For the three hot core sources,...

  17. ALMA and VLA Observations: Evidence for Ongoing Low-mass Star Formation near Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Cotton, W.; Wardle, M.; Royster, M. J.; Kunneriath, D.; Roberts, D. A.; Wootten, A.; Schödel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Using the VLA, we recently detected a large number of protoplanetary disk (proplyd) candidates lying within a couple of light years of the massive black hole Sgr A*. The bow-shock appearance of proplyd candidates point toward the young massive stars located near Sgr A*. Similar to Orion proplyds, the strong UV radiation from the cluster of massive stars at the Galactic center is expected to photoevaporate and photoionize the circumstellar disks around young, low mass stars, thus allowing detection of the ionized outflows from the photoionized layer surrounding cool and dense gaseous disks. To confirm this picture, ALMA observations detect millimeter emission at 226 GHz from five proplyd candidates that had been detected at 44 and 34 GHz with the VLA. We present the derived disk masses for four sources as a function of the assumed dust temperature. The mass of protoplanetary disks from cool dust emission ranges between 0.03 - 0.05 M⊙. These estimates are consistent with the disk masses found in star forming sites in the Galaxy. These measurements show the presence of on-going star formation with the implication that gas clouds can survive near Sgr A* and the relative importance of high vs low-mass star formation in the strong tidal and radiation fields of the Galactic center.

  18. Radio observations of Planck clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Ruta

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a number of new galaxy clusters have been detected by the ESA-Planck satellite, the South Pole Telescope and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Several of the newly detected clusters are massive, merging systems with disturbed morphology in the X-ray surface brightness. Diffuse radio sources in clusters, called giant radio halos and relics, are direct probes of cosmic rays and magnetic fields in the intra-cluster medium. These radio sources are found to occur mainly in massive merging clusters. Thus, the new SZ-discovered clusters are good candidates to search for new radio halos and relics. We have initiated radio observations of the clusters detected by Planck with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. These observations have already led to the detection of a radio halo in PLCKG171.9-40.7, the first giant halo discovered in one of the new Planck clusters.

  19. Comparisons of Cosmological MHD Galaxy Cluster Simulations to Radio Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Hao; Murgia, Matteo; Li, Hui; Collins, David C; Norman, Michael L; Cen, Renyue; Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Radio observations of galaxy clusters show that there are $\\mu$G magnetic fields permeating the intra-cluster medium (ICM), but it is hard to accurately constrain the strength and structure of the magnetic fields without the help of advanced computer simulations. We present qualitative comparisons of synthetic VLA observations of simulated galaxy clusters to radio observations of Faraday Rotation Measure (RM) and radio halos. The cluster formation is modeled using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with the assumption that the initial magnetic fields are injected into the ICM by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift. In addition to simulated clusters in Xu et al. (2010, 2011), we present a new simulation with magnetic field injections from multiple AGNs. We find that the cluster with multiple injection sources is magnetized to a similar level as in previous simulations with a single AGN. The RM profiles from simulated clusters, both $|RM|$ and the dispersion of RM (...

  20. A VLA (Very Large Array) Search for 5 GHz Radio Transients and Variables at Low Galactic Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Frail, D. A.; Breslauer, B.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Chandra, P.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a 5GHz survey with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the expanded VLA, designed to search for short-lived (approx 1.8mJy) = 0.039(exp +0.13,+0.18) (sub .0.032,.0.038) / sq. deg (1, 2 sigma confidence errors). This areal density is consistent with the sky surface density of transients from the Bower et al. survey extrapolated to 1.8mJy. Our observed transient areal density is consistent with a Neutron Stars (NSs) origin for these events. Furthermore, we use the data to measure the sources variability on days to years time scales, and we present the variability structure function of 5GHz sources. The mean structure function shows a fast increase on approximately 1 day time scale, followed by a slower increase on time scales of up to 10 days. On time scales between 10 - 60 days the structure function is roughly constant. We find that approx > 30% of the unresolved sources brighter than 1.8mJy are variable at the > 4-sigma confidence level, presumably due mainly to refractive scintillation.

  1. A VLA Survey for Faint Compact Radio Sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A.; Mann, Rita K.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2016-11-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 1.3, 3.6, and 6 cm continuum maps of compact radio sources in the Orion Nebular Cluster (ONC). We mosaicked 34 arcmin2 at 1.3 cm, 70 arcmin2 at 3.6 cm and 109 arcmin2 at 6 cm, containing 778 near-infrared detected young stellar objects and 190 Hubble Space Telescope-identified proplyds (with significant overlap between those characterizations). We detected radio emission from 175 compact radio sources in the ONC, including 26 sources that were detected for the first time at these wavelengths. For each detected source, we fitted a simple free-free and dust emission model to characterize the radio emission. We extrapolate the free-free emission spectrum model for each source to ALMA bands to illustrate how these measurements could be used to correctly measure protoplanetary disk dust masses from submillimeter flux measurements. Finally, we compare the fluxes measured in this survey with previously measured fluxes for our targets, as well as four separate epochs of 1.3 cm data, to search for and quantify the variability of our sources.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CHANG-ES. IV. VLA D-configuration observations (Wiegert+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, T.; Irwin, J.; Miskolczi, A.; Schmidt, P.; Mora, S. C.; Damas-Segovia, A.; Stein, Y.; English, J.; Rand, R. J.; Santistevan, I.; Walterbos, R.; Krause, M.; Beck, R.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Kepley, A.; Wezgowiec, M.; Wang, Q. D.; Heald, G.; Li, J.; MacGregor, S.; Johnson, M.; Strong, A. W.; Desouza, A.; Porter, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    This is the fourth paper in the series "Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies, an EVLA Survey" (CHANG-ES). With CHANG-ES, we have observed 35 nearby edge-on galaxies in the radio continuum in L- and C-bands (centered at approximately 1.5 and 6GHz, respectively), in three array configurations (B, C, D; in the B configuration only L-band was observed) of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (hereafter VLA). We refer to Table1 of Irwin et al. (2012AJ....144...43I; Paper I) for details of the galaxy sample. Two other papers, Irwin et al. (2012AJ....144...44I; Paper II) and Irwin et al. (2013AJ....146..164I; Paper III), present the detailed results of CHANG-ES observations of NGC 4631 and UGC 10288, respectively. In this, the fourth CHANG-ES paper, we present all observations that were carried out in the shortest baseline array configuration, D. The data products (including intensity maps, spectral index maps, and polarization maps) are part of our Data Release 1, located at http://www.queensu.ca/changes. Of the 405hr that were awarded for the entire CHANG-ES project, 65hr were set apart for the D-configuration observations in two frequency bands, L and C. The observations were divided up into 13 scheduling blocks. The bulk of the data were observed during 2011 December. Two scheduling blocks were reobserved in 2013 March. The details of the observations are presented in Table1. (5 data files).

  3. The shape of the blue\\/UV continuum of B3-VLA radio quasars Dependence on redshift, blue\\/UV luminosity and radio power

    CERN Document Server

    Carballo, R; Benn, C R; Sánchez, S F; Vigotti, M

    1999-01-01

    UBVR photometry of a sample of B3-VLA radio quasars, about 80 per cent complete, is used to analyse their spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs are generally well fitted with power-laws, with an average slope alpha=-0.39 (S_nu propto nu^alpha). Two quasars appear clearly differenciated, exhibiting redder colours that the rest, and they have redshifts z=0.50 and 1.12. Broad-band composite SEDs in the range 1300-4500 AA were obtained from the remaining quasars and they show the CIV1549 line and a break at around 3000 A, where the SED changes from alpha_blue=0.11+-0.16 at lambda>3000 A to alpha_UV=-0.66+-0.15 at lambda1.2 alpha_UV is more flat, -0.48+-0.12. A similar trend is found between alpha_UV and luminosity at 2400 A, L_2400, with luminous quasars exhibiting a bluer spectrum. In addition, an intrinsic correlation is found between L_2400 and radio power at 408 MHz. The correlations alpha_UV-z, alpha_UV-L_2400 and L_2400-z are consistent with accretion disc models with approximately constant black hol...

  4. Spitzer observations of Abell 1763 - II: Constraining the nature of activity in the cluster-feeding filament with VLA and XMM-Newton data

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, Louise O V; Frayer, David T; Neto, Gastao B Lima; Durret, Florence

    2010-01-01

    The Abell 1763 superstructure at z=0.23 contains the first galaxy filament to be directly detected using mid-infrared observations. Our previous work has shown that the frequency of starbursting galaxies, as characterized by 24{\\mu}m emission is much higher within the filament than at either the center of the rich galaxy cluster, or the field surrounding the system. New VLA and XMM-Newton data are presented here. We use the radio and X-ray data to examine the fraction and location of active galaxies, both active galactic nuclei (AGN) and starbursts. The radio far-infrared correlation, X-ray point source location, IRAC colors, and quasar positions are all used to gain an understanding of the presence of dominant AGN. We find very few MIPS-selected galaxies that are clearly dominated by AGN activity. Most radio selected members within the filament are starbursts. Within the supercluster, 3 of 8 spectroscopic members detected both in the radio and in the mid-infrared are radio-bright AGN. They are found at or ne...

  5. A new method to separate star forming from AGN galaxies at intermediate redshift: The submillijansky radio population in the VLA-COSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Smolcic, V; Scodeggio, M; Franzetti, P; Aussel, H; Bondi, M; Brusa, M; Carilli, C L; Capak, P; Charlot, S; Ciliegi, P; Ilbert, O; Ivezic, Z; Jahnke, K; McCracken, H J; Obric, M; Salvato, M; Sanders, D B; Scoville, N; Trump, J R; Tremonti, C; Tasca, L; Walcher, C J; Zamorani, G

    2008-01-01

    We explore the properties of the submillijansky radio population at 20 cm by applying a newly developed optical color-based method to separate star forming (SF) from AGN galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z1.3) galaxies. We find, for the composition of the submillijansky radio population, that SF galaxies are not the dominant population at submillijansky flux levels, as previously often assumed, but that they make up an approximately constant fraction of 30-40% in the flux density range of ~50 microJy to 0.7 mJy. In summary, based on the entire VLA-COSMOS radio population at 20 cm, we find that the radio population at these flux densities is a mixture of roughly 30-40% of SF and 50-60% of AGN galaxies, with a minor contribution (~10%) of QSOs.

  6. Hard X-ray and radio observations of Abell 754

    CERN Document Server

    Fusco-Femiano, R; Grandi, S D; Molendi, S; Feretti, L; Giovannini, G; Bacchi, M; Govoni, F

    2003-01-01

    We present a long BeppoSAX observation of Abell 754 that reports a nonthermal excess with respect to the thermal emission at energies greater than ~45 keV. A VLA radio observation at 1.4 GHz definitely confirms the existence of diffuse radio emission in the central region of the cluster, previously suggested by images at 74 and 330 MHz (Kassim et al 2001), and reports additional features. Besides, our observation determines a steeper radio halo spectrum in the 330-1400 MHz frequency range with respect to the spectrum detected at lower frequencies, indicating the presence of a spectral cutoff. The presence of a radio halo in A754, considered the prototype of a merging cluster, reinforces the link between formation of Mpc-scale radio regions and very recent or current merger processes. The radio results combined with the hard X-ray excess detected by BeppoSAX give information on the origin of the electron population responsible for nonthermal phenomena in galaxy clusters. We discuss also the possibility that 26...

  7. Dust properties across the CO snowline in the HD 163296 disk from ALMA and VLA observations

    CERN Document Server

    Guidi, G; Testi, L; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; Chandler, C J; Pérez, L; Isella, A; Natta, A; Ortolani, S; Hennings, Th; Corder, S; Linz, H; Andrews, S; Wilner, D; Ricci, L; Carpenter, J; Sargent, A; Mundy, L; Storm, S; Calvet, N; Dullemond, C; Greaves, J; Lazio, J; Deller, A; Kwon, W

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the mechanisms of planet formation it is crucial to investigate the properties and evolution of protoplanetary disks around young stars, where the initial conditions for the growth of planets are set. Our goal is to study grain growth in the disk of the young, intermediate mass star HD163296 where dust processing has already been observed, and to look for evidence of growth by ice condensation across the CO snowline, already identified in this disk with ALMA. Under the hypothesis of optically thin emission we compare images at different wavelengths from ALMA and VLA to measure the opacity spectral index across the disk and thus the maximum grain size. We also use a Bayesian tool based on a two-layer disk model to fit the observations and constrain the dust surface density. The measurements of the opacity spectral index indicate the presence of large grains and pebbles ($\\geq$1 cm) in the inner regions of the disk (inside $\\sim$50 AU) and smaller grains, consistent with ISM sizes, in the outer ...

  8. GMRT and VLA Observations at 49 cm and 20 cm of the HII Region near = 24.8°, = 0.1°

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. G. Kantharia; W. M. Goss; D. Anish Roshi; Niruj R. Mohan; Francois Viallefond

    2007-03-01

    We report multi-frequency radio continuum and hydrogen radio recombination line observations of HII regions near = 24.8°, = 0.1° using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope(GMRT) at 1.28 GHz ( = 172), 0.61 GHz ( = 220) and the Very Large Array (VLA) at 1.42 GHz ( = 166). The region consists of a large number of resolved HII regions and a few compact HII regions as seen in our continuum maps, many of which have associated infrared (IR) point sources. The largest HII region at = 24.8° and = 0.1° is a few arcmins in size and has a shell-type morphology. It is a massive HII region enclosing ∼ 550 M⊙ with a linear size of 7 pc and an rms electron density of ∼ 110 cm-3 at a kinematic distance of 6 kpc. The required ionization can be provided by a single star of spectral type O5.5. We also report detection of hydrogen recombination lines from the HII region at = 24.8° and = 0.1° at all observed frequencies near = 100 km s-1. We model the observed integrated line flux density as arising in the diffuse HII region and find that the best fitting model has an electron density comparable to that derived from the continuum.We also report detection of hydrogen recombination lines from two other HII regions in the field.

  9. CHANDRA, KECK, AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF THE CRAB NEBULA DURING THE 2011-APRIL GAMMA-RAY FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; O' Dell, Stephen L. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Office (ZP12), Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Arons, Jonathan [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Blandford, Roger; Funk, Stefan; Romani, Roger W. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Buehler, Rolf [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Caraveo, Patrizia; De Luca, Andrea [INAF-IASF Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Cheung, Chi C. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Costa, Enrico [INFN Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Ferrigno, Carlo [ISDC, Data Center for Astrophysics of the University of Geneva, chemin d' cogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Fu, Hai [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Habermehl, Moritz; Horns, Dieter [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Linford, Justin D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Lobanov, Andrei [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Max, Claire [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Mignani, Roberto [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-03-01

    We present results from our analysis of Chandra X-Ray Observatory, W. M. Keck Observatory, and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) images of the Crab Nebula that were contemporaneous with the {gamma}-ray flare of 2011 April. Despite hints in the X-ray data, we find no evidence for statistically significant variations that pinpoint the specific location of the flares within the Nebula. The Keck observations extend this conclusion to the 'inner knot', i.e., the feature within an arcsecond of the pulsar. The VLA observations support this conclusion. We also discuss theoretical implications of the {gamma}-ray flares and suggest that the most dramatic {gamma}-ray flares are due to radiation-reaction-limited synchrotron emission associated with sudden, dissipative changes in the current system sustained by the central pulsar.

  10. Deep VLA observations of nearby star forming regions I: Barnard 59 and Lupus 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzib, S. A.; Loinard, L.; Medina, S.-N. X.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Mioduszewski, A. J.; Torres, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    Barnard 59 and Lupus 1 are two nearby star-forming regions visible from the southern hemisphere. In this manuscript, we present deep (σ˜15 μJy) radio observations (ν=6 GHz) of these regions, and report the detection of a total of 114 sources. Thirteen of these sources are associated with known young stellar objects, nine in Barnard 59 and four in Lupus 1. The properties of the radio emission (spectral index and, in some cases, polarization) suggest a thermal origin for most young stellar objects. Only for two sources (Sz 65 and Sz 67) are there indications for a possible non-thermal origin. The remaining radio detections do not have counterparts at other wavelengths, and the number of sources detected per unit solid angle is in agreement with extragalactic number counts, suggesting that they are extragalactic sources.

  11. Radio observations of massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Blomme, Ronny

    2011-01-01

    Detectable radio emission occurs during almost all phases of massive star evolution. I will concentrate on the thermal and non-thermal continuum emission from early-type stars. The thermal radio emission is due to free-free interactions in the ionized stellar wind material. Early ideas that this would lead to an easy and straightforward way of measuring the mass-loss rates were thwarted by the presence of clumping in the stellar wind. Multi-wavelength observations provide important constraints on this clumping, but do not allow its full determination. Non-thermal radio emission is associated with binarity. This conclusion was already known for some time for Wolf-Rayet stars and in recent years it has become clear that it is also true for O-type stars. In a massive-star binary, the two stellar winds collide and around the shocks a fraction of the electrons are accelerated to relativistic speeds. Spiralling in the magnetic field these electrons emit synchrotron radiation, which we detect as non-thermal radio em...

  12. Radio Continuum Observations towards Optical and Molecular Outflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Girart

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos observaciones de continuo en varias frecuencias, realizadas con el VLA, en ocho regiones de formación estelar asociadas con flujos moleculares y ópticos: L1489, HH 68{69, HH 94{95, NGC 2264D, L1681B, L778, MWC 1080 y V645 Cyg. Detectamos tres chorros térmicos de radio, L1489, YLW 16A en L1681B y NGC 2264D VLA 7, asociados con ujos moleculares y/o flujos HH. Los chorros térmicos de radio en L1489 y NGC 2264D VLA 7 aparecen colimados en la dirección del ujo a mayor escala. Presentamos la primera detección tentativa de un chorro no térmico de radio, L778 VLA 5, asociado con una protoestrella de baja masa de clase I y con un flujo molecular. En HH 68{69, HH 94{95 y en el ujo molecular en NGC 2264D no hemos podido identificar las fuentes de excitación de estos flujos. La emisión de radio asociada con V645 Cyg es bastante extendida, 0:1 pc y variable. Detectamos tres radio fuentes en la región de MWC 1080 que podrán estar asociadas a fuentes jóvenes.

  13. VLA and CARMA Observations of Protostars in the Cepheus Clouds: Sub-arcsecond Proto-Binaries Formed via Disk Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Tobin, John J; Wilner, David J; Looney, Leslie W; Loinard, Laurent; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; D'Alessio, Paola; Bourke, Tyler L; Kwon, Woojin

    2013-01-01

    We present observations of three Class 0/I protostars (L1157-mm, CB230 IRS1, and L1165-SMM1) using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and observations of two (L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1) with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The VLA observations were taken at wavelengths of $\\lambda = 7.3$ mm, 1.4 cm, 3.3 cm, 4.0 cm, and 6.5 cm with a best resolution of $\\sim$0\\farcs06 (18 AU) at 7.3 mm. The L1165-SMM1 CARMA observations were taken at $\\lambda = 1.3$ mm with a best resolution of $\\sim0\\farcs3$ (100 AU), and the CB230 IRS1 observations were taken at $\\lambda = 3.4$ mm with a best resolution of $\\sim$3\\arcsec\\ (900 AU). We find that L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1 have probable binary companions at separations of $\\sim$0\\farcs3 (100 AU) from detections of secondary peaks at multiple wavelengths. The position angles of these companions are nearly orthogonal to the direction of the observed bipolar outflows, consistent with the expected protostellar disk orientations. We sugge...

  14. Star-forming galaxies versus low- and high-excitation radio AGN in the VLA-COSMOS 3GHz Large Project

    CERN Document Server

    Baran, N; Novak, M; Delhaize, J; Delvecchio, I; Capak, P; Civano, F; Herrera-Ruiz, N; Ilbert, O; Laigle, C; Marchesi, S; McCracken, H J; Middelberg, E; Salvato, M; Schinnerer, E

    2016-01-01

    We study the composition of the faint radio population selected from the VLA-COSMOS 3GHz Large Project, a radio continuum survey performed at 10 cm wavelength. The survey covers the full 2 square degree COSMOS field with mean $rms\\sim2.3$ $\\mu$Jy/beam, cataloging 10,899 source components above $5\\times rms$. By combining these radio data with UltraVISTA, optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data, as well as X-ray data from the Chandra Legacy, and Chandra COSMOS surveys, we gain insight into the emission mechanisms within our radio sources out to redshifts of $z\\sim5$. From these emission characteristics we classify our souces as star forming galaxies or AGN. Using their multi-wavelength properties we further separate the AGN into sub-samples dominated by radiatively efficient and inefficient AGN, often referred to as high- and low-excitation emission line AGN. We compare our method with other results based on fitting of the sources' spectral energy distributions using both galaxy and AGN spec...

  15. Measuring gravitational lens time delays using low-resolution radio monitoring observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gurkan, G; Koopmans, L V E; Fassnacht, C D; Alba, A Berciano

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining lensing time delay measurements requires long-term monitoring campaigns with a high enough resolution (< 1 arcsec) to separate the multiple images. In the radio, a limited number of high-resolution interferometer arrays make these observations difficult to schedule. To overcome this problem, we propose a technique for measuring gravitational time delays which relies on monitoring the total flux density with low-resolution but high-sensitivity radio telescopes to follow the variation of the brighter image. This is then used to trigger high-resolution observations in optimal numbers which then reveal the variation in the fainter image. We present simulations to assess the efficiency of this method together with a pilot project observing radio lens systems with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) to trigger Very Large Array (VLA) observations. This new method is promising for measuring time delays because it uses relatively small amounts of time on high-resolution telescopes. This will b...

  16. Deep GMRT 150 MHz Observations of the DEEP2 Fields: Searching for High Red-Shift Radio Galaxies Revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susanta K. Bisoi; C. H. Ishwara-Chandra; S. K. Sirothia; P. Janardhan

    2011-12-01

    High red-shift radio galaxies are best searched at low radio frequencies, due to its steep radio spectra. Here we present preliminary results from our programme to search for high red-shift radio galaxies to ∼ 10 to 100 times fainter than the known population till date. We have extracted ultra-steep spectrum (USS) samples from deep 150 MHz Giant Meter-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations from one of the three well-studied DEEP2 fields to this effect. From correlating these radio sources with respect to the high-frequency catalogues such as VLA, FIRST and NVSS at 1.4 GHz, we find ∼ 100 steep spectrum (spectral index, > 1) radio sources, which are good candidates for high red-shift radio galaxies.

  17. VLA observations of candidate high-mass protostellar objects at 7 mm

    CERN Document Server

    Garay, Guido; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar

    2007-01-01

    We present radio continuum observations at 7 mm made using the Very Large Array towards three massive star forming regions thought to be in very early stages of evolution selected from the sample of Sridharan et al. (2002). Emission was detected towards all three sources (IRAS 18470-0044, IRAS 19217+1651 and IRAS 23151+5912). We find that in all cases the 7 mm emission corresponds to thermal emission from ionized gas. The regions of ionized gas associated with IRAS 19217+1651 and IRAS 23151+5912 are hypercompact with diameters of 0.009 and 0.0006 pc, and emission measures of 7.0 x 10^8 and 2.3 x 10^9 pc cm^(-6), respectively.

  18. VLA-ANGST: A high-resolution HI Survey of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Juergen; Warren, Steven R; Skillman, Evan D; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Walter, Fabian; de Blok, W J G; Koribalski, Baerbel; West, Andrew A

    2012-01-01

    We present the "Very Large Array survey of Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury galaxies (VLA-ANGST)." VLA-ANGST is a National Radio Astronomy Observatory Large Program consisting of high spectral (0.6-2.6 km/s) and spatial (~6") resolution observations of neutral, atomic hydrogen (HI) emission toward 35 nearby dwarf galaxies from the ANGST survey. ANGST is a systematic HST survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D\\lesssim4 Mpc). VLA-ANGST provides VLA HI observations of the sub-sample of ANGST galaxies with recent star formation that are observable from the northern hemisphere and that were not observed in the "The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey" (THINGS). The overarching scientific goal of VLA-ANGST is to investigate fundamental characteristics of the neutral interstellar medium (ISM) of dwarf galaxies. Here we describe the VLA observations, the data reduction, and the final VLA-ANGST data products. We pre...

  19. Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lochner, Michelle; Zwart, Jonathan T L; Smirnov, Oleg; Bassett, Bruce A; Oozeer, Nadeem; Kunz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) New telescopes like the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will push into a new sensitivity regime and expose systematics, such as direction-dependent effects, that could previously be ignored. Current methods for handling such systematics rely on alternating best estimates of instrumental calibration and models of the underlying sky, which can lead to inaccurate uncertainty estimates and biased results because such methods ignore any correlations between parameters. These deconvolution algorithms produce a single image that is assumed to be a true representation of the sky, when in fact it is just one realisation of an infinite ensemble of images compatible with the noise in the data. In contrast, here we report a Bayesian formalism that simultaneously infers both systematics and science. Our technique, Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations (BIRO), determines all parameters directly from the raw data, bypassing image-making entirely, by sampling from the joint posterior probability distribution. Thi...

  20. VLA and CARMA observations of protostars in the Cepheus clouds: Sub-arcsecond proto-binaries formed via disk fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie W. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Chandler, Claire J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); Wilner, David J.; Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Loinard, Laurent; D' Alessio, Paola [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Chiang, Hsin-Fang [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kwon, Woojin, E-mail: jtobin@nrao.edu [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-12-20

    We present observations of three Class 0/I protostars (L1157-mm, CB230 IRS1, and L1165-SMM1) using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and observations of two (L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1) with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The VLA observations were taken at wavelengths of λ = 7.3 mm, 1.4 cm, 3.3 cm, 4.0 cm, and 6.5 cm with a best resolution of ∼0.''06 (18 AU) at 7.3 mm. The L1165-SMM1 CARMA observations were taken at λ = 1.3 mm with a best resolution of ∼0.''3 (100 AU) and the CB230 IRS1 observations were taken at λ = 3.4 mm with a best resolution of ∼3'' (900 AU). We find that L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1 have probable binary companions at separations of ∼0.''3 (100 AU) from detections of secondary peaks at multiple wavelengths. The position angles of these companions are nearly orthogonal to the direction of the observed bipolar outflows, consistent with the expected protostellar disk orientations. We suggest that these companions may have formed from disk fragmentation; turbulent fragmentation would not preferentially arrange the binary companions to be orthogonal to the outflow direction. For L1165-SMM1, both the 7.3 mm and 1.3 mm emission show evidence of a large (R > 100 AU) disk. For the L1165-SMM1 primary protostar and the CB230 IRS1 secondary protostar, the 7.3 mm emission is resolved into structures consistent with ∼20 AU radius disks. For the other protostars, including L1157-mm, the emission is unresolved, suggesting disks with radii <20 AU.

  1. Fast radio flashes observed with LOFAR prototypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigl, A.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis consists of a detailed analysis of several observations with prototype stations of the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). Chapter 1 introduces the field of radio astronomy, briefly describes the radio telescopes which were used and discusses radio frequency interference (RFI) and important too

  2. High dynamic range VLA observations of eight core-dominated quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollgaard, R.I.; Wardle, J.F.C.; Roberts, D.H. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The Very Large Array has been used at 5 GHz to make high dynamic range observations of eight quasars with prominent cores. All exhibit one-sided jets, and all but one show evidence of diffuse halos. The luminosity of the extended emission by itself is sufficient for these to be Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio sources. This interpretation is confirmed by the polarization of the extended structure: the inferred magnetic field is parallel to the jet axis in all cases, and in all but one instance turns to be nearly perpendicular to the jet at its outer end. These latter structures are identified as classical terminal hot-spots. Both the total intensity data and especially the polarization data strongly support the notion that these quasars are similar to the classical lobe-dominated quasars, but are oriented with jet axes close to the line of sight. If this is so, then the relatively high degrees of polarization observed in the terminal hotspots appear to require that the downstream fluid velocities in the hotspots are mildly relativistic, in the range v/c = 0.2 - 0.8. This, in turn, implies that the jets are at least moderately relativistic over their entire length. 53 refs.

  3. VLA-ANGST: A HIGH-RESOLUTION H I SURVEY OF NEARBY DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Juergen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Warren, Steven R.; Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); De Blok, W. J. G. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Oude Hoogeveensedijk 4, 7991 PD Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Koribalski, Baerbel [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); West, Andrew A., E-mail: jott@nrao.edu, E-mail: adrienne@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: warren@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: walter@mpia.de, E-mail: blok@astron.nl, E-mail: Baerbel.Koribalski@csiro.au, E-mail: aawest@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We present the 'Very Large Array survey of Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury galaxies (VLA-ANGST)'. VLA-ANGST is a National Radio Astronomy Observatory Large Program consisting of high spectral (0.6-2.6 km s{sup -1}) and spatial ({approx}6'') resolution observations of neutral, atomic hydrogen (H I) emission toward 35 nearby dwarf galaxies from the ANGST survey. ANGST is a systematic Hubble Space Telescope survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D {approx}< 4 Mpc). VLA-ANGST provides VLA H I observations of the sub-sample of ANGST galaxies with recent star formation that are observable from the northern hemisphere and that were not observed in the 'The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey' (THINGS). The overarching scientific goal of VLA-ANGST is to investigate fundamental characteristics of the neutral interstellar medium (ISM) of dwarf galaxies. Here we describe the VLA observations, the data reduction, and the final VLA-ANGST data products. We present an atlas of the integrated H I maps, the intensity-weighted velocity fields, the second moment maps as a measure for the velocity dispersion of the H I, individual channel maps, and integrated H I spectra for each VLA-ANGST galaxy. We closely follow the observational setup and data reduction of THINGS to achieve comparable sensitivity and angular resolution. A major difference between VLA-ANGST and THINGS, however, is the high velocity resolution of the VLA-ANGST observations (0.65 and 1.3 km s{sup -1} for the majority of the galaxies). The VLA-ANGST data products are made publicly available through a dedicated Web site (https://science.nrao.edu/science/surveys/vla-angst). With available star formation histories from resolved stellar populations and lower resolution ancillary observations from the far-infrared to the ultraviolet, VLA-ANGST will enable detailed studies of the

  4. VLA observations of Jupiter at 1.3 - 20 cm wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depater, Imke

    1986-01-01

    In order to study the vertical distribution of ammonia as a function of Jovian latitude, high resolution images were obtained with the VLA at 1.3, 2, 6 and 20 cm wavelengths. Although the interpretation of the data is quite complicated due to Jupiter's synchrotron radiation, which in fact is the dominant source of radiation at 29 cm, the belt-zone structure is clearly present at 2 and 6 cm wavelengths. At 1.3 cm near the center of the ammonia band, the structure is less pronounced, and at 20 cm it is absent. The data is currently being fitted with model atmosphere calculations. Since one probes in and through the visible cloud layers at these wavelengths (temperatures of 135 to 400 K), and the opacity is likely all provided by ammonia gas, a detailed vertical distribution of this gas can be obtained as a function of Jovian latitude. This ought to give insight in the formation processes of the white cloud layers in the zones and their absence above the belts.

  5. VLA Observations of HI in the Circumstellar Envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, Lynn D; 10.1086/512613

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged) We have used the VLA to search for neutral atomic hydrogen in the circumstellar envelopes of five AGB stars. We have detected HI 21-cm emission coincident in both position and velocity with the semi-regular variable RS Cnc. The emission comprises a compact, slightly elongated feature centered on the star with a mean diameter ~82'' (1.5e17 cm), plus an additional filament extending ~6' to the NW. This filament suggests that a portion of the mass loss is highly asymmetric. We estimate MHI=1.5e-3 Msun and M_dot~1.7e-7 Msun/yr. Toward R Cas, we detect weak emission that peaks at the stellar systemic velocity and overlaps with the location of its circumstellar dust shell and thus is probably related to the star. In the case of IRC+10216, we were unable to confirm the detection of HI in absorption against the cosmic background previously reported by Le Bertre & Gerard. However, we detect arcs of emission at projected distances of r~14'-18' (~2e18 cm) to the NW. A large separation of the emission from...

  6. VLA Observations of the Magnetic Field of the Smith High Velocity Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Sarah; Hill, Alex S.; Mao, Sui Ann; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Lockman, Felix J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2017-01-01

    High velocity clouds (HVCs) are hydrogen gas clouds around galaxies with velocities inconsistent with Galactic rotation. HVCs may fuel future star formation and drive galaxy evolution. The Smith Cloud is an HVC with an orbit suggesting it has made at least one passage through the disk. A measured magnetic field suggests how it survived passage through the Galactic halo. The Faraday rotation measure (RM) provides information about the strength and direction of the magnetic field. We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to obtain reliable RMs towards ~950 background point sources to measure the geometry of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud. These RMs constrain the strength of the magnetic field at the head, tail, and body of the Smith Cloud while RMs directly behind the Smith Cloud suggest there is ionized gas associated with the cloud that has not previously been detected. The confirmation of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud along with a detailed morphology of the magnetic field structure will constrain how HVCs pass through the Galactic halo without losing their gas and survive the passage through the intergalactic and interstellar media.

  7. VLA and Swift XRT Observations of PTF12os in NGC 5806

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, C. J.; Immler, S.; Horesh, A.; Kasliwal, M.; Ryder, S. D.; Weiler, K. W.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Panagia, N.; Bauer, F. E.; Marcaide, J. M.; Pooley, D.; Sramek, R. A.; Williams, C. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of radio emission near the position of the type-IIb supernova PTF2012os (ATEL #3881) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array radio telescope in the DnC configuration: A flux density of 0.44 ± 0.05 mJy was measured at 5.02 GHz (wavelength 6.0 cm) on 2012 Jan. 22.42 UT. The measured position of the radio emission of R.A. = 14h59m59.s12, Decl. = +01d53m23s.3, equinox 2000.0 is in good agreement with the measured optical position of (ending digits) R.A.

  8. Radio Astronomy Explorer /RAE/. I - Observations of terrestrial radio noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, J. R.; Caruso, J. A.; Stone, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) I data are analyzed to establish characteristics of HF terrestrial radio noise at an altitude of about 6000 km. Time and frequency variations in amplitude of the observed noise well above cosmic noise background are explained on the basis of temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric critical frequency coupled with those in noise source distributions. It is shown that terrestrial radio noise regularly breaks through the ionosphere and reaches RAE with magnitudes 15 dB and more above cosmic noise background, on frequencies above the F-layer critical frequency.

  9. NRAO Makes Available VLA Sky Survey Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    An original and comprehensive data set potentially full of scientific surprises now is available to astronomers, students and the public through the information superhighway. Radio images of the sky produced by the Very Large Array radio telescope -- one of the premier astronomical instruments in the world -- as part of a massive survey now are stored in an electronic repository avail- able over the Internet computer communications network. "Each of these sensitive new sky maps shows about a thou- sand radio-emitting objects, most of which have never been seen before," said Dr. J. J. Condon, leader of the National Radio As- tronomy Observatory (NRAO) survey team. "We are releasing them as soon as they are completed because they contain more data than we could possibly analyze by ourselves." "By using electronic distribution, we can open this tre- mendous resource of information for computer analysis by all as- tronomers immediately, without waiting for traditional publication," Condon added. The radio images are copyright NRAO/ AUI. Permission is granted for use of the material without charge for scholarly, educational and private non-commercial purposes. "It is entirely conceivable -- even probable -- that valuable discoveries will be made by students or amateur astrono- mers who devote the time to study these maps carefully," said team member Dr. W. D. Cotton. "Making this new information available electronically means that more people can participate in adding to its scientific value." The maps are a product of the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), which began its observational phase in September of 1993 and will cover 82 percent of the sky when completed by the end of 1996. The NVSS is expected to produce a catalog of more than two million ra- dio-emitting objects in the sky, and it is the first sky survey sensitive to linearly polarized emission from radio sources beyond our own Milky Way galaxy. "The NVSS is being made as a service to the entire astronomical

  10. Radio Observations as a Tool to Investigate Shocks and Asymmetries in Accreting White Dwarf Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Jennifer Helen Seng; E-Nova Project

    2017-01-01

    In this dissertation, I use radio observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to reveal that colliding flows within the ejecta from nova explosions can lead to shocks that accelerate particles and produce radio synchrotron emission. In both novae V1723 Aql and V5589 Sgr, radio emission within the first one to two months deviated strongly from the classic thermal model for radio emission from novae. Three years of radio observations of V1723 Aql show that multiple outflows from the system collided to create non-thermal shocks with a brightness temperature of >106 K. After these shocks faded, the radio light curve became roughly consistent with an expanding thermal shell. However, resolved images of V1723 Aql show elongated material that apparently rotates its major axis over the course of 15 months. In the case of nova V5589 Sgr, I show that the early radio emission is dominated by a shock-powered non-thermal flare that produces strong (kTx > 33 keV) X-rays. These findings have important implications for understanding how normal novae generate GeV gamma-rays.Additionally, I present VLA observations of the symbiotic star CH Cyg and two small surveys of symbiotic binaries. Radio observations of CH Cyg tie the ejection of a collimated jet to a change of state in the accretion disk, strengthening the link between bipolar outflows from accreting white dwarfs and other types of accreting compact objects. Next, I use a survey of eleven accretion-driven symbiotic binaries to determine that the radio brightness of a symbiotic system could potentially be used as an indicator of whether it is powered predominantly by shell burning on the surface of the white dwarf or by accretion. This survey also produces the first radio detections of seven of the target systems. In the second survey of seventeen symbiotic binaries, I spatially resolve extended radio emission in several systems for the first time. The results from these surveys provide some support for the

  11. The VLA Atmospheric Phase Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Keith

    2014-05-01

    The Atmospheric Phase Interferometer (API) is a two-element atmospheric seeing monitor located at the Very Large Array (VLA) site. The instrument measures turbulent refractive index variation through the atmosphere by examining phase differences in a satellite beacon signal detected at two (or more) antennas. With this measurement, the VLA scheduling software is able to consider atmospheric stability when determining which frequency observation to schedule next. We are in the process of extending this two-element interferometer to four elements, which will allow us to measure the turbulence in two dimensions and at multiple length scales. This thesis will look at some statistical properties of turbulence, the effects of atmospheric stability on radio interferometric observations, and discuss details of the instrument and the data that it collects. The thesis will also cover some techniques and principles of signal processing, and an analysis of some data from the instrument. The results demonstrate that other surface atmospheric variables (e.g. windspeed, water vapor pressure) show the same structure function exponent as the atmospheric phase fluctuations. In particular, the structure functions of water vapor partial pressure and wind speed show the same exponent as the phase. Though the agreement between meteorological variables and atmospheric phase is scientifically satisfying, these surface measurements are not nearly as sensitive as the API saturation phase measurement, and therefore cannot be used to schedule telescope time in its stead. What is informative about these results is that the similar structure functions for API and meteorological data are detecting reinforce the claim that both measurements represent turbulent transport, and not instrumental noise. Data from the instrument reveals that measurements are consistent with both Kolmogorov turbulence theory, and with prior observations. The API predominately measures three-dimensional isotropic

  12. The alfalfa “almost darks” campaign: Pilot VLA HI observations of five high mass-to-light ratio systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, John M.; Martinkus, Charlotte P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Leisman, Lukas; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Jones, Michael, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: cmartink@macalester.edu, E-mail: leisman@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: hallenbg@union.edu, E-mail: jonesmg@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    We present new Very Large Array (VLA) H i spectral line imaging of five sources discovered by the ALFALFA extragalactic survey. These targets are drawn from a larger sample of systems that were not uniquely identified with optical counterparts during ALFALFA processing, and as such have unusually high H i mass to light ratios. The candidate “Almost Dark” objects fall into four broad categories: (1) objects with nearby H i neighbors that are likely of tidal origin; (2) objects that appear to be part of a system of multiple H i sources, but which may not be tidal in origin; (3) objects isolated from nearby ALFALFA H i detections, but located near a gas-poor early type galaxy; (4) apparently isolated sources, with no object of coincident redshift within ∼400 kpc. Roughly 75% of the 200 objects without identified counterparts in the α.40 database (Haynes et al. 2011) fall into category 1 (likely tidal), and were not considered for synthesis follow-up observations. The pilot sample presented here (AGC193953, AGC208602, AGC208399, AGC226178, and AGC233638) contains the first five sources observed as part of a larger effort to characterize H i sources with no readily identifiable optical counterpart at single dish resolution (3.′5). These objects span a range of H i mass [7.41 < log(M{sub Hi}) < 9.51] and H i mass to B-band luminosity ratios (3 < M{sub Hi}/L{sub B} < 9). We compare the H i total intensity and velocity fields to optical imaging drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and to ultraviolet imaging drawn from archival GALEX observations. Four of the sources with uncertain or no optical counterpart in the ALFALFA data are identified with low surface brightness optical counterparts in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging when compared with VLA H i intensity maps, and appear to be galaxies with clear signs of ordered rotation in the H i velocity fields. Three of these are detected in far-ultraviolet GALEX images, a likely indication of star formation within

  13. H2O line mapping at high spatial and spectral resolution - Herschel observations of the VLA1623 outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Bjerkeli, P; Larsson, B; Rydbeck, G; Nisini, B; Tafalla, M; Antoniucci, S; Benedettini, M; Bergman, P; Cabrit, S; Giannini, T; Melnick, G; Neufeld, D; Santangelo, G; van Dishoeck, E F

    2012-01-01

    Apart from being an important coolant, H2O is known to be a tracer of high-velocity molecular gas. Recent models predict relatively high abundances behind interstellar shockwaves. The dynamical and physical conditions of the H2O emitting gas, however, are not fully understood yet. We aim to determine the abundance and distribution of H2O, its kinematics and the physical conditions of the gas responsible for the H2O emission. The observed line profile shapes help us understand the dynamics in molecular outflows. We mapped the VLA1623 outflow, in the ground-state transitions of o-H2O, with the HIFI and PACS instruments. We also present observations of higher energy transitions of o-H2O and p-H2O obtained with HIFI and PACS towards selected outflow positions. From comparison with non-LTE radiative transfer calculations, we estimate the physical parameters of the water emitting regions. The observed water emission line profiles vary over the mapped area. Spectral features and components, tracing gas in different ...

  14. SEARCH FOR NEW MICROQUASARS CANDIDATES THROUGH VLA/XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Combi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have developed an improved search strategy based on positional cross-identi cation with very restrictive selection criteria to nd new MQs candidate, using more sensitive modern X-ray data. For such purpose, we made combined use of the radio, infrared, and X-ray properties of the sources, using di erent available catalogs. As a result, we nd 86 sources with positional coincidence in the NVSS/XMM catalogs atgalactic latitudes |b| < 10 . For the fully coincident sources, whenever possible, we analyzed color-color and hardness ratio diagrams and found that at least 3 of them display high-mass X-ray binary characteristics. A preliminary study of one of them is presented.

  15. Intelligent Cognitive Radio Models for Enhancing Future Radio Astronomy Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele Abiola Periola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio astronomy organisations desire to optimise the terrestrial radio astronomy observations by mitigating against interference and enhancing angular resolution. Ground telescopes (GTs experience interference from intersatellite links (ISLs. Astronomy source radio signals received by GTs are analysed at the high performance computing (HPC infrastructure. Furthermore, observation limitation conditions prevent GTs from conducting radio astronomy observations all the time, thereby causing low HPC utilisation. This paper proposes mechanisms that protect GTs from ISL interference without permanent prevention of ISL data transmission and enhance angular resolution. The ISL transmits data by taking advantage of similarities in the sequence of observed astronomy sources to increase ISL connection duration. In addition, the paper proposes a mechanism that enhances angular resolution by using reconfigurable earth stations. Furthermore, the paper presents the opportunistic computing scheme (OCS to enhance HPC utilisation. OCS enables the underutilised HPC to be used to train learning algorithms of a cognitive base station. The performances of the three mechanisms are evaluated. Simulations show that the proposed mechanisms protect GTs from ISL interference, enhance angular resolution, and improve HPC utilisation.

  16. Rotating Radio Transients: X-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rea, Nanda

    2007-01-01

    Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs) are a new class of neutron stars discovered through the emission of radio bursts. Eleven sources are known up to now, but population studies predict these objects to be more numerous than the normal radio pulsar population. Multiwavelength observations of these peculiar objects are in progress to disentangle their spectral energy distribution, and then study in detail their nature. In this review I report on the current state of the art on these objects, and in particular on the results of new X-ray observations.

  17. Radio Observations of SNR Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela M. Reynoso

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se calcula que la mayor a de los remanentes de supernovas (RSNs en nuestra galaxia se encuentran muy cerca o dentro de las nubes moleculares en las que nacieron sus estrellas progenitoras. Cuando un RSN interact ua con nubes interestelares, no s olo se altera la morfolog a y la evoluci on del RSN sino que tambi en las nubes se calientan, se comprimen, se disocian, o sufren modi caciones en su qu mica. La turbulencia que se genera en las nubes moleculares puede desencadenar formaci on estelar. El estudio de la emisi on en radio en l neas at omicas y moleculares proveniente de RSNs aporta informaci on fundamental para describir el ambiente en el cual evoluciona un RSN y determinar posibles sitios de interacci on RSN-nube interestelar. La detecci on de m asers de OH en la l nea sat elite de 1720 MHz permite acotar tanto las caracter sticas del medio ambiente chocado como de la din amica del frente de choque del RSN. En este art culo presento una recopilaci on de distintos resultados obtenidos a partir de observaciones en radio en diferentes l neas espectrales y bajo distintas condiciones en direcci on a algunos RSNs y sus entornos

  18. Multi-wave band SMM-VLA observations of an M2 flare and an associated coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F.; Lang, Kenneth R.; Schmelz, Joan T.; Gonzalez, Raymond D.; Smith, Kermit L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of observations of an M2 flare and an associated coronal mass ejection CME by instruments on the SMM as well as by the VLA and other ground-based observatories on September 30, 1988. The multiwave band data show a gradual slowly changing event which lasted several hours. The microwave burst emission was found to originate in compact moderately circularly polarized sources located near the sites of bright H-alpha and soft X-ray emission. These data are combined with estimates of an electron temperature of 1.5 x 10 to the 7th K and an emission measure of about 2.0 x 10 to the 49th/cu cm obtained from Ca XIX and Fe XXV spectra to show that the microwave emission can be attributed to thermal gyrosynchrotron radiation in regions where the magnetic field strength is 425-650 G. The CME acceleration at low altitudes is measured on the basis of ground- and space-based coronagraphs.

  19. The Wasp-Waist Nebula: VLA Ammonia Observations of the Molecular Core Envelope In a Unique Class 0 Protostellar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Jennifer; Barsony, M.; Sahai, R.

    2010-01-01

    The Wasp-Waist Nebula was discovered in the IRAC c2d survey of the Ophiuchus star-forming clouds. It is powered by a well-isolated, low-luminosity, low-mass Class 0 object. Its weak outflow has been mapped in the CO (3-2) transition with the JCMT, in 2.12 micron H2 emission with WIRC (the Wide-Field Infrared Camera) on the Hale 5-meter, and, most recently, in six H2 mid-infrared lines with the IRS (InfraRed Spectrograph) on-board the Spitzer Space Telescope; possible jet twisting structure may be evidence of unique core dynamics. Here, we report results of recent VLA ammonia mapping observations of the dense gas envelope feeding the central core protostellar system. We describe the morphology, kinematics, and angular momentum characteristics of this unique system. The results are compared with the envelope structure deduced from IRAC 8-micron absorption of the PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) background emission from the cloud.

  20. The ALFALFA "Almost Darks" Campaign: Pilot VLA HI Observations of Five High Mass-to-Light Ratio Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, John M; Leisman, Lukas; Haynes, Martha P; Adams, Elizabeth A K; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Janowiecki, Steven; Jones, Michael; Józsa, Gyula I G; Koopmann, Rebecca A; Nichols, Nathan; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Rhode, Katherine L; Salzer, John J; Troischt, Parker

    2014-01-01

    We present VLA HI spectral line imaging of 5 sources discovered by ALFALFA. These targets are drawn from a larger sample of systems that were not uniquely identified with optical counterparts during ALFALFA processing, and as such have unusually high HI mass to light ratios. These candidate "Almost Dark" objects fall into 4 categories: 1) objects with nearby HI neighbors that are likely of tidal origin; 2) objects that appear to be part of a system of multiple HI sources, but which may not be tidal in origin; 3) objects isolated from nearby ALFALFA HI detections, but located near a gas-poor early-type galaxy; 4) apparently isolated sources, with no object of coincident redshift within ~400 kpc. Roughly 75% of the 200 objects without identified counterparts in the $\\alpha$.40 database (Haynes et al. 2011) fall into category 1. This pilot sample contains the first five sources observed as part of a larger effort to characterize HI sources with no readily identifiable optical counterpart at single dish resolutio...

  1. ALMA and VLA Observations of Recombination Lines and Continuum toward the Becklin-Neugebauer object in Orion

    CERN Document Server

    Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Rodriguez, Luis F

    2012-01-01

    Compared to their centimeter-wavelength counterparts, millimeter recombination lines (RLs) are intrinsically brighter and are free from pressure broadening. We report observations of RLs (H30alpha at 231.9 GHz and H53alpha at 42.9 GHz) and the millimeter and centimeter continuum toward the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) object in Orion, obtained from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Science Verification archive and the Very Large Array (VLA). The RL emission appears to be arising from the slowly-moving, dense (N_e=8.4x10^6 cm^-3) base of the ionized envelope around BN. This ionized gas has a relatively low electron temperature (T_e<4900 K) and small (<<10 km s^-1) bulk motions. Comparing our continuum measurements with previous (non)detections, we find evidence that BN could have large flux variations in the mm, but only mild (<30 %) variations in the cm. This could be understood if the free-free continuum of BN arises in an unresolved, unconfined ionized region that preserves its ...

  2. VLA Observations of Z CMa: The Orientation and Origin of the Thermal Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Velázquez

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos observaciones sensitivas y de alta resolución angular ( 0``45 hechas a 6 y 3.5 cm con el Conjunto Muy Grande de Radiotelescopios (Very Large Array hacia el chorro térmico asociado con la estrella joven Z CMa. Hemos encontrado que el ángulo de posición del eje del chorro térmico es coincidente dentro del error con la orientación del chorro óptico y con la orientación del flujo bipolar observado en CO. Las estructuras débiles observadas en radio alrededor de Z CMa (principalmente al este de esta fuente podrán ser el resultado de eyecciones periódicas. Se sabe que Z CMa tiene una compañera infrarroja 0:001 al noroeste. Hemos usado nuestros datos de alta resolución angular ( 0:``2 tomados en la configuración A y la posición astrométrica de Hipparcos para establecer que el chorro se origina en la compañera visible.

  3. The VLA Low Band Ionospheric and Transient Experiment (VLITE): A Commensal Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Tracy; Polisensky, Emil; Peters, Wendy; Giacintucci, Simona; Hyman, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    The US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) have collaborated to develop, install, and commission a new commensal system on the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). The VLA Low Band Ionospheric and Transient Experiment (VLITE) makes use of dedicated samplers and fibers to tap the signal from 10 VLA low band receivers and correlate those through a real-time DiFX correlator. VLITE allows for the simultaneous use of the VLA to observe primary science using the higher frequencies receivers (1-50 GHz) through the NRAO WIDAR correlator and lower frequencies through the DiFX correlator. VLITE operates during nearly all observing programs and provides 64 MHz of bandwidth centered at 352 MHz. The operation of VLITE requires no additional resources from the VLA system running the primary science and produces an ad-hoc sky survey. The commensal system greatly expands the capabilities of the VLA through value-added PI science, stand-alone astrophysics, the opening of a new...

  4. TINY SCALE OPACITY FLUCTUATIONS FROM VLBA, MERLIN, AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF H I ABSORPTION TOWARD 3C 138

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Nirupam; Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Minter, Anthony H. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Brogan, Crystal L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Lazio, T. J. W., E-mail: nroy@aoc.nrao.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-04-20

    The structure function of opacity fluctuations is a useful statistical tool to study tiny scale structures of neutral hydrogen. Here we present high-resolution observation of H I absorption toward 3C 138, and estimate the structure function of opacity fluctuations from the combined VLA, MERLIN, and VLBA data. The angular scales probed in this work are {approx}10-200 mas (about 5-100 AU). The structure function in this range is found to be well represented by a power law S{sub {tau}}(x) {approx} x{sup {beta}} with index {beta} {approx} 0.33 {+-} 0.07 corresponding to a power spectrum P{sub {tau}}(U) {approx} U{sup -2.33}. This is slightly shallower than the earlier reported power-law index of {approx}2.5-3.0 at {approx}1000 AU to few pc scales. The amplitude of the derived structure function is a factor of {approx}20-60 times higher than the extrapolated amplitude from observation of Cas A at larger scales. On the other hand, extrapolating the AU scale structure function for 3C 138 predicts the observed structure function for Cas A at the pc scale correctly. These results clearly establish that the atomic gas has significantly more structures in AU scales than expected from earlier pc scale observations. Some plausible reasons are identified and discussed here to explain these results. The observational evidence of a shallower slope and the presence of rich small-scale structures may have implications for the current understanding of the interstellar turbulence.

  5. Observations of Radio Giant Pulses with GAVRT

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Radio giant pulses provide a unique opportunity to study the pulsar radio emission mechanism in exquisite detail. Previous studies have revealed a wide range of properties and phenomena, including extraordinarily high brightness temperatures, sub-nanosecond emission features, and banded dynamic spectra. New measurements of giant pulse characteristics can help guide and test theoretical emission models. To this end, an extensive observation campaign has begun which will provide more than 500 hours on the Crab with a 34-meter antenna located in California, USA. The observations are being done as part of an educational outreach program called the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT). This antenna has a novel wide bandwidth receiver which provides up to 8 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth in the range of 2.5 to 14 GHz. These observations will provide detailed information about the variability, amplitude distribution, and detailed frequency structure of radio giant pulses. In addition, a database of pulses ...

  6. Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) 1 observations of terrestrial radio noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, J. R.; Caruso, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Radio Astonomy Explorer (RAE) 1 data are analyzed to establish characteristics of HF terrestrial radio noise at an altitude of about 6000 km. Time and frequency variations in amplitude of the observed noise well above cosmic noise background are explained on the basis of temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric critical frequency coupled with those in noise source distributions. It is shown that terrestrial noise regularly breaks through the ionosphere and reaches RAE with magnitudes 15 or more db higher than cosmic noise background. Maximum terrestrial noise is observed when RAE is over the dark side of the Earth in the neighborhood of equatorial continental land masses where thunderstorms occur most frequently. The observed noise level is 30-40 db lower with RAE over oceans.

  7. Radio Band Observations of Blazar Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Aller, Margo F; Hughes, Philip A

    2010-01-01

    The properties of blazar variability in the radio band are studied using the unique combination of temporal resolution from single dish monitoring and spatial resolution from VLBA imaging; such measurements, now available in all four Stokes parameters, together with theoretical simulations, identify the origin of radio band variability and probe the characteristics of the radio jet where the broadband blazar emission originates. Outbursts in total flux density and linear polarization in the optical-to-radio bands are attributed to shocks propagating within the jet spine, in part based on limited modeling invoking transverse shocks; new radiative transfer simulations allowing for shocks at arbitrary angle to the flow direction confirm this picture by reproducing the observed centimeter-band variations observed more generally, and are of current interest since these shocks may play a role in the gamma-ray flaring detected by Fermi. Recent UMRAO multifrequency Stokes V studies of bright blazars identify the spec...

  8. Formation and evolution of the water maser outflow event in AFGL 2591 VLA 3-N

    CERN Document Server

    Trinidad, M A; Estalella, R; Cantó, J; Raga, A; Torrelles, J M; Patel, N A; Gómez, J F; Anglada, G; Carrasco-González, C; Rodríguez, L F

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we analyze multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) water maser observations carried out with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) toward the high-mass star-forming region AFGL 2591. We detected maser emission associated with the radio continuum sources VLA 2 and VLA 3. In addition, a water maser cluster, VLA 3-N, was detected ~ 0.5" north of VLA 3. We concentrate the discussion of this paper on the spatio-kinematical distribution of the water masers towards VLA 3-N. The water maser emission toward the region VLA 3-N shows two bow shock-like structures, Northern and Southern, separated from each other by ~ 100 mas (~ 330 AU). The spatial distribution and kinematics of the water masers in this cluster have persisted over a time span of seven years. The Northern bow shock has a somewhat irregular morphology, while the Southern one has a remarkably smooth morphology. We measured the proper motions of 33 water maser features, which have an average proper motion velocity of ~ 1.3 mas/yr (~...

  9. Radio observations of D I and fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiles, Carl; Mccullough, Peter R.; Glassgold, Alfred E.

    1993-01-01

    We report observations to detect the 327 MHz line of atomic deuterium in the primarily molecular clouds towards Cas A and Sgr A, making appropriate choices of spectral and spatial resolution. Our best results for Cas A, based on 1253 hr of observing with the 85 foot (26 m) Hat Creek telescope and 45 hr with the very large array (VLA), yield an upper limit for the fraction of deuterium in atomic form, D I, of 0.14. We present an approximate analytical analysis of deuterium fractionation in translucent clouds, which shows that gas-phase ion-molecule reactions, assisted by dust and HD line self-shielding, are efficient in converting deuterium to HD. We conclude that little atomic deuterium is present in the molecular clumps in the Cas A clouds and that much higher sensitivity observations would be required to detect 327 MHz line in molecular clouds. We have also attempted to detect the 72 GHz line of DCO(+) toward Cas A. The observed upper limit to the DCO(+)/HCO(+) ratio of approximately 0.03 is not much larger than our theoretical estimate, and the DCO(+) line should be detectable with existing instrumentation, unless the temperature of these clouds is much larger than usually assumed.

  10. EVOLUTION OF THE WATER MASER EXPANDING SHELL IN W75N VLA 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Sang Joon [School of Space Science, Kyunghee University, Seocheon-dong, Giheung-si, Gyeonggi-do, 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon-Wook [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Kurayama, Tomoharu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Honma, Mareki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sasao, Tesuo [Yaeyama Star Club, Ookawa, Ishigaki, Okinawa 904-0022 (Japan); Surcis, Gabriele [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Canto, Jorge [Instituto de Astronomia (UNAM), Apartado 70-264, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Torrelles, Jose M., E-mail: evony@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: skim@kasi.re.kr [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (CSIC)-UB/IEEC, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-04-10

    We present Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers in the high-mass star-forming region of W75N, carried out with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) for three epochs in 2007 with an angular resolution of {approx}1 mas. We detected H{sub 2}O maser emission toward the radio jet in VLA 1 and the expanding shell-like structure in VLA 2. The spatial distribution of the H{sub 2}O masers detected with VERA and measured proper motions around VLA 1 and VLA 2 are similar to those found with previous VLBI observations in epochs 1999 and 2005, with the masers in VLA 1 mainly distributed along a linear structure parallel to the radio jet and, on the other hand, forming a shell-like structure around VLA 2. We have made elliptical fits to the VLA 2 H{sub 2}O maser shell-like structure observed in the different epochs (1999, 2005, and 2007), and found that the shell is still expanding eight years after its discovery. From the difference in the size of the semi-major axes of the fitted ellipses in epochs 1999 ({approx_equal}71 {+-} 1 mas), 2005 ({approx_equal}97 {+-} 3 mas), and 2007 ({approx_equal}111 {+-} 1 mas), we estimate an average expanding velocity of {approx}5 mas yr{sup -1}, similar to the proper motions measured in the individual H{sub 2}O maser features. A kinematic age of {approx}20 yr is derived for this structure. In addition, our VERA observations indicate an increase in the ellipticity of the expanding shell around VLA 2 from epochs 1999 to 2007. In fact, the elliptical fit of the VERA data shows a ratio of the minor and major axes of {approx}0.6, in contrast with an almost circular shape for the shell detected in 1999 and 2005 (b/a {approx} 0.9). This suggests that we are probably observing the formation of a jet-driven H{sub 2}O maser structure in VLA2, evolving from a non-collimated pulsed-outflow event during the first stages of evolution of a massive young stellar object (YSO). This may support predictions made

  11. Radio and Millimeter Observations of the COSMOS Field

    OpenAIRE

    Schinnerer, E.; Bertoldi, F.; Carilli, C.L.; Smolčić, V.; Scoville, N.; K. Menten; Voss, H.; Blain, A; Lutz, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) targets an equatorial two square degree field covering the full electromagnetic spectrum. Here we present first results from observations of the COSMOS field in the millimeter and centimeter regime done with the IRAM 30m/MAMBO array and NRAO's Very Large Array (VLA) at 250GHz and 1.4GHz, respectively.

  12. NH$_3$(3,3) and CH$_3$OH near Supernova Remnants: GBT and VLA Observations

    CERN Document Server

    McEwen, Bridget; Sjouwerman, Loránt

    2016-01-01

    We report on Green Bank Telescope 23.87 GHz NH$_3$(3,3), emission observations in five supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds (G1.4$-$0.1, IC443, W44, W51C, and G5.7$-$0.0). The observations show a clumpy gas density distribution, and in most cases the narrow line widths of $\\sim3-4$\\,km\\,s$^{-1}$ are suggestive of maser emission. Very Large Array observations reveal 36~GHz and/or 44~GHz CH$_3$OH, maser emission in a majority (72\\%) of the NH$_3$, peak positions towards three of these SNRs. This good positional correlation is in agreement with the high densities required for the excitation of each line. Through these observations we have shown that CH$_3$OH, and NH$_3$, maser emission can be used as indicators of high density clumps of gas shocked by supernova remnants, and provide density estimates thereof. Modeling of the optical depth of the NH$_3$(3,3) emission is compared to that of CH$_3$OH, constraining the densities of the clumps to a typical density of the order of $10^5$~cm$^{-3}$ for ...

  13. VLA's Sharpened Vision Shows Details of Still-Forming Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Using a new observing capability of the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, astronomers have discovered a solar-system-sized disk of gas and dust feeding material onto a young star with 8 to 10 times the mass of the Sun. This is the first time an inner "accretion disk" has been seen around such a massive star. The VLA images also revealed the inner portion of an energetic outflow of material powered by the accretion disk. Artist's conception "Disks and outflows in young stars increase dramatically in mass and energy as the mass of the young star increases. We don't know if the same process is at work in all young stars or how the disks can both power an outflow that extends more than 15 light-years and also start the process of forming planets," said Debra Shepherd, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. "By studying the birth of massive young stars, we're pushing the limits of our understanding and trying to learn if there are critical differences between the outflows from high and low mass young stars," she added Shepherd and Mark Claussen, also from the NRAO in Socorro, and Stan Kurtz of the National Autonomous University in Mexico, presented their findings today at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA. The scientists made the discovery using the VLA connected by a newly- operational fiber-optic link to one of the radio-telescope antennas of the NSF's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), located at Pie Town, NM, 32 miles away from the VLA. Linking the VLA to the Pie Town antenna almost doubled the resolving power, or ability to see fine detail, available to the astronomers. "We could not have seen these structures without using the Pie Town antenna connected to the VLA," said Claussen. Work on the VLA-Pie Town fiber-optic link, financed by the NSF and Associated Universities, Inc., which operates NRAO for the NSF, began in late 1997. The linked facilities first were

  14. Observations of radio-quiet quasars at 10mas resolution by use of gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Neal; Roberts, Carl; Sluse, Dominique; Stacey, Hannah; Vives-Arias, Hector; Wucknitz, Olaf; Volino, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    We present VLA detections of radio emission in four four-image gravitational lens systems with quasar sources: HS0810+2554, RXJ0911+0511, HE0435$-$1223 and SDSSJ0924+0219, and e-MERLIN observations of two of the systems. The first three are detected at a high level of significance, and SDSS J0924+0219 is detected. HS0810+2554 is resolved, allowing us for the first time to achieve 10-mas resolution of the source frame in the structure of a radio quiet quasar. The others are unresolved or marginally resolved. All four objects are among the faintest radio sources yet detected, with intrinsic flux densities in the range 1-5$\\mu$Jy; such radio objects, if unlensed, will only be observable routinely with the Square Kilometre Array. The observations of HS0810+2554, which is also detected with e-MERLIN, strongly suggest the presence of a mini-AGN, with a radio core and milliarcsecond scale jet. The flux densities of the lensed images in all but HE0435-1223 are consistent with smooth galaxy lens models without the req...

  15. A Chandra Observation of Abell 13: Investigating the Origin of the Radio Relic

    CERN Document Server

    Juett, Adrienne M; Clarke, Tracy E; Andernach, Heinz; Ehle, Matthias; Fujita, Yutaka; Kempner, Joshua C; Roy, Alan L; Rudnick, Lawrence; Slee, O Bruce

    2007-01-01

    We present results from the Chandra X-ray observation of Abell 13, a galaxy cluster that contains an unusual noncentral radio source, also known as a radio relic. This is the first pointed X-ray observation of Abell 13, providing a more sensitive study of the properties of the X-ray gas. The X-ray emission from Abell 13 is extended to the northwest of the X-ray peak and shows substructure indicative of a recent merger event. The cluster X-ray emission is centered on the bright galaxy H of Slee et al. 2001. We find no evidence for a cooling flow in the cluster. A knot of excess X-ray emission is coincident with the other bright elliptical galaxy F. This knot of emission has properties similar to the enhanced emission associated with the large galaxies in the Coma cluster. With these Chandra data we are able to compare the properties of the hot X-ray gas with those of the radio relic from VLA data, to study the interaction of the X-ray gas with the radio emitting electrons. Our results suggest that the radio re...

  16. Simultaneous Observations of GRS 1758-258 in 1997 by VLA, IRAM, SEST, RXTE and OSSE Spectroscopy and Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, D; Liang, E P; Bridgman, T; Smith, D M; Martí, J; Durouchoux, P; Mirabel, I F; Rodríguez, L F; Durouchoux, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    We report the results of our multi-wavelength observations of GRS 1758-258 made in August 1997. The energy bands include radio, millimeter, X-ray, and gamma-ray. The observations enable us to obtain a complete spectrum of the source over an energy range of 2 - 500 keV. The spectrum shows that GRS 1758-258 was in its hard state. It is well fitted by the Sunyaev-Titarchuk (ST) Compton scattering model. The spectrum is also fit by a power law with an exponential cutoff (PLE) plus a soft black-body component. The temperature of the soft component is about 1.2 keV, and the energy flux is less than 1.5% of the total X- and gamma-ray flux. The deduced hydrogen column density is in the range of (0.93 - 2.0) 10^{22} cm^{-2}. No significant iron lines are detected. The radio emission has a flat energy spectrum. The daily radio, X-ray and gamma-ray light curves show that GRS 1758-258 was stable during the observation period, but was highly variable on smaller time scales in X- and gamma-rays. The power density spectra a...

  17. Radio Observations as a Tool to Investigate Shocks and Asymmetries in Accreting White Dwarf Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Jennifer H. S.

    2016-07-01

    This dissertation uses radio observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to investigate the mechanisms that power and shape accreting white dwarfs (WD) and their ejecta. We test the predictions of both simple spherical and steady-state radio emission models by examining nova V1723 Aql, nova V5589 Sgr, symbiotic CH Cyg, and two small surveys of symbiotic binaries. First, we highlight classical nova V1723 Aql with three years of radio observations alongside optical and X-ray observations. We use these observations to show that multiple outflows from the system collided to create early non-thermal shocks with a brightness temperature of ≥106 K. While the late-time radio light curve is roughly consistent an expanding thermal shell of mass 2x10-4 M⊙ solar masses, resolved images of V1723 Aql show elongated material that apparently rotates its major axis over the course of 15 months, much like what is seen in gamma-ray producing nova V959 Mon, suggesting similar structures in the two systems. Next, we examine nova V5589 Sgr, where we find that the early radio emission is dominated by a shock-powered non-thermal flare that produces strong (kTx > 33 keV) X-rays. We additionally find roughly 10-5 M⊙ solar masses of thermal bremsstrahlung emitting material, all at a distance of ~4 kpc. The similarities in the evolution of both V1723 Aql and V5589 Sgr to that of nova V959 Mon suggest that these systems may all have dense equatorial tori shaping faster flows at their poles. Turning our focus to symbiotic binaries, we first use our radio observations of CH Cyg to link the ejection of a collimated jet to a change of state in the accretion disk. We additionally estimate the amount of mass ejected during this period (10-7 M⊙ masses), and improve measurements of the period of jet precession (P=12013 ± 74 days). We then use our survey of eleven accretion-driven symbiotic systems to determine that the radio brightness of a symbiotic system could potentially

  18. Division x: Radio Astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, Russ; Chapman, Jessica; Rendong, Nan; Carilli, Christopher; Giovannini, Gabriele; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prajval

    This triennium has seen a phenomenal investment in development of observational radio astronomy facilities in all parts of the globe at a scale that significantly impacts the international community. This includes both major enhancements such as the transition from the VLA to the EVLA in North

  19. Radio Band Observations of Blazar Variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Margo F. Aller; Hugh D. Aller; Philip A. Hughes

    2011-03-01

    The properties of blazar variability in the radio band are studied using the unique combination of temporal resolution from single dish monitoring and spatial resolution from VLBA imaging. Such measurements now available in all four Stokes parameters, together with theoretical simulations, identify the origin of radio band variability and probe the characteristics of the radio jet where the broadband blazar emission originates. Outbursts in total flux density and linear polarization in the optical-to-radio bands are attributed to shocks propagating within the jet spine, in part, based on limited modelling invoking transverse shocks; new radiative transfer simulations allowing for shocks at arbitrary angle to the flow direction confirm this picture by reproducing the observed centimeter-band variations observed more generally, and are of current interest since these shocks may play a role in the -ray flaring detected by Fermi. Recent UMRAO multifrequency Stokes V studies of bright blazars identify the spectral variability properties of circular polarization for the first time and demonstrate that polarity flips are relatively common. All-Stokes data are consistent with the production of circular polarization by linear-to-circular mode conversion in a region that is at least partially selfabsorbed. Detailed analysis of single-epoch, multifrequency, all-Stokes VLBA observations of 3C 279 support this physical picture and are best explained by emission from an electron-proton plasma.

  20. Hydroxyl, water, ammonia, carbon monoxide, and neutral carbon towards the Sagittarius A complex. VLA, Odin, and SEST observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, R.; Sandqvist, Å.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Winnberg, A.; Fathi, K.; Frisk, U.; Olberg, M.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: The Sagittarius A complex in the Galactic centre comprises an ensemble of molecular clouds of different species with a variety of geometrical and kinematic properties. This work aims to study molecular abundances, morphology, and kinematics by comparing hydroxyl, water, carbon monoxide, ammonia, and atomic carbon and some of their isotopologues, in the +50 km s-1 cloud, the circumnuclear disk (CND), the +20 km s-1 cloud, the expanding molecular ring and the line-of-sight spiral arm features, including the Local/Sgr arm, the -30 km s-1 arm, and the 3-kpc arm. Methods: We observed the +50 km s-1 cloud, the CND and the +20 km s-1 cloud, and other selected positions at the Galactic centre with the VLA, and the Odin satellite. The VLA was used to map the 1665 and 1667 MHz OH lambda doublet main lines of the (2Π3/2) state, and the Odin satellite was used to map the 557 GHz H2O (110 - 101) line as well as to observe the 548 GHz H218O (110-101) line, the 572 GHz NH3 (10 - 00) line, the 576 GHz CO J = 5 - 4 line and the 492 GHz C i (3P1-3P0) line. Furthermore, the SEST was used to map a region of the Sgr A complex in the 220 GHz C18O J = 2-1 line. Results: Strong OH absorption, H2O emission and absorption lines were seen at all observed positions, and the H218O line was detected in absorption towards the +50 km s-1 cloud, the CND, the +20 km s-1cloud, the expanding molecular ring, and the 3-kpc arm. Strong CO J = 5-4, C18O J = 2-1, and neutral carbon C i emissions were seen towards the +50 and +20 km s-1 clouds. NH3 was only detected in weak absorption originating in the line-of-sight spiral arm features. The abundances of OH and H2O in the +50 and +20 km s-1 clouds reflect the different physical environments in the clouds, where shocks and star formation prevail in the +50 km s-1 cloud and giving rise to a higher rate of H2O production there than in the +20 km s-1 cloud. In the CND, cloud collisions and shocks are frequent, and the CND is also subject to intense UV

  1. Visual Landing Aids (VLA) Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Visual Landing Aids (VLA) Laboratory serves to support fleet VLA systems by maintaining the latest service change configuration of currently deployed VLA...

  2. Radio imaging of core-dominated high redshift quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthel, Peter D.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Lonsdale, Colin J.

    1999-01-01

    VLA imaging at kiloparsec-scale resolution of sixteen core-dominated radio-loud QSOs is presented. Many objects appear to display variable radio emission and their radio morphologies are significantly smaller than those of steep-spectrum quasars, consistent with these objects being observed...

  3. The Sérsic-Pastoriza galaxy NGC 1808. I. Radio-continuum, optical and H I observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, D. J.; Unger, S. W.; Pedlar, A.; Yates, G. J.; Axon, D. J.; Wolstencroft, R. D.; Taylor, K.; Gyldenkerne, K.

    1990-08-01

    The authors present radio-continuum observations made at high angular resolution with the VLA at 20, 6 and 2 cm of the central region of the Sérsic-Pastoriza galaxy NGC 1808. These observations reveal a population of compact radio sources, reminiscent of those found in the archetypal starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The bulk of these compact features are not coincident with the optical hot-spots and are likely to be individual or unresolved groups of SNRs. The authors have also made H I observations of NGC 1808 with the VLA. Although this was primarily to search for unusual motions which may enable the authors to understand the nuclear activity, they also obtained information on the large-scale distribution and dynamics of gas in this system. The neutral hydrogen is largely concentrated in a central bar, with weak emission from the spiral arms. An absorption profile against the radio emission from the nuclear region shows two features straddling the systemic velocity. The velocity field of the galaxy is largely consistent with rotation although there is evidence of significant non-circular motions in the bar. The authors discuss any possible relationship between these non-circular motions and the starburst/nuclear activity in the central region of NGC 1808.

  4. The VLA-COSMOS Survey: II. Source Catalog of the Large Project

    CERN Document Server

    Schinnerer, E; Carilli, C L; Bondi, M; Ciliegi, P; Jahnke, K; Scoville, N Z; Aussel, H; Bertoldi, F; Blain, A W; Impey, C D; Koekemoer, A M; Lefèvre, O; Urry, C M

    2006-01-01

    The VLA-COSMOS large project is described and its scientific objective is discussed. We present a catalog of ~ 3,600 radio sources found in the 2deg^2 COSMOS field at 1.4 GHz. The observations in the VLA A and C configuration resulted in a resolution of 1.5''x1.4'' and a mean rms noise of ~ 10.5(15) uJy/beam in the central 1(2)deg^2. 80 radio sources are clearly extended consisting of multiple components, and most of them appear to be double-lobed radio galaxies. The astrometry of the catalog has been thoroughly tested and the uncertainty in the relative and absolute astrometry are 130mas and <55mas, respectively.

  5. VLA Detection of RRLs from the radio nucleus of NGC 253 Ionization by a weak AGN, an obscured SSC or a compact SNR ?

    CERN Document Server

    Mohan, N R; Goss, W M; Mohan, Niruj R.

    2002-01-01

    We have imaged the H92alpha and H75alpha radio recombination line (RRL) emissions from the starburst galaxy NGC 253 with a resolution of ~4 pc. The peak of the RRL emission at both frequencies coincides with the unresolved radio nucleus. Both lines observed towards the nucleus are extremely wide, with FWHM of ~200 km /s. Modeling the RRL and radio continuum data for the radio nucleus shows that the lines arise in gas whose density is ~10^4 \\cc and mass is few thousand Msun, which requires an ionizing flux of (6-20)x10^{51} photons /s. We consider a SNR expanding in a dense medium, a star cluster and also an AGN as potential ionizing sources. Based on dynamical arguments, we rule out an SNR as a viable ionizing source. A star cluster model was considered and the dynamics of the ionized gas in a stellar-wind driven structure was investigated. Such a model is consistent with the properties of the ionized gas only for a cluster younger than ~10^5 years. The existence of such a young cluster at the nucleus seems i...

  6. Connecting low- and high-mass star formation: the intermediate-mass protostar IRAS 05373+2349 VLA 2

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, G M; Hoare, M G; Lumsden, S L

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, there have been few studies of the protostellar evolution of intermediate-mass (IM) stars, which may bridge the low- and high-mass regimes. This paper aims to investigate whether the properties of an IM protostar within the IRAS 05373+2349 embedded cluster are similar to that of low- and/or high-mass protostars. We carried out Very Large Array as well as Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy continuum and 12CO(J=1-0) observations, which uncover seven radio continuum sources (VLA 1-7). The spectral index of VLA 2, associated with the IM protostar is consistent with an ionised stellar wind or jet. The source VLA 3 is coincident with previously observed H2 emission line objects aligned in the north-south direction (P.A. -20 to -12 deg), which may be either an ionised jet emanating from VLA 2 or (shock-)ionised cavity walls in the large-scale outflow from VLA 2. The position angle between VLA 2 and 3 is slightly misaligned with the large-scale outflow we map at ~5-arcsec resolution i...

  7. Radio Meteors Observations Techniques at RI NAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovk, Vasyl; Kaliuzhnyi, Mykola

    2016-07-01

    The Solar system is inhabited with large number of celestial bodies. Some of them are well studied, such as planets and vast majority of big asteroids and comets. There is one group of objects which has received little attention. That is meteoroids with related to them meteors. Nowadays enough low-technology high-efficiency radio-technical solutions are appeared which allow to observe meteors daily. At RI NAO three methodologies for meteor observation are developed: single-station method using FM-receiver, correlation method using FM-receiver and Internet resources, and single-station method using low-cost SDR-receiver.

  8. Radio continuum observations of the Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 163296 and HR 5999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. A.; Perez, M. R.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.

    1993-01-01

    Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the two bright Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 163296 and HR 5999 have been carried out at lambda 3.6 and 20 cm. We report the detection of a radio source at lambda 3.6 cm that may be associated with HD 163296. From the peak flux density of 0.39 mJy/beam area, we estimate a mass-loss rate of 1.8 x 10(exp -8) solar mass/yr if the flux is due to free-free emission in an ionized wind with spherical symmetry, assuming a terminal wind velocity of 200 km/s. HR 5999 was not detected at either wavelength. We discuss the results in terms of the stellar-driven and accretion-driven scenarios for line and wind formation in Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  9. Radio observations of Jupiter-family comets

    CERN Document Server

    Crovisier, J; Bockelée-Morvan, D; Colom, P

    2008-01-01

    Radio observations from decimetric to submillimetric wavelengths are now a basic tool for the investigation of comets. Spectroscopic observations allow us i) to monitor the gas production rate of the comets, by directly observing the water molecule, or by observing secondary products (e.g., the OH radical) or minor species (e.g., HCN); ii) to investigate the chemical composition of comets; iii) to probe the physical conditions of cometary atmospheres: kinetic temperature and expansion velocity. Continuum observations probe large-size dust particles and (for the largest objects) cometary nuclei. Comets are classified from their orbital characteristics into two separate classes: i) nearly-isotropic, mainly long-period comets and ii) ecliptic, short-period comets, the so-called Jupiter-family comets. These two classes apparently come from two different reservoirs, respectively the Oort cloud and the trans-Neptunian scattered disc. Due to their different history and - possibly - their different origin, they may h...

  10. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 4 REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Eun, E-mail: minho@kasi.re.kr [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Star formation activities in the NGC 2024 FIR 4 region were studied by imaging centimeter continuum sources and water maser sources using several archival data sets from the Very Large Array. The continuum source VLA 9 is elongated in the northwest–southeast direction, consistent with the FIR 4 bipolar outflow axis, and has a flat spectrum in the 6.2–3.6 cm interval. The three water maser spots associated with FIR 4 are also distributed along the outflow axis. One of the spots is located close to VLA 9, and another one is close to an X-ray source. Examinations of the positions of compact objects in this region suggest that the FIR 4 cloud core contains a single low-mass protostar. VLA 9 is the best indicator of the protostellar position. VLA 9 may be a radio thermal jet driven by this protostar, and it is unlikely that FIR 4 contains a high-mass young stellar object (YSO). A methanol 6.7 GHz maser source is located close to VLA 9, at a distance of about 100 AU. The FIR 4 protostar must be responsible for the methanol maser action, which suggests that methanol class II masers are not necessarily excited by high-mass YSOs. Also discussed are properties of other centimeter continuum sources in the field of view and the water masers associated with FIR 6n. Some of the continuum sources are radio thermal jets, and some are magnetically active young stars.

  11. Atmospheric waves and dynamics beneath Jupiter's clouds from radio wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberías, Raúl; Simon, Amy; de Pater, Imke

    2017-08-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between ∼ 0.5 - 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiter's atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of ∼1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10°N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-μm hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wavelength map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiter's atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 μm hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLA's upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric dynamics

  12. The continuum radio emission from the Sy 1.5 galaxy NGC 5033

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Torres, Miguel A

    2007-01-01

    We present new continuum VLA observations of the nearby Sy 1.5 galaxy NGC 5033, made at 4.9 and 8.4 GHz on 8 April 2003. Combined with VLA archival observations at 1.4 and 4.9 GHz made on 7 August 1993, 29 August 1999, and 31 October 1999, we sample the galaxy radio emission at scales ranging from the nuclear regions (<~ 100 pc) to the outer regions of the disk (~ 40 kpc). The high-resolution VLA images show a core-jet structure for the Sy 1.5 nucleus. While the core has a moderately steep non-thermal radio spectrum (S_\

  13. Radio follow-up observations of stellar tidal disruption flares: Constraints on off-axis jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Körding E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN and X-ray binaries have shown that relativistic jets are ubiquitous when compact objects accrete. One could therefore anticipate the launch of a jet after a star is disrupted and accreted by a massive black hole. This birth of a relativistic jet may have been observed recently in two stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs, which were discovered in gamma-rays by Swift. Yet no transient radio emission has been detected from the tens of TDF candidates that were discovered at optical to soft X-ray frequencies. Because the sample that was followed-up at radio frequencies is small, the non-detections can be explained by Doppler boosting, which reduces the jet flux for off-axis observers. Plus, the existing followup observation are mostly within ∼ 10 months of the discovery, so the non-detections can also be due to a delay of the radio emission with respect to the time of disruption. To test the conjecture that all TDFs launch jets, we obtained 5 GHz follow-up observations with the Jansky VLA of six known TDFs. To avoid missing delayed jet emission, our observations probe 1–8 years since the estimated time of disruption. None of the sources are detected, with very deep upper limits at the 10 micro Jansky level. These observations rule out the hypothesis that these TDFs launched jets similar to radio-loud quasars. We also constrain the possibility that the flares hosted a jet identical to Sw 1644+57.

  14. Nuclear star formation on 100 parsec scales: 10" resolution radio continuum, HI and CO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jean L.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Martin, Robert N.

    1987-01-01

    A program of radio line and continuum studies of star formation in nearby spiral galaxies is reported. The objective is a search for hot gas and peculiar dynamics in spiral nuclei with 10" to 30" angular resolution. Vigorous star formation is found to be a common phenomenon in the inner kpc of spirals. Arcsecond resolution observations of radio continuum emission at 6 and 2 cm were used to separate the thermal and nonthermal radio components. It was found that thermal and nonthermal emission are well mixed even on sizescales of 10 pc. To understand the reason for the increased level of star formation activity in spiral nuclei, HI and CO emission in these galaxies is studied. The CO transition was detected in M51, M82, NGC 253, NGC 6946 and IC 342 with T sub a approx. 0.5 to 2.0 K, at 20" angular resolution. The dynamics and spatial distribution of nuclear gas are being studied using VLA HI maps with 30" synthesized beams. Evidence for noncircular motions in HI was found in the nucleus of IC 342.

  15. The Young and the Dustless: Interpreting Radio Observations of UltraViolet Luminous Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Basu-Zych, Antara R; Johnson, Benjamin D; Hoopes, Charles; Overzier, Roderik; Treyer, Marie A; Heckman, Timothy M; Barlow, Tom A; Bianchi, Luciana; Conrow, Tim; Donas, Jose; Forster, Karl G; Friedman, Peter G; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F; Martin, D Christopher; Milliard, Bruno; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Rich, R Michael; Salim, Samir; Seibert, Mark; Small, Todd A; Szalay, Alexander S; Wyder, Ted K; Yi, Suk Young

    2007-01-01

    Ultraviolet Luminous Galaxies (UVLGs) have been identified as intensely star-forming, nearby galaxies. A subset of these, the supercompact UVLGs, are believed to be local analogs of high redshift Lyman Break Galaxies. Here we investigate the radio continuum properties of this important population for the first time. We have observed 42 supercompact UVLGs with the VLA, all of which have extensive coverage in the UV/optical by GALEX and SDSS. Our analysis includes comparison samples of multiwavelength data from the Spitzer First Look Survey and from the SDSS-Galex matched catalogs. In addition we have Spitzer MIPS data for 24 of our galaxies and find that they fall on the radio-FIR correlation of normal star-forming galaxies. We find that our galaxies have lower radio-to-UV ratios and lower Balmer decrements than other local galaxies with similar (high) star formation rates. Optical spectra show they have lower Dn(4000) and HdeltaA indices, higher Hbeta emission-line equivalents widths, and higher [OIII]5007/Hb...

  16. The Multiwavelength Study of Two Unique Radio Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nectaria A. B. Gizani; M. A. Garrett; J. P. Leahy

    2002-03-01

    We present the usage of multi-frequency and multi-band radio, VLA, observations as well as X-ray observations in order to study the environment around two powerful radio galaxies, namely Hercules A and 3 C310. We study their environment both in pc- and kpc-scales. We have chosen these two radio galaxies as they present similar and unique characteristics, compared to the ones from our general knowledge about double radio galaxies associated with active galactic nuclei.

  17. Atmospheric Waves and Dynamics Beneath Jupiters Clouds from Radio Wavelength Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Simon, Amy; De Pater, Imke

    2017-01-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between approx. 0.5- 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiters atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of approx. 1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10 N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-m hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wave- length map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiters atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 m hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLAs upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric

  18. TESTING THE MAGNETAR MODEL VIA LATE-TIME RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF TWO MACRONOVA CANDIDATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horesh, Assaf [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Hotokezaka, Kenta; Piran, Tsvi [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Nakar, Ehud [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Hancock, Paul [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845 (Australia)

    2016-03-10

    Compact binary mergers may have already been observed as they are the leading model for short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). Radioactive decay within the ejecta from these mergers is expected to produce an infrared flare, dubbed macronova (or kilonova), on a timescale of a week. Recently, two such macronova candidates were identified in followup observations of sGRBs, strengthening the possibility that those indeed arise from mergers. The same ejecta will also produce long-term (months to years) radio emission due to its interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium. In the search for this emission, we observed the two macronova candidates, GRB 130603B and GRB 060614, with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Our observations resulted in null-detections, putting strong upper limits on the kinetic energy and mass of the ejecta. A possible outcome of a merger is a highly magnetized neutron star (a magnetar), which has been suggested as the central engine for GRBs. Such a magnetar will deposit a significant fraction of its energy into the ejecta leading to a brighter radio flare. Our results, therefore, rule out magnetars in these two events.

  19. Parameter Estimation Using VLA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Willem C.

    The main objective of this dissertation is to extract parameters from multiple wavelength images, on a pixel-to-pixel basis, when the images are corrupted with noise and a point spread function. The data used are from the field of radio astronomy. The very large array (VLA) at Socorro in New Mexico was used to observe planetary nebula NGC 7027 at three different wavelengths, 2 cm, 6 cm and 20 cm. A temperature model, describing the temperature variation in the nebula as a function of optical depth, is postulated. Mathematical expressions for the brightness distribution (flux density) of the nebula, at the three observed wavelengths, are obtained. Using these three equations and the three data values available, one from the observed flux density map at each wavelength, it is possible to solve for two temperature parameters and one optical depth parameter at each pixel location. Due to the fact that the number of unknowns equal the number of equations available, estimation theory cannot be used to smooth any noise present in the data values. It was found that a direct solution of the three highly nonlinear flux density equations is very sensitive to noise in the data. Results obtained from solving for the three unknown parameters directly, as discussed above, were not physical realizable. This was partly due to the effect of incomplete sampling at the time when the data were gathered and to noise in the system. The application of rigorous digital parameter estimation techniques result in estimated parameters that are also not physically realizable. The estimated values for the temperature parameters are for example either too high or negative, which is not physically possible. Simulation studies have shown that a "double smoothing" technique improves the results by a large margin. This technique consists of two parts: in the first part the original observed data are smoothed using a running window and in the second part a similar smoothing of the estimated parameters

  20. VLA Discovers Giant Rings Around Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    , thanks to its very high sensitivity and unique capability to make images of exceedingly faint radio-emitting objects," Bagchi said. The scientists also used the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton, the world's most sensitive X-ray observatory, to observe this extraordinary cluster of galaxies. "The advanced technical capabilities of the orbiting XMM-Newton revealed a spectacular bullet-like region of X-ray emission in this dynamically active cluster," said Gastao B. Lima Neto, of the Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics in Sao Paulo, Brazil, a co-author of the research paper. "Our X-ray observations strongly suggest a recent collision and merger of two or more smaller clusters. Such a phenomenon is among the most energetic events in the Universe after the Big Bang. Only a tiny fraction of the total energy of this collision, if transferred to electrons, would cause them to emit the radio waves observed by the VLA. However, the main question is, how this is achieved," said Florence Durret of the Astrophysical Institute of Paris, France, another of the researchers. The scientists calculated that the total energy of the colliding groups of galaxies would be enough to keep our Sun shining for more than 20 sextillion years (2 followed by 22 zeros)! "We think the shock waves that sped up these electrons came from the collision of a smaller group of galaxies with the main body of the larger cluster. When two such massive objects crash into each other at supersonic speed, gigantic ripple-like shock waves are created in the surrounding gas, which race out to the outer regions of the forming cluster at a speed of thousands of kilometers per second," Bagchi said. "You can imagine that each cluster is like a supersonic aircraft, moving faster than the speed of sound in the surrounding gas, and just as you hear a sonic boom when shock waves from an airplane pass by you, we believe that the situation in the Abell 3376 cluster is similar, with ringlike radio structures tracing out the

  1. Radio-continuum observations of Sersic-Pastoriza galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, G. J.; Saikia, D. J.; Pedlar, A.; Axon, D. J.

    1989-07-01

    Preliminary results of radio continuum observations of selected Sersic-Pastoriza galaxies are presented. Subjects reported are their radio properties at 6 and 20 cm, estimates of linear polarization and spectral indices and a discussion of possible relationships between nuclear morphology and radio luminosity.

  2. A Warp in Progress: H I and Radio Continuum Observations of the Spiral NGC 3145

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, Michele; Struck, Curtis; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Elmegreen, Debra M

    2015-01-01

    We present VLA H I and 6 cm radio continuum observations of the spiral NGC 3145 and H I observations of its two companions, NGC 3143 and PGC 029578. In optical images NGC 3145 has stellar arms that appear to cross, forming "X"-features. Our radio continuum observations rule out shock fronts at 3 of the 4 "X"-features. In the middle-to-outer disk, the H I line-profiles of NGC 3145 are skewed. Relative to the disk, the gas in the skewed wing of the line-profiles has z-motions away from us on the approaching side of the galaxy and z-motions of about the same magnitude (about 40 km/s) towards us on the receding side. These warping motions imply that there has been a perturbation perpendicular to the disk over large spatial scales. Two features in NGC 3145 have velocities indicating that they are out-of-plane tidal arms. One is an apparent branch of a main spiral arm; the velocity of the branch is 150 km/s greater than the spiral arm where they appear to intersect in projection. The other is an arm that forms 3 of...

  3. Radio Observations of the Star Formation Activities in the NGC 2024 FIR 4 Region

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Minho; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Star formation activities in the NGC 2024 FIR 4 region were studied by imaging centimeter continuum sources and water maser sources using several archival data sets from the Very Large Array. The continuum source VLA 9 is elongated in the northwest-southeast direction, consistent with the FIR 4 bipolar outflow axis, and has a flat spectrum in the 6.2-3.6 cm interval. The three water maser spots associated with FIR 4 are also distributed along the outflow axis. One of the spots is located close to VLA 9, and another one is close to an X-ray source. Examinations of the positions of compact objects in this region suggest that the FIR 4 cloud core contains a single low-mass protostar. VLA 9 is the best indicator of the protostellar position. VLA 9 may be a radio thermal jet driven by this protostar, and it is unlikely that FIR 4 contains a high-mass young stellar object (YSO). A methanol 6.7 GHz maser source is located close to VLA 9, at a distance of about 100 AU. The FIR 4 protostar must be responsible for the ...

  4. Radio continuum jet in NGC 7479

    OpenAIRE

    Laine, Seppo; Beck, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    The barred galaxy NGC 7479 hosts a remarkable jet-like radio continuum feature: bright, 12-kpc long in projection, and hosting an aligned magnetic field. The degree of polarization is 6%-8% along the jet, and remarkably constant, which is consistent with helical field models. The radio brightness of the jet suggests strong interaction with the ISM and hence a location near the disk plane. We observed NGC 7479 at four wavelengths with the VLA and Effelsberg radio telescopes. The equipartition ...

  5. Connecting low- and high-mass star formation: the intermediate-mass protostar IRAS 05373+2349 VLA 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G. M.; Johnston, K. G.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, there have been few studies of the protostellar evolution of intermediate-mass (IM) stars, which may bridge the low- and high-mass regimes. This paper aims to investigate whether the properties of an IM protostar within the IRAS 05373+2349 embedded cluster are similar to that of low- and/or high-mass protostars. We carried out Very Large Array as well as Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy continuum and 12CO(J=1-0) observations, which uncover seven radio continuum sources (VLA 1-7). The spectral index of VLA 2, associated with the IM protostar is consistent with an ionized stellar wind or jet. The source VLA 3 is coincident with previously observed H2 emission line objects aligned in the north-south direction (P.A. -20 to -12°), which may be either an ionized jet emanating from VLA 2 or (shock-)ionized cavity walls in the large-scale outflow from VLA 2. The position angle between VLA 2 and 3 is slightly misaligned with the large-scale outflow we map at ˜5-arcsec resolution in 12CO (P.A. ˜ 30°), which in the case of a jet suggests precession. The emission from the mm core associated with VLA 2 is also detected; we estimate its mass to be 12-23 M⊙, depending on the contribution from ionized gas. Furthermore, the large-scale outflow has properties intermediate between outflows from low- and high-mass young stars. Therefore, we conclude that the IM protostar within IRAS 05373+2349 is phenomenologically as well as quantitatively intermediate between the low- and high-mass domains.

  6. The Double–Double Radio Galaxy 3C293

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. A. Joshi; S. Nandi; D. J. Saikia; C. H. Ishwara-Chandra; C. Konar

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of radio continuum observations at frequencies ranging from ∼ 150–5000 MHz of the misaligned double–double radio galaxy (DDRG) 3C293 (J1352+3126) using the GMRT and the VLA, and estimate the time-scale of interruption of jet activity to be less than ∼ 0.1 Myr.

  7. Radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars: one population, different epochs of observation

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    I bring together evidence for the rapidity with which quasars' radio synchrotron lobe emission fades and for the intermittency with which jet plasma is ejected from individual quasars and radio galaxies and affirm the picture presented by Nipoti et al (2005) that the radio-loudness of quasars is a function of the epoch at which they are observed. I briefly illustrate this account with examples of successive episodes of jet activity where the axis along which jet plasma is launched appears to have precessed. A new model for the weak core radio emission from radio-quiet quasars, that is not any kind of jet ejecta, is also briefly described.

  8. Resolved Multifrequency Radio Observations of GG Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Sean M; Isella, Andrea; Birnstiel, Tilman; Rosenfeld, Katherine A; Wilner, David J; Perez, Laura M; Ricci, Luca; Carpenter, John M; Calvet, Nuria; Corder, Stuartt A; Deller, Adam T; Dullemond, Cornelis P; Greaves, Jane S; Harris, Robert J; Henning, Thomas; Kwon, Woojin; Lazio, Joseph; Linz, Hendrik; Mundy, Lee G; Sargent, Anneila I; Storm, Shaye; Testi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    We present sub-arcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ~60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales of ~0.1". A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present ...

  9. New Radio Telescope Makes First Scientific Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    August 2000 and now is being prepared for routine scientific operation. It is operated by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, headquartered in Charlottesville, Virginia. It is the largest fully-steerable telescope in the world. It is a highly advanced telescope with a mechanized reflecting surface and a laser measurement system for continuous adjustments to its structure. The 305-meter (1,000 feet) Arecibo telescope recently has completed a major upgrade funded by the NSF and NASA to improve its observing capabilities, including a more powerful radar transmitter for planetary studies. It is operated by the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center (NAIC) headquartered at Cornell University. Its reflector is fixed to the ground, and is the largest telescope of any type in the world. The radar capability of Arecibo, combined with the large reflectors of Arecibo and Green Bank, make for a uniquely powerful radar imaging capability. Both observatories are facilities of the National Science Foundation. The NRAO is operated for the NSF by Associated Universities, Inc., under a cooperative agreement. NAIC is operated by Cornell University, also under a cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  10. X-ray and Radio Observations of the Massive Star Forming Region IRAS 20126+4104

    CERN Document Server

    Montes, Virginie A; Anderson, Crystal; Rosero, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    We present results of Chandra ACIS-I and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) 6 cm continuum observations of the IRAS 20126+4104 massive star forming region. We detect 150 X-ray sources within the 17 arcmin x 17 arcmin ACIS-I field, and a total of 13 radio sources within the 9'.2 primary beam at 4.9 GHz. Among these are the first 6 cm detections of the central sources reported by Hofner et al. (2007), namely I20N1, I20S, and I20var. A new variable radio sources is also reported. Searching the 2MASS archive we identified 88 NIR counterparts to the X-ray sources. Only 4 of the X-ray sources had 6 cm counterparts. Based on an NIR color-color analysis, and on the Besancon simulation of Galactic stellar populations (Robin et al. 2003), we estimate that about 90 X-ray sources are associated with this massive star forming region. We detect an increasing surface density of X-ray sources toward the massive protostar and infer the presence of a cluster of at least 46 YSOs within a distance of 1.2 pc from the massive p...

  11. Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

  12. Joint radio and optical observations of the most radio-powerful intracloud lightning discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Jacobson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The most radio-powerful intracloud lightning emissions are associated with a phenomenon variously called "narrow bipolar events" or "compact intracloud discharges". This article examines in detail the coincidence and timing relationship between, on the one hand, the most radio-powerful intracloud lightning events and, on the other hand, optical outputs (or lack thereof of the same discharge process. This is done, first, using coordinated very high frequency (VHF and optical observations from the FORTE satellite and, second, using coordinated sferic and all-sky optical observations from the Los Alamos Sferic Array. In both cases, it is found that the sought coincidences are exceedingly rare. Moreover, in the handful of coincidences between optical and intense radio emissions that have been identified, the radio emissions differ from their usual behavior, by being accompanied by approximately simultaneous "conventional" lightning radio emissions. It is implied that the most radio-powerful intracloud emission process essentially differs from ordinary incandescent lightning.

  13. Evolution of the Water Maser Expanding Shell in W75N VLA 2

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jeong-Sook; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Honma, Mareki; Sasao, Tesuo; Surcis, Gabriele; Canto, Jorge; Torrelles, Jose M; Kim, Sang Joon

    2013-01-01

    We present Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of 22 GHz H$_2$O masers in the high-mass star-forming region of \\objectname{W75N}, carried out with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) for three-epochs in 2007 with an angular resolution of $\\sim$ 1 mas. We detected H$_2$O maser emission toward the radio jet in VLA 1 and the expanding shell-like structure in VLA 2. .......... We have made elliptical fits to the VLA 2 H$_2$O maser shell-like structure observed in the different epochs (1999, 2005, and 2007), and found that the shell is still expanding eight years after its discovery. From the difference in the size of the semi-major axes of the fitted ellipses in the epochs 1999 ($\\simeq$ 71$\\pm$1 mas), 2005 ($\\simeq$ 97$\\pm$3 mas), and 2007 ($\\simeq$ 111$\\pm$1 mas), we estimate an average expanding velocity of $\\sim$ 5 mas yr$^{-1}$, similar to the proper motions measured in the individual H$_2$O maser features. A kinematic age of $\\sim$ 20 yr is derived for this structure. In addition, ...

  14. 3C 84 Expanding Radio Lobe Revealed by VSOP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, K.; Kameno, S.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Shinji, H.; Gabuzda, D. C.; Inoue, M.

    2009-08-01

    We report the detection of the expansion and inner proper motions of a young radio lobe associated with the bright radio source 3C 84 in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275 using multi-epoch VSOP observation. The observed inner proper motions are consistent with the evolution scenario of classical double radio sources. The apparent expansion velocity is 0.50 ± 0.09 c, and the age of radio lobe is estimated to be 45.7 ± 8.9 years in 2001. The total flux density at 5 GHz increased at the end of the 1950's, with several peaks in the middle of the 1980's, and is in a decay phase now. The decay of total flux density can be naturally explained by an adiabatic cooling due to the expansion of the radio lobe, and previously measured spectral indices suggest that the emission comes from the surface of the radio lobe.

  15. Deep Radio Observations of the Toothbrush Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Röttgering, H.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; de Gasperin, F.; Bonafede, A.; Pizzo, R.; Ferrari, C.; Orrù, E.; Ogrean, G. A.; LOFAR Busyweek Team; surveys KSP, LOFAR

    2014-01-01

    We present LOFAR and JVLA radio observations of the Toothbrush galaxy cluster. The Toothbrush cluster hosts diffuse 2 Mpc extended radio emission in the form of a radio relic and halo. XMM-Newton X-ray observations show that the cluster is undergoing a major merger event. Both the radio relic and halo are likely related to this ongoing merger. Radio relics are proposed to be direct tracers of shock waves in the intracluster medium. The XMM observations indeed reveal a shock, but there is a puzzling 200 kpc spatial offset between the shock position and relic. Our deep LOFAR and JVLA observations allow a detailed spectral study to test the shock origin of the relic and underlying particle acceleration mechanisms. Finally, the LOFAR observations highlight the science that could be obtained from a deep low-frequency all-sky survey.

  16. Plasma properties and magnetic field structure of the solar corona, based on coordinated Max 1991 observations from SERTS, the VLA, and magnetographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    1995-01-01

    The purposes of this investigation are to determine the plasma properties and magnetic field structure of the solar corona using coordinated observations obtained with NASA/GSFC's Solar EUV rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS), the Very Large Array (VLA), and magnetographs. The observations were obtained under the auspices of NASA's Max '91 program. The methods of achieving the stated purposes of this investigation are: (1) to use SERTS spectra and spectroheliograms to determine coronal plasma properties such as temperature, density, and emission measure; (2) to use the coronal plasma properties to calculate the intensity of the thermal bremsstrahlung microwave emission from the coronal plasma (the minimum microwave intensity expected from the emitting plasma); (3) to establish which emission mechanism(s) contribute to the observed microwave emission by comparing the calculated thermal bremsstrahlung intensity with the observed microwave intensity; (4) to derive the coronal magnetic field for regions in which gyroemission contributes to the microwave emission by determining the appropriate harmonic of the local electron gyrofrequency; (5) to derive the coronal magnetic field for regions in which thermal bremsstrahlung emission alone is responsible for the observed microwave emission by calculating the magnetic field which yields the observed microwave polarization; (6) to derive three-dimensional models of the coronal plasma and magnetic field which are consistent with all of the EUV spectra and spectroheliograms, as well as with the intensity and polarization maps at all of the microwave observing frequencies; and (7) to compare the coronal magnetic field derived from the coordinated multiwaveband observations with extrapolations from photospheric magnetograms.

  17. Testing the Magnetar Model via Late Time Radio Observations of Two Macronova Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Horesh, Assaf; Piran, Tsvi; Nakar, Ehud; Hancock, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Compact binary mergers may have already been observed as they are the leading model for short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). Radioactive decay within the ejecta from these mergers is expected to produce an infra-red flare, dubbed macronova (or kilonova), on a time scale of a week. Recently two such macronova candidates were identified in followup observations of sGRBs, strengthening the possibility that those indeed arise from mergers. The same ejecta will also produce a long term (months to years) radio emission due to its interaction with the surrounding ISM. In search for this emission, we observed the two macronova candidates, GRB 130603B and GRB 060614 with the Jansky very large array (VLA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Our observations resulted in null-detections, putting strong upper limits on the kinetic energy and mass of the ejecta. A possible outcome of a merger is a highly magnetized neutron star (a magnetar), which has been suggested as the central engine for GRBs. Such a magnetar ...

  18. VLA-Max '91 tests of high energy flare physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.; Willson, Robert F.

    1989-01-01

    The potential for the Very Large Array (VLA) contributions during the coming maximum in solar activity is illustrated by unpublished observations of solar flares on 28 May, 8 June, 24 June, and 30 September 1988. Some of this data appears in the two papers by Willson et al., referenced in this article. The VLA can be used to spatially resolve flaring active regions and their magnetic fields. These results can be compared with simultaneous x ray and gamma ray observations from space. Examples are provided in which spatially separated radio sources are resolved for the pre-burst, impulsive and decay phases of solar flares. The emergence of precursor coronal loops probably triggers the release of stored magnetic energy in adjacent coronal loops. Noise storm enhancements can originate in large-scale coronal loops on opposite sides of the visible solar disk. An interactive feedback mechanism may exist between activity in high-lying 90 cm coronal loops and lower-lying 20 cm ones.

  19. Rotational modulation and flares on RS canum Venaticorum and BY Draconis stars. XVI - IUE spectroscopy and VLA observations of Gl 182( = V 1005 Orionis) in October 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, M.; Doyle, J. G.; Byrne, P. B.; Rodono, M.; Gibson, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A large flare was detected simultaneously with IUE and VLA on Gl 182 on October 5, 1983, this event showing the largest C IV flare enhancement yet observed by IUE. A smaller flare was also detected on October 4, although only with the IUE satellite. Line ratio and emission measure techniques are used to derive various physical parameters of the flares. The radiative losses in the temperature region log T(e) = 4.3-5.4 in the two flares are 2.9 x 10 to the 33rd and 8.4 x 10 to the 32nd ergs, respectively. Total radiative losses over the whole temperature range log T(e) = 4.0-8.0 are estimated to be of the order of 6.4 x 10 to the 34th and 1.1 x 10 to the 34th ergs, respectively. In the October 5, flare, a very strong ultraviolet continuum is present with a total energy of 1.9 x 10 to the 33rd ergs over the wavelength range 1250-1950 A.

  20. Observation of local radio emission associated with type III radio bursts and Langmuir waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    The first clear detection of fundamental and harmonic radiation from the type III radio source region is presented. This radiation is characterized by its lack of frequency drift, its short rise and decay times, its relative weakness compared to the remotely observed radiation and its temporal coincidence with observed Langmuir waves. The observations were made with the radio and plasma frequency (URAP) receivers on the Ulysses spacecraft between about 1 and 2 AU from the Sun.

  1. No radio emission from SN 2006X after 2 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Poonam; Chevalier, Roger; Patat, Ferdinando

    2008-02-01

    We observed Type Ia supernova SN 2006X (IAUC 8667) with the VLA for 2 hours in 8.46 GHz band at 2008 Feb 19.47 UT mean time. We did not detect any radio emission, indicating it to be a normal Type Ia supernova. The map rms is 18 uJy and the flux density at the supernova position is 4 +/-18 uJy. We thank VLA staff for making this observation possible. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  2. Planetary and exoplanetary low frequency radio observations from the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarka, P.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Briand, C.; Cecconi, B.; Falcke, H.; Girard, J.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hess, S.; Klein-Wolt, M.; Konovalenko, A.; Lamy, L.; Mimoun, D.; Aminaei, A.

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the planetary and exoplanetary science that can be carried out with precursor as well as future low frequency radio instruments on the Moon, assessing the limiting noise sources, comparing them to the average and peak spectra of all planetary radio components as they will be seen from the Lunar surface or orbit. We identify which objectives will be accessible with each class of instrument, and discuss the interest of these observations compared to observations by planetary probes and to ground-based observations by large low-frequency radio arrays. The interest of goniopolarimetry is emphasized for pathfinder missions.

  3. Swift observations of unidentified radio sources in the revised Third Cambridge Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, A.; Massaro, F.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Liuzzo, E.; Tremblay, G. R.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated a group of unassociated radio sources included in the Third Cambridge Catalogue (3CR) to increase the multifrequency information on them and possibly obtain an identification. We have carried out an observational campaign with the Swift satellite to observe with the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) the field of view of 21 bright NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) sources within the positional uncertainty region of the 3CR sources. Furthermore, we have searched in the recent AllWISE Source Catalogue for infrared sources matching the position of these NVSS sources. We have detected significant emission in the soft X-ray band for nine of the investigated NVSS sources. To all of them, and in four cases with no soft X-ray association, we have associated a Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared counterpart. Eight of these infrared candidates have not been proposed earlier in the literature. In the five remaining cases our candidate matches one among a few optical candidates suggested for the same 3CR source in previous studies. No source has been detected in the UVOT filters at the position of the NVSS objects, confirming the scenario that all of them are heavily obscured. With this in mind, a spectroscopic campaign, preferably in the infrared band, will be necessary to establish the nature of the sources that we have finally identified.

  4. Unusual Solar Radio Burst Observed at Decameter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Panchenko, M.; Stanislavskyy, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    An unusual solar burst was observed simultaneously by two decameter radio telescopes UTR-2 (Kharkov, Ukraine) and URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) on 3 June 2011 in the frequency range of 16 - 28 MHz. The observed radio burst had some unusual properties, which are not typical for the other types of solar radio bursts. Its frequency drift rate was positive (about 500 kHz s-1) at frequencies higher than 22 MHz and negative (100 kHz s-1) at lower frequencies. The full duration of this event varied from 50 s up to 80 s, depending on the frequency. The maximum radio flux of the unusual burst reached ≈103 s.f.u. and its polarization did not exceed 10 %. This burst had a fine frequency-time structure of unusual appearance. It consisted of stripes with the frequency bandwidth 300 - 400 kHz. We consider that several accompanied radio and optical events observed by SOHO and STEREO spacecraft were possibly associated with the reported radio burst. A model that may interpret the observed unusual solar radio burst is proposed.

  5. Plasma Properties and Magnetic Field Structure of the Solar Corona, Based on Coordinated Max '91 Observations from SERTS, the VLA, and Magnetographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The plasma properties and magnetic field structure of the solar corona were determined using coordinated observations obtained with NASA/GSFC's Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS), the Very Large Array (VLA), and Kitt Peak photospheric longitudinal magnetograms. A problem was identified with the SERTS calibration as determined from laboratory measurements. A revised calibration curve was derived by requiring that the numerous available measured line intensity ratios agreed with their respective theoretical values. Densities were derived from line intensity ratios, and active region densities were found to typically exceed quiet Sun densities by factors of only about 2. The active region density was found to remain constant across the SERTS slit, despite the fact that the emission line intensities vary significantly. This indicates that the product of the path length and the volume filling factor must vary significantly from the active region outskirts to the central core. Filling factors were derived and found to range from much less than one to nearly unity. Wavelength shifts were examined along the SERTS slit in the spatially resolved spectra, but no evidence was found for significant Doppler shifts in active region 7563 or in the quiet Sun. The numerical procedure developed by Monsignori-Fossi and Landini was used to derive the active region and quiet sun differential emission measure (DEM) from the spatially averaged spectra. A DEM was estimated for each spatial pixel in the two dimensional active region images by scaling the averaged active region DEM based upon corresponding pixel intensities of SERTS Mg IX, Fe XV, and Fe XVI images. These results, along with density measurements, were used in an IDL computer code which calculated the temperature dependence of the coronal magnetic field in each spatial pixel by minimizing the difference between the observed and calculated 20 and 6 cm microwave brightness temperatures.

  6. Multi-epoch VLA observations of IRAS 16293-2422B and the modeling of its continuum emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Gómez, A.; Quénard, D.; Loinard, L.; Caux, E.

    2017-07-01

    We present multi-epoch interferometric observations of IRAS 16293-2422B taken with the Very Large Array at 0.7, 1, 1.3, 2, 3, 6 and 13 cm. We made continuum maps of the source at these wavelengths and measured a proper motion of -5.7±1.4 mas yr-1 in R.A. and -21.0±1.1 mas yr-1 in Dec. We also measured the spectral energy distribution for the source and found that the emission doesn't show any break in frequency as IRAS16293-2422A does, which is associated with free-free emission. We also observe that the size of this source increases always with the frequency, reaching a maximum of about 200 marcsec at 7 mm. This could indicate us that the emission is coming mostly from dust. We built up a model with a radiative transfer code (GASS-LIME) by considering the dust opacity, and the radial density and temperature profiles for the source. We show a comparison between our model and the continuum maps, proving that we are able to reproduce satisfactorily the continuum emission and the size for all the observations.

  7. Radio Continuum Observations of the Galactic Center: Photoevaporative Proplyd-like Objects near Sgr A*

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Wardle, M; Cotton, W; Schödel, R; Royster, M J

    2015-01-01

    We present radio images within 30$''$ of Sgr A* based on recent VLA observations at 34 GHz with 7.8 microJy sensitivity and resolution $\\sim88\\times46$ milliarcseconds (mas). We report 44 partially resolved compact sources clustered in two regions in the E arm of ionized gas that orbits Sgr A*. These sources have size scales ranging between ~50 and 200 mas (400 to 1600 AUs), and a bow-shock appearance facing the direction of Sgr A*. Unlike the bow-shock sources previously identified in the near-IR but associated with massive stars, these 34 GHz sources do not appear to have near-IR counterparts at 3.8 $\\mu$m. We interpret these sources as a candidate population of photoevaporative protoplanetary disks (proplyds) that are associated with newly formed low mass stars with mass loss rates ~10^{-7} - 10^{-6} solar mass per year and are located at the edge of a molecular cloud outlined by ionized gas. The disks are externally illuminated by strong Lyman continuum radiation from the ~100 OB and WR massive stars dist...

  8. Multi-Timescale Radio Observations of Multi-Wavelength GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Horst, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are a broadband phenomenon, with emission detected across the electromagnetic spectrum from low-frequency radio waves to high-energy gamma-rays. Besides this extremely broad spectral range, they are also observed over a very large range of timescales, from millisecond variability in gamma-rays to the afterglows at radio frequencies that can sometimes be observed for years after the initial gamma-ray trigger. Our current understanding of gamma-ray bursts is based on these multi-frequency and multi-timescale observations. In this talk I will show the role that radio observations have played and will play in putting together a broadband picture of the physics behind the observed emission, the progenitors, and their environment. I will highlight some recent discoveries and developments, in particular the searches for early radio emission within the first minutes after gamma-ray triggers; the increasing number of radio-detected, optically dark bursts; and the possibilities that several new and upgraded radio observatories offer to obtain a better understanding of the macro- and microphysics behind these enigmatic phenomena.

  9. AGN physics - The Jet-driven Outflow in the Radio Galaxy 3C305 and the Use of Hardness Ratio Maps to Constrain Spectral Parameters of Low Brightness Regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, D. E.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Massaro, F.; Baum, S. A.; Bianchi, S.; Chiaberge, M.; Morganti, R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Siemiginowska, A.

    2012-01-01

    From Chandra X-ray and VLA radio observations of the radio galaxy 3C305, we can make a self-consistent model in which the X-ray-emitting plasma is responsible for the depolarization of some regions of the radio emission from the jets and hotspots. On the assumption that the X-ray-emitting material,

  10. COMPARISONS OF COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GALAXY CLUSTER SIMULATIONS TO RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Collins, David C. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Govoni, Federica; Murgia, Matteo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Poggio dei Pini, Strada 54, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Norman, Michael L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Cen Renyue [Department of Astrophysical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele, E-mail: hao_xu@lanl.gov, E-mail: hli@lanl.gov, E-mail: dccollins@lanl.gov, E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu, E-mail: fgovoni@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: matteo@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: lferetti@ira.inaf.it, E-mail: ggiovann@ira.inaf.it [INAF-Istituto di Radioastronomia, Via P.Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    Radio observations of galaxy clusters show that there are {mu}G magnetic fields permeating the intracluster medium (ICM), but it is hard to accurately constrain the strength and structure of the magnetic fields without the help of advanced computer simulations. We present qualitative comparisons of synthetic Very Large Array observations of simulated galaxy clusters to radio observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) and radio halos. The cluster formation is modeled using adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the assumption that the initial magnetic fields are injected into the ICM by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift. In addition to simulated clusters in Xu et al., we present a new simulation with magnetic field injections from multiple AGNs. We find that the cluster with multiple injection sources is magnetized to a similar level as in previous simulations with a single AGN. The RM profiles from simulated clusters, both |RM| and the dispersion of RM ({sigma}{sub RM}), are consistent at a first order with the radial distribution from observations. The correlations between the {sigma}{sub RM} and X-ray surface brightness from simulations are in a broad agreement with the observations, although there is an indication that the simulated clusters could be slightly overdense and less magnetized with respect to those in the observed sample. In addition, the simulated radio halos agree with the observed correlations between the radio power versus the cluster X-ray luminosity and between the radio power versus the radio halo size. These studies show that the cluster-wide magnetic fields that originate from AGNs and are then amplified by the ICM turbulence match observations of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters.

  11. ARCADE 2 Observations of Galactic Radio Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A; Levin, S M; Limon, M; Lubin, P M; Mirel, P; Seiffert, M; Singal, J; Villela, T; Wollack, E; Wünsche, C A

    2009-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data from the ARCADE 2 flight in July 2006 to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index beta_synch = -2.5 +/- 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 +/- 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc|b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of CII emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power-law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission towards the north polar cap T_Gal = 0.498 +/- 0.028 K and spectral index beta = -2.55 +/- 0.03 at reference frequency 1 GHz. The well calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emi...

  12. VLA Measurements of Faraday Rotation through Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kooi, Jason E; Buffo, Jacob J; Spangler, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun that play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation (FR) is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma such as a CME. FR observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch. We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August 2012. We made sensitive Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations using 1 - 2 GHz frequencies of a "constellation" of radio sources through the solar corona at heliocentric distances that ranged from 6 - 15 solar radii. Of the nine sources observed, three were occulted by CMEs: two sources (0842+1835 and 0900+1832) were occulted by a single CME and one source (0843+1547) was occulted by two CMEs. In addition to our radioastronomical observations, which represent one of the first active hunts for CME Faraday r...

  13. Observations of Supernova Remnants with the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Egron, E; Loru, S; Iacolina, M N; Marongiu, M; Righini, S; Mulas, S; Murtas, G; Bachetti, M; Concu, R; Melis, A; Trois, A; Ricci, R; Pilia, M

    2016-01-01

    In the frame of the Astronomical Validation activities for the 64m Sardinia Radio Telescope, we performed 5-22 GHz imaging observations of the complex-morphology supernova remnants (SNRs) W44 and IC443. We adopted innovative observing and mapping techniques providing unprecedented accuracy for single-dish imaging of SNRs at these frequencies, revealing morphological details typically available only at lower frequencies through interferometry observations. High-frequency studies of SNRs in the radio range are useful to better characterize the spatially-resolved spectra and the physical parameters of different regions of the SNRs interacting with the ISM. Furthermore, synchrotron-emitting electrons in the high-frequency radio band are also responsible for the observed high-energy phenomenology as -e.g.- Inverse Compton and bremsstrahlung emission components observed in gamma-rays, to be disentangled from hadron emission contribution (providing constraints on the origin of cosmic rays).

  14. Fine structures of type III radio bursts observed by LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalenic, Jasmina; Marque, Christophe; Fallows, Richard; Mann, Gottfried; Vocks, Christian

    2017-04-01

    On August 25, 2014, NOAA AR 2146 produced the M2.0 class flare (peaked at 15:11 UT). The flare was associated with a coronal dimming, a EUV wave, a halo CME and a radio event observed by LOFAR (the LOw-Frequency Array). The radio event consisted of a type II, type III and type IV radio emissions. In this study, we focus on LOFAR observations of the type III bursts, generally considered to be radio signatures of fast electron beams propagating along open or quasi open field lines. The group of type III bursts was, as usually, observed during the impulsive phase of the flare. At first hand, type III bursts show no peculiarity, but the high frequency/time resolution LOFAR observations reveal that only few of these type III bursts have a smooth emission profile. The majority of bursts is strongly fragmented. Some show a structuring similar to type IIIb bursts, but on a smaller frequency scale, and others show a non-organized patchy structure which gives indication on the possibly related turbulence processes. Although fine structures of type III bursts were already reported, the wealth of fine structures, and the fragmentation of the radio emission observed in this August 25 event is unprecedented. We show that these LOFAR observations bring completely new insight and pose a new challenge for the physics of the acceleration of electron beams and associated emission processes.

  15. Division x: Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Russ; Chapman, Jessica; Rendong, Nan; Carilli, Christopher; Giovannini, Gabriele; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prajval

    2012-04-01

    This triennium has seen a phenomenal investment in development of observational radio astronomy facilities in all parts of the globe at a scale that significantly impacts the international community. This includes both major enhancements such as the transition from the VLA to the EVLA in North America, and the development of new facilities such as LOFAR, ALMA, FAST, and Square Kilometre Array precursor telescopes in Australia and South Africa. These developments are driven by advances in radio-frequency, digital and information technologies that tremendously enhance the capabilities in radio astronomy. These new developments foreshadow major scientific advances driven by radio observations in the next triennium. We highlight these facility developments in section 3 of this report. A selection of science highlight from this triennium are summarized in section 2.

  16. Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations - Going beyond deconvolution

    CERN Document Server

    Lochner, Michelle; Kunz, Martin; Natarajan, Iniyan; Oozeer, Nadeem; Smirnov, Oleg; Zwart, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Radio interferometers suffer from the problem of missing information in their data, due to the gaps between the antennas. This results in artifacts, such as bright rings around sources, in the images obtained. Multiple deconvolution algorithms have been proposed to solve this problem and produce cleaner radio images. However, these algorithms are unable to correctly estimate uncertainties in derived scientific parameters or to always include the effects of instrumental errors. We propose an alternative technique called Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations (BIRO) which uses a Bayesian statistical framework to determine the scientific parameters and instrumental errors simultaneously directly from the raw data, without making an image. We use a simple simulation of Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope data including pointing errors and beam parameters as instrumental effects, to demonstrate the use of BIRO.

  17. Montblanc: GPU accelerated Radio Interferometer Measurement Equations in support of Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Perkins, Simon; Zwart, Jonathan; Natarajan, Iniyan; Smirnov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    We present Montblanc, a GPU implementation of the Radio interferometer measurement equation (RIME) in support of the Bayesian inference for radio observations (BIRO) technique. BIRO uses Bayesian inference to select sky models that best match the visibilities observed by a radio interferometer. To accomplish this, BIRO evaluates the RIME multiple times, varying sky model parameters to produce multiple model visibilities. Chi-squared values computed from the model and observed visibilities are used as likelihood values to drive the Bayesian sampling process and select the best sky model. As most of the elements of the RIME and chi-squared calculation are independent of one another, they are highly amenable to parallel computation. Additionally, Montblanc caters for iterative RIME evaluation to produce multiple chi-squared values. Only modified model parameters are transferred to the GPU between each iteration. We implemented Montblanc as a Python package based upon NVIDIA's CUDA architecture. As such, it is ea...

  18. Simultaneous X-ray and Radio Observations of Rotating Radio Transient J1819-1458

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Joshua; Rea, Nanda; Lazaridis, Kosmas; Keane, Evan; Kramer, Michael; Lyne, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of PSR J1819-1458. Our 94-ks XMM-Newton observation of the high magnetic field 5*10^13 G pulsar reveals a blackbody spectrum (kT~130 eV) with a broad absorption feature, possibly composed of two lines at ~1.0 and ~1.3 keV. We performed a correlation analysis of the X-ray photons with radio pulses detected in 16.2 hours of simultaneous observations at 1-2 GHz with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Parkes telescopes, respectively. Both the detected X-ray photons and radio pulses appear to be randomly distributed in time. We find tentative evidence for a correlation between the detected radio pulses and X-ray photons on timescales of less than 10 pulsar spin periods, with the probability of this occurring by chance being 0.46%. This suggests that the physical process producing the radio pulses may also heat the polar-cap.

  19. Revealing Hanny's Voorwerp : radio observations of IC 2497

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jozsa, G. I. G.; Garrett, M. A.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Rampadarath, H.; Paragi, Z.; van Arkel, H.; Lintott, C.; Keel, W. C.; Schawinski, K.; Edmondson, E.

    2009-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength radio observations in the direction of the spiral galaxy IC 2497 and the neighbouring emission nebula known as "Hanny's Voorwerp". Our WSRT continuum observations at 1.4 GHz and 4.9 GHz reveal the presence of extended emission at the position of the nebulosity, although t

  20. Revealing Hanny's Voorwerp : radio observations of IC 2497

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jozsa, G. I. G.; Garrett, M. A.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Rampadarath, H.; Paragi, Z.; van Arkel, H.; Lintott, C.; Keel, W. C.; Schawinski, K.; Edmondson, E.

    We present multi-wavelength radio observations in the direction of the spiral galaxy IC 2497 and the neighbouring emission nebula known as "Hanny's Voorwerp". Our WSRT continuum observations at 1.4 GHz and 4.9 GHz reveal the presence of extended emission at the position of the nebulosity, although

  1. Evidence for Observation of Virtual Radio Cherenkov Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bean, Alice; Snow, James

    2010-01-01

    We present evidence for observation of virtual electromagnetic fields in the radio domain from experiment T926 at the Fermilab Meson Test Beam Facility. Relativistic protons with 120 GeV energy traversed a sealed electromagnetic cavity and were observed in the radio regime of 200MHz-GHz. Closely related to ordinary Cherenkov radiation, which we also measured, the virtual fields require no acceleration for their existence. The experiment is also the first observation of fields from hadronic showers, an independent and new confirmation of coherent radio emission from ultra-relativistic particles. Conditions of very low signal to noise were overcome by a novel and unbiased filtering strategy that exploits exhaustive studies of correlations in the noise backgrounds. Linear scaling of the signal region with the number of beam particles provides evidence of coherence. Extrapolation to measurement of the field of a single relativistic proton charge is consistent within errors. Our study also illustrates new data pro...

  2. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Saturn Kilometric Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Hess, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) is the auroral radio emission of Saturn, which has been observed by Voyager 1 & 2, Cassini, and Ulysses. Ulysses is able to detect the intense intervals of SKR from distances up to 10 AU, because of its long antennas (72 m tip-to-tip) and sensitive radio receivers. Studies of SKR by A. Lecacheux gave the surprising result that the periodicity of SKR varied with time; it was not locked to a planetary rotation of Saturn. This result has been confirmed by Cassini radio observations. Here, we compare Ulysses and Cassini observations of SKR to constrain a mode! for the SKR emission geometry. SpecifIcally, we examine the question - are the brighter sources of 5KR fixed in Saturn longitude or local time? The results have significant consequences for our understanding of SKR and its varying periodicity

  3. Fine spectral structures in Jovian decametric radio emission observed by ground-based radio telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter with the largest planetary magnetosphere in the solar system emits intense coherent non-thermal radio emission in a wide frequency range. This emission is a result of a complicated interaction between the dynamic Jovian magnetosphere and energetic particles supplying the free energy from planetary rotation and the interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moons. Decametric radio emission (DAM) is the strongest component of Jovian radiation observed in a frequency range from few MHz up to 40 MHz. This emission is generated via cyclotron maser mechanism in sources located along Jovian magnetic field lines. Depending on the time scales the Jovian DAMexhibits different complex spectral structures. We present the observations of the Jovian decametric radio emission using the large ground-based radio telescope URAN- 2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. This telescope is one of the largest low frequency telescopes in Europe equipped with high performance digital radio spectrometers. The antenna array of URAN-2 consists of 512 crossed dipoles with an effective area of 28 000m2 and beam pattern size of 3.5 x 7 deg. (at 25 MHz). The instrument enables continuous observations of the Jovian radio during long period of times. Jovian DAM was observed continuously since Sep. 2012 (depending on Jupiter visibility) with relatively high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100ms) in the broad frequency range (8-32MHz). We have detected a big amount of the fine spectral structures in the dynamic spectra of DAM such as trains of S-bursts, quasi-continuous narrowband emission, narrow-band splitting events and zebra stripe-like patterns. We analyzed mainly the fine structures associated with non-Io controlled DAM. We discuss how the observed narrowband structures which most probably are related to the propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jupiter's ionosphere can be used to study the plasma parameters in the inner Jovian magnetosphere.

  4. New insights from deep VLA data on the potentially recoiling black hole CID-42 in the COSMOS field

    CERN Document Server

    Novak, Mladen; Civano, Francesca; Bondi, Marco; Ciliegi, Paolo; Wang, Xiawei; Loeb, Abraham; Banfield, Julie; Bourke, Stephen; Elvis, Martin; Hallinan, Gregg; Intema, Huib T; Klockner, Hans-Rainer; Mooley, Kunal; Navarrete, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    We present deep 3 GHz VLA observations of the potentially recoiling black hole CID-42 in the COSMOS field. This galaxy shows two optical nuclei in the HST/ACS image and a large velocity offset of ~ 1300 km/s between the broad and narrow H beta emission line although the spectrum is not spacially resolved (Civano et al. 2010). The new 3 GHz VLA data has a bandwidth of 2 GHz and to correctly interpret the flux densities imaging was done with two different methods: multi-scale multi-frequency synthesis and spectral windows stacking. The final resolutions and sensitivities of these maps are 0.7" with rms = 4.6 muJy/beam and 0.9" with rms = 4.8 muJy/beam respectively. With a 7 sigma detection we find that the entire observed 3 GHz radio emission can be associated with the South-Eastern component of CID-42, coincident with the detected X-ray emission. We use our 3 GHz data combined with other radio data from the literature ranging from 320 MHz to 9 GHz, which include the VLA, VLBA and GMRT data, to construct a radi...

  5. Observation of Reconstructable Radio Waveforms from Solar Flares with the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian; Askaryan Radio Array Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is an ultra-high energy (>1017 eV) neutrino detector in phased construction at the South Pole. The full detector will consist of 37 autonomous stations of antennas which search for the radio pulses produced by neutrino interactions in the Antarctic ice. Three of the proposed detectors have been installed at up to 200m depth, with an additional two slated for deployment in Austral summer 2017. A prototype of the detector was deployed in January 2011, in time to serendipitously observe the relatively active solar month of February. In this talk, we will present preliminary results from an analysis of radio waveforms associated with an X-class solar flare observed in this prototype station. These are the first reconstructable events of natural origin seen by ARA, and could potentially be a powerful calibration source for the array.

  6. Radio Observations of the S5 Sample

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jun Liu; Xiang Liu

    2011-03-01

    The S5 sample was monitored on a monthly basis since December 2008 at Urumqi Observatory. Most of the sources are variables and a considerable proportion (about 20%) exhibited a significant inter-month flux variability (modulation index > 4%) during the 1-year observation.

  7. A Multifrequency Study of Five Large Radio Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Pirya; S. Nandi; D. J. Saikia; C. Konar; M. Singh

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of GMRT and VLA observations of five large radio sources over a wide frequency range to investigate their structural and spectral asymmetries. The hot-spot brightness ratios suggest intrinsic source asymmetries, while the spectral indices show evidence of re-acceleration of particles.

  8. The radio properties of composite liner/H II galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filho, ME; Barthel, PD; Ho, LC

    2002-01-01

    Arcsecond-resolution VLA observations newly obtained as well as published of 40 nearby galaxies are discussed, completing a study of the radio properties of a magnitude-limited sample of nearby galaxies of the composite LINER/H II type. Our results reveal an overall detection rate of at least 25% ac

  9. Separating weak lensing and intrinsic alignments using radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Whittaker, Lee; Battye, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    We discuss methods for performing weak lensing using radio observations to recover information about the intrinsic structural properties of the source galaxies. Radio surveys provide unique information that can benefit weak lensing studies, such as HI emission, which may be used to construct galaxy velocity maps, and polarized synchrotron radiation; both of which provide information about the unlensed galaxy and can be used to reduce galaxy shape noise and the contribution of intrinsic alignments. Using a proxy for the intrinsic position angle of an observed galaxy, we develop techniques for cleanly separating weak gravitational lensing signals from intrinsic alignment contamination in forthcoming radio surveys. Random errors on the intrinsic orientation estimates introduce biases into the shear and intrinsic alignment estimates. However, we show that these biases can be corrected for if the error distribution is accurately known. We demonstrate our methods using simulations, where we reconstruct the shear an...

  10. Ultraviolet and radio flares from UX Arietis and HR 1099

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.; Willson, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of the RS CVn systems UX Ari and HR 1099 with the IUE satellite and the VLA are presented. Flaring activity is observed at ultraviolet wavelengths with the IUE when none is detected at radio wavelengths with the VLA. Radio flares with no detectable ultraviolet activity have also been observed. Thus, flares in the two spectral regions are either uncorrelated or weakly correlated. The flaring emission probably originates in different regions at the two wavelengths. Radio flares from RS CVn stars may originate in sources that are larger than, or comparable to, a star in size. This is in sharp contrast to compact, coherent radio flares from dwarf M stars. The ultraviolet flares from RS CVn stars probably originate in sources that are smaller than a component star.

  11. GMRT observations of X-shaped radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lal, D V; Lal, Dharam Vir

    2006-01-01

    We present results from a study of X-shaped sources based on observations using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). These observations were motivated by our low frequency study of 3C 223.1 (Lal & Rao 2005), an X-shaped radio source, which showed that the wings (or low-surface-brightness jets) have flatter spectral indices than the active lobes (or high-surface-brightness jets), a result not easily explained by most models. We have now obtained GMRT data at 240 and 610 MHz for almost all the known X-shaped radio sources and have studied the distribution of the spectral index across the sources. While the radio morphologies of all the sources at 240 and 610 MHz show the characteristic X-shape, the spectral characteristics of the X-shaped radio sources, seem to fall into three categories, namely, sources in which (A) the wings have flatter spectral indices than the active lobes, (B) the wings and the active lobes have comparable spectral indices, and (C) the wings have steeper spectral indices than t...

  12. Probing large-scale structure with radio observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shea D.

    This thesis focuses on detecting magnetized relativistic plasma in the intergalactic medium (IGM) of filamentary large-scale structure (LSS) by observing synchrotron emission emitted by structure formation shocks. Little is known about the IGM beyond the largest clusters of galaxies, and synchrotron emission holds enormous promise as a means of probing magnetic fields and relativistic particle populations in these low density regions. I'll first report on observations taken at the Very Large Array and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope of the diffuse radio source 0809+39. I use these observations to demonstrate that 0809+39 is likely the first "radio relic" discovered that is not associated with a rich |"X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. I then demonstrate that an unconventional reprocessing of the NVSS polarization survey can reveal structures on scales from 15' to hundreds of degrees, far larger than the nominal shortest-baseline scale. This yields hundreds of new diffuse sources as well as the identification of a new nearby galactic loop . These observations also highlight the major obstacle that diffuse galactic foreground emission poses for any search for large-scale, low surface- brightness extragalactic emission. I therefore explore the cross-correlation of diffuse radio emission with optical tracers of LSS as a means of statistically detecting the presence of magnetic fields in the low-density regions of the cosmic web. This initial study with the Bonn 1.4 GHz radio survey yields an upper limit of 0.2 mG for large-scale filament magnetic fields. Finally, I report on new Green Bank Telescope and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations of the famous Coma cluster of galaxies. Major findings include an extension to the Coma cluster radio relic source 1253+275 which makes its total extent ~2 Mpc, as well as a sharp edge, or "front", on the Western side of the radio halo which shows a strong correlation with merger activity associated with an

  13. Solar and Planetary Observations with a Lunar Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, N.; Weiler, K. W.; Lazio, J. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Jones, D. L.; Bale, S. D.; Demaio, L.; Kasper, J. C.

    2006-05-01

    Ground-based radio telescopes cannot observe at frequencies below about 10 MHz (wavelengths longer than 30 m) because of ionospheric absorption. The Lunar Imaging Radio Array (LIRA) is a mission concept in which an array of radio telescopes is deployed on the Moon, as part of the Vision for Space Exploration, with the aim of extending radio observations to lower frequencies than are possible from the Earth. LIRA would provide the capability for dedicated monitoring of solar and planetary bursts as well as the search for magnetospheric emissions from extrasolar planets. The highest sensitivity observations can be accomplished by locating LIRA on the far side of the Moon. The array would be composed of 10-12 radial arms, each 1-2 km in length. Each arm would have several hundred dipole antennas and feedlines printed on a very thin sheet of kapton with a total mass of about 300 kg. This would provide a convenient way to deploy thousands of individual antennas and a centrally condensed distribution of array baselines. The lunar farside provides shielding from terrestrial natural and technological radio interference and freedom from the corrupting influence of Earth's ionosphere. This paper will describe the science case for LIRA as well as various options for array deployment and data transmission to Earth. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Basic research in radio astronomy at the NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  14. A WARP IN PROGRESS: H I AND RADIO CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPIRAL NGC 3145

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, Michele [110 Westchester Rd, Newton, MA 02458 (United States); Brinks, Elias [University of Hertfordshire, Centre for Astrophysics Research, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Struck, Curtis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Rd., Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Elmegreen, Debra M., E-mail: kaufmanrallis@icloud.com, E-mail: E.Brinks@herts.ac.uk, E-mail: curt@iastate.edu, E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com, E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, 124 Raymond Av., Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    VLA H i observations and λ6 cm radio continuum observations are presented of the barred-spiral galaxy NGC 3145. In optical images NGC 3145 has stellar arms that appear to cross, forming “X”-features. Our radio continuum observations rule out shock fronts at three of the four “X”-features, and our H i data provide evidence of gas motions perpendicular to the disk of NGC 3145. In large portions of NGC 3145, particularly in the middle-to-outer disk, the H i line profiles are skewed. Relative to the disk, the gas in the skewed wing of the line profiles has z-motions away from us on the approaching side of the galaxy and z-motions of about the same magnitude (∼40 km s{sup −1}) toward us on the receding side. These warping motions imply that there has been a perturbation with a sizeable component perpendicular to the disk over large spatial scales. Two features in NGC 3145 have velocities indicating that they are out-of-plane tidal arms. One is an apparent branch of a main spiral arm on the northeastern side of NGC 3145; the velocity of the branch is ∼150 km s{sup −1} greater than the spiral arm where they appear to intersect in projection. The other is the arm on the southwestern side that forms three of the “X”-features. It differs in velocity by ∼56 km s{sup −1} from that of the disk at the same projected location. H i observations are presented also of the two small companions NGC 3143 and PGC 029578. Based on its properties (enhanced SFR, H i emission 50% more extended on its northeastern side, etc.), NGC 3143 is the more likely of the two companions to have interacted with NGC 3145 recently. A simple analytic model demonstrates that an encounter between NGC 3143 and NGC 3145 is a plausible explanation for the observed warping motions in NGC 3145.

  15. Radio continuum observations of LMC SNR J0550-6823

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzetto, L M; Crawford, E J; Payne, J L; De Horta, A Y; Stupar, M

    2011-01-01

    We report on new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) supernova remnant (SNR) J0550-6823 (DEM L328). This object is a typical horseshoe SNR with a diameter of 373" x 282" +- 4" (90 x 68 +- 1), making it one of the largest known SNRs in the Local Group. We estimate a relatively steep radio spectral index of alpha = -0.79 +- 0.27. However, its stronger than expected polarisation of 50% +- 10% is atypical for older and more evolved SNRs. We also note a strong correlation between [Oiii] and radio images, classifying this SNR as oxygen dominant.

  16. Antenna system characteristic and solar radio burst observation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Sha; Chen, Zhijun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Donghao

    2015-01-01

    Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph (CSRH) is an advanced aperture synthesis solar radio heliograph, developed by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences independently. It consists of 100 reflector antennas, which are grouped into two antenna arrays (CSRH-I and CSRH-II) for low and high frequency bands respectively. The frequency band of CSRH-I is 0.4-2GHz and for CSRH-II, the frequency band is 2-15GHz. In the antenna and feed system, CSRH uses an Eleven feed to receive signals coming from the Sun, the radiation pattern with lower side lobe and back lobe of the feed is well radiated. The characteristics of gain G and antenna noise temperature T effect the quality of solar radio imaging. For CSRH, measured G is larger than 60 dBi and $ T $ is less than 120K, after CSRH-I was established, we have successfully captured a solar radio burst between 1.2-1.6GHz on November 12, 2010 through this instrument and this event was confirmed through the observation of Solar Broadband Radio Spectromete...

  17. Physical properties of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 through low and high frequency radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Marcote, B; Paredes, J M; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2015-01-01

    We have studied in detail the 0.15-15 GHz radio spectrum of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 to look for a possible turnover and absorption mechanisms at low frequencies, and to constrain the physical properties of its emission. We have analysed two archival VLA monitorings, all the available archival GMRT data and a coordinated quasi-simultaneous observational campaign conducted in 2013 with GMRT and WSRT. The data show that the radio emission of LS 5039 is persistent on day, week and year timescales, with a variability $\\lesssim 25~\\%$ at all frequencies, and no signature of orbital modulation. The obtained spectra reveal a power-law shape with a curvature below 5 GHz and a turnover at $\\sim0.5$ GHz, which can be reproduced by a one-zone model with synchrotron self-absorption plus Razin effect. We obtain a coherent picture for a size of the emitting region of $\\sim0.85~\\mathrm{mas}$, setting a magnetic field of $B\\sim20~\\mathrm{mG}$, an electron density of $n_{\\rm e}\\sim4\\times10^5~{\\rm cm^{-3}}$ and a mass-los...

  18. Gamma Rays from Radio Galaxies: FERMI/LAT Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Paola

    We review the high energy properties of Misaligned AGNs associated with γ-ray sources detected by Fermi in 24 months of survey. Most of them are nearby emission low power radio galaxies (i.e FRIs) which probably have structured jets. On the contrary, high power radio sources (i.e FRIIs) with GeV emission are rare. The small number of FRIIs does not seem to be related to their higher redshifts. Assuming proportionality between the radio core flux and the γ-ray flux, several of them are expected to be bright enough to be detected above 100 MeV in spite of their distance. We suggest that beaming/jet structural differences are responsible for the detection rate discrepancy observed between FRIs and FRIIs.

  19. Radio upper limits for the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J17511-3057

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller-Jones, J.C.A.; Russell, D.M.; Migliari, S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on recent radio observations of the newly-detected accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar, IGR J17511-3057 (ATels #2196, #2197, #2198, #2199, #2215, #2216, #2220, #2221). We used the Very Large Array (VLA) to observe the source under observing program AM971. The array was in its relatively com

  20. The jet of the BL Lacertae object PKS 2201+044: MAD near-IR adaptive optics observations and comparison with optical, radio and X-ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuzzo, E.; Falomo, R.; Treves, A.; Donato, D.; Sambruna, M.; Arcidiacono, C.; Giovannini, G.; Farinato, J.; Moretti, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Diolaiti, E.; Lombini, M.; Brast, R.; Donaldson, R.; Kolb, J.; Marchetti, E.; Tordo, S.

    2011-04-01

    Context. Relativistic jets are a common feature of radio loud active galactic nuclei. Multifrequency observations are a unique tool to constrain their physics. Aims: We report on a detailed study of the properties of the jet of the nearby BL Lac object PKS 2201+044, one of the rare cases where the jet is detected from radio to X-rays. Methods: We use new adaptive optics near-IR observations of the source, obtained with the ESO multi-conjugated adaptive optics demonstrator (MAD) at the Very Large Telescope. These observations acquired in Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics mode are combined with images previously achieved by HST, VLA and Chandra to perform a morphological and photometric study of the jet. Results: We find a noticeable similarity in the morphology of the jet at radio, near-IR and optical wavelengths. We construct the spectral shape of the main knot of jet that appears dominated by synchrotron radiation. Conclusions: On the basis of the jet morphology and the weak lines spectrum we suggest that PKS 2201+044 belongs to the class of radio sources intermediate between FRIs and FRIIs.

  1. Radio observations of the TeV source HESS J1943+213: a new case of a pulsar wind nebula?

    CERN Document Server

    Gabanyi, K E; Giacani, E; Paragi, Z; Pidopryhora, Y; Frey, S

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the H.E.S.S. Collaboration discovered a very high energy gamma-ray point source close to the Galactic plane. They offered three possible explanations for the nature of the source: a gamma-ray binary, a pulsar wind nebula, or a BL Lac object. They concluded that the observations favoured an extreme BL Lac object interpretation. We investigated the nature of the radio source reported as the counterpart of the very high energy gamma-ray source. We performed high-resolution radio interferometric observations with the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network at a frequency of 1.6 GHz on 2011 May 18. We also reanalysed archival 1.4-GHz radio continuum and HI spectral line data taken with the Very Large Array. The accurate position of the radio source, as observed with EVN, is ~ 4" off from the one obtained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. The new position is in excellent agreement with that of the proposed X-ray counterpart of the TeV source. From HI absorption data, a distance of about 11.5 +/- 1.5 ...

  2. SPAM: A data reduction recipe for high-resolution, low-frequency radio-interferometric observations

    CERN Document Server

    Intema, H T

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution astronomical imaging at sub-GHz radio frequencies has been available for more than 15 years, with the VLA at 74 and 330 MHz, and the GMRT at 150, 240, 330 and 610 MHz. Recent developments include wide-bandwidth upgrades for VLA and GMRT, and commissioning of the aperture-array-based, multi-beam telescope LOFAR. A common feature of these telescopes is the necessity to deconvolve the very many detectable sources within their wide fields-of-view and beyond. This is complicated by gain variations in the radio signal path that depend on viewing direction. One such example is phase errors due to the ionosphere. Here I discuss the inner workings of SPAM, a set of AIPS-based data reduction scripts in Python that includes direction-dependent calibration and imaging. Since its first version in 2008, SPAM has been applied to many GMRT data sets at various frequencies. Many valuable lessons were learned, and translated into various SPAM software modifications. Nowadays, semi-automated SPAM data reduction ...

  3. The nature of extragalactic radio-jets from high-resolution radio-interferometric observations

    CERN Document Server

    Perucho, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Extragalactic jets are a common feature of radio-loud active galaxies. The nature of the observed jets in relation to the bulk flow is still unclear. In particular it is not clear whether the observations of parsec-scale jets using the very long baseline interferometric technique (VLBI) reveal wave-like structures that develop and propagate along the jet, or trace the jet flow itself. In this contribution I review the evidence collected during the last years showing that the ridge-lines of helical radio-jets do not correspond to observational artifacts. This conclusion was reached by studying a number of VLBI observations of the radio jet in the quasar S5~0836+710 at different frequencies and epochs. The ridge-line of the emission in the jet coincides at all frequencies within the errors. Moreover, small differences between the ridge-lines as observed at different epochs reveal wave-like motion transversal to the jet propagation axis. I also discuss similar results, albeit with different interpretations, obta...

  4. VLBI observations of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, Enno; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Tingay, Steven

    2006-10-01

    We propose to observe a small sample of radio sources from the ATLAS project (ATLAS = Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) with the LBA, to determine their compactness and map their structures. The sample consists of three radio sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubbed Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations: we will map their structure to test whether they resemble core-jet or double-lobed morphologies, and we will measure the flux densities on long baselines, to determine their compactness. Previous snapshot-style LBA observations of two other IFRS yielded no detections, hence we propose to use disk-based recording with 512 Mbps where possible, for highest sensitivity. With the observations proposed here, we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from two to five, soon allowing us to draw general conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  5. Cosmological simulations of the high-redshift radio universe

    OpenAIRE

    Kawata, Daisuke; Gibson, Brad K.; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2004-01-01

    Using self-consistent cosmological simulations of disc galaxy formation, we analyse the 1.4 GHz radio flux from high-redshift progenitors of present-day normal spirals within the context of present-day and planned next-generation observational facilities. We demonstrate that while current radio facilities such as the Very Large Array (VLA) are unlikely to trace these progenitors beyond redshifts z

  6. Radio Emission from Globular Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Radio emission of globular clusters is studied by analyzing the VLA radio survey data of the NVSS and FIRST. We find that 13 clusters have radio sources within their half-mass radii of clusters. Sources detected previously in NGC 7078and NGC 6440 are identified. Pulsars in NGC 6121, NGC 6440 and NGC 7078cannot be detected because of the insufficient survey sensitivity and resolution.There may be a pulsar in the core of Terzan 1. The nature of the extended radio source near the core of NGC 6440 remains unclear. In the core of a globular cluster,there may be many neutron stars or an intermediate mass black hole, but this cannot be clarified with the current radio observations.

  7. Simultaneous X-Ray, Gamma-Ray, and Radio Observations of the Repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, P.; Bogdanov, S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lynch, R. S.; Spitler, L. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Bower, G. C.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Butler, B. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Gourdji, K.; Kaspi, V. M.; Law, C. J.; Marcote, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Michilli, D.; Paragi, Z.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Wharton, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    We undertook coordinated campaigns with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Arecibo radio telescopes during Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton observations of the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102 to search for simultaneous radio and X-ray bursts. We find 12 radio bursts from FRB 121102 during 70 ks total of X-ray observations. We detect no X-ray photons at the times of radio bursts from FRB 121102 and further detect no X-ray bursts above the measured background at any time. We place a 5σ upper limit of 3 × 10‑11 erg cm‑2 on the 0.5–10 keV fluence for X-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts for durations fast radio bursts in general.

  8. Saturn's rings resolved by the VLA. [Very Larg Array (VLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depater, I.; Dickel, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution radio data of Saturn were obtained at 1.3, 2, 6, and 21 cm, at different inclination angles of the ring plane. Results on optical depth measurements in the rings are described. There is no wavelength dependence in the optical depth of the rings between 1.3 and 6 cm. This indicates that there are not many small particles (sizes of a few centimeters) in the B-ring, which ring is responsible for most of the observed obscuration. This result agrees with the Voyager radio occultation experiment.

  9. Radio Imaging Observations of Solar Activity Cycle and Its Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, K.

    2011-12-01

    The 24th solar activity cycle has started and relative sunspot numbers are increasing. However, their rate of increase is rather slow compared to previous cycles. Active region sizes are small, lifetime is short, and big (X-class) flares are rare so far. We study this anomalous situation using data from Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). Radio imaging observations have been done by NoRH since 1992. Nearly 20 years of daily radio images of the Sun at 17 GHz are used to synthesize a radio butterfly diagram. Due to stable operation of the instrument and a robust calibration method, uniform datasets are available covering the whole period of observation. The radio butterfly diagram shows bright features corresponding to active region belts and their migration toward low latitude as the solar cycle progresses. In the present solar activity cycle (24), increase of radio brightness is delayed and slow. There are also bright features around both poles (polar brightening). Their brightness show solar cycle dependence but peaks around solar minimum. Comparison between the last minimum and the previous one shows decrease of its brightness. This corresponds to weakening of polar magnetic field activity between them. In the northern pole, polar brightening is already weakened in 2011, which means it is close to solar maximum in the northern hemisphere. Southern pole does not show such feature yet. Slow rise of activity in active region belt, weakening of polar activity during the minimum, and large north-south asymmetry in polar activity imply that global solar activity and its synchronization are weakening.

  10. Suzaku observation of the giant radio galaxy 3C 326

    CERN Document Server

    Isobe, Naoki; Gandhi, Poshak; Hayato, Asami; Nagai, Hiroshi; Hada, Kazuhiro; Seta, Hiromi; Matsuta, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    A Suzaku observation of a giant radio galaxy, 3C 326, which has a physical size of about 2 Mpc, was conducted on 2008 January 19 -- 21. In addition to several X-ray sources, diffuse emission was significantly detected associated with its west lobe, but the east lobe was contaminated by an unidentified X-ray source WARP J1552.4+2007. After careful evaluation of the X-ray and Non X-ray background, the 0.4 -- 7 keV X-ray spectrum of the west lobe is described by a power-law model. The photon index and 1 keV flux density was derived as $1.82_{-0.24}^{+0.26}\\pm0.04$ and $19.4_{-3.2}^{+3.3}\\pm 3.0$ nJy, respectively, where the first and second errors represent the statistical and systematic ones. The diffuse X-rays were attributed to be inverse Compton radiation by the synchrotron radio electrons scattering off the cosmic microwave background photons. This radio galaxy is the largest among those with lobes detected through inverse Compton X-ray emission. A comparison of the radio to X-ray fluxes yields the energy d...

  11. A New Solar Radio Emission Component Observed at Hectometric Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, M.; Kaiser, M.; Fainberg, J.

    2003-04-01

    From May 17 to 22, 2002 a highly circularly polarized solar radio source was observed by the WAVES receivers on the Wind spacecraft. This unique event, which became quite intense and definite after May 19 and which was observed continuously for 6 days, was characterized by fine frequency structures, 1 to 2 hour amplitude periodicities, and a peaked frequency spectrum. Indeed, this emission has characteristics more typical of planetary emissions than of solar emissions. This is the only such event observed by Wind/WAVES in its 8 years of operation. (The only other example of an event of similar nature may have been observed more than 20 years ago by the ISEE-3 spacecraft.) The direction-finding analysis for this event indicates a relatively small radio source that may lie somewhere between 0.06 and 0.36 AU from the sun. The radiation from this event was very weak at the onset, being nearly an order of magnitude below the galactic background radiation level. It is speculated that this radio event may be a unique hectometric manifestation of a moving type IV burst. The radiation mechanism is unknown--possibilities include plasma emission, gyro-synchrotron, and cyclotron maser.

  12. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION TOWARD G28.87+0.07 (IRAS 18411-0338) INVESTIGATED BY MEANS OF MASER KINEMATICS AND RADIO TO INFRARED CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J. J.; Xu, Y. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Moscadelli, L.; Cesaroni, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Furuya, R. S.; Usuda, T. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Menten, K. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Pestalozzi, M.; Elia, D.; Schisano, E., E-mail: jjli@pmo.ac.cn [INAF-Istituto Fisica Spazio Interplanetario, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2012-04-10

    We used the Very Long Baseline Array and the European VLBI Network to perform phase-referenced very long baseline interferometry observations of the three most powerful maser transitions associated with the high-mass star-forming region G28.87+0.07: the 22.2 GHz H{sub 2}O, 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH, and 1.665 GHz OH lines. We also performed Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the radio continuum emission at 1.3 and 3.6 cm and Subaru observations of the continuum emission at 24.5 {mu}m. Two centimeter-continuum sources are detected and one of them (named hot molecular core (HMC)) is compact and placed at the center of the observed distribution of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}OH, and OH masers. The bipolar distribution of line-of-sight velocities and the pattern of the proper motions suggest that the water masers are driven by a (proto)stellar jet interacting with the dense circumstellar gas. The same jet could both excite the centimeter-continuum source named HMC (interpreted as free-free emission from shocked gas) and power the molecular outflow observed at larger scales-although one cannot exclude that the free-free continuum is rather originating from a hypercompact H II region. At 24.5 {mu}m, we identify two objects separated along the north-south direction, whose absolute positions agree with those of the two VLA continuum sources. We establish that {approx}90% of the luminosity of the region ({approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} L{sub Sun }) is coming from the radio source HMC, which confirms the existence of an embedded massive young stellar object exciting the masers and possibly still undergoing heavy accretion from the surrounding envelope.

  13. The extreme flare in III Zw 2: evolution of a radio jet in a Seyfert galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunthaler, A.; Falcke, H.D.E.; Bower, G.C.; Aller, M.F.; Aller, H.D.; Teräsranta, H.

    2005-01-01

    A very detailed monitoring of a radio flare in the Seyfert I galaxy III Zw 2 with the VLA and the VLBA is presented. The relative astrometry in the VLBA observations was precise to a few muas. The spectral and spatial evolutions of the source are closely linked, and these observations allowed us to

  14. The extreme flare in III Zw 2: evolution of a radio jet in a Seyfert galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunthaler, A.; Falcke, H.D.E.; Bower, G.C.; Aller, M.F.; Aller, H.D.; Teräsranta, H.

    2005-01-01

    A very detailed monitoring of a radio flare in the Seyfert I galaxy III Zw 2 with the VLA and the VLBA is presented. The relative astrometry in the VLBA observations was precise on a level of a few microarcseconds. Spectral and spatial evolution of the source are closely linked and these observation

  15. Titan Extinction Profiles Observed by Cassini Radio Occultations and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouf, Essam; French, Richard; Flasar, F. Michael; Schinder, Paul J.; Rappaport, Nicole J.

    Three monochromatic and phase-coherent radio signals of wavelength = 0.9, 3.6, and 13 cm (Ka-, X-, and S-bands), were propagated by Cassini through the neutral atmosphere of Titan and the refracted signals were observed on the Earth. Abel inversion of observed changes in the signal frequency is used to recover the refractivity profile of the atmosphere, hence estimate the expected loss in signal strength due to defocusing of the radio signal by differential refraction. The refractive defocusing component (wavelength independent, in principle) is then removed from the actual measured signal strength profiles yielding the "true" signal extinction due to absorption and scattering integrated along the propagation path. Abel inversion of the integrated intensity profiles, tempered to combat noise contribution, yields localized estimates of the extinction coefficient (absorbtivity) as a function of altitude, or the extinction profiles. The initial radio measurements are diffraction-limited. We extend Fresnel transform based diffraction reconstruction procedures developed for radio occultation observations of planetary rings to remove diffraction effects from the initial radio measurements. The procedures are tested using idealized models of simple isothermal atmospheric profile extending above a hard-limb (knife-edge) model. Reconstruction of the simulated "observed" diffraction-limited data shows good agreement with the assumed atmospheric profile and the location of the hard-limb for a range of model parameters. We then apply a similar approach to the actual measured data. Strong wavelength-dependent extinction coefficient profile behavior is observed. Its large-scale structure appears well modeled by predictions based on N2-N2 collision-induced gaseous absorption for Titan's physical conditions. Interesting localized features of yet unexplained origin are also observed. Because the spatial scales of the extinction profile features are relatively large compared with

  16. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  17. Cassini RPWS Observation of Saturn's Radio Rotation Rates After Equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, S.; Fischer, G.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Saturn's radio rotation rate, originally thought to be constant, was found to vary with time by comparing the Voyager and Ulysses observation of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR). Later on, Cassini RPWS observation of SKR revealed that the two hemispheres of Saturn are rotating at two different rotational periods, and it was proposed that the two periods are subject to seasonal change. The topic we would like to focus on resolving is whether the north and south rotational periods actually crossed after equinox. The almost continuous observation of SKR, Saturn narrowband emission, and auroral hiss by RPWS provide a good method of tracking the radio rotation periods of the planet. SKR power from the northern and southern hemispheres can be separated by the polarization of the radiation. Based on the evolution of SKR phase in the northern and southern hemispheres, we show that the rotation rate of the northern SKR is slower than that of the southern SKR starting from late 2014. Auroral hiss provides another unambiguous method of isolating the rotation signals from one hemisphere because the whistler mode plasma wave cannot cross the equator. Rotational modulation rates of auroral hiss are shown to agree with those of SKR during Cassini's high inclination orbits. Hemispherical origins of the narrowband emission are not distinguishable due to its unique generation mechanism. However, Lomb-Scargle periodogram of the 5 kHz narrowband emissions indicates that the two separate radio rotation periods of Saturn's magnetosphere reappeared after a long break since equinox.

  18. Radio Continuum and Methanol Observations of DR21(OH)

    CERN Document Server

    Araya, Esteban D; Hofner, Peter; Linz, Hendrik

    2009-01-01

    We report high sensitivity sub-arcsecond angular resolution observations of the massive star forming region DR21(OH) at 3.6, 1.3, and 0.7 cm obtained with the Very Large Array. In addition, we conducted observations of CH3OH 44 GHz masers. We detected more than 30 new maser components in the DR21(OH) region. Most of the masers appear to trace a sequence of bow-shocks in a bipolar outflow. The cm continuum observations reveal a cluster of radio sources; the strongest emission is found toward the molecular core MM1. The radio sources in MM1 are located about 5" north of the symmetry center of the CH3OH outflow, and therefore, they are unlikely to be associated with the outflow. Instead, the driving source of the outflow is likely located in the MM2 core. Although based on circumstantial evidence, the radio continuum from MM1 appears to trace free-free emission from shock-ionized gas in a jet. The orientation of the putative jet in MM1 is approximately parallel to the CH3OH outflow and almost perpendicular to th...

  19. Observations of the solar radio emission with the Callisto spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monstein, Kh. A.; Lesovoy, S. V.; Maslov, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    In the framework of the program for setting the Callisto spectrometer network into operation, the spectral measurements were carried out at the sites of spectrometer locations in India and Russia in winter 2006. The results achieved at Badary, the site where the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) is located, are presented. The measurements were performed using a broadband log-periodic antenna connected to the Callisto spectrometer developed at the Institute of Astronomy (Zurich). The results of these measurements should explain whether spectral studies at frequencies below 1 GHz can be performed using such antennas or new antennas should be developed. The presented results are compared with the similar results obtained in Switzerland in the frequency intervals of interest for radio astronomy. Concerning electromagnetic noise, Badary is a better site for observing the Sun in the 50-800 MHz frequency range as compared to observatories in Switzerland.

  20. Radio & Optical Interferometry: Basic Observing Techniques and Data Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Monnier, John D

    2012-01-01

    Astronomers usually need the highest angular resolution possible, but the blurring effect of diffraction imposes a fundamental limit on the image quality from any single telescope. Interferometry allows light collected at widely-separated telescopes to be combined in order to synthesize an aperture much larger than an individual telescope thereby improving angular resolution by orders of magnitude. Radio and millimeter wave astronomers depend on interferometry to achieve image quality on par with conventional visible and infrared telescopes. Interferometers at visible and infrared wavelengths extend angular resolution below the milli-arcsecond level to open up unique research areas in imaging stellar surfaces and circumstellar environments. In this chapter the basic principles of interferometry are reviewed with an emphasis on the common features for radio and optical observing. While many techniques are common to interferometers of all wavelengths, crucial differences are identified that will help new practi...

  1. RY Scuti: Infrared and radio observations of the mass-loss wind of a massive binary star system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Hayward, T. L.; Houck, J. R.; Miles, J. W.; Hjellming, R. M.; Jones, T. J.; Woodward, Charles E.; Prentice, Ricarda; Forrest, W. J.; Libonate, S.

    1995-01-01

    We report infrared (IR) imaging, IR photometry, IR spectroscopy, optical/IR photopolarimetry, and Very Large Array (VLA) radio observations of the peculiar binary star RY Scuti. These observations provide an unprecedented view of the detailed spatial structure of the equatorial mass-loss wind of a massive, luminous, 'overcontact' binary system. The binary star (0.43 AU separation) is surrounded by a flattened equatorial disk with an outer radius of approximately = 3 x 10(exp 16) cm (2000 AU) that emits strongly in the IR and radio. The inside of the disk is ionized and emits free-free radiation from hydrogen and 12.8 micrometers forbidden-line emission from (Ne II); the outside of the disk emits thermal radiation from silicate dust. Radio continuum emission is also produced in a compact H II region surrounding the binary. The dust may have a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) component. We use a rudimentary geometric model in which the thermal IR and radio emission from the disk are assumed to arise in a pair of concentric toroidal rings to estimate the physical properties of the disk. The mean radius of the ionized gas toroid is approximately = 1.3 x 10(exp 16) cm (870 AU), and the mean radius of the dust toroid is approximately = 2.2 x 10(exp 16) cm (1470 AU). RY Scuti has a small intrinsic polarization, with the electric vector perpendicular to the equatorial disk, that is probably caused by electron scattering from hot gas close to the central binary. We conclude that neon in the nebula is overabundant with respect to hydrogen and helium by a factor of between 1.6 and 10. Our IR/radio image data suggest that the circumstellar disk is part of an extensive radiation driven mass-loss outflow that is strongly confined to the equatorial plane of the binary system. The sharp spatial separation of the outer dust torous from the inner ionized gas torus confirms earlier suggestions that dust formation in the circumstellar ejecta of very hot stars must occur in

  2. VLA observations of the OH emission from Comet Wilson (1986) - The value of high resolution in both spatial and velocity coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Patrick; De Pater, Imke; Snyder, Lewis E.

    1989-01-01

    In comparison with Comet Halley, the radio OH emission from Comet Wilson behaved very erratically, changing rapidly in position as well as in velocity, while the emission and brightness distribution from Comet Halley displayed apparent stability. A few months later, nearer perihelion, just the opposite behavior was observed at UV wavelengths. Another difference between the two comets is that the OH emission from Comet Halley seemed confined to a region a few times 100.000 km in size, while the emission from Comet Wilson showed up in sporadic blobs, with variable intensities and velocities, at distances as far as 10 to the 6th km from the nucleus. This behavior in Comet Wilson may be associated with the disintegration of the outer frosting associated with new comets and possibly with the fragmentation and ejection of cometesimals from the nucleus. As part of the data analysis, it is demonstrated that lengthening the integration time and lowering the velocity resolution affects the symmetry of the OH images and spectral-line profiles. As a consequence, asymmetric cometary OH line profiles may be more common than previously thought.

  3. Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Ceccni, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first few orbits around Saturn. During the approach the intensity modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) showed that the radio rotation period of Saturn has increased to 10 hr 45 min plus or minus 36 sec, about 6 min longer than measured by Voyager in 1980-81. Also, many intense impulsive radio signals called Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SEDs) were detected from saturnian lightning, starting as far as 1.08 AU from Saturn, much farther than terrestrial lightning can be detected from Earth. Some of the SED episodes have been linked to cloud systems observed in Saturn s atmosphere by the Cassini imaging system. Within the magnetosphere plasma wave emissions have been used to construct an electron density profile through the inner region of the magnetosphere. With decreasing radial distance the electron density increases gradually to a peak of about 100 per cubic centimeter near the outer edge of the A ring, and then drops precipitously to values as low as .03 per cubic centimeter over the rings. Numerous nearly monochromatic whistler-mode emissions were observed as the spacecraft passed over the rings that are believed to be produced by meteoroid impacts on the rings. Whistlermode emissions, similar to terrestrial auroral hiss were also observed over the rings, indicating that an electrodynamic interaction, similar to auroral particle acceleration, may be occurring in or near the rings. During the Titan flybys Langmuir probe and plasma wave measurements provided observations of the density and temperature in Titan's ionosphere.

  4. The Expanded Very Large Array: A Radio Telescope for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The world's most productive and widely-used radio telescope, the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA), can be improved tenfold with an expansion project proposed by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This project will ensure that the scientific community has a state-of-the-art research tool to meet the astronomical research challenges of the 21st Century," said Paul Vanden Bout, NRAO Director. Aerial View of the VLA Plans for the Expanded VLA (EVLA) and its potential for new scientific contributions were described today in a series of presentations at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Rochester, NY. The EVLA project plans to replace dated equipment left over from the VLA's original construction in the 1970s and add eight new radio- telescope dish antennas to the current, 27-dish system. It received a strong endorsement last month when the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee of the National Academy of Sciences gave the project one of its highest ratings as a priority for the next decade in its report entitled "Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium." "The Survey Committee's endorsement shows that the astronomical research community strongly supports the Expanded VLA," said NRAO astronomer Jim Ulvestad, who spoke to reporters at the AAS meeting. "The VLA has long been a unique and critical resource for all of astronomy, and we look forward to turning it into a dramatic, new research tool." The VLA Expansion Project will use modern electronics and computer technology to greatly improve the VLA's ability to observe faint celestial objects and to analyze their radio emissions. A set of eight new dish antennas, added to the current 27-antenna system, will allow the VLA to produce images with ten times greater detail. The project will build on the VLA's current infrastructure, including its 230-ton dish antennas, the railroad tracks for moving those antennas, and the existing buildings and access roads. The

  5. A Search for Radio Emission at the Bottom of the Main Sequence and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthi, A; Linsky, J L; Krishnamurthi, Anita; Leto, Giuseppe; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    We have used the VLA to conduct a deep search for 3.6 cm radio emission from nearby very low mass stars and brown dwarfs. The Gudel-Benz relation is used to predict radio luminosities for some very low mass stars and candidate brown dwarfs with measured X-ray fluxes. The predicted radio fluxes are quite small, whereas the measured radio flux from the brown dwarf candidate Rho Oph GY 31 is relatively strong. In light of our new observations, this object remains an anomaly. We present upper limits for our measured radio fluxes at 3.6 cm for our targets.

  6. A Search for Radio Emission at the Bottom of the Main Sequence and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Anita; Leto, Giuseppe; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1999-09-01

    We have used the VLA to conduct a deep search for 3.6 cm radio emission from nearby very low mass stars and brown dwarfs. The Güdel-Benz relation is used to predict radio luminosities for some very low mass stars and candidate brown dwarfs with measured X-ray fluxes. The predicted radio fluxes are quite small, whereas the measured radio flux from the brown dwarf candidate GY 31 in the rho Oph cloud is relatively strong. In light of our new observations, this object remains an anomaly. We present upper limits for our measured radio fluxes at 3.6 cm for our targets.

  7. X-ray Observations of High-B Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Olausen, S A; Vogel, J K; Kaspi, V M; Lyne, A G; Espinoza, C M; Stappers, B W; Manchester, R N; McLaughlin, M A

    2013-01-01

    The study of high-magnetic-field pulsars is important for examining the relationships between radio pulsars, magnetars, and X-ray-isolated neutron stars (XINSs). Here we report on X-ray observations of three such high-magnetic-field radio pulsars. We first present the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of PSR J1734-3333, taken to follow up on its initial detection in 2009. The pulsar's spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of 300 +/- 60 eV, with bolometric luminosity L_bb = 2.0(+2.2 -0.7)e+32 erg/s = 0.0036E_dot for a distance of 6.1 kpc. We detect no X-ray pulsations from the source, setting a 1 sigma upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 60% in the 0.5-3 keV band. We compare PSR J1734-3333 to other rotation-powered pulsars of similar age and find that it is significantly hotter, supporting the hypothesis that the magnetic field affects the observed thermal properties of pulsars. We also report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of PSRs B1845-19 and J1001-5939. We do not detect eit...

  8. A Search for Radio Transients and Variables in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neureuther, J. L.; Hyman, S. D.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Nord, M. E.; Kassim, N. E.

    2002-12-01

    We report on a search for radio transients in the Galactic center using a number of 327 MHz VLA observations made during the 1990's, and from a series of monthly VLA observations made during Spring and Summer 2002. A typical yield of compact sources in a given epoch is roughly 200. We have detected at least one new radio transient located only 1.1 degrees north of the Galactic center (AJ, 2002, vol. 123, pg. 1497). Other candidate sources are also presented. We use these observations to constrain the timescale(s) and nature of radio transients and variables in the Galactic center. Basic research in radio astronomy at the NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research, and at Sweet Briar College by Research Corporation, the Jeffress Memorial Trust, and the National Science Foundation.

  9. New radio observations of the Moon at L band

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Zhen Zhang; Andrew Gray; Yan Su; Jun-Duo Li; Tom Landecker; Hong-Bo Zhang; Chun-Lai Li

    2012-01-01

    We present results of new radio observations of the Moon at L band with the synthesis telescope of the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory Synthesis Telescope.The resolution and temperature sensitivity of the observations are 159″ ×87″ and 1.7 K,respectively.The main results are:(1) the lunar brightness temperature averaged over the whole disk is about 233 K while the average brightness temperature for the four quadrants are 228.1 K (NE),239.7 K (NW),233.9 K (SW) and 228.8 K (SE).The observations reveal large temperature and spatial variations on the Moon for the first time.The highest brightness temperature is about 257 K and it is located along the lunar equator,to the west.The total uncertainty is about 5% due to the absolute accuracy of the fluxes of the primary calibrators; (2) the total degree of polarization is about 6%.Both polarization intensity and degree of polarization increase from the disk's center to the limb,and the distribution of the degree of polarization along the limb is not uniform; (3) the new data are used to study the properties of regolith,such as dielectric constant and thickness distribution.The results show that the lunar regolith's thickness increases from the NW (mare area) to the SE (highland area) regions on the lunar surface.

  10. Radio Emission from the Be/Black Hole Binary MWC 656

    CERN Document Server

    Dzib, S A; Jaron, F

    2015-01-01

    Context. MWC 656 is the recently discovered first binary system case composed of a Be-type star and an accreting black hole. Its low X-ray luminosity indicates that the system is in a quiescent X-ray state. Aims. The aim of our investigation is to establish if the MWC 656 system has detectable radio emission and if the radio characteristics are consistent with those of quiescent black hole systems. Methods.We used three archived VLA data sets, one hour each, at 3 GHz and seven new VLA observations, two hours each, at 10 GHz to produce very high sensitivity images, down to $\\sim$1$\\,\\mu$Jy. Results.We detected the source twice in the new observations: in the first VLA run, at periastron passage, with a flux density of 14.2$\\,\\pm\\,$2.9 $\\mu$Jy and by combining all together the other six VLA runs, with a flux density of $3.7 \\pm 1.4$ $\\mu$Jy. The resulting combined map of the archived observations has the sensitivity of $1 \\sigma = 6.6\\, \\mu Jy$ but no radio emission is there detected. Conclusions. The radio and...

  11. Metric Observations of Saturn with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtin, R.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Gautier, D.; Zarka, P.; Hofstadter, M.; Hersant, F.; Girard, J.

    2015-12-01

    We used the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT, India) to observe Saturn in the metric domain – at 0.49 m (610 MHz), 1.28 m (235 MHz), and 2.0 m (150 MHz) -with the aim of constraining the deep atmospheric ammonia and water vapor concentrations around 10-20 kbar. We have obtained a clean detection at 610 MHz, with a disk brightness temperature Tb= 216 ± 32 K, and no significant emission outside of the disk, thus confirming model predictions about the weakness of synchrotron radiation by magnetospheric electrons (Lorenzato et al. 2012, Lorenzato et al. 2012). A marginal detection was obtained at 235 MHz, with Tb= 404 ± 249 K, while an upper limit of 1210 K was set at 150 MHz. Unfortunately, some of the GMRT measurements were affected by strong ionospheric scintillation or radio frequency interferences (RFI). Although the reduction of the LOFAR measurements is much more complex, results are expected in the near future and they will complement nicely with those obtained with the GMRT. We will discuss the constraints resulting from these observations on Saturn's deep atmospheric composition.

  12. The TANGO Project: Thorough ANalysis of radio-Galaxies Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña Flaquer, Breezy; Leon Tanne, Stephane; Combes, Francoise; Lim, Jeremy

    2010-05-01

    We present a sample of radio galaxies selected only on the basis of radio continuum emission and we confirm that these galaxies have lower molecular gas mass than other elliptical galaxies with different selection criteria.

  13. A Multiple System of Radio Sources at the Core of the L723 Multipolar Outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Gonzalez, Carlos; Rodriguez, Luis F; Torrelles, Jose M; Osorio, Mayra; Girart, Jose M

    2007-01-01

    We present high angular resolution Very Large Array multi-epoch continuum observations at 3.6 cm and 7 mm towards the core of the L723 multipolar outflow revealing a multiple system of four radio sources suspected to be YSOs in a region of only ~4 arcsecs (1200 AU) in extent. The 3.6 cm observations show that the previously detected source VLA 2 contains a close (separation ~0.29 arcsecs or ~90 AU) radio binary, with components (A and B) along a position angle of ~150 degrees. The northern component (VLA 2A) of this binary system is also detected in the 7 mm observations, with a positive spectral index between 3.6 cm and 7 mm. In addition, the source VLA 2A is associated with extended emission along a position angle of ~115 degrees, that we interpret as outflowing shock-ionized gas that is exciting a system of HH objects with the same position angle. A third, weak 3.6 cm source, VLA 2C, that is detected also at 7 mm, is located ~0.7 arcsecs northeast of VLA 2A, and is possibly associated with the water maser ...

  14. A giant radio halo in the low luminosity X-ray cluster Abell 523

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, G; Girardi, M; Govoni, F; Murgia, M; Vacca, V; Bagchi, J

    2011-01-01

    Radio halos are extended and diffuse non-thermal radio sources present at the cluster center, not obviously associated with any individual galaxy. A strong correlation has been found between the cluster X-ray luminosity and the halo radio power. We observe and analyze the diffuse radio emission present in the complex merging structure Abell 523, classified as a low luminosity X-ray cluster, to discuss its properties in the context of the halo total radio power versus X-ray luminosity correlation. We reduced VLA archive observations at 1.4 GHz to derive a deep radio image of the diffuse emission, and compared radio, optical, and X-ray data. Low-resolution VLA images detect a giant radio halo associated with a complex merging region. The properties of this new halo agree with those of radio halos in general discussed in the literature, but its radio power is about a factor of ten higher than expected on the basis of the cluster X-ray luminosity. Our study of this giant radio source demonstrates that radio halos...

  15. Compact Intraday Variable Radio Cores New Observational Approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Fuhrmann, L; Krichbaum, T P; Beckert, T; Kraus, A L; Witzel, A; Zensus, J A

    2002-01-01

    The evidence for refractive interstellar scintillation (RISS) being the main cause for rapid intraday variations (Intraday Variability, IDV) in Quasars and BL Lacs has recently become stronger. If IDV is still a complex composition of extrinsic and source intrinsic effects, the intrinsic part of the IDV pattern should show up in the millimeter and sub-millimeter regime due to the frequency dependence of RISS. Hence, observations at higher frequencies are essential in order to exclude RISS as the sole cause of IDV. Here we report on our new attempt to search for rapid variations at much higher frequencies. In addition, the possibility of a direct detection of the postulated scattering screen in front of IDV sources will be discussed. Our recent line observations towards a few IDV sources lead to the first detection of a high latitude molecular cloud in front of an intraday variable radio core.

  16. Optical, infrared and radio astronomy from techniques to observation

    CERN Document Server

    Poggiani, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents the established sciences of optical, infrared, and radio astronomy as distinct research areas, focusing on the science targets and the constraints that they place on instrumentation in the different domains. It aims to bridge the gap between specialized books and practical texts, presenting the state of the art in different techniques. For each type of astronomy, the discussion proceeds from the orders of magnitude for observable quantities that drive the building of instrumentation and the development of advanced techniques. The specific telescopes and detectors are then presented, together with the techniques used to measure fluxes and spectra. Finally, the instruments and their limits are discussed to assist readers in choice of setup, planning and execution of observations, and data reduction. The volume also includes worked examples and problem sets to improve student understanding; tables and figures in chapters summarize the state of the art of instrumentation and techniques.

  17. Large Radio Telescopes for Anomalous Microwave Emission Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Battistelli, E S; de Bernardis, P; Masi, S

    2013-01-01

    We discuss in this paper the problem of the Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) in the light of ongoing or future observations to be performed with the largest fully steerable radio telescope in the world. High angular resolution observations of the AME will enable astronomers to drastically improve the knowledge of the AME mechanisms as well as the interplay between the different constituents of the interstellar medium in our galaxy. Extragalactic observations of the AME have started as well, and high resolution is even more important in this kind of observations. When cross-correlating with IR-dust emission, high angular resolution is also of fundamental importance in order to obtain unbiased results. The choice of the observational frequency is also of key importance in continuum observation. We calculate a merit function that accounts for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in AME observation given the current state-of-the-art knowledge and technology. We also include in our merit functions the frequency depen...

  18. Analysis and Modeling of Jovian Radio Emissions Observed by Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    Our studies of Jovian radio emission have resulted in the publication of five papers in refereed journals, with three additional papers in progress. The topics of these papers include the study of narrow-band kilometric radio emission; the apparent control of radio emission by Callisto; quasi-periodic radio emission; hectometric attenuation lanes and their relationship to Io volcanic activity; and modeling of HOM attenuation lanes using ray tracing. A further study of the control of radio emission by Jovian satellites is currently in progress. Abstracts of each of these papers are contained in the Appendix. A list of the publication titles are also included.

  19. Radio continuum JVLA observations of the dwarf galaxy Sextans A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkiewicz, Jacqueline A.; Powell, Devon; Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Bomans, Dominik; Bowman, Judd D.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2017-06-01

    We present 20-cm Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) observations of the star-forming dwarf galaxy Sextans A. Located at the outer edge of the Local Group, with an oxygen abundance of less than one-tenth of the Solar abundance (12+log O/H = 7.49), Sextans A provides a nearby laboratory for the study of low-metallicity star formation processes. This galaxy is a weak source in the infrared, but exhibits evidence for vigorous star formation-powered outflows in ionized gas, including large-scale H-alpha shells and filaments up to a kpc in length. Sextans A has not previously been detected in radio continuum. The upgraded JVLA and WIDAR correlator provide enhanced sensitivity over previous studies. We resolve a 3.0 mJy (+/- 0.3 mJy) continuum source centered on the brightest star formation region in Sextans A. Using two relatively interference-free windows at 1.4 GHz and 1.85 GHz, we are able to measure the spectral slope of the detected emission. We estimate the non-thermal contribution and the strength of the galaxy's magnetic field. We discuss the impact of low metallicity on the reliability of the IR/radio relation.

  20. Radio observations of Supernova Remnants and the surrounding molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Dubner, G

    2011-01-01

    Supernova Remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the main source of Galactic cosmic rays (CR). The strong SNR shocks provide ideal acceleration sites for particles of at least 10^14 eV/nucleon. Radio continuum studies of SNRs carried out with good sensitivity and high angular resolution convey information about three main aspects of the SNRs: morphology, polarization and spectrum. Based on this information it is possible to localize sites of higher compression and particle acceleration as well as the orientation and degree of order of the magnetic fields, and in some cases even its intensity. All this information, when complemented with the study of the distribution and kinematics of the surrounding interstellar gas, results in a very useful dataset to investigate the role of SNRs as cosmic ray accelerators. In this presentation, I analyze the radio observations of SNRs and surrounding molecular clouds, showing the contribution of these studies to the understanding of the role of SNRs as factories of CRs.

  1. Observation of a Metric Type N Solar Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Xiangliang; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang; Koval, Artem; Vasanth, V; Wang, Bing; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Type III and type-III-like radio bursts are produced by energetic electron beams guided along coronal magnetic fields. As a variant of type III bursts, Type N bursts appear as the letter "N" in the radio dynamic spectrum and reveal a magnetic mirror effect in coronal loops. Here, we report a well-observed N-shaped burst consisting of three successive branches at metric wavelength with both fundamental and harmonic components and a high brightness temperature ($>$10$^9$ K). We verify the burst as a true type N burst generated by the same electron beam from three aspects of the data. First, durations of the three branches at a given frequency increase gradually, may due to the dispersion of the beam along its path. Second, the flare site, as the only possible source of non-thermal electrons, is near the western feet of large-scale closed loops. Third, the first branch and the following two branches are localized at different legs of the loops with opposite sense of polarization. We also find that the sense of p...

  2. The VLA Low-frequency Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, A S; Cotton, W D; Kassim, N E; Lazio, T J W; Perley, R A; Condon, J J; Erickson, W C

    2007-01-01

    The Very Large Array (VLA) Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) has imaged 95% of the 3*pi sr of sky north of declination = -30 degrees at a frequency of 74 MHz (4 meter wavelength). The resolution is 80" (FWHM) throughout, and the typical RMS noise level is ~0.1 Jy/beam. The typical point-source detection limit is 0.7 Jy/beam and so far nearly 70,000 sources have been catalogued. This survey used the 74 MHz system added to the VLA in 1998. It required new imaging algorithms to remove the large ionospheric distortions at this very low frequency throughout the entire ~11.9 degree field of view. This paper describes the observation and data reduction methods used for the VLSS and presents the survey images and source catalog. All of the calibrated images and the source catalog are available online (http://lwa.nrl.navy.mil/VLSS) for use by the astronomical community.

  3. Assimilation of GNSS radio occultation observations in GRAPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Xue, J.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews the development of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) observations assimilation in the Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System (GRAPES) of China Meteorological Administration, including the choice of data to assimilate, the data quality control, the observation operator, the tuning of observation error, and the results of the observation impact experiments. The results indicate that RO data have a significantly positive effect on analysis and forecast at all ranges in GRAPES not only in the Southern Hemisphere where conventional observations are lacking but also in the Northern Hemisphere where data are rich. It is noted that a relatively simple assimilation and forecast system in which only the conventional and RO observation are assimilated still has analysis and forecast skill even after nine months integration, and the analysis difference between both hemispheres is gradually reduced with height when compared with NCEP (National Centers for Enviromental Prediction) analysis. Finally, as a result of the new onboard payload of the Chinese FengYun-3 (FY-3) satellites, the research status of the RO of FY-3 satellites is also presented.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The population of compact radio sources in ONC (Forbrich+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbrich, J.; Rivilla, V. M.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Wolk, S. J.; Meingast, S.

    2016-08-01

    The observations were carried out with the Karl G. Jansky VLA of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory on 2012 September 30, October 2-5 under project code SD630. Data were taken using the VLA's C-band (4-8GHz) receivers in full polarization mode, with two 1GHz basebands centered at 4.736 and 7.336GHz to provide a good baseline for source spectral index determination. Apart from the first epoch, the field was simultaneously observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Mostly of interest for variability information, these data will be presented as part of a follow-up paper. (1 data file).

  5. High-Redshift Radio Galaxies from Deep Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. H. Ishwara-Chandra; S. K. Sirothia; Y. Wadadekar; S. Pal

    2011-12-01

    Most of the radio galaxies with > 3 have been found using the red-shift spectral index correlation.We have started a programme with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to exploit this correlation at flux density levels about 100 times deeper than the known high-redshift radio galaxies, with an aim to detect candidate high-redshift radio galaxies. Here we present results from the deep 150 MHz observations of LBDS-Lynx field, which has been imaged at 327, 610 and 1412 MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and at 1400 and 4860 MHz with the Very Large Array (VLA). We find about 150 radio sources with spectra steeper than 1. About two-thirds of these are not detected in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), hence are strong candidate high-redshift radio galaxies, which need to be further explored with deep infra-red imaging and spectroscopy to estimate the red-shift.

  6. Radio Detection of A Candidate Neutron Star Associated with Galactic Center Supernova Remnant Sagittarius A East

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Goss, W M

    2013-01-01

    We report the VLA detection of the radio counterpart of the X-ray object referred to as the "Cannonball", which has been proposed to be the remnant neutron star resulting from the creation of the Galactic Center supernova remnant, Sagittarius A East. The radio object was detected both in our new VLA image from observations in 2012 at 5.5 GHz and in archival VLA images from observations in 1987 at 4.75 GHz and in the period from 1990 to 2002 at 8.31 GHz. The radio morphology of this object is characterized as a compact, partially resolved point source located at the northern tip of a radio "tongue" similar to the X-ray structure observed by Chandra. Behind the Cannonball, a radio counterpart to the X-ray plume is observed. This object consists of a broad radio plume with a size of 30\\arcsec$\\times$15\\arcsec, followed by a linear tail having a length of 30\\arcsec. The compact head and broad plume sources appear to have relatively flat spectra ($\\propto\

  7. Radio emission from rapidly-rotating cool giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Walter, Frederick M.; Florkowski, David R.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a VLA program are reported to examine the radio continuum emission from 11 rapidly-rotating cool giant stars, all of which were originally believed to be single stars. Six of the 11 stars were detected as radio sources, including FK Com and HR 9024, for which there exist multifrequency observations. HD 199178, UZ Lib (now known to be a binary system), and HD 82558, for which there is only 6-cm data. The radio properties of these stars are compared with those of the active, rapidly rotating evolved stars found in the RS CVn binary systems.

  8. Simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the radio-mode-switching pulsar PSR B1822-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Mitra, D.; Rankin, J. M.; Stappers, B. W.; Wright, G. A. E.; Basu, R.; Szary, A.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2017-04-01

    We report on simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the radio-mode-switching pulsar PSR B1822-09 with ESA's XMM-Newton and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Lovell radio telescopes. PSR B1822-09 switches between a radio-bright and radio-quiet mode, and we discovered a relationship between the durations of its modes and a known underlying radio-modulation time-scale within the modes. We discovered X-ray (energies 0.2-1.4 keV) pulsations with a broad sinusoidal pulse, slightly lagging the radio main pulse in phase by 0.094 ± 0.017, with an energy-dependent pulsed fraction varying from ∼0.15 at 0.3 keV to ∼0.6 at 1 keV. No evidence is found for simultaneous X-ray and radio mode switching. The total X-ray spectrum consists of a cool component (T ∼0.96 × 106 K, hotspot radius R ∼2.0 km) and a hot component (T ∼2.2 × 106 K, R ∼100 m). The hot component can be ascribed to the pulsed emission and the cool component to the unpulsed emission. The high-energy characteristics of PSR B1822-09 resemble those of middle-aged pulsars such as PSR B0656+14, PSR B1055-52 and Geminga, including an indication for pulsed high-energy gamma-ray emission in Fermi Large Area Telescope data. Explanations for the high pulsed fraction seem to require different temperatures at the two poles of this orthogonal rotator, or magnetic anisotropic beaming effects in its strong magnetic field. In our X-ray skymap, we found a harder source at only 5.1 ± 0.5 arcsec from PSR B1822-09, which might be a pulsar wind nebula.

  9. Simultaneous optical and radio observations of flare stars in the Pleiades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovmassian, H.M.; Haro, G.; Webber, J.C.; Swenson, G.W. Jr.; Yang, K.S.; Yoss, K.M.; Deming, D.; Green, R.F.

    1974-01-01

    Simultaneous optical (at Tonantzintla, Palomar, and Prairie Observatories) and radio (at the Vermilion River and Owens Valley Radio Observatories) observations of the flare stars in the Pleiades cluster were made from October 1 to 6, 1972. Eleven optical flare-ups were detected. One large flare-up (greater than 8/sup m/ in U) was accompanied by radio flare at 170 MHz. The ratio of optical to radio energy output of this flare is about 6 . 10/sup 2/.

  10. Simultaneous observations of periodic non-Io decametric radio emission by ground radio telescope URAN-2 and STEREO/WAVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Rucker, H. O.; Frantzusenko, A.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    Periodic bursts of the non-Io component of Jovian decametric radio emission (non-Io DAM) is observed as (1) series of arc-like radio bursts with negative frequency drift which reoccur with 1.5% longer period than the Jovian magnetosphere rotation rate, (2) series of bursts with positive frequency drift which reoccur with Jupiter's rotation period and (3) periodic non-arc like radio features [1, 2]. These bursts are typically detected during several Jupiter rotations in decametric frequency range from 4 MHz to 12 - 16 MHz between 300° and 60° of CML. We present simultaneous observations of the periodic non-Io controlled DAM performed by the WAVES radio experiment onboard the two STEREO spacecraft and the groundbased radio telescope URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. URAN-2 with an effective area of about 30000 m2 consists of 512 broadband crossed dipoles and equipped with the high performance digital radio spectrometer with polarization measurement capability. During the observation campaign Sep., 2012 - Apr., 2013 URAN-2 recorded a large amount of Jovian DAM events with the high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100 ms) in a frequency range 8-32 MHz. In the same time the two spatially separated STEREO spacecraft was able to observe DAM in the frequency range up to 16 MHz. The first analysis of the acquired stereoscopic observations is presented. In particular, we show one episode when the periodic non-arc DAM was recorded together with long lasting Jovian narrow band (NB) emissions. These NB emission was observed at the high frequency cutoff of DAM and can be interpreted as propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jovian ionosphere [3]. We discuss the possible relations between the observed NB events and the periodic non-Io controlled Jovian decametric radio emission.

  11. Cosmological MHD Simulations of Galaxy Cluster Radio Relics: Insights and Warnings for Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Skillman, Samuel W; Hallman, Eric J; O'Shea, Brian W; Burns, Jack O; Li, Hui; Collins, David C; Norman, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Non-thermal radio emission from cosmic ray electrons in the vicinity of merging galaxy clusters is an important tracer of cluster merger activity, and is the result of complex physical processes that involve magnetic fields, particle acceleration, gas dynamics, and radiation. In particular, objects known as radio relics are thought to be the result of shock-accelerated electrons that, when embedded in a magnetic field, emit synchrotron radiation in the radio wavelengths. In order to properly model this emission, we utilize the adaptive mesh refinement simulation of the magnetohydrodynamic evolution of a galaxy cluster from cosmological initial conditions. We locate shock fronts and apply models of cosmic ray electron acceleration that are then input into radio emission models. We have determined the thermodynamic properties of this radio-emitting plasma and constructed synthetic radio observations to compare to observed galaxy clusters. We find a significant dependence of the observed morphology and radio rel...

  12. Mutual distance dependence drives the observed jet-power-radio-luminosity scaling relations in radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, L. E. H.; Shabala, S. S.

    2016-02-01

    The kinetic power of radio jets is a quantity of fundamental importance to studies of the AGN feedback process and radio galaxy physics. A widely used proxy for jet power is the extended radio luminosity. A number of empirical methods have been used to calibrate a scaling relationship between jet power (Q) and radio luminosity (L) of the form log (Q) = βL log (L) + C. The regression slope has typically been found to be βL ˜ 0.7-0.8. Here we show that the previously reported scaling relations are strongly affected by the confounding variable, distance. We find that in a sample of FRI X-ray cavity systems, after accounting for the mutual distance dependence, the jet power and radio luminosity are only weakly correlated, with slope βL ≈ 0.3: significantly flatter than previously reported. We also find that in previously used samples of high-power sources, no evidence for an intrinsic correlation is present when the effect of distance is accounted for. Using a simple model we show that βL is expected to be significantly lower in samples of FRI radio galaxies than it is for FRIIs, due to the differing dynamics for these two classes of radio source. For FRI X-ray cavity systems the model predicts βL(FRI) ≳ 0.5 in contrast to FRII radio galaxies, for which βL(FRII) ≳ 0.8. We discuss the implications of our finding for studies of radio mode feedback, and radio galaxy physics.

  13. Revealing Hanny's Voorwerp: radio observations of IC 2497

    CERN Document Server

    Jozsa, G I G; Oosterloo, T A; Rampadarath, H; Paragi, Z; van Arkel, H; Lintott, C; Keel, W C; Schawinski, K; Edmondson, E

    2009-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength radio observations in the direction of the spiral galaxy IC 2497 and the neighbouring emission nebula known as "Hanny's Voorwerp". Our WSRT continuum observations at 1.4 GHz and 4.9 GHz, reveal the presence of extended emission at the position of the nebulosity, although the bulk of the emission remains unresolved at the centre of the galaxy. e-VLBI 1.65 GHz observations show that on the milliarcsecond-scale a faint central compact source is present in IC 2497 with a brightness temperature in excess of 4E5 K. With the WSRT, we detect a large reservoir of neutral hydrogen in the proximity of IC 2497. One cloud complex with a total mass of 5.6E9 Msol to the South of IC 2497, encompasses Hanny's Voorwerp. Another cloud complex is located at the position of a small galaxy group ~100 kpc to the West of IC 2497 with a mass of 2.9E9 Msol. Our data hint at a physical connection between both complexes. We also detect HI in absorption against the central continuum source of IC 2497. Our obse...

  14. The Broad Line Radio Galaxy J2114+820

    CERN Document Server

    Lara, L; Cotton, W D; Feretti, L; Giovannini, G; Marcaide, J M; Venturi, T

    1998-01-01

    In the frame of the study of a new sample of large angular size radio galaxies selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, we have made radio observations of J2114+820, a low power radio galaxy with an angular size of 6'. Its radio structure basically consists of a prominent core, a jet directed in north-west direction and two extended S-shaped lobes. We have also observed the optical counterpart of J2114+820, a bright elliptical galaxy with a strong unresolved central component. The optical spectrum shows broad emission lines. This fact, together with its low radio power and FR-I type morphology, renders J2114+820 a non-trivial object from the point of view of the current unification schemes of radio loud active galactic nuclei.

  15. Radio sky and the right to observe it

    CERN Document Server

    Gulyaev, Sergei

    2012-01-01

    It was decided in May 2012 that the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be built in Africa and Australia, two Southern Hemisphere continents. Here we discuss the plan for SKA design and construction, and how New Zealand radio astronomers can participate in this project and contribute to astronomy and astrophysics research. Geodesy and the study of tectonic plate motion is another important area of research for New Zealand radio astronomy to contribute to. As New Zealand is located at the boundary between two colliding tectonic plates (Australian and Pacific) and most of geological activity in New Zealand originates from their motion, it is important to monitor the relative plate motion with high precision using both GPS and radio astronomical techniques. We discuss radio frequency interference (RFI) as a limiting factor for radio astronomy, and provide results of RFI measurements in different locations in New Zealand.

  16. Technologies for Low Frequency Radio Observations of the Cosmic Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    2014-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is developing concepts and technologies for low frequency radio astronomy space missions aimed at observing highly redshifted neutral Hydrogen from the Dark Ages. This is the period of cosmic history between the recombination epoch when the microwave background radiation was produced and the re-ionization of the intergalactic medium by the first generation of stars (Cosmic Dawn). This period, at redshifts greater than about 20, is a critical epoch for the formation and evolution of large-scale structure in the universe. The 21-cm spectral line of Hydrogen provides the most promising method for directly studying the Dark Ages, but the corresponding frequencies at such large redshifts are only tens of MHz and thus require space-based observations to avoid terrestrial RFI and ionospheric absorption and refraction. This paper reports on the status of several low frequency technology development activities at JPL, including deployable bi-conical dipoles for a planned lunar-orbiting mission, and both rover-deployed and inflation-deployed long dipole antennas for use on the lunar surface.

  17. Atmospheric diurnal variations observed with GPS radio occultation soundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xie

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal variation, driven by solar forcing, is a fundamental mode in the Earth's weather and climate system. Radio occultation (RO measurements from the six COSMIC satellites (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate provide nearly uniform global coverage with high vertical resolution, all-weather and diurnal sampling capability. This paper analyzes the diurnal variations of temperature and refractivity from three-year (2007–2009 COSMIC RO measurements in the troposphere and stratosphere between 30° S and 30° N. The RO observations reveal both propagating and trapped vertical structures of diurnal variations, including transition regions near the tropopause where data with high vertical resolution are critical. In the tropics the diurnal amplitude in refractivity shows the minimum around 14 km and increases to a local maximum around 32 km in the stratosphere. The upward propagating component of the migrating diurnal tides in the tropics is clearly captured by the GPS RO measurements, which show a downward progression in phase from stratopause to the upper troposphere with a vertical wavelength of about 25 km. At ~32 km the seasonal variation of the tidal amplitude maximizes at the opposite side of the equator relative to the solar forcing. The vertical structure of tidal amplitude shows strong seasonal variations and becomes asymmetric along the equator and tilted toward the summer hemisphere in the solstice months. Such asymmetry becomes less prominent in equinox months.

  18. Radio Observations of the Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, M

    2003-01-01

    After a short introduction on how we get information of the magnetic fields from radio observations I discuss the results concerning the magnetic field structure in galaxies: Large-scale regular magnetic field pattern of spiral structure exist in grand-design spirals, flocculent and even irregular galaxies. The regular field in spirals is aligned along the optical spiral arms but strongest in the interarm region, sometimes forming 'magnetic arms'. The strongest total field is found in the optical arms, but mainly irregular. The large-scale regular field is best explained by some kind of dynamo action. Only a few galaxies show a dominant axisymmetric field pattern, most field structures seem to be a superposition of different dynamo modes or rather reveal more local effects related to density waves, bars or shocks. Observations of edge-on galaxies show that the magnetic fields are mainly parallel to the disk except in some galaxies with strong star formation and strong galactic winds as e.g. NGC 4631.

  19. Exploring atmospheric blocking with GPS radio occultation observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Brunner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric blocking has been closely investigated in recent years due to its impact on weather and climate, such as heat waves, droughts, and flooding. We use, for the first time, satellite-based observations from Global Positioning System (GPS radio occultation (RO and explore their ability to resolve blocking in order to potentially open up new avenues complementing models and re-analyses. RO delivers globally available and vertically high resolved profiles of atmospheric variables such as temperature and geopotential height (GPH. Applying a standard blocking detection algorithm we find that RO data robustly capture blocking as demonstrated for two well-known blocking events over Russia in summer 2010 and over Greenland in late winter 2013. During blocking episodes, vertically resolved GPH gradients show a distinct anomalous behavior compared to climatological conditions up to 300 hPa and sometimes even further up to the tropopause. The accompanied increase in GPH of up to 300 m in the upper troposphere yields a pronounced tropopause height increase. Corresponding temperatures rise up to 10 K in the middle and lower troposphere. These results demonstrate the feasibility and potential of RO to detect and resolve blocking and in particular to explore the vertical structure of the atmosphere during blocking episodes. This new observation-based view is available globally at the same quality so that also blocking in the Southern Hemisphere can be studied with the same reliability as in the Northern Hemisphere.

  20. Radio spectral index from NVSS and TGSS

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    We extract the radio spectral index, $\\alpha$, from the 541,195 common sources observed in 150 MHz TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) and 1.4 GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). These catalogs cover about $80\\%$ of the sky and represent the largest radio population. We confirm the steepening of $\\alpha$ with increasing flux density. Further, we observe an increase in $\\alpha$ with source size (TGSS measured) saturating araound size 50 arcsec to $0.83\\pm0.01$. From this saturated value, we constrain the electron energy injection spectral index, $\\gamma$, and the fractional contribution of supernova remnants to the total radio flux. Our results indicate relatively low $\\gamma \\sim 1.8-1.9$ and a large supernova remnants contribution ($\\sim 15-25\\%$). For very compact sources the convection and the thermal radio emission are likely to be important.

  1. Radio continuum and radio recombination line observations of Sagittarius B1 and G0.6-0.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehringer, David M.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Palmer, Patrick; Goss, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    Continuum emission and H110-alpha recombination line emission from Sgr B1 and G0.6-0.0 have been observed using the VLA. It is shown that Sgr B1 is a region of great complexity, both spatially and kinematically. The continuum observations show that this region is dominated by many extended features rather than compact sources. On the other hand, Sgr B2 is dominated by several ultracompact H II regions. The two regions may be in different stages of evolution, with Sgr B1 being older, perhaps by as much as 0 exp 6 yrs. The recombination line study shows that Sgr B1 is composed of two distinct kinematic regions, a simple western one and a more complex eastern one. G0.6-0.0 is a region composed of at least four ultracompact H II regions that is situated between Sgr B1 and Sgr B2. There is an arc of ionized gas that lies to the east and to the south of these compact regions. The velocity of G0.6-0.0 is intermediate between those of Sgr B1 and Sgr B2. These facts strengthen the argument that these regions are physically associated.

  2. The Radio Properties of Composite LINER/HII Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Filho, M E; Ho, L C; Filho, Mercedes E.; Barthel, Peter D.; Ho, Luis C.

    2002-01-01

    Arcsec-resolution VLA observations -- newly obtained as well as published -- of 40 nearby galaxies are discussed, completing a study of the radio properties of a magnitude-limited sample of nearby galaxies of the composite LINER/HII type. Our results reveal an overall detection rate of at least 25% AGN candidates among these composite sources. The general properties of these AGN candidates, as compared to non-AGN composite sources and HII galaxies, are discussed.

  3. Sgr A* at low radio frequencies: GMRT observations

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, S; Roy, Subhashis

    2004-01-01

    The central region of the Galaxy has been observed at 580, 620 and 1010 MHz with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We detect emission from Sgr-A*, the compact object at the dynamical centre of the Galaxy, and estimate its flux density at 620 MHz to be 0.5 +/- 0.1 Jy. This is the first detection of Sgr A* below 1 GHz (Roy & Rao 2002, 2003), which along with a possible detection at 330 MHz (Nord et al. 2004) provides its spectrum below 1 GHz. Comparison of the 620 MHz map with maps made at other frequencies indicates that most parts of the Sgr A West HII region have optical depth 2. However, Sgr A*, which is seen in the same region in projection, shows a slightly inverted spectral index between 1010 MHz and 620 MHz. This is consistent with its high frequency spectral index, and indicates that Sgr A* is located in front of the Sgr A West complex, and rules out any low frequency turnover around 1 GHz, as suggested by Davies et al. (1976).

  4. Swift observations of high-redshift radio-loud quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Sambruna, R M; Ghisellini, G; Donato, D; Holland, S T; Markwardt, C B; Tüller, J; Mushotzky, R F

    2007-01-01

    We report on Swift observations of four z>2 radio-loud quasars (0212+735, 0537-286, 0836+710, and 2149-307), classified as blazars. The sources, well-known emitters at soft-medium X-rays, were detected at >5sigma with the BAT experiment in 15-150 keV. No flux variability was detected within the XRT and BAT exposures, with the exception of 0836+710 which shows an increase of a factor 4 of the 15-150 keV flux on a timescale of one month. The 0.3-10 keV spectra are well fitted by power law models, with rather hard continua (photon indices Gamma_XRT ~1.3-1.5); similarly, the 15-150 keV spectra are described by power laws with Gamma_BAT ~1.3-1.8. The XRT data exhibit spectral curvature, which can be modeled either in terms of excess absorption along the line of sight, or a downward-curved broken power law. In the former case, if the excess N_H is at the rest-frame of the source, columns of N_H^z=(0.3-6)x10^22 cm^-2 are measured. Modeling of the SEDs of the four quasars shows that the emission at the higher frequen...

  5. Interstellar Scintillation Observations of 146 Extragalactic Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rickett, B

    2005-01-01

    From 1979--1996 the Green Bank Interferometer was used by the Naval Research Laboratory to monitor the flux density from 146 compact radio sources at frequencies near 2 and 8 GHz. We filter the ``light curves'' to separate intrinsic variations on times of a year or more from more rapid interstellar scintilation (ISS) on times of 5--50 d. Whereas the intrinsic variation at 2 GHz is similar to that at 8 GHz (though diminished in amplitude), the ISS variation is much stronger at 2 than at 8 GHz. We characterize the ISS variation by an rms amplitude and a timescale and examine the statistics of these parameters for the 121 sources with significant ISS at 2 GHz. We model the scintillations using the NE2001 Galactic electron model assuming the sources are brightness-limited. We find the observed rms amplitude to be in general agreement with the model, provided that the compact components of the sources have about 50% of their flux density in a component with maximum brightness temperatures $10^{11}$--$10^{12}$K. Th...

  6. Antenna array characterization via radio interferometry observation of astronomical sources

    CERN Document Server

    Colegate, T M; Hall, P J; Padhi, S K; Wayth, R B; de Vaate, J G Bij; Crosse, B; Emrich, D; Faulkner, A J; Hurley-Walker, N; Acedo, E de Lera; Juswardy, B; Razavi-Ghods, N; Tingay, S J; Williams, A

    2015-01-01

    We present an in-situ antenna characterization method and results for a "low-frequency" radio astronomy engineering prototype array, characterized over the 75-300 MHz frequency range. The presence of multiple cosmic radio sources, particularly the dominant Galactic noise, makes in-situ characterization at these frequencies challenging; however, it will be shown that high quality measurement is possible via radio interferometry techniques. This method is well-known in the radio astronomy community but seems less so in antenna measurement and wireless communications communities, although the measurement challenges involving multiple undesired sources in the antenna field-of-view bear some similarities. We discuss this approach and our results with the expectation that this principle may find greater application in related fields.

  7. Thunderstorm Observations by Air-Shower Radio Antenna Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Doll, P; Ender, M; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Nehls, S; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; 10.1016/j.asr.2011.06.003

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic, charged particles present in extensive air showers lead to a coherent emission of radio pulses which are measured to identify the shower initiating high-energy cosmic rays. Especially during thunderstorms, there are additional strong electric fields in the atmosphere, which can lead to further multiplication and acceleration of the charged particles and thus have influence on the form and strength of the radio emission. For a reliable energy reconstruction of the primary cosmic ray by means of the measured radio signal it is very important to understand how electric fields affect the radio emission. In addition, lightning strikes are a prominent source of broadband radio emissions that are visible over very long distances. This, on the one hand, causes difficulties in the detection of the much lower signal of the air shower. On the other hand the recorded signals can be used to study features of the lightning development. The detection of cosmic rays via the radio emission and the influence of s...

  8. Radio upper limits for the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J17511-3057

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Russell, D. M.; Migliari, S.

    2009-10-01

    We report on recent radio observations of the newly-detected accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar, IGR J17511-3057 (ATels #2196, #2197, #2198, #2199, #2215, #2216, #2220, #2221). We used the Very Large Array (VLA) to observe the source under observing program AM971. The array was in its relatively compact 'C' and 'DNC' configurations, and the observations were made at 8.46 GHz. In no case was the source significantly detected.

  9. Mutual distance dependence drives the observed jet power - radio luminosity scaling relations in radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Godfrey, L E H

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic power of radio jets is a quantity of fundamental importance to studies of the AGN feedback process and radio galaxy physics. A widely used proxy for jet power is the extended radio luminosity. A number of empirical methods have been used to calibrate a scaling relationship between jet power (Q) and radio luminosity (L) of the form log(Q) = beta_L * log(L) + C. The regression slope has typically been found to be beta_L ~ 0.7 - 0.8. Here we show that the previously reported scaling relations are strongly affected by the confounding variable, distance. We find that in a sample of FRI X-ray cavity systems, after accounting for the mutual distance dependence, the jet power and radio luminosity are only weakly correlated, with slope beta_L ~ 0.3: significantly flatter than previously reported. We also find that in previously used samples of high-power sources, no evidence for an intrinsic correlation is present when the effect of distance is accounted for. Using a simple model we show that beta_L is exp...

  10. The variability of the Crab Nebula in radio: No radio counterpart to gamma-ray flares

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Michael F; Buehler, R; Lobanov, A P; Blandford, R

    2014-01-01

    We present new Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) radio images of the Crab Nebula at 5.5 GHz, taken at two epochs separated by 6 days about two months after a gamma-ray flare in 2012 July. We find no significant change in the Crab's radio emission localized to a region of <2 light-months in radius, either over the 6-day interval between our present observations or between the present observations and ones from 2001. Any radio counterpart to the flare has a radio luminosity of <~ $2 \\times 10^{-4}$ times that of the nebula. Comparing our images to one from 2001, we do however find changes in radio brightness, up to 10% in amplitude, which occur on decade timescales throughout the nebula. The morphology of the changes is complex suggesting both filamentary and knotty structures. The variability is stronger, and the timescales likely somewhat shorter, nearer the centre of the nebula. We further find that even with the excellent uv~coverage and signal-to-noise of the VLA, deconvolution errors are much larger tha...

  11. Sharing Low Frequency Radio Emissions in the Virtual Observatory: Application for JUNO-Ground-Radio Observations Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, B.; Savalle, R.; Zarka, P. M.; Anderson, M.; Andre, N.; Coffre, A.; Clarke, T.; Denis, L.; Ebert, R. W.; Erard, S.; Genot, V. N.; Girard, J. N.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Hess, S. L.; Higgins, C. A.; Hobara, Y.; Imai, K.; Imai, M.; Kasaba, Y.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Kumamoto, A.; Kurth, W. S.; Lamy, L.; Le Sidaner, P.; Misawa, H.; Nakajo, T.; Orton, G. S.; Ryabov, V. B.; Sky, J.; Thieman, J.; Tsuchiya, F.; Typinski, D.

    2015-12-01

    In the frame of the preparation of the NASA/JUNO and ESA/JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) missions, and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet-VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nancay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol, as well as data from the Iitate Low Frquency Radio Antenna, in Japan. Amateur radio data from the RadioJOVE project is also available. The attached figure shows data from those three providers. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets.

  12. Coordinated observations using the world largest low-frequency radio telescopes and space misiions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Zarka, Ph.; Kolyadin, V. L.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Stepkin, S. V.; Panchenko, M.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Fischer, G.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Melnik, V. N.; Litvinenko, G. V.; Sidorchuk, M. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Vasilyeva, Ya. Yu.; Bojko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Mann, G.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Falkovich, I. S.; Koval, A. A.; Mylostna, K.; Pylaev, O. S.; Shepelev, V. A.; Reznik, A. P.

    2013-09-01

    The positive possibilities of astrophysical objects studies(including the Solar system investigations) using coordinated observations with the largest existing and coming low frequency radio telescopes are shown. The observations of the Sun, Jupiter, Saturn, ant others with UTR-2, URAN, NDA radio telescopes, and WIND, Cassini and STEREO space missions at frequencies lower than 40 MHz have been carried out.

  13. Massive star-formation toward G28.87+0.07 (IRAS 18411-0338) investigated by means of maser kinematics and radio to infrared, continuum observations

    CERN Document Server

    Li, J J; Cesaroni, R; Furuya, R S; Xu, Y; Usuda, T; Menten, K M; Pestalozzi, M; Elia, D; Schisano, E

    2012-01-01

    We used the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and the European VLBI Network (EVN) to perform phase-referenced VLBI observations of the three most powerful maser transitions associated with the high-mass star-forming region G28.87+0.07: the 22.2 GHz H$_{2}$O, 6.7 GHz CH$_{3}$OH, and 1.665 GHz OH lines. We also performed VLA observations of the radio continuum emission at 1.3 and 3.6 cm and Subaru observations of the continuum emission at 24.5 $\\mu$m. Two centimeter continuum sources are detected and one of them (named "HMC") is compact and placed at the center of the observed distribution of H$_{2}$O, CH$_{3}$OH and OH masers. The bipolar distribution of line-of-sight (l.o.s) velocities and the pattern of the proper motions suggest that the water masers are driven by a (proto)stellar jet interacting with the dense circumstellar gas. The same jet could both excite the centimeter continuum source named "HMC" (interpreted as free-free emission from shocked gas) and power the molecular outflow observed at larger sca...

  14. VLBA Observations of Low Luminosity Flat Spectrum Radio Galaxies and BL Lac Objects: Polarisation Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, M.; Dallacasa, D.; Stanghellini, C.; Marchã, M. J. M.

    We obtained two-epoch VLBA observations at 5 GHz of a list of radio galaxies drawn from the 200 mJy sample (Marcha et al. 1996). The objects selected for milli-arcsecond scale observations are classified, on the basis of their optical spectroscopic and polarimetric properties, as BL Lac objects, normal weak line radio galaxies, broad line radio galaxies, and transition objects (those with intermediate properties). We present preliminary results on the radio polarization properties, on the milli-arcsecond scale, of objects with different optical properties and discuss structural variations detected from the two epochs.

  15. Radio emission from RS CVn binary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doiron, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The RS CVn binary stellar systems UX Ari, HR 1099, AR Lac, HR 5110, II Peg, lambda And, and SZ Psc were investigated by use of radio interferometry during the period from July 1982 through August 1983. Interferometry took two forms: Very Large Array (VLA) observations and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). The VLA observations determined the characteristic polarization and flux behavior of the centimeter wavelength radio emission. The observed spectral index was near zero during quiescent periods, rising to between 0.5 and 1.0 during active periods. No net linear polarization is observed to a limit of 1.7%. This is expected since the Faraday depth of thermal electrons deduced from x-ray observations is approx. 10/sup 5/. Circular polarization is observed to be less than 20% at all frequencies often with a helicity reversal between 1.6 GHz and 5 GHz. The VLBI observations have shown that the brightness temperatures are often T/sub B/ approx.> 10/sup 10/ /sup 0/K and size sources smaller than or comparable to the overall size of the binary system. These data are consistent with incoherent gyrosynchrotron emission from mildly relativistic electrons which are optically thick to their own radiation at 1.6 GHz and optically thin at 5 GHz and above. The spectral behavior suggests that the radio emission is due to a power-law distribution of electrons.

  16. LOFAR: A new radio telescope for low frequency radio observations: Science and project status

    CERN Document Server

    Röttgering, H J A; Fender, R P; Kuijpers, J; Van Haarlem, M P; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Miley, G K

    2003-01-01

    LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a large radio telescope consisting about 100 soccer field sized antenna stations spread over a region of 400 km in diameter. It will operate in the frequency range from ~10 to 240 MHz, with a resolution at 240 MHz of better than an arcsecond. Its superb sensitivity will allow for a broad range of astrophysical studies. In this contribution we first discuss four major areas of astrophysical research in which LOFAR will undoubtedly make important contributions: reionisation, distant galaxies and AGNs, transient radio sources and cosmic rays. Subsequently, we will discuss the technical concept of the instrument and the status of the LOFAR project

  17. Emission Patterns of Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft Rj = Ij /[Sigma]Ij (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of approximately 2 deg and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from [approx] -100 deg to approximately 100 deg. The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  18. Characteristics of tropopause parameters as observed with GPS radio occultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Rieckh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of the lapse rate tropopause are analyzed globally for tropopause altitude and temperature using global positioning system (GPS radio occultation (RO data from late 2001 to the end of 2013. RO profiles feature high vertical resolution and excellent quality in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, which are key factors for tropopause determination, including multiple ones. RO data provide measurements globally and allow examination of both temporal and spatial tropopause characteristics based entirely on observational measurements. To investigate latitudinal and longitudinal tropopause characteristics, the mean annual cycle, and inter-annual variability, we use tropopauses from individual profiles as well as their statistical measures for zonal bands and 5° × 10° bins. The latitudinal structure of first tropopauses shows the well-known distribution with high (cold tropical tropopauses and low (warm extra-tropical tropopauses. In the transition zones (20 to 40° N/S, individual profiles reveal varying tropopause altitudes from less than 7 km to more than 17 km due to variability in the subtropical tropopause break. In this region, we also find multiple tropopauses throughout the year. Longitudinal variability is strongest at northern hemispheric mid latitudes and in the Asian monsoon region. The mean annual cycle features changes in amplitude and phase, depending on latitude. This is caused by different underlying physical processes (such as the Brewer–Dobson circulation – BDC and atmospheric dynamics (such as the strong polar vortex in the southern hemispheric winter. Inter-annual anomalies of tropopause parameters show signatures of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO, the quasi–biennial oscillation (QBO, and the varying strength of the polar vortex, including sudden stratospheric warming (SSW events. These results are in good agreement with previous studies and underpin the high utility of the entire RO record

  19. Emission Patterns of Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft Rj = Ij /[Sigma]Ij (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of approximately 2 deg and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from [approx] -100 deg to approximately 100 deg. The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  20. Spectral Index Studies of the Diffuse Radio Emission in Abell 2256: Implications to Merger Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Ruta, Kale

    2010-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the merging rich cluster of galaxies Abell 2256. We have observed A2256 at 150 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and successfully detected the diffuse radio halo and the relic emission over an extent $\\sim1.2$ Mpc$^2$. Using this 150 MHz image and the images made using archival observations from the VLA (1369 MHz) and the WSRT (350 MHz), we have produced spectral index images of the diffuse radio emission in A2256. These spectral index images show a distribution of flat spectral index (S$\\propto\

  1. Non-thermal emission from extragalactic radio sources a high resolution broad band (radio to X-rays) approach

    CERN Document Server

    Brunetti, G

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the study of extragalactic radio sources, we will focus on the importance of the spatial resolution at different wavelengths, and of the combination of observations at different frequency bands. In particular, a substantial step forward in this field is now provided by the new generation X-ray telescopes which are able to image radio sources in between 0.1--10 keV with a spatial resolution comparable with that of the radio telescopes (VLA) and of the optical telescopes. After a brief description of some basic aspects of acceleration mechanisms and of the radiative processes at work in the extragalactic radio sources, we will focus on a number of recent radio, optical and X-ray observations with arcsec resolution, and discuss the deriving constraints on the physics of these sources.

  2. The XXL Survey: IX. Optical overdensity and radio continuum analysis of a supercluster at $z=0.43$

    CERN Document Server

    Baran, N; Milaković, D; Novak, M; Delhaize, J; Gastaldello, F; Ramos-Ceja, M E; Pacaud, F; Bourke, S; Carilli, C L; Ettori, S; Hallinan, G; Horellou, C; Koulouridis, E; Chiappetti, L; Miettinen, O; Melnyk, O; Mooley, K; Pierre, M; Pompei, E; Schinnerer, E

    2016-01-01

    We present observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz toward a sub-field of the XXL-North 25 deg$^{2}$ field targeting the first supercluster discovered in the XXL Survey. The structure has been found at a spectroscopic redshift of 0.43 and extending over $0.35\\times0.1$ deg$^{2}$ on the sky. We present the 3 GHz VLA radio continuum observations, the radio mosaic and radio source catalogue, and, perform an analysis of the supercluster in the optical and radio regimes using photometric redshifts from the CFHTLS survey and our new VLA data. Our 3 GHz radio mosaic has a resolution of $3.2\\times1.9$ arcsec$^2$, and covers an area of $41\\times41$ arcmin$^2$ with rms noise level below $\\sim20 \\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ ($\\sim11\\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ in central $15\\times15$ arcmin$^2$). We extract a catalogue of 155 radio sources $\\geq6\\sigma$, 8 of which are multicomponent sources, and 123 ($79\\%$) can be associated with optical sources in the CFHTLS W1 catalogue. Applying Voronoi tessellation analysi...

  3. On the radio properties of the intermediate-mass black hole candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1

    CERN Document Server

    Cseh, D; Godet, O; Barret, D; Corbel, S; Coriat, M; Falcke, H; Farrell, S A; Koerding, E; Lenc, E; Wrobel, J M

    2014-01-01

    We present follow-up radio observations of ESO 243-49 HLX-1 from 2012 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We report the detection of radio emission at the location of HLX-1 during its hard X-ray state using the ATCA. Assuming that the `Fundamental Plane' of accreting black holes is applicable, we provide an independent estimate of the black hole mass of $M_{\\rm{BH}}\\leq2.8^{+7.5}_{-2.1} \\times 10^{6}$ M$_{\\odot}$ at 90% confidence. However, we argue that the detected radio emission is likely to be Doppler-boosted and our mass estimate is an upper limit. We discuss other possible origins of the radio emission such as being due to a radio nebula, star formation, or later interaction of the flares with the large-scale environment. None of these were found adequate. The VLA observations were carried out during the X-ray outburst. However, no new radio flare was detected, possibly due to a sparse time sampling. The deepest, combined VLA data suggests a ...

  4. Systematic Search of the Nearest Stars for Exoplanetary Radio Emission: Preliminary results from LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, Daniel; Knapp, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Radio observations have been used as a tool to search for exoplanets since before the confirmed discovery of the first extrasolar planet. To date, neither targeted observations of known exoplanets nor surveys have produced definitive detections of exoplanetary radio emission. We present the framework for, and initial results from, a blind radio survey of the nearest star systems for exoplanetary radio emission. The very closest stars were chosen to minimize the dilution of potential radio signals by distance and thereby increase the probability of a detection. The goal of this survey is to obtain, at minimum, physically meaningful upper limits on radio emission from (or modulated by) substellar companions of the nearest stars. The target selection criteria for this survey are restricted to distance, observability for LOFAR and the VLA, and data quality metrics only. Stellar properties are not considered because preconceptions about the types of systems most likely to exhibit radio emission have not been observationally confirmed and may be incorrect. Two survey targets, GJ 411 and GJ 725A/B, have been observed with the LOFAR telescope LBA (30-75 MHz) system. A series of 4 2-hour integrations and 1 3-hour integration were made for each target of a period of approximately 2 weeks. Additional observations are underway with LOFAR as well as the VLA. Preliminary results from the first LOFAR observations are presented.

  5. COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF GALAXY CLUSTER RADIO RELICS: INSIGHTS AND WARNINGS FOR OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skillman, Samuel W.; Hallman, Eric J.; Burns, Jack O. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Xu, Hao; Li, Hui; Collins, David C. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); O' Shea, Brian W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Norman, Michael L., E-mail: samuel.skillman@colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Non-thermal radio emission from cosmic-ray electrons in the vicinity of merging galaxy clusters is an important tracer of cluster merger activity, and is the result of complex physical processes that involve magnetic fields, particle acceleration, gas dynamics, and radiation. In particular, objects known as radio relics are thought to be the result of shock-accelerated electrons that, when embedded in a magnetic field, emit synchrotron radiation in the radio wavelengths. In order to properly model this emission, we utilize the adaptive mesh refinement simulation of the magnetohydrodynamic evolution of a galaxy cluster from cosmological initial conditions. We locate shock fronts and apply models of cosmic-ray electron acceleration that are then input into radio emission models. We have determined the thermodynamic properties of this radio-emitting plasma and constructed synthetic radio observations to compare observed galaxy clusters. We find a significant dependence of the observed morphology and radio relic properties on the viewing angle of the cluster, raising concerns regarding the interpretation of observed radio features in clusters. We also find that a given shock should not be characterized by a single Mach number. We find that the bulk of the radio emission comes from gas with T > 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K, {rho} {approx} 10{sup -28}-10{sup -27} g cm{sup -3}, with magnetic field strengths of 0.1-1.0 {mu}G, and shock Mach numbers of M {approx} 3-6. We present an analysis of the radio spectral index which suggests that the spatial variation of the spectral index can mimic synchrotron aging. Finally, we examine the polarization fraction and position angle of the simulated radio features, and compare to observations.

  6. Reconciling CME Kinematics using Radio and White-light Observations from STEREO and SOHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Xie, Hong; Makela, Pertti; Akiyama, Sachiko; Reiner, Michael; MacDowall, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We study the characteristics of nonthermal radio emission associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by STEREO, SOHO, and Wind spacecraft. In particular, we examine three backside CMEs associated with type II radio bursts at frequencies below 16 MHz. These bursts are known to be excellent indicators of solar energetic particle events. We use the universal drift rate spectrum of type II radio bursts and the inferred density scale heights in the corona and interplanetary medium o estimate the speed of the shock waves that produce the type II radio bursts. We find that the radio bursts can provide an accurate estimate of the CME speeds. We consider three backside events and a cannibalism event to show the usefulness of radio dynamic spectrum in inferring CME kinematics. We use radio direction finding technique to show that CME-CME interaction results in enhanced nonthermal radio emission. The radio data also provide constraints on the particle acceleration mechanisms and the reason for the energetic particles observed at wide-ranging longitudes. Finally we infer the shape and extent of the shock associated with one of the biggest solar energetic particle events in the space era.

  7. GMRT observations of NGC 2997 and radio detection of the circumnuclear ring

    CERN Document Server

    Kodilkar, J; Ananthakrishnan, S

    2011-01-01

    We present high-resolution, high-sensitivity radio continuum observations of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2997 at 332, 616 and 1272 $\\rmn{MHz}$ using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The integrated spectrum of this galaxy has a spectral index of -0.92 ($S_{\

  8. Observation of two coronal mass ejections on April 7, 2011 by radio telescope URAN-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhenko, A.; Melnik, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Dorovskyy, V.; Vashchishin, V.; Franzusenko, A.; Rucker, H.

    2012-09-01

    Two CME's (coronal mass ejection) were registered by SOHO and STEREO on April 7, 2011. The results of observations obtained by radio telescope URAN-2 of different CME manifestations in radio emission at decameter wavelengths are discussed in this paper. Particularly we report about registration of new type of fine structure of type II bursts.

  9. 21-cm Observations with the Morehead Radio Telescope: Involving Undergraduates in Observing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malphrus, B. K.; Combs, M. S.; Kruth, J.

    2000-12-01

    Herein we report astronomical observations made by undergraduate students with the Morehead Radio Telescope (MRT). The MRT, located at Morehead State University, Morehead, Kentucky, is small aperture (44-ft.) instrument designed by faculty, students, and industrial partners to provide a research instrument and active laboratory for undergraduate astronomy, physics, pre-engineering, and computer science students. Small aperture telescopes like the MRT have numerous advantages as active laboratories and as research instruments. The benefits to students are based upon a hands-on approach to learning concepts in astrophysics and engineering. Students are provided design and research challenges and are allowed to pursue their own solutions. Problem-solving abilities and research design skills are cultivated by this approach. Additionally, there are still contributions that small aperture centimeter-wave instruments can make. The MRT operates over a 6 MHz bandwidth centered at 1420 MHz (21-cm), which corresponds to the hyperfine transition of atomic hydrogen (HI). The HI spatial distribution and flux density associated with cosmic phenomena can be observed and mapped. The dynamics and kinematics of celestial objects can be investigated by observing over a range of frequencies (up to 2.5 MHz) with a 2048-channel back-end spectrometer, providing up to 1 KHz frequency resolution. The sensitivity and versatility of the telescope design facilitate investigation of a wide variety of cosmic phenomena, including supernova remnants, emission and planetary nebulae, extended HI emission from the Milky Way, quasars, radio galaxies, and the sun. Student observations of galactic sources herein reported include Taurus A, Cygnus X, and the Rosette Nebula. Additionally, we report observations of extragalactic phenomena, including Cygnus A, 3C 147, and 3C 146. These observations serve as a performance and capability test-bed of the MRT. In addition to the astronomical results of these

  10. Robust sparse image reconstruction of radio interferometric observations with PURIFY

    CERN Document Server

    Pratley, Luke; d'Avezac, Mayeul; Carrillo, Rafael E; Onose, Alexandru; Wiaux, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation radio interferometers, such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will revolutionise our understanding of the universe through their unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. However, to realise these goals significant challenges in image and data processing need to be overcome. The standard methods in radio interferometry for reconstructing images, such as CLEAN and its variants, have served the community well over the last few decades and have survived largely because they are pragmatic. However, they produce reconstructed interferometric images that are limited in quality and they are not scalable for big data. In this work we apply and evaluate alternative interferometric reconstruction methods that make use of state-of-the-art sparse image reconstruction algorithms motivated by compressive sensing, which have been implemented in the PURIFY software package. In particular, we implement and apply the proximal alternating direction method of multipliers (P-ADMM) algorithm presented in a recen...

  11. High resolution radio observations of nuclear and circumnuclear regions of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, A; Perez-Torres, M A [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA, CSIC), PO Box 3004, 18080-Granada (Spain); Colina, L [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia - IEM, CSIC, C, Serrano 115, 28005 Madrid (Spain); Torrelles, J M [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC) and IEEC, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: antxon@iaa.es, E-mail: torres@iaa.es, E-mail: colina@damir.iem.csic.es, E-mail: torrelle@ieec.fcr.es

    2008-10-15

    High-resolution radio observations of the nuclear region of Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) have shown that its radio structure consists of a compact high surface-brightness central radio source immersed in a diffuse low brightness circumnuclear halo. While the central component could be associated with an AGN or compact star-forming regions where radio supernovae are exploding, it is well known that the circumnuclear regions host bursts of star-formation. The studies of radio supernovae can provide essential information about stellar evolution and CSM/ISM properties in regions hidden by dust at optical and IR wavelengths. In this contribution, we show results from radio interferometric observations from NGC 7469, IRAS 18293-3413 and IRAS 17138-1017 where three extremely bright radio supernovae have been found. High-resolution radio observations of these and other LIRGs would allow us to determine the core-collapse supernova rate in them as well as their star-formation rate.

  12. Observational Characteristics of Radio Emission Related to Multi-polar Magnetic Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Rui-Xiang Xie; Chun Xu; Shuo-Biao Shi; Yi-Hua Yan

    2005-01-01

    We present a large complex radio burst and its associated fast time structures observed on 2001 April 10 in the frequency range of 0.65-7.6 GHz. The NoRH radio image observation shows very complex radio source structures which include preexisting, newly emerging, submerging/cancelling polarities and a biposuggests that the radio burst is generated from a very complicated loop structure.According to the spectral and image observations, we assume that the beginning connection structure. A composite of radio continuum and fast time structures is contained in this flare. The various fast radio emission phenomena include normal and reverse drifting type Ⅲ bursts, and slowly drifting and no-drift structures.ture, which is an important source of the various types of fast time structures.The two-loop reconnection model can lead simultaneously to electron acceleration and corona heating. We have also analyzed the behaviors of coronal magnetic polarities and the emission processes of different types radio emission qualitatively.Interactions of a bipolar or multi-polar loop are consistent with our observational results. Our observations favor the magnetic reconnection configurations of the lar).

  13. High Resolution Rapid Response observations of compact radio sources with the Ceduna Hobart Interferometer (CHI)

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchard, Jay M; Ojha, Roopesh; Kadler, Matthias; Dickey, John M; Edwards, Philip G

    2012-01-01

    Context. Frequent, simultaneous observations across the electromagnetic spectrum are essential to the study of a range of astrophysical phenomena including Active Galactic Nuclei. A key tool of such studies is the ability to observe an object when it flares i.e. exhibits a rapid and significant increase in its flux density. Aims. We describe the specific observational procedures and the calibration techniques that have been developed and tested to create a single baseline radio interferometer that can rapidly observe a flaring object. This is the only facility that is dedicated to rapid high resolution radio observations of an object south of -30 degrees declination. An immediate application is to provide rapid contemporaneous radio coverage of AGN flaring at {\\gamma}-ray frequencies detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Methods. A single baseline interferometer was formed with radio telescopes in Hobart, Tasmania and Ceduna, South Australia. A software correlator was set up at the University of Ta...

  14. VLBI observations of four radio quasars at z > 4: blazars or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H. M.; Frey, S.; Gabányi, K. É.; Paragi, Z.; Yang, J.; Cseh, D.; Hong, X.-Y.; An, T.

    2017-01-01

    Blazars are active galactic nuclei (AGN) whose relativistic jets point nearly to the line of sight. Their compact radio structure can be imaged with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) on parsec scales. Blazars at extremely high redshifts provide a unique insight into the AGN phenomena in the early Universe. We observed four radio sources at redshift z > 4 with the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 1.7 and 5 GHz. These objects were previously classified as blazar candidates based on X-ray observations. One of them, J2134-0419 is firmly confirmed as a blazar with our VLBI observations, due to its relativistically beamed radio emission. Its radio jet extended to ˜10 milli-arcsec scale makes this source a promising target for follow-up VLBI observations to reveal any apparent proper motion. Another target, J0839+5112 shows a compact radio structure typical of quasars. There is evidence for flux density variability and its radio "core" has a flat spectrum. However, the EVN data suggest that its emission is not Doppler-boosted. The remaining two blazar candidates (J1420+1205 and J2220+0025) show radio properties totally unexpected from radio AGN with small-inclination jet. Their emission extends to arcsec scales and the Doppler factors of the central components are well below 1. Their structures resemble that of double-lobed radio AGN with large inclination to the line of sight. This is in contrast with the blazar-type modeling of their multi-band spectral energy distributions. Our work underlines the importance of high-resolution VLBI imaging in confirming the blazar nature of high-redshift radio sources.

  15. CHANG-ES. IV. RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION OF 35 EDGE-ON GALAXIES OBSERVED WITH THE KARL G. JANSKY VERY LARGE ARRAY IN D CONFIGURATION—DATA RELEASE 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegert, Theresa; Irwin, Judith; MacGregor, Stephen, E-mail: twiegert@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: irwin@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: 11sm36@queensu.ca [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics, and Astronomy, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); and others

    2015-09-15

    We present the first part of the observations made for the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies, an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) project. The aim of the CHANG-ES project is to study and characterize the nature of radio halos, their prevalence as well as their magnetic fields, and the cosmic rays illuminating these fields. This paper reports observations with the compact D configuration of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) for the sample of 35 nearby edge-on galaxies of CHANG-ES. With the new wide bandwidth capabilities of the VLA, an unprecedented sensitivity was achieved for all polarization products. The beam resolution is an average of 9.″6 and 36″ with noise levels reaching approximately 6 and 30 μJy beam{sup −1} for C- and L-bands, respectively (robust weighting). We present intensity maps in these two frequency bands (C and L), with different weightings, as well as spectral index maps, polarization maps, and new measurements of star formation rates (SFRs). The data products described herein are available to the public in the CHANG-ES data release available at http://www.queensu.ca/changes. We also present evidence of a trend among galaxies with larger halos having higher SFR surface density, and we show, for the first time, a radio continuum image of the median galaxy, taking advantage of the collective signal-to-noise ratio of 30 of our galaxies. This image shows clearly that a “typical” spiral galaxy is surrounded by a halo of magnetic fields and cosmic rays.

  16. CHANG-ES. IV. Radio Continuum Emission of 35 Edge-on Galaxies Observed with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in D Configuration—Data Release 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Theresa; Irwin, Judith; Miskolczi, Arpad; Schmidt, Philip; Mora, Silvia Carolina; Damas-Segovia, Ancor; Stein, Yelena; English, Jayanne; Rand, Richard J.; Santistevan, Isaiah; Walterbos, Rene; Krause, Marita; Beck, Rainer; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; Kepley, Amanda; Wezgowiec, Marek; Wang, Q. Daniel; Heald, George; Li, Jiangtao; MacGregor, Stephen; Johnson, Megan; Strong, A. W.; DeSouza, Amanda; Porter, Troy A.

    2015-09-01

    We present the first part of the observations made for the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies, an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) project. The aim of the CHANG-ES project is to study and characterize the nature of radio halos, their prevalence as well as their magnetic fields, and the cosmic rays illuminating these fields. This paper reports observations with the compact D configuration of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) for the sample of 35 nearby edge-on galaxies of CHANG-ES. With the new wide bandwidth capabilities of the VLA, an unprecedented sensitivity was achieved for all polarization products. The beam resolution is an average of 9.″6 and 36″ with noise levels reaching approximately 6 and 30 μJy beam-1 for C- and L-bands, respectively (robust weighting). We present intensity maps in these two frequency bands (C and L), with different weightings, as well as spectral index maps, polarization maps, and new measurements of star formation rates (SFRs). The data products described herein are available to the public in the CHANG-ES data release available at http://www.queensu.ca/changes. We also present evidence of a trend among galaxies with larger halos having higher SFR surface density, and we show, for the first time, a radio continuum image of the median galaxy, taking advantage of the collective signal-to-noise ratio of 30 of our galaxies. This image shows clearly that a “typical” spiral galaxy is surrounded by a halo of magnetic fields and cosmic rays.

  17. Simultaneous observations of solar sporadic radio emission by the radio telescopes UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA within the frequency range 8-42 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Brazhenko, A.; Briand, C.; Dorovskyy, V.; Zarka, P.; Denis, L.; Bulatzen, V.; Frantzusenko, A.; Rucker, H.; Stanislavskyy, A.

    2012-09-01

    From 25 June till 12 August 2011 sporadic solar radio emission was observed simultaneously by three separate radio telescopes: UTR-2 (Kharkov, Ukraine), URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) and NDA (Nancay, France). During these observations some interesting phenomena were observed. Some of them are discussed in this paper.

  18. HI observations of low surface brightness galaxies : Probing low-density galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; vanderHulst, JM

    1996-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) 21-cm HI observations of 19 late-type low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Our main findings are that these galaxies, as well as having low surface brightnesses, have low HI surface densities, about a factor of simil

  19. Observation of quasi-periodic solar radio bursts associated with propagating fast-mode waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, C. R.; Nisticò, G.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Zimovets, I. V.; White, S. M.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Radio emission observations from the Learmonth and Bruny Island radio spectrographs are analysed to determine the nature of a train of discrete, periodic radio "sparks" (finite-bandwidth, short-duration isolated radio features) which precede a type II burst. We analyse extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging from SDO/AIA at multiple wavelengths and identify a series of quasi-periodic rapidly-propagating enhancements, which we interpret as a fast wave train, and link these to the detected radio features. Methods: The speeds and positions of the periodic rapidly propagating fast waves and the coronal mass ejection (CME) were recorded using running-difference images and time-distance analysis. From the frequency of the radio sparks the local electron density at the emission location was estimated for each. Using an empirical model for the scaling of density in the corona, the calculated electron density was used to obtain the height above the surface at which the emission occurs, and the propagation velocity of the emission location. Results: The period of the radio sparks, δtr = 1.78 ± 0.04 min, matches the period of the fast wave train observed at 171 Å, δtEUV = 1.7 ± 0.2 min. The inferred speed of the emission location of the radio sparks, 630 km s-1, is comparable to the measured speed of the CME leading edge, 500 km s-1, and the speeds derived from the drifting of the type II lanes. The calculated height of the radio emission (obtained from the density) matches the observed location of the CME leading edge. From the above evidence we propose that the radio sparks are caused by the quasi-periodic fast waves, and the emission is generated as they catch up and interact with the leading edge of the CME. The movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  20. A Multiwavelength Study of RZ Cassiopeiae: The XMM-Newton/VLA Campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Audard, M; Güdel, M; Audard, Marc; Donisan, Julius R.; Guedel, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    XMM-Newton and the VLA simultaneously observed the eclipsing Algol-type binary RZ Cassiopeiae in August 2003. The secondary eclipse (K3 IV companion behind the A3 V primary) was placed at the center of the 15-hour radio campaign, while the X-ray satellite monitored a full 1.2-day orbital period. We present results of the X-ray and radio campaigns. The X-ray light curve shows significant modulation probably related to rotational modulation and active region evolution, and even small flares. However, the X-ray eclipse is not deep, implying that the coronal X-ray emitting material is spatially extended. The Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectrum shows a variety of bright emission lines from Fe, Ne, O, N. A strong [C/N] depletion probably reflects the surface composition of the secondary which fills its Roche lobe and loses material onto the primary. The O~\\textsc{vii} He-like triplet reflects a low forbidden-to-intercombination ratio; while it generally suggests high electron densities, the ratio is here...

  1. Shock Formation Height in the Solar Corona Estimated from SDO and Radio Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Nitta, N.

    2011-01-01

    Wave transients at EUV wavelengths and type II radio bursts are good indicators of shock formation in the solar corona. We use recent EUV wave observations from SDO and combine them with metric type II radio data to estimate the height in the corona where the shocks form. We compare the results with those obtained from other methods. We also estimate the shock formation heights independently using white-light observations of coronal mass ejections that ultimately drive the shocks.

  2. Challenges to our understanding of radio relics: X-ray observations of the Toothbrush cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrean, G. A.; Brüggen, M.; van Weeren, R. J.; Röttgering, H.; Croston, J. H.; Hoeft, M.

    2013-07-01

    The cluster 1RXS J0603.3+4214 is a merging galaxy cluster that hosts three radio relics and a giant radio halo. The northern relic, the Toothbrush, is 1.9 Mpc long and has an unusual linear morphology. According to simple diffusive shock acceleration theory, its radio spectral index indicates a Mach number of 3.3-4.6. Here, we present results from a deep XMM-Newton observation of the cluster. We observe two distinct cluster cores that have survived the merger. The presence of three shocks at or near the locations of the radio relics is confirmed by density and temperature discontinuities. However, the observation poses several puzzles that challenge our understanding of radio relics: (i) at the Toothbrush, the shock Mach number is not larger than 2, in apparent conflict with the shock strength predicted from the radio spectrum; (ii) at the Toothbrush, the shock front is, in part, spatially offset from the radio emission; (iii) at the eastern relic, we detect a temperature jump corresponding to a Mach number of approximately 2.5, but there is no associated surface brightness discontinuity. We discuss possible explanations for these findings.

  3. Challenges to our understanding of radio relics: X-ray observations of the Toothbrush cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Ogrean, G A; van Weeren, R J; Röttgering, H; Croston, J H; Hoeft, M

    2013-01-01

    The cluster 1RXS J0603.3+4214 is a merging galaxy cluster that hosts three radio relics and a giant radio halo. The northern relic, the Toothbrush, is 1.9-Mpc long and has an unusual linear morphology. According to simple diffusive shock acceleration theory, its radio spectral index indicates a Mach number of 3.3-4.6. Here, we present results from a deep XMM-Newton observation of the cluster. We observe two distinct cluster cores that have survived the merger. The presence of three shocks at or near the locations of the radio relics is confirmed by density and temperature discontinuities. However, the observation poses several puzzles that challenge our understanding of radio relics: (i) at the Toothbrush, the shock Mach number is not larger than 2, in apparent conflict with the shock strength predicted from the radio spectrum; (ii) at the Toothbrush, the shock front is, in part, spatially offset from the radio emission; (iii) at the eastern relic, we detect a temperature jump corresponding to a Mach number o...

  4. Radio transient following FRB 150418: afterglow or coincident AGN flare?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Keane et al. reported the discovery of a fading radio transient following FRB 150418, and interpreted it as the afterglow of the FRB. Williams \\& Berger, on the other hand, suggested that the radio transient is analogous to a group of variable radio sources, so that it could be a coincident AGN flare in the observational beam of the FRB. A new observation with VLA showed a re-brightening, which is consistent with the AGN picture. Here, using the radio survey data of Ofek et al., we statistically examine the chance coincidence probability to produce an event like the FRB 150418 transient. We find that the probabilities to produce a variable radio transient with at least the same variability amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio as the FRB 150415 transient, without and with the VLA point, are $P_1 \\sim 6 \\times 10^{-4}$ and $P_1 \\sim 2 \\times 10^{-3}$, respectively. In addition, the chance probability to have a fading transient detected following a random time (FRB time) is less than $P_2 \\sim 10^{-...

  5. Diffuse bubble-like radio-halo emission in MRC 0116+111: Imprint of AGN feedback in a distant cluster of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Gopal-Krishna,; Wadnerkar, Nitin; Belapure, J; Werner, Norbert; Kumbharkhane, A C

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of a luminous, mini radio halo of ~240 kpc dimension at the center of a distant cluster of galaxies at redshift z = 0.131. Our optical and multi-wavelength GMRT and VLA observations reveal a highly unusual structure showing a twin bubble-like diffuse radio halo surrounding a cluster of bright elliptical galaxies; very similar to the large-scale radio structure of M87, the dominant galaxy in Virgo cluster. It presents an excellent opportunity to understand the energetics and the dynamical evolution of such radio jet inflated plasma bubbles in the hot cluster atmosphere.

  6. Particle acceleration and dynamics of double-double radio galaxies: theory versus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, C.; Hardcastle, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we show that a small sample of radio galaxies with evidence for multiple epochs of jet activity (so-called double-double radio galaxies) have the same electron injection spectral index in the two activity episodes, a result which might be considered surprising given the very different lobe dynamics expected in the first and second episode. We construct models for the dynamics of radio galaxies, with an emphasis on their episodic behaviour, and show that hotspot formation and confinement of lobes for the inner double of double-double radio galaxies are possible even without any thermal matter in the outer cocoon. We argue that (i) the observed similar injection spectral indices are due to similar jet powers in the two episodes, (ii) the `spectral index-radio power' correlation of a flux limited sample of radio galaxies is the primary one, and not the `spectral index-redshift correlation', (iii) jets are made of pair plasma and not electron-proton and (iv) the Lorentz factor of the spine of the jet should be ≳ 10 to explain the observations. Furthermore, we argue that the observations show that higher power radio galaxies do not have a higher jet bulk Lorentz factors, but instead simply have a higher number density of particles in the jet rest frame. A consequence of our models is that aligned double-double radio galaxies with very old ( ≳ 108 yr) outer doubles, or misaligned double-double radio galaxies, are statistically more likely to have dissimilar injection indices in two different episodes, as they will probably have different jet powers.

  7. Radio observations of the tidal disruption event XMMSL1 J0740$-$85

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Kate D; Berger, Edo; Saxton, Richard D; Komossa, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    We present radio observations of the tidal disruption event candidate (TDE) XMMSL1 J0740$-$85 spanning 592 to 875 d post X-ray discovery. We detect radio emission that fades from an initial peak flux density at 1.6 GHz of $1.19\\pm 0.06$ mJy to $0.65\\pm 0.06$ mJy suggesting an association with the TDE. This makes XMMSL1 J0740$-$85 at $d=75$ Mpc the nearest TDE with detected radio emission to date and only the fifth TDE with radio emission overall. The observed radio luminosity rules out a powerful relativistic jet like that seen in the relativistic TDE Swift J1644+57. Instead we infer from an equipartition analysis that the radio emission most likely arises from a non-relativistic outflow similar to that seen in the nearby TDE ASASSN-14li, with a velocity of about $10^4$ km s$^{-1}$ and a kinetic energy of about $10^{48}$ erg, expanding into a medium with a density of about $10^2$ cm$^{-3}$. Alternatively, the radio emission could arise from a weak initially-relativistic but decelerated jet with an energy of $...

  8. High-resolution radio observations of nuclear and circumnuclear starbursts in Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Torres, Miguel A

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution radio observations of nearby starburst galaxies have shown that the distribution of their radio emission consists of a compact (<150 pc), high surface brightness, central radio source immersed in a low surface brightness circumnuclear halo. This radio structure is similar to that detected in bright Seyferts galaxies like NGC 7469 or Mrk 331, which display clear circumnuclear rings. While the compact, centrally located radio emission in these starbursts might be generated by a point-like source (AGN), or by the combined effect of multiple radio supernovae and supernova remnants (e.g., the evolved nuclear starburst in Arp~220), it seems well established that the circumnuclear regions of those objects host an ongoing burst of star-formation (e.g., NGC 7469; Colina et al. 2001, Alberdi et al. 2006). Therefore, high-resolution radio observations of Luminous Infra-Red Galaxies (LIRGs) in our local universe are a powerful tool to probe the dominant dust heating mechanism in their nuclear and circu...

  9. Computing Architecture for the ngVLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jeffrey S.; Glendenning, Brian; Hiriart, R.

    2017-01-01

    Computing challenges for the Next Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) are not always the ones that first come to mind. Current design concepts have visibility data rates which allow the permanent storage of the raw visibility data, and although challenging, the calibration and imaging processing for the ngVLA is not beyond the capabilities of existing systems (let alone those that will exist when ngVLA construction is completed). Design goals include a system that supports a wide range of PI-driven projects, end to end data management, and the production of science ready data products. This should be accomplished while minimizing the operating costs of an array consisting of hundreds of elements distributed over an area of nearly 100,000 km2. We discuss a proposed architecture of the computing system, design constraints for a detailed design, and some possible design choices and their implications.

  10. Synchronized observations by using the STEREO and the largest ground-based decametre radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.; Mann, G.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Kaiser, M. L.; Briand, C.; Zarka, P.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Koval, A. A.; Mel'nik, V. N.; Mukha, D. V.; Panchenko, M.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the approach to simultaneous (synchronous) solar observations of radio emission by using the STEREO-WAVES instruments (frequency range 0.125-16 MHz) and the largest ground-based low-frequency radio telescope. We illustrate it by the UTR-2 radio telescope implementation (10-30 MHz). The antenna system of the radio telescope is a T-shape-like array of broadband dipoles and is located near the village Grakovo in the Kharkiv region (Ukraine). The third observation point on the ground in addition to two space-based ones improves the space-mission performance capabilities for the determination of radio-emission source directivity. The observational results from the high sensitivity antenna UTR-2 are particularly useful for analysis of STEREO data in the condition of weak event appearances during solar activity minima. In order to improve the accuracy of flux density measurements, we also provide simultaneous observations with a large part of the UTR-2 radio telescope array and its single dipole close to the STEREO-WAVES antennas in sensitivity. This concept has been studied by comparing the STEREO data with ground-based records from 2007-2011 and shown to be effective. The capabilities will be useful in the implementation of new instruments (LOFAR, LWA, MWA, etc.) and during the future Solar Orbiter mission.

  11. Update on the Commensal VLA Low-band Ionospheric and Transient Experiment (VLITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Ray, Paul S.; Polisensky, Emil; Peters, Wendy M.; Giacintucci, Simona; Helmboldt, Joseph F.; Hyman, Scott D.; Brisken, Walter; Hicks, Brian; Deneva, Julia S.

    2017-01-01

    The JVLA Low-band Ionospheric and Transient Experiment (VLITE) is a commensal observing system on the NRAO JVLA. The separate optical path of the prime-focus sub-GHz dipole feeds and the Cassegrain-focus GHz feeds provided an opportunity to expand the simultaneous frequency operation of the JVLA through joint observations across both systems. The low-band receivers on 10 JVLA antennas are outfitted with dedicated samplers and use spare fibers to transport the 320-384 MHz band to the VLITE correlator. The initial phase of VLITE uses a custom-designed real-time DiFX software correlator to produce autocorrelations, as well as parallel and cross-hand cross-correlations from the linear dipole feeds. NRL and NRAO have worked together to explore the scientific potential of the commensal low frequency system for ionospheric remote sensing, astrophysics and transients. VLITE operates at nearly 70% wall time with roughly 6200 hours of JVLA time recorded each year.VLITE data are used in real-time for ionospheric research and are transferred daily to NRL for processing in the astrophysics and transient pipelines. These pipelines provide automated radio frequency interference excision, calibration, imaging and self-calibration of data.We will review early scientific results from VLITE across all three science focus areas, including the ionosphere, slow (> 1 sec) transients, and astrophysics. We also discuss the future of the project, that includes its planned expansion to eVLITE including the addition of more antennas, and a parallel capability to search for fast (< 1 sec), dispersed transients, such as Fast Radio Bursts and Rotating Radio Transients. We will also present early results of commissioning tests to utilize VLITE data products to complement NRAO’s 3 GHz VLA Sky Survey (VLASS). Revised pipelines are under development for operation during the on-the-fly operation mode of the sky survey.

  12. Radio Observations of the Tidal Disruption Event XMMSL1 J0740‑85

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, K. D.; Wieringa, M. H.; Berger, E.; Saxton, R. D.; Komossa, S.

    2017-03-01

    We present radio observations of the tidal disruption event candidate (TDE) XMMSL1 J0740‑85 spanning 592 to 875 days post X-ray discovery. We detect radio emission that fades from an initial peak flux density at 1.6 GHz of 1.19 ± 0.06 mJy to 0.65 ± 0.06 mJy, suggesting an association with the TDE. This makes XMMSL1 J0740‑85 at d = 75 Mpc the nearest TDE with detected radio emission to date and only the fifth TDE with radio emission overall. The observed radio luminosity rules out a powerful relativistic jet like that seen in the relativistic TDE Swift J1644+57. Instead, we infer from an equipartition analysis that the radio emission most likely arises from a non-relativistic outflow similar to that seen in the nearby TDE ASASSN-14li, with a velocity of about 104 km s‑1 and a kinetic energy of about 1048 erg, expanding into a medium with a density of about 102 cm‑3. Alternatively, the radio emission could arise from a weak initially relativistic but decelerated jet with an energy of ∼ 2× {10}50 erg, or (for an extreme disruption geometry) from the unbound debris. The radio data for XMMSL1 J0740‑85 continues to support the previous suggestion of a bimodal distribution of common non-relativistic isotropic outflows and rare relativistic jets in TDEs (in analogy with the relation between Type Ib/c supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts). The radio data also provide a new measurement of the circumnuclear density on a sub-parsec scale around an extragalactic supermassive black hole.

  13. Radio Observations of Star Forming Galaxies in the SKA era

    CERN Document Server

    Mancuso, C; Cai, Z-Y; Negrello, M; De Zotti, G; Perrotta, F; Danese, L

    2014-01-01

    We have combined determinations of the epoch-dependent star formation rate (SFR) function with relationships between SFR and radio (synchrotron and free-free) emission to work out detailed predictions for the counts and the redshift distributions of star-forming galaxies detected by planned Square Kilometer Array (SKA) surveys. The evolving SFR function comes from recent models fitting the far-infrared (FIR) to millimeter-wave luminosity functions and the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions up to z=10, extended to take into account additional UV survey data. We used very deep 1.4 GHz number counts from the literature to check the relationship between SFR and synchrotron emission, and the 95 GHz South Pole Telescope (SPT) counts of dusty galaxies to test the relationship between SFR and free-free emission. We show that the SKA will allow us to investigate the SFRs of galaxies down to few Msun/yr up to z=10, thus extending by more than two orders of magnitude the high-z SFR functions derived from Herschel sur...

  14. VLBI observations of the CORALZ sample: young radio sources at low redshift

    CERN Document Server

    de Vries, N; Schilizzi, R T; Mack, K -H; Kaiser, C R

    2009-01-01

    Young radio-loud active galactic nuclei form an important tool to investigate the evolution of extragalactic radio sources. To study the early phases of expanding radio sources, we have constructed CORALZ, a sample of 25 compact ($\\theta<2"$) radio sources associated with nearby ($z<0.16$) galaxies. In this paper we determine the morphologies, linear sizes, and put first constraints on the lobe expansion speeds of the sources in the sample. We observed the radio sources from the CORALZ sample with MERLIN at 1.4 GHz or 1.6 GHz, the EVN at 1.6 GHz, and global VLBI at 1.6 GHz and/or 5.0 GHz. Radio maps, morphological classifications, and linear sizes are presented for all sources in the CORALZ sample. We have determined a first upper limit to the expansion velocity of one of the sources, which is remarkably low compared to the brighter GPS sources at higher redshifts, indicating a relation between radio luminosity and expansion speed, in agreement with analytical models. In addition we present further stro...

  15. A shock front in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754: X-ray and radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Macario, Giulia; Giacintucci, Simona; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Venturi, Tiziana; Murray, Stephen S

    2010-01-01

    We present new Chandra X-ray and Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) radio observations of the nearby merging galaxy cluster Abell 754. Our X-ray data confirm the presence of a shock front by obtaining the first direct measurement of a gas temperature jump across the X-ray brightness edge previously seen in the imaging data. A754 is only the fourth galaxy cluster with confirmed merger shock fronts, and it has the weakest shock of those, with a Mach number M=1.57+0.16-0.12. In our new GMRT observation at 330 MHz, we find that the previously-known centrally located radio halo extends eastward to the position of the shock. The X-ray shock front also coincides with the position of a radio relic previously observed at 74 MHz. The radio spectrum of the post-shock region, using our radio data and the earlier results at 74 MHz and 1.4 GHz, is very steep. We argue that acceleration of electrons at the shock front directly from thermal to ultrarelativistic energies is problematic due to energy arguments, while reacc...

  16. A systematic observational study of radio properties of H2O megamaser Seyfert-2 galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. W.; Zhang, J. S.; Henkel, C.; Liu, J.; Müller, P.; Wang, J. Z.; Guo, Q.; Wang, J.; Li, J.

    2017-04-01

    A systematic study is performed on radio properties of H2O megamaser host Seyfert 2 galaxies, through multiband radio continuum observations (at 11, 6.0, 3.6, 2.0 and 1.3 cm) with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope within a total time duration of 4 d. For comparison, a control Seyfert 2 galaxy sample without detected maser emission was also observed. Spectral indices were determined for those sources for which measurements exist at two adjacent bands assuming a power-law dependence Sν ∝ ν-α, where S is the flux density and ν is the frequency. Comparisons of the radio continuum properties between megamaser and non-masing Seyfert 2s show no difference in spectral indices. However, a difference in radio luminosity is statistically significant, i.e. the maser galaxies tend to have higher radio luminosities by a factor of 2-3 than the non-masing ones, commonly reaching values above a critical threshold of 1029 erg s-1 Hz-1. This result confirms an earlier conclusion by Zhang et al., but is based on superior data with respect to the time interval within which the data were obtained, with respect to the observational facility (only one telescope used), and the number of frequency bands.

  17. Contemporaneous observations of the radio galaxy NGC 1275 from radio to very high energy γ-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carreto Fidalgo, D.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Farina, E.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadamek, A.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Knoetig, M. L.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Partini, S.; Persic, M.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Balmaverde, B.; Kataoka, J.; Rekola, R.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: The radio galaxy NGC 1275, recently identified as a very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) γ-ray emitter by MAGIC, is one of the few non-blazar active galactic nuclei detected in the VHE regime. The purpose of this work is to better understand the origin of the γ-ray emission and locate it within the galaxy. Methods: We studied contemporaneous multifrequency observations of NGC 1275 and modeled the overall spectral energy distribution. We analyzed unpublished MAGIC observations carried out between October 2009 and February 2010, and the previously published observations taken between August 2010 and February 2011. We studied the multiband variability and correlations by analyzing data of Fermi-LAT in the 100 MeV-100 GeV energy band, as well as Chandra (X-ray), KVA (optical), and MOJAVE (radio) data taken during the same period. Results: Using customized Monte Carlo simulations corresponding to early MAGIC stereoscopic data, we detect NGC 1275 also in the earlier MAGIC campaign. The flux level and energy spectra are similar to the results of the second campaign. The monthly light curve above 100 GeV shows a hint of variability at the 3.6σ level. In the Fermi-LAT band, both flux and spectral shape variabilities are reported. The optical light curve is also variable and shows a clear correlation with the γ-ray flux above 100 MeV. In radio, three compact components are resolved in the innermost part of the jet. One of these components shows a similar trend as the Fermi-LAT and KVA light curves. The γ-ray spectra measured simultaneously with MAGIC and Fermi-LAT from 100 MeV to 650 GeV can be well fitted either by a log-parabola or by a power-law with a subexponential cutoff for the two observation campaigns. A single-zone synchrotron-self-Compton model, with an electron spectrum following a power-law with an exponential cutoff, can explain the broadband spectral energy distribution and the multifrequency behavior of the source. However, this model suggests an

  18. The compact, time-variable radio source projected inside W3(OH): Evidence for a Photoevaporated Disk?

    CERN Document Server

    Dzib, Sergio A; Rodriguez, Luis F; Kurtz, Stan E; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis A; Lizano, Susana

    2013-01-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of the compact (~ 0.05"), time-variable radio source projected near the center of the ultracompact HII region W3(OH). The analysis of our new data as well as of VLA archival observations confirms the variability of the source on timescales of years and for a given epoch indicates a spectral index of \\alpha = 1.3 +- 0.3 (S_\

  19. Radio emission in air showers measured by LOPES-10 in concidence with KASCADE-Grande observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, A.F.; Apel, W.D.; Asch, T. (and others)

    2006-05-15

    Data taken during half a year of operation of 10 LOPES antennas (LOPES-10), triggered by EAS observed with KASCADE-Grande have been analysed. We report about the analysis of correlations of radio signals measured by LOPES-10 with extensive air shower events reconstructed by KASCADE-Grande, including shower cores at large distances. The efficiency of detecting radio signals induced by air showers up to distances of 700m from the shower axis has been investigated. The results are discussed with special emphasis on the effects of the reconstruction accuracy for shower core and arrival direction on the coherence of the measured radio signal. In addition, the correlations of the radio pulse amplitude with the primary cosmic ray energy and with the lateral distance from the shower core are studied. (Orig.)

  20. JVLA Observations of IC 348SW: Compact Radio Sources and their Nature

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, L F; Palau, A

    2014-01-01

    We present sensitive 2.1 and 3.3 cm JVLA radio continuum observations of the region IC 348 SW. We detect a total of 10 compact radio sources in the region, of which seven are first reported here. One of the sources is associated with the remarkable periodic time-variable infrared source LRLL 54361, opening the possibility of monitoring this object at radio wavelengths. Four of the sources appear to be powering outflows in the region, including HH 211 and HH 797. In the case of the rotating outflow HH 797 we detect at its center a double radio source, separated by $\\sim3"$. Two of the sources are associated with infrared stars that possibly have gyrosynchrotron emission produced in active magnetospheres. Finally, three of the sources are interpreted as background objects.

  1. The widest-frequency radio relic spectra: observations from 150 MHz to 30 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Stroe, Andra; Rumsey, Clare; van Weeren, Reinout; Kierdorf, Maja; Donnert, Julius; Jones, Thomas W; Röttgering, Huub J A; Hoeft, Matthias; Rodriguez-Gonzalvez, Carmen; Harwood, Jeremy J; Saunders, Richard D E

    2015-01-01

    Radio relics are patches of diffuse synchrotron radio emission that trace shock waves. Relics are thought to form when intra-cluster medium electrons are accelerated by cluster merger induced shock waves through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In this paper, we present observations spanning 150 MHz to 30 GHz of the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' relics from the Giant Metrewave and Westerbork telescopes, the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the Effelsberg telescope, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We detect both relics at 30 GHz, where the previous highest frequency detection was at 16 GHz. The integrated radio spectra of both sources clearly steepen above 2 GHz, at the >6$\\sigma$ significance level, supports the spectral steepening previously found in the `Sausage' and the Abell 2256 relic. Our results challenge the widely adopted simple formation mechanism of radio relics and suggest more complicated models have to be developed that, for ...

  2. JVLA observations of IC 348 SW: Compact radio sources and their nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Zapata, Luis A.; Palau, Aina, E-mail: l.rodriguez@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: l.zapata@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: a.palau@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-07-20

    We present sensitive 2.1 and 3.3 cm Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of the region IC 348 SW. We detect a total of 10 compact radio sources in the region, 7 of which are first reported here. One of the sources is associated with the remarkable periodic time-variable infrared source LRLL 54361, opening the possibility of monitoring this object at radio wavelengths. Four of the sources appear to be powering outflows in the region, including HH 211 and HH 797. In the case of the rotating outflow HH 797, we detect a double radio source at its center, separated by ∼3''. Two of the sources are associated with infrared stars that possibly have gyrosynchrotron emission produced in active magnetospheres. Finally, three of the sources are interpreted as background objects.

  3. Tracing the Baryon Cycle within Nearby Galaxies with a next-generation VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Leroy, Adam; Murphy, Eric J.; ngVLA Baryon Cycle Science Working Group

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of galaxies over cosmic time is shaped by the cycling of baryons through these systems, namely the inflow of atomic gas, the formation of molecular structures, the birth of stars, and the expulsion of gas due to associated feedback processes. The best way to study this cycle in detail are observations of nearby galaxies. These systems provide a complete picture of baryon cycling over a wide range of astrophysical conditions. In the next decade, higher resolution/sensitivity observations of such galaxies will fundamentally improve our knowledge of galaxy formation and evolution, allowing us to better interpret higher redshift observations of sources that were rapidly evolving at epochs soon after the Big Bang. In particular, the centimeter-to-millimeter part of the spectrum provides critical diagnostics for each of the key baryon cycling processes and access to almost all phases of gas in galaxies: cool and cold gas (via emission and absorption lines), ionized gas (via free-free continuum and recombination lines), cosmic rays and hot gas (via synchrotron emission and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect). This poster highlights a number of key science problems in this area whose solutions require a next-generation radio-mm interferometer such as the next-generation VLA.

  4. Non-thermal emission from high-energy binaries through interferometric radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Marcote, B

    2016-01-01

    High-mass binary systems involve extreme environments that produce non-thermal emission from radio to gamma rays. Only three types of these systems are known to emit persistent gamma-ray emission: colliding-wind binaries, high-mass X-ray binaries and gamma-ray binaries. This thesis is focused on the radio emission of high-mass binary systems through interferometric observations, and we have explored several of these sources with low- and high-frequency radio observations, and very high-resolution VLBI ones. We have studied two gamma-ray binaries, LS 5039 and LS I +61 303, at low frequencies. We have obtained their light-curves and spectra, and we have determined the physical properties of their radio emitting regions. We have also studied the gamma-ray binary HESS J0632+057 through VLBI observations. A new colliding wind binary, HD 93129A, has been discovered through VLBI and optical observations. Finally, we have conducted radio observations of two sources that were candidates to be gamma-ray binaries.

  5. First observations of the water masers with the Urumqi 25m radio telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new radio spectral receiving system has been installed on the 25 m radio telescope of the Urumqi Astronomical Observatory. The back end is a surface acoustic wave chirp transform spectrometer (SAW CZT), used for the first time in radio astronomy. The calibration of the line observations has carefully been investigated for the new-type spectrometer. In order to test the feasibility of the prototype spectrometer, we observed water maser emission from a number of known Galactic sources. We describe the observed spectra of W49N, W3(OH), 2248+600 and 1909+090. We found that W49N spectrum showed high-velocity features ranging from -330 to 146 km s-1. In comparison with the spectra observed by Medicina, the feature at the LSR velocity -52 km s-1 in the W3(OH) presented the rapid variation in flux density.

  6. High-frequency radio polarization measurements of WMAP point sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, N; Battye, R A; Gabuzda, D; Taylor, A C

    2009-01-01

    We present polarization measurements at 8.4, 22, and 43 GHz made with the VLA of a complete sample of extragalactic sources stronger than 1 Jy in the 5-year WMAP catalogue and with declinations north of -34 degrees. The observations were motivated by the need to know the polarization properties of radio sources at frequencies of tens of GHz in order to subtract polarized foregrounds for future sensitive Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. The total intensity and polarization measurements are generally consistent with comparable VLA calibration measurements for less-variable sources, and within a similar range to WMAP fluxes for unresolved sources. A further paper will present correlations between measured parameters and derive implications for CMB measurements.

  7. Quark nugget dark matter: Comparison with radio observations of nearby galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, K., E-mail: klawson@phas.ubc.ca; Zhitnitsky, A.R.

    2016-06-10

    It has been recently claimed that radio observations of nearby spiral galaxies essentially rule out a dark matter source for the galactic haze [1]. Here we consider the low energy thermal emission from a quark nugget dark matter model in the context of microwave emission from the galactic centre and radio observations of nearby Milky Way like galaxies. We demonstrate that observed emission levels do not strongly constrain this specific dark matter candidate across a broad range of the allowed parameter space in drastic contrast with conventional dark matter models based on the WIMP paradigm.

  8. Quark Nugget Dark Matter: Comparison with radio observations of nearby galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, K

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently claimed that radio observations of nearby spiral galaxies essentially rule out a dark matter source for the galactic haze. Here we consider the low energy thermal emission from a quark nugget dark matter model in the context of microwave emission from the galactic centre and radio observations of nearby Milky Way like galaxies. We demonstrate that observed emission levels do not strongly constrain this specific dark matter candidate across a broad range of the allowed parameter space in drastic contrast with conventional dark matter models based on the WIMP paradigm.

  9. Optimized Trigger for Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic-Ray and Neutrino Observations with the Low Frequency Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, K; Scholten, O; Anderson, J M; van Ardenne, A; Arts, M; Avruch, M; Asgekar, A; Bell, M; Bennema, P; Bentum, M; Bernadi, G; Best, P; Boonstra, A -J; Bregman, J; van de Brink, R; Broekema, C; Brouw, W; Brueggen, M; Buitink, S; Butcher, H; van Cappellen, W; Ciardi, B; Coolen, A; Damstra, S; Dettmar, R; van Diepen, G; Dijkstra, K; Donker, P; Doorduin, A; Drost, M; van Duin, A; Eisloeffel, J; Falcke, H; Garrett, M; Gerbers, M; Griessmeier, J; Grit, T; Gruppen, P; Gunst, A; van Haarlem, M; Hoeft, M; Holties, H; Horandel, J; Horneffer, L A; Huijgen, A; James, C; de Jong, A; Kant, D; Kooistra, E; Koopman, Y; Koopmans, L; Kuper, G; Lambropoulos, P; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Mallary, C; McFadden, R; Meulman, H; Mol, J -D; Morawietz, J; Mulder, E; Munk, H; Nieuwenhuis, L; Nijboer, R; Norden, M; Noordam, J; Overeem, R; Paas, H; Pandey, V N; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A; Reich, W; de Reijer, J; Renting, A; Riemers, P; Roettgering, H; Romein, J; Roosjen, J; Ruiter, M; Schoenmakers, A; Schoonderbeek, G; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B; Steinmetz, M; Stiepel, H; Stuurwold, K; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; ter Veen, S; Vermeulen, R; de Vos, M; Vogt, C; van der Wal, E; Weggemans, H; Wijnholds, S; Wise, M; Wucknitz, O; Yattawatta, S; van Zwieten, J

    2011-01-01

    When an ultra-high energy neutrino or cosmic ray strikes the Lunar surface a radio-frequency pulse is emitted. We plan to use the LOFAR radio telescope to detect these pulses. In this work we propose an e?cient trigger implementation for LOFAR optimized for the observation of short radio pulses.

  10. Multi-frequency solar observations at Metsähovi Radio Observatory and KAIRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallunki, J.; Uunila, M.; McKay-Bukowski, D.

    2015-08-01

    We describe solar observations carried out for the first time jointly with Kilpisjärvi Atmospheric Imaging Receiver Array (KAIRA) and Aalto University Metsähovi Radio Observatory (MRO). KAIRA is new radio antenna array observing the decimeter and meter wavelength range. It is located near Kilpisjärvi, Finland, and operated by the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory, University of Oulu. We investigate the feasibility of KAIRA for solar observations, and the additional benefits of carrying out multi-instrument solar observations with KAIRA and the MRO facilities, which are already used for regular solar observations. The data measured with three instruments at MRO, and with KAIRA during time period 2014 April-October were analyzed. One solar radio event, measured on 2014 April 18, was studied in detail. Seven solar flares were recorded with at least two of the three instruments at MRO, and with KAIRA during the chosen time period. KAIRA is a great versatile asset as a new Finnish instrument that can also be used for solar observations. Collaboration observations with MRO instruments and KAIRA enable detailed multi-frequency solar flare analysis. Flare pulsations, flare statistics and radio spectra of single flares can be investigated due to the broad frequency range observations. The Northern locations of both MRO and KAIRA make as long as 15-hour unique solar observations possible during summer time.

  11. Optical, radio, and infrared observations of compact H II regions. V. The hourglass in M8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, C.E.; Pipher, J.L.; Helfer, H.L.; Sharpless, S.; Moneti, A.; Kozikowski, D.; Oliveri, M.; Willner, S.P.; Lacasse, M.G.; Herter, T.

    1986-04-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the inner core of the M8 Hourglass region are presented, including VLA interferometric maps, 2--4 ..mu..m and 8--13 ..mu..m spectroscopy, photometric mapping in the K (2.2 ..mu..m) and L (3.45 ..mu..m) bands and in the 3.28 ..mu..m dust-emission feature, optical CCD imaging, and optical and infrared polarimetry. The compact H II region is excited by the O7 V star Herschel 36, and its apparent bipolar structure at optical wavelengths may be due to variable line-of-sight extinction and scattered light. Standard reddening laws are not applicable in the Hourglass region. A power law extinction lambda/sup -0.78/ yields consistent agreement between ultraviolet, optical, and infrared extinction estimates and suggests that one component of the total grain distribution is on the average larger than that found in the interstellar medium. The spatial distribution of the 3.28 ..mu..m dust-emission feature shows that the feature emission is associated with the boundary layer in the H II region/molecular cloud interface. The observations favor models in which feature emission comes from small refractory grains rather than from fluorescence or thermal emission from volatile mantles.

  12. MWA Observations of Solar Radio Bursts and the Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, I.; Oberoi, D.; Morgan, J.; Bastian, T.; Bhatnagar, S.; Bisi, M.; Benkevitch, L.; Bowman, J.; Donea, A.; Giersch, O.; Jackson, B.; Chat, G. L.; Golub, L.; Hariharan, K.; Herne, D.; Kasper, J.; Kennewell, J.; Lonsdale, C.; Lobzin, V.; Matthews, L.; Mohan, A.; Padmanabhan, J.; Pankratius, V.; Pick, M.; Subramanian, P.; Ramesh, R.; Raymond, J.; Reeves, K.; Rogers, A.; Sharma, R.; Tingay, S.; Tremblay, S.; Tripathi, D.; Webb, D.; White, S.; Abidin, Z. B. Z.

    2017-01-01

    A hundred hours of observing time for solar observations is requested during the 2017-A observing semester. These data will be used to address science objectives for solar burst science (Goal A), studies of weak non-thermal radiation (Goal B) and quiet sun science (Goal C). Goal A will focus on detailed investigations of individual events seen in the MWA data, using the unsurpassed spectroscopic imaging ability of the MWA to address some key solar physics questions. Detailed observations of type II bursts, of which MWA has observed two, will be one focus, with MWA polarimetric imaging observations of type III bursts another focus. Goal B will address studies of the numerous short lived and narrow band emission features, significantly weaker than those seen by most other instruments revealed by the MWA. These emission features do not resemble any known types of solar bursts, but are possible signatures of "nanoflares" which have long been suspected to play a role in coronal heating. A large database of these events is needed to be able to reliably estimate their contribution to coronal heating. These observations will contribute to this database. Goal C will focus on characterizing the Sun's background thermal emission, their short and long term variability and looking for evidence of a scattering disc around the Sun.

  13. Radio observations of OH in comet West 1975n

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, L.E.; Webber, J.C.; Crutcher, R.M.; Swenson, G.W. Jr.

    1976-10-01

    The main lines of OH at 1667 MHz and 1665 MHz have been observed in comet West 1975n during postperihelion passage. The 1667 MHz line was observed in emission with time-varying intensity. The 1665 MHz line was initially in emission and was stronger than the 1667 MHz line but later changed to weak absorption. Our results generally tend to support the model of ultraviolet pumping by the Sun which was proposed earlier to explain the OH observations of comet Kohoutek 1973f. (AIP)

  14. Contemporaneous observations of the radio galaxy NGC 1275 from radio to very high energy gamma-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Fidalgo, D Carreto; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadamek, A; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Krause, J; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Balmaverde, B; Kataoka, J; Rekola, R; Takahashi, Y; .,

    2013-01-01

    The radio galaxy NGC 1275, recently identified as a very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) gamma-ray emitter by MAGIC, is one of the few non-blazar AGN detected in the VHE regime. In order to better understand the origin of the gamma-ray emission and locate it within the galaxy, we study contemporaneous multi-frequency observations of NGC 1275 and model the overall spectral energy distribution (SED). We analyze unpublished MAGIC observations carried out between Oct. 2009 and Feb. 2010, and the already published ones taken between Aug. 2010 and Feb. 2011. We study the multi-band variability and correlations analyzing data of Fermi-LAT (0.1 - 100 GeV), Chandra (X-ray), KVA (optical) and MOJAVE (radio) taken during the same period. Using custom Monte Carlo simulations corresponding to early MAGIC stereo data, we detect NGC 1275 also in the earlier MAGIC campaign. The flux level and energy spectra are similar to the results of the second campaign. The monthly light curve above 100 GeV shows a hint of variability at the...

  15. High Resolution Radio Observations of AGN(Session 5 : Evidence for Giant Black Holes)

    OpenAIRE

    Hisashi, HIRABAYASHI; Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

    2004-01-01

    HALCA, the first dedicated satellite for space-VLBI, was launched in February 1997, and VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) observations have been successfully undertaken at 1.6 and 5 GHz. This paper outlines the highlights of high resolution radio observations of AGN by VSOP. The planned near-future VSOP-2 mission and further future missions are introduced.

  16. Particle acceleration and dynamics of double-double radio galaxies: theory vs. observations

    CERN Document Server

    Konar, C

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we show that a small sample of radio galaxies with evidence for multiple epochs of jet activity (so-called `double-double' radio galaxies) have the same electron injection spectral index in the two activity episodes, a result which might be considered surprising given the very different lobe dynamics expected in the first and second episode. We construct models for the dynamics of radio galaxies, with an emphasis on their episodic behaviour, and show that hotspot formation and confinement of lobes for the inner double of double-double radio galaxies are possible even without any thermal matter in the outer cocoon. We argue that (i) the observed similar injection spectral indices are due to similar jet powers in the two episodes, (ii) the `spectral index--radio power' correlation of a flux limited sample of radio galaxies is the primary one, and not the `spectral index--redshift correlation', (iii) jets are made of pair plasma and not electron-proton, (iv) and the Lorentz factor of the spine of t...

  17. Observation of quasi-periodic solar radio bursts associated with propagating fast-mode waves

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, C R; Nakariakov, V M; Zimovets, I V; White, S M

    2016-01-01

    Radio emission observations from the Learmonth and Bruny Island radio spectrographs are analysed to determine the nature of a train of discrete, periodic radio \\lq sparks\\rq (finite-bandwidth, short-duration isolated radio features) which precede a type II burst. We analyse extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging from SDO/AIA at multiple wavelengths and identify a series of quasi-periodic rapidly-propagating enhancements, which we interpret as a fast wave train, and link these to the detected radio features. The speeds and positions of the periodic rapidly propagating fast waves and the coronal mass ejection (CME) were recorded using running-difference images and time-distance analysis. From the frequency of the radio sparks the local electron density at the emission location was estimated for each. Using an empirical model for the scaling of density in the corona, the calculated electron density was used to obtain the height above the surface at which the emission occurs, and the propagation velocity of the emissi...

  18. CENSORS: A Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources. I. Sample definition, radio data and optical identifications

    CERN Document Server

    Best, P N; Röttgering, H J A; Rengelink, R B; Brookes, M H; Wall, J

    2003-01-01

    A new sample of radio sources, with the designated name CENSORS (A Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources), has been defined by combining the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) at 1.4 GHz with the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) Patch D, a 3 by 2 degree region of sky centred at 09 51 36.0, -21 00 00 (J2000). New radio observations of 199 NVSS radio sources with NVSS flux densities S(1.4GHz) > 7.8mJy are presented, and compared with the EIS I-band imaging observations which reach a depth of I~23; optical identifications are obtained for over two-thirds of the ~150 confirmed radio sources within the EIS field. The radio sources have a median linear size of 6 arcseconds, consistent with the trend for lower flux density radio sources to be less extended. Other radio source properties, such as the lobe flux density ratios, are consistent with those of brighter radio source samples. From the optical information, 30-40% of the sources are expected to lie at redshifts z >~ 1.5. One of the key goals of this survey is to accuratel...

  19. VLBA observations of radio faint Fermi-LAT sources above 10 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Lico, R; Orienti, M; D'Ammando, F

    2016-01-01

    The first Fermi-LAT High-energy source catalog (1FHL), containing gamma-ray sources detected above 10 GeV, is an ideal sample to characterize the physical properties of the most extreme gamma-ray sources. We investigate the pc scale properties of a sub-sample of radio faint 1FHL sources with the aim to confirm the proposed blazar associations, by revealing a compact high brightness temperature radio core, and we propose new low-frequency counterparts for the unassociated gamma-ray sources (UGS). Moreover, we increase the number of 1FHL sources with high resolution observations to explore the possible connection between radio and gamma rays at E >10 GeV. We observed 84 1FHL sources, mostly blazars of High Synchrotron Peaked (HSP) type, in the northern sky with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz. These sources lack high resolution radio observations and have at least one NVSS counterpart within the 95% confidence radius. For those sources without a well identified radio counterpart we exploit the VLBA...

  20. Implications of Fermi Observations for Hadronic Models of Radio Halos in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, Tesla E

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the impact of the Fermi non-detection of gamma-ray emission from clusters of galaxies on hadronic models for the origin of cluster radio halos. In hadronic models, the inelastic proton-proton collisions responsible for the production of the electron-positron population fueling the observed synchrotron radio emission yield a gamma-ray flux, from the decay of neutral pions, whose spectrum and normalization depend on the observed radio emissivity and on the cluster magnetic field. We thus infer lower limits on the average cluster magnetic field in hadronic models from the Fermi gamma-ray limits. We also calculate the corresponding maximal energy density in cosmic rays and the minimal-guaranteed gamma-ray flux from hadronic radio-halo models. We find that the observationally most interesting cases correspond to clusters with large radio emissivities featuring soft spectra. Estimates of the central magnetic field values for those clusters are larger than, or close, to the largest magnetic field values i...

  1. Observations and properties of candidate high frequency GPS radio sources in the AT20G survey

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock1, Paul J; Mahony, Elizabeth K; Ricci, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    We used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to obtain 40 GHz and 95 GHz observations of a number of sources that were selected from the Australia Telescope Compact Array 20 GHz (AT20G) survey . The aim of the observations was to improve the spectral coverage for sources with spectral peaks near 20 GHz or inverted (rising) radio spectra between 8.6 GHz and 20 GHz. We present the radio observations of a sample of 21 such sources along with optical spectra taken from the ANU Siding Spring Observatory 2.3m telescope and the ESO-New Technology Telescope (NTT). We find that as a group the sources show the same level of variability as typical GPS sources, and that of the 21 candidate GPS sources roughly 60% appear to be genuinely young radio galaxies. Three of the 21 sources studied show evidence of being restarted radio galaxies. If these numbers are indicative of the larger population of AT20G radio sources then as many as 400 genuine GPS sources could be contained within the AT20G with up to 25% of them ...

  2. Connecting Gas Dynamics and Star Formation Histories in Nearby Galaxies: The VLA-ANGST Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Juergen; Dalcanton, Julianne; Walter, Fabian; Stilp, Adrienne; Koribalski, Baerbel; West, Andrew; Warren, Steven

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, HST revolutionized the field of star formation in nearby galaxies. Due to its high angular resolution it has now become possible to construct star formation histories of individual stellar populations on scales of a few arcseconds spanning a range of up to ~600 Myr. This method will be applied to the ANGST galaxies, a large HST volume limited survey to map galaxies up to distances of 3.5-4.0 Mpc (excluding the Local Group). The ANGST sample is currently followed--up by high, ~6'' resolution VLA observations of neutral, atomic hydrogen (HI) in the context of VLA-ANGST, an approved Large VLA Project. The VLA resolution is well matched to that of the spatially resolved star formation history maps. The combination of ANGST and VLA-ANGST data will provide a new, promising approach to study essential fields of galaxy evolution such as the triggering of star formation, the feedback of massive stars into the interstellar medium, and the structure and dynamics of the interstellar medium.

  3. MERLIN radio observations of two recent supernovae in Arp299: SN2010O & SN2010P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, R. J.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Mattila, S.; Garrington, S. T.; Kankare, E.; Ryder, S.; Alberdi, A.; Romero-Canizales, C.

    2010-02-01

    We report MERLIN radio observations of the two recent supernovae in Arp299; SN2010P and SN2010O (CBET #2145 and CBET #2144, respectively). Observations of Arp299 were made between 1900UT 29th Jan 2010 and 0150UT 1st Feb 2010 at 4994MHz. The previously known compact radio structure of Arp299, including the nuclear starburst components associated with A=IC694 and B1=the southernmost nucleus of NGC3690 are detected (Neff, Ulvestad & Teng 2004, ApJ, 611, 186; Ulvestad 2009 AJ, 138, 152; Perez-Torres et al 2009, A&A 507, 17).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 6GHz JVLA observations of low-z SDSS quasars (Kellermann+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, K. I.; Condon, J. J.; Kimball, A. E.; Perley, R. A.; Ivezic, Z.

    2017-02-01

    We have reprocessed the VLA observations of a sample of SDSS QSOs discussed in Kimball+ (2011ApJ...739L..29K), and generated a catalog of radio sources associated with each QSO. We detected radio emission at 6GHz from all but two of the 178 color-selected SDSS QSOs contained in our volume-limited sample of QSOs more luminous than M_i=-23 and with redshifts 0.2

  5. Radio Observations of HD 80606 Near Planetary Periastron

    CERN Document Server

    Lazio, T J W; Farrell, W M; Blank, D L

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports Very Large Array observations at 325 and 1425 MHz (90cm and 20cm) during and near the periastron passage of HD 80606b on 2007 November 20. We obtain flux density limits (3-sigma) of 1.7 mJy and 48 microJy at 325 and 1425 MHz, respectively, equivalent to planetary luminosity limits of 2.3 x 10^{24} erg/s and 2.7 x 10^{23} erg/s. These are well above the Jovian value (at 40 MHz) of 2 x 10^{18} erg/s. The motivation for these observations was that the planetary magnetospheric emission is driven by a stellar wind-planetary magnetosphere interaction so that the planetary luminosity would be elevated. Near periastron, HD 80606b might be as much as 3000 times more luminous than Jupiter. Recent transit observations of HD 80606b provide stringent constraints on the planetary mass and radius, and, because of the planet's highly eccentric orbit, its rotation period is likely to be "pseudo-synchronized" to its orbital period, allowing a robust estimate of the former. We are able to make robust estimate...

  6. Advanced spectral analysis of ionospheric waves observed with sparse arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Helmboldt, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study from a single, six-hour observing period to illustrate the application of techniques developed for interferometric radio telescopes to the spectral analysis of observations of ionospheric fluctuations with sparse arrays. We have adapted the deconvolution methods used for making high dynamic range images of cosmic sources with radio arrays to making comparably high dynamic range maps of spectral power of wavelike ionospheric phenomena. In the example presented here, we have used observations of the total electron content (TEC) gradient derived from Very Large Array (VLA) observations of synchrotron emission from two galaxy clusters at 330 MHz as well as GPS-based TEC measurements from a sparse array of 33 receivers located within New Mexico near the VLA. We show that these techniques provide a significant improvement in signal to noise (S/N) of detected wavelike structures by correcting for both measurement inaccuracies and wavefront distortions. This is especially true for the...

  7. A Fast Radio Burst Occurs Every Second throughout the Observable Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-09-01

    Recent multi-telescope observations of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB) FRB 121102 reveal a Gaussian-like spectral profile and associate the event with a dwarf metal-poor galaxy at a cosmological redshift of 0.19. Assuming that this event represents the entire FRB population, we make predictions for the expected number counts of FRBs observable by future radio telescopes between 50 MHz and 3.5 GHz. We vary our model assumptions to bracket the expected rate of FRBs and find that it exceeds one FRB per second per sky when accounting for faint sources. We show that future low-frequency radio telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array, could detect more than one FRB per minute over the entire sky originating from the epoch of reionization.

  8. The Ability of Radio Heliospheric Remote Sensing Observations to Provide Global Solar Wind Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Yu, H.; Bisi, M. M.; Fallows, R.

    2012-12-01

    Heliospheric remote sensing, in particular those using Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) observations, allow the 3-D reconstruction of solar wind parameters globally. These parameters include velocity, density, and by extrapolation from solar surface magnetogram observations, vector magnetic field components. Since the year 2000, the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STELab), Nagoya University, Japan, has provided a source of IPS data with short-enough latency to enable forecasts of these solar wind parameters throughout the inner heliosphere. Over time these techniques have been improved upon with data from other radio sites (Ootacamund - Ooty - India; and the European Incoherent SCATter - EISCAT - radio telescopes based across Northern Scandinavia). Here we review the improvements, limitations, and the potential future of these techniques. In particular in one new development, the ability to measure polarization from radio sources allows the possibility to use Faraday rotation inputs to reconstruct heliospheric vector magnetic fields without a reliance on solar surface magnetic field extrapolation.

  9. Directional Statistics for Polarization Observations of Individual Pulses from Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    McKinnon, M M

    2010-01-01

    Radio polarimetry is a three-dimensional statistical problem. The three-dimensional aspect of the problem arises from the Stokes parameters Q, U, and V, which completely describe the polarization of electromagnetic radiation and conceptually define the orientation of a polarization vector in the Poincar'e sphere. The statistical aspect of the problem arises from the random fluctuations in the source-intrinsic polarization and the instrumental noise. A simple model for the polarization of pulsar radio emission has been used to derive the three-dimensional statistics of radio polarimetry. The model is based upon the proposition that the observed polarization is due to the incoherent superposition of two, highly polarized, orthogonal modes. The directional statistics derived from the model follow the Bingham-Mardia and Fisher family of distributions. The model assumptions are supported by the qualitative agreement between the statistics derived from it and those measured with polarization observations of the ind...

  10. Energy Storage and Release through the Solar Activity Cycle Models Meet Radio Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Nindos, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    For nearly sixty years, radio observations have provided a unique insight into the physics of the active and quiescent solar atmosphere. Thanks to the variety of emission mechanisms and to the large altitude range available to observations, fundamental plasma parameters have been measured from the low chromosphere to the upper corona and interplanetary medium. This book presents current research in solar radio astronomy and shows how well it fits in the exceptional scientific context brought by the current space solar observatories. It essentially contains contributed research and review papers presented during the 2010 Community of European Solar Radio Astronomers (CESRA) meeting, which took place in Belgium in June 2010. This book is aimed at graduate students and researchers working in solar physics and space science. Previously published in Solar Physics journal, Vol. 273/2, 2011.

  11. SAS-2 gamma-ray observations of PSR 1747-46. [radio pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence is reported for the observation of gamma-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 1747-46 by the gamma-ray telescope aboard SAS 2. The evidence is based on the presence of both an approximately 3-sigma enhancement of gamma rays at the pulsar's location and an approximately 4-sigma peak in the phase plot of 79 gamma-ray events whose phase was calculated from the pulsar's known period. The gamma-ray pulsation is found to appear at a phase lag of about 0.16 from that predicted by the radio observations. The pulsed gamma-ray fluxes above 35 MeV and 100 MeV are estimated, and it is shown that the gamma-ray pulse width is similar to the radio pulse width. It is concluded that PSR 1747-46 is a most likely candidate for pulsed gamma-ray emission.

  12. Characterizing Interference in Radio Astronomy Observations through Active and Unsupervised Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the process of observing signals from astronomical sources, radio astronomers must mitigate the effects of manmade radio sources such as cell phones, satellites, aircraft, and observatory equipment. Radio frequency interference (RFI) often occurs as short bursts (< 1 ms) across a broad range of frequencies, and can be confused with signals from sources of interest such as pulsars. With ever-increasing volumes of data being produced by observatories, automated strategies are required to detect, classify, and characterize these short "transient" RFI events. We investigate an active learning approach in which an astronomer labels events that are most confusing to a classifier, minimizing the human effort required for classification. We also explore the use of unsupervised clustering techniques, which automatically group events into classes without user input. We apply these techniques to data from the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey to characterize several million detected RFI events from over a thousand hours of observation.

  13. GMRT observations of IC 711 - The longest head-tail radio galaxy known

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    We present low-frequency, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations at 240, 610 and 1300 MHz of IC 711, a narrow angle tail (NAT) radio galaxy. The galaxy lies in Abell cluster 1314 (redshift ~ 0.034) and has a long radio tail of total angular extent ~17 arcmin, corresponding to a projected linear size of ~700 kpc. This makes it the longest head-tail radio galaxy known. The objectives of the GMRT observations were to investigate the diffuse-emission of the long tail structure at low frequencies. The radio structure, especially initial ~10 arcmin of tail being a long straight feature, does not seem to be consistent with a simple circular motion around the cluster center, as previously suggested in the literature. Two sharp bends after the straight section of the tail cast doubt on the prevailing idea in the literature that the long narrow tails represent trails left behind by the fast moving parent optical galaxy with respect to the cluster medium, as the optical galaxy could not have undergone such ...

  14. High sensitive observations of the planetary radio emission in decameter wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Galina; Zakharenko, Vyacheslav; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander; Shaposhnikov, Vladimir; Zarka, Philippe; Griessmeier, Jean-M.; Fisher, Georg; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Mylostna, Krystyna

    2013-04-01

    The progress of the ground-based low frequency radio astronomy has opened a new approach to the study of planetary radio emission in the solar system and beyond. This is manifested in the study of the Jupiter (detection of various types of the sporadic emission), of the Saturn (investigation of the electrostatic discharges emission, SED), as well as other planets and exoplanets. High efficiency decameter wavelength radio telescope UTR-2 and modern registration systems (effective area is more than 100 000 sq.m., instant frequency band is 8-33 MHz, dynamic range is about 90 dB, the frequency resolution is about 1 kHz, the temporal resolution is about 1 microsecond) allow for a new observation and detect many interesting phenomena. This includes the detection of superfine time-frequency structures and new types of the modulations effects in the Jovian radio emission, the detection of microsecond scales in the SED emission of the Saturn, and dispersion delay of the SED signals in the interplanetary medium. In addition, the described above method of observation of the planetary signals allowed for the first time to start ground-based searching radio emission from Uranus, Venus, Mars and exoplanets.

  15. Alma Observations of Massive Molecular Gas Filaments Encasing Radio Bubbles in the Phoenix Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, H. R.; McDonald, M.; McNamara, B. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Bayliss, M. B.; Benson, B. A.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Edge, A. C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Marrone, D. P.; Reichardt, C. L.; Vieira, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    We report new ALMA observations of the CO(3-2) line emission from the 2.1+/- 0.3× {10}10 {M}ȯ molecular gas reservoir in the central galaxy of the Phoenix cluster. The cold molecular gas is fueling a vigorous starburst at a rate of 500{--}800 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1 and powerful black hole activity in the forms of both intense quasar radiation and radio jets. The radio jets have inflated huge bubbles filled with relativistic plasma into the hot, X-ray atmospheres surrounding the host galaxy. The ALMA observations show that extended filaments of molecular gas, each 10{--}20 {kpc} long with a mass of several billion solar masses, are located along the peripheries of the radio bubbles. The smooth velocity gradients and narrow line widths along each filament reveal massive, ordered molecular gas flows around each bubble, which are inconsistent with gravitational free-fall. The molecular clouds have been lifted directly by the radio bubbles, or formed via thermal instabilities induced in low-entropy gas lifted in the updraft of the bubbles. These new data provide compelling evidence for close coupling between the radio bubbles and the cold gas, which is essential to explain the self-regulation of feedback. The very feedback mechanism that heats hot atmospheres and suppresses star formation may also paradoxically stimulate production of the cold gas required to sustain feedback in massive galaxies.

  16. FURTHER OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), (* MERCURY ( PLANET ), (*RADIO ASTRONOMY, EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES, SKY BRIGHTNESS, ANTENNAS...EPHEMERIDES, ASTROPHYSICS, JUPITER( PLANET ), VENUS( PLANET ), BRIGHTNESS, ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE, INTENSITY, MEASUREMENT.

  17. Radio polarization observations of large supernova remnants at 6cm

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J L; Sun, X H; Reich, W; Xiao, L; Reich, P; Xu, J W; Shi, W B; Fuerst, E; Wielebinski, R

    2013-01-01

    We have observed 79 supernova remnants (SNRs) with the Urumqi 25m telescope at 6cm during the Sino-German 6cm polarization survey of the Galactic plane. We measured flux densities of SNRs at 6cm, some of which are the first measurements or the data at highest frequencies, so that we can determine or improve spectra of SNRs. Our observations have ruled out the suggested spectral breaks or spectral flattening of a few SNRs, and confirmed the spectral break of S147. Combined our 6cm maps with 11cm and 21cm maps from the Effelsberg 100m telescope, we calculated the spectral index maps of several large SNRs. For many remnants, we obtained for the first time polarization images, which show the intrinsic magnetic field structures at 6 cm. We disapproved three "remnants", OA184, G192.8-1.1 and G16.8-1.1, which show a thermal spectrum and no polarization. We have discovered two large supernova remnant, G178.2-4.2 and G25.1-2.3, from the 6cm survey maps.

  18. Mueller Matrix Parameters for Radio Telescopes and their Observational Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Heiles, C; Nolan, M L; Lorimer, D; Bhat, R; Ghosh, T K; Lewis, M; O'Neil, K; Salter, C; Stanimirovic, S; Heiles, Carl; Perillat, Phil; Nolan, Michael; Lorimer, Duncan; Bhat, Ramesh; Ghosh, Tapasi; Lewis, Murray; Neil, Karen O'; Salter, Chris; Stanimirovic, Snezana

    2001-01-01

    Modern digital crosscorrelators permit the simultaneous measurement of all four Stokes parameters. However, the results must be calibrated to correct for the polarization transfer function of the receiving system. The transfer function for any device can be expressed by its Mueller matrix. We express the matrix elements in terms of fundamental system parameters that describe the voltage transfer functions (known as the Jones matrix) of the various system devices in physical terms and thus provide a means for comparing with engineering calculations and investigating the effects of design changes. We describe how to determine these parameters with astronomical observations. We illustrate the method by applying it to some of the receivers at the Arecibo Observatory.

  19. Some characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed by radio-interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Mercier

    Full Text Available Observations of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs are considered through their effect on the horizontal gradient G of the slant total electron content (slant TEC, which can be directly obtained from two-dimensional radio-interferometric observations of cosmic radio-sources with the Nançay radioheligraph (2.2°E, 47.3°N. Azimuths of propagation can be deduced (modulo 180°. The total database amounts to about 800 h of observations at various elevations, local time and seasons. The main results are:

    a AGWs are partially directive, confirming our previous results.

    b The propagation azimuths considered globally are widely scattered with a preference towards the south.

    c They show a bimodal time distribution with preferential directions towards the SE during daytime and towards the SW during night-time (rather than a clockwise rotation as reported by previous authors.

    d The periods are scattered but are larger during night-time than during daytime by about 60%.

    e The effects observed with the solar radio-sources are significantly stronger than with other radio-sources (particularly at higher elevations, showing the role of the geometry in line of sight-integrated observations.

  20. Deep 610-MHz Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of the Spitzer extragalactic First Look Survey field - III. The radio properties of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Garn, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of source which are bright at radio frequencies, but do not appear in deep infrared images. We report the detection of 14 IFRSs within the Spitzer extragalactic First Look Survey field, eight of which are detected near to the limiting magnitude of a deep R-band image of the region, at R ~ 24.5. Sensitive Spitzer Space Telescope images are stacked in order to place upper limits on their mid-infrared flux densities, and using recent 610-MHz and 1.4-GHz observations we find that they have spectral indices which vary between alpha = 0.05 and 1.38, where we define alpha such that S = S_0 nu^(- alpha), and should not be thought of as a single source population. We place constraints on the luminosity and linear size of these sources, and through comparison with well-studied local objects in the 3CRR catalogue demonstrate that they can be modelled as being compact ( 4).

  1. Observing the Plasma-Physical Processes of Pulsar Radio Emission with Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Joanna M.

    2017-01-01

    With their enormous densities and fields, neutron stars entail some of the most exotic physics in the cosmos. Similarly, the physical mechanisms of pulsar radio emission are no less exotic, and we are only now beginning to understand them. The talk will provide an introduction to the phenomenology of radio pulsar emission and focus on those aspects of the exquisite Arecibo observations that bear on their challenging emission physics.The commonalities of the radio beamforms of most slow pulsars (and some millisecond pulsars) argue strongly that their magnetic fields have a nearly dipolar structure at the height of their radio emission regions. These heights can often be determined by aberration/retardation analyses. Similarly, measurement of the orientation of the polarized radio emission with respect to the emitting magnetic field facilitates identification of the physical(X/O) emission modes and study of the plasma coupling to the electromagnetic radiation.While the physics of primary plasma generation above the pulsar polar cap is only beginning to be understood, it is clear that the radio pulsars we see are able to generate copious amounts of electron-positron plasma in their emission regions. Within the nearly dipolar field structure of these emission regions, the plasma density is near to that of the Goldreich-Julian model, and so the physical conditions in these regions can be accurately estimated.These conditions show that the plasma frequencies in the emission regions are much higher than the frequency of the emitted radiation, such that the plasma couples most easily to the extraordinary mode as observed. Therefore, the only surviving emission mechanism is curvature radiation from charged solitons, produced by the two-stream instability. Such soliton emission has probably been observed directly in the Crab pulsar; however, a physical theory of charged soliton radiation does not yet exist.

  2. "Normal" FRII Radio Galaxies as a Probe of the Nature of X-Shaped Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lal, Dharam Vir; Kraft, Ralph P

    2008-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength radio study of a sample of nearby Fanaroff-Riley class II (FRII) radio galaxies, matched with the sample of known X-shaped radio sources in size, morphological properties and redshift, using new Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data and archival data from the Very Large Array (VLA). Our principal aim in this paper is to provide a control sample for earlier studies of samples of `X-shaped' radio sources, which have similar luminosities and small-scale radio structures to our targets but exhibit large-scale extensions to their lobes that more typical FRII sources lack; earlier spectral work with the GMRT has suggested that these `wings' sometimes have flat spectral indices at low frequencies, in contrast to expectations from models in which the wings are formed hydrodynamically or by jet reorientation. In our new observations we find that almost all of our target FRII radio galaxies show standard spectral steepening as a function of distance from the hotspot at the low frequen...

  3. Deep images of cluster radio halos

    CERN Document Server

    Bacchi, M; Giovannini, G; Govoni, F

    2003-01-01

    New radio data are presented for the clusters A401, A545, A754, A1914, A2219 and A2390, where the presence of diffuse radio emission was suggested from the images of the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. Sensitive images of these clusters, obtained with the Very Large Array (VLA)at 20 cm confirm the existence of the diffuse sources and allow us to derive their fluxes and intrinsic parameters.The correlation between the halo radio power and cluster X-ray luminosity is derived for a large sample of halo clusters, and is briefly discussed.

  4. NuSTAR Observations of the Powerful Radio-Galaxy Cygnus A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Ogle, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A,focusing on the central absorbed active galactic nucleus (AGN). Cygnus A is embedded in a cool-core galaxy cluster, and hence we also examine archival XMM-Newton data to facilitate the decomposition of the spectrum into the AGN ...

  5. Hard X-Ray Spectrum from West Lobe of Radio Galaxy Fornax A Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, Makoto S; Seta, Hiromi; Matsuta, Keiko; Yaji, Yuichi

    2009-01-01

    An observation of the West lobe of radio galaxy Fornax A (NGC 1316) with Suzaku is reported. Since Feigelson et al. (1995) and Kaneda et al. (1995) discovered the cosmic microwave background boosted inverse-Comptonized (IC) X-rays from the radio lobe, the magnetic field and electron energy density in the lobes have been estimated under the assumption that a single component of the relativistic electrons generates both the IC X-rays and the synchrotron radio emission. However, electrons generating the observed IC X-rays in the 1 -- 10 keV band do not possess sufficient energy to radiate the observed synchrotron radio emission under the estimated magnetic field of a few micro-G. On the basis of observations made with Suzaku, we show in the present paper that a 0.7 -- 20 keV spectrum is well described by a single power-law model with an energy index of 0.68 and a flux density of 0.12+/-0.01 nJy at 1 keV from the West lobe. The derived multiwavelength spectrum strongly suggests that a single electron energy distr...

  6. Some Observed Results of Solar Radio Spectrometer at 4.5-7.5 GHz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new instrument of broadband solar radio spectrometer working at waveband 4.5-7.5 GHz was developed at Purple Mountain Observatory for Solar Maximum 23. Some new results of spectral observation have been obtained since August 1999. Two typical type Ⅲμ bursts with rich fine structures are presented and some interesting features discussed.

  7. Multifrequency radio continuum observations of head-tail galaxies in the Perseus cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbring, D; de Bruyn, AG

    1998-01-01

    New observations of head-tail radio galaxies in the Perseus cluster at 21, 49 and 92 cm using the WSRT are presented. Two new head-tail galaxies were discovered bringing the total for the cluster to five. We show total intensity maps for all of them and spectral index distribution and polarization m

  8. Determining the solar wind speed above active regions using remote radio-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougeret, J L; Fainberg, J; Stone, R G

    1983-11-04

    A new technique has made it possible to measure the velocity of portions of the solar wind during its flow outward from the sun. This analysis utilizes spacecraft (ISEE-3) observations of radio emission generated in regions of the solar wind associated with solar active regions. By tracking the source of these radio waves over periods of days, it is possible to measure the motion of the emission regions. Evidence of solar wind acceleration during this outward flow, consistent with theoretical models, has also been obtained.

  9. Unusual Solar Radio Events Observed by the Wind and STEREO Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Hess, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present several unusual solar radio events observed by the Wind spacecraft. These events - type II and type III bursts - show significant unexpected time-frequency structure that is likely due to interaction of the electron beam sources with atypical density variations of the solar wind. These events permit us to test our understanding of the emission processes, as well as demonstrating the remote detection of solar wind structure. We will also report on updates to the Wind Waves website at NASA GSFC of interest to radio data users.

  10. Density waves in Saturn's rings probed by radio and optical occultation - Observational tests of theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Thomas G.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    A parallel examination is conducted of Voyager radio and photopolarimeter occultation observations of the Saturn A ring's density waves. The radio instrument waves exhibit an average -90 deg offset from the dynamical phase. A warping height of about 100-m amplitude can qualtitatively reproduce this phase shift, while preserving the overall model wave shape. These results may be profoundly relevant for satellite-ring torque calculations in Saturn's rings, given the deposition of all of the net torque of the standard model in the first wavelength.

  11. Radio Observations of the Hubble Deep Field South region: I. Survey Description and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, R P; Jackson, C A; Boyle, B J; Ekers, R D; Mitchell, D A; Sault, R J; Wieringa, M H; Williams, R E; Hopkins, A M; Higdon, J; Norris, Ray P.; Huynh, Minh T.; Jackson, Carole A.; Boyle, Brian J.; Ekers, Ronald. D.; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Sault, Robert J.; Wieringa, Mark H.; Williams, Robert E.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Higdon, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the first of a series describing the results of the Australia Telescope Hubble Deep Field South (ATHDFS) radio survey. The survey was conducted at four wavelengths - 20, 11, 6, and 3 cm, over a 4-year period, and achieves an rms sensitivity of about 10 microJy at each wavelength. We describe the observations and data reduction processes, and present data on radio sources close to the centre of the HDF-S. We discuss in detail the properties of a subset of these sources. The sources include both starburst galaxies and galaxies powered by an active galactic nucleus, and range in redshift from 0.1 to 2.2. Some of them are characterised by unusually high radio-to-optical luminosities, presumably caused by dust extinction.

  12. The VLA 1.4GHz Survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: Second Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, N A; Fomalont, E B; Kellermann, K I; Mainieri, V; Padovani, P; Rosati, P; Tozzi, P; Vattakunnel, S

    2013-01-01

    Deep radio observations at 1.4GHz for the Extended Chandra Deep Field South were performed in June through September of 2007 and presented in a first data release (Miller et al. 2008). The survey was made using six separate pointings of the Very Large Array (VLA) with over 40 hours of observation per pointing. In the current paper, we improve on the data reduction to produce a second data release (DR2) mosaic image. This DR2 image covers an area of about a third of a square degree and reaches a best rms sensitivity of 6 uJy and has a typical sensitivity of 7.4 uJy per 2.8" by 1.6" beam. We also present a more comprehensive catalog, including sources down to peak flux densities of five or more times the local rms noise along with information on source sizes and relevant pointing data. We discuss in some detail the consideration of whether sources are resolved under the complication of a radio image created as a mosaic of separate pointings each suffering some degree of bandwidth smearing, and the accurate eval...

  13. Intraday Variability in Northern Hemisphere Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Krichbaum, T P; Fuhrmann, L; Cimo, G; Witzel, A

    2001-01-01

    We summarize results from flux density monitoring campaigns performed with the 100 meter radio-telescope at Effelsberg and the VLA during the past 15 yrs. We briefly discuss some of the statistical properties of the rapid variability from now more than 40 high declination sources, which show Intraday Variability (IDV). In general, IDV is more pronounced for sources with flat radio spectra and compact VLBI structures. The frequency dependence of the variability pattern varies with source and observing time. For 0917+62, we present new VLBI images, which suggest that the variability pattern is modified by the occurrence of new jet components. For 0716+71, we show the first detection of IDV at millimeter wavelengths (32 GHz). For the physical interpretation of the IDV phenomenon, a complex source and frequency dependent superposition of interstellar scintillation and source intrinsic variability should be considered.

  14. Non-thermal radio emission from O-type stars. II. HD 167971

    CERN Document Server

    Blomme, R; Runacres, M C; Van Loo, S; Gunawan, D Y A S

    2006-01-01

    HD 167971 is a triple system consisting of a 3.3-day eclipsing binary (O5-8 V + O5-8 V) and an O8 supergiant. It is also a well known non-thermal radio emitter. We observed the radio emission of HD 167971 with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). By combining these data with VLA archive observations we constructed a radio lightcurve covering a 20-yr time-range. We searched for, but failed to find, the 3.3-day spectroscopic period of the binary in the radio data. This could be due to the absence of intrinsic synchrotron radiation at the colliding-wind region between the two components of the eclipsing binary, or due to the large amount of free-free absorption that blocks the synchrotron radiation. We are able to explain many of the observed characteristics of the radio data if the non-thermal emission is produced in a colliding-wind region between the supergiant and the combined winds of the binary. Furthermore, if the system is gravitationally bound, the orbital motion ...

  15. A Highly Circularly Polarized Solar Radio Emission Component Observed at Hectometric Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, M. J.; Kaiser, M. L.; Fainberg, J.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2006-04-01

    We report here the observation of a rare solar radio event at hectometric wavelengths that was characterized by essentially 100% circularly polarized radiation and that was observed continuously for about six days, from May 17 to 23, 2002. This was the first time that a solar source with significantly polarized radiation was detected by the WAVES experiment on the Wind spacecraft. From May 19 to 22, the intense polarized radio emissions were characterized by quasi-periodic intensity variations with periods from one to two hours and with superposed drifting, narrowband, fine structures. The bandwidth of this radiation extended from about 400 kHz to 7 MHz, and the peak frequency of the frequency spectrum slowly decreased from 2 MHz to about 0.8 MHz over the course of four days. The radio source, at each frequency, was observed to slowly drift from east to west about the Sun, as viewed from the Earth and was estimated to lie between 26 and 82 R ⊙ ( R ⊙ = 696 000 km). We speculate that this unusual event may represent an interplanetary manifestation of a moving type IV burst and discuss possible radio emission mechanisms. The ISEE-3 spacecraft may possibly have detected a similar event some 26 years ago.

  16. Self-calibration strategy for a LOFAR solar radio burst observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocks, C.; Mann, G.; Breitling, F.

    2016-11-01

    The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a novel radio interferometer consisting of a central core near Exloo in the Netherlands, remote stations in the Netherlands, and international stations. It observes in two frequency bands, the low band of 10-90 MHz and the high band of 110-250 MHz. The key science project ``Solar Physics and Space Weather with LOFAR'' aims at studying the solar activity and its influence on interplanetary space. Solar radio radiation in the low and high band emanates from the upper and middle corona, respectively. We present early commissioning observations of the Sun, that serendipitously include a weak radio burst. Since no external calibrator was observed, a self-calibration approach has to be used. This works well for the quiet Sun, but not for the burst data. We develop a self-calibration strategy for radio bursts, and discuss the general properties of such a self-calibration method. Our results lead to the conclusion that external calibrators with known source structure should generally be preferred.

  17. The repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102: Multi-wavelength observations and additional bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Kaspi, V M; Wharton, R S; Bassa, C G; Bogdanov, S; Camilo, F; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Mickaliger, M; Parent, E; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Tendulkar, S P

    2016-01-01

    We report on radio and X-ray observations of the only known repeating Fast Radio Burst (FRB) source, FRB 121102. We have detected six additional radio bursts from this source: five with the Green Bank Telescope at 2 GHz, and one at 1.4 GHz at the Arecibo Observatory for a total of 17 bursts from this source. All have dispersion measures consistent with a single value ($\\sim559$ pc cm$^{-3}$) that is three times the predicted maximum Galactic value. The 2-GHz bursts have highly variable spectra like those at 1.4 GHz, indicating that the frequency structure seen across the individual 1.4 and 2-GHz bandpasses is part of a wideband process. X-ray observations of the FRB 121102 field with the Swift and Chandra observatories show at least one possible counterpart; however, the probability of chance superposition is high. A radio imaging observation of the field with the Jansky Very Large Array at 1.6 GHz yields a 5$\\sigma$ upper limit of 0.3 mJy on any point-source continuum emission. This upper limit, combined wit...

  18. Deep XMM-Newton Observations of the NW Radio Relic Region of Abell 3667

    CERN Document Server

    Sarazin, Craig L; Wik, Daniel R; Clarke, Tracy E

    2016-01-01

    The results of long XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the NW radio relic of Abell 3667 are presented. A shock is detected at the sharp outer edge of the radio relic, both in the X-ray surface brightness and the temperature profiles. The Mach number is M = 2.54^+0.80_-0.43. The temperature jump at the shock is larger than expected from the density jump, which may indicate that a dynamically important magnetic field aligned primarily parallel to the shock front is present. The gas temperature rises gradually over several arc minutes within the shock region. This could indicate that the shock energy is initially dissipated into some mix of thermal and nonthermal (e.g., turbulence) components, and that the nonthermal energy decays into heat in the post-shock region. The observed radio relic can be powered if ~0.2% of the energy dissipated in the shock goes into the (re)acceleration of relativistic electrons. We show that the observed steepening of the radio spectrum with distance behind the shock is consistent wit...

  19. Radio continuum emission from knots in the DG Tau jet

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, L F; Raga, A C; Canto, J; Riera, A; Loinard, L; Dzib, S A; Zapata, L A

    2011-01-01

    Context: HH 158, the jet from the young star DG Tau, is one of the few sources of its type where jet knots have been detected at optical and X-ray wavelengths. Aims: To search, using Very Large Array observations of this source, radio knots and if detected, compare them with the optical and X-ray knots. To model the emission from the radio knots. Methods: We analyzed archive data and also obtained new Very Large Array observations of this source, as well as an optical image, to measure the present position of the knots. We also modeled the radio emission from the knots in terms of shocks in a jet with intrinsically time-dependent ejection velocities. Results: We detected radio knots in the 1996.98 and 2009.62 VLA data. These radio knots are,within error, coincident with optical knots. We also modeled satisfactorily the observed radio flux densities as shock features from a jet with intrinsic variability. All the observed radio, optical, and X-ray knot positions can be intepreted as four successive knots, ejec...

  20. Simultaneous ground- and satellite-based observation of MF/HF auroral radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuka; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Katoh, Yuto; Shinbori, Atsuki; Kadokura, Akira; Ogawa, Yasunobu

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first simultaneous measurements of medium-high frequency (MF/HF) auroral radio emissions (above 1 MHz) by ground- and satellite-based instruments. Observational data were obtained by the ground-based passive receivers in Iceland and Svalbard, and by the Plasma Waves and Sounder experiment (PWS) mounted on the Akebono satellite. We observed two simultaneous appearance events, during which the frequencies of the auroral roar and MF bursts detected at ground level were different from those of the terrestrial hectometric radiation (THR) observed by the Akebono satellite passing over the ground-based stations. This frequency difference confirms that auroral roar and THR are generated at different altitudes across the F peak. We did not observe any simultaneous observations that indicated an identical generation region of auroral roar and THR. In most cases, MF/HF auroral radio emissions were observed only by the ground-based detector, or by the satellite-based detector, even when the satellite was passing directly over the ground-based stations. A higher detection rate was observed from space than from ground level. This can primarily be explained in terms of the idea that the Akebono satellite can detect THR emissions coming from a wider region, and because a considerable portion of auroral radio emissions generated in the bottomside F region are masked by ionospheric absorption and screening in the D/E regions associated with ionization which results from auroral electrons and solar UV radiation.

  1. Meteor observations of forward-scattered FM-radio echo in Busan (Korea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.-M.; Cho, M.; Kim, T.; Hong, J.; Kang, Y.-W.; Ahn, S.-H.; Lee, S. H.; Song, I.-O.

    2015-01-01

    The detection system of forward-scattered FM-radio signals has been newly set up in Korea Science Academy of KAIST in Busan, Korea. The meteor observations using a 2.5m-long Yagi antenna have been carried out since May, 2015. The radio station we use is the NHK broadcasting station (85.20MHz) located in Hokkaido, Japan which is approximately 1,400 km away from Busan and is well below the local horizon. The detection is successfully running, and we examine the observed data reliability by simply checking long-lasting echoes. An additional observing station is being installed in the nearby city of Ulsan to make a cross-check. We analyze the results to find the diurnal and daily variation of the meteor rates. We are planning to pursue long-term observations in order to educate students.

  2. Unveiling the hidden supernova population in local LIRGs with NIR/Radio observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Illana, R.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.

    2013-05-01

    The dust enshrouded environments of Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs), and especially of their nuclear regions, prevents the direct detection of supernovae in the optical. Radio observations are unaffected by dust extinction, allowing for the detection of most of these supernovae, thus probing their massive star formation rate. In addition, complementary observations in the near IR can help us to understand the nature of these phenomena and derive properties of the regions where they occur.

  3. Radio Sources in the NCP Region Observed with the 21 Centimeter Array

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Qian; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Gu, Jun-Hua; Xu, Haiguang

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalog of 624 radio sources detected around the North Celestial Pole (NCP) with the 21 Centimeter Array (21CMA), a radio interferometer dedicated to the statistical measurement of the epoch of reionization (EoR). The data are taken from a 12 h observation made on 2013 April 13, with a frequency coverage from 75 to 175 MHz and an angular resolution of ~ 4 arcmin. The catalog includes flux densities at eight sub-bands across the 21CMA bandwidth and provides the in-band spectral indicies for the detected sources. To reduce the complexity of interferometric imaging from the so-called 'w' term and ionospheric effect, the present analyses are restricted to the east-west baselines within 1500 km only. The 624 radio sources are found within 5 degrees around the NCP down to ~ 10 mJy with a completeness of roughly 80%. Our source counts are compared, and also exhibit a good agreement with deep low-frequency observations made recently with the GMRT and MWA. In particular, for fainter radio sources below ~ ...

  4. ALMA observations of massive molecular gas filaments encasing radio bubbles in the Phoenix cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, H R; McNamara, B R; Fabian, A C; Nulsen, P E J; Bayliss, M B; Benson, B A; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Edge, A C; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Marrone, D P; Reichardt, C L; Vieira, J D

    2016-01-01

    We report new ALMA observations of the CO(3-2) line emission from the $2.7\\pm0.4\\times10^{10}\\rm\\thinspace M_{\\odot}$ molecular gas reservoir in the central galaxy of the Phoenix cluster. The cold molecular gas is fuelling a vigorous starburst at a rate of $500-800\\rm\\thinspace M_{\\odot}\\rm\\; yr^{-1}$ and powerful black hole activity in the form of both intense quasar radiation and radio jets. The radio jets have inflated huge bubbles filled with relativistic plasma into the hot, X-ray atmospheres surrounding the host galaxy. The ALMA observations show that extended filaments of molecular gas, each $10-20\\rm\\; kpc$ long with a mass of several billion solar masses, are located along the peripheries of the radio bubbles. The smooth velocity gradients and narrow line widths along each filament reveal massive, ordered molecular gas flows around each bubble, which are inconsistent with gravitational free-fall. The molecular clouds have been lifted directly by the radio bubbles, or formed via thermal instabilities ...

  5. ATCA observations of the MACS-Planck Radio Halo Cluster Project - I. New detection of a radio halo in PLCK G285.0-23.7

    CERN Document Server

    Aviles, Gerardo Martinez; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Pratley, Luke; Macario, Giulia; Venturi, Tiziana; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Cassano, Rossella; Dallacasa, Daniele; Intema, Huib; Giacintucci, Simona; Hurier, Guillaume; Aghanim, Nabila; Douspis, Marian; Langer, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the possible presence of diffuse radio emission in the intermediate redshift, massive cluster PLCK G285.0-23.7 (z=0.39, M_500 = 8.39 x 10^(14) M_Sun). Our 16cm-band ATCA observations of PLCK G285.0-23.7 allow us to reach a rms noise level of ~11 microJy/beam on the wide-band (1.1-3.1 GHz), full-resolution (~5 arcsec) image of the cluster, making it one of the deepest ATCA images yet published. We also re-image visibilities at lower resolution in order to achieve a better sensitivity to low-surface-brightness extended radio sources. We detect one of the lowest luminosity radio halos known at z>0.35, characterised by a slight offset from the well-studied 1.4 GHz radio power vs. cluster mass correlation. Similarly to most known radio-loud clusters (i.e. those hosting diffuse non-thermal sources), PLCK G285.0-23.7 has a disturbed dynamical state. Our analysis reveals a similarly elongated X-ray and radio morphology. While the size of the radio halo in PLCK G285.0-23.7 is smaller than lower redshift...

  6. Low Frequency Radio Observations of X-ray Ghost Bubbles in Abell 2597: A History of Radio Activity in the Core

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, T E; Blanton, E L; Neumann, D M; Kassim, N E

    2005-01-01

    A previous analysis of the Chandra X-ray image of the center of the cooling core cluster Abell 2597 showed two ``ghost holes'' in the X-ray emission to the west and northeast of the central radio galaxy PKS 2322-123. Previous radio observations did not detect any radio emission coming from the interior of the X-ray holes. We present new low frequency radio observations of Abell 2597. At 330 MHz, radio emission extends into the interior of the western ghost bubble, but not the northeast one. Our re-analysis of the archival Chandra data shows evidence for an X-ray tunnel (elongated region of reduced X-ray emission) extending from near the center of the cD out to the west ghost bubble. We also detect a smaller X-ray hole to the northeast of the center of the cD and closer than the outer ghost bubbles. Radio observations at 1.3 GHz show extensions to the west along the X-ray tunnel toward the west ghost bubble, to the northeast into the new X-ray hole, and to the northwest. All of these structures are much larger...

  7. Optimising commensality of radio continuum and spectral line observations in the era of the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Maddox, Natasha; Oosterloo, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The substantial decrease in star formation density from z=1 to the present day is curious given the relatively constant neutral gas density over the same epoch. Future radio astronomy facilities, including the SKA and pathfinder telescopes, will provide pioneering measures of both the gas content of galaxies and star formation activity over cosmological timescales. Here we investigate the commensalities between neutral atomic gas (HI) and radio continuum observations, as well as the complementarity of the data products. We start with the proposed HI and continuum surveys to be undertaken with the SKA precursor telescope MeerKAT, and building on this, explore optimal combinations of survey area coverage and depth of proposed HI and continuum surveys to be undertaken with the SKA1-MID instrument. Intelligent adjustment of these observational parameters results in a tiered strategy that minimises observation time while maximising the value of the dataset, both for HI and continuum science goals. We also find gre...

  8. Identification of a Likely Radio Counterpart of the Rapid Burster

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, C B; Fox, D W; Guerriero, R A; Lewin, W H G; Fender, R P; Van Paradijs, J

    1999-01-01

    We have identified a likely radio counterpart to the low-mass X-ray binary MXB 1730-335 (the Rapid Burster). The counterpart has shown 8.4 GHz radio on/off behavior correlated with the X-ray on/off behavior as observed by the RXTE/ASM during six VLA observations. The probability of an unrelated, randomly varying background source duplicating this behavior is 1--3% depending on the correlation time scale. The location of the radio source is RA 17h 33m 24.61s; Dec -33d 23' 19.8" (J2000), +/- 0.1". We do not detect 8.4 GHz radio emission coincident with type II (accretion-driven) X-ray bursts. The ratio of radio to X-ray emission during such bursts is constrained to be below the ratio observed during X-ray persistent emission at the 2.9-sigma level. Synchrotron bubble models of the radio emission can provide a reasonable fit to the full data set, collected over several outbursts, assuming that the radio evolution is the same from outburst to outburst, but given the physical constraints the emission is more likel...

  9. CHILES Con Pol: Probing galaxy evolution, the dark Universe, and cosmic magnetism with a deep 1000 hour Jansky VLA survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Chiles Con Pol Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We recently started a 1000 hour campaign to observe 0.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field in full polarization continuum at 1.4 GHz with the Jansky VLA, as part of a joint program with the spectral line COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES). When complete, we expect our CHILES Continuum Polarization (CHILES Con Pol) survey to reach an unprecedented SKA-era sensitivity of 0.7 uJy per 4 arcsecond FWHM beam. Here we present the key goals of CHILES Con Pol, which are to (i) produce a source catalog of legacy value to the astronomical community, (ii) measure differential source counts in total intensity, linear polarization, and circular polarization in order to constrain the redshift and luminosity distributions of source populations, (iii) perform a novel weak lensing study using radio polarization as an indicator of intrinsic alignment to better study dark energy and dark matter, and (iv) probe the unknown origin of cosmic magnetism by measuring the strength and structure of intergalactic magnetic fields in the filaments of large scale structure. The CHILES Con Pol source catalog will be a useful resource for upcoming wide-field surveys by acting as a training set for machine learning algorithms, which can then be used to identify and classify radio sources in regions lacking deep multiwavelength coverage.

  10. Radio polarization characteristics of two RS CVn binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutel, R. L.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Doiron, D. J.

    1985-07-01

    The authors report the results of multifrequency epoch VLA observations of polarized radio emission from the nearby active RS CVn binaries UX Arietis and HR 1099. For both systems, there is an excellent correlation between handedness of circular polarization and frequency. Helicity reversal is almost always seen between 1.4 and 5.0 GHz, possibly due to optical depth effects. There may also be an anticorrelation between total intensity and fractional circular polarization, especially at 5 GHz. This is consistent with models in which intense flares are associated with compact self-absorbed synchrotron sources, while the quiescent emission arises from larger gyrosynchrotron-emitting plasma.

  11. The Radio Activity-Rotation Relation of Ultracool Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    McLean, M; Reiners, A

    2011-01-01

    [Abridged] We present a new radio survey of about 100 late-M and L dwarfs undertaken with the VLA. The sample was chosen to explore the role of rotation in the radio activity of ultracool dwarfs. Combining the new sample with results from our previous studies and from the literature, we compile the largest sample to date of ultracool dwarfs with radio observations and measured rotation velocities (167 objects). In the spectral type range M0-M6 we find a radio activity-rotation relation, with saturation at log(L_rad/L_bol) 10^(-7.5) above vsini~5 km/s, similar to the relation in H-alpha and X-rays. However, at spectral types >M7 the ratio of radio to bolometric luminosity increases regardless of rotation velocity, and the scatter in radio luminosity increases. In particular, while the most rapid rotators (vsini>20 km/s) exhibit "super-saturation" in X-rays and H-alpha, this effect is not seen in the radio. We also find that ultracool dwarfs with vsini>20 km/s have a higher radio detection fraction by about a f...

  12. Simultaneous Monitoring of X-ray and Radio Variability in Sagittarius A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, Daryl; Capellupo, Daniel M.; Choux, Nicolas; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Cotton, William D.; Degenaar, Nathalie; Dexter, Jason; Falcke, Heino; Fragile, P. Christopher Christopher; Heinke, Craig O.; Law, Casey J.; Markoff, Sera; Neilsen, Joseph; Ponti, Gabriele; Rea, Nanda; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2017-08-01

    We report on joint X-ray/radio campaigns targeting Sagittarius A*, including 9 contemporaneous Chandra and VLA observations. These campaigns are the most extensive of their kind and have allowed us to test whether the black hole’s variations in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum are due to the same physical processes. We detect significant radio variability peaking >176 minutes after the brightest X-ray flare ever detected from Sgr A*. We also identify other potentially associated X-ray and radio variability, with radio peaks appearing <80 minutes after weaker X-ray flares. These results suggest that stronger X-ray flares lead to longer time lags in the radio. However, we also test the possibility that the variability at X-ray and at radio wavelengths are not temporally correlated, and show that the radio variations occurring around the time of X-ray flaring are not significantly greater than the overall radio flux variations. We also cross-correlate data from mismatched X-ray and radio epochs and obtain comparable correlations to the matched data. Hence, we find no overall statistical evidence that X-ray flares and radio variability are correlated, underscoring a need for more simultaneous, long duration X-ray-radio monitoring of Sgr A*.

  13. Seeking Fast Radio Burst Origins Using the Very Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Bridget Clare; Spolaor, Sarah; Demorest, Paul; Realfast

    2017-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are transient pulses of radio emission lasting on the order of milliseconds. There have been ~25 FRB sources discovered to date with pulse widths ranging from 1 to 15 ms, and flux densities typically ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 Jy (Petroff et al. 2016). These FRBs have dispersion measures (DMs) on the order of hundreds of pc/cc, well in excess of the expected Galactic contribution. This has lead many to believe that FRBs are extragalactic in origin, with leading progenitor theories suggesting some connection to neutron star related events. However, plausible origin theories remain numerous (Popov & Pshirkov 2016). Thus, localization will be a critical contribution to our understanding of FRBs. Spatial identification of a progenitor would not only help us whittle down origin theories but also allow us to utilize FRBs as invaluable cosmological probes of the intergalactic medium. All reported FRBs to date have been discovered with single dish telescopes that have insufficient resolution for confident localization. In contrast, the Very Large Array (VLA) has the capability to detect and localize FRBs to arcsecond precision. Project realfast takes advantage of this unique localization capability to conduct FRB searches at the VLA in quasi-real-time. We present recent realfast data, including the development of FRB visualization using interferometric imaging, and a discussion of thermal noise candidates and common types of radio frequency interference detected by realfast software. We also present the results of the FRB candidate search for the most recent 150 hour VLA observing campaign. This campaign focused on observations of nearby galaxies with high star-formation rates, and we are thus able to perform a sharp test on any correlation between FRB rates and star-forming galaxies, as might be expected if FRBs originate from neutron stars in nearby galaxies. This analysis allows us to put a lower limit on the characteristic distance to FRBs.

  14. A VLA Survey of Orion Class 0 Protostars at 30 AU Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnath, Nicole; Tobin, John J.; Booker, Joseph J.; Guilfoil Cox, Erin; Diaz-Rodriguez, Ana; Kama, MIHKEL; Li, Zhi-Yun; Looney, Leslie; Melis, Carl; Murillo, Nadia; Persson, Magnus; Reynolds, Nick; Sadavoy, Sarah; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Stephenson, Brian; Megeath, Samuel Thomas

    2017-06-01

    We present initial results from the VANDAM:Orion survey, a VLA survey of Class 0 protostars in Orion. Disks and multiple systems are thought to originate early in the star formation process, when the protostars are deeply embedded in dense envelopes. The VANDAM survey of the Perseus molecular cloud demonstrated that VLA Ka-band (33 GHz) observations can resolve disks and companions around Class 0 protostars, providing the means to study the incidence and separations of companions, and the properties of disks during the first 100,000 years of protostellar evolution. The VANDAM:Orion survey targets 92 Class 0 protostars in the Orion Molecular clouds, the largest population of Class 0 objects within 500 pc of the Sun. These were selected from protostars characterized by the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey, or HOPS, which assembled 1.6-870 micron SEDs of 319 protostars in the Orion A and B molecular clouds. VANDAM:Orion not only triples the number of Class 0 protostars observed with the VLA , as compared to the original VANDAM survey, but also samples the diverse environments found in the Orion clouds. VANDAM:Orion also includes 38 Class I protostars found near the targeted Class 0 objects.VANDAM:Orion initially carried out VLA observations in the C-array to determine their fluxes in the Ka-band (33 GHZ). The subsequent A-array observations then imaged the protostars with a resolution of 0.08”/34 AU. The entire sample has now been observed and reduced. We will overview the detection statistics and show examples of multiple systems and disks around Orion Class 0 protostars. The VLA images will also be compared to images from a recent ALMA 850 micron snapshot survey of all Orion protostars characterized by HOPS. Many sources appear opaque to ALMA at 870 μm, but the dust is optically thin for the VLA, enabling it to detect structure that ALMA cannot. Finally, we will discuss the prospects of VANDAM:Orion for characterizing the role of environment in the formation of

  15. Radio spectrum evolution and magnetic field in extreme GPS radio sources. The case of RXJ1459+3337

    CERN Document Server

    Orienti, M

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The knowledge of the properties of the youngest radio sources is very important in order to trace the earliest phase of the evolution of the radio emission. RXJ1459+3337, with its high turnover frequency (~25 GHz) provides a unique opportunity to study this class of extreme objects. Methods: High-sensitivity multi-frequency VLA observations have been carried out to measure the flux-density with high accuracy, while multi-frequency VLBA observations were performed, aimed at determining the pc-scale structure. Archival ROSAT data have been used to infer the X-ray luminosity. Results: The comparison between our new VLA data and those available in the literature shows a steady increment of the flux-density in the optically-thick part of the spectrum and a decrement of the turnover frequency. In the optically-thin regime, the source flux density has already started to decrease. Such a variability can be explained in terms of an adiabatically-expanding homogeneous radio component. The frequency range spanned ...

  16. Radio monitoring of NGC 7469: Late time radio evolution of SN 2000ft and the circumnuclear starburst in NGC 7469

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Torres, M A; Colina, L; Torrelles, J M; Panagia, N; Wilson, A; Kankare, E; Mattila, S

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of an eight-year long monitoring of the radio emission from the Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG) NGC 7469, using 8.4 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations at 0.3'' resolution. Our monitoring shows that the late time evolution of the radio supernova SN 2000ft follows a decline very similar to that displayed at earlier times of its optically thin phase. The late time radio emission of SN 2000ft is therefore still being powered by its interaction with the presupernova stellar wind, and not with the interstellar medium (ISM). Indeed, the ram pressure of the presupernova wind is \\rho_w v_w^2 \\approx 7.6E-9 dyn/cm^2, at a supernova age of approximately 2127 days, which is significantly larger than the expected pressure of the ISM around SN 2000ft. At this age, the SN shock has reached a distance r_{sh \\approx 0.06 pc, and our observations are probing the interaction of the SN with dense material that was ejected by the presupernova star about 5820 years prior to its explosion. From our VLA m...

  17. LOFAR observations of decameter carbon radio recombination lines towards Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, P.; Oonk, J. B. R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Salgado, F.; Morabito, L. K.; Toribio, M. C.; Emig, K.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a study of carbon radio recombination lines towards Cassiopeia A using LOFAR observations in the frequency range 10-33 MHz. Individual carbon α lines are detected in absorption against the continuum at frequencies as low as 16 MHz. Stacking several Cα lines we obtain detections in the 11-16 MHz range. These are the highest signal-to-noise measurements at these frequencies. The peak optical depth of the Cα lines changes considerably over the 11-33 MHz range with the peak optical depth decreasing from 4 × 10-3 at 33 MHz to 2 × 10-3 at 11 MHz, while the line width increases from 20 km s-1 to ˜150 km s-1. The combined change in peak optical depth and line width results in a roughly constant integrated optical depth. We interpret this as carbon atoms close to local thermodynamic equilibrium. In this work we focus on how the 11-33 MHz carbon radio recombination lines can be used to determine the gas physical conditions. We find that the ratio of the carbon radio recombination lines to that of the 158 μm [CII] fine-structure line is a good thermometer, while the ratio between low frequency carbon radio recombination lines provides a good barometer. By combining the temperature and pressure constraints with those derived from the line width we are able to constrain the gas properties (electron temperature and density) and radiation field intensity. Given the 1σ uncertainties in our measurements these are; Te ≈ 68-98 K, ne ≈ 0.02-0.035 cm-3 and Tr, 100 ≈ 1500-1650 K. Despite challenging RFI and ionospheric conditions, our work demonstrates that observations of carbon radio recombination lines in the 10-33 MHz range can provide insight into the gas conditions.

  18. AMI radio continuum observations of young stellar objects with known outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Ainsworth, Rachael E; Ray, Tom P; Buckle, Jane V; Davies, Matthew; Franzen, Thomas M O; Grainge, Keith J B; Hobson, Michael P; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Lasenby, Anthony N; Olamaie, Malak; Perrott, Yvette C; Pooley, Guy G; Richer, John S; Rodriguez-Gonzalvez, Carmen; Schammel, Michel P; Scott, Paul F; Shimwell, Timothy; Saunders, Richard D E; Titterington, David; Waldram, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    We present 16 GHz (1.9 cm) deep radio continuum observations made with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) of a sample of low-mass young stars driving jets. We combine these new data with archival information from an extensive literature search to examine spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for each source and calculate both the radio and sub-mm spectral indices in two different scenarios: (1) fixing the dust temperature (Td) according to evolutionary class; (2) allowing Td to vary. We use the results of this analysis to place constraints on the physical mechanisms responsible for the radio emission. From AMI data alone, as well as from model fitting to the full SED in both scenarios, we find that 80 per cent of the objects in this sample have spectral indices consistent with free-free emission. We find an average spectral index in both Td scenarios consistent with free-free emission. We examine correlations of the radio luminosity with bolometric luminosity, envelope mass, and outflow force and find that...

  19. Pre- and Post-burst Radio Observations of the Class 0 Protostar HOPS 383 in Orion

    CERN Document Server

    Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Liu, Hauyu B; Costigan, Gráinne; Palau, Aina; Zapata, Luis A; Loinard, Laurent; .,

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that episodic accretion is a common phenomenon in Young Stellar Objects (YSOs). Recently, the source HOPS 383 in Orion was reported to have a $\\times 35$ mid-infrared -- and bolometric -- luminosity increase between 2004 and 2008, constituting the first clear example of a class 0 YSO (a protostar) with a large accretion burst. The usual assumption that in YSOs accretion and ejection follow each other in time needs to be tested. Radio jets at centimeter wavelengths are often the only way of tracing the jets from embedded protostars. We searched the Very Large Array archive for the available observations of the radio counterpart of HOPS 383. The data show that the radio flux of HOPS 383 varies only mildly from January 1998 to December 2014, staying at the level of $\\sim 200$ to 300 $\\mu$Jy in the X band ($\\sim 9$ GHz), with a typical uncertainty of 10 to 20 $\\mu$Jy in each measurement. We interpret the absence of a radio burst as suggesting that accretion and ejection enhancements d...

  20. Radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts and its correlation with optical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, T.; Maki, K.; Yamori, A.

    This paper describes the most interesting phenomena of radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts. A projectile of polycarbonate with 1.1 g weight was accelerated by a rail gun to 3.8 km/sec, and hit two targets which are a 2 mm thick aluminum plate upstream and a 45 mm diameter aluminum column downstream, respectively. The projectile first breaks wires to give a triggering signal to a data recorder, then penetrates the aluminum plate, and finally hit the column, The emitted radio-waves propagate through the chamber window, and are received by antennas at each frequency band. The receivers in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands consist of a low noise amplifier, a mixer, a local oscillator and an IF amplifier , respectively. The receiver in 1 MHz-band is a simple RF amplifier. The outputs of all receivers are fed to a data recorder which is actually a high-speed digital oscilloscope with a large amount of memory. The radio-waves were successfully recorded in 22 GHz-band with 500 MHz bandwidth, in 2 GHz-band with 300 MHz bandwidth, and in 1MHz-band. The waveforms in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands coincide well each other, and are composed of two groups of sharp impulses with a separation of about 20 micro seconds. The width of an impulse is less than 2 n sec. which is the resolution limit of the data recorder. We carried out optical observations using an ultra-high speed camera simultaneously through another window of the chamber. The time interval between scenes is 2 micro sec. We can see a faint light of the projectile before the first impact to the plate, and then a brilliant gas exploding backward from the plate and forward to the column. After hitting the column target, the brilliant gas flows to the chamber wall and is reflected back to make a mixture with dark gas in the chamber. Excellent correlation between radio-wave emission and the observed optical phenomena was obtained in the experiment. It is easily conceived that the radio-waves consist of quite a wide frequency

  1. Observations of solar radio emissions in meter wavelengths carried by CALLISTO-BR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, F. C. R.; Silva, R. D. C.; Sodré, Z. A. L.; Costa, J. E. R.; Sawant, H. S.

    2012-04-01

    Two Callisto-type (Compound Astronomical Low-cost Low frequency Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatory) spectrographs are in operation in Cachoeira Paulista, Brazil, since 2010. The CALLISTO-BR integrates the e-Callisto network consisting of several radio spectrographs distributed around the world, for provide continuous monitoring (24 hours) of the solar activity in the meter frequency range of 45 - 870 MHz. The solar radio emissions observations carried out by Callisto can be used as a diagnostic of several physical processes on the Sun. Here, we present the observations of several bursts recorded by CALLISTO-BR, such as type I bursts associated with a long lasting noise storm, recorded on March 30, 2010 in the typical frequency band around 200 MHz; a group of normal drifting type III bursts recorded in March 31, 2010 and also in February 15, 2011 and a rarely observed broadband (~180 - 800 MHz) continuum emission presenting positive frequency drifting (from low to high frequencies), suggesting the source is moving towards photosphere. Observations of type II and type IV bursts were also recorded. Details of these and many other solar radio emissions recorded by CALLISTO-BR will be presented and their implications for the solar activity and space weather investigations will be discussed.

  2. First Spectroscopic Imaging Observations of the Sun at Low Radio Frequencies with the Murchison Widefield Array Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Oberoi, Divya; Cairns, Iver H; Emrich, David; Lobzin, Vasili; Lonsdale, Colin J; Morgan, Edward H; Prabu, T; Vedantham, Harish; Wayth, Randall B; Williams, Andrew; Williams, Christopher; White, Stephen M; Allen, G; Arcus, Wayne; Barnes, David; Benkevitch, Leonid; Bernardi, Gianni; Bowman, Judd D; Briggs, Frank H; Bunton, John D; Burns, Steve; Cappallo, Roger C; Clark, M A; Corey, Brian E; Dawson, M; DeBoer, David; De Gans, A; deSouza, Ludi; Derome, Mark; Edgar, R G; Elton, T; Goeke, Robert; Gopalakrishna, M R; Greenhill, Lincoln J; Hazelton, Bryna; Herne, David; Hewitt, Jacqueline N; Kamini, P A; Kaplan, David L; Kasper, Justin C; Kennedy, Rachel; Kincaid, Barton B; Kocz, Jonathan; Koeing, R; Kowald, Errol; Lynch, Mervyn J; Madhavi, S; McWhirter, Stephen R; Mitchell, Daniel A; Morales, Miguel F; Ng, A; Ord, Stephen M; Pathikulangara, Joseph; Rogers, Alan E E; Roshi, Anish; Salah, Joseph E; Sault, Robert J; Schinckel, Antony; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Stevens, Jamie; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Thakkar, D; Tingay, Steven J; Tuthill, J; Vaccarella, Annino; Waterson, Mark; Webster, Rachel L; Whitney, Alan R

    2011-01-01

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9-201.6 MHz. Though our observing period is characterized as a period of `low' to `medium' activity, one broadband emission feature and numerous short-lived, narrowband, non-thermal emission features are evident. Our data represent a significant advance in low radio frequency solar imaging, enabling us to follow the spatial, spectral, and temporal evolution of events simultaneously and in unprecedented detail. The rich variety of features seen here reaffirms the coronal diagnostic capability of low radio frequency emission and provides an early glimpse of the nature of radio observations that will become available as the next generation of low frequency radio interferometers come on-line over the next few years.

  3. Estimation of emission cone wall thickness of Jupiter's decametric radio emission using stereoscopic STEREO/WAVES observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H. O.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: Stereoscopic observations by the WAVES instrument onboard two STEREO spacecraft have been used with the aim of estimating wall thickness of an emission cone of Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). Methods: Stereoscopic observations provided by STEREO-A and -B facilitate unambiguous recognition of the Jovian DAM in observed dynamic spectra as well as identification of its components (Io DAM or non-Io DAM). The dynamic spectra of radio emissions recorded by STEREO/WAVES have been analyzed using the method of cross-correlation of the radio dynamic spectra. Results: Altogether, 139 radio events, in particular 91 Io- and 48 non-Io-related radio events were observed. The averaged width of the emission cone wall for Io-DAM as well as for non-Io DAM is about 1.1° ± 0.2°. These results are in agreement with previous findings.

  4. Radio properties of the magnetar near Sagittarius A* from observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, Ryan M

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out observations of the newly-discovered magnetar in the direction of Sagittarius A* using the Australia Telescope Compact Array in four frequency bands from 4.5 to 20 GHz. Radio pulsations are clearly detected at all frequencies. We measure the pulsar's dispersion measure to be 1650 +/- 50 cm^-3 pc, the highest of any of the known pulsars. Once Faraday rotation has been taken into account, the pulse profile is almost completely linearly polarized at all frequencies and has a small degree of circular polarization. The rotation measure of -67000 +/- 500 rad m^-2 is the largest ever measured in an astronomical object. The combination of the dispersion and rotation measures imples an integrated magnetic field strength of -50 uG along the line of sight. This object therefore joins the small class of radio emitting magnetars. Follow-up observations using single dishes are underway and will no doubt characterise this object further.

  5. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Arun; Manoharan, P K; Krishnakumar, M A

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a b...

  6. LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF PICOFLARE CATEGORY ENERGY RELEASES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, R.; Sasikumar Raja, K.; Kathiravan, C.; Satya Narayanan, A., E-mail: ramesh@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India)

    2013-01-10

    We report low-frequency (80 MHz) radio observations of circularly polarized non-thermal type I radio bursts ({sup n}oise storms{sup )} in the solar corona whose estimated energy is {approx}10{sup 21} erg. These are the weakest energy release events reported to date in the solar atmosphere. The plot of the distribution of the number of bursts (dN) versus their corresponding peak flux density in the range S to S+dS shows a power-law behavior, i.e., dN {proportional_to} S {sup {gamma}} dS. The power-law index {gamma} is in the range -2.2 to -2.7 for the events reported in the present work. The present results provide independent observational evidence for the existence of picoflare category energy releases in the solar atmosphere which are yet to be explored.

  7. Low Frequency (30-110 MHz) Radio Imaging Observations Of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, R.

    Ground based radio imaging observations play an useful role in the study of mass ejections from the solar corona since they do not have the limitation of an occulter and both the disk/limb events can be detected early in their development, particularly via the thermal bremmstrahlung emission from the frontal loop of the CME. I present here some of the recent results on the above topic using data obtained with the Gauribidanur radioheliograph, near Bangalore in India.

  8. Radio Observation of the 11-Month Fermi-AGN at Urumqi Observatory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhen Ding; Xiang Liu; Jun Liu; Lang Cui; H. G. Song

    2011-03-01

    We carry out flux observation at 5 GHz for 124 sources from the ‘clean’ sample of Fermi catalog 1LAC (The First LAT AGN Catalog) with Urumqi 25 m telescope. We find that it is obvious that there is a correlation between the -ray and the radio flux density for blazars. For the subclasses, the correlation for FSRQs is strong, but the correlation for BL Lacs is weak.

  9. Electron Temperatures in W51 Complex from High Resolution, Low Frequency Radio Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. K. Srivastava; A. Pramesh Rao

    2010-03-01

    W51 is a giant radio complex lying along the tangent to the Sagitarius arm at a distance of about 7 kpc from the Sun, with an extension of about 1° in the sky. It is divided into three components A, B, C where W51A and W51B consist of many compact HII regions while W51C is a supernova remnant. We have made continuum radio observations of these HII regions of the W51 complex at 240, 610, 1060 and 1400 MHz using GMRT with lower resolution (20'' × 15'') at the lowest frequency. The observed spectra of the prominent thermal subcomponents of W51 have been fitted to a free-free emission spectrum and their physical properties like electron temperatures and emission measures have been estimated. The electron temperatures from continuum spectra are found to be lower than the temperatures reported from radio recombination line (RRL) studies of these HII regions indicating the need for a filling factor even at this resolution. Also, the observed brightness at 240 MHz is found to be higher than expected from the best fits suggesting the need for a multicomponent model for the region.

  10. Observational Constraints on Radio Transient Emissions from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Joanna; Dispoto, D.; Cardena, B.; Kavic, M.; Ellingson, S.; Simonetti, J.; Cutchin, S.; Patterson, C.

    2012-01-01

    The merger of a binary neutron star pair is expected to generate a strong transient radio signal. This emission will be strongest at low-frequency and will disperse as it transverses the interstellar medium arriving at Earth after coincidentally emitted gravitational or (higher frequency) electromagnetic signals. The rate of compact object merger events is poorly constrained by observations. The Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) telescope is a low-frequency radio telescope initially located at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), which is sensitive to a frequency range of 29-47 MHz. It is being upgraded and relocated to western Virginia where it will continue to conduct low frequency observations. This instrument is an all-sky instrument designed to detect astronomical sources of radio transients. Using a series of observations taken during the ETA's first science run, we were able to constrain the rate of such merger events to <1.3 x 10-5 Mpc-3/yr.

  11. BeppoSAX Observations of Synchrotron X-ray Emission from Radio Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Ghisellini, G; Giommi, P; Perlman, E

    2002-01-01

    We present new BeppoSAX LECS, MECS, and PDS observations of four flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) having effective spectral indices alpha_ro and alpha_ox typical of high-energy peaked BL Lacs. Our sources have X-ray-to-radio flux ratios on average ~ 70 times larger than ``classical'' FSRQ and lie at the extreme end of the FSRQ X-ray-to-radio flux ratio distribution. The collected data cover the energy range 0.1 - 10 keV (observer's frame), reaching ~ 100 keV for one object. The BeppoSAX band in one of our sources, RGB J1629+4008, is dominated by synchrotron emission peaking at ~ 2 x 10^16 Hz, as also shown by its steep (energy index alpha_x ~ 1.5) spectrum. This makes this object the FIRST known FSRQ whose X-ray emission is not due to inverse Compton radiation. Two other sources display a flat BeppoSAX spectrum (alpha_x ~ 0.7), with weak indications of steepening at low X-ray energies. The combination of BeppoSAX and ROSAT observations, (non-simultaneous) multifrequency data, and a synchrotron inverse Compt...

  12. A complete radio study of SNR G15.4+0.1 from new GMRT observations

    CERN Document Server

    Supan, L; Joshi, B C; Surnis, M P; Supanitsky, D

    2015-01-01

    The supernova remnant G15.4+0.1 is considered to be the possible counterpart of the gamma-ray source HESSJ1818-154. With the goal of getting a complete view of this remnant and understanding the nature of the gamma-ray flux, we conducted a detailed radio study that includes the search for pulsations and a model of the broadband emission for the G15.4+0.1/HESSJ1818-154 system. Low-frequency imaging at 624 MHz and pulsar observations at 624 and 1404 MHz towards G15.4+0.1 were carried out with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We correlated the new radio data with observations of the source at X-ray and infrared wavelengths from XMM-Newton and Herschel observatories, respectively. To characterize the neutral hydrogen medium (HI) towards G15.4+0.1, we used data from the Southern Galactic Plane Survey. We modelled the spectral energy distribution using both hadronic and leptonic scenarios. From the combination of the new GMRT observations with existing data, we derived a continuum spectral index alpha=-0...

  13. Constraining the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Strength using Split-band Type II Radio Burst Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, P.; Ramesh, R.; Hariharan, K.; Kathiravan, C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-11-01

    We report on low-frequency radio (85-35 MHz) spectral observations of four different type II radio bursts, which exhibited fundamental-harmonic emission and split-band structure. Each of the bursts was found to be closely associated with a whitelight coronal mass ejection (CME) close to the Sun. We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength from the split-band characteristics of the bursts, by assuming a model for the coronal electron density distribution. The choice of the model was constrained, based on the following criteria: (1) when the radio burst is observed simultaneously in the upper and lower bands of the fundamental component, the location of the plasma level corresponding to the frequency of the burst in the lower band should be consistent with the deprojected location of the leading edge (LE) of the associated CME; (2) the drift speed of the type II bursts derived from such a model should agree closely with the deprojected speed of the LE of the corresponding CMEs. With the above conditions, we find that: (1) the estimated field strengths are unique to each type II burst, and (2) the radial variation of the field strength in the different events indicate a pattern. It is steepest for the case where the heliocentric distance range over which the associated burst is observed is closest to the Sun, and vice versa.

  14. Suzaku observations of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2255: The northeast radio relic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, H.; Mizuno, M.; Ota, N.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; van Weeren, R. J.; Kawahara, H.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kawaharada, M.; Nakazawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Takizawa, M.; Vink, J.; Zandanel, F.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of deep 140 ks Suzaku X-ray observations of the north-east (NE) radio relic of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2255. The temperature structure of Abell 2255 is measured out to 0.9 times the virial radius (1.9 Mpc) in the NE direction for the first time. The Suzaku temperature map of the central region suggests a complex temperature distribution, which agrees with previous work. Additionally, on a larger-scale, we confirm that the temperature drops from 6 keV around the cluster center to 3 keV at the outskirts, with two discontinuities at r 5' (450 kpc) and 12' (1100 kpc) from the cluster center. Their locations coincide with surface brightness discontinuities marginally detected in the XMM-Newton image, which indicates the presence of shock structures. From the temperature drop, we estimate the Mach numbers to be ℳinner 1.2 and, ℳouter 1.4. The first structure is most likely related to the large cluster core region ( 350-430 kpc), and its Mach number is consistent with the XMM-Newton observation (ℳ 1.24: Sakelliou & Ponman 2006, MNRAS, 367, 1409). Our detection of the second temperature jump, based on the Suzaku key project observation, shows the presence of a shock structure across the NE radio relic. This indicates a connection between the shock structure and the relativistic electrons that generate radio emission. Across the NE radio relic, however, we find a significantly lower temperature ratio (T1/T2 1.44 ± 0.16 corresponds to ℳX-ray 1.4) than the value expected from radio wavelengths, based on the standard diffusive shock acceleration mechanism (T1/T2> 3.2 or ℳRadio> 2.8). This may suggest that under some conditions, in particular the NE relic of A2255 case, the simple diffusive shock acceleration mechanism is unlikely to be valid, and therefore, more a sophisticated mechanism is required.

  15. VLBI observations of SN2011dh: imaging of the youngest radio supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Marti-Vidal, I; Paragi, Z; Yang, J; Marcaide, J M; Guirado, J C; Ros, E; Alberdi, A; Perez-Torres, M A; Argo, M K; van der Horst, A J; Garrett, M A; Stockdale, C J; Weiler, K W

    2011-01-01

    We report on the VLBI detection of supernova SN2011dh at 22GHz using a subset of the EVN array. The observations took place 14 days after the discovery of the supernova, thus resulting in a VLBI image of the youngest radio-loud supernova ever. We provide revised coordinates for the supernova with milli-arcsecond precision, linked to the ICRF. The recovered flux density is a factor 2 below the EVLA flux density reported by other authors at the same frequency and epoch of our observations. This discrepancy could be due to extended emission detected with the EVLA or to calibration problems in the VLBI and/or EVLA observations.

  16. A limit on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux from lunar observations with the Parkes radio telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Bray, J D; Roberts, P; Reynolds, J E; James, C W; Phillips, C J; Protheroe, R J; McFadden, R A; Aartsen, M G

    2015-01-01

    We report a limit on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux based on a non-detection of radio pulses from neutrino-initiated particle cascades in the Moon, in observations with the Parkes radio telescope undertaken as part of the LUNASKA project. Due to the improved sensitivity of these observations, which had an effective duration of 127 hours and a frequency range of 1.2-1.5 GHz, this limit extends to lower neutrino energies than those from previous lunar radio experiments, with a detection threshold below 10^20 eV. The calculation of our limit allows for the possibility of lunar-origin pulses being misidentified as local radio interference, and includes the effect of small-scale lunar surface roughness. The targeting strategy of the observations also allows us to place a directional limit on the neutrino flux from the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A.

  17. ADDITIONAL OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM,

    Science.gov (United States)

    MERCURY ( PLANET ), VENUS( PLANET ), PERIODIC VARIATIONS, RADIO ASTRONOMY, SPECTRUM SIGNATURES...EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES, SOURCES), GALAXIES, BLACKBODY RADIATION, BRIGHTNESS, TEMPERATURE, MARS( PLANET ), JUPITER( PLANET ), SATURN( PLANET

  18. OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), (* PLANETS , STARS, VENUS( PLANET ), MARS( PLANET ), MERCURY ( PLANET ), PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES, GALAXIES, ASTROPHYSICS, TEMPERATURE, MEASUREMENT, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY, ASTRONOMY, RADIO ASTRONOMY.

  19. X-rays from the jet in 3C 273 clues from the radio-optical spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Jester, S; Meisenheimer, K; Perley, R

    2002-01-01

    Using new deep VLA and HST observations of the large-scale jet in 3C273 matched to 0.3" resolution, we have detected excess near-ultraviolet emission (300 nm) above a synchrotron cutoff spectrum accounting for the emission from radio through optical (3.6 cm - 620 nm). This necessitates a two-component model for the emission. The radio-optical-X-ray spectral energy distributions suggest a common origin for the UV excess and the X-rays from the jet.

  20. Radio-Continuum study of the Nearby Sculptor Group Galaxies. Part 1: NGC 300 at lambda = 20 cm

    CERN Document Server

    Galvin, Timothy J; Crawford, Evan J; Wong, Graeme; Payne, Jeff L; De Horta, Ain; White, Graeme L; Tothill, Nick; Drasković, Danica; Pannuti, Thomas G; Grimes, Caleb K; Cahall, Benjamin J; Millar, William C; Laine, Seppo

    2012-01-01

    A series of new radio-continuum (lambda=20 cm) mosaic images focused on the NGC 300 galactic system were produced using archived observational data from the VLA and/or ATCA. These new images are both very sensitive (rms=60 microJy) and feature high angular resolution (<10"). The most prominent new feature is the galaxy's extended radio-continuum emission, which does not match its optical appearance. Using these newly created images a number of previously unidentified discrete sources have been discovered. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a joint deconvolution approach to imaging this complete data-set is inferior when compared to an immerge approach.

  1. ISO observations of a sample of Compact Steep Spectrum and GHz Peaked Spectrum Radio Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Baum, S A; O'Dea, C P; Bremer, M; Dallacasa, D; Falcke, H; De Graauw, T; Marecki, A; Miley, G K; Röttgering, H J A; Schilizzi, R T; Snellen, I; Spencer, R E; Stanghellini, C

    2000-01-01

    We present results from observations obtained with ISOPHOT, on board the ISO satellite, of a representative sample of seventeen CSS/GPS radio galaxies and of a control sample of sixteen extended radio galaxies spanning similar ranges in redshift (0.2 = 10^26 W/Hz). The observations have been performed at lambda = 60, 90, 174 and 200 microns. Seven of the CSS/GPS sources have detections >= 3 sigma at one or more wavelengths, one of which is detected at >= 5 sigma. By co-adding the data we have obtained average flux densities at the four wavelengths. We found no evidence that the FIR luminosities of the CSS/GPS sources are significantly different from those of the extended objects and therefore there is not any support for CSS/GPS sources being objects "frustrated" by an abnormally dense ambient medium. The two samples were then combined, providing FIR information on a new sample of radio galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We compare this information with what previously known from IRAS and discuss the average...

  2. Long-term Radio Observations of the Intermittent Pulsar B1931+24

    CERN Document Server

    Young, N J; Lyne, A G; Weltevrede, P; Kramer, M; Cognard, I

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of approximately 13-yr of observations of the intermittent pulsar B1931+24 to further elucidate its behaviour. We find that while the source exhibits a wide range of nulling (~4-39 d) and radio-emitting (~1-19 d) timescales, it cycles between its different emission phases over an average timescale of approximately 38 d, which is remarkably stable over many years. On average, the neutron star is found to be radio emitting for 26 +- 6 % of the time. No evidence is obtained to suggest that the pulsar undergoes any systematic, intrinsic variations in pulse intensity during the radio-emitting phases. In addition, we find no evidence for any correlation between the length of consecutive emission phases. An analysis of the rotational behaviour of the source shows that it consistently assumes the same spin-down rates, i.e. nudot = -16 +- 1 x 10^-15 s^-2 when emitting and nudot = -10.8 +- 0.4 x 10^-15 s^-2 when not emitting, over the entire observation span. Coupled with the stable switching tim...

  3. Deep 1.4 GHZ Follow Up of the Steep Spectrum Radio Halo in Abell 521

    CERN Document Server

    Dallacasa, D; Giacintucci, S; Cassano, R; Venturi, T; Macario, G; Kassim, N E; Lane, W; Setti, G

    2009-01-01

    In a recent paper we reported on the discovery of a radio halo with very steep spectrum in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 521 through observations with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We showed that the steep spectrum of the halo is inconsistent with a secondary origin of the relativistic electrons and supports a turbulent acceleration scenario. At that time, due to the steep spectrum, the available observations at 1.4 GHz (archival NRAO - Very Large Array - VLA CnB-configuration data) were not adequate to accurately determine the flux density associated with the radio halo. In this paper we report the detection at 1.4 GHz of the radio halo in Abell 521 using deep VLA observations in the D-configuration. We use these new data to confirm the steep-spectrum of the object. We consider Abell 521 the prototype of a population of very-steep spectrum halos. This population is predicted assuming that turbulence plays an important role in the acceleration of relativistic particles in galaxy clusters, and...

  4. New Radio Continuum Observations of the Compact Source Projected Inside NGC 6334A

    CERN Document Server

    Rodr'\\iguez, Luis F; Dzib, Sergio A; Loinard, Laurent; Kurtz, Stanley E

    2013-01-01

    A handful of HII regions are known to exhibit a compact radio source near their centers. The nature of these compact radio sources is not well established. We present the analysis of new as well as archival Very Large Array observations of the compact source projected near the center of the NGC 6334A HII region, part of the NGC 6334 complex. We show that the compact source is time variable on a scale of years and determine for one epoch a non-thermal spectrum, suggestive of synchrotron emission. We propose that this source could be the wind interaction region of a massive binary system that could be the ionizing source of NGC 6334A.

  5. Cygnus X-3 Revisited 10 Years of Muon and Radio Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Allison, W W M; Ayres, D S; Barrett, W L; Bode, C; Border, P M; Brooks, C B; Cobb, J H; Cotton, R J; Courant, H; Demuth, D M; Fields, T H; Gallagher, H R; Goodman, M C; Gran, R; Joffe-Minor, T M; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M; Leeson, W; Lichtfield, P J; Longley, N P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Milburn, R H; Miller, W H; Mualem, L M; Napier, A; Oliver, W P; Pearce, G F; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Price, L E; Ruddick, K; Sánchez, M; Schneps, J; Schub, M H; Seidlein, R; Stassinakis, A; Thron, J L; Vasilev, V; Villaume, G; Wakely, S P; West, N; Wall, D

    1999-01-01

    The Soudan 2 deep underground tracking calorimeter has recorded cosmic ray muon tracks from the direction of the galactic x-ray binary Cygnus X-3 on most transits during the interval 1989-1998. We analyze these events in the context of previous reports of Cygnus X-3-related muon flux during major radio flares of that source. We find some evidence for excess flux during a small number of transits coincident with major radio flares. We also find an indication that these events may be distributed around the source with a Gaussian point spread function with $\\sigma = 1.3^{\\circ}$, larger than the instrumental angular spread of $\\le 0.3^{\\circ}$, verified by observation of the shadow of the moon.

  6. Airborne GPS Radio Occultation Observations of Moisture Variations in Atmospheric Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M. J.; Haase, J. S.; Chen, S. H.; Murphy, B.; Chen, X. M.

    2016-12-01

    Airborne GPS radio occultation observations were collected in an atmospheric river rainfall event during the Calwater 2015 campaign using the Global Navigation Satellite System Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS). Airborne GPS radio occultation (ARO) uses broadcast GPS signals from setting satellites recorded on side-looking antennas to measure the signal ray path bending angle and refractivity, and further retrieve vertical water vapor and temperature profiles below the aircraft altitude. GISMOS records high sample rate (10 MHz) RF signals, which are then post-processed using a software receiver to retrieve excess phase, mitigating the effects of complex signal propagation through strong moisture gradients that prohibit recordings on conventional tracking receivers. The Calwater 2015 campaign, off the west coast of California, made observations during a particularly strong AR storm on 6 February 2015 that brought up to 35 cm of rain to central California. We have run a high- resolution simulation using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with initial and boundary conditions from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting operational analysis to simulate the four-dimensional moisture distribution on this day, and examine the accuracy of precipitation forecasts. The spatial distribution of rainfall is similar to the California-Nevada River Forecast Center multisensor precipitation product, however precipitation amounts were underestimated towards the northern extent of the affected area. Compared with SSM/I satellite precipitable water estimates, the center of the water vapor transport plume in the model was biased towards the south at landfall, possibly leading to the lower modeled precipitation amounts to the north. Radio occultation profiles sample regions on both sides of the cold front with a good horizontal distribution and profiles are retrieved to less than 1 km from the surface. Preliminary comparisons

  7. The heating of X-ray gas by radio gas in cluster PKS0745-191

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, F.; Chen, Y.; Wu, M.; Lu, F. J.; Song, L. M.; Jia, S. M..

    2004-05-01

    A calculation about the energy evolution of the relativistic particles in galaxy clusters is presented. The heating of X-ray gas by radio gas in cluster PKS 0745-191 is derived through a combined analysis of Chandra data and VLA radio observations. It was found that the heating of X-ray gas by radio gas is not enough to supply the energy lose by the X-ray emission when the low energy cut-off in the power-law spectrum of the relativistic electrons is set to 0.001erg. Therefore further computing is made to study the heating of X-ray gas by radio gas with different low energy cut-off is computed and the low energy cut-off values.

  8. Tracing low-mass galaxy clusters with radio relics: the discovery of Abell 3527-bis

    CERN Document Server

    de Gasperin, F; Ridl, J; Salvato, M; van Weeren, R; Bonafede, A; Greiner, J; Cassano, R; Bruggen, M

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters undergo mergers that can generate extended radio sources called radio relics. Radio relics are the consequence of merger-induced shocks that propagate in the intra cluster medium (ICM). In this paper we analyse the radio, optical and X-ray data from a candidate galaxy cluster that has been selected from the radio emission coming from a candidate radio relic detected in NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). Our aim is to clarify the nature of this source and prove that under certain conditions radio emission from radio relics can be used to trace relatively low-mass galaxy clusters. We have observed the candidate galaxy cluster with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at three different frequencies. These datasets have been analysed together with archival data from ROSAT in the X-ray and with archival data from the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) telescope in four different optical bands. We confirm the presence of a 1 Mpc long radio relic located in the outskirts of a previ...

  9. Dust in high-z radio-loud AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Cimatti, A; Röttgering, H J A; Ivison, R J; Mazzei, P; Cimatti, Andrea; Freudling, Wolfram; Roettgering, Huub; Ivison, Rob; Mazzei, Paola

    1997-01-01

    We present continuum observations of a small sample of high-redshift, radio-loud AGN (radio galaxies and quasars) aimed at the detection of thermal emission from dust. Seven AGN were observed with IRAM and SEST at 1.25mm; two of them, the radio galaxies 1243+036 ($z \\sim 3.6$) and MG1019+0535 ($z \\sim 2.8$) were also observed at 0.8mm with the JCMT submillimetre telescope. Additional VLA observations were obtained in order to derive the spectral shape of the synchrotron radiation of MG1019+0535 at high radio frequencies. MG1019+0535 and TX0211$-$122 were expected to contain a large amount of dust based on their depleted Ly$\\alpha$ emission. The observations suggest a clear 1.25-mm flux density excess over the synchrotron radiation spectrum of MG1019+0535, suggesting the presence of thermal emission from dust in this radio galaxy, whereas the observations of TX0211$-$122 were not sensitive enough to meaningfully constrain its dust content. On the other hand, our observations of 1243+036 provide a stringent upp...

  10. Anisotropic Beam Model for the Spectral Observations of Radio Burst Fine Structures on 1998 April 15

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A fine structure consisting of three almost equidistant frequency bands was observed in the high frequency part of a solar burst on 1998 April 15 by the spectrometer of Beijing Astronomical Observatory in the range 2.6-3.8 GHz. A model for this event based on beam-anisotropic instability in the solar corona is presented. Longitudinal plasma waves are excited at cyclotron resonance and then transformed into radio emission at their second harmonic. The model is in accordance with the observations if we suppose a magnetic field strength in the region of emission generation of about 200 G.

  11. Coronal magnetic field and the plasma beta determined from radio and multiple satellite observations

    CERN Document Server

    Iwai, Kazumasa; Nozawa, Satoshi; Takahashi, Takuya; Sawada, Shinpei; Kitagawa, Jun; Miyawaki, Shun; Kashiwagi, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    We derived the coronal magnetic field, plasma density, and temperature from the observation of polarization and intensity of radio thermal free-free emission using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations. We observed a post-flare loop on the west limb 11 April 2013. The line-of-sight magnetic field was derived from the circularly polarized free-free emission observed by NoRH. The emission measure and temperature were derived from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The derived temperature was used to estimate the emission measure from the NoRH radio free-free emission observations. The derived density from NoRH was larger than that determined using AIA, which can be explained by the fact that the low temperature plasma is not within the temperature coverage of the AIA filters used in this study. We also discuss the other observation of the post-flare loops by the EUV Imager onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (...

  12. The jet-cloud interacting radio galaxy PKS B2152-699. I. Structures revealed in new deep radio and X-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Worrall, D M; Young, A J; Momtahan, K; Fosbury, R A E; Morganti, R; Tadhunter, C N; Kleijn, G Verdoes

    2012-01-01

    PKS B2152-699 has radio power characteristic of sources that dominate radio feedback. We present new deep ATCA, Chandra and optical observations, and test the feedback model. We report the first high-resolution observations of the radio jet. The inner jet extends ~8.5 kpc towards an optical emission-line High Ionization Cloud (HIC) before taking a zig-zag path to an offset position. Jet X-ray synchrotron radiation is seen. The HIC is associated with 0.3 keV X-ray gas of anomalously low metallicity. On larger scales the radio galaxy displays all three X-ray features that together confirm supersonic expansion of the lobes into the external medium: gas cavities, inverse-Compton emission showing excess internal lobe pressure, and high-contrast arms of temperature above the ~1 keV ambient medium. The well-formed S lobe on the counterjet side is expanding with a Mach number 2.2-3. We estimate a cavity power ~3x10^43 ergs/s, which falls well below previously reported correlations with radio power. The total inferred...

  13. The radio halo in the merging cluster A3562

    CERN Document Server

    Venturi, T; Dallacasa, D; Brunetti, G; Giacintucci, S; Hunstead, R W; Morganti, R

    2003-01-01

    we present new VLA observations at 1.4 GHz confirming the presence of a radio halo at the centre of the cluster A3562, in the core of the Shapley Concentration. We also report a detailed multifrequency radio study of the head tail galaxy J1333--3141, which is completely embedded in the halo emission. The radio halo has an irregular shape, and a largest linear size of $\\sim$ 620 kpc, which is among the smallest found in the literature. The source has a steep spectrum, i.e. $\\alpha_{843 MHz}^{1.4 GHz} \\sim 2$, and its total radio power, P$_{1.4 GHz} \\sim 2 \\times10^{23}$ W Hz$^{-1}$, is the lowest known to date.The radio power of the halo and the X-ray parameters of the cluster, such as L$_X$ and kT, nicely fit the correlations found in the literature for the other halo clusters, extending them to low radio powers. We found that the total number of electrons injected in the cluster environment by the head--tail source is enough to feed the halo, if we assume that the galaxy has been radio active over a large fr...

  14. Milliarcsecond radio structure of weak-lined T Tauri stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R. B.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Feigelson, E. D.

    1991-01-01

    VLBI and VLA observations of six radio-bright weak-lined T Taur (WTT) stars are reported, as well as direct measurements of the sizes of the emitting regions. VLBI measurements established that essentially all the radio emission from these premain-sequence stars originates in regions 15 stellar radii or less in size. Corresponding brightness temperatures ranged from 10 exp 7.5 to not less than 10 exp 9 K, ruling out a thermal process such as free-free bremsstrahlung radiation from a circumstellar wind. The radio luminosity and structure of several stars changed significantly between measurements separated by 1 day. HD 283447 showed intraday radio variability on time scales as short as 1 hr. Corresponding VLBI measurements show a new unresolved component appearing after an increase in flux density, possibly indicating that the driving agent for larger radio flares originates close to the star. The high conformation rate of nonthermal radio emission from this initial sample of radio-bright WTT stars show that these solar-type premain-sequence stars alter their immediate environments via magnetic processes to an extent comparable to that shown by RS CVn or Algol close binaries.

  15. Abundances of Cloud-Related Gases in the Venus Atmosphere as Inferred from Observed Radio Opacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffes, Paul Gregory

    1982-03-01

    Various radio-analytical techniques have detected microwave opacity in the middle atmosphere of Venus, well above the main carbon dioxide opacity of the lower atmosphere. Consideration of the amount, distribution, and effects of the constituents which produce the main cloud layer at about 50 km altitude, indicate that such cloud-related gases, especially sulfuric acid vapor, are the predominant source of the observed opacity of the middle atmosphere. Theoretical and laboratory studies were made of the microwave absorption from three cloud-related gases: sulfur dioxide, sulfur trioxide, and gaseous sulfuric acid. While the measured absorption from sulfur dioxide under conditions for the middle atmosphere of Venus was found to be 50% larger than suggested by theory, the amount of sulfur dioxide required to explain the opacity as measured by radio occultation exceeded the abundance measured in situ by atmospheric probes, suggesting that there must be another important source of opacity. Sulfur trioxide was tested and found to be relatively transparent, but laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity of gaseous sulfuric acid under Venus atmospheric conditions indicate that it is an exceptionally strong absorber with absorptivity that has a surprisingly weak dependence on radio frequency. Initial theoretical studies also indicate a large absorptivity and weak frequency dependence, although the measured opacity is larger than the computed value, presumably due to deviations from Van Vleck-Weisskopf theory. The absorbing characteristics of sulfuric acid vapor appear to reconcile past inconsistencies among measurements and deductions concerning the constituents of the atmosphere of Venus, and radio occultation, radar reflection, and radio emission measurements of its opacity. The results of the current studies are used with previous data for the absorptivity of water vapor and carbon dioxide to model relative contributions to opacity as a function of height, in a way

  16. Imaging Cold Gas to 1 kpc scales in high-redshift galaxies with the ngVLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Caitlin; Narayanan, Desika; Dave, Romeel; Hung, Chao-Ling; Champagne, Jaclyn; Carilli, Chris Luke; Decarli, Roberto; Murphy, Eric J.; Popping, Gergo; Riechers, Dominik; Somerville, Rachel S.; Walter, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    The next generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) will revolutionize our understanding of the distant Universe via the detection of cold molecular gas in the first galaxies. Its impact on studies of galaxy characterization via detailed gas dynamics will provide crucial insight on dominant physical drivers for star-formation in high redshift galaxies, including the exchange of gas from scales of the circumgalactic medium down to resolved clouds on mass scales of ~10^5 M_sun. In this study, we employ a series of high-resolution, cosmological, hydrodynamic zoom simulations from the MUFASA simulation suite and a CASA simulator to generate mock ngVLA observations. Based on a direct comparison between the inferred results from our mock observations and the cosmological simulations, we investigate the capabilities of ngVLA to constrain the mode of star formation, dynamical mass, and molecular gas kinematics in individual high-redshift galaxies using cold gas tracers like CO(1-0) and CO(2-1). Using the Despotic radiative transfer code that encompasses simultaneous thermal and statistical equilibrium in calculating the molecular and atomic level populations, we generate parallel mock observations of high-J transitions of CO and C+ from ALMA for comparison. The factor of 100 times improvement in mapping speed for the ngVLA beyond the Jansky VLA and the proposed ALMA Band 1 will make these detailed, high-resolution imaging and kinematic studies routine at z=2 and beyond.

  17. ADDING CONTEXT TO JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE SURVEYS WITH CURRENT AND FUTURE 21 cm RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardsley, A. P.; Morales, M. F. [Department of Physics, University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lidz, A.; Malloy, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Sutter, P. M., E-mail: beards@phys.washington.edu [INFN - National Institute for Nuclear Physics via Valerio 2, I-34127, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-02-20

    Infrared and radio observations of the Epoch of Reionization promise to revolutionize our understanding of the cosmic dawn, and major efforts with the JWST, MWA, and HERA are underway. While measurements of the ionizing sources with infrared telescopes and the effect of these sources on the intergalactic medium with radio telescopes should be complementary, to date the wildly disparate angular resolutions and survey speeds have made connecting proposed observations difficult. In this paper we develop a method to bridge the gap between radio and infrared studies. While the radio images may not have the sensitivity and resolution to identify individual bubbles with high fidelity, by leveraging knowledge of the measured power spectrum we are able to separate regions that are likely ionized from largely neutral, providing context for the JWST observations of galaxy counts and properties in each. By providing the ionization context for infrared galaxy observations, this method can significantly enhance the science returns of JWST and other infrared observations.

  18. VLBI observations of helical jets: hints on the nature of radio-jets

    CERN Document Server

    Perucho, M; Lobanov, A P; Agudo, I; Marti-Vidal, I

    2013-01-01

    We make use of VLBI observations of the radio jet in the quasar S5 0836+710 at different frequencies and epochs to study its properties. The jet shows helical structure at all frequencies. The ridge-line of the emission in the jet coincides at all frequencies and epochs, within the errors. We conclude that the helicity is a real, physical structure. Small differences between epochs reveal wave-like motion of the ridge-line transversal to the jet propagation axis. These transversal motions are measured to be superluminal. This unphysical result could correspond to a possible small amplitude oscillation of the ridge-line at the radio-core and to large errors in the determination of the positions. In addition, higher resolution images at 15 GHz show that the ridge-line does not coincide exactly with the centre of the radio jet. At arc-second scales, this powerful jet shows non-collimated, irregular structure and a lack of a hot-spot. Following this collection of evidence, we conclude that the ridge-line could be...

  19. Low frequency radio observations of bi-directional electron beams in the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Carley, Eoin P; Vilmer, Nicole; Gallagher, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    The radio signature of a shock travelling through the solar corona is known as a type II solar radio burst. In rare cases these bursts can exhibit a fine structure known as `herringbones', which are a direct indicator of particle acceleration occurring at the shock front. However, few studies have been performed on herringbones and the details of the underlying particle acceleration processes are unknown. Here, we use an image processing technique known as the Hough transform to statistically analyse the herringbone fine structure in a radio burst at $\\sim$20-90 MHz observed from the Rosse Solar-Terrestrial Observatory on 2011 September 22. We identify 188 individual bursts which are signatures of bi-directional electron beams continuously accelerated to speeds of 0.16$_{-0.10}^{+0.11} c$. This occurs at a shock acceleration site initially at a constant altitude of $\\sim$0.6 R$_{\\odot}$ in the corona, followed by a shift to $\\sim$0.5 R$_{\\odot}$. The anti-sunward beams travel a distance of 170$_{-97}^{+174}$ ...

  20. Discovery of an outflow from radio observations of the tidal disruption event ASASSN-14li

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Kate D; Guillochon, James; Zauderer, Bevin A; Williams, Peter K G

    2015-01-01

    The tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBH) lights up dormant systems and can be used to probe accretion and outflow processes. Theoretical calculations indicate that most tidal disruption events (TDEs) lead to super-Eddington accretion, which in turn drives outflows. The discovery of luminous radio emission from the $\\gamma$-ray TDE Sw J1644+57 revealed the formation of a relativistic jetted outflow, but such events represent $\\lesssim 1\\%$ of the TDE population. Direct evidence for outflows in the bulk of the TDE population, discovered through optical, ultraviolet (UV), and X-ray observations, has been lacking. Here we report the discovery of transient radio emission from the nearby optically-discovered TDE ASASSN-14li (distance of 90 Mpc), making it the first normal TDE detected in the radio, and unambiguously pointing to the formation of a non-relativistic outflow with a kinetic energy of $\\approx 10^{48}$ erg, a velocity of $\\approx 12,000-39,000$ km s$^{-1}$, and a mass of $\\approx ...

  1. ISO observations of the radio-loud BALQSO 1556+3517

    CERN Document Server

    Clavel, J

    1997-01-01

    To date, the quasar 1556+3517 is the only radio loud Broad Absorption Line QSO (BALQSO; Becker et al. 1997). This prompted narrow band filter imaging observations in the range 4-15 micron with the ISO satellite. The source is clearly detected in all filters and appears point-like and isolated at the resolution of ISO. The overall Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) in erg/s peaks at a rest wavelength > 6 micron and is reddened by 1.6 visual magnitudes. Correction for reddening brings 1556+3517 within 1.3 sigma from the log R = 1 dividing line between radio-loud and radio-quiet sources. The mid-IR luminosity integrated over the 1.8-6 micron rest wavelength range is ~ 2 E+46 erg/s (Ho = 75 km/s/Mpc, qo = 0), which requires at least 4 solar masses of dust and 800 solar masses of associated gas. It is unlikely that such a large mass stems from the BAL wind itself.

  2. NICMOS observations of high redshift radio galaxies witnessing the formation of bright elliptical galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Pentericci, L; Röttgering, H J A; Miley, G K; Van Breugel, W; Fosbury, R A E

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of a near infrared imaging program of a sample of 19 radio galaxies with redshift between 1.7 and 3.2, using the NICMOS Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxies were observed in H-band which, for 18 of the 19 targets, samples the rest-frame optical emission longwards of the 4000 A break. The images show a wide range of morphologies, from unresolved to compact systems, to systems with substructures such as multiple emission peaks, to systems comprised of several components spread over large areas. The morphologies of 5 of the lowest redshift targets are well represented by a de Vaucouleurs profile, consistent with them being elliptical galaxies. Their average effective radius is a factor of 2 smaller than that of z=1 3CR radio galaxies at similar restframe wavelengths. The near infrared continuum light is generally well aligned with the radio axis and the aligned light has typical V-H colors of around 3.5-4. For several galaxies where WFPC2 images were available, we computed ...

  3. Multifrequency radio observations of SNR J0536-6735 (N 59B) with associated pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzetto, L M; Crawford, E J; De Horta, A Y; Stupar, M

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of new Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of supernova remnant, SNR J0536-6735. This remnant appears to follow a shell morphology with a diameter of D=36x29 pc (with 1 pc uncertainty in each direction). There is an embedded Hii region on the northern limb of the remnant which made various analysis and measurements (such as flux density, spectral index and polarisation) difficult. The radio-continuum emission followed the same structure as the optical emission, allowing for extent and flux density estimates at 20 cm. We estimate a surface brightness for the SNR at 1 GHz of 2.55x10^-21 W m^-2 Hz^-1 sr^-1. Also, we detect a distinctive radio-continuum point source which confirms the previous suggestion of this remnant being associated with a pulsar wind nebulae (PWN). The tail of this remnant isn't seen in the radio-continuum images and is only seen in the optical and X-ray images.

  4. MAGIC observations and multifrequency properties of the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar 3C 279 in 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Fidalgo, D Carreto; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T; Saito, K; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Berdyugin, A; Vornanen, T; Lähteenmäki, A; Tammi, J; Tornikoski, M; Hovatta, T; Max-Moerbeck, W; Readhead, A; Richards, J; Hayashida, M; Sanchez, D A; Fermi-LAT, on behalf of the; Marscher, A; Jorstad, S

    2013-01-01

    We study the multifrequency emission and spectral properties of the quasar 3C 279. We observed 3C 279 in very high energy (VHE, E>100GeV) gamma rays, with the MAGIC telescopes during 2011, for the first time in stereoscopic mode. We combine these measurements with observations at other energy bands: in high energy (HE, E>100MeV) gamma rays from Fermi-LAT, in X-rays from RXTE, in the optical from the KVA telescope and in the radio at 43GHz, 37GHz and 15GHz from the VLBA, Mets\\"ahovi and OVRO radio telescopes and optical polarisation measurements from the KVA and Liverpool telescopes. During the MAGIC observations (February to April 2011) 3C 279 was in a low state in optical, X-ray and gamma rays. The MAGIC observations did not yield a significant detection. These upper limits are in agreement with the extrapolation of the HE gamma-ray spectrum, corrected for extragalactic background light absorption, from Fermi-LAT. The second part of the MAGIC observations in 2011 was triggered by a high activity state in the...

  5. A low cost meteor observation system using radio forward scattering and the interferometry technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, Waleed; Yamamoto, Masa-yuki; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Mizumoto, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    We present a low cost meteor observation system based on the radio forward scattering and interferometry technique at Kochi University of Technology (KUT). The system can be a suitable model for low budget educational institutes that target practical learning of astronomical objects and upper atmospheric characteristics. The system methodology for the automatic counting of meteor echoes, filtering noise and detecting meteor echo directions is described. Detection of the meteor echo directions, which is the basic element for determining the meteor trajectories and the orbital parameters of parent comets, is based on a software system developed for analysis of phase differences detected by interferometry. Randomly selected observation samples measured by the radio interferometer are compared to simultaneous optical observations by video cameras to verify the system accuracy. Preliminary error analysis revealed that the system accuracy is directly related to the duration of observed meteor echoes. Eighty percent of meteor echo samples with durations longer than 3 s showed agreement in azimuth and elevation angles measurements to within a 10° error range, while meteor echo samples with shorter durations showed lower agreement levels probably due to the low system sampling resolution of 0.1 s. The reasonable agreement level of meteor echoes with duration longer than 3 s demonstrated the applicability of the system methodology. Accurate observation of shorter duration meteor echoes could possibly be achieved by improving the system resolution.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MGRO J2019+37 region radio and IR observations (Paredes+, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, J. M.; Marti, J.; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Sanchez-Sutil, J. R.; Munoz-Arjonilla, A. J.; Moldon, J.; Peracaula, M.; Luque-Escamilla, P. L.; Zabalza, V.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bordas, P.; Romero, G. E.; Ribo, M.

    2009-09-01

    This table contains information about all radio sources detected with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) of the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA) in Khodad (India) in the MGRO J2019+37 region. The observations were carried out at 610MHz (49cm wavelength) in July 2007. An hexagonal pattern of 19 pointings was designed in order to cover the region of 2.5 square degree centered on the MGRO J2019+37 peak of emission. The list of sources was determined using the SExtractor automatic procedure over our 5" resolution radio mosaic. Only sources with peak ux density higher than about ten times the local noise after primary beam correction were included. There are 42 of the 362 detected radio sources inside the area imaged in the near-infrared Ks-band. A total of 6 out of these 42 sources have a near-infrared counterpart candidate within 0.6" of their radio position. On the other hand, a total of 41 of the 362 radio sources are located in fields observed in X-rays. In this case, 5 of the 41 radio sources have an X-ray counterpart candidate within 5" (the typical uncertainty for XMM-Newton). Both, the Ks magnitude and the X-ray flux, are listed when available. (1 data file).

  7. Radio and X-ray variability in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4051

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Sadie; Moss, Derek; Seymour, Nick; Breedt, Elme; Uttley, Phil; Kording, Elmar; Tudose, Valeriu

    2010-01-01

    We present intensive quasi-simultaneous X-ray and radio monitoring of the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051, over a 16 month period in 2000-2001. Observations were made with the Rossi Timing X-ray Explorer (RXTE) and the Very Large Array (VLA) at 8.4 and 4.8 GHz. In the X-ray band NGC 4051 behaves much like a Galactic black hole binary (GBH) system in a `soft-state'. In such systems, there has so far been no firm evidence for an active, radio-emitting jet like those found in `hard state' GBHs. VLBI observations of NGC 4051 show three co-linear compact components. This structure resembles the core and outer hot spots seen in powerful, jet-dominated, extragalactic radio sources and suggests the existence of a weak jet. Radio monitoring of the core of NGC 4051 is complicated by the presence of surrounding extended emission and by the changing array configurations of the VLA. Only in the A configuration is the core reasonably resolved. We have carefully removed the contaminations of the core by extended emiss...

  8. An Overview of Observations by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Roux, A.; Canu, P.; Zarka, P.; Tokarev, Y.

    2001-01-01

    On August 18, 1999, the Cassini spacecraft flew by Earth at an altitude of 1186 km on its way to Saturn. Although the flyby was performed exclusively to provide the spacecraft with sufficient velocity to get to Saturn, the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) instrument, along with several others, was operated to gain valuable calibration data and to validate the operation of a number of capabilities. In addition, an opportunity to study the terrestrial radio and plasma wave environment with a highly capable instrument on a swift fly-through of the magnetosphere was afforded by the encounter. This paper provides an overview of the RPWS observations, at Earth, including the identification of a number of magnetospheric plasma wave modes, an accurate measurement of the plasma density over a significant portion of the trajectory using the natural wave spectrum in addition to a relaxation sounder and Langmuir probe, the detection of natural and human-produced radio emissions, and the validation of the capability to measure the wave normal angle and Poynting flux of whistler-mode chorus emissions. The results include the observation of a double-banded structure at closest' approach including a band of Cerenkov emission bounded by electron plasma and upper hybrid frequencies and an electron cyclotron harmonic band just above the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. In the near-Earth plasma sheet, evidence for electron phase space holes is observed, similar to those first reported by Geotail in the magnetotail. The wave normal analysis confirms the Polar result that chorus is generated very close to the magnetic equator and propagates to higher latitudes. The integrated power flux of auroral kilometric radiation is also used to identify a series of substorms observed during the outbound passage through the magnetotail.

  9. Low frequency radio observations of SN 2011dh and the evolution of its post-shock plasma properties

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    We present late time, low frequency observations of SN 2011dh made using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Our observations at $325\\ \\rm MHz$, $610\\ \\rm MHz$ and $1280\\ \\rm MHz$ conducted between $93-421\\ \\rm days$ after the explosion supplement the millimeter and centimeter wave observations conducted between $4-15 \\ \\rm days$ after explosion using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) and extensive radio observations ($ 1.0-36.5\\ \\rm GHz$) conducted between $16-93\\ \\rm days$ after explosion using Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). We fit a synchrotron self absorption model (SSA) to the $610\\ \\rm MHz$ and $1280\\ \\rm MHz$ radio light curves. We use it to determine the radius ($R_{\\rm p}$) and magnetic field ($B_{\\rm p}$) at $173$ \\& $323$ days after the explosion. A comparison of the peak radio luminosity $L_{\\rm op}$, with the product of the peak frequency $\

  10. Constraints on the progenitor system and the environs of SN 2014J from deep radio observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Glorieta de las Astronomía, s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Lundqvist, P.; Björnsson, C. I.; Fransson, C. [Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Beswick, R. J.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Argo, M. K. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Paragi, Z. [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Ryder, S. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Marcaide, J. M.; Ros, E.; Guirado, J. C. [Departamento de Astronomía i Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Martí-Vidal, I. [Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden)

    2014-09-01

    We report deep EVN and eMERLIN observations of the Type Ia SN 2014J in the nearby galaxy M82. Our observations represent, together with JVLA observations of SNe 2011fe and 2014J, the most sensitive radio studies of Type Ia SNe ever. By combining data and a proper modeling of the radio emission, we constrain the mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of SN 2014J to M-dot ≲7.0×10{sup −10} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} (for a wind speed of 100 km s{sup –1}). If the medium around the supernova is uniform, then n {sub ISM} ≲ 1.3 cm{sup –3}, which is the most stringent limit for the (uniform) density around a Type Ia SN. Our deep upper limits favor a double-degenerate (DD) scenario—involving two WD stars—for the progenitor system of SN 2014J, as such systems have less circumstellar gas than our upper limits. By contrast, most single-degenerate (SD) scenarios, i.e., the wide family of progenitor systems where a red giant, main-sequence, or sub-giant star donates mass to an exploding WD, are ruled out by our observations. (While completing our work, we noticed that a paper by Margutti et al. was submitted to The Astrophysical Journal. From a non-detection of X-ray emission from SN 2014J, the authors obtain limits of M-dot ≲1.2×10{sup −9} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (for a wind speed of 100 km s{sup –1}) and n {sub ISM} ≲ 3.5 cm{sup –3}, for the ρ∝r {sup –2} wind and constant density cases, respectively. As these limits are less constraining than ours, the findings by Margutti et al. do not alter our conclusions. The X-ray results are, however, important to rule out free-free and synchrotron self-absorption as a reason for the radio non-detections.) Our estimates on the limits on the gas density surrounding SN2011fe, using the flux density limits from Chomiuk et al., agree well with their results. Although we discuss the possibilities of an SD scenario passing observational tests, as well as uncertainties in the modeling of the radio emission, the

  11. 15 years of VLBI observations of two compact radio sources in Messier 82

    CERN Document Server

    Beswick, R J; Fenech, D; Marti-Vidal, I; McDonald, A R; Muxlow, T W B; Pedlar, A; Riley, J D; Wills, K A

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of a second epoch of 18cm global Very Long-Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations, taken on 23 February 2001, of the central kiloparsec of the nearby starburst galaxy Messier 82. These observations further investigate the structural and flux evolution of the most compact radio sources in the central region of M82. The two most compact radio objects in M82 have been investigated (41.95+575 and 43.31+592). Using this recent epoch of data in comparison with our previous global VLBI observations and two earlier epochs of European VLBI Network observations we measure expansion velocities in the range of 1500-2000km/s for 41.95+575, and 9000-11000km/s for 43.31+592 using various independent methods. In each case the measured remnant expansion velocities are significantly larger than the canonical expansion velocity (500km/s) of supernova remnants within M82 predicted from theoretical models. In this paper we discuss the implications of these measured expansion velocities with respect to ...

  12. The 2006 Radio Outburst of a Microquasar Cyg X-3: Observation and Data

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuboi, M; Kuno, N; Nakanishi, K; Sawada, T; Umemoto, T; Trushkin, S A; Kotani, T; Kawai, N; Kurono, Y; Handa, T; Kohno, K; Tsukagoshi, T; Kameya, O; Kobayashi, H; Fujisawa, K; Doi, A; Omodaka, T; Takaba, H; Sudou, H; Wakamatsu, K; Koyama, Y; Kawai, E; Mochizuki, N; Murata, Y

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of the multi-frequency observations of radio outburst of the microquasar Cyg X-3 in February and March 2006 with the Nobeyama 45-m telescope, the Nobeyama Millimeter Array, and the Yamaguchi 32-m telescope. Since the prediction of a flare by RATAN-600, the source has been monitored from Jan 27 (UT) with these radio telescopes. At the eighteenth day after the quench of the activity, successive flares exceeding 1 Jy were observed successfully. The time scale of the variability in the active phase is presumably shorter in higher frequency bands. We also present the result of a follow-up VLBI observation at 8.4 GHz with the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN) 2.6 days after the first rise. The VLBI image exhibits a single core with a size of <8 mas (80 AU). The observed image was almost stable, although the core showed rapid variation in flux density. No jet structure was seen at a sensitivity of $T_b = 7.5\\times 10^5$ K.

  13. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF 3C RADIO SOURCES WITH z < 0.3. II. COMPLETING THE SNAPSHOT SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Tremblay, G. R. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Harris, D. E.; O' Dea, C. P. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kharb, P.; Axon, D. [Department of Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Carlson Center for Imaging Science 76-3144, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Balmaverde, B.; Capetti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Baum, S. A. [Carlson Center for Imaging Science 76-3144, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, F. D.; Sparks, W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martine Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gilli, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Giovannini, G. [INAF-Istituto di Radioastronomia di Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Grandi, P.; Torresi, E. [INAF-IASF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e fisica Cosmica di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Risaliti, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    We report on the second round of Chandra observations of the 3C snapshot survey developed to observe the complete sample of 3C radio sources with z < 0.3 for 8 ks each. In the first paper, we illustrated the basic data reduction and analysis procedures performed for the 30 sources of the 3C sample observed during Chandra Cycle 9, while here we present the data for the remaining 27 sources observed during Cycle 12. We measured the X-ray intensity of the nuclei and of any radio hot spots and jet features with associated X-ray emission. X-ray fluxes in three energy bands, i.e., soft, medium, and hard, for all the sources analyzed are also reported. For the stronger nuclei, we also applied the standard spectral analysis, which provides the best-fit values of the X-ray spectral index and absorbing column density. In addition, a detailed analysis of bright X-ray nuclei that could be affected by pile-up has been performed. X-ray emission was detected for all the nuclei of the radio sources in our sample except for 3C 319. Among the current sample, there are two compact steep spectrum radio sources, two broad-line radio galaxies, and one wide angle tail radio galaxy, 3C 89, hosted in a cluster of galaxies clearly visible in our Chandra snapshot observation. In addition, we also detected soft X-ray emission arising from the galaxy cluster surrounding 3C 196.1. Finally, X-ray emission from hot spots has been found in three FR II radio sources and, in the case of 3C 459, we also report the detection of X-ray emission associated with the eastern radio lobe as well as X-ray emission cospatial with radio jets in 3C 29 and 3C 402.

  14. Discovery of Radio-loud Broad Absorption Line Quasars Using Ultraviolet Excess and Deep Radio Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Brotherton, M S; Smith, R J; Boyle, B J; Shanks, T; Croom, S M; Miller, L; Becker, R H; Breugel, Wil van; Miller, Lance; Becker, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    We report the discovery of five broad-absorption-line (BAL) QSOs in a complete sample of 111 ultraviolet excess (UVX) QSO candidates also detected in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. All five BAL QSOs, which include two high-ionization BAL QSOs and three low-ionization BAL QSOs, are formally radio-loud. Of QSOs with z > 0.4, 3+/-2% show low-ionization BALs, and of QSOs with z > 1.5, all radio-loud, 9+/-5% show BALs; these frequencies are consistent with those of optical surveys. While the first reported radio-loud BAL QSO, FIRST J155633.8+351758, is likely to be heavily dust reddened and thus less radio-loud than indicated by its observed radio-to-optical luminosity, these QSOs are UVX selected and probably free of significant dust along the line of sight. We point out unusual features in two of the BAL QSOs and discuss the significance finding these heretofore rare objects.

  15. The peculiar mass-loss history of SN 2014C as revealed through AMI radio observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. E.; Horesh, A.; Mooley, K. P.; Rushton, A. P.; Fender, R. P.; Staley, T. D.; Argo, M. K.; Beswick, R. J.; Hancock, P. J.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Perrott, Y. C.; Plotkin, R. M.; Pretorius, M. L.; Rumsey, C.; Titterington, D. J.

    2017-04-01

    We present a radio light curve of supernova (SN) 2014C taken with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) Large Array at 15.7 GHz. Optical observations presented by Milisavljevic et al. demonstrated that SN 2014C metamorphosed from a stripped-envelope Type Ib SN into a strongly interacting Type IIn SN within 1 yr. The AMI light curve clearly shows two distinct radio peaks, the second being a factor of 4 times more luminous than the first peak. This double bump morphology indicates two distinct phases of mass-loss from the progenitor star with the transition between density regimes occurring at 100-200 d. This reinforces the interpretation that SN 2014C exploded in a low-density region before encountering a dense hydrogen-rich shell of circumstellar material that was likely ejected by the progenitor prior to the explosion. The AMI flux measurements of the first light-curve bump are the only reported observations taken within ∼50 to ∼125 d post-explosion, before the blast-wave encountered the hydrogen shell. Simplistic synchrotron self-absorption and free-free absorption modelling suggest that some physical properties of SN 2014C are consistent with the properties of other Type Ibc and IIn SNe. However, our single frequency data does not allow us to distinguish between these two models, which implies that they are likely too simplistic to describe the complex environment surrounding this event. Lastly, we present the precise radio location of SN 2014C obtained with the electronic Multi-Element Remotely Linked Interferometer Network, which will be useful for future very long baseline interferometry observations of the SN.

  16. An elusive radio halo in the merging cluster Abell 781?

    CERN Document Server

    Venturi, T; Dallacasa, D; Brunetti, G; Cassano, R; Macario, G; Athreya, R

    2011-01-01

    Deep radio observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 781 have been carried out using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 325 MHz and have been compared to previous 610 MHz observations and to archival VLA 1.4 GHz data. The radio emission from the cluster is dominated by a diffuse source located at the outskirts of the X-ray emission, which we tentatively classify as a radio relic. We detected residual diffuse emission at the cluster centre at the level of S(325 MHz)~15-20 mJy. Our analysis disagrees with Govoni et al. (2011), and on the basis of simple spectral considerations we do not support their claim of a radio halo with flux density of 20-30 mJy at 1.4 GHz. Abell 781, a massive and merging cluster, is an intriguing case. Assuming that the residual emission is indicative of the presence of a radio halo barely detectable at our sensitivity level, it could be a very steep spectrum source.

  17. Extended Radio Emission in MOJAVE Blazars: Challenges to Unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Cooper, N. J.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of a study on the kiloparsec-scale radio emission in the complete flux density limited MOJAVE sample, comprising 135 radio-loud active galactic nuclei. New 1.4 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) radio images of six quasars and previously unpublished images of 21 blazars are presented, along with an analysis of the high-resolution (VLA A-array) 1.4 GHz emission for the entire sample. While extended emission is detected in the majority of the sources, about 7% of the sources exhibit only radio core emission. We expect more sensitive radio observations, however, to detect faint emission in these sources, as we have detected in the erstwhile "core-only" source, 1548+056. The kiloparsec-scale radio morphology varies widely across the sample. Many BL Lac objects exhibit extended radio power and kiloparsec-scale morphology typical of powerful FRII jets, while a substantial number of quasars possess radio powers intermediate between FRIs and FRIIs. This poses challenges to the simple radio-loud unified scheme, which links BL Lac objects to FRIs and quasars to FRIIs. We find a significant correlation between extended radio emission and parsec-scale jet speeds: the more radio powerful sources possess faster jets. This indicates that the 1.4 GHz (or low-frequency) radio emission is indeed related to jet kinetic power. Various properties such as extended radio power and apparent parsec-scale jet speeds vary smoothly between different blazar subclasses, suggesting that, at least in terms of radio jet properties, the distinction between quasars and BL Lac objects, at an emission-line equivalent width of 5 Å, is essentially an arbitrary one. While the two blazar subclasses display a smooth continuation in properties, they often reveal differences in the correlation test results when considered separately. This can be understood if, unlike quasars, BL Lac objects do not constitute a homogeneous population, but rather include both FRI and FRII radio galaxies for

  18. Essential roles of VLA-4 in the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yoichi; Shimaoka, Motomu; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2010-05-01

    Integrins are one of the major families of adhesion molecules and make various kinds of biological effects by mediating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Among integrins, VLA-4 is expressed on many types of hematopoietic cells including stem/progenitor cells and it is considered as a critical regulator of adult hematopoiesis. Recent studies revealed that VLA-4 is not necessarily required for the development or maintenance of adult hematopoietic cells. On the other hand, it was proved that VLA-4 is essential for homeostasis of distribution of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and mature lymphocytes in the body. The dynamic regulation of VLA-4 function is mediated by its conformational change, which is strictly linked to the interaction between alpha and beta cytoplasmic domains. The study using knockin mice showed that GFFKR sequence, a well-preserved motif in the alpha cytoplasmic domain of VLA-4, is critical for binding of alpha and beta cytoplasmic domains as well as regulation of hematopoietic cell distribution. Small molecules targeting this cytoplasmic interaction or ligand-VLA-4 interaction may become good candidates of new drugs for mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells. Several studies have suggested the impact of VLA-4 on chemotherapy sensitivity and prognosis in hematological malignancies, which awaits further investigations.

  19. The VLA Survey of the Chandra Deep Field South. IV. Source Population

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Tozzi, P; Kellermann, K I; Fomalont, E B; Miller, N; Rosati, P; Shaver, P

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of 256 radio sources from our deep (flux density limit of 42 microJy at the field centre at 1.4 GHz) Chandra Deep Field South 1.4 and 5 GHz VLA survey. The radio population is studied by using a wealth of multi-wavelength information in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. The availability of redshifts for ~ 80% of the sources in our complete sample allows us to derive reliable luminosity estimates for the majority of the objects. X-ray data, including upper limits, for all our sources turn out to be a key factor in establishing the nature of faint radio sources. Due to the faint optical levels probed by this study, we have uncovered a population of distant Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) systematically missing from many previous studies of sub-millijansky radio source identifications. We find that, while the well-known flattening of the radio number counts below 1 mJy is mostly due to star forming galaxies, these sources and AGN make up an approximately equal fraction of the sub-m...

  20. A method of mapping compact structure in radio sources using VLBI observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    A two-part technique is described for determining the angular structure of the compact components of radio sources from VLBI observations. With this technique, the source structure is first approximated, using both amplitudes and closure phases, by a model consisting of circularly symmetric Gaussian components located on a grid of positions on the sky. The second part begins by employing this model to predict the visibility phase corresponding to each observed visibility amplitude; these estimated visibility phases are then adjusted to agree with the observed closure phases. The resulting estimates of the visibility phases and the observed visibility amplitudes are then combined in a direct Fourier transform to produce a 'dirty' source map that is deconvolved via the CLEAN procedure on the basis of the point-source response. Some examples based on data generated from test models are provided.

  1. High-frequency radar observations of PMSE modulation by radio heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Andrew; Rietveld, Michael; Mahmoudian, Alireza; La Hoz, Cesar; Kosch, Michael; Scales, Wayne; Pinedo, Henry

    The first observations using high-frequency (8 MHz) radar of modulation of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) by radio heating of the ionosphere are presented. The experiment was performed at the EISCAT facility near Tromsø, Norway. The observations are compared with simultaneous radar measurements at 224 MHz and with a model of the dusty plasma response to electron heating. Agreement between the model and observations is good considering technical limitations on the 8 MHz radar measurements. Predictions made about the response of high-frequency PMSE to heating where dust charging dominates over diffusion, opposite to the situation at very high-frequencies are confirmed. Suggestions are made about improving the 8 MHz observations to overcome the current limitations.

  2. Experimental observation and computational analysis of striations in electronegative capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yong-Xin; Korolov, Ihor; Donko, Zoltan; Wang, You-Nian; Schulze, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Self-organized spatial structures in the light emission from the ion-ion capacitive RF plasma of a strongly electronegative gas (CF4) are observed experimentally for the first time. Their formation is analyzed and understood based on particle-based kinetic simulations. These "striations" are found to be generated by the resonance between the driving radio-frequency and the eigenfrequency of the ion-ion plasma (derived from an analytical model) that establishes a modulation of the electric field, the ion densities, as well as the energy gain and loss processes of electrons in the plasma. The growth of the instability is followed by the numerical simulations.

  3. Multi-frequency radio observations of BAL quasar 1045+352

    CERN Document Server

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M; Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena; Marecki, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Multi-frequency 1.7, 5 and 8.4-GHz VLBA observations of a radio-loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasar 1045+352 are presented. It is a young compact steep spectrum (CSS) object and its asymmetric, two-sided morphology on a scale of several hundred parsecs, extending in two different directions, may suggest intermittent activity. The young age and unusual morphology of 1045+352 are arguments in favour of an evolution scenario for BAL quasars, in which the BAL features appear at a very early stage of their evolution.

  4. Optimizing commensality of radio continuum and spectral line observations in the era of the SKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Natasha; Jarvis, M. J.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2016-08-01

    The substantial decrease in star formation density from z = 1 to the present day is curious given the relatively constant neutral gas density over the same epoch. Future radio astronomy facilities, including the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and pathfinder telescopes, will provide pioneering measures of both the gas content of galaxies and star formation activity over cosmological time-scales. Here we investigate the commensalities between neutral atomic gas (H I) and radio continuum observations, as well as the complementarity of the data products. We start with the proposed H I and continuum surveys to be undertaken with the SKA precursor telescope MeerKAT, and building on this, explore optimal combinations of survey area coverage and depth of proposed H I and continuum surveys to be undertaken with the SKA1-MID instrument. Intelligent adjustment of these observational parameters results in a tiered strategy that minimizes observation time while maximizing the value of the data set, both for H I and continuum science goals. We also find great complementarity between the H I and continuum data sets, with the spectral line H I data providing redshift measurements for gas-rich, star-forming galaxies with stellar masses M* ˜ 109 M⊙ to z ˜ 0.3, a factor of 3 lower in stellar mass than would be feasible to reach with large optical spectroscopic campaigns.

  5. Radio observations of the first three-months of Fermi AGN at 4.8 GHz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Liu; Hua-Gang Song; Jun Liu; Zhen Ding; Nicola Marchili; Thomas P. Krichbaum; Lars Fuhrmann; Anton Zensus; Tao An

    2012-01-01

    Using the Urumqi 25 m radio telescope,sources from the first three months of the Fermi-large area telescope detected active galactic nuclei (AGN) catalog with a declination of > 0° were observed in 2009 at 4.8 GHz.The radio flux density appeared to correlate with the γ-ray intensity.Intra-day variability (IDV) observations were performed in March,April and May 2009 for 42 selected γ-ray bright blazars,and ~60% of them showed evidence of flux variability at 4.8 GHz during the IDV observations.The IDV detection rate was higher than that in previous flat-spectrum AGN samples.IDV appeared more often in the very long baseline interferometry-core dominant blazars,and the non-IDV blazars showed relatively “steeper” spectral indices than the IDV blazars.Pronounced inter-month variability was also found in two BL Lac objects:J0112+2244 and J0238+1636.

  6. Radio observations of HD 93129A: The earliest O star with the highest mass loss ?

    CERN Document Server

    Benaglia, P; Benaglia, Paula; Koribalski, Baerbel

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of radio continuum observations towards the open cluster Tr 14, where our main targets are the early-type O stars HD 93129A/B and HD 93128. The observations were carried out at 3 cm (8.64 GHz) and 6 cm (4.80 GHz) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Only HD 93129A (type O2 If*) was detected; we measure flux densities of S_(3cm) = 2.0 +- 0.2 mJy and S_(6cm) = 4.1 +- 0.4 mJy. The resulting spectral index of alpha = -1.2 +- 0.3 (S_(nu) = k . nu^alpha) indicates predominantly non-thermal emission, suggesting HD 93129A may be a binary system. We propose that the observed 3 cm radio emission is mostly coming from the non-thermal wind collision region of a binary, and, to a lesser extent, from the thermal winds of the primary and secondary stars in HD 93129A. At a stellar distance of 2.8 kpc, we derive a mass-loss rate M_dot = 5.1 x 10^(-5) M_sun/yr, assuming the thermal fraction of the 3 cm emission is about 0.5.

  7. GEOS-2 observations of energetic electrons in the morning sector during auroral radio absorption events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, P.N.; Korth, A.

    1985-04-01

    The temporal development of two auroral absorption events in the morning sector is compared with simultaneous observations of electrons from the satellite GEOS-2, utilizing the good energy resolution over the range 15-300 keV to show that the electrons effective in contributing to the observed radio absorption are confined to the range 30-130 keV. By far the most important are those below 80 keV, and as a geophysical monitor the riometer may be considered an efficient indicator of electron fluxes of energy typically of 60-70 keV. The ionospheric effects of the precipitated fluxes are predicted, and the results used to discuss the validity of the model atmosphere and of the profiles of effective recombination coefficient and specific absorption. Integration of the calculated profiles of incremental radio absorption yields total estimates within 30 percent of the observed intensities. The absorbing layer maximizes at altitudes of 85-90 km and has a typical half-height of 25 km. It is shown further that the electron-flux characteristics are consistent with gradient-curvature drift from a particle source in the midnight sector. 33 references.

  8. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Arun; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Manoharan, P. K.; Krishnakumar, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a bandwidth of about four times larger (16 MHz) than that of the legacy system as well as its fluctuation spectrum with high temporal and frequency resolutions. The key point is that all the above modes operate in real time. This paper presents the design aspects of PONDER and outlines the design methodology for future similar backends. It also explains the principal operations of PONDER, illustrates its capabilities for a variety of pulsar and IPS observations and demonstrates its usefulness for a variety of astrophysical studies using the high sensitivity of the ORT.

  9. Probing the Disk-jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Kataoka, J; Iwasawa, K; Markowitz, A G; Mushotzky, R F; Arimoto, M; Takahashi, T; Tsubuku, Y; Ushio, M; Watanabe, S; Gallo, L C; Madejski, G M; Terashima, Y; Isobe, N; Tashiro, M S; Kohmura, T; Kataoka, Jun; Reeves, James N.; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Markowitz, Alex G.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Arimoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tsubuku, Yoshihiro; Ushio, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Shin; Gallo, Luigi C.; Madejski, Greg M.; Terashima, Yuichi; Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Kohmura, Takayoshi

    2006-01-01

    Broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are a rare type of radio-loud AGN, in which the broad optical permitted emission lines have been detected in addition to the extended jet emission. Here we report on deep (40ksec x4) observations of the bright BLRG 3C~120 using Suzaku. The observations were spaced a week apart, and sample a range of continuum fluxes. An excellent broadband spectrum was obtained over two decades of frequency (0.6 to 50 keV) within each 40 ksec exposure. We clearly resolved the iron K emission line complex, finding that it consists of a narrow K_a core (sigma ~ 110 eV or an EW of 60 eV), a 6.9 keV line, and an underlying broad iron line. Our confirmation of the broad line contrasts with the XMM-Newton observation in 2003, where the broad line was not required. The most natural interpretation of the broad line is iron K line emission from a face-on accretion disk which is truncated at ~10 r_g. Above 10 keV, a relatively weak Compton hump was detected (reflection fraction of R ~ 0.6), superposed ...

  10. Revisiting ISEE-3-Voyager Observations of Back-Side Type III Radio Bursts in View of the Stereo/Waves observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougeret, J.; Lecacheux, A.; Hoang, S.; Maksimovic, M.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we revisit old observations of interplanetary type III radio bursts made simultaneously by the radio instruments on the ISEE-3 spacecraft and on the Voyager spacecraft, in view of the new opportunities offered by the Stereo mission.. Type III radio emission is produced by beams of supra-thermal electrons believed to be accelerated during the flare process and traveling along open interplanetary field lines. Their observation can help trace the large scale structure of the interplanetary medium. Lecacheux et al. (1989) analyzed the properties of such radio bursts originating behind the Sun as viewed from the Earth and still also observed by the ISEE-3 spacecraft located at the L1 libration point. Information on the beaming of the radiation can be deduced from these observations. Lecacheux et al. also measured anomalous delays in burst arrival time at one spacecraft relative to the other. These anomalous delays could be explained by the presence of both the fundamental and harmonic radiation modes with different beaming properties. Such an hypothesis can be checked by the Stereo/Waves observations. Finally, we discuss previous radio wave propagation models in the interplanetary medium and emphasize their importance for the interpretation of the radio observations. Lecacheux, A., J.-L. Steinberg, S. Hoang, and G. A. Dulk, Characteristics of type III bursts in the solar wind from simultaneous observations on board ISEE-3 and Voyager, Astron. Astrophys. 217, 237-250, 1989.

  11. Testing for Shock-Heated X-Ray Gas around Compact Steep Spectrum Radio Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; O'Dea, Christopher; Worrall, Diana M.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Tremblay, Grant; Baum, Stefi; Christiansen, Kevin; Mullarkey, Christopher; Mittal, Rupal

    2017-01-01

    We present Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray, VLA radio, and optical observations of two CSS radio galaxies. B3 1445+410 is a low excitation emission line galaxy with possibly a hybrid FRI/II (or Fat Double) radio morphology. The Chandra observations are point-like and well fit with a power-law consistent with emission from a Doppler boosted core. PKS B1017-325 is a galaxy with a bent double radio morphology. The XMM-Newton observations are consistent with an ISM with a contribution from hot shocked gas. We compile selected radio and X-ray properties of the nine CSS radio galaxies with X-ray detections so far. We find that 1/3 show evidence for hot shocked gas. We note that the counts in the sources are low and the properties of the 3 sources with evidence for hot shocked gas are typical of the other CSS radio galaxies. We suggest that hot shocked gas may be typical of CSS radio galaxies due to their propagation through their host galaxies.

  12. ALMA Observations of the Interaction of a Radio Jet with Molecular Gas in Minkowski's Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Mark; Croft, Steve; Fragile, Chris; Wood, Sarah; Nyland, Kristina

    2017-04-01

    We use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to detect and image CO (1-0) emission from Minkowski’s Object, a dwarf galaxy in the cluster Abell 194 that is interacting with a radio jet from a nearby elliptical galaxy. The ALMA observations, which are the first to detect molecular gas in Minkowski’s Object, also image the high-frequency continuum emission from the radio jet, allowing us to study the interaction in detail. We estimate the range in the mass of molecular gas in Minkowski’s Object assuming two different values of the ratio of the molecular gas mass to the CO luminosity, {α }{CO}. For the Milky Way value of {α }{CO}=4.6 {M}ȯ {({{K}}{km}{{{s}}}-1{{pc}}2)}-1 we obtain a molecular gas mass of {M}{{{H}}2}=3.0× {10}7 {M}ȯ , 6% of the H I gas mass. We also use the prescription of Narayanan et al. (2012) to estimate an {α }{CO}=27 {M}ȯ {({{K}}{km}{{{s}}}-1{{pc}}2)}-1, in which case we obtain {M}{{{H}}2}=1.8× {10}8 {M}ȯ , 36% of the H I mass. The observations are consistent with previous claims of star formation being induced in Minkowski’s Object via the passage of the radio jet, and it therefore being a rare local example of positive feedback from an active galactic nucleus. In particular, we find highly efficient star formation, with gas depletion timescales ∼ 5× {10}7{--}3× {10}8 year (for assumed values of {α }{CO}=4.6 and 27 {M}ȯ {({{K}}{km}{{{s}}}-1{{pc}}2)}-1, respectively) in the upstream regions of Minkowski’s Object that were struck first by the jet, and less efficient star formation downstream. We discuss the implications of this observation for models of jet-induced star formation and radio-mode feedback in massive galaxies.

  13. Low-frequency radio observations of SN 2011dh and the evolution of its post-shock plasma properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak; Chakraborti, Sayan

    2016-06-01

    We present late time, low-frequency observations of SN 2011dh made using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Our observations at 325, 610 and 1280 MHz conducted between 93 and 421 d after the explosion supplement the millimeter and centimetre wave observations conducted between 4 and 15 d after explosion using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) and extensive radio observations (1.0-36.5 GHz) conducted between 16 and 93 d after explosion using Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). We fit a synchrotron self absorption model (SSA) to the 610 and 1280 MHz radio light curves. We use it to determine the radius (Rp) and magnetic field (Bp) at 173 and 323 d after the explosion. A comparison of the peak radio luminosity Lop with the product of the peak frequency νp and time to peak tp shows that the supernova evolves between the epochs of CARMA, JVLA and GMRT observations. It shows a general slowing down of the expansion speed of the radio emitting region on a time-scale of several hundred days during which the shock is propagating through a circumstellar medium set up by a wind with a constant mass-loss parameter, dot{M}/{v}_w. We derive the mass-loss parameter (A⋆) based on 610 and 1280 MHz radio light curves, which are found to be consistent with each other within error limits.

  14. Novalike Cataclysmic Variables are Significant Radio Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Coppejans, Deanne L; Miller-Jones, James C A; Rupen, Michael P; Knigge, Christian; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Groot, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Radio emission from non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs, accreting white dwarfs) could allow detailed studies of outflows and possibly accretion flows in these nearby, numerous and non-relativistic compact accretors. Up to now, however, very few CVs have been detected in the radio. We have conducted a VLA pilot survey of four close and optically-bright novalike CVs at 6 GHz, detecting three, and thereby doubling the number of radio detections of these systems. RW Sex, V603 Aql and the old nova TT Ari were detected in both of the epochs, while V1084 Her was not detected (to a $3\\sigma$ upper-limit of 7.8 $\\mu\\rm{Jy}\\,\\rm{beam}^{-1}$). These observations clearly show that the sensitivity of previous surveys was typically too low to detect these objects and that non-magnetic CVs can indeed be significant radio emitters. The three detected sources show a range of properties, including flaring and variability on both short ($\\sim$200 s) and longer-term (days) time-scales, as well as circular polarization level...

  15. Detection of radio continuum emission from Procyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Simon, Theodore; Brown, Alexander

    1993-01-01

    We have detected the F5 IV-V star Procyon as a weak and variable 3.6 cm radio continuum source using the VLA. The inferred radio luminosity is similar to, though some-what higher than, the X-band luminosity of the active and flaring sun. The 33 micro-Jy flux density level at which we detected Procyon on four of five occasions is close to the 36 micro-Jy radio flux density expected from a model in which the radio emission consists of two components: optically thick 'stellar disk' emission with a 3.6 cm brightness temperature of 20,000 K that is 50 percent larger than the solar value, and optically thin coronal emission with an emission measure the same as that indicated by Einstein and EXOSAT X-ray flux measurements in 1981 and 1983. The maximum mass-loss rate of a warm stellar wind is less than 2 x 10 exp -11 solar mass/yr. An elevated flux density of 115 micro-Jy observed on a single occasion provides circumstantial evidence for the existence of highly localized magnetic fields on the surface of Procyon.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio observations of Galactic WISE HII regions (Anderson+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, D. S.; Wenger, T. V.; Cunningham, V.

    2016-01-01

    We draw our targets from the MIR objects in the WISE catalog of Anderson+, 2014, J/ApJS/212/1. We also include in our sample Sharpless H II regions (Sharpless 1959, VII/20). See section 2 for further details. Our observations were made with the GBT 100m telescope from 2012 July through 2014 August. There are seven radio recombination lines (RRLs) that can be cleanly observed simultaneously with the GBT in the X-band: H87α to H93α. We average these seven RRLs (each at two orthogonal polarizations) to create a single average RRL spectrum. We followed the same GBT observational procedure as in the original HRDS (Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS; Bania et al. 2010ApJ...718L.106B). (3 data files).

  17. Observations of Rotating Radio Transients with the First Station of the Long Wavelength Array

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, G B; McCrackan, M; McLaughlin, M A; Miller, R; Karako-Argaman, C; Dowell, J; Schinzel, F K

    2016-01-01

    Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs) are a subclass of pulsars first identified in 2006 that are detected only in searches for single pulses and not through their time averaged emission. Here, we present the results of observations of 19 RRATs using the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1) at frequencies between 30 MHz and 88 MHz. The RRATs observed here were first detected in higher frequency pulsar surveys. Of the 19 RRATs observed, 2 sources were detected and their dispersion measures, periods, pulse profiles, and flux densities are reported and compared to previous higher frequency measurements. We find a low detection rate (11%), which could be a combination of the lower sensitivity of LWA1 compared to the higher frequency telescopes, and the result of scattering by the interstellar medium or a spectral turnover.

  18. Electron beams and Langmuir turbulence in solar type III radio bursts observed in the interplanetary medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of in situ observations of electron beams, plasma waves, and associated solar type II radio emission in the interplanetary medium near 1 AU, which were provided by the ISEE-3 spacecraft. It is shown that electron beams are formed by the faster electrons arriving before the slower ones, following an impulsive injection at the sun. The resulting bump-on-tail in the reduced 1D distribution function is unstable to the growth of electrostatic electron plasma (Langmuir) waves. The Langmuir waves are observed to be highly impulsive in nature. The onset and temporal variations of the observed plasma waves are in good qualitative agreement with the wave growth expected from the evolution of the measured 1D distribution function. The lack of obvious plateauing of the bump-on-tail suggests that the waves were removed from resonance with the beam electrons by some wave-wave interaction.

  19. Giant Lobes of Centaurus A Radio Galaxy Observed with the Suzaku X-ray Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Stawarz, L; Madejski, G; O'Sullivan, S P; Cheung, C C; Feain, I J; Fukazawa, Y; Gandhi, P; Hardcastle, M J; Kataoka, J; Ostrowski, M; Reville, B; Siemiginowska, A; Simionescu, A; Takahashi, T; Takei, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Werner, N

    2012-01-01

    [abridged] We report on Suzaku observations of selected regions within the Southern giant lobe of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. We focus on distinct X-ray features likely associated with fine radio structure of the lobe. We find that the spectral properties of the detected X-ray features are equally consistent with thermal emission from hot gas, or with a power-law radiation continuum. However, the plasma parameters implied by these different models favor a synchrotron origin for the analyzed X-ray spots, indicating that a very efficient acceleration of electrons is taking place within the giant structure of Centaurus A, albeit only in isolated and compact regions. We also present a detailed analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission, resulting in a tentative detection of a soft excess component best fitted by a thermal model with a temperature of 0.5 keV. The exact origin of the observed excess remains uncertain, although energetic considerations point to thermal gas filling the bulk of the volume of the lobe an...

  20. Simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of PSR B0611+22

    CERN Document Server

    Rajwade, Kaustubh; Lorimer, Duncan R; Karastergiou, Aris; Serylak, Maciej; McLaughlin, Maura A; Griessmeier, Jean M

    2016-01-01

    We report results from simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of PSR B0611+22 which is known to exhibit bursting in its single-pulse emission. The pulse phase of the bursts vary with radio frequency. The bursts are correlated in 327/150~MHz datasets while they are anti-correlated, with bursts at one frequency associated with normal emission at the other, in 820/150~MHz datasets. Also, the flux density of this pulsar is lower than expected at 327~MHz assuming a power law. We attribute this unusual behaviour to the pulsar itself rather than absorption by external astrophysical sources. Using this dataset over an extensive frequency range, we show that the bursting phenomenon in this pulsar exhibits temporal variance over a span of few hours. We also show that the bursting is quasi-periodic over the observed band. The anti-correlation in the phase offset of the burst mode at different frequencies suggests that the mechanisms responsible for phase offset and flux enhancement have different dependencies on the ...

  1. X-ray, radio, and infrared observations of the 'rapid burster' /MXB 1730-335/ during 1979 and 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, A.; Cominsky, L.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Oda, M.; Ogawara, Y.; Inoue, H.; Koyama, K.; Makishima, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Murakami, T.

    1983-01-01

    The paper reports partially simultaneous observations of the 'rapid burster' (MXB 1730-335) at X-ray, infrared, and radio wavelengths, covering several hundred hours during 1979 and 1980. None of the authors of this report saw any infrared or radio bursts. On several occasions an absence of infrared bursting was observed during X-ray bursting. On one occasion an absence of X-ray bursting was observed during a radio burst (4.1 GHz) reported by Calla et al. (1979). To date, radio bursts (a total of at least a dozen) have been reported only by Calla et al. (1980). Considering these and other observations summarized here, the reported radio bursts are either unreal or do not bear a simple relation to the X-ray bursts from the 'rapid burster'. The status of the reported infrared bursts also remain ambiguous. Limits to the brightness of any persistent radio source at the position of MXB 1730-335, limits to persistent X-ray emission during an extended X-ray quiet phase, and a measurement of the infrared polarization in the direction of the X-ray source are also reported.

  2. On the relationship between BL Lacertae objects and radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Landt, Hermine

    2008-01-01

    We present deep radio images at 1.4 GHz of a large and complete sample of BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) selected from the Deep X-ray Radio Blazar Survey (DXRBS). We have observed 24 northern sources with the Very Large Array (VLA) in both its A and C configurations and 15 southern sources with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) in its largest configuration. We find that in the DXRBS, as in the 1-Jy survey, which has a radio flux limit roughly ten times higher than the DXRBS, a considerable number (about a third) of BL Lacs can be identified with the relativistically beamed counterparts of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies. We attribute the existence of FR II-BL Lacs, which is not accounted for by current unified schemes, to an inconsistency in our classification scheme for radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN). Taking the extended radio power as a suitable measure of intrinsic jet power, we find similar average values for low- (LBL) and high-energy peaked BL Lacs (HBL), contrary to the...

  3. The NRAO Observing for University Classes Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, John M.; Van Moorsel, Gustaaf A.

    2017-01-01

    The NRAO "Observing for University Classes" program is a tremendous resource for instructors of courses in observational astronomy. As a service to the astronomical and educational communities, the NRAO offers small amounts of observing time on the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Very Long Baseline Array to such instructors. The data can be used by students and faculty to demonstrate radio astronomy theory with modern data products. Further, the results may lead to publication; this is a unique opportunity for faculty members to integrate research into the classroom. Previous experience with NRAO facilities is required for instructors; individuals without radio astronomy experience can take advantage of other NRAO educational opportunities (e.g., the Synthesis Imaging Workshop) prior to using the program. No previous experience with radio astronomy data is required for students; this is the primary target audience of the program. To demonstrate concept, this poster describes three different VLA observing programs that have been completed using the "Observing for University Classes" resource at Macalester College; undergraduate students have published the results of all three of these programs. Other recent "Observing for University Classes" programs are also described.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS observations of the host galaxies of powerful radio sources : Does size matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, WH; O'Dea, CP; Barthel, PD; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Lehnert, MD

    2000-01-01

    We present near-infrared J- and K-band imaging of a sample of powerful radio source host galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS2 camera. These sources have been selected on their double-lobed radio structure and include a wide range of projected radio source sizes. The largest projected

  5. Radio monitoring of NGC 7469: late-time radio evolution of SN 2000ft and the circumnuclear starburst in NGC 7469

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.; Colina, L.; Torrelles, J. M.; Panagia, N.; Wilson, A.; Kankare, E.; Mattila, S.

    2009-11-01

    We present the results of an eight-year long monitoring of the radio emission from the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) NGC 7469, using 8.4 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations at 0.3 arcsec resolution. Our monitoring shows that the late-time evolution of the radio supernova (RSN) SN 2000ft follows a decline very similar to that displayed at earlier times of its optically thin phase. The late-time radio emission of SN 2000ft is, therefore, still being powered by its interaction with the pre-SN stellar wind, and not with the interstellar medium (ISM). Indeed, the ram pressure of the pre-SN wind is ρwv2w ~ 7.6 × 10-9dyncm-2, at a SN age of t ~ 2127 d, which is significantly larger than the expected pressure of the ISM around SN 2000ft. At this age, the SN shock has reached a distance rsh ~ 0.06 pc, and our observations are probing the interaction of the SN with dense material that was ejected by the pre-SN star about 5820yr prior to its explosion. From our VLA monitoring, we estimate that the swept-up mass by the SN shock after about six years of expansion is Msw ~ 0.29Msolar, assuming an average expansion speed of the SN of 104km s-1. We also searched for recently exploded core-collapse SNe in our VLA images. Apart from SN 2000ft (Sν ~ 1760μJy at its peak, corresponding to 1.1 × 1028ergs-1Hz-1), we found no evidence for any other RSN more luminous than ~6.0 × 1026ergs-1Hz-1, which suggests that no other Type IIn SN has exploded since 2000 in the circumnuclear starburst of NGC 7469.

  6. A low-frequency study of two asymmetric large radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pirya, A; Saikia, D J; Singh, M

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of multifrequency observations of two asymmetric, Mpc-scale radio sources with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and the Very Large Array (VLA). The radio luminosity of these two sources, J1211+743 and J1918+742, are in the Fanaroff-Riley class II (FRII) range, but have diffuse radio components on one side of the galaxy while the opposite component appears edge-brightened with a prominent hot-spot. Although the absence of a hot-spot is reminiscent of FRI radio galaxies, suggesting a hybrid morphology, the radio jet facing the diffuse lobe in J1211+743 is similar to those in FRII radio sources, and it is important to consider these aspects as well while classifying these sources in the FR scheme. The observed asymmetries in these Mpc-scale sources are likely to be largely intrinsic rather than being due to the effects of orientation and relativistic motion. The formation of a diffuse lobe facing the radio jet in J1211+743 is possibly due to the jet being highly dissipative. The ...

  7. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Redshift 1.53 Radio-loud Quasar 3C 270.1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Lal, Dharam V.; Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Haas, Martin; Willner, S. P.; Antonucci, Robert; Ashby, M. L. N.; Avara, Mark; Barthel, Peter; Chini, Rolf; Fazio, G. G.; Hardcastle, Martin; Lawrence, Charles; Leipski, Christian; Ogle, Patrick; Schulz, Bernhard

    Chandra X-ray observations of the high redshift (z = 1.532) radio-loud quasar 3C 270.1 in 2008 February show the nucleus to have a power-law spectrum, Γ = 1.66 ± 0.08, typical of a radio-loud quasar, and a marginally detected Fe Kα emission line. The data also reveal extended X-ray emission, about

  8. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Redshift 1.53 Radio-loud Quasar 3C 270.1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Lal, Dharam V.; Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Haas, Martin; Willner, S. P.; Antonucci, Robert; Ashby, M. L. N.; Avara, Mark; Barthel, Peter; Chini, Rolf; Fazio, G. G.; Hardcastle, Martin; Lawrence, Charles; Leipski, Christian; Ogle, Patrick; Schulz, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Chandra X-ray observations of the high redshift (z = 1.532) radio-loud quasar 3C 270.1 in 2008 February show the nucleus to have a power-law spectrum, Γ = 1.66 ± 0.08, typical of a radio-loud quasar, and a marginally detected Fe Kα emission line. The data also reveal extended X-ray emission, about

  9. Observation of the Emission Spectra of an Atmospheric Pressure Radio-frequency Plasma Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using radio-frequency (13.56 MHz)power has been developed to produce homogeneous glow discharge at low temperature. With optical emission spectroscopy, we observed the excited species (atomic helium, atomic oxygen and metastable oxygen) generated in this APPJ and their dependence on gas composition ratio and RF power. O and O2(b1∑g+) are found in the effluent outside the jet by measuring the emission spectra of effluent perpendicular to the jet. An interesting phenomenon is found that there is an abnormal increase of O emission intensity (777.4 nm) between 10 mm and 40 mm away from the nozzle. This observation result is very helpful in practical operation.

  10. LOW-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSIENT QUASI-PERIODIC RADIO EMISSION FROM THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasikumar Raja, K.; Ramesh, R., E-mail: sasikumar@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India)

    2013-09-20

    We report low-frequency observations of quasi-periodic, circularly polarized, harmonic type III radio bursts whose associated sunspot active regions were located close to the solar limb. The measured periodicity of the bursts at 80 MHz was ≈5.2 s, and their average degree of circular polarization (dcp) was ≈0.12. We calculated the associated magnetic field B (1) using the empirical relationship between the dcp and B for the harmonic type III emission, and (2) from the observed quasi-periodicity of the bursts. Both the methods result in B ≈ 4.2 G at the location of the 80 MHz plasma level (radial distance r ≈ 1.3 R{sub ☉}) in the active region corona.

  11. Low frequency observations of transient quasi-periodic radio emission from the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Raja, K Sasikumar

    2016-01-01

    We report low frequency observations of the quasi-periodic, circularly polarized, harmonic type III radio bursts whose associated sunspot active regions were located close to the solar limb. The measured periodicity of the bursts at 80 MHz was $\\approx$ 5.2 s and their average degree of circular polarization ($dcp$) was $\\approx 0.12$. We calculated the associated magnetic field $B$ : (1) using the empirical relationship between the $dcp$ and $B$ for the harmonic type III emission, and (2) from the observed quasi-periodicity of the bursts. Both the methods result in $B \\approx$ 4.2 G at the location of the 80 MHz plasma level (radial distance $r \\approx 1.3~\\rm R_{\\odot}$) in the active region corona.

  12. A new VLA/e-MERLIN limit on central images in the gravitational lens system CLASS B1030+074

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, Jonathan; Tagore, Amitpal; Biggs, Andrew; Birkinshaw, Mark; Chapman, Scott; De Zotti, Gianfranco; McKean, John; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Scott, Douglas; Serjeant, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We present new VLA 22-GHz and e-MERLIN 5-GHz observations of CLASS B1030+074, a two-image strong gravitational lens system whose background source is a compact flat-spectrum radio quasar. In such systems we expect a third image of the background source to form close to the centre of the lensing galaxy. The existence and brightness of such images is important for investigation of the central mass distributions of lensing galaxies, but only one secure detection has been made so far in a galaxy-scale lens system. The noise levels achieved in our new B1030+074 images reach 3 microJy/beam and represent an improvement in central image constraints of nearly an order of magnitude over previous work, with correspondingly better resulting limits on the shape of the central mass profile of the lensing galaxy. Simple models with an isothermal outer power law slope now require either the influence of a central supermassive black hole, or an inner power law slope very close to isothermal, in order to suppress the central i...

  13. Nuclear Radio Continuum Emission of Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus NGC 4258

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Akihiro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kameno, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Hada, Kazuhiro; Sorai, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    The nearby low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) NGC 4258 has a weak radio continuum emission at the galactic center. Quasi-simultaneous multi-frequency observations using the Very Large Array (VLA) from 5 GHz (6 cm) to 22 GHz (1.3 cm) showed inverted spectra in all epochs, which were intra-month variable, as well as complicated spectral features that cannot be represented by a simple power law, indicating multiple blobs in nuclear jets. Using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array (NMA), we discovered a large amplitude variable emission at 100 GHz (3 mm), which had higher flux densities at most epochs than those of the VLA observations. A James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observation at 347 GHz (850 micron) served an upper limit of dust contamination. The inverted radio spectrum of the nucleus NGC 4258 is suggestive of an analogy to our Galactic center Sgr A*, but with three orders of magnitude higher radio luminosity. In addition to the LLAGN M 81, we discuss the nucleus of NGC 4258 as another up-scaled ...

  14. New results on interplanetary type III radio storms from multi-spacecraft combined STEREO-A/B and WIND observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, C.; Belyaev, V.; Bougeret, J. H.; Krupar, V.; Bonnin, X.; Cecconi, B.; Hoang, S.

    2011-12-01

    Interplanetary (IP) type III radio storms were intensively studied in the 80's (Bougeret et al. 1984a,b) using observations from a single radio instrument on the ISEE-3 spacecraft located at the Lagrange point L1. These studies showed that the IP storms trace long lasting (several days) streams of energetic electrons occurring in corotating regions of enhanced density, appearing to be the extension of active regions through the IP space at levels 0.05 - 0.8 AU. These studies were consistent with the hypothesis of steady conditions in the storm region over periods of several days. We propose the hypothesis that the overall duration of an IP storm observed from one vantage point directly results from the beaming of the radio radiation when the steady radio source corotates with the Sun. The goal of the present study is to track the evolution of the IP radio storms observed from three vantage points separated by about 90 degrees and spanning 180 degrees (STEREO-B, WIND, STEREO-A), over a time period of the order of a solar rotation, in order to test the limits of the above hypothesis and to track the evolution of the IP radio storms over periods close to a solar rotation.

  15. The impact of SZ effect on cm-wavelength (1-30 GHz) observation of galaxy cluster radio relics

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Kaustuv; Erler, Jens; Sommer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) Radio relics in galaxy clusters are believed to be associated with powerful shock fronts that originate during cluster mergers, and are a testbed for the acceleration of relativistic particles in the intracluster medium. Recently, radio relic observations have pushed into the cm-wavelength domain (1-30 GHz) where a break from the standard synchrotron power-law spectrum has been found, most noticeably in the famous 'Sausage' relic. In this paper, we point to an important effect that has been ignored or considered insignificant while interpreting these new high-frequency radio data, namely the contamination due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect that changes the observed radio flux. Even though the radio relics reside in the cluster outskirts, the shock-driven pressure boost increases the SZ signal locally by roughly an order of magnitude. The resulting flux contamination for some well-known relics are non-negligible already at 10 GHz, and at 30 GHz the observed radio fluxes can be diminished by a...

  16. SINGLE-PULSE RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE GALACTIC CENTER MAGNETAR PSR J1745–2900

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhen; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Rong-Bing; Fan, Qing-Yuan; Hong, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Dong-Rong; Li, Bin; Liang, Shi-Guang; Ling, Quan-Bao; Liu, Qing-Hui; Qian, Zhi-Han; Zhang, Xiu-Zhong; Zhong, Wei-Ye; Ye, Shu-Hua [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Wu, Xin-Ji [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Manchester, R. N. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Weltevrede, P. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Yuan, Jian-Ping [Key Laboratory of Radio Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Lee, Ke-Jia, E-mail: yanzhen@shao.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-11-20

    In this paper, we report radio observations of the Galactic Center magnetar PSR J1745–2900 at six epochs between 2014 June and October. These observations were carried out using the new Shanghai Tian Ma Radio Telescope at a frequency of 8.6 GHz. Both the flux density and integrated profile of PSR J1745–2900 show dramatic changes from epoch to epoch, showing that the pulsar was in its “erratic” phase. On MJD 56836, the flux density of this magnetar was about 8.7 mJy, which was 10 times larger than that reported at the time of discovery, enabling a single-pulse analysis. The emission is dominated by narrow “spiky” pulses that follow a log-normal distribution in peak flux density. From 1913 pulses, we detected 53 pulses whose peak flux densities are 10 times greater than that of the integrated profile. They are concentrated in pulse phase at the peaks of the integrated profile. The pulse widths at the 50% level of these bright pulses were between 0.°2 and 0.°9, much narrower than that of the integrated profile (∼12°). The observed pulse widths may be limited by interstellar scattering. No clear correlation was found between the widths and peak flux density of these pulses and no evidence was found for subpulse drifting. Relatively strong spiky pulses are also detected in the other five epochs of observation, showing the same properties as those detected in MJD 56836. These strong spiky pulses cannot be classified as “giant” pulses but are more closely related to normal pulse emission.

  17. First Spectroscopic Imaging Observations of the Sun at Low Radio Frequencies with the Murchison Widefield Array Prototype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberoi, Divya; Matthews, Lynn D.; Cairns, Iver H.; Emrich, David; Lobzin, Vasili; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Morgan, Edward H.; Prabu, T.; Vedantham, Harish; Wayth, Randall B.; Williams, Andrew; Williams, Christopher; White, Stephen M.; Allen, G.; Arcus, Wayne; Barnes, David; Benkevitch, Leonid; Bernardi, Gianni; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, Frank H.; Bunton, John D.; Burns, Steve; Cappallo, Roger C.; Clark, M.A.; Corey, Brian E.; Dawson, M.; DeBoer, David; De Gans, A.; deSouza, Ludi; Derome, Mark; Edgar, R. G.; Elton, T.; Goeke, Robert; Gopalakrishna, M. R.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Hazelton, Bryna; Herne, David; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Kamini, P. A.; Kaplan, David L.; Kasper, Justin C.; Kennedy, Rachel; Kincaid, Barton B.; Kocz, Jonathan; Koeing, R.; Kowald, Errol; Lynch, Mervyn J.; Madhavi, S.; McWhirter, Stephen R.; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Morales, Miguel F.; Ng, A.; Ord, Stephen M.; Pathikulangara, Joseph; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Roshi, Anish; Salah, Joseph E.; Sault, Robert J.; Schinckel, Antony; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Stevens, Jamie; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Thakkar, D.; Tingay, Steven J.; Tuthill, J.; Vaccarella, Annino; Waterson, Mark; Webster, Rachel L.; Whitney, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9- 201.6 MHz. Though our observing period is characterized as a period of "low"

  18. First Spectroscopic Imaging Observations of the Sun at Low Radio Frequencies with the Murchison Widefield Array Prototype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberoi, Divya; Matthews, Lynn D.; Cairns, Iver H.; Emrich, David; Lobzin, Vasili; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Morgan, Edward H.; Prabu, T.; Vedantham, Harish; Wayth, Randall B.; Williams, Andrew; Williams, Christopher; White, Stephen M.; Allen, G.; Arcus, Wayne; Barnes, David; Benkevitch, Leonid; Bernardi, Gianni; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, Frank H.; Bunton, John D.; Burns, Steve; Cappallo, Roger C.; Clark, M. A.; Corey, Brian E.; Dawson, M.; DeBoer, David; De Gans, A.; deSouza, Ludi; Derome, Mark; Edgar, R. G.; Elton, T.; Goeke, Robert; Gopalakrishna, M. R.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Hazelton, Bryna; Herne, David; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Kamini, P. A.; Kaplan, David L.; Kasper, Justin C.; Kennedy, Rachel; Kincaid, Barton B.; Kocz, Jonathan; Koeing, R.; Kowald, Errol; Lynch, Mervyn J.; Madhavi, S.; McWhirter, Stephen R.; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Morales, Miguel F.; Ng, A.; Ord, Stephen M.; Pathikulangara, Joseph; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Roshi, Anish; Salah, Joseph E.; Sault, Robert J.; Schinckel, Antony; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Stevens, Jamie; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Thakkar, D.; Tingay, Steven J.; Tuthill, J.; Vaccarella, Annino; Waterson, Mark; Webster, Rachel L.; Whitney, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9- 201.6 MHz. Though our observing period is characterized as a period of "low" to "medium"

  19. Radio Galaxy 3C 230 Observed with Gemini Laser-Adaptive-Optics Integral-Field Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbring, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The Altair laser-guide-star adaptive optics facility combined with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer (NIFS) on Gemini North have been employed to study the morphology and kinematics of 3C 230 at z=1.5, the first such observations of a high-redshift radio galaxy. These suggest a bi-polar outflow spanning 0"9 (~16 kpc projected distance for a standard lambda-CDM cosmology) reaching a mean relative velocity of 235 km/s in redshifted H-alpha + [NII] and [SII] emission. Structure is resolved to 0"1 (0.8 kpc), well correlated with optical images from the Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Array radio maps obtained at similar spatial resolution. Line diagnostics suggest that over the 10^7 yr to 10^8 yr duration of its AGN activity, gas has been ejected into bright turbulent lobes at rates comparable to star formation, although constituting perhaps only 1 percent of the baryonic mass in the galaxy.

  20. The Lockman Hole project: LOFAR observations and spectral index properties of low-frequency radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mahony, E K; Prandoni, I; van Bemmel, I M; Shimwell, T W; Brienza, M; Best, P N; Brüggen, M; Rivera, G Calistro; de Gasperin, F; Hardcastle, M J; Harwood, J J; Heald, G; Jarvis, M J; Mandal, S; Miley, G K; Retana-Montenegro, E; Röttgering, H J A; Sabater, J; Tasse, C; van Velzen, S; van Weeren, R J; Williams, W L; White, G J

    2016-01-01

    The Lockman Hole is a well-studied extragalactic field with extensive multi-band ancillary data covering a wide range in frequency, essential for characterising the physical and evolutionary properties of the various source populations detected in deep radio fields (mainly star-forming galaxies and AGNs). In this paper we present new 150-MHz observations carried out with the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR), allowing us to explore a new spectral window for the faint radio source population. This 150-MHz image covers an area of 34.7 square degrees with a resolution of 18.6$\\times$14.7 arcsec and reaches an rms of 160 $\\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ at the centre of the field. As expected for a low-frequency selected sample, the vast majority of sources exhibit steep spectra, with a median spectral index of $\\alpha_{150}^{1400}=-0.78\\pm0.015$. The median spectral index becomes slightly flatter (increasing from $\\alpha_{150}^{1400}=-0.84$ to $\\alpha_{150}^{1400}=-0.75$) with decreasing flux density down to $S_{150} \\sim$10 mJy b...