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Sample records for vivo rat retina

  1. In vivo two-photon imaging of retina in rabbits and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, Gopal Swamy; Wu, Yi-Kai; Bille, Josef F; Kim, Samuel; Mao, Xiao Wen; Gimbel, Howard V; Rauser, Michael E; Fan, Joseph T

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the retina using near-infrared (NIR) two-photon scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. New Zealand white rabbits, albino rats, and brown Norway rats were used in this study. An autofluorescence image of the retina, including the retinal cells and its associated vasculatures was obtained by a real-time scan using the ophthalmoscope. Furthermore, the retinal vessels, nerve fiber layers and the non-pigmented retina were recorded with two-photon fluorescein angiography (FA); and the choroidal vasculatures were recorded using two-photon indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). Two-photon ICGA was achieved by exciting a second singlet state at ∼398 nm. Simultaneous two-photon FA and two-photon ICGA were performed to characterize the retinal and choroidal vessels with a single injection. The minimum laser power threshold required to elicit two-photon fluorescence was determined. The two-photon ophthalmoscope could serve as a promising tool to detect and monitor the disease progression in animal models. Moreover, these high-resolution images of retinal and choroidal vessels can be acquired in a real-time scan with a single light source, requiring no additional filters for FA or ICGA. The combination of FA and ICGA using the two-photon ophthalmoscope will help researchers to characterize the retinal diseases in animal models, and also to classify the types (classic, occult or mixed) of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in macular degeneration. Furthermore, the prototype can be adapted to image the retina of rodents and rabbits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Up-regulation of DRP-3 long isoform during the induction of neural progenitor cells by glutamate treatment in the ex vivo rat retina

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    Tokuda, Kazuhiro, E-mail: r502um@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Department of Biochemistry and Functional Proteomics, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Byron, Baron; Kitagawa, Takao [Department of Biochemistry and Functional Proteomics, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Tokuda, Nobuko [Faculty of Health Sciences, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube (Japan); Kobayashi, Daiki; Nagayama, Megumi; Araki, Norie [Department of Tumor Genetics and Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Sonoda, Koh-Hei [Department of Ophthalmology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Nakamura, Kazuyuki [Department of Biochemistry and Functional Proteomics, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Glutamate has been shown to induce neural progenitor cells in the adult vertebrate retina. However, protein dynamics during progenitor cell induction by glutamate are not fully understood. To identify specific proteins involved in the process, we employed two-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics on glutamate untreated and treated retinal ex vivo sections. Rat retinal tissues were incubated with 1 mM glutamate for 1 h, followed by incubation in glutamate-free media for a total of 24 h. Consistent with prior reports, it was found that mitotic cells appeared in the outer nuclear layer without any histological damage. Immunohistological evaluations and immunoblotting confirmed the emergence of neuronal progenitor cells in the mature retina treated with glutamate. Proteomic analysis revealed the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 3 (DRP-3), DRP-2 and stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1 (STIP1) during neural progenitor cell induction by glutamate. Moreover, mRNA expression of DRP-3, especially, its long isoform, robustly increased in the treated retina compared to that in the untreated retina. These results may indicate that glutamate induces neural progenitor cells in the mature rat retina by up-regulating the proteins which mediate cell mitosis and neurite growth. - Highlights: • Glutamate induced neuronal progenitor cells in the mature rat retina. • Proteomic analysis revealed the up-regulation of DRP-3, DRP-2 and STIP1. • mRNA expression of DRP-3, especially, its long isoform, robustly increased.

  3. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of melanin and lipofuscin in the retina with multimodal photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hao F.; Zhou, Lixiang; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-02-01

    We combined photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) with autofluorescence imaging for simultaneous in vivo imaging of dual molecular contrasts in the retina using a single light source. The dual molecular contrasts come from melanin and lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Melanin and lipofuscin are two types of pigments and are believed to play opposite roles (protective vs. exacerbate) in the RPE in the aging process. We successfully imaged the retina of pigmented and albino rats at different ages. The experimental results showed that multimodal PAOM system can be a potentially powerful tool in the study of age-related degenerative retinal diseases.

  4. Distribution of photon absorption rates across the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T P; Webbers, J P; Giordano, L; Henderson, R P

    1998-04-15

    1. An investigation into the distribution of light intensity across the rat retina was carried out on excised, intact rat eyes exposed to Ganzfeld illumination from a helium-neon laser (543 nm). 2. Some of the light entering the eyes exits through the sclera where its intensity can be monitored with an optical 'pick-up' that samples the intensity coming from a small region of external sclera and underlying retina. The spatial resolution of the pick-up is such that it samples light that has passed through ca 2 % of the rods in the rat eye. 3. Some of the laser light is absorbed by the rod pigment, rhodopsin, which gradually bleaches. Bleaching in the retina, in turn, causes an exponential increase in intensity emanating from the sclera. By monitoring this intensity increase, we are able to measure two important parameters in a single bleaching run: the local rhodopsin concentration and the local intensity falling on the rods. 4. With an ocular transmission photometer, we have measured both the local intensity and the local rhodopsin concentration across wide regions of rat retina. Both pigmented and albino rats were studied. 5. The distributions of rhodopsin and intensity were both nearly uniform; consequently, the product, (rhodopsin concentration) x (intensity), was similarly nearly equal across the retina. This means that the initial rate of photon absorption is about the same at all retinal locations. 6. Interpreted in terms of photostasis (the regulation of daily photon catch), this means that the rate of photon absorption is about the same in each rod, viz. 14 400 photons absorbed per rod per second. Since this rate of absorption is sufficient to saturate the rod, one possible purpose of photostasis is to maintain the rod system in a saturated state during daylight hours.

  5. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of melanin and lipofuscin in the retina with photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy and autofluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hao F.; Puliafito, Carmen A.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2011-08-01

    We combined photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) with autofluorescence imaging for simultaneous in vivo imaging of dual molecular contrasts in the retina using a single light source. The dual molecular contrasts come from melanin and lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Melanin and lipofuscin are two types of pigments and are believed to play opposite roles (protective versus exacerbate) in the RPE in the aging process. We have successfully imaged the retina of pigmented and albino rats at different ages. The experimental results showed that multimodal PAOM system can be a potentially powerful tool in the study of age-related degenerative retinal diseases.

  6. Protective effect of melatonin in the diabetic rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrzadi, Saeed; Motevalian, Manijeh; Rezaei Kanavi, Mozhgan; Fatemi, Iman; Ghaznavi, Habib; Shahriari, Mansoor

    2018-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common and serious microvascular complications of diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of melatonin (MEL) on retinal injury in diabetic rats. In this study, 21 rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, diabetic, and diabetic + MEL. Streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes at a dose of 50 mg/kg, i.p., and blood glucose was measured to choose the diabetic rats for the study. MEL (20 mg/kg) was given orally for 7 weeks in diabetic rats starting 1 week after induction of diabetes. After 8 weeks, the groups were compared in terms of mean scores of fluorescein leakage, using fluorescein angiography. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in retina using commercially available assays. Structural changes in retinas were evaluated by light microscopy. Results showed that diabetes significantly increased the mean scores of fluorescein leakage, and MDA and ROS levels compared to control group. Treatment of the diabetic rats with MEL for 7 weeks prevented the alterations induced by diabetes in comparison with the diabetic control group.Based on these findings, it can be concluded that MEL might have beneficial effects in prevention of DR. © 2018 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  7. Proteomic profiling of early degenerative retina of RCS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-Hong; Fu, Yan; Weng, Chuan-Huang; Zhao, Cong-Jian; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2017-01-01

    To identify the underlying cellular and molecular changes in retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Label-free quantification-based proteomics analysis, with its advantages of being more economic and consisting of simpler procedures, has been used with increasing frequency in modern biological research. Dystrophic RCS rats, the first laboratory animal model for the study of RP, possess a similar pathological course as human beings with the diseases. Thus, we employed a comparative proteomics analysis approach for in-depth proteome profiling of retinas from dystrophic RCS rats and non-dystrophic congenic controls through Linear Trap Quadrupole - orbitrap MS/MS, to identify the significant differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). Bioinformatics analyses, including Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway annotation and upstream regulatory analysis, were then performed on these retina proteins. Finally, a Western blotting experiment was carried out to verify the difference in the abundance of transcript factor E2F1. In this study, we identified a total of 2375 protein groups from the retinal protein samples of RCS rats and non-dystrophic congenic controls. Four hundred thirty-four significantly DEPs were selected by Student's t -test. Based on the results of the bioinformatics analysis, we identified mitochondrial dysfunction and transcription factor E2F1 as the key initiation factors in early retinal degenerative process. We showed that the mitochondrial dysfunction and the transcription factor E2F1 substantially contribute to the disease etiology of RP. The results provide a new potential therapeutic approach for this retinal degenerative disease.

  8. Proteomic profiling of early degenerative retina of RCS rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Hong Zhu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify the underlying cellular and molecular changes in retinitis pigmentosa (RP. METHODS: Label-free quantification-based proteomics analysis, with its advantages of being more economic and consisting of simpler procedures, has been used with increasing frequency in modern biological research. Dystrophic RCS rats, the first laboratory animal model for the study of RP, possess a similar pathological course as human beings with the diseases. Thus, we employed a comparative proteomics analysis approach for in-depth proteome profiling of retinas from dystrophic RCS rats and non-dystrophic congenic controls through Linear Trap Quadrupole - orbitrap MS/MS, to identify the significant differentially expressed proteins (DEPs. Bioinformatics analyses, including Gene ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway annotation and upstream regulatory analysis, were then performed on these retina proteins. Finally, a Western blotting experiment was carried out to verify the difference in the abundance of transcript factor E2F1. RESULTS: In this study, we identified a total of 2375 protein groups from the retinal protein samples of RCS rats and non-dystrophic congenic controls. Four hundred thirty-four significantly DEPs were selected by Student’s t-test. Based on the results of the bioinformatics analysis, we identified mitochondrial dysfunction and transcription factor E2F1 as the key initiation factors in early retinal degenerative process. CONCLUSION: We showed that the mitochondrial dysfunction and the transcription factor E2F1 substantially contribute to the disease etiology of RP. The results provide a new potential therapeutic approach for this retinal degenerative disease.

  9. Expression of nitric oxide synthase during the development of RCS rat retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R K; Warfvinge, K; Ehinger, B

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to be both neurodestructive and neuroprotective in the central nervous system and could possibly play an important role in neurodegenerative disorders. On the assumption that NO synthesis may influence degenerative processes in the retina, we have examined the development and distribution of nitric-oxide-synthase(NOS)-immunoreactive cells in developing Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat retinas, which is an animal model for retinal degeneration. An antibody against constitutive neuronal NOS was used for immunocytochemistry on RCS rat retinas from postnatal (PN) days 3, 7, 10, 14, 35, 70 and 281 and compared with that in the normal rats of PN days 3, 7, 10, 14, 54 and adults. Immunoreactive cells were not seen in PN 3 retinas but were distinctly seen in the PN 7 retina along with a plexus in the inner plexiform layer. In both groups (normal and RCS rats) a distinct sublayering of the plexus in the inner plexiform layer could be seen at PN 10, which became more distinct at PN 14. The immunoreactive cells were detected also in the oldest retina examined, which was PN 281 in the case of RCS rats. In both groups, certain amacrine cells, certain bipolar cells and certain horizontal cells were found to be immunoreactive. In conclusion, the developmental timetable of the NOS immunoreactivity was identical in the normal and the RCS rat retinas. The NOS-immunoreactive cells persisted in the RCS retinas even when the retina had degenerated extensively. Abnormalities with the inducible isoforms of NOS cannot be ruled out from this study. We conclude that the chronological and qualitative development of the constitutive neuronal NOS immunoreactivity is normal in RCS rat retinas. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Preservation of Retina Ganglion Cell Function by Morphine in a Chronic Ocular-Hypertensive Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Husain, Shahid; Abdul, Yasir; Crosson, Craig E.

    2012-01-01

    Morphine, a broad range opioid-receptors agonist, provides retina neuroprotection against glaucomatous injury in chronic experimental rat model. Morphine-induced retina neuroprotection in glaucoma model is mediated partly via inhibition of TNF-alpha production and caspase-3 and caspase-8 activation.

  11. Wavefront optimized nonlinear microscopy of ex vivo human retinas

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    Gualda, Emilio J.; Bueno, Juan M.; Artal, Pablo

    2010-03-01

    A multiphoton microscope incorporating a Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor to control the ultrafast laser beam's wavefront aberrations has been developed. This instrument allowed us to investigate the impact of the laser beam aberrations on two-photon autofluorescence imaging of human retinal tissues. We demonstrated that nonlinear microscopy images are improved when laser beam aberrations are minimized by realigning the laser system cavity while wavefront controlling. Nonlinear signals from several human retinal anatomical features have been detected for the first time, without the need of fixation or staining procedures. Beyond the improved image quality, this approach reduces the required excitation power levels, minimizing the side effects of phototoxicity within the imaged sample. In particular, this may be important to study the physiology and function of the healthy and diseased retina.

  12. Histologic correlation of in vivo optical coherence tomography images of the human retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, T.; Cense, B.; Miller, J.S.; Rubin, P. A. D.; Deschler, D. G.; Gragoudas, E. S.; de Boer, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate in vivo human retina optical coherence tomography (OCT)3 images with histology. Design: Case series. Methods: Linear OCT3 scans through the macula and optic nerve were obtained in three eyes of three patients who then underwent exenteration surgery for orbital cancers. OCT3

  13. Abnormal levels of histone methylation in the retinas of diabetic rats are reversed by minocycline treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wenjun; Sidoli, Simone; Zhang, Wenquan

    2017-01-01

    67% of these marks had their relative abundance restored to non-diabetic levels after minocycline treatment. Mono-and di-methylation states of histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20me1/me2), markers related to DNA damage response, were found to be up-regulated in the retinas of diabetic rats and restored......In this study we quantified the alterations of retinal histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) in diabetic rats using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approach. Some diabetic rats were subsequently treated with minocycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, which has...... been shown to inhibit the diabetes-induced chronic inflammation in the retinas of rodents. We quantified 266 differentially modified histone peptides, including 48 out of 83 methylation marks with significantly different abundancein retinas of diabetic rats as compared to non-diabetic controls. About...

  14. Bcl-2 expression during the development and degeneration of RCS rat retinae.

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    Sharma, R K

    2001-12-14

    In various hereditary retinal degenerations, including that in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, the photoreceptors ultimately die by apoptosis. Bcl-2 is one of the genes, which regulates apoptosis and is thought to promote survival of cells. This study has investigated the developmental expression of Bcl-2 in RCS rat, which is a well-studied animal model for hereditary retinal degeneration. An antibody against Bcl-2 was used for its immunohistochemical localization in dystrophic RCS rat retinae from postnatal (PN) days 4, 7, 13, 35, 45, 70, 202 and 14 months. Results were compared with Bcl-2 localization in congenic non-dystrophic rats from PN 4, 7, 13, 44, 202 and 14 months. Bcl-2 immunoreactivity in non-dystrophic retinae was already present in PN 4 retinae in the nerve fiber layer (presumably in the endfeet of immature Müller cells) and in the proximal parts of certain radially aligned neuroepithelial cells/immature Müller cell radial processes. With increasing age the immunoreactivity in relatively more mature Müller cell radial processes spread distally towards the outer retina and between PN 13 and 44 it reached the adult distribution. No cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer were found to be immunoreactive. Expression of Bcl-2 immunoreactivity in dystrophic RCS rat retinae closely resembled that of non-dystrophic retinae. No immunoreactivity was seen in photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium in dystrophic or non-dystrophic retinae. In conclusion, Bcl-2 expression is not altered, either in terms of its chronology or the cell type expressing it, during retinal degeneration in RCS rats.

  15. Localization and Developmental Expression Patterns of CSPG in the RCS Rat Retina

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    Li-Feng Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Investigate changes in chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG distribution in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rat retinae. Could CSPGs distribution act as a physical barrier to transplanted cell migration in degenerating retinae? Methods: CSPG expression was examined in RCS and Long-Evans rat retinae from birth to postnatal day 150 (PND150 using immunofluorescence and western-blots. Results: Both groups showed a rapid rise in CSPG expression on PND14, which peaked on PND21 before declining to lower levels by PND35. CSPG expression had risen again by PND90 and remained elevated for the duration of the study (PND150. However, from PND21, CSPG expression was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05, n = 5 in Long-Evans rat retinae. CSPG-positive cells were localized in the ganglion cell layer (GCL and the photoreceptor outer segment debris zone (DZ; CSPG expression in the DZ was the main contributor to the higher expression in older animals for both groups. Conclusions: Increased expression of CSPGs in the DZ may act as a physical barrier following retinal cellular transplantation. CSPGs in the GCL is probably related to dendritic changes. CSPG accumulation in the older retinae suggests that aging influences the microenvironment in the retina, which may affect the efficacy of cell transplantation.

  16. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen on crystalline lens and retina in nicotine-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Seyhmus; Nergiz, Yusuf; Cingü, Abdullah Kürşat; Atay, Ahmet Engin; Sahin, Alparslan; Cinar, Yasin; Caca, Ihsan

    2013-03-01

    To determine histopathological changes on crystalline lens and retina of rats after subcutaneous injection of nicotine and to examine the effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on these changes related to nicotine exposure. Twenty-eight female Sprague-Dawley rats were enrolled in the study and the rats were divided into four equal sized groups randomly (Group N: the rats exposed only to nicotine, group HB: the rats received only HBO, group N+HB: the rats that underwent to nicotine injection and subsequently received HBO, group C: the control group that neither exposed to nicotine nor received HBO). The rats were sacrificed by decapitation method and all were enucleated immediately after scarification. Tissue samples from crystalline lens, lens capsule, and the retina from the right eyes of the rats were examined by light microscopy. While the histological appearances of the retina and the lens was similar in group HB, group N+HB, and the control group; group N showed some pathological changes like decrement in the retinal ganglion cell density, atrophy of the retinal nerve fiber layer, congestion of the vessels in the optic nerve head, thinning of the internal plexiform layer, thinning of the lens capsule, and transformation of the anterior subcapsular epithelium into squamous epithelia. Subcutaneous injection of nicotine was found to be related with some pathological changes in the retina and lens of the Sprague-Dawley rats. However HBO caused no significant negative effect. Furthermore, the histopathological changes related to nicotine exposure in the lens and retina of the rats recovered by the application of HBO.

  17. Ultrasound-mediated nanoparticle delivery across ex vivo bovine retina after intravitreal injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Di; Chen, Ying-Shan; Thakur, Sachin S; Rupenthal, Ilva D

    2017-10-01

    Intravitreal injection is the most common administration route for the treatment of retinal diseases. However, the vitreous and some of the retinal layers themselves act as significant barriers to efficient delivery of drugs administered intravitreally. This study aimed to improve the diffusive mobility of nanoparticles (NPs) in the vitreous and enhance their permeation across the retina after intravitreal injection by application of ultrasound (US). Ex vivo posterior bovine eye cups were used and the vitreous was either left intact or removed gently from the neural retina. Hyaluronic acid coated human serum albumin NPs were administered into the eye cups and continuous US with a frequency of 1MHz, an intensity of 0.5W/cm 2 , and a duration of 30s was applied once or repeatedly via the transscleral route. After pre-determined time points, fluorescence intensities in the vitreous and the retina were analyzed. Short pulses of US significantly improved the diffusive mobility of NPs through the vitreous as well as their penetration across the neural retina into the retinal pigment epithelium and choroid without causing any detectable damage to the ocular tissues. Therefore, transscleral US could be a powerful and safe tool to enhance retinal delivery of intravitreally injected NPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression and Localization of TRK-Fused Gene Products in the Rat Brain and Retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maebayashi, Hisae; Takeuchi, Shigako; Masuda, Chiaki; Makino, Satoshi; Fukui, Kenji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    The TRK-fused gene (TFG in human, Tfg in rat) was originally identified in human papillary thyroid cancer as a chimeric form of the NTRK1 gene. It has been reported that the gene product (TFG) plays a role in regulating phosphotyrosine-specific phosphatase-1 activity. However, no information regarding the localization of Tfg in rat tissues is available. In this study, we investigated the expression of Tfg mRNA in normal rat tissues using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We also produced an antibody against Tfg gene products and examined the localization of TFG in the rat brain and retina. The RT-PCR experiments demonstrated that two types of Tfg mRNA were expressed in rat tissues: the conventional form of Tfg (cTfg) and a novel variant form, retinal Tfg (rTfg). RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that cTfg was ubiquitously expressed in rat tissues, while rTfg was predominantly expressed in the brain and retina. Western blot analysis demonstrated two bands with molecular weights of about 30 kDa and 50 kDa in the rat brain. Immunohistochemistry indicated that TFG proteins were predominantly expressed by neurons in the brain. In the rat retina, intense TFG-immunoreactivity was detected in the layer of rods and cones and the outer plexiform layer

  19. Expression of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Factors in the Retinas of Diabetic Rats

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    Shu Yan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports show that ER stress plays an important role in diabetic retinopathy (DR, but ER stress is a complicated process involving a network of signaling pathways and hundreds of factors, What factors involved in DR are not yet understood. We selected 89 ER stress factors from more than 200, A rat diabetes model was established by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ. The expression of 89 ER stress-related factors was found in the retinas of diabetic rats, at both 1- and 3-months after development of diabetes, by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction arrays. There were significant changes in expression levels of 13 and 12 ER stress-related factors in the diabetic rat retinas in the first and third month after the development of diabetes, Based on the array results, homocysteine- inducible, endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducible, ubiquitin-like domain member 1(HERP, and synoviolin(HRD1 were studied further by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses showed that the expression of HERP was reduced in the retinas of diabetic rats in first and third month. The expression of Hrd1 did not change significantly in the retinas of diabetic rats in the first month but was reduced in the third month.

  20. Effect of ozone therapy on cell apoptosis and angiogenesis in retina tissue of diabetic retinopathy rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Liu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective:To study the effect of ozone therapy on cell apoptosis and angiogenesis in retina tissue of diabetic retinopathy rats.Methods:SD rats were selected as experimental animals and divided into control group, model group and ozone group, and after diabetic models were built, ozone enema was conducted. Retina tissue was collected, TUNEL kits were used to detect the number of apoptotic cells, and Elisa kits were used to detect the contents of nerve damage molecules, angiogenesis-related molecules and endoplasmic reticulum stress molecules. Results:The number of apoptotic cells in retina tissue of model group was significantly more than that of control group, and the number of apoptotic cells in retina tissue of ozone group was significantly less than that of model group; NgR, NR2B, ERK1, ERK2, GFAP, VEGF, STAT-3, HIF-1α, Apelin, APJ, PERK, IRE-1α, ATF-6, eIF2α and XBP-1 contents in retina tissue of model group were significantly higher than those of control group, and PEDF content was lower than that of control group; NgR, NR2B, ERK1, ERK2, GFAP, VEGF, STAT-3, HIF-1α, Apelin, APJ, PERK, IRE-1α, ATF-6, eIF2α and XBP-1 contents in retina tissue of ozone group were significantly lower than those of model group, and PEDF content was higher than that of model group.Conclusion:Ozone therapy can reduce the number of apoptotic cells while reduce nerve cell injury and inhibit angiogenesis and endoplasmic reticulum stress in retina tissue of diabetic rats.

  1. Circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled genes in the rat retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Willem; Cailotto, Cathy; Dijk, Frederike; Bergen, Arthur; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2005-01-01

    The circadian expression patterns of genes encoding for proteins that make up the core of the circadian clock were measured in rat retina using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Transcript levels of several genes previously used for normalization of qPCR assays were determined and the effect of

  2. Cellular disturbance in the rats retina after irradiation and metabolic errors during the postnatal period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lierse, W.; Franke, H.D.

    1982-01-01

    During the first five days of the postnatal period the retina has been vulnerable following administration of DNA blocking drugs and irradiation with conventional X-rays and fast neutrons. During this period the disturbance of lamination accompanied with pycnosis of neurons and neuroblasts has been the important morphologic reaction. During the same phase metabolic errors, like experimental phenylketonuria, have produced a swelling of photoreceptor cells and pigmentepithelium cells. The other neurons of the retina were pycnotic. Structural alterations like rosettes persisted during the rest of life. The relative minor error during the first phase of rats life may result in a persistent disease. (orig.)

  3. Feasibility study of Raman spectroscopy for investigating the mouse retina in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Suman K.; de Oliveira, Marcos A. S.; Zhang, Pengfei; Maleppat, Ratheesh K.; Chang, Che-Wei; Pugh, Edward N.; Chan, James W.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2018-02-01

    The use of Raman spectroscopy in biochemistry has been very successful, particularly because of its ability to identify elementary chemical species. However, application of this spectroscopic technique for in vivo assessment is often limited by autofluorescence, which make detection of Raman signatures difficult. The mouse eye has been used as an optical testbed for investigation of a variety of disease models and therapeutic pathways. Implementation of in vivo Raman spectroscopy in mice retina would be valuable but needs to be examined in context of the intrinsic auto-fluorescence artifact and potential light damage if high probing beam powers were used. To evaluate feasibility, a Raman system was built on a custom SLO/OCT platform allowing mouse positioning and morphological data acquisition along with the Raman signal from a desired retinal eccentricity. The performance of the Raman system was first assessed with a model eye consisting of polystyrene in the image plane (retina), using excitation wavelengths of 488 nm, 561 nm, and 785 nm to determine whether auto-fluorescence would be reduced at longer wavelengths. To improve the SNR, the combined system is featured with the optical compatibility for these three excitations such that their corresponding spectra from a typical region of interest can be acquired consecutively during single imaging run. Our results include emission spectra acquired over 10 s with excitation energy less than 160 J.s-1.m-2 for all wavelengths and corresponding retinal morphology for different mouse strains including WT, BALB/c and ABCA4-/-.

  4. Post-translational processing of synaptophysin in the rat retina is disrupted by diabetes.

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    Travis S D'Cruz

    Full Text Available Synaptophysin, is an abundant presynaptic protein involved in synaptic vesicle recycling and neurotransmitter release. Previous work shows that its content is significantly reduced in the rat retina by streptozotocin (STZ-diabetes. This study tested the hypothesis that STZ-diabetes alters synaptophysin protein turnover and glycosylation in the rat retina. Whole explant retinas from male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Rats were made diabetic by a single intraperitoneal STZ injection (65 mg/kg body weight in 10 mM sodium citrate, pH 4.5. mRNA translation was measured using a (35S-methionine labeling assay followed by synaptophysin immunoprecipitation and autoradiography. A pulse-chase study was used to determine the depletion of newly synthesized synaptophysin. Depletion of total synaptophysin was determined after treatment with cycloheximide. Mannose rich N-glycosylated synaptophysin was detected by treating retinal lysates with endoglycosidase H followed by immunoblot analysis. Synaptophysin mRNA translation was significantly increased after 1 month (p<0.001 and 2 months (p<0.05 of STZ-diabetes, compared to age-matched controls. Newly synthesized synaptophysin degradation was significantly accelerated in the retina after 1 and 2 months of diabetes compared to controls (p<0.05. Mannose rich glycosylated synaptophysin was significantly increased after 1 month of STZ-diabetes compared to controls (p<0.05.These data suggest that diabetes increases mRNA translation of synaptophysin in the retina, resulting in an accumulation of mannose rich glycosylated synaptophysin, a transient post-translational state of the protein. This diabetes-induced irregularity in post-translational processing could explain the accelerated degradation of retinal synaptophysin in diabetes.

  5. Ontogenetic expression of the Otx2 and Crx homeobox genes in the retina of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Morin, Fabrice; Shi, Qiong

    2007-01-01

    . This confirmed the presence of Otx2 mRNA in both the embryonic retinal pigment epithelium and the developing neural retina. During development, the expression of Otx2 persists in the pigment epithelium, whereas Otx2 expression of the neural retina becomes progressively restricted to the outer nuclear layer......Otx2 and Crx are vertebrate orthologs of the orthodenticle family of homeobox genes, which are involved in retinal development. In this study, the temporal expression patterns of Otx2 and Crx in the rat retina during embryonic and postnatal stages of development were analyzed in detail...... and the outer part of the inner nuclear layer. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Otx2 protein is also present in cell bodies of the ganglion cell layer, which does not contain the Otx2 transcript, suggesting that Otx2 protein is synthesized in cell bodies of the bipolar neurons and then transported...

  6. Mechanical Stress and Antioxidant Protection in the Retina of Hindlimb Suspended Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Aziza; Theriot, Corey A.; Alway, Stephen E.; Zanello, Susana B.

    2012-01-01

    It has been postulated that hindlimb suspension (HS) causes a cephalad fluid shift in quadrupeds similar to that occurring to humans in microgravity. Therefore, HS may provide a suitable animal model in which to recapitulate the ocular changes observed in the human Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. This work reports preliminary results from a tissue sharing project using 34 week-old Brown Norway rats. Two different experiments compared normal posture controls and HS rats for 2 weeks and rats exposed to HS for 2 weeks but allowed to recover in normal posture for 2 additional weeks. The effects of two nutritional countermeasures, green tea extract (GT) and plant polyphenol resveratrol (Rv), were also evaluated. Green tea contains the antioxidant epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). qPCR gene expression analysis of selected targets was performed on RNA from isolated retinas, and histologic analysis was done on one fixed eye per rat. The transcription factor early growth response protein 1 (Egr1) was upregulated almost 2-fold in HS retinas relative to controls (P = 0.059), and its expression returned to control levels after 2 weeks of recovery in normal posture (P = 0.023). HS-induced upregulation of Egr1 was attenuated (but not significantly) in retinas from rats fed an antioxidant rich (GT extract) diet. In rats fed the GT-enriched diet, antioxidant enzymes were induced, evidenced by the upregulation of the gene heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) (P = 0.042) and the gene superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2) (P = 0.0001). Egr1 is a stretch-activated transcription factor, and the Egr1 mechanosensitive response to HS may have been caused by a change in the translaminal pressure and/or mechanical deformation of the eye globe. The observed histologic measurements of the various retinal layers in the HS rats were lower in value than those of the control animal (n = 1), however insufficient data were available for statistical analysis. Aquaporin 4, a water

  7. Potassium-stimulated release of radiolabelled taurine and glycine from the isolated rat retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.F.; Pycock, C.J.

    1982-09-01

    The release of preloaded (/sup 3/H)glycine and (/sup 3/H)taurine in response to a depolarising stimulus (12.5-50 mM KCl) has been studied in the superfused rat retina. High external potassium concentration immediately increased the spontaneous efflux of (/sup 3/H)glycine, the effect of 50 mM K+ apparently being abolished by omitting calcium from the superfusing medium. In contrast, although high potassium concentrations increased the spontaneous efflux of (/sup 3/H)taurine from the superfused rat retina, this release was not evident until the depolarising stimulus was removed from the superfusing medium. The magnitude of this late release of (/sup 3/H)taurine was dependent on external K+ concentrations, and appeared immediately after cessation of the stimulus irrespective of whether it was applied for 4, 8, or 12 min. Potassium (50 mM)-induced release of taurine appeared partially calcium-dependent, being significantly reduced (p less than 0.01) but not abolished by replacing calcium with 1 mM EDTA in the superfusate. High-affinity uptake systems for both (/sup 3/H)glycine and (/sup 3/H)taurine were demonstrated in the rat retina in vitro (Km values, 1.67 microM and 2.97 microM; Vmax values, 19.3 and 23.1 nmol/g wet weight tissue/h, respectively). The results are discussed with respect to the possible neurotransmitter roles of both amino acids in the rat retina.

  8. Direct localised measurement of electrical resistivity profile in rat and embryonic chick retinas using a microprobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald van Lintel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an alternative technique to perform a direct and local measurement of electrical resistivities in a layered retinal tissue. Information on resistivity changes along the depth in a retina is important for modelling retinal stimulation by retinal prostheses. Existing techniques for resistivity-depth profiling have the drawbacks of a complicated experimental setup, a less localised resistivity probing and/or lower stability for measurements. We employed a flexible microprobe to measure local resistivity with bipolar impedance spectroscopy at various depths in isolated rat and chick embryo retinas for the first time. Small electrode spacing permitted high resolution measurements and the probe flexibility contributed to stable resistivity profiling. The resistivity was directly calculated based on the resistive part of the impedance measured with the Peak Resistance Frequency (PRF methodology. The resistivity-depth profiles for both rat and chick embryo models are in accordance with previous mammalian and avian studies in literature. We demonstrate that the measured resistivity at each depth has its own PRF signature. Resistivity profiles obtained with our setup provide the basis for the construction of an electric model of the retina. This model can be used to predict variations in parameters related to retinal stimulation and especially in the design and optimisation of efficient retinal implants.

  9. Characterisation of the metabolome of ocular tissues and post-mortem changes in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shi Z; Mullard, Graham; Hollywood, Katherine A; Dunn, Warwick B; Bishop, Paul N

    2016-08-01

    Time-dependent post-mortem biochemical changes have been demonstrated in donor cornea and vitreous, but there have been no published studies to date that objectively measure post-mortem changes in the retinal metabolome over time. The aim of the study was firstly, to investigate post-mortem, time-dependent changes in the rat retinal metabolome and secondly, to compare the metabolite composition of healthy rat ocular tissues. To study post-mortem changes in the rat retinal metabolome, globes were enucleated and stored at 4 °C and sampled at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 h post-mortem. To study the metabolite composition of rat ocular tissues, eyes were dissected immediately after culling to isolate the cornea, lens, vitreous and retina, prior to storing at -80 °C. Tissue extracts were subjected to Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC-MS). Generally, the metabolic composition of the retina was stable for 8 h post-mortem when eyes were stored at 4 °C, but showed increasing changes thereafter. However, some more rapid changes were observed such as increases in TCA cycle metabolites after 2 h post-mortem, whereas some metabolites such as fatty acids only showed decreases in concentration from 24 h. A total of 42 metabolites were identified across the ocular tissues by GC-MS (MSI level 1) and 2782 metabolites were annotated by UHPLC-MS (MSI level 2) according to MSI reporting standards. Many of the metabolites detected were common to all of the tissues but some metabolites showed partitioning between different ocular structures with 655, 297, 93 and 13 metabolites being uniquely detected in the retina, lens, cornea and vitreous respectively. Only a small percentage (1.6%) of metabolites found in the vitreous were only detected in the retina and not other tissues. In conclusion, mass spectrometry-based techniques have been used for the first time to compare the metabolic composition of

  10. Microscopic hyperspectral imaging studies of normal and diabetic retina of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A microscopic hyperspectral imager was developed based on the microscopic technology and the spectral imaging technology. Some microscopic hyperspectral images of retina sections of the normal, the diabetic, and the treated rats were collected by the new imager. Single-band images and pseudo-color images of each group were obtained and the typical transmittance spectrums were ex-tracted. The results showed that the transmittance of outer nuclear layer cells of the diabetic group was generally higher than that of the normal. A small absorption peak appeared near the 180th band in the spectrum of the diabetic group and this peak weakened or disappeared in the spectrum of the treated group. Our findings indicate that the microscopic hyperspectral images include wealthy information of retina sections which is helpful for the ophthalmologist to reveal the pathogenesis of diabetic reti-nopathy and explore the therapeutic effect of drugs.

  11. Assessment of apoptosis and oxidative stress in retina tissue of rats with diabetic retinopathy after grape polyphenols intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Li Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of grape polyphenols intervention on apoptosis and oxidative stress in retina tissue of rats with diabetic retinopathy (DR).Methods: SPF male SD rats were selected as experimental animals and divided into control group, diabetes group and grape polyphenols group, intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin was adopted to establish diabetic rat models, and grape polyphenols group received intragastric administration of grape polyphenols. 60 d after model establishment, the rats were executed, and the retina tissue was collected to determine apoptosis molecules and oxidative stress indexes.Results:Bax, Caspase-3, c-fos, c-jun, ROS, MDA, 8-OHdG, PARP, Cyclophilin D, Nrf-2, ARE, ERK and PI3K content in retina tissue of diabetes group were significantly higher than those of control group while Bcl-2, CAT, SOD, GSH-Px, HO-1 and NQO1 content were significantly lower than those of control group; Bax, Caspase-3, c-fos, c-jun, ROS, MDA, 8-OHdG, PARP and Cyclophilin D content in retina tissue of grape polyphenols group were significantly lower than those of diabetes group while Bcl-2, CAT, SOD, GSH-Px, HO-1, NQO1, Nrf-2, ARE, ERK and PI3K content were significantly higher those of diabetes group.Conclusions:Grape polyphenols intervention can relieve the apoptosis and oxidative stress in retina tissue of rats with diabetic retinopathy.

  12. Effect of intravitreal injection of bevacizumab-chitosan nanoparticles on retina of diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the effects of intravitreal injection of bevacizumab-chitosan nanoparticles on pathological morphology of retina and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF protein and VEGF mRNA in the retina of diabetic rats.METHODS: Seventy-two 3-month aged diabetic rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, each containing 24 animals and 48 eyes. Both eyes of the rats in group A were injected into the vitreous at the pars plana with 3μL of physiological saline, while in groups B and C were injected with 3μL (75μg of bevacizumab and 3μL of bevacizumab-chitosan nanoparticles (containing 75μg of bevacizumab, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess retinal angiogenesis, real-time PCR assay was used to analyse the expression of VEGF mRNA, and light microscopy was used to evaluate the morphology of retinal capillaries.RESULTS:Real-time PCR assay revealed that the VEGF mRNA expression in the retina before injection was similar to 1 week after injection in group A (P>0.05, while theVEGF mRNA expression before injection significantly differed from those 4 and 8 weeks after injection (P<0.05. Retinal expression of VEGF protein and VEGF mRNA was inhibited 1 week and 4 weeks after injection (P<0.05 in group B, and the expression of VEGF protein and VEGF mRNA was obviously inhibited until 8 weeks after injection (P<0.05 in group C. Using multiple comparisons among group A, group B, and group C, the VEGF expression before injection was higher than at 1, 4 and 8 weeks after injection (P<0.05. The amount of VEGF expression was higher 8 weeks after injection than 1 week or 4 weeks after injection, and also higher 1 week after injection compared with 4 weeks after injection (P<0.05. No toxic effect on SD rats was observed with bevacizumab-chitosan nanoparticles injection alone.CONCLUSION: The results offer a new approach for inhibiting angiogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and indicate that the intravitreal injection of

  13. Expression of neurotransmitters and neurotrophins in neurogenic inflammation of the rat retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Bronzetti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Antidromic stimulation of the rat trigeminal ganglion triggers the release of substance P (SP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP from sensory nerve terminals of the capsaicin sensitive C-fibers. These pro-inflammatory neuropeptides produce a marked hyperemia in the anterior segment of the eye, accompanied by increased intraocular pressure, breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier and myosis. To assess the effects of neurogenic inflammation on the retina, specifically on the immunostaining of neurotransmitters and neurotrophins, as well as on the expression of neurotrophin receptors in the retina. RT-PCR was also accomplished in control and stimulated animals to confirm the immunohistochemical results. In the electrically stimulated eyes, immunostaining for SP, CGRP, VIP and nNOS demonstrated a marked increase in the RPE/POS (Retinal Pigment Epithelium/Photoreceptor Outer Segments, in the inner and outer granular layers and in the ganglion cells in comparison to the control eyes. CGRP and SP were found increased in stimulated animals and this result has been confirmed by RT- PCR. Changes in neurotrophin immunostaining and in receptor expression were also observed after electric stimulation of trigeminal ganglia. Decrease of BDNF and NT4 in the outer and inner layers and in ganglion cells was particularly marked. In stimulated rat retinas immunostaining and RT-PCR showed a NGF expression increase. Neurotrophin receptors remained substantially unchanged. These studies demonstrated, for the first time, that antidromic stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion and subsequent neurogenic inflammation affect immunostaining of retinal cell neurotransmitter/ neuropeptides and neurotrophins as well as the expression of neurotrophin receptors.

  14. Silencing p75NTR prevents proNGF-induced endothelial cell death and development of acellular capillaries in rat retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Y Shanab

    Full Text Available Accumulation of the nerve growth factor precursor (proNGF and its receptor p75NTR have been associated with several neurodegenerative diseases in both brain and retina. However, whether proNGF contributes to microvascular degeneration remain unexplored. This study seeks to investigate the mechanism by which proNGF/p75NTR induce endothelial cell (EC death and development of acellular capillaries, a surrogate marker of retinal ischemia. Stable overexpression of the cleavage-resistant proNGF and molecular silencing of p75NTR were utilized in human retinal EC and rat retinas in vivo. Stable overexpression of proNGF decreased NGF levels and induced retinal vascular cell death evident by 1.9-fold increase in acellular capillaries and activation of JNK and cleaved-PARP that were mitigated by p75NTRshRNA. In vitro, overexpression of proNGF did not alter TNF-α level, reduced NGF, however induced EC apoptosis evident by activation of JNK and p38 MAPK, cleaved-PARP. Silencing p75NTR using siRNA restored expression of NGF and TrkA activation and prevented EC apoptosis. Treatment of EC with human-mutant proNGF induced apoptosis that coincided with marked protein interaction and nuclear translocation of p75NTR and the neurotrophin receptor interacting factor. These effects were abolished by a selective p75NTR antagonist. Therefore, targeting p75NTR represents a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases associated with aberrant expression of proNGF.

  15. Localization of diacylglycerol lipase alpha and monoacylglycerol lipase during postnatal development of the rat retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eCécyre

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, there has been increased interest in the physiological roles of the endocannabinoid (eCB system and its receptors, the cannabinoid receptor types 1 (CB1R and 2 (CB2R. Exposure to cannabinoids during development results in neurofunctional alterations, which implies that the eCB system is involved in the developmental processes of the brain. Because of their lipophilic nature, eCBs are synthesized on demand and are not stored in vesicles. Consequently, the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation are key regulators of their physiological actions. Therefore, knowing the localization of these enzymes during development is crucial for a better understanding of the role played by eCBs during the formation of the central nervous system.In this study, we investigated the developmental protein localization of the synthesizing and catabolic enzymes of the principal eCB, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG in the retinas of young and adult rats. The distribution of the enzymes responsible for the synthesis (DAGLα and the degradation (MAGL of 2-AG was determined for every retinal cell type from birth to adulthood. Our results indicate that DAGLα is present early in postnatal development. It is highly expressed in photoreceptor, horizontal, amacrine, and ganglion cells. MAGL appears later during the development of the retina and its presence is limited to amacrine and Müller cells. Overall, these results suggest that 2-AG is strongly present in early retinal development and might be involved in the regulation of the structural and functional maturation of the retina.

  16. Expression and location of mRNAs encoding multiple forms of secretory phospholipase A2 in the rat retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; Christoffersen, Nanna R; Barreiro, Sebastian G

    2004-01-01

    of sPLA(2)s in neuronal signaling and survival [Kolko et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271: 32722-32728]. To date, no retinal sPLA(2)s have been cloned or characterized. We evaluated the existence and abundance of sPLA(2) subtypes in rat retina and explored their possible involvement in light...

  17. Ethambutol induces impaired autophagic flux and apoptosis in the rat retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Ping Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethambutol (EMB, an effective first-line antituberculosis agent, can cause serious visual impairment or irreversible vision loss in a significant number of patients. However, the mechanism underlying this ocular cytotoxicity remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that there were statistically significant dose- and time-dependent increases in the number of cytoplasmic vacuoles and the level of cell death in EMB-treated RGC-5 cells (retinal ganglion cells. The protein kinase C (PKCδ inhibitor rottlerin markedly reduced the EMB-induced activation of caspase-3 and the subsequent apoptosis of RGC-5 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression levels of class III PI3K, Beclin-1, p62 and LC3-II were upregulated, and LC3 immunostaining results showed activation of the early phase and inhibition of the late stage of autophagy in retinas of the EMB-intraperitoneal (IP-injected rat model. We further demonstrated that exposure to EMB induces autophagosome accumulation, which results from the impaired autophagic flux that is mediated by a PKCδ-dependent pathway, inhibits the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and leads to apoptotic death in retina neuronal cells. These results indicate that autophagy dysregulation in retinal neuronal cells might play a substantial role in EMB-induced optic neuroretinopathy.

  18. Direction-selective circuitry in rat retina develops independently of GABAergic, cholinergic and action potential activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Sun

    Full Text Available The ON-OFF direction selective ganglion cells (DSGCs in the mammalian retina code image motion by responding much more strongly to movement in one direction. They do so by receiving inhibitory inputs selectively from a particular sector of processes of the overlapping starburst amacrine cells, a type of retinal interneuron. The mechanisms of establishment and regulation of this selective connection are unknown. Here, we report that in the rat retina, the morphology, physiology of the ON-OFF DSGCs and the circuitry for coding motion directions develop normally with pharmacological blockade of GABAergic, cholinergic activity and/or action potentials for over two weeks from birth. With recent results demonstrating light independent formation of the retinal DS circuitry, our results strongly suggest the formation of the circuitry, i.e., the connections between the second and third order neurons in the visual system, can be genetically programmed, although emergence of direction selectivity in the visual cortex appears to require visual experience.

  19. Neurite regeneration in adult rat retinas exposed to advanced glycation end-products and regenerative effects of neurotrophin-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbova, Guzel; Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2013-10-09

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of low concentrations of advanced glycation end-products on neurite regeneration in isolated rat retinas, and to determine the effects of neurotrophin-4 on regeneration in advanced glycation end-products exposed retinas. Retinal explants of 4 adult Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured on collagen gel and were incubated in; (1) serum-free control culture media, (2) glucose-advanced glycation end-products-bovine serum albumin media, (3) glycolaldehyde-advanced glycation end-products-bovine serum albumin media, (4) glyceraldehyde-advanced glycation end-products-bovine serum albumin media, (5) glucose-advanced glycation end-products+neurotrophin-4 media, (6) glycolaldehyde-advanced glycation end-products+neurotrophin-4 media, or (7) glyceraldehyde-advanced glycation end-products+neurotrophin-4 supplemented culture media. After 7 days, the number of regenerating neurites from the explants was counted. Then, explants were fixed, cryosectioned, and stained for TUNEL. The ratio of TUNEL-positive cells to all cells in the ganglion cell layer was determined. Immunohistochemical examinations for the active-form of caspase-9 and apoptosis-inducing factor were performed. In retinas incubated with advanced glycation end-products containing media, the number of regenerating neurites were fewer than in retinas without advanced glycation end-products, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells and caspase-9- and apoptosis-inducing factor-immunopositive cells was significantly higher than in control media. Neurotrophin-4 supplementation increased the numbers of regenerating neuritis, and the number of TUNEL-positives, caspase-9-, and apoptosis-inducing factor-immunopositive cells were significantly fewer than that in advanced glycation end-products without neurotrophin-4 media. Low doses of advanced glycation end-products impede neurite regeneration in the rat retinas. Neurotrophin-4 significantly enhances neurite regeneration in

  20. Impact of type 1 diabetes mellitus and sitagliptin treatment on the neuropeptide Y system of rat retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, Elisa J.; Martins, João; Brudzewsky, Dan

    2018-01-01

    1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and sitagliptin, a DPP-IV inhibitor, on the NPY system in the retina using an animal model.  Methods: Type 1 DM was induced in male Wistar rats by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Starting 2weeks after DM onset, animals were treated orally with sitagliptin (5...... of NPY to all receptors. Sitagliptin alone reduced retinal NPY mRNA levels. The effects of DM on the NPY system were not affected by sitagliptin.  Conclusion: DM modestly affects the NPY system in the retina and these effects are not prevented by sitagliptin treatment. These observations suggest that DPP...

  1. Circadian rhythms and light responsiveness of mammalian clock gene, Clock and BMAL1, transcripts in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namihira, M; Honma, S; Abe, H; Tanahashi, Y; Ikeda, M; Honma, K

    1999-08-13

    Circadian expression and light-responsiveness of the mammalian clock genes, Clock and BMAL1, in the rat retina were examined by in situ hydbribization under constant darkness. A small but significant daily variation was detected in the Clock transcript level, but not in BMAL1. Light increased the Clock and BMAL1 expressions significantly when examined 60 min after exposure. The light-induced gene expression was phase-dependent for Clock and peaked at ZT2, while rather constant throughout the day for BMAL1. These findings suggest that Clock and BMAL1 play different roles in the generation of circadian rhytm in the retina from those in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Different roles are also suggested between the two genes in the photic signal transduction in the retina.

  2. Evidence for diffuse central retinal edema in vivo in diabetic male Sprague Dawley rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A Berkowitz

    Full Text Available Investigations into the mechanism of diffuse retinal edema in diabetic subjects have been limited by a lack of animal models and techniques that co-localized retinal thickness and hydration in vivo. In this study we test the hypothesis that a previously reported supernormal central retinal thickness on MRI measured in experimental diabetic retinopathy in vivo represents a persistent and diffuse edema.In diabetic and age-matched control rats, and in rats experiencing dilutional hyponatremia (as a positive edema control, whole central retinal thickness, intraretinal water content and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC, 'water mobility' were measured in vivo using quantitative MRI methods. Glycated hemoglobin and retinal thickness ex vivo (histology were also measured in control and diabetic groups. In the dilutional hyponatremia model, central retinal thickness and water content were supernormal by quantitative MRI, and intraretinal water mobility profiles changed in a manner consistent with intracellular edema. Groups of diabetic (2, 3, 4, 6, and 9 mo of diabetes, and age-matched controls were then investigated with MRI and all diabetic rats showed supernormal whole central retinal thickness. In a separate study in 4 mo diabetic rats (and controls, MRI retinal thickness and water content metrics were significantly greater than normal, and ADC was subnormal in the outer retina; the increase in retinal thickness was not detected histologically on sections of fixed and dehydrated retinas from these rats.Diabetic male Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate a persistent and diffuse retinal edema in vivo, providing, for the first time, an important model for investigating its pathogenesis and treatment. These studies also validate MRI as a powerful approach for investigating mechanisms of diabetic retinal edema in future experimental and clinical investigations.

  3. Comparative toxicity of 4 commonly used intravitreal corticosteroids on rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citirik, Mehmet; Dilsiz, Nihat; Batman, Cosar; Zilelioglu, Orhan

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the effects of 4 commonly used steroids (dexamethasone, triamcinolone, betamethasone, and methylprednisolone) on 50 retinas of 25 adult pigmented rats. Experimental animal study. Twenty-five pigmented Long-Evans male rats. Each steroid drug with 2 different doses (0.025 mL and 0.050 mL) was injected into the vitreous of each eye of 5 rats. The low drug dose was injected into the right eye and the high dose was injected into the left eye. Ten eyes of 5 randomly selected rats were used as a control group and intravitreal saline was injected into these eyes. Oxidative damage and intrinsic antioxidative capacity were determined by measuring retinal malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, respectively. No statistically meaningful difference was observed in retinal GSH and MDA measurements in the low- and high-dose triamcinolone (1 and 2 mg), low-dose betamethasone (0.075 mg), and low-dose dexamethasone (0.1 mg) groups, compared with the control group. Both doses of methylprednisolone (1.6 mg and 3.2 mg), high-dose betamethasone (0.15 mg), and high-dose dexamethasone (0.2 mg) markedly altered retinal GSH and MDA levels. The results of our study show that the toxicity of triamcinolone is not evident even in high doses. It may be used safely. We also suggest that intravitreal use of low doses of betamethasone and dexamethasone is safer than higher doses of these drugs and both doses of methylprednisolone.

  4. Changes in intrinsic excitability of ganglion cells in degenerated retinas of RCS rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ming Ren

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the intrinsic excitability of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in degenerated retinas. METHODS: The intrinsic excitability of various morphologically defined RGC types using a combination of patch-clamp recording and the Lucifer yellow tracer in retinal whole-mount preparations harvested from Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rats, a common retinitis pigmentosa (RP model, in a relatively late stage of retinal degeneration (P90 were investigated. Several parameters of RGC morphologies and action potentials (APs were measured and compared to those of non-dystrophic control rats, including dendritic stratification, dendritic field diameter, peak amplitude, half width, resting membrane potential, AP threshold, depolarization to threshold, and firing rates. RESULTS: Compared with non-dystrophic control RGCs, more depolarizations were required to reach the AP threshold in RCS RGCs with low spontaneous spike rates and in RCS OFF cells (especially A2o cells, and RCS RGCs maintained their dendritic morphologies, resting membrane potentials and capabilities to generate APs. CONCLUSION: RGCs are relatively well preserved morphologically and functionally, and some cells are more susceptible to decreased excitability during retinal degeneration. These findings provide valuable considerations for optimizing RP therapeutic strategies.

  5. Immunohistochemical Localization of an Isoform of TRK-Fused Gene-Like Protein in the Rat Retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Chiaki; Takeuchi, Shigeko; Bisem, Naomi J.; Vincent, Steven R.; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    The TRK-fused gene (TFG) was originally identified in chromosome translocation events, creating a pair of oncogenes in some cancers, and was recently demonstrated as the causal gene of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with proximal dominant involvement. Recently, we cloned an alternative splicing variant of Tfg from a cDNA library of the rat retina, tentatively naming it retinal Tfg (rTfg). Although the common form of Tfg is ubiquitously expressed in most rat tissues, rTfg expression is localized to the central nervous system. In this study, we produced an antibody against an rTFG-specific amino acid sequence and used it to examine the localization of rTFG-like protein in the rat retina by immunohistochemistry and Western blots. Western blot analysis showed that the antibody detected a single band of 24 kDa in the rat retina. When we examined rTFG recombinant protein, the antibody detected two bands of about 42 kDa and 24 kDa. The results suggest that the 24 kDa rTFG-like protein is a fragment of rTFG. In our immunohistochemical studies of the rat retina, rTFG-like immunoreactivity was observed in all calbindin D-28K-positive horizontal cells and in some syntaxin 1-positive amacrine cells (ACs). In addition, the rTFG-like immunopositive ACs were actually glycine transporter 1-positive glycinergic or glutamate decarboxylase-positive GABAergic ACs. Our findings indicate that this novel 24 kDa rTFG-like protein may play a specific role in retinal inhibitory interneurons

  6. Subretinal electrical stimulation preserves inner retinal function in RCS rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavatta, Vincent T; Mocko, Julie A; Kim, Moon K; Pardue, Machelle T

    2013-01-01

    Previously, studies showed that subretinal electrical stimulation (SES) from a microphotodiode array (MPA) preserves electroretinography (ERG) b-wave amplitude and regional retinal structure in the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat and simultaneously upregulates Fgf2 expression. This preservation appears to be associated with the increased current produced when the MPA is exposed to ERG test flashes, as weekly ERG testing produces greater neuroprotection than biweekly or no testing. Using an infrared source to stimulate the MPA while avoiding potential confounding effects from exposing the RCS retina to high luminance white light, this study examined whether neuroprotective effects from SES increased with subretinal current in a dose-dependent manner. RCS rats (n=49) underwent subretinal implantation surgery at P21 with MPA devices in one randomly selected eye, and the other eye served as the control. Naïve RCS rats (n=25) were also studied. To increase SES current levels, implanted eyes were exposed to 15 min per session of flashing infrared light (IR) of defined intensity, frequency, and duty cycle. Rats were divided into four SES groups that received ERG testing only (MPA only), about 450 µA/cm2 once per week (Low 1X), about 450 µA/cm2 three times per week (Low 3X), and about 1350 µA/cm2 once per week (High 1X). One eye of the control animals was randomly chosen for IR exposure. All animals were followed for 4 weeks with weekly binocular ERGs. A subset of the eyes was used to measure retina Fgf2 expression with real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Eyes receiving SES showed significant preservation of b-wave amplitude, a- and b-wave implicit times, oscillatory potential amplitudes, and post-receptoral parameters (Vmax and log σ) compared to untreated eyes. All SES-treated eyes had similar preservation, regardless of increased SES from IR light exposure. SES-treated eyes tended to have greater retinal Fgf2 expression than untreated eyes, but Fgf2 expression

  7. Lin28B promotes Müller glial cell de-differentiation and proliferation in the regenerative rat retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zui; Zhao, Chen; Jian, Qian; Gillies, Mark; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    Retinal regeneration and repair are severely impeded in higher mammalian animals. Although Müller cells can be activated and show some characteristics of progenitor cells when injured or under pathological conditions, they quickly form gliosis scars. Unfortunately, the basic mechanisms that impede retinal regeneration remain unknown. We studied retinas from Royal College of Surgeon (RCS) rats and found that let-7 family molecules, let-7e and let-7i, were significantly overexpressed in Müller cells of degenerative retinas. It demonstrated that down-regulation of the RNA binding protein Lin28B was one of the key factors leading to the overexpression of let-7e and let-7i. Lin28B ectopic expression in the Müller cells suppressed overexpression of let-7e and let-7i, stimulated and mobilized Müller glia de-differentiation, proliferation, promoted neuronal commitment, and inhibited glial fate acquisition of de-differentiated Müller cells. ERG recordings revealed that the amplitudes of a-wave and b-wave were improved significantly after Lin28B was delivered into the subretinal space of RCS rats. In summary, down-regulation of Lin28B as well as up-regulation of let-7e and let-7i may be the main factors that impede Müller cell de-differentiation and proliferation in the retina of RCS rats. PMID:27384999

  8. In Vivo Imaging of Microglia Turnover in the Mouse Retina After Ionizing Radiation and Dexamethasone Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alt, C.; Runnels, J. M.; Mortensen, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    irradiation with a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope that we custom-built specifically for multicolor imaging of the murine retina. RESULTS. Ionizing radiation resulted in loss of 75% of the resident retinal microglia population after 70 days. Recruitment of BMDCs was delayed with respect...... dexamethasone preserves resident microglia and minimizes recruitment of BMDCs after ionizing radiation exposure and BMT.......PURPOSE. Gamma irradiation and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are established clinical procedures for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. The radiation targets cells in the bone marrow, but injury to other tissues, including the central nervous system (CNS), have been reported. Here, we...

  9. Morphology and Topography of Retinal Pericytes in the Living Mouse Retina Using In Vivo Adaptive Optics Imaging and Ex Vivo Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallek, Jesse; Geng, Ying; Nguyen, HoanVu; Williams, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To noninvasively image retinal pericytes in the living eye and characterize NG2-positive cell topography and morphology in the adult mouse retina. Methods. Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent pericytes (NG2, DsRed) were imaged using a two-channel, adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). One channel imaged vascular perfusion with near infrared light. A second channel simultaneously imaged fluorescent retinal pericytes. Mice were also imaged using wide-field ophthalmoscopy. To confirm in vivo imaging, five eyes were enucleated and imaged in flat mount with conventional fluorescent microscopy. Cell topography was quantified relative to the optic disc. Results. We observed strong DsRed fluorescence from NG2-positive cells. AOSLO revealed fluorescent vascular mural cells enveloping all vessels in the living retina. Cells were stellate on larger venules, and showed banded morphology on arterioles. NG2-positive cells indicative of pericytes were found on the smallest capillaries of the retinal circulation. Wide-field SLO enabled quick assessment of NG2-positive distribution, but provided insufficient resolution for cell counts. Ex vivo microscopy showed relatively even topography of NG2-positive capillary pericytes at eccentricities more than 0.3 mm from the optic disc (515 ± 94 cells/mm2 of retinal area). Conclusions. We provide the first high-resolution images of retinal pericytes in the living animal. Subcellular resolution enabled morphological identification of NG2-positive cells on capillaries showing classic features and topography of retinal pericytes. This report provides foundational basis for future studies that will track and quantify pericyte topography, morphology, and function in the living retina over time, especially in the progression of microvascular disease. PMID:24150762

  10. Functional and Cellular Responses to Laser Injury in the Rat Snake Retina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glickman, Randolph D; Elliott, III, W. R; Kumar, Neeru

    2007-01-01

    .... This animal is of interest for vision research because its eye has an all-cone retina. A linear array of 5 thermal lesions was placed in the retina of anesthetized animals, near the area centralis, using a Nd:VO4 laser (532 nm...

  11. Experimental oral iron administration: Histological investigations and expressions of iron handling proteins in rat retina with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Jha, Kumar Abhiram; Dey, Sanjay Kumar; Kathpalia, Poorti; Maurya, Meenakshi; Gupta, Chandan Lal; Bhatia, Jagriti; Roy, Tara Sankar; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2017-12-01

    Iron is implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The aim of this study was to see if long-term, experimental iron administration with aging modifies retinal and choroidal structures and expressions of iron handling proteins, to understand some aspects of iron homeostasis. Male Wistar rats were fed with ferrous sulphate heptahydrate (500mg/kg body weight/week, oral; elemental iron availability: 20%) from 2 months of age onward until they were 19.5 month-old. At 8, 14 and 20 months of age, they were sacrificed and serum and retinal iron levels were detected by HPLC. Oxidative stress was analyzed by TBARS method. The retinas were examined for cell death (TUNEL), histology (electron microscopy) and the expressions of transferrin, transferrin receptor-1 [TFR-1], H- and L-ferritin. In control animals, at any age, there was no difference in the serum and retinal iron levels, but the latter increased significantly in 14- and 20 month-old iron-fed rats, indicating that retinal iron accumulation proceeds with progression of aging (>14 months). The serum and retinal TBARS levels increased significantly with progression of aging in experimental but not in control rats. There was significant damage to choriocapillaris, accumulation of phagosomes in retinal pigment epithelium and increased incidence of TUNEL+ cells in outer nuclear layer and vacuolation in inner nuclear layer (INL) of 20 month-aged experimental rats, compared to those in age-matched controls. Vacuolations in INL could indicate a long-term effect of iron accumulation in the inner retina. These events paralleled the increased expression of ferritins and transferrin and a decrease in the expression of TFR-1 in iron-fed rats with aging, thereby maintaining iron homeostasis in the retina. As some of these changes mimic with those happening in eyes with AMD, this model can be utilized to understand iron-induced pathophysiological changes in AMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The protective effects of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (velcade on ischemia-reperfusion injury in the rat retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Ting Chen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the protective effects of bortezomib (Velcade on ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury in the rat retina. METHODS: The rats were randomized to receive treatment with saline, low-dose bortezomib (0.05 mg/kg, or high-dose bortezomib (0.2 mg/kg before the induction of IR injury. Electroretinography (ERG was used to assess functional changes in the retina. The expression of inflammatory mediators (iNOS, ICAM-1, MCP-1, TNF-α, anti-oxidant proteins (heme oxygenase, thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin, and pro-apoptotic proteins (p53, bax were quantified by PCR and western blot analysis. An immunofluorescence study was performed to detect the expression of iNOS, oxidative markers (nitrotyrosine, 8-OHdG, acrolein, NF-κB p65, and CD 68. Apoptosis of retinal cells was labeled with in situ TUNEL staining. Neu-N staining was performed in the flat-mounted retina to evaluate the density of retinal ganglion cells. RESULTS: ERG showed a decreased b-wave after IR injury, and pretreatment with bortezomib, especially the high dosage, reduced the functional impairment. Bortezomib successfully reduced the elevation of inflammatory mediators, anti-oxidant proteins, pro-apoptotic proteins and oxidative markers after IR insult in a dose-dependent manner. In a similar fashion, NF-κB p65- and CD 68-positive cells were decreased by bortezomib treatment. Retinal cell apoptosis in each layer was attenuated by bortezomib. The retinal ganglion cell density was markedly decreased in the saline and low-dose bortezomib groups but was not significantly changed in the high-dose bortezomib group. CONCLUSIONS: Bortezomib had a neuro-protective effect in retinal IR injury, possibly by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB related to IR insult and reducing the inflammatory signals and oxidative stress in the retina.

  13. Diurnal rodents as animal models of human central vision: characterisation of the retina of the sand rat Psammomys obsesus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïdi, Tounès; Mbarek, Sihem; Chaouacha-Chekir, Rafika Ben; Hicks, David

    2011-07-01

    Cone photoreceptor-based central vision is of paramount importance in human eyesight, and the increasing numbers of persons affected by macular degeneration emphasizes the need for relevant and amenable animal models. Although laboratory mice and rats have provided valuable information on retinal diseases, they have inherent limitations for studies on macular pathology. In the present study, we extend our recent analyses of diurnal murid rodents to demonstrate that the sand rat Psammomys obesus has a remarkably cone-rich retina, and represents a useful adjunct to available animal models of central vision. Adult P. obesus were captured and transferred to animal facilities where they were maintained under standard light/dark cycles. Animals were euthanised and their eyes enucleated. Tissue was either fixed in paraformaldehyde and prepared for immunohistochemistry, or solubilized in lysis buffer and separated by SDS-PAGE and subjected to western blot analysis. Samples were labelled with a battery of antibodies against rod and cone photoreceptors, inner retinal neurones, and glia. P. obesus showed a high percentage of cones, 41% of total photoreceptor numbers in both central and peripheral retina. They expressed multiple cone-specific proteins, including short and medium-wavelength opsin and cone transducin. A second remarkable feature of the retina concerned the horizontal cells, which expressed high levels of glial fibrillar acidic protein and occludin, two proteins which are not seen in other species. The retina of P. obesus displays high numbers of morphologically and immunologically identifiable cones which will facilitate analysis of cone pathophysiology in this species. The unusual horizontal cell phenotype may be related to the cone distribution or to an alternative facet of the animals lifestyle.

  14. Changes in expression of Class 3 Semaphorins and their receptors during development of the rat retina and superior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anil; LeVaillant, Chrisna J; Plant, Giles W; Harvey, Alan R

    2014-07-26

    Members of the Semaphorin 3 family (Sema3s) influence the development of the central nervous system, and some are implicated in regulating aspects of visual system development. However, we lack information about the timing of expression of the Sema3s with respect to different developmental epochs in the mammalian visual system. In this time-course study in the rat, we document for the first time changes in the expression of RNAs for the majority of Class 3 Semaphorins (Sema3s) and their receptor components during the development of the rat retina and superior colliculus (SC). During retinal development, transcript levels changed for all of the Sema3s examined, as well as Nrp2, Plxna2, Plxna3, and Plxna4a. In the SC there were also changes in transcript levels for all Sema3s tested, as well as Nrp1, Nrp2, Plxna1, Plxna2, Plxna3, and Plxna4a. These changes correlate with well-established epochs, and our data suggest that the Sema3s could influence retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis, patterning and connectivity in the maturing retina and SC, and perhaps guidance of RGC and cortical axons in the SC. Functionally we found that SEMA3A, SEMA3C, SEMA3E, and SEMA3F proteins collapsed purified postnatal day 1 RGC growth cones in vitro. Significantly this is a developmental stage when RGCs are growing into and within the SC and are exposed to Sema3 ligands. These new data describing the overall temporal regulation of Sema3 expression in the rat retina and SC provide a platform for further work characterising the functional impact of these proteins on the development and maturation of mammalian visual pathways.

  15. Effects of Dietary Iron and Gamma Radiation on the Rat Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jennifer; Marshall, Grace; Theriot, Corey A.; Chacon, Natalia; Zwart, Sara; Zanello, Susana B.

    2012-01-01

    A health risk of concern for NASA relates to radiation exposure and its synergistic effects with other space environmental factors, includi ng nutritional status of the crew. Astronauts consume almost three times the recommended daily allowance of iron due to the use of fortifie d foods aboard the International Space Station, with iron intake occa sionally exceeding six times the recommended values. Recently, NASA has become concerned with visual changes associated with spaceflight, a nd research is being conducted to elucidate the etiology of eye structure alterations in the spaceflight environment. Terrestrially, iron o verload is also associated with certain optic neuropathies. In additi on, due to its role in Fenton reactions, iron can potentiate oxidative stress, which is a recognized cause of cataract formation. As part o f a study investigating the combined effects of radiation exposure an d iron overload on multiple physiological systems, we focused on defining the effects of both treatments on eye biology. In this study, 12- week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of four experimental groups: normal iron/no radiation (Control/Sham), high iron/no radiat ion (Fe/Sham), normal iron/gamma radiation (3 Gy cumulative dose, fra ctionated at 0.375 Gy/d every other day for 16 d) (Control/Rad), and high iron/gamma radiation (Fe/Rad). Oxidative stress-induced DNA damag e, measured as concentration of the marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) in eye retinal tissue by enzyme-immunoanalysis did not show significant changes among treatments. However, there was an overall i ncrease in 8OHdG immunostaining density in retina sections due to radiation exposure (P = 0.05). Increased dietary iron and radiation expos ure had an interactive effect (P = 0.02) on 8OHdG immunostaining of t he retinal ganglion cell layer with iron diet increasing the signal in the group not exposed to radiation (P = 0.05). qPCR gene expression profiling of relevant target genes

  16. The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea on the electrophysiological property and visual signal transmission of rat's retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Chen, Tao; Liu, Bei; Yang, Guo Qing; Peng, Guanghua; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Yi Fei

    2015-07-01

    The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on the inner retinal neurons and related visual signal circuits have not been described in any animal models or human, despite ample morphological evidences about the MNU induced photoreceptor (PR) degeneration. With the helping of MEA (multielectrode array) recording system, we gained the opportunity to systemically explore the neural activities and visual signal pathways of MNU administrated rats. Our MEA research identified remarkable alterations in the electrophysiological properties and firstly provided instructive information about the neurotoxicity of MNU that affects the signal transmission in the inner retina. Moreover, the spatial electrophysiological functions of retina were monitored and found that the focal PRs had different vulnerabilities to the MNU. The MNU-induced PR dysfunction exhibited a distinct spatial- and time-dependent progression. In contrast, the spiking activities of both central and peripheral RGCs altered synchronously in response to the MNU administration. Pharmacological tests suggested that gap junctions played a pivotal role in this homogeneous response of RGCs. SNR analysis of MNU treated retina suggested that the signaling efficiency and fidelity of inner retinal circuits have been ruined by this toxicant, although the microstructure of the inner retina seemed relatively consolidated. The present study provided an appropriate example of MEA investigations on the toxicant induced pathological models and the effects of the pharmacological compounds on neuron activities. The positional MEA information would enrich our knowledge about the pathology of MNU induced RP models, and eventually be instrumental for elucidating the underlying mechanism of human RP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Zinc might protect oxidative changes in the retina and pancreas at the early stage of diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, Sohair A.

    2004-01-01

    It is well documented that oxidative stress is a basic mechanism behind the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR). The current study was undertaken to elucidate the possible role of zinc as an antioxidant and a biological membrane stabilizer in the protection against (DR). Male Wistar rats weighing 250 ± 50 g were made diabetic by injection with a single ip dose of alloxan (100 mg/kg). Another group of rats was simultaneously treated with alloxan (100 mg/kg) and a single ip dose of zinc chloride (ZnCl 2 ) (5 mg/kg). Blood and tissue samples were collected at 24, 48, and 72 h post-treatment in both groups. Diabetic state was confirmed by the determination of plasma glucose levels (significantly elevated at any time of the experiment when compared with controls receiving vehicle). Plasma insulin was significantly increased 24 h after treatment in both alloxan and alloxan plus ZnCl 2 -treated groups, and then decreased markedly 48 and 72 h post treatment in both groups. Alloxan treatment depleted both retinal and liver glutathione contents. The decrease in retinal and liver GSH in alloxan-treated rats was accompanied with a sustained increase in their thiobarbituric acid (TBA) content. Simultaneous treatment of rats with alloxan and ZnCl 2 blunted the sustained increment in plasma glucose induced by alloxan. The combined administration of alloxan and zinc reversed the depleting effect on retinal and hepatic GSH in alloxan-treated rats and reduced the elevations in TBA content of both retinas and livers. At variance with many other antioxidants the current results clearly indicate the beneficial effects of Zn in both controlling hyperglycemia and the protection of the retina against oxidative stress in diabetes which may help set a new direction toward the development of effective treatments of DR

  18. Increased Expression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1, Vascular Cellular Adhesion Molecule-1 and Leukocyte Common Antigen in Diabetic Rat Retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ningyan Bai; Shibo Tang; Jing Ma; Yan Luo; Shaofeng Lin

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To understand the expression and distribution of intercellular adhesion molecule- 1(ICAM- 1),vascular cellular adhesion molecule- 1 (VCAM- 1)and CD45 (Leukocyte Common Antigen) in the control nondiabetic and various courses of diabetic rats retina. To explore the role of adhesion molecules (Ams) and the adhesion of leukocytes to vascular endothelial cells via Ams in diabetic retinopathy(DR).Methods: Sixty healthy adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into diabetic groups(induced by Streptozotocin, STZ) and normal control groups. Rats in these two groups were further randomly divided into 3, 7, 14, 30, 90 and 180 days-group,including 5 rats respectively. The immunohistochemical studies of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and CD45 were carried out in the retinal digest preparations or retinal paraffin sections, and the results were analyzed qualitatively, semi-quantitatively.Results: No positive reaction of VCAM-1 was found, and weak reactions of ICAM-1,CD45 were found in nondiabetic rats retina. The difference of 6 control groups had no statistical significance(P > 0.05). The increased ICAM-1 and CD45 staining pattern were detectable 3 days after diabetes induction, and a few VCAM-1 positive cells were observed in the retinal blood capillaries. The difference of diabetes and control is significant( P < 0.05).Following the course, the expressions of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and CD45 were increasingly enhanced, reaching a peak at the 14th day.Conclusion: Increased expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and leukocytes adhering and stacking in retinal capillaries are the very early events in DR. Coherence of expression and distribution of the three further accounts for it is the key point for the onset of DR that Ams mediates leukocytes adhesion and endothelial cell injury.

  19. In vivo analysis of the time and spatial activation pattern of microglia in the retina following laser-induced choroidal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Garcia, Sergio; Reichhart, Nadine; Hernandez-Matas, Carlos; Zabulis, Xenophon; Kociok, Norbert; Brockmann, Claudia; Joussen, Antonia M; Strauss, Olaf

    2015-10-01

    Microglia play a major role in retinal neovascularization and degeneration and are thus potential targets for therapeutic intervention. In vivo assessment of microglia behavior in disease models can provide important information to understand patho-mechanisms and develop therapeutic strategies. Although scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) permits the monitoring of microglia in transgenic mice with microglia-specific GFP expression, there are fundamental limitations in reliable identification and quantification of activated cells. Therefore, we aimed to improve the SLO-based analysis of microglia using enhanced image processing with subsequent testing in laser-induced neovascularization (CNV). CNV was induced by argon laser in MacGreen mice. Microglia was visualized in vivo by SLO in the fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF) mode and verified ex vivo using retinal preparations. Three image processing algorithms based on different analysis of sequences of images were tested. The amount of recorded frames was limiting the effectiveness of the different algorithms. Best results from short recordings were obtained with a pixel averaging algorithm, further used to quantify spatial and temporal distribution of activated microglia in CNV. Morphologically, different microglia populations were detected in the inner and outer retinal layers. In CNV, the peak of microglia activation occurred in the inner layer at day 4 after laser, lacking an acute reaction. Besides, the spatial distribution of the activation changed by the time over the inner retina. No significant time and spatial changes were observed in the outer layer. An increase in laser power did not increase number of activated microglia. The SLO, in conjunction with enhanced image processing, is suitable for in vivo quantification of microglia activation. This surprisingly revealed that laser damage at the outer retina led to more reactive microglia in the inner retina, shedding light upon a new perspective to approach

  20. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin [Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Nagar, Geet Kumar [Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute (CSIR-CDRI) (India); Mitra, Kalyan [Electron Microscopy Unit, CSIR-CDRI, Lucknow 226001 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra, E-mail: sanghmitra@iitr.res.in [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India)

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2′-, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase.

  1. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti; Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin; Nagar, Geet Kumar; Mitra, Kalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2′-, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase.

  2. The expression of the Slit-Robo signal in the retina of diabetic rats and the vitreous or fibrovascular retinal membranes of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weiyan; Wang, Hongya; Yu, Wenzhen; Xie, Wankun; Zhao, Min; Huang, Lvzhen; Li, Xiaoxin

    2017-01-01

    The Slit-Robo signal has an important role in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Our study examined the expression of Slit2 and its receptor, Robo1, in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats via a single, intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The rats were sacrificed 1, 3 or 6 months after the injection. The expression of Slit2 and Robo1 in retinal tissue was measured by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and protein levels were measured by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Recombinant N-Slit2 protein was used to study the effects of Slit2 on the expression of VEGF in vivo. The concentration of Slit2 protein in human eyes was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 27 eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 28 eyes in control group. The expression of Slit2, Robo1 and VEGF in the excised human fibrovascular membranes was examined by fluorescence immunostaining and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of Slit2 and Robo1 in the retina was altered after STZ injection. Recombinant N-Slit2 protein did not increase the retinal VEGF expression. Vitreous concentrations of Slit2 were significantly higher in the study group than in the control group. In the human fibrovascular membranes of the study group, the co-localization of VEGF with the markers for Slit2 and Robo1was observed. The expression of Slit2 mRNA, Robo1 mRNA, and VEGF mRNA was significantly higher in human fibrovascular proliferative diabetic retinopathy membranes than in the control membranes. The alteration of Slit2 and Robo1 expression in the retinas of diabetic rats and patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy suggests a role for the Slit-Robo signal in the various stages diabetic retinopathy. Further studies should address the possible involvement of the Slit-Robo signal in the pathophysiological progress of diabetic

  3. Postconditioning with inhaled carbon monoxide counteracts apoptosis and neuroinflammation in the ischemic rat retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Schallner

    Full Text Available Ischemia and reperfusion injury (I/R of neuronal structures and organs is associated with increased morbidity and mortality due to neuronal cell death. We hypothesized that inhalation of carbon monoxide (CO after I/R injury ('postconditioning' would protect retinal ganglion cells (RGC.Retinal I/R injury was performed in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 by increasing ocular pressure (120 mmHg, 1 h. Rats inhaled room air or CO (250 ppm for 1 h immediately following ischemia or with 1.5 and 3 h latency. Retinal tissue was harvested to analyze Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, HO-1 expression and phosphorylation of the nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB, p38 and ERK-1/2 MAPK. NF-κB activation was determined and inhibition of ERK-1/2 was performed using PD98059 (2 mg/kg. Densities of fluorogold prelabeled RGC were analyzed 7 days after injury. Microglia, macrophage and Müller cell activation and proliferation were evaluated by Iba-1, GFAP and Ki-67 staining.Inhalation of CO after I/R inhibited Bax and Caspase-3 expression (Bax: 1.9 ± 0.3 vs. 1.4 ± 0.2, p = 0.028; caspase-3: 2.0 ± 0.2 vs. 1.5 ± 0.1, p = 0.007; mean ± S.D., fold induction at 12 h, while expression of Bcl-2 was induced (1.2 ± 0.2 vs. 1.6 ± 0.2, p = 0.001; mean ± S.D., fold induction at 12 h. CO postconditioning suppressed retinal p38 phosphorylation (p = 0.023 at 24 h and induced the phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 (p<0.001 at 24 h. CO postconditioning inhibited the expression of HO-1. The activation of NF-κB, microglia and Müller cells was potently inhibited by CO as well as immigration of proliferative microglia and macrophages into the retina. CO protected I/R-injured RGC with a therapeutic window at least up to 3 h (n = 8; RGC/mm(2; mean ± S.D.: 1255 ± 327 I/R only vs. 1956 ± 157 immediate CO treatment, vs. 1830 ± 109 1.5 h time lag and vs. 1626 ± 122 3 h time lag; p<0.001. Inhibition of ERK-1/2 did not counteract the CO effects (RGC/mm(2: 1956 ± 157 vs. 1931 ± 124, mean ± S.D., p

  4. Dopamine Attenuates Ketamine-Induced Neuronal Apoptosis in the Developing Rat Retina Independent of Early Synchronized Spontaneous Network Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Gao, Lingqi; Han, Junde; Zhang, Junjie; Zheng, Jijian

    2017-07-01

    Deprivation of spontaneous rhythmic electrical activity in early development by anesthesia administration, among other interventions, induces neuronal apoptosis. However, it is unclear whether enhancement of neuronal electrical activity attenuates neuronal apoptosis in either normal development or after anesthesia exposure. The present study investigated the effects of dopamine, an enhancer of spontaneous rhythmic electrical activity, on ketamine-induced neuronal apoptosis in the developing rat retina. TUNEL and immunohistochemical assays indicated that ketamine time- and dose-dependently aggravated physiological and ketamine-induced apoptosis and inhibited early-synchronized spontaneous network activity. Dopamine administration reversed ketamine-induced neuronal apoptosis, but did not reverse the inhibitory effects of ketamine on early synchronized spontaneous network activity despite enhancing it in controls. Blockade of D1, D2, and A2A receptors and inhibition of cAMP/PKA signaling partially antagonized the protective effect of dopamine against ketamine-induced apoptosis. Together, these data indicate that dopamine attenuates ketamine-induced neuronal apoptosis in the developing rat retina by activating the D1, D2, and A2A receptors, and upregulating cAMP/PKA signaling, rather than through modulation of early synchronized spontaneous network activity.

  5. Holographic line field en-face OCT with digital adaptive optics in the retina in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginner, Laurin; Schmoll, Tilman; Kumar, Abhishek; Salas, Matthias; Pricoupenko, Nastassia; Wurster, Lara M; Leitgeb, Rainer A

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate a high-resolution line field en-face time domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using an off-axis holography configuration. Line field en-face OCT produces high speed en-face images at rates of up to 100 Hz. The high frame rate favors good phase stability across the lateral field-of-view which is indispensable for digital adaptive optics (DAO). Human retinal structures are acquired in-vivo with a broadband light source at 840 nm, and line rates of 10 kHz to 100 kHz. Structures of different retinal layers, such as photoreceptors, capillaries, and nerve fibers are visualized with high resolution of 2.8 µm and 5.5 µm in lateral directions. Subaperture based DAO is successfully applied to increase the visibility of cone-photoreceptors and nerve fibers. Furthermore, en-face Doppler OCT maps are generated based on calculating the differential phase shifts between recorded lines.

  6. In Vivo Multimodal Imaging of NF-kappaB (pB) Spatial and Temporal Activation Following Light Injury in the Mouse Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-15

    breathing artifacts in retinal images. The cSLO fea- tures one argon wavelength (488 nm) and two infrared diode lasers (790/820 nm) which were used to...Engineering Heuy-Ching H Wang United States Army of Institutes of Surgical Research January 15, 2014 Interim Report for January 2010 to January...transgenic mouse model were used to perform in vivo experiments of laser - induced thermal damage to the retina. A Heidelberg Spectralis HRA confocal

  7. Exposing primary rat retina cell cultures to γ-rays: An in vitro model for evaluating radiation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddini, Lucia; Balduzzi, Maria; Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Patrono, Clarice; Matteucci, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Retinal tissue can receive incidental γ-rays exposure during radiotherapy either of tumors of the eye and optic nerve or of head-and-neck tumors, and during medical diagnostic procedures. Healthy retina is therefore at risk of suffering radiation-related side effects and the knowledge of pathophysiological response of retinal cells to ionizing radiations could be useful to design possible strategies of prevention and management of radiotoxicity. In this study, we have exploited an in vitro model (primary rat retinal cell culture) to study an array of biological effects induced on retinal neurons by γ-rays. Most of the different cell types present in retinal tissue - either of the neuronal or glial lineages - are preserved in primary rat retinal cultures. Similar to the retina in situ, neuronal cells undergo in vitro a maturational development shown by the formation of polarized neuritic trees and operating synapses. Since 2 Gy is the incidental dose received by the healthy retina per fraction when the standard treatment is delivered to the brain, retina cell cultures have been exposed to 1 or 2 Gy of γ-rays at different level of neuronal differentiation in vitro: days in vitro (DIV)2 or DIV8. At DIV9, retinal cultures were analyzed in terms of viability, apoptosis and characterized by immunocytochemistry to identify alterations in neuronal differentiation. After irradiation at DIV2, MTT assay revealed an evident loss of cell viability and βIII-tubulin immunostaining highlighted a marked neuritic damage, indicating that survived neurons showed an impaired differentiation. Differentiated cultures (DIV8) appeared to be more resistant with respect to undifferentiated, DIV2 cultures, both in terms of cell viability and differentiation. Apoptosis evaluated with TUNEL assay showed that irradiation at both DIV2 and DIV8 induced a significant increase in the apoptotic rate. To further investigate the effects of γ-rays on retinal neurons, we evaluated the

  8. Effect of chronic administration of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on the histology of the retina and optic nerve of adult male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltony, Sohair A; Abdelhameed, Sally Y

    2017-04-01

    Abnormal vision has been reported by 3% of patients treated with sildenafil citrate (Viagra). Although many men use Viagra for an extended period for treatment of erectile dysfunction, the implications of the long term-daily use of it on the retina and optic nerve are unclear. To investigate the effect of chronic daily use of sildenafil citrate in a dose equivalent to men preferred therapeutic dose on the histology of the retina and optic nerve of adult male rat. Eighteen adult male Wistar rats were equally divided into three groups. Group I: control. Group II: treated with sildenafil citrate orally (10mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks. Group III (withdrawal): treated as group II and then left for 4 weeks without treatment. Specimens from the retina and optic nerve were processed for light and electron microscopy. In sildenafil citrate treated group, the retina and optic nerve revealed vacuolations and congested blood capillaries with apoptotic endothelial and pericytic cells, and thickened basal lamina. Caspase-3 (apoptotic marker) and CD31 (endothelial marker) expression increased. Glial cells revealed morphological changes: Müller cells lost their processes, activated microglia, astrocytic clasmatodendrosis, degenerated oligodendrocytes surrounded by disintegrated myelin sheathes of the optic nerve fibers. The retina and optic nerve of the withdrawal group revealed less vacuolations and congestion, and partial recovery of the glial cells. Chronic treatment with sildenafil citrate (Viagra) caused toxic effect on the structure of the retina and optic nerve of the rat. Partial recovery was observed after drug withdrawal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional imaging of hemodynamic stimulus response in the rat retina with ultrahigh-speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, WooJhon; Baumann, Bernhard; Clermont, Allen C.; Feener, Edward P.; Boas, David A.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-03-01

    Measuring retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus is important for investigating pathophysiology in small animal models of diabetic retinopathy, because a reduction in the hyperemic response is thought to be one of the earliest changes in diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we investigated functional imaging of retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus in the rat retina using an ultrahigh speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT system at 840nm with an axial scan rate of 244kHz. At 244kHz the nominal axial velocity range that could be measured without phase wrapping was +/-37.7mm/s. Pulsatile total retinal arterial blood flow as a function of time was measured using an en face Doppler approach where a 200μm × 200μm area centered at the central retinal artery was repeatedly raster scanned at a volume acquisition rate of 55Hz. Three-dimensional capillary imaging was performed using speckle decorrelation which has minimal angle dependency compared to other angiography techniques based on OCT phase information. During OCT imaging, a flicker stimulus could be applied to the retina synchronously by inserting a dichroic mirror in the imaging interface. An acute transient increase in total retinal blood flow could be detected. At the capillary level, an increase in the degree of speckle decorrelation in capillary OCT angiography images could also be observed, which indicates an increase in the velocity of blood at the capillary level. This method promises to be useful for the investigation of small animal models of ocular diseases.

  10. The effect of a hyperdynamic environment on the development of the rat retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, D. M.; Fuller, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of a 2 G field on the retinal development of the layers in the rat and central visual system nuclei are investigated. The thickness of the retinal layers, ganglion cells, and brains of male and female Wistar rats suspended from an 18 foot diameter centrifuge creating a 2 G field are evaluated and compared with a control group. A decrease in the thickness of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of 37.1 percent, of 58.5 percent in the inner nuclear layer (INL), and of 28.8 percent in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), and a reduction in body weight are observed in the 2-G rats. The data reveal that the ganglion cells and visual system nuclei activity correspond well with the control data; however, the medial terminal nucleus (MTN) activity is inhibited in the 2-G rats. It is concluded that the differences in ONL and IPL are attributed to body weight reduction, but the INL and MTN are affected by the 2-G conditions.

  11. Effects of the Hydroalcoholic Extract of Zingiber officinale on Arginase I Activity and Expression in the Retina of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamuchi-Deli, Nasrin; Aberomand, Mohammad; Babaahmadi-Rezaei, Hossein; Mohammadzadeh, Ghorban

    2017-04-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that an increased arginase activity is involved in vascular dysfunction in experimental animals. Zingiber officinale Roscoe, commonly known as ginger, has been widely used in the traditional medicine for treatment of diabetes. This study aimed at investigating the effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of Z. officinale on arginase I activity and expression in the retina of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. In this experimental study, 16 male Wistar rats weighing 200 - 250 g were assessed. Diabetes was induced via a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (60 mg/kg body weight). The rats were randomly allocated into four experimental groups. Untreated healthy and diabetic controls received 1.5 mL/kg distilled water. Treated diabetic rats received 200, and 400 mg/kg of the Z. officinale extract dissolved in distilled water (1.5 mL/kg). Body weight, blood glucose and insulin concentration were measured by standard methods. The arginase I activity and expression were determined by spectrophotometric and western blot analysis, respectively. Our results showed that blood glucose concentration was significantly decreased in diabetic rats treated with the extract compared to untreated diabetic controls (P officinale hydroalcoholic extract may potentially be a promising therapeutic option for treating diabetes-induced vascular disorders, possibly through reducing arginase I activity and expression in the retina.

  12. The Effect of Intravitreal Bevacizumab on Apoptosis of Rat Retina Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan Kayıkçıoğlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To investigate the apoptotic effects of intravitreal bevacizumab on rat retinal cells. Ma te ri al and Met hod: Thirty-six male adult Swiss albino rats were randomly divided into two groups. The first group was applied 0.25 mg bevacizumab in 0.01 ml saline, and the second group received the same amount of saline intravitreally. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups. The animals were sacrificed and their globes were enucleated at the 3rd, 24th, and 72nd hours of the experiment. Enucleated eyes were preserved for histological analysis, immunohistochemical analysis of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, Fas/Fas L, VEGF and VEGF receptors (Flt-1, Flk-1, and TUNEL staining. Re sults: Histological evaluation showed no sign of retinal toxicity in both groups. In TUNEL staining, TUNEL(+ cells were detected in all subgroups, but the number of positive cells was relatively lower in bevacizumab treatment group that reached statistically significant level at 24 and 72 hours of treatment (p<0.001. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that in saline-treated subgroups, immunoreactivity was more pronounced for all apoptosis-inducing proteins compared to bevacizumab-treated group. Also immunoreactivity of VEGF was prominent in saline treated group. For VEGF receptors, staining was only positive for Flt-1 at the 3rd hour in the control group. Dis cus si on: Bevacizumab did not have apoptosis-inducing potential compared to saline solution in short term, which was documented with TUNEL and immunohistochemical staining. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 39-44

  13. The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea on the electrophysiological property and visual signal transmission of rat's retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Ye [Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Chen, Tao [Department of Clinical Aerospace Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Liu, Bei [Department of Neurosurgery and Institute for Functional Brain Disorders, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Yang, Guo Qing [Department of Clinical Aerospace Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Peng, Guanghua [Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Zhang, Hua [Department of Neurosurgery and Institute for Functional Brain Disorders, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Huang, Yi Fei [Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2015-07-01

    The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on the inner retinal neurons and related visual signal circuits have not been described in any animal models or human, despite ample morphological evidences about the MNU induced photoreceptor (PR) degeneration. With the helping of MEA (multielectrode array) recording system, we gained the opportunity to systemically explore the neural activities and visual signal pathways of MNU administrated rats. Our MEA research identified remarkable alterations in the electrophysiological properties and firstly provided instructive information about the neurotoxicity of MNU that affects the signal transmission in the inner retina. Moreover, the spatial electrophysiological functions of retina were monitored and found that the focal PRs had different vulnerabilities to the MNU. The MNU-induced PR dysfunction exhibited a distinct spatial- and time-dependent progression. In contrast, the spiking activities of both central and peripheral RGCs altered synchronously in response to the MNU administration. Pharmacological tests suggested that gap junctions played a pivotal role in this homogeneous response of RGCs. SNR analysis of MNU treated retina suggested that the signaling efficiency and fidelity of inner retinal circuits have been ruined by this toxicant, although the microstructure of the inner retina seemed relatively consolidated. The present study provided an appropriate example of MEA investigations on the toxicant induced pathological models and the effects of the pharmacological compounds on neuron activities. The positional MEA information would enrich our knowledge about the pathology of MNU induced RP models, and eventually be instrumental for elucidating the underlying mechanism of human RP. - Highlights: • We systemically explored the neural activities and visual signal pathways of MNU administrated retinas. • The focal photoreceptors had different vulnerabilities to the MNU administration.

  14. The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea on the electrophysiological property and visual signal transmission of rat's retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Ye; Chen, Tao; Liu, Bei; Yang, Guo Qing; Peng, Guanghua; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Yi Fei

    2015-01-01

    The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on the inner retinal neurons and related visual signal circuits have not been described in any animal models or human, despite ample morphological evidences about the MNU induced photoreceptor (PR) degeneration. With the helping of MEA (multielectrode array) recording system, we gained the opportunity to systemically explore the neural activities and visual signal pathways of MNU administrated rats. Our MEA research identified remarkable alterations in the electrophysiological properties and firstly provided instructive information about the neurotoxicity of MNU that affects the signal transmission in the inner retina. Moreover, the spatial electrophysiological functions of retina were monitored and found that the focal PRs had different vulnerabilities to the MNU. The MNU-induced PR dysfunction exhibited a distinct spatial- and time-dependent progression. In contrast, the spiking activities of both central and peripheral RGCs altered synchronously in response to the MNU administration. Pharmacological tests suggested that gap junctions played a pivotal role in this homogeneous response of RGCs. SNR analysis of MNU treated retina suggested that the signaling efficiency and fidelity of inner retinal circuits have been ruined by this toxicant, although the microstructure of the inner retina seemed relatively consolidated. The present study provided an appropriate example of MEA investigations on the toxicant induced pathological models and the effects of the pharmacological compounds on neuron activities. The positional MEA information would enrich our knowledge about the pathology of MNU induced RP models, and eventually be instrumental for elucidating the underlying mechanism of human RP. - Highlights: • We systemically explored the neural activities and visual signal pathways of MNU administrated retinas. • The focal photoreceptors had different vulnerabilities to the MNU administration.

  15. The Transient Intermediate Plexiform Layer, a Plexiform Layer-like Structure Temporarily Existing in the Inner Nuclear Layer in Developing Rat Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Hong-Lim; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, In-Beom

    2018-02-01

    The retina is a highly specialised part of the brain responsible for visual processing. It is well-laminated; three layers containing five different types of neurons are compartmentalised by two synaptic layers. Among the retinal layers, the inner nuclear layer (INL) is composed of horizontal, bipolar, and amacrine cell types. Bipolar cells form one sublayer in the distal half of the IPL, while amacrine cells form another sublayer in the proximal half, without any border-like structure. Here, we report that a plexiform layer-like structure exists temporarily in the border between the bipolar and amacrine sublayers in the INL in the rat retina during retinal development. This transient intermediate plexiform layer (TIPL) appeared at postnatal day (PD) 7 and then disappeared around PD 12. Most apoptotic cells in the INL were found near the TIPL. These results suggest that the TIPL may contribute to the formation of sublayers and the cell number limit in the INL.

  16. In vivo dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential for exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has risen recently because of their increased use. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin and permethrin in the rat. Hair on the dorsal side of anesthetized adult m...

  17. The retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Reyk, David M; Gillies, Mark C; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    A prominent and early feature of the retinopathy of diabetes mellitus is a diffuse increase in vascular permeability. As the disease develops, the development of frank macular oedema may result in vision loss. That reactive oxygen species production is likely to be elevated in the retina, and tha...

  18. Pathological changes in the retina of eyes rats with experimental 2 type diabetes mellitus and their correction by oral gels with biologically active substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Vit

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study of therapeutic and prophylactic action on the retina of rats with experimental diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2 oral mucosal gels containing biologically active substances (BAS.Methods: DM2 was induced by protamine method Ulyanov and Tarasova [2000]. As BAS used lysozyme, flour of grape leaves, the water extract of blueberries and quercetin. Mucosal gels containing active substances, applied to the mucous lining of the mouth for 2 weeks. The serum glucose concentration was performed and histological studies of the retina.Results: Application mucosal gels reduces BAS 8‑22 % glucose (most with blueberry extract and significantly improves retinal histology (vacuolar degeneration less pronounced ganglion cells, there are no structural changes in photoreceptor layer. Gels revealed more effective with containing extract of bilberry, grape flour and quercetin.Conclusion: Oral mucosal application of gels containing active substances, have protection of retina in diabetes mellitus type 2.

  19. Early adaptive response of the retina to a pro-diabetogenic diet: Impairment of cone response and gene expression changes in high-fructose fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Magalie; Pasquis, Bruno; Buteau, Bénédicte; Fourgeux, Cynthia; Dembele, Doulaye; Leclere, Laurent; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène; Acar, Niyazi; Bron, Alain M; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P; Bretillon, Lionel

    2015-06-01

    The lack of plasticity of neurons to respond to dietary changes, such as high fat and high fructose diets, by modulating gene and protein expression has been associated with functional and behavioral impairments that can have detrimental consequences. The inhibition of high fat-induced rewiring of hypothalamic neurons induced obesity. Feeding rodents with high fructose is a recognized and widely used model to trigger obesity and metabolic syndrome. However the adaptive response of the retina to short term feeding with high fructose is poorly documented. We therefore aimed to characterize both the functional and gene expression changes in the neurosensory retina of Brown Norway rats fed during 3 and 8 days with a 60%-rich fructose diet (n = 16 per diet and per time point). Glucose, insulin, leptin, triacylglycerols, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and fructosamine were quantified in plasma (n = 8 in each group). Functionality of the inner retina was studied using scotopic single flash electroretinography (n = 8 in each group) and the individual response of rod and cone photoreceptors was determined using 8.02 Hz Flicker electroretinography (n = 8 in each group). Analysis of gene expression in the neurosensory retina was performed by Affymetrix genechips, and confirmed by RT-qPCR (n = 6 in each group). Elevated glycemia (+13%), insulinemia (+83%), and leptinemia (+172%) was observed after 8 days of fructose feeding. The cone photoreceptor response was altered at day 8 in high fructose fed rats (Δ = 0.5 log unit of light stimulus intensity). Affymetrix analysis of gene expression highlighted significant modulation of the pathways of eIF2 signaling and endoplasmic reticulum stress, regulation of eIF4 and p70S6K signaling, as well as mTOR signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction. RT-qPCR analysis confirmed the down regulation of Crystallins, Npy, Nid1 and Optc genes after 3 days of fructose feeding, and up regulation of End2. Meanwhile, a trend

  20. Using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived conditional medium to attenuate the light-induced photodamaged retina of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Ming Chang

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The conditional medium of iPSCs contains plenty of cytoprotective, immune-modulative and rescue chemicals, contributing to the maintenance of neuronal function and retinal layers in light-damaged retina compared with apoptotic iPSC-CM and PBS. The antiapoptotic effect of iPSC-CM also shows promise in restoring damaged neurons. This result demonstrates that iPSC-CM may serve as an alternative to cell therapy alone to treat retinal light damage and maintain functional and structural integrity of the retina.

  1. Light induces translocation of NF-κB p65 to the mitochondria and suppresses expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III) in the rat retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Hiroshi, E-mail: htomita@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Soft-Path Engineering Research Center (SPERC), Faculty of Science and Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Clinical Research, Innovation and Education Center, Tohoku University Hospital, 1-1 Seiryo, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8574 (Japan); Tabata, Kitako, E-mail: ktabata@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Takahashi, Maki, E-mail: mqdelta@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Nishiyama, Fumiaki, E-mail: t2114018@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Sugano, Eriko, E-mail: sseriko@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Soft-Path Engineering Research Center (SPERC), Faculty of Science and Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) plays various roles in cell survival, apoptosis, and inflammation. In the rat retina, NF-κB activity increases after exposure to damaging light, resulting in degeneration of photoreceptors. Here, we report that in dark-adapted rats exposed for 6 h to bright white light, the p65 subunit of retinal NF-κB translocates to the mitochondria, an event associated with a decrease in expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III). However, sustained exposure for 12 h depleted p65 from the mitochondria, and enhanced COX III expression. Treatment with the protective antioxidant PBN prior to light exposure prevents p65 depletion in the mitochondria and COX III upregulation during prolonged exposure, and apoptosis in photoreceptor cells. These results indicate that COX III expression is sensitive to the abundance of NF-κB p65 in the mitochondria, which, in turn, is affected by exposure to damaging light. - Highlights: • Damaging light exposure of the retina induces NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation. • NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation is associated with the decrease of COX III expression. • Prolonged light exposure depletes mitochondrial p65 resulting in the increase in COX III expression. • NF-κB p65 and COX III expression play an important role in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration.

  2. Light induces translocation of NF-κB p65 to the mitochondria and suppresses expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III) in the rat retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Hiroshi; Tabata, Kitako; Takahashi, Maki; Nishiyama, Fumiaki; Sugano, Eriko

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) plays various roles in cell survival, apoptosis, and inflammation. In the rat retina, NF-κB activity increases after exposure to damaging light, resulting in degeneration of photoreceptors. Here, we report that in dark-adapted rats exposed for 6 h to bright white light, the p65 subunit of retinal NF-κB translocates to the mitochondria, an event associated with a decrease in expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III). However, sustained exposure for 12 h depleted p65 from the mitochondria, and enhanced COX III expression. Treatment with the protective antioxidant PBN prior to light exposure prevents p65 depletion in the mitochondria and COX III upregulation during prolonged exposure, and apoptosis in photoreceptor cells. These results indicate that COX III expression is sensitive to the abundance of NF-κB p65 in the mitochondria, which, in turn, is affected by exposure to damaging light. - Highlights: • Damaging light exposure of the retina induces NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation. • NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation is associated with the decrease of COX III expression. • Prolonged light exposure depletes mitochondrial p65 resulting in the increase in COX III expression. • NF-κB p65 and COX III expression play an important role in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration.

  3. The Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant SkQ1 Downregulates Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Genes in the Retina of OXYS Rats with AMD-Like Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Perepechaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 is a novel drug thought to retard development of age-related diseases. It has been shown that SkQ1 reduces clinical signs of retinopathy in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats, which are a known animal model of human age-related macular degeneration (AMD. The aim of this work was to test whether SkQ1 affects transcriptional activity of AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, which are considered as AMD-associated genes in the retina of OXYS and Wistar rats. Our results showed that only AhR and AhR-dependent genes were sensitive to SkQ1. Dietary supplementation with SkQ1 decreased the AhR mRNA level in both OXYS and Wistar rats. At baseline, the retinal Cyp1a1 mRNA level was lower in OXYS rats. SkQ1 supplementation decreased the Cyp1a1 mRNA level in Wistar rats, but this level remained unchanged in OXYS rats. Baseline Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 mRNA expression was stronger in OXYS than in Wistar rats. In the OXYS strain, Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 mRNA levels decreased as a result of SkQ1 supplementation. These data suggest that the Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 enzymes are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD-like retinopathy of OXYS rats and are possible therapeutic targets of SkQ1.

  4. Single residue AAV capsid mutation improves transduction of photoreceptors in the Abca4-/- mouse and bipolar cells in the rd1 mouse and human retina ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Samantha R; Charbel Issa, Peter; Singh, Mandeep S; Lipinski, Daniel M; Barnea-Cramer, Alona O; Walker, Nathan J; Barnard, Alun R; Hankins, Mark W; MacLaren, Robert E

    2016-11-01

    Gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for the treatment of retinal degenerations has shown safety and efficacy in clinical trials. However, very high levels of vector expression may be necessary for the treatment of conditions such as Stargardt disease where a dual vector approach is potentially needed, or in optogenetic strategies for end-stage degeneration in order to achieve maximal light sensitivity. In this study, we assessed two vectors with single capsid mutations, rAAV2/2(Y444F) and rAAV2/8(Y733F) in their ability to transduce retina in the Abca4 -/- and rd1 mouse models of retinal degeneration. We noted significantly increased photoreceptor transduction using rAAV2/8(Y733F) in the Abca4 -/- mouse, in contrast to previous work where vectors tested in this model have shown low levels of photoreceptor transduction. Bipolar cell transduction was achieved following subretinal delivery of both vectors in the rd1 mouse, and via intravitreal delivery of rAAV2/2(Y444F). The successful use of rAAV2/8(Y733F) to target bipolar cells was further validated on human tissue using an ex vivo culture system of retinal explants. Capsid mutant AAV vectors transduce human retinal cells and may be particularly suited to treat retinal degenerations in which high levels of transgene expression are required.

  5. Hindlimb Suspension as a Model to Study Ophthalmic Complications in Microgravity Status Report: Optimization of Rat Retina Flat Mounts Staining to Study Vascular Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Corey A.; Zanello, Susana B.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary data from a prior tissue-sharing experiment has suggested that early growth response protein-1 (Egr1), a transcription factor involved in various stress responses in the vasculature, is induced in the rat retina after 14 days of hindlimb suspension (HS) and may be evidence that mechanical stress is occurring secondary to the cephalad fluid shift. This mechanical stress could cause changes in oxygenation of the retina, and the subsequent ischemia- or inflammation-driven hypoxia may lead to microvascular remodeling. This microvascular remodeling process can be studied using image analysis of retinal vessels and can be then be quantified by the VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software, a computational tool that quantifies remodeling patterns of branching vascular trees and capillary or vasculogenic networks. Our project investigates whether rodent HS is a valid model to study the effects of simulated-weightlessness on ocular structures and their relationship with intracranial pressure (ICP). One of the hypotheses to be tested is that HS-induced cephalad fluid shift is accompanied by vascular engorgement that produces changes in retinal oxygenation, leading to oxidative stress, hypoxia, microvascular remodeling, and cellular degeneration. We have optimized the procedure to obtain flat mounts of rat retina, staining of the endothelial lining in vasculature and acquisition of high quality images suitable for VESGEN analysis. Briefly, eyes were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for 24 hours and retinas were detached and then mounted flat on microscope slides. The microvascular staining was done with endothelial cell-specific isolectin binding, coupled to Alexa-488 fluorophore. Image acquisition at low magnification and high resolution was performed using a new Leica SP8 confocal microscope in a tile pattern across the X,Y plane and multiple sections along the Z-axis. This new confocal microscope has the added capability of dye separation using the Linear

  6. Biological activity is the likely origin of the intersection between the photoreceptor inner and outer segments of the rat retina as determined by optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamauchi Y

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Yasuyuki Yamauchi, Hiromichi Yagi, Yoshihiko Usui, Keisuke Kimura, Tsuyoshi Agawa, Rintaro Tsukahara, Naoyuki Yamakawa, Hiroshi GotoDepartment of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Medical University Hospital, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Recent research on macular diseases has prompted investigations into the condition of the intersection between the photoreceptor inner and outer segments (IS/OS and the relationship with retinal photoreceptor abnormalities. Although the origin of the IS/OS in optical coherence tomography (OCT images is unclear, it may be related to either the cellular activity of the photoreceptors or the structure of the OS disks. To address this question, we compared the IS/OS status in OCT images of rat retinas before and after euthanasia.Methods: OCT images were taken before and after euthanasia in four eyes of two Brown Norway rats. After the OCT images were taken, the rats were used for histopathological studies to confirm that retinal structures were intact.Results: Before euthanasia, the IS/OS and external limiting membrane (ELM line were clearly identifiable on the OCT images. However, after euthanasia, neither the IS/OS nor the ELM line was evident in three out of four eyes, and a faint IS/OS and an ELM line were identified in one eye. Histopathological analysis did not show any abnormalities in the retina in any of the four eyes.Conclusion: The origin of the IS/OS identified in OCT images is likely related to the biological activities of the photoreceptor cells.Keywords: IS/OS, OCT, histopathology, biological activity

  7. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio M Larrayoz

    Full Text Available Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP, including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3 and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP, but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C. Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina.

  8. In vivo studies of biotin absorption in distal rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have extended their previous studies of biotin absorption in rat proximal jejunum (PJ) to examine biotin absorptive capacity of rat ileum (I) and proximal colon (PC) using in vivo intestinal loop technique. Intestinal loops (2.5 cm) were filled with 0.3 ml of solution containing ( 3 H)-biotin and ( 14 C)-inulin in phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Biotin absorption was determined on the basis of luminal biotin disappearance after correction for inulin recovery and averaged (pmol/loop-10 min; X +/- SEM). In related experiments, 5-cm loops of PJ, distal I (DI), or PC were filled with 0.5 ml of solution of similar composition (1.0 μM biotin). The abdominal cavity was closed and the rats were allowed to recover from anesthesia, then sacrificed 3 hr after injection. Biotin absorption averaged 96.2% (PJ), 93.2% (DI), and 25.8% (PC) of the dose administered. These differences were reflected in the radioactive biotin content of plasma and intestinal loop, kidney, and liver. These data demonstrate significant biotin absorption in rat DI and PC, as required if the intestinal microflora are to be considered as a source of biotin for the host

  9. Na,K-ATPase alpha isoforms at the blood-cerebrospinal fluid-trigeminal nerve and blood-retina interfaces in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Xianghong; McCleary, Paige; Techy, Matthew; Chiang, Jiarong; Kuo, Linus; Fonteh, Alfred N; Armstrong, Brian; Levy, Dan; Harrington, Michael G

    2013-03-14

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sodium concentration increases during migraine attacks, and both CSF and vitreous humor sodium increase in the rat migraine model. The Na,K-ATPase is a probable source of these sodium fluxes. Since Na,K-ATPase isoforms have different locations and physiological roles, our objective was to establish which alpha isoforms are present at sites where sodium homeostasis is disrupted. Specific Na,K-ATPase alpha isoforms were identified in rat tissues by immunohistochemistry at the blood-CSF barrier at the choroid plexus, at the blood-CSF-trigeminal barrier at the meninges, at the blood-retina barrier, and at the blood-aqueous barrier at the ciliary body. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), occludin, or von Willibrand factor (vWF) were co-localized with Na,K-ATPase to identify trigeminal nociceptor fibers, tight junctions, and capillary endothelial cells respectively. The Na,K-ATPase alpha-2 isoform is located on capillaries and intensely at nociceptive trigeminal nerve fibers at the meningeal blood-CSF-trigeminal barrier. Alpha-1 and -3 are lightly expressed on the trigeminal nerve fibers but not at capillaries. Alpha-2 is expressed at the blood-retina barriers and, with alpha-1, at the ciliary body blood aqueous barrier. Intense apical membrane alpha-1 was associated with moderate cytoplasmic alpha-2 expression at the choroid plexus blood-CSF barrier. Na,K-ATPase alpha isoforms are present at the meningeal, choroid plexus, and retinal barriers. Alpha-2 predominates at the capillary endothelial cells in the meninges and retinal ganglion cell layer.

  10. Modifying a standard method allows simultaneous extraction of RNA and protein, enabling detection of enzymes in the rat retina with low expressions and protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agardh, Elisabet; Gustavsson, Carin; Hagert, Per; Nilsson, Marie; Agardh, Carl-David

    2006-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate messenger RNA and protein expression in limited amounts of tissue with low protein content. The Chomczynski method was used for simultaneous extraction of RNA, and protein was modified in the protein isolation step. Template mass and cycling time for the complementary DNA synthesis step of real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for analysis of catalase, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, manganese superoxide dismutase, the catalytic subunit of glutamylcysteine ligase, glutathione peroxidase 1, and the endogenous control cyclophilin B (CypB) were optimized before PCR. Polymerase chain reaction accuracy and efficacy were demonstrated by calculating the regression (R2) values of the separate amplification curves. Appropriate antibodies, blocking buffers, and running conditions were established for Western blot, and protein detection and multiplex assays with CypB were performed for each target. During the extraction procedure, the protein phase was dissolved in a modified washing buffer containing 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, followed by ultrafiltration. Enzyme expression on real-time RT-PCR was accomplished with high reliability and reproducibility (R2, 0.990-0.999), and all enzymes except for glutathione peroxidase 1 were detectable in individual retinas on Western blot. Western blot multiplexing with CypB was possible for all targets. In conclusion, connecting gene expression directly to protein levels in the individual rat retina was possible by simultaneous extraction of RNA and protein. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot allowed accurate detection of retinal protein expressions and levels.

  11. Association of the AMPA receptor-related postsynaptic density proteins GRIP and ABP with subsets of glutamate-sensitive neurons in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gábriel, Robert; de Souza, Sunita; Ziff, Edward B; Witkovsky, Paul

    2002-07-22

    We used specific antibodies against two postsynaptic density proteins, GRIP (glutamate receptor interacting protein) and ABP (AMPA receptor-binding protein), to study their distribution in the rat retina. In the central nervous system, it has been shown that both proteins bind strongly to the AMPA glutamate receptor (GluR) 2/3 subunits, but not other GluRs, through a set of three PDZ domains. Western blots detected a single GRIP protein that was virtually identical in retina and brain, whereas retinal ABP corresponded to only one of three ABP peptides found in brain. The retinal distributions of GluR2/3, GRIP, and ABP immunoreactivity (IR) were similar but not identical. GluR2/3 immunoreactivity (IR) was abundant in both plexiform layers and in large perikarya. ABP IR was concentrated in large perikarya but was sparse in the plexiform layers, whereas GRIP IR was relatively more abundant in the plexiform layers than in perikarya. Immunolabel for these three antibodies consisted of puncta ABP IR was examined by double labeling subclasses of retinal neuron with characteristic marker proteins, e.g., calbindin. GRIP, ABP, and GluR2/3 IR were detected in horizontal cells, dopaminergic and glycinergic AII amacrine cells and large ganglion cells. Immunolabel was absent in rod bipolar and weak or absent in cholinergic amacrine cells. By using the tyramide method of signal amplification, a colocalization of GluR2/3 was found with either GRIP or ABP in horizontal cell terminals, and perikarya of amacrine and ganglion cells. Our results show that ABP and GRIP colocalize with GluR2/3 in particular subsets of retinal neuron, as was previously established for certain neurons in the brain. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Effect of epithalon on age-specific changes in the retina in rats with hereditary pigmentary dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavinson, V Kh; Razumovskii, M I; Trofimova, S V; Grigor'yan, R A; Chaban, T V; Oleinik, T L; Razumovskaya, A M

    2002-01-01

    The effect of peptide bioregulator Epithalon on the course of hereditary pigmentary retinal degeneration was studied in Campbell rats. Administration of epithalon starting from birth protected morphological structure, increased its bioelectrical activity, and improved its function.

  13. In vivo postprandial lipid partitioning in liver and muscle of diabetic rats is disturbed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prompers, J.J.; Jonkers, R.A.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.; Nicolay, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study in vivo lipid partitioning in insulin-resistant liver and muscle of diabetic rats using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Methods: Four groups of n=6 male Zucker diabetic fatty rats were used for this study: obese, pre-diabetic fa/fa rats and lean, non-diabetic fa/+

  14. Expression of c-Fos and c-Jun in the cornea, lens, and retina after ultraviolet irradiation of the rat eye and effect of topical antisense oligodeoxynucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillardon, F.; Zimmermann, M.

    1995-01-01

    Aims - Immunohistochemical techniques were used to investigate c-Fos and c-Jun proto-oncogene expression in the cornea, lens, and retina after ultraviolet irradiation of the rat eye. Methods -Eyes of anaesthetised rats were exposed to 1.5 J/cm 2 of ultraviolet radiation (280-380 nm). Animals were perfused 1, 6, or 24 hours after irradiation and tissue sections were incubated with specific antiserum to c-Fos and c-Jun, respectively. Non-irradiated contralateral eyes displayed no c-Fos and c-Jun immunoreactivity. One and 6 hours after ultraviolet exposure numerous c-Fos and c-Jun immunopositive nuclei were observed mainly in the epithelial cell layers of the cornea and the lens epithelium. Scattered labelled nuclei were detectable in the retinal ganglion cell layer and the inner nuclear layer. Twenty four hours after irradiation c-Fos and c-Jun protein expression returned to near control levels. Histological signs of ultraviolet damage (for example, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation) were first recognisable in the corneal epithelium 6 hours after irradiation and became more apparent at later times. The rapid and sustained activation of c-Fos and c-Jun expression in the eye after single ultraviolet exposure may represent the molecular mechanism underlying ultraviolet induced photodamage and initiation of cell death. Furthermore, topical application of a c-fos antisense oligode-oxynucleotide to the ultraviolet exposed rat eye inhibited the increase in c-Fos expression in the cornea, suggesting therapeutic activity of antisense drugs in corneal malignant and infectious diseases. (author)

  15. Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper Protects the Retina From Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration by Inducing Bcl-xL in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruiping; Tang, Wenyi; Lei, Boya; Ding, Xinyi; Jiang, Cheng; Xu, Gezhi

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in a light-induced retinal degeneration model and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Intravitreal injection of recombinant GILZ-overexpressing lentivirus (OE-GILZ-rLV) and short hairpin RNA targeting GILZ recombinant lentivirus (shRNA-GILZ-rLV) was performed to up- and downregulate retinal GILZ, respectively. Three days after stable transduction, rats were exposed to continuous bright light (5000 lux) for 2 days. Retinal function was assessed by full-field electroretinography (ERG), and the retinal structure was examined for photoreceptor survival and death in rats kept under a 12-hour light:2-hour dark cycle following light exposure. The expression levels of retinal Bcl-xL, caspase-9, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blotting or real-time PCR at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after light exposure. Exposure to bright light downregulated retinal GILZ in parallel with the downregulation of Bcl-xL and the upregulation of active caspase-3. Overexpression of retinal GILZ attenuated the decrease of Bcl-xL and the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after bright light exposure, respectively. GILZ silencing aggravated the downregulation of Bcl-xL induced by bright light exposure. Bright light exposure reduced the amplitude of ERG, increased the number of apoptotic photoreceptor cells, and decreased retinal thickness; and GILZ overexpression could attenuate all these effects. Overexpression of GILZ by OE-GILZ-rLV transduction protected the retina from light-induced cellular damage by activating antiapoptotic pathways.

  16. Retina-Inspired Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutsi, Effrosyni; Fillatre, Lionel; Antonini, Marc; Gaulmin, Julien

    2018-07-01

    This paper introduces a novel filter, which is inspired by the human retina. The human retina consists of three different layers: the Outer Plexiform Layer (OPL), the inner plexiform layer, and the ganglionic layer. Our inspiration is the linear transform which takes place in the OPL and has been mathematically described by the neuroscientific model "virtual retina." This model is the cornerstone to derive the non-separable spatio-temporal OPL retina-inspired filter, briefly renamed retina-inspired filter, studied in this paper. This filter is connected to the dynamic behavior of the retina, which enables the retina to increase the sharpness of the visual stimulus during filtering before its transmission to the brain. We establish that this retina-inspired transform forms a group of spatio-temporal Weighted Difference of Gaussian (WDoG) filters when it is applied to a still image visible for a given time. We analyze the spatial frequency bandwidth of the retina-inspired filter with respect to time. It is shown that the WDoG spectrum varies from a lowpass filter to a bandpass filter. Therefore, while time increases, the retina-inspired filter enables to extract different kinds of information from the input image. Finally, we discuss the benefits of using the retina-inspired filter in image processing applications such as edge detection and compression.

  17. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg; Fisher, Robyn L.; Vickers, Alison E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol

  18. In vivo kinetics of intestinal absorption of riboflavin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feder, S.; Daniel, H.; Rehner, G.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate absorption kinetics of riboflavin under in vivo conditions, with blood and lymph circulation intact, the small intestine of anesthetized rats was perfused with [ 14 C]riboflavin in a concentration range between 0.31 and 10.00 mumol/L. Apart from the uptake of riboflavin from the perfusate, passage of the vitamin into the portal (vena portae) and peripheral (vena femoralis) blood was determined. The absorption proved to be a dual process: at low substrate concentrations (less than 2 mumol/L) a saturable component predominated; at higher concentrations simple diffusion was found to be the prevailing uptake mechanism. The apparent transport constant of the saturable component was calculated to be 0.38 mumol/L. [ 14 C]flavin concentrations in the portal and peripheral blood were estimated as a function of the riboflavin concentration of the perfusion media. The dual character of the absorption was reflected by the portal blood flavin levels. Due to the high retaining and equalizing capacity of the liver, the [ 14 C]flavin level of the peripheral blood was relatively low and obeyed saturation kinetics. Constants of elimination, determined by pharmacokinetic calculations, were different for the two blood compartments but independent of the concentration of riboflavin in the perfusion media

  19. Consequences of Mrp2 deficiency for diclofenac toxicity in the rat intestine ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; van de Vegte, Dennis; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Sekine, Shuichi; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (DCF) has a high prevalence of intestinal side effects in humans and rats. It has been reported that Mrp2 transporter deficient rats (Mrp2) are more resistant to DCF induced intestinal toxicity. This was explained in vivo by impaired Mrp2-dependent

  20. A comparative in vivo and in vitro L-band EPR study of irradiated rat incisors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdravkova, M.; Gallez, B.; Debuyst, R.

    2005-01-01

    L-band (∼1GHz) EPR has the potential to measure the absorbed radiation dose in human teeth inside the mouth (in vivo analyses). One crucial point in the development of the method is to know if dosimetry evaluation carried out in vivo after accidental exposures can be reliably based on calibration curves built in vitro. The aim of the present work is to specifically address this point. First, we compared L-band in vitro and in vivo analyses in irradiated rat teeth and estimated the possible loss in in vivo experiments due to rat movements and mouth proximity. Second, the lower pair of rat incisors were analysed by L-band EPR before and after irradiation (50Gy), first on the living rat, then on the same dead rat, finally after extraction of the teeth. X-band powder spectra were also taken after crushing of the two teeth. Irradiations of dead rats and extracted teeth were also carried out. Comparing L-band spectra obtained with living rats and removed heads does not show any significant difference due to possible small rat movements or breathing. Relative standard deviations of the amplitudes of the dosimetric signal are quite high (27-54%). Nevertheless, it seems to be a tendency to have higher signals in irradiated extracted teeth than in irradiated animals

  1. Structure of the vitreoretinal border region in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR rats)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Steffen

    1993-01-01

    Øjenpatologi, vitreoretinal border region, inner limiting membrane of the retina, spontaneously hypertensive rats, SHR rats, ultrastructure......Øjenpatologi, vitreoretinal border region, inner limiting membrane of the retina, spontaneously hypertensive rats, SHR rats, ultrastructure...

  2. Connexin 30 expression and frequency of connexin heterogeneity in astrocyte gap junction plaques increase with age in the rat retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Mansour

    Full Text Available We investigated age-associated changes in retinal astrocyte connexins (Cx by assaying Cx numbers, plaque sizes, protein expression levels and heterogeneity of gap junctions utilizing six-marker immunohistochemistry (IHC. We compared Wistar rat retinal wholemounts in animals aged 3 (young adult, 9 (middle-aged and 22 months (aged. We determined that retinal astrocytes have gap junctions composed of Cx26, -30, -43 and -45. Cx30 was consistently elevated at 22 months compared to younger ages both when associated with parenchymal astrocytes and vascular-associated astrocytes. Not only was the absolute number of Cx30 plaques significantly higher (P<0.05 but the size of the plaques was significantly larger at 22 months compared to younger ages (p<0.05. With age, Cx26 increased significantly initially, but returned to basal levels; whereas Cx43 expression remained low and stable with age. Evidence that astrocytes alter connexin compositions of gap junctions was demonstrated by the significant increase in the number of Cx26/Cx45 gap junctions with age. We also found gap junctions comprised of 1, 2, 3 or 4 Cx proteins suggesting that retinal astrocytes use various connexin protein combinations in their gap junctions during development and aging. These data provides new insight into the dynamic and extensive Cx network utilized by retinal astrocytes for communication within both the parenchyma and vasculature for the maintenance of normal retinal physiology with age. This characterisation of the changes in astrocytic gap junctional communication with age in the CNS is crucial to the understanding of physiological aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. In vivo study about specific captation of 125 I-insulin by rat brain structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanvitto, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The specific captation of 125 I-insulin was evaluated by brain structures, as olfactory bulbous, hypothalamus and cerebellum in rats, from in vivo experiences that including two different aspects: captation measure of 125 I-insulin after the intravenous injection of the labelled hormone, in fed rats and in rats with 48 h of fast or convulsion, procedure by the pentylene tetrazole; captation measure of 125 I-insulin after intra-cerebral-ventricular injection of the labelled hormone in fed rats. (C.G.C.)

  4. Persistence of DNA studied in different ex vivo and in vivo rat models simulating the human gut situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; van Hoek, A.H.A.M.; Joosten, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of DNA sequences from genetically modified plants to persist in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. PCR analysis and transformation assays were used to study DNA persistence and integrity in various ex vivo and in vivo systems using gnotobiotic rats. DNA......, plasmid DNA could be recovered throughout the GI tract when intestinal samples were taken up to 5 h after feeding rats with plasmid. Furthermore, DNA isolated from these intestinal samples was able to transform electro-competent Escherichia coli, showing that the plasmid was still biologically active....... The results indicate that ingested DNA may persist in the GI tract and consequently may be present for uptake by intestinal bacteria....

  5. Noninvasive Raman spectroscopy of rat tibiae: approach to in vivo assessment of bone quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okagbare, Paul I.; Begun, Dana; Tecklenburg, Mary; Awonusi, Ayorinde; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We report on in vivo noninvasive Raman spectroscopy of rat tibiae using robust fiber-optic Raman probes and holders designed for transcutaneous Raman measurements in small animals. The configuration allows placement of multiple fibers around a rat leg, maintaining contact with the skin. Bone Raman data are presented for three regions of the rat tibia diaphysis with different thicknesses of overlying soft tissue. The ability to perform in vivo noninvasive Raman measurement and evaluation of subtle changes in bone composition is demonstrated with rat leg phantoms in which the tibia has carbonated hydroxylapatite, with different carbonate contents. Our data provide proof of the principle that small changes in bone composition can be monitored through soft tissue at anatomical sites of interest in biomedical studies. PMID:23085899

  6. Desprendimiento de retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jaime Claramunt, Dr.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available El desprendimiento de retina (DR consiste en la separación entre la retina neurosensorial y el epitelio pigmentario subyacente. Su forma más frecuente es el DR regmatógeno, causado por una rotura en la retina. Se manifiesta generalmente como un defecto en el campo visual o mala visión. Si se pesquisa y trata oportunamente tiene buenas posibilidades de éxito. No obstante, sigue siendo una causa importante de mala visión y ceguera, por lo que su prevención tiene un rol fundamental.

  7. Desprendimiento de retina

    OpenAIRE

    L. Jaime Claramunt, Dr.

    2010-01-01

    El desprendimiento de retina (DR) consiste en la separación entre la retina neurosensorial y el epitelio pigmentario subyacente. Su forma más frecuente es el DR regmatógeno, causado por una rotura en la retina. Se manifiesta generalmente como un defecto en el campo visual o mala visión. Si se pesquisa y trata oportunamente tiene buenas posibilidades de éxito. No obstante, sigue siendo una causa importante de mala visión y ceguera, por lo que su prevención tiene un rol fundamental.

  8. Developmental and daily expression of the Pax4 and Pax6 homeobox genes in the rat retina: localization of Pax4 in photoreceptor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Bailey, Michael J; Kim, Jong-So

    2009-01-01

    Pax4 is a homeobox gene encoding Pax4, a transcription factor that is essential for embryonic development of the endocrine pancreas. In the pancreas, Pax4 counters the effects of the related transcription factor, Pax6, which is known to be essential for eye morphogenesis. In this study, we have...... in the foetal eye. Histological analysis revealed that Pax4 mRNA is exclusively expressed in the retinal photoreceptors, whereas Pax6 mRNA and protein are present in the inner nuclear layer and in the ganglion cell layer of the mature retina. In the adult retina, Pax4 transcripts exhibit a diurnal rhythm...

  9. In vivo Dentin Caries Model using Rat Molars

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi, HIGASHI; Junji, TAGAMI; Nobuhiro, HANADA; Cariology and Operative Dentistry, Department of Restorative Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University; Cariology and Operative Dentistry, Department of Restorative Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University; Department of Oral Science The National Institute of Infectious Diseases(NIID)

    2000-01-01

    Experimental dentinal caries was induced in rat molars which were inoculated orally with Streptococcus mutans and maintained on a carionenic diet 2000. After 30 days on the diet, the rats were sacrificed. The caries lesions were confirmed with a caries detector, then nanohardness determination of caries dentin were measured with nanoindentation. After hardness measurement, the lesion was examined by SEM and EDS. Dentin caries in sixteen fissures was induced among 20 fissures in the mandibular...

  10. Thrombolytic effects in vivo of nattokinase in a carrageenan-induced rat model of thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping; Du, Ming; Yang, Xiulin; Chen, Qingquan; Chen, Hong; Lin, Dong-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Nattokinase is a serine protease produced by Bacillus subtilis during the fermentation of the soybean product natto. The fibrinolytic activity and thrombolytic effects of nattokinase have been observed in vitro, but the effect in vivo has still to be researched. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the activity of nattokinase in vivo. To establish a rat model of thrombosis, κ-carrageenan was injected subcutaneously into the toes of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Histological examination confirmed thrombosis. The rats were then treated with varying doses of nattokinase and the resulting thrombolysis was histologically assessed. ELISA was used to determine the levels of the fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs) and D-dimer, which are sensitive indices of fibrinolytic activity. Vermis kinase, a known thrombolytic agent, was used as a positive control. Biopsy results revealed partial thrombolysis in the tail vessels of the rats treated with nattokinase or vermis kinase. FDP and D-dimer levels were higher in rats treated with high-dose nattokinase than in those treated with saline. No difference in FDP or D-dimer levels was observed between rats treated with high-dose nattokinase and those treated with vermis kinase. Both the histological and physiological evidence from this study indicate that nattokinase exerts thrombolytic effects in vivo.

  11. A programmable artificial retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, T.M.; Zavidovique, B.Y.; Devos, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    An artificial retina is a device that intimately associates an imager with processing facilities on a monolithic circuit. Yet, except for simple environments and applications, analog hardware will not suffice to process and compact the raw image flow from the photosensitive array. To solve this output problem, an on-chip array of bare Boolean processors with halftoning facilities might be used, providing versatility from programmability. By setting the pixel memory size to 3 b, the authors have demonstrated both the technological practicality and the computational efficiency of this programmable Boolean retina concept. Using semi-static shifting structures together with some interaction circuitry, a minimal retina Boolean processor can be built with less than 30 transistors and controlled by as few as 6 global clock signals. The successful design, integration, and test of such a 65x76 Boolean retina on a 50-mm 2 CMOS 2-μm circuit are presented

  12. Helping the Retina Regenerate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the retina News Brief 03/30/17 A new report gives recommendations for regenerating retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), crucial neurons in the back of the eye that carry visual information to the brain. Authored ...

  13. In vivo micro-CT analysis of bone remodeling in a rat calvarial defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umoh, Joseph U; Holdsworth, David W [Pre-Clinical Imaging Research Centre, Robarts Research Institute, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, PO Box 5015, 100 Perth Drive, London, ON N6A 5K8 (Canada); Sampaio, Arthur V; Underhill, T Michael [Laboratory of Molecular Skeletogenesis, Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Welch, Ian [Animal Care and Veterinary Services, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A [CIHR Group in Skeletal Development and Remodelling, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)], E-mail: jumoh@imaging.robarts.ca, E-mail: asampaio@interchange.ubc.ca, E-mail: tunderhi@interchange.ubc.ca, E-mail: iwelch@uwo.ca, E-mail: vasek.pitelka@schulich.uwo.ca, E-mail: hagoldbe@uwo.ca, E-mail: david.holdsworth@imaging.robarts.ca

    2009-04-07

    The rodent calvarial defect model is commonly used to investigate bone regeneration and wound healing. This study presents a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) methodology for measuring the bone mineral content (BMC) in a rat calvarial defect and validates it by estimating its precision error. Two defect models were implemented. A single 6 mm diameter defect was created in 20 rats, which were imaged in vivo for longitudinal experiments. Three 5 mm diameter defects were created in three additional rats, which were repeatedly imaged ex vivo to determine precision. Four control rats and four rats treated with bone morphogenetic protein were imaged at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-surgery. Scan parameters were 80 kVp, 0.45 mA and 180 mAs. Images were reconstructed with an isotropic resolution of 45 {mu}m. At 6 weeks, the BMC in control animals (4.37 {+-} 0.66 mg) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that in treated rats (11.29 {+-} 1.01 mg). Linear regression between the BMC and bone fractional area, from 20 rats, showed a strong correlation (r{sup 2} = 0.70, p < 0.0001), indicating that the BMC can be used, in place of previous destructive analysis techniques, to characterize bone growth. The high precision (2.5%) of the micro-CT methodology indicates its utility in detecting small BMC changes in animals.

  14. Expression and light sensitivity of clock genes Per1 and Per2 and immediate-early gene c-fos within the retina of early postnatal Wistar rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějů, Kristýna; Sumová, Alena; Bendová, Zdeňka

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 518, č. 17 (2010), s. 3630-3644 ISSN 0021-9967 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/08/0503; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18741 - EUCLOCK Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD309/08/H079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : development * retina * circadian clock Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.774, year: 2010

  15. In Vitro and in Vivo Metabolism of Verproside in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Hee Shin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Verproside, a catalpol derivative iridoid glycoside isolated from Pseudolysimachion rotundum var. subintegrum, is a biologically active compound with anti-inflammatory, antinociceptic, antioxidant, and anti-asthmatic properties. Twenty-one metabolites were identified in bile and urine samples obtained after intravenous administration of verproside in rats using liquid chromatography-quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Verproside was metabolized by O-methylation, glucuronidation, sulfation, and hydrolysis to verproside glucuronides (M1 and M2, verproside sulfates (M3 and M4, picroside II (M5, M5 glucuronide (M7, M5 sulfate (M9, isovanilloylcatalpol (M6, M6 glucuronide (M8, M6 sulfate (M10, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (M11, M11 glucuronide (M12, M11 sulfates (M13 and M14, 3-methyoxy-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (M15, M15 glucuronides (M17 and M18, M15 sulfate (M20, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzoic acid (M16, M16 glucuronide (M19, and M16 sulfate (M21. Incubation of verproside with rat hepatocytes resulted in thirteen metabolites (M1–M11, M13, and M14. Verproside sulfate, M4 was a major metabolite in rat hepatocytes. After intravenous administration of verproside, the drug was recovered in bile (0.77% of dose and urine (4.48% of dose, and O-methylation of verproside to picroside II (M5 and isovanilloylcatalpol (M6 followed by glucuronidation and sulfation was identified as major metabolic pathways compared to glucuronidation and sulfation of verproside in rats.

  16. Rat brain sagittal organotypic slice cultures as an ex vivo dopamine cell loss system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey-Chapman, Amy; Connor, Bronwen

    2017-02-01

    Organotypic brain slice cultures are a useful tool to study neurological function as they provide a more complex, 3-dimensional system than standard 2-dimensional in vitro cell cultures. Building on a previously developed mouse brain slice culture protocol, we have developed a rat sagittal brain slice culture system as an ex vivo model of dopamine cell loss. We show that rat brain organotypic slice cultures remain viable for up to 6 weeks in culture. Using Fluoro-Gold axonal tracing, we demonstrate that the slice 3-dimensional cytoarchitecture is maintained over a 4 week culturing period, with particular focus on the nigrostriatal pathway. Treatment of the cultures with 6-hydroxydopamine and desipramine induces a progressive loss of Fluoro-Gold-positive nigral cells with a sustained loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive nigral cells. This recapitulates the pattern of dopaminergic degeneration observed in the rat partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model and, most importantly, the progressive pathology of Parkinson's disease. Our slice culture platform provides an advance over other systems, as we demonstrate for the first time 3-dimensional cytoarchitecture maintenance of rat nigrostriatal sagittal slices for up to 6 weeks. Our ex vivo organotypic slice culture system provides a long term cellular platform to model Parkinson's disease, allowing for the elucidation of mechanisms involved in dopaminergic neuron degeneration and the capability to study cellular integration and plasticity ex vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In vivo detection of c-Met expression in a rat C6 glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, R A; Smith, N; Doblas, S; Tesiram, Y; Garteiser, P; Saunders, D; Cranford, R; Silasi-Mansat, R; Herlea, O; Ivanciu, L; Wu, D; Lupu, F

    2008-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor, c-Met, and its substrate, the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), are implicated in the malignant progression of glioblastomas. In vivo detection of c-Met expression may be helpful in the diagnosis of malignant tumours. The C6 rat glioma model is a widely used intracranial brain tumour model used to study gliomas experimentally. We used a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) molecular targeting agent to specifically tag the cell surface receptor, c-Met, with an anti-c-Met antibody (Ab) linked to biotinylated Gd (gadolinium)-DTPA (diethylene triamine penta acetic acid)-albumin in rat gliomas to detect overexpression of this antigen in vivo. The anti-c-Met probe (anti-c-Met-Gd-DTPA-albumin) was administered intravenously, and as determined by an increase in MRI signal intensity and a corresponding decrease in regional T(1) relaxation values, this probe was found to detect increased expression of c-Met protein levels in C6 gliomas. In addition, specificity for the binding of the anti-c-Met contrast agent was determined by using fluorescence microscopic imaging of the biotinylated portion of the targeting agent within neoplastic and 'normal'brain tissues following in vivo administration of the anti-c-Met probe. Controls with no Ab or with a normal rat IgG attached to the contrast agent component indicated no non-specific binding to glioma tissue. This is the first successful visualization of in vivo overexpression of c-Met in gliomas.

  18. The in vivo phosphorylation sites of rat brain dynamin I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Mark E; Anggono, Victor; Bache, Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    -824). To resolve the discrepancy and to better understand the biological roles of dynI phosphorylation, we undertook a systematic identification of all phosphorylation sites in rat brain nerve terminal dynI. Using phosphoamino acid analysis, exclusively phospho-serine residues were found. Thr(780) phosphorylation...... of their relative abundance and relative responses to depolarization. The multiple phospho-sites suggest subtle regulation of synaptic vesicle endocytosis by new protein kinases and new protein-protein interactions. The homologous dynI and dynIII phosphorylation indicates a high mechanistic similarity. The results...

  19. In Silico Ocular Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Delivery of Topical FK962 to Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Ayumi; Yabuta, Chiho; Kishimoto, Yayoi; Kozai, Seiko; Ohtori, Akira; Shearer, Thomas R; Azuma, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-09-01

    To establish the in silico ocular pharmacokinetic modeling for eye drops, and to simulate the dose regimen for FK962 in human choroid/retinal diseases. Pharmacokinetics for FK962 in vivo was performed by a single instillation of drops containing 0.1% 14 C-FK962 in rabbit eyes. Permeation of FK962 across the cornea, sclera, and choroid/retina was measured in vitro. Neurite elongation by FK962 was measured in cultured rat retinal ganglion cells. Parameters from the experimental data were used in an improved in silico model of ocular pharmacokinetics of FK962 in man. The mean concentration of FK962 in ocular tissues predicted by in silico modeling was consistent with in vivo results, validating the in silico model. FK962 rapidly penetrated into the anterior and posterior segments of the eye and then diffused into the vitreous body. The in silico pharmacokinetic modeling also predicted that a dose regimen of 0.0054% FK962 twice per day would produce biologically effective concentrations of FK962 in the choroid/retina, where FK962 facilitates rat neurite elongation. Our in silico model for ocular pharmacokinetics is useful (1) for predicting drug concentrations in specific ocular tissues after topical instillation, and (2) for suggesting the optimal dose regimens for eye drops. The pharmacodynamics for FK962 produced by this model may be useful for clinical trials against retinal neuropathy.

  20. Ultrasound method applied to characterize healthy femoral diaphysis of Wistar rats in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes-Pereira, A.; Matusin, D.P.; Rosa, P.; Schanaider, A.; Krüger, M.A. von; Pereira, W.C.A.

    2014-01-01

    A simple experimental protocol applying a quantitative ultrasound (QUS) pulse-echo technique was used to measure the acoustic parameters of healthy femoral diaphyses of Wistar rats in vivo. Five quantitative parameters [apparent integrated backscatter (AIB), frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB), time slope of apparent backscatter (TSAB), integrated reflection coefficient (IRC), and frequency slope of integrated reflection (FSIR)] were calculated using the echoes from cortical and trabecular bone in the femurs of 14 Wistar rats. Signal acquisition was performed three times in each rat, with the ultrasound signal acquired along the femur's central region from three positions 1 mm apart from each other. The parameters estimated for the three positions were averaged to represent the femur diaphysis. The results showed that AIB, FSAB, TSAB, and IRC values were statistically similar, but the FSIR values from Experiments 1 and 3 were different. Furthermore, Pearson's correlation coefficient showed, in general, strong correlations among the parameters. The proposed protocol and calculated parameters demonstrated the potential to characterize the femur diaphysis of rats in vivo. The results are relevant because rats have a bone structure very similar to humans, and thus are an important step toward preclinical trials and subsequent application of QUS in humans

  1. In vivo micro-CT analysis of bone remodeling in a rat calvarial defect model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoh, Joseph U.; Sampaio, Arthur V.; Welch, Ian; Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Underhill, T. Michael; Holdsworth, David W.

    2009-04-01

    The rodent calvarial defect model is commonly used to investigate bone regeneration and wound healing. This study presents a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) methodology for measuring the bone mineral content (BMC) in a rat calvarial defect and validates it by estimating its precision error. Two defect models were implemented. A single 6 mm diameter defect was created in 20 rats, which were imaged in vivo for longitudinal experiments. Three 5 mm diameter defects were created in three additional rats, which were repeatedly imaged ex vivo to determine precision. Four control rats and four rats treated with bone morphogenetic protein were imaged at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-surgery. Scan parameters were 80 kVp, 0.45 mA and 180 mAs. Images were reconstructed with an isotropic resolution of 45 µm. At 6 weeks, the BMC in control animals (4.37 ± 0.66 mg) was significantly lower (p small BMC changes in animals.

  2. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  3. Effects of phenobarbital pretreatment on the in vivo metabolism of carbaryl in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, E.V.; Alvares, A.P.; Chin, B.H.

    1987-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) pretreatment of animals is known to induce the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes in liver microsomes. Previous studies showed that incubation of carbaryl with microsomes obtained from livers of untreated or PB-treated rats resulted in little or no oxidative metabolism of the substrate. In addition, no spectral interactions were observed when carbaryl was added to hepatic microsomal suspensions. The present study was carried out to determine the effect of PB pretreatment on the in vivo metabolism of carbaryl in rats

  4. Effect of nutritional status on oxidative stress in an ex vivo perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Michaela; Nuyens, Vincent; Seidel, Laurence; Albert, Adelin; Boogaerts, Jean G

    2005-11-01

    Normothermic ischemia-reperfusion is a determinant in liver injury occurring during surgical procedures, ischemic state, and multiple organ failure. The preexisting nutritional status of the liver might contribute to the extent of tissue injury and primary nonfunction. The aim of this study was to determine the role of starvation on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in normal rat livers. Rats were randomly divided into two groups: one had free access to food, the other was fasted for 16 h. The portal vein was cannulated, and the liver was removed and perfused in a closed ex vivo system. Two modes of perfusion were applied in each series of rats, fed and fasting. In the ischemia-reperfusion mode, the experiment consisted of perfusion for 15 min, warm ischemia for 60 min, and reperfusion during 60 min. In the nonischemia mode, perfusion was maintained during the 135-min study period. Five rats were included in each experimental condition, yielding a total of 20 rats. Liver enzymes, potassium, glucose, lactate, free radicals, i.e., dienes and trienes, and cytochrome c were analyzed in perfusate samples. The proportion of glycogen in hepatocytes was determined in tissue biopsies. Transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase, potassium, and free radical concentrations were systematically higher in fasting rats in both conditions, with and without ischemia. Cytochrome c was higher after reperfusion in the fasting rats. Glucose and lactate concentrations were greater in the fed group. The glycogen content decreased in both groups during the experiment but was markedly lower in the fasting rats. In fed rats, liver injury was moderate, whereas hepatocytes integrity was notably impaired both after continuous perfusion and warm ischemia in fasting animals. Reduced glycogen store in hepatocytes may explain reduced tolerance.

  5. Multifunctional nanoparticle platforms for in vivo MRI enhancement and photodynamic therapy of a rat brain cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, Raoul; Lee Koo, Yong-Eun; Philbert, Martin; Moffat, Bradford A.; Ramachandra Reddy, G.; McConville, Patrick; Hall, Daniel E.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Bhojani, Mahaveer Swaroop; Buck, Sarah M.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2005-05-01

    A paradigm for brain cancer detection, treatment, and monitoring is established. Multifunctional biomedical nanoparticles (30-60 nm) containing photosensitizer externally deliver reactive oxygen species (ROS) to cancer cells while simultaneously enhancing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast providing real-time tumor kill measurement. Plasma residence time control and specific cell targeting are achieved. A 5 min treatment in rats halted and even reversed in vivo tumor growth after 3-4 days post-treatment.

  6. Multifunctional nanoparticle platforms for in vivo MRI enhancement and photodynamic therapy of a rat brain cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopelman, Raoul; Lee Koo, Yong-Eun; Philbert, Martin; Moffat, Bradford A.; Ramachandra Reddy, G.; McConville, Patrick; Hall, Daniel E.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Bhojani, Mahaveer Swaroop; Buck, Sarah M.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    A paradigm for brain cancer detection, treatment, and monitoring is established. Multifunctional biomedical nanoparticles (30-60 nm) containing photosensitizer externally deliver reactive oxygen species (ROS) to cancer cells while simultaneously enhancing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast providing real-time tumor kill measurement. Plasma residence time control and specific cell targeting are achieved. A 5 min treatment in rats halted and even reversed in vivo tumor growth after 3-4 days post-treatment

  7. Multifunctional nanoparticle platforms for in vivo MRI enhancement and photodynamic therapy of a rat brain cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopelman, Raoul [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 N. University, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States)]. E-mail: kopelman@umich.edu; Lee Koo, Yong-Eun [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 N. University, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States); Philbert, Martin [Environmental Health Sciences, niversity of Michigan (United States); Moffat, Bradford A. [Department of Radiology, The University of Michigan (United States); Ramachandra Reddy, G. [Molecular Therapeutics, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); McConville, Patrick [Molecular Therapeutics, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Hall, Daniel E. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan (United States); Chenevert, Thomas L. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan (United States); Bhojani, Mahaveer Swaroop [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan (United States); Buck, Sarah M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 N. University, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States); Rehemtulla, Alnawaz [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan (United States); Ross, Brian D. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan (United States)

    2005-05-15

    A paradigm for brain cancer detection, treatment, and monitoring is established. Multifunctional biomedical nanoparticles (30-60 nm) containing photosensitizer externally deliver reactive oxygen species (ROS) to cancer cells while simultaneously enhancing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast providing real-time tumor kill measurement. Plasma residence time control and specific cell targeting are achieved. A 5 min treatment in rats halted and even reversed in vivo tumor growth after 3-4 days post-treatment.

  8. Histological study of subcutaneous fat at NIR laser treatment of the rat skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanina, I. Y.; Svenskaya, Yu. I.; Navolokin, N. A.; Matveeva, O. V.; Bucharskaya, A. B.; Maslyakova, G. N.; Gorin, D. A.; Sukhorukov, G. B.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this work is to quantify impact of in vivo photochemical treatment using indocyanine green (ICG) or encapsulated ICG and NIR laser irradiation through skin of rat with obesity by the follow up tissue sampling and histochemistry. After 1 hour elapsed since 1-min light exposure samples of rat skin with subcutaneous tissue of thickness of 1.5-2.5 mm were taken by surgery from rats within marked 4-zones of the skin site. For hematoxylin-eosin histological examination of excised tissue samples, fixation was carried out by 10%-formaldehyde solution. For ICG and encapsulated ICG subcutaneous injection and subsequent 1-min diode laser irradiation with power density of 8 W/cm2, different necrotic regions with lipolysis of subcutaneous fat were observed. The obtained data can be used for safe layer-by-layer laser treatment of obesity and cellulite.

  9. Dietary restriction of choline reduces hippocampal acetylcholine release in rats: in vivo microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, A; Suzuki, Y; Umegaki, H; Ikari, H; Tajima, T; Endo, H; Iguchi, A

    2001-12-01

    We fed rats with a diet deficient in choline for 12 weeks and studied how dietary choline deficiency affected their behavior and their ability to release acetylcholine in discrete regions of rat brain using step-through passive avoidance task and in vivo microdialysis. In comparison with the control, rats fed the choline-deficient diet showed poorer retention of nociceptive memory in the passive avoidance task. Average choline level in cerebrospinal fluid in the choline-deficient group was significantly less (33.1%) than that of control rats. In vivo microdialysis showed no difference in the pattern of acetylcholine release enhanced by intraperitoneal administration of scopolamine hydrochloride (2 mg/kg) in the striatum between the two groups, whereas in the hippocampus, the maximum and subsequent increase of acetylcholine from the baseline by scopolamine injection was significantly lower in the choline-deficient group than in the control. From the results of our study, we speculate that long-term dietary restriction of choline can affect extra- and intracellular sources of substrates required for acetylcholine synthesis, and eventually limit the ability to release acetylcholine in the hippocampus. Reduced capacity to release acetylcholine in the hippocampus implies that the mechanism, maintaining acetylcholine synthesis on increased neuronal demand, may vary in discrete regions of the brain in response to dietary manipulation. The vulnerability of the mechanism in the hippocampus to dietary choline restriction is indicated by impaired mnemonic performance we observed.

  10. Biotransformation of vinclozolin in rat precision-cut liver slices: comparison with in vivo metabolic pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursztyka, Julian; Debrauwer, Laurent; Perdu, Elisabeth; Jouanin, Isabelle; Jaeg, Jean-Philippe; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre

    2008-06-25

    Vinclozolin is a dicarboxymide fungicide that presents antiandrogenic properties through its two hydrolysis products M1 and M2, which bind to the androgen receptor. Because of the lack of data on the biotransformation of vinclozolin, its metabolism was investigated in vitro in precision-cut rat liver slices and in vivo in male rat using [ (14)C]-vinclozolin. Incubations were performed using different concentrations of substrate, and the kinetics of formation of the major metabolites were studied. Three male Wistar rats were fed by gavage with [ (14)C]-VZ. Urine was collected for 24 h and analyzed by radio-HPLC for metabolic profiling. Metabolite identification was carried out on a LCQ ion trap mass spectrometer. In rat liver slices and in vivo, the major primary metabolite has been identified as 3',5'-dichloro-2,3,4-trihydroxy-2-methylbutyranilide (M5) and was mainly present as glucuronoconjugates. M5 is produced by dihydroxylation of the vinyl group of M2. Other metabolites have been identified as 3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-5-(1,2-dihydroxyethyl)-1,3-oxazolidine-2,4-dione (M4), a dihydroxylated metabolite of vinclozolin, which undergoes further conjugation to glucuronic acid, and 2-[[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy]-2-methyl-3,4-dihydroxy-butanoic acid (M6), a dihydroxylated metabolite of M1.

  11. Differences in pyrimidine dimer removal between rat skin cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullaart, E.; Lohman, P.H.; Vijg, J.

    1988-01-01

    Pyrimidine dimers, the most abundant type of DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light (UV), are rapidly repaired in human skin fibroblasts in vitro. In the same cell type from rats, however, there is hardly any removal of such dimers. To investigate whether this low capacity of rat skin cells to repair lesions in their DNA is an inherent characteristic of this species or an artifact due to cell culturing, we measured the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from rat epidermal keratinocytes both in vitro and in vivo. Epidermal keratinocytes in vitro were unable to remove any dimers over the first 3 h after UV-irradiation, while only about 20% was removed during a repair period of 24 h. In this respect, these cells were not different from cultured rat fibroblasts. In contrast to the results obtained with keratinocytes in vitro, we observed a rapid repair of pyrimidine dimers in UV-irradiated keratinocytes in vivo over the first 3 h; this rapid repair phase was followed by a much slower repair phase between 3 and 24 h. These results are discussed in terms of the possibility that mammalian cells are able to switch from one DNA repair pathway to another

  12. Characterization and toxicological effects of three-dimensional graphene foams in rats in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Yingying [University of Science and Technology of China, CAS Key laboratory of Brain Function and Diseases and School of Life Sciences (China); Chai, Renjie [Southeast University, Key Laboratory for Developmental Genes and Human Disease, Ministry of Education, Institute of Life Sciences (China); Song, Qin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics (China); Chen, Lin; Wang, Xinxing [University of Science and Technology of China, CAS Key laboratory of Brain Function and Diseases and School of Life Sciences (China); Cheng, Guosheng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics (China); Tang, Mingliang, E-mail: mingliangtang@seu.edu.cn [Southeast University, Key Laboratory for Developmental Genes and Human Disease, Ministry of Education, Institute of Life Sciences (China); Wang, Ming, E-mail: wming@ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, CAS Key laboratory of Brain Function and Diseases and School of Life Sciences (China)

    2016-05-15

    Current studies have demonstrated the advantage of graphene-based materials, which suggests their potential usage for biomedical applications. However, the in vivo toxicity and performance of three-dimensional (3D) graphene foams (GFs) remain largely unclear. In the present study, we identified the short-term and long-term tissue responses to GFs or graphene oxide foams (GOFs) in a rat model of subcutaneous implantation. Results from blood biochemistry, hematological analysis, histological examination, and behavioral test all indicated nearly no noticeable in vivo toxicity in either GF- or GOF-implanted rats during the first 2 weeks post-implantation. In addition, hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained images showed GFs or GOFs remained in the subcutaneous implantation site for at least 7 months without significant degradation after implantation. Our study demonstrates the non-biodegradable feature of GFs and GOFs as implanted scaffolds, while they exhibit good biocompatibility in vivo. It adds new evidence for the in vivo toxicological study of GFs and GOFs, which may provide reference for their biomedical applications.

  13. In vivo formation of beta-oxidized metabolites of leukotriene E4 in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, P.; Zirrolli, J.; Stene, D.O.; Lellouche, J.P.; Beaucourt, J.P.; Murphy, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of [ 3 H]-leukotriene E4 in the rat resulted in the appearance of radiolabel in urine and feces. Separation of polar urinary metabolites and chromatographic comparison of synthetic metabolites indicated the in vivo formation of omega-oxidized metabolites of LTE4 with sequential beta-oxidation. Furthermore, the metabolite identified as 16-carboxy-17,18,19,20-tetranor-14,15-dihydro-N-acetyl-LTE4 substantiates the biochemical pathway of beta-oxidation in vivo involving the 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductase as an integral step. These results substantiate beta-oxidation of sulfidopeptide leukotrienes in vivo and these metabolites account for some of the major urinary metabolites of this class of lipid mediator

  14. Influence of acidosis and hypoxia on liver ischemia and reperfusion injury in an in vivo rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, Bob H. M.; Elkhaloufi, Yasser; Straatsburg, Irene H.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    The contribution of acidosis to the development of reperfusion injury is controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of respiratory acidosis and hypoxia in a frequently used in vivo liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury rat model. Rats were anesthetized with intraperitoneal

  15. Selective retina therapy (SRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, R.; Birngruber, R.

    2007-01-01

    Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) is a new and very gentle laser method developed at the Medical Laser Center Luebeck. It is currently investigated clinically in order to treat retinal disorders associated with a decreased function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). SRT is designed to selectively effect the RPE while sparing the neural retina and the photoreceptors as well as the choroid. Aim of the therapy is the rejuvenation of the RPE in the treated areas, which should ideally lead to a long term metabolic increase at the chorio-retinal junction. In contrast to conventional laser photocoagulation, which is associated with a complete thermal necrosis of the treated site, SRT completely retains full vision. This paper reviews the methods and mechanisms behind selective RPE effects and reports the first clinical results. An online dosimetry technique to visualize the ophthalmoscopically invisible effects is introduced. (orig.)

  16. Protein metabolism in the rat cerebral cortex in vivo and in vitro as affected by the acquisition enhancing drug piracetam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nickolson, V.J.; Wolthuis, O.L.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of Piracetam on rat cerebral protein metabolism in vivo and in vitro was studied. It was found that the drug stimulates the uptake of labelled leucine by cerebral cortex slices, has no effect on the incorporation of leucine into cerebral protein, neither in slices nor in vivo, but

  17. The infrared retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    As infrared imaging systems have evolved from the first generation of linear devices to the second generation of small format staring arrays to the present 'third-gen' systems, there is an increased emphasis on large area focal plane arrays (FPAs) with multicolour operation and higher operating temperature. In this paper, we discuss how one needs to develop an increased functionality at the pixel level for these next generation FPAs. This functionality could manifest itself as spectral, polarization, phase or dynamic range signatures that could extract more information from a given scene. This leads to the concept of an infrared retina, which is an array that works similarly to the human eye that has a 'single' FPA but multiple cones, which are photoreceptor cells in the retina of the eye that enable the perception of colour. These cones are then coupled with powerful signal processing techniques that allow us to process colour information from a scene, even with a limited basis of colour cones. Unlike present day multi or hyperspectral systems, which are bulky and expensive, the idea would be to build a poor man's 'infrared colour' camera. We use examples such as plasmonic tailoring of the resonance or bias dependent dynamic tuning based on quantum confined Stark effect or incorporation of avalanche gain to achieve embodiments of the infrared retina.

  18. In vivo microwave-based thermoacoustic tomography of rats (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Microwave-based thermoacoustic tomography (TAT), based on the measurement of ultrasonic waves induced by microwave pulses, can reveal tissue dielectric properties that may be closely related to the physiological and pathological status of the tissues. Using microwaves as the excitation source improved imaging depth because of their deep penetration into biological tissues. We demonstrate, for the first time, in vivo microwave-based thermoacoustic imaging in rats. The transducer is rotated around the rat in a full circle, providing a full two-dimensional view. Instead of a flat ultrasonic transducer, we used a virtual line detector based on a cylindrically focused transducer. A 3 GHz microwave source with 0.6 µs pulse width and an electromagnetically shielded transducer with 2.25 MHz central frequency provided clear cross-sectional images of the rat's body. The high imaging contrast, based on the tissue's rate of absorption, and the ultrasonically defined spatial resolution combine to reveal the spine, kidney, muscle, and other deeply seated anatomical features in the rat's abdominal cavity. This non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging modality achieved an imaging depth beyond 6 cm in the rat's tissue. Cancer diagnosis based on information about tissue properties from microwave band TAT can potentially be more accurate than has previously been achievable.

  19. Insulin-like activity in the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.

    1986-01-01

    A number of studies have recently demonstrated that insulin or a homologous peptide may be synthesized outside the pancreas also. The present study was designed to investigate whether insulin-like activity exists in the retina, and if it exists, whether it is due to local synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide in the retina. To determine whether the insulin-like immunoreactivity in retinal glial cells is due to binding and uptake or local synthesis of insulin, a combined approach of immunocytochemistry and in situ DNA-RNA hybridization techniques was used on cultured rat retinal glial cells. Insulin-like immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the cytoplasma of these cells. In situ hybridization studies using labeled rat insulin cDNA indicated that these cells contain the mRNA necessary for de novo synthesis of insulin or a closely homologous peptide. Since human retinal cells have, as yet, not been conveniently grown in culture, an ocular tumor cell line, human Y79 retinoblastoma was used as a model to extend these investigations. The presence of insulin-like immunoreactivity as well as insulin-specific mRNA was demonstrated in this cell line. Light microscopic autoradiography following incubation of isolated rat retinal cells with 125 I-insulin showed the presence of insulin binding sites on the photoreceptors and amarcine cells. On the basis of these observations that rat retina glial cells, including Muller cells are sites of synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide, a model for the pathogenesis of dabetic retinopathy is proposed

  20. In vivo imaging of brain androgen receptors in rats: a [18F]FDHT PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayum, M.A.; Doorduin, J.; Antunes, I.F.; Kwizera, C.; Zijlma, R.; Boer, J.A. den; Dierckx, R.A.J.O.; Vries, E.F.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Steroid hormones like androgens play an important role in the development and maintenance of several brain functions. Androgens can act through androgen receptors (AR) in the brain. This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of positron emission tomography (PET) with 16β-[ 18 F]fluoro-5α-dihydrotestosterone ([ 18 F]FDHT) to image AR expression in the brain. Methods: Male Wistar rats were either orchiectomized to inhibit endogenous androgen production or underwent sham-surgery. Fifteen days after surgery, rats were subjected to a 90-min dynamic [ 18 F]FDHT PET scan with arterial blood sampling. In a subset of orchiectomized rats, 1 mg/kg dihydrotestosterone was co-injected with the tracer in order to saturate the AR. Plasma samples were analyzed for the presence of radioactive metabolites by radio-TLC. Pharmacokinetic modeling was performed to quantify brain kinetics of the tracer. After the PET scan, the animals were terminated for ex-vivo biodistribution. Results: PET imaging and ex vivo biodistribution studies showed low [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in all brain regions, except pituitary. [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in the surrounding cranial bones was high and increased over time. [ 18 F]FDHT was rapidly metabolized in rats. Metabolism was significantly faster in orchiectomized rats than in sham-orchiectomized rats. Quantitative analysis of PET data indicated substantial spill-over of activity from cranial bones into peripheral brain regions, which prevented further analysis of peripheral brain regions. Logan graphical analysis and kinetic modeling using 1- and 2-tissue compartment models showed reversible and homogenously distributed tracer uptake in central brain regions. [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in the brain could not be blocked by endogenous androgens or administration of dihydrotestosterone. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that imaging of AR availability in rat brain with [ 18 F]FDHT PET is not feasible. The low AR expression in the brain, the

  1. In vivo somatostatin, vasopressin, and oxytocin synthesis in diabetic rat hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernstrom, J.D.; Fernstrom, M.H.; Kwok, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    The in vivo labeling of somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, arginine vasopressin, and oxytocin was studied in rat hypothalamus after third ventricular administration of [35S]cysteine to streptozotocin-diabetic and normal rats. Immunoreactive somatostatin levels in hypothalamus were unaffected by diabetes, as was the incorporation of [35S]cysteine into hypothalamic somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28. In contrast, immunoreactive vasopressin levels in hypothalamus and posterior pituitary (and oxytocin levels in posterior pituitary) were below normal in diabetic rats. Moreover, [35S]cysteine incorporation into hypothalamic vasopressin and oxytocin (probably mainly in the paraventricular nucleus because of its proximity to the third ventricular site of label injection) was significantly above normal. The increments in vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were reversed by insulin administration. In vivo cysteine specific activity and the labeling of acid-precipitable protein did not differ between normal and diabetic animals; effects of diabetes on vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were therefore not caused by simple differences in cysteine specific activity. These results suggest that diabetes (1) does not influence the production of somatostatin peptides in hypothalamus but (2) stimulates the synthesis of vasopressin and oxytocin. For vasopressin at least, the increase in synthesis may be a compensatory response to the known increase in its secretion that occurs in uncontrolled diabetes

  2. Cyclosporine A at reperfusion fails to reduce infarct size in the in vivo rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paulis, Damien; Chiari, Pascal; Teixeira, Geoffrey; Couture-Lepetit, Elisabeth; Abrial, Maryline; Argaud, Laurent; Gharib, Abdallah; Ovize, Michel

    2013-09-01

    We examined the effects on infarct size and mitochondrial function of ischemic (Isch), cyclosporine A (CsA) and isoflurane (Iso) preconditioning and postconditioning in the in vivo rat model. Anesthetized open-chest rats underwent 30 min of ischemia followed by either 120 min (protocol 1: infarct size assessment) or 15 min of reperfusion (protocol 2: assessment of mitochondrial function). All treatments administered before the 30-min ischemia (Pre-Isch, Pre-CsA, Pre-Iso) significantly reduced infarct as compared to control. In contrast, only Post-Iso significantly reduced infarct size, while Post-Isch and Post-CsA had no significant protective effect. As for the postconditioning-like interventions, the mitochondrial calcium retention capacity significantly increased only in the Post-Iso group (+58 % vs control) after succinate activation. Only Post-Iso increased state 3 (+177 and +62 %, for G/M and succinate, respectively) when compared to control. Also, Post-Iso reduced the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production (-46 % vs control) after complex I activation. This study suggests that isoflurane, but not cyclosporine A, can prevent lethal reperfusion injury in this in vivo rat model. This might be related to the need for a combined effect on cyclophilin D and complex I during the first minutes of reperfusion.

  3. The effect of ionizing radiations on rat serum albumin on in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portakal, S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiations on rat serum albumin was studied on in vivo and in vitro. Male rats (rattus norvegicus) were exposed to 225 roentgen wholebody X-irradiation on in vivo experiments. Time-course effects of irradiation on albumin level examined at immediately, 2.5 hours and 3 days after irradiation. Albumin level decreased above control level 2.5 hours after irradiation and rised within 3 days reaching control level. Pre-albumin/albumin ratio enhanced after x-irradiation. Aqueous solutions (0.5 percent) of rat serum albumin was exposed to various doses (0.2, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.9 Mrad) of 60 Co gamma irradiation on in vitro experiments. Results showed that electrophoretic mobility of serum albumin decreased after gamma irradiation. No significant change in albumin UV absorption spectrum was observed at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.9 Mrad doses. Albumin becomes progressively less soluble in water as the radiation doses is increased. Radiation induced transformation into insoluble albumin agregates and scission products. (author)

  4. Long-term reproducibility of in vivo measures of specific binding of radioligands in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbourn, Michael R. E-mail: mkilbour@umich.edu

    2004-07-01

    The long-term reproducibility of measures of in vivo specific binding of radiolabeled forms of (+)-{alpha}-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) and d-threo-methylphenidate (MPH) in rat brain was examined. All studies were done using a consistent bolus plus infusion protocol and calculation of equilibrium distribution volume ratios (DVR). Over a period of eight years striatal DVR values for DTBZ binding to the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in young adult (8-10 wks old) rats showed very good reproducibility (3.62{+-}0.33, N=35). Equivalent values were obtained using either tritiated or carbon-11 labeled DTBZ, and were irrespective of sex of animals. Older animals (78 wks old) showed losses (-45%) of specific binding. Striatal binding of MPH to the dopamine transporter (DAT) showed a similar reproducibility over a five year period (DVR=2.17{+-}0.39, N=52), again irrespective of radionuclide or sex. These studies demonstrate that use of a consistent in vivo technique can provide reliable measures of specific binding of radioligands to high affinity sites in the rat brain.

  5. In vivo effects of adenosine 5´-triphosphate on rat preneoplastic liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V. Frontini

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of adenosine 5´-triphosphate (ATP infusions to inhibit the growth of some human and animals tumors was based on the anticancer activity observed in in vitro and in vivo experiments, but contradictory results make the use of ATP in clinical practice rather controversial. Moreover, there is no literature regarding the use of ATP infusions to treat hepatocarcinomas. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether ATP prevents in vivo oncogenesis in very-early-stage cancer cells in a well characterized two-stage model of hepatocarcinogenesis in the rat. As we could not preclude the possible effect due to the intrinsic properties of adenosine, a known tumorigenic product of ATP hydrolysis, the effect of the administration of adenosine was also studied. Animals were divided in groups: rats submitted to the two stage preneoplasia initiation/promotion model of hepatocarcinogenesis, rats treated with intraperitoneal ATP or adenosine during the two phases of the model and appropriate control groups. The number and volume of preneoplastic foci per liver identified by the expression of glutathione S-transferase placental type and the number of proliferating nuclear antigen positive cells significantly increased in ATP and adenosine treated groups. Taken together, these results indicate that in this preneoplastic liver model, ATP as well as adenosine disturb the balance between apoptosis and proliferation contributing to malignant transformation.

  6. Robust optical fiber patch-cords for in vivo optogenetic experiments in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Pisanty, Ivan; Sanio, Christian; Chaudhri, Nadia; Shizgal, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In vivo optogenetic experiments commonly employ long lengths of optical fiber to connect the light source (commonly a laser) to the optical fiber implants in the brain. Commercially available patch cords are expensive and break easily. Researchers have developed methods to build these cables in house for in vivo experiments with rodents [1-4]. However, the half-life of those patch cords is greatly reduced when they are used with behaving rats, which are strong enough to break the delicate cable tip and to bite through the optical fiber and furcation tubing. Based on [3] we have strengthened the patch-cord tip that connects to the optical implant, and we have incorporated multiple layers of shielding to produce more robust and resistant cladding. Here, we illustrate how to build these patch cords with FC or M3 connectors. However, the design can be adapted for use with other common optical-fiber connectors. We have saved time and money by using this design in our optical self-stimulation experiments with rats, which are commonly several months long and last four to eleven hours per session. The main advantages are: •Long half-life.•Resistant to moderate rodent bites.•Suitable for long in vivo optogenetic experiments with large rodents.

  7. In vivo longitudinal micro-CT study of bent long limb bones in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schaepdrijver, Luc; Delille, Peter; Geys, Helena; Boehringer-Shahidi, Christian; Vanhove, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Micro-computed X-ray tomography (micro-CT) has been reported as a reliable method to assess ex vivo rat and rabbit fetal skeletons in embryo-fetal developmental toxicity studies. Since micro-CT is a non-invasive imaging modality it has the potential for longitudinal, in vivo investigation of postnatal skeletal development. This is the first paper using micro-CT to assess the reversibility of drug-induced bent long bones in a longitudinal study from birth to early adulthood in rat offspring. Analysis of the scans obtained on postnatal Day 0, 7, 21 and 80 showed complete recovery or repair of the bent long limb bones (including the scapula) within the first 3 weeks. When assessing risk the ability to demonstrate recovery is highly advantageous when interpreting such transient skeletal change. In summary, in vivo micro-CT of small laboratory animals can aid in non-clinical safety assessment, particularly for specific mechanistic purposes or to address a particular concern in developmental biology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Translational step inhibited in vivo by aflatoxin B1 in rat-liver polysomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarasin, A.; Moule, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Aflatoxin B 1 strongly inhibits protein synthesis in rat liver cells. This paper confirms the foregoing results and represents an attempt to localize the translational step inhibited in vivo by aflatoxin B 1 . We used the simulation study developed by Li, Kisilevsky, Wasan and Hammond, 1972 (Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 272, 451-462) to determine precisely the site inhibited in vivo after drug intoxication. This analysis is based on two parameters: the kinetics of polysome labeling to follow the nascent peptide synthesis, and the kinetics of supernatant labeling to follow the completed protein synthesis. Up to 5 h after dosing, aflatoxin specifically inhibits the elongation and/or termination steps during protein synthesis; after longer periods of time inhibition occurs essentially at the initiation step. When the intracellular concentration of aflatoxin is too high, particularly 2 h after dosing, each step of protein synthesis is blocked. Polypeptide synthesis by the postmitochondrial supernatants isolated from aflatoxin-treated animals is impaired in the same proportion as protein synthesis in vivo. The damage caused by aflatoxin is mostly observed on microsomes. However, purified polysomes isolated from aflatoxin-treated rats synthesize proteins in vitro to the same extent as those from controls. These results suggest that aflatoxin metabolite(s) are bound to polysomes with noncovalent bonds. These active metabolites are probably lost during polysome isolation procedures. Finally, relationships between protein metabolism and aflatoxin carcinogenesis are discussed. (orig./BSC) [de

  9. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry underestimates in vivo lumbar spine bone mineral density in overweight rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Rim; Vico, Laurence; Laroche, Norbert; Sakly, Mohsen; Attia, Nebil; Lavet, Cedric

    2018-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is currently the most widely used technique for measuring areal bone mineral density (BMD). However, several studies have shown inaccuracy, with either overestimation or underestimation of DXA BMD measurements in the case of overweight or obese individuals. We have designed an overweight rat model based on junk food to compare the effect of obesity on in vivo and ex vivo BMD and bone mineral content measurements. Thirty-eight 6-month old male rats were given a chow diet (n = 13) or a high fat and sucrose diet (n = 25), with the calorie amount being kept the same in the two groups, for 19 weeks. L1 BMD, L1 bone mineral content, amount of abdominal fat, and amount of abdominal lean were obtained from in vivo DXA scan. Ex vivo L1 BMD was also measured. A difference between in vivo and ex vivo DXA BMD measurements (P body weight, perirenal fat, abdominal fat, and abdominal lean. Multiple linear regression analysis shows that body weight, abdominal fat, and abdominal lean were independently related to ex vivo BMD. DXA underestimated lumbar in vivo BMD in overweight rats, and this measurement error is related to body weight and abdominal fat. Therefore, caution must be used when one is interpreting BMD among overweight and obese individuals.

  10. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC, even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75NTR, TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75NTR enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75NTR contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration.

  11. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise A; De Nicolò, Sara; Rosso, Pamela; De Vitis, Luigi A; Castoldi, Valerio; Leocani, Letizia; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F; Tirassa, Paola; Rama, Paolo; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2017-01-05

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC) degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC), even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75 NTR , TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac) by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75 NTR enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75 NTR contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration.

  12. In vivo genotoxicity of furan in F344 rats at cancer bioassay doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Wei; Petibone, Dayton M.; Latendresse, John R.; Pearce, Mason G.; Muskhelishvili, Levan; White, Gene A.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A.; Shaddock, Joseph G.; McDaniel, Lea P.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Morris, Suzanne M.; Bishop, Michelle E.; Manjanatha, Mugimane G.; Aidoo, Anane; Heflich, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Furan, a potent rodent liver carcinogen, is found in many cooked food items and thus represents a human cancer risk. Mechanisms for furan carcinogenicity were investigated in male F344 rats using the in vivo Comet and micronucleus assays, combined with analysis of histopathological and gene expression changes. In addition, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III (EndoIII)-sensitive DNA damage was monitored as a measure of oxidative DNA damage. Rats were treated by gavage on four consecutive days with 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg bw furan, doses that were tumorigenic in 2-year cancer bioassays, and with two higher doses, 12 and 16 mg/kg. Rats were killed 3 h after the last dose, a time established as producing maximum levels of DNA damage in livers of furan-treated rats. Liver Comet assays indicated that both DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines and pyrimidines increased in a near-linear dose-responsive fashion, with statistically significant increases detected at cancer bioassay doses. No DNA damage was detected in bone marrow, a non-target tissue for cancer, and peripheral blood micronucleus assays were negative. Histopathological evaluation of liver from furan-exposed animals produced evidence of inflammation, single-cell necrosis, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. In addition, genes related to apoptosis, cell-cycle checkpoints, and DNA-repair were expressed at a slightly lower level in the furan-treated livers. Although a mixed mode of action involving direct DNA binding cannot be ruled out, the data suggest that furan induces cancer in rat livers mainly through a secondary genotoxic mechanism involving oxidative stress, accompanied by inflammation, cell proliferation, and toxicity. -- Highlights: ► Furan is a potent rodent liver carcinogen and represents a human cancer risk. ► Furan induces DNA damage in rat liver at cancer bioassay doses. ► Furan induces oxidative stress, inflammation and cell proliferation in rat liver. ► Expression of

  13. Hypoglycemic depression of hepatic phagocytosis in vivo and in the in situ perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, P M; Filkins, J P

    1981-01-01

    Depression of the phagocytic function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) during endotoxic hypoglycemia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of endotoxin shock. The present study evaluated the in vivo effects of hypoglycemia on RES function and assessed the effects of an vivo bout of hypoglycemia on phagocytosis in the in situ perfused rat liver. Hypoglycemia was produced in male Holtzman rats using either 1 U of regular insulin (RI) (ILETIN, Lilly) or 0.75 U of long-acting insulin (LAI) (85% LENTE/15% ULTRALENTE, Lilly). RES function was quantitated by intravascular clearance of 8 mg/100 gm body weight colloidal carbon (CC). Two hr after RI and 2.5 hr after LAI, the intravascular halftimes of CC clearance were 19 +/- 2 min (N = 22) and 18 +/- 1 min (N = 19), respectively, as compared to control, 11.3 +/- 0.4 min (N = 53, P less than 0.001). The corresponding plasma glucose (PG) levels were 95 +/- 2 mg/dl in control, 14.4 +/- 0.9 for the RI group, and 17 +/- 1 for LAI. Two hr after RI, livers were perfused for 10 min in situ with 50 mg/liter CC in saline 5% rat serum. PG for control liver donors were 90 +/- 3 mg/dl, while those for hypoglycemic liver donors were 15 +/- 2. CC uptake was decreased from 22 micrograms/min/gm liver in the control (+ serum, n = 19) to 11 +/- 2 in hypoglycemia livers (N = 6); no effect of serum on hypoglycemic depression of the RES was seen. There were no differences in flow rates in the 2 groups. These results indicate that hypoglycemia directly impairs RES function and that the in vivo depression of intravascular clearance is not related to either the presence or absence of serum factors or total hepatic blood flow. Thus, the characteristic hypoglycemia of endotoxin shock may contribute to RES depression and the lethal shock syndrome.

  14. In vivo and in vitro study of /sub 90/Sr in developing rat molar enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, B.A.; Deaton, T.G.; Bawden, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The uptake patterns of /sub 90/Sr in developing rat molar enamel were studied in vivo and in vitro. Autoradiographic methods were used that preclude loss or translocation of tracers associated with water-soluble compounds in the sections. In eight-day-old rats injected with the tracer, /sub 90/Sr uptake in the enamel was significantly less than for dentin and bone, particularly at early sacrifice times. The uptake pattern of 90Sr was somewhat different from that previously observed for /sub 45/Ca. The in vitro experiments indicated that the viable intact enamel organ limits uptake of /sub 90/Sr by enamel in both the secretory and maturation phases of enamel formation

  15. Protective properties of plasma of burnt and irradiated rats against lethal effect of endotoxins in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budagov, R S; Chureyeva, L N

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to estimate protective properties of plasma in disease with increased endotoxemia. Burns and acute radiation sickness were used as models of suppression of physiological mechanisms of detoxication. Experiments were performed on male Wistar rats and mice, which received 3rd degree burns over 15% of the body surface, whole body gamma irradiation at 7.5 Gr or both. At 3 hours, 3, 7 and 12 days after the exposure the animals were decapitated and blood collected. The irradiated mice received 0.2 ml endotoxin intraperitoneally, 1.0 ml freshly prepared rat plasma, then the lethality of the mice in 24 hours was observed. It was found that the plasma of intact rats was capable of decreasing the lethal effects of S. typhimurium and E. coli endotoxins in vivo in mice. Deep skin burns, acute radiation sickness and the combined effects of radiation and thermal injury did not change this phenomenon. The plasma of the experimental rats retained the protective properties at various periods of time after the thermal, radiation and combined exposures. The functioning of the humoral detoxication mechanism is radioresistant, indirectly indicating the nonimmunoglobulin nature of endotoxin inactivators. 19 references.

  16. In vivo genotoxicity assessment in rats exposed to Prestige-like oil by inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Kiliç, Gözde; Costa, Carla; Amor-Carro, Óscar; Mariñas-Pardo, Luis; Ramos-Barbón, David; Méndez, Josefina; Pásaro, Eduardo; Laffon, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    One of the largest oil spill disasters in recent times was the accident of the oil tanker Prestige in front of the Galician coast in 2002. Thousands of people participated in the cleanup of the contaminated areas, being exposed to a complex mixture of toxic substances. Acute and prolonged respiratory symptoms and genotoxic effects were reported, although environmental exposure measurements were restricted to current determinations, such that attribution of effects observed to oil exposure is difficult to establish. The aim of this study was to analyze peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) harvested from a rat model of subchronic exposure to a fuel oil with similar characteristics to that spilled by the Prestige tanker, in order to determine potential genotoxic effects under strictly controlled, in vivo exposure. Wistar Han and Brown Norway rats were exposed to the oil for 3 wk, and micronucleus test (MN) and comet assay, standard and modified with 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) enzyme, were employed to assess genotoxicity 72 h and 15 d after the last exposure. In addition, the potential effects of oil exposure on DNA repair capacity were determined by means of mutagen sensitivity assay. Results obtained from this study showed that inhalation oil exposure induced DNA damage in both Brown Norway and Wistar Han rats, especially in those animals evaluated 15 d after exposure. Although alterations in the DNA repair responses were noted, the sensitivity to oil substances varied depending on rat strain. Data support previous positive genotoxicity results reported in humans exposed to Prestige oil during cleanup tasks.

  17. In vivo electrophysiological measurement of the rat ulnar nerve with axonal excitability testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, Brandon M.; Morris, Renée; Moldovan, Mihai

    2018-01-01

    Electrophysiology enables the objective assessment of peripheral nerve function in vivo. Traditional nerve conduction measures such as amplitude and latency detect chronic axon loss and demyelination, respectively. Axonal excitability techniques "by threshold tracking" expand upon these measures...... by providing information regarding the activity of ion channels, pumps and exchangers that relate to acute function and may precede degenerative events. As such, the use of axonal excitability in animal models of neurological disorders may provide a useful in vivo measure to assess novel therapeutic...... interventions. Here we describe an experimental setup for multiple measures of motor axonal excitability techniques in the rat ulnar nerve. The animals are anesthetized with isoflurane and carefully monitored to ensure constant and adequate depth of anesthesia. Body temperature, respiration rate, heart rate...

  18. Cortical substrate oxidation during hyperketonemia in the fasted anesthetized rat in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Lihong; Mason, Graeme F; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A; Behar, Kevin L

    2011-01-01

    Ketone bodies are important alternate brain fuels, but their capacity to replace glucose and support neural function is unclear. In this study, the contributions of ketone bodies and glucose to cerebral cortical metabolism were measured in vivo in halothane-anesthetized rats fasted for 36 hours (n=6) and receiving intravenous [2,4-13C2]--β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Time courses of 13C-enriched brain amino acids (glutamate-C4, glutamine-C4, and glutamate and glutamine-C3) were measured at 9.4 Tes...

  19. Alpha2-adrenoceptor modulation of long-term potentiation elicited in vivo in rat occipital cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondaca, Mauricio; Hernández, Alejandro; Pérez, Hernán; Valladares, Luis; Sierralta, Walter; Fernández, Victor; Soto-Moyano, Rubén

    2004-09-24

    Pretreatment with the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine (31.25, 62.5, or 125 microg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced long-term potentiation (LTP) elicited in vivo in the occipital cortex of anesthetized rats, whereas pretreatment with the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (0.133, 0.4, or 1.2 mg/kg, i.p.) increased neocortical LTP in a dose-dependent fashion. These effects could be related to the reported disruptive and facilitatory actions induced on memory formation by pretreatment with alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists, respectively.

  20. Binding of in vivo administrated 125-I-triiodothyronine by the rat liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedorowicz, K.; Nauman, A.; Nauman, J.

    1979-01-01

    In vivo administrated 125 I-triiodothyronine ( 125 I-T 3 ) was bound by the rat liver mitochondria. About 10 % of hormone was bound with external mitochondrial membrane while the remaining part with matrix and inner mitochondrial membrane. The highest accumulation of 125 I-T 3 in mitochondria was observed 30 min after injection while in the whole liver homogenate the highest hormone accumulation appeared 15 min post injection. Mitochondrial binding sites have a great capacity for T 3 which makes impossible estimation of the kinetic parameters of triiodothyronine-mitochondrium interaction by means of saturation and displacement of 125 I-T 3 . (author)

  1. In vivo turnover of the basement membrane and other heparan sulfate proteoglycans of rat glomerulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beavan, L A; Davies, M; Couchman, J R

    1989-01-01

    The metabolic turnover of rat glomerular proteoglycans in vivo was investigated. Newly synthesized proteoglycans were labeled during a 7-h period after injecting sodium [35S]sulfate intraperitoneally. At the end of the labeling period a chase dose of sodium sulfate was given. Subsequently......-propanesulfonate-4 M guanidine hydrochloride, a procedure which solubilized greater than 95% of the 35S-labeled macromolecules. Of these 11-13% was immunoprecipitated by an antiserum against heparan sulfate proteoglycan which, in immunolocalization experiments, showed specificity for staining the basement membrane...

  2. In vivo sodium, potassium, and sperm concentrations in the rat epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, T T; Hartmann, P K; Howards, S S

    1977-02-01

    In vivo samples of epididymal fluids were obtained through the use of micropuncture techniques. Microsamples from four areas of the rat epididymis were analyzed for Na+ and K+ concentrations and for sperm density. Na+ values declined significantly from caput to corpus epididymidis (P less than 0.01), while K+ and sperm concentrations increased significantly (P less than 0.01). A large water loss from the epididymal lumen was calculated, as well as net losses of both cations. Water losses may be explained on the basis of an active Na+ pump; however, the effect of the absolute values of epididymal Na+ and K+ concentrations on sperm motility and fertility remains unresolved.

  3. In vivo determination of body composition of rats using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H; Vasselli, J; Wu, E; Gallagher, D

    2000-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has potential as an instrument to measure body composition because it can discriminate various soft tissues in vivo. These soft tissues include adipose tissue, muscle, organs, and brain. We report on preliminary studies using a 4.2-tesla MRI for measuring body composition in the mouse and rat. We employed image segmentation methods that include an image correction method, a necessary requirement when the images are taken in the presence of nonuniform radio-frequency (RF) coil response. The software for 3-D data segmentation, quantification, correction, image manipulation, and visualization has been developed as a research tool. This method currently is being validated.

  4. Stimulus-dependent changes of extracellular glucose in the rat hippocampus determined by in vivo microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, A; Bert, B; Fink, H; Voigt, J-P

    2009-10-19

    Neuronal activity is tightly coupled with brain energy metabolism; and glucose is an important energy substrate for neurons. The present in vivo microdialysis study was aimed at investigating changes in extracellular glucose concentrations in the rat ventral hippocampus due to exposure to the elevated plus maze. Determination of basal hippocampal glucose and lactate/pyruvate ratio in male Wistar rats was conducted in the home cage using in vivo microdialysis. Rats were exposed to the elevated plus maze, a rodent model of anxiety-related behaviour, or to unspecific stress induced by white noise (95dB) as a control condition. Basal hippocampal levels of glucose, as determined by zero-net-flux, and the basal lactate/pyruvate ratio were 1.49+/-0.05mmol/l and 13.8+/-1.1, respectively. In rats without manipulation, glucose levels remained constant throughout the experiment (120min). By contrast, exposure to the elevated plus maze led to a temporary decline in hippocampal glucose (-33.2+/-4.4%) which returned to baseline level in the home cage. White noise caused only a non-significant decrease in extracellular glucose level (-9.3+/-3.5%). In all groups, the lactate/pyruvate ratio remained unchanged by the experimental procedures. Our microdialysis study demonstrates that exposure to the elevated plus maze induces a transient decrease in extracellular hippocampal glucose concentration. In contrast, an unspecific stimulus did not change hippocampal glucose. The latter suggests that only specific behavioural stimuli increase hippocampal glucose utilization in the ventral hippocampus.

  5. Spinal cord dopamine D2/D3 receptors: in vivo and ex vivo imaging in the rat using 18F/11C-fallypride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Khararjian, Armen; Coleman, Robert A.; Constantinescu, Cristian C.; Pan, Min-Liang; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The spinal cord is known to be innervated with dopaminergic cells with catecholaminergic projections arising from the medulla and pons and dopaminergic transmission in the spinal cord is vital for sensory and motor function. Our goal was to evaluate and compare the imaging capability of dopamine D2/D3 receptors in the rat spinal cord using PET ligands 18 F-fallypride and 11 C-fallypride. Methods: Male Sprague–Dawley rats were used in all in vitro and in vivo studies. Spinal cord and brain sections were used for in vitro autoradiography and ex vivo autoradiography. For in vivo studies animals received a 18 F-fallypride scan or a 11 C-fallypride PET scan. The spinal cord and the brain were then harvested, flash-frozen and imaged ex vivo. For in vivo analysis Logan plots with cerebellum as a reference was used to evaluate binding potentials (BP). Tissue ratios were used for ex vivo analysis. Drug effects were evaluated using clozapine, haloperidol and dopamine were evaluated on spinal cord sections in vitro. Results: In vitro studies showed 18 F-fallypride binding to superficial dorsal horn (SDH), dorsal horn (DH), ventral horn (VH) and the pars centralis (PC). In the cervical section, the greatest amount of binding appeared to be in the SDH. Ex vivo studies showed approximately 6% of 18 F-fallypride in SDH compared to that observed in the striatum. In vivo analysis of both 18 F-fallypride and 11 C-fallypride in the spinal cord were comparable to that in the extrastriatal regions. Haloperidol and clozapine displaced more than 75% of the 18 F-fallypride in spinal cord sections. Conclusions: Our studies showed 18 F-fallypride and 11 C-fallypride binding in the spinal cord in vitro and in vivo. The binding pattern correlates well with the known distribution of dopamine D2/D3 receptors in the spinal cord

  6. Blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid-enhanced pericyte microvasculature contraction in rat retina: A novel in vitro study of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Qiang; Cui, Gaoyu; Zhu, Gang; Tang, Weihua; Zhao, Hengli; Zhang, John H.; Chen, Yujie; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Previously, it was widely accepted that the delayed ischemic injury and poor clinical outcome following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was caused by cerebral vasospasm. This classical theory was challenged by a clazosentan clinical trial, which failed to improve patient outcome, despite reversing angiographic vasospasm. One possible explanation for the results of this trial is the changes in microcirculation following SAH, particularly in pericytes, which are the primary cell type controlling microcirculation in the brain parenchyma. However, as a result of technical limitations and the lack of suitable models, there was no direct evidence of microvessel dysfunction following SAH. In the present study, whole-mount retinal microvasculature has been introduced to study microcirculation in the brain following experimental SAH in vitro. Artificial blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid (BSCF) was applied to the retinal microvasculature to test the hypothesis that the presence of subarachnoid blood affects the contractile properties of the pericytes containing cerebral microcirculation during the early phase of SAH. It was observed that BCSF induced retina microvessel contraction and that this contraction could be resolved by BCSF wash-out. Furthermore, BCSF application accelerated pericyte-populated collagen gel contraction and increased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin. In addition, BCSF induced an influx of calcium in cultured retinal pericytes. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates increased contractility of retinal microvessels and pericytes in the presence of BCSF in vitro. These findings suggest that pericyte contraction and microvascular dysfunction is induced following SAH, which could lead to greater susceptibility to SAH-induced ischemia. PMID:27698742

  7. CHANGES IN NEUROTRANSMITTER GENE EXPRESSION IN THE AGING RETINA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand mechanisms of neurotoxicity in susceptible populations, we examined age-related changes in constitutive gene expression in the retinas of young (4mos), middle-aged (11 mos) and aged (23 mos) male Long Evans rats. Derived from a pouch of the forebrain during develop...

  8. Sorbitol increases muscle glucose uptake ex vivo and inhibits intestinal glucose absorption ex vivo and in normal and type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that sorbitol, a known polyol sweetener, possesses glycemic control potentials. However, the effect of sorbitol on intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake still remains elusive. The present study investigated the effects of sorbitol on intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake as possible anti-hyperglycemic or glycemic control potentials using ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. Sorbitol (2.5% to 20%) inhibited glucose absorption in isolated rat jejuna (IC 50 = 14.6% ± 4.6%) and increased glucose uptake in isolated rat psoas muscle with (GU 50 = 3.5% ± 1.6%) or without insulin (GU 50 = 7.0% ± 0.5%) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, sorbitol significantly delayed gastric emptying, accelerated digesta transit, inhibited intestinal glucose absorption, and reduced blood glucose increase in both normoglycemic and type 2 diabetic rats after 1 h of coingestion with glucose. Data of this study suggest that sorbitol exhibited anti-hyperglycemic potentials, possibly via increasing muscle glucose uptake ex vivo and reducing intestinal glucose absorption in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. Hence, sorbitol may be further investigated as a possible anti-hyperglycemic sweetener.

  9. Hindlimb unloading in rat decreases preosteoblast proliferation assessed in vivo with BrdU incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barou, O; Palle, S; Vico, L; Alexandre, C; Lafage-Proust, M H

    1998-01-01

    Immobilization affects bone formation. However, the mechanisms regulating the decrease in osteoblast recruitment remain unclear. The aim of our study was to determine in vivo osteoblastic proliferation after short-term immobilization among the different bone compartments. Twelve Wistar 5-wk-old rats were assigned to two groups: six tail-suspended animals for 6 days and their six age-related controls. Osmotic minipumps, each containing 40 mg of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), were implanted intraperitoneally at day 4 until euthanasia. Histomorphometric measurements found a significantly lower bone volume in primary (ISP, -22%) and secondary spongiosa (IISP, -37%) in unloaded rats compared with their age-related controls. BrdU immunohistochemistry showed that the proliferation capacity of osteogenic precursors in ISP (-29%) and preosteoblasts in IISP (-80%) and in periosteum as well as bone marrow cells (-40%) was lowered by unloading. We demonstrated in vivo for the first time that 6-day tail suspension induced a significant decrease in proliferation of periosteal and trabecular preosteoblasts in ISP and IISP as well as in bone marrow cells.

  10. In vivo turnover rates of rat peripheral blood and spleen LGL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichardt, D.; Mason, L.H.; Rolstad, B.; Reynolds, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Recently much data has accumulated on the morphology and function of LGL. However, there is still little definitive information regarding the lineage and in vivo dynamics of these cells. The present experiments were designed to study one aspect of LGL biology, their in vivo turnover rate. F344 rats were injected 2x daily with 100 μCi 3 HTdR for 1-7 days, their bone marrow (BM) spleens (SPL) and peripheral blood (PB) collected, and LGL and T cells isolated on Percoll gradients. These cell preparations were counted for total radioactivity by scintillation counting and % of labeled cells determined by autoradiography. The results demonstrated the highest 3 HTdR counts were from Percoll fractions 1 and 2 (LGL) with almost no CPM in those fractions containing T cells. The autoradiography data demonstrated that PB and SPL LGL, unlike T cells, were derived from a rapidly dividing precursor population since 30-40% of the LGL were labeled by a 5 day 3 HTdR pulse. In contrast 3 HTdR. Calculations of the approximate steady state turnover rates in these normal rats were BM = 5 days, LGL = 7 days and T cells = >30 days. These results clearly demonstrate that unlike mature T cells, PB and SPL LGL are derived from a rapidly dividing precursor population. More definitive experiments to calculate the half-life of these cells are currently underway

  11. In vivo detection of dynamics of elements in a living rat using multitracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Ui, Iori; Endo, Kazutoyo [Showa Pharmaceutical Univ., Dept. of Physical Chemistry, Machida, Tokyo (Japan); Hirunuma, Rieko; Enomoto, Shuichi [The Inst. of Physical and Chemical Research, Cyclotron Center, Division of Radioisotope Technology, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    In vivo detection technique for radioactivity of the nuclide in the multitracer intravenously administered to a living rat was proposed using a special setting of lead slit and high-purity Ge semiconducting detector. In vivo time courses of the relative distribution of {sup 7}Be, 4{sup 8}V, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 58}Co, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 74}As, {sup 75}Se, {sup 83}Rb, {sup 85}Sr, and {sup 88}Y in upper abdomen and head of six week old male Wistar rats were analyzed. The dynamics of the elements were estimated using the relative distribution of {sup 74}As as base line of blood concentration, since exogenous arsenic tracer is mainly taken into red blood cell. In the head, elements distributed mainly in bones or muscles except for Co and Se, while these elements in blood. In the upper abdomen, Mn, Co, Zn, Se, Rb, V, and Y are distributed in to the liver, which is a main organ for accumulating metals. It is the first report that dynamics of biotrace elements within an hour after administration was non-invasively obtained in living animal. (author)

  12. In vivo detection of dynamics of elements in a living rat using multitracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Ui, Iori; Endo, Kazutoyo; Hirunuma, Rieko; Enomoto, Shuichi

    2002-01-01

    In vivo detection technique for radioactivity of the nuclide in the multitracer intravenously administered to a living rat was proposed using a special setting of lead slit and high-purity Ge semiconducting detector. In vivo time courses of the relative distribution of 7 Be, 4 8 V, 54 Mn, 58 Co, 65 Zn, 74 As, 75 Se, 83 Rb, 85 Sr, and 88 Y in upper abdomen and head of six week old male Wistar rats were analyzed. The dynamics of the elements were estimated using the relative distribution of 74 As as base line of blood concentration, since exogenous arsenic tracer is mainly taken into red blood cell. In the head, elements distributed mainly in bones or muscles except for Co and Se, while these elements in blood. In the upper abdomen, Mn, Co, Zn, Se, Rb, V, and Y are distributed in to the liver, which is a main organ for accumulating metals. It is the first report that dynamics of biotrace elements within an hour after administration was non-invasively obtained in living animal. (author)

  13. In vivo measurement of hemodynamic information in stenosed rat blood vessels using X-ray PIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanwook; Park, Jun Hong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-11-28

    Measurements of the hemodynamic information of blood flows, especially wall shear stress (WSS), in animal models with circulatory vascular diseases (CVDs) are important to understand the pathological mechanism of CVDs. In this study, X-ray particle image velocimetry (PIV) with high spatial resolution was applied to obtain velocity field information in stenosed blood vessels with high WSS. 3D clips fabricated with a 3D printer were applied to the abdominal aorta of a rat cadaver to induce artificial stenosis in the real blood vessel of an animal model. The velocity and WSS information of blood flows in the stenosed vessel were obtained and compared at various stenosis severities. In vivo measurement was also conducted by fastening a stenotic clip on a live rat model through surgical intervention to reduce the flow rate to match the limited temporal resolution of the present X-ray PIV system. Further improvement of the temporal resolution of the system might be able to provide in vivo measurements of hemodynamic information from animal disease models under physiological conditions. The present results would be helpful for understanding the relation between hemodynamic characteristics and the pathological mechanism in animal CVD models.

  14. In vivo studies on the nitrogen, chlorine, calcium and phosphorus composition of rats by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel-Jacrot, Micheline.

    1975-01-01

    The role of neutron activation analysis 'in vivo' to determine the elementary composition of the rat organism is demonstrated. In part one the possibilities offered by certain methods which establish the elementary composition of living organisms are analyzed, together with the contribution and scope of neutron activation analysis. In part two the technical details of the neutron activation of rats in vivo are determined and the problems raised by application of the method considered. This is followed by an application of neutron activation analysis to research on changes in the nitrogen, chlorine, calcium and phosphorus composition of rats during growth (from 30 to 440 days) and important biological events such as puberty in both sexes, reproduction and lactation. Finally a study of the fertility rate and the effects of repeated irradiations on Sprague-Dawley rats are described [fr

  15. In vivo evaluation method of the effect of nattokinase on carrageenan-induced tail thrombosis in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Seitaro; Hagimori, Masayori; Ogasawara, Masayoshi; Arakawa, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    Thrombosis is characterized by congenital and acquired procatarxis. Nattokinase inhibits thrombus formation in vitro. However, in vivo evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of nattokinase against thrombosis remains to be conducted. Subcutaneous nattokinase injections of 1 or 2 mg/ml were administered to the tails of rats. Subsequently, κ-carrageenan was intravenously administered to the tails at 12 h after nattokinase injections. The mean length of the infarcted regions in the tails of rats was significantly shorter in rats administered 2 mg/ml of nattokinase than those in control rats. Nattokinase exhibited significant prophylactic antithrombotic effects. Previously, the in vitro efficacy of nattokinase against thrombosis had been reported; now our study has revealed the in vivo efficacy of nattokinase against thrombosis. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase in the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite in rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramkowski, K; Leszczynska, A; Przyborowski, K; Kaminski, T; Rykaczewska, U; Sitek, B; Zakrzewska, A; Proniewski, B; Smolenski, R T; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W; Chlopicki, S

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying nitrite-induced effects on thrombosis and hemostasis in vivo are not clear. The goal of the work described here was to investigate the role of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) in the anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic activities of nitrite in rats in vivo. Arterial thrombosis was induced electrically in rats with renovascular hypertension by partial ligation of the left renal artery. Sodium nitrite (NaNO2, 0.17 mmol/kg twice daily for 3 days, p.o) was administered with or without one of the XOR-inhibitors: allopurinol (ALLO) and febuxostat (FEB) (100 and 5 mg/kg, p.o., for 3 days). Nitrite treatment (0.17 mmol/kg), which was associated with a significant increase in NOHb, nitrite/nitrate plasma concentration, resulted in a substantial decrease in thrombus weight (TW) (0.48 ± 0.03 mg vs. vehicle [VEH] 0.88 ± 0.08 mg, p < 0.001) without a significant hypotensive effect. The anti-thrombotic effect of nitrite was partially reversed by FEB (TW = 0.63 ± 0.06 mg, p < 0.05 vs. nitrites), but not by ALLO (TW = 0.43 ± 0.02 mg). In turn, profound anti-platelet effect of nitrite measured ex vivo using collagen-induced whole-blood platelet aggregation (70.5 ± 7.1% vs. VEH 100 ± 4.5%, p < 0.05) and dynamic thromboxaneB2 generation was fully reversed by both XOR-inhibitors. In addition, nitrite decreased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentration (0.47 ± 0.13 ng/ml vs. VEH 0.62 ± 0.04 ng/ml, p < 0.05) and FEB/ALLO reversed this effect. In vitro the anti-platelet effect of nitrite (1 mM) was reversed by FEB (0.1 mM) under hypoxia (0.5%O2) and normoxia (20%O2). Nitrite treatment had no effect on coagulation parameters. In conclusion, the nitrite-induced anti-platelet effect in rats in vivo is mediated by XOR, but XOR does not fully account for the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite.

  17. The Retina Algorithm

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; PUNZI, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Charge particle reconstruction is one of the most demanding computational tasks found in HEP, and it becomes increasingly important to perform it in real time. We envision that HEP would greatly benefit from achieving a long-term goal of making track reconstruction happen transparently as part of the detector readout ("detector-embedded tracking"). We describe here a track-reconstruction approach based on a massively parallel pattern-recognition algorithm, inspired by studies of the processing of visual images by the brain as it happens in nature ('RETINA algorithm'). It turns out that high-quality tracking in large HEP detectors is possible with very small latencies, when this algorithm is implemented in specialized processors, based on current state-of-the-art, high-speed/high-bandwidth digital devices.

  18. Corpus vitreum, retina og chorioidea biopsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherfig, Erik Christian Høegh

    2002-01-01

    oftalmology, biopsy, choroid, corpus vitreum, retina, malignant melanoma, biopsy technic, retinoblastoma......oftalmology, biopsy, choroid, corpus vitreum, retina, malignant melanoma, biopsy technic, retinoblastoma...

  19. Deuterium isotope effect on metabolism of N-nitrosodimethylamine in vivo in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swann, P.F.; Mace, R.; Angeles, R.M.; Keefer, L.K.

    1983-01-01

    The maximal rates of metabolic oxidation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodimethylamine-d6 (NDMA-d6) in vivo (VH and VD, respectively) have been measured by following 14CO2 exhalation in rats after intraperitoneal injection of the two 14C-labelled carcinogens at high doses (20 or 40 mg/kg). Complete deuteration of NDMA reduced only slightly the maximal rate of metabolism when the two substrates were administered separately (VH/VD approximately 1.2). However, much larger (approximately 4-fold) deuterium isotope effects were observed when mixtures of NDMA with NDMA-d6 were injected. These results are tentatively interpreted as evidence that C-H bond cleavage is not a rate limiting feature of overall metabolism, but that the complex between NDMA and the principal enzyme(s) metabolizing it in vivo freely equilibrates with unbound substrate. Single, large, intraperitoneal doses of NDMA and NDMA-d6 produced a similar alkylation of rat liver DNA and also of kidney DNA. However, a small oral dose (54 micrograms/kg) of NDMA-d6 produced 1/3 less alkylation of liver DNA and 3 times as much alkylation of kidney DNA as did an equimolar dose of NDMA. The reduction in alkylation of liver DNA correlates well with, and possibly explains, the decreased ability of NDMA-d6 to induce liver tumors in rats. The associated increase in the alkylation of kidney DNA suggests that this change is due to a decrease in the amount of nitrosamine removed from the portal blood on the first pass through the liver

  20. Cortical substrate oxidation during hyperketonemia in the fasted anesthetized rat in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lihong; Mason, Graeme F; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A; Behar, Kevin L

    2011-12-01

    Ketone bodies are important alternate brain fuels, but their capacity to replace glucose and support neural function is unclear. In this study, the contributions of ketone bodies and glucose to cerebral cortical metabolism were measured in vivo in halothane-anesthetized rats fasted for 36 hours (n=6) and receiving intravenous [2,4-(13)C(2)]-D-β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Time courses of (13)C-enriched brain amino acids (glutamate-C4, glutamine-C4, and glutamate and glutamine-C3) were measured at 9.4 Tesla using spatially localized (1)H-[(13)C]-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Metabolic rates were estimated by fitting a constrained, two-compartment (neuron-astrocyte) metabolic model to the (13)C time-course data. We found that ketone body oxidation was substantial, accounting for 40% of total substrate oxidation (glucose plus ketone bodies) by neurons and astrocytes. D-β-Hydroxybutyrate was oxidized to a greater extent in neurons than in astrocytes (≈ 70:30), and followed a pattern closely similar to the metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose reported in previous studies. Total neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) flux in hyperketonemic rats was similar to values reported for normal (nonketotic) anesthetized rats infused with [1-(13)C]glucose, but neuronal glucose oxidation was 40% to 50% lower, indicating that ketone bodies had compensated for the reduction in glucose use.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and chronically injured adult rat spinal cord in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizar-Sahagun, G.; Rivera, F.; Babinski, E.; Berlanga, E.; Madrazo, M.; Franco-Bourland, R.; Grijalva, I.; Gonzalez, J.; Contreras, B.; Madrazo, I.

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the capacity of MRI to show and characterise the spinal cord (SC) in vivo in normal and chronically injured adult rats. In the chronically injured animals the SC was studied by MRI and histological examination. MRI was performed at 1.5 T, using gradient-echo and spin-echo (SE) sequences, the latter with and without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Several positions were tried for good alignment and to diminish interference by respiratory movements. Images of the SC were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. Normal SC was observed as a continuous intensity in both sequences, although contrast resolution was better using SE; it was not possible to differentiate the grey and white matter. Low signal was seen in the damaged area in chronically injured rats, which corresponded to cysts, trabeculae, mononuclear infiltrate, and fibroglial wall on histological examination. Gd-DTPA failed to enhance the SC in normal or chronically injured rats. It did, however, cause enhancement of the lesion after acute SC injury. (orig.)

  2. Intracochlear electrical stimulation suppresses apoptotic signaling in rat spiral ganglion neurons after deafening in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelovich, Jonathan C; Cagaanan, Alain P; Miller, Charles A; Abbas, Paul J; Green, Steven H

    2013-11-01

    To establish the intracellular consequences of electrical stimulation to spiral ganglion neurons after deafferentation. Here we use a rat model to determine the effect of both low and high pulse rate acute electrical stimulation on activation of the proapoptotic transcription factor Jun in deafferented spiral ganglion neurons in vivo. Experimental animal study. Hearing research laboratories of the University of Iowa Departments of Biology and Otolaryngology. A single electrode was implanted through the round window of kanamycin-deafened rats at either postnatal day 32 (P32, n = 24) or P60 (n = 22) for 4 hours of stimulation (monopolar, biphasic pulses, amplitude twice electrically evoked auditory brainstem response [eABR] threshold) at either 100 or 5000 Hz. Jun phosphorylation was assayed by immunofluorescence to quantitatively assess the effect of electrical stimulation on proapoptotic signaling. Jun phosphorylation was reliably suppressed by 100 Hz stimuli in deafened cochleae of P32 but not P60 rats. This effect was not significant in the basal cochlear turns. Stimulation frequency may be consequential: 100 Hz was significantly more effective than was 5 kHz stimulation in suppressing phospho-Jun. Suppression of Jun phosphorylation occurs in deafferented spiral ganglion neurons after only 4 hours of electrical stimulation. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that electrical stimulation can decrease spiral ganglion neuron death after deafferentation.

  3. Cyclosporine A administered during reperfusion fails to restore cardioprotection in prediabetic Zucker obese rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, R; Heinen, A; Hollmann, M W; Schlack, W; Preckel, B; Weber, N C

    2010-12-01

    Hyperglycaemia blocks sevoflurane-induced postconditioning, and cardioprotection in hyperglycaemic myocardium can be restored by inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). We investigated whether sevoflurane-induced postconditioning is also blocked in the prediabetic heart and if so, whether cardioprotection could be restored by inhibiting mPTP. Zucker lean (ZL) and Zucker obese (ZO) rats were assigned to one of seven groups. Animals underwent 25 min of ischaemia and 120 min of reperfusion. Control (ZL-/ZO Con) animals were not further treated. postconditioning groups (ZL-/ZO Sevo-post) received sevoflurane for 5 min starting 1min prior to the onset of reperfusion. The mPTP inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) was administered intravenously in a concentration of 5 (ZO CsA and ZO CsA+Sevo-post) or 10 mg/kg (ZO CsA10+Sevo-post) 5 min before the onset of reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, infarct sizes were measured by TTC staining. Blood samples were collected to measure plasma levels of insulin, cholesterol and triglycerides. Sevoflurane postconditioning reduced infarct size in ZL rats to 35±12% (pfailed to restore cardioprotection in the prediabetic but normoglycaemic heart of Zucker obese rats in vivo. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and chronically injured adult rat spinal cord in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guizar-Sahagun, G [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Inst. Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico City (Mexico); Rivera, F [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico); Babinski, E [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico); Berlanga, E [Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico); Madrazo, M [Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico); Franco-Bourland, R [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Biochemistry, Inst. Nacional de la Nutricion, Mexico City (Mexico); Grijalva, I [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo

    1994-08-01

    We assessed the capacity of MRI to show and characterise the spinal cord (SC) in vivo in normal and chronically injured adult rats. In the chronically injured animals the SC was studied by MRI and histological examination. MRI was performed at 1.5 T, using gradient-echo and spin-echo (SE) sequences, the latter with and without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Several positions were tried for good alignment and to diminish interference by respiratory movements. Images of the SC were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. Normal SC was observed as a continuous intensity in both sequences, although contrast resolution was better using SE; it was not possible to differentiate the grey and white matter. Low signal was seen in the damaged area in chronically injured rats, which corresponded to cysts, trabeculae, mononuclear infiltrate, and fibroglial wall on histological examination. Gd-DTPA failed to enhance the SC in normal or chronically injured rats. It did, however, cause enhancement of the lesion after acute SC injury. (orig.)

  5. Radiography used to measure internal spinal cord deformation in an in vivo rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, E; Whyte, T; Liu, J; Tetzlaff, W; Cripton, P A

    2018-04-11

    Little is known about the internal mechanics of the in vivo spinal cord during injury. The objective of this study was to develop a method of tracking internal and surface deformation of in vivo rat spinal cord during compression using radiography. Since neural tissue is radio-translucent, radio-opaque markers were injected into the spinal cord. Two tantalum beads (260 µm) were injected into the cord (dorsal and ventral) at C5 of nine anesthetized rats. Four beads were glued to the lateral surface of the cord, caudal and cranial to the injection site. A compression plate was displaced 0.5 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm into the spinal cord and lateral X-ray images were taken before, during, and after each compression for measuring bead displacements. Potential bead migration was monitored for by comparing displacements of the internal and glued surface beads. Dorsal beads moved significantly more than ventral beads with a range in averages of 0.57-0.71 mm and 0.31-0.35 mm respectively. Bead displacements during 0.5 mm compressions were significantly lower than 2 mm and 3 mm compressions. There was no statistically significant migration of the internal beads. The results indicate the merit of this technique for measuring in vivo spinal cord deformation. The pattern of bead displacements illustrates the complex internal and surface deformations of the spinal cord during transverse compression. This information is needed for validating physical and finite element spinal cord surrogates and to define relationships between loading parameters, internal cord deformation, and biological and functional outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In vivo transgenic expression of collybistin in neurons of the rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Christopher D; Goz, Roman U; Dinallo, Sean; Miralles, Celia P; Chiou, Tzu-Ting; Bear, John; Fiondella, Christopher G; LoTurco, Joseph J; De Blas, Angel L

    2017-04-01

    Collybistin (CB) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor selectively localized to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glycinergic postsynapses. Active CB interacts with gephyrin, inducing the submembranous clustering and the postsynaptic accumulation of gephyrin, which is a scaffold protein that recruits GABA A receptors (GABA A Rs) at the postsynapse. CB is expressed with or without a src homology 3 (SH3) domain. We have previously reported the effects on GABAergic synapses of the acute overexpression of CB SH3- or CB SH3+ in cultured hippocampal (HP) neurons. In the present communication, we are studying the effects on GABAergic synapses after chronic in vivo transgenic expression of CB2 SH3- or CB2 SH3+ in neurons of the adult rat cerebral cortex. The embryonic precursors of these cortical neurons were in utero electroporated with CB SH3- or CB SH3+ DNAs, migrated to the appropriate cortical layer, and became integrated in cortical circuits. The results show that: 1) the strength of inhibitory synapses in vivo can be enhanced by increasing the expression of CB in neurons; and 2) there are significant differences in the results between in vivo and in culture studies. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1291-1311, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Increased protein damage in renal glomeruli, retina, nerve, plasma and urine and its prevention by thiamine and benfotiamine therapy in a rat model of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachalias, N; Babaei-Jadidi, R; Rabbani, N; Thornalley, P J

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify protein damage by glycation, oxidation and nitration in a rat model of diabetes at the sites of development of microvascular complications, including the effects of thiamine and benfotiamine therapy. Diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by 55 mg/kg streptozotocin and moderated by insulin (2 U twice daily). Diabetic and control rats were given thiamine or benfotiamine (7 or 70 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) over 24 weeks. Plasma, urine and tissues were collected and analysed for protein damage by stable isotopic dilution analysis MS. There were two- to fourfold increases in fructosyl-lysine and AGE content of glomerular, retinal, sciatic nerve and plasma protein in diabetes. Increases in AGEs were reversed by thiamine and benfotiamine therapy but increases in fructosyl-lysine were not. Methionine sulfoxide content of plasma protein and 3-nitrotyrosine content of sciatic nerve protein were increased in diabetes. Plasma glycation free adducts were increased up to twofold in diabetes; the increases were reversed by thiamine. Urinary excretion of glycation, oxidation and nitration free adducts was increased by seven- to 27-fold in diabetes. These increases were reversed by thiamine and benfotiamine therapy. AGEs, particularly arginine-derived hydroimidazolones, accumulate at sites of microvascular complication development and have markedly increased urinary excretion rates in experimental diabetes. Thiamine and benfotiamine supplementation prevented tissue accumulation and increased urinary excretion of protein glycation, oxidation and nitration adducts. Similar effects may contribute to the reversal of early-stage clinical diabetic nephropathy by thiamine.

  8. Imaging regional metabolic changes in the ischemic rat heart in vivo using hyperpolarized(1-13C)Pyruvate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Mette Hauge; Magnusson, Peter; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    in the in vivo rat heart in an open-chest model of ischemia reperfusion. Hyperpolarized MRI enables new possibilities for evaluating changes in cardiac metabolism noninvasively and in real time, which potentially could be used for research to evaluate new treatments and metabolic interventions for myocardial......We evaluated the use of hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an open-chest rat model of myocardial infarction to image regional changes in myocardial metabolism. In total, 10 rats were examined before and after 30 minutes of occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary...

  9. In vivo genotoxic effects of dietary heme iron on rat colon mucosa and ex vivo effects on colon cells monitored by an optimized alkaline comet assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Océane, C Martin

    2015-04-01

    In conclusion, our results offer a suitable protocol to evaluate genotoxicity on in vivo cryopreserved colon mucosa and on in vitro murine colonic cells, with a middle throughput capacity. This protocol confirms the increase of genotoxicity in rat colon mucosa after an heme-iron diet. Moreover, this protocol enables the demonstration that aldehydes from heme-induced lipoperoxidation are responsible for this increase of genotoxicity.

  10. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; van der Bij, Hendrik A.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal

  11. Manganese-induced hydroxyl radical formation in rat striatum is not attenuated by dopamine depletion or iron chelation in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.N. Sloot (W.); J. Korf (Jakob); J.F. Koster (Johan); L.E.A. de Wit (Elly); J.-B.P. Gramsbergen (J. B P)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe present studies were aimed at investigating the possible roles of dopamine (DA) and iron in production of hydroxyl radicals (.OH) in rat striatum after Mn2+ intoxication. For this purpose, DA depletions were assessed concomitant with in vivo 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA)

  12. In Vivo Imaging of Glial Activation after Unilateral Labyrinthectomy in the Rat: A [18F]GE180-PET Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Zwergal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The functional relevance of reactive gliosis for recovery from acute unilateral vestibulopathy is unknown. In the present study, glial activation was visualized in vivo by [18F]GE180-PET in a rat model of unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL and compared to behavioral vestibular compensation (VC overtime. 14 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a UL by transtympanic injection of bupivacaine/arsenilate, 14 rats a SHAM UL (injection of normal saline. Glial activation was depicted with [18F]GE180-PET and ex vivo autoradiography at baseline and 7, 15, 30 days after UL/SHAM UL. Postural asymmetry and nystagmus were registered at 1, 2, 3, 7, 15, 30 days after UL/SHAM UL. Signs of vestibular imbalance were found only after UL, which significantly decreased until days 15 and 30. In parallel, [18F]GE180-PET and ex vivo autoradiography depicted glial activation in the ipsilesional vestibular nerve and nucleus on days 7 and 15 after UL. Correlation analysis revealed a strong negative association of [18F]GE180 uptake in the ipsilesional vestibular nucleus on day 7 with the rate of postural recovery (R = −0.90, p < 0.001, suggesting that glial activation accelerates VC. In conclusion, glial activation takes place in the ipsilesional vestibular nerve and nucleus within the first 30 days after UL in the rat and can be visualized in vivo by [18F]GE180-PET.

  13. Closure of multiple types of K+ channels is necessar to induce changes in renal vascular resistance in vivo in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin; Giese, Isaiah; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of K(+) channels might mediate renal vasoconstriction. As inhibition of a single type of K(+) channel caused minor or no renal vasoconstriction in vivo in rats, we hypothesized that several classes of K(+) channels must be blocked to elicit renal vasoconstriction. We measured renal blo...

  14. Effects of 1 alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D-3 on Transporters and Enzymes of the Rat Intestine and Kidney In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chow, Edwin C. Y.; Sun, Huadong; Khan, Ansar A.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Pang, K. Sandy

    1 alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D-3 (1,25(OH)(2)D-3), the natural ligand of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), was found to regulate bile acid related transporters and enzymes directly and indirectly in the rat intestine and liver in vivo. The kidney is another VDR-rich target organ in which VDR regulation

  15. In vivo cellular uptake of glutamate is impaired in the rat hippocampus during and after transient cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, T; Christensen, Thomas; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2001-01-01

    Using microdialysis in CA1 of the rat hippocampus, we studied the effect of transient cerebral ischemia on in vivo uptake and on extracellular levels of glutamate during, and at different time points after ischemia. (3)H-D-aspartate (test substance), and (14)C-mannitol (reference substance), were...

  16. Ex vivo evaluation of the serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist [³H]CUMI-101 in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; Underwood, Mark D; Kumar, Dileep J S

    2011-01-01

    [³H]CUMI-101 is a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist, which has been evaluated for use as a positron emission tracer in baboon and humans. We sought to evaluate the properties of [³H]CUMI-101 ex vivo in awake rats and determine if [³H]CUMI-101 can measure changes in synaptic levels of serotonin after diffe...

  17. In vitro solubility of uranium tetrafluoride with oxidizing medium compared with in vivo solubility in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Chalabreysse, J.; Escallon, S.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    A simple in vitro solubility test for UF 4 was developed to investigate effects of addition of enzymes, proteins or gases (eg O 2 ) to synthetic biological fluid or Gamble solvent. Tests were made concomitantly with an in vivo inhalation study using male rats. With Gamble solvent alone, UF 4 showed class Y behaviour with dissolution half-time 300-500 days. When O 2 or carbonates were added to Gamble solvent, UF 4 showed class W behaviour (half-time 25-50 days). In the presence of oxygen and pyrogallol, the superoxide ion was formed and UF 4 behaved as class D (half-time 2-3 days). Results correlated with those of the inhalation experiment in which dissolution half-time was 2.5 and 5.2 days. Data also agree with urine monitoring data for workers exposed to UF 4 over 20 years. (author)

  18. Limited Nesting Stress Alters Maternal Behavior and In Vivo Intestinal Permeability in Male Wistar Pup Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Moussaoui

    Full Text Available A few studies indicate that limited nesting stress (LNS alters maternal behavior and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA axis of dams and offspring in male Sprague Dawley rats. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of LNS on maternal behavior in Wistar rats, and on the HPA axis, glycemia and in vivo intestinal permeability of male and female offspring. Intestinal permeability is known to be elevated during the first week postnatally and influenced by glucocorticoids. Dams and neonatal litters were subjected to LNS or normal nesting conditions (control from days 2 to 10 postnatally. At day 10, blood was collected from pups for determination of glucose and plasma corticosterone by enzyme immunoassay and in vivo intestinal permeability by oral gavage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4kDa. Dams exposed to LNS compared to control showed an increase in the percentage of time spent building a nest (118%, self-grooming (69%, and putting the pups back to the nest (167%. LNS male and female pups exhibited a reduction of body weight by 5% and 4%, adrenal weights/100g body weight by 17% and 18%, corticosterone plasma levels by 64% and 62% and blood glucose by 11% and 12% respectively compared to same sex control pups. In male LNS pups, intestinal permeability was increased by 2.7-fold while no change was observed in females compared to same sex control. There was no sex difference in any of the parameters in control pups except the body weight. These data indicate that Wistar dams subjected to LNS during the first postnatal week have an altered repertoire of maternal behaviors which affects the development of the HPA axis in both sexes and intestinal barrier function in male offspring.

  19. Expression of non-neuronal cholinergic system in maxilla of rat in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acetylcholine (ACh is known to be a key neurotransmitter in the central and peripheral nervous systems, which is also produced in a variety of non-neuronal tissues and cell. The existence of ACh in maxilla in vivo and potential regulation role for osteogenesis need further study. RESULTS: Components of the cholinergic system (ACh, esterase, choline acetyltransferase, high-affinity choline uptake, n- and mAChRs were determined in maxilla of rat in vivo, by means of Real-Time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results showed RNA for CarAT, carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase member 20 (Slc25a20, VAChT, OCTN2, OCT1, OCT3, organic cation transporter member 4 (Slc22a4, AChE, BChE, nAChR subunits α1, α2, α3, α5, α7, α10, β1, β2, β4, γ and mAChR subunits M1, M2, M3, M4, M5 were detected in rat's maxilla. RNA of VAChT, AChE, nAChR subunits α2, β1, β4 and mAChR subunits M4 had abundant expression (2-ΔCt > 0.03. Immunohistochemical staining was conducted for ACh, VAChT, nAChRα7 and AChE. ACh was expressed in mesenchymal cells, chondroblast, bone and cartilage matrix and bone marrow cells, The VAChT expression was very extensively while ACh receptor α7 was strongly expressed in newly formed bone matrix of endochondral and bone marrow ossification, AchE was found only in mesenchymal stem cells, cartilage and bone marrow cells. CONCLUSIONS: ACh might exert its effect on the endochondral and bone marrow ossification, and bone matrix mineralization in maxilla.

  20. Effects of the neonicotinoids thiametoxam and clothianidin on in vivo dopamine release in rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Iris Machado; Nunes, Brenda Viviane Ferreira; Barbosa, Durán Rafael; Pallares, Alfonso Miguel; Faro, Lilian Rosana Ferreira

    2010-02-15

    Thiamethoxam (TMX) and clothianidin (CLO) are neonicotinoids insecticides. The main characteristic of these pesticides is their agonist action on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In the present work it was studied and characterized the effects of TMX and CLO, in different concentrations, on dopaminergic system of rat striatum using in vivo brain microdialysis coupled to HPLC-EC. Intrastriatal administration of 1mM or 5mM TMX has not produced significant increases on dopamine (DA) levels, nonetheless the infusion of 10mM TMX increases the DA output to 841+/-132%, when compared to basal levels. Infusion of 1mM CLO has not induced a significant increase in DA levels, even so 2, 3.5 and 5mM CLO have produced an increase of 438+/-8%, 2778+/-598% and 4604+/-516%, respectively, every compared to basal levels. Mecamylamine (MEC), a non-competitive nAChRs antagonist, was used to investigate the role of nAChRs on DA release induced by TMX and CLO. The increases in extracellular DA levels induced by TMX and CLO when associated to MEC are 80% and 68% lower than the effect produced by CLO and TMX isolated. These results confirm that TMX and CLO appear to induce in vivo DA increased release in striatum of rats and it seems to be concentration dependent. Moreover, these results indicate that this effect might be related to nAChRs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intralipid minimizes hepatocytes injury after anoxia-reoxygenation in an ex vivo rat liver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Michaela; Nuyens, Vincent; Boogaerts, Jean G

    2007-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is a determinant in liver injury occurring during surgical procedures, ischemic states, and multiple organ failure. The pre-existing nutritional status of the liver, i.e., fasting, might contribute to the extent of tissue injury. This study investigated whether Intralipid, a solution containing soybean oil, egg phospholipids, and glycerol, could protect ex vivo perfused livers of fasting rats from anoxia-reoxygenation injury. The portal vein was cannulated, and the liver was removed and perfused in a closed ex vivo system. Isolated livers were perfused with glucose 5.5 and 15 mM, and two different concentrations of Intralipid, i.e., 0.5:100 and 1:100 (v/v) Intralipid 10%:medium (n = 5 in each group). The experiment consisted of perfusion for 15 min, warm anoxia for 60 min, and reoxygenation during 60 min. Hepatic enzymes, potassium, glucose, lactate, bilirubin, dienes, trienes, and cytochrome-c were analyzed in perfusate samples. The proportion of glycogen in hepatocytes was determined in biopsies. Intralipid attenuated transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase, potassium, diene, and triene release in the perfusate (dose-dependant) during the reoxygenation phase when compared with glucose-treated groups. The concentration of cytochrome-c in the medium was the highest in the 5.5-mM glucose group. The glycogen content was low in all livers at the start of the experiment. Intralipid presents, under the present experimental conditions, a better protective effect than glucose in anoxia-reoxygenation injury of the rat liver.

  2. Differences between in vitro and in vivo degradation of LHRH by rat brain and other organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carone, F.A.; Stetler-Stevenson, M.A.; May, V.; LaBarbera, A.; Flouret, G.

    1987-01-01

    Homogenates of brain, pituitary, liver, lung, ovary, and testes were incubated with [ 1 -3,4- 3 H] luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ([ 3 H]LHRH), and the profiles of metabolites generated as a function of time were determined. After 5 min of incubation, 5 was the predominant metabolite in most homogenates. Although the profiles of metabolites varied at different times intervals, metabolites 2, 3, 4, and 5, and in some instances 7 and 9, appeared to form simultaneously and were detectable at 10 min. Neither metabolite 6 nor other larger metabolites formed initially as dominant degradation products. The findings suggest cleavage of LHRH by the simultaneous action of several endopeptidases. After a single vascular transit of [ 3 H]LHRH, metabolites were determined in the venous blood of liver, lung, and brain of rats in vivo. There were no metabolites of [ 3 H]LHRH in venous blood liver and lung; however, metabolites 2-4 present in venous blood of the brain. Incubation of rat anterior pituitary cells with [ 3 H]LHRH yielded metabolites 1-4 but not metabolites 5 or 9 as in homogenates. Incubation of [ 3 H]LHRH with porcine follicular granulosa cells resulted in the generation of metabolites 2-7 and 9, similar to the profile in homogenates. Thus, since homogenates contain enzymes of disrupted cells, they do not always reflect mechanisms for in vivo hydrolysis of circulating LHRH. Brain degraded 12.1% of LHRH during a single vascular transit and may account for substantial degradation of the circulating hormone

  3. In vivo metabolism of CCl4 by rats pretreated with chlordecone, mirex, or phenobarbital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehendale, H.M.; Klingensmith, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The propensity of chlordecone (CD) to potentiate hepatotoxic and lethal effects of CCl4 is well established. Mirex (M), a close structural analogue of CD, or phenobarbital (PB), powerful inducers of hepatic microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes, are much weaker potentiators of CCl4 toxicity. The purpose of this study was to test the possibility that CD potentiates the toxicity of CCl4 by increasing the metabolism of CCl4 to a greater degree than either PB or M. We compared the in vivo metabolism of CCl4 in rats pretreated with CD, M, or PB, by measuring the hepatic content of 14CCl4, the expiration of 14CCl4, expiration of 14CCl4-derived 14CO2, and lipid peroxidation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-270 g) were pretreated with a single oral dose of CD (10 mg/kg), M (10 mg/kg), or corn oil vehicle (1 ml/kg). PB pretreatment consisted of an ip injection of sodium PB (80 mg/kg) in saline (0.9%) for 2 successive days. Twenty-four hours later, 14CCl4 (0.1 ml/kg; sp act: 0.04 mCi/mmol) was administered ip in corn oil and the radioactivity present in the expired air was collected for 6 hr. Excretion of the parent compound as represented by the 14C label in the toluene trap was unchanged by any of the pretreatments. Expiration of 14CO2 measured during the 6 hr after CCl4 administration was increased in animals pretreated with PB or CD. In vivo lipid peroxidation measured as diene conjugation in lipids extracted from the livers was increased to a similar extent in animals pretreated with PB and CD, whereas the serum transaminases (ALT, AST) were significantly elevated only in animals pretreated with CD.M did not affect 14CO2 production and was without a significant effect on the lipid peroxidation

  4. Differences between in vitro and in vivo degradation of LHRH by rat brain and other organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carone, F.A.; Stetler-Stevenson, M.A.; May, V.; LaBarbera, A.; Flouret, G.

    1987-09-01

    Homogenates of brain, pituitary, liver, lung, ovary, and testes were incubated with (rats in vivo. There were no metabolites of (/sup 3/H)LHRH in venous blood liver and lung; however, metabolites 2-4 present in venous blood of the brain. Incubation of rat anterior pituitary cells with (/sup 3/H)LHRH yielded metabolites 1-4 but not metabolites 5 or 9 as in homogenates. Incubation of (/sup 3/H)LHRH with porcine follicular granulosa cells resulted in the generation of metabolites 2-7 and 9, similar to the profile in homogenates. Thus, since homogenates contain enzymes of disrupted cells, they do not always reflect mechanisms for in vivo hydrolysis of circulating LHRH. Brain degraded 12.1% of LHRH during a single vascular transit and may account for substantial degradation of the circulating hormone.

  5. Differential in vivo regulation of TH and DBH mRNA in rat atria by maprotiline and fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasojević Nataša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that antidepressants affect central monoaminergic neurotransmission and that they also modulate hormone release in peripheral tissues. Repeated maprotiline (a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor and fluoxetine (a serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment on gene expression of the catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes were examined in rat atria and ventricles in vivo. Maprotiline decreased the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and dopamineβ-hydroxylase (DBH in the rat atrium. Fluoxetine increased gene expression of TH and DBH, but not of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT. Chronic application of antidepressants did not change the expression of these enzymes in the ventricles. We conclude that repeated administration of fluoxetine enhances gene transcription of TH and DBH and subsequently stimulates noradrenaline synthesis in rat atria in vivo.

  6. Maternal separation affects dopamine transporter function in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat: An in vivo electrochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Womersley Jacqueline S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a developmental disorder characterised by symptoms of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR is a well-characterised model of this disorder and has been shown to exhibit dopamine dysregulation, one of the hypothesised causes of ADHD. Since stress experienced in the early stages of life can have long-lasting effects on behaviour, it was considered that early life stress may alter development of the dopaminergic system and thereby contribute to the behavioural characteristics of SHR. It was hypothesized that maternal separation would alter dopamine regulation by the transporter (DAT in ways that distinguish SHR from control rat strains. Methods SHR and control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rats were subjected to maternal separation for 3 hours per day from postnatal day 2 to 14. Rats were tested for separation-induced anxiety-like behaviour followed by in vivo chronoamperometry to determine whether changes had occurred in striatal clearance of dopamine by DAT. The rate of disappearance of ejected dopamine was used as a measure of DAT function. Results Consistent with a model for ADHD, SHR were more active than WKY in the open field. SHR entered the inner zone more frequently and covered a significantly greater distance than WKY. Maternal separation increased the time that WKY spent in the closed arms and latency to enter the open arms of the elevated plus maze, consistent with other rat strains. Of note is that, maternal separation failed to produce anxiety-like behaviour in SHR. Analysis of the chronoamperometric data revealed that there was no difference in DAT function in the striatum of non-separated SHR and WKY. Maternal separation decreased the rate of dopamine clearance (k-1 in SHR striatum. Consistent with this observation, the dopamine clearance time (T100 was increased in SHR. These results suggest that the chronic mild stress of

  7. Simultaneous in vivo determination of calcium and phosphate effective intestinal absorption in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladizesky, M.; Mautalen, C.A.; Cabrejas, M.; Degrossi, O.J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of a technique which allows a more precise assessment of the interrelation between calcium and phosphate transport systems. Rats were given an i.p. or oral dose of 47 Ca with 40 Ca as carrier and/or 32 P with 31 P as carrier. The animals were sacrificed and activities in body and excised gastrointestinal tract determined. The 1.28 MeV photopeak activity was measured for calcium 47, and phosphorus 32 activity was determined by measuring the Bremsstrahlung produced by this isotope in the rat's body in the 80 to 200 keV range. The rates of intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphate differed; there seemed to be no urinary excretion of the radioisotopes within 3 hours. The reciprocal influence of calcium and phosphate on the intestinal absorption was also studied. The technique is simple and allows the simultaneous in vivo measurement of the effective intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphate. (U.K.)

  8. Magnet Tracking: a new tool for in vivo studies of the rat gastrointestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignet, R; Bergonzelli, G; Schlageter, V; Turini, M; Kucera, P

    2006-06-01

    Digestive motility was studied in the rat using a miniaturized version of the Magnet Tracking system which monitored the progression of a small magnetic pill through the entire digestive tract. The dynamics of movement was followed and three-dimensional (3-D) images of digestive tract were generated. After a retention period in the stomach and rapid passage through duodenum, the magnet progressed along the small intestine with gradually decreasing speed and longer stationary periods. It remained in the caecum for variable intervals. In the colon, periods of progress alternated with long quiescent periods. Gastric activity oscillated at 5-6 min(-1). In the small intestine, two frequency domains coexisted, showing independent modulations and proximo-distal gradients (40 to >32 and 28 to >20 min(-1)). Caecal oscillations were of 1.5 min(-1). The data allowed the magnet location and calculation of gastric and small intestinal transit times (58 +/- 36 and 83 +/- 14 min respectively), both significantly prolonged by oleate administration (243 +/- 130 and 170 +/- 45 min respectively). Magnet Tracking is a non-invasive tool to study the in vivo spatial and temporal organization of gastrointestinal motility in the rat.

  9. In vivo and in vitro conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol into vitamin D3 in rat skin by ultraviolet ray's irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Toshio; Yasumura, Mitsue; Mizuno, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Tadashi

    1978-01-01

    The photochemical conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) into vitamin D 3 in rat skin was experimentally studied. The skin stripped off from a sacrificed normal rat was irradiated with an ultraviolet light for a constant period in the first in vitro experiment. The normal rat irradiated under the same conditions mentioned above was sacrificed and then the skin was stripped off in the second in vivo experiment. Lipids were individually extracted with chloroformmethanol (1:1) from the skin obtained in the two experiments and the solvent was evaporated. The resulting residue was saponified and the unsaponified matter extracted with benzene was purified by application to hydroxyalkoxypropyl (HAP) Sephadex column chromatography. The resulting purified vitamin D 3 fraction was applied to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in order to estimate vitamin D 3 . No peak, aside from that of alphanaphthol as an initial standard, was observed in the HPLC chromatogram on the skin obtained from the non-irradiated rat, whereas the peak corresponding to vitamin D 3 was observed in each HPLC chromatogram on both the irradiated skin (in vitro experiment) and the skin obtained from the irradiated rat (in vivo experiment). The result shows that 7-DHC in rat skin was photochemically converted into vitamin D 3 . (Iwakiri, K.)

  10. Preventive effects of bee pollen Cistus ladaniferus extract on bone loss in ovariectomized rats in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Taeko

    2007-01-01

    The effect of bee pollen Cistus ladaniferus extract on ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss in vivo was investigated. The water-solubilized extracts were obtained from the bee pollen of Cistus ladaniferus. Cistus extract (5.0 or 10.0 mg/100 g body weight) was orally administered once daily for 30 days to OVX rats. The analysis using a peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) showed that OVX-induced a significant decrease in mineral content, mineral density, and polar strength strain index in the femoral-metaphyseal tissues. These decreases were significantly prevented after the administration of Cistus extract (10.0 mg/100 g). Moreover, OVX-induced a significant decrease in calcium content in the femoral-diaphyseal and -metaphyseal tissues. This decrease was significantly prevented after the administration of cistus extract (5.0 or 10.0 mg/100 g). This study demonstrates that cistus extract has a preventive effect on OVX-induced bone loss in vivo. (author)

  11. In vivo microcomputed tomography evaluation of rat alveolar bone and root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Nan; Liu, Sean Shih-Yao; Zhuang, Li; Li, Song; Bai, Yuxing

    2013-05-01

    To observe the real-time microarchitecture changes of the alveolar bone and root resorption during orthodontic treatment. A 10 g force was delivered to move the maxillary left first molars mesially in twenty 10-week-old rats for 14 days. The first molar and adjacent alveolar bone were scanned using in vivo microcomputed tomography at the following time points: days 0, 3, 7, and 14. Microarchitecture parameters, including bone volume fraction, structure model index, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, and trabecular separation of alveolar bone, were measured on the compression and tension side. The total root volume was measured, and the resorption crater volume at each time point was calculated. Univariate repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni corrections were performed to compare the differences in each parameter between time points with significance level at P Root resorption volume of the mesial root increased significantly on day 7 of orthodontic loading. Real-time root and bone resorption during orthodontic movement can be observed in 3 dimensions using in vivo micro-CT. Alveolar bone resorption and root resorption were observed mostly in the apical third on day 7 on the compression side; bone formation was observed on day 14 on the tension side during orthodontic tooth movement.

  12. In vivo non-thermal irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golberg, A; Laufer, S; Rabinowitch, H D; Rubinsky, B

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 deg. C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.

  13. In vivo non-thermal irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golberg, A; Laufer, S [Center for Bioengineering in the Service of Humanity and Society, School of Computer Science and Engineering, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Rabinowitch, H D [Robert H Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Robert H Smith Institute of Plant Science and Genetics in Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76 100 (Israel); Rubinsky, B, E-mail: Rabin@agri.huji.ac.il [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 84720 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 deg. C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.

  14. Calcium absorption in rat large intestine in vivo: availability of dietary calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammann, P.; Rizzoli, R.; Fleisch, H.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium absorption in the large intestine of the rat was investigated in vivo. After a single injection of 45 CaCl 2 into the cecum, 26.0 +/- 2.5% (mean +/- SE, n = 9) of the 45 CaCl 2 injected disappeared. This absorption was modulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, increased to 64.0 +/- 4.2% under a low-Ca diet, and increased under low-Pi diet. In contrast, when the difference of nonradioactive Ca in the cecal content and the feces was measured, only 4.1 +/- 4.6% (not significant) was absorbed. Secretion of intravenously injected 45 Ca into the lumen was small and not altered by any of the conditions tested. When cecum contents were placed into duodenal tied loops, 14 +/- 6.2% were absorbed in situ when 45 Ca was given orally, whereas when 45 Ca was directly added to the content 35.6 +/- 4.6% were absorbed (P less than 0.02). These results indicate that the large intestine has an important vitamin D-dependent Ca absorptive system detectable if 45 Ca is injected into the cecum. However, it is not effective in vivo because the Ca arriving in the large intestine appears to be no longer in an absorbable form

  15. Ex vivo effects of lysine clonixinate on cyclooxygenases in rat lung and stomach preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, A M; Di Girolamo, G; De los Santos, A R; Marti, M L; Gimeno, M A

    1999-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate (LC) is an anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic and analgesic drug with minor digestive side effects, which might suggest a weak COX-1 inhibitor. The aim of this study focused on ex vivo effects of LC 40 mg/kg ip and indomethacin (INDO) 10 mg/kg ip in lung and stomach preparations of control rats and LPS-treated rats (5 mg/kg ip). The non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs were administered concomitantly, following three hours and before one, two or three hours of LPS treatment. Tissues were weighed and incubated in 2 ml of Kress Ringer Bicarbonate buffer containing glucose (11 mM) under an atmosphere of 95% oxygen and 5% CO(2). Approximately 200 mg of tissue were used for each determination; 0.25 microCi of (14)C-arachidonic acid was added to each tube and the tissues were incubated for 60 min. Prostanoids were extracted from the incubation medium and separated by TLC. Results were expressed as a percentage of the total radioactivity of the plates (% of cpm on plate/100 mg ww). It was found that LC animals that were not given LPS did not modify the synthesis of PGE(2); in lung and stomach tissues showing that did not inhibit COX-1 activity. However, LC inhibited clearly the synthesis of PGE(2) in both preparations obtained from LPS-treated animals. The inhibition was shown when the rats were treated concomitantly, 3 h after or 1 or 2 h before the injection of LPS.

  16. Structural layers of ex vivo rat hippocampus at 7T MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine Manuella Kamsu

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI applied to the hippocampus is challenging in studies of the neurophysiology of memory and the physiopathology of numerous diseases such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, ischemia, and depression. The hippocampus is a well-delineated cerebral structure with a multi-layered organization. Imaging of hippocampus layers is limited to a few studies and requires high magnetic field and gradient strength. We performed one conventional MRI sequence on a 7T MRI in order to visualize and to delineate the multi-layered hippocampal structure ex vivo in rat brains. We optimized a volumic three-dimensional T2 Rapid Acquisition Relaxation Enhancement (RARE sequence and quantified the volume of the hippocampus and one of its thinnest layers, the stratum granulare of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, we tested passive staining by gadolinium with the aim of decreasing the acquisition time and increasing image contrast. Using appropriated settings, six discrete layers were differentiated within the hippocampus in rats. In the hippocampus proper or Ammon's Horn (AH: the stratum oriens, the stratum pyramidale of, the stratum radiatum, and the stratum lacunosum moleculare of the CA1 were differentiated. In the dentate gyrus: the stratum moleculare and the stratum granulare layer were seen distinctly. Passive staining of one brain with gadolinium decreased the acquisition time by four and improved the differentiation between the layers. A conventional sequence optimized on a 7T MRI with a standard receiver surface coil will allow us to study structural layers (signal and volume of hippocampus in various rat models of neuropathology (anxiety, epilepsia, neurodegeneration.

  17. Maltitol inhibits small intestinal glucose absorption and increases insulin mediated muscle glucose uptake ex vivo but not in normal and type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of maltitol on intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake using ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. The ex vivo experiment was conducted in isolated jejunum and psoas muscle from normal rats. The in vivo study investigated the effects of a single bolus dose of maltitol on gastric emptying, intestinal glucose absorption and digesta transit in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. Maltitol inhibited glucose absorption in isolated rat jejunum and increased glucose uptake in isolated rat psoas muscle in the presence of insulin but not in the absence of insulin. In contrast, maltitol did not significantly (p > 0.05) alter small intestinal glucose absorption or blood glucose levels as well as gastric emptying and digesta transit in normal or type 2 diabetic rats. The results suggest that maltitol may not be a suitable dietary supplement for anti-diabetic food and food products to improve glycemic control.

  18. Effects of acute chlorpyrifos exposure on in vivo acetylcholine accumulation in rat striatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karanth, Subramanya; Liu, Jing; Mirajkar, Nikita; Pope, Carey

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the acute effects of chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinesterase inhibition and acetylcholine levels in the striatum of freely moving rats using in vivo microdialysis. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg) or CPF (84, 156 or 279 mg/kg, sc) and functional signs of toxicity, body weight and motor activity recorded. Microdialysis was conducted at 1, 4 and 7 days after CPF exposure for measurement of acetylcholine levels in striatum. Rats were then sacrificed and the contralateral striatum and diaphragm were collected for biochemical measurements. Few overt signs of cholinergic toxicity were noted in any rats. Body weight gain was significantly affected in the high-dose (279 mg/kg) group only, while motor activity (nocturnal rearing) was significantly reduced in all CPF-treated groups at one day (84 mg/kg) or from 1-4 days (156 and 279 mg/kg) after dosing. Cholinesterase activities in both diaphragm and striatum were markedly inhibited (50-92%) in a time-dependent manner, but there were relatively minimal dose-related changes. In contrast, time- and dose-dependent changes in striatal acetylcholine levels were noted, with significantly higher levels noted in the high-dose group compared to other groups. Maximal increases in striatal acetylcholine levels were observed at 4-7 days after dosing (84 mg/kg, 7-9-fold; 156 mg/kg, 10-13-fold; 279 mg/kg, 35-57-fold). Substantially higher acetylcholine levels were noted when an exogenous cholinesterase inhibitor was included in the perfusion buffer, but CPF treatment-related differences were substantially lower in magnitude under those conditions. The results suggest that marked differences in acetylcholine accumulation can occur with dosages of CPF eliciting relatively similar degrees of cholinesterase inhibition. Furthermore, the minimal expression of classic signs of cholinergic toxicity in the presence of extensive brain acetylcholine accumulation suggests that some

  19. Physical limits to autofluorescence signals in vivo recordings in the rat olfactory bulb: a Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Heureux, B.; Gurden, H.; Pinot, L.; Mastrippolito, R.; Lefebvre, F.; Lanièce, P.; Pain, F.

    2007-07-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of energy supply to neurons following physiological activation is still challenging and has strong implications to the interpretation of clinical functional images based on metabolic signals such as Blood Oxygen Level Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging or 18F-Fluorodexoy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography. Intrinsic Optical Signal Imaging provides with high spatio temporal resolution in vivo imaging in the anaesthetized rat. In that context, intrinsic signals are mainly related to changes in the optical absorption of haemoglobin depending on its oxygenation state. This technique has been validated for imaging of the rat olfactory bulb, providing with maps of the actived olfactory glomeruli, the functional modules involved in the first step of olfactory coding. A complementary approach would be autofluorescence imaging relying on the fluorescence properties of endogenous Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD) or Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH) both involved in intracellular metabolic pathways. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of in vivo autofluorescence imaging in the rat olfactory bulb. We performed standard Monte Carlo simulations of photons scattering and absorption at the excitation and emission wavelengths of FAD and NADH fluorescence. Characterization of the fluorescence distribution in the glomerulus, effect of hemoglobin absorption at the excitation and absorption wavelengths as well as the effect of the blurring due to photon scattering and the depth of focus of the optical apparatus have been studied. Finally, optimal experimental parameters are proposed to achieve in vivo validation of the technique in the rat olfactory bulb.

  20. Effect of irradiation on gene expression of rat liver adhesion molecules. In vivo and in vitro studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriconi, Federico; Malik, Ihtzaz; Ahmad, Ghayyor; Dudas, Joszef; Ramadori, Giuliano; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Vorwerk, Hilke; Hille, Andrea; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Christiansen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Migration of leukocytes into tissue is a key element of innate and adaptive immunity. An animal study showed that liver irradiation, in spite of induction of chemokine gene expression, does not lead to recruitment of leukocytes into the parenchyma. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression of adhesion molecules, which mediate leukocyte recruitment into organs, in irradiated rat liver in vivo and rat hepatocytes in vitro. Material and methods: Rat livers in vivo were irradiated selectively at 25 Gy. Isolated hepatocytes in vitro were irradiated at 8 Gy. RNA extracted within 48 h after irradiation in vivo and in vitro was analyzed by real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and Northern blot. Adhesion molecule concentration in serum was measured by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Cryostat sections of livers were used for immunohistology. Results: Significant radiation-induced increase of ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), JAM-1 (junctional adhesion molecule-1), β 1 -integrin, β 2 -integrin, E-cadherin, and P-selectin gene expression could be detected in vivo, while PECAM-1 (platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1) gene expression remained unchanged. In vitro, β 1 -integrin, JAM-1, and ICAM-2 showed a radiation-induced increased expression, whereas the levels of P-selectin, ICAM-1, PECAM-1, VCAM-1, Madcam-1 (mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1), β 2 -integrin, and E-cadherin were downregulated. However, incubation of irradiated hepatocytes with either tumor necrosis factor-(TNF-)α, interleukin-(IL-)1β, or IL-6 plus TNF-α led to an upregulation of P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Conclusion: The findings suggest that liver irradiation modulates gene expression of the main adhesion molecules in vivo and in cytokine-activated hepatocytes, with the exception of PECAM-1. This may be one reason for the lack of inflammation in the irradiated rat liver. (orig.)

  1. Free radicals imaged in vivo in the rat by using proton-electron double-resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurie, D.J.; Nicholson, Ian; Foster, M.A.; Mallard, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    A new technique called proton-electron double-resonance imaging is described for imaging free radicals in aqueous samples. The method is a combination of proton NMR imaging with nuclear electron double resonance. The results of using this technique to image free radicals in vivo in the rat are presented. Rats were injected intravenously with a nitroxide free radical solution and a series of images was obtained from which the clearance of the free radical through the liver and kidneys could be observed. (author)

  2. Protein synthesis in the rat brain: a comparative in vivo and in vitro study in immature and adult animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, F.M.

    1985-01-01

    Rates of protein synthesis of CNS and other organs were compared in immature and adult rats by in vivo and slice techniques with administration of flooding doses of labeled precursor. The relationship between synthesis and brain region, cell type, subcellular fraction, or MW was examined. Incorporation of [ 14 C]valine into protein of CNS regions in vivo was about 1.2% per hour for immature rats and 0.6% for adults. For slices, the rates decreased significantly more in adults. In adult organs, the highest synthesis rate in vivo was found in liver (2.2% per hour) followed by kidney, spleen, lung, heart, brain, and muscle (0.5% per hour). In immature animals synthesis was highest in liver and spleen (2.5% per hour) and lowest in muscle (0.9% per hour). Slices all showed lower rates than in vivo, especially in adults. In vivo, protein synthesis rates of immature neurons and astrocytes and adult neurons exceeded those of whole brain, while that in adult astrocytes was the same. These results demonstrate a developmental difference of protein synthesis (about double in immature animals) in all brain cells, cell fractions and most brain protein. Similarly the decreased synthesis in brain slices - especially in adults, affects most proteins and structural elements

  3. Toluene metabolism in isolated rat hepatocytes: effects of in vivo pretreatment with acetone and phenobarbital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith-Kielland, A.; Ripel, A. (National Inst. of Forensic Toxicology, Oslo (Norway))

    1993-02-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from control, acetone- and phenobarbital-pretreated rats were used to study the metabolic conversion of toluene to benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid and hippuric acid at low (<100 [mu]M) and high (100-500 [mu]M) toluene concentrations. The baseline formation rates of toluene metabolites (benzyl alcohol, benzoic acid and hippuric acid) were 2.9[+-]1.7 and 10.0[+-]2.3 nmol/mg cell protein/60 min at low and high toluene concentrations, respectively. In vivo pretreatment of rats with acetone and phenobarbital increased the formation of metabolites: at low toluene concentrations 3- and 5-fold, respectively; at high toluene concentrations no significant increase (acetone) and 8-fold increase (phenobarbital). Apparent inhibition by ethanol, 7 and 60 mM, was most prominent at low toluene concentrations: 63% and 69%, respectively, in control cells; 84% and 91% in acetone-pretreated cells, and 32% (not significant) and 51% in phenobarbital-pretreated cells. Ethanol also caused accumulation of benzyl alcohol. The apparent inhibition by isoniazid was similar to that of ethanol at low toluene concentrations. Control and acetone-pretreated cells were apparently resistant towards metyrapone; the decrease was 49% and 64% in phenobarbital-pretreated cells at low and high toluene concentrations, respectively. In these cells, the decrease in presence of combined ethanol and metyrapone was 95% (low toluene concentrations). 4-Methylpyrazole decreased metabolite formation extensively in all groups. Benzaldehyde was only found in the presence of an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor. Increased ratio benzoic/hippuric acid was observed at high toluene concentrations. These results demonstrate that toluene oxidation may be studied by product formation in isolated hepatocytes. However, the influence of various enzymes in the overall metabolism could not be ascertained due to lack of inhibitor specificity. (orig.).

  4. In vivo turnover of the basement membrane and other heparan sulfate proteoglycans of rat glomerulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavan, L.A.; Davies, M.; Couchman, J.R.; Williams, M.A.; Mason, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    The metabolic turnover of rat glomerular proteoglycans in vivo was investigated. Newly synthesized proteoglycans were labeled during a 7-h period after injecting sodium [35S]sulfate intraperitoneally. At the end of the labeling period a chase dose of sodium sulfate was given. Subsequently at defined times (0-163 h) the kidneys were perfused in situ with 0.01% cetylpyridinium chloride in phosphate-buffered saline to maximize the recovery of 35S-proteoglycans. Glomeruli were isolated from the renal cortex and analyzed for 35S-proteoglycans by autoradiographic, biochemical, and immunochemical methods. Grain counting of autoradiographs revealed a complex turnover pattern of 35S-labeled macromolecules, commencing with a rapid phase followed by a slower phase. Biochemical analysis confirmed the biphasic pattern and showed that the total population of [35S]heparan sulfate proteoglycans had a metabolic half-life (t1/2) of 20 and 60 h in the early and late phases, respectively. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans accounted for 80% of total 35S-proteoglycans, the remainder being chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans. Whole glomeruli were extracted with 4% 3-[(cholamidopropyl)dimethy-lammonio]-1-propanesulfonate-4 M guanidine hydrochloride, a procedure which solubilized greater than 95% of the 35S-labeled macromolecules. Of these 11-13% was immunoprecipitated by an antiserum against heparan sulfate proteoglycan which, in immunolocalization experiments, showed specificity for staining the basement membrane of rat glomeruli. Autoradiographic analysis showed that 18% of total radioactivity present at the end of the labeling period was associated with the glomerular basement membrane

  5. Comparative effects of organic and inorganic mercury on in vivo dopamine release in freely moving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R.F. Faro

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out in order to compare the effects of administration of organic (methylmercury, MeHg and inorganic (mercury chloride, HgCl 2 forms of mercury on in vivo dopamine (DA release from rat striatum. Experiments were performed in conscious and freely moving female adult Sprague-Dawley (230-280 g rats using brain microdialysis coupled to HPLC with electrochemical detection. Perfusion of different concentrations of MeHg or HgCl 2 (2 µL/min for 1 h, N = 5-7/group into the striatum produced significant increases in the levels of DA. Infusion of 40 µM, 400 µM, or 4 mM MeHg increased DA levels to 907 ± 31, 2324 ± 156, and 9032 ± 70% of basal levels, respectively. The same concentrations of HgCl 2 increased DA levels to 1240 ± 66, 2500 ± 424, and 2658 ± 337% of basal levels, respectively. These increases were associated with significant decreases in levels of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovallinic acid. Intrastriatal administration of MeHg induced a sharp concentration-dependent increase in DA levels with a peak 30 min after injection, whereas HgCl 2 induced a gradual, lower (for 4 mM and delayed increase in DA levels (75 min after the beginning of perfusion. Comparing the neurochemical profile of the two mercury derivatives to induce increases in DA levels, we observed that the time-course of these increases induced by both mercurials was different and the effect produced by HgCl 2 was not concentration-dependent (the effect was the same for the concentrations of 400 µM and 4 mM HgCl 2 . These results indicate that HgCl 2 produces increases in extracellular DA levels by a mechanism differing from that of MeHg.

  6. Insulin action in vivo: studies in control and exercise trained rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis is primarily concerned with in vivo insulin action and how this is modified by exercise training. The aims are; to define differential insulin action within the major insulin sensitive tissues; to characterize the relationship between these individual responses and whole body insulin action; and to examine the effect of exercise training on whole body and differential tissue insulin action. A technique, based on the euglycaemic clamp, is described for examining in vivo insulin action on glucose utilization and storage in individual tissues in the conscious, unrestrained rat. Tissue glucose metabolic rate (Rg') was estimated using (/sup 3/H)-2-deoxyglucose and glucose disposal was examined by measuring glycogen content and /sup 14/C-glucose incorporation into tissue glycogen or lipids. Elevating plasma insulin to 150 mU/l resulted in significant increases of glucose utilization in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Oxidative skeletal muscle could account for up to 70% of total glucose disposal whereas adipose tissue and liver could account for less than 3%. The following conclusions have been drawn from these studies. The whole body insulin response curve for glucose utilization closely reflects muscle glucose metabolism; mild elevations in plasma insulin will markedly elevate the glucose utilization rate in oxidative but not glycolytic skeletal muscle fibers; the increased whole body insulin sensitivity which is observed following exercise training is due to increased insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. These results indicate that exercise training will undoubtedly result in improved glucose disposal in the prandial state. This emphasises the potential benefit of exercise in obesity and Type II diabetes.

  7. α(1) adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, actively contracts early rat rib fracture callus ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Stuart J; Dooley, Philip C; McDonald, Aaron C; Djouma, Elvan; Schuijers, Johannes A; Ward, Alex R; Grills, Brian L

    2011-05-01

    Early, soft fracture callus that links fracture ends together is smooth muscle-like in nature. We aimed to determine if early fracture callus could be induced to contract and relax ex vivo by similar pathways to smooth muscle, that is, contraction via α(1) adrenergic receptor (α(1) AR) activation with phenylephrine (PE) and relaxation via β(2) adrenergic receptor (β(2) AR) stimulation with terbutaline. A sensitive force transducer quantified 7 day rat rib fracture callus responses in modified Krebs-Henseliet (KH) solutions. Unfractured ribs along with 7, 14, and 21 day fracture calluses were analyzed for both α(1) AR and β(2) AR gene expression using qPCR, whilst 7 day fracture callus was examined via immunohistochemistry for both α(1) AR and β(2) AR- immunoreactivity. In 7 day callus, PE (10(-6)  M) significantly induced an increase in force that was greater than passive force generated in calcium-free KH (n = 8, mean 51% increase, 95% CI: 26-76%). PE-induced contractions in calluses were attenuated by the α(1) AR antagonist, prazosin (10(-6)  M; n = 7, mean 5% increase, 95% CI: 2-11%). Terbutaline did not relax callus. Gene expression of α(1) ARs was constant throughout fracture healing; however, β(2) AR expression was down-regulated at 7 days compared to unfractured rib (p contract. We propose that increased concentrations of α(1) AR agonists such as noradrenaline may tonically contract callus in vivo to promote osteogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  8. In vivo tracking of magnetically labeled mesenchmal stem cells injected via renal arteries in kidney failure rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Junhui; Teng Gaojun; Ju Shenghong; Ma Zhanlong; Mai Xiaoli; Zhang Yu; Ma Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo depiction and tracking for magnetically labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stern cells (MSCs) in a renal failure rat model injected intravascularly using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Methods: Rat MSCs were isolated, purified, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. Prussian blue stain was employed for identifying intracellular irons. An acute renal failure in rat was induced by intramuscular injection of glycerol and MSCs were injected into renal arteries of 11 recipients (labeled cells in six, unlabeled cells in five). MR images of kidneys were obtained respectively before injection of MSCs, and immediately, 1, 3, 5, and 8 clays after transplantation. MR imaging findings were analyzed, which were correlated with histological findings. Results: Rat MSCs were successfully labeled, and labeling efficiency was almost 100%. Prussian blue staining of Fe 2 O 3 -PLL labeled cells revealed the presence of iron-containing vesicles or endosomes in the cytoplasm. In the renal failure model of rats, the labeled MSCs were demonstrated as signal intensity loss in renal cortex on T 2 * -weighted MR images. The signal intensity decrease was visualized up to days 8 after transplantation. Histological analyses showed that most Prussian blue staining-positive cells were well correlated with the area where a signal intensity loss was observed in MRI. Signal intensity decrease was not detected after transplantation of unlabeled cells. Conclusion: The rat MSCs can be effectively labeled with Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. 1.5-T MR imaging seems to be a good technique to monitor the magnetically labeled MSCs in vivo in renal failure rat model intravascularly administered, which may have much more potential values for studying the engraftment of stem cells in kidneys. (authors)

  9. Imaging of the peripheral retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Kernt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The technical progress of the recent years has revolutionized imaging in ophthalmology. Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO, digital angiography, optical coherence tomography (OCT, and detection of fundus autofluorescence (FAF have fundamentally changed our understanding of numerous retinal and choroidal diseases. Besides the tremendous advances in macular diagnostics, there is more and more evidence that central pathologies are often directly linked to changes in the peripheral retina. This review provides a brief overview on current posterior segment imaging techniques with a special focus on the peripheral retina.

  10. In vivo synthesis of phosphatidylcholine in rat brain via the phospholipid methylation pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakher, Michael; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The in vivo synthesis of brain phosphatidylcholine (PC) by the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was examined. (H-3)methyl)methionine was infused i.c.v., by indwelling cannula, and brain samples were taken 0.5-18 h thereafter and assayed for (H-3)PC, as well as for its biosynthetic intermediates (H-3)phosphatidyl monomethylethanolamine ((H-3)PMME) and (H-3)phosphatidyl dimethylethanolamine ((H-3)PDME), and for (H-3)lysophosphatidylcholine ((H-3)LPC) and S-(H-3)adenosylmethionine ((H-3)SAM). Most of the (H-3)PC (79-94 percent) was present ipsilateral to the infusion site; indicating that the radioactivity in the (H-3)PC was primarily of intracerebral origin, and not taken up from the blood. Moreover, only very low levels of (H-3)PC were attained in brains of animals receiving (H-3)methionine i.p. and these levels were symmetrically distributed. (H-3)PMME and (H-3)PDME turned over with apparent half-lives of 2.2 h and 2.4 h. In contrast, the accumulation of brain (H-3)PC was biphasic, suggesting the existence of two pools, the more labile of which turned over rapidly (t(sub 1/2) = 5 h) and was formed for as long as (H-3)PMME and (H-3)PDME are present in the brain, and another, which was distinguishable only at 18 h after the (H-3)methionine infusion. (The latter pool may have been synthesized from (H-3)choline that was released via the hydrolysis of some of the brain (H-3)PC previously formed by the methylation of PE.) Subcellular fractionation of brain tissue obtained after in vivo labelling with (H-3)methionine revealed that mitochondrial PC had the highest specific radioactivity (dpm per micromol total lipid phosphorus), and myelin the least. These observations affirm that rat brain does synthesize PC in vivo by methylating PE, and the technique provides an experimental system which may be useful for examining the physiological regulation of this process.

  11. Sister chromatid exchanges in the bone marrow cells of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez R, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in the bone marrow of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation doses and by the chemical mutagens, mitomycin C (MMC), cyclophosphamide (CP), and sulphonate-methylmethane (SMM), were studied. The purpose was to evaluate the sensitivity and reproducibility of a simplified SCE in vivo detecting system developed in our laboratory and to compare the results obtained with those reported elsewhere. Simplification consisted in administering the amounts of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) necessary to observe the SCE, after first adsorbing the BrdU in activated carbon and then injecting it interperitoneally, into the rats. The results were a longer time in vivo ADN incorporation without convulsions in the rats, and a reduction in the time course as compared to other methods. We observed a basal rate of 3.6+-0.37 SCE/cell and that: 0.44 Gy of gamma radiation induced 7.7+-0.73 SCE/cell; 1.6 μg/g of MMC induced 8.1+-1.20 SCE/cell; 5 μg/g of CP induced 8.25+-1.5 SCE/cell, 40 μg/g of SMM induced 22.0+-5 SCE/cell and 380 μg/g of sulphonate-ethylmethane induced 8.6+-1.2 SCE/cell. This showed that all the agents were capable of inducing SCE in the bone marrow cells of rats in vivo under our conditions. We noted a greater induced efficiency for gamma radiation than the obtained by other investigators and a relatively similar efficiency in the case of chemical mutagens as reported in other studies. (author)

  12. Impact of bronchopulmonary dysplasia on brain and retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Wing Hoi Poon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many premature newborns develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, a chronic lung disease resulting from prolonged mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia. BPD survivors typically suffer long-term injuries not only to the lungs, but also to the brain and retina. However, currently it is not clear whether the brain and retinal injuries in these newborns are related only to their prematurity, or also to BPD. We investigated whether the hyperoxia known to cause histologic changes in the lungs similar to BPD in an animal model also causes brain and retinal injuries. Sprague Dawley rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia (95% O2, ‘BPD’ group or room air (21% O2, ‘control’ group from postnatal day 4–14 (P4–14; the rat pups were housed in room air between P14 and P28. At P28, they were sacrificed, and their lungs, brain, and eyes were extracted. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed on lung and brain sections; retinas were stained with Toluidine Blue. Hyperoxia exposure resulted in an increased mean linear intercept in the lungs (P<0.0001. This increase was associated with a decrease in some brain structures [especially the whole-brain surface (P=0.02], as well as a decrease in the thickness of the retinal layers [especially the total retina (P=0.0008], compared to the room air control group. In addition, a significant negative relationship was observed between the lung structures and the brain (r=−0.49, P=0.02 and retina (r=−0.70, P=0.0008 structures. In conclusion, hyperoxia exposure impaired lung, brain, and retina structures. More severe lung injuries correlated with more severe brain and retinal injuries. This result suggests that the same animal model of chronic neonatal hyperoxia can be used to simultaneously study lung, brain and retinal injuries related to hyperoxia.

  13. In vivo behavior of 111In-DTPA in rat and mouse after intra-ventricular administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Hiroaki; Kato, Makoto; Sugimura, Yukiharu; Hazue, Masaaki

    1977-01-01

    In vivo behavior of 111 In-DTPA in rat and mouse after intra-ventricular administration was studied. Thus, 50μCi and 35μCi of 111 In-DTPA was injected intraventricularly to rat and mouse respectively. At specific time intervals, the animals were sacrificed, then distribution in organs was determined by radioactivity counting and autoradiographic method. Urinary and fecal excretion were separately collected and excretion rates were estimated. Metabolites in urine of rat were examined with chromatography. A part of 111 In-DTPA injected intra-ventricularly to the animals migrated to subarachnoid space, then radioactivity in cerebrospinal fluid effused into blood with about 1 hr initial half-life. Blood clearance was also rapid, about 1 hr after administration the blood level reached maximum and then decreased showing an initial half-life of about 1 hr. The predominant excretion route in rat was urinary and about 90% and 5% of administered dose were excreted within 48 hr through urine and feces respectively. Judging from the Rf-value of radioactivity peak on chromatograms, 111 In-DTPA seems to be excreted without suffering any metabolic change. Concerning to the behavior of 111 In-DTPA in male and female rat, no difference was observed, and the distribution pattern of 111 In-DTPA in mouse was similar to that of rat. (auth.)

  14. Increased in vivo glucose utilization in 30-day-old obese Zucker rat: Role of white adipose tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krief, S.; Bazin, R.; Dupuy, F.; Lavau, M.

    1988-01-01

    In vivo whole-body glucose utilization and uptake in multiple individual tissues were investigated in conscious 30-day-old Zucker rats, which when obese are hyperphagic, hyperinsulinemic, and normoglycemic. Whole-body glucose metabolism (assessed by [3- 3 H]glucose) was 40% higher in obese (fa/fa) than in lean (Fa/fa) rats, suggesting that obese rats were quite responsive to their hyperinsulinemia. In obese compared with lean rats, tissue glucose uptake was increased by 15, 12, and 6 times in dorsal, inguinal, perigonadal white depots, respectively; multiplied by 2.5 in brown adipose tissue; increased by 50% in skin from inguinal region but not in that from cranial, thoracic, or dorsal area; and increased twofold in diaphragm but similar in heart in proximal intestine, and in total muscular mass of limbs. The data establish that in young obese rats the hypertrophied white adipose tissue was a major glucose-utilizing tissue whose capacity for glucose disposal compared with that of half the muscular mass. Adipose tissue could therefore play an important role in the homeostasis of glucose in obese rats in the face of their increased carbohydrate intake

  15. Blue light irradiation-induced oxidative stress in vivo via ROS generation in rat gingival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ayaka; Shiotsu-Ogura, Yukako; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Toyama, Toshizo; Yoshino, Fumihiko

    2015-10-01

    It has been reported that oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is induced by blue light irradiation to a living body. Only limited research has been reported in dental field on the dangers of blue light, mostly focusing on cytotoxicity associated with heat injury of dental pulp. We thus performed an in vivo study on oral tissue exposed to blue light. ROS generated upon blue light irradiation of flavin adenine dinucleotide were measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. After blue light irradiation, the palatal gingiva of Wistar rats were isolated. Collected samples were subjected to biochemical analysis of lipid peroxidation and glutathione. Singlet oxygen was generated by blue light irradiation, but was significantly quenched in an N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) concentration-dependent manner. Blue light significantly accelerated oxidative stress and increased the oxidized glutathione levels in gingival tissue. These effects were also inhibited by NAC pre-administration. The results suggest that blue light irradiation at clinical levels of tooth bleaching treatment may enhance lipid peroxidation by the induction of oxidative stress and the consumption of a significant amount of intracellular glutathione. In addition, NAC might be an effective supplement for the protection of oral tissues against blue light irradiation-induced oxidative damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ex Vivo Assay of Electrical Stimulation to Rat Sciatic Nerves: Cell Behaviors and Growth Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhiyong; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Wang, Dingkun; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Zhang, Ze

    2016-06-01

    Neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration are known to benefit from electrical stimulation. However, how neuritis and their surroundings react to electrical field is difficult to replicate by monolayer cell culture. In this work freshly harvested rat sciatic nerves were cultured and exposed to two types of electrical field, after which time the nerve tissues were immunohistologically stained and the expression of neurotrophic factors and cytokines were evaluated. ELISA assay was used to confirm the production of specific proteins. All cell populations survived the 48 h culture with little necrosis. Electrical stimulation was found to accelerate Wallerian degeneration and help Schwann cells to switch into migratory phenotype. Inductive electrical stimulation was shown to upregulate the secretion of multiple neurotrophic factors. Cellular distribution in nerve tissue was altered upon the application of an electrical field. This work thus presents an ex vivo model to study denervated axon in well controlled electrical field, bridging monolayer cell culture and animal experiment. It also demonstrated the critical role of electrical field distribution in regulating cellular activities. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cuscuta arvensis Beyr "Dodder": In Vivo Hepatoprotective Effects Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca-Caliskan, Ufuk; Yilmaz, Ismet; Taslidere, Asli; Yalcin, Funda N; Aka, Ceylan; Sekeroglu, Nazim

    2018-05-02

    Cuscuta arvensis Beyr. is a parasitic plant, and commonly known as "dodder" in Europe, in the United States, and "tu si zi shu" in China. It is one of the preferred spices used in sweet and savory dishes. Also, it is used as a folk medicine for the treatment particularly of liver problems, knee pains, and physiological hepatitis, which occur notably in newborns and their mothers in the southeastern part of Turkey. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effects and antioxidant activities of aqueous and methanolic extracts of C. arvensis Beyr. on acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats. The results were supported by subsequent histopathological studies. The hepatoprotective activity of both the aqueous and methanolic extracts at an oral dose of 125 and 250 mg/kg was investigated by observing the reduction levels or the activity of alkaline phosphatase, alkaline transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, blood urine nitrogen, and total bilirubin content. In vivo antioxidant activity was determined by analyzing the serum superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde, glutathione, and catalase levels. Chromatographic methods were used to isolate biologically active compounds from the extract, and spectroscopic methods were used for structure elucidation. Both the methanolic and aqueous extracts exerted noticable hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects supporting the folkloric usage of dodder. One of the bioactive compounds was kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside, isolated and identified from the methanolic extract.

  18. A simple, quantitative method using alginate gel to determine rat colonic tumor volume in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-04-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the Apc(Pirc/+) rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm³. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained.

  19. In vivo evaluation of the biocompatibility of surface modified hemodialysis polysulfone hollow fibers in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganpat J Dahe

    Full Text Available Polysulfone (Psf hollow fiber membranes (HFMs have been widely used in blood purification but their biocompatibility remains a concern. To enhance their biocompatibility, Psf/TPGS (d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate composite HFMs and 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC coated Psf HFMs have been prepared. They have been evaluated for in vivo biocompatibility and graft acceptance and compared with sham and commercial membranes by intra-peritoneal implantation in rats at day 7 and 21. Normal body weights, tissue formation and angiogenesis indicate acceptance of implants by the animals. Hematological observations show presence of post-surgical stress which subsides over time. Serum biochemistry results reveal normal organ function and elevated liver ALP levels at day 21. Histological studies exhibit fibroblast recruitment cells, angiogenesis and collagen deposition at the implant surface indicating new tissue formation. Immuno-histochemistry studies show non-activation of MHC molecules signifying biocompatibilty. Additionally, Psf/TPGS exhibit most favorable tissue response as compared with other HFMs making them the material of choice for HFM preparation for hemodialysis applications.

  20. Lecithin inhibits fatty acid and bile salt absorption from rat small intestine in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, D R; Sillery, J

    1976-12-01

    During digestion of a fatty meal, long chain free fatty acids (FFA) and lecithin are among the lipids solubilized in intestinal contents as mixed micelles with bile salts. We hypothesized that if lecithin were not hydrolyzed, the mixed micelles would be abnormal, and absorption of FFA and bile salts would be depressed. To test this hypothesis, isolated segments of rat small intestine were infused in vivo with micellar solutions of 2 mMolar linoleic acid and 10 mMolar taurocholate to which was added 3 mMolar 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl lecithin (a common lecithin in bile and food), or 1-palmitoyl lysolecithin (the hydrolytic product of lecithin). Absorption of FFA and bile salt was measured under steady state conditions using a single-pass technique. Lecithin depressed the rate of FFA absorption by 40% (p less than 0.025) in jejunal and ileal segments whereas lysolecithin was associated with normal rates of FFA absorption. Lecithin also reduced taurocholate absorption from the ileum by 30% (p less than 0.05). These data support the idea that lecithin may depress FFA and bile salt absorption from the small intestine in pancreatic insufficiency.

  1. Correlation of regional disease and in vivo PO2 in rat mammary adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, M A; Crawford, D W; Warner, N E; Puffer, H W

    1983-07-01

    A knowledge of the distribution of oxygen tension (PO2) and vascularization in neoplasia has been fundamental to understanding relationships between tumor growth, hypoxia, and therapy. We have combined recessed oxygen microcathode and freeze-substitution techniques to correlate in situ PO2 profiles and morphologic features in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) tumors in rats. Overlying connective tissue of transplanted tumor was exposed by a 1-2 mm incision and a cross-stitch pattern demarcated electrode puncture sites for histologic reference. Three buffered salt solutions (BSS) with different PO2 were each allowed to flow through a well over the tumor where electrodes were placed for calibration. Zero electrode oxygen current was recorded from a buffered yeast-agar mixture of zero torr. PO2 was recorded at 5-mu intervals to approximately 1-2 mm. Atmospheric contamination was eliminated by continuous well flow of BSS, 30 torr. Finally, the tumor and surrounding tissues were quick-frozen in vivo with Freon 22 and liquid nitrogen. The tissue block was freeze-substituted and sectioned. PO2 profiles were superimposed onto correspondingly scaled photomicrographs. A viable periphery with a PO2 range of 50-82 torr and a transition to necrotic areas of PO2, 2-13 torr were observed. This transition was characterized by PO2 gradients within distances of 50-300 mu at variable puncture depths. This technique should be useful in further studies of growth, necrosis, and therapy.

  2. In vivo rat deep brain imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Li, Lei; Zhu, Liren; Hu, Peng; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-03-01

    The brain has been likened to a great stretch of unknown territory consisting of a number of unexplored continents. Small animal brain imaging plays an important role charting that territory. By using 1064 nm illumination from the side, we imaged the full coronal depth of rat brains in vivo. The experiment was performed using a real-time full-ring-array photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) imaging system, which achieved an imaging depth of 11 mm and a 100 μm radial resolution. Because of the fast imaging speed of the full-ring-array PACT system, no animal motion artifact was induced. The frame rate of the system was limited by the laser repetition rate (50 Hz). In addition to anatomical imaging of the blood vessels in the brain, we continuously monitored correlations between the two brain hemispheres in one of the coronal planes. The resting states in the coronal plane were measured before and after stroke ligation surgery at a neck artery.

  3. A kinetic study of the in vivo incorporation of 65Zn into the rat hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.M.; Frazier, J.M.; Goldberg, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Previous autoradiographical studies utilizing 65 Zn demonstrated an apparent concentration of 65 Zn in the mossy fiber boutons of the hippocampus. To examine the speciation of the 65 Zn pool found in this neuronal pathway, we investigated the in vivo incorporation of systemic 65 Zn into rat hippocampus compared with other brain regions. We were especially interested in kinetically assessing the zinc associated with three previously identified cytosolic zinc-binding species found in the hippocampus. The hypothesis that two of these cytosolic zinc-binding species, a metallothionein-like protein and a putative zinc-glutathione complex, may be responsible for the sequestration of zinc in the hippocampus was tested. It was confirmed that the t 1/2 of hippocampal zinc is longer than other brain regions that were studied. Furthermore, we observed that 65 Zn is incorporated into three cytosolic zinc-binding species in the hippocampus as resolved using Ultrogel AcA 34 gel permeation chromatography. One of these species, the putative zinc-glutathione complex, accumulates zinc more slowly than the other species. The data suggest that the putative zinc-glutathione complex may represent an important 65 Zn pool in the hippocampus. This finding is in accordance with out hypothesis that a zinc-binding species, specifically, the putative zinc-glutathione complex, may be responsible for the sequestration of zinc in the hippocampal mossy boutons

  4. Effects of chlorphentermine and phentermine on the pulmonary disposition of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the rat in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, T.; Mehendale, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    This study was designed to examine whether chlorphentermine (CP) affects pulmonary disposition of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in rat in vivo. Further, the effects of CP were compared with those of phentermine (P), the nonchlorinated congener. The right jugular vein and left carotid artery of male Sprague-Dawley rats were cannulated and fresh saline solution containing 150 micrograms indocyanine green and a mixture of labeled and unlabeled 5-HT was injected into the jugular vein, and arterial blood samples were collected for 20 s. In order to compare the effect of CP and P on pulmonary disposition of 5-HT, 2.6 nmol [ 14 C]-5-HT was employed for in vivo single-pass experiments. Each animal was used for 2 in vivo single-pass experiments. After the first experiment, which served as a control, animals received an indicated dose of CP or P, to commence the second ''drug-treated'' in vivo experiment. Pulmonary clearance of 5-HT was inhibited by prior administration of CP (1 mg/kg) by 42%, whereas at the highest dose (20 mg/kg) P inhibited 5-HT clearance by only 25%. Pulmonary accumulation of CP was greater than P at higher doses, and the inhibition of 5-HT clearance correlated with the pulmonary accumulation of these drugs. In addition to the in vivo demonstration of the CP inhibition of pulmonary clearance of 5-HT in the rat, these studies also demonstrate a higher affinity of the lung tissue for CP than for P and a greater propensity for the impairment of pulmonary 5-HT clearance

  5. The TetO rat as a new translational model for type 2 diabetic retinopathy by inducible insulin receptor knockdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhart, Nadine; Crespo-Garcia, Sergio; Haase, Nadine; Golic, Michaela; Skosyrski, Sergej; Rübsam, Anne; Herrspiegel, Christina; Kociok, Norbert; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Dechend, Ralf; Strauss, Olaf; Joussen, Antonia M

    2017-01-01

    Although the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the progression of diabetic retinopathy, its influence therein has not been systematically evaluated. Here we test the suitability of a new translational model of diabetic retinopathy, the TetO rat, for addressing the role of angiotensin-II receptor 1 (AT1) blockade in experimental diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes was induced by tetracycline-inducible small hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of the insulin receptor in rats, generating TetO rats. Systemic treatment consisted of an AT1 blocker (ARB) at the onset of diabetes, following which, 4-5 weeks later the retina was analysed in vivo and ex vivo. Retinal function was assessed by Ganzfeld electroretinography (ERG). Retinal vessels in TetO rats showed differences in vessel calibre, together with gliosis. The total number and the proportion of activated mononuclear phagocytes was increased. TetO rats presented with loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and ERG indicated photoreceptor malfunction. Both the inner and outer blood-retina barriers were affected. The ARB treated group showed reduced gliosis and an overall amelioration of retinal function, alongside RGC recovery, whilst no statistically significant differences in vascular and inflammatory features were detected. The TetO rat represents a promising translational model for the early neurovascular changes associated with type 2 diabetic retinopathy. ARB treatment had an effect on the neuronal component of the retina but not on the vasculature.

  6. Effect of aging on phosphate metabolites of rat brain as revealed by the in vivo and in vitro 31P NMR measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hsiuchih; Chi, Chinwen; Liu, Tsungyun; Liu, Lianghui; Luh, Wenming; Hsieh, Changhuain; Wu, Wenguey

    1991-01-01

    Changes of phosphate metabolism in brains of neonate, weaning and adult rats were compared using both in vivo and in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Ratios of phosphocreatine/nucleoside triphosphate (PCr/NTP) were the same in neonatal brain in both in vivo and in vitro studies, but not in weaning and adult brains. This discrepancy may have resulted from extended cerebral hypoxia due to slowed freezing of the brain by the increased skull thickness and brain mass in the weaning and adult rats. Variations of in vitro extraction condition for this age-related study may lead to systematic errors in the adult rats. Nevertheless, the phosphomonoester/nucleoside triphosphate (PME/NTP) ratios in extracts of brain from neonatal rats were higher than those obtained in vivo. In addition, the glycerophosphorylethanolamine plus glycerophosphorylcholine/nucleoside triphosphate (GPE+GPC/NTP) ratios, which were not measurable in vivo, showed age-dependent increase in extracts of rat brain. Some of the phosphomonoester and phosphodiester molecules in rat brain may be undetectable in in vivo NMR analysis because of their interaction with cellular components. The total in vitro GPE and GPC concentration in brain from neonatal rat was estimated to be 0.34 mmole/g wet tissue

  7. In Vivo Real-Time Imaging of Exogenous HGF-Triggered Cell Migration in Rat Intact Soleus Muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishido, Minenori; Kasuga, Norikatsu

    2012-01-01

    The transplantation of myogenic cells is a potentially effective therapy for muscular dystrophy. However, this therapy has achieved little success because the diffusion of transplanted myogenic cells is limited. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is one of the primary triggers to induce myogenic cell migration in vitro. However, to our knowledge, whether exogenous HGF can trigger the migration of myogenic cells (i.e. satellite cells) in intact skeletal muscles in vivo has not been reported. We previously reported a novel in vivo real-time imaging method in rat skeletal muscles. Therefore, the present study examined the relationship between exogenous HGF treatment and cell migration in rat intact soleus muscles using this imaging method. As a result, it was indicated that the cell migration velocity was enhanced in response to increasing exogenous HGF concentration in skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the expression of MyoD was induced in satellite cells in response to HGF treatment. We first demonstrated in vivo real-time imaging of cell migration triggered by exogenous HGF in intact soleus muscles. The experimental method used in the present study will be a useful tool to understand further the regulatory mechanism of HGF-induced satellite cell migration in skeletal muscles in vivo

  8. An in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of the effects of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on liver lipid metabolism in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, S.; Ciapaite, J.; Wolters, J.C.; van Riel, N.A.; Nicolay, K.; Prompers, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate the effects of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on liver lipid metabolism in rats using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to determine their roles in the development of liver steatosis. Wistar rats received normal chow and either normal drinking water, or

  9. An In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Effects of Caloric and Non-Caloric Sweeteners on Liver Lipid Metabolism in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Sharon; Ciapaite, Jolita; Wolters, Justina C.; van Riel, Natal A.; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate the effects of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on liver lipid metabolism in rats using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to determine their roles in the development of liver steatosis. Wistar rats received normal chow and either normal drinking water, or

  10. In vivo human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell tracking after intra-articular delivery in a rat osteoarthritis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs have shown efficacy in treating osteoarthritis (OA both preclinically and clinically via intra-articular (IA injection. However, understanding the mode of action of the cell therapy has been limited by cell tracking capability and correlation between the pharmacokinetics of the injected cells and the intended pharmacodynamics effect. This study aims to explore methodology and to understand in vivo biodistribution of clinical-grade haMSCs labeled with fluorescent dye and injected into an immunocompetent OA rat model. Methods haMSCs labeled with fluorescent dye were investigated for their proliferation and differentiation capabilities. Labeled cells were used to establish detection threshold of a noninvasive biofluorescent imaging system before the cells (2.5 × 106 were injected into a conventional rat OA model induced by medial meniscectomy for 8 weeks. We attempted to reveal the existence of labeled cells in vivo by imaging and a molecular biomarker approach, and to correlate with the in vivo efficacy and physical presence over a follow-up period up to 10 weeks. Results In vitro proliferation and differentiation of haMSCs were not affected by the labeling of DiD dye. Detection thresholds of the labeled cells in vitro and in vivo were determined to be 104 and 105 cells, respectively. When 2.5 × 106 haMSCs were injected into the joints of a rat OA model, fluorescent signals (or >105 cells lasted for about 10 weeks in the surgical knee joint at the same time as efficacy was observed. Signals in nonsurgical rats only lasted for 4 weeks. The human MSCs were shown to engraft to the rat joint tissues and were proliferative. Human FOXP2 gene was only detected in the knee joint tissue, suggesting limited biodistribution locally to the joints. Conclusions The current study represents the first attempt to correlate cell therapy efficacy on OA with the physical presence

  11. Selective retina therapy (SRT); Selektive Retina-Therapie (SRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, R.; Birngruber, R. [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Biomedizinische Optik; Medizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck GmbH, Luebeck (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) is a new and very gentle laser method developed at the Medical Laser Center Luebeck. It is currently investigated clinically in order to treat retinal disorders associated with a decreased function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). SRT is designed to selectively effect the RPE while sparing the neural retina and the photoreceptors as well as the choroid. Aim of the therapy is the rejuvenation of the RPE in the treated areas, which should ideally lead to a long term metabolic increase at the chorio-retinal junction. In contrast to conventional laser photocoagulation, which is associated with a complete thermal necrosis of the treated site, SRT completely retains full vision. This paper reviews the methods and mechanisms behind selective RPE effects and reports the first clinical results. An online dosimetry technique to visualize the ophthalmoscopically invisible effects is introduced. (orig.)

  12. Effect of in vivo nicotine exposure on chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Kwang; Poet, Torka S.; Smith, Jordan N.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-03-30

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is one of the most studied and widely used broad spectrum organophosphorus (OP) insecticides. The neurotoxicity of CPF results from inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) by its metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon), which subsequently leads to cholinergic hyperstimulation. The routine consumption of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products will modify a number of metabolic and physiological processes which may impact the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of other xenobiotics including pesticides. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of repeated ethanol and nicotine co-exposure on in vivo CPF pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The major CPF metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in blood and urine along with changes in plasma and brain AChE activities were measured in male Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats. Animals were repeatedly treated with either saline or ethanol (1 g/kg/day, po) and nicotine (1 mg/kg/day, sc) in addition to CPF (1 or 5 mg/kg/day, po) for 7 days. Rats were sacrificed at times from 1 to 24 hr post-last dosing of CPF. There were apparent differences in blood TCPy pharmacokinetics following ethanol and nicotine pretreatments in both CPF dose groups, which showed higher TCPy peak concentrations and increased blood TCPy AUC in ethanol and nicotine groups over CPF-only (~1.8- and 3.8-fold at 1 and 5 mg CPF doses, respectively). Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities from both ethanol and nicotine-treated groups showed substantially less inhibition following repeated 5 mg CPF/kg dosing compared to CPF-only controls (96 ± 13 and 66 ± 7% of naïve at 4 hr post-last CPF dosing, respectively). Inhibition of brain AChE activities was minimal in both 1 mg CPF/kg/day dosing groups, but a similar trend indicating less inhibition following ethanol/nicotine pretreatment was apparent. No differences were observed in plasma ChE activities due to the combined alcohol and nicotine treatments. In vitro, CPF

  13. Electrophysiological and neurochemical changes in the rat hippocampus after in vitro and in vivo treatments with cocaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo effects of cocaine in the noradrenergic pathway in the rat hippocampus were examined. Although the blockade of [ 3 H]-norepinephrine-uptake by cocaine has been well-characterized in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, investigations characterizing the electrophysiological effects of cocaine in the central nervous system have been limited. The first part of this thesis examines the relationship between the ability of cocaine to potentiate the electrophysiological response to norepinephrine (NE) and the ability of cocaine to block noradrenergic high affinity uptake in rat hippocampal slices. The second part of this thesis examines the effects of the repeated administration of cocaine on noradrenergic pre- and postsynaptic function and receptors of the rat hippocampus. These studies demonstrate that after repeated administration of cocaine (10 mg/kg/day) for 8 and 14 days there is a 50% decrease in NE high affinity uptake in the rat hippocampus. This was accompanied by a 40% increase in a binding site for NE uptake inhibitors at 14 days. In contrast to these effects, there was no effect on β-adrenergic receptor number or the isoproterenol induced electrophysiological responsiveness in the rat hippocampus. The conclusion of these studies is that the repeated administration of cocaine has a greater effect on presynaptic targets in the noradrenergic system than on postsynaptic neurons

  14. In Vivo MR Imaging of Magnetically Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rat Model of Renal Ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sung Il [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyup [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Cheol; Chung, Se Young; Moon, Woo Kyung; Kim, Hoe Suk [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Sun [Dongguk University International Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Min Hoan [Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Kyu Ri; Sung, Chang Kyu [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    This study was designed to evaluate in vivo MR imaging for the depiction of intraarterially injected superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an experimental rat model of renal ischemia. Left renal ischemia was induced in 12 male Sprague- Dawley rats by use of the catheter lodging method. In vivo MR signal intensity variations depicted on T2*-weighted sequences were evaluated in both the left and right kidneys prior to injection (n = 2), two hours (n = 4), 15 hours (n = 2), 30 hours (n = 2) and 72 hours (n = 2) after injection of SPIO-labeled MSCs in both kidneys. Signal intensity variations were correlated with the number of Prussian blue stain-positive cells as visualized in histological specimens. In an in vivo study, it was determined that there was a significant difference in signal intensity variation for both the left and right cortex (40.8 {+-} 4.12 and 26.4 {+-} 7.92, respectively) and for both the left and right medulla (23.2 {+-} 3.32 and 15.2 {+-} 3.31, respectively) until two hours after injection (p < 0.05). In addition, signal intensity variation in the left renal cortex was well correlated with the number of Prussian blue stain-positive cells per high power field (r = 0.98, p < 0.05). Intraarterial injected SPIO-labeled MSCs in an experimental rat model of renal ischemia can be detected with the use of in vivo MR imaging immediately after injection.

  15. Transmural changes in mast cell density in rat heart after infarct induction in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, W.; Reiters, P. H.; Daemen, M. J.; Smits, J. F.; van der Vusse, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The cardiac distribution of mast cells was investigated after the induction of acute myocardial infarction in the rat. The left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was occluded by ligation in the infarct group, whereas in sham rats only a superficial ligature was placed beside the LAD. Rats of

  16. In vivo determination of steric and electrostatic exclusion of albumin in rat skin and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyenge, Christina C; Tenstad, Olav; Wiig, Helge

    2003-11-01

    In order to estimate the magnitude of electrostatic exclusion provided by the fixed negative charges of the skin and muscle interstitia of rat in vivo we measured the distribution volumes of two differently charged albumin probes within these tissues. An implanted osmotic pump was used to reach and maintain a steady-state extracellular concentration of a mixture containing two iodine-labelled probes: a charged-modified human serum albumin, cHSA (i.e. a positive probe, isoelectirc point (pI) = 7.6) and a native human serum albumin, HSA (i.e. a normally charged, negative probe, pI = 5.0). Steady-state tissue concentrations were achieved after intravenous infusion of probes for 5-7 days. At the end of this period the animals were nephrectomized and a bolus of 51Cr-EDTA was administered for estimating the extracellular volume. Plasma volumes were measured as 5-min distribution volume of 125I-HSA in separate experiments. The steady-state interstitial fluid concentrations of all probes were determined using nylon wicks implanted postmortem. Calculations of labelled probes were made for interstitial fluid volumes (Vi), extravascular albumin distribution volumes (Vav,a) and relative interstitial excluded volume fractions (Vex,a/Vi). We found that the positive probe is excluded from a significantly smaller fraction of the interstitium. Specifically, the average relative albumin exclusion fractions obtained were: 16% and 26% in skeletal muscle and 30% and 40% in skin, for cHSA and HSA, respectively. On average, the fixed negative charges of the interstitium are responsible for about 40% of the total albumin exclusion in skeletal muscle and 25% in the whole skin tissue and thus, contribute significantly to volume exclusion in these tissues.

  17. Poly(anhydride-co-imides): in vivo biocompatibility in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibim, S M; Uhrich, K E; Bronson, R; El-Amin, S F; Langer, R S; Laurencin, C T

    1998-05-01

    The degradation and tissue compatibility characteristics of a novel class of biodegradable poly(anhydride-co-imide) polymers: poly[trimellitylimidoglycine-co-1,6-bis(carboxyphenoxy)hexan e] (TMA-gly: CPH) (in 10:90; 30:70 and 50: 50 molar ratios) and poly[pyromellitylimidoalanine-co-1,6-bis(carboxyphenoxy)hexa ne] (PMA-ala:CPH) (in 10:90 and 30:70 molar ratios) were investigated and compared with control poly(lactic acid/glycolic acid) (PLAGA in 50:50 molar ratio) matrices, a well-characterized biocompatible polymer, in rat subcutaneous tissues for 60 days. Polymers were compression-molded into circular discs of 14 mm x 1 mm in diameter. On post-operative days 7, 14, 28 and 60, histological tissue samples were removed, prepared by fixation and staining, and analyzed by light microscopy. PLAGA matrices produced mild inflammatory reactions and were completely degraded at the end of 60 days, leaving implant tissues that were similar to surgical wounds without implants. TMA-gly:CPH (10:90 and 30:70) matrices produced mild inflammatory reactions by the end of 60 days, similar to those seen with PLAGA. TMA-gly: CPH (50: 50) produced moderate inflammatory reactions characterized by macrophages and edema. PMA-ala:CPH matrices elicited minimal inflammatory reactions that were characterized by fibrous encapsulation by the end of 60 days. In vivo degradation rates of poly(anhydride-co-imides) were similar to PLAGA. Both PMA-ala:CPH and TMA-gly: CPH matrices maintained their shapes and degraded at a constant rate over the period of two months. These polymers, possessing good mechanical properties and tissue compatibility, may be useful in weight-bearing applications in bone.

  18. Effect of In Vivo Nicotine Exposure on Chlorpyrifos Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sookwang; Poet, Torka S.; Smith, Jordan N.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-03-30

    Routine use of tobacco products may modify physiological and metabolic functions, including drug metabolizing enzymes, which may impact the pharmacokinetics of environmental contaminants. Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus (OP) insecticide that is bioactivated to chlorpyrifos-oxon, and manifests its neurotoxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of repeated nicotine exposure on the pharmacokinetics of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and its major metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in blood and urine and also to determine the impact on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in plasma and brain. Animals were exposed to 7-daily doses of either 1 mg nicotine/kg or saline (sc), and to either a single oral dose of 35 mg CPF/kg or a repeated dose of 5 mg CPF/kg/day for 7 days. Groups of rats were then sacrificed at multiple time-points after receiving the last dose of CPF. Repeated nicotine and CPF exposures resulted in enhanced metabolism of CPF to TCPy, as evidenced by increases in the measured TCPy concentration and AUC in blood. However, there was no significant difference in the amount of TCPy (free or total) excreted in the urine. The extent of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition was reduced due to nicotine co-exposure consistent with an increase in CYP450-mediated dearylation (detoxification) versus desulfuration. It was of interest to note that the impact of nicotine co-exposure was experimentally observed only after repeated CPF doses. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model simulations of CPF-oxon concentrations in blood and brain were predicted to be lower in nicotine treated groups, which were simulated by increasing the dearylation Vmax based upon previously conducted in vitro metabolism studies. These results were consistent with the experimental data. The current study demonstrated that repeated nicotine exposure could alter CPF metabolism in vivo, further modulating brain AChE inhibition.

  19. In vivo image of radioiodinated IVDU and IVFRU in HSV-TK gene tranduced hepatocellular carcinoma bearing buffalo rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Sup; Choi, T. H.; Ahn, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, S. J.; Choi, C. W. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    The extent of gene delivery and expression in gene therapy with suicide genes such as herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) is assessed with measurement of selective localization of radioiodinated HSV-tk substrates in HSV-tk expressing tumor. We compared n vitro uptake of {sup 125}I-IVDU, IVFRU and in vivo image of HSV-tk gene tranduced hepatocellular carcinoma model. Using H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(hydrogen peroxide), IVDU and IVFRU was radiolabeled as carrier free form. The uptake of {sup 125}I-IVDU IVFRU was determined with increasing incubation periods in MCA-tk and MCA cell line (1X10{sup 6}cell/flask). The cell harvested and counted after incubation of 15, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 minutes. For estimating accumulation of radiolabelled IVDU, IVFRU in HSV-tk expressing tumor, MCA-tk cells (1 X 10{sup 6}/100 {mu}l) injected intramuscularly into right thigh of buffalo rats. To determine selective localization of radiolabelled IVDU, IVFRU in HSV-tk expressing hepatocellular carcinoma bearing buffalo rats, MCA-tk cells (1X 10{sup 7} cell/100 {mu}l) were injected subcutaneously into both shoulders of buffalo rats. Established tumor mass implanted into liver of buffalo rats using intra-hepatic tumor injection. Two weeks later, {sup 123}I labelled IVDU, IVFRU(7.4 X 10{sup 7}Bq/200 {mu}l) injected intravenously into tail veins of each buffalo rats. Gamma camera used as revealing localization of {sup 123}I-IVDU, IVFRU in MCA-tk cells grafts rats and in vivo image was taken 2 hrs, 24 hrs after injection. radioiodinated IVDU, IVFRU were radiolabeled with {sup 123}I as labeling yield 70%, {sup 125}I as 84%. Two compounds showed minimal uptake in MCA cell line, but in MCA-tk cell line, increased uptake was observed. The ratio of MCA-tk to MCA was up to 116-fold in {sup 125}I-IVDU, up to 37-fold in {sup 125}I-IVFRU at 480 min. The uptake of IVDU was 4 times higher than IVFRU in MCA-tk cells. Gamma camera images of HSV-tk gene tranduced MCA tumor showed accumulation of {sup 123}I

  20. Ex Vivo Gene Therapy Using Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Deliver Growth Factors in the Skeletal Muscle of a Familial ALS Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic protein and molecule delivery to target sites by transplanted human stem cells holds great promise for ex vivo gene therapy. Our group has demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of ex vivo gene therapy targeting the skeletal muscles in a transgenic rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We used human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and genetically modified them to release neuroprotective growth factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Intramuscular growth factor delivery via hMSCs can enhance neuromuscular innervation and motor neuron survival in a rat model of ALS (SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats). Here, we describe the protocol of ex vivo delivery of growth factors via lentiviral vector-mediated genetic modification of hMSCs and hMSC transplantation into the skeletal muscle of a familial ALS rat model.

  1. Towards photovoltaic powered artificial retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Silvestre

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to provide an overview of current and future concepts in the field of retinal prostheses, and is focused on the power supply based on solar energy conversion; we introduce the possibility of using PV minimodules as power supply for a new concept of retinal prostheses: Photovoltaic Powered Artificial Retina (PVAR. Main characteristics of these PV modules are presented showing its potential for this application.

  2. In vivo autoradiographic demonstration of β-adrenergic binding sites in adult rat type II alveolar epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.M.; Sidhu, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    Adult male rats were injected intravenously with the muscarinic binding probe 3 H-Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) or the β-adrenergic probe 3 H-dihydroalprenolol (DHA). Other rats were pre-treated with an intraperitoneal injection of a 500-fold excess of L-isoproterenol prior to the DHA. Light microscopic autoradiography of 0.5 μm sections of lung from the QNB group demonstrated very little labelling even after 6 months of exposure. In constrast, trachealis smooth muscle from these animals contained substantial labelling. Autoradiographs of lung from rats injected with DHA demonstrated labelling which was well localized over alveolar septa and concentrated over the cytoplasm of type II cells. Quantitative analysis of labelling in the DHA groups indicated a significant reduction of labelling in animals treated with L-isoproterenol prior to DHA, in both the alveolar parenchyma in general and over type II cells. The results of this study provide morphologic evidence for the uptake and specific binding of β-adrenergic antagonists by the adult lung in vivo, while failing to demonstrate similar binding of a muscarinic probe. In addition, the results demonstrate specific β-adrenergic receptors on type II cells in vivo and substantiate the view of a direct effect of β-adrenergic agonists on alveolar type II cells

  3. In vivo retention of poloxamer-based in situ hydrogels for vaginal application in mouse and rat models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the in vivo retention capabilities of poloxamer-based in situ hydrogels for vaginal application with nonoxinol-9 as the model drug. Two in situ hydrogel formulations, which contained 18% poloxamer 407 plus 1% poloxamer 188 (GEL1, relative hydrophobic or 6% poloxamer 188 (GEL2, relative hydrophilic, were compared with respect to the rheological properties, in vitro hydrogel erosion and drug release. The vaginal retention capabilities of these hydrogel formulations were further determined in two small animal models, including drug quantitation of vaginal rinsing fluid in mice and isotope tracing with 99mTc in rats. The two formulations exhibited similar phase transition temperatures ranging from 27 to 32 °C. Increasing the content of poloxamer 188 resulted in higher rheological moduli under body temperature, but slightly accelerated hydrogel erosion and drug release. When compared in vivo, GEL1 was eliminated significantly slower in rat vagina than GEL2, while the vaginal retention of these two hydrogel formulations behaved similarly in mice. In conclusion, increases in the hydrophilic content of formulations led to faster hydrogel erosion, drug release and intravaginal elimination. Rats appear to be a better animal model than mice to evaluate the in situ hydrogel for vaginal application.

  4. In vivo detection of c-MET expression in a rat hepatocarcinogenesis model using molecularly targeted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Smith, Nataliya; Tesiram, Yasvir A; Abbott, Andrew; Saunders, Debbie; Blindauer, Rebecca; Herlea, Oana; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea

    2007-01-01

    The multifunctional growth factor scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptor, c-MET, have been implicated in the genesis and malignant progression of numerous human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinomas. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas in the United States has increased noticeably over the past two decades and is listed as the fifth major cancer in men worldwide. In this study, we used a choline-deficient l-amino acid (CDAA)-defined rat hepatocarcinogenesis model to visualize increased in vivo expression of the c-MET antigen in neoplastic lesion formation with the use of a super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-anti-c-MET molecularly targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. SPIO-anti-c-MET was used for the first time to detect overexpression of c-MET in neoplastic nodules and tumors within the livers of CDAA-treated rats, as determined by a decrease in MRI signal intensity and a decrease in regional T(2) values. Specificity for the binding of the molecularly targeted anti-c-MET contrast agent was determined using rat hepatoma (H4-II-E-C3) cell cultures and immunofluorescence microscopic imaging of the targeting agents within neoplastic liver tissue 1 to 2 hours following intravenous administration of SPIO-anti-c-MET and MRI investigation. This method has the ability to visualize in vivo the overexpression of c-MET at early developmental stages of tumor formation.

  5. In Vivo Detection of c-MET Expression in a Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis Model Using Molecularly Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rheal A. Towner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional growth factor scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptor, c-MET, have been implicated in the genesis and malignant progression of numerous human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinomas. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas in the United States has increased noticeably over the past two decades and is listed as the fifth major cancer in men worldwide. In this study, we used a choline-deficient l-amino acid (CDAA-defined rat hepatocarcinogenesis model to visualize increased in vivo expression of the c-MET antigen in neoplastic lesion formation with the use of a super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO–anti-c-MET molecularly targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. SPIO–anti-c-MET was used for the first time to detect overexpression of c-MET in neoplastic nodules and tumors within the livers of CDAA-treated rats, as determined by a decrease in MRI signal intensity and a decrease in regional T2 values. Specificity for the binding of the molecularly targeted anti-c-MET contrast agent was determined using rat hepatoma (H4-II-E-C3 cell cultures and immunofluorescence microscopic imaging of the targeting agents within neoplastic liver tissue 1 to 2 hours following intravenous administration of SPIO–anti-c-MET and MRI investigation. This method has the ability to visualize in vivo the overexpression of c-MET at early developmental stages of tumor formation.

  6. Tissue-specific expression of transfected human insulin genes in pluripotent clonal rat insulinoma lines induced during passage in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, O.D.; Andersen, L.C.; Michelsen, B.; Owerbach, D.; Larsson, L.I.; Lernmark, A.; Steiner, D.F. (Hagedorn Research Laboratory, Gentofte (Denmark))

    1988-09-01

    The pluripotent rat islet tumor cell line MSL-G2 expresses primarily glucagon or cholecystokinin and not insulin in vitro but changes phenotype completely after prolonged in vivo cultivation to yield small-sized hypoglycemic tumors composed almost entirely of insulin-producing beta cells. When a genomic DNA fragment containing the coding and upstream regulatory regions of the human insulin gene was stably transfected into MSL-G2 cells no measurable amounts of insulin or insulin mRNA were detected in vitro. However, successive transplantation of two transfected clones resulted in hypoglycemic tumors that efficiently coexpressed human and rat insulin as determined by human C-peptide-specific immunoreagents. These results demonstrate that cis-acting tissue-specific insulin gene enhancer elements are conserved between rat and human insulin genes. The authors propose that the in vivo differentiation of MSL-G2 cells and transfected subclones into insulin-producing cells reflects processes of natural beta-cell ontogeny leading to insulin gene expression.

  7. Tissue-specific expression of transfected human insulin genes in pluripotent clonal rat insulinoma lines induced during passage in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, O.D.; Andersen, L.C.; Michelsen, B.; Owerbach, D.; Larsson, L.I.; Lernmark, A.; Steiner, D.F.

    1988-01-01

    The pluripotent rat islet tumor cell line MSL-G2 expresses primarily glucagon or cholecystokinin and not insulin in vitro but changes phenotype completely after prolonged in vivo cultivation to yield small-sized hypoglycemic tumors composed almost entirely of insulin-producing beta cells. When a genomic DNA fragment containing the coding and upstream regulatory regions of the human insulin gene was stably transfected into MSL-G2 cells no measurable amounts of insulin or insulin mRNA were detected in vitro. However, successive transplantation of two transfected clones resulted in hypoglycemic tumors that efficiently coexpressed human and rat insulin as determined by human C-peptide-specific immunoreagents. These results demonstrate that cis-acting tissue-specific insulin gene enhancer elements are conserved between rat and human insulin genes. The authors propose that the in vivo differentiation of MSL-G2 cells and transfected subclones into insulin-producing cells reflects processes of natural beta-cell ontogeny leading to insulin gene expression

  8. In vivo MR imaging of nanometer magnetically labeled bone marrow stromal cells transplanted via portal vein in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ping; Wang Jianhua; Yan Zhiping; Hu Meiyu; Xu Pengju; Zhou Meiling; Ya Fuhua; Fan Sheung-tat; Luk John-m

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo magnetic resonance imaging with a conventional 1.5-T system for tracking of intra-portal vein transplantation nanometer magnetically labeled BMSCs in rat liver. Methods: BMSCs were isolated from 5 SD rats bone marrow with the density gradient centrifugation method. Then BMSCs were labeled with nanometer superpara-magnetic iron oxide and transfection agent. Cell labeling efficiency was assessed with determination of the percentage of Peris Prussian blue stain. Then BMSCs transplanted into normal rats' livers via portal vein. The receipts were divided into 5 groups ,including sham control,2 h ,3 d,7 d and 2 w after transplantation. Follow-up serial T 1 WI,T 2 WI and T 2 * -weighted gradient- echo MR imaging were performed at 1.5 T MRI system. MR imaging findings were compared with histology. Results: Cell labeling efficiency was more than 95% by Perls Prussian blue stain. After transplantation of labeled BMSCs via portal vein, liver's had diffuse granular signal intensity appearance in T 2 * WI MRI. Cells were detected for up to 2 w in receipts' liver's. At histologic analysis, signal intensity loss correlated with iron-loaded cells. Conclusion: MR imaging could aid in monitoring of magnetically labeled BMSCs administered via portal vein in vivo. (authors)

  9. X-ray PIV measurement of blood flow in deep vessels of a rat: An in vivo feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-18

    X-ray PIV measurement is a noninvasive approach to measure opaque blood flows. However, it is not easy to measure real pulsatile blood flows in the blood vessels located at deep position of the body, because the surrounding tissues significantly attenuate the contrast of X-ray images. This study investigated the effect of surrounding tissues on X-ray beam attenuation by measuring the velocity fields of blood flows in deep vessels of a live rat. The decrease in image contrast was minimized by employing biocompatible CO2 microbubbles as tracer particles. The maximum measurable velocity of blood flows in the abdominal aorta of a rat model was found through comparative examination between the PIV measurement accuracy and the level of image contrast according to the input flow rate. Furthermore, the feasibility of using X-ray PIV to accurately measure in vivo blood flows was demonstrated by determining the velocity field of blood flows in the inferior vena cava of a rat. This study may serve as a reference in conducting in vivo X-ray PIV measurements of pulsatile blood flows in animal disease models and investigating hemodynamic characteristics and circulatory vascular diseases.

  10. Pituitary and brain D2 receptor density measured in vitro and in vivo in EEDQ treated male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekman, A.; Eriksson, E.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the alkylating compound N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) on dopamine D2 receptor density in rat pituitary and brain was measured using in vitro and in vivo radioligand binding techniques. In the in vitro radioligand binding experiments EEDQ was found to reduce the density (B max ) of [ 3 H]-spiperone binding sites in the striatum by 86% while in the pituitary the corresponding decrease was only 37%. The affinity (K D ) of the remaining striatal and pituitary D2 receptors was not different in EEDQ treated animals as compared to controls. When D2 receptor density was measured in vivo the effect of EEDQ was less pronounced. Thus, in rats given EEDQ the specific binding of either of the two D2 ligands [ 3 H]-raclopride or [ 3 H]-spiperone in striatum and in the limbic forebrain was reduced by 45-62%; moreover, no significant decrease in pituitary D2 receptor density was observed. The data are discussed in relation to the finding that the same dose of EEDQ that failed to influence pituitary D2 receptor density as measured in vivo effectively antagonizes the prolactin decreasing effect of the partial D2 agonist (-)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-n-propyl-piperidine [(-)-3-PPP

  11. Non-invasive imaging and monitoring of rodent retina using simultaneous dual-band optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimalla, Peter; Burkhardt, Anke; Walther, Julia; Hoefer, Aline; Wittig, Dierk; Funk, Richard; Koch, Edmund

    2011-03-01

    Spectral domain dual-band optical coherence tomography for simultaneous imaging of rodent retina in the 0.8 μm and 1.3 μm wavelength region and non-invasive monitoring of the posterior eye microstructure in the field of retinal degeneration research is demonstrated. The system is illuminated by a supercontinuum laser source and allows three-dimensional imaging with high axial resolution better than 3.8 μm and 5.3 μm in tissue at 800 nm and 1250 nm, respectively, for precise retinal thickness measurements. A fan-shaped scanning pattern with the pivot point close to the eye's pupil and a contact lens are applied to obtain optical access to the eye's fundus. First in vivo experiments in a RCS (royal college of surgeons) rat model with gene-related degeneration of the photoreceptor cells show good visibility of the retinal microstructure with sufficient contrast for thickness measurement of individual retinal layers. An enhanced penetration depth at 1250 nm is clearly identifiable revealing sub-choroidal structures that are not visible at 800 nm. Furthermore, additional simultaneous imaging at 1250 nm improves image quality by frequency compounding speckle noise reduction. These results are encouraging for time course studies of the rodent retina concerning its development related to disease progression and treatment response.

  12. Fibroblast-mediated in vivo and in vitro growth promotion of tumorigenic rat thyroid carcinoma cells but not normal Fisher rat thyroid follicular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Ohki; Mitsutake, Norisato; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Nagayama, Yuji

    2009-07-01

    It is known that genetic abnormalities in oncogenes and/or tumor suppressor genes promote carcinogenesis. Numerous recent articles, however, have demonstrated that epithelial-stromal interaction also plays a critical role for initiation and progression of carcinoma cells. Furthermore, ionizing radiation induces alterations in the tissue microenvironments that promote carcinogenesis. There is little or no information on epithelial-stromal interaction in thyroid carcinoma cells. The objective of this study was to determine if epithelial-stromal interaction influenced the growth of thyroid carcinoma cells in vivo and in vitro and to determine if radiation had added or interacting effects. Normal Fisher rat thyroid follicular cells (FRTL5 cells) and tumorigenic rat thyroid carcinoma cells (FRTL-Tc cells) derived from FRTL5 cells were employed. The cells were injected into thyroids or subcutaneously into left flanks of rats alone or in combination with skin-derived fibroblasts. In groups of rats, fibroblasts were irradiated with 0.1 or 4 Gy x-ray 3 days before inoculation. In vitro growth of FRTL-Tc and FRTL-5 cells were evaluated using the fibroblast-conditioned medium and in a co-culture system with fibroblasts. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that FRTL-Tc cells injected intrathyroidally grew faster than those injected subcutaneously, and that admixed fibroblasts enhanced growth of subcutaneous FRTL-Tc tumors, indicating that the intrathyroidal milieu, particularly in the presence of fibroblasts, confer growth-promoting advantage to thyroid carcinoma cells. This in vivo growth-promoting effect of fibroblasts on FRTL-Tc cells was duplicated in the in vitro experiments using the fibroblast-conditioned medium. Thus, our data demonstrate that this effect is mediated by soluble factor(s), is reversible, and is comparable to that of 10% fetal bovine serum. However, normal FRTL5 cells did not respond to the fibroblast-conditioned medium. Furthermore, high- and low

  13. MR angiography, MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopy in-vivo assessment of skeletal muscle ischemia in diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Delli Pizzi

    Full Text Available To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of using magnetic resonance (MR techniques for in-vivo assessing a rat diabetic model of limb ischemia. Unilateral hind limb ischemia was induced by ligation of the iliac-femoral artery in male streptozotocin-treated and non-diabetic control rats. Four weeks after ligation, rats underwent MR Angiography (MRA, T(1-weighted and Short Time Inversion Recovery (STIR sequences and muscle Proton MR Spectroscopy ((1H-MRS on both hind limbs. After MR examinations, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analysis were performed. MRA showed a signal void due to flow discontinuation distal to the artery ligation. T(1-weighted and STIR images showed, respectively, the presence of tissue swelling (p = 0.018 for non-diabetic; p = 0.027 for diabetic rats and signal hyperintensity in tissue affected by occlusion. Mean total creatine/water for the occluded limb was significantly lower than for the non-occluded limbs in both non-diabetic (5.46×10(-4 vs 1.14×10(-3, p = 0.028 and diabetic rats (1.37×10(-4 vs 1.10×10(-3; p = 0.018. MR Imaging and (1H-MRS changes were more pronounced in diabetic than in non-diabetic occluded limbs (p = 0.032. MR findings were confirmed by using histological findings. Combined MR techniques can be used to demonstrate the presence of structural and metabolic changes produced by iliac-femoral artery occlusion in rat diabetic model of limb ischemia.

  14. The ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde inhibits the induction of long-term potentiation in the rat dentate gyrus in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kazuho; Yamaguchi, Shinichi; Sugiura, Minoru; Saito, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Ethanol has been reported to inhibit the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus. However, the correlation between the effects of ethanol in vivo and in vitro remained unclear. In addition, previous works have little considered the possibility that the effect of ethanol is mediated by its metabolites. To solve these problems, we investigated the effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde, the first metabolite in the metabolism of ethanol, on the induction of LTP at medial perforant path-granule cell synapses in the dentate gyrus of anaesthetized rats in vivo.Oral administration of 1 g kg−1 ethanol significantly inhibited the induction of LTP, confirming the effectiveness of ethanol in vivo.A lower dose of ethanol (0.5 g kg−1) failed to inhibit the induction of LTP in intact rats, but significantly inhibited LTP in rats treated with disulfiram, an inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase, demonstrating that LTP is inhibited by acetaldehyde accumulation following ethanol administration.Intravenous injection of acetaldehyde (0.06 g kg−1) significantly inhibited the induction of LTP.The inhibitory effect of acetaldehyde on LTP induction was also observed when it was injected into the cerebroventricules, suggesting that acetaldehyde has a direct effect on the brain. The intracerebroventricular dose of acetaldehyde effective in inhibiting LTP induction (0.1–0.15 mg brain−1) was approximately 10 fold lower than that of ethanol (1.0–1.5 mg brain−1).It is possible that acetaldehyde is partly responsible for memory impairments induced by ethanol intoxication. PMID:10482910

  15. Proteolysis of His-Phe-Arg-Trp-Pro-Gly-Pro in the blood and brain of rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, K V; Nagaev, I Yu; Babakov, V N; Andreeva, L A; Shevchenko, V P; Radilov, A S; Myasoedov, N F

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of the content of His-Phe-Arg-Trp-Pro-Gly-Pro (ACTH (6-9)PGP) and its hydrolysis products in the blood and brain of rats in the case of intranasal administration and intravenous injection of tritiated ACTH(6-9)PGP was studied. The parameters of bioavailability of ACTH(6-9)PGP administered intranasally were higher, indicating certain prospects in the intranasal application in clinical practice. We also found that the factor that determines ACTH(6-9)PGP proteolysis in experiments both in vivo and in vitro is aminopeptidases. The main products of ACTH(6-9)PGP during its metabolism in rats are short peptides and amino acids.

  16. In vivo incorporation of 1-14C-acetate into liver and plasma lipids of postnatally overfed rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, L.; Noack, R.; Borchardt, M.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin-Buch. Forschungszentrum fuer Molekularbiologie und Medizin)

    1982-01-01

    Postnatal overnutrition due to breeding of rats in small nests (4 pups per dam) leads to distinct metabolic changes in later life stages even in conditions of ad libitum feeding. At an age of 5 months rats from small nests differ from those of large nests (14 pups per dam) in a significant higher level of liver triglycerides and cholesterol esters, whereas changes in plasma lipids concern only the increased cholesterol ester fraction. The relative distribution of in vivo incorporated 1- 14 C-acetate into liver lipids shows a higher moiety in the triglyceride fraction of animals from small nests but no changes of the relative distribution of activity among lipid fractions of plasma. These changes of lipid metabolism are discussed in relation to the development of an obese state of postnatally overfed animals. (author)

  17. Monitoring of implanted stem cell migration in vivo: A highly resolved in vivo magnetic resonance imaging investigation of experimental stroke in rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Mathias; Küstermann, Ekkehard; Blunk, James; Wiedermann, Dirk; Trapp, Thorsten; Wecker, Stefan; Föcking, Melanie; Arnold, Heinz; Hescheler, Jürgen; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Schwindt, Wolfram; Bührle, Christian

    2002-01-01

    In vivo monitoring of stem cells after grafting is essential for a better understanding of their migrational dynamics and differentiation processes and of their regeneration potential. Migration of endogenous or grafted stem cells and neurons has been described in vertebrate brain, both under normal conditions from the subventricular zone along the rostral migratory stream and under pathophysiological conditions, such as degeneration or focal cerebral ischemia. Those studies, however, relied on invasive analysis of brain sections in combination with appropriate staining techniques. Here, we demonstrate the observation of cell migration under in vivo conditions, allowing the monitoring of the cell dynamics within individual animals, and for a prolonged time. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, constitutively expressing the GFP, were labeled by a lipofection procedure with a MRI contrast agent and implanted into rat brains. Focal cerebral ischemia had been induced 2 weeks before implantation of ES cells into the healthy, contralateral hemisphere. MRI at 78-μm isotropic spatial resolution permitted the observation of the implanted cells with high contrast against the host tissue, and was confirmed by GFP registration. During 3 weeks, cells migrated along the corpus callosum to the ventricular walls, and massively populated the borderzone of the damaged brain tissue on the hemisphere opposite to the implantation sites. Our results indicate that ES cells have high migrational dynamics, targeted to the cerebral lesion area. The imaging approach is ideally suited for the noninvasive observation of cell migration, engraftment, and morphological differentiation at high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:12444255

  18. Increased in vivo release of neuropeptide S in the amygdala of freely moving rats after local depolarisation and emotional stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Karl; Rjabokon, Alesja; Pape, Hans-Christian; Singewald, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Intracerebral microdialysis in conjunction with a highly sensitive radioimmunoassay was used to study the in vivo release of neuropeptide S (NPS) within the amygdala of freely moving rats. NPS was consistently detected in basolateral amygdala dialysates and the release considerably enhanced in response to local depolarisation as well as exposure to forced swim stress. Thus, our data demonstrate for the first time emotional stress-induced release of NPS in the amygdala supporting a functional role of endogenous NPS in stress/anxiety-related phenomena.

  19. An in vivo MRI Template Set for Morphometry, Tissue Segmentation, and fMRI Localization in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Hernández, Pedro Antonio; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Haga, Risa; Aubert-Vásquez, Eduardo; Ogawa, Takeshi; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Riera, Jorge J.; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, several papers have focused on the construction of highly detailed mouse high field magnetic resonance image (MRI) templates via non-linear registration to unbiased reference spaces, allowing for a variety of neuroimaging applications such as robust morphometric analyses. However, work in rats has only provided medium field MRI averages based on linear registration to biased spaces with the sole purpose of approximate functional MRI (fMRI) localization. This precludes any morphometric analysis in spite of the need of exploring in detail the neuroanatomical substrates of diseases in a recent advent of rat models. In this paper we present a new in vivo rat T2 MRI template set, comprising average images of both intensity and shape, obtained via non-linear registration. Also, unlike previous rat template sets, we include white and gray matter probabilistic segmentations, expanding its use to those applications demanding prior-based tissue segmentation, e.g., statistical parametric mapping (SPM) voxel-based morphometry. We also provide a preliminary digitalization of latest Paxinos and Watson atlas for anatomical and functional interpretations within the cerebral cortex. We confirmed that, like with previous templates, forepaw and hindpaw fMRI activations can be correctly localized in the expected atlas structure. To exemplify the use of our new MRI template set, were reported the volumes of brain tissues and cortical structures and probed their relationships with ontogenetic development. Other in vivo applications in the near future can be tensor-, deformation-, or voxel-based morphometry, morphological connectivity, and diffusion tensor-based anatomical connectivity. Our template set, freely available through the SPM extension website, could be an important tool for future longitudinal and/or functional extensive preclinical studies. PMID:22275894

  20. Origin and characterization of retrograde labeled neurons supplying the rat urethra using fiberoptic confocal fluorescent microscopy in vivo and immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keon-Cheol; Sharma, Seema; Tuttle, Jeremy B; Steers, William D

    2010-10-01

    Autonomic innervation of urethral smooth muscle may influence urinary continence after prostatectomy. It is unclear whether the cavernous nerves carry fibers that influence continence. Using a retrograde axonal tracer combined with real-time in vivo imaging and ex vivo immunohistochemistry we determined the course and type of neurons supplying urethral smooth muscle distal to the prostate in the rat. We injected the retrograde axonal tracers cholera toxin B fragment-Alexa Fluor 488 and Fast Blue in the distal urethral smooth muscle in 10 rats each. Five days later the cavernous nerves and pelvic ganglion were imaged using fiberoptic confocal fluorescence microscopy (cholera toxin B fragment-Alexa Fluor 488) or harvested for immunohistochemistry (Fast Blue). Dual immunofluorescence of Fast Blue neurons with tyrosine hydroxylase or neuronal nitric oxide synthase was done to characterize neurons as noradrenergic or nitrergic. To ascertain whether the cavernous nerves contain fibers to the urethra that originate in the pelvic ganglia we cut the cavernous nerves with their ancillary branches in 3 rats and imaged them for Fast Blue. Fluorescent neurons and axons were detected in cavernous nerves and the pelvic ganglion. Few neurons were seen in rats with cavernous nerve section. Of urethral neurons 53.1% showed neuronal nitric oxide synthase positivity while 40.6% were immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase. About 6.2% of urethral neurons failed to show tyrosine hydroxylase or neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity. Most of the autonomic innervation to the urethra beyond the prostatic apex travels in the cavernous nerves. Many nerves may be parasympathetic based on neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity. Nerves supplying the urethra outside the cavernous nerves may course posterior to the prostate. Along with afferent fibers, tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity expressing neuron fibers, ie noradrenergic nerves, traveling in the cavernous nerves may

  1. An in vivo MRI template set for morphometry, tissue segmentation and fMRI localization in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Antonio Valdes Hernandez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, several papers have focused on the construction of highly detailed mouse high field MRI templates via nonlinear registration to unbiased reference spaces, allowing for a variety of neuroimaging applications such as robust morphometric analyses. However, work in rats has only provided medium field MRI averages based on linear registration to biased spaces with the sole purpose of approximate fMRI localization. This precludes any morphometric analysis in spite of the need of exploring in detail the neuroanatomical substrates of diseases in a recent advent of rat models. In this paper we present a new in vivo rat T2 MRI template set, comprising average images of both intensity and shape, obtained via nonlinear registration. Also, unlike previous rat template sets, we include white and gray matter probabilistic segmentations, expanding its use to those applications demanding prior-based tissue segmentation, e.g. SPM voxel-based morphometry. We also provide a preliminary digitalization of latest Paxinos & Watson atlas for anatomical and functional interpretations within the cerebral cortex. We confirmed that, like with previous templates, forepaw and hindpaw fMRI activations can be correctly localized in the expected atlas structure. To exemplify the use of our new MRI template set, we reported the volumes of brain tissues and cortical structures and probed their relationships with ontogenetic development. Other in vivo applications in the near future can be tensor-, deformation- or voxel-based morphometry, morphological connectivity and diffusion tensor-based anatomical connectivity. Our template set, freely available through the SPM extension website, could be an important tool for future longitudinal and/or functional extensive preclinical studies.

  2. An in vivo MRI Template Set for Morphometry, Tissue Segmentation, and fMRI Localization in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Hernández, Pedro Antonio; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Haga, Risa; Aubert-Vásquez, Eduardo; Ogawa, Takeshi; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Riera, Jorge J; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, several papers have focused on the construction of highly detailed mouse high field magnetic resonance image (MRI) templates via non-linear registration to unbiased reference spaces, allowing for a variety of neuroimaging applications such as robust morphometric analyses. However, work in rats has only provided medium field MRI averages based on linear registration to biased spaces with the sole purpose of approximate functional MRI (fMRI) localization. This precludes any morphometric analysis in spite of the need of exploring in detail the neuroanatomical substrates of diseases in a recent advent of rat models. In this paper we present a new in vivo rat T2 MRI template set, comprising average images of both intensity and shape, obtained via non-linear registration. Also, unlike previous rat template sets, we include white and gray matter probabilistic segmentations, expanding its use to those applications demanding prior-based tissue segmentation, e.g., statistical parametric mapping (SPM) voxel-based morphometry. We also provide a preliminary digitalization of latest Paxinos and Watson atlas for anatomical and functional interpretations within the cerebral cortex. We confirmed that, like with previous templates, forepaw and hindpaw fMRI activations can be correctly localized in the expected atlas structure. To exemplify the use of our new MRI template set, were reported the volumes of brain tissues and cortical structures and probed their relationships with ontogenetic development. Other in vivo applications in the near future can be tensor-, deformation-, or voxel-based morphometry, morphological connectivity, and diffusion tensor-based anatomical connectivity. Our template set, freely available through the SPM extension website, could be an important tool for future longitudinal and/or functional extensive preclinical studies.

  3. Müller glia provide essential tensile strength to the developing retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ryan B.; Randlett, Owen; Oswald, Julia; Yoshimatsu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the cellular basis of tissue integrity in a vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) tissue, we eliminated Müller glial cells (MG) from the zebrafish retina. For well over a century, glial cells have been ascribed a mechanical role in the support of neural tissues, yet this idea has not been specifically tested in vivo. We report here that retinas devoid of MG rip apart, a defect known as retinoschisis. Using atomic force microscopy, we show that retinas without MG have decreased resistance to tensile stress and are softer than controls. Laser ablation of MG processes showed that these cells are under tension in the tissue. Thus, we propose that MG act like springs that hold the neural retina together, finally confirming an active mechanical role of glial cells in the CNS. PMID:26416961

  4. In vivo binding and autoradiographic imaging of (+)-3-[125I]Iodo-MK-801 to the NMDA receptor-channel complex in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.E.; Burns, H.D.; Thorpe, H.H.; Waisi Eng; Ransom, R.; Solomon, H.

    1992-01-01

    Radioiodinated (+)-3-Iodo-MK-801 is a high affinity radioligand for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-channel complex. We have demonstrated in vivo localization in the CNS of rat which is stereoselective and blocked by coinjection of unlabeled MK-801. Autoradiography indicates localization in vivo which is in concordance with in vitro autoradiographic studies. These results indicate that radioiodinated (+)-3-Iodo-MK-801 is a useful probe for in vitro and in vivo autoradiographic studies and suggest that radioligands for the NMDA receptor may be developed which will provide in vivo images of receptor distribution in man. (author)

  5. Nanoemulsion improves the oral bioavailability of baicalin in rats: in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao L

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ling Zhao,1,2 Yumeng Wei,1,2 Yu Huang,1 Bing He,2 Yang Zhou,1 Junjiang Fu31Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City, Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China; 2Drug and Functional Food Research Center, Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City, Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China; 3The Research Center for Preclinical Medicine, Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City, Sichuan Province, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Baicalin is one of the main bioactive flavone glucuronides derived as a medicinal herb from the dried roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, and it is widely used for the treatment of fever, inflammation, and other conditions. Due to baicalin's poor solubility in water, its absolute bioavailability after oral administration is only 2.2%. The objective of this study was to develop a novel baicalin-loaded nanoemulsion to improve the oral bioavailability of baicalin. Based on the result of pseudoternary phase diagram, the nanoemulsion formulation consisting of soy-lecithin, tween-80, polyethylene glycol 400, isopropyl myristate, and water (1:2:1.5:3.75:8.25, w/w was selected for further study. Baicalin-loaded nanoemulsions (BAN-1 and BAN-2 were prepared by internal or external drug addition and in vivo and in vitro evaluations were performed. The results showed that the mean droplet size, polydispersity index, and drug content of BAN-1 and BAN-2 were 91.2 ± 2.36 nm and 89.7 ± 3.05 nm, 0.313 ± 0.002 and 0.265 ± 0.001, and 98.56% ± 0.79% and 99.40% ± 0.51%, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical globules and confirmed droplet size analysis. After dilution 30-fold with water, the solubilization capacity of BAN-1 and BAN-2 did not change. In vitro release results showed sustained-release characteristics. BAN-1 formulation was stable for at least 6 months and was more stable than BAN-2. In rats, the area under the plasma drug concentration

  6. [Lattice degeneration of the retina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, E V; Suetov, A A; Mal'tsev, D S

    2014-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is a clinically important type of peripheral retinal dystrophies due to its participation in the pathogenesis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. In spite of extensive epidemiological, morphological, and clinical data, the question on causes of this particular type of retinal dystrophies currently remains debatable. Existing hypotheses on pathogenesis of retinal structural changes in lattice degeneration explain it to a certain extent. In clinical ophthalmology it is necessary to pay close attention to this kind of degenerations and distinguish between cases requiring preventive treatment and those requiring monitoring.

  7. Lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, N E

    1979-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is the most important of all clinically distinct entities that effect the peripheral fundus and are related to retinal detachment. The purpose of this review is to survey the extensive literature, to evaluate the many diverse opinions on this subject, and to correlate and summarize all the known facts regarding this disease entity. The disease is fully defined and described, both clinically and histologically. Some aspects of the disease are still poorly understood, and some remain controversial, especially in the area of management. For this reason, the indications for treatment are discussed under eight subsections, with a view toward providing practical guidelines for recommendations in management.

  8. In vivo dosimetry of high-dose fractionated irradiation in an experimental set-up with rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortan, L; Van Hecke, H; Van Duyse, B; De Neve, W; De Meerleer, B [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Pattyn, P; Van Renthergem, K [Ghent University (Belgium). Dept. of Surgery

    1995-12-01

    The feasibility to irradiate a limited section of a rat abdomen with well-defined edges was assessed. Because of the relative small volume involved, in vivo dosimetry with TLDs was necessary in providing us information about the accuracy of the irradiation method. Three to five days prior to the start of the radiotherapy treatment, two plastic strips - each containing a TLD-dosimeter (Harshaw TLD10 LiF rods, 1 mm dia x 6 mm) sealed in polyethylene tubing, and a lead bean - were implanted in the rat abdomen. The plastic strips made a closed loop around the bowel, through the mesenterium, and were fixed with a single stitch on the inner abdominal wall. One loop was made in the hepatic area; another was made in the lower abdomen, around the rectosigmoid. Conscious animals were irradiated using a purpose-build plexi-holder, with rear legs immobilised to avoid longitudinal movements. The implanted lead beans enabled us to simulate the rat prior to each radiation session. This way, the radiation field could be set up individually for each rat, in such way that the rectosigmoid area received full dose and the hepatic area received no irradiation dose at all. Irradiation was carried out, using 5 MV photons of a linear accelerator. Fifteen animals per group were irradiated according a conventional (2.0 Gy / fraction; 5 fractions / week) or a hyperfractionated (1.6 Gy / fraction; 2 daily fractions; 5 days / week) schedule, with different total doses. Prior to implantation, TLDs were individually calibrated and checked for stability. After removal from the abdomen . TLDs were tested again for accuracy. TLDs with an unacceptable read-out curve were rejected (about 2 to 4 TLDs per group of 15). The obtained accumulated doses - as determined by TLD read-outs-were comparable to the theoretical doses, indicating that fractionated radiation of small fields, with well defined mark off, in rats is feasible.

  9. In vivo dosimetry of high-dose fractionated irradiation in an experimental set-up with rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortan, L.; Van Hecke, H.; Van Duyse, B.; De Neve, W.; De Meerleer, B.; Pattyn, P.; Van Renthergem, K.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility to irradiate a limited section of a rat abdomen with well-defined edges was assessed. Because of the relative small volume involved, in vivo dosimetry with TLDs was necessary in providing us information about the accuracy of the irradiation method. Three to five days prior to the start of the radiotherapy treatment, two plastic strips - each containing a TLD-dosimeter (Harshaw TLD10 LiF rods, 1 mm dia x 6 mm) sealed in polyethylene tubing, and a lead bean - were implanted in the rat abdomen. The plastic strips made a closed loop around the bowel, through the mesenterium, and were fixed with a single stitch on the inner abdominal wall. One loop was made in the hepatic area; another was made in the lower abdomen, around the rectosigmoid. Conscious animals were irradiated using a purpose-build plexi-holder, with rear legs immobilised to avoid longitudinal movements. The implanted lead beans enabled us to simulate the rat prior to each radiation session. This way, the radiation field could be set up individually for each rat, in such way that the rectosigmoid area received full dose and the hepatic area received no irradiation dose at all. Irradiation was carried out, using 5 MV photons of a linear accelerator. Fifteen animals per group were irradiated according a conventional (2.0 Gy / fraction; 5 fractions / week) or a hyperfractionated (1.6 Gy / fraction; 2 daily fractions; 5 days / week) schedule, with different total doses. Prior to implantation, TLDs were individually calibrated and checked for stability. After removal from the abdomen . TLDs were tested again for accuracy. TLDs with an unacceptable read-out curve were rejected (about 2 to 4 TLDs per group of 15). The obtained accumulated doses - as determined by TLD read-outs-were comparable to the theoretical doses, indicating that fractionated radiation of small fields, with well defined mark off, in rats is feasible

  10. Vasomotor function in rat arteries after ex vivo and intragastric exposure to food-grade titanium dioxide and vegetable carbon particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ditte Marie; Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Sheykhzade, Majid

    2018-01-01

    -grade particle exposure on vasomotor function and systemic oxidative stress in an ex vivo study and intragastrically exposed rats.Methods: In an ex vivo study, aorta rings from naive Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed for 30 min to food-grade TiO2 (E171), benchmark TiO2 (Aeroxide P25), food-grade vegetable carbon...... (E153) or benchmark carbon black (Printex 90). Subsequently, the vasomotor function was assessed in wire myographs. In an in vivo study, lean Zucker rats were exposed intragastrically once a week for 10 weeks to vehicle, E171 or E153. Doses were comparable to human daily intake. Vasomotor function...... no differences between groups.Conclusion: Gastrointestinal tract exposure to E171 and E153 was associated with modest albeit statistically significant alterations in the vasocontraction and vasorelaxation responses. Direct particle exposure to aorta rings elicited a similar type of response. The vasomotor...

  11. Mechanical stress-induced apoptosis of nucleus pulposus cells: an in vitro and in vivo rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Jie; Wu, Lien-Chen; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Chen, Ming-Hong; Sun, Man-Ger; Tsuang, Yang-Hwei

    2014-03-01

    Un-physiological loads play an important role in the degenerative process of inter-vertebral discs (IVD). In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo rat model to investigate the mechanism of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells apoptosis induced by mechanical stress. Static compressive load to IVDs of rat tails was used as the in vivo model. For the in vitro model, NP cells were tested under the physiological and un-physiological loading. For histological examination, apoptotic index study, and apoptotic gene expression, we also selected cytokines [bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/7, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)] to be analyzed. Under mechanical loading, cellular density was significantly decreased, but there was an increase of TUNEL positive cells and apoptosis index. In a dose-dependent manner; the necrosis became apparent in the un-physiologic strain. The selected cytokines (BMP-2/7, IGF-1, PDGF) can significantly reduce the percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells. We conclude that the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway plays an important role in the compressive load-induced apoptosis of NP cells. Combination therapy reducing the mechanical load and selected cytokines (BMP-2/7, IGF-1 and PDGF) may have considerable promise in the treatment of spine disc degeneration.

  12. Acute and Subacute Toxicity In Vivo of Thermal-Sprayed Silver Containing Hydroxyapatite Coating in Rat Tibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Masatsugu; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Ando, Yoshiki; Eto, Shuichi; Akiyama, Takayuki; Yonekura, Yutaka; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    To reduce the incidence of implant-associated infection, we previously developed a novel coating technology using hydroxyapatite (HA) containing silver (Ag). This study examined in vivo acute and subacute toxicity associated with the Ag-HA coating in rat tibiae. Ten-week-old rats received implantation of HA-, 2% Ag-HA-, or 50% Ag-HA-coated titanium rods. Concentrations of silver in serum, brain, liver, kidneys, and spleen were measured in the acute phase (2–4 days after treatment) and subacute phase (4–12 weeks after treatment). Biochemical and histological examinations of those organs were also performed. Mean serum silver concentration peaked in the acute phase and then gradually decreased. Mean silver concentrations in all examined organs from the 2% Ag-HA coating groups showed no significant differences compared with the HA coating group. No significant differences in mean levels of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine, or blood urea nitrogen were seen between the three groups and controls. Histological examinations of all organs revealed no abnormal pathologic findings. No acute or subacute toxicity was seen in vivo for 2% Ag-HA coating or HA coating. Ag-HA coatings on implants may represent biologically safe antibacterial biomaterials and may be of value for reducing surgical-site infections related to implantation. PMID:24779019

  13. Nicotine affects rat Leydig cell function in vivo and vitro via down-regulating some key steroidogenic enzyme expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoling; Wang, Huang; Wu, Xiaolong; Chen, Xianwu; Chen, Yong; Guo, Jingjing; Li, Xiaoheng; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2017-12-01

    Nicotine is consumed largely as a component of cigarettes and has a potential effect on pubertal development of Leydig cells in males. To investigate its effects, 49-day-old male Sprague Dawley rats received intraperitoneal injections of nicotine (0.5 or 1 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks and immature Leydig cells were isolated from the testes of 35-day-old rats and treated with nicotine (0.05-50 μM). Serum hormones, Leydig cell number and related gene expression levels after in vivo treatment were determined and medium androgen levels were measured and cell cycle, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential (△Ψm), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of Leydig cells after in vitro treatment were measured. In vivo exposure to nicotine lowered serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, and testosterone levels and reduced Leydig cell number and gene expression levels. Nicotine in vitro inhibited androgen production in Leydig cells by downregulating the expression levels of P450 cholesterol side cleavage enzyme, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, and steroidogenic factor 1 at different concentration ranges. In conclusion, nicotine disrupts Leydig cell steroidogenesis during puberty possibly via down-regulating some key steroidogenic enzyme expressions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Excessive Activation Inhibited Fetal Rat Lung Development In Vivo and In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengchang Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intrauterine hypoxia is a common cause of fetal growth and lung development restriction. Although N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs are distributed in the postnatal lung and play a role in lung injury, little is known about NMDAR’s expression and role in fetal lung development. Methods. Real-time PCR and western blotting analysis were performed to detect NMDARs between embryonic days (E 15.5 and E21.5 in fetal rat lungs. NMDAR antagonist MK-801’s influence on intrauterine hypoxia-induced retardation of fetal lung development was tested in vivo, and NMDA’s direct effect on fetal lung development was observed using fetal lung organ culture in vitro. Results. All seven NMDARs are expressed in fetal rat lungs. Intrauterine hypoxia upregulated NMDARs expression in fetal lungs and decreased fetal body weight, lung weight, lung-weight-to-body-weight ratio, and radial alveolar count, whereas MK-801 alleviated this damage in vivo. In vitro experiments showed that NMDA decreased saccular circumference and area per unit and downregulated thyroid transcription factor-1 and surfactant protein-C mRNA expression. Conclusions. The excessive activation of NMDARs contributed to hypoxia-induced fetal lung development retardation and appropriate blockade of NMDAR might be a novel therapeutic strategy for minimizing the negative outcomes of prenatal hypoxia on lung development.

  15. Parallelogram approach using rat-human In vitro and rat in vivo toxicogenomics predicts acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienhuis, A.S.; Poll, M.C.G. van de; Wortelboer, H.; Herwijnen, M. van; Gottschalk, R.; Jong, C.H.C. de; Boorsma, A.; Paules, R.S.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Stierum, R.H.; Delft, J.H.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The frequent use of rodent hepatic in vitro systems in pharmacological and toxicological investigations challenges extrapolation of in vitro results to the situation in vivo and interspecies extrapolation from rodents to humans. The toxicogenomics approach may aid in evaluating relevance of these

  16. In vivo effects of Faizol Ubat Batuk, a herbal product on aminopyrine metabolism in rat hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas Hj Hussin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicines, in particular herbal products, have been used abundantly over the years in curing several diseases. Pharmacological interactions of herbal products with modern drugs, however, remain to some extent unknown. Herein, we examined whether co-administration of Faizol Ubat Batuk (FUB, a mixture of aqueous extract of different plants, modifies the metabolism of aminopyrine, a conventional analgesic drug, in rat liver. We used rat hepatocytes outfitted by collagenase perfusion technique. Determination of aminopyrine n-demethylase activity was performed using the Nash colorimetric method, by measuring the amount of formaldehyde produced. Compared to control treatment, FUB significantly increased the hepatic metabolism of aminopyrine in healthy adult male rats. In contrast, the hepatic metabolism of aminopyrine in adult female rats was decreased. Besides, a biphasic effect in n-demethylase activity was observed in young male rats treated with FUB. In a subsequent experiment, FUB did not change the metabolism of aminopyrine in streptozotocin (STZ-diabetic adult male rats. In conclusion, administration of FUB could affect phase I aminopyrine metabolism in rat heptocytes. In addition, the effects of FUB on hepatic n-demethylase activity were gender and disease dependent.

  17. Intermittent fasting modulation of the diabetic syndrome in sand rats. II. In vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkacemi, Louiza; Selselet-Attou, Ghalem; Louchami, Karim; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J

    2010-11-01

    This study deals with the effects of daily intermittent fasting for 15 h upon the development of diabetes in sand rats exposed to a hypercaloric diet. The same pattern of daily intermittent fasting was imposed on sand rats maintained on a purely vegetal diet (control animals). Over the last 30 days of the present experiments, non-fasting animals gained weight, whilst intermittently fasting sand rats lost weight. In this respect, there was no significant difference between control animals and either diabetic or non-diabetic sand rats exposed to the hypercaloric diet. The postprandial glycemia remained fairly stable in the control animals. During a 3-week transition period from a purely vegetal to a hypercaloric diet, the post-prandial glycemia increased by 5.95 ± 1.26 mM (n=6) in diabetic sand rats, as distinct from an increase of only 0.45 ± 0.56 mM (n=6) in the non-diabetic animals. During the intermittent fasting period, the postprandial glycemia decreased significantly in the diabetic animals, but not so in the non-diabetic sand rats. Before the switch in food intake, the peak glycemia at the 30th min of an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test was already higher in the diabetic than non-diabetic rats. In both the non-diabetic and diabetic sand rats, intermittent fasting prevented the progressive deterioration of glucose tolerance otherwise observed in non-fasting animals. These findings reveal that, at least in sand rats, intermittent daily fasting prevents the progressive deterioration of glucose tolerance otherwise taking place when these animals are exposed to a hypercaloric diet.

  18. Induction of cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1A2 suppresses formation of DNA adducts by carcinogenic aristolochic acid I in rats in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dračínská, Helena; Bárta, František; Levová, Kateřina; Hudecová, Alena; Moserová, Michaela; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Kopka, Klaus; Frei, Eva; Arlt, Volker M.; Stiborová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation and reduction of aristolochic acid I (AAI) dictate its (geno)toxicity in vivo. • Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1A2 are induced in rats treated with Sudan I and AAI. • Induced CYP1A enzyme activity resulted in decreased AAI-DNA adduct levels in vivo. • CYP1A1 and 1A2 mainly detoxify AAI and attenuate its genotoxicity in vivo. - Abstract: Aristolochic acid I (AAI) is a natural plant alkaloid causing aristolochic acid nephropathy, Balkan endemic nephropathy and their associated urothelial malignancies. One of the most efficient enzymes reductively activating AAI to species forming AAI-DNA adducts is cytosolic NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1. AAI is also either reductively activated or oxidatively detoxified to 8-hydroxyaristolochic acid (AAIa) by microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1A2. Here, we investigated which of these two opposing CYP1A1/2-catalyzed reactions prevails in AAI metabolism in vivo. The formation of AAI-DNA adducts was analyzed in liver, kidney and lung of rats treated with AAI, Sudan I, a potent inducer of CYP1A1/2, or AAI after pretreatment with Sudan I. Compared to rats treated with AAI alone, levels of AAI-DNA adducts determined by the 32 P-postlabeling method were lower in liver, kidney and lung of rats treated with AAI after Sudan I. The induction of CYP1A1/2 by Sudan I increased AAI detoxification to its O-demethylated metabolite AAIa, thereby reducing the actual amount of AAI available for reductive activation. This subsequently resulted in lower AAI-DNA adduct levels in the rat in vivo. Our results demonstrate that CYP1A1/2-mediated oxidative detoxification of AAI is the predominant role of these enzymes in rats in vivo, thereby suppressing levels of AAI-DNA adducts.

  19. Temporal resolution of misfolded prion protein transport, accumulation, glial activation, and neuronal death in the retinas of mice inoculated with scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, there is a lack of pathologic landmarks to describe the progression of prion disease in vivo. The goal of this work was to determine the temporal relationship between the transport of misfolded prion protein from the brain to the retina, the accumulation of PrPSc in the retina, the respon...

  20. Administration of exercise-conditioned plasma alters muscle catalase kinetics in rat: An argument for in vivo-like Km instead of in vitro-like Vmax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristidis S. Veskoukis

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Maximal velocity (Vmax is a well established biomarker for the assessment of tissue redox status. There is scarce evidence, though, that it does not probably reflect sufficiently in vivo tissue redox profile. Instead, the Michaelis constant (Km could more adequately image tissue oxidative stress and, thus, be a more physiologically relevant redox biomarker. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to side-by-side compare Vmax and Km of an antioxidant enzyme after implementing an in vivo set up that induces alterations in tissue redox status. Forty rats were divided into two groups including rats injected with blood plasma originating from rats that had previously swam until exhaustion and rats injected with blood plasma originating from sedentary rats. Tail-vein injections were performed daily for 21 days. Catalase Vmax and Km measured in gastrocnemius muscle were increased after administration of the exercise-conditioned plasma, denoting enhancement of the enzyme activity but impairment of its affinity for the substrate, respectively. These alterations are potential adaptations stimulated by the administered plasma pointing out that blood is an active fluid capable of regulating tissue homeostasis. Our findings suggest that Km adequately reflects in vivo modifications of skeletal muscle catalase and seems to surpass Vmax regarding its physiological relevance and biological interpretation. In conclusion, Km can be regarded as an in vivo-like biomarker that satisfactorily images the intracellular environment, as compared to Vmax that could be aptly parallelized with a biomarker that describes tissue oxidative stress in an in vitro manner.

  1. An acute rat in vivo screening model to predict compounds that alter blood glucose and/or insulin regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brott, David A; Diamond, Melody; Campbell, Pam; Zuvich, Andy; Cheatham, Letitia; Bentley, Patricia; Gorko, Mary Ann; Fikes, James; Saye, JoAnne

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced glucose dysregulation and insulin resistance have been associated with weight gain and potential induction and/or exacerbation of diabetes mellitus in the clinic suggesting they may be safety biomarkers when developing antipsychotics. Glucose and insulin have also been suggested as potential efficacy biomarkers for some oncology compounds. The objective of this study was to qualify a medium throughput rat in vivo acute Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test (IVGTT) for predicting compounds that will induce altered blood glucose and/or insulin levels. Acute and sub-chronic studies were performed to qualify an acute IVGTT model. Double cannulated male rats (Han-Wistar and Sprague-Dawley) were administered vehicle, olanzapine, aripiprazole or other compounds at t=-44min for acute studies and at time=-44min on the last day of dosing for sub-chronic studies, treated with dextrose (time=0min; i.v.) and blood collected using an automated Culex® system for glucose and insulin analysis (time=-45, -1, 2, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150 and 180min). Olanzapine significantly increased glucose and insulin area under the curve (AUC) values while aripiprazole AUC values were similar to control, in both acute and sub-chronic studies. All atypical antipsychotics evaluated were consistent with literature references of clinical weight gain. As efficacy biomarkers, insulin AUC but not glucose AUC values were increased with a compound known to have insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) activity, compared to control treatment. These studies qualified the medium throughput acute IVGTT model to more quickly screen compounds for 1) safety - the potential to elicit glucose dysregulation and/or insulin resistance and 2) efficacy - as a surrogate for compounds affecting the glucose and/or insulin regulatory pathways. These data demonstrate that the same in vivo rat model and assays can be used to predict both clinical safety and efficacy of compounds. © 2013.

  2. Hypotensive effect of aqueous extract of Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae) in rats: an in vivo and in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soncini, Roseli; Santiago, Michael B; Orlandi, Lidiane; Moraes, Gabriel O I; Peloso, André Luiz M; dos Santos, Marcelo H; Alves-da-Silva, Geraldo; Paffaro, Valdemar A; Bento, Antonio C; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2011-01-27

    Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae) leaves are used in Brazilian traditional medicine to treat hypertension. This study was conducted to evaluate the hypotensive effect of the aqueous extract of Averrhoa carambola (AEAc) and its underlying mechanisms in the isolated rat aorta. The effect of AEAc on the mean arterial pressure (MAP) was determined in vivo in anesthetized rats. In vitro, thoracic aortic rings were isolated and suspended in organ baths, and the effects of AEAc were studied by means of isometric tension recording experiments. In HPLC analysis, the fingerprint chromatogram of AEAc was established. In normotensive rats, AEAc (12.5-50.0 mg/kg, i.v.) induced dose-dependent hypotension. In vitro, AEAc caused a depression in the E(max) response to phenylephrine without a change in sensibility. Also, in a depolarized Ca(2+)-free medium, AEAc inhibited CaCl(2)-induced contractions and caused a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the response curves, indicating that AEAc inhibited the contractile mechanisms involving extracellular Ca(2+) influx. These results demonstrate the hypotensive effects of AEAc, and these effects may, in part, be due to the inhibition of Ca(2+), which supports previous claims of its traditional use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of the profibrinolytic effect of an inhibitory anti-rat TAFI nanobody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, Maarten L V; Zatloukalova, Monika; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Muyldermans, Serge; Gils, Ann; Declerck, Paul J

    2014-05-05

    One of the main disadvantages of current t-PA thrombolytic treatment is the increased bleeding risk. Upon activation, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) is a very powerful antifibrinolytic enzyme. Therefore, co-administration of a TAFI inhibitor during thrombolysis could reduce the required t-PA dose without compromising the thrombolytic efficacy. In this study we generated and characterised a nanobody that is inhibitory towards rat TAFI and evaluated its profibrinolytic property in vitro and in vivo. Nanobody VHH-rTAFI-i81 inhibits (at a 16-fold molar ratio nanobody over TAFI) the thrombin/thrombomodulin (T/TM)-mediated activation of rat TAFI (rTAFI) by 83 ± 1.8% with an IC50 of 0.46 (molar ratio nanobody over TAFI). The affinity (KA) of VHH-rTAFI-i81 for rTAFI, as determined by surface plasmon resonance (Biacore®), is 2.5 ± 0.2 x 10(10) M(-1) and illustrates a very strong binding. In an in vitro clot lysis assay, administration of VHH-rTAFI-i81 strongly enhances the degree of lysis and reduces time to reach full lysis of t-PA-mediated clot lysis. Epitope mapping discloses that Lys392 is of primary importance for the nanobody/rTAFI interaction besides minor contributions of Tyr175 and Glu183. In vivo application of VHH-rTAFI-i81 in a tissue factor-induced mouse thromboembolism model significantly decreases fibrin deposition in the lungs in the absence of exogenous administered t-PA. Nanobody VHH-rTAFI-i81 is a very potent inhibitor of T/TM-mediated TAFI activation. Co-administration of this nanobody and t-PA enhances the fibrinolytic efficacy. In an in vivo mouse thromboembolism model, VHH-rTAFI-i81 reduces fibrin deposition in the lungs.

  4. The retina of Spalax ehrenbergi: novel histologic features supportive of a modified photosensory role.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cernuda-Cernuda, R.; Grip, W.J. de; Cooper, H.M.; Nevo, E.; Garcia-Fernandez, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The retina of the blind mole rat Spalax ehrenbergi was compared with other vertebrate photosensitive organs in an attempt to correlate its histologic organization with a presumptive nonvisual photoreceptor role. METHODS: The eyes of eight adult animals were analyzed by light and electron

  5. Neural Responses to Injury: Prevention, Protection and Repair; Volume 7: Role Growth Factors and Cell Signaling in the Response of Brain and Retina to Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bazan, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    ...: Prevention, Protection, and Repair, Subproject: Role of Growth Factors and Cell Signaling in the Response of Brain and Retina to Injury, are as follows: Species Rat(Albino Wistar), Number Allowed...

  6. Acetylcholine receptors in the human retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, J.B.; Hollyfield, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence for a population of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in the human retina is presented. The authors have used the irreversible ligand 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard ( 3 H-PrBCM) to label muscarinic receptors. 3 H- or 125 I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTx) was used to label putative nicotinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors are apparently present in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Autoradiographic grain densities are reduced in the presence of saturating concentrations of atropine, quinuclidinyl benzilate or scopolamine; this indicates that 3 H-PrBCM binding is specific for a population of muscarinic receptors in the human retina. Binding sites for radiolabeled alpha-BTx are found predominantly in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Grain densities are reduced in the presence of d-tubocurarine, indicating that alpha-BTx may bind to a pharmacologically relevant nicotinic ACh receptor. This study provides evidence for cholinergic neurotransmission in the human retina

  7. In vivo assessment of the impact of efflux transporter on oral drug absorption using portal vein-cannulated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoshiki; Konno, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Takashi; Nagai, Mika; Taguchi, Takayuki; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shinji

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of intestinal efflux transporters on the in vivo oral absorption process. Three model drugs-fexofenadine (FEX), sulfasalazine (SASP), and topotecan (TPT)-were selected as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and P-gp and BCRP substrates, respectively. The drugs were orally administered to portal vein-cannulated rats after pretreatment with zosuquidar (ZSQ), P-gp inhibitor, and/or Ko143, BCRP inhibitor. Intestinal availability (Fa·Fg) of the drugs was calculated from the difference between portal and systemic plasma concentrations. When rats were orally pretreated with ZSQ, Fa·Fg of FEX increased 4-fold and systemic clearance decreased to 75% of the control. In contrast, intravenous pretreatment with ZSQ did not affect Fa·Fg of FEX, although systemic clearance decreased significantly. These data clearly show that the method presented herein using portal vein-cannulated rats can evaluate the effects of intestinal transporters on Fa·Fg of drugs independently of variable systemic clearance. In addition, it was revealed that 71% of FEX taken up into enterocytes underwent selective efflux via P-gp to the apical surface, while 79% of SASP was effluxed by Bcrp. In the case of TPT, both transporters were involved in its oral absorption. Quantitative analysis indicated a 3.5-fold higher contribution from Bcrp than P-gp. In conclusion, the use of portal vein-cannulated rats enabled the assessment of the impact of efflux transporters on intestinal absorption of model drugs. This experimental system is useful for clarifying the cause of low bioavailability of various drugs.

  8. Water extracts of cabbage and kale inhibit ex vivo H2O2-induced DNA damage but not rat hepatocarcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Horst

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemopreventive potential of water extracts of the Brassica vegetables cabbage and kale was evaluated by administering their aqueous extracts in drinking water ad libitum to Wistar rats submitted to Ito’s hepatocarcinogenesis model (CB group and K group, respectively - 14 rats per group. Animals submitted to this same model and treated with water were used as controls (W group - 15 rats. Treatment with the vegetable extracts did not inhibit (P > 0.05 placental glutathione S-transferase-positive preneoplastic lesions (PNL. The number of apoptotic bodies did not differ (P > 0.05 among the experimental groups. Ex vivo hydrogen peroxide treatment of rat livers resulted in lower (P < 0.05 DNA strand breakage in cabbage- (107.6 ± 7.8 µm and kale- (110.8 ± 10.0 µm treated animals compared with control (120.9 ± 12.7 µm, as evaluated by the single cell gel (comet assay. Treatment with cabbage (2 ± 0.3 µg/g or kale (4 ± 0.2 µg/g resulted in increased (P < 0.05 hepatic lutein concentration compared with control (0.5 ± 0.07 µg/g. Despite the absence of inhibitory effects of cabbage and kale aqueous extracts on PNL, these Brassica vegetables presented protection against DNA damage, an effect possibly related to increased hepatic lutein concentrations. However, it must be pointed out that the cause-effect relationship between lutein levels and protection is hypothetical and remains to be demonstrated.

  9. Further assessment of Monkeypox Virus infection in Gambian pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) using in vivo bioluminescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falendysz, Elizabeth; Lopera, Juan G.; Faye Lorenzsonn,; Salzer, Johanna S.; Hutson, Christina L.; Doty, Jeffrey; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia; Carroll, Darin S.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox is a zoonosis clinically similar to smallpox in humans. Recent evidence has shown a potential risk of increased incidence in central Africa. Despite attempts to isolate the virus from wild rodents and other small mammals, no reservoir host has been identified. In 2003,Monkeypox virus (MPXV) was accidentally introduced into the U.S. via the pet trade and was associated with the Gambian pouched rat (Cricetomys gambianus). Therefore, we investigated the potential reservoir competence of the Gambian pouched rat for MPXV by utilizing a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods. We inoculated three animals by the intradermal route and three animals by the intranasal route, with one mock-infected control for each route. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) was used to track replicating virus in infected animals and virological assays (e.g. real time PCR, cell culture) were used to determine viral load in blood, urine, ocular, nasal, oral, and rectal swabs. Intradermal inoculation resulted in clinical signs of monkeypox infection in two of three animals. One severely ill animal was euthanized and the other affected animal recovered. In contrast, intranasal inoculation resulted in subclinical infection in all three animals. All animals, regardless of apparent or inapparent infection, shed virus in oral and nasal secretions. Additionally, BLI identified viral replication in the skin without grossly visible lesions. These results suggest that Gambian pouched rats may play an important role in transmission of the virus to humans, as they are hunted for consumption and it is possible for MPXV-infected pouched rats to shed infectious virus without displaying overt clinical signs.

  10. In vivo treatment with diphenyl ditelluride induces neurodegeneration in striatum of young rats: Implications of MAPK and Akt pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimfarth, Luana; Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Andrade, Cláudia; Pettenuzzo, Letícia; Guma, Fátima T. Costa Rodrigues; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Batista Teixeira da Rocha, João [Departamento de Química, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, RS Brazil (Brazil); Pessoa-Pureur, Regina, E-mail: rpureur@ufrgs.br [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    In the present report 15 day-old Wistar rats were injected with 0.3 μmol of diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe){sub 2}/kg body weight and parameters of neurodegeneration were analyzed in slices from striatum 6 days afterwards. We found hyperphosphorylation of intermediate filament (IF) proteins from astrocyte (glial fibrillary acidic protein—GFAP and vimentin) and from neuron (low-, medium- and high molecular weight neurofilament subunits: NF-L, NF-M and NF-H, respectively) and increased MAPK (Erk, JNK and p38MAPK) as well as PKA activities. The treatment induced reactive astrogliosis in the striatum, evidenced by increased GFAP and vimentin immunocontent as well as their mRNA overexpression. Also, (PhTe){sub 2} significantly increased the propidium iodide (PI) positive cells in NeuN positive population without altering PI incorporation into GFAP positive cells, indicating that in vivo exposure to (PhTe){sub 2} provoked neuronal damage. Immunohistochemistry showed a dramatic increase of GFAP staining characteristic of reactive astrogliosis. Moreover, increased caspase 3 in (PhTe){sub 2} treated striatal slices suggested apoptotic cell death. (PhTe){sub 2} exposure decreased Akt immunoreactivity, however phospho-GSK-3-β (Ser9) was unaltered, suggesting that this kinase is not directly implicated in the neurotoxicity of this compound. Therefore, the present results shed light into the mechanisms of (PhTe){sub 2}-induced neurodegeneration in rat striatum, evidencing a critical role for the MAPK and Akt signaling pathways and disruption of cytoskeletal homeostasis, which could be related with apoptotic neuronal death and astrogliosis. -- Highlights: ► Diphenyl ditelluride causes apoptotic neuronal death in the striatum of young rats. ► Diphenyl ditelluride causes reactive astrogliosis in the striatum of rats. ► Diphenyl ditelluride disrupts the homeostasis of the cytoskeleton of the striatum. ► The actions of diphenyl ditelluride are mediated by MAPK and Akt

  11. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha release from rat pulmonary leukocytes exposed to ultrafine cobalt: in vivo and in vitro studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qunwei; Kusaka, Yukinori; Sato, Kazuhiro; Wang Deweng; Donaldson, Kenneth

    1999-01-01

    Ultrafine cobalt (Uf-Co), one of the new category of ultrafine particles, is generated in some industrial situations and it also exists in environmental particles. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of rat pulmonary leukocytes to release tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) after exposure to Uf-Co in vivo and in vitro. Rats were intratracheally instilled with 1 mg of Uf-Co, and then wet lung weight and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BASF) profile were analysed 1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days later. The effects of Uf-Co on indices that can be presumed to reflect epithelial injury and permeability (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total protein (TP)) were increased throughout the 30 day post-exposure period. Furthermore, at 3 days after exposure, leukocytes were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). After 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours of incubation, TNF-alpha in supernatants were determined by ELISA method. The results showed that TNF-alpha secretion by activated leukocytes from rats instilled with Uf-Co was significantly higher than that of the controls. BAL leucocytes from the lung of exposed rats revealed time-and dose-related increases in TNF-alpha release. In conclusion, our results reveal, for the first time to our knowledge, that exposure to Uf-Co can stimulate leukocytes to secrete TNF-alpha. These data suggest that the TNF-alpha release from pulmonary leukocytes probably plays a role in the pathogenesis of 'cobalt lung'. (author)

  12. The Role of Phosphoramidon on the Biological Activity of Big Endothelin-1 in the Rat Mesenteric Microcirculation in Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelhalim, Mohamed A K

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to clarify the role of metalloprotease inhibitor phosphoramidon on the effects induced by big endothelin-1 (big ET-1) in the rat mesenteric microcirculation in vivo, through investigating the systemic blood pressure, diameter and blood flow velocity of arterioles and venules of the rat mesentery. For this purpose, the rat mesentery was arranged for in situ intravital microscopic observation under transillumination and separate cumulative injections of big ET-1 and phosphoramidon were infused into the right jugular vein, respectively. In these experiments twenty-five rats (Charles River, 130 - 140 g) were used. The experiments were divided into two groups. In the first group of experiments, cumulative injections of big ET-1 (1000-8000 pmole/kg) were infused through a catheter inserted into the right jugular vein. Each dose of big ET-1 was infused 25 min prior to the infusion of the following dose. Infusion of big ET-1 (1000-8000 pmole/kg) elicited a long-lasting pressor effect. The infusion of low doses of big ET-1 (1000-2000 pmole/kg) elicited a significant (p < 0.05) dose-dependent increase in the microvascular blood flow velocity both in arterioles (20 - 30 ?m) and venules (30 - 50 ?m), and diameters of arterioles and venules exhibited a slight not significant vasodilator effect. The infusion of high doses of big ET-1 (4000-8000 pmole/kg) elicited significant dose-dependant decrease in the blood flow velocity of arterioles and venules, and diameters returned to the control runs. This may be attributed to the gradual conversion of big ET-1 to ET-1, and ET-1 is a potent vasoconstrictor. In the second group of experiments, cumulative injections of phosphoramidon (30 mg/kg /10 min) were administered 10 min prior to the infusion of big ET-1. These findings suggested that phosphoramidon significantly suppressed long-lasting pressor effect, dose-dependent increase, dose-dependent decrease and slow vasodilator effect produced by big ET-1

  13. Cardiovascular effects of a herbicide containing glufosinate and a surfactant: in vitro and in vivo analyses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, K; Koyama, K; Goto, K

    1997-08-01

    A herbicide, Basta (BASTA), containing glufosinate ammonium (GLA) as the main component and an anionic surfactant, sodium polyoxyethylene alkylether sulfate (AES), causes hemodynamic changes characterized by a decrease in total vascular resistance with an increase or a decrease in cardiac output in human acute oral poisoning. With a motivation based on these clinical observations, we tried to elucidate the exact component and its mode of action that is mostly responsible for the direct cardiovascular effects of this herbicide formulation, investigating the effects of BASTA, GLA, and AES independently on the cardiovascular system in rats in vitro and in vivo. In isolated right atria beating spontaneously in Krebs-Ringer's solution, BASTA and AES produced negative chronotropic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. In electrically driven isolated left atria, BASTA and AES produced positive inotropic responses concentration dependently but negative inotropic responses at extremely high concentrations. In aortic ring segments, BASTA and AES produced no vasoconstrictive effects but exerted significant vasodilative effects when the aortic ring was precontracted with phenylephrine. These in vitro responses caused by BASTA and AES occurred to a similar degree. On the other hand, the main component, GLA, produced no effects in isolated atria and aortas. In anesthetized rats, relatively low doses of BASTA and AES produced a decrease in blood pressure followed by a slight increase in heart rate, which was presumably due to baroreflex caused by the decrease in blood pressure. At an extremely high dose, BASTA and AES produced a decrease in blood pressure with a marked decrease in heart rate. These in vivo responses to BASTA and AES also occurred to a similar degree. In contrast, the main component, GLA, did not produce any effects on heart rate and blood pressure in anesthetized rats. From these results, we concluded that the effects of BASTA in our in vivo experiments

  14. Interaction of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase with clofibryl-S-acyl-glutathione in vitro and in vivo in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, M P; Benet, L Z

    2001-08-01

    Clofibric acid (CA) is metabolized to chemically reactive acylating products that can transacylate glutathione to form clofibryl-S-acyl-glutathione (CA-SG) in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the first step in the degradation of CA-SG to the mercapturic acid conjugate, clofibryl-S-acyl-N-acetylcysteine (CA-SNAC), which is catalyzed by gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (gamma-GT). After gamma-GT mediated cleavage of glutamate from CA-SG, the product clofibryl-S-acyl-cysteinylglycine (CA-S-CG) should undergo an intramolecular rearrangement reaction [Tate, S. S. (1975) FEBS Lett. 54, 319-322] to form clofibryl-N-acyl-cysteinylglycine (CA-N-CG). We performed in vitro studies incubating CA-SG with gamma-GT to determine the products formed, and in vivo studies examining the products excreted in urine after dosing rats with CA-SG or CA. Thus, CA-SG (0.1 mM) was incubated with gamma-GT (0.1 unit/mL) in buffer (pH 7.4, 25 degrees C) and analyzed for products formed by reversed-phase HPLC and electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Results showed that CA-SG is degraded completely after 6 h of incubation leading to the formation of two products, CA-N-CG and its disulfide, with no detection of CA-S-CG thioester. After 36 h of incubation, only the disulfide remained in the incubation. Treatment of the disulfide with dithiothreitol led to the reappearance of CA-N-CG. ESI/LC/MS analysis of urine (16 h) extracts of CA-SG-dosed rats (200 mg/kg, iv) showed that CA-SG is degraded to CA-N-CG, CA-N-acyl-cysteine (CA-N-C) and their respective S-methylated products. The mercapturic acid conjugate (CA-SNAC) was found as a minor product. Analysis of urine extracts from CA-dosed rats (200 mg/kg, ip) resulted in the detection of clofibryl-N-acyl-cysteine (CA-N-C), but no evidence for the formation of CA-SNAC was obtained. These in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that gamma-GT mediated degradation of clofibryl-S-acyl-glutathione leads primarily to the formation and excretion of clofibryl

  15. In vivo integrated photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for retinal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hao F.; Wei, Qing; Cao, Wenwu

    2012-12-01

    The physiological and pathological properties of retina are closely associated with various optical contrasts. Hence, integrating different ophthalmic imaging technologies is more beneficial in both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of several blinding diseases. Recently, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) was developed for in vivo retinal imaging in small animals, which demonstrated the capability of imaging retinal vascular networks and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) at high sensitivity. We combined PAOM with traditional imaging modalities, such as fluorescein angiography (FA), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and auto-fluorescence scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AF-SLO), for imaging rats and mice. The multimodal imaging system provided more comprehensive evaluation of the retina based on the complementary imaging contrast mechanisms. The high-quality retinal images show that the integrated ophthalmic imaging system has great potential in the investigation of blinding disorders.

  16. Cytogenesis in the monkey retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Vail, M.M.; Rapaport, D.H.; Rakic, P.

    1991-01-01

    Time of cell origin in the retina of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) was studied by plotting the number of heavily radiolabeled nuclei in autoradiograms prepared from 2- to 6-month-old animals, each of which was exposed to a pulse of 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR) on a single embryonic (E) or postnatal (P) day. Cell birth in the monkey retina begins just after E27, and approximately 96% of cells are generated by E120. The remaining cells are produced during the last (approximately 45) prenatal days and into the first several weeks after birth. Cell genesis begins near the fovea, and proceeds towards the periphery. Cell division largely ceases in the foveal and perifoveal regions by E56. Despite extensive overlap, a class-specific sequence of cell birth was observed. Ganglion and horizontal cells, which are born first, have largely congruent periods of cell genesis with the peak between E38 and E43, and termination around E70. The first labeled cones were apparent by E33, and their highest density was achieved between E43 and E56, tapering to low values at E70, although some cones are generated in the far periphery as late as E110. Amacrine cells are next in the cell birth sequence and begin genesis at E43, reach a peak production between E56 and E85, and cease by E110. Bipolar cell birth begins at the same time as amacrines, but appears to be separate from them temporally since their production reaches a peak between E56 and E102, and persists beyond the day of birth. Mueller cells and rod photoreceptors, which begin to be generated at E45, achieve a peak, and decrease in density at the same time as bipolar cells, but continue genesis at low density on the day of birth. Thus, bipolar, Mueller, and rod cells have a similar time of origin

  17. Carbamazepine (Tegretol) inhibits in vivo iodide uptake and hormone synthesis in rat thyroid glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, S.M.; Alexander, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    Decreased serum concentrations of T3 and T4 occur in patients treated with the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine (CBZ), but with rare exception, these patients remain euthyroid. The mechanism that accounts for diminished hormone levels is unknown, and our objective was to study the direct effect of CBZ on iodide uptake and hormone synthesis in thyroid glands of CBZ-treated and pair-fed control rats. Chronic ingestion (per os) of CBZ in male rats reduced the four hour thyroid 131I-iodide uptake by approximately 60%. This inhibition occurred after the animals had received sufficient CBZ to attain plasma CBZ concentrations of 0.8 microgram/ml. Continued treatment with CBZ ranging from 560 to 800 mg/kg/day for 14 days did not result in further inhibition of iodide uptake even though the plasma CBZ concentrations had increased 6-20 fold. No inhibition of iodide uptake was apparent when the animals initially received CBZ ranging from 40 to 152 mg/kg body weight for 22 days when there were no detectable levels of plasma CBZ. Overall growth rates of CBZ-treated rats were slightly (6-10%) less than the pair-fed control animals. Plasma T4 concentrations were reduced by 18% (p less than 0.05) in the CBZ-fed animals, while T3 concentrations were diminished by 53% (p less than 0.01). CBZ appeared to alter thyroidal iodide transport because the thyroid:plasma iodide ratios were decreased by 26% in the drug-treated rats. The distribution of radioiodine in thyroidal iodoamino acids was essentially the same in both groups of rats but the absolute quantities of radioiodine were more than 2.5 times greater in the control rats. CBZ failed to inhibit peroxidase-catalyzed iodide and guaiacol oxidation in vitro

  18. Phasic spike patterning in rat supraoptic neurones in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Nancy; Brown, Colin H; Ludwig, Mike; Leng, Gareth

    2004-01-01

    In vivo, most vasopressin cells of the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus fire action potentials in a ‘phasic’ pattern when the systemic osmotic pressure is elevated, while most oxytocin cells fire continuously. The phasic firing pattern is believed to arise as a consequence of intrinsic activity-dependent changes in membrane potential, and these have been extensively studied in vitro. Here we analysed the discharge patterning of supraoptic nucleus neurones in vivo, to infer the characteristics of the post-spike sequence of hyperpolarization and depolarization from the observed spike patterning. We then compared patterning in phasic cells in vivo and in vitro, and we found systematic differences in the interspike interval distributions, and in other statistical parameters that characterized activity patterns within bursts. Analysis of hazard functions (probability of spike initiation as a function of time since the preceding spike) revealed that phasic firing in vitro appears consistent with a regenerative process arising from a relatively slow, late depolarizing afterpotential that approaches or exceeds spike threshold. By contrast, in vivo activity appears to be dominated by stochastic rather than deterministic mechanisms, and appears consistent with a relatively early and fast depolarizing afterpotential that modulates the probability that random synaptic input exceeds spike threshold. Despite superficial similarities in the phasic firing patterns observed in vivo and in vitro, there are thus fundamental differences in the underlying mechanisms. PMID:15146047

  19. Specific Schistosoma mansoni rat T cell clones. I. Generation and functional analysis in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, J; Dissous, C; Dessaint, J P; Louis, J; Engers, H; Capron, A

    1985-06-01

    In an attempt to determine the role of schistosome-specific T cells in the immune mechanisms developed during schistosomiasis, Schistosoma mansoni-specific T cells and clones were generated in vitro and some of their functions analyzed in vitro and in vivo in the fischer rat model. The data presented here can be summarized as follows: a) Lymph node cells (LNC) from rats primed with the excretory/secretory antigens-incubation products (IPSm) of adult worms proliferate in vitro only in response to the homologous schistosome antigens and not to unrelated antigens (Ag) such as ovalbumin (OVA) or Dipetalonema viteae and Fasciola hepatica parasite extracts. b) After in vitro restimulation of the primed LNC population with IPSm in the presence of antigen-presenting cells (APC) and maintenance in IL 2-containing medium, the frequency of IPSm-specific T cells is increased and the T cells can be restimulated only in the presence of APC possessing the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens. c) Following appropriate limiting dilution assays (LDA) (1 cell/well), 10 IPSm-specific T cell clones were obtained, and two of four maintained in culture were tested for their helper activity because they expressed only the W3/13+ W3/25+ surface phenotypes. d) The two highly proliferating IPSm-specific T cell clones (G5 and E23) exhibit an IPSm-dependent helper activity, as shown by the increase in IgG production by IPSm-primed B cells. e) IPSm-T cell clone (G5) as well as IPSm-T cell lines when injected in S. mansoni-infested rats can exert an in vivo helper activity, which is characterized by an accelerated production of IgG antibodies specific for the previously identified 30 to 40 kilodaltons (kd) schistosomula surface antigens (Ag). As recent studies have demonstrated that rat monoclonal antibodies recognize some incubation products of adult S. mansoni as well as one of the 30 to 40 kd schistosomula surface antigens, and taking into account the fact that the T cell

  20. Dietary fibers from mushroom sclerotia. 4. In vivo mineral absorption using ovariectomized rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka-Hing; Katsumata, Shin-Ichi; Masuyama, Ritsuko; Uehara, Mariko; Suzuki, Kazuharu; Cheung, Peter C K

    2006-03-08

    The effect of three novel dietary fibers (DFs) prepared from mushroom sclerotia, namely, Pleurotus tuber-regium, Polyporus rhinocerus, and Wolfiporia cocos, on calcium and magnesium absorption was evaluated in ovariectomized (OVX) rats fed with sclerotial DF based and low Ca (0.3%) diets for 14 days. The animals in the W. cocos DF diet group possessed significantly (p cocos DF group were also significantly (p cocos DF could improve the overall Ca and Mg absorptions of the OVX rats fed a low Ca diet. The potential use of sclerotial DFs as a functional food ingredient for enhancing mineral absorption is also discussed.

  1. In vivo oestrogenic modulation of Egr1 and Pitx1 gene expression in female rat pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska, Alina; Herman, Andrzej P; Wolińska-Witort, Ewa; Kochman, Kazimierz; Zwierzchowski, Lech

    2014-12-01

    EGR1 and PITX1 are transcription factors required for gonadotroph cell Lhb promoter activation. To determine changes in Egr1 and Pitx1 mRNA levels in central and peripheral pituitary stimulations, an in vivo model based on i.c.v. pulsatile (1 pulse/0.5 h over 2 h) GnRH agonist (1.5 nM buserelin) or antagonist (2 nM antide) microinjections was used. The microinjections were given to ovariectomised and 17β-oestradiol (E2) (3×20 μg), ERA (ESR1) agonist propyl pyrazole triol (PPT) (3×0.5 mg), ERB (ESR2) agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) (3×0.5 mg) s.c. pre-treated rats 30 min after last pulse anterior pituitaries were excised. Relative mRNA expression was determined by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Results revealed a gene-specific response for GnRH and/or oestrogenic stimulations in vivo. Buserelin pulses enhanced Egr1 expression by 66% in ovariectomised rats, whereas the oestradiol-supplemented+i.c.v. NaCl-microinjected group showed a 50% increase in Egr1 mRNA expression. The oestrogenic signal was transmitted via ERA (ESR1) and ERB (ESR2) activation as administration of PPT and DPN resulted in 97 and 62%, respectively, elevation in Egr1 mRNA expression. A synergistic action of GnRH agonist and 17β-oestradiol (E2) stimulation of the Egr1 gene transcription in vivo were found. GnRHR activity did not affect Pitx1 mRNA expression; regardless of NaCl, buserelin or antide i.c.v. pulses, s.c. oestrogenic supplementation (with E2, PPT or DPN) consistently decreased (by -46, -48 and -41% respectively) the Pitx1 mRNA in the anterior pituitary gland. Orchestrated Egr1 and Pitx1 activities depending on specific central and peripheral regulatory inputs could be responsible for physiologically variable Lhb gene promoter activation in vivo. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. Parsley extract inhibits in vitro and ex vivo platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadi, Dounia; Bnouham, Mohamed; Aziz, Mohammed; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Legrand, Chantal; Lafeve, Françoise Fauvel; Mekhfi, Hassane

    2009-08-17

    Many cardiovascular diseases are associated with an increase in blood platelet activity. In Morocco, parsley (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae) is one of the medicinal herbs used to treat cardiovascular diseases such as arterial hypertension. In this study, crude aqueous extract (CAE) of parsley was evaluated for its anti-platelet activity in experimental animals on platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo; and on bleeding time in vivo. The in vitro aggregation was monitored after pre-incubation of platelets with CAE. The bleeding time and ex vivo aggregation were performed after oral treatment. CAE inhibited dose dependently platelet aggregation in vitro induced by thrombin, ADP, collagen and epinephrine. The oral administration of CAE (3g/kg) inhibited significantly (pparsley may be benefit in the normalization of platelet hyperactivation, in the nutritional prevention of cardiovascular diseases and are potentially interesting in the development of new prevention strategies.

  3. Iodine-123 labelled nor-beta-CIT binds to the serotonin transporter in vivo as assessed by biodistribution studies in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, J.; Knol, R. J.; Reneman, L.; de Bruin, K.; Janssen, A. G.; van Royen, E. A.

    1998-01-01

    Iodine-123 labelled 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-4-iodophenylnortropane (nor-beta-CIT), a radioiodinated cocaine analogue, was evaluated as an agent for the in vivo labelling of serotonin transporters by biodistribution studies in rats. Intravenous injection of [123I]nor-beta-CIT resulted in high

  4. Ketone-body utilization and lipid synthesis by developing rat brain—a comparison between in vivo and in vitro experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, W.; Lopes-Cardozo, M.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of ketone bodies between oxidation and lipid synthesis was analysed in homogenates of developing rat brain. The capacity for lipid synthesis of homogenized or minced brain preparations was compared with rates of lipid synthesis in vivo, assessed by incorporation of ³H from

  5. Involvement of Histone Lysine Methylation in p21 Gene Expression in Rat Kidney In Vivo and Rat Mesangial Cells In Vitro under Diabetic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN, a common complication associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, characterized by glomerular mesangial expansion, inflammation, accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM protein, and hypertrophy, is the major cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Increasing evidence suggested that p21-dependent glomerular and mesangial cell (MC hypertrophy play key roles in the pathogenesis of DN. Recently, posttranscriptional modifications (PTMs have uncovered novel molecular mechanisms involved in DN. However, precise regulatory mechanism of histone lysine methylation (HKme mediating p21 related hypertrophy associated with DN is not clear. We evaluated the roles of HKme and histone methyltransferase (HMT SET7/9 in p21 gene expression in glomeruli of diabetic rats and in high glucose- (HG- treated rat mesangial cells (RMCs. p21 gene expression was upregulated in diabetic rats glomeruli; chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays showed decreased histone H3-lysine9-dimethylation (H3K9me2 accompanied with enhanced histone H3-lysine4-methylation (H3K4me1/3 and SET7/9 occupancies at the p21 promoter. HG-treated RMCs exhibited increased p21 mRNA, H3K4me level, SET7/9 recruitment, and inverse H3K9me, which were reversed by TGF-β1 antibody. These data uncovered key roles of H3Kme and SET7/9 responsible for p21 gene expression in vivo and in vitro under diabetic conditions and confirmed preventive effect of TGF-β1 antibody on DN.

  6. In vivo labelling in several rat tissues of 'peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benavides, J.; Guilloux, F.; Rufat, P.; Uzan, A.; Renault, C.; Dubroeucq, M.C.; Gueremy, C.; Le Fur, G. (Pharmuka Laboratoires, 92 - Gennevilliers (France))

    1984-03-16

    'Peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites in several rat tissues were labelled by intravenous injection of (/sup 3/H)PK 11195 and (/sup 3/H)RO5-4864. Binding was saturable in all tissues studied and regional distribution paralleled the in vitro binding. A similar potency order of displacing compounds was found in vivo and in vitro PK 11195 > PK 11211 > RO5-4864 > diazepam > dipyridamole > clonazepam. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique to examine the effects of pharmacological manipulation on the binding sites in their native state. However, some properties (broader maximum during time course, higher percentage of particulate binding in the brain and independence of temperature) make (/sup 3/H)PK 11195 the most suitable ligand for this kind of studies.

  7. Autoradiographic localization of glucocorticosteriod binding sites in rat brain after in vivo injection of [3H]RU 28362

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrieau, Alain; Dussaillant, Monique; Rostene, William

    1988-01-01

    The autoradiographic distribution of glucocorticosteriod binding sites in the brain of adrenalectomized rats was studied following in vivo injection of a potent synthetic glucocorticosteriod agonist [ 3 H]RU 28362. Analysis of the autoradiograms revealed a specific and dense labelling in the pyramidal cell layer of the Ammon's horn and in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In the hypothalmus, the labelling was particularly high in the paraventricular nucleus (site of CRF synthesis), the arcuate, periventricular and the supraoptic nuclei as well as in the median eminence. Autoradiograms also revealed the presence of[ 3 H]RU 28362 binding sites in several brain regions including the amygdala, the pineal gland, the entorhinal cortex, the interpeduncular, interfascicular and dorsal raphe nuclei, the central grey and the substantia nigra suggesting possible effects of glucocorticosteriods in these structures (author)

  8. In vivo Evaluation of Venular Glycocalyx during Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats using Intravital Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    and by Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ). The views expressed herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as...Animals. Male Sprague– Dawley rats (Charles River Laboratories, Wilmington, MA, 220±10 g body weight) breathing spontaneously room air or 100% oxygen were

  9. Evidence that stress activates glial lactate formation in vivo assessed with rat hippocampus lactography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elekes, O; Venema, K; Postema, F; Dringen, R; Hamprecht, B; Korf, J

    1996-01-01

    Extracellular lactate of the rat hippocampus is inter alia increased by immobilization stress. The origin of lactate is, however, not well established, so it is not known whether it is mainly derived form neurons or glial cells. Dialysates were collected shortly (1 or 2 days) or with a delay (14 or

  10. Hard tissue formation of STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp stem cells in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Walboomers, X.F.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine hard tissue formation of STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp-derived stem cells, seeded into a calcium phosphate ceramic scaffold, and implanted subcutaneously in mice. Previously, STRO-1 selection was used to obtain a mesenchymal stem cell progenitor

  11. IPRODIONE DELAYS MALE RAT PUBERTAL DEVELOPMENT, REDUCING SERUM TESTOSTERONE AND EX VIVO TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iprodione (IPRO) is a dichlorophenyl dicarboximide fungicide similar to the androgen receptor (AR) antagonist vinclozolin. The current studies were designed to determine if IPRO would delay male rat pubertal development like vinclozolin and to identify the mechanism(s) of action...

  12. Correlation between the in vivo metabolism of hexobarbital and antipyrine in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaff, M; Vermeulen, N P; Joeres, R P; Vlietstra, T; Breimer, D D

    1983-01-01

    Two model substrates for oxidative hepatic enzyme activity, viz. hexobarbital (HB) and antipyrine (AP), were given simultaneously to rats by the oral route of administration. Blood concentrations of HB and AP were measured simultaneously by a gas chromatographic method and the urinary excretion of

  13. In vivo effects of T-2 mycotoxin on synthesis of proteins and DNA in rat tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.L.; Wannemacher, R.W. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Rats were given an ip injection of T-2 mycotoxin (T-2), the T-2 metabolite, T-2 tetraol (tetraol), or cycloheximide. Serum, liver, heart, kidney, spleen, muscle, and intestine were collected at 3, 6, and 9 hr postinjection after a 2-hr pulse at each time with [14C]leucine and [3H]thymidine. Protein and DNA synthesis levels in rats were determined by dual-label counting of the acid-precipitable fraction of tissue homogenates. Rats given a lethal dose of T-2, tetraol, or cycloheximide died between 14 and 20 hr. Maximum inhibition of protein synthesis at the earliest time period was observed in additional rats given the same lethal dose of the three treatments and continued for the duration of the study (9 hr). With sublethal doses of T-2 or tetraol, the same early decrease in protein synthesis was observed but, in most of the tissues, recovery was seen with time. In the T-2-treated rats. DNA synthesis in the six tissues studied was also suppressed, although to a lesser degree. With sublethal doses, complete recovery of DNA synthesis took place in four of the six tissues by 9 hr after toxin exposure. The appearance of newly translated serum proteins did not occur in the animals treated with T-2 mycotoxin or cycloheximide, as evidenced by total and PCA-soluble serum levels of labeled leucine. An increase in tissue-pool levels of free leucine and thymidine in response to T-2 mycotoxin was also noted. T-2 mycotoxin, its metabolite, T-2 tetraol, and cycloheximide cause a rapid inhibition of protein and DNA synthesis in all tissue types studied. These results are compared with the responses seen in in vitro studies

  14. In vivo observation of the hypo-echoic "black hole" phenomenon in rat arterial bloodstream: a preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Paeng, Dong-Guk

    2014-07-01

    The "black hole," a hypo-echoic hole at the center of the bloodstream surrounded by a hyper-echoic zone in cross-sectional views, has been observed in ultrasound backscattering measurements of blood with red blood cell aggregation in in vitro studies. We investigated whether the phenomenon occurs in the in vivo arterial bloodstream of rats using a high-frequency ultrasound imaging system. Longitudinal and cross-sectional ultrasound images of the rat common carotid artery (CCA) and abdominal aorta were obtained using a 40-MHz ultrasound system. A high-frame-rate retrospective imaging mode was employed to precisely examine the dynamic changes in blood echogenicity in the arteries. When the imaging was performed with non-invasive scanning, blood echogenicity was very low in the CCA as compared with the surrounding tissues, exhibiting no hypo-echoic zone at the center of the vessel. Invasive imaging of the CCA by incising the skin and subcutaneous tissues at the imaging area provided clearer and brighter blood echo images, showing the "black hole" phenomenon near the center of the vessel in longitudinal view. The "black hole" was also observed in the abdominal aorta under direct imaging after laparotomy. The aortic "black hole" was clearly observed in both longitudinal and cross-sectional views. Although the "black hole" was always observed near the center of the arteries during the diastolic phase, it dissipated or was off-center along with the asymmetric arterial wall dilation at systole. In conclusion, we report the first in vivo observation of the hypo-echoic "black hole" caused by the radial variation of red blood cell aggregation in arterial bloodstream. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduced Cerebral Oxygen Content in the DG and SVZ In Situ Promotes Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Brain In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult brain occurs mainly within two neurogenic structures, the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ of the forebrain. It has been reported that mild hypoxia promoted the proliferation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCsin vitro. Our previous study further demonstrated that an external hypoxic environment stimulated neurogenesis in the adult rat brain in vivo. However, it remains unknown how external hypoxic environments affect the oxygen content in the brain and result in neurogenesis. Here we use an optical fiber luminescent oxygen sensor to detect the oxygen content in the adult rat brain in situ under normoxia and hypoxia. We found that the distribution of oxygen in cerebral regions is spatiotemporally heterogeneous. The Po2 values in the ventricles (45∼50 Torr and DG (approximately 10 Torr were much higher than those of other parts of the brain, such as the cortex and thalamus (approximately 2 Torr. Interestingly, our in vivo studies showed that an external hypoxic environment could change the intrinsic oxygen content in brain tissues, notably reducing oxygen levels in both the DG and SVZ, the major sites of adult neurogenesis. Furthermore, the hypoxic environment also increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, two factors that have been reported to regulate neurogenesis, within the DG and SVZ. Thus, we have demonstrated that reducing the oxygen content of the external environment decreased Po2 levels in the DG and SVZ. This reduced oxygen level in the DG and SVZ might be the main mechanism triggering neurogenesis in the adult brain. More importantly, we speculate that varying oxygen levels may be the physiological basis of the regionally restricted neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  16. Ecto-ATPase inhibition: ATP and adenosine release under physiological and ischemic in vivo conditions in the rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melani, Alessia; Corti, Francesca; Stephan, Holger; Müller, Christa E; Donati, Chiara; Bruni, Paola; Vannucchi, Maria Giuliana; Pedata, Felicita

    2012-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS) ATP and adenosine act as transmitters and neuromodulators on their own receptors but it is still unknown which part of extracellular adenosine derives per se from cells and which part is formed from the hydrolysis of released ATP. In this study extracellular concentrations of adenosine and ATP from the rat striatum were estimated by the microdialysis technique under in vivo physiological conditions and after focal ischemia induced by medial cerebral artery occlusion. Under physiological conditions, adenosine and ATP concentrations were in the range of 130 nmol/L and 40 nmol/L, respectively. In the presence of the novel ecto-ATPase inhibitor, PV4 (100 nmol/L), the extracellular concentration of ATP increased 12-fold to ~360 nmol/L but the adenosine concentration was not altered. This demonstrates that, under physiological conditions, adenosine is not a product of extracellular ATP. In the first 4h after ischemia, adenosine increased to ~690 nmol/L and ATP to ~50 nmol/L. In the presence of PV4 the extracellular concentration of ATP was in the range of 450 nmol/L and a significant decrease in extracellular adenosine (to ~270 nmol/L) was measured. The contribution of extracellular ATP to extracellular adenosine was maximal in the first 20 min after ischemia onset. Furthermore we demonstrated, by immunoelectron microscopy, the presence of the concentrative nucleoside transporter CNT2 on plasma and vesicle membranes isolated from the rat striatum. These results are in favor that adenosine is transported in vesicles and is released in an excitation-secretion manner under in vivo physiological conditions. Early after ischemia, extracellular ATP is hydrolyzed by ecto-nucleotidases which significantly contribute to the increase in extracellular adenosine. To establish the contribution of extracellular ATP to adenosine might constitute the basis for devising a correct putative purinergic strategy aimed at protection from ischemic damage

  17. Long-term exposure to nicotine markedly reduces kynurenic acid in rat brain - In vitro and ex vivo evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, Elzbieta; Kuc, Damian; Zgrajka, Wojciech; Turski, Waldemar A.; Dekundy, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a recognized broad-spectrum antagonist of excitatory amino acid receptors with a particularly high affinity for the glycine co-agonist site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex. KYNA is also a putative endogenous neuroprotectant. Recent studies show that KYNA strongly blocks α7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The present studies were aimed at assessing effects of acute and chronic nicotine exposure on KYNA production in rat brain slices in vitro and ex vivo. In brain slices, nicotine significantly increased KYNA formation at 10 mM but not at 1 or 5 mM. Different nAChR antagonists (dihydro-β-erythroidine, methyllycaconitine and mecamylamine) failed to block the influence exerted by nicotine on KYNA synthesis in cortical slices in vitro. Effects of acute (1 mg/kg, i.p.), subchronic (10-day) and chronic (30-day) administration of nicotine in drinking water (100 μg/ml) on KYNA brain content were evaluated ex vivo. Acute treatment with nicotine (1 mg/kg i.p.) did not affect KYNA level in rat brain. The subchronic exposure to nicotine in drinking water significantly increased KYNA by 43%, while chronic exposure to nicotine resulted in a reduction in KYNA by 47%. Co-administration of mecamylamine with nicotine in drinking water for 30 days reversed the effect exerted by nicotine on KYNA concentration in the cerebral cortex. The present results provide evidence for the hypothesis of reciprocal interaction between the nicotinic cholinergic system and the kynurenine pathway in the brain.

  18. Presynaptic selectivity of a ligand for serotonin 1A receptors revealed by in vivo PET assays of rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Saijo

    Full Text Available A novel investigational antidepressant with high affinity for the serotonin transporter and the serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A receptor, called Wf-516 (structural formula: (2S-1-[4-(3,4-dichlorophenylpiperidin-1-yl]-3-[2-(5-methyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-ylbenzo[b]furan-4-yloxy]propan-2-ol monohydrochloride, has been found to exert a rapid therapeutic effect, although the mechanistic basis for this potential advantage remains undetermined. We comparatively investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Wf-516 and pindolol by positron emission tomographic (PET and autoradiographic assays of rat brains in order to elucidate their molecular interactions with presynaptic and postsynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In contrast to the full receptor occupancy by pindolol in PET measurements, the binding of Wf-516 to 5-HT(1A receptors displayed limited capacity, with relatively high receptor occupancy being achieved in regions predominantly containing presynaptic receptors. This selectivity was further proven by PET scans of neurotoxicant-treated rats deficient in presynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In addition, [(35S]guanosine 5'-O-[γ-thio]triphosphate autoradiography indicated a partial agonistic ability of Wf-516 for 5-HT(1A receptors. This finding has lent support to reports that diverse partial agonists for 5-HT(1A receptors exert high sensitivity for presynaptic components. Thus, the present PET data suggest a relatively high capacity of presynaptic binding sites for partial agonists. Since our in vitro and ex vivo autoradiographies failed to illustrate these distinct features of Wf-516, in vivo PET imaging is considered to be, thus far, the sole method capable of pharmacokinetically demonstrating the unique actions of Wf-516 and similar new-generation antidepressants.

  19. Presynaptic selectivity of a ligand for serotonin 1A receptors revealed by in vivo PET assays of rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Takeaki; Maeda, Jun; Okauchi, Takashi; Maeda, Jun-ichi; Morio, Yasunori; Kuwahara, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Masayuki; Goto, Nobuharu; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    A novel investigational antidepressant with high affinity for the serotonin transporter and the serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor, called Wf-516 (structural formula: (2S)-1-[4-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)piperidin-1-yl]-3-[2-(5-methyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)benzo[b]furan-4-yloxy]propan-2-ol monohydrochloride), has been found to exert a rapid therapeutic effect, although the mechanistic basis for this potential advantage remains undetermined. We comparatively investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Wf-516 and pindolol by positron emission tomographic (PET) and autoradiographic assays of rat brains in order to elucidate their molecular interactions with presynaptic and postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. In contrast to the full receptor occupancy by pindolol in PET measurements, the binding of Wf-516 to 5-HT(1A) receptors displayed limited capacity, with relatively high receptor occupancy being achieved in regions predominantly containing presynaptic receptors. This selectivity was further proven by PET scans of neurotoxicant-treated rats deficient in presynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. In addition, [(35)S]guanosine 5'-O-[γ-thio]triphosphate autoradiography indicated a partial agonistic ability of Wf-516 for 5-HT(1A) receptors. This finding has lent support to reports that diverse partial agonists for 5-HT(1A) receptors exert high sensitivity for presynaptic components. Thus, the present PET data suggest a relatively high capacity of presynaptic binding sites for partial agonists. Since our in vitro and ex vivo autoradiographies failed to illustrate these distinct features of Wf-516, in vivo PET imaging is considered to be, thus far, the sole method capable of pharmacokinetically demonstrating the unique actions of Wf-516 and similar new-generation antidepressants.

  20. Uptake and metabolism of fructose by rat neocortical cells in vivo and by isolated nerve terminals in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Elsais, Ahmed; Frøland, Anne-Sofie; Taubøll, Erik; Gjerstad, Leif; Quan, Yi; Dingledine, Raymond; Rise, Frode

    2015-05-01

    Fructose reacts spontaneously with proteins in the brain to form advanced glycation end products (AGE) that may elicit neuroinflammation and cause brain pathology, including Alzheimer's disease. We investigated whether fructose is eliminated by oxidative metabolism in neocortex. Injection of [(14) C]fructose or its AGE-prone metabolite [(14) C]glyceraldehyde into rat neocortex in vivo led to formation of (14) C-labeled alanine, glutamate, aspartate, GABA, and glutamine. In isolated neocortical nerve terminals, [(14) C]fructose-labeled glutamate, GABA, and aspartate, indicating uptake of fructose into nerve terminals and oxidative fructose metabolism in these structures. This was supported by high expression of hexokinase 1, which channels fructose into glycolysis, and whose activity was similar with fructose or glucose as substrates. By contrast, the fructose-specific ketohexokinase was weakly expressed. The fructose transporter Glut5 was expressed at only 4% of the level of neuronal glucose transporter Glut3, suggesting transport across plasma membranes of brain cells as the limiting factor in removal of extracellular fructose. The genes encoding aldose reductase and sorbitol dehydrogenase, enzymes of the polyol pathway that forms glucose from fructose, were expressed in rat neocortex. These results point to fructose being transported into neocortical cells, including nerve terminals, and that it is metabolized and thereby detoxified primarily through hexokinase activity. We asked how the brain handles fructose, which may react spontaneously with proteins to form 'advanced glycation end products' and trigger inflammation. Neocortical cells took up and metabolized extracellular fructose oxidatively in vivo, and isolated nerve terminals did so in vitro. The low expression of fructose transporter Glut5 limited uptake of extracellular fructose. Hexokinase was a main pathway for fructose metabolism, but ketohexokinase (which leads to glyceraldehyde formation) was

  1. Elucidation of Arctigenin Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution after Intravenous, Oral, Hypodermic and Sublingual Administration in Rats and Beagle Dogs: Integration of In Vitro and In Vivo Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Xin; Ren, Yu-Shan; Lv, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Jun-Sheng; Xu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xian-Zhen; Yao, Jing-Chun; Zhang, Gui-Min; Liu, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Although arctigenin ( AG ) has diverse bioactivities, such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, immunoregulatory and neuroprotective activities, its pharmacokinetics have not been systematically evaluated. The purpose of this work was to identify the pharmacokinetic properties of AG via various experiments in vivo and in vitro . In this research, rats and beagle dogs were used to investigate the PK (pharmacokinetics, PK) profiles of AG with different drug-delivery manners, including intravenous (i.v), hypodermic injection (i.h), and sublingual (s.l) administration. The data shows that AG exhibited a strong absorption capacity in both rats and beagle dogs (absorption rate 100%), and a strong elimination ability ( t 1/2 beagle dog (25.9 ± 3.24%) > rat (15.7 ± 9%) > monkey (3.69 ± 0.12%). This systematic investigation of pharmacokinetic profiles of arctigenin (AG) in vivo and in vitro is worthy of further exploration.

  2. Effect of amiodarone on the conversion of thyroxine to triiodotironine in rat myocardium in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceppi, J.A.; Gonzalez, M.R.; Zaninovich, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    It was studied the effect of the antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone, on the conversion of T 4 to T 3 by rat myocardium and liver. Wistar rats were injected with amiodarone (AM) or iopanoic acid (IOP), afterwards the liver and the heart were homogenized in krebs-ringer phosphate. Aliquots of 400μl of the homogenized were separated and DTT 8mM and 10 -2 μCi 125 I-T 4 or 125 I-T 3 were added (either the conversion of T 4 to T 3 or degradation of T 3 are measured). In vitro: were added AM 0,1 mM or IOP 10mM. Incubation proceeded for 2 hours at 37 deg C and aliquots were chromatographied. The conversion of T 4 to T 3 in the myocardium and liver in vivo decreased, but in vitro did not have any deiodination of T 4 and the IOP reduced the production of T 3 by heart. Neither drug altered the deiodination of T 3 by heart or liver homogenates. Serum TSH and T 3 were decreased by AM and serum T 4 increased. IOP caused similar variations in T 4 and T 3 , but serum TSH was increased. It is concluded that blocking the T 3 miocardial production by AM may not be the cause of the antiarrhythmic effect of the drug. (M.E.L.) [es

  3. In vivo expression of ß-galactosidase by rat oviduct exposed to naked DNA or messenger RNA

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    MARIANA RIOS

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-oviductal administration of RNA obtained from oviducts of estradiol-treated rats resulted in accelerated egg transport (Ríos et al., 1997. It is probable that estradiol-induced messenger RNA (mRNA entered oviductal cells and was translated into the proteins involved in accelerated egg transport. In order to test this interpretation we deposited in vivo 50 µg of pure ß-galactosidase (ß-gal mRNA, 50 µg of pure DNA from the reporter gene ß-gal under SV40 promoter or the vehicle (control oviducts into the oviductal lumen of rats. Twenty four hours later the ß-gal activity was assayed in oviductal tissue homogenates using o-nitrophenyl-ß-D-galactopyranoside as a substrate. The administration of ß-gal mRNA and pSVBgal plasmid increased ß-gal activity by 71% and 142%, respectively, over the control oviducts. These results indicate that naked DNA and mRNA coding for ß-gal can enter oviductal cells and be translated into an active enzyme. They are consistent with the interpretation that embryo transport acceleration caused by the injection of estradiol-induced RNA in the oviduct involves translation of the injected mRNA

  4. Influence of dietary spices on the in vivo absorption of ingested β-carotene in experimental rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veda, Supriya; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2011-05-01

    Animal studies were conducted to evaluate the influence of dietary spice compounds, piperine, capsaicin and ginger, on the absorption of orally administered β-carotene and its conversion to vitamin A. In rats maintained on these spice-containing diets for 8 weeks, concentrations of β-carotene and retinol were determined in the serum, liver and intestine 4 h after a single oral administration of β-carotene. β-Carotene concentration was significantly increased in the serum, liver and intestine of piperine- and ginger-fed rats, suggesting improved absorption of β-carotene. However, retinol concentration was not significantly changed in these animals, suggesting that the bioconversion of β-carotene to vitamin A was not similarly influenced. Between the two enzymes involved in the bioconversion of β-carotene to vitamin A, the activity of intestinal and hepatic β-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase was either unaffected or lowered by these spice treatments. The activity of intestinal and hepatic retinal reductase was unaffected by the dietary spices. Activities of these two enzymes involved in the bioconversion of β-carotene to retinal were inhibited by the test spices in vitro, thus corroborating with the in vivo observation. Although the bioconversion of β-carotene was not promoted, increased absorption and tissue levels of β-carotene by the dietary spices may contribute to a higher antioxidant protection.

  5. A wireless beta-microprobe based on pixelated silicon for in vivo brain studies in freely moving rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märk, J.; Benoit, D.; Balasse, L.; Benoit, M.; Clémens, J. C.; Fieux, S.; Fougeron, D.; Graber-Bolis, J.; Janvier, B.; Jevaud, M.; Genoux, A.; Gisquet-Verrier, P.; Menouni, M.; Pain, F.; Pinot, L.; Tourvielle, C.; Zimmer, L.; Morel, C.; Laniece, P.

    2013-07-01

    The investigation of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the functional specificity of brain regions requires the development of technologies that are well adjusted to in vivo studies in small animals. An exciting challenge remains the combination of brain imaging and behavioural studies, which associates molecular processes of neuronal communications to their related actions. A pixelated intracerebral probe (PIXSIC) presents a novel strategy using a submillimetric probe for beta+ radiotracer detection based on a pixelated silicon diode that can be stereotaxically implanted in the brain region of interest. This fully autonomous detection system permits time-resolved high sensitivity measurements of radiotracers with additional imaging features in freely moving rats. An application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) allows for parallel signal processing of each pixel and enables the wireless operation. All components of the detector were tested and characterized. The beta+ sensitivity of the system was determined with the probe dipped into radiotracer solutions. Monte Carlo simulations served to validate the experimental values and assess the contribution of gamma noise. Preliminary implantation tests on anaesthetized rats proved PIXSIC's functionality in brain tissue. High spatial resolution allows for the visualization of radiotracer concentration in different brain regions with high temporal resolution.

  6. The in vivo situation of 3H-Aescin which had been administered orally and subcutaneously to rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Hayase, Shigeru.

    1975-01-01

    The in vivo situation of the Aescin, a product of aesculus hippocastanum, was examined by administering the 3 H labelled compounds to rats. The following results were obtained: 1) The intestinal absorption from oral administration was not so fast. The blood concentration was low, and its combination with plasma protein was slight. 2) As for the distribution in the organs after an oral administration, the affinity was relatively high in the following organs: Pancreas>heart>kidney>adrenal>gland>lung>muscle>liver. However, the concentrations were extremely low being shown by a ng unit per g tissue in the organs. 3) When it was administered orally to the pregnant rats, the concentrations which were transmitted to the fetuses were low. 4) On the 7th day after oral administration, excretion into the urine was less than 3% and in the feces was more than 70%. The bile excretion was also observed. 5) The metabolic products in the excretion after the oral administration were examined by the method. A large amount of Aescin was excreted in an unchanged form or in compounds. From this, Aescin is presumed to be metabolised by the activity of intestinal bacterial enzymes. 6) The absorption of this drug into the body was low when it was intracutaneously administered. (Saito, K.)

  7. Effect of complex polyphenols and tannins from red wine on DNA oxidative damage of rat colon mucosa in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, L; Testa, G; De Filippo, C; Cheynier, V; Clifford, M N; Dolara, P

    2000-10-01

    Dietary polyphenols have been reported to have a variety of biological actions, including anti-carcinogenic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study we have evaluated the effect of an oral treatment with complex polyphenols and tannins from red wine and tea on DNA oxidative damage in the rat colon mucosa. Isolated colonocytes were prepared from the colon mucosa of rats treated for ten days with either wine complex polyphenols (57.2 mg/kg/d) or thearubigin (40 mg/kg/d) by oral gavage. Colonocyte oxidative DNA damage was analysed at the single cell level using a modification of the comet assay technique. The results show that wine complex polyphenols and tannins induce a significant decrease (-62% for pyrimidine and -57% for purine oxidation) in basal DNA oxidative damage in colon mucosal cells without affecting the basal level of single-strand breaks. On the other hand, tea polyphenols, namely a crude extract of thearubigin, did not affect either strand breaks or pyrimidine oxidation in colon mucosal cells. Our experiments are the first demonstration that dietary polyphenols can modulate in vivo oxidative damage in the gastrointestinal tract of rodents. These data support the hypothesis that dietary polyphenols might have both a protective and a therapeutic potential in oxidative damage-related pathologies.

  8. The metabolism of aflatoxin B1 by hepatocytes isolated from rats following the in vivo administration of some xenobiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, S.A.; Neal, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    Isolated rat hepatocytes, an intact cellular system capable of performing phase I and phase II metabolism, have been used to investigate metabolism of aflatoxin B1. These cells were found to metabolise [ 14 C]aflatoxin B1 to aflatoxins M1 and Q1, and to radiolabelled polar material, presumably conjugates, as analysed by h.p.l.c., t.l.c. and radioactive determination. In vivo administration of the mixed function oxidase inducers, phenobarbitone and 3-methylcholanthrene, resulted in enhanced hepatocyte phase I (microsomal) metabolism of aflatoxin B1. In contrast to metabolism of AFB1 by in vitro subcellular systems increased production of polar material (conjugated metabolites) derived from [ 14 C]aflatoxin B1 was also detected in hepatocytes isolated from these pretreated animals. Formation of aflatoxin Q1 by isolated hepatocytes appeared to be mediated by cytochrome P450-linked enzymes whereas cytochrome P448-linked enzymes were apparently involved in aflatoxin M1 production. Chronic feeding of aflatoxin B1 to rats enhanced hepatocyte production of conjugated material only and did not elevate cellular cytochrome P450 levels, thus suggesting that aflatoxin B1 is not an inducer of its own primary metabolism

  9. In vivo antidiabetic and antioxidant potential of Helichrysum plicatum ssp. plicatum capitulums in streptozotocin-induced-diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Mustafa; Deliorman Orhan, Didem; Orhan, Nilüfer; Sezik, Ekrem; Yesilada, Erdem

    2007-01-03

    Helichrysum species (Asteraceae) are widely found in Anatolia. Decoction prepared from the capitulums of Helichrysum plicatum ssp. plicatum is used to alleviate the symptoms of diabetes mellitus in folk medicine. In the present study, the hypoglycaemic and antioxidant potential of Helichrysum plicatum ssp. plicatum was evaluated by using in vivo methods in normal and streptozotocin-induced-diabetic rats. After the oral administration of water and ethanolic extracts at doses of 500mg/kg body weight prepared from the capitulums of plant, blood glucose levels were monitored at specific intervals. Tolbutamide was used as a reference drug at a dose of 100mg/kg. The experimental data indicated that water and ethanol extracts of capitulums demonstrate significant antihyperglycaemic and antioxidant activity in streptozotocin-induced rats which confirmed the folkloric utilization. In order to assess the role of polyphenolic components in the relevant activity, phenolic and flavonoid contents of each extract were also determined in terms of total phenols: 113.5+/-8.6mg (gallic acid equivalent/1g extract) and total flavanoids 50.5+/-1.9mg (quercetin equivalent/1g extract) for ethanol extract, total phenols: 75.9+/-3.7, flavonoids: 31.5+/-2.3 for water extract using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent.

  10. Resistance to DNA Damaging Agents Produced Invasive Phenotype of Rat Glioma Cells—Characterization of a New in Vivo Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Stojković

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemoresistance and invasion properties are severe limitations to efficient glioma therapy. Therefore, development of glioma in vivo models that more accurately resemble the situation observed in patients emerges. Previously, we established RC6 rat glioma cell line resistant to DNA damaging agents including antiglioma approved therapies such as 3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU and temozolomide (TMZ. Herein, we evaluated the invasiveness of RC6 cells in vitro and in a new orthotopic animal model. For comparison, we used C6 cells from which RC6 cells originated. Differences in cell growth properties were assessed by real-time cell analyzer. Cells’ invasive potential in vitro was studied in fluorescently labeled gelatin and by formation of multicellular spheroids in hydrogel. For animal studies, fluorescently labeled cells were inoculated into adult male Wistar rat brains. Consecutive coronal and sagittal brain sections were analyzed 10 and 25 days post-inoculation, while rats’ behavior was recorded during three days in the open field test starting from 25th day post-inoculation. We demonstrated that development of chemoresistance induced invasive phenotype of RC6 cells with significant behavioral impediments implying usefulness of orthotopic RC6 glioma allograft in preclinical studies for the examination of new approaches to counteract both chemoresistance and invasion of glioma cells.

  11. In vivo blockade of acetylcholinesterase increases intraovarian acetylcholine and enhances follicular development and fertility in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urra, Javier; Blohberger, Jan; Tiszavari, Michelle; Mayerhofer, Artur; Lara, Hernan E

    2016-07-21

    Growth and differentiation of ovarian follicles are regulated by systemic and local factors, which may include acetylcholine (ACh). Granulosa cells (GCs) of growing follicles and luteal cells produce ACh and in cultured GCs it exerts trophic actions via muscarinic receptors. However, such actions were not studied in vivo. After having established that rat ovarian GCs and luteal cells express the ACh-metabolizing enzyme ACh esterase (AChE), we examined the consequences of local application of an AChE inhibitor, huperzine A (HupA), by osmotic minipump delivery into the ovarian bursa of hemiovariectomized rats. Saline was used in the control group. Local delivery of HupA for 4 weeks increased ovarian ACh content. Estrus cyclicity was not changed indicating a locally restricted range of HupA action. The number of primordial and primary follicles was unaffected, but small secondary follicles significantly increased in the HupA group. Furthermore, a significant increase in the number of corpora lutea suggested increased ovulatory events. In support, as shown upon mating, HupA-treated females had significantly increased implantation sites and more pups. Thus the data are in support of a trophic role of ACh in follicular development and ovulation and point to an important role of ACh in female fertility.

  12. In vivo binding in rat brain and radiopharmaceutical preparation of radioiodinated HEAT, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couch, M.W.; Greer, D.M.; Thonoor, C.M.; Williams, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    In vivo binding of [ 125 I]-2-[beta-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylaminomethyl tetralone) ([ 125 I]HEAT) to alpha-1 adrenoceptors in the rat brain was determined over 4 hr. Uptake in the thalamus and frontal cortex was approximately 0.1% injected dose per gram tissue. Thalamus/cerebellum ratios of 10:1 and frontal cortex/cerebellum ratios of 5:1 were found at 4 hr. Pretreatment with prazosin, an alpha-1 antagonist, completely inhibited the accumulation of [ 125 I]HEAT in thalamus and frontal cortex; yet uptake of radioactivity was not significantly affected by antagonists and agonists for other receptors classes (propranolol, beta-1; apomorphine, D-1; spiperone, D-2). Binding of [ 125 I]HEAT is saturable. At 4 hr, [ 125 I]HEAT or [ 123 I]HEAT was shown to be the only radioactive material in rat thalamus and frontal cortex. Iodine-123 HEAT and [ 125 I]HEAT were synthesized as radiopharmaceuticals within 3 hr in 99% radiochemical purity

  13. In vivo situation of /sup 3/H-Aescin which had been administered orally and subcutaneously to rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, T; Matsumoto, Y [Tokyo Coll. of Pharmacy (Japan); Hayase, S

    1975-08-01

    The in vivo situation of the Aescin, a product of aesculus hippocastanum, was examined by administering the /sup 3/H labelled compounds to rats. The following results were obtained: (1) The intestinal absorption from oral administration was not so fast. The blood concentration was low, and its combination with plasma protein was slight. (2) As for the distribution in the organs after an oral administration, the affinity was relatively high in the following organs: Pancreas(3)heart>kidney>adrenal>gland>lung>muscle>liver. However, the concentrations were extremely low being shown by a ng unit per g tissue in the organs. 3) When it was administered orally to the pregnant rats, the concentrations which were transmitted to the fetuses were low. (4) On the 7th day after oral administration, excretion into the urine was less than 3% and in the feces was more than 70%. The bile excretion was also observed. (5) The metabolic products in the excretion after the oral administration were examined by the method. A large amount of Aescin was excreted in an unchanged form or in compounds. From this, Aescin is presumed to be metabolised by the activity of intestinal bacterial enzymes. (6) The absorption of this drug into the body was low when it was intracutaneously administered.

  14. Sedimentation of nucleoids from thymus and spleen cells of rats after X-irradiation in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzelmann, R.

    1987-01-01

    The reaction to irradiation of thymocytes was tested immediately and 6 hours after whole body X-irradiation of rats with doses from 190 cGy up to 1520 cGy by nucleoid sedimentation. For comparison, examinations of thymus and spleen cells after X-irradiation in vitro were done. Preliminary analyses should find a possible coergism between X-rays on one side and hyperthermia and inhibitors of DNA-synthesis or DNA-repair (cytosinearabinoside, dideoxythymidine, 3-amino-benzamide, ethidiumbromide, and novobiocine) on the other side. From the results the following conclusions may be drawn: 1) With respect to the detection of in vivo effects of X-irradiation, the nucleoid sedimentation is less sensitive than biochemical methods. 2) Some hours after sublethal X-irradiation in vivo, free DNA and/or polydesoxyribonucleotides appear. At the same time cross-links can be detected in the chromatin fraction. 3) The reduction of the nucleoid sedimentation immediately after high doses of whole-body irradiation is the result of primary DNA lesions. The changes detectable some hours after are due to the secondary enzymatic changes, that are connected with the interphase death of thymocytes, and coincide with the present opinions about the irradiation induced apoptosis of cells. (orig./ECB) [de

  15. Different mechanisms of modulation of gap junction communication by non-genotoxic carcinogens in rat liver in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowles, C.; Mally, A.; Chipman, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    This is a comparative study of the mechanisms by which three different rodent non-genotoxic carcinogens modulate connexin-mediated gap junction intercellular communication in male rat liver in vivo. In the case of the peroxisome proliferating agent Wy-14,643, a non-hepatotoxic dose of 50 mg/kg led to a marked loss of inter-hepatocyte dye transfer associated with a loss of both Cx32 and Cx26 protein expression. In contrast, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) at a non-hepatotoxic dose (25 mg/kg) was not found to alter Cx32 or Cx26 expression or to produce a measurable Cx32 serine phosphorylation but did give a small, significant reduction of cell communication. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) did not affect cell communication (despite a small significant reduction of Cx32 content) at a non-hepatotoxic dose. Both loss of communication and Cx32 expression was observed only at a dose that caused hepatocyte toxicity as evidenced by increased serum alanine aminotransferase activity. Overall, the findings emphasise that loss of gap junctional communication in vivo can contribute to carcinogenesis by non-genotoxic carcinogens through different primary mechanism. In contrast to Wy-14,643 and DDT, the results with CCl 4 are consistent with a requirement for hepatotoxicity in its carcinogenic action

  16. In vivo effects of naproxen, salicylic acid, and valproic acid on the pharmacokinetics of trichloroethylene and metabolites in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhou, Mouna Cheikh; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Haddad, Sami

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that some drugs modulate in vitro metabolism of trichloroethylene (TCE) in humans and rats. The objective was to assess in vivo interactions between TCE and three drugs: naproxen (NA), valproic acid (VA), and salicylic acid (SA). Animals were exposed to TCE by inhalation (50 ppm for 6 h) and administered a bolus dose of drug by gavage, equivalent to 10-fold greater than the recommended daily dose. Samples of blood, urine, and collected tissues were analyzed by headspace gas chromatography coupled to an electron capture detector for TCE and metabolites (trichloroethanol [TCOH] and trichloroacetate [TCA]) levels. Coexposure to NA and TCE significantly increased (up to 50%) total and free TCOH (TCOHtotal and TCOHfree, respectively) in blood. This modulation may be explained by an inhibition of glucuronidation. VA significantly elevated TCE levels in blood (up to 50%) with a marked effect on TCOHtotal excretion in urine but not in blood. In contrast, SA produced an increase in TCOHtotal levels in blood at 30, 60, and 90 min and urine after coexposure. Data confirm in vitro observations that NA, VA, and SA affect in vivo TCE kinetics. Future efforts need to be directed to evaluate whether populations chronically medicated with the considered drugs display greater health risks related to TCE exposure.

  17. Complex computation in the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Nikhil Rajiv

    Elucidating the general principles of computation in neural circuits is a difficult problem requiring both a tractable model circuit as well as sophisticated measurement tools. This thesis advances our understanding of complex computation in the salamander retina and its underlying circuitry and furthers the development of advanced tools to enable detailed study of neural circuits. The retina provides an ideal model system for neural circuits in general because it is capable of producing complex representations of the visual scene, and both its inputs and outputs are accessible to the experimenter. Chapter 2 describes the biophysical mechanisms that give rise to the omitted stimulus response in retinal ganglion cells described in Schwartz et al., (2007) and Schwartz and Berry, (2008). The extra response to omitted flashes is generated at the input to bipolar cells, and is separable from the characteristic latency shift of the OSR apparent in ganglion cells, which must occur downstream in the circuit. Chapter 3 characterizes the nonlinearities at the first synapse of the ON pathway in response to high contrast flashes and develops a phenomenological model that captures the effect of synaptic activation and intracellular signaling dynamics on flash responses. This work is the first attempt to model the dynamics of the poorly characterized mGluR6 transduction cascade unique to ON bipolar cells, and explains the second lobe of the biphasic flash response. Complementary to the study of neural circuits, recent advances in wafer-scale photolithography have made possible new devices to measure the electrical and mechanical properties of neurons. Chapter 4 reports a novel piezoelectric sensor that facilitates the simultaneous measurement of electrical and mechanical signals in neural tissue. This technology could reveal the relationship between the electrical activity of neurons and their local mechanical environment, which is critical to the study of mechanoreceptors

  18. Secretory phospholipase A2 potentiates glutamate-induced rat striatal neuronal cell death in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; Bruhn, T; Christensen, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) OS2 (10, 20 and 50 pmol) or OS1, (50 pmol) purified from taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus scutellatus venom, and the excitatory amino acid glutamate (Glu) (2.5 and 5.0 micromol) were injected into the right striatum of male Wistar rats. Injection of 10...... no tissue damage or neurological abnormality. After injection of 5.0 micromol Glu, the animals initially circled towards the side of injection, and gradually developed generalized clonic convulsions. These animals showed a well demarcated striatal infarct. When non-toxic concentrations of 20 pmol OS2 and 2.......5 micromol Glu were co-injected, a synergistic neurotoxicity was observed. Extensive histological damage occurred in the entire right hemisphere, and in several rats comprising part of the contralateral hemisphere. These animals were apathetic in the immediate hours following injection, with circling towards...

  19. In vivo assessment of intracellular redox state in rat liver using hyperpolarized [1-13 C]Alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Mo; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Liu, Shie-Chau; Hurd, Ralph E; Spielman, Daniel M

    2017-05-01

    The intracellular lactate to pyruvate concentration ratio is a commonly used tissue assay biomarker of redox, being proportional to free cytosolic [NADH]/[NAD + ]. In this study, we assessed the use of hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]alanine and the subsequent detection of the intracellular products of [1- 13 C]pyruvate and [1- 13 C]lactate as a useful substrate for assessing redox levels in the liver in vivo. Animal experiments were conducted to measure in vivo metabolism at baseline and after ethanol infusion. A solution of 80-mM hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]alanine was injected intravenously at baseline (n = 8) and 45 min after ethanol infusion (n = 4), immediately followed by the dynamic acquisition of 13 C MRS spectra. In vivo rat liver spectra showed peaks from [1- 13 C] alanine and the products of [1- 13 C]lactate, [1- 13 C]pyruvate, and 13 C-bicarbonate. A significantly increased 13 C-lactate/ 13 C-pyruvate ratio was observed after ethanol infusion (8.46 ± 0.58 at baseline versus 13.58 ± 0.69 after ethanol infusion; P alanine is presented, with the validity of the proposed 13 C-pyruvate/ 13 C-lactate metric tested using an ethanol challenge to alter liver redox state. Magn Reson Med 77:1741-1748, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Correlation of regional disease and in vivo PO2 in rat mammary adenocarcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, M. A.; Crawford, D. W.; Warner, N. E.; Puffer, H. W.

    1983-01-01

    A knowledge of the distribution of oxygen tension (PO2) and vascularization in neoplasia has been fundamental to understanding relationships between tumor growth, hypoxia, and therapy. We have combined recessed oxygen microcathode and freeze-substitution techniques to correlate in situ PO2 profiles and morphologic features in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) tumors in rats. Overlying connective tissue of transplanted tumor was exposed by a 1-2 mm incision and a cross-stitch pattern demar...

  1. Experimental chronic kidney disease attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury in an ex vivo rat lung model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Kan Peng

    Full Text Available Lung ischemia reperfusion injury (LIRI is one of important complications following lung transplant and cardiopulmonary bypass. Although patients on hemodialysis are still excluded as lung transplant donors because of the possible effects of renal failure on the lungs, increased organ demand has led us to evaluate the influence of chronic kidney disease (CKD on LIRI. A CKD model was induced by feeding Sprague-Dawley rats an adenine-rich (0.75% diet for 2, 4 and 6 weeks, and an isolated rat lung in situ model was used to evaluate ischemia reperfusion (IR-induced acute lung injury. The clinicopathological parameters of LIRI, including pulmonary edema, lipid peroxidation, histopathological changes, immunohistochemistry changes, chemokine CXCL1, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, heat shock protein expression, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation were determined. Our results indicated that adenine-fed rats developed CKD as characterized by increased blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and the deposition of crystals in the renal tubules and interstitium. IR induced a significant increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure, lung edema, lung injury scores, the expression of CXCL1 mRNA, iNOS level, and protein concentration of the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF. The tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the BALF and perfusate; the interleukin-10 level in the perfusate; and the malondialdehyde levels in the lung tissue and perfusate were also significantly increased by LIRI. Counterintuitively, adenine-induced CKD significantly attenuated the severity of lung injury induced by IR. CKD rats exhibited increased heat shock protein 70 expression and decreased activation of NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, adenine-induced CKD attenuated LIRI by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway.

  2. Local signaling from a retinal prosthetic in a rodent retinitis pigmentosa model in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, James W.; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). Approach. PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. Main results. When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (⩽7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells. The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Significance. Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent processing within

  3. Effect of exercise training on in vivo lipolysis in intra-abdominal adipose tissue in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, L H; Stallknecht, B; Fluckey, J D

    2000-01-01

    Intra-abdominal obesity is associated with cardiovascular disease and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and physical training has been suggested to alleviate these conditions. We compared epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis in vivo in three intra-abdominal adipose tissues (ATs: retroperitonea...... be beneficial in alleviating intra-abdominal obesity by enhancing lipolysis in intra-abdominal fat depots.......Intra-abdominal obesity is associated with cardiovascular disease and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and physical training has been suggested to alleviate these conditions. We compared epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis in vivo in three intra-abdominal adipose tissues (ATs: retroperitoneal......: 73 +/- 12 (trained) vs. 14 +/- 4 (sedentary) ml. 100 g(-1). min(-1), P abdominal than in subcutaneous AT in both trained...

  4. IL-6 has no acute effect on the regulation of urea synthesis in vivo in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Karen; Aagaard, Niels Kristian; Grønbæk, Henning

    2011-01-01

    Clinical or experimentally induced, active inflammation up-regulates the in vivo capacity of urea synthesis (CUNS), which promotes nitrogen removal from the body and metabolic catabolism. We have shown that tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a) up-regulates CUNS and increases interleukin 6 expression (IL......-6) within hours of administration. The described effect of TNF-a on nitrogen homeostasis may, therefore, depend on IL-6....

  5. An analog silicon retina with multichip configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Seiji; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2006-01-01

    The neuromorphic silicon retina is a novel analog very large scale integrated circuit that emulates the structure and the function of the retinal neuronal circuit. We fabricated a neuromorphic silicon retina, in which sample/hold circuits were embedded to generate fluctuation-suppressed outputs in the previous study [1]. The applications of this silicon retina, however, are limited because of a low spatial resolution and computational variability. In this paper, we have fabricated a multichip silicon retina in which the functional network circuits are divided into two chips: the photoreceptor network chip (P chip) and the horizontal cell network chip (H chip). The output images of the P chip are transferred to the H chip with analog voltages through the line-parallel transfer bus. The sample/hold circuits embedded in the P and H chips compensate for the pattern noise generated on the circuits, including the analog communication pathway. Using the multichip silicon retina together with an off-chip differential amplifier, spatial filtering of the image with an odd- and an even-symmetric orientation selective receptive fields was carried out in real time. The analog data transfer method in the present multichip silicon retina is useful to design analog neuromorphic multichip systems that mimic the hierarchical structure of neuronal networks in the visual system.

  6. Towards metabolic mapping of the human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, D; Schenke, S; Hammer, M; Schweitzer, F; Jentsch, S; Birckner, E; Becker, W; Bergmann, A

    2007-05-01

    = 190 ps) originates from the retinal pigment epithelium and the second lifetime (t2 = 1,000 ps) from the neural retina. The lifetime t3 approximately 5.5 ns might be influenced by the long decay of the fluorescence in the crystalline lens. In vitro analysis of the spectral properties of expected fluorophores under the condition of the living eye lightens the interpretation of in vivo measurements. Taking into account the transmission of the ocular media, the excitation of NADH is unlikely at the fundus. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant lymphocytes in Fischer 344 rats following in vivo exposure to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aidoo, A.; Lyn-Cook, L.E.; Mittelstaedt, R.A.; Heflich, R.H.; Casciano, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have developed a limiting dilution clonal assay for determining the frequency of 6-thioguanine-resistant (TG r ) lymphocytes produced in rats by in vivo exposure to genotoxic agents. Lymphocyte cloning efficiencies (CEs) were highest in plates containing both irradiated TK6 cells and irradiated autologous feeder cells. To measure the effects of chemical mutagens on the frequency of TG r lymphocytes, rats were given a single i.p. injection of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), a direct-acting alkylating agent, cyclophosphamide (CP), an indirect acting alkylating agent. Lymphocytes were isolated, primed, and cloned at 4 weeks after CP treatment and at 1,2,4 and 6 weeks after ENU treatment. CE in these cultures ranged from 12% to 27%. Cultures were also established for measuring CE in the presence of 6-thioguanine (TG). The dose-dependent responses obtained with both ENU and CP treatments suggest that rat lymphocytes are sensitive to direct- and indirect-acting alkylating agents administered in vivo and that the rat lymphocyte assay is a useful complement to the in vivo/in vitro mouse assay for determining the mutagenicity of environmental toxicants

  8. Combined Impact of Gamma and Laser Radiation on Peripheral Blood of Rats in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Batay, L. E.; Koshlan, I. V.; Nasek, V. M.; Zilberman, R. D.; Milevich, T. I.; Govorun, R. D.; Koshlan, N. A.; Blaga, P.

    2017-11-01

    The impact of γ radiation of 137Cs (doses of 1 and 3 Gy), low-intensity laser radiation (λ = 670 nm, 5.3 or 10.6 J/cm2) as well as the influence of consecutive laser and γ radiation on peripheral blood and blood cells (erythrocytes, leukocytes, lymphocytes, granulocytes) were studied by analyzing the number of blood cells, blood absorption spectra, and activity of antioxidant defense enzymes. Two series of experiments were performed on four groups of rats. The rats of the control group (group 1) were not exposed to γ or laser radiation. In the experimental groups, single irradiation of the whole body of rats with γ radiation (group 2), three- or four-day over-vein irradiation of blood in the tail vein by low-intensity laser radiation (group 3), and successive three- or four-day irradiation of blood by laser and then a single irradiation of the whole body with γ radiation (group 4) were performed. It was shown that changes of the blood cell content in the experimental groups are accompanied by changes in the spectral characteristics of the blood and the activity of antioxidant defense enzymes. The radioprotective effect of low-intensity laser radiation is manifested as an increase in the average number of leukocytes and lymphocytes in the group as compared with the postradiation, as well as an increase in the activity of antioxidant protection enzymes. The possibility of using low-intensity optical radiation for correction of hematological disorders caused by ionizing radiation is discussed.

  9. Transient inhibitory effect of methoxychlor on testicular steroidogenesis in rat: an in vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaithinathan, S.; Saradha, B.; Mathur, P.P. [Pondicherry University, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry (India)

    2008-11-15

    Methoxychlor, an organochlorine pesticide, has been reported to induce reproductive abnormalities in male reproductive tract. To get more insight into the mechanism(s) of gonadal toxicity provoked by methoxychlor, we investigated whether treatment with methoxychlor at low observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) would alter the activities of steroidogenic enzymes such as {delta}{sup 5}3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3{beta}-HSD) and {delta}{sup 5}17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17{beta}-HSD), the expression levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein and androgen binding protein (ABP) in the testis of adult male rats. The experimental rats were exposed to a single dose of methoxychlor (50 mg/kg body weight) orally. The rats were killed at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 72 h following treatment using anesthetic ether and testes were collected, processed and used to measure the activities of 3{beta}-HSD, 17{beta}-HSD, levels of hydrogen peroxide produced and the expression levels of StAR protein, and ABP. Methoxychlor administration resulted in a sequential reduction in the expression of StAR protein and activities of 3{beta}-HSD, 17{beta}-HSD with concomitant increase in the levels of hydrogen peroxide in the testis. These changes were significant between 6-12 h following treatment. The levels of ABP declined at 6-12 h following exposure to methoxychlor. The present study demonstrates transient effect of methoxychlor at LOAEL on testicular steroidogenesis and the possible role of hydrogen peroxide in mediating these effects. (orig.)

  10. A rat monoclonal antibody that recognizes pro- and active MMP-7 indicates polarized expression in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fingleton, Barbara; Powell, William C; Crawford, Howard C

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes named for their ability to degrade proteins of the extracellular matrix. Here we describe the characterization of a rat monoclonal antibody specifically recognizing one member of this enzyme family, MMP-7. This antibody has been tested...... for its use in multiple assay types and was shown to be useful for direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of frozen or paraffin-embedded tissues. The antibody has been evaluated for its usefulness with tissues from several...

  11. Administration of exercise-conditioned plasma alters muscle catalase kinetics in rat: An argument for in vivo-like Km instead of in vitro-like Vmax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Paschalis, Vassilis; Kyparos, Antonios; Nikolaidis, Michalis G

    2018-05-01

    Maximal velocity (V max ) is a well established biomarker for the assessment of tissue redox status. There is scarce evidence, though, that it does not probably reflect sufficiently in vivo tissue redox profile. Instead, the Michaelis constant (K m ) could more adequately image tissue oxidative stress and, thus, be a more physiologically relevant redox biomarker. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to side-by-side compare V max and K m of an antioxidant enzyme after implementing an in vivo set up that induces alterations in tissue redox status. Forty rats were divided into two groups including rats injected with blood plasma originating from rats that had previously swam until exhaustion and rats injected with blood plasma originating from sedentary rats. Tail-vein injections were performed daily for 21 days. Catalase V max and K m measured in gastrocnemius muscle were increased after administration of the exercise-conditioned plasma, denoting enhancement of the enzyme activity but impairment of its affinity for the substrate, respectively. These alterations are potential adaptations stimulated by the administered plasma pointing out that blood is an active fluid capable of regulating tissue homeostasis. Our findings suggest that K m adequately reflects in vivo modifications of skeletal muscle catalase and seems to surpass V max regarding its physiological relevance and biological interpretation. In conclusion, K m can be regarded as an in vivo-like biomarker that satisfactorily images the intracellular environment, as compared to V max that could be aptly parallelized with a biomarker that describes tissue oxidative stress in an in vitro manner. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. In vivo distribution of Tc-99m labeled recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator in control and thrombus-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Eriko

    1992-01-01

    In vivo distribution of Tc-99m labeled recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (Tc-99m-rt-PA) was studied in control rats and thrombus-bearing rats. To compare fibrin binding in vivo with that in vitro, Tc-99m-rt-PA binding to fibrin gel in vitro was also imaged. Rapid blood clearance and accumulation into the liver and kidneys were observed in both control and thrombus-bearing rats. Accumulation in the stomach, which indicates instability of labeled rt-PA in vivo, was very low until two hours after injection. Tc-99m-rt-PA accumulation in the clots was higher than that in skeletal and heart muscles, although it was lower than in blood, liver, and kidneys. Administration of aprotinin, an antifibrinolytic agent, significantly prolonged clot accumulation of Tc-99m-rt-PA at 30 minutes after injection. These results suggest that fibrinolysis is responsible for the low rt-PA concentration in the clots. A scintigram of a thrombus-bearing rat demonstrated increased radioactivity at the clot forming site. On the other hand, Tc-99m-labeled human albumin, which was used as a control, was not accumulated in the clot. Tc-99m-rt-PA binding to fibrin gel in vitro was clearly imaged. By comparison, in vivo fibrin binding of Tc-99m-rt-PA was much lower than in vitro. The reasons for low thrombus uptake in vivo may be: (1) biochemical inactivation of extrinsically administered rt-PA by t-PA inhibitor; (2) fibrinolysis by rt-PA activated plasminogen. Overcoming these limitations will enable Tc-99m-rt-PA to reach the stage of clinical trials. (author)

  13. Analysis of MTHFR, CBS, Glutathione, Taurine, and Hydrogen Sulfide Levels in Retinas of Hyperhomocysteinemic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xuezhi; Navneet, Soumya; Wang, Jing; Roon, Penny; Chen, Wei; Xian, Ming; Smith, Sylvia B

    2017-04-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy) is implicated in certain retinal neurovascular diseases, although whether it is causative remains uncertain. In isolated ganglion cells (GCs), mild Hhcy induces profound death, whereas retinal phenotypes in Hhcy mice caused by mutations in remethylation (methylene tetrahydrofolatereductase [Mthfr+/-]) or transsulfuration pathways (cystathionine β-synthase [Cbs+/-]) demonstrate mild GC loss and mild vasculopathy. The current work investigated compensation in vivo of one pathway for the other, and, because the transsulfuration pathway yields cysteine necessary for formation of glutathione (GSH), taurine, and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), they were analyzed also. Retinas isolated from wild-type (WT), Mthfr+/-, and Cbs+/- mice (12 and 22 weeks) were analyzed for methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), and cystathionase (CTH) RNA/protein levels. Retinas were evaluated for levels of reduced:oxidized GSH (GSH:GSSG), Slc7a11 (xCT), taurine, taurine transporter (TAUT), and H2S. Aside from decreased CBS RNA/protein levels in Cbs+/- retinas, there were minimal alterations in remethylation/transsulfuration pathways in the two mutant mice strains. Glutathione and taurine levels in Mthfr+/- and Cbs+/- retinas were similar to WT, which may be due to robust levels of xCT and TAUT in mutant retinas. Interestingly, levels of H2S were markedly increased in retinas of Mthfr+/- and Cbs+/- mice compared with WT. Ganglion cell loss and vasculopathy observed in Mthfr+/- and Cbs+/- mouse retinas may be milder than expected, not because of compensatory increases of enzymes in remethylation/transsulfuration pathways, but because downstream transsulfuration pathway products GSH, taurine, and H2S are maintained at robust levels. Elevation of H2S is particularly intriguing owing to neuroprotective properties reported for this gasotransmitter.

  14. Some indications of structural damage in retina by heavy ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.C.; Hayes, T.L.; Tobias, C.A.; Yang, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    At the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac Facility, iron nuclei were accelerated to an energy of 600 MeV/amu. The beam of iron thus obtained was used to irradiate living biological specimens in order to study possible microscopic tissue damage with the aid of SEM. The experiments involved total head irradiation of live rats which were subsequently returned to their cages to remain for 1 day and 30 days before further examination. After the 1 day and 30 day waits, both eyes were enucleated and placed in chemical fixative followed by ethanol dehydration and critical point drying. Retinas were carefully removed from the eye cups and loaded separately on aluminum stubs which were sputter coated. SEM of the 1 day and 30 day retinas revealed lesions which were not found at all in control retinas. The 1 day and 30 day retinas manifest regions where outer rod segments were missing or rearranged. A single energetic iron nucleus may be capable of generating a retinal lesion which becomes enlarged as biological processes intervene during the 1 day and 30 day waits. Being composed of highly specialized nerve cells, retinas cannot regenerate following irradiation which severely damages the rod cells. Thus one would expect the observed radiation induced retinal lesions to correspond to permanent tissue damage and possible loss of visual acuity in the intact animal

  15. in vivo EFFECTS OF RARE-EARTH BASED NANOPARTICLES ON OXIDATIVE BALANCE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Klochkov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to find the influence of rare-earth based nanoparticles (CeO2, GdVO2: Eu3+ on the oxidative balance in rats. We analyzed biochemical markers of oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation level, nitric oxide metabolites, sulfhydryl groups content and enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase in tissues of rats. It has been found that administration of both types of the nanoparticles increased nitric oxide metabolites and products of lipid peroxidation in liver and spleen within 5 days. At injections of GdVO2: Eu3+ lipid peroxidation products, nitric oxide metabolites in serum at 5, 10 and 15 days of the experiment was also increased whereas the level of sulfhydryl groups decreased compared to the intact state and the control. In contrast, under the influence of nanoparticle CeO2 level diene conjugates were not significantly changed and the level of nitric oxide metabolites within 15 day even decreased. During this period, under the influence of both types of nanoparticles the activity of superoxide dismutase was increased, catalase activity was not changed. Oxidative stress coefficient showed the less pronounced CeO2 prooxidant effect (2.04 in comparison to GdVO2: Eu3+ (6.89. However, after-effect of both types of nanoparticles showed complete restoration of oxidative balance values.

  16. Effects of Aluminium on Rat Brain Mitochondria Bioenergetics: an In vitro and In vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-González, Javier; Sánchez-Iglesias, Sofía; Beiras-Iglesias, Andrés; Méndez-Álvarez, Estefanía; Soto-Otero, Ramón

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the potential of aluminium as an aetiological factor for some neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Our previous studies have shown that aluminium can cause oxidative stress, reduce the activity of some antioxidant enzymes, and enhance the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in an experimental model of Parkinson's disease in rats. We now report a study on the effects caused by aluminium on mitochondrial bioenergetics following aluminium addition and after its chronic administration to rats. To develop our study, we used a high-resolution respirometry to test the mitochondrial respiratory capacities under the conditions of coupling, uncoupling, and non-coupling. Our study showed alterations in leakiness, a reduction in the maximum capacity of complex II-linked respiratory pathway, a decline in the respiration efficiency, and a decrease in the activities of complexes III and V in both models studied. The observed effects also included both an alteration in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and a decrease in oxidative phosphorylation capacity when relatively high concentrations of aluminium were added to the isolated mitochondria. These findings contribute to explain both the ability of aluminium to generate oxidative stress and its suggested potential to act as an etiological factor by promoting the progression of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

  17. In vivo mammary tumourigenesis in the Sprague-Dawley rat and microdosimetric correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicello, J F; Christian, A; Cucinotta, F A

    2004-01-01

    Standard methods for risk assessments resulting from human exposures to mixed radiation fields in Space consisting of different particle types and energies rely upon quality factors. These are generally defined as a function of linear energy transfer (LET) and are assumed to be proportional to the risk. In this approach, it is further assumed that the risks for single exposures from each of the radiation types add linearly. Although risks of cancer from acute exposures to photon radiations have been measured in humans, quality factors for protons and ions of heavier atomic mass are generally inferred from animal and/or cellular data. Because only a small amount of data exists for such particles, this group has been examining tumourigenesis initiated by energetic protons and iron ions. In this study, 741 female Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated or sham irradiated at approximately 60 days of age with 250 MeV protons, 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions or both protons and iron ions. The results suggest that the risk of mammary tumours in the rats sequentially irradiated with 1 GeV/nucleon 56 Fe ions and 250 MeV protons is less than additive. These data in conjunction with earlier results further suggest that risk assessments in terms of only mean LETs of the primary cosmic rays may be insufficient to accurately evaluate the relative risks of each type of particle in a radiation field of mixed radiation qualities

  18. In Vivo Detection of the Effect of Electroacupuncture on “Zusanli” Acupoint in Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis through Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Wu, Xiuli; Su, Chengkang; Long, Jia; Lin, Jin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) treatment through optical coherence tomography (OCT) in vivo on rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis. OCT images were obtained from the ankle of the right hind paws of the rats in control, model, and EA groups before modelling and 1 day, 8 days, 15 days, 22 days, and 29 days after modelling. Results demonstrated that the OCT signal of the ankle of the right hind paws of the rats was indistinct compared to 1 day after modelling and before modelling in the EA group. In the EA group, the light averaged attenuation coefficients of the ankle tissues decreased as treatment duration was prolonged after EA was administered (3.43, 2.96, 2.61, 2.42, and 2.29 mm−1, resp.). There was a significant difference in attenuation coefficient decrease between the 29th d and the 1st d for EA group compared with control group (P < 0.01). This condition indicated that the light absorption of the ankle of the treated rats in the EA group decreased. Therefore, OCT can be used to monitor the effect of treatment on rats with arthritis in vivo. PMID:27981046

  19. Effect of high-intensity irradiation from dental photopolymerization on the isolated and superfused vertebrate retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassaei, Mohammad; Thelen, Martin; Abumuaileq, Ramzi; Hescheler, Jürgen; Lüke, Matthias; Schneider, Toni

    2013-03-01

    Light or electromagnetic radiation may damage the neurosensory retina during irradiation of photopolymerizing resinous materials. Direct and indirect effects of irradiation emitted from polymerisation curing light may represent a severe risk factor for the eyes and the skin of the lamp operators, as well as for the patient's oral mucosa. Bovine superfused retinas were used to record their light-evoked electroretinogram (ERG) as ex vivo ERGs. Both the a- and the b-waves were used as indicators for retinal damage on the functional level. The isolated retinas were routinely superfused with a standard nutrient solution under normoglycemic conditions (5 mM D-glucose). The change in the a- and b-wave amplitude and implicit time, caused by low and high intensity irradiation, was calculated and followed over time. From the results, it can be deduced that the irradiation from LED high-power lamps affects severely the normal physiological function of the bovine retina. Irradiations of 1,200 lx irreversibly damaged the physiological response. In part, this may be reversible at lower intensities, but curing without using the appropriate filter will bleach the retinal rhodopsin to a large extent within 20 to 40 s of standard application times. Constant exposure to intense ambient irradiation affects phototransduction (a-wave) as well as transretinal signalling. The proper use of the UV- and blue-light filtering device is highly recommended, and may prevent acute and long lasting damage of the neurosensory retina.

  20. Two-Photon Autofluorescence Imaging Reveals Cellular Structures Throughout the Retina of the Living Primate Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Robin; Williams, David R; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hunter, Jennifer J

    2016-02-01

    Although extrinsic fluorophores can be introduced to label specific cell types in the retina, endogenous fluorophores, such as NAD(P)H, FAD, collagen, and others, are present in all retinal layers. These molecules are a potential source of optical contrast and can enable noninvasive visualization of all cellular layers. We used a two-photon fluorescence adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (TPF-AOSLO) to explore the native autofluorescence of various cell classes spanning several layers in the unlabeled retina of a living primate eye. Three macaques were imaged on separate occasions using a custom TPF-AOSLO. Two-photon fluorescence was evoked by pulsed light at 730 and 920 nm excitation wavelengths, while fluorescence emission was collected in the visible range from several retinal layers and different locations. Backscattered light was recorded simultaneously in confocal modality and images were postprocessed to remove eye motion. All retinal layers yielded two-photon signals and the heterogeneous distribution of fluorophores provided optical contrast. Several structural features were observed, such as autofluorescence from vessel walls, Müller cell processes in the nerve fibers, mosaics of cells in the ganglion cell and other nuclear layers of the inner retina, as well as photoreceptor and RPE layers in the outer retina. This in vivo survey of two-photon autofluorescence throughout the primate retina demonstrates a wider variety of structural detail in the living eye than is available through conventional imaging methods, and broadens the use of two-photon imaging of normal and diseased eyes.

  1. Dopamine denervation does not alter in vivo 3H-spiperone binding in rat striatum: implications for external imaging of dopamine receptors in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.P. Jr.; Wooten, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    Striatal particulate preparations, both from rats with lesion-induced striatal dopamine (DA) loss and from some striatal dopamine (DA) loss and from some patients with Parkinson's disease, exhibit increased 3 H-neuroleptic binding, which is interpreted to be the mechanism of denervation-induced behavioral supersensitivity to dopaminergic compounds. After intravenous 3 H-spiperone ( 3 H-SP) administration to rats with unilateral nigral lesions, we found no differences in accumulation of total or particulate-bound 3 H-SP in dopamine-denervated compared with intact striata. 3 H-SP in vivo binds to less than 10% of striatal sites labeled by 3 H-SP incubated with striatal particulate preparations in vitro. Quantitative autoradiography of 3 H-SP binding to striatal sections in vitro also failed to reveal any effects of dopamine denervation. 3 H-SP bound to striatal sites in vivo dissociates more slowly than that bound to striatal particulate preparations labeled in vitro. Striatal binding properties of 3 H-SP administered in vivo are quite different from the same kinetic binding parameters estimated in vitro using crude membrane preparations of striatum. In addition, striatal binding of in vivo-administered 3H-SP is not affected by prior lesion of the substantia nigra, which results in profound ipsilateral striatal dopamine depletion. Thus, behavioral supersensitivity to dopaminergic compounds may not be associated with altered striatal binding properties for dopamine receptor ligands in vivo

  2. Increased expression of IRE1α and stress-related signal transduction proteins in ischemia-reperfusion injured retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuyo Hata

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Natsuyo Hata1, Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Akiko Yokoyama1,3, Yoshinori Mitamura1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, Japan; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Inoue Memorial Hospital, Chuo-ku, Chiba, JapanAbstract: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the expression of ER stress-related factors IRE1α, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1, SAPK/ERK kinase 1 (SEK1 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK is associated with the damaged retinal neurons induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury. After 60 minutes of ischemia, the rat retinas were reperfused, and retinas were isolated and fixed after 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 hours, and 2, 5, and 9 days of reperfusion. Cryosections were immunostained with Fluoro-Jade B, a degenerating neuron marker to label degenerating neurons. Semi-quantitative analysis of the expression of IRE1α, ASK1, SEK1, and JNK were performed in both control and ischemic retinas. In ischemic retinas, the intensities of IRE1α immunoreactivity in the ganglion cell layer (GCL were significantly higher than in the control retinas. In ischemic retinas, the numbers of SEK1-, ASK1-, and JNK-positive cells were significantly increased in the GCL compared to those in the control retinas. In addition, the cells that were positive for SEK1-, ASK1-, and JNK were also positive for Fluoro-Jade B-positive cells. These results indicate that the increased expression of ER stress-related factors was, in part, associated with the retinal neuronal abnormalities after ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat retinas.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum, IRE1α, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, SAPK/ERK kinase 1, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, Fluoro-Jade B, ischemia-reperfusion injury

  3. Brazilian Green Propolis Protects against Retinal Damage In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Inokuchi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis, a honeybee product, has gained popularity as a food and alternative medicine. Its constituents have been shown to exert pharmacological (anticancer, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated whether Brazilian green propolis exerts neuroprotective effects in the retina in vitro and/or in vivo. In vitro, retinal damage was induced by 24 h hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 exposure, and cell viability was measured by Hoechst 33342 and YO-PRO-1 staining or by a resazurin–reduction assay. Propolis inhibited the neurotoxicity and apoptosis induced in cultured retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5, a rat ganglion cell line transformed using E1A virus by 24 h H2O2 exposure. Propolis also inhibited the neurotoxicity induced in RGC-5 cultures by staurosporine. Regarding the possible underlying mechanism, in pig retina homogenates propolis protected against oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, as also did trolox (water-soluble vitamin E. In mice in vivo, propolis (100 mg kg−1; intraperitoneally administered four times reduced the retinal damage (decrease in retinal ganglion cells and in thickness of inner plexiform layer induced by intravitreal in vivo N-methyl-d-aspartate injection. These findings indicate that Brazilian green propolis has neuroprotective effects against retinal damage both in vitro and in vivo, and that a propolis-induced inhibition of oxidative stress may be partly responsible for these neuroprotective effects.

  4. Radioadaptive Cytoprotective Pathways in the Mouse Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Wotring, V.; Theriot, C.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation implies a risk of tissue degeneration. Radiation retinopathy is a complication of radiotherapy and exhibits common features with other retinopathies and neuropathies. Exposure to a low radiation dose elicits protective cellular events (radioadaptive response), reducing the stress of a subsequent higher dose. To assess the risk of radiation-induced retinal changes and the extent to which a small priming dose reduces this risk, we used a mouse model exposed to a source of Cs-137-gamma radiation. Gene expression profiling of retinas from non-irradiated control C57BL/6J mice (C) were compared to retinas from mice treated with a low 50 mGy dose (LD), a high 6 Gy dose (HD), and a combined treatment of 50 mGy (priming) and 6 Gy (challenge) doses (LHD). Whole retina RNA was isolated and expression analysis for selected genes performed by RTqPCR. Relevant target genes associated with cell death/survival, oxidative stress, cellular stress response and inflammation pathways, were analyzed. Cellular stress response genes were upregulated at 4 hr after the challenge dose in LHD retinas (Sirt1: 1.5 fold, Hsf1: 1.7 fold, Hspa1a: 2.5 fold; Hif1a: 1.8 fold, Bag1: 1.7). A similar trend was observed in LD animals. Most antioxidant enzymes (Hmox1, Sod2, Prdx1, Cygb, Cat1) and inflammatory mediators (NF B, Ptgs2 and Tgfb1) were upregulated in LHD and LD retinas. Expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2 was upregulated in LD (6-fold) and LHD (4-fold) retinas. In conclusion, cytoprotective gene networks activation in the retina suggests a radioadaptive response to a priming irradiation dose, with mitigation of the deleterious effects of a subsequent high dose exposure. The enhancement of these cytoprotective mechanisms has potential value as a countermeasure to ocular alterations caused by radiation alone or in combination with other factors in spaceflight environments.

  5. Rutin protects against neuronal damage in vitro and ameliorates doxorubicin-induced memory deficits in vivo in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingayya GV

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Grandhi Venkata Ramalingayya, Sri Pragnya Cheruku, Pawan G Nayak, Anoop Kishore, Rekha Shenoy, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna Rao, Nandakumar Krishnadas Department of Pharmacology, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India Abstract: Doxorubicin (DOX is the most widely used broad-spectrum anticancer agent, either alone or in combination, for most cancers including breast cancer. Long-term use of chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer patients results in cognitive complications with a negative impact on survivors’ quality of life. The study objective was to evaluate rutin (RUT for its neuroprotective effect against DOX in human neuroblastoma (IMR32 cells in vitro and study its potential to ameliorate DOX-induced cognitive dysfunction in Wistar rats. Cell viability assay (3-[4,5 dimethyl thiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, neurite growth assay, detection of apoptosis by (acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS assay, and flowcytometric analysis were carried out to assess neuroprotective potential against DOX. An in vivo study was conducted for assessing protective effect of RUT against memory deficit associated with DOX-induced chemobrain using object recognition task (ORT. Locomotion was assessed using open field test. Serum biochemistry, acetylcholinesterase, oxidative stress markers in hippocampus, and frontal cortex were assessed. Histopathological analysis of major organ systems was also carried out. Prior exposure to RUT at 100 µM protected IMR32 cells from DOX (1 µM neurotoxicity. DOX exposure resulted in increased cellular death, apoptosis, and intracellular ROS generation with inhibition of neurite growth in differentiated IMR32 cells, which was significantly ameliorated by RUT. Cognitive dysfunction was induced in Wistar rats by administering ten cycles of DOX (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, once in 5 days, as we observed

  6. The rat subcutaneous air sac model. A new and simple method for in vivo screening of antiangiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberg, J.; Abildgaard Hansen, C.; Skak-Nielsen, T.; Bay, C.; Thing Mortensen, J.; Binderup, L.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental rat model, the Subcutaneous Air Sac (SAS) model, was developed to provide an animal model in which neo-vascularisation can be easily assessed in situ and quantified using a radiolabelled plasma marker. The SAS model was designed to replace a previous model where neo-vascularisation was induced by chemical injury of rat or rabbit cornea or by implantation of tumour cells intracorneally, a methodology which is believed to cause severe pain to the animals. In the SAS model the air sac replaces the cornea as a transparent avascular substratum in which vascularisation can be observed. The air sac is induced by injection of air subcutaneously on the back of the animal. After 8 to 10 days a sufficient air sac has been established. The animal is anaesthesized and by a minor operation the cellulose sponge is implanted upon the air sac under the skin. The vaso-proliferative effect of the cellulose sponge caused formation of new vessels which are macroscopically visible 10 days after implantation. The ability of the in vivo SAS model to show an anti-angiogenic effect of a systemically applied test compound was investigated using the fumagilline analogue TNP-470 (o-chloro-acetylcarbomoyl-fumagillol) as a positive control at dose levels of 0, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg/day given subcutaneously for 10 days. The neo-angio genesis was scored both in situ using a subjective point system and by measuring the 125 I-activity of the implant and the membrane after an intravenous injection of 125 I-labelled antibodies. The neo-angio genesis was reduced by approximately 45-50% in animals treated with 5 or 10 mg/kg/day of TNP-470 compared to animals treated with the vehicle. The animals treated with 10 mg/kg/day TNP-470 showed signs of toxicity. The SAS model is considered highly relevant for in vivo testing of potential anti-angiogenci drugs on humane grounds. The high reproducibility, the low cost and the technical simplicity of the method makes it attractive. (au)

  7. Transcriptional response of rat frontal cortex following acute In Vivo exposure to the pyrethroid insecticides permethrin and deltamethrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tornero-Velez Rogelio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroids are neurotoxic pesticides that interact with membrane bound ion channels in neurons and disrupt nerve function. The purpose of this study was to characterize and explore changes in gene expression that occur in the rat frontal cortex, an area of CNS affected by pyrethroids, following an acute low-dose exposure. Results Rats were acutely exposed to either deltamethrin (0.3 – 3 mg/kg or permethrin (1 – 100 mg/kg followed by collection of cortical tissue at 6 hours. The doses used range from those that cause minimal signs of intoxication at the behavioral level to doses well below apparent no effect levels in the whole animal. A statistical framework based on parallel linear (SAM and isotonic regression (PIR methods identified 95 and 53 probe sets as dose-responsive. The PIR analysis was most sensitive for detecting transcripts with changes in expression at the NOAEL dose. A sub-set of genes (Camk1g, Ddc, Gpd3, c-fos and Egr1 was then confirmed by qRT-PCR and examined in a time course study. Changes in mRNA levels were typically less than 3-fold in magnitude across all components of the study. The responses observed are consistent with pyrethroids producing increased neuronal excitation in the cortex following a low-dose in vivo exposure. In addition, Significance Analysis of Function and Expression (SAFE identified significantly enriched gene categories common for both pyrethroids, including some relating to branching morphogenesis. Exposure of primary cortical cell cultures to both compounds resulted in an increase (~25% in the number of neurite branch points, supporting the results of the SAFE analysis. Conclusion In the present study, pyrethroids induced changes in gene expression in the frontal cortex near the threshold for decreases in ambulatory motor activity in vivo. The penalized regression methods performed similarly in detecting dose-dependent changes in gene transcription. Finally, SAFE analysis of

  8. On the relationship between the two branches of the kynurenine pathway in the rat brain in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amori, Laura; Guidetti, Paolo; Pellicciari, Roberto; Kajii, Yasushi; Schwarcz, Robert

    2009-04-01

    In the mammalian brain, kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II) and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), key enzymes of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan degradation, form the neuroactive metabolites kynurenic acid (KYNA) and 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), respectively. Although physically segregated, both enzymes use the pivotal KP metabolite l-kynurenine as a substrate. We studied the functional consequences of this cellular compartmentalization in vivo using two specific tools, the KAT II inhibitor BFF 122 and the KMO inhibitor UPF 648. The acute effects of selective KAT II or KMO inhibition were studied using a radiotracing method in which the de novo synthesis of KYNA, and of 3-HK and its downstream metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN), is monitored following an intrastriatal injection of (3)H-kynurenine. In naïve rats, intrastriatal BFF 122 decreased newly formed KYNA by 66%, without influencing 3-HK or QUIN production. Conversely, UPF 648 reduced 3-HK synthesis (by 64%) without affecting KYNA formation. Similar, selective effects of KAT II and KMO inhibition were observed when the inhibitors were applied acutely together with the excitotoxin QUIN, which impairs local KP metabolism. Somewhat different effects of KMO (but not KAT II) inhibition were obtained in rats that had received an intrastriatal QUIN injection 7 days earlier. In these neuron-depleted striata, UPF 648 not only decreased both 3-HK and QUIN production (by 77% and 66%, respectively) but also moderately raised KYNA synthesis (by 27%). These results indicate a remarkable functional segregation of the two pathway branches in the brain, boding well for the development of selective KAT II or KMO inhibitors for cognitive enhancement and neuroprotection, respectively.

  9. In vivo regulation of the serotonin-2 receptor in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockmeier, C.A.; Kellar, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    Serotonin-2 (5-HT-2) receptors in brain were measured using ( 3 H)ketanserin. The authors examined the effects of amitriptyline, an anti-depressant drug, of electroconvulsive shock (ECS) and of drug-induced alterations in presynaptic 5-HT function on ( 3 H)ketanserin binding to 5-HT-2 receptors in rat brain. The importance of intact 5-HT axons to the up-regulation of 5-HT-2 receptors by ECS was also investigated, and an attempt was made to relate the ECS-induced increase in this receptor to changes in 5-HT presynaptic mechanisms. Twelve days of ECS increased the number of 5-HT-2 receptors in frontal cortex. Neither the IC 50 nor the Hill coefficient of 5-HT in competing for ( 3 H)ketanserin binding sites was altered by ECS. Repeated injections of amitriptyline reduced the number of 5-HT-2 receptors in frontal cortex. Reserpine, administered daily for 12 days, caused a significant increase in 5-HT-2 receptors, but neither daily injections of p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) nor lesions of 5-HT axons with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) affected 5-HT-2 receptors. However, regulation of 5-HT-2 receptors by ECS was dependent on intact 5-HT axons since ECS could not increase the number of 5-HT-2 receptors in rats previously lesioned with 5,7-DHT. Repeated ECS, however, does not appear to affect either the high-affinity uptake of ( 3 H)5-HT or ( 3 H)imipramine binding, two presynaptic markers of 5-HT neuronal function. 5-HT-2 receptors appear to be under complex control. ECS or drug treatments such as reserpine or amitriptyline, which affect several monoamine neurotransmission systems including 5-HT, can alter 5-HT-2 receptors. 28 references, 1 figure, 7 tables

  10. Enhanced oral bioavailability of docetaxel in rats combined with myricetin: In situ and in vivo evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tianyun; Ling, Yunni; Wu, Meijuan; Shen, Yajing; Gao, Yu; Liang, Shujun; Gao, Yuan; Qian, Shuai

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of myricetin on the pharmacokinetics of docetaxel in rats. In comparison to oral docetaxel alone (40mg/kg), the bioavailability of docetaxel could be significantly enhanced by 1.6-2.4-fold via oral co-administration with various flavonoids (apigenin, naringenin, baicalein, quercetin and myricetin) at a dosage of 10mg/kg, and myricetin showed the highest bioavailability improvement. Further pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the presence of myricetin (5-20mg/kg) enhanced both C max and AUC of docetaxel with the highest C max (162ng/mL, 2.3-fold) and relative bioavailability (244%) achieved at 10mg/kg of myricetin, while t 1/2 was not influenced. In order to explore the reasons for such bioavailability enhancement of docetaxel, rat in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion model and intravenous docetaxel co-administrated with oral myricetin were carried out. After combining with myricetin, the permeability coefficient (P blood ) of docetaxel based on its appearance in mesenteric blood was significantly increased up to 3.5-fold in comparison to that of docetaxel alone. Different from oral docetaxel, the intravenous pharmacokinetics of docetaxel was not affected by co-administration of myricetin, indicating the limited effect of myricetin on the elimination of docetaxel. The above findings suggested that the oral bioavailability enhancement of docetaxel via co-administration with myricetin might be mainly attributed to the enhanced absorption in gastrointestinal tract rather than modulating the elimination of docetaxel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of synaptically evoked cortical acetylcholine release by adenosine: an in vivo microdialysis study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materi, L M; Rasmusson, D D; Semba, K

    2000-01-01

    The release of cortical acetylcholine from the intracortical axonal terminals of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons is closely associated with electroencephalographic activity. One factor which may act to reduce cortical acetylcholine release and promote sleep is adenosine. Using in vivo microdialysis, we examined the effect of adenosine and selective adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on cortical acetylcholine release evoked by electrical stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in urethane anesthetized rats. All drugs were administered locally within the cortex by reverse dialysis. None of the drugs tested altered basal release of acetylcholine in the cortex. Adenosine significantly reduced evoked cortical acetylcholine efflux in a concentration-dependent manner. This was mimicked by the adenosine A(1) receptor selective agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine and blocked by the selective A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). The A(2A) receptor agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosi ne hydrochloride (CGS 21680) did not alter evoked cortical acetylcholine release even in the presence of DPCPX. Administered alone, neither DPCPX nor the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine affected evoked cortical acetylcholine efflux. Simultaneous delivery of the adenosine uptake inhibitors dipyridamole and S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine significantly reduced evoked cortical acetylcholine release, and this effect was blocked by the simultaneous administration of caffeine. These data indicate that activation of the A(1) adenosine receptor inhibits acetylcholine release in the cortex in vivo while the A(2A) receptor does not influence acetylcholine efflux. Such inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release by adenosine may contribute to an increased propensity to sleep during prolonged wakefulness.

  12. Dopaminergic and cholinergic regulation of Fyn tyrosine kinase phosphorylation in the rat striatum in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li-Min; Wang, John Q

    2015-12-01

    Src and Fyn are two Src family kinase (SFK) members that are expressed in mammalian brains and play important roles in the regulation of a variety of neuronal and synaptic substrates. Here we investigated the responsiveness of these SFKs to changing dopamine receptor signals in dopamine responsive regions of adult rat brains in vivo. Pharmacological activation of dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) by a systemic injection of the selective agonist SKF81297 increased phosphorylation of SFKs at a conserved and activation-associated autophosphorylation site (Y416) in the striatum, indicating activation of SFKs following SKF81297 injection. The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) agonist quinpirole had no effect. Blockade of D1Rs with an antagonist SCH23390 did not alter striatal Y416 phosphorylation, while the D2R antagonist eticlopride elevated it. Between Src and Fyn, SKF81297 seemed to preferentially facilitate Fyn phosphorylation. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptors (M4Rs) with a positive allosteric modulator VU0152100 suppressed SFK Y416 responses to SKF81297. Additionally, SKF81297 induced a correlated increase in phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor GluN2B subunits at a Fyn site (Y1472), which was attenuated by VU0152100. SKF81297 also enhanced synaptic recruitments of active Fyn and GluN1/GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors. These data demonstrate that D1Rs regulate Fyn and downstream NMDA receptors in striatal neurons in vivo. Acetylcholine through activating M4Rs inhibits Fyn and NMDA receptors in their sensitivity to D1R signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro and ex vivo distribution of [3H]harmane, an endogenous beta-carboline, in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Neil J; Tyacke, Robin J; Husbands, Stephen M; Nutt, David J; Hudson, Alan L; Robinson, Emma S J

    2006-03-01

    The endogenous beta-carboline, harmane, has been shown to bind to monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) and a separate, high affinity, non-MAO site. Research in our laboratory has shown that harmane is an active component of clonidine-displacing substance (CDS), the proposed endogenous ligand for imidazoline binding sites (IBS). In the present study we have investigated the distribution of [3H]harmane in rat brain, and related the binding profile to the distribution of the MAO-A selective ligand [3H]Ro41-1049 and the I2BS ligand [3H]2-BFI. The in vivo distribution of [3H]harmane following intravenous administration was also investigated. Receptor autoradiography revealed a highly significant correlation for the distribution of [3H]harmane and [3H]Ro41-1049, and a significant correlation for [3H]harmane and the I2BS ligand [3H]2-BFI. The in vivo distribution of [3H]harmane suggests that the ligand accumulates in the adrenal gland and throughout the brain with the primary route of excretion occurring via the duodenum. In conclusion, these studies have shown that [3H]harmane labels a population of binding sites that reflect the distribution of MAO-A. Further evidence for a non-MAO, IBS [3H]harmane population has not been shown but the high level of expression of the MAO-A site is likely to have masked the much smaller population of I2BS.

  14. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  15. Elucidation of Arctigenin Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution after Intravenous, Oral, Hypodermic and Sublingual Administration in Rats and Beagle Dogs: Integration of In Vitro and In Vivo Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Li; Jie Li; Jie Li; Xin Li; Xin Li; Xin Li; Yu-Shan Ren; Yu-Shan Ren; Yuan-Yuan Lv; Yuan-Yuan Lv; Yuan-Yuan Lv; Jun-Sheng Zhang; Jun-Sheng Zhang; Jun-Sheng Zhang; Xiao-Li Xu

    2017-01-01

    Although arctigenin (AG) has diverse bioactivities, such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, immunoregulatory and neuroprotective activities, its pharmacokinetics have not been systematically evaluated. The purpose of this work was to identify the pharmacokinetic properties of AG via various experiments in vivo and in vitro. In this research, rats and beagle dogs were used to investigate the PK (pharmacokinetics, PK) profiles of AG with different drug-delivery manners, including ...

  16. Flash photolysis of rhodopsin in the cat retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripps, H.; Mehaffey, L.; Siegel, I.M.; Ernst, W.; Kemp, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    The bleaching of rhodopsin by short-duration flashes of a xenon discharge lamp was studied in vivo in the cat retina with the aid of a rapid, spectral-scan fundus reflectometer. Difference spectra recorded over a broad range of intensities showed that the bleaching efficacy of high-intensity flashes was less than that of longer duration, steady lights delivering the same amount of energy. Both the empirical results and those derived from a theoretical analysis of flash photolysis indicate that, under the conditions of these experiments, the upper limit of the flash bleaching of rhodopsin in cat is approximately 90%. Although the fact that a full bleach could not be attained is attributable to photoreversal, i.e., the photic regeneration of rhodopsin from its light-sensitive intermediates, the 90% limit is considerably higher than the 50% (or lower) value obtained under other experimental circumstances. Thus, it appears that the duration (approximately 1 ms) and spectral composition of the flash, coupled with the kinetic parameters of the thermal and photic reactions in the cat retina, reduce the light-induced regeneration of rhodopsin to approximately 10%

  17. Elucidation of Inflammation Processes Exacerbating Neuronal Cell Damage to the Retina and Brain Visual Centers as Quest for Therapeutic Drug Targets in Rat Model of Blast Overpressure Wave Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Righting Reflex of rats following double blast exposure. 0 4 8 12 16 20 R ig ht in g Re fle x (m in ut es ) PLACEBO FISH OIL Total Lived Died...experiments. Funding Support: Geneva Foundation contractor – WRAIR Name: Joseph B. Long, Ph.D. Project Role: Co-Investigator – WRAIR Researcher...Funding Support: Clinical Research Management contractor Name: Andrew B. Batuure Project Role: Technician - WRAIR Researcher Identifier (e.g. ORCID

  18. In vivo and in vitro dermal penetration of 2,4,5,2',4', 5'-hexachlorobiphenyl in young and adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, P.V.; Sumler, M.R.; Fisher, H.L.; Hall, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    Penetration of 2,4,5,2',4',5'-[ 14 C]hexachlorobiphenyl (HCB) through skin of young (33 days) and adult (82 days) female Fischer 344 rats was determined in vivo and by two in vitro methods. In vivo dermal penetration at 120 hr was 45% in young and 43% in adults. At 72 hr in vivo dermal penetration was 35% in young and 26% in adults compared to 1.5% for young and 1.0% for adult as measured with a continuous flow in vitro system and 2.9% for young and 1.9% for adults as measured with a static in vitro system. Most of the dermally absorbed HCB remained in the body as only 4.9 and 2.6% of that absorbed was excreted by young and adult rats, respectively, at the end of 120 hr. Significant differences in dermal penetration and kinetics of HCB between young and adult female rats were observed. The elimination of ECB-derived material was approximately six times higher in feces than in urine. A physiological pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the organ and tissue radioactivity distribution data. Parameters in the model determined from dermal dosing of female Fischer 344 rats were in reasonable agreement with those reported in the literature for adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (iv dose). The rate constant for dermal penetration was 0.83 x 10 -4 min -1 for adults and 0.96 x 10 -4 min -1 for young. The delay or lag time parameter for dermal penetration was 4.4 hr in adults and 1.1 hr in young

  19. Simultaneous in vivo visualization and localization of solid oral dosage forms in the rat gastrointestinal tract by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, V; Rosenberg, J; Seega, J; Lehr, C M

    1997-08-01

    Bioavailability of orally administered drugs is much influenced by the behavior, performance and fate of the dosage form within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Therefore, MRI in vivo methods that allow for the simultaneous visualization of solid oral dosage forms and anatomical structures of the GI tract have been investigated. Oral contrast agents containing Gd-DTPA were used to depict the lumen of the digestive organs. Solid oral dosage forms were visualized in a rat model by a 1H-MRI double contrast technique (magnetite-labelled microtablets) and a combination of 1H- and 19F-MRI (fluorine-labelled minicapsules). Simultaneous visualization of solid oral dosage forms and the GI environment in the rat was possible using MRI. Microtablets could reproducibly be monitored in the rat stomach and in the intestines using a 1H-MRI double contrast technique. Fluorine-labelled minicapsules were detectable in the rat stomach by a combination of 1H- and 19F-MRI in vivo. The in vivo 1H-MRI double contrast technique described allows solid oral dosage forms in the rat GI tract to be depicted. Solid dosage forms can easily be labelled by incorporating trace amounts of non-toxic iron oxide (magnetite) particles. 1H-MRI is a promising tool for observing such pharmaceutical dosage forms in humans. Combined 1H- and 19F-MRI offer a means of unambiguously localizing solid oral dosage forms in more distal parts of the GI tract. Studies correlating MRI examinations with drug plasma levels could provide valuable information for the development of pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  20. Effect of the spider toxin Tx3-3 on spinal processing of sensory information in naive and neuropathic rats: an in vivo electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Bannister, Kirsty; Gonçalves, Leonor; Sikandar, Shafaq; Patel, Ryan; Cordeiro, Marta do Nascimento; Gomez, Marcus Vinícius; Ferreira, Juliano; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2017-07-01

    Drugs that counteract nociceptive transmission in the spinal dorsal horn preferentially after nerve injury are being pursued as possible neuropathic pain treatments. In a previous behavioural study, the peptide toxin Tx3-3, which blocks P/Q- and R-type voltage-gated calcium channels, was effective in neuropathic pain models. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of Tx3-3 on dorsal horn neuronal responses in rats under physiological conditions and neuropathic pain condition induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL). In vivo electrophysiological recordings of dorsal horn neuronal response to electrical and natural (mechanical and thermal) stimuli were made in rats under normal physiological state (naive rats) or after the SNL model of neuropathic pain. Tx3-3 (0.3-100 pmol/site) exhibited greater inhibitory effect on electrical-evoked neuronal response of SNL rats than naive rats, inhibiting nociceptive C-fibre and Aδ-fibre responses only in SNL rats. The wind-up of neurones, a measurement of spinal cord hyperexcitability, was also more susceptible to a dose-related inhibition by Tx3-3 after nerve injury. Moreover, Tx3-3 exhibited higher potency to inhibit mechanical- and thermal-evoked neuronal response in conditions of neuropathy. Tx3-3 mediated differential inhibitory effect under physiological and neuropathic conditions, exhibiting greater potency in conditions of neuropathic pain.

  1. Effects of lysine clonixinate and ketorolac tromethamine on prostanoid release from various rat organs incubated ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallapies, D; Salinger, A; Meyer zum Gottesberge, A; Atkins, D J; Rohleder, G; Nagyiványi, P; Peskar, B A

    1995-01-01

    The release of prostanoids from rat brain, gastric mucosa, lungs and kidneys incubated ex vivo has been investigated for up to 5 h after oral administration of 10 mg/kg lysine clonixinate or 1 mg/kg ketorolac tromethamine. Additionally, 60 min after drug administration, a time point of near-maximal inhibition of prostanoid release, the effects of 2.5, 10 and 30 mg/kg lysine clonixinate and of 0.0225, 0.15 and 1 mg/kg ketorolac tromethamine were compared. In all organs investigated both drugs inhibited fatty acid cyclooxygenase (COX) in a dose-dependent manner, but ketorolac tromethamine was more potent and had a longer-lasting effect than lysine clonixinate. While the ID50 values for lysine clonixinate were in the same order of magnitude for all 4 organs investigated, ketorolac tromethamine exhibited some organ selectivity with a particularly high activity in the kidneys. This effect might be related to the renal toxicity of ketorolac tromethamine. On the other hand, the difference in potency was smallest in brain suggesting that inhibition of central prostanoid biosynthesis could contribute to the rapid and effective inhibition of pain by both drugs. IC50 values for inhibition of purified COX-1 and COX-2 in vitro were slightly lower for lysine clonixinate (2.4 and 24.6 micrograms/ml, respectively) than for ketorolac tromethamine (3.7 and 25.6 micrograms/ml, respectively).

  2. Effect of subchronic administration of methyl parathion on in vivo protein synthesis in pregnant rats and their conceptuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.C.; Thornburg, J.E.; Stedman, D.B.; Welsch, F.

    1984-01-01

    Pregnant rats received daily po doses of the organophosphate methyl parathion (MPTH) from Day 6 through Day 15 or 19 of gestation at doses causing no (1.0 mg/kg) or minimal (1.5 mg/kg) signs of maternal toxicity. Following the dose of MPTH on Day 15 or 19, in vivo protein synthesis was measured 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 hr after sc injection of L-[1- 14 C]valine at a dose of 5 microCi/mmol/100 g body wt. The specific activity of [ 14 C]valine in the free amino acid pool and protein bound pool was significantly reduced in various regions of maternal brain and in maternal viscera, placenta, and whole embryos (Day 15), and in fetal brain and viscera (Day 19). The inhibitory effect of MPTH on net protein synthesis was dose dependent, greater on Day 19 than 15 of gestation and more pronounced in fetal than in maternal tissues

  3. In vivo bioavailability of polyphenols from grape by-product extracts, and effect on lipemia of normocholesterolemic Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero-David, Raul; Ruiz-Roso, Maria Belen; Caporaso, Nicola; Perez-Olleros, Lourdes; De Las Heras, Natalia; Lahera, Vicente; Ruiz-Roso, Baltasar

    2018-04-24

    The direct use of phenolic extracts from grape by-products can be useful to formulate functional food to improve consumers' health. The use of phenolic extracts instead of pure polyphenols as an ingredient is relevant in this context. The current work studied the bioavailability and absorption of polyphenols from grape by-product extracts and their health effect on cholesterolemia, by adding the extract (GE) to Wistar rats diet (50 g/kg) in vivo. GE caused the appearance of (+)-catechin, myricetin and quercetic acid in plasma and liver. (+)-Catechin was the most abundant compound, with 6 μg/mL in plasma and 0.7 μg/mg protein in liver, while no phenolic compounds were detected in plasma or liver in the control group. Similarly, 3,4-hydroxyphenylacetic (DOPAC), a major product of polyphenol digestion, was detected in the plasma, liver and urine of the GE-group only. GE-group had significantly lower cholesterol level and lower total cholesterol/HDL ratio in plasma. Total bile acid (TBA) content significantly increased in faecal matter after 24 h administration of the GE-enriched diet. Grape extract polyphenols are partially bioavailable and showed improvement in lipid metabolism. Thus, the results suggest that GE is promising as a functional ingredient in the prevention of hypercholesterolemia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of the in vivo antioxidative activity of Cynara scolymus (artichoke) leaf extract in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magielse, Joanna; Verlaet, Annelies; Breynaert, Annelies; Keenoy, Begoña Manuel Y; Apers, Sandra; Pieters, Luc; Hermans, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo antioxidant activity of a quantified leaf extract of Cynara scolymus (artichoke) was studied. The aqueous artichoke leaf extract (ALE), containing 1.5% caffeoylquinic acid with chlorogenic acid being most abundant (0.30%), and luteolin-7-O-glucoside as major flavonoid (0.15%), was investigated by evaluating the effect on different oxidative stress biomarkers, after 3 wk oral supplementation in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model. Apart from two test groups (0.2 g ALE/kg BW/day and 1 g ALE/kg BW/day, where BW is body weight), a healthy control group, untreated oxidative stress group, and vitamin E treated group (positive control) were included. A 0.2 g/kg BW/day of ALE decreased oxidative stress: malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels significantly diminished, whereas erythrocyte glutathione levels significantly increased. A 1.0 g/kg BW/day ALE did not show higher antioxidant activity. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Texture coarseness responsive neurons and their mapping in layer 2–3 of the rat barrel cortex in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garion, Liora; Dubin, Uri; Rubin, Yoav; Khateb, Mohamed; Schiller, Yitzhak; Azouz, Rony; Schiller, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Texture discrimination is a fundamental function of somatosensory systems, yet the manner by which texture is coded and spatially represented in the barrel cortex are largely unknown. Using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in the rat barrel cortex during artificial whisking against different surface coarseness or controlled passive whisker vibrations simulating different coarseness, we show that layer 2–3 neurons within barrel boundaries differentially respond to specific texture coarsenesses, while only a minority of neurons responded monotonically with increased or decreased surface coarseness. Neurons with similar preferred texture coarseness were spatially clustered. Multi-contact single unit recordings showed a vertical columnar organization of texture coarseness preference in layer 2–3. These findings indicate that layer 2–3 neurons perform high hierarchical processing of tactile information, with surface coarseness embodied by distinct neuronal subpopulations that are spatially mapped onto the barrel cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03405.001 PMID:25233151

  6. Carbidopa/levodopa-loaded biodegradable microspheres: in vivo evaluation on experimental Parkinsonism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arica, Betül; Kaş, H Süheyla; Moghdam, Amir; Akalan, Nejat; Hincal, A Atilla

    2005-02-16

    The purpose of this study was to prepare and characterize injectable carbidopa (CD)/levodopa (LD)-loaded Poly(L-lactides) (L-PLA), Poly(D,L-lactides) (D,L-PLA) and Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) microspheres for the intracerebral treatment of Parkinson's disease. The microspheres were prepared by solvent evaporation method. The polymers' (L-PLA, D,L-PLA and PLAGA) concentrations were 10% (w/w) in the organic phase; the emulsifiers [sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC):sodium oleate (SO) and Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA):SO mixture (4:1 w/v)] concentrations were 0.75% in the aqueous phase. Microspheres were analyzed for morphological characteristics, size distribution, drug loading and in vitro release. The release profile of CD/LD from microspheres was characterized in the range of 12-35% within the first hour of the in vitro release experiment. The efficiency of CD- and LD-encapsulated microspheres to striatal transplantation and the altering of apomorphine-induced rotational behavior in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) unilaterally lesioned rat model were also tested. 6-OHDA/CD-LD-loaded microsphere groups exhibited lower rotation scores than 6-OHDA/Blank microsphere groups as early as 1 week postlesion. These benefits continued throughout the entire experimental period and they were statistically significant during the 1, 2 and 8 weeks (p<0.05). CD/LD-loaded microspheres were specifically prepared to apply as an injectable dosage forms for brain implantation.

  7. Identifying lipidic emulsomes for improved oxcarbazepine brain targeting: In vitro and rat in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zaafarany, Ghada M; Soliman, Mahmoud E; Mansour, Samar; Awad, Gehanne A S

    2016-04-30

    Lipid-based nanovectors offer effective carriers for brain delivery by improving drug potency and reducing off-target effects. Emulsomes are nano-triglyceride (TG) carriers formed of lipid cores supported by at least one phospholipid (PC) sheath. Due to their surface active properties, PC forms bilayers at the aqueous interface, thereby enabling encapsulated drug to benefit from better bioavailability and stability. Emulsomes of oxcarbazepine (OX) were prepared, aimed to offer nanocarriers for nasal delivery for brain targeting. Different TG cores (Compritol(®), tripalmitin, tristearin and triolein) and soya phosphatidylcholine in different amounts and ratios were used for emulsomal preparation. Particles were modulated to generate nanocarriers with suitable size, charge, encapsulation efficiency and prolonged release. Cytotoxicity and pharmacokinetic studies were also implemented. Nano-spherical OX-emulsomes with maximal encapsulation of 96.75% were generated. Stability studies showed changes within 30.6% and 11.2% in the size and EE% after 3 months. MTT assay proved a decrease in drug toxicity by its encapsulation in emulsomes. Incorporation of OX into emulsomes resulted in stable nanoformulations. Tailoring emulsomes properties by modulating the surface charge and particle size produced a stable system for the lipophilic drug with a prolonged release profile and mean residence time and proved direct nose-to-brain transport in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Triple-Gene Therapy for Stroke: A Proof-of-Concept in Vivo Study in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail E. Sokolov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural brain repair after stroke is extremely limited, and current therapeutic options are even more scarce with no clinical break-through in sight. Despite restricted regeneration in the central nervous system, we have previously proved that human umbilical cord blood mono-nuclear cells (UCB-MC transduced with adenoviral vectors carrying genes encoding vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM successfully rescued neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. This proof-of-principle project was aimed at evaluating the beneficial effects of the same triple-gene approach in stroke. Rats subjected to distal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery were treated intrathecally with a combination of these genes either directly or using our cell-based (UCB-MC approach. Various techniques and markers were employed to evaluate brain injury and subsequent recovery after treatment. Brain repair was most prominent when therapeutic genes were delivered via adenoviral vector- or UCB-MC-mediated approach. Remodeling of brain cortex in the stroke area was confirmed by reduction of infarct volume and attenuated neural cell death, depletion of astrocytes and microglial cells, and increase in the number of oligodendroglial cells and synaptic proteins expression. These results imply that intrathecal injection of genetically engineered UCB-MC over-expressing therapeutic molecules (VEGF, GDNF, and NCAM following cerebral blood vessel occlusion might represent a novel avenue for future research into treating stroke.

  9. The effects of octanol on penicillin induced epileptiform activity in rats: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanci, M Omer; Bağirici, Faruk

    2006-10-01

    The common features of all types of epilepsy are the synchronized and uncontrolled discharges of nerve cell assemblies. The reason for the pathologically synchronized discharges of the neuron is not exactly known yet. Recent reports claim that gap junctions have a critical role in neuronal synchronization. The present study was planned to investigate the effects of octanol, a gap junction blocker, on penicillin-induced experimental epilepsy. Permanent screw electrodes allowing EEG monitoring from conscious animals and permanent cannula providing the administration of the substances to the brain ventricle were placed into the cranium of rats under general anesthesia. After the postoperative recovery period, epileptiform activity was generated by injecting 300 IU crystallized penicillin through the ventricular cannula. When epileptiform activity, monitored from a digital recording system, reached at its maximum intensity, octanol was applied in the same way as penicillin administered. Application of octanol caused an inhibition in the epileptiform activity. Vehicle solution alone did not affect the epileptiform activity. Results of this study suggest that the blockade of electrical synapses may contribute to the prevention and amelioration of epileptic activity. Production of gap junction blockers selective for connexin types is needed. Further studies on the differential roles of gap junctions on certain epileptiform activities are required.

  10. In vivo study of rat cortical hemodynamics using a stereotaxic-apparatus-compatible photoacoustic microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Heng; Chen, Qian; Qi, Weizhi; Chen, Xingxing; Xi, Lei

    2018-04-19

    Brain imaging is an important technique in cognitive neuroscience. In this article, we designed a stereotaxic-apparatus-compatible photoacoustic microscope for the studies of rat cortical hemodynamics. Compared with existing optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) systems, the probe owns feature of fast, light and miniature. In this microscope, we integrated a miniaturized ultrasound transducer with a center frequency of 10 MHz to detect photoacoustic signals and a 2-dimensional (2D) microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanner to achieve raster scanning of the optical focus. Based on phantom evaluation, this imaging probe has a high lateral resolution of 3.8 μm and an effective imaging domain of 2 × 2 mm 2 . Different from conventional ORPAMs, combining with standard stereotaxic apparatus enables broad studies of rodent brains without any motion artifact. To show its capability, we successfully captured red blood cell flow in the capillary, monitored the vascular changes during bleeding and blood infusion and visualized cortical hemodynamics induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Imaging separation of neuronal from vascular effects of cocaine on rat cortical brain in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Z.; Du, C.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Pan, Y.

    2011-01-01

    MRI techniques to study brain function assume coupling between neuronal activity, metabolism and flow. However, recent evidence of physiological uncoupling between neuronal and cerebrovascular events highlights the need for methods to simultaneously measure these three properties. We report a multimodality optical approach that integrates dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging (measures changes in blood flow, blood volume and hemoglobin oxygenation), digital-frequency-ramping optical coherence tomography (images quantitative 3D vascular network) and Rhod2 fluorescence (images intracellular calcium for measure of neuronal activity) at high spatiotemporal resolutions (30 (micro)m, 10 Hz) and over a large field of view (3 x 5 mm 2 ). We apply it to assess cocaine's effects in rat cortical brain and show an immediate decrease 3.5 ± 0.9 min, phase (1) in the oxygen content of hemoglobin and the cerebral blood flow followed by an overshoot 7.1 ± 0.2 min, phase (2) lasting over 20 min whereas Ca 2+ increased immediately (peaked at t = 4.1 ± 0.4 min) and remained elevated. This enabled us to identify a delay (2.9 ± 0.5 min) between peak neuronal and vascular responses in phase 2. The ability of this multimodality optical approach for simultaneous imaging at high spatiotemporal resolutions permits us to distinguish the vascular versus cellular changes of the brain, thus complimenting other neuroimaging modalities for brain functional studies (e. g., PET, fMRI).

  12. Imaging separation of neuronal from vascular effects of cocaine on rat cortical brain in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Z.; Du, C.; Yuan, Z.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Pan, Y.; Du, C.

    2010-09-08

    MRI techniques to study brain function assume coupling between neuronal activity, metabolism and flow. However, recent evidence of physiological uncoupling between neuronal and cerebrovascular events highlights the need for methods to simultaneously measure these three properties. We report a multimodality optical approach that integrates dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging (measures changes in blood flow, blood volume and hemoglobin oxygenation), digital-frequency-ramping optical coherence tomography (images quantitative 3D vascular network) and Rhod2 fluorescence (images intracellular calcium for measure of neuronal activity) at high spatiotemporal resolutions (30 {micro}m, 10 Hz) and over a large field of view (3 x 5 mm{sup 2}). We apply it to assess cocaine's effects in rat cortical brain and show an immediate decrease 3.5 {+-} 0.9 min, phase (1) in the oxygen content of hemoglobin and the cerebral blood flow followed by an overshoot 7.1 {+-} 0.2 min, phase (2) lasting over 20 min whereas Ca{sup 2+} increased immediately (peaked at t = 4.1 {+-} 0.4 min) and remained elevated. This enabled us to identify a delay (2.9 {+-} 0.5 min) between peak neuronal and vascular responses in phase 2. The ability of this multimodality optical approach for simultaneous imaging at high spatiotemporal resolutions permits us to distinguish the vascular versus cellular changes of the brain, thus complimenting other neuroimaging modalities for brain functional studies (e. g., PET, fMRI).

  13. Varenicline increases in vivo striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor binding: an ultra-high-resolution pinhole [123I]IBZM SPECT study in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crunelle, Cleo L.; Wit, Tim C. de; Bruin, Kora de; Ramakers, Ruud M.; Have, Frans van der; Beekman, Freek J.; Brink, Wim van den; Booij, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Ex vivo storage phosphor imaging rat studies reported increased brain dopamine D 2/3 receptor (DRD 2/3 ) availability following treatment with varenicline, a nicotinergic drug. However, ex vivo studies can only be performed using cross-sectional designs. Small-animal imaging offers the opportunity to perform serial assessments. We evaluated whether high-resolution pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in rats was able to reproduce previous ex vivo findings. Methods: Rats were imaged for baseline striatal DRD 2/3 availability using ultra-high-resolution pinhole SPECT (U-SPECT-II) and [ 123 I]IBZM as a radiotracer, and randomized to varenicline (n=7; 2 mg/kg) or saline (n=7). Following 2 weeks of treatment, a second scan was acquired. Results: Significantly increased striatal DRD 2/3 availability was found following varenicline treatment compared to saline (time⁎treatment effect): posttreatment difference in binding potential between groups corrected for initial baseline differences was 2.039 (P=.022), indicating a large effect size (d=1.48). Conclusions: Ultra-high-resolution pinhole SPECT can be used to assess varenicline-induced changes in DRD 2/3 availability in small laboratory animals over time. Future small-animal studies should include imaging techniques to enable repeated within-subjects measurements and reduce the amount of animals.

  14. Temporal resolution of PrPSc transport, PrPSc accumulation, activation of glia and neuronal death in retinas from C57Bl/6 mice inoculated with RML scrapie: Relevance to biomarkers of prion disease progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, there is a lack of pathologic landmarks to objectively evaluate the progression of prion disease in vivo. The goal of this work was to determine the temporal relationship between transport of misfolded prion protein to the retina from the brain, accumulation of PrPSc in the retina, the re...

  15. Effects of radiation of cells in vivo: a rat mammary gland model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, M.N.

    1977-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for the quantitative transplantation of monodispersed mammary cells. When adequate numbers of cells are transplanted, normal functional mammary tissue containing both secretory and myoepithelial cells in their normal tissue locations is formed. The analysis of the shape of cell dose-transplantation curves indicates a single cell origin of this tissue. Quantitative transplantation data from density gradient separated mammary cell subpopulations indicate that this cell is not of a unique type. With the use of an assay based on development of such structures from inoculated cells, in vivo radiation dose-cell survival curves have been generated under two hormonal conditions which result in differing rates of cell proliferation in the mammary gland. Survival curves generated under hormonal states that result in slow and rapid mammary cell proliferation are superimposable. In these assays tissue was removed immediately after irradiation for transplantation. If, however, the cells (slowly proliferating) are allowed to remain in situ for 24 hrs before removal for transplantation, the value of D 0 remains the same while n and D/sub q/ increase. Evidence is presented that indicates that these changes are due to a unique component of the repair of radiation damage which is dependent on the retention of the cells in their in situ tissue environment following the radiation period. This repair process is termed in situ repair

  16. Neurotransmitter properties of the newborn human retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Frederick, J.M.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Human retinal tissue from a newborn was examined autoradiographically for the presence of high-affinity uptake and localization of the following putative neurotransmitters: dopamine, glycine, GABA, aspartate, and glutamate. In addition, the dopamine content of this newborn retina was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Our study reveals that specific uptake mechanisms for 3 H-glycine, 3 H-dopamine, and 3 H-GABA are present at birth. However, the number and distribution of cells labeled with each of these 3 H-transmitters are not identical to those observed in adult human retinas. Furthermore, the amount of endogenous dopamine in the newborn retina is approximately 1/20 the adult level. Photoreceptor-specific uptake of 3 H-glutamate and 3 H-aspartate are not observed. These findings indicate that, while some neurotransmitter-specific properties are present at birth, significant maturation of neurotransmitter systems occurs postnatally

  17. Retina image–based optic disc segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The change of optic disc can be used to diagnose many eye diseases, such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration. Moreover, retinal blood vessel pattern is unique for human beings even for identical twins. It is a highly stable pattern in biometric identification. Since optic disc is the beginning of the optic nerve and main blood vessels in retina, it can be used as a reference point of identification. Therefore, optic disc segmentation is an important technique for developing a human identity recognition system and eye disease diagnostic system. This article hence presents an optic disc segmentation method to extract the optic disc from a retina image. The experimental results show that the optic disc segmentation method can give impressive results in segmenting the optic disc from a retina image.

  18. K-ATP channel expression and pharmacological in vivo and in vitro studies of the K-ATP channel blocker PNU-37883A in rat middle meningeal arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, K.B.; Boni, L.J.; Baun, M.

    2008-01-01

    closed cranial window model and in myograph baths, respectively. Key results: Expression studies indicate that inwardly rectifying K+ (Kir)6.1/sulphonylurea receptor (SUR) 2B is the major K-ATP channel complex in rat MMA. PNU-37883A (0.5 mg kg(-1)) significantly inhibited the in vivo dilatory effect...... of levcromakalim (0.025 mg kg(-1)), pinacidil (0.38 mg kg(-1)) and P-1075 (0.016 mg kg(-1)) in rat MMA. In vitro PNU-37883A significantly inhibited the dilatory responses of the three K-ATP channel openers in rat MMA at 10(-7) and 3 x 10(-7) M. Conclusions and implications: We suggest that Kir6.1/SUR2B...

  19. In vivo assay for conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone by rat prostatic steroid 5 alpha-reductase and comparison of two inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toomey, R.E.; Goode, R.L.; Petrow, V.; Neubauer, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    An in vivo assay for steroid 5 alpha-reductase in rat ventral prostate has been developed and used to compare the inhibitory activity of N,N-diethyl-4-methyl-3-oxo-4-aza-5 alpha-androstane-17 beta-carboxamide (4-MA) and 6-methylene-4-pregnene-3,20-dione (LY207320). Immature rats (70-80 g) received test compounds 30 min prior to s.c. injection of [3H]-T. The rats were sacrificed 30 min later and the ventral prostates were analyzed for [3H]-T metabolites. Intraprostatic [3H]-T and [3H]-DHT reached peak levels within 5 min after injection of [3H]-T and declined to about 25% of peak levels after 2 hr. 4-MA was a very potent inhibitor of [3H]-DHT formation with an estimated IC50 of 0.2 mg/kg. LY207320, an inhibitor of 5 alpha-reductase in vitro, was weakly active in vivo and did not achieve greater than 45% inhibition at high doses (greater than 200 mg/kg, s.c.). Tissue uptake of [3H]-T was also inhibited by LY207320, which may contribute to its inhibitory activity on accessory sex organ growth in the rat

  20. A novel rat fibrosarcoma cell line from transformed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with maintained in vitro and in vivo stemness properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Meng-Yu; Nestvold, Janne; Rekdal, Øystein; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Fodstad, Øystein

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a possible relationship between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and sarcoma. MSCs are hypothesized to be the cells initiating sarcomagenesis, and cancer stem cells (CSCs) sharing features of MSCs have been identified in sarcomas. Here, we report on the characteristics of a bone marrow-derived rat mesenchymal stem cell line that spontaneously transformed in long-term culture. The rat transformed mesenchymal stem cells (rTMSCs) produced soft-tissue fibrosarcomas in immunocompromised mice and immunocompetent rats. In vitro, the rTMSCs displayed increased proliferation capacity compared to the untransformed cell line. The transformed MSCs maintained the mesenchymal phenotype by expression of the stem cell marker CD 90 and the lack of hematopoietic and endothelial markers. Cytogenetic analysis detected trisomy 6 in the rTMSCs. Side population (SP) isolation and tumorsphere cultivation of the transformed cells confirmed the presence of CSCs among the rTMSCs. Importantly, the rTMSCs retained their differentiation capacity towards osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. This transformed MSC-based cell line may be valuable in examining the balance in a mixed cell population between cancer stem cell properties and the ability to differentiate to specific non-transformed cell populations. Moreover, it may also be a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of novel targeted immunotherapies in vivo. - Highlights: • Spontaneously transformed rat MSCs (rTMSCs) share characteristics with normal MSCs. • rTMSCs possess a side population, enriched with tumorigenic cells. • rTMSCs model fibrosarcoma in vivo.

  1. A novel rat fibrosarcoma cell line from transformed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with maintained in vitro and in vivo stemness properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Meng-Yu [Department of Cell Therapy, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Nestvold, Janne, E-mail: j.m.nestvold@medisin.uio.no [Department of Molecular Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo (Norway); Rekdal, Øystein [Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø (Norway); Kvalheim, Gunnar [Department of Cell Therapy, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Fodstad, Øystein [Department of Tumor Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2017-03-15

    Increasing evidence suggests a possible relationship between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and sarcoma. MSCs are hypothesized to be the cells initiating sarcomagenesis, and cancer stem cells (CSCs) sharing features of MSCs have been identified in sarcomas. Here, we report on the characteristics of a bone marrow-derived rat mesenchymal stem cell line that spontaneously transformed in long-term culture. The rat transformed mesenchymal stem cells (rTMSCs) produced soft-tissue fibrosarcomas in immunocompromised mice and immunocompetent rats. In vitro, the rTMSCs displayed increased proliferation capacity compared to the untransformed cell line. The transformed MSCs maintained the mesenchymal phenotype by expression of the stem cell marker CD 90 and the lack of hematopoietic and endothelial markers. Cytogenetic analysis detected trisomy 6 in the rTMSCs. Side population (SP) isolation and tumorsphere cultivation of the transformed cells confirmed the presence of CSCs among the rTMSCs. Importantly, the rTMSCs retained their differentiation capacity towards osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. This transformed MSC-based cell line may be valuable in examining the balance in a mixed cell population between cancer stem cell properties and the ability to differentiate to specific non-transformed cell populations. Moreover, it may also be a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of novel targeted immunotherapies in vivo. - Highlights: • Spontaneously transformed rat MSCs (rTMSCs) share characteristics with normal MSCs. • rTMSCs possess a side population, enriched with tumorigenic cells. • rTMSCs model fibrosarcoma in vivo.

  2. Effects of low-molecular-weight-chitosan on the adenine-induced chronic renal failure rats in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xuan; Han, Baoqin; Sui, Xianxian; Hu, Rui; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-02-01

    The effects of low-molecular-weight-chitosan (LMWC) on chronic renal failure (CRF) rats induced by adenine were investigated in vivo and in vitro. Chitosan were hydrolyzed using chitosanase at pH 6-7 and 37° for 24 h to obtain LMWC. In vitro, the effect of LMWC on the proliferation of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) showed that it had no cytotoxic effect and could promote cell growth. For the in vivo experiment, chronic renal failure rats induced by adenine were randomly divided into control group, Niaoduqing group, and high-, medium- and low-dose LMWC groups. For each group, we detected serum creatinine (SCR), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione oxidase (GSH-Px) activities of renal tissue, and obtained the ratio of kidney weight/body weight, pathological changes of kidney. The levels of serum SCR, BUN were higher in the adenine-induced rats than those in the control group, indicating that the rat chronic renal failure model worked successfully. The results after treatment showed that LMWC could reduce the SCR and BUN levels and enhance the activities/levels of T-SOD and GSH-PX in kidney compared to control group. Histopathological examination revealed that adenine-induced renal alterations were restored by LMWC at three tested dosages, especially at the low dosage of 100 mg kg-1 d-1.

  3. In vivo layer visualization of rat olfactory bulb by a swept source optical coherence tomography and its confirmation through electrocoagulation and anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hideyuki; Rajagopalan, Uma Maheswari; Nakamichi, Yu; Igarashi, Kei M.; Madjarova, Violeta Dimitrova; Kadono, Hirofumi; Tanifuji, Manabu

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report in vivo 3-D visualization of the layered organization of a rat olfactory bulb (OB) by a swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The SS-OCT operates at a wavelength of 1334 nm with respective theoretical depth and lateral resolutions of 6.7 μm and 15.4 μm in air and hence it is possible to get a 3D structural map of OB in vivo at the micron level resolution with millimeter-scale imaging depth. Up until now, with methods such as MRI, confocal microscopy, OB depth structure in vivo had not been clearly visualized as these do not satisfy the criterion of simultaneously providing micron-scale spatial resolution and imaging up to a few millimeter in depth. In order to confirm the OB’s layered organization revealed by SS-OCT, we introduced the technique of electrocoagulation to make landmarks across the layered structure. To our knowledge this is such a first study that combines electrocoagulation and OCT in vivo of rat OB. Our results confirmed the layered organization of OB, and moreover the layers were clearly identified by electrocoagulation landmarks both in the OCT structural and anatomical slice images. We expect such a combined study is beneficial for both OCT and neuroscience fields. PMID:21833364

  4. The effect of milk on plasmatic and tissue levels of macrolides: in vivo study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Groppo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The ingestion of milk with drugs, particularly some antibiotics, is frequently recommended in order to decrease possible gastrointestinal discomfort. The objective of this study was to assess the interference of milk in the absorption and tissue levels of macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin and azithromycin. Forty female rats received surgicallyimplanted PVC sponges on their backs. One week later, granulomatous tissue was observed and the animals were divided into eight groups, which received erythromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin and azithromycin with and without milk. One hour after administration of antibiotic, the animals were sacrificed. The serum and tissue samples were submitted to microbiological assay with Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341, in order to determine drug concentration. Milk did not cause any reduction in the serum and tissue levels of azithromycin and clarithromycin (p>0.05,t-test. However, ingestion of milk reduced by approximately 28.7% the roxithromycin (p<0.0001, t-test and by 34.1% the erythromycin (p<0.0001, t test serum concentrations. Similar effects were observed on tissue levels. Milk ingestion caused a reduction of approximately 20.8% in the roxithromycin (p<0.0001, t-test and 40% in the erythromycin (p<0.0001, t-test tissue levels. We concluded that erythromycin and roxithromycin should be not administered with milk. Keywords: Pharmacokinetics, macrolides, milk, serum concentration

  5. Effect of baking and frying on the in vivo toxicity to rats of cornmeal containing fumonisins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Kenneth A; Meredith, Filmore I; Bacon, Charles W

    2003-08-27

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium verticillioides (=F. moniliforme) and other Fusarium species. They are found in corn and corn-based foods. Cooking decreases fumonisin concentrations in food products under some conditions; however, little is known about how cooking effects biological activity. Baked cornbread, pan-fried corncakes, and deep-fried fritters were made from cornmeal that was spiked with 5% w/w F. verticillioides culture material (CM). The cooked materials and the uncooked CM-spiked cornmeal were fed to male rats (n = 5/group) for 2 weeks at high (20% w/w spiked cornmeal equivalents) or low (2% w/w spiked cornmeal equivalents) doses. A control group was fed a diet containing 20% w/w unspiked cornmeal. Toxic response to the uncooked CM-spiked cornmeal and the cooked products included decreased body weight gain (high-dose only), decreased kidney weight, and microscopic kidney and liver lesions of the type caused by fumonisins. Fumonisin concentration, as determined by HPLC analysis, in the 20% w/w pan-fried corncake diet [92.2 ppm of fumonisin B(1) (FB(1))] was slightly, but not statistically significantly, lower than those of the 20% w/w baked cornbread (132.2 ppm of FB(1)), deep-fried fritter (120.2 ppm of FB(1)) and CM-spiked cornmeal (130.5 of ppm FB(1)) diets. Therefore, baking and frying had no significant effect on the biological activity or concentration of fumonisins in these corn-based products, and the results provided no evidence for the formation of novel toxins or "hidden" fumonisins during cooking.

  6. Sub-NOAEL amounts of vinclozolin and xenoestrogens target rat chondrogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auxietre, Thuy-Anh; Dumontier, Marie-France; Balguy, Irene; Frapart, Yves; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie-Chantal; Berges, Raymond; Boudalia, Sofiane; Auger, Jacques; Corvol, Marie-Therese; Savouret, Jean-François

    2014-04-01

    Several endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC) elicit skeletal dysgenesis at pharmacological doses. We have investigated the impact of doses below the "No Observed Adverse Effect" (NOAEL) for vinclozolin (V), an anti-androgenic fungicide, alone or associated with xenoestrogens (Genistein, G and bisphenol-A, BPA). V, G, BPA and their combinations were administered orally to female Wistar rats during gestation and lactation. F1 and F2 offspring were investigated for skeletal anomalies at post-natal days 30, 110 (d30, d110). Skeletal development was monitored by measuring caudal vertebrae and long bones dimensions by X-ray micro-CT-scan. A significant increase in Inter Transverse Apophysis (ITA) distance at the upper head of caudal vertebrae, associated with a reduction in vertebral body height was observed in treated F1 females, but not males. Histometrical analysis of vertebral body growth plate cartilage was performed on serial sections of caudal vertebrae. F1 females but not males showed a diminution in growth plate thickness, with greater impact on the hypertrophic zone. All effects were maximal at d30. Effects on ITA width persisted until d110 while effects on growth plate disappeared. These effects were essentially vinclozolin or BPA-dependent. F2 animals were not affected. Our data suggest that vinclozolin and xenoestrogens act as cartilage developmental disruptors. We suggest that present NOAEL values for these compounds, and EDC at large, might be reconsidered using gestational exposure models. Finally, micro CT-scan appears a valuable non-invasive technique to detect EDC effects on live fauna. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Cultured alveolar epithelial cells from septic rats mimic in vivo septic lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor S Cohen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis results in the formation of pulmonary edema by increasing in epithelial permeability. Therefore we hypothesized that alveolar epithelial cells isolated from septic animals develop tight junctions with different protein composition and reduced barrier function relative to alveolar epithelial cells from healthy animals. Male rats (200-300 g were sacrificed 24 hours after cecal ligation and double puncture (2CLP or sham surgery. Alveolar epithelial cells were isolated and plated on fibronectin-coated flexible membranes or permeable, non-flexible transwell substrates. After a 5 day culture period, cells were either lysed for western analysis of tight junction protein expressin (claudin 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, and 18, occludin, ZO-1, and JAM-A and MAPk (JNK, ERK, an p38 signaling activation, or barrier function was examined by measuring transepithelial resistance (TER or the flux of two molecular tracers (5 and 20 A. Inhibitors of JNK (SP600125, 20 microM and ERK (U0126, 10 microM were used to determine the role of these pathways in sepsis induced epithelial barrier dysfunction. Expression of claudin 4, claudin 18, and occludin was significantly lower, and activation of JNK and ERK signaling pathways was significantly increased in 2CLP monolayers, relative to sham monolayers. Transepithelial resistance of the 2CLP monolayers was reduced significantly compared to sham (769 and 1234 ohm-cm(2, respectively, however no significant difference in the flux of either tracer was observed. Inhibition of ERK, not JNK, significantly increased TER and expression of claudin 4 in 2CLP monolayers, and prevented significant differences in claudin 18 expression between 2CLP and sham monolayers. We conclude that alveolar epithelial cells isolated from septic animals form confluent monolayers with impaired barrier function compared to healthy monolayers, and inhibition of ERK signaling partially reverses differences between these monolayers. This model provides a unique

  8. In Vivo Quantification of Inflammation in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Rats Using Fluorine-19 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reveals Immune Cell Recruitment outside the Nervous System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zhong

    Full Text Available Progress in identifying new therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS can be accelerated by using imaging biomarkers of disease progression or abatement in model systems. In this study, we evaluate the ability to noninvasively image and quantitate disease pathology using emerging "hot-spot" 19F MRI methods in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE rat, a model of MS. Rats with clinical symptoms of EAE were compared to control rats without EAE, as well as to EAE rats that received daily prophylactic treatments with cyclophosphamide. Perfluorocarbon (PFC nanoemulsion was injected intravenously, which labels predominately monocytes and macrophages in situ. Analysis of the spin-density weighted 19F MRI data enabled quantification of the apparent macrophage burden in the central nervous system and other tissues. The in vivo MRI results were confirmed by extremely high-resolution 19F/1H magnetic resonance microscopy in excised tissue samples and histopathologic analyses. Additionally, 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of intact tissue samples was used to assay the PFC biodistribution in EAE and control rats. In vivo hot-spot 19F signals were detected predominantly in the EAE spinal cord, consistent with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates. Surprising, prominent 19F hot-spots were observed in bone-marrow cavities adjacent to spinal cord lesions; these were not observed in control animals. Quantitative evaluation of cohorts receiving cyclophosphamide treatment displayed significant reduction in 19F signal within the spinal cord and bone marrow of EAE rats. Overall, 19F MRI can be used to quantitatively monitored EAE disease burden, discover unexpected sites of inflammatory activity, and may serve as a sensitive biomarker for the discovery and preclinical assessment of novel MS therapeutic interventions.

  9. In vivo cell tracking imaging of hexadecyl-4-[{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]iodobenzoate labeled adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) in rat heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Kyo Chul [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Monitoring of transplanted stem cells for cardiac repair is important part in regenerative medicine. Direct cell labeling techniques using [{sup 18}F]FDG, [{sup 64}Cu]PTSM and [{sup 99m}Tc]-HMPAO have been developed for in vivo imaging. Especially, {sup 18}F-labeled derivates have been widely used for direct labeling agent. But the {sup 18}F has short half life (T{sub 1/2}={approx}2 h), thus this imaging agent has limitation of in vivo imaging. We used {sup 123}I or {sup 124}I which has relative long half life, to track the transplanted stem cells for a long-term imaging. This study is aimed to track the transplanted adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) in rat heart using hexadecyl-4-[{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]iodobenzoate ([{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]HIB) mediated direct labeling method in vivo

  10. [Degenerative lesions of the peripheral retina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conart, J-B; Baron, D; Berrod, J-P

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative lesions of the peripheral retina are present from teenage years onwards and increase with age. These abnormabilities are frequent, some of them being benign while others predispose to retinal tears and detachment. In the latter case, the lesions are rhegmatogenous and may justify prophylactic treatment by laser photocoagulation. We distinguish congenital lesions of the peripheral retina and intraretinal, chorioretinal and vitreoretinal degenerations. The holes and tears observed in 2% of the population consist of round atrophic holes, "horseshoe" tears, oral dialyses and giant tears. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetics of lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, F; Ohba, N

    1982-01-01

    First-degree relatives of proband patients with lattice degeneration of the retina revealed a significantly higher prevalence of the disease than the prevalence in the general population: the former had the disease about three times as frequently as the latter. The observed data were analyzed in terms of their accordance with recognized genetic models. The inheritance pattern did not fit well to a monogenic mode of inheritance, and it was hypothesized that a polygenic or multifactorial mode of inheritance is the most likely for lattice degeneration of the retina.

  12. Capsaicin pretreatment enhanced the bioavailability of fexofenadine in rats by P-glycoprotein modulation: in vitro, in situ and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedada, Satish Kumar; Appani, Ramgopal; Boga, Praveen Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Capsaicin is the main pungent principle present in chili peppers has been found to possess P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibition activity in vitro, which may have the potential to modulate bioavailability of P-gp substrates. Therefore, purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of capsaicin on intestinal absorption and bioavailability of fexofenadine, a P-gp substrate in rats. The mechanistic evaluation was determined by non-everted sac and intestinal perfusion studies to explore the intestinal absorption of fexofenadine. These results were confirmed by an in vivo pharmacokinetic study of oral administered fexofenadine in rats. The intestinal transport and apparent permeability (P app ) of fexofenadine were increased significantly by 2.8 and 2.6 fold, respectively, in ileum of capsaicin treated rats when compared to control group. Similarly, absorption rate constant (K a ), fraction absorbed (F ab ) and effective permeability (P eff ) of fexofenadine were increased significantly by 2.8, 2.9 and 3.4 fold, respectively, in ileum of rats pretreated with capsaicin when compared to control group. In addition, maximum plasma concentration (C max ) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) were increased significantly by 2.3 and 2.4 fold, respectively, in rats pretreated with capsaicin as compared to control group. Furthermore, obtained results in rats pretreated with capsaicin were comparable to verapamil (positive control) treated rats. Capsaicin pretreatment significantly enhanced the intestinal absorption and bioavailability of fexofenadine in rats likely by inhibition of P-gp mediated cellular efflux, suggesting that the combined use of capsaicin with P-gp substrates may require close monitoring for potential drug interactions.

  13. Expression and localization of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in the goldfish retina--an in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenbranden, C. A.; Kamphuis, W.; Nunes Cardozo, B.; Kamermans, M.

    2000-01-01

    The expression and distribution of AMPA, kainate and NMDA glutamate receptor subunits was studied in the goldfish retina. For the immunocytochemical localization of the AMPA receptor antisera against GluR2, GluR2/3 and GluR4 were used, and for in situ hybridization rat specific probes for GluR1 and

  14. Brain delivery of valproic acid via intranasal administration of nanostructured lipid carriers: in vivo pharmacodynamic studies using rat electroshock model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharareh Eskandari

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sharareh Eskandari1, Jaleh Varshosaz1, Mohsen Minaiyan2, Majid Tabbakhian11Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, IranAbstract: The treatment of brain disorders is one of the greatest challenges in drug delivery because of a variety of main barriers in effective drug transport and maintaining therapeutic concentrations in the brain for a prolonged period. The objective of this study was delivery of valproic acid (VPA to the brain by intranasal route. For this purpose, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs were prepared by solvent diffusion method followed by ultrasonication and characterized for size, zeta potential, drug-loading percentage, and release. Six groups of rats each containing six animals received drug-loaded NLCs intraperitoneally (IP or intranasally. Brain responses were then examined by using maximal electroshock (MES. The hind limb tonic extension:flexion inhibition ratio was measured at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-minute intervals. The drug concentration was also measured in plasma and brain at the most protective point using gas chromatography method. The particle size of NLCs was 154 ± 16 nm with drug-loading percentage of 47% ± 0.8% and drug release of 75% ± 1.9% after 21 days. In vivo results showed that there was a significant difference between protective effects of NLCs of VPA and control group 15, 30, 60, and 90 minutes after treatment via intranasal route (P < 0.05. Similar protective effect was observed in rats treated with NLCs of VPA in intranasal route and positive control in IP route (P > 0.05. Results of drug determination in brain and plasma showed that brain:plasma concentration ratio was much higher after intranasal administration of NLCs of VPA than the positive control group (IP route. In conclusion, intranasal administration of NLCs of VPA provided a better protection

  15. Transfer of uranium throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract of the rat: In vivo and in vitro approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dublineau, I.; Grison, S.; Dudoignon, N.; Baudelin, C.; Aigueperse, J.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of uranium in environment either natural or due to civil and military use, may lead to contamination of the public throughout the entire life mainly by chronic ingestion. The mechanisms of uranium transfer from alimentary bolus to blood are still not well known. In particular, few information are available on the different absorption sites along the gastrointestinal tract, the different cellular pathways (para-or trans-cellular), and the transporters implicated in the uranium absorption. In addition, the specific role of Peyer's patches, the aggregated structure of Gut-Associated Lymphoid tissue, in the intestinal transfer of uranium has never been determined. In fact, the transport of uranium through these structures specialized in antigen uptake from intestinal lumen may lead to major dysfunctions in mucosal immunity. Thus, different approaches have to be developed to determine the role of the different gastrointestinal structures and to apprehend the biological consequences of daily passage of uranium through these structures. These experiments include in vivo measurement of uranium in blood after in situ deposit of uranium (233U) in the different segments of the alimentary tract (buccal cavity, stomach, small intestine, colon) and ex vivo experiments in Using chambers to compare uranium passage from luminal to serosal side through intestinal epithelium and Peyer's patches. In vitro studies are also necessary to determine the nature of the cells as well as the transporters implicated in the gastrointestinal passage of uranium. Autoradiography experiments were performed to determine if uranium absorption was only restricted to villi which contained absorptive cells or if uranium absorption was also due to crypt cells. In addition, the transporter implicated in the uranium passage id dependent of the physico-chemical form of uranium present at the different gastrointestinal sites. When complexed to phosphate, uranium is transported by the sodium

  16. Transfer of uranium throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract of the rat: In vivo and in vitro approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dublineau, I.; Grison, S.; Dudoignon, N.; Baudelin, C.; Aigueperse, J.

    2004-07-01

    The presence of uranium in environment either natural or due to civil and military use, may lead to contamination of the public throughout the entire life mainly by chronic ingestion. The mechanisms of uranium transfer from alimentary bolus to blood are still not well known. In particular, few information are available on the different absorption sites along the gastrointestinal tract, the different cellular pathways (para-or trans-cellular), and the transporters implicated in the uranium absorption. In addition, the specific role of Peyer's patches, the aggregated structure of Gut-Associated Lymphoid tissue, in the intestinal transfer of uranium has never been determined. In fact, the transport of uranium through these structures specialized in antigen uptake from intestinal lumen may lead to major dysfunctions in mucosal immunity. Thus, different approaches have to be developed to determine the role of the different gastrointestinal structures and to apprehend the biological consequences of daily passage of uranium through these structures. These experiments include in vivo measurement of uranium in blood after in situ deposit of uranium (233U) in the different segments of the alimentary tract (buccal cavity, stomach, small intestine, colon) and ex vivo experiments in Using chambers to compare uranium passage from luminal to serosal side through intestinal epithelium and Peyer's patches. In vitro studies are also necessary to determine the nature of the cells as well as the transporters implicated in the gastrointestinal passage of uranium. Autoradiography experiments were performed to determine if uranium absorption was only restricted to villi which contained absorptive cells or if uranium absorption was also due to crypt cells. In addition, the transporter implicated in the uranium passage is dependent of the physico-chemical form of uranium present at the different gastrointestinal sites. When complexed to phosphate, uranium is transported by the

  17. Evaluation of 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether in the rat comet assay: Part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of in vivo rat alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Catherine C; Walker, Joanne S; O'Donovan, Michael R; Doherty, Ann T

    2015-07-01

    As a part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay, 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether (DPE), a known rodent genotoxic carcinogen, was tested in this laboratory. Sprague Dawley rats (7-9 weeks of age) were given three oral doses of DPE, 24 and 21 h apart and liver or stomach sampled 3h after the final dose. Under the conditions of the test, no increases in DNA damage in liver and stomach were observed with DPE (up to 200 mg/kg/day). A dose-dependent decrease in DNA migration, compared to vehicle controls, was noted for DPE in rat stomach. Further analysis is required to elucidate fully whether this decrease is a consequence of the mode of action or due to the toxicity of DPE. What is perhaps surprising is the inability of the comet assay to detect a known rat genotoxic carcinogen in liver. Further investigation is needed to clarify whether this apparent lack of response results from limited tissue exposure or metabolic differences between species. This finding highlights a need for careful consideration of study design when evaluating assay performance as a measure of in vivo genotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Systemic candidiasis in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A

    1996-01-01

    A reproducible model of a generalized Candida albicans infection was established in rats to allow a precise evaluation of the efficacy of antifungal compounds. In contrast to the intravenous C. albicans model in mice, which serves as a primary model for in vivo efficacy studies of antimycotic compounds, the infectious process in Sprague-Dawley rats is more severely spread into organs other than the kidneys, such as brain, heart, liver, lung, retina and spleen. Apart from a severe granulomatous nephritis beginning 1 day after infection, we observed a severe pneumonitis 3 days after infection with a mass of extravasal erythrocytes in the interstitium and the alveolar space. In addition, multiple nodular lesions could be observed in the brain, heart, liver, retina and spleen on the first day after infection. Lethality was 100% within 1 week, the majority of deaths occurring from 5 to 7 days. Antifungal therapy with amphotericin B or fluconazole led to long-term survival over 4 months, which could not be achieved in mice.

  19. The Alterations in the Expression and Function of P-Glycoprotein in Vitamin A-Deficient Rats as well as the Effect of Drug Disposition in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubang Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate whether vitamin A deficiency could alter P-GP expression and function in tissues of rats and whether such effects affected the drug distribution in vivo of vitamin A-deficient rats. We induced vitamin A-deficient rats by giving them a vitamin A-free diet for 12 weeks. Then, Abcb1/P-GP expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR and Western blot. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that Abcb1a mRNA levels were increased in hippocampus and liver. In kidney, it only showed an upward trend. Abcb1b mRNA levels were increased in hippocampus, but decreased in cerebral cortex, liver and kidney. Western blot results were in good accordance with the alterations of Abcb1b mRNA levels. P-GP function was investigated through tissue distribution and body fluid excretion of rhodamine 123 (Rho123, and the results proclaimed that P-GP activities were also in good accordance with P-GP expression in cerebral cortex, liver and kidney. The change of drug distribution was also investigated through the tissue distribution of vincristine, and the results showed a significantly upward trend in all indicated tissues of vitamin A-deficient rats. In conclusion, vitamin A deficiency may alter Abcb1/P-GP expression and function in rat tissues, and the alterations may increase drug activity/toxicity through the increase of tissue accumulation.

  20. Effect of isologous and autologous insulin antibodies on in vivo bioavailability and metabolic fate of immune-complexed insulin in Lou/M rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arquilla, E.R.; McDougall, B.R.; Stenger, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo bioavailability, distribution, and metabolic fate of 125I-labeled insulin complexed to isologous and autologous antibodies were studied in inbred Lou/M rats. There was an impaired bioavailability of the 125I-insulin bound to the isologous and autologous antibodies. Very little of the 125I-insulin in these immune complexes could bind to insulin receptors on hepatocytes or renal tubular cells and be degraded, because the amounts of 125I from degraded 125I-insulin in the blood or secreted into the stomach were markedly attenuated in both cases for at least 30 min after injection. There was a simultaneous accumulation of 125I-insulin immune complexes in the liver and the kidneys of Lou/M rats injected with 125I-insulin complexed with isologous antibodies or when insulin-immunized Lou/M rats were injected with 125I-insulin during the same interval. The impaired bioavailability of immune-complexed insulin and altered distribution of radioactivity due to the accumulation of immune complexes in the liver and kidney were also observed in previous experiments in which Lewis rats were injected with xenogenic guinea pig and homologous insulin antibodies. These observations are therefore submitted as evidence that the Lou/M rat is a valid model in which to study the bioavailability of insulin immune complexed to isologous, homologous, and xenogenic antibodies and the metabolic fate of the respective insulin-antibody immune complexes

  1. Diltiazem Reduces Mortality and Breakdown of ATP in Red Blood Cell Induced by Isoproterenol in a Freely Moving Rat Model in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollen K.F. Yeung

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The benefit of calcium channel blockers for cardiovascular prevention against heart attack and stroke has not been firmly supported. We investigated the possible cardiovascular protective effect of diltiazem (DTZ against injury induced by isoproterenol using a freely moving rat model in vivo. Sprague Dawley rats were injected subcutaneously (sc with either 5 or 10 mg/kg of DTZ, or saline as control, twice daily for five doses. One hour after the last injection, a single dose of isoproterenol (30 mg/kg was injected sc to each rat. Blood samples were collected serially for 6 h for measurement of adenine nucleotides (ATP, ADP and AMP in red blood cell (RBC by a validated HPLC. The study has shown isoproterenol induced 50% mortality and also increased RBC concentrations of AMP from 0.04 ± 0.02 to 0.29 ± 0.21 mM at the end of the experiment (p < 0.05. Treatment with 10 mg/kg of DTZ reduced mortality from 50% to <20% and attenuated the increase of RBC concentrations of AMP from +0.25 ± 0.22 in the control rats to +0.072 ± 0.092 mM (p < 0.05. The study concluded that 10 mg/kg of DTZ reduced mortality and breakdown of ATP induced by isoproterenol in rats.

  2. Cyclosporine, a P-glycoprotein modulator, increases [18F]MPPF uptake in rat brain and peripheral tissues: microPET and ex vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacan, Goran; Way, Baldwin M.; Plenevaux, Alain; Defraiteur, Caroline; Lemaire, Christian; Aerts, Joel; Luxen, Andre; Rubins, Daniel J.; Cherry, Simon R.; Melega, William P.

    2008-01-01

    Pretreatment with cyclosporine, a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) modulator increases brain uptake of 4-(2'-methoxyphenyl)-1-[2'-(N-2''-pyridinyl)-p-[ 18 F] fluorobenzamido] ethylpiper azine ([ 18 F]MPPF) for binding to hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT 1A ) receptors. Those increases were quantified in rat brain with in vivo microPET and ex vivo tissue studies. Each Sprague-Dawley rat (n=4) received a baseline [ 18 F]MPPF microPET scan followed by second scan 2-3 weeks later that included cyclosporine pretreatment (50 mg/kg, i.p.). Maximum a posteriori reconstructed images and volumetric ROIs were used to generate dynamic radioactivity concentration measurements for hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum, with simplified reference tissue method (SRTM) analysis. Western blots were used to semiquantify P-gp regional distribution in brain. MicroPET studies showed that hippocampus uptake of [ 18 F]MPPF was increased after cyclosporine; ex vivo studies showed similar increases in hippocampus and frontal cortex at 30 min, and for heart and kidney at 2.5 and 5 min, without concomitant increases in [ 18 F]MPPF plasma concentration. P-gp content in cerebellum was twofold higher than in hippocampus or frontal cortex. These studies confirm and extend prior ex vivo results (J. Passchier, et al., Eur J Pharmacol, 2000) that showed [ 18 F]MPPF as a substrate for P-gp. Our microPET results showed that P-gp modulation of [ 18 F]MPPF binding to 5-HT 1A receptors can be imaged in rat hippocampus. The heterogeneous brain distribution of P-gp appeared to invalidate the use of cerebellum as a nonspecific reference region for SRTM modeling. Regional quantitation of P-gp may be necessary for accurate PET assessment of 5-HT 1A receptor density when based on tracer uptake sensitive to P-gp modulation. (orig.)

  3. Low-dose in vivo pharmacokinetic and deuterium isotope effect studies of N-nitrosodimethylamine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mico, B.A.; Swagzdis, J.E.; Hu, H.S.; Keefer, L.K.; Oldfield, N.F.; Garland, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    The rates of elimination of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and its fully deuterated analogue (N-nitrosodi[ 2 H6]methylamine, [ 2 H6]NDMA) were studied in vivo to explore the origins of the difference in their carcinogenicity. Male Fischer 344 rats, 7.5 weeks of age, were given nitrosamine bolus doses of 1.35 mumol/kg by tail vein injection and 2.02 or 4.05 mumol/kg by p.o. gavage. Animals were sacrificed at various time points from 2.5 to 180 min after i.v. administration or 5 to 120 min after p.o. dosage, and their blood was analyzed for NDMA by gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry. After i.v. injection, blood nitrosamine concentrations declined in an apparently biexponential manner with a terminal half-life of 10 min for NDMA and 12 min for [ 2 H6]NDMA. The apparent total systemic blood clearances for NDMA and [ 2 H6]NDMA were 39 and 26 ml/min/kg, respectively. The apparent steady-state volumes of distribution were nearly identical (297 and 309 ml/kg, respectively). The areas under the curve after 2.02- and 4.05-mumol/kg p.o. doses were proportional to dose. The apparent bioavailability of NDMA was 8%, while that of [ 2 H6]NDMA was 21%. Isotope effects calculated as the ratios of first-pass metabolism, total systemic clearances, bioavailabilities, and intrinsic hepatic clearances were 1.2, 1.5, 2.6, and 3.2, respectively. The isotope effect determined from blood concentrations measured after simultaneous administration of NDMA and [ 2 H6]NDMA by steady-state infusion (each at 1.5 mumol/kg/h) was 2.6 +/- 0.9 (SD)

  4. The ethanol-induced stimulation of rat duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in vivo is critically dependent on luminal Cl-.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sommansson

    Full Text Available Alcohol may induce metabolic and functional changes in gastrointestinal epithelial cells, contributing to impaired mucosal barrier function. Duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion (DBS is a primary epithelial defense against gastric acid and also has an important function in maintaining the homeostasis of the juxtamucosal microenvironment. The aim in this study was to investigate the effects of the luminal perfusion of moderate concentrations of ethanol in vivo on epithelial DBS, fluid secretion and paracellular permeability. Under thiobarbiturate anesthesia, a ∼30-mm segment of the proximal duodenum with an intact blood supply was perfused in situ in rats. The effects on DBS, duodenal transepithelial net fluid flux and the blood-to-lumen clearance of 51Cr-EDTA were investigated. Perfusing the duodenum with isotonic solutions of 10% or 15% ethanol-by-volume for 30 min increased DBS in a concentration-dependent manner, while the net fluid flux did not change. Pre-treatment with the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh172 (i.p. or i.v. did not change the secretory response to ethanol, while removing Cl- from the luminal perfusate abolished the ethanol-induced increase in DBS. The administration of hexamethonium (i.v. but not capsazepine significantly reduced the basal net fluid flux and the ethanol-induced increase in DBS. Perfusing the duodenum with a combination of 1.0 mM HCl and 15% ethanol induced significantly greater increases in DBS than 15% ethanol or 1.0 mM HCl alone but did not influence fluid flux. Our data demonstrate that ethanol induces increases in DBS through a mechanism that is critically dependent on luminal Cl- and partly dependent on enteric neural pathways involving nicotinic receptors. Ethanol and HCl appears to stimulate DBS via the activation of different bicarbonate transporting mechanisms.

  5. In vivo imaging of cerebral hemodynamics and tissue scattering in rat brain using a surgical microscope camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Kanie, Takuya; Mustari, Afrina; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Sato, Manabu; Kokubo, Yasuaki

    2018-02-01

    We investigated a rapid imaging method to monitor the spatial distribution of total hemoglobin concentration (CHbT), the tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), and the scattering power b in the expression of musp=a(lambda)^-b as the scattering parameters in cerebral cortex using a digital red-green-blue camera. In the method, Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) for light transport in brain tissue is used to specify a relation among the RGB-values and the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (CHbO), that of deoxygenated hemoglobin (CHbR), and the scattering power b. In the present study, we performed sequential recordings of RGB images of in vivo exposed brain of rats while changing the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), using a surgical microscope camera system. The time courses of CHbO, CHbR, CHbT, and StO2 indicated the well-known physiological responses in cerebral cortex. On the other hand, a fast decrease in the scattering power b was observed immediately after the respiratory arrest, which is similar to the negative deflection of the extracellular DC potential so-called anoxic depolarization. It is said that the DC shift coincident with a rise in extracellular potassium and can evoke cell deformation generated by water movement between intracellular and extracellular compartments, and hence the light scattering by tissue. Therefore, the decrease in the scattering power b after the respiratory arrest is indicative of changes in light scattering by tissue. The results in this study indicate potential of the method to evaluate the pathophysiological conditions and loss of tissue viability in brain tissue.

  6. Extracellular Vesicles from Human Liver Stem Cells Reduce Injury in an Ex Vivo Normothermic Hypoxic Rat Liver Perfusion Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Federica; De Stefano, Nicola; Navarro-Tableros, Victor; David, Ezio; Rizza, Giorgia; Catalano, Giorgia; Gilbo, Nicholas; Maione, Francesca; Gonella, Federica; Roggio, Dorotea; Martini, Silvia; Patrono, Damiano; Salizzoni, Mauro; Camussi, Giovanni; Romagnoli, Renato

    2018-05-01

    The gold standard for organ preservation before transplantation is static cold storage, which is unable to fully protect suboptimal livers from ischemia/reperfusion injury. An emerging alternative is normothermic machine perfusion (NMP), which permits organ reconditioning. Here, we aimed to explore the feasibility of a pharmacological intervention on isolated rat livers by using a combination of NMP and human liver stem cells-derived extracellular vesicles (HLSC-EV). We established an ex vivo murine model of NMP capable to maintain liver function despite an ongoing hypoxic injury induced by hemodilution. Livers were perfused for 4 hours without (control group, n = 10) or with HLSC-EV (treated group, n = 9). Bile production was quantified; perfusate samples were collected hourly to measure metabolic (pH, pO2, pCO2) and cytolysis parameters (AST, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase). At the end of perfusion, we assessed HLSC-EV engraftment by immunofluorescence, tissue injury by histology, apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay, tissue hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 RNA expression by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. During hypoxic NMP, livers were able to maintain homeostasis and produce bile. In the treated group, AST (P = 0.018) and lactate dehydrogenase (P = 0.032) levels were significantly lower than those of the control group at 3 hours of perfusion, and AST levels persisted lower at 4 hours (P = 0.003). By the end of NMP, HLSC-EV had been uptaken by hepatocytes, and EV treatment significantly reduced histological damage (P = 0.030), apoptosis (P = 0.049), and RNA overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (P < 0.0001) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (P = 0.014). HLSC-EV treatment, even in a short-duration model, was feasible and effectively reduced liver injury during hypoxic NMP.

  7. The effect of high-energy extracorporeal shock waves on hyaline cartilage of adult rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Ernst, Judith; Maier, Markus; Chiquet, Matthias; Joos, Helga; Müller, Peter E; Jansson, Volkmar; Sievers, Birte; Hausdorf, Jörg

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in vivo affects the structural integrity of articular cartilage. A single bout of ESWT (1500 shock waves of 0.5 mJ/mm(2)) was applied to femoral heads of 18 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Two sham-treated animals served as controls. Cartilage of each femoral head was harvested at 1, 4, or 10 weeks after ESWT (n = 6 per treatment group) and scored on safranin-O-stained sections. Expression of tenascin-C and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (Chi3L1) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to examine collagen (II)alpha(1) (COL2A1) expression and chondrocyte morphology was investigated by transmission electron microscopy no changes in Mankin scores were observed after ESWT. Positive immunostaining for tenascin-C and Chi3L1 was found up to 10 weeks after ESWT in experimental but not in control cartilage. COL2A1 mRNA was increased in samples 1 and 4 weeks after ESWT. Alterations found on the ultrastructural level showed expansion of the rough-surfaced endoplasmatic reticulum, detachment of the cell membrane and necrotic chondrocytes. Extracorporeal shock waves caused alterations of hyaline cartilage on a molecular and ultrastructural level that were distinctly different from control. Similar changes were described before in the very early phase of osteoarthritis (OA). High-energy ESWT might therefore cause degenerative changes in hyaline cartilage as they are found in initial OA. Copyright 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. In vivo oxidative stress alters thiol redox status of peroxiredoxin 1 and 6 and impairs rat sperm quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannan Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and antioxidant activity is a major culprit of male infertility. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs are major antioxidant enzymes of mammalian spermatozoa and are thiol oxidized and inactivated by ROS in a dose-dependent manner. Their deficiency and/or inactivation have been associated with men infertility. The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of oxidative stress, generated by the in vivo tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tert-BHP treatment on rat epididymal spermatozoa during their maturation process. Adult Sprague-Dawley males were treated with 300 μmoles tert-BHP/kg or saline (control per day intraperitoneal for 15 days. Lipid peroxidation (2-thibarbituric acid reactive substances assay, total amount and thiol oxidation of PRDXs along with the total amount of superoxide dismutase (SOD, motility and DNA oxidation (8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine were determined in epididymal spermatozoa. Total amount of PRDXs and catalase and thiol oxidation of PRDXs were determined in caput and cauda epididymis. While animals were not affected by treatment, their epididymal spermatozoa have decreased motility, increased levels of DNA oxidation and lipid peroxidation along with increased PRDXs (and not SOD amounts. Moreover, sperm PRDXs were highly thiol oxidized. There was a differential regulation in the expression of PRDX1 and PRDX6 in the epididymis that suggests a segment-specific role for PRDXs. In conclusion, PRDXs are increased in epididymal spermatozoa in an attempt to fight against the oxidative stress generated by tert-BHP in the epididymis. These findings highlight the role of PRDXs in the protection of sperm function and DNA integrity during epididymal maturation.

  9. Information processing in the outer retina of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endeman, D.

    2017-01-01

    The retina translates light into neuronal activity. Thus, it renders visual information of the external environment. The retina can only send a limited amount of information to the brain within a given period. To use this amount optimally, light stimuli are strongly processed in the retina. This

  10. Specific in vivo binding of 3H-spiperone to individual lobes of the pituitary gland of the rat. Evidence for the labelling of dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, C.; Fahlberg, K.

    1985-01-01

    The in vivo binding of 3 H-spiperone to individual lobes of the pituitary gland was studied after intravenous injections in unanesthetized male rats. The binding was found to be saturable and reversible. The percentage of total binding of 3 H-spiperone that was specific binding was highest in the intermediate (approx= 75%) and lowest in the posterior (approx= 35%) lobes. The regional distribution of 3 H-spiperone binding 1 hour after injections was the following: intermediate>anterior>posterior. Pharmacological analysis of the in vivo 3 H-spiperone binding showed that dopamine agonists (e.g. bromocriptine, N-n-propylnorapomorphine) and antagonsits could prevent the in vivo binding of sup3H-spiperone in all three parts of the gland. The substituted benzamide drugs remoxipride and raclopride blocked the in vivo 3 H-spiperone binding in the anterior and intermediate lobes but did not reduce the 3 H-spiperone binding in the posterior part, except when given in very high doses. Taken together, the present study has shown that 3 H-spiperone can be used in studies of the dopamine receptors in the anterior, intermediate and posterior lobes of the pituitary gland, but the proportion of non-specific binding is higher than in the striatum. The use of in vivo 3 H-spiperone binding may thus be a useful method to study the regulation and pharmacology of these receptors in situ. (Author)

  11. In vivo and in vitro effects of lysine clonixinate on nitric oxide synthase in LPS-treated and untreated rat lung preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, A M; Di Girolamo, G; Farina, M; de los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Gimeno, M A

    2001-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) inhibited the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) without direct effect on the catalytic activity of this enzyme. This study was conducted to investigate the in vitro and in vivo effects of lysine clonixinate (LC) and indomethacin (INDO) on NOS activity in rat lung preparation. LC is a drug with antiinflammatory, antipyretic, and analgesic action. In the in vitro experiments, rats were injected with saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and killed 6 h after treatment. Lung preparations were incubated with LC at 2.3 x 10(-5) M or 3.8 x 10(-5) M. The minimum concentration did not modify NOS activity in control or LPS-treated rats but the maximum dose inhibited increased NO production induced by LPS. Furthermore, INDO at 10(-6) M had no effect on enzymatic activity in control or LPS-treated rats. In the in vivo experiments, 40 mg/kg of LC were injected ip. Such a dose did not affect basal production of NO. When LC and LPS were injected simultaneously 6 h before sacrifice, a significant decrease in LPS-induced NOS activity was observed. INDO 10 mg/kg injected in control animals had no effect on NOS activity and did not block LPS induced stimulation of NO production when injected simultaneously. Finally, when LC (40 mg/kg) was injected 3 h after LPS, the enzymatic activity remained unchanged. Expression of iNOS was detected by Western blotting in rats treated with LPS plus 4, 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg of LC. The lowest dose was the only one showing no effect on LPS-induced increase of iNOS. In short, LC is a NSAID with inhibitory action on the expression of LPS-induced NOS, effect that was not seen with INDO in our experimental conditions. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  12. Metabolism of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) in rats: in vivo and in vitro dose and time dependency of metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhuguenot, J.C.; Mitchell, A.M.; Milner, G.; Lock, E.A.; Elcombe, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigated the in vivo metabolism of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) in rats after multiple dosing, the metabolism of MEHP in primary rat hepatocyte cultures for periods of up to 3 days, and the biotransformation of some major metabolites of MEHP. Rats were orally administered [ 14 C]DEHP or [ 14 C]MEHP at doses of 50 and 500 mg/kg body wt for three consecutive days. Urine was collected at 24-hr intervals, and metabolite profiles were determined. After a single dose of either compound, urinary metabolite profiles were similar to those previously reported. However, after multiple administration of both DEHP and MEHP at 500 mg/kg, increases in omega-/beta-oxidation products [metabolites I and V, mono(3-carboxy-2-ethylpropyl) phthalate and mono(5-carboxy-2-ethylpentyl) phthalate, respectively] and decreases in omega - 1-oxidation products [metabolites VI and IX, mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate and mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate, respectively] were seen. At the low dose of 50 mg/kg little or no alteration in urinary metabolite profiles was observed. At 500 mg/kg of MEHP a 4-fold stimulation of CN- -insensitive palmitoyl-CoA oxidation (a peroxisomal beta-oxidation marker) was seen after three consecutive daily doses. At the low dose of 50 mg/kg only a 1.8-fold increase was noted. Similar observations were made with rat hepatocyte cultures. MEHP at concentrations of 50 and 500 microM was extensively metabolized in the rat hepatocyte cultures. Similar metabolic profiles to those seen after in vivo administration of MEHP were observed. At the high (500 microM) concentration of MEHP, changes in the relative proportions of omega- and omega- 1-oxidized metabolites were seen

  13. Elucidation of Arctigenin Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution after Intravenous, Oral, Hypodermic and Sublingual Administration in Rats and Beagle Dogs: Integration of In Vitro and In Vivo Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although arctigenin (AG has diverse bioactivities, such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, immunoregulatory and neuroprotective activities, its pharmacokinetics have not been systematically evaluated. The purpose of this work was to identify the pharmacokinetic properties of AG via various experiments in vivo and in vitro. In this research, rats and beagle dogs were used to investigate the PK (pharmacokinetics, PK profiles of AG with different drug-delivery manners, including intravenous (i.v, hypodermic injection (i.h, and sublingual (s.l administration. The data shows that AG exhibited a strong absorption capacity in both rats and beagle dogs (absorption rate < 1 h, a high absorption degree (absolute bioavailability > 100%, and a strong elimination ability (t1/2 < 2 h. The tissue distributions of AG at different time points after i.h showed that the distribution of AG in rat tissues is rapid (2.5 h to reach the peak and wide (detectable in almost all tissues and organs. The AG concentration in the intestine was the highest, followed by that in the heart, liver, pancreas, and kidney. In vitro, AG were incubated with human, monkey, beagle dog and rat liver microsomes. The concentrations of AG were detected by UPLC-MS/MS at different time points (from 0 min to 90 min. The percentages of AG remaining in four species’ liver microsomes were human (62 ± 6.36% > beagle dog (25.9 ± 3.24% > rat (15.7 ± 9% > monkey (3.69 ± 0.12%. This systematic investigation of pharmacokinetic profiles of arctigenin (AG in vivo and in vitro is worthy of further exploration.

  14. Curcumin Delays Retinal Degeneration by Regulating Microglia Activation in the Retina of rd1 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhe; Yin, Zhiyuan; Gao, Lixiong; Sun, Dayu; Hu, Xisu; Xue, Langyue; Dai, Jiaman; Zeng, YuXiao; Chen, Siyu; Pan, Boju; Chen, Min; Xie, Jing; Xu, Haiwei

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is characterized by degeneration of photoreceptors, and there are currently no effective treatments for this disease. However, curcumin has shown neuroprotectant efficacy in a RP rat and swine model, and thus, may have neuroprotective effects in this disease. Immunofluorescence staining, electroretinogram recordings, and behavioral tests were used to analyze the effects of curcumin and the underlying mechanism in retinal degeneration 1 (rd1) mice. The number of apoptotic cells in the retina of rd1 mice at postnatal day 14 significantly decreased with curcumin treatment and visual function was improved. The activation of microglia and secretion of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases in the retina were inhibited by curcumin. These effects were also observed in a co-culture of BV2 microglial cells and retina-derived 661W cells. Curcumin delayed retinal degeneration by suppressing microglia activation in the retina of rd1 mice. Thus, it may be an effective treatment for neurodegenerative disorders such as RP. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Curcumin Delays Retinal Degeneration by Regulating Microglia Activation in the Retina of rd1 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhe Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is characterized by degeneration of photoreceptors, and there are currently no effective treatments for this disease. However, curcumin has shown neuroprotectant efficacy in a RP rat and swine model, and thus, may have neuroprotective effects in this disease. Methods: Immunofluorescence staining, electroretinogram recordings, and behavioral tests were used to analyze the effects of curcumin and the underlying mechanism in retinal degeneration 1 (rd1 mice. Results: The number of apoptotic cells in the retina of rd1 mice at postnatal day 14 significantly decreased with curcumin treatment and visual function was improved. The activation of microglia and secretion of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases in the retina were inhibited by curcumin. These effects were also observed in a co-culture of BV2 microglial cells and retina-derived 661W cells. Conclusions: Curcumin delayed retinal degeneration by suppressing microglia activation in the retina of rd1 mice. Thus, it may be an effective treatment for neurodegenerative disorders such as RP.

  16. The in vivo pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion investigation of mesaconine in rats and its in vitro intestinal absorption study using UPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuxiu; Tang, Minghai; Liu, Taohong; Wang, Chunyan; Tang, Qiaoxin; Xiao, Yaxin; Yang, Ruixin; Chao, Ruobing

    2017-12-27

    1. Mesaconine, an ingredient from Aconitum carmichaelii Debx., has been proven to have cardiac effect. For further development and better pharmacological elucidation, the in vivo process and intestinal absorptive behavior of mesaconine should be investigated comprehensively. 2. An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantitation of mesaconine in rat plasma, tissue homogenates, urine and feces to investigate the in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles, tissue distribution and excretion. The intestinal absorptive behavior of mesaconine was investigated using in vitro everted rat gut sac model. 3. Mesaconine was well distributed in tissues and a mass of unchanged form was detected in feces. It was difficultly absorbed into blood circulatory system after oral administration. The insufficient oral bioavailability of mesaconine may be mainly attributed to its low intestinal permeability due to a lack of lipophilicity. The absorption of mesaconine in rat's intestine is a first-order process with the passive diffusion mechanism.

  17. Unilateral lesion of dorsal hippocampus in adult rats impairs contralateral long-term potentiation in vivo and spatial memory in the early postoperative phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjie; Wu, Xiaoyan; Bai, Yanrui; Huang, Yan; He, Wenting; Dong, Zhifang

    2012-05-01

    It is well documented that bilateral hippocampal lesions or unilateral hippocampal lesion at birth causes impairment of contralateral LTP and long-term memory. However, effects of unilateral hippocampal lesion in adults on contralateral in vivo LTP and memory are not clear. We here examined the influence of unilateral electrolytic dorsal hippocampal lesion in adult rats on contralateral LTP in vivo and spatial memory during different postoperative phases. We found that acute unilateral hippocampal lesion had no effect on contralateral LTP. However, contralateral LTP was impaired at 1 week after lesion, and was restored to the control level at postoperative week 4. Similarly, spatial memory was also impaired at postoperative week 1, and was restored at postoperative week 4. In addition, the rats at postoperative week 1 showed stronger spatial exploratory behavior in a novel open-field environment. The sham operation had no effects on contralateral LTP, spatial memory and exploration at either postoperative week 1 or week 4. These results suggest that unilateral dorsal hippocampal lesion in adult rats causes transient contralateral LTP impairment and spatial memory deficit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of three absorption-modifying critical excipients on the in vivo intestinal absorption of six model compounds in rats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Dahlgren; Carl, Roos; Pernilla, Johansson; Christer, Tannergren; Anders, Lundqvist; Peter, Langguth; Markus, Sjöblom; Erik, Sjögren; Hans, Lennernäs

    2018-05-11

    Pharmaceutical excipients that may affect gastrointestinal (GI) drug absorption are called critical pharmaceutical excipients (CPEs), or absorption-modifying excipients (AMEs) if they act by altering the integrity of the intestinal epithelial cell membrane. Some of these excipients increase intestinal permeability, and subsequently the absorption and bioavailability of the drug. This could have implications for both the assessment of bioequivalence and the efficacy of the absorption-enhancing drug delivery system. The absorption-enhancing effects of AMEs/CPEs with different mechanisms (chitosan, sodium caprate, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) have previously been evaluated in the rat single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) model. However, it remains unclear whether these SPIP data are predictive in a more in vivo like model. The same excipients were in this study evaluated in rat and dog intraintestinal bolus models. SDS and chitosan did exert an absorption-enhancing effect in both bolus models, but the effect was substantially lower than those observed in the rat SPIP model. This illustrates the complexity of the AME/CPE effects, and indicates that additional GI physiological factors need to be considered in their evaluation. We therefore recommend that AME/CPE evaluations obtained in transit-independent, preclinical permeability models (e.g. Ussing, SPIP) should be verified in animal models better able to predict in vivo relevant GI effects, at multiple excipient concentrations. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Actions of p-synephrine on hepatic enzyme activities linked to carbohydrate metabolism and ATP levels in vivo and in the perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Marcos Rodrigues; Bracht, Lívia; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Corrêa, Rúbia Carvalho Gomes; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2018-01-01

    p-Synephrine is one of the main active components of the fruit of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange). Extracts of the bitter orange and other preparations containing p-synephrine have been used worldwide to promote weight loss and for sports performance. The purpose of the study was to measure the action of p-synephrine on hepatic enzyme activities linked to carbohydrate and energy metabolism and the levels of adenine mononucleotides. Enzymes and adenine mononucleotides were measured in the isolated perfused rat liver and in vivo after oral administration of the drug (50 and 300 mg/kg) by using standard techniques. p-Synephrine increased the activity of glycogen phosphorylase in vivo and in the perfused liver. It decreased, however, the activities of pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase also in vivo and in the perfused liver. p-Synephrine increased the hepatic pools of adenosine diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate. Stimulation of glycogen phosphorylase is consistent with the reported increased glycogenolysis in the perfused liver and increased glycemia in rats. The decrease in the pyruvate dehydrogenase activity indicates that p-synephrine is potentially capable of inhibiting the transformation of carbohydrates into lipids. The capability of increasing the adenosine triphosphate-adenosine diphosphate pool indicates a beneficial effect of p-synephrine on the cellular energetics. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Biocompatibility Assessment of Poly(lactic acid Films after Sterilization with Ethylene Oxide in Histological Study In Vivo with Wistar Rats and Cellular Adhesion of Fibroblasts In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Savaris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials must meet certain fundamental requirements for their usage in living beings, such as biocompatibility, bifunctionality, and sterilizability, without having chemical and structural changes. The biocompatibility of poly(lactic acid (PLA films, shaped by compression, was evaluated after sterilization by ethylene oxide by a histological in vivo test with Wistar rats and cytotoxicity in cell adhesion in vitro. The cytotoxicity test was performed by the reduction of tetrazolium salt (MTT. Thermal and chemical changes in PLA films concerning the proposed sterilization process and characteristics were not observed to evidence polymer degradation due to sterilization. The analysis of the cytotoxicity by the MTT method has shown that the sterilized PLA films are not cytotoxic. The adhesion and proliferation of fibroblasts on PLA films were homogeneously distributed over the evaluation period, showing an elongated appearance with unnumbered cytoplasmic extensions and cell-cell interactions. By examining the biocompatibility in a histological study, a mild tissue inflammation was observed with the presence of fibrosis in the samples that had been exposed for 21 days in the rats’ bodies. PLA films sterilized with ethylene oxide did not exhibit cell adhesion in vitro and toxicity to the surrounding tissue in vivo and they may be used in future in vivo testing, according to histological findings in Wistar rats in the present study.

  1. Human cadaver retina model for retinal heating during corneal surgery with a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Fan, Zhongwei; Yun, Jin; Zhao, Tianzhuo; Yan, Ying; Kurtz, Ron M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers are widely used in everyday clinical procedures to perform minimally invasive corneal refractive surgery. The intralase femtosecond laser (AMO Corp. Santa Ana, CA) is a common example of such a laser. In the present study a numerical simulation was developed to quantify the temperature rise in the retina during femtosecond intracorneal surgery. Also, ex-vivo retinal heating due to laser irradiation was measured with an infrared thermal camera (Fluke Corp. Everett, WA) as a validation of the simulation. A computer simulation was developed using Comsol Multiphysics to calculate the temperature rise in the cadaver retina during femtosecond laser corneal surgery. The simulation showed a temperature rise of less than 0.3 degrees for realistic pulse energies for the various repetition rates. Human cadaver retinas were irradiated with a 150 kHz Intralase femtosecond laser and the temperature rise was measured withan infrared thermal camera. Thermal camera measurements are in agreement with the simulation. During routine femtosecond laser corneal surgery with normal clinical parameters, the temperature rise is well beneath the threshold for retina damage. The simulation predictions are in agreement with thermal measurements providing a level of experimental validation.

  2. Coenzyme Q10 protects retinal cells from apoptosis induced by radiation in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulli, M.; Witort, E.; Papucci, L.; Torre, E.; Schiavone, N.; Capaccioli, S.; Dal Monte, M.

    2012-01-01

    The key pathogenetic event of many retinopathies is apoptosis of retinal cells. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) prevents apoptosis of corneal keratocytes both in vitro and in vivo, by virtue of its ability to inhibit mitochondrial depolarization, independently of i