WorldWideScience

Sample records for vivo proteomics investigations

  1. Pre-analytical factors in clinical proteomics investigations: impact of ex vivo protein modifications for multiple sclerosis biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieragostino, Damiana; Petrucci, Francesca; Del Boccio, Piero; Mantini, Dante; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Tiberio, Sara; Onofrj, Marco; Gambi, Domenico; Sacchetta, Paolo; Di Ilio, Carmine; Federici, Giorgio; Urbani, Andrea

    2010-01-03

    Serum proteome investigations have raised an incredible interest in the research of novel molecular biomarker, nevertheless few of the proposed evidences have been translated to the clinical practice. One of the limiting factors has been the lack of generally accepted guidelines for clinical proteomics studies and the lack of a robust analytical and pre-analytical ground for the proposed classification models. Pre-analytical issues may results in a deep impact for biomarker discovery campaign. In this study we present a systematic evaluation of sample storage and sampling conditions for clinical proteomics investigations. We have developed and validated a linear MALDI-TOF-MS protein profiling method to explore the low protein molecular weight region (5-20 kDa) of serum samples. Data normalization and processing was performed using optimise peak detection routine (LIMPIC) able to describe each group under investigation. Data were acquired either from healthy volunteers and from multiple sclerosis patients in order to highlight ex vivo protein profile alteration related to different physio-pathological conditions. Our data showed critical conditions for serum protein profiles depending on storage times and temperatures: 23 degrees C, 4 degrees C, -20 degrees C and -80 degrees C. We demonstrated that upon a -20 degrees C short term storage, characteristic degradation profiles are associated with different clinical groups. Protein signals were further identified after preparative HPLC separation by peptide sequencing on a nanoLC-Q-TOF TANDEM mass spectrometer. Apolipoprotein A-IV and complement C3 protein fragments, transthyretin and the oxidized isoforms in different apolipoprotein species represent the major molecular features of such a degradation pattern. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteomic Investigations into Hemodialysis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bonomini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The retention of a number of solutes that may cause adverse biochemical/biological effects, called uremic toxins, characterizes uremic syndrome. Uremia therapy is based on renal replacement therapy, hemodialysis being the most commonly used modality. The membrane contained in the hemodialyzer represents the ultimate determinant of the success and quality of hemodialysis therapy. Membrane’s performance can be evaluated in terms of removal efficiency for unwanted solutes and excess fluid, and minimization of negative interactions between the membrane material and blood components that define the membrane’s bio(incompatibility. Given the high concentration of plasma proteins and the complexity of structural functional relationships of this class of molecules, the performance of a membrane is highly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire. Proteomic investigations have been increasingly applied to describe the protein uremic milieu, to compare the blood purification efficiency of different dialyzer membranes or different extracorporeal techniques, and to evaluate the adsorption of plasma proteins onto hemodialysis membranes. In this article, we aim to highlight investigations in the hemodialysis setting making use of recent developments in proteomic technologies. Examples are presented of why proteomics may be helpful to nephrology and may possibly affect future directions in renal research.

  3. Proteomic Investigations into Hemodialysis Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Mario; Sirolli, Vittorio; Pieroni, Luisa; Felaco, Paolo; Amoroso, Luigi; Urbani, Andrea

    2015-12-10

    The retention of a number of solutes that may cause adverse biochemical/biological effects, called uremic toxins, characterizes uremic syndrome. Uremia therapy is based on renal replacement therapy, hemodialysis being the most commonly used modality. The membrane contained in the hemodialyzer represents the ultimate determinant of the success and quality of hemodialysis therapy. Membrane's performance can be evaluated in terms of removal efficiency for unwanted solutes and excess fluid, and minimization of negative interactions between the membrane material and blood components that define the membrane's bio(in)compatibility. Given the high concentration of plasma proteins and the complexity of structural functional relationships of this class of molecules, the performance of a membrane is highly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire. Proteomic investigations have been increasingly applied to describe the protein uremic milieu, to compare the blood purification efficiency of different dialyzer membranes or different extracorporeal techniques, and to evaluate the adsorption of plasma proteins onto hemodialysis membranes. In this article, we aim to highlight investigations in the hemodialysis setting making use of recent developments in proteomic technologies. Examples are presented of why proteomics may be helpful to nephrology and may possibly affect future directions in renal research.

  4. Digital and analogical reality in proteomics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, Andrea; Castagnola, Massimo; Fasano, Mauro; Bini, Luca; Modesti, Alessandra; Timperio, Anna Maria; Roncada, Paola

    2013-06-01

    Are protein functions continuous or discretized? Proteomics investigations are starting to address this non-trivial awesome question focusing upon determining the nature of biological molecular relationships. In the following editorial we present a number of experimental studies published in this themed Proteomics Issue demonstrating the development of a new analogical vision for the interpretation of genotype-phenotype relationships. New metrics and languages are evolving, which may complement the insufficiency based on a binary digital interpretation of biological phenomena, providing new tools for the interpretation of large scale-experimental studies.

  5. The proteome response to amyloid protein expression in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A Gomes

    Full Text Available Protein misfolding disorders such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and transthyretin amyloidosis are characterized by the formation of protein amyloid deposits. Although the nature and location of the aggregated proteins varies between different diseases, they all share similar molecular pathways of protein unfolding, aggregation and amyloid deposition. Most effects of these proteins are likely to occur at the proteome level, a virtually unexplored reality. To investigate the effects of an amyloid protein expression on the cellular proteome, we created a yeast expression system using human transthyretin (TTR as a model amyloidogenic protein. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a living test tube, to express native TTR (non-amyloidogenic and the amyloidogenic TTR variant L55P, the later forming aggregates when expressed in yeast. Differential proteome changes were quantitatively analyzed by 2D-differential in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. We show that the expression of the amyloidogenic TTR-L55P causes a metabolic shift towards energy production, increased superoxide dismutase expression as well as of several molecular chaperones involved in protein refolding. Among these chaperones, members of the HSP70 family and the peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase (PPIase were identified. The latter is highly relevant considering that it was previously found to be a TTR interacting partner in the plasma of ATTR patients but not in healthy or asymptomatic subjects. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO expression is also increased. Our findings suggest that refolding and degradation pathways are activated, causing an increased demand of energetic resources, thus the metabolic shift. Additionally, oxidative stress appears to be a consequence of the amyloidogenic process, posing an enhanced threat to cell survival.

  6. Application of proteomics to investigate barley-Fusarium graminearum interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Fen

    aspects in this thesis shown in Chapter 2, 3 and 4. In Chapter 2, the effect of nitrogen on FHB in a susceptible barley cultivar was investigated with using two levels of nitrogen fertilizers (15 and 100 kg ha-1). Albumin proteome analysis of the infected and control kernels under two N levels showed...

  7. Sample handling for mass spectrometric proteomic investigations of human sera.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West-Nielsen, M.; Hogdall, E.V.; Marchiori, E.; Hogdall, C.K.; Schou, C.; Heegaard, N.H.H.

    2005-01-01

    Proteomic investigations of sera are potentially of value for diagnosis, prognosis, choice of therapy, and disease activity assessment by virtue of discovering new biomarkers and biomarker patterns. Much debate focuses on the biological relevance and the need for identification of such biomarkers

  8. Proteome analysis of in vitro and in vivo root tissue of Withania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... The results indicate that the expression pattern and the protein identified in both in vitro and in vivo roots of W. somnifera are similar, in spite of providing exogenous plant growth regulators for the in vitro root induction. Though, proteome analysis specific secondary metabolism related proteins involved in.

  9. Long-term in vivo polychlorinated biphenyl 126 exposure induces oxidative stress and alters proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; Dos Anjos, Fabyana Maria; Shimada, Ana Lúcia; Cruz, Wesley Soares; Drewes, Carine Cristiane; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes; Cardozo, Karina Helena Morais; Carvalho, Valdemir Melechco; Pinto, Ernani; Farsky, Sandra Helena

    2016-06-01

    It has been recently proposed that exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a risk factor to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We investigated this hypothesis using long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure to rats addressing metabolic, cellular and proteomic parameters. Male Wistar rats were exposed to PCB126 (0.1, 1 or 10 μg/kg of body weight/day; for 15 days) or vehicle by intranasal instillation. Systemic alterations were quantified by body weight, insulin and glucose tolerance, and blood biochemical profile. Pancreatic toxicity was measured by inflammatory parameters, cell viability and cycle, free radical generation, and proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans. In vivo PCB126 exposure enhanced the body weight gain, impaired insulin sensitivity, reduced adipose tissue deposit, and elevated serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin levels. Inflammatory parameters in the pancreas and cell morphology, viability and cycle were not altered in islets of Langerhans. Nevertheless, in vivo PCB126 exposure increased free radical generation and modified the expression of proteins related to oxidative stress on islets of Langerhans, which are indicative of early β-cell failure. Data herein obtained show that long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure through intranasal route induced alterations on islets of Langerhans related to early end points of DM2.

  10. In vivo Host-Pathogen Interaction as Revealed by Global Proteomic Profiling of Zebrafish Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Díaz-Pascual

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of a host-pathogen interaction is determined by the conditions of the host, the pathogen, and the environment. Although numerous proteomic studies of in vitro-grown microbial pathogens have been performed, in vivo proteomic approaches are still rare. In addition, increasing evidence supports that in vitro studies inadequately reflect in vivo conditions. Choosing the proper host is essential to detect the expression of proteins from the pathogen in vivo. Numerous studies have demonstrated the suitability of zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos as a model to in vivo studies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. In most zebrafish-pathogen studies, infection is achieved by microinjection of bacteria into the larvae. However, few reports using static immersion of bacterial pathogens have been published. In this study we infected 3 days post-fertilization (DPF zebrafish larvae with P. aeruginosa PAO1 by immersion and injection and tracked the in vivo immune response by the zebrafish. Additionally, by using non-isotopic (Q-exactive metaproteomics we simultaneously evaluated the proteomic response of the pathogen (P. aeruginosa PAO1 and the host (zebrafish. We found some zebrafish metabolic pathways, such as hypoxia response via HIF activation pathway, were exclusively enriched in the larvae exposed by static immersion. In contrast, we found that inflammation mediated by chemokine and cytokine signaling pathways was exclusively enriched in the larvae exposed by injection, while the integrin signaling pathway and angiogenesis were solely enriched in the larvae exposed by immersion. We also found important virulence factors from P. aeruginosa that were enriched only after exposure by injection, such as the Type-III secretion system and flagella-associated proteins. On the other hand, P. aeruginosa proteins involved in processes like biofilm formation, and cellular responses to antibiotic and starvation were enriched exclusively after exposure by

  11. In vivo intravascular biotinylation of Schistosoma bovis adult worms and proteomic analysis of tegumental surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Escudero, Eduardo; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Oleaga, Ana

    2013-12-06

    Schistosoma bovis is a blood-dwelling fluke of ruminants that lives for years inside the vasculature of their hosts. The parasite tegument covers the surface of the worms and plays a key role in the host-parasite relationship. The parasite molecules expressed at the tegument surface are potential targets for immune or drug intervention. The purpose of this work was the identification of the proteins expressed in vivo on the surface of the tegument of S. bovis adult worms. To accomplish this we used a method based on in vivo vascular perfusion of mice infected with S. bovis which allowed the labelling of the surface of the worms inside the blood vasculature. The biotinylation of parasite inside blood vessels prevents the handling of worms in vitro and hence possible damage to the tegument that could produce results that would be difficult to interpret. Trypsin digestion of biotinylated proteins and subsequent liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS) resulted in the identification on the S. bovis tegument of 80 parasite proteins and 28 host proteins. The proteins identified were compared with the findings from other proteomic studies of the schistosome surface. The experimental approach used in this work is a reliable method for selective investigation of the surface of the worms and provides valuable information about the exposed protein repertoire of the tegument of S. bovis in the environmental conditions that the parasite faces inside the blood vessels. To identify the proteins expressed on the surface of the tegument of S. bovis adult worms we used a method based on in vivo vascular perfusion, with biotin, of mice infected with S. bovis which allowed the labelling of the surface of the worms inside the blood vasculature. This methodology prevents the handling of worms in vitro and hence possible damage to the tegument that could produce results that would be difficult to interpret. This work is the first in which vascular perfusion

  12. In-vivo optical investigation of psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Cicchi, Riccardo; Bruscino, Nicola; Alfieri, Domenico; Massi, Daniela; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2011-03-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin characterized by hyperkeratosis, hyperproliferation of the epidermis, inflammatory cell accumulation and increased dilatation of dermal papillary blood vessels. Cases of psoriasis were investigated in vivo with optical means in order to evaluate the potential of in vivo optical biopsy. A Polarization Multispectral Dermoscope was employed for the macroscopic observation. Features such as the 'dotted' blood vessels pattern was observed with high contrast. The average size of dot vessels in Psoriasis was measured to be 974 μm2 which is much higher compared to healthy skin. High resolution image sections of the epidermis and the dermis were produced with a custom made Multiphoton Microscope. Imaging extended from the surface of the lesion down to the papillary dermis, at a depth of 200 μm. In the epidermis, a characteristic morphology of the stratum corneum found only in Psoriasis was revealed. Additionally, the cytoplasmic area of the cells in the stratum spinosum layer was found to be smaller than normal. In the dermis the morphological features were more pronounced, where the elongated dermal papillae dominated the papillary layer. Their length exceeds 100μm, which is a far greater value compared to that of healthy skin. These in vivo observations are consistent with the ex vivo histopathological observations, supporting both the applicability and potentiality of multispectral dermoscopy and multiphoton microscopy in the field of in vivo optical investigation and biopsy of skin.

  13. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics is an efficient tool to identify proteins present in specific tissues, cell types, or organelles. The resulting proteome reference maps and/or comparative analyses provide overviews of regulated proteins between wild type and mutants or between different conditions together...... with a comprehensive list of proteins. Post translation modifications (PTMs), such as glycosylation and phosphorylation, are pivotal for protein stability and function. Several strategies for enrichment of PTMs have been developed where targeted proteomic approaches are used to identify these PTMs. The sequenced...... and annotated Lotus japonicus (Lotus) genome has been essential for obtaining high-quality protein identifications from proteomics studies. Furthermore, additional genomics and transcriptomics studies from several Lotus species/ecotypes support putative gene structures and these can be further supported using...

  14. A Proteomic Approach for Investigation of Bee Products: Royal Jelly, Propolis and Honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Raspor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bee products such as royal jelly, honey and propolis have been reported to possess several biological activities. In order to better understand their mechanism of action and, consequently, their efficiency and safety, 'omic' approaches are used. Here cases with proteomic approach are indicated. In addition to studying biological activity at a proteome level, a proteomic approach for investigation of bee products has also been applied in analyzing proteins as their (bioactive components.

  15. Expressing the human proteome for affinity proteomics: optimising expression of soluble protein domains and in vivo biotinylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keates, Tracy; Cooper, Christopher D O; Savitsky, Pavel; Allerston, Charles K; Phillips, Claire; Hammarström, Martin; Daga, Neha; Berridge, Georgina; Mahajan, Pravin; Burgess-Brown, Nicola A; Müller, Susanne; Gräslund, Susanne; Gileadi, Opher

    2012-06-15

    The generation of affinity reagents to large numbers of human proteins depends on the ability to express the target proteins as high-quality antigens. The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) focuses on the production and structure determination of human proteins. In a 7-year period, the SGC has deposited crystal structures of >800 human protein domains, and has additionally expressed and purified a similar number of protein domains that have not yet been crystallised. The targets include a diversity of protein domains, with an attempt to provide high coverage of protein families. The family approach provides an excellent basis for characterising the selectivity of affinity reagents. We present a summary of the approaches used to generate purified human proteins or protein domains, a test case demonstrating the ability to rapidly generate new proteins, and an optimisation study on the modification of >70 proteins by biotinylation in vivo. These results provide a unique synergy between large-scale structural projects and the recent efforts to produce a wide coverage of affinity reagents to the human proteome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A proteomic investigation of Fusobacterium nucleatum alkaline-induced biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Jactty

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram negative anaerobe Fusobacterium nucleatum has been implicated in the aetiology of periodontal diseases. Although frequently isolated from healthy dental plaque, its numbers and proportion increase in plaque associated with disease. One of the significant physico-chemical changes in the diseased gingival sulcus is increased environmental pH. When grown under controlled conditions in our laboratory, F. nucleatum subspecies polymorphum formed mono-culture biofilms when cultured at pH 8.2. Biofilm formation is a survival strategy for bacteria, often associated with altered physiology and increased virulence. A proteomic approach was used to understand the phenotypic changes in F. nucleatum cells associated with alkaline induced biofilms. The proteomic based identification of significantly altered proteins was verified where possible using additional methods including quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR, enzyme assay, acidic end-product analysis, intracellular polyglucose assay and Western blotting. Results Of 421 proteins detected on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels, spot densities of 54 proteins varied significantly (p F. nucleatum cultured at pH 8.2 compared to growth at pH 7.4. Proteins that were differentially produced in biofilm cells were associated with the functional classes; metabolic enzymes, transport, stress response and hypothetical proteins. Our results suggest that biofilm cells were more metabolically efficient than planktonic cells as changes to amino acid and glucose metabolism generated additional energy needed for survival in a sub-optimal environment. The intracellular concentration of stress response proteins including heat shock protein GroEL and recombinational protein RecA increased markedly in the alkaline environment. A significant finding was the increased abundance of an adhesin, Fusobacterial outer membrane protein A (FomA. This surface protein is known for its capacity to bind to a

  17. Proteomic investigation of response to FORL infection in tomato roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, Maria Fiorella; Cacace, Giuseppina; Ferriello, Francesca; Puopolo, Gerardo; Zoina, Astolfo; Ercolano, Maria Raffaella; Siciliano, Rosa Anna

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici (FORL) leading to fusarium crown and root rot is considered one of the most destructive tomato soilborne diseases occurring in greenhouse and field crops. In this study, response to FORL infection in tomato roots was investigated by differential proteomics in susceptible (Monalbo) and resistant (Momor) isogenic tomato lines, thus leading to identify 33 proteins whose amount changed depending on the pathogen infection, and/or on the two genotypes. FORL infection induced accumulation of pathogen-related proteins (PR proteins) displaying glucanase and endochitinases activity or involved in redox processes in the Monalbo genotype. Interestingly, the level of the above mentioned PR proteins was not influenced by FORL infection in the resistant tomato line, while other proteins involved in general response mechanisms to biotic and/or abiotic stresses showed significant quantitative differences. In particular, the increased level of proteins participating to arginine metabolism and glutathione S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) as well as that of protein LOC544002 and phosphoprotein ECPP44-like, suggested their key role in pathogen defence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Multi-Probe Investigation of Proteomic Structure of Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; Vogelstein, B; Wheeler, K E

    2008-01-24

    Complete genome sequences are available for understanding biotransformation, environmental resistance and pathogenesis of microbial, cellular and pathogen systems. The present technological and scientific challenges are to unravel the relationships between the organization and function of protein complexes at cell, microbial and pathogens surfaces, to understand how these complexes evolve during the bacterial, cellular and pathogen life cycles, and how they respond to environmental changes, chemical stimulants and therapeutics. In particular, elucidating the molecular structure and architecture of human pathogen surfaces is essential to understanding mechanisms of pathogenesis, immune response, physicochemical interactions, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. The objective of this project was to investigate the architecture, proteomic structure, and function of bacterial spores through a combination of high-resolution in vitro atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based immunolabeling with threat-specific antibodies. Particular attention in this project was focused on spore forming Bacillus species including the Sterne vaccine strain of Bacillus anthracis and the spore forming near-neighbor of Clostridium botulinum, C. novyi-NT. Bacillus species, including B. anthracis, the causative agent of inhalation anthrax are laboratory models for elucidating spore structure/function. Even though the complete genome sequence is available for B. subtilis, cereus, anthracis and other species, the determination and composition of spore structure/function is not understood. Prof. B. Vogelstein and colleagues at the John Hopkins University have recently developed a breakthrough bacteriolytic therapy for cancer treatment (1). They discovered that intravenously injected Clostridium novyi-NT spores germinate exclusively within the avascular regions of tumors in mice and destroy advanced cancerous lesions. The bacteria were also

  19. [Preanalytical guidelines for clinical proteomics investigation of biological fluids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, S; Roche, S; Allory, Y; Barthelaix, A; Beaudeux, J-L; Berger, F; Betsou, F; Borg, J; Dupuy, A; Garin, J; Quillard, M; Lizard, G; Peoc'h, K; Riviere, M; Ducoroy, P

    2009-01-01

    Research of new diagnosis or prognosis biomarkers is a major challenge for the management of patients with complex pathologies like cancer. Clinical proteomics is one of the recent approaches to identify these biomarkers in biological fluids. Over the last five years, many problems related to the variability and the quality control of these analyses have been observed. This was notably related to the different preanalytical status of each sample. A strong need for standardization of the critical preanalytical phases (collection, transport, processing, storage...) has been therefore recognized. With this goal in mind, working groups of the "Institut national du cancer" (INCa) and the "Société française de biologie clinique" (SFBC) proposed here preanalytical proteomics guidelines for the most common biological fluids: plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. To goal is to provide the basis for the harmonization of the procedures in clinical laboratories and biobanks to allow an optimal use of biological collections.

  20. Proteomic characterization of EL4 lymphoma-derived tumors upon chemotherapy treatment reveals potential roles for lysosomes and caspase-6 during tumor cell death in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David A; Eldeeb, Mohamed A; Wuest, Melinda; Mercer, John; Fahlman, Richard P

    2017-06-01

    The murine mouse lymphoblastic lymphoma cell line (EL4) tumor model is an established in vivo apoptosis model for the investigation of novel cancer imaging agents and immunological treatments due to the rapid and significant response of the EL4 tumors to cyclophosphamide and etoposide combination chemotherapy. Despite the utility of this model system in cancer research, little is known regarding the molecular details of in vivo tumor cell death. Here, we report the first in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of the changes that occur in these tumors upon cyclophosphamide and etoposide treatment in vivo. Using a label-free quantitative proteomic approach a total of 5838 proteins were identified in the treated and untreated tumors, of which 875 were determined to change in abundance with statistical significance. Initial analysis of the data reveals changes that may have been predicted, such as the downregulation of ribosomes, but demonstrates the robustness of the dataset. Analysis of the dataset also reveals the unexpected downregulation of caspase-3 and an upregulation of caspase-6 in addition to a global upregulation of lysosomal proteins in the bulk of the tumor. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Integrating cell biology and proteomic approaches in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takáč, Tomáš; Šamajová, Olga; Šamaj, Jozef

    2017-10-03

    Significant improvements of protein extraction, separation, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics nurtured advancements of proteomics during the past years. The usefulness of proteomics in the investigation of biological problems can be enhanced by integration with other experimental methods from cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, pharmacology, molecular biology and other omics approaches including transcriptomics and metabolomics. This review aims to summarize current trends integrating cell biology and proteomics in plant science. Cell biology approaches are most frequently used in proteomic studies investigating subcellular and developmental proteomes, however, they were also employed in proteomic studies exploring abiotic and biotic stress responses, vesicular transport, cytoskeleton and protein posttranslational modifications. They are used either for detailed cellular or ultrastructural characterization of the object subjected to proteomic study, validation of proteomic results or to expand proteomic data. In this respect, a broad spectrum of methods is employed to support proteomic studies including ultrastructural electron microscopy studies, histochemical staining, immunochemical localization, in vivo imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins and visualization of protein-protein interactions. Thus, cell biological observations on fixed or living cell compartments, cells, tissues and organs are feasible, and in some cases fundamental for the validation and complementation of proteomic data. Validation of proteomic data by independent experimental methods requires development of new complementary approaches. Benefits of cell biology methods and techniques are not sufficiently highlighted in current proteomic studies. This encouraged us to review most popular cell biology methods used in proteomic studies and to evaluate their relevance and potential for proteomic data validation and enrichment of purely proteomic analyses. We also provide examples of

  2. In Vivo and in Vitro Proteome Analysis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1-infected, Human CD4+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Johannes; Vongrad, Valentina; Metzner, Karin J; Strouvelle, Victoria P; Weber, Rainer; Pedrioli, Patrick; Aebersold, Ruedi; Günthard, Huldrych F; Collins, Ben C

    2017-04-01

    Host-directed therapies against HIV-1 are thought to be critical for long term containment of the HIV-1 pandemic but remain elusive. Because HIV-1 infects and manipulates important effectors of both the innate and adaptive immune system, identifying modulations of the host cell systems in humans during HIV-1 infection may be crucial for the development of immune based therapies. Here, we quantified the changes of the proteome in human CD4+ T cells upon HIV-1 infection, both in vitro and in vivo A SWATH-MS approach was used to measure the proteome of human primary CD4+ T cells infected with HIV-1 in vitro as well as CD4+ T cells from HIV-1-infected patients with paired samples on and off antiretroviral treatment. In the in vitro experiment, the proteome of CD4+ T cells was quantified over a time course following HIV-1 infection. 1,725 host cell proteins and 4 HIV-1 proteins were quantified, with 145 proteins changing significantly during the time course. Changes in the proteome peaked 24 h after infection, concomitantly with significant HIV-1 protein production. In the in vivo branch of the study, CD4+ T cells from viremic patients and those with no detectable viral load after treatment were sorted, and the proteomes were quantified. We consistently detected 895 proteins, 172 of which were considered to be significantly different between the viremic patients and patients undergoing successful treatment. The proteome of the in vitro-infected CD4+ T cells was modulated on multiple functional levels, including TLR-4 signaling and the type 1 interferon signaling pathway. Perturbations in the type 1 interferon signaling pathway were recapitulated in CD4+ T cells from patients. The study shows that proteome maps generated by SWATH-MS indicate a range of functionally significant changes in the proteome of HIV-infected human CD4+ T cells. Exploring these perturbations in more detail may help identify new targets for immune based interventions. © 2017 by The American

  3. Proteomic Investigation of Ram Spermatozoa and the Proteins Conferred by Seminal Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Taylor; Leahy, Tamara; Soleilhavoup, Clement; Tsikis, Guillaume; Labas, Valerie; Combes-Soia, Lucie; Harichaux, Gregoire; Rickard, Jessica P; Druart, Xavier; de Graaf, Simon P

    2016-10-07

    Sperm proteomes have emerged for several species; however, the extent of species similarity is unknown. Sheep are an important agricultural species for which a comprehensive sperm proteome has not been produced. In addition, potential proteomic factors from seminal plasma that may contribute to improved fertility after cervical insemination are yet to be explored. Here we use liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to investigate the proteome of ejaculated ram spermatozoa, with quantitative comparison to epididymal spermatozoa. We also present a comparison to published proteomes of five other species. We identified 685 proteins in ejaculated ram spermatozoa, with the most abundant proteins involved in metabolic pathways. Only 5% of ram sperm proteins were not detected in other species, which suggest highly conserved structures and pathways. Of the proteins present in both epididymal and ejaculated ram spermatozoa, 7% were more abundant in ejaculated spermatozoa. Only two membrane-bound proteins were detected solely in ejaculated sperm lysates: liver enriched gene 1 (LEG1/C6orf58) and epidermal growth factor-like repeats and discoidin I-like domains 3 (EDIL3). This is the first evidence that despite its relatively complex proteomic composition, seminal plasma exposure leads to few novel proteins binding tightly to the ram sperm plasma membrane.

  4. A Proteome-wide, Quantitative Survey of In Vivo Ubiquitylation Sites Reveals Widespread Regulatory Roles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Sebastian Alexander; Beli, Petra; Weinert, Brian Tate

    2011-01-01

    % of the known ubiquitylation sites and contains 10,254 novel sites on proteins with diverse cellular functions including cell signaling, receptor endocytosis, DNA replication, DNA damage repair, and cell cycle progression. Our method enables site-specific quantification of ubiquitylation in response to cellular......Post-translational modification of proteins by ubiquitin is a fundamentally important regulatory mechanism. However, proteome-wide analysis of endogenous ubiquitylation remains a challenging task, and almost always has relied on cells expressing affinity tagged ubiquitin. Here we combine single......-step immunoenrichment of ubiquitylated peptides with peptide fractionation and high-resolution mass spectrometry to investigate endogenous ubiquitylation sites. We precisely map 11,054 endogenous putative ubiquitylation sites (diglycine-modified lysines) on 4,273 human proteins. The presented data set covers 67...

  5. Proteome analysis of in vitro and in vivo root tissue of Withania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We applied this technique to investigate the protein changes under in vitro and in vivo conditions, since in vitro cultures is considered to be an alternative approach to traditional agriculture in the industrial production of the biomolecules. To better understand the proteins and enzymes involved in withanolide biosynthetic ...

  6. Lactobacillus acidophilus-Rutin Interplay Investigated by Proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fiorella Mazzeo

    Full Text Available Dietary polyphenols are bioactive molecules that beneficially affect human health, due to their anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective and chemopreventive properties. They are absorbed in a very low percentage in the small intestine and reach intact the colon, where they are metabolized by the gut microbiota. Although it is well documented a key role of microbial metabolism in the absorption of polyphenols and modulation of their biological activity, molecular mechanisms at the basis of the bacteria-polyphenols interplay are still poorly understood. In this context, differential proteomics was applied to reveal adaptive response mechanisms that enabled a potential probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain to survive in the presence of the dietary polyphenol rutin. The response to rutin mainly modulated the expression level of proteins involved in general stress response mechanisms and, in particular, induced the activation of protein quality control systems, and affected carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, protein synthesis and cell wall integrity. Moreover, rutin triggered the expression of proteins involved in oxidation-reduction processes.This study provides a first general view of the impact of dietary polyphenols on metabolic and biological processes of L. acidophilus.

  7. Reducing protein oxidation in low-flow electrospray enables deeper investigation of proteoforms by top down proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunggon; Compton, Philip D; Toby, Timothy K; Thomas, Paul M; Wilkins, John T; Mutharasan, R Kannan; Kelleher, Neil L

    2015-09-01

    Enabling the implementation of top down proteomic techniques within clinical workflows requires a dramatic increase in sensitivity. It has been previously demonstrated that electrospray ionization (ESI) becomes more efficient with decreasing volumetric flow rates at the emitter. Therefore, narrow inner diameter (I.D.) columns used in front-end chromatographic separations yield increased sensitivity. However, the smaller cross-sectional area of a narrow I.D. column places a larger fraction of the eluent in fluid communication with the electrode within the high voltage union that facilitates electrospray ionization (ESI), leading to increased oxidation of solution-phase proteins. Oxidation of proteins alters their chemical state of the protein, complicates data analysis, and reduces the depth of proteome coverage attained in a typical top-down proteomics experiment. Excessive protein oxidation results in poor deconvolution and exact mass calculations from MS1 spectra, interferes with peak isolation for MS/MS fragmentation, and effectively reduces sensitivity by splitting ion current. All of these factors deteriorate top down mass spectral data quality, an effect that becomes more pronounced as column diameter decreases. Artificial protein oxidation can also mislead investigations of in vivo protein oxidation. All of these effects are accentuated in comparison to bottom up proteomics due to the increased probability of having oxidizable residues within a particular species with increasing mass. Herein, we describe a configuration (which we term "Low Protein Oxidation (LPOx)") for proteomics experiments created by re-arranging liquid chromatography (LC) plumbing and present its application to artificial protein oxidation and show a marked improvement in detection sensitivity. Using a standard mixture of five intact proteins, we demonstrate that the LPOx configuration reduces protein oxidation up to 90% using 50 μm I.D. columns when compared to a conventional LC

  8. Investigation of Biomarkers of Bile Tolerance in Lactobacillus casei Using Comparative Proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamon, Erwann; Horvatovich, Peter; Bisch, Magali; Bringel, Francoise; Marchioni, Eric; Aoude-Werner, Dalal; Ennahar, Said

    The identification of cell determinants involved in probiotic features is a challenge in current probiotic research. In this work, markers of bile tolerance in Lactobacillus casei were investigated using comparative proteomics. Six L. casei strains were classified on the basis of their ability to

  9. In Vivo SILAC-Based Proteomics Reveals Phosphoproteome Changes during Mouse Skin Carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanivan, Sara; Meves, Alexander; Behrendt, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    SILAC technology in combination with high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) can be successfully used to measure phosphoproteomes in vivo. Here, Zanivan, Mann, and colleagues have applied SILAC-based MS to investigate phosphoproteomic changes during skin carcinogenesis, using the DMBA/TPA two-stag......-stage mouse model. Using this approach, the authors have revealed the phosphoproteomic dynamics that accompany skin cancer progression and predict specific kinase activities associated with tumor malignancy....

  10. The “Dark Side” of Food Stuff Proteomics: The CPLL-Marshals Investigate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Fasoli, Elisa; D’Amato, Alfonsina; Boschetti, Egisto

    2014-01-01

    The present review deals with analysis of the proteome of animal and plant-derived food stuff, as well as of non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages. The survey is limited to those systems investigated with the help of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, a most powerful technique allowing access to low- to very-low-abundance proteins, i.e., to those proteins that might characterize univocally a given biological system and, in the case of commercial food preparations, attest their genuineness or adulteration. Among animal foods the analysis of cow’s and donkey’s milk is reported, together with the proteomic composition of egg white and yolk, as well as of honey, considered as a hybrid between floral and animal origin. In terms of plant and fruits, a survey is offered of spinach, artichoke, banana, avocado, mango and lemon proteomics, considered as recalcitrant tissues in that small amounts of proteins are dispersed into a large body of plant polymers and metabolites. As examples of non-alcoholic beverages, ginger ale, coconut milk, a cola drink, almond milk and orgeat syrup are analyzed. Finally, the trace proteome of white and red wines, beer and aperitifs is reported, with the aim of tracing the industrial manipulations and herbal usage prior to their commercialization. PMID:28234315

  11. The “Dark Side” of Food Stuff Proteomics: The CPLL-Marshals Investigate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Giorgio Righetti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present review deals with analysis of the proteome of animal and plant-derived food stuff, as well as of non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages. The survey is limited to those systems investigated with the help of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, a most powerful technique allowing access to low- to very-low-abundance proteins, i.e., to those proteins that might characterize univocally a given biological system and, in the case of commercial food preparations, attest their genuineness or adulteration. Among animal foods the analysis of cow’s and donkey’s milk is reported, together with the proteomic composition of egg white and yolk, as well as of honey, considered as a hybrid between floral and animal origin. In terms of plant and fruits, a survey is offered of spinach, artichoke, banana, avocado, mango and lemon proteomics, considered as recalcitrant tissues in that small amounts of proteins are dispersed into a large body of plant polymers and metabolites. As examples of non-alcoholic beverages, ginger ale, coconut milk, a cola drink, almond milk and orgeat syrup are analyzed. Finally, the trace proteome of white and red wines, beer and aperitifs is reported, with the aim of tracing the industrial manipulations and herbal usage prior to their commercialization.

  12. The "Dark Side" of Food Stuff Proteomics: The CPLL-Marshals Investigate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Fasoli, Elisa; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Boschetti, Egisto

    2014-04-17

    The present review deals with analysis of the proteome of animal and plant-derived food stuff, as well as of non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages. The survey is limited to those systems investigated with the help of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, a most powerful technique allowing access to low- to very-low-abundance proteins, i.e., to those proteins that might characterize univocally a given biological system and, in the case of commercial food preparations, attest their genuineness or adulteration. Among animal foods the analysis of cow's and donkey's milk is reported, together with the proteomic composition of egg white and yolk, as well as of honey, considered as a hybrid between floral and animal origin. In terms of plant and fruits, a survey is offered of spinach, artichoke, banana, avocado, mango and lemon proteomics, considered as recalcitrant tissues in that small amounts of proteins are dispersed into a large body of plant polymers and metabolites. As examples of non-alcoholic beverages, ginger ale, coconut milk, a cola drink, almond milk and orgeat syrup are analyzed. Finally, the trace proteome of white and red wines, beer and aperitifs is reported, with the aim of tracing the industrial manipulations and herbal usage prior to their commercialization.

  13. Towards delineating functions within the fasciola secreted cathepsin l protease family by integrating in vivo based sub-proteomics and phylogenetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell M Morphew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available fasciola hepatica, along with Fasciola gigantica, is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonotic disease affecting grazing animals and humans worldwide. Pathology is directly related to the release of parasite proteins that facilitate establishment within the host. The dominant components of these excretory-secretory (ES products are also the most promising vaccine candidates, the cathepsin L (Cat L protease family.the sub-proteome of Cat L proteases from adult F. hepatica ES products derived from in vitro culture and in vivo from ovine host bile were compared by 2-DE. The individual Cat L proteases were identified by tandem mass spectrometry with the support of an in-house translated liver fluke EST database. The study reveals plasticity within the CL1 clade of Cat L proteases; highlighted by the identification of a novel isoform and CL1 sub-clade, resulting in a new Cat L phylogenetic analysis including representatives from other adult Cat L phylogenetic clades. Additionally, for the first time, mass spectrometry was shown to be sufficiently sensitive to reveal single amino acid polymorphisms in a resolved 2-DE protein spot derived from pooled population samples.we have investigated the sub-proteome at the population level of a vaccine target family using the Cat L proteases from F. hepatica as a case study. We have confirmed that F. hepatica exhibits more plasticity in the expression of the secreted CL1 clade of Cat L proteases at the protein level than previously realised. We recommend that superfamily based vaccine discovery programmes should screen parasite populations from different host populations and, if required, different host species via sub-proteomic assay in order to confirm the relative expression at the protein level prior to the vaccine development phase.

  14. Application of proteomics to investigate stress-induced proteins for improvement in crop protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, Amber; Ali, Ghulam Muhammad; Mir, Asif; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2011-05-01

    Proteomics has contributed to defining the specific functions of genes and proteins involved in plant-pathogen interactions. Proteomic studies have led to the identification of many pathogenicity and defense-related genes and proteins expressed during phytopathogen infections, resulting in the collection of an enormous amount of data. However, the molecular basis of plant-pathogen interactions remains an intensely active area of investigation. In this review, the role of differential analysis of proteins expressed during fungal, bacterial, and viral infection is discussed, as well as the role of JA and SA in the production of stress related proteins. Resistance acquired upon induction of stress related proteins in intact plant leaves is mediated by potentiation of pathogens via signal elicitors. Stress related genes extensively used in biotechnology had been cited. Stress related proteins identified must be followed through for studying the molecular mechanism for plant defense against pathogens.

  15. Investigation of glandular trichome proteins in Artemisia annua L. using comparative proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wu

    Full Text Available Glandular secreting trichomes (GSTs are called biofactories because they are active in synthesizing, storing and secreting various types of plant secondary metabolites. As the most effective drug against malaria, artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone is derived from GSTs of Artemisia annua. However, low artemisinin content (0.001%~1.54% of dry weight has hindered its wide application. We investigate the GST-expressed proteins in Artemisia annua using a comparative proteomics approach, aiming for a better understanding of the trichome proteome and arteminisin metabolism. 2D-electrophoresis was employed to compare the protein profiles of GSTs and leaves. More than 700 spots were resolved for GSTs, of which ∼93 non-redundant proteins were confidently identified by searching NCBI and Artemisia EST databases. Over 70% of these proteins were highly expressed in GTSs. Functional classification of these GSTs enriched proteins revealed that many of them participate in major plant metabolic processes such as electron transport, transcription and translation.

  16. In-vivo morphologic and spectroscopic investigation of Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Cicchi, Riccardo; Bruscino, Nicola; Alfieri, Domenico; Massi, Daniela; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2011-07-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin characterized by hyperkeratosis, hyperproliferation of the epidermis, inflammatory cell accumulation and increased dilatation of dermal papillary blood vessels. Cases of psoriasis were investigated in vivo with optical means in order to evaluate the potential of in vivo optical biopsy. A Polarization Multispectral Dermoscope was employed for the macroscopic observation. Features such as the 'dotted' blood vessels pattern was observed with high contrast. High resolution image sections of the epidermis and the dermis were produced with a custom made Multiphoton Microscope. Imaging extended from the surface of the lesion down to the papillary dermis, at a depth of 200 μm. In the epidermis, a characteristic morphology of the stratum corneum found only in Psoriasis was revealed. Additionally, the cytoplasmic area of the cells in the stratum spinosum layer was found to be smaller than normal. In the dermis the morphological features were more pronounced, where the elongated dermal papillae dominated the papillary layer. Their length exceeds 100μm, which is a far greater value compared to that of healthy skin. These in vivo observations are consistent with the ex vivo histopathological observations, supporting both the applicability and potentiality of multispectral dermoscopy and multiphoton microscopy in the field of in vivo optical investigation and biopsy of skin.

  17. A proteomic investigation of apple fruit during ripening and in response to ethylene treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qifa; Song, Jun; Campbell-Palmer, Leslie; Thompson, Kristen; Li, Li; Walker, Brad; Cui, Yunsong; Li, Xihong

    2013-11-20

    A proteomic approach employing a two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) technique with SYPRO Ruby, a fluorescent stain with improved sensitivity and quantitative accuracy, was performed to separate the total proteins from apple fruit at different stages of ripening and senescence. After imaging and statistical analyses were performed on 2340 spots, a total of 316 spots, or approximately 13.5% of the total protein population, was found to be significantly changed in this study. Of the 316 proteins, 219 spots were only present at a specific ripening stage, while 97 spots were significantly different (pripening and in response to ethylene treatment. From 316 candidate spots, 221 proteins were further identified by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis with protein sequence and express sequence tag (EST) data searching. Analysis and identification of proteins revealed that apple fruit ripening is associated with increase of abundance of many proteins with functions such as ethylene production, antioxidation and redox, carbohydrate metabolism, oxidative stress, energy, and defense response. Ethylene treatment increased a group of unique proteins that were not present during normal fruit ripening and have not been previously reported. It also reduced some proteins involved in primary metabolism, including those of the last few steps of the glycolytic pathway. This study demonstrated the complexity and dynamic changes of protein profiles of apple fruit during ripening and in response to exogenous ethylene treatment. Identifying and tracking protein changes may allow us to better understand the mechanism of ripening in climacteric fruit. Postharvest physiology and biochemistry has been conducted on apple fruit for many years. Ethylene plays an important role in ripening and senescence in many climacteric fruit. However, little information is available at the proteome level to investigate fruit ripening and effect of ethylene treatment. The significance of

  18. Proteome Exploration to Provide a Resource for the Investigation of Ganoderma lucidum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guo-Jun; Yin, Ya-Lin; Yu, Wen-Hui; Liu, Wei; Jin, Yan-Xia; Shrestha, Alok; Yang, Qing; Ye, Xiang-Dong; Sun, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a basidiomycete white rot fungus that has been used for medicinal purposes worldwide. Although information concerning its genome and transcriptome has recently been reported, relatively little information is available for G. lucidum at the proteomic level. In this study, protein fractions from G. lucidum at three developmental stages (16-day mycelia, and fruiting bodies at 60 and 90 days) were prepared and subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis. A search against the G. lucidum genome database identified 803 proteins. Among these proteins, 61 lignocellulose degrading proteins were detected, most of which (49 proteins) were found in the 90-day fruiting bodies. Fourteen TCA-cycle related proteins, 17 peptidases, two argonaute-like proteins, and two immunomodulatory proteins were also detected. A majority (470) of the 803 proteins had GO annotations and were classified into 36 GO terms, with “binding”, “catalytic activity”, and “hydrolase activity” having high percentages. Additionally, 357 out of the 803 proteins were assigned to at least one COG functional category and grouped into 22 COG classifications. Based on the results from the proteomic and sequence alignment analyses, a potentially new immunomodulatory protein (GL18769) was expressed and shown to have high immunomodulatory activity. In this study, proteomic and biochemical analyses of G. lucidum were performed for the first time, revealing that proteins from this fungus can play significant bioactive roles and providing a new foundation for the further functional investigations that this fungus merits. PMID:25756518

  19. Proteomic investigations of the ventriculo-lumbar gradient in human CSF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Bech, Sara Brynhild Winther; Laursen, Inga

    2010-01-01

    of specific proteins. In the present study we took a proteomics approach to investigate the possible concentration gradient of a panel of proteins and peptides in the CSF of 16 patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Using two different mass spectrometry techniques, matrix assisted laser desorption...... ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF), we found that only one of the investigated proteins, apolipoprotein CI, was significantly decreased between the 1st and the 10th mL of CSF. Furthermore, we confirmed previous results showing...

  20. Comparative proteome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A global overview of in vivo targets of the yeast activator protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun He

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of the yeast activator protein 1 (Yap1p increases under stress conditions, which leads to enhanced transcription of a number of genes encoding protective enzymes or other proteins. To obtain a global overview of changes in expression of Yap1p-targeted proteins, we compared a Yap1p-overexpressing transformant with a control transformant by triplicate analysis of the proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE. Proteins of interest were identified using MALDI-MS or LC-MS/MS. Results The relative quantities of 55 proteins were elevated significantly upon overexpression of Yap1p, and most of these proteins were found to have a Yap1p-binding site upstream of their coding sequences. Interestingly, the main metabolic enzymes in the glycolysis and pyruvate-ethanol pathways showed a significant increase in the Yap1p-overexpressing transformant. Moreover, a comparison of our proteome data with transcriptome data from the literature suggested which proteins were regulated at the level of the proteome, and which proteins were regulated at the level of the transcriptome. Eight proteins involved in stress response, including seven heat-shock and chaperone proteins, were significantly more abundant in the Yap1p-overexpressing transformant. Conclusions We have investigated the general protein composition in Yap1p-overexpressing S. cerevisiae using proteomic techniques, and quantified the changes in the expression of the potential Yap1p-targeted proteins. Identification of the potential Yap1p targets and analysis of their role in cellular processes not only give a global overview of the ubiquitous cellular changes elicited by Yap1p, but also provide the framework for understanding the mechanisms behind Yap1p-regulated stress response in yeast.

  1. Comparative proteome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a global overview of in vivo targets of the yeast activator protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, He; Kieselbach, Thomas; Jönsson, Leif J

    2012-06-09

    The activity of the yeast activator protein 1 (Yap1p) increases under stress conditions, which leads to enhanced transcription of a number of genes encoding protective enzymes or other proteins. To obtain a global overview of changes in expression of Yap1p-targeted proteins, we compared a Yap1p-overexpressing transformant with a control transformant by triplicate analysis of the proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Proteins of interest were identified using MALDI-MS or LC-MS/MS. The relative quantities of 55 proteins were elevated significantly upon overexpression of Yap1p, and most of these proteins were found to have a Yap1p-binding site upstream of their coding sequences. Interestingly, the main metabolic enzymes in the glycolysis and pyruvate-ethanol pathways showed a significant increase in the Yap1p-overexpressing transformant. Moreover, a comparison of our proteome data with transcriptome data from the literature suggested which proteins were regulated at the level of the proteome, and which proteins were regulated at the level of the transcriptome. Eight proteins involved in stress response, including seven heat-shock and chaperone proteins, were significantly more abundant in the Yap1p-overexpressing transformant. We have investigated the general protein composition in Yap1p-overexpressing S. cerevisiae using proteomic techniques, and quantified the changes in the expression of the potential Yap1p-targeted proteins. Identification of the potential Yap1p targets and analysis of their role in cellular processes not only give a global overview of the ubiquitous cellular changes elicited by Yap1p, but also provide the framework for understanding the mechanisms behind Yap1p-regulated stress response in yeast.

  2. Proteomic investigations of complex I composition: How to define a subunit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne H Meyer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex I is present in almost all aerobic species. Being the largest complex of the respiratory chain, it has a central role in energizing biological membranes and is essential for many organisms. Bacterial complex I is composed of 14 subunits that are sufficient to achieve the respiratory functions. Eukaryotic enzymes contain orthologs of the 14 bacterial subunits and around 30 additional subunits. This complexity suggests either that complex I requires more stabilizing subunits in mitochondria or that it fulfills additional functions. In many organisms recent work on complex I concentrated on the determination of its exact composition. This review summarizes the work done to elucidate complex I composition in the model plant Arabidopsis and proposes a model for the organization of its 44 confirmed subunits. The comparison of the different studies investigating the composition of complex I across species identifies sample preparation for the proteomic analysis as critical to differentiate between true subunits, assembly factors or proteins associated with complex I. Coupling comparative proteomics with biochemical or genetic studies is thus required to define a subunit and its function within the complex.

  3. New insights into neuroblastoma cisplatin resistance: a comparative proteomic and meta-mining investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aguanno, Simona; D'Alessandro, Annamaria; Pieroni, Luisa; Roveri, Antonella; Zaccarin, Mattia; Marzano, Valeria; De Canio, Michele; Bernardini, Sergio; Federici, Giorgio; Urbani, Andrea

    2011-02-04

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most aggressive solid tumors in the childhood. Therapy resistance to anticancer drugs represents the major limitation to the effectiveness of clinical treatment. To better understand the mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance, we performed a comparative proteomic study of the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y and its cisplatin resistant counterpart by both the classical 2-DE electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry and the more innovative label-free nLC-MS(E). The differentially expressed proteins were classified by bioinformatic tools according to their biological functions and their involvement in several cellular processes. Moreover, a meta-mining investigation of protein ontologies was also performed on available data from previously published proteomics studies to highlight the modulation of significant cellular pathways, which may regulate the sensitivity of neuroblastoma to cisplatin. In particular, we hypothesized a major role of the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Confocal microscopy experiments, enzyme assay, and Western blotting of proteins regulated by Nrf2 provided evidences that this pathway, playing a protective role in normal cells, may represent a potential novel target to control cisplatin resistance in neuroblastoma.

  4. Direct Assessment of Plasma/Serum Sample Quality for Proteomics Biomarker Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Viviana; Piras, Cristian; Pieroni, Luisa; Urbani, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Blood proteome analysis for biomarker discovery represents one of the most challenging tasks to be achieved through clinical proteomics due to the sample complexity, such as the extreme heterogeneity of proteins in very dynamic concentrations, and to the observation of proper sampling and storage conditions. Quantitative and qualitative proteomics profiling of plasma and serum could be useful both for the early detection of diseases and for the evaluation of pathological status. Two main sources of variability can affect the precision and accuracy of the quantitative experiments designed for biomarker discovery and validation. These sources are divided into two categories, pre-analytical and analytical, and are often ignored; however, they can contribute to consistent errors and misunderstanding in biomarker research. In this chapter, we review critical pre-analytical and analytical variables that can influence quantitative proteomics. According to guidelines accepted by proteomics community, we propose some recommendations and strategies for a proper proteomics analysis addressed to biomarker studies.

  5. Investigating the Effect of Growth Phase on the Surface-Layer Associated Proteome of Lactobacillus acidophilus Using Quantitative Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Klotz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial surface-layers (S-layers are semi-porous crystalline arrays that self-assemble to form the outermost layer of some cell envelopes. S-layers have been shown to act as scaffolding structures for the display of auxiliary proteins externally. These S-layer associated proteins have recently gained attention in probiotics due to their direct physical contact with the intestinal mucosa and potential role in cell proliferation, adhesion, and immunomodulation. A number of studies have attempted to catalog the S-layer associated proteome of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM under a single condition. However, due to the versatility of the cell surface, we chose to employ a multiplexing-based approach with the intention of accurately contrasting multiple conditions. In this study, a previously described lithium chloride isolation protocol was used to release proteins bound to the L. acidophilus S-layer during logarithmic and early stationary growth phases. Protein quantification values were obtained via TMT (tandem mass tag labeling combined with a triple-stage mass spectrometry (MS3 method. Results showed significant growth stage-dependent alterations to the surface-associated proteome while simultaneously highlighting the sensitivity and reproducibility of the technology. Thus, this study establishes a framework for quantifying condition-dependent changes to cell surface proteins that can easily be applied to other S-layer forming bacteria.

  6. Differential cerebro spinal fluid proteome investigation of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aguanno, Simona; Barassi, Alessandra; Lupisella, Santina; d'eril, Gianlodovico Melzi; Del Boccio, Piero; Pieragostino, Damiana; Pallotti, Francesco; Carelli, Valerio; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Liguori, Rocco; Avoni, Patrizia; Bernardini, Sergio; Gambi, Domenico; Urbani, Andrea; Federici, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disease leading to the loss of central vision and optic nerve atrophy. The existence of occasional cases of LHON patients developing a Multiple Sclerosis (MS)-like illness and the hypothesis that mtDNA variants may be involved in MS suggest the possibility of some common molecular mechanisms linking the two diseases. We have pursued a comparative proteomics approach on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from LHON and MS patients, as well as healthy donors by employing 2-DE gel separations coupled to MALDI-TOF-MS and nLC-MS/MS investigations. 7 protein spots showed significant differential distribution among the three groups. Both CSF of LHON or MS patients are characterized by lower level of transthyretin dimer adduct while a specific up regulation of Apo A-IV was detected in LHON CSF.

  7. Time-course investigation of Phytophthora infestans infection of potato leaf from three cultivars by quantitative proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Kruse Guldstrand Larsen

    2016-03-01

    We used label-free quantitative proteomics to investigate the infection with P. infestans in a time-course study over 258 h. Several key issues limits proteome analysis of potato leaf tissue [5–7]. Firstly, the immense complexity of the plant proteome, which is further complicated by the presence of highly abundant proteins, such as ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO. Secondly, plant leaf and potato, in particular, contain abundant levels amounts of phenols and polyphenols, which hinder or completely prevent a successful protein extraction. Hitherto, protein profiling of potato leaf tissues have been limited to few proteome studies and only 1484 proteins have been extracted and comprehensively described [5,8,9]. We here present the detailed methods and raw data by optimized gel-enhanced label free quantitative approach. The methodology enabled us to detect and quantify between 3248 and 3529 unique proteins from each cultivar, and up to 758 P. infestans derived proteins. The complete dataset is available via ProteomeXchange, with the identifier PXD002767.

  8. A brain proteomic investigation of rapamycin effects in the Tsc1+/- mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling, Hendrik; Elgersma, Ype; Bahn, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare monogenic disorder characterized by benign tumors in multiple organs as well as a high prevalence of epilepsy, intellectual disability and autism. TSC is caused by inactivating mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. Heterozygocity induces hyperactivation of mTOR which can be inhibited by mTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin, which have proven efficacy in the treatment of TSC-associated symptoms. The aim of the present study was (1) to identify molecular changes associated with social and cognitive deficits in the brain tissue of Tsc1+/- mice and (2) to investigate the molecular effects of rapamycin treatment, which has been shown to ameliorate genotype-related behavioural deficits. Molecular alterations in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of Tsc1+/- and control mice, with or without rapamycin treatment, were investigated. A quantitative mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomic approach (LC-MSE) was employed as an unbiased method to detect changes in protein levels. Changes identified in the initial profiling stage were validated using selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Protein Set Enrichment Analysis was employed to identify dysregulated pathways. LC-MSE analysis of Tsc1+/- mice and controls (n = 30) identified 51 proteins changed in frontal cortex and 108 in the hippocampus. Bioinformatic analysis combined with targeted proteomic validation revealed several dysregulated molecular pathways. Using targeted assays, proteomic alterations in the hippocampus validated the pathways "myelination", "dendrite," and "oxidative stress", an upregulation of ribosomal proteins and the mTOR kinase. LC-MSE analysis was also employed on Tsc1+/- and wildtype mice (n = 34) treated with rapamycin or vehicle. Rapamycin treatment exerted a stronger proteomic effect in Tsc1+/- mice with significant changes (mainly decreased expression) in 231 and 106 proteins, respectively. The cellular pathways "oxidative stress" and "apoptosis" were found

  9. Proteomic investigation of falciparum and vivax malaria for identification of surrogate protein markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandipan Ray

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to analyze alterations in the human serum proteome as a consequence of infection by malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis, host immune response, and identification of potential protein markers. Serum samples from patients diagnosed with falciparum malaria (FM (n = 20, vivax malaria (VM (n = 17 and healthy controls (HC (n = 20 were investigated using multiple proteomic techniques and results were validated by employing immunoassay-based approaches. Specificity of the identified malaria related serum markers was evaluated by means of analysis of leptospirosis as a febrile control (FC. Compared to HC, 30 and 31 differentially expressed and statistically significant (p<0.05 serum proteins were identified in FM and VM respectively, and almost half (46.2% of these proteins were commonly modulated due to both of the plasmodial infections. 13 proteins were found to be differentially expressed in FM compared to VM. Functional pathway analysis involving the identified proteins revealed the modulation of different vital physiological pathways, including acute phase response signaling, chemokine and cytokine signaling, complement cascades and blood coagulation in malaria. A panel of identified proteins consists of six candidates; serum amyloid A, hemopexin, apolipoprotein E, haptoglobin, retinol-binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I was used to build statistical sample class prediction models. By employing PLS-DA and other classification methods the clinical phenotypic classes (FM, VM, FC and HC were predicted with over 95% prediction accuracy. Individual performance of three classifier proteins; haptoglobin, apolipoprotein A-I and retinol-binding protein in diagnosis of malaria was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. The discrimination of FM, VM, FC and HC groups on the basis of differentially expressed serum proteins demonstrates

  10. Fluorescence investigations to classify malignant laryngeal lesions in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydell, Roland; Eker, Charlotta; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent of surgical resection for malignant laryngeal lesions influences voice quality. An instrument to estimate histopathologic grading of dysplasia in vivo may spare normal tissue without increasing the risk of local failure. METHODS: Laryngeal lesions (N = 39; 21 after...... administration of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)) were investigated with laser-induced fluorescence, and the results correlated to histopathologic grading in 4 groups: non/mild dysplasia (I), moderate dysplasia (II), severe dysplasia/cancer in situ (III), and carcinoma. RESULTS: At 337-nm excitation, there were...... differences in the fluorescence ratio I(431)/I(390) between groups I/III and carcinoma. Following 405-nm excitation, I(500 nm) group I differed significantly from group III and cancer. The sensitivity for the fluorescence method was 89%, and the specificity was 100%. CONCLUSIONS: There are differences...

  11. Considerations when investigating lncRNA function in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Andrew R; Akhtar, Asifa; Barlow, Denise P; Bird, Adrian P; Brockdorff, Neil; Duboule, Denis; Ephrussi, Anne; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Gingeras, Thomas R; Haerty, Wilfried; Higgs, Douglas R; Miska, Eric A; Ponting, Chris P

    2014-08-14

    Although a small number of the vast array of animal long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have known effects on cellular processes examined in vitro, the extent of their contributions to normal cell processes throughout development, differentiation and disease for the most part remains less clear. Phenotypes arising from deletion of an entire genomic locus cannot be unequivocally attributed either to the loss of the lncRNA per se or to the associated loss of other overlapping DNA regulatory elements. The distinction between cis- or trans-effects is also often problematic. We discuss the advantages and challenges associated with the current techniques for studying the in vivo function of lncRNAs in the light of different models of lncRNA molecular mechanism, and reflect on the design of experiments to mutate lncRNA loci. These considerations should assist in the further investigation of these transcriptional products of the genome. Copyright © 2014, Bassett et al.

  12. Time-course investigation of Phytophthora infestans infection of potato leaf from three cultivars by quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Mia Kruse Guldstrand; Jørgensen, Malene Møller; Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Stensballe, Allan

    2016-03-01

    Potato late blight is one the most important crop diseases worldwide. Even though potato has been studied for many years, the potato disease late blight still has a vast negative effect on the potato production [1], [2], [3]. Late blight is caused by the pathogen Phytophthora infestans (P. infestans), which initiates infection through leaves. However, the biological activities during different stages of infection are poorly described, and could enable novel or improved ways of defeating late blight infection [4]. Therefore, we investigated the interactions between P. infestans (mixed strain culture) and potato (Solanum tuberosum). Three commercially available field potato cultivars of different resistance to late blight infection; Kuras (moderate), Sarpo Mira (highly resistant) and Bintje (very susceptable) were grown under controlled green house conditions and inoculated with a diversity of P. infestans populations. We used label-free quantitative proteomics to investigate the infection with P. infestans in a time-course study over 258 h. Several key issues limits proteome analysis of potato leaf tissue [5], [6], [7]. Firstly, the immense complexity of the plant proteome, which is further complicated by the presence of highly abundant proteins, such as ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Secondly, plant leaf and potato, in particular, contain abundant levels amounts of phenols and polyphenols, which hinder or completely prevent a successful protein extraction. Hitherto, protein profiling of potato leaf tissues have been limited to few proteome studies and only 1484 proteins have been extracted and comprehensively described [5], [8], [9]. We here present the detailed methods and raw data by optimized gel-enhanced label free quantitative approach. The methodology enabled us to detect and quantify between 3248 and 3529 unique proteins from each cultivar, and up to 758 P. infestans derived proteins. The complete dataset is available via Proteome

  13. Proteomic investigation of male Gammarus fossarum, a freshwater crustacean, in response to endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Judith; Armengaud, Jean; Pible, Olivier; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Abbaci, Khedidja; Habtoul, Yassine; Chaumot, Arnaud; Geffard, Olivier

    2015-01-02

    While the decrease in human sperm count in response to pollutants is a worldwide concern, little attention is being devoted to its causes and occurrence in the biodiversity of the animal kingdom. Arthropoda is the most species-rich phyla, inhabiting all aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. During evolution, key molecular players of the arthropod endocrine system have diverged from the vertebrate counterparts. Consequently, arthropods may have different sensitivities toward endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Here alteration of sperm quality in a crustacean, Gammarus fossarum, a popular organism in freshwater risk assessment, was investigated after laboratory exposure to various concentrations of three different xenobiotics: cadmium, methoxyfenozide, and pyriproxyfen. The integrity of the reproductive process was assessed by means of sperm-quality markers. For each substance, semiquantitative/relative proteomics based on spectral counting procedure was carried out on male gonads to observe the biological impact. The changes in a total of 871 proteins were monitored in response to toxic pressure. A drastic effect was observed on spermatozoon production, with a dose-response relationship. While exposure to EDCs leads to strong modulations of male-specific proteins in testis, no induction of female-specific proteins was noted. Also, a significant portion of orphans proved to be sensitive to toxic stress.

  14. Alterations of protein composition along the rostro-caudal axis after spinal cord injury: proteomic, in vitro and in vivo analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasa eCizkova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on proteomic analyses we investigated the differences of released molecules in the conditioned media (CM from the spinal cord central lesion and adjacent rostral and caudal segments at 3, 7 and 10 days after spinal cord injury (SCI, in order to specify the molecular environment within greater extent of tissue damage. Proteins found in CM were analyzed by shot-gun MS using nanoLC coupled to an orbitrap. The results showed some specific proteins at each site of the lesion at 3days. Among the proteins from rostral and lesion segments, some are related to chemokines, cytokines or to neurogenesis factors. In contrast, proteins from caudal segments are more related to necrosis factors. The CM from each spinal segment were used in vitro, on microglial BV2 cell lines and DRGs explants, showing a lesion site-dependent impact on microglia activation and DRGs neurite outgrowth. In addition, while naive BV2 cells exhibited insignificant staining for CX3CR1 receptor, the level of CX3CR1 was strongly enhanced in some BV2 cells after their stimulation by CM collected from SCI. The molecular data might correlate with different polarization of activated microglia and macrophages along the rostro-caudal axis following acute injury. This was partially confirmed in vivo with CX3CR1 receptor, revealing higher expression in the rostral segment, with potential neuroprotective action. In addition, the neurotrophic factors released from rostral and lesion segments enhanced outgrowth of DRGs explants. Taken together these data suggest that regionalization in terms of inflammatory and neurotrophic responses may occur between rostral and caudal segments in acute SCI.

  15. Proteomics in investigation of cancer metastasis: functional and clinical consequences and methodological challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryáš, Josef; Faktor, Jakub; Dvořáková, Monika; Struhárová, Iva; Grell, Peter; Bouchal, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Metastases are responsible for most of the cases of death in patients with solid tumors. There is thus an urgent clinical need of better understanding the exact molecular mechanisms and finding novel therapeutics targets and biomarkers of metastatic disease of various tumors. Metastases are formed in a complicated biological process called metastatic cascade. Up to now, proteomics has enabled the identification of number of metastasis-associated proteins and potential biomarkers in cancer tissues, microdissected cells, model systems, and secretomes. Expression profiles and biological role of key proteins were confirmed in verification and functional experiments. This communication reviews these observations and analyses the methodological aspects of the proteomics approaches used. Moreover, it reviews contribution of current proteomics in the field of functional characterization and interactome analysis of proteins involved in various events in metastatic cascade. It is evident that ongoing technical progress will further increase proteome coverage and sample capacity of proteomics technologies, giving complex answers to clinical and functional questions asked. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  17. Proteomics investigation of human platelets by shotgun nUPLC-MSE and 2DE experimental strategies: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finamore, Francesco; Pieroni, Luisa; Ronci, Maurizio; Marzano, Valeria; Mortera, Stefano Levi; Romano, Mario; Cortese, Claudio; Federici, Giorgio; Urbani, Andrea

    2010-06-01

    Platelets, the smallest human blood cells component, have a key role in the control of haemostasis and thrombosis but they have also been shown to be implicated in a number of different pathological states because of their involvement also in the process of inflammation end its resolution. Their peculiar anucleated morphology render the proteomics an intriguing approach to understand their biology. Given the high impact of platelet in different diseases we have started a systematic investigation of protein repertoire in controlled platelet preparation. Platelets have been extracted from blood of healthy donors (n=6) collected by venipuncture in Vacutainer. The quality of the preparation was assessed by observation and enumeration in a Bürker chamber with a conventional tissue culture microscope. To characterize human platelets proteome we analysed the pool of purified platelets combining two proteomic approaches: 2-DE separation combined with Mass Spectrometry and nanoscale ultra performances LC-MS(E) shotgun proteomics experiments. The 2D gel analysis leads an average of 1900 protein spots, after the filtering of "noise" and "false positive" spots, over 500 were selected to be eligible for further analysis given their optimal spot quality value. To perform the analysis by ion accounting shotgun proteomic approach, based on nano ultra performance liquid chromatography (nUPLC) coupled to MS(E) processing of continuum LC-MS data, the same pool of samples was subject to liquid phase tryptic digestion and the peptide obtained used for the experiments. All the data obtained were analysed using ProteinLynx GlobalServer v2.3 (PLGS, Waters). Three analytical replicates run were acquire in high/low energy modes and associated to a human protein database returning the identification of 100 distinct genes. Comparative analysis of the Gene Ontology has been performed to evaluate the differential functional representation of the molecular repertoire investigated with these two

  18. Ex vivo tissue imaging of human glioblastoma using a small bore 7T MRI and correlation with digital pathology and proteomics profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kant M.; Lopes-Calcas, Ana; Magyar, Thalia; O'Brien-Moran, Zoe; Buist, Richard; Martin, Melanie

    2017-03-01

    Recent advancement in MRI established multi-parametric imaging for in vivo characterization of pathologic changes in brain cancer, which is expected to play a role in imaging biomarker development. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is a prime example, which has been deployed for assessment of therapeutic response via analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) / mean diffusivity (MD) values. They have been speculated to reflect apoptosis/necrosis. As newer medical imaging emerges, it is essential to verify that apparent abnormal features in imaging correlate with histopathology. Furthermore, the feasibility of imaging correlation with molecular profile should be explored in order to enhance the potential of biomedical imaging as a reliable biomarker. We focus on glioblastoma, which is an aggressive brain cancer. Despite the increased number of studies involving DTI in glioblastoma; however, little has been explored to bridge the gap between the molecular biomarkers and DTI data. Due to spatial heterogeneity in, MRI signals, pathologic change and protein expression, precise correlation is required between DTI, pathology and proteomics data in a histoanatomically identical manner. The challenge is obtaining an identical plane from in vivo imaging data that exactly matches with histopathology section. Thus, we propose to incorporate ex vivo tissue imaging to bridge between in vivo imaging data and histopathology. With ex vivo scan of removed tissue, it is feasible to use high-field 7T MRI scanner, which can achieve microscopic resolution. Once histology section showing the identical plane, it is feasible to correlate protein expression by a unique technology, "multiplex tissue immunoblotting".

  19. Proteomic investigations on the effect of different membrane materials on blood protein adsorption during haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, Andrea; Sirolli, Vittorio; Lupisella, Santina; Levi-Mortera, Stefano; Pavone, Barbara; Pieroni, Luisa; Amoroso, Luigi; Di Vito, Roberto; Bucci, Sonia; Bernardini, Sergio; Sacchetta, Paolo; Bonomini, Mario

    2012-05-01

    During haemodialysis procedure, the contact of blood with the membrane material contained in the hemodialyser results in protein deposition and adsorption, and surface-adsorbed proteins may trigger a variety of biological pathways with potential pathophysiologic consequences. The present work was undertaken to examine for protein adsorption capacity of two membranes used for clinical haemodialysis, namely cellulose triacetate (a derivatized cellulosic membrane) and the synthetic polymer polysulfone-based helixone. We performed a prospective cross-over study in chronic haemodialysis patients, routinely treated with a cellulose triacetate dialyser (n=3) or with a helixone dialyser (n=3). Dialysers from each patient were obtained after dialysis session, and flushed with a litre of saline to remove residual blood. Adsorbed proteins were then eluted by a strong chaotropic buffer. Patients were next switched to the other membrane dialyser for four weeks, at the end of this period protein adsorption being evaluated again. After silver staining, expression profile protein of the two groups was analyzed by 2-DE gels, analyzed and identified by Peptide Mass-finger printing and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS sequency. Moreover nanoLC-MS/MS shotgun profiling was pursued using a semi-quantitative label free approach by emPAI data analysis. A total of 54 differentially expressed proteins were identified: 22 proteins more concentrated in helixone membrane (predominantly low abundant plasma proteins) and 32 in cellulose triacetate (most represented by high abundant plasma proteins). The difference proved to be related to membrane material and not to patient's characteristics. Proteomic techniques represent a useful approach for the investigation of proteins surface-adsorbed onto a haemodialysis membrane, and can also be applied for critical assessment to compare efficiencies of different dialyser membrane materials in the adsorption of plasma proteins.

  20. Children's Coping with "In Vivo" Peer Rejection: An Experimental Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijntjes, Albert; Stegge, Hedy; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Kamphuis, Jan Henk; Telch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    We examined children's behavioral coping in response to an "in vivo" peer rejection manipulation. Participants (N = 186) ranging between 10 and 13 years of age, played a computer game based on the television show "Survivor" and were randomized to either peer rejection (i.e., being voted out of the game) or non-rejection control. During a five-min.…

  1. The use of proteomics for the investigation of immunostimulators and immunomodulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Tune; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    . This demonstrated the usability of proteomics to follow complicated physiological changes and responses, as several proteins were found to change in response to the wounding. Proteins of interest to the wound healing process were then identified using Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) - mass...

  2. A proteomic approach to investigating gene cluster expression and secondary metabolite functionality in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Owens

    Full Text Available A combined proteomics and metabolomics approach was utilised to advance the identification and characterisation of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus fumigatus. Here, implementation of a shotgun proteomic strategy led to the identification of non-redundant mycelial proteins (n = 414 from A. fumigatus including proteins typically under-represented in 2-D proteome maps: proteins with multiple transmembrane regions, hydrophobic proteins and proteins with extremes of molecular mass and pI. Indirect identification of secondary metabolite cluster expression was also achieved, with proteins (n = 18 from LaeA-regulated clusters detected, including GliT encoded within the gliotoxin biosynthetic cluster. Biochemical analysis then revealed that gliotoxin significantly attenuates H2O2-induced oxidative stress in A. fumigatus (p>0.0001, confirming observations from proteomics data. A complementary 2-D/LC-MS/MS approach further elucidated significantly increased abundance (p<0.05 of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, NADH-quinone oxidoreductase and the gliotoxin oxidoreductase GliT, along with significantly attenuated abundance (p<0.05 of a heat shock protein, an oxidative stress protein and an autolysis-associated chitinase, when gliotoxin and H2O2 were present, compared to H2O2 alone. Moreover, gliotoxin exposure significantly reduced the abundance of selected proteins (p<0.05 involved in de novo purine biosynthesis. Significantly elevated abundance (p<0.05 of a key enzyme, xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase Xpt1, utilised in purine salvage, was observed in the presence of H2O2 and gliotoxin. This work provides new insights into the A. fumigatus proteome and experimental strategies, plus mechanistic data pertaining to gliotoxin functionality in the organism.

  3. Quantitative proteomic investigation employing stable isotope labeling by peptide dimethylation on proteins of strawberry fruit at different ripening stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Song, Jun; Kalt, Wilhelmina; Forney, Charles; Tsao, Rong; Pinto, Devanand; Chisholm, Kenneth; Campbell, Leslie; Fillmore, Sherry; Li, Xihong

    2013-12-06

    A quantitative proteomic investigation of strawberry fruit ripening employing stable isotope labeling by peptide dimethylation was conducted on 'Mira' and 'Honeoye' strawberry fruit. Postharvest physiological quality indices, including volatile production, total phenolics, total anthocyanins, antioxidant capacity, soluble solids and titratable acidity, were also characterized in white, pink and red fruit. More than 892 and 848 proteins were identified and quantified in the 'Mira' and 'Honeoye' fruit, respectively, using at least two peptides for each protein identification. Using the normalized ratio of protein abundance changes, proteins that changed two-fold or more were identified as proteins that are up- or down-regulated during fruit ripening. Among the quantified proteins, 111 proteins were common to both cultivars and represented five significant clusters based on quantitative changes. Among the up-regulated proteins were proteins involved in metabolic pathways including flavonoid/anthocyanin biosynthesis, volatile biosynthesis, antioxidant metabolism, stress responses and allergen formation. Proteins that decreased during fruit ripening were found to be responsible for methionine metabolism, antioxidant-redox, energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Our results show that strawberry ripening is a highly complex system involving multi-physiological processes made possible through changes in protein expression. This study provides new insights on the regulation of proteins during strawberry fruit ripening that lay the foundation for further targeted studies. Research on the postharvest physiology and biochemistry of strawberry fruit as a model of non-climacteric fruit ripening has been conducted for many years. However, the mechanism(s) for the initiation and metabolic regulation of non-climacteric fruit ripening remains unknown. Little information on strawberry fruit ripening is available at the proteome level. This paper is the first report of a

  4. Nutritional Proteomics: Investigating molecular mechanisms underlying the health beneficial effect of functional foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kawashima

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjective: We introduce a new technical and conceptual term “nutritional proteomics” by identifying and quantifying the proteins and their changes in a certain organ or tissue dependent on the food intake by utilizing a mass spectrometry-based proteomics technique.Purpose: Food intake is essentially important for every life on earth to sustain the physical as well as mental functions. The outcome of food intake will be manifested in the health state and its dysfunction. The molecular information about the protein expression change caused by diets will assist us to understand the significance of functional foods. We wish to develop nutritional proteomics to promote a new area in functional food studies for a better understanding of the role of functional foods in health and disease.Methods: We chose two classes of food ingredients to show the feasibility of nutritional proteomics, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids both of which are involved in the inflammation/anti-inflammation axis. Each class of the polyunsaturated fatty acids was mixed in mouse chow respectively. The liver tissue of mice fed with omega-3 diet or omega-3 diet was analyzed by the state-of-the-art shotgun proteomics using nano-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The data were analyzed by the number of differentially expressed proteins that were guaranteed by 1% false discovery rate for protein identification and by the statistical significance of variance evaluated by p-value in two-tailed distribution analysis better than 0.05 (n=4. The differential pattern of protein expression was characterized with Gene Ontology designation.Results: The data analysis of the shotgun nutritional proteomics identified 2,810 proteins that are validated with 1% FDR. Among these 2,810 proteins, 125 were characterized with statistical significance of variance (p<0.05; n=4 between the omega-3 diet and the omega-6 diet by twotailed distribution analysis. The results

  5. Integration analysis of quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics data identifies potential targets of frizzled-8 protein-related antiproliferative factor in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Kim, Yongsoo; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Keay, Susan K; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Steen, Hanno; Freeman, Michael R; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Jayoung

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a prevalent and debilitating pelvic disorder generally accompanied by chronic pain combined with chronic urinating problems. Over one million Americans are affected, especially middle-aged women. However, its aetiology or mechanism remains unclear. No efficient drug has been provided to patients. Several urinary biomarker candidates have been identified for IC; among the most promising is antiproliferative factor (APF), whose biological activity is detectable in urine specimens from >94% of patients with both ulcerative and non-ulcerative IC. The present study identified several important mediators of the effect of APF on bladder cell physiology, suggesting several candidate drug targets against IC. In an attempt to identify potential proteins and genes regulated by APF in vivo, and to possibly expand the APF-regulated network identified by stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), we performed an integration analysis of our own SILAC data and the microarray data of Gamper et al. (2009) BMC Genomics 10: 199. Notably, two of the proteins (i.e. MAPKSP1 and GSPT1) that are down-regulated by APF are involved in the activation of mTORC1, suggesting that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is potentially a critical pathway regulated by APF in vivo. Several components of the mTOR pathway are currently being studied as potential therapeutic targets in other diseases. Our analysis suggests that this pathway might also be relevant in the design of diagnostic tools and medications targeting IC. • To enhance our understanding of the interstitial cystitis urine biomarker antiproliferative factor (APF), as well as interstitial cystitis biology more generally at the systems level, we reanalyzed recently published large-scale quantitative proteomics and in vivo transcriptomics data sets using an integration analysis tool that we have developed. • To

  6. Investigation of Yersinia pestis Laboratory Adaptation through a Combined Genomics and Proteomics Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen P Leiser

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis, the cause of plague in humans and animals, normally has a sylvatic lifestyle, cycling between fleas and mammals. In contrast, laboratory-grown Y. pestis experiences a more constant environment and conditions that it would not normally encounter. The transition from the natural environment to the laboratory results in a vastly different set of selective pressures, and represents what could be considered domestication. Understanding the kinds of adaptations Y. pestis undergoes as it becomes domesticated will contribute to understanding the basic biology of this important pathogen. In this study, we performed a parallel serial passage experiment (PSPE to explore the mechanisms by which Y. pestis adapts to laboratory conditions, hypothesizing that cells would undergo significant changes in virulence and nutrient acquisition systems. Two wild strains were serially passaged in 12 independent populations each for ~750 generations, after which each population was analyzed using whole-genome sequencing, LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis, and GC/MS metabolomics. We observed considerable parallel evolution in the endpoint populations, detecting multiple independent mutations in ail, pepA, and zwf, suggesting that specific selective pressures are shaping evolutionary responses. Complementary LC-MS/MS proteomic data provide physiological context to the observed mutations, and reveal regulatory changes not necessarily associated with specific mutations, including changes in amino acid metabolism and cell envelope biogenesis. Proteomic data support hypotheses generated by genomic data in addition to suggesting future mechanistic studies, indicating that future whole-genome sequencing studies be designed to leverage proteomics as a critical complement.

  7. Proteomic investigations of lysine acetylation identify diverse substrates of mitochondrial deacetylase sirt3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sol, E-ri Maria; Wagner, Sebastian A; Weinert, Brian T

    2012-01-01

    of KDACs and pinpointing the regulated acetylation sites on target proteins may provide important information about the molecular basis of their functions. Here we apply quantitative proteomics to identify endogenous substrates of the mitochondrial deacetylase Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) by comparing site...... by modulating acetylation on diverse substrates. The experimental strategy described here is generic and can be applied to identify endogenous substrates of other lysine deacetylases....

  8. Proteomic investigations reveal a role for RNA processing factor THRAP3 in the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beli, Petra; Lukashchuk, Natalia; Wagner, Sebastian A

    2012-01-01

    The regulatory networks of the DNA damage response (DDR) encompass many proteins and posttranslational modifications. Here, we use mass spectrometry-based proteomics to analyze the systems-wide response to DNA damage by parallel quantification of the DDR-regulated phosphoproteome, acetylome, and ...... cellular hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Collectively, these data broaden our knowledge of DNA damage signaling networks and highlight an important link between RNA metabolism and DNA repair.......The regulatory networks of the DNA damage response (DDR) encompass many proteins and posttranslational modifications. Here, we use mass spectrometry-based proteomics to analyze the systems-wide response to DNA damage by parallel quantification of the DDR-regulated phosphoproteome, acetylome......, and proteome. We show that phosphorylation-dependent signaling networks are regulated more strongly compared to acetylation. Among the phosphorylated proteins identified are many putative substrates of DNA-PK, ATM, and ATR kinases, but a majority of phosphorylated proteins do not share the ATM/ATR/DNA...

  9. An In-vivo investigation of transverse flow estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound scanners are restricted to display the blood velocity component in the ultrasound beam direction. By introducing a laterally oscillating field, signals are created from which the transverse velocity component can be estimated. This paper presents velocity and volume flow...... estimates obtained from flow phantom and in-vivo measurements at 90° relative to the ultrasound beam axis. The flow phantom experiment setup consists of a SMI140 flow phantom connected to a CompuFlow1000 programmable flow pump, which generates a flow similarly to that in the femoral artery. A B-K medical...... 8804 linear array transducer with 128 elements and a center frequency of 7 MHz is emitting 8 cycle ultrasound pulses with a pulse repetition frequency of 7 kHz in a direction perpendicular to the flow direction in the phantom. The transducer is connected to the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS...

  10. Children's coping with in vivo peer rejection: an experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijntjes, Albert; Stegge, Hedy; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Kamphuis, Jan Henk; Telch, Michael J

    2006-12-01

    We examined children's behavioral coping in response to an in vivo peer rejection manipulation. Participants (N=186) ranging between 10 and 13 years of age, played a computer game based on the television show Survivor and were randomized to either peer rejection (i.e., being voted out of the game) or non-rejection control. During a five-min. post-feedback waiting period children's use of several behavioral coping strategies was assessed. Rejection elicited a marked shift toward more negative affect, but higher levels of perceived social competence attenuated the negative mood shift. Children higher in depressive symptoms were more likely to engage in passive and avoidant coping behavior. Types of coping were largely unaffected by gender and perceived social competence. Implications are discussed.

  11. Investigating the biology of alpha herpesviruses with MS-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Esteban A; Song, Ren; Koyuncu, Orkide O; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-06-01

    Viruses are intracellular parasites that can only replicate and spread in cells of susceptible hosts. Alpha herpesviruses (α-HVs) contain double-stranded DNA genomes of at least 120 kb, encoding for 70 or more genes. The viral genome is contained in an icosahedral capsid that is surrounded by a proteinaceous tegument layer and a lipid envelope. Infection starts in epithelial cells and spreads to the peripheral nervous system. In the natural host, α-HVs establish a chronic latent infection that can be reactivated and rarely spread to the CNS. In the nonnatural host, viral infection will in most cases spread to the CNS with often fatal outcome. The host response plays a crucial role in the outcome of viral infection. α-HVs do not encode all the genes required for viral replication and spread. They need a variety of host gene products including RNA polymerase, ribosomes, dynein, and kinesin. As a result, the infected cell is dramatically different from the uninfected cell revealing a complex and dynamic interplay of viral and host components required to complete the virus life cycle. In this review, we describe the pivotal contribution of MS-based proteomics studies over the past 15 years to understand the complicated life cycle and pathogenesis of four α-HV species from the alphaherpesvirinae subfamily: Herpes simplex virus-1, varicella zoster virus, pseudorabies virus and bovine herpes virus-1. We describe the viral proteome dynamics during host infection and the host proteomic response to counteract such pathogens. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Investigating the emerging role of comparative proteomics in the search for new biomarkers of metal contamination under varying abiotic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vellinger, Céline, E-mail: celine.vellinger@gmail.com [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire des Environnements Continentaux (LIEC), CNRS UMR 7360, Université de Lorraine – Metz (France); Sohm, Bénédicte, E-mail: benedicte.sohm@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire des Environnements Continentaux (LIEC), CNRS UMR 7360, Université de Lorraine – Metz (France); Parant, Marc, E-mail: marc.parant@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire des Environnements Continentaux (LIEC), CNRS UMR 7360, Université de Lorraine – Metz (France); Immel, Françoise, E-mail: Francoise.Immel@u-bourgogne.fr [Biogéosciences, CNRS UMR 6282, Université de Bourgogne – Dijon (France); Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.usseglio-polatera@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire des Environnements Continentaux (LIEC), CNRS UMR 7360, Université de Lorraine – Metz (France)

    2016-08-15

    This study aims at investigating the potential use of comparative proteomics as a multi-marker approach of metal contamination, taking into account the potential confounding effect of water temperature. The major objective was to identify combinations of proteins specifically responding to a given metal, even if included in a metal mixture. The diagnostic approach was performed via the comparative analysis of protein expression on spot mapping provided by adult males of Gammarus pulex (Amphipoda, Crustacea) respectively exposed to arsenate (As), cadmium (Cd) or a binary mixture of these metals (AsCd) at three realistic temperatures (5, 10 and 15 °C). Proteomic expression analysis was performed by Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DiGE), and completed by an adapted inferential statistical approach. Combinations of under/over-expressed protein spots discriminated the metal identity. However, none of these spots discriminated both the individual metal effect (As or Cd) and its effect in metal mixture (AsCd) whatever the tested temperature. Some limits of the two-dimensional analysis of protein spot maps in G. pulex have been highlighted: (i) the presence of contaminating peptides and/or abundant “déja-vu” proteins which can mask the responses of other proteins of interest or (ii) the presence of post-translational modifications. An optimization of the experimental design (especially during the sample preparation) has been described for future investigations. This study has also highlighted (i) the importance of precisely identifying the protein spots of interest to avoid erroneous interpretations in terms of action mechanisms of chemicals and (ii) the importance of working under controlled laboratory conditions with a temperature close to 10 °C. In such conditions, we have demonstrated a higher impact of As than Cd on the energetic metabolism of Gammarus. This As impact is reduced in AsCd mixture confirming the antagonistic interaction of this binary

  13. Proteomic investigation of epigenetics in neuropsychiatric disorders: a missing link between genetics and behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazas-Mayorca, Mariana D; Vrana, Kent E

    2011-01-07

    Neuropsychiatric disorders affect a large segment of the human population and result in large costs to society. The majority of such disorders have unknown underlying causes. Recent evidence suggests an important role for epigenetic regulation in the emergence of neuropsychiatric disease. Epigenetics may provide a link between genetic and environmental factors and behavior. Epigenetic signaling involves changes on the structure of chromatin; such changes are often triggered and maintained by the post-translational modification of chromatin proteins and/or DNA. Recent proteomic technologies have enabled the study of epigenetic mechanisms in a high-throughput manner. This review will provide an overview of the major epigenetic pathways and modern techniques for their study, before focusing on experimental evidence supporting a strong role for epigenetics in selected psychiatric disorders such as depression, schizophrenia, and drug addiction. These results highlight a great need for the inclusion of the proteomic characterization of epigenetic mechanisms in the study of gene/disease associations in psychiatric disorders.

  14. Research Resource: A Dual Proteomic Approach Identifies Regulated Islet Proteins During β-Cell Mass Expansion In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Signe; Kirkegaard, Jeannette S.; Hoelper, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by insulin insufficiency due to a relative paucity of functional β-cell mass. Thus, strategies for increasing β-cell mass in situ are sought-after for therapeutic purposes. Pregnancy is a physiological state capable of inducing robust β-cell mass expansion, however, the ...... as upstream regulators of the observed expressional changes. As the first characterization of the islet-proteome during pregnancy, this study provides novel insight into the mechanisms involved in promoting pregnancy-induced β-cell mass expansion and function.[on SciFinder (R)]...

  15. Investigation of Pokemon-regulated proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xin; Jin, Yibao; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription regulator involved in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple human cancers including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is considered as a promising biomarker for HCC. In this work, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy was used to investigate the proteomic profile associated with Pokemon in human HCC cell line QGY7703 and human hepatocyte line HL7702. Samples were labeled with four-plex iTRAQ reagents followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 24 differentially expressed proteins were selected as significant. Nine proteins were potentially up-regulated by Pokemon while 15 proteins were potentially down-regulated and many proteins were previously identified as potential biomarkers for HCC. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment revealed that the listed proteins were mainly involved in DNA metabolism and biosynthesis process. The changes of glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD, up-regulated) and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large sub-unit (RIM1, down-regulated) were validated by Western blotting analysis and denoted as Pokemon's function of oncogenesis. We also found that Pokemon potentially repressed the expression of highly clustered proteins (MCM3, MCM5, MCM6, MCM7) which played key roles in promoting DNA replication. Altogether, our results may help better understand the role of Pokemon in HCC and promote the clinical applications.

  16. Faecal proteomics: A tool to investigate dysbiosis and inflammation in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debyser, Griet; Mesuere, Bart; Clement, Lieven; Van de Weygaert, Jens; Van Hecke, Pieter; Duytschaever, Gwen; Aerts, Maarten; Dawyndt, Peter; De Boeck, Kris; Vandamme, Peter; Devreese, Bart

    2016-03-01

    Several microbial studies reported gut microbiota dysbiosis in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The functional consequences of this phenomenon are poorly understood. Faecal metaproteomics allows the quantitative analysis of host and microbial proteins to address functional changes resulting from this dysbiosis. We analysed faecal protein extracts from fifteen patients with CF that have pancreatic insufficiency and from their unaffected siblings by shotgun proteomics. Novel computational and statistical tools were introduced to evaluate changes in taxonomic composition and protein abundance. Faecal protein extracts from patients with CF were dominated by host proteins involved in inflammation and mucus formation. Taxonomic analysis of the microbial proteins confirmed the strong reduction of butyrate reducers such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and increase of Enterobacteriaceae, Ruminococcus gnavus and Clostridia species. Faecal metaproteomics provides insights in intestinal dysbiosis, inflammation in patients with CF and can be used to monitor different disease markers in parallel. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential expression proteomics to investigate responses and resistance to Orobanche crenata in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Rubiales

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic angiosperm Orobanche crenata infection represents a major constraint for the cultivation of legumes worldwide. The level of protection achieved to date is either incomplete or ephemeral. Hence, an efficient control of the parasite requires a better understanding of its interaction and associated resistance mechanisms at molecular levels. Results In order to study the plant response to this parasitic plant and the molecular basis of the resistance we have used a proteomic approach. The root proteome of two accessions of the model legume Medicago truncatula displaying differences in their resistance phenotype, in control as well as in inoculated plants, over two time points (21 and 25 days post infection, has been compared. We report quantitative as well as qualitative differences in the 2-DE maps between early- (SA 27774 and late-resistant (SA 4087 genotypes after Coomassie and silver-staining: 69 differential spots were observed between non-inoculated genotypes, and 42 and 25 spots for SA 4087 and SA 27774 non-inoculated and inoculated plants, respectively. In all, 49 differential spots were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF following MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Many of the proteins showing significant differences between genotypes and after parasitic infection belong to the functional category of defense and stress-related proteins. A number of spots correspond to proteins with the same function, and might represent members of a multigenic family or post-transcriptional forms of the same protein. Conclusion The results obtained suggest the existence of a generic defense mechanism operating during the early stages of infection and differing in both genotypes. The faster response to the infection observed in the SA 27774 genotype might be due to the action of proteins targeted against key elements needed for the parasite's successful infection, such as protease inhibitors. Our data are discussed and

  18. Proteomic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteomic studies of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have recently received great attention because this animal is a useful model platform for the in vivo study of various biological problems relevant to human disease. In general, proteomic analysis is performed in order to address a...

  19. Proteomics and nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Mario; Sirolli, Vittorio; Magni, Fulvio; Urbani, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Proteome analysis has emerged as a new field of protein science offering the possibility of achieving unbiased identification, quantification and functional assessment of all proteins and peptides present in biological samples. Proteomics technologies are being used with increased frequency in the renal community. In this article we aim to highlight investigations in basic renal research and in clinical nephrology making use of recent developments in proteomic methods. Several examples are presented of how proteomics may be helpful to nephrology and affect possible future directions in kidney research.

  20. A Proteomic Approach to Investigate the Drought Response in the Orphan Crop Eragrostis tef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizqah Kamies

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The orphan crop, Eragrostis tef, was subjected to controlled drought conditions to observe the physiological parameters and proteins changing in response to dehydration stress. Physiological measurements involving electrolyte leakage, chlorophyll fluorescence and ultra-structural analysis showed tef plants tolerated water loss to 50% relative water content (RWC before adverse effects in leaf tissues were observed. Proteomic analysis using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ mass spectrometry and appropriate database searching enabled the detection of 5727 proteins, of which 211 proteins, including a number of spliced variants, were found to be differentially regulated with the imposed stress conditions. Validation of the iTRAQ dataset was done with selected stress-related proteins, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA and the protective antioxidant proteins, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR and peroxidase (POX. Western blot analyses confirmed protein presence and showed increased protein abundance levels during water deficit while enzymatic activity for FBA, MDHAR and POX increased at selected RWC points. Gene ontology (GO-term enrichment and analysis revealed terms involved in biotic and abiotic stress response, signaling, transport, cellular homeostasis and pentose metabolic processes, to be enriched in tef upregulated proteins, while terms linked to reactive oxygen species (ROS-producing processes under water-deficit, such as photosynthesis and associated light harvesting reactions, manganese transport and homeostasis, the synthesis of sugars and cell wall catabolism and modification, to be enriched in tef downregulated proteins.

  1. Protein modifications in cooked pork products investigated by a proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Luccia, Aldo; la Gatta, Barbara; Nicastro, Annarita; Petrella, Giovanni; Lamacchia, Carmela; Picariello, Gianluca

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate process-induced protein modifications in cooked ham and emulsion sausages, the proteomes of whole-cut (Parma and "Praga" cooked hams) and comminuted pork (mortadella and würstel) products were compared to raw pork using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to image analysis and mass spectrometry (MS). Other than heat-induced breakdown of part of the myosin heavy chains, the 2-DE pattern of cooked ham was substantially similar to that of raw pork. However, the MS-based analysis showed minor modifications, including the extensive oxidation of methionines. In contrast, likely due to emulsification, comminuted sausages were characterized by an abundant insoluble protein fraction (IPF). Interestingly, tropomyosin and myosin light chains in comminuted sausages were exclusively found in the IPF. Our results indicate that the protein aggregation systems of cooked hams and emulsion sausages reflect the processing conditions and are definitely different, the former being characterized mainly by disulphide bridges and the latter by additional covalent inter-protein links. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteomic Investigation of the Response of Enterococcus faecalis V583 when Cultivated in Urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntzen, Magnus Øverlie; Karlskås, Ingrid Lea; Skaugen, Morten; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Mathiesen, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a robust bacterium, which is able to survive in and adapt to hostile environments such as the urinary tract and bladder. In this label-free quantitative proteomic study based on MaxQuant LFQ algorithms, we identified 127 proteins present in the secretome of the clinical vancomycin-resistant isolate E. faecalis V583 and we compared proteins secreted in the initial phase of cultivation in urine with the secretome during cultivation in standard laboratory medium, 2xYT. Of the 54 identified proteins predicted to be secreted, six were exclusively found after cultivation in urine including the virulence factor EfaA (“endocarditis specific antigen”) and its homologue EF0577 (“adhesion lipoprotein”). These two proteins are both involved in manganese transport, known to be an important determinant of colonization and infection, and may additionally function as adhesins. Other detected urine-specific proteins are involved in peptide transport (EF0063 and EF3106) and protease inhibition (EF3054). In addition, we found an uncharacterized protein (EF0764), which had not previously been linked to the adaptation of V583 to a urine environment, and which is unique to E. faecalis. Proteins found in both environments included a histone-like protein, EF1550, that was up-regulated during cultivation in urine and that has a homologue in streptococci (HlpA) known to be involved in bacterial adhesion to host cells. Up-regulated secreted proteins included autolysins. These results from secretome analyses are largely compatible with previously published data from transcriptomics studies. All in all, the present data indicate that transport, in particular metal transport, adhesion, cell wall remodelling and the unknown function carried out by the unique EF0764 are important for enterococcal adaptation to the urine environment. These results provide a basis for a more targeted exploration of novel proteins involved in the adaptability and pathogenicity of E

  3. Response surface optimization, Ex vivo and In vivo investigation of nasal spanlastics for bioavailability enhancement and brain targeting of risperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Fatma Elzahraa; Elsayed, Ibrahim; Gad, Mary Kamal; Elshafeey, Ahmed Hassen; Mohamed, Magdi Ibrahim

    2017-09-15

    Transnasal brain drug targeting could ensure better drug delivery to the brain through the olfactory pathway. Risperidone bioavailability is 66% in extensive metabolizers and 82% in slow metabolizers. The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of the nanovesicular spanlastics to effectively deliver risperidone through the nasal route to the brain and increase its bioavailability. Spanlastics formulae, composed of span and polyvinyl alcohol, were designed based on central composite statistical design. The planned formulae were prepared using ethanol injection method. The prepared formulae were characterized by testing their particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency. The optimized formula having the lowest particle size, polydispersity index, the highest zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency was subjected to further investigations including characterization of its rheological properties, elasticity, transmission electron microscopy, in vitro diffusion, ex vivo permeation, histopathology and in vivo biodistribution. The optimized formula was composed of 5mg/mL span and 30mg/mL polyvinyl alcohol. It showed significantly higher transnasal permeation and better distribution to the brain, when compared to the used control regarding the brain targeting efficiency and the drug transport percentage (2.16 and 1.43 folds increase, respectively). The study introduced a successful and promising formula to directly and effectively carry the drug from nose to brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Microdialysis as a tool for in vivo investigation of glutamate transport capacity in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, T; Christensen, Thomas; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1995-01-01

    technique, we present a method that is suitable for the in vivo investigation of the capacity of cellular uptake of glutamate. Using 14C-mannitol as reference, we measured the cellular extraction and the cell membrane permeability of the test substance 3H-D-aspartate in the corpus striatum of the rat brain...

  5. Do ultrasonic dental scalers interfere with implantable cardioverter defibrillators? An in vivo investigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maiorana, Carlo; Grossi, Giovanni B; Garramone, Rocco A; Manfredini, Ruggero; Santoro, Franco

    2013-01-01

    .... Ultrasonic dental scalers have been suspected of electromagnetic interference (EMI) with the normal functioning of ICDs and the use of this type of equipment for patients with these devices has been controversial. This is the first in vivo study to investigate EMI of ICD activity during the operation with ultrasonic dental scaler.

  6. Non-invasively collected amniotic fluid as a source of possible biomarkers for premature rupture of membranes investigated by proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consonni, Sara; Mainini, Veronica; Pizzardi, Agnese; Gianazza, Erica; Chinello, Clizia; Locatelli, Anna; Magni, Fulvio

    2014-02-01

    Preterm delivery is one of the main causes of perinatal morbidity and mortality and it accounts for 75 % of perinatal mortality and more than half of the long-term morbidity. We applied a proteomic approach based on mass spectrometry (MS) for biomarkers discovery of preterm premature rupture of membranes (pPROM) by investigating amniotic fluid (AF) invasively and non-invasively collected. Amniotic fluid was obtained from vagina of women with pPROM (group 1), PROM at term (group 2) and by genetic amniocentesis (group 3). Pre-fractionated AF proteome was analyzed through matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) MS. The characterization of proteins/peptides of interest was obtained by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem MS. Three peptides overexpressed in pPROM and able to discriminate the groups 1 and 2 were detected. One peptide was identified as the fragment Gly452LAVPDGPLGLPPKPro466 of the protein KIAA1522, expressed by fetal brain and liver. This peptide was overexpressed in a patient of the group 3, completely asymptomatic at the time of the amniocentesis, who later developed pPROM. Amniotic fluid invasively and non-invasively collected can be analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS to obtain proteomic profiles. Proteomic analysis identified a peptide with promising diagnostic capability for pPROM.

  7. Using proteomic analysis to investigate uniconazole-induced phytohormone variation and starch accumulation in duckweed (Landoltia punctata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mengjun; Fang, Yang; Liu, Yang; Jin, Yanling; Sun, Jiaolong; Tao, Xiang; Ma, Xinrong; He, Kaize; Zhao, Hai

    2015-09-15

    Duckweed (Landoltia punctata) has the potential to remediate wastewater and accumulate enormous amounts of starch for bioethanol production. Using systematical screening, we determined that the highest biomass and starch percentage of duckweed was obtained after uniconazole application. Uniconazole contributes to starch accumulation of duckweed, but the molecular mechanism is still unclear. To elucidate the mechanisms of high starch accumulation, in the study, the responses of L. punctata to uniconazole were investigated using a quantitative proteomic approach combined with physiological and biochemical analysis. A total of 3327 proteins were identified. Among these identified proteins, a large number of enzymes involved in endogenous hormone synthetic and starch metabolic pathways were affected. Notably, most of the enzymes involved in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis showed up-regulated expression, which was consistent with the content variation. The increased endogenous ABA may up-regulate expression of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase to promote starch biosynthesis. Importantly, the expression levels of several key enzymes in the starch biosynthetic pathway were up-regulated, which supported the enzymatic assay results and may explain why there is increased starch accumulation. These generated data linked uniconazole with changes in expression of enzymes involved in hormone biosynthesis and starch metabolic pathways and elucidated the effect of hormones on starch accumulation. Thus, this study not only provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of uniconazole-induced hormone variation and starch accumulation but also highlighted the potential for duckweed to be feedstock for biofuel as well as for sewage treatment.

  8. Comparative investigation of seed coats of brown- versus yellow-colored soybean seeds using an integrated proteomics and metabolomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Min, Chul Woo; Kim, So Wun; Wang, Yiming; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kim, Sang Gon; Lee, Byong Won; Ko, Jong Min; Baek, In Yeol; Bae, Dong Won; Kim, Sun Tae

    2015-05-01

    Seed coat color is an important attribute determining consumption of soybean seeds. Soybean cultivar Mallikong (M) has yellow seed coat while its naturally mutated cultivar Mallikong mutant (MM), has brown colored seed coat. We used integrated proteomics and metabolomics approach to investigate the differences between seed coats of M and MM during different stages of seed development (4, 5, and 6 weeks after flowering). 2DE profiling of total seed coat proteins from three stages showed 178 differentially expressed spots between M and MM of which 172 were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Of these, 62 were upregulated and 105 were downregulated in MM compared with M, while five spots were detected only in MM. Proteins involved in primary metabolism showed downregulation in MM suggesting energy in MM might be utilized for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis via secondary metabolic pathways that leads to the development of brown seed coat color. Besides, downregulation of two isoforms of isoflavone reductase indicated reduced isoflavones in seed coat of MM that was confirmed by quantitative estimation of total and individual isoflavones using HPLC. We propose that low isoflavones level in MM may offer a high substrate for proanthocyanidin production that results in the development of brown seed coat in MM. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Differential proteomics analysis of the surface heterogeneity of dextran iron oxide nanoparticles and the implications for their in vivo clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simberg, Dmitri; Park, Ji-Ho; Karmali, Priya P; Zhang, Wan-Ming; Merkulov, Sergei; McCrae, Keith; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Sailor, Michael; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2009-08-01

    In order to understand the role of plasma proteins in the rapid liver clearance of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in vivo, we analyzed the full repertoire of SPIO-binding blood proteins using novel two-dimensional differential mass spectrometry approach. The identified proteins showed specificity for surface domains of the nanoparticles: mannan-binding lectins bound to the dextran coating, histidine-rich glycoprotein and kininogen bound to the iron oxide part, and the complement lectin and contact clotting factors were secondary binders. Nanoparticle clearance studies in knockout mice suggested that these proteins, as well as several previously identified opsonins, do not play a significant role in the SPIO clearance. However, both the dextran coat and the iron oxide core remained accessible to specific probes after incubation of SPIO in plasma, suggesting that the nanoparticle surface could be available for recognition by macrophages, regardless of protein coating. These data provide guidance to rational design of bioinert, long-circulating nanoparticles.

  10. Proteomic and transcriptomic investigation of acne vulgaris microcystic and papular lesions: Insights in the understanding of its pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanico, Jusal; Gimeno, Jean-Pascal; Nadal-Wollbold, Florence; Casas, Christiane; Alvarez-Georges, Sandrine; Redoulès, Daniel; Schmitt, Anne-Marie; Fournier, Isabelle; Salzet, Michel

    2017-03-01

    The pathogenesis of acne vulgaris involves several phases including androgen-dependent hyper-seborrhea, colonization by Propionibacterium acnes, and inflammation. Recent investigations have shown that in fact P. acnes provokes the activation of the inflammasome present in macrophages and dendritic cells. This signaling pathway leads to excessive production of interleukin IL-1β, a proinflammatory cytokine. Nevertheless, these well-studied phenomena in acne fail to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the appearance of different lesions. We investigate response pathways for specific acne lesions such as microcysts and papules using shot-gun proteomic followed by systemic biology and transcriptomic approaches. Results show that most of the proteins identified as differentially expressed between the normal and acne tissue biopsies associated with the immune system response were identified as highly or exclusively expressed in the papule biopsies. They were also expressed in microcysts, but in lower amounts compared to those in papules. These results are supported by the identification of CAMP factor protein produced by P. acnes in microcysts, indicating its enhanced proliferation in this type of lesion CONCLUSIONS: As CAMP factor protein was not detected in papule biopsies, we can see a clear delineation in the stages of progression of acne pathogenesis, which begins with a hyphenated inflammatory response in the papule stage, followed by imbalance of lipid production, which in turn triggers the enhanced proliferation of P. acnes. We demonstrate that expression inflammation varies across the two types of lesions, suggesting different pathways enhanced as a function of the progression of P. acnes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigation of in-vivo skin autofluorescence lifetimes under long-term cw optical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lihachev, A; Ferulova, I; Vasiljeva, K; Spigulis, J [Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia)

    2014-08-31

    The main results obtained during the last five years in the field of laser-excited in-vivo human skin photobleaching effects are presented. The main achievements and results obtained, as well as methods and experimental devices are briefly described. In addition, the impact of long-term 405-nm cw low-power laser excitation on the skin autofluorescence lifetime is experimentally investigated. (laser biophotonics)

  12. Tissue damage in organic rainbow trout muscle investigated by proteomics and bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Tune; Silva, Tomé; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2013-07-01

    The response to tissue damage is a complex process, which involves the coordinated regulation of multiple proteins to ensure tissue repair. In order to investigate the effect of tissue damage in a lower vertebrate, samples were taken from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at day 7 after damage and proteins were separated using 2DE. The experimental design included two groups of rainbow trout, which were fed organic feed either with or without astaxanthin. In total, 96 proteins were found to be affected by tissue damage, clearly demonstrating in this lower vertebrate the complexity and magnitude of the cellular response, in the context of a regenerative process. Using a bioinformatics approach, the main biological function of these proteins were assigned, showing the regulation of proteins involved in processes such as apoptosis, iron homeostasis, and regulation of muscular structure. Interestingly, it was established that exclusively within the astaxanthin feed group, three members of the annexin protein family (annexin IV, V, and VI) were regulated in response to tissue damage. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A gel-free quantitative proteomics approach to investigate temperature adaptation of the food-borne pathogen Cronobacter turicensis 3032.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Paula; Grunau, Alexander; Schneider, Thomas; Hartmann, Isabel; Lehner, Angelika; Stephan, Roger; Gehrig, Peter; Grossmann, Jonas; Groebel, Katrin; Hoelzle, Ludwig E; Eberl, Leo; Riedel, Kathrin

    2010-09-01

    The opportunistic food-borne pathogen Cronobacter sp. causes rare but significant illness in neonates and is capable to grow at a remarkably wide range of temperatures from 5.5 to 47 degrees C. A gel-free quantitative proteomics approach was employed to investigate the molecular basis of the Cronobacter sp. adaptation to heat and cold-stress. To this end the model strain Cronobacter turicensis 3032 was grown at 25, 37, 44, and 47 degrees C, and whole-cell and secreted proteins were iTRAQ-labelled and identified/quantified by 2-D-LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. While 44 degrees C caused only minor changes in C. turicensis growth rate and protein profile, 47 degrees C affected the expression of about 20% of all 891 identified proteins and resulted in a reduced growth rate and rendered the strain non-motile and filamentous. Among the heat-induced proteins were heat shock factors, transcriptional and translational proteins, whereas proteins affecting cellular morphology, proteins involved in motility, central metabolism and energy production were down-regulated. Notably, numerous potential virulence factors were found to be up-regulated at higher temperatures, suggesting an elevated pathogenic potential of Cronobacter sp. under these growth conditions. Significant alterations in the protein expression profile and growth rate of C. turicensis exposed to 25 degrees C indicate that at this temperature the organism is cold-stressed. Up-regulated gene products comprised cold-shock, DNA-binding and ribosomal proteins, factors that support protein folding and proteins opposing cold-induced decrease in membrane fluidity, whereas down-regulated proteins were mainly involved in central metabolism.

  14. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy application for ex vivo investigation of ocular fundus samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sven; Hammer, Martin; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2011-07-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of ocular tissue has recently become a promising tool in ophthalmology for diagnostic and research purposes. The feasibility and the advantages of TPEF imaging, namely deeper tissue penetration and improved high-resolution imaging of microstructures, have been demonstrated lately using human ocular samples. The autofluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ocular fundus tissue are well known from spectrophotometric analysis. But fluorophores, especially when it comes to fluorescence lifetime, typically display a dependence of their fluorescence properties on local environmental parameters. Hence, a more detailed investigation of ocular fundus autofluorescence ideally in vivo is of utmost interest. The aim of this study is to determine space-resolved the stationary and time-resolved fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ex vivo porcine ocular fundus samples by means of two-photon excited fluorescence spectrum and lifetime imaging microscopy (FSIM/FLIM). By our first results, we characterized the autofluorescence of individual anatomical structures of porcine retina samples excited at 760 nm. The fluorescence properties of almost all investigated retinal layers are relatively homogenous. But as previously unknown, ganglion cell bodies show a significantly shorter fluorescence lifetime compared to the adjacent mueller cells. Since all retinal layers exhibit bi-exponential autofluorescence decays, we were able to achieve a more precise characterization of fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores compared to a present in vivo FLIM approach by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO).

  15. Redox Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are major targets of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and numerous post-translational, reversible or irreversible modifications have been characterized, which may lead to a change in the structure and/or function of the oxidized protein. Redox proteomics is an increasingly emerging branch of proteomics aimed at identifying and quantifying redox-based changes within the proteome both in redox signaling and under oxidative stress conditions. Correlation between protein ox...

  16. In Vivo Investigation of Breast Cancer Progression by Use of an Internal Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Baeten

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical imaging of breast cancer has been considered for detecting functional and molecular characteristics of diseases in clinical and preclinical settings. Applied to laboratory research, photonic investigations offer a highly versatile tool for preclinical imaging and drug discovery. A particular advantage of the optical method is the availability of multiple spectral bands for performing imaging. Herein, we capitalize on this feature to demonstrate how it is possible to use different wavelengths to offer internal controls and significantly improve the observation accuracy in molecular imaging applications. In particular, we show the independent in vivo detection of cysteine proteases along with tumor permeability and interstitial volume measurements using a dual-wavelength approach. To generate results with a view toward clinically geared studies, a transgenic Her2/neu mouse model that spontaneously developed mammary tumors was used. In vivo findings were validated against conventional ex vivo tests such as histology and Western blot analyses. By correcting for biodistribution parameters, the dual-wavelength method increases the accuracy of molecular observations by separating true molecular target from probe biodistribution. As such, the method is highly appropriate for molecular imaging studies where often probe delivery and target presence are not independently assessed. On the basis of these findings, we propose the dual-wavelength/normalization approach as an essential method for drug discovery and preclinical imaging studies.

  17. Global Proteome Analysis of Leptospira interrogans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative global proteome analyses were performed on Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni grown under conventional in vitro conditions and those mimicking in vivo conditions (iron limitation and serum presence). Proteomic analyses were conducted using iTRAQ and LC-ESI-tandem mass spectrometr...

  18. An investigation of the effect of in vivo interferences on Raman glucose measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Bongchu; Oh, Hyunho; Oh, Jeankun; Yang, Yongju; Ku, Yunhee; Kim, Moosub; Kim, Dami; Eum, Hyejin; Cho, Seongmoon; Miller, David R.

    2011-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a promising technology for noninvasive blood glucose monitoring because of its good selectivity for the glucose molecule. The low sensitivity of the Raman signal however, makes it difficult to quantify the concentration of glucose directly from the Raman spectra. To solve this, statistical methods such as PCA (principle component analysis) and PLS (partial least square) are traditionally used. These statistical methods general work very well and give highly accurate results, provided there is no interference. In the in-vivo case however, there are many interferences such as the inhomogeneity of tissue, physiological changes, and denaturation of the tissue by the light source. This study investigates the affect of in-vivo interferences on Raman glucose measurements. In this study, a high throughput dispersive Raman system was constructed with an 830nm multimode laser, a multiple conductor optical fiber bundle, and a back-illuminated CCD spectrometer. A simply phantom was devised, which was comprised of a plastic cuvette fitted with a human fingernail window and glucose doped human serum used as the sample. To test the inhomogeneity of tissue samples, different sites of the phantom were exposed to the laser. In the case of denaturation, tests were conducted under two laser power densities: low (3.7mW/mm2) and high density (110mW/mm2). To simulate the physiological change, gelatin phantoms of varied concentration were investigated. The results of the study indicate that the dominant interferers for Raman in-vivo glucose measurements are the inhomogeneity of the tissue and the denaturation by the laser power density. The next phase for this study will be the design of a high SNR Raman system which affords a low power density laser sample illumination as well as larger volumetric illumination to mitigate the effects of tissue inhomogeneity.

  19. In vivo Raman Confocal Spectroscopy in the Investigation of the Skin Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal barrier, predominantly attributed to the stratum corneum (SC), is the outermost part of our body that comprises multiple defensive functions against exogenous attacks and the loss of body substances, e.g. water. A novel investigative method, in vivo Raman confocal spectroscopy (RCS), is employed to study the composition of the epidermal barrier and compounds penetrating the epidermis both in a space-resolved manner. By using this method, a semiquantitative analysis of skin barrier constituents can be evaluated, namely SC lipids, natural moisturizing factor components and sweat constituents. The technique enables to examine epidermal barrier impairment in experimental settings as well as the penetration of exogenous substances into the epidermis, e.g. retinol. RCS can reveal microcompositional changes in the skin barrier as a function of age. We also review the use of RCS in studying antioxidant defense components. This chapter discusses the application of in vivo RCS in the investigation of the epidermal barrier. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Proteomics dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Ellingsen, Torkell

    2017-01-01

    The datasets presented in this article are related to the research articles entitled “Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Ulcerative Colitis: A Proteome Analysis of Intestinal Biopsies” (Bennike et al., 2015 [1]), and “Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa” (Bennike et al., 2017 [2...... conducted the sample preparation and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of all samples in one batch, enabling label-free comparison between all biopsies. The datasets are made publicly available to enable critical or extended analyses. The proteomics data and search results, have...... been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001608 for ulcerative colitis and control samples, and PXD003082 for rheumatoid arthritis samples....

  1. Soybean proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Zahed; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    Soybean, the world's most widely grown seed legume, is an important global source of vegetable oil and protein. Though, complete draft genome sequence of soybean is now available, but functional genomics studies remain in their infancy, as this agricultural legume species exhibits genetic constrains like genome duplications and self-incompatibilities. The techniques of proteomics provide much powerful tool for functional analysis of soybean. In the present review, an attempt has been made to summarize all significant contributions in the field of soybean proteomics. Special emphasis is given to subcellular proteomics in response to abiotic stresses for better understanding molecular basis of acquisition of stress tolerance mechanism. Detailed protocols of protein extraction, solubilization, fractionation of subcellular organelle, and proteins identification are explained for soybean proteomics. All this information would not only enrich us in understanding the plants response to environmental stressors but would also enable us to design genetically engineered stress tolerant soybean.

  2. Proteomics dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Ellingsen, Torkell

    2017-01-01

    The datasets presented in this article are related to the research articles entitled “Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Ulcerative Colitis: A Proteome Analysis of Intestinal Biopsies” (Bennike et al., 2015 [1]), and “Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa” (Bennike et al., 2017 [2...... patients (Morgan et al., 2012; Abraham and Medzhitov, 2011; Bennike, 2014) [8–10. Therefore, we characterized the proteome of colon mucosa biopsies from 10 inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, 11 gastrointestinal healthy rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and 10 controls. We...... conducted the sample preparation and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of all samples in one batch, enabling label-free comparison between all biopsies. The datasets are made publicly available to enable critical or extended analyses. The proteomics data and search results, have...

  3. SWATH-MS Quantitative Proteomic Investigation Reveals a Role of Jasmonic Acid during Lead Response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fu-Yuan; Chan, Wai-Lung; Chen, Mo-Xian; Kong, Ricky P W; Cai, Congxi; Wang, Qiaomei; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Lo, Clive

    2016-10-07

    Lead (Pb) pollution is a growing environment problem that continuously threatens the productivity of crops. To understand the molecular mechanisms of plant adaptation to Pb toxicity, we examined proteome changes in Arabidopsis seedlings following Pb treatment by SWATH-MS, a label-free quantitative proteomic platform. We identified and quantified the expression of 1719 proteins in water- and Pb-treated plants. Among them, 231 proteins showed significant abundance changes (151 elevated and 80 reduced) upon Pb exposure. Functional categorization revealed that most of the Pb-responsive proteins are involved in different metabolic processes. For example, down-regulation of photosynthesis and biosynthesis of isoprenoids and tetrapyrroles in chloroplasts were observed. On the contrary, pathways leading to glutathione, jasmonic acid (JA), glucosinolate (GSL), and phenylpropanoid production are up-regulated. Experimental characterizations demonstrated a rapid elevation of endogenic JA production in Pb-treated Arabidopsis seedlings, while a JA-deficient mutant and a JA-insensitive mutant showed hypersensitivity to root inhibition by Pb, implicating an essential role of JA during Pb responses. Consistently, methyl jasmonate supplementation alleviated Pb toxicity in the wild-type and JA-deficient mutant. Furthermore, GSL levels were substantially enhanced following Pb treatment, while such induction was not detected in the JA mutant, suggesting that the Pb-induced GSL accumulation is JA-dependent. Overall, our work represents the first SWATH-MS analysis in Arabidopsis and highlights a potential mediating role of JA during Pb stress.

  4. Phenotypic profile linked to inhibition of the major Zn influx system in Salmonella enterica: proteomics and ionomics investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavardelli, Domenico; Ammendola, Serena; Ronci, Maurizio; Consalvo, Ada; Marzano, Valeria; Lipoma, Mario; Sacchetta, Paolo; Federici, Giorgio; Di Ilio, Carmine; Battistoni, Andrea; Urbani, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Zinc is required for a wide variety of cellular functions and plays a key role in bacterial metabolism and virulence. However, Zn can also be toxic and, therefore, its influx is tightly regulated. The high affinity zinc uptake transporter ZnuABC is the main Zn influx system in Salmonella enterica under conditions of Zn starvation. It has been shown that deletion of the gene encoding for its periplasmic subunit ZnuA significantly affects S. Typhimurium growth rate and virulence, highlighting the importance of this system in the host-pathogen interaction. To gain further insight into the mechanisms involved in Zn influx regulation, we characterized the main alterations in the ionome and proteome of S. Typhimurium wild type and znuA mutant strains grown either under Zn starvation or under Zn-replete conditions. We found significant differences in the element profile and protein expression that were reversed by Zn supplementation. In particular, several of the differentially regulated proteins are predicted to be metal-binding proteins. Interestingly, their over-expression in the znuA mutant strain strictly depends on Zn starvation and correlates with the differences found at the ionome level. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that inhibition of Zn influx has relevant effects either on the bacterial ionome or proteome and shed new light on the role of the ZnuABC system and Zn influx in S. Typhimurium pathogenicity.

  5. Redox proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D Allan; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2012-12-01

    Proteins are major targets of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and numerous post-translational, reversible or irreversible modifications have been characterized, which may lead to a change in the structure and/or function of the oxidized protein. Redox proteomics is an increasingly emerging branch of proteomics aimed at identifying and quantifying redox-based changes within the proteome both in redox signaling and under oxidative stress conditions. Correlation between protein oxidation and human disease is widely accepted, although elucidating cause and effect remains a challenge. Increasing biomedical data have provided compelling evidences for the involvement of perturbations in redox homeostasis in a large number of pathophysiological conditions and aging. Research toward a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of a disease together with identification of specific targets of oxidative damage is urgently required. This is the power and potential of redox proteomics. In the last few years, combined proteomics, mass spectrometry (MS), and affinity chemistry-based methodologies have contributed in a significant way to provide a better understanding of protein oxidative modifications occurring in various biological specimens under different physiological and pathological conditions. Hence, this Forum on Redox Proteomics is timely. Original and review articles are presented on various subjects ranging from redox proteomics studies of oxidatively modified brain proteins in Alzheimer disease and animal models of Alzheimer and Parkinson disease, to potential new biomarker discovery paradigm for human disease, to chronic kidney disease, to protein nitration in aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders, electrophile-responsive proteomes of special relevance to diseases involving mitochondrial alterations, to cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

  6. Ex vivo and in vivo investigations of picroliv from Picrorhiza kurroa in an alcohol intoxication model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, B; Visen, P K; Patnaik, G K; Dhawan, B N

    1999-09-01

    Picroliv, the active constituent isolated from the plant Picrorhiza kurroa, was evaluated as a hepatoprotective agent against ethanol-induced hepatic injury in rats. Alcohol feeding (3.75 g/kg x45 days) produced 20-114% alteration in selected serum (AST, ALT and ALP) and liver markers (lipid, glycogen and protein). Further, it reduced the viability (44-48%) of isolated hepatocytes (ex vivo) as assessed by Trypan blue exclusion and rate of oxygen uptake. Its effect was also seen on specific alcohol-metabolizing enzymes (aldehyde dehydrogenase, 41%; acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, 52%) in rat hepatocytes. The levels of these enzymes were found to be reduced in the cells following alcohol intoxication. Ethyl alcohol also produced cholestasis (41-53%), as indicated by reduction in bile volume, bile salts and bile acids. Picroliv treatment (3-12 mg/kg p.o. x45 days) restored the altered parameters in a dose-dependent manner (36-100%).

  7. In-depth proteome analysis of Arabidopsis leaf peroxisomes combined with in vivo subcellular targeting verification indicates novel metabolic and regulatory functions of peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumann, Sigrun; Quan, Sheng; Aung, Kyaw; Yang, Pingfang; Manandhar-Shrestha, Kalpana; Holbrook, Danielle; Linka, Nicole; Switzenberg, Robert; Wilkerson, Curtis G; Weber, Andreas P M; Olsen, Laura J; Hu, Jianping

    2009-05-01

    Peroxisomes are metabolically diverse organelles with essential roles in plant development. The major protein constituents of plant peroxisomes are well characterized, whereas only a few low-abundance and regulatory proteins have been reported to date. We performed an in-depth proteome analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf peroxisomes using one-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. We detected 65 established plant peroxisomal proteins, 30 proteins whose association with Arabidopsis peroxisomes had been previously demonstrated only by proteomic data, and 55 putative novel proteins of peroxisomes. We subsequently tested the subcellular targeting of yellow fluorescent protein fusions for selected proteins and confirmed the peroxisomal localization for 12 proteins containing predicted peroxisome targeting signals type 1 or 2 (PTS1/2), three proteins carrying PTS-related peptides, and four proteins that lack conventional targeting signals. We thereby established the tripeptides SLM> and SKV> (where > indicates the stop codon) as new PTS1s and the nonapeptide RVx(5)HF as a putative new PTS2. The 19 peroxisomal proteins conclusively identified from this study potentially carry out novel metabolic and regulatory functions of peroxisomes. Thus, this study represents an important step toward defining the complete plant peroxisomal proteome.

  8. Prion structure investigated in situ, ex vivo, and in vitro by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Janina; Miller, Lisa M.; Spassov, Sashko; Sokolowski, Fabian; Lasch, Peter; Beekes, Michael; Naumann, Dieter

    2004-07-01

    Syrian hamster nervous tissue was investigated by FTIR microspectroscopy with conventional and synchrotron infrared light sources. Various tissue structures from the cerebellum and medulla oblongata of scrapie-infected and control hamsters were investigated at a spatial resolution of 50 μm. Single neurons in dorsal root ganglia of scrapie-infected hamsters were analyzed by raster scan mapping at 6 μm spatial resolution. These measurements enabled us to (i) scrutinize structural differences between infected and non-infected tissue and (ii) analyze for the first time the distribution of different protein structures in situ within single nerve cells. Single nerve cells exhibited areas of increased β-sheet content, which co-localized consistently with accumulations of the pathological prion protein (PrPSc). Spectral data were also obtained from purified, partly proteinase K digested PrPSc isolated from scrapie-infected nervous tissue of hamsters to elucidate similarities/dissimilarities between prion structure in situ and ex vivo. A further comparison is drawn to the recombinant Syrian hamster prion protein SHaPrP90-232, whose in vitro transition from the predominantly a-helical isoform to β-sheet rich oligomeric structures was also investigated by FTIR spectroscopy.

  9. Proteomics of human mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmfeldt, Johan; Bross, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Proteomics have passed through a tremendous development in the recent years by the development of ever more sensitive, fast and precise mass spectrometry methods. The dramatically increased research in the biology of mitochondria and their prominent involvement in all kinds of diseases and ageing has benefitted from mitochondrial proteomics. We here review substantial findings and progress of proteomic analyses of human cells and tissues in the recent past. One challenge for investigations of human samples is the ethically and medically founded limited access to human material. The increased sensitivity of mass spectrometry technology aids in lowering this hurdle and new approaches like generation of induced pluripotent cells from somatic cells allow to produce patient-specific cellular disease models with great potential. We describe which human sample types are accessible, review the status of the catalog of human mitochondrial proteins and discuss proteins with dual localization in mitochondria and other cellular compartments. We describe the status and developments of pertinent mass spectrometric strategies, and the use of databases and bioinformatics. Using selected illustrative examples, we draw a picture of the role of proteomic analyses for the many disease contexts from inherited disorders caused by mutation in mitochondrial proteins to complex diseases like cancer, type 2 diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we speculate on the future role of proteomics in research on human mitochondria and pinpoint fields where the evolving technologies will be exploited. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Proteomics and autoimmune kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovin, Brad H; Klein, Jon B

    2015-11-01

    Proteomics has long been considered an ideal platform, and urine an ideal source for biomarker discovery in human autoimmune kidney diseases. A number of studies have examined the urine proteome to identify biomarkers of disease activity, kidney pathology, and response to therapy. Increasingly, proteomic studies of kidney disease have expanded to include blood, circulating cells and kidney tissue. Recently the clinical potential of renal proteomics has been realized through a handful of investigations whose results appear to be applicable to patient care. In this review, approaches to the proteomic evaluation of autoimmune kidney diseases will be considered in the context of developing clinically useful disease biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cutaneous tumors in vivo investigations using fluorescence and diffuse reflectance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Nikolova, E.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    In the recent years, there has been growing interest in the common use of laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) and reflectance spectroscopy (RS) to differentiate disease from normal surrounding tissue - so called optical biopsy method. Painless, instant diagnoses from optical biopsies will soon be a reality. These forms of optical diagnoses are preferable to the removal of several square millimeters of tissue surface - common in traditional biopsies - followed by delays while samples are sent for clinical analysis. The goal of this work was investigation of cutaneous benign and malignant lesions by the methods of LIAFS and RS. A nitrogen laser at 337 nm was applied for the needs of autofluorescence excitation. Broad-spectrum halogen lamp (from 400 to 900 nm) was applied for diffuse reflectance measurements. An associated microspectrometer detected in vivo the fluorescence and reflectance signals from human skin. The main spectral features of benign lesions - compound nevus, dysplastic nevi, heamangioma and basal cell papilloma and malignant lesions - pigmented, amelanotic and secondary malignant melanoma, as well as basal cell carcinoma are discussed and their possible origins are indicated. Spectra from healthy skin areas near to the lesion were detected to be used posteriori to reveal changes between healthy and lesion skin spectra. Influence of the main skin pigments on the spectra detected is discussed and evaluation of possibilities for differentiation between malignant and benign lesions is made based on their spectral properties. This research shows that non-invasive and high-sensitive in vivo detection by means of appropriate light sources and detectors should be possible, related to real-time determination of existing pathological conditions.

  12. In vivo-to-in silico iterations to investigate aeroallergen-host interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Llop-Guevara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Allergic asthma is a complex process arising out of the interaction between the immune system and aeroallergens. Yet, the relationship between aeroallergen exposure, allergic sensitization and disease remains unclear. This knowledge is essential to gain further insight into the origin and evolution of allergic diseases. The objective of this research is to develop a computational view of the interaction between aeroallergens and the host by investigating the impact of dose and length of aeroallergen exposure on allergic sensitization and allergic disease outcomes, mainly airway inflammation and to a lesser extent lung dysfunction and airway remodeling. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/C mice were exposed intranasally to a range of concentrations of the most pervasive aeroallergen worldwide, house dust mite (HDM, for up to a quarter of their lifespan (20 weeks. Actual biological data delineating the kinetics, nature and extent of responses for local (airway inflammation and systemic (HDM-specific immunoglobulins events were obtained. Mathematical equations for each outcome were developed, evaluated, refined through several iterations involving in vivo experimentation, and validated. The models accurately predicted the original biological data and simulated an extensive array of previously unknown responses, eliciting two- and three-dimensional models. Our data demonstrate the non-linearity of the relationship between aeroallergen exposure and either allergic sensitization or airway inflammation, identify thresholds, behaviours and maximal responsiveness for each outcome, and examine inter-variable relationships. CONCLUSIONS: This research provides a novel way to visualize allergic responses in vivo and establishes a basic experimental platform upon which additional variables and perturbations can be incorporated into the system.

  13. In Vivo Investigation of ALBO-OS Scaffold Based on Hydroxyapatite and PLGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukoman Jokanović

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A synthetic bone substitute based on calcium hydroxyapatite (CHA and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, described in this paper, was synthesized to fulfill specific requirements like biodegradability, satisfying mechanical properties, optimal porosity and nanotopology, osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties, and so forth. Structural and morphological properties of the new scaffold were analyzed by micro computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy, while its physicochemical properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. In vivo biological investigations of the synthesized scaffold were conducted over the cutaneous irritation and biofunctionality assays on rabbits and the test of acute systemic toxicity on mice. The results showed that the scaffold is not irritant and that it does not exhibit any symptoms of acute toxicity. Biofunctionality assays which include evaluation of the presence of various cells of immune response, the presence of neoangiogenesis, percentage of mineralization of newly formed bone, and fibroplasia in the tissue indicated that the new scaffold is suitable for the application in maxillofacial and dental surgery as a bone substitute. Also, it showed significant advantages over commercial product Geistlich Bio-Oss® from the aspect of some parameters of immunological response.

  14. Culex tarsalis vitellogenin gene promoters investigated in silico and in vivo using transgenic Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    Full Text Available Genetic modification, or transgenesis, is a powerful technique to investigate the molecular interactions between vector-borne pathogens and their arthropod hosts, as well as a potential novel approach for vector-borne disease control. Transgenesis requires the use of specific regulatory regions, or promoters, to drive expression of genes of interest in desired target tissues. In mosquitoes, the vast majority of described promoters are from Anopheles and Aedes mosquitoes.Culex tarsalis is one of the most important vectors of arboviruses (including West Nile virus in North America, yet it has not been the subject of molecular genetic study. In order to facilitate molecular genetic work in this important vector species, we isolated four fat body-specific promoter sequences located upstream of the Cx. tarsalis vitellogenin genes (Vg1a, Vg1b, Vg2a and Vg2b. Sequences were analyzed in silico to identify requisite cis-acting elements. The ability for promoter sequences to drive expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP in vivo was investigated using transgenic Drosophila melanogaster. All four promoters were able to drive GFP expression but there was dramatic variation between promoters and between individual Drosophila lines, indicating significant position effects. The highest expression was observed in line Vg2bL3, which was >300-fold higher than the lowest line Vg1aL2.These new promoters will be useful for driving expression of genes of interest in transgenic Cx. tarsalis and perhaps other insects.

  15. In vivo investigations on the penetration of various oils and their influence on the skin barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, A; Lademann, J; Richter, H; Darvin, M E; Schanzer, S; Thiede, G; Sterry, W; Vergou, T; Hauser, M

    2012-08-01

    The skin represents a potent barrier to the environment, which can be enhanced by the topical application of skin care products, such as oil and oil-based formulations by moisturizing the skin. The aim of this study was the investigation of the penetration behaviour of four vegetable oils and of paraffin oil into the stratum corneum by laser scanning microscopy. In addition, the occlusion capacity of these substances was assessed by transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements. Petrolatum served as a positive control for skin occlusion. The study was conducted in vivo and included six healthy volunteers. Paraffin oil, as well as the vegetable oils, penetrated only into the first upper layers of the stratum corneum. TEWL measurements indicated that the application of the vegetable oils (except jojoba oil) as well as paraffin oil, led to a similar occlusion of the skin surface. The most effective occlusion was found for petrolatum. For the investigated oils, a deeper penetration than into the first upper layers of the stratum corneum could be excluded. The decreased TEWL values indicate that the application of the oils leads to a semi-occlusion of the skin surface as it is intended by the use of oils to retain moisture in skin. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. A proteomic investigation of Streptococcus agalactiae grown under conditions associated with neonatal exposure reveals the upregulation of the putative virulence factor C protein beta antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Zhang, Meng; Harrington, Dean J; Black, Gary W; Sutcliffe, Iain C

    2010-06-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major neonatal pathogen that is able to adapt to a variety of host environments, including both rectal and vaginal maternal carriage, growth in amniotic fluid and at various neonatal body sites. As such it is important to elucidate the patterns of protein expression that are associated with S. agalactiae growth under these different in vivo conditions. To this end, we have grown S. agalactiae strain A909 under in vitro conditions reflecting those associated with maternal vaginal carriage (low pH, low oxygen, nutrient stress) and those associated with exposure to body fluids during invasive disease (neutral pH, aeration, nutrient sufficient). The protein profiles of bacterial cells grown under each of these conditions were compared using a proteome approach. A total of 76 proteins were reproducibly identified 16 of which were shown to be differentially expressed. The putative virulence factor C protein beta and several proteins linked to resistance to oxidative stress were found to be upregulated under the conditions hypothesised to reflect those associated with foetal exposure to S. agalactiae. Thus, these data add to the currently limited understanding of the molecular basis of S. agalactiae GBS adaptation to different environmental conditions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Proteomic investigation of the ventral rat hippocampus links DRP-2 to escitalopram treatment resistance and SNAP to stress resilience in the chronic mild stress model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Christina; Jayatissa, Magdalena N; Enghild, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    The development of depression as well as recovery from depression is most likely accompanied by a change in protein expression profiles. The purpose of the present study was to quantitatively investigate global protein expression differences independent of any hypothesis describing depression...... etiology and recovery. Thus two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the ventral hippocampal proteomes between different treatment groups in the chronic mild stress (CMS) model of depression. The CMS paradigm induces anhedonic behaviour, which is a major symptom...... of depression, by exposing rats to a series of mild stressors for 7 weeks, with antidepressant treatment during the last 4 weeks. In the CMS model, animals were split into six different groups at the end of treatment; unchallenged control escitalopram (n = 12), unchallenged control vehicle (n = 12), CMS vehicle...

  18. In vivo laser scanning microscopic investigation of the decontamination of hazardous substances from the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Schanzer, S.; Richter, H.; Gross, I.; Menting, K. H.; Frazier, L.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stimulation of the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin is a topic of intensive dermatological and pharmacological research. In this context, it was found that in addition to the intercellular penetration, the follicular penetration also represents an efficient penetration pathway. The hair follicles act as a long-term reservoir for topically applied substances. They are surrounded by all important target structures, such as blood capillaries, stem and dendritic cells. Therefore, the hair follicles, as well as the skin, need to be protected from hazardous substances. The traditional method of decontamination after respective accidental contacts consists of an intensive washing of the skin. However, during this mechanical procedure, the substances can be pushed even deeper into the hair follicles. In the present study, absorbent materials were applied to remove a fluorescent model substance from the skin without inducing mechanical stress. The results were compared to the decontamination effects obtained by intensive washing. Investigations were performed by means of in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The comparison revealed that decontamination with absorbent materials is more effective than decontamination with washing processes.

  19. Investigation of a pulsed current annealing method in reusing MOSFET dosimeters for in vivo IMRT dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guang-Wen; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Wu; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2014-05-01

    To explore the feasibility of pulsed current annealing in reusing metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters for in vivo intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry. Several MOSFETs were irradiated at d(max) using a 6 MV x-ray beam with 5 V on the gate and annealed with zero bias at room temperature. The percentage recovery of threshold voltage shift during multiple irradiation-annealing cycles was evaluated. Key dosimetry characteristics of the annealed MOSFET such as the dosimeter's sensitivity, reproducibility, dose linearity, and linearity of response within the dynamic range were investigated. The initial results of using the annealed MOSFETs for IMRT dosimetry practice were also presented. More than 95% of threshold voltage shift can be recovered after 24-pulse current continuous annealing in 16 min. The mean sensitivity degradation was found to be 1.28%, ranging from 1.17% to 1.52%, during multiple annealing procedures. Other important characteristics of the annealed MOSFET remained nearly consistent before and after annealing. Our results showed there was no statistically significant difference between the annealed MOSFETs and their control samples in absolute dose measurements for IMRT QA (p = 0.99). The MOSFET measurements agreed with the ion chamber results on an average of 0.16% ± 0.64%. Pulsed current annealing provides a practical option for reusing MOSFETs to extend their operational lifetime. The current annealing circuit can be integrated into the reader, making the annealing procedure fully automatic.

  20. Novel aspects of understanding molecular working mechanisms of salivary glands of worker honeybees (Apis mellifera) investigated by proteomics and phosphoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mao; Fang, Yu; Han, Bin; Zhang, Lan; Lu, Xiaoshan; Li, Jianke

    2013-07-11

    Honeybee salivary glands (SGs) are important exocrine glands. However, the molecular basis of how SGs fulfill their biological duty is still elusive. Proteomics and phosphoproteomics of cephalic SG (HSG) and thoracic SG (TSG) were compared between normal and single-cohort honeybee colonies. Of 113 and 64 differentially regulated proteins and phosphoproteins, 86 and 33 were identified, respectively. The SGs require a wide spectrum of proteins to support their multifaceted functions and ensure normal social management of the colony. Changes of protein expression and phosphoproteins are key role players. The HSG triggers labor transition from in-hive work to foraging activities via the regulation of juvenile hormone and ethyl oleate levels. The stronger expression of proteins involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein folding, protein metabolism, cellular homeostasis and cytoskeleton in TSG, supports the gland to efficiently enhance honey processing by synthesis and secretion of saliva into nectar. The age structure of the colony is vital for increased production efficiency. This data reveals the molecular underpinning of SGs to accomplish their biological missions and provides new knowledge for the beekeeping industry for enhancing the management and production efficiency of the colony and honey quality through manipulation of potential target proteins. This study comprehensively analyses the characteristic of the proteome and phosphoproteome of honeybee salivary glands (SGs) between normal and single-cohort honeybee colonies. The SGs need a wide spectrum of proteins to support their multifaceted functions and ensure normal social management of the colony. The cephalic SG triggers labor transition from in-hive work to foraging behavior via the regulation of juvenile hormone and ethyl oleate titer. The thoracic SG stronger expressed of proteins related to carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein folding, protein metabolism, cellular homeostasis and

  1. Proteomic Investigation of the Sinulariolide-Treated Melanoma Cells A375: Effects on the Cell Apoptosis through Mitochondrial-Related Pathway and Activation of Caspase Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Wu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sinulariolide is an active compound isolated from the cultured soft coral Sinularia flexibilis. In this study, we investigated the effects of sinulariolide on A375 melanoma cell growth and protein expression. Sinulariolide suppressed the proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner and was found to induce both early and late apoptosis by flow cytometric analysis. Comparative proteomic analysis was conducted to investigate the effects of sinulariolide at the molecular level by comparison between the protein profiles of melanoma cells treated with sinulariolide and those without treatment. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE master maps of control and treated A375 cells were generated by analysis with PDQuest software. Comparison between these maps showed up- and downregulation of 21 proteins, seven of which were upregulated and 14 were downregulated. The proteomics studies described here identify some proteins that are involved in mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis-associated proteins, including heat shock protein 60, heat shock protein beta-1, ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase complex core protein 1, isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD subunit alpha (down-regulated, and prohibitin (up-regulated, in A375 melanoma cells exposed to sinulariolide. Sinulariolide-induced apoptosis is relevant to mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathways, elucidated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, and activation of Bax, Bad and caspase-3/-9, as well as suppression of p-Bad, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2. Taken together, our results show that sinulariolide-induced apoptosis might be related to activation of the caspase cascade and mitochondria dysfunction pathways. Our results suggest that sinulariolide merits further evaluation as a chemotherapeutic agent for human melanoma.

  2. The Potato Tuber Mitochondrial Proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper F; Chen, Mingjie

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are called the powerhouses of the cell. To better understand the role of mitochondria in maintaining and regulating metabolism in storage tissues, highly purified mitochondria were isolated from dormant potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum ‘Folva’) and their proteome investigated. Proteins...... manner using normalized spectral counts including as many as 5-fold more “extreme” proteins (low mass, high isoelectric point, hydrophobic) than previous mitochondrial proteome studies. We estimate that this compendium of proteins represents a high coverage of the potato tuber mitochondrial proteome...

  3. Arabidopsis peroxisome proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Bussell

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analytical depth of investigation of the peroxisomal proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has not yet reached that of other major cellular organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. This is primarily due to the difficulties associated with isolating and obtaining purified samples of peroxisomes from Arabidopsis. So far only a handful of research groups have been successful in obtaining such fractions. To make things worse, enriched peroxisome fractions frequently suffer from significant organellar contamination, lowering confidence in localization assignment of the identified proteins. As with other cellular compartments, identification of peroxisomal proteins forms the basis for investigations of the dynamics of the peroxisomal proteome. It is therefore not surprising that, in terms of functional analyses by proteomic means, there remains a considerable gap between peroxisomes and chloroplasts or mitochondria. Alternative strategies are needed to overcome the obstacle of hard-to-obtain organellar fractions. This will help to close the knowledge gap between peroxisomes and other organelles and provide a full picture of the physiological pathways shared between organelles. In this review we briefly summarize the status quo and discuss some of the methodological alternatives to classic organelle proteomic approaches.

  4. A Proteomics and Transcriptomics Investigation of the Venom from the Barychelid Spider Trittame loki (Brush-Foot Trapdoor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undheim, Eivind A.B.; Sunagar, Kartik; Herzig, Volker; Kely, Laurence; Low, Dolyce H.W.; Jackson, Timothy N.W.; Jones, Alun; Kurniawan, Nyoman; King, Glenn F.; Ali, Syed A.; Antunes, Agostino; Ruder, Tim; Fry, Bryan G.

    2013-01-01

    Although known for their potent venom and ability to prey upon both invertebrate and vertebrate species, the Barychelidae spider family has been entirely neglected by toxinologists. In striking contrast, the sister family Theraphosidae (commonly known as tarantulas), which last shared a most recent common ancestor with Barychelidae over 200 million years ago, has received much attention, accounting for 25% of all the described spider toxins while representing only 2% of all spider species. In this study, we evaluated for the first time the venom arsenal of a barychelid spider, Trittame loki, using transcriptomic, proteomic, and bioinformatic methods. The venom was revealed to be dominated by extremely diverse inhibitor cystine knot (ICK)/knottin peptides, accounting for 42 of the 46 full-length toxin precursors recovered in the transcriptomic sequencing. In addition to documenting differential rates of evolution adopted by different ICK/knottin toxin lineages, we discovered homologues with completely novel cysteine skeletal architecture. Moreover, acetylcholinesterase and neprilysin were revealed for the first time as part of the spider-venom arsenal and CAP (CRiSP/Allergen/PR-1) were identified for the first time in mygalomorph spider venoms. These results not only highlight the extent of venom diversification in this neglected ancient spider lineage, but also reinforce the idea that unique venomous lineages are rich pools of novel biomolecules that may have significant applied uses as therapeutics and/or insecticides. PMID:24351713

  5. A Proteomics and Transcriptomics Investigation of the Venom from the Barychelid Spider Trittame loki (Brush-Foot Trapdoor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eivind A. B. Undheim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Although known for their potent venom and ability to prey upon both invertebrate and vertebrate species, the Barychelidae spider family has been entirely neglected by toxinologists. In striking contrast, the sister family Theraphosidae (commonly known as tarantulas, which last shared a most recent common ancestor with Barychelidae over 200 million years ago, has received much attention, accounting for 25% of all the described spider toxins while representing only 2% of all spider species. In this study, we evaluated for the first time the venom arsenal of a barychelid spider, Trittame loki, using transcriptomic, proteomic, and bioinformatic methods. The venom was revealed to be dominated by extremely diverse inhibitor cystine knot (ICK/knottin peptides, accounting for 42 of the 46 full-length toxin precursors recovered in the transcriptomic sequencing. In addition to documenting differential rates of evolution adopted by different ICK/knottin toxin lineages, we discovered homologues with completely novel cysteine skeletal architecture. Moreover, acetylcholinesterase and neprilysin were revealed for the first time as part of the spider-venom arsenal and CAP (CRiSP/Allergen/PR-1 were identified for the first time in mygalomorph spider venoms. These results not only highlight the extent of venom diversification in this neglected ancient spider lineage, but also reinforce the idea that unique venomous lineages are rich pools of novel biomolecules that may have significant applied uses as therapeutics and/or insecticides.

  6. Quantitative changes in proteins responsible for flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthesis in strawberry fruit at different ripening stages: A targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing multiple reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Du, Lina; Li, Li; Kalt, Wilhelmina; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, ZhaoQi; Li, XiHong

    2015-06-03

    To better understand the regulation of flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthesis, a targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing LC-MS with multiple reaction monitoring was conducted on two strawberry cultivars at three ripening stages. This quantitative proteomic workflow was improved through an OFFGEL electrophoresis to fractionate peptides from total protein digests. A total of 154 peptide transitions from 47 peptides covering 21 proteins and isoforms related to anthocyanin biosynthesis were investigated. The normalized protein abundance, which was measured using isotopically-labeled standards, was significantly changed concurrently with increased anthocyanin content and advanced fruit maturity. The protein abundance of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase; anthocyanidin synthase, chalcone isomerase; flavanone 3-hydroxylase; dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, UDP-glucose:flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase, cytochrome c and cytochrome C oxidase subunit 2, was all significantly increased in fruit of more advanced ripeness. An interaction between cultivar and maturity was also shown with respect to chalcone isomerase. The good correlation between protein abundance and anthocyanin content suggested that a metabolic control point may exist for anthocyanin biosynthesis. This research provides insights into the process of anthocyanin formation in strawberry fruit at the level of protein concentration and reveals possible candidates in the regulation of anthocyanin formation during fruit ripening. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms contributing to flavonoids and anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation of strawberry fruit during ripening is challenging due to limited molecular biology tools and established hypothesis. Our targeted proteomic approach employing LC-MS/MS analysis and MRM technique to quantify proteins in relation to flavonoids and anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation in strawberry fruit during fruit ripening is novel. The identification of peptides

  7. PROTEOMICS ERA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion of nutritional genomics and proteomics to 5,-,9 Over 89% Qf their diet using maize mea| molecular epidemiology ... banana; the Acholi tribe, using cassava (a low- the human genome and the subsequent know- protein, starchy root) ..... Carvacrol marioram. Furocoumarins lime, citrus oils, carrots, celery, parsley, parsnips.

  8. Proteomics of Maize Root Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hochholdinger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Maize forms a complex root system with structurally and functionally diverse root types that are formed at different developmental stages to extract water and mineral nutrients from soil. In recent years proteomics has been intensively applied to identify proteins involved in shaping the three-dimensional architecture and regulating the function of the maize root system. With the help of developmental mutants, proteomic changes during the initiation and emergence of shoot-borne, lateral and seminal roots have been examined. Furthermore, root hairs were surveyed to understand the proteomic changes during the elongation of these single cell type structures. In addition, primary roots have been used to study developmental changes of the proteome but also to investigate the proteomes of distinct tissues such as the meristematic zone, the elongation zone as well as stele and cortex of the differentiation zone. Moreover, subcellular fractions of the primary root including cell walls, plasma membranes and secreted mucilage have been analyzed. Finally, the superior vigor of hybrid seedling roots compared to their parental inbred lines was studied on the proteome level. In summary, these studies provide novel insights into the complex proteomic interactions of the elaborate maize root system during development.

  9. Monitoring the response of urothelial precancerous lesions to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin at the proteome level in an in vivo rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teke, Kerem; Guzel, Nil; Uslubas, Ali Kemal; Kasap, Murat; Yilmaz, Hasan; Akpinar, Gurler; Yildiz, Demir Kursat; Dillioglugil, Ozdal

    2017-09-15

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the best treatment modality for progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. We aimed to monitor changes at the proteome level to identify putative protein biomarkers associated with the response of urothelial precancerous lesions to intravesical BCG treatment. The rats were divided into three groups (n = 10/group): control, non-treated, and BCG-treated groups. The non-treated and BCG-treated groups received N-methyl-N-nitrosourea intravesically. BCG Tice-strain was instilled into bladder in BCG-treated group. At the endpoint of experiment, all surviving rat bladders were collected and equally divided into two portions vertically from dome to neck. Half of each bladder was assessed immunohistopathologically and the other half was used for 2D-based comparative proteomic analysis. Differentially expressed proteins were validated by Western blot analysis. Precancerous lesions of bladder cancer were more common in non-treated group (77.8%) than in BCG-treated group (50%) and the control group (0%). Greater than twofold changes occurred in the expression of a number of proteins. Among them, Rab-GDIβ, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and 14-3-3 zeta/delta were important since they were previously reported to be associated with cancer and their expression levels were found to be lower in BCG-treated group in comparison to the non-treated group. ALDH2 and 14-3-3 zeta/delta were also found to be highly expressed in the non-treated group compared to the control group. The down-regulation of these proteins and Rab-GDIβ was achieved with BCG; this result indicates that they may be used as putative biomarkers for monitoring changes in bladder carcinogenesis in response to BCG immunotherapy.

  10. Domestication Syndrome Is Investigated by Proteomic Analysis between Cultivated Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz and Its Wild Relatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei An

    Full Text Available Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz wild relatives remain a largely untapped potential for genetic improvement. However, the domestication syndrome phenomena from wild species to cultivated cassava remain poorly understood. The analysis of leaf anatomy and photosynthetic activity showed significantly different between cassava cultivars SC205, SC8 and wild relative M. esculenta ssp. Flabellifolia (W14. The dry matter, starch and amylose contents in the storage roots of cassava cultivars were significantly more than that in wild species. In order to further reveal the differences in photosynthesis and starch accumulation of cultivars and wild species, the globally differential proteins between cassava SC205, SC8 and W14 were analyzed using 2-DE in combination with MALDI-TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 175 and 304 proteins in leaves and storage roots were identified, respectively. Of these, 122 and 127 common proteins in leaves and storage roots were detected in SC205, SC8 and W14, respectively. There were 11, 2 and 2 unique proteins in leaves, as well as 58, 9 and 12 unique proteins in storage roots for W14, SC205 and SC8, respectively, indicating proteomic changes in leaves and storage roots between cultivated cassava and its wild relatives. These proteins and their differential regulation across plants of contrasting leaf morphology, leaf anatomy pattern and photosynthetic related parameters and starch content could contribute to the footprinting of cassava domestication syndrome. We conclude that these global protein data would be of great value to detect the key gene groups related to cassava selection in the domestication syndrome phenomena.

  11. Domestication Syndrome Is Investigated by Proteomic Analysis between Cultivated Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and Its Wild Relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Feifei; Chen, Ting; Stéphanie, Djabou Mouafi Astride; Li, Kaimian; Li, Qing X; Carvalho, Luiz J C B; Tomlins, Keith; Li, Jun; Gu, Bi; Chen, Songbi

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) wild relatives remain a largely untapped potential for genetic improvement. However, the domestication syndrome phenomena from wild species to cultivated cassava remain poorly understood. The analysis of leaf anatomy and photosynthetic activity showed significantly different between cassava cultivars SC205, SC8 and wild relative M. esculenta ssp. Flabellifolia (W14). The dry matter, starch and amylose contents in the storage roots of cassava cultivars were significantly more than that in wild species. In order to further reveal the differences in photosynthesis and starch accumulation of cultivars and wild species, the globally differential proteins between cassava SC205, SC8 and W14 were analyzed using 2-DE in combination with MALDI-TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 175 and 304 proteins in leaves and storage roots were identified, respectively. Of these, 122 and 127 common proteins in leaves and storage roots were detected in SC205, SC8 and W14, respectively. There were 11, 2 and 2 unique proteins in leaves, as well as 58, 9 and 12 unique proteins in storage roots for W14, SC205 and SC8, respectively, indicating proteomic changes in leaves and storage roots between cultivated cassava and its wild relatives. These proteins and their differential regulation across plants of contrasting leaf morphology, leaf anatomy pattern and photosynthetic related parameters and starch content could contribute to the footprinting of cassava domestication syndrome. We conclude that these global protein data would be of great value to detect the key gene groups related to cassava selection in the domestication syndrome phenomena.

  12. A Monte Carlo investigation of contaminant electrons due to a novel in vivo transmission detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuni, G; Jensen, J M; McCurdy, B M C

    2011-02-21

    A novel transmission detector (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) developed as an IMRT quality assurance tool, intended for in vivo patient dose measurements, is studied here. The goal of this investigation is to use Monte Carlo techniques to characterize treatment beam parameters in the presence of the detector and to compare to those of a plastic block tray (a frequently used clinical device). Particular attention is paid to the impact of the detector on electron contamination model parameters of two commercial dose calculation algorithms. The linac head together with the COMPASS transmission detector (TRD) was modeled using BEAMnrc code. To understand the effect of the TRD on treatment beams, the contaminant electron fluence, energy spectra, and angular distributions at different SSDs were analyzed for open and non-open (i.e. TRD and block tray) fields. Contaminant electrons in the BEAMnrc simulations were separated according to where they were created. Calculation of surface dose and the evaluation of contributions from contaminant electrons were performed using the DOSXYZnrc user code. The effect of the TRD on contaminant electrons model parameters in Eclipse AAA and Pinnacle(3) dose calculation algorithms was investigated. Comparisons of the fluence of contaminant electrons produced in the non-open fields versus open field show that electrons created in the non-open fields increase at shorter SSD, but most of the electrons at shorter SSD are of low energy with large angular spread. These electrons are out-scattered or absorbed in air and contribute less to surface dose at larger SSD. Calculated surface doses with the block tray are higher than those with the TRD. Contribution of contaminant electrons to dose in the buildup region increases with increasing field size. The additional contribution of electrons to surface dose increases with field size for TRD and block tray. The introduction of the TRD results in a 12% and 15% increase in the Gaussian widths used in the

  13. Screening Novel Molecular Targets of Metformin in Breast Cancer by Proteomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobna Al-Zaidan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is a commonly prescribed antihyperglycemic drug, and has been investigated in vivo and in vitro for its effect to improve the comorbidity of diabetes and various types of cancers. Several studies investigated the therapeutic mechanisms of metformin on cancer cells, but the exact mechanism of metformin’s effect on the proteomic pathways of cancer cells is yet to be further investigated. The main objective of our research line is to discover safe and alternative therapeutic options for breast cancer, we aimed in this study to design a novel “bottom up proteomics workflow” in which proteins were first broken into peptides to reveal their identity, then the proteomes were precisely evaluated using spectrometry analysis. In our study, metformin suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7 with minimal toxicity to normal breast epithelial cells MCF-10. Metformin induced apoptosis by arresting cells in G1 phase as evaluated by flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, The G1 phase arrest for the MCF-7 has been confirmed by increased expression levels of p21 and reduction in cyclin D1 level. Additionally, metformin increased the expression levels of p53, Bax, Bad while it reduced expression levels of Akt, Bcl-2, and Mdm2. The study employed a serviceable strategy that investigates metformin-dependent changes in the proteome using a literature-derived network. The protein extracts of the treated and untreated cell lines were analyzed employing proteomic approaches; the findings conveyed a proposed mechanism of the effectual tactics of metformin on breast cancer cells. Metformin proposed an antibreast cancer effect through the examination of the proteomic pathways upon the MCF-7 and MCF-10A exposure to the drug. Our findings proposed prolific proteomic changes that revealed the therapeutic mechanisms of metformin on breast cancer cells upon their exposure. In conclusion, the reported proteomic

  14. In vivo and in silico investigation of selected herbal compounds as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37v strain by determining their microbial inhibitory concentration (MIC) and cytotoxicity. The compounds were also screened using in silico techniques, such as molecular docking and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) prediction. Results: The in vivo ...

  15. Unrestrictive identification of post-translational modifications in the urine proteome without enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Research on the human urine proteome may lay the foundation for the discovery of relevant disease biomarkers. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) have important effects on the functions of protein biomarkers. Identifying PTMs without enrichment adds no extra steps to conventional identification procedures for urine proteomics. The only difference is that this method requires software that can conduct unrestrictive identifications of PTMs. In this study, routine urine proteomics techniques were used to identify urine proteins. Unspecified PTMs were searched by MODa and PEAKS 6 automated software, followed by a manual search to screen out in vivo PTMs by removing all in vitro PTMs and amino acid substitutions. Results There were 75 peptides with 6 in vivo PTMs that were found by both MODa and PEAKS 6. Of these, 34 peptides in 18 proteins have novel in vivo PTMs compared with the annotation information of these proteins on the Universal Protein Resource website. These new in vivo PTMs had undergone methylation, dehydration, oxidation, hydroxylation, phosphorylation, or dihydroxylation. Conclusions In this study, we identified PTMs of urine proteins without the need for enrichment. Our investigation may provide a useful reference for biomarker discovery in the future. PMID:23317149

  16. Proteomic comparison of mcf-7 tumoursphere and monolayer cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Morrison

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, composed of tumour cells with differing gene expressions and phenotypes. Very few antigens have been identified and a better understanding of tumour initiating-cells as targets for therapy is critically needed. Recently, a rare subpopulation of cells within tumours has been described with the ability to: (i initiate and sustain tumour growth; (ii resist traditional therapies and allow for secondary tumour dissemination; and (iii display some of the characteristics of stem cells such as self-renewal. These cells are termed tumour-initiating cells or cancer stem cells, or alternatively, in the case of breast cancer, breast cancer stem cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that breast cancer stem cells can be enriched for in "tumoursphere" culture. Proteomics represents a novel way to investigate protein expression between cells. We hypothesise that characterisation of the proteome of the breast cancer line MCF-7 tumourspheres compared to adherent/differentiated cells identifies proteins of novel interest for further isolating or targeting breast cancer stem cells. We present evidence that: (i the proteome of adherent cells is different to the proteome of cells grown in sphere medium from either early passage (passage 2 or late passage (passage 5 spheres; (ii that spheres are enriched in expression of a variety of tumour-relevant proteins (including MUC1 and Galectin-3; and (iii that targeting of one of these identified proteins (galectin-3 using an inhibitor (N-acetyllactosamine decreases sphere formation/self-renewal of MCF-7 cancer stem cells in vitro and tumourigenicity in vivo. Hence, proteomic analysis of tumourspheres may find use in identifying novel targets for future therapy. The therapeutic targeting of breast cancer stem cells, a highly clinically relevant sub-population of tumour cells, has the potential to eliminate residual disease and may become an important component of a multi

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Investigation of the Potential of Amorphous Microporous Silica as a Protein Delivery Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Chaudhari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delivering growth factors (GFs at bone/implant interface needs to be optimized to achieve faster osseointegration. Amorphous microporous silica (AMS has a potential to be used as a carrier and delivery platform for GFs. In this work, adsorption (loading and release (delivery mechanism of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA, from AMS was investigated in vitro as well as in vivo. In general, strong BSA adsorption to AMS was observed. The interaction was stronger at lower pH owing to favorable electrostatic interaction. In vitro evaluation of BSA release revealed a peculiar release profile, involving a burst release followed by a 6 h period without appreciable BSA release and a further slower release later. Experimental data supporting this observation are discussed. Apart from understanding protein/biomaterial (BSA/AMS interaction, determination of in vivo protein release is an essential aspect of the evaluation of a protein delivery system. In this regard micropositron emission tomography (μ-PET was used in an exploratory experiment to determine in vivo BSA release profile from AMS. Results suggest stronger in vivo retention of BSA when adsorbed on AMS. This study highlights the possible use of AMS as a controlled protein delivery platform which may facilitate osseointegration.

  18. Proteome | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A proteome is the entire complement of proteins, including modifications made to a particular set of proteins, produced by an organism or a cellular system. This will vary with time and distinct requirements such as growth conditions and stresses, and thus is highly dynamic and spatial. Proteomics is the study of the proteome.

  19. Comparative differential proteomic profiles of nonfailing and failing hearts after in vivo thoracic aortic constriction in mice overexpressing FKBP12.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévilon, Miresta; Le Gall, Morgane; Chafey, Philippe; Federeci, Christian; Pezet, Mylène; Clary, Guilhem; Broussard, Cédric; François, Guillonneau; Mercadier, Jean-Jacques; Rouet-Benzineb, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pressure overload (PO) induces pathological left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) leading to congestive heart failure (HF). Overexpression of FKBP12.6 (FK506-binding protein [K]) in mice should prevent Ca2+-leak during diastole and may improve overall cardiac function. In order to decipher molecular mechanisms involved in thoracic aortic constriction (TAC)-induced cardiac remodeling and the influence of gender and genotype, we performed a proteomic analysis using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics techniques to identify alterations in characteristic biological networks. Wild-type (W) and K mice of both genders underwent TAC. Thirty days post-TAC, the altered cardiac remodeling was accompanied with systolic and diastolic dysfunction in all experimental groups. A gender difference in inflammatory protein expression (fibrinogen, α-1-antitrypsin isoforms) and in calreticulin occurred (males > females). Detoxification enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins were noticeably increased in K mice. Both non- and congestive failing mouse heart exhibited down- and upregulation of proteins related to mitochondrial function and purine metabolism, respectively. HF was characterized by a decrease in enzymes related to iron homeostasis, and altered mitochondrial protein expression related to fatty acid metabolism, glycolysis, and redox balance. Moreover, two distinct differential protein profiles characterized TAC-induced pathological LVH and congestive HF in all TAC mice. FKBP12.6 overexpression did not influence TAC-induced deleterious effects. Huntingtin was revealed as a potential mediator for HF. A broad dysregulation of signaling proteins associated with congestive HF suggested that different sets of proteins could be selected as useful biomarkers for HF progression and might predict outcome in PO-induced pathological LVH. PMID:24303125

  20. Tumor Cold Ischemia | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recently published manuscript in the journal of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, researchers from the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) investigated the effect of cold ischemia on the proteome of fresh frozen tumors.

  1. A proteomic investigation of B lymphocytes in an autistic family: a pilot study of exposure to natural rubber latex (NRL) may lead to autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Zhao, Xin-liang; Ju, Weina; Zou, Xiao-bing; Huo, Li-rong; Yan, Wu; Zou, Jun-hua; Yan, Guo-di; Jenkins, Edmund C; Brown, W Ted; Zhong, Nanbert

    2011-03-01

    Autism is a multi-factorial neurodevelopmental disorder. We have investigated the molecular mechanism involved in a Chinese family with autism by a proteomic approach. Antibody chips containing 500 spots of human protein antibodies were used to screen for differentially expressed proteins in the peripheral B lymphocytes between autistic and non-autistic siblings in this family. Four proteins relevant to immuno-pathway, including IKKα that was up-regulated and Tyk2, EIF4G1 and PRKCI that were down-regulated, were identified differentially expressed in autistic versus non-autistic siblings. Western blot analysis and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction validated the differential expression of these four proteins. Based on the function of these differentially expressed proteins, relevant studies on immunoglobulin E (IgE) level, nuclear factor kappa B signaling activation and cell cycle were conducted in both autistic and non-autistic children of this family. Considering the fact that the family members were in close contact with natural rubber latex (NRL) and that IgE-mediated cross-reactions could be triggered by Hevea brasiliensis (Hev-b) proteins in NRL, we hypothesize that immune reactions triggered by close contact with NRL might influence the functions of B lymphocytes by altering expression of certain proteins identified in our experiments thus contributing to the occurrence of autism.

  2. Clinical veterinary proteomics: Techniques and approaches to decipher the animal plasma proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodasara, P; Sadowski, P; Satake, N; Kopp, S; Mills, P C

    2017-12-01

    Over the last two decades, technological advancements in the field of proteomics have advanced our understanding of the complex biological systems of living organisms. Techniques based on mass spectrometry (MS) have emerged as powerful tools to contextualise existing genomic information and to create quantitative protein profiles from plasma, tissues or cell lines of various species. Proteomic approaches have been used increasingly in veterinary science to investigate biological processes responsible for growth, reproduction and pathological events. However, the adoption of proteomic approaches by veterinary investigators lags behind that of researchers in the human medical field. Furthermore, in contrast to human proteomics studies, interpretation of veterinary proteomic data is difficult due to the limited protein databases available for many animal species. This review article examines the current use of advanced proteomics techniques for evaluation of animal health and welfare and covers the current status of clinical veterinary proteomics research, including successful protein identification and data interpretation studies. It includes a description of an emerging tool, sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion mass spectra (SWATH-MS), available on selected mass spectrometry instruments. This newly developed data acquisition technique combines advantages of discovery and targeted proteomics approaches, and thus has the potential to advance the veterinary proteomics field by enhancing identification and reproducibility of proteomics data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modification-specific proteomics in plant biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Jensen, Ole N

    2010-01-01

    and proteomics. In general, methods for PTM characterization are developed to study yeast and mammalian biology and later adopted to investigate plants. Our point of view is that it is advantageous to enrich for PTMs on the peptide level as part of a quantitative proteomics strategy to not only identify the PTM...

  4. Egg albumin microspheres containing paracetamol for oral administration. II. In vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, J J; Illum, L; Cadorniga, R; Davis, S S

    1990-01-01

    Egg albumin microspheres containing paracetamol for oral administration were prepared and their in vivo characteristics evaluated. The egg albumin microspheres were able to improve the organoleptic characteristics of paracetamol formulations. The pharmacokinetic characteristics of three different formulations of paracetamol were evaluated in six volunteers. The formulations administered orally were: (1) Paracetamol granulated with lactose (reference), (2) Egg albumin microspheres and (3) Egg albumin microspheres coated with polymethacrylate. The pharmacokinetic characteristics for formulations 1 and 2 were similar but formulation 3 gave significant differences (p less than 0.05) in Ka, Cmax and tmax. No significant differences in relative bioavailability were observed.

  5. Isolation of hydroxytyrosol from olive leaves extract, radioiodination and investigation of bioaffinity using in vivo/in vitro methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozkan, M.; Biber Muftuler, F.Z.; Kilcar, A. Yurt; Medine, E.I.; Unak, P. [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Applications

    2013-11-01

    It is known that medicinal plants like olive have biological activities due to their flavonoid content such as olueropein, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol etc. In current study, hydroxytrosol (HT) which is one of the major phenolic compounds in olive, olive leaves and olive oil, was isolated after methanol extraction and purification of olive leaves which are grown in the northern Anatolia region of Turkey. The isolated HT was radiolabeled with {sup 131}I ({sup 131}I-HT) and the bioaffinity of this radiolabeled component of olive leaves extract was investigated by using in vivo/in vitro methods. It was found that HT could be radiolabeled with {sup 131}I in yields of 95.6 {+-} 4.4% (n = 8), and in vivo studies showed that {sup 131}I-HT is taken up by urinary bladder, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, breast and prostate. Significant incorporation of activity was observed in cell lines via in vitro studies. (orig.)

  6. Real-time, multidimensional in vivo imaging used to investigate blood flow in mouse pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Lara R; Wells, K Sam; Head, W Steve; McCaughey, Michael; Ford, Eric; Brissova, Marcela; Piston, David W; Powers, Alvin C

    2008-11-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans are highly vascularized micro-organs that play a key role in the regulation of blood glucose homeostasis. The specific arrangement of endocrine cell types in islets suggests a coupling between morphology and function within the islet. Here, we established a line-scanning confocal microscopy approach to examine the relationship between blood flow and islet cell type arrangement by real-time in vivo imaging of intra-islet blood flow in mice. These data were used to reconstruct the in vivo 3D architecture of the islet and time-resolved blood flow patterns throughout the islet vascular bed. The results revealed 2 predominant blood flow patterns in mouse islets: inner-to-outer, in which blood perfuses the core of beta cells before the islet perimeter of non-beta cells, and top-to-bottom, in which blood perfuses the islet from one side to the other regardless of cell type. Our approach included both millisecond temporal resolution and submicron spatial resolution, allowing for real-time imaging of islet blood flow within the living mouse, which has not to our knowledge been attainable by other methods.

  7. Investigating in vivo airway wall mechanics during tidal breathing with optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Claire; Lee, Sang-Won; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Mahon, Sari; Chen, Zhongping; Brenner, Matthew; George, Steven C.

    2011-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a nondestructive imaging technique offering high temporal and spatial resolution, which makes it a natural choice for assessing tissue mechanical properties. We have developed methods to mechanically analyze the compliance of the rabbit trachea in vivo using tissue deformations induced by tidal breathing, offering a unique tool to assess the behavior of the airways during their normal function. Four-hundred images were acquired during tidal breathing with a custom-built endoscopic OCT system. The surface of the tissue was extracted from a set of these images via image processing algorithms, filtered with a bandpass filter set at respiration frequency to remove cardiac and probe motion, and compared to ventilatory pressure to calculate wall compliance. These algorithms were tested on elastic phantoms to establish reliability and reproducibility. The mean tracheal wall compliance (in five animals) was 1.3+/-0.3×10-5 (mm Pa)-1. Unlike previous work evaluating airway mechanics, this new method is applicable in vivo, noncontact, and loads the trachea in a physiological manner. The technique may have applications in assessing airway mechanics in diseases such as asthma that are characterized by significant airway remodeling.

  8. Establishment of Larval Zebrafish as an Animal Model to Investigate Trypanosoma cruzi Motility In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akle, Veronica; Agudelo-Dueñas, Nathalie; Molina-Rodriguez, Maria A; Kartchner, Laurel Brianne; Ruth, Annette Marie; González, John M; Forero-Shelton, Manu

    2017-09-30

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose motility is not only important for localization, but also for cellular binding and invasion. Current animal models for the study of T. cruzi allow limited observation of parasites in vivo, representing a challenge for understanding parasite behavior during the initial stages of infection in humans. This protozoan has a flagellar stage in both vector and mammalian hosts, but there are no studies describing its motility in vivo.The objective of this project was to establish a live vertebrate zebrafish model to evaluate T. cruzi motility in the vascular system. Transparent zebrafish larvae were injected with fluorescently labeled trypomastigotes and observed using light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), a noninvasive method to visualize live organisms with high optical resolution. The parasites could be visualized for extended periods of time due to this technique's relatively low risk of photodamage compared to confocal or epifluorescence microscopy. T. cruzi parasites were observed traveling in the circulatory system of live zebrafish in different-sized blood vessels and the yolk. They could also be seen attached to the yolk sac wall and to the atrioventricular valve despite the strong forces associated with heart contractions. LSFM of T. cruzi-inoculated zebrafish larvae is a valuable method that can be used to visualize circulating parasites and evaluate their tropism, migration patterns, and motility in the dynamic environment of the cardiovascular system of a live animal.

  9. An investigation on in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial properties of the antidepressant: amitriptyline hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurup Mandal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The antidepressant drug amitriptyline hydrochloride was obtained in a dry powder form and was screened against 253 strains of bacteria which included 72 Gram positive and 181 Gram negative bacteria and against 5 fungal strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined by inoculating a loopful of an overnight peptone water culture of the organism on nutrient agar plates containing increasing concentrations of amitriptyline hydrochloride (0, 10 µg/mL, 25 µg/mL, 50 µg/mL, 100 µg/mL, 200 µg/mL. Amitriptyline hydrochloride exhibited significant action against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria at 25-200 µg/mL. In the in vivo studies it was seen that amitriptyline hydrochloride at a concentration of 25 µg/g and 30 µg/g body weight of mouse offered significant protection to Swiss strain of white mice when challenged with 50 median lethal dose (MLD of a virulent strain of Salmonella typhimurium NCTC 74. The in vivo data were highly significant (p<0.001 according to the chi-square test.

  10. NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assays.  This community web-based repository for well-characterized quantitative proteomic assays currently consists of 456 unique peptide assays to 282 unique proteins and ser

  11. Blood vector velocity estimation using an autocorrelation approach: In vivo Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Bachmann, Michael; Rue, Kristina

    2005-01-01

    In conventional techniques for blood velocity estimation, only the axial component of the velocity vector is found. We have previously shown that it is possible to estimate the 2-D blood velocity vector both in simulations and in flow phantom experiments using a fast and inexpensive method (the...... deg phase shift in the lateral direction. The TO method works at angles where conventional methods fails to estimate any blood movement, i.e. when the angle between the ultrasound beam and the velocity vector is approximately 90 deg. In this paper the first in-vivo color flow map (CFM) images......) The common carotid artery, 2) the common carotid artery and the jugular vein, 3) the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. In all three cases the angle between the ultrasound beams and the blood velocity vector is larger than 60 deg. i.e. the conventional Doppler velocity estimator degrades significantly...

  12. In vivo multiphoton imaging of a diverse array of fluorophores to investigate deep neurovascular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David R; Hassan, Ahmed M; Jarrett, Jeremy W; Medina, Flor A; Perillo, Evan P; Hagan, Kristen; Shams Kazmi, S M; Clark, Taylor A; Sullender, Colin T; Jones, Theresa A; Zemelman, Boris V; Dunn, Andrew K

    2017-07-01

    We perform high-resolution, non-invasive, in vivo deep-tissue imaging of the mouse neocortex using multiphoton microscopy with a high repetition rate optical parametric amplifier laser source tunable between λ=1,100 and 1,400 nm. By combining the high repetition rate (511 kHz) and high pulse energy (400 nJ) of our amplifier laser system, we demonstrate imaging of vasculature labeled with Texas Red and Indocyanine Green, and neurons expressing tdTomato and yellow fluorescent protein. We measure the blood flow speed of a single capillary at a depth of 1.2 mm, and image vasculature to a depth of 1.53 mm with fine axial steps (5 μm) and reasonable acquisition times. The high image quality enabled analysis of vascular morphology at depths to 1.45 mm.

  13. In Vivo Investigation of Escitalopram’s Allosteric Site on the Serotonin Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karen E.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Owens, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Escitalopram is a commonly prescribed antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class. Clinical evidence and mapping of the serotonin transporter (SERT) identified that escitalopram, in addition to its binding to a primary uptake-blocking site, is capable of binding to the SERT via an allosteric site that is hypothesized to alter escitalopram’s kinetics at the SERT. The studies reported here examined the in vivo role of the SERT allosteric site in escitalopram action. A knockin mouse model that possesses an allosteric-null SERT was developed. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the knockin protein was expressed at a lower density than endogenous mouse SERT (approximately 10–30% of endogenous mouse SERT), but the knockin mice are a viable tool to study the allosteric site. Microdialysis studies in the ventral hippocampus found no measurable decrease in extracellular serotonin response after local escitalopram challenge in mice without the allosteric site compared to mice with the site (p = 0.297). In marble burying assays there was a modest effect of the absence of the allosteric site, with a larger systemic dose of escitalopram (10-fold) necessary for the same effect as in mice with intact SERT (p = 0.023). However, there was no effect of the allosteric site in the tail suspension test. Together these data suggest that there may be a regional specificity in the role of the allosteric site. The lack of a robust effect overall suggests that the role of the allosteric site for escitalopram on the SERT may not produce meaningful in vivo effects. PMID:26621784

  14. Nucleus pulposus deformation in response to lumbar spine lateral flexion: an in vivo MRI investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazey, Peter J; Takasaki, Hiroshi; Singer, Kevin P

    2010-07-01

    Whilst there are numerous studies examining aspects of sagittal plane motion in the lumbar spine, few consider coronal plane range of motion and there are no in vivo reports of nucleus pulposus (NP) displacement in lateral flexion. This study quantified in vivo NP deformation in response to side flexion in healthy volunteers. Concomitant lateral flexion and axial rotation range were also examined to evaluate the direction and extent of NP deformation. Axial T2- and coronal T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) were obtained from 21 subjects (mean age, 24.8 years) from L1 to S1 in the neutral and left laterally flexed position. Images were evaluated for intersegmental ranges of lateral flexion and axial rotation. A novel methodology derived linear pixel samples across the width of the disc from T2 images, from which the magnitude and direction of displacement of the NP was determined. This profiling technique represented the relative hydration pattern within the disc. The NP was displaced away from the direction of lateral flexion in 95/105 discs (p < 0.001). The extent of NP displacement was associated strongly with lateral flexion at L2-3 (p < 0.01). The greatest range of lateral flexion occurred at L2-3, L3-4 and L4-5. Small intersegmental ranges of axial rotation occurred at all levels, but were not associated with NP displacement. The direction of NP deformation was highly predictable in laterally flexed healthy lumbar spines; however, the magnitude of displacement was not consistent with the degree of intersegmental lateral flexion or rotation.

  15. The ability of human periodontium-derived stem cells to regenerate periodontal tissues: a preliminary in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Wolf-Dieter; Dannan, Aous; Becher, Sebastian; Gassmann, Georg; Arnold, Wolfgang; Varga, Gabor; Dittmar, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Periodontium-derived stem cells (pdSCs) can be cultured as dentospheres and differentiated into various cells of the neuronal lineage such as glial cells, thereby demonstrating their stem cell state. This study investigated whether pdSCs could be differentiated into the osteogenic lineage and, if so, whether these cells are able to regenerate periodontal tissue in vivo in an athymic rat model. Human adult pdSCs were isolated during minimally invasive periodontal surgery and expanded in vitro. To induce osteogenic differentiation, expanded pdSCs were cultured for 3 weeks in osteogenic differentiation media. Staining for alkaline phosphatase expression was positive, suggesting osteogenic differentiation. For in vivo studies, pdSCs were delivered onto suitable collagen sponges and implanted into periodontal defects on the right buccal cortex of the mandible in 16 immunodeficient nude rats. Histologic analysis of samples from the test side revealed reformation of periodontal ligament-like tissue, collagen fibers, and elements of bone, but no functional periodontal tissue regeneration. The data show that human adult pdSCs are capable of regenerating elements of bone and collagen fibers in an in vivo animal model.

  16. Investigation of anticancer potential of hypophyllanthin and phyllanthin against breast cancer by in vitro and in vivo methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukiran Parvathaneni

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities of hypophyllanthin and phyllanthin isolated from Phyllanthus amarus Schum & Thonn against breast cancer. Methods: In vitro anticancer activity was evaluated against two cell lines (MCF-7 and MDAMB-231 using MTT assay. In vivo anticancer activity was tested using Sprague-Dawley rats with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea induced mammary cancer. Results: In vitro studies demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell growth with IC50 values of (35.18依1.48 µg/mL (hypophyllanthin and (32.51依0.95 µg/mL (phyllanthin for MCF-7; (38.74 依1.24 (hypophyllanthin and (32.2依1.17 (phyllanthin for MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Tumor weights per group at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg/day for hypophyllanthin (12.82 and 12.06 g and phyllanthin (11.95 and 8.87 g treated groups were significantly (P<0.001 lower than untreated N-methyl-N-nitrosourea group (35.85. Conclusions: Results of the present research work indicated that the isolated lignan compounds, hypophyllanthin and phyllanthin showed significant anticancer activities against breast cancer, in vitro and in vivo.

  17. An Investigation into the Prediction of in Vivo Clearance for a Range of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barry C; Srivastava, Abhishek; Colclough, Nicola; Wilson, Joanne; Reddy, Venkatesh Pilla; Amberntsson, Sara; Li, Danxi

    2017-10-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMO) are metabolic enzymes mediating the oxygenation of nucleophilic atoms such as nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, and selenium. These enzymes share similar properties to the cytochrome P450 system but can be differentiated through heat inactivation and selective substrate inhibition by methimazole. This study investigated 10 compounds with varying degrees of FMO involvement to determine the nature of the correlation between human in vitro and in vivo unbound intrinsic clearance. To confirm and quantify the extent of FMO involvement six of the compounds were investigated in human liver microsomal (HLM) in vitro assays using heat inactivation and methimazole substrate inhibition. Under these conditions FMO contribution varied from 21% (imipramine) to 96% (itopride). Human hepatocyte and HLM intrinsic clearance (CLint) data were scaled using standard methods to determine the predicted unbound intrinsic clearance (predicted CLint u) for each compound. This was compared with observed unbound intrinsic clearance (observed CLint u) values back calculated from human pharmacokinetic studies. A good correlation was observed between the predicted and observed CLint u using hepatocytes (R(2) = 0.69), with 8 of the 10 compounds investigated within or close to a factor of 2. For HLM the in vitro-in vivo correlation was maintained (R(2) = 0.84) but the accuracy was reduced with only 3 out of 10 compounds falling within, or close to, twofold. This study demonstrates that human hepatocytes and HLM can be used with standard scaling approaches to predict the human in vivo clearance for FMO substrates. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. A Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of In Vitro Assembled Chromatin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker-Albert, Moritz Carl; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Fedisch, Andreas; Schilcher, Pierre; Schmidt, Andreas; Imhof, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The structure of chromatin is critical for many aspects of cellular physiology and is considered to be the primary medium to store epigenetic information. It is defined by the histone molecules that constitute the nucleosome, the positioning of the nucleosomes along the DNA and the non-histone proteins that associate with it. These factors help to establish and maintain a largely DNA sequence-independent but surprisingly stable structure. Chromatin is extensively disassembled and reassembled during DNA replication, repair, recombination or transcription in order to allow the necessary factors to gain access to their substrate. Despite such constant interference with chromatin structure, the epigenetic information is generally well maintained. Surprisingly, the mechanisms that coordinate chromatin assembly and ensure proper assembly are not particularly well understood. Here, we use label free quantitative mass spectrometry to describe the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin supported by an embryo extract prepared from preblastoderm Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The use of a data independent acquisition method for proteome wide quantitation allows a time resolved comparison of in vitro chromatin assembly. A comparison of our in vitro data with proteomic studies of replicative chromatin assembly in vivo reveals an extensive overlap showing that the in vitro system can be used for investigating the kinetics of chromatin assembly in a proteome-wide manner. PMID:26811354

  19. Consolidation of proteomics data in the Cancer Proteomics database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Boddie, Paul; Frick, Rahel; Koehler, Christian J; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by abnormal cell growth and one of the major reasons for human deaths. Proteins are involved in the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer, furthermore they are affected by anti-cancer drugs, and protein biomarkers can be used to diagnose certain cancer types. Therefore, it is important to explore the proteomics background of cancer. In this report, we developed the Cancer Proteomics database to re-interrogate published proteome studies investigating cancer. The database is divided in three sections related to cancer processes, cancer types, and anti-cancer drugs. Currently, the Cancer Proteomics database contains 9778 entries of 4118 proteins extracted from 143 scientific articles covering all three sections: cell death (cancer process), prostate cancer (cancer type) and platinum-based anti-cancer drugs including carboplatin, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin (anti-cancer drugs). The detailed information extracted from the literature includes basic information about the articles (e.g., PubMed ID, authors, journal name, publication year), information about the samples (type, study/reference, prognosis factor), and the proteomics workflow (Subcellular fractionation, protein, and peptide separation, mass spectrometry, quantification). Useful annotations such as hyperlinks to UniProt and PubMed were included. In addition, many filtering options were established as well as export functions. The database is freely available at http://cancerproteomics.uio.no. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Application of Proteomics for the Investigation of the Effect of Initial pH on Pathogenic Mechanisms of Fusarium proliferatum on Banana Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taotao Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium proliferatum is an important pathogen and causes a great economic loss to fruit industry. Environmental pH-value plays a regulatory role in fungi pathogenicity, however, the mechanism needs further exploration. In this study, F. proliferatum was cultured under two initial pH conditions of 5 and 10. No obvious difference was observed in the growth rate of F. proliferatum between two pH-values. F. proliferatum cultured under both pH conditions infected banana fruit successfully, and smaller lesion diameter was presented on banana fruit inoculated with pH 10-cultured fungi. Proteomic approach based on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE was used to investigate the changes in secretome of this fungus between pH 5 and 10. A total of 39 differential spots were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS. Compared to pH 5 condition, proteins related to cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs and proteolysis were significantly down-regulated at pH 10, while proteins related to oxidation-reduction process and transport were significantly up-regulated under pH 10 condition. Our results suggested that the downregulation of CWDEs and other virulence proteins in the pH 10-cultured F. proliferatum severely decreased its pathogenicity, compared to pH 5-cultured fungi. However, the alkaline environment did not cause a complete loss of the pathogenic ability of F. proliferatum, probably due to the upregulation of the oxidation-reduction related proteins at pH 10, which may partially compensate its pathogenic ability.

  1. Application of Proteomics for the Investigation of the Effect of Initial pH on Pathogenic Mechanisms of Fusarium proliferatum on Banana Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taotao; Wu, Qixian; Wang, Yong; John, Afiya; Qu, Hongxia; Gong, Liang; Duan, Xuewu; Zhu, Hong; Yun, Ze; Jiang, Yueming

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium proliferatum is an important pathogen and causes a great economic loss to fruit industry. Environmental pH-value plays a regulatory role in fungi pathogenicity, however, the mechanism needs further exploration. In this study, F. proliferatum was cultured under two initial pH conditions of 5 and 10. No obvious difference was observed in the growth rate of F. proliferatum between two pH-values. F. proliferatum cultured under both pH conditions infected banana fruit successfully, and smaller lesion diameter was presented on banana fruit inoculated with pH 10-cultured fungi. Proteomic approach based on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was used to investigate the changes in secretome of this fungus between pH 5 and 10. A total of 39 differential spots were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Compared to pH 5 condition, proteins related to cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs) and proteolysis were significantly down-regulated at pH 10, while proteins related to oxidation-reduction process and transport were significantly up-regulated under pH 10 condition. Our results suggested that the downregulation of CWDEs and other virulence proteins in the pH 10-cultured F. proliferatum severely decreased its pathogenicity, compared to pH 5-cultured fungi. However, the alkaline environment did not cause a complete loss of the pathogenic ability of F. proliferatum, probably due to the upregulation of the oxidation-reduction related proteins at pH 10, which may partially compensate its pathogenic ability.

  2. Metabolic labeling in middle-down proteomics allows for investigation of the dynamics of the histone code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoli, Simone; Lu, Congcong; Coradin, Mariel; Wang, Xiaoshi; Karch, Kelly R; Ruminowicz, Chrystian; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2017-07-06

    consistent portion of histones modified as H3K27me2K36me2 in epithelial cells were converted into H3K27me3K36me2 in mesenchymal cells. We demonstrate that middle-down MS, despite being a more scarcely exploited MS technique than bottom-up, is a robust quantitative method for histone PTM characterization. In particular, middle-down MS combined with metabolic labeling is currently the only methodology available for investigating turnover of combinatorial histone PTMs in dynamic systems.

  3. In vivo performance of a matrix-based quantitative ultrasound imaging device dedicated to calcaneus investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, M A; Defontaine, M; Giraudeau, B; Camus, E; Colin, L; Laugier, P; Patat, F

    2002-10-01

    We developed a prototype of an ultrasound (US) bone matrix densitometer, the BEAM scanner, in the context of a European Space Agency research program. This device, which is a contact imaging device, was designed to overcome the limitations of immersion devices in space. Broadband US attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS) parameters were calculated from the radiofrequency (RF) signal. The principle aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo performance in direct comparison with a currently available device (UBIS 3000, DMS, France). The short-term precision of the BEAM scanner for BUA was estimated at 2.8%, whereas it was 2.3% with UBIS 3000. The short-term precision for SOS was 0.3%, and this was the same as the coefficient of variation (CV) of the UBIS 3000. CVs of 3.4% and 0.6% for midterm precision were found for BUA and SOS, respectively, and UBIS 3000 scores were 3% and 0.4%, respectively. This preliminary study demonstrates the high performance of the BEAM scanner and its new concept offers a wide range of improvements and new applications.

  4. Mussel mimetic tissue adhesive for fetal membrane repair: initial in vivo investigation in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelio, A; Dekoninck, P; Perrini, M; Brubaker, C E; Messersmith, P B; Mazza, E; Deprest, J; Zimmermann, R; Ehrbar, M; Ochsenbein-Koelble, N

    2013-12-01

    Iatrogenic preterm prelabour rupture of fetal membranes (iPPROM) remains the main complication after invasive interventions into the intrauterine cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sealing capability and tissue interaction of mussel-mimetic tissue adhesive (mussel glue) in comparison to fibrin glue on punctured fetal membranes in vivo. A mid-gestational rabbit model was used for testing the materials. The fetal sacs of pregnant rabbits at day 23 were randomly assigned into experimental groups: unoperated (negative control), unclosed puncture (positive control), commercially available fibrin glue (FG) with decellularized amnion scaffold (DAM), mussel glue (MG) with DAM, or mussel glue alone. Evaluation was done at term (30 days' gestation) assessing fetal survival, fetal membrane integrity and histology of the membranes. Fetal survival was not significantly lower in any of the treatment groups compared to the negative control. All plugging materials could be found at the end of the pregnancy and no adverse effects on the fetus or the pregnant does could be observed. Sac integrity was higher in all treatment groups compared to the positive control group but significant only in the FG+DAM group. Cellular infiltration could be seen in fibrin glue and DAM in contrast to mussel glue which was only tightly adhering to the surrounding tissue. These cells were mostly of mesenchymal phenotype staining positive for vimentin. CD68 positive macrophages were found clustered around all the plugging materials, but their numbers were only significantly increased for the mussel glue alone group compared to negative controls. Mussel glues performance in sealing fetal membranes in the rabbit model was comparable to that of fibrin glue. Taking into account its other favorable properties, it is a noteworthy candidate for a clinically applicable fetal membrane sealant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental investigation on the mechanical behavior of polyurethane PICCs after long-term conservation in in vivo-like conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Puccio, Francesca; Gallone, Giuseppe; Baù, Andrea; Calabrò, Emanuele M; Mainardi, Simona; Poli, Paolo; Scocca, Antonella

    2017-11-17

    In a previous paper, the authors investigated the mechanical behavior of several commercial polyurethane peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) in their 'brand new' condition. The present study represents a second step of the research activity and aims to investigate possible modifications of the PICC mechanical response, induced by long-term conservation in in vivo-like conditions, particularly when used to introduce oncologic drugs. Eight 5 Fr single-lumen catheters from as many different vendors, were examined. Several specimens were cut from each of them and kept in a bath at 37°C for 1, 2, 3 and 6 months. Two fluids were used to simulate in vivo-like conditions, i.e. ethanol and Ringer-lactate solutions, the first being chosen in order to reproduce a typical chemical environment of oncologic drugs. The test plan included swelling analyses, uniaxial tensile tests and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). All tested samples were chemically and mechanically stable in the studied conditions, as no significant weight variation was observed even after six months of immersion in ethanol solution. Uniaxial tensile tests confirmed such a response. For each PICC, very similar curves were obtained from samples tested after different immersion durations in the two fluid solutions, particularly for strains lower than 10%.

  6. PET imaging with copper-64 as a tool for real-time in vivo investigations of the necessity for crosslinking of polymeric micelles in nanomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Tue Ingemann; Binderup, Tina; Ek, Pramod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric micelles in nanomedicine are often crosslinked to prevent disintegration in vivo. This typically requires clinically problematic chemicals or laborious procedures. In addition, crosslinking may interfere with advanced release strategies. Despite this, it is often not investigated whether...

  7. CPTAC Accelerates Precision Proteomics Biomedical Research | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The accurate quantitation of proteins or peptides using Mass Spectrometry (MS) is gaining prominence in the biomedical research community as an alternative method for analyte measurement. The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) investigators have been at the forefront in the promotion of reproducible MS techniques, through the development and application of standardized proteomic methods for protein quantitation on biologically relevant samples.

  8. Mining the granule proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Goetze, Jens P; Johnsen, Anders H

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics of secretory granules is an emerging strategy for identifying secreted proteins, including potentially novel candidate biomarkers and peptide hormones. In addition, proteomics can provide information about the abundance, localization and structure (post-translational modification) of g...

  9. The disulfide proteome and other reactive cysteine proteomes: analysis and functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Marika; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Kieselbach, Thomas

    2011-06-15

    Ten years ago, proteomics techniques designed for large-scale investigations of redox-sensitive proteins started to emerge. The proteomes, defined as sets of proteins containing reactive cysteines that undergo oxidative post-translational modifications, have had a particular impact on research concerning the redox regulation of cellular processes. These proteomes, which are hereafter termed "disulfide proteomes," have been studied in nearly all kingdoms of life, including animals, plants, fungi, and bacteria. Disulfide proteomics has been applied to the identification of proteins modified by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species under stress conditions. Other studies involving disulfide proteomics have addressed the functions of thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. Hence, there is a steadily growing number of proteins containing reactive cysteines, which are probable targets for redox regulation. The disulfide proteomes have provided evidence that entire pathways, such as glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Calvin-Benson cycle, are controlled by mechanisms involving changes in the cysteine redox state of each enzyme implicated. Synthesis and degradation of proteins are processes highly represented in disulfide proteomes and additional biochemical data have established some mechanisms for their redox regulation. Thus, combined with biochemistry and genetics, disulfide proteomics has a significant potential to contribute to new discoveries on redox regulation and signaling.

  10. Analysis of soybean seed proteins using proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This editorial elaborates on investigations consisting of different proteomics technologies and their application to biological sciences. In addition, different classes of soybean seed proteins are discussed. This information will be useful to scientists in obtaining a greater understanding of the...

  11. Proteomics and integrative genomics for unraveling the mysteries of spermatogenesis: the strategies of a team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Com, Emmanuelle; Melaine, Nathalie; Chalmel, Frédéric; Pineau, Charles

    2014-07-31

    The strikingly complex structural organization of the mammalian testis in vivo creates particular difficulties for studies of its organization, function and regulation. These difficulties are particularly pronounced for investigations of the molecular communication networks within the seminiferous tubules that govern spermatogenesis. The use of classical molecular and cell biology approaches to unravel this complexity has proved problematic, due to difficulties in maintaining differentiated germ cells in vitro, in particular. The lack of a suitable testing ground has led to a greater reliance on high-quality proteomic and genomic analyses as a prelude to the in vitro antx1d in vivo testing of hypotheses. In this study, we highlight the options currently available for research, as used in our laboratory, in which proteomic and integrative genomic strategies are applied to the study of spermatogenesis in mammals. We will comment on results providing insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying normal and pathological spermatogenesis and new perspectives for the treatment of male infertility in humans. Finally, we will discuss the relevance of our strategies and the unexpected potential and perspectives they offer to teams involved in the study of male reproduction, within the framework of the Human Proteome Project. Integrative genomics is becoming a powerful strategy for discovering the biological significance hidden in proteomic datasets. This work introduces some of the integrative genomic concepts and works used by our team to gain new insight into mammalian spermatogenesis, a remarkably sophisticated process. We demonstrate the relevance of these integrative approaches to understand the cellular cross talks established between the somatic Sertoli cells and the germ cell lineage, within the seminiferous epithelium. Our work also contributes to new knowledge on the pathophysiology of testicular function, with promising clinical applications. This article is

  12. Significance of different animal species in experimental models for in vivo investigations of hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević-Filipović Milica

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous discoveries in medicine are results of experiments on different animal species. The most frequently used animals in hematopoiesis investigations are laboratory mice and rats, but so-called big animals, such as pigs, sheep, cats, dogs, and monkeys, evolution-wise closer to humans have a place in experimental hematology as well. The specific problematics of a certain animal specie can lead to fundamental knowledge on certain aspects of the process of hematopoiesis end the biology of stem cells in hematopoiesis. Furthermore, comparative investigations of certain phenomena in different species help in the recognition of the general rules in the living world. In the area f preclinicalinvesti- gations, animal models are an inevitable step in studies of transplantation biology of stem cells in hematopoiesis, as well as in studies of biologically active molecules which have an effect on the hematopoietic system. Knowledge acquired on animal models is applied in both human and veterinary medicine.

  13. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  14. Investigation in vivo of Enterococcus faecalis in endodontic retreatment by phenotypic and genotypic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Sergio Endo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of E. faecalis in root-filled canals using culture and molecular approaches. It was evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility to different antibiotics and the virulence factors of E. faecalis isolates. Microbial samples were taken from thirty root-filled canals. Culture methods and 16S rDNA assay were used to identify E. faecalis. The antimicrobial susceptibility of E. faecalis was determined by MIC values using the E test. Cultivable strains of E. faecalis were investigated for virulence factors by PCR technique. E. faecalis were detected by culture (7/30, traditional PCR assay (13/30 and nested PCR (23/30. Both PCR were significantly more effective than culture in detecting  E. faecalis (p < 0.05. All tested E. faecalis were highly sensitive to amoxicillin. Some strains of E. faecalis were resistant to antibiotics such as rifampicin (4/12, erythromycin (3/12 and azythromycin (8/12. The genes efaA and ace were detected in all isolates. The other virulence genes were found in 91.6 (gelE, 83.3 (asa, 25 (esp and 16.6% (cylA. Strains of E. faecalis isolated from root-filled canals showed virulence factors related to adherence. They also showed resistance to some antibiotics commonly used in dentistry.

  15. In vivo investigations of neurotensin receptors in adipocytes, hepatocytes and enterocytes of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piątek, Jacek; Maćkowiak, Paweł; Krauss, Hanna; Nowak, Dorota; Bogdański, Paweł

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic vascular disease is currently the biggest threat and the highest cause of death worldwide, approaching almost 60%.The development of atherosclerosis is affected by ecological factors associated with industry and pollution of the environment. Neurotensin (NT) is a peptide acting via 3 kinds of neurotensin receptors (NTR) localized in target tissues. In several studies, the presence of its receptors has been shown in chicken liver, and the influence of NT on the metabolism of this organ was confirmed (glycogenolysis stimulation through sympathetic nervous system, enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, metabolism of lipoproteins). Healthy male WISTAR rats weighing 300}30 grams, were used for the experiments. The animals were divided into 4 groups: 1) control group, to which 0.9% NaCl was administrated (i.p.); 2) the second group was given levocabastine 1mg/kg i.p.; 3) the third group received SR 48692 0.4 mg/; 4) the fourth group was given NT analog [D-Trp 11]-neurotensin 15 nM/kg. Plasmatic membranes of liver, small intestine and adipose tissue were prepared according to the method of Havrankova. Analysis of results obtained in the investigation of NT receptors was performed using the Scatchard method from LIGAND-Pc, v. 3.1 software. The investigation of antigenity of I125NT showed proper antigen-antibody reaction. No binding of the I125NT with plasmatic membranes of adipocytes or enterocytes was observed. Unspecific binding of I125NT with 10 μmol/L of free NT was observed in the plasmatic membranes of hepatocytes. The presence of NT receptors only in the membranes of hepatocytes may suggest their role in the regulation of lipid metabolism via receptor – ligand way.

  16. Development and validation of Triticum phytobiological method as an alternative procedure for investigating in vivo acute toxicity on mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Ştefănescu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to validate an alternative method for determining in vivo acute toxicity using vegetal material instead of laboratory animals, starting from the phytobiological method known also as the Triticum technique. We set out to demonstrate that vegetal cells have similar sensitivity to some toxic agents as animal cells, in which case a statistical correlation could be established. A series of new compounds synthesized by the Romanian National Institute for Chemical Pharmaceutical Research and Development as potential β3 adrenergic receptors agonists were tested for their acute toxicity using classic animal exposure models, before investigating possible anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects. We then determined whether similar conclusions might be reached exposing vegetal material to the same agents. We successfully demonstrated that plants are affected in a very similar way as animals when exposed to some potentially toxic agents, providing new possibilities for ending unethical animal experiments.

  17. Phytochemical and in vitro and in vivo biological investigation on the antihypertensive activity of mango leaves (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, Silas Nascimento; Brasil, Girlandia Alexandre; do Nascimento, Andrews Marques; de Lima, Ewelyne Miranda; Scherer, Rodrigo; Costa, Helber B; Romão, Wanderson; Boëchat, Giovanna Assis Pereira; Lenz, Dominik; Fronza, Marcio; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza; Endringer, Denise Coutinho; de Andrade, Tadeu Uggere

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antihypertensive effect of leaves Mangifera indica L. using in vitro and in vivo assays. The ethanol extract of leaves of M. indica was fractionated to dichloromethanic, n-butyl alcohol and aqueous fractions. The chemical composition of ethanolic extract and dichloromethanic fraction were evaluated by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Antioxidant activity was evaluated in the DPPH scavenging activity assay. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity was investigated using in vitro and in vivo assays. The chronic antihypertensive assay was performed in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and Wistar rats treated with enalapril (10 mg/kg), dichloromethanic fraction (100 mg/kg; twice a day) or vehicle control for 30 days. The baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated through the use of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by morphometric analysis. The dichloromethanic fraction exhibited the highest flavonoid, total phenolic content and high antioxidant activity. Dichloromethanic fraction elicited ACE inhibitory activity in vitro (99 ± 8%) similar to captopril. LC-MS/MS analysis revealed the presence of ferulic acid (48.3 ± 0.04 µg/g) caffeic acid (159.8 ± 0.02 µg/g), gallic acid (142.5 ± 0.03 µg/g), apigenin (11.0 ± 0.01 µg/g) and quercetin (203.3 ± 0.05 µg/g). The chronic antihypertensive effects elicited by dichloromethanic fraction were similar to those of enalapril, and the baroreflex sensitivity was normalized in SHR. Plasma ACE activity and cardiac hypertrophy were comparable with animals treated with enalapril. Dichloromethanic fraction of M. indica presented an antihypertensive effect, most likely by ACE inhibition, with benefits in baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac hypertrophy. Altogether, the results of the present study suggest that the dichloromethanic fraction of M. indica leaves may have potential as a promoting

  18. Proteome Characterization of Leaves in Common Bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith M. Robison

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dry edible bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is a globally relevant food crop. The bean genome was recently sequenced and annotated allowing for proteomics investigations aimed at characterization of leaf phenotypes important to agriculture. The objective of this study was to utilize a shotgun proteomics approach to characterize the leaf proteome and to identify protein abundance differences between two bean lines with known variation in their physiological resistance to biotic stresses. Overall, 640 proteins were confidently identified. Among these are proteins known to be involved in a variety of molecular functions including oxidoreductase activity, binding peroxidase activity, and hydrolase activity. Twenty nine proteins were found to significantly vary in abundance (p-value < 0.05 between the two bean lines, including proteins associated with biotic stress. To our knowledge, this work represents the first large scale shotgun proteomic analysis of beans and our results lay the groundwork for future studies designed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in pathogen resistance.

  19. Visualizing Meta-Features in Proteomic Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepouras George

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The steps of a high-throughput proteomics experiment include the separation, differential expression and mass spectrometry-based identification of proteins. However, the last and more challenging step is inferring the biological role of the identified proteins through their association with interaction networks, biological pathways, analysis of the effect of post-translational modifications, and other protein-related information. Results In this paper, we present an integrative visualization methodology that allows combining experimentally produced proteomic features with protein meta-features, typically coming from meta-analysis tools and databases, in synthetic Proteomic Feature Maps. Using three proteomics analysis scenarios, we show that the proposed visualization approach is effective in filtering, navigating and interacting with the proteomics data in order to address visually challenging biological questions. The novelty of our approach lies in the ease of integration of any user-defined proteomic features in easy-to-comprehend visual representations that resemble the familiar 2D-gel images, and can be adapted to the user's needs. The main capabilities of the developed VIP software, which implements the presented visualization methodology, are also highlighted and discussed. Conclusions By using this visualization and the associated VIP software, researchers can explore a complex heterogeneous proteomics dataset from different perspectives in order to address visually important biological queries and formulate new hypotheses for further investigation. VIP is freely available at http://pelopas.uop.gr/~egian/VIP/index.html.

  20. Mechanisms of in vivo muscle fatigue in humans: investigating age‐related fatigue resistance with a computational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Damien M.; Umberger, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Muscle fatigue can be defined as the transient decrease in maximal force that occurs in response to muscle use. Fatigue develops because of a complex set of changes within the neuromuscular system that are difficult to evaluate simultaneously in humans.The skeletal muscle of older adults fatigues less than that of young adults during static contractions. The potential sources of this difference are multiple and intertwined.To evaluate the individual mechanisms of fatigue, we developed an integrative computational model based on neural, biochemical, morphological and physiological properties of human skeletal muscle.Our results indicate first that the model provides accurate predictions of fatigue and second that the age‐related resistance to fatigue is due largely to a lower reliance on glycolytic metabolism during contraction.This model should prove useful for generating hypotheses for future experimental studies into the mechanisms of muscle fatigue. Abstract During repeated or sustained muscle activation, force‐generating capacity becomes limited in a process referred to as fatigue. Multiple factors, including motor unit activation patterns, muscle fibre contractile properties and bioenergetic function, can impact force‐generating capacity and thus the potential to resist fatigue. Given that neuromuscular fatigue depends on interrelated factors, quantifying their independent effects on force‐generating capacity is not possible in vivo. Computational models can provide insight into complex systems in which multiple inputs determine discrete outputs. However, few computational models to date have investigated neuromuscular fatigue by incorporating the multiple levels of neuromuscular function known to impact human in vivo function. To address this limitation, we present a computational model that predicts neural activation, biomechanical forces, intracellular metabolic perturbations and, ultimately, fatigue during repeated isometric contractions

  1. In vivo and in vitro investigations of retinal fluorophores in age-related macular degeneration by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M.; Quick, S.; Klemm, M.; Schenke, S.; Mata, N.; Eitner, A.; Schweitzer, D.

    2009-02-01

    Ocular fundus autofluorescence imaging has been introduced into clinical diagnostics recently for the observation of the age pigment lipofuscin, a precursor of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, a deeper understanding of the generation of single compounds contributing to the lipofuscin as well as of the role of other fluorophores such as FAD, glycated proteins, and collagen needs their discrimination by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). FLIM at the ocular fundus is performed using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope equipped with a picosecond laser source (448nm or 468nm respectively, 100ps, 80 MHz repetition rate) and dual wavelength (490-560nm and 560-7600nm) time-correlated single photon counting. A three-exponential fit of the fluorescence decay revealed associations of decay times to anatomical structures. Disease-related features are identified from alterations in decay times and-amplitudes. The in-vivo investigations in patients were paralleled by experiments in an organ culture of the porcine ocular fundus. Photo-oxidative stress was induced by exposure to blue light (467nm, 0.41 mW/mm2). Subsequent analysis (fluorescence microscopy, HPLC, LC-MS) indicated the accumulation of the pyridinium bis-retinoid A2E and its oxidation products as well as oxidized phospholipids. These compounds contribute to the tissue auto-fluorescence and may play a key role in the pathogenesis of AMD. Thus, FLIM observation at the ocular fundus in vivo enhances our knowledge on the etiology of AMD and may become a diagnostic tool.

  2. Investigation of in vivo potential of scorpion venom against skin tumorigenesis in mice via targeting markers associated with cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Asmari AK

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdulrahman K Al Asmari, Abdul Quaiyoom Khan Research Centre, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world in spite of the advances made in its management. In this study, we investigated the in vivo antitumorigenic potential of the venom obtained from a medically important scorpion species Leiurus quinquestriatus on chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Animals were divided into five groups, with 13 animals in each group. All the treatments were given topically on the shaved dorsal surface of the skin. Animals in Group 1 received vehicle only (0.2 mL acetone. Moreover, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 400 nmol per mouse was applied to all the animals in the remaining four groups. After 1 week, different concentrations of venom (17.5 µg, 35 µg, and 52.5 µg per animal were applied to each animal in the Groups III–V. Thirty minutes after the application of venom, croton oil was applied on the same position where venom was administered to the animals of Groups III–V. Animals in Group II were treated as the positive control (without venom and received croton oil as in Groups III–V. The findings of this study revealed that venom extract of L. quinquestriatus inhibits DMBA + croton oil-induced mouse skin tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity. Venom treatment also decreased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry results showed a downregulation of the expression of molecular markers such as Ki-67, nuclear factor kappa-B, cyclooxygenase-2, B-cell lymphoma-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in venom-treated animals. Our findings suggest that the venom of L. quinquestriatus possesses in vivo anticancer potential and may be used in the development of anticancer molecules. Keywords: Leiurus quinquestriatus, skin cancer, apoptosis, immunosuppression

  3. Proteomic analysis of protein adsorption capacity of different haemodialysis membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, Andrea; Lupisella, Santina; Sirolli, Vittorio; Bucci, Sonia; Amoroso, Luigi; Pavone, Barbara; Pieroni, Luisa; Sacchetta, Paolo; Bonomini, Mario

    2012-04-01

    Protein-adsorptive properties are a key feature of membranes used for haemodialysis treatment. Protein adsorption is vital to the biocompatibility of a membrane material and influences membrane's performance. The object of the present study is to investigate membrane biocompatibility by correlating the adsorbed proteome repertoire with chemical feature of the membrane surfaces. Dialyzers composed of either cellulose triacetate (Sureflux 50 L, effective surface area 0.5 m(2); Nipro Corporation, Japan) or the polysulfone-based helixone (FX40, effective surface area 0.4 m(2); Fresenius Medical Care AG, Germany) materials were employed to develop an ex vivo apparatus to study protein adsorption. Adsorbed proteins were eluted by a strong chaotropic buffer condition and investigated by a proteomic approach. The profiling strategy was based on 2D-electrophoresis separation of desorbed protein coupled to MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis. The total protein adsorption was not significantly different between the two materials. An average of 179 protein spots was visualised for helixone membranes while a map of retained proteins of cellulose triacetate membranes was made up of 239 protein spots. The cellulose triacetate material showed a higher binding capacity for albumin and apolipoprotein. In fact, a number of different protein spots belonging to the gene transcript of albumin were visible in the cellulose triacetate map. In contrast, helixone bound only a small proportion of albumin, while proved to be particularly active in retaining protein associated with the coagulation cascade, such as the fibrinogen isoforms. Our data indicate that proteomic techniques are a useful approach for the investigation of proteins surface-adsorbed onto haemodialysis membranes, and may provide a molecular base for the interpretation of the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation treatment during renal replacement therapy.

  4. Completed | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the current Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), previously funded initiatives associated with clinical proteomics research included: Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC 2.0) Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative (CPTC) Mouse Proteomic Technologies Initiative

  5. 2-DE-based proteomic investigation of the saliva of the Amazonian triatomine vectors of Chagas disease: Rhodnius brethesi and Rhodnius robustus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Camila M; Sousa, Marcelo V; Ricart, Carlos André O

    2011-01-01

    The triatomine bugs are obligatory haematophagous organisms that act as vectors of Chagas disease by transmitting the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Their feeding success is strongly related to salivary proteins that allow these insects to access blood by counteracting host haemostatic mechanisms....... Proteomic studies were performed on saliva from the Amazonian triatomine bugs: Rhodnius brethesi and R. robustus, species epidemiologically relevant in the transmission of T. cruzi. Initially, salivary proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The average number of spots...

  6. Proteomics investigation of human platelets in healthy donors and cystic fibrosis patients by shotgun nUPLC-MSE and 2DE: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieroni, Luisa; Finamore, Francesco; Ronci, Maurizio; Mattoscio, Domenico; Marzano, Valeria; Mortera, Stefano Levi; Quattrucci, Serena; Federici, Giorgio; Romano, Mario; Urbani, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Platelets are of pathophysiological relevance in haemostasis, wound repair, inflammation and cardiovascular disease. We have shown that human platelets express a biologically active Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator, which is dysfunctional in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients, and regulate platelet responses related to inflammation and its resolution. In order to further elucidate platelet involvement in CF inflammation, we pursued a comparative proteomic analysis of cells from healthy donors and CF patients, in association with a non-supervised comparative analysis of the Gene Ontology. Our results, showing changes in the integrin signalling in CF, support a pro-inflammatory profile of CF platelets.

  7. Proteome analysis of mouse model systems: A tool to model human disease and for the investigation of tissue-specific biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislinger, Thomas; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2010-10-10

    The molecular dissections of the mechanistic pathways involved in human disease have always relied on the use of model organisms. Among the higher mammalian organisms, the laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) is the most widely used model. A large number of commercially-available, inbred strains are available to the community, including an ever growing collection of transgenic, knock-out, and disease models. Coupled to availability is the fact that animal colonies can be kept under standardized housing condition at most major universities and research institutes, with relative ease and cost efficiency (compared to larger vertebrates). As such, mouse models to study human biology and disease remains extremely attractive. In the current review we will provide an historic overview of the use of mouse models in proteome research with a focus on general tissue and organelle biology, comparative proteomics of human and mouse and the use of mouse models to study cardiac disease. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of the in vivo antioxidative activity of Cynara scolymus (artichoke) leaf extract in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magielse, Joanna; Verlaet, Annelies; Breynaert, Annelies; Keenoy, Begoña Manuel Y; Apers, Sandra; Pieters, Luc; Hermans, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo antioxidant activity of a quantified leaf extract of Cynara scolymus (artichoke) was studied. The aqueous artichoke leaf extract (ALE), containing 1.5% caffeoylquinic acid with chlorogenic acid being most abundant (0.30%), and luteolin-7-O-glucoside as major flavonoid (0.15%), was investigated by evaluating the effect on different oxidative stress biomarkers, after 3 wk oral supplementation in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model. Apart from two test groups (0.2 g ALE/kg BW/day and 1 g ALE/kg BW/day, where BW is body weight), a healthy control group, untreated oxidative stress group, and vitamin E treated group (positive control) were included. A 0.2 g/kg BW/day of ALE decreased oxidative stress: malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels significantly diminished, whereas erythrocyte glutathione levels significantly increased. A 1.0 g/kg BW/day ALE did not show higher antioxidant activity. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability...... of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence......, of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle...

  10. Hemocyte responses of Dreissena polymorpha following a short-term in vivo exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Preliminary investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couleau, Nicolas; Techer, Didier [Universite de Lorraine, Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologie, Biodiversite, Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, IUT Thionville-Yutz, Espace Cormontaigne, Yutz, F-57970 (France); Pagnout, Christophe [Universite de Lorraine, Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologie, Biodiversite, Ecosystemes (LIEBE), UMR 7146, Campus Bridoux, rue du General Delestraint, Metz, F-57070 (France); International Consortium for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, iCEINT, http://www.i-ceint.org (France); Jomini, Stephane [Universite de Lorraine, Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologie, Biodiversite, Ecosystemes (LIEBE), UMR 7146, Campus Bridoux, rue du General Delestraint, Metz, F-57070 (France); Foucaud, Laurent; Laval-Gilly, Philippe; Falla, Jairo [Universite de Lorraine, Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologie, Biodiversite, Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, IUT Thionville-Yutz, Espace Cormontaigne, Yutz, F-57970 (France); Bennasroune, Amar, E-mail: amar.bennasroune@univ-metz.fr [Universite de Lorraine, Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologie, Biodiversite, Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, IUT Thionville-Yutz, Espace Cormontaigne, Yutz, F-57970 (France)

    2012-11-01

    The widespread use of titanium-based nanoparticles and their environmental release may pose a significant risk to aquatic organisms within freshwater ecosystems. Suspension-feeder invertebrates like bivalve molluscs represent a unique target group for nanoparticle toxicology. The aim of this work was to investigate the short-term responses of Dreissena polymorpha hemocytes after in vivo exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2} NP). For this purpose, freshwater mussels were exposed to P25 TiO{sub 2} NP at the concentrations of 0.1, 1, 5 and 25 mg/L during 24 h. Viability, phagocytosis activity and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation level of ERK 1/2 and p38 in hemocytes extracted from exposed mussels were compared to those from control specimens. Results demonstrated an inhibition of the phagocytosis activity after exposure to TiO{sub 2} NP at 0.1 and 1 mg/L. Similar trends, albeit less pronounced, were reported for higher concentrations of NP. Transmission electron microscopy showed for the first time the internalization of TiO{sub 2} NP into Dreissena polymorpha hemocytes. Besides, exposure to NP increased the ERK 1/2 phosphorylation levels in all treatments. Concerning the phosphorylation level of p38, only exposures to 5 and 25 mg/L of NP induced significant p38 activation in comparison to that of the control. Finally, these short-term effects observed at environmentally relevant concentrations highlighted the need for further studies concerning ecotoxicological evaluation of nanoparticle release into an aquatic environment. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phagocytosis inhibition at TiO{sub 2} NP exposure concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mg/L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Internalization of TiO{sub 2} NP in freshwater mussel hemocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased phosphorylation level of p38 and ERK 1/2 after in vivo exposure to TiO{sub 2} NP.

  11. Antioxidant activity of omega-3 derivatives and their delivery via nanocages and nanocones: DFT and experimental in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Houshang; Changizi-Ashtiyani, Saeed; Najafi, Meysam

    2017-10-28

    The antioxidant properties of omega-3 were investigated via experimental in vivo and theoretical methods. For experimental evaluation, oxidative stress was induced by 30 min bilateral renal ischemia and 24 h of reperfusion in male Sprague Dawley rats. The oxidative stress was evaluated through measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) and ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) levels in renal tissue. In theoretical methods, the reaction enthalpies of antioxidant mechanisms of omega-3 were calculated and the effects of NHMe, OMe, OH, Cl, and Me substituents on its antioxidant activity were investigated. Moreover, the omega-3 delivery potential by carbon and boron nitride nanocages and naocones were evaluated. The experimental results showed that omega-3 administration decreases MDA and increases FRAP levels after their changes by ischemia/reperfusion. Theoretical results indicated that NHMe and OMe substituents can significantly improve the antioxidant activity of omega-3. Also, boron nitride nanocone (BNNC) has higher |∆Ead| values, so it has higher potential for omega-3 delivery. Taken together, the new findings presented here indicate that omega-3 has anti-oxidative properties and NHMe and OMe substituents can improve its antioxidant activity. Moreover, adsorption of omega-3 on the surface of the studied nanostructures was exothermic, and BNNC with higher |∆Ead| values has higher potential for omega-3 delivery. Graphical abstract The interaction and adsorption of BNNC with omega-3 is exothermic and experimentally possible from the energetic viewpoint, so the BNNC with higher |∆Ead| and |∆Gad| values has higher potential for omega-3 delivery.

  12. Proteomic Characterization of Cr(VI) resistent Bacteria In Wastewater Effluents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koçberber Kılıç, nur; Kjeldal, Henrik; Lolas, Ihab Bishara Yousef

    of heavy metals were isolated by enrichment cultures from locations in Turkey. Degradation or resistance characteristics were determined by quantitative proteomics for. Membrane and cytosolic fractions were prepared, digested in gel or in solution followed by high resolution shotgun sequencing using either...... on four bacterial strains capable of tolerating extreme levels of Cr(VI) in vivo. The detailed investigation of four Cr(VI) tolerant bacterial strains also gave clear indications of novel gene products involved in the resistence mechanisms. A detailed mapping of the proteins involved in the tolerance...

  13. Proteomic Investigation of Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 Identifies Secretome and Mycelial Proteins with roles in Plant Cell Wall Degradation and Virulence

    KAUST Repository

    Lakshman, Dilip

    2016-03-28

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 is a soilborne necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen that causes economically important diseases on agronomic crops worldwide. Here we used a proteomics approach to characterize both intracellular proteins and the secretome of R. solani AG 4 isolate Rs23A under several growth conditions; the secretome being highly important in pathogenesis. From over 500 total secretome and soluble intracellular protein spots from 2-D gels, 457 protein spots were analyzed and 318 proteins positively matched with fungal proteins of known function by comparison with available R. solani genome databases specific for anastomosis groups 1-IA, 1-IB, and 3. These proteins were categorized to possible cellular locations and functional groups; and for some proteins their putative roles in plant cell wall degradation and virulence. The majority of the secreted proteins were grouped to extracellular regions and contain hydrolase activity.

  14. A proteomic glimpse into human ureter proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdeldin, Sameh; Hirao, Yoshitoshi; Elguoshy, Amr; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Fujinaka, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yates, John R; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Urine has evolved as one of the most important biofluids in clinical proteomics due to its noninvasive sampling and its stability. Yet, it is used in clinical diagnostics of several disorders by detecting changes in its components including urinary protein/polypeptide profile. Despite the fact that majority of proteins detected in urine are primarily originated from the urogenital (UG) tract, determining its precise source within the UG tract remains elusive. In this article, we performed a comprehensive analysis of ureter proteome to assemble the first unbiased ureter dataset. Next, we compared these data to urine, urinary exosome, and kidney mass spectrometric datasets. Our result concluded that among 2217 nonredundant ureter proteins, 751 protein candidates (33.8%) were detected in urine as urinary protein/polypeptide or exosomal protein. On the other hand, comparing ureter protein hits (48) that are not shown in corresponding databases to urinary bladder and prostate human protein atlas databases pinpointed 21 proteins that might be unique to ureter tissue. In conclusion, this finding offers future perspectives for possible identification of ureter disease-associated biomarkers such as ureter carcinoma. In addition, the ureter proteomic dataset published in this article will provide a valuable resource for researchers working in the field of urology and urine biomarker discovery. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002620 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002620). © 2015 The Authors. Proteomics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Proteomics made more accessible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikalsen, Svein-Ole

    2014-05-01

    MS-based proteomics is a bioinformatic-intensive field. Additionally, the instruments and instrument-related and analytic software are expensive. Some free Internet-based proteomics tools have gained wide usage, but there have not been any single bioinformatic framework that in an easy and intuitive way guided the user through the whole process from analyses to submission. Together, these factors may have limited the expansion of proteomics analyses, and also the secondary use (reanalyses) of proteomic data. Vaudel et al. (Proteomics 2014, 14, 1001-1005) are now describing their Compomics framework that guides the user through all the main steps, from the database generation, via the analyses and validation, and through the submission process to PRIDE, a proteomic data bank. Vaudel et al. partly base the framework on tools that they have developed themselves, and partly they are integrating other freeware tools into the workflow. One of the most interesting aspects with the Compomics framework is the possibility of extending MS-based proteomics outside the MS laboratory itself. With the Compomics framework, any laboratory can handle large amounts of proteomic data, thereby facilitating collaboration and in-depth data analyses. The described software also opens the potential for any laboratory to reanalyze data deposited in PRIDE. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Proteomics reveals the effects of sustained weight loss on the human plasma proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Philipp E; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Tyanova, Stefka; Grassl, Niklas; Iepsen, Eva W; Lundgren, Julie; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens J; Torekov, Signe S; Mann, Matthias

    2016-12-22

    Sustained weight loss is a preferred intervention in a wide range of metabolic conditions, but the effects on an individual's health state remain ill-defined. Here, we investigate the plasma proteomes of a cohort of 43 obese individuals that had undergone 8 weeks of 12% body weight loss followed by a year of weight maintenance. Using mass spectrometry-based plasma proteome profiling, we measured 1,294 plasma proteomes. Longitudinal monitoring of the cohort revealed individual-specific protein levels with wide-ranging effects of losing weight on the plasma proteome reflected in 93 significantly affected proteins. The adipocyte-secreted SERPINF1 and apolipoprotein APOF1 were most significantly regulated with fold changes of -16% and +37%, respectively (P plasma proteome, and eight plasma proteins correlated better with insulin resistance than the known marker adiponectin. Nearly all study participants benefited from weight loss regarding a ten-protein inflammation panel defined from the proteomics data. We conclude that plasma proteome profiling broadly evaluates and monitors intervention in metabolic diseases. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  17. The proteome of human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingbo; Dufresne, Craig; Turner, Randi; Ferri, Sara; Venkatraman, Vidya; Karani, Rabia; Lutty, Gerard A; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Semba, Richard D

    2015-02-01

    The retina is a delicate tissue that detects light, converts photochemical energy into neural signals, and transmits the signals to the visual cortex of the brain. A detailed protein inventory of the proteome of the normal human eye may provide a foundation for new investigations into both the physiology of the retina and the pathophysiology of retinal diseases. To provide an inventory, proteins were extracted from five retinas of normal eyes and fractionated using SDS-PAGE. After in-gel digestion, peptides were analyzed in duplicate using LC-MS/MS on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. A total of 3436 nonredundant proteins were identified in the human retina, including 20 unambiguous protein isoforms, of which eight have not previously been demonstrated to exist at the protein level. The proteins identified in the retina included most of the enzymes involved in the visual cycle and retinoid metabolism. One hundred and fifty-eight proteins that have been associated with age-related macular degeneration were identified in the retina. The MS proteome database of the human retina may serve as a valuable resource for future investigations of retinal biology and disease. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001242 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001242). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Proteomic approach toward molecular backgrounds of drug resistance of osteosarcoma cells in spheroid culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Ruriko; Kubota, Daisuke; Kondo, Tadashi

    2013-08-01

    Chemoresistance is one of the most critical prognostic factors in osteosarcoma, and elucidation of the molecular backgrounds of chemoresistance may lead to better clinical outcomes. Spheroid cells resemble in vivo cells and are considered an in vitro model for the drug discovery. We found that spheroid cells displayed more chemoresistance than conventional monolayer cells across 11 osteosarcoma cell lines. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the resistance to chemotherapy, we examined the proteomic differences between the monolayer and spheroid cells by 2D-DIGE. Of the 4762 protein species observed, we further investigated 435 species with annotated mass spectra in the public proteome database, Genome Medicine Database of Japan Proteomics. Among the 435 protein species, we found that 17 species exhibited expression level differences when the cells formed spheroids in more than five cell lines and four species out of these 17 were associated with spheroid-formation associated resistance to doxorubicin. We confirmed the upregulation of cathepsin D in spheroid cells by western blotting. Cathepsin D has been implicated in chemoresistance of various malignancies but has not previously been implemented in osteosarcoma. Our study suggested that the spheroid system may be a useful tool to reveal the molecular backgrounds of chemoresistance in osteosarcoma. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. [Update on proteomic use in hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Mario; Sirolli, Vittorio; Baroni, Silvia; Urbani, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Application of proteomics has become one of the leading experimental disciplines for increased understanding of the key role played by proteins and protein-protein interactions in all aspects of cell function. There is an increasing use of proteomic technologies for investigation into renal replacement therapy such as hemodialysis. In the last 10 years, the application of shotgun bottom-up liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry approaches has been successfully applied to research in uremic toxicity, with the discovery of novel uremic toxins and the potential to delineate a precise molecular approach to defining the biochemical nature of uremia. Major investigations of proteomics in hemodialysis therapy include molecular definition of uremic toxicity, identification of prognostic biomarkers, blood purification efficiency testing, and biocompatibility assessment of the dialyzer membrane materials. In this article, we review the results of recent proteoic investigations in the setting of chronic hemodialysis therapy. Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  20. Copper exposure effects on yeast mitochondrial proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; D'Alessandro, Annamaria; Jaiswal, Deepa; Marzano, Valeria; Neri, Sara; Ronci, Maurizio; Urbani, Andrea

    2011-10-19

    Mitochondria play an important role on the entire cellular copper homeostatic mechanisms. Alteration of cellular copper levels may thus influence mitochondrial proteome and its investigation represents an important contribution to the general understanding of copper-related cellular effects. In these study we have performed an organelle targeted proteomic investigation focusing our attention on the effect of non-lethal 1mM copper concentration on Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial proteome. Functional copper effects on yeast mitochondrial proteome were evaluated by using both 2D electrophoresis (2-DE) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic data have been then analyzed by different unsupervised meta-analysis approaches that highlight the impairment of mitochondrial functions and the activation of oxidative stress response. Interestingly, our data have shown that stress response generated by 1mM copper treatment determines the activation of S. cerevisiae survival pathway. To investigate these findings we have treated yeast cells responsiveness to copper with hydrogen peroxide and observed a protective role of this metal. These results are suggestive of a copper role in the protection from oxidative stress possibly due to the activation of mechanisms involved in cellular survival and growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Micro-proteomics with iterative data analysis: Proteome analysis in C. elegans at the single worm level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Narayan, Vikram; Nicolas, Armel; Murillo, Alejandro Brenes; Gartner, Anton; Kenyon, Cynthia J; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-02-01

    Proteomics studies typically analyze proteins at a population level, using extracts prepared from tens of thousands to millions of cells. The resulting measurements correspond to average values across the cell population and can mask considerable variation in protein expression and function between individual cells or organisms. Here, we report the development of micro-proteomics for the analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans, a eukaryote composed of 959 somatic cells and ∼1500 germ cells, measuring the worm proteome at a single organism level to a depth of ∼3000 proteins. This includes detection of proteins across a wide dynamic range of expression levels (>6 orders of magnitude), including many chromatin-associated factors involved in chromosome structure and gene regulation. We apply the micro-proteomics workflow to measure the global proteome response to heat-shock in individual nematodes. This shows variation between individual animals in the magnitude of proteome response following heat-shock, including variable induction of heat-shock proteins. The micro-proteomics pipeline thus facilitates the investigation of stochastic variation in protein expression between individuals within an isogenic population of C. elegans. All data described in this study are available online via the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd), an open access, searchable database resource. © 2015 The Authors. PROTEOMICS Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. ProteomicsDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Samaras, Patroklos; Frejno, Martin; Gessulat, Siegfried; Barnert, Maximilian; Kienegger, Harald; Krcmar, Helmut; Schlegl, Judith; Ehrlich, Hans-Christian; Aiche, Stephan; Kuster, Bernhard; Wilhelm, Mathias

    2018-01-04

    ProteomicsDB (https://www.ProteomicsDB.org) is a protein-centric in-memory database for the exploration of large collections of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics data. ProteomicsDB was first released in 2014 to enable the interactive exploration of the first draft of the human proteome. To date, it contains quantitative data from 78 projects totalling over 19k LC-MS/MS experiments. A standardized analysis pipeline enables comparisons between multiple datasets to facilitate the exploration of protein expression across hundreds of tissues, body fluids and cell lines. We recently extended the data model to enable the storage and integrated visualization of other quantitative omics data. This includes transcriptomics data from e.g. NCBI GEO, protein-protein interaction information from STRING, functional annotations from KEGG, drug-sensitivity/selectivity data from several public sources and reference mass spectra from the ProteomeTools project. The extended functionality transforms ProteomicsDB into a multi-purpose resource connecting quantification and meta-data for each protein. The rich user interface helps researchers to navigate all data sources in either a protein-centric or multi-protein-centric manner. Several options are available to download data manually, while our application programming interface enables accessing quantitative data systematically. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuko eKomatsu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improving crop productivity, particularly under unfavorable environmental conditions. To better understand the mechanisms underlying stress response in crops, cell wall proteomic analyses are being increasingly utilized. In this review, the methods of purification and purity assays of cell wall protein fractions from crops are described, and the results of protein identification using gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques are presented. Furthermore, protein composition of the cell walls of rice, wheat, maize and soybean are compared, and the role of cell wall proteins in crops under flooding and drought stress is discussed. This review will be useful for clarifying the role of the cell wall of crops in response to environmental stresses.

  4. Simultaneous investigation of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, Krebs cycle metabolism and pH, using hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C2]pyruvate in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Albert P; Hurd, Ralph E; Schroeder, Marie A; Lau, Angus Z; Gu, Yi-ping; Lam, Wilfred W; Barry, Jennifer; Tropp, James; Cunningham, Charles H

    2012-02-01

    (13)C MR spectroscopy studies performed on hearts ex vivo and in vivo following perfusion of prepolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate have shown that changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) flux may be monitored non-invasively. However, to allow investigation of Krebs cycle metabolism, the (13)C label must be placed on the C2 position of pyruvate. Thus, the utilization of either C1 or C2 labeled prepolarized pyruvate as a tracer can only afford a partial view of cardiac pyruvate metabolism in health and disease. If the prepolarized pyruvate molecules were labeled at both C1 and C2 positions, then it would be possible to observe the downstream metabolites that were the results of both PDH flux ((13)CO(2) and H(13)CO(3)(-)) and Krebs cycle flux ([5-(13)C]glutamate) with a single dose of the agent. Cardiac pH could also be monitored in the same experiment, but adequate SNR of the (13)CO(2) resonance may be difficult to obtain in vivo. Using an interleaved selective RF pulse acquisition scheme to improve (13)CO(2) detection, the feasibility of using dual-labeled hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C(2)]pyruvate as a substrate for dynamic cardiac metabolic MRS studies to allow simultaneous investigation of PDH flux, Krebs cycle flux and pH, was demonstrated in vivo. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Persistent Luminescence Nanophosphor Involved Near-Infrared Optical Bioimaging for Investigation of Foodborne Probiotics Biodistribution in Vivo: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaoyao; Liu, Jing-Min; Zhang, Dongdong; Ge, Kun; Wang, Peihua; Liu, Huilin; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Shuo

    2017-09-20

    Probiotics has attracted great attention in food nutrition and safety research field, but thus far there are limited analytical techniques for visualized and real-time monitoring of the probiotics when they are ingested in vivo. Herein, the optical bioimaging technique has been introduced for investigation of foodborne probiotics biodistribution in vivo, employing the near-infrared (NIR) emitting persistent luminescence nanophosphors (PLNPs) of Cr 3+ -doped zinc gallogermanate (ZGGO) as the contrast nanoprobes. The ultrabrightness, super long afterglow, polydispersed size, low toxicity, and excellent photostability and biocompatibility of PLNPs were demonstrated to be qualified as a tracer for labeling probiotics via antibody (anti-Gram positive bacteria LTA antibody) recognition as well as contrast agent for long-term bioimaging the probiotics. In vivo optical bioimaging assay showed that the LTA antibody functionalized ZGGO nanoprobes that could be efficiently tagged to the probiobics were successfully applied for real-time monitoring and nondamaged probing of the biodistribution of probiotics inside the living body after oral administration. This work presents a proof-of-concept that exploited the bioimaging methodology for real-time and nondamaged researching the foodborne probiotics behaviors in vivo, which would open up a novel way of food safety detection and nutrition investigation.

  6. An in Vivo Investigation of Brain Inflammation in Gulf War Illness with Integrated PET/MR Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    previously  pending)     R01  AT007550  (PI:  Harris/Napadow)    Neuroimaging  Approaches  to  Deconstructing   Acupuncture  for...Kreisl WC, Fujita M, Dustin I, Khan O, Appel S, et al. Increased in vivo expression of an inflammatory marker in temporal lobe epilepsy . J Nuclear Med

  7. Shotgun proteomics of the barley seed proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley seed proteins are of prime importance to the brewing industry, human and animal nutrition and in plant breeding for cultivar identification. To obtain comprehensive proteomic data from barley seeds, acetone precipitated proteins were in-solution digested and the resulting peptides were analyz...

  8. Functional genomics and proteomics - the role of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, U. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Nuklearmedizin; German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Altmann, A. [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Eisenhut, M. [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiopharmacy

    2002-01-01

    Now that the sequencing of the human genome has been completed, the basic challenges are finding the genes, locating their coding regions and predicting their functions. This will result in a new understanding of human biology as well as in the design of new molecular structures as potential novel diagnostic or drug discovery targets. The assessment of gene function may be performed using the tools of the genome program. These tools represent high-throughput methods used to evaluate changes in the expression of many or all genes of an organism at the same time in order to investigate genetic pathways for normal development and disease. This will lead to a shift in the scientific paradigm: In the pre-proteomics era, functional assignments were derived from hypothesis-driven experiments designed to understand specific cellular processes. The new tools describe proteins on a proteome-wide scale, thereby creating a new way of doing cell research which results in the determination of three-dimensional protein structures and the description of protein networks. These descriptions may then be used for the design of new hypotheses and experiments in the traditional physiological, biochemical and pharmacological sense. The evaluation of genetically manipulated animals or newly designed biomolecules will require a thorough understanding of physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology and the experimental approaches will involve many new technologies, including in vivo imaging with single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography. Nuclear medicine procedures may be applied for the determination of gene function and regulation using established and new tracers or using in vivo reporter genes such as enzymes, receptors, antigens or transporters. Pharmacogenomics will identify new surrogate markers for therapy monitoring which may represent potential new tracers for imaging. Also, drug distribution studies for new therapeutic biomolecules are needed, at least

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of Fasciola hepatica juveniles and Schistosoma bovis schistosomula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Torre Escudero, E; Manzano-Román, R; Valero, L; Oleaga, A; Pérez-Sánchez, R; Hernández-González, A; Siles-Lucas, M

    2011-08-24

    Protein interactions between host and parasites can influence the infection success and severity. The aim of this investigation was to identify the proteins from two trematodes potentially localized at the host-parasite interface. We performed the proteomic profiles from in vivo obtained immature lung stage Schistosoma bovis schistosomula and in vitro excysted juveniles from Fasciola hepatica, parasites of ruminants and man usually giving rise to chronic infections. Proteomes from those parasites were obtained after digestion with trypsin and the peptides generated were identified by mass spectrometry, both before and after parasites' treatment with 70% methanol. The comparison of the two proteome sets from each parasite and between them, the analysis of their relative abundance and of their potential exposure to the host from living parasites, together with the specific immunolocalization of two of the identified molecules, show that this approach could assist in the identification of parasite exposed proteins and in the definition of molecules common for the two parasites with potential interaction with the host. Further characterization of these molecules could guide to define new common anti-parasitic targets and potential vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanoscaled Proteomic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Jia, Lee

    2013-09-01

    Global proteomics research is currently hampered by the extremely complexity of the proteome and the absence of techniques like the polymerase chain reaction in genomics which enables multiplication of a single protein molecule. Since all the existing analytical technologies cannot overcome the detection limit and the dynamic concentration barrier, development of improved analytical technologies at nanoscale, ideally those that could recognize single protein molecule in the presence of high abundant of others, is a high priority for proteomics. In this chapter, we will show the state-of-the-art of nanoproteomics, i.e., the application of nanotechnologies to proteomics. Various nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles, polymer and copolymer nanoparticles, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles have been used to improve sensitivity, specificity, and repeatability of proteomic analysis especially when the multidimensional separation system coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS is used. Among them, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the two most important nanomaterials: while GNPs are frequently utilized for enzyme immobilization, high throughput bioassay, selection of target-peptides and target-protein, CNTs including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and mutiple-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have wide applications to electronic sensor, sensitive immunodetection, nanobiocatalysis, affinity probes, MALDI matrices, protein digestion, peptides enrichment and analysis. In perspectives, a deep understanding of the structures and property of nanomaterials and interdisciplinary applications of nanotechnology to proteomics will certainly be revolutionary and intellectually rewarding.

  11. Impacts of Humanized Mouse Models on the Investigation of HIV-1 Infection: Illuminating the Roles of Viral Accessory Proteins in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Yamada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes four accessory genes: vif, vpu, vpr, and nef. Recent investigations using in vitro cell culture systems have shed light on the roles of these HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vif, Vpr, Vpu, and Nef, in counteracting, modulating, and evading various cellular factors that are responsible for anti-HIV-1 intrinsic immunity. However, since humans are the exclusive target for HIV-1 infection, conventional animal models are incapable of mimicking the dynamics of HIV-1 infection in vivo. Moreover, the effects of HIV-1 accessory proteins on viral infection in vivo remain unclear. To elucidate the roles of HIV-1 accessory proteins in the dynamics of viral infection in vivo, humanized mouse models, in which the mice are xenotransplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells, has been utilized. This review describes the current knowledge of the roles of HIV-1 accessory proteins in viral infection, replication, and pathogenicity in vivo, which are revealed by the studies using humanized mouse models.

  12. Proteomic cornerstones of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors...... which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem...... evaluation, 893 proteins were found differentially expressed between multipotent and myeloid committed cells. The differential protein content in these cell populations points to a distinct structural organization of the cytoskeleton including remodeling activity. In addition, we found a marked difference...

  13. Relative Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Brucella abortus Reveals Metabolic Adaptation to Multiple Environmental Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Zai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens that cause chronic brucellosis in humans and animals. The virulence of Brucella primarily depends on its successful survival and replication in host cells. During invasion of the host tissue, Brucella is simultaneously subjected to a variety of harsh conditions, including nutrient limitation, low pH, antimicrobial defenses, and extreme levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS via the host immune response. This suggests that Brucella may be able to regulate its metabolic adaptation in response to the distinct stresses encountered during its intracellular infection of the host. An investigation into the differential proteome expression patterns of Brucella grown under the relevant stress conditions may contribute toward a better understanding of its pathogenesis and adaptive response. Here, we utilized a mass spectrometry-based label-free relative quantitative proteomics approach to investigate and compare global proteomic changes in B. abortus in response to eight different stress treatments. The 3 h short-term in vitro single-stress and multi-stress conditions mimicked the in vivo conditions of B. abortus under intracellular infection, with survival rates ranging from 3.17 to 73.17%. The proteomic analysis identified and quantified a total of 2,272 proteins and 74% of the theoretical proteome, thereby providing wide coverage of the B. abortus proteome. By including eight distinct growth conditions and comparing these with a control condition, we identified a total of 1,221 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs that were significantly changed under the stress treatments. Pathway analysis revealed that most of the proteins were involved in oxidative phosphorylation, ABC transporters, two-component systems, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, the citrate cycle, thiamine metabolism, and nitrogen metabolism; constituting major response mechanisms toward the reconstruction of cellular

  14. Relative Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Brucella abortus Reveals Metabolic Adaptation to Multiple Environmental Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zai, Xiaodong; Yang, Qiaoling; Yin, Ying; Li, Ruihua; Qian, Mengying; Zhao, Taoran; Li, Yaohui; Zhang, Jun; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens that cause chronic brucellosis in humans and animals. The virulence of Brucella primarily depends on its successful survival and replication in host cells. During invasion of the host tissue, Brucella is simultaneously subjected to a variety of harsh conditions, including nutrient limitation, low pH, antimicrobial defenses, and extreme levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via the host immune response. This suggests that Brucella may be able to regulate its metabolic adaptation in response to the distinct stresses encountered during its intracellular infection of the host. An investigation into the differential proteome expression patterns of Brucella grown under the relevant stress conditions may contribute toward a better understanding of its pathogenesis and adaptive response. Here, we utilized a mass spectrometry-based label-free relative quantitative proteomics approach to investigate and compare global proteomic changes in B. abortus in response to eight different stress treatments. The 3 h short-term in vitro single-stress and multi-stress conditions mimicked the in vivo conditions of B. abortus under intracellular infection, with survival rates ranging from 3.17 to 73.17%. The proteomic analysis identified and quantified a total of 2,272 proteins and 74% of the theoretical proteome, thereby providing wide coverage of the B. abortus proteome. By including eight distinct growth conditions and comparing these with a control condition, we identified a total of 1,221 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) that were significantly changed under the stress treatments. Pathway analysis revealed that most of the proteins were involved in oxidative phosphorylation, ABC transporters, two-component systems, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, the citrate cycle, thiamine metabolism, and nitrogen metabolism; constituting major response mechanisms toward the reconstruction of cellular homeostasis and metabolic

  15. Proteomic profile of dormant Trichophyton Rubrum conidia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Wenchuan; Liu, Tao; Li, Rui; Yang, Jian; Wei, Candong; Zhang, Wenliang; Jin, Qi

    2008-01-01

    Background Trichophyton rubrum is the most common dermatophyte causing fungal skin infections in humans. Asexual sporulation is an important means of propagation for T. rubrum, and conidia produced by this way are thought to be the primary cause of human infections. Despite their importance in pathogenesis, the conidia of T. rubrum remain understudied. We intend to intensively investigate the proteome of dormant T. rubrum conidia to characterize its molecular and cellular features and to enhance the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Results The proteome of T. rubrum conidia was analyzed by combining shotgun proteomics with sample prefractionation and multiple enzyme digestion. In total, 1026 proteins were identified. All identified proteins were compared to those in the NCBI non-redundant protein database, the eukaryotic orthologous groups database, and the gene ontology database to obtain functional annotation information. Functional classification revealed that the identified proteins covered nearly all major biological processes. Some proteins were spore specific and related to the survival and dispersal of T. rubrum conidia, and many proteins were important to conidial germination and response to environmental conditions. Conclusion Our results suggest that the proteome of T. rubrum conidia is considerably complex, and that the maintenance of conidial dormancy is an intricate and elaborate process. This data set provides the first global framework for the dormant T. rubrum conidia proteome and is a stepping stone on the way to further study of the molecular mechanisms of T. rubrum conidial germination and the maintenance of conidial dormancy. PMID:18578874

  16. Comparative profiling of the sperm proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Ashling; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-02-01

    The highly complex and species-selective mechanism of fertilization is a central theme of developmental biology. Gametogenesis, sperm activation, and egg-sperm recognition are fundamental biological processes, warranting detailed studies into the molecular composition of gametes. Biological MS has been instrumental for the comprehensive itemizing of gamete proteomes. The protein constellation of sperm cells and its subcellular structures has been established for a variety of animal species. Spermatogenesis and the crucial activation of sperm cells as a prerequisite of successful fertilization and physiological adaptations to external stressors was investigated using proteomics, as well as the underlying mechanisms of male infertility with respect to proteome-wide alterations. This review outlines recent achievements of sperm proteomics and exemplifies the usefulness of gel-based surveys by outlining the comparative analysis of abnormal spermatozoa in globozoospermia. Besides label-free MS techniques and cell-based labeling methodology, high-resolution fluorescence 2DE has been shown to be highly suitable as a proteomic biomarker discovery tool in sperm protein research. The appropriateness of novel protein markers for improving our understanding of normal spermatogenesis and sperm activation versus the molecular pathogenesis of male infertility will be discussed. New biomarker candidates might be useful to improve diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic aspects of infertility. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Proteomics, biomarkers, and HIV-1: A current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Maire Rose; Ciborowski, Pawel

    2016-02-01

    Despite more than three decades of extensive research, HIV-1 infection although well controlled with cART, remains incurable. Multifactorial complexity of the viral life-cycle poses great challenges in understanding molecular mechanisms underlying this infection and the development of biomarkers, which we hope will lead us to its eradication. For a more in-depth understanding of how the virus interacts with host target cells, T cells and macrophages, proteomic profiling techniques that offer strategies to investigate the proteome in its entirety were employed. Here, we review proteomic studies related to HIV-1 infection and discuss perspectives and limitations of proteomic and systems biology approaches in future studies. © 2015 The Authors. PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  18. Ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kant M; Lopes-Calcas, Ana; Honke, Michael L; O'Brien-Moran, Zoe; Buist, Richard; West, Michael; Martin, Melanie

    2017-07-01

    To advance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies further for in vivo tissue characterization with histopathologic validation, we investigated the feasibility of ex vivo tissue imaging of a surgically removed human brain tumor as a comprehensive approach for radiology-pathology correlation in histoanatomically identical fashion in a rare case of pigmented ganglioglioma with complex paramagnetic properties. Pieces of surgically removed ganglioglioma, containing melanin and hemosiderin pigments, were imaged with a small bore 7-T MRI scanner to obtain T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted image and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Corresponding histopathological slides were prepared for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain and special stains for melanin and iron/hemosiderin to correlate with MRI signal characteristics. Furthermore, mean diffusivity (MD) maps were generated from DTI data and correlated with cellularity using image analysis. While the presence of melanin was difficult to interpret in in vivo MRI with certainty due to concomitant hemosiderin pigments and calcium depositions, ex vivo tissue imaging clearly demonstrated pieces of tissue exhibiting the characteristic MR signal pattern for melanin with pathologic confirmation in a histoanatomically identical location. There was also concordant correlation between MD and cellularity. Although it is still in an initial phase of development, ex vivo tissue imaging is a promising approach, which offers radiology-pathology correlation in a straightforward and comprehensive manner.

  19. The wheat chloroplastic proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Cho, Kun; Choi, Jong-Soon; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Komatsu, Setsuko; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Woo, Sun Hee

    2013-11-20

    With the availability of plant genome sequencing, analysis of plant proteins with mass spectrometry has become promising and admired. Determining the proteome of a cell is still a challenging assignment, which is convoluted by proteome dynamics and convolution. Chloroplast is fastidious curiosity for plant biologists due to their intricate biochemical pathways for indispensable metabolite functions. In this review, an overview on proteomic studies conducted in wheat with a special focus on subcellular proteomics of chloroplast, salt and water stress. In recent years, we and other groups have attempted to understand the photosynthesis in wheat and abiotic stress under salt imposed and water deficit during vegetative stage. Those studies provide interesting results leading to better understanding of the photosynthesis and identifying the stress-responsive proteins. Indeed, recent studies aimed at resolving the photosynthesis pathway in wheat. Proteomic analysis combining two complementary approaches such as 2-DE and shotgun methods couple to high through put mass spectrometry (LTQ-FTICR and MALDI-TOF/TOF) in order to better understand the responsible proteins in photosynthesis and abiotic stress (salt and water) in wheat chloroplast will be focused. In this review we discussed the identification of the most abundant protein in wheat chloroplast and stress-responsive under salt and water stress in chloroplast of wheat seedlings, thus providing the proteomic view of the events during the development of this seedling under stress conditions. Chloroplast is fastidious curiosity for plant biologists due to their intricate biochemical pathways for indispensable metabolite functions. An overview on proteomic studies conducted in wheat with a special focus on subcellular proteomics of chloroplast, salt and water stress. We have attempted to understand the photosynthesis in wheat and abiotic stress under salt imposed and water deficit during seedling stage. Those studies

  20. Proteomics in evolutionary ecology: linking the genotype with the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz, Angel P; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Rolán-Alvarez, Emilio

    2012-03-01

    The study of the proteome (proteomics), which includes the dynamics of protein expression, regulation, interactions and its function, has played a less prominent role in evolutionary and ecological investigations in comparison with the study of the genome and transcriptome. There are, however, a number of arguments suggesting that this situation should change. First, the proteome is closer to the phenotype than the genome or the transcriptome, and as such may be more directly responsive to natural selection, and thus closely linked to adaptation. Second, there is evidence of a low correlation between protein and transcript expression levels across genes in many different organisms. Finally, there have been some recent important technological improvements in proteomics methods that make them feasible, practical and useful to address a wide range of evolutionary questions even in nonmodel organisms. The different proteomic methods, their limitations and problems when interpreting empirical data are described and discussed. In addition, the proteomic literature pertaining to evolutionary ecology is reviewed with examples, and potential applications of proteomics in a variety of evolutionary contexts are outlined. New proteomic research trends such as the study of posttranslational modifications and protein-protein interactions, as well as the combined use of the different -omics approaches, are discussed in relation to the development of a more functional and integrated perspective, needed for achieving a more comprehensive knowledge of evolutionary change. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Plant nuclear proteomics for unraveling physiological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaojian; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-09-25

    The nucleus is the subcellular organelle that functions as the regulatory hub of the cell and is responsible for regulating several critical cellular functions, including cell proliferation, gene expression, and cell survival. Nuclear proteomics is a useful approach for investigating the mechanisms underlying plant responses to abiotic stresses, including protein-protein interactions, enzyme activities, and post-translational modifications. Among abiotic stresses, flooding is a major limiting factor for plant growth and yields, particularly for soybean. In this review, plant nuclei purification methods, modifications of plant nuclear proteins, and recent contributions to the field of plant nuclear proteomics are summarized. In addition, to reveal the upstream regulating mechanisms controlling soybean responses to flooding stress, the functions of flooding-responsive nuclear proteins are reviewed based on the results of nuclear proteomic analysis of soybean in the early stages of flooding stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Design of an ex vivo culture system to investigate the effects of shear stress on cardiovascular tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucosky, Philippe; Padala, Muralidhar; Elhammali, Adnan; Balachandran, Kartik; Jo, Hanjoong; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2008-06-01

    Mechanical forces are known to affect the biomechanical properties of native and engineered cardiovascular tissue. In particular, shear stress that results from the relative motion of heart valve leaflets with respect to the blood flow is one important component of their mechanical environment in vivo. Although different types of bioreactors have been designed to subject cells to shear stress, devices to expose biological tissue are few. In an effort to address this issue, the aim of this study was to design an ex vivo tissue culture system to characterize the biological response of heart valve leaflets subjected to a well-defined steady or time-varying shear stress environment. The novel apparatus was designed based on a cone-and-plate viscometer. The device characteristics were defined to limit the secondary flow effects inherent to this particular geometry. The determination of the operating conditions producing the desired shear stress profile was streamlined using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model validated with laser Doppler velocimetry. The novel ex vivo tissue culture system was validated in terms of its capability to reproduce a desired cone rotation and to maintain sterile conditions. The CFD results demonstrated that a cone angle of 0.5 deg, a cone radius of 40 mm, and a gap of 0.2 mm between the cone apex and the plate could limit radial secondary flow effects. The novel cone-and-plate permits to expose nine tissue specimens to an identical shear stress waveform. The whole setup is capable of accommodating four cone-and-plate systems, thus concomitantly subjecting 36 tissue samples to desired shear stress condition. The innovative design enables the tissue specimens to be flush mounted in the plate in order to limit flow perturbations caused by the tissue thickness. The device is capable of producing shear stress rates of up to 650 dyn cm(-2) s(-1) (i.e., maximum shear stress rate experienced by the ventricular surface of an aortic valve leaflet

  3. Drafting the proteome landscape of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, María; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Zudaire, Maribel; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Perez-Valderrama, Estela; Zabaleta, Aintzane; Kochan, Grazyna; Escors, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Santamaría, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of cells that are defined by their myeloid origin, immature state, and ability to potently suppress T-cell responses. They regulate immune responses and the population significantly increases in the tumor microenvironment of patients with glioma and other malignant tumors. For their study, MDSCs are usually isolated from the spleen or directly of tumors from a large number of tumor-bearing mice although promising ex vivo differentiated MDSC production systems have been recently developed. During the last years, proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach to analyze MDSCs proteomes using shotgun-based mass spectrometry (MS), providing functional information about cellular homeostasis and metabolic state at a global level. Here, we will revise recent proteome profiling studies performed in MDSCs from different origins. Moreover, we will perform an integrative functional analysis of the protein compilation derived from these large-scale proteomic studies in order to obtain a comprehensive view of MDSCs biology. Finally, we will also discuss the potential application of high-throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and post-translational modifications (PTMs) during the differentiation process of MDSCs that will greatly boost the identification of novel MDSC-specific therapeutic targets to apply in cancer immunotherapy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Proteomic Study to Survey the CIGB-552 Antitumor Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielis Rodríguez-Ulloa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CIGB-552 is a cell-penetrating peptide that exerts in vitro and in vivo antitumor effect on cancer cells. In the present work, the mechanism involved in such anticancer activity was studied using chemical proteomics and expression-based proteomics in culture cancer cell lines. CIGB-552 interacts with at least 55 proteins, as determined by chemical proteomics. A temporal differential proteomics based on iTRAQ quantification method was performed to identify CIGB-552 modulated proteins. The proteomic profile includes 72 differentially expressed proteins in response to CIGB-552 treatment. Proteins related to cell proliferation and apoptosis were identified by both approaches. In line with previous findings, proteomic data revealed that CIGB-552 triggers the inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, proteins related to cell invasion were differentially modulated by CIGB-552 treatment suggesting new potentialities of CIGB-552 as anticancer agent. Overall, the current study contributes to a better understanding of the antitumor action mechanism of CIGB-552.

  5. Micro‐proteomics with iterative data analysis: Proteome analysis in C. elegans at the single worm level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Narayan, Vikram; Nicolas, Armel; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Gartner, Anton; Kenyon, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics studies typically analyze proteins at a population level, using extracts prepared from tens of thousands to millions of cells. The resulting measurements correspond to average values across the cell population and can mask considerable variation in protein expression and function between individual cells or organisms. Here, we report the development of micro‐proteomics for the analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans, a eukaryote composed of 959 somatic cells and ∼1500 germ cells, measuring the worm proteome at a single organism level to a depth of ∼3000 proteins. This includes detection of proteins across a wide dynamic range of expression levels (>6 orders of magnitude), including many chromatin‐associated factors involved in chromosome structure and gene regulation. We apply the micro‐proteomics workflow to measure the global proteome response to heat‐shock in individual nematodes. This shows variation between individual animals in the magnitude of proteome response following heat‐shock, including variable induction of heat‐shock proteins. The micro‐proteomics pipeline thus facilitates the investigation of stochastic variation in protein expression between individuals within an isogenic population of C. elegans. All data described in this study are available online via the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd), an open access, searchable database resource. PMID:26552604

  6. In vitro and in vivo investigation on genomic stability of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT41 obtained from broiler breeders in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barua, Himel; Lindblom, Ina Lucilia; Bisgaard, Magne

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT41 has previously been identified from salmonella-positive broiler breeder flocks in Denmark and isolates obtained from different flocks have demonstrated major diversity by multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis (MLVA) typing...... and human origin, respectively. The in vitro experiment demonstrated that DT41 survived more than 6 months in feed-pellets at 20 °C whereas the survival in dust was less than 4 weeks. Infection pattern and excretion varied for the poultry and human strain and birds of different age groups as revealed...... by the in vivo experiment. Genetic stability of cultures obtained from the in vitro and in vivo survival/passage was investigated by plasmid profiling, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and MLVA. The results of plasmid profiling and PFGE demonstrated genomic stability of all but one strain kept in dust...

  7. Integrated proteomic and genomic analysis of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators who analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples are expressed at the protein level. The integration of proteomic and genomic data, or proteogenomics, pro

  8. CPTAC Teams | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following are the current CPTAC teams, representing a network of Proteome Characterization Centers (PCCs), Proteogenomic Translational Research Centers (PTRCs), and Proteogenomic Data Analysis Centers (PGDACs). Teams are listed alphabetically by institution, with their respective Principal Investigators:

  9. Once-daily propranolol extended-release tablet dosage form: formulation design and in vitro/in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yaw-Bin; Tsai, Yi-Hung; Yang, Wan-Chiech; Chang, Jui-Sheng; Wu, Pao-Chu; Takayama, Kozo

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and optimize the propranolol once-daily extended release formulations containing HPMC, Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and lactose. In vitro studies, the response surface methodology and multiple response optimization utilizing the polynomial equation were used to search for the optimal formulation with specific release rate at different time intervals. The constrained mixture experimental design was used to prepare systematic model formulations, which were composed of three formulation variables: the content of HPMC (X(1)) MCC (X(2)) and lactose (X(3)). The drug release percent at 1.5, 4, 8, 14 and 24 h were the target responses and were restricted to 15-30, 35-55, 55-75, 75-90 and 90-110%, respectively. The results showed that the optimized formulation provided a dissolution pattern equivalent to the predicted curve, which indicated that the optimal formulation could be obtained using response surface methodology. The mechanism of drug release from HMPC matrix tablets followed non-Fickian diffusion. In the vivo study, the MRT was prolonged for matrix tablets when compared with commercial immediate release tablets. Furthermore, a linear relationship between in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption was observed in the beagle dogs.

  10. Proteomics and Autoimmune Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rovin, Brad H; Klein, Jon B.

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics has long been considered an ideal platform, and urine an ideal source for biomarker discovery in human autoimmune kidney diseases. A number of studies have examined the urine proteome to identify biomarkers of disease activity, kidney pathology, and response to therapy. Increasingly, proteomic studies of kidney disease have expanded to include blood, circulating cells and kidney tissue. Recently the clinical potential of renal proteomics has been realized through a handful of inves...

  11. In vitro and in vivo investigation of taste-masking effectiveness of Eudragit E PO as drug particle coating agent in orally disintegrating tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drašković, Milica; Medarević, Djordje; Aleksić, Ivana; Parojčić, Jelena

    2017-05-01

    Considering that bitter taste of drugs incorporated in orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) can be the main reason for avoiding drug therapy, it is of the utmost importance to achieve successful taste-masking. The evaluation of taste-masking effectiveness is still a major challenge. The objective of this study was to mask bitter taste of the selected model drugs by drug particle coating with Eudragit ® E PO, as well as to evaluate taste-masking effectiveness of prepared ODTs using compendial dissolution testing, dissolution in the small-volume shake-flask assembly and trained human taste panel. Model drugs were coated in fluidized bed. Disintequik™ ODT was used as a novel co-processed excipient for ODT preparation. Selected formulations were investigated in vitro and in vivo using techniques for taste-masking assessment. Significantly slower drug dissolution was observed from tablets with coated drug particles during the first 3 min of investigation. Results of in vivo taste-masking assessment demonstrated significant improvement in drug bitterness suppression in formulations with coated drug. Strong correlation between the results of drug dissolution in the small-volume shake-flask assembly and in vivo evaluation data was established (R ≥ 0.970). Drug particle coating with Eudragit ® E PO can be a suitable approach for bitter taste-masking. Strong correlation between in vivo and in vitro results implicate that small-volume dissolution method may be used as surrogate for human panel taste-masking assessment, in the case of physical taste-masking approach application.

  12. Peptide prefractionation is essential for proteomic approaches employing multiple-reaction monitoring of fruit proteomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, XiaoTang; Li, Li; Song, Jun; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Li, XiHong; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2014-01-01

    Off-gel™ IEF has become a popular tool in proteomics research to fractionate peptides or proteins. We conducted a detailed investigation on the fruit proteomics of apple, banana, and strawberry fruit employing Off-gel™ electrophoresis (OGE) as a crucial step to improve the proteome coverage and quantitative proteomic workflows including multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM). We provide technical details concerning the application of Off-gel™IEF, nano-LC-MS detection, and MRM optimization and analysis. Our results demonstrated that the application of OGE is an effective method for peptide fractionation and increased significantly the number of proteins identified by at least ten times, with more total peptides detected and collected. Furthermore, we developed a protocol combining OGE and MRM studies to identify and quantitatively investigate monodehydroascorbate reductase, a key enzyme in the redox and antioxidant system of apple fruit during fruit ripening. Using this method, the quantitative changes in this protein during ripening and in response to ethylene treatment was investigated. Our results provide direct and comprehensive evidence demonstrating the benefits of OGE and its application for both shotgun and quantitative proteomics research. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Translational plant proteomics: A perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agrawal, G.K.; Pedreschi, R.; Barkla, B.J.; Bindschedler, L.V.; Cramer, R.; Sarkar, A.; Renaut, J.; Job, D.; Rakwal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Translational proteomics is an emerging sub-discipline of the proteomics field in the biological sciences. Translational plant proteomics aims to integrate knowledge from basic sciences to translate it into field applications to solve issues related but not limited to the recreational and economic

  14. Beer and wort proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimure, Takashi; Kihara, Makoto; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Proteome analysis provides a way to identify proteins related to the quality traits of beer. A number of protein species in beer and wort have been identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with enzyme digestion such as trypsin, followed by mass spectrometry analyses and/or liquid chromatography mass/mass spectrometry. In addition, low molecular weight polypeptides in beer have been identified by the combination of non-enzyme digestion and mass analyses. These data sets of various molecular weight polypeptides (i.e., proteomes) provide a platform for analyzing protein functions in beer. Several novel proteins related to beer quality traits such as foam stability and haze formation have been identified by analyzing these proteomes. Some of the proteins have been applied to the development of efficient protein or DNA markers for trait selection in malting barley breeding. In this chapter, recent proteome studies of beer and wort are reviewed, and the methods and protocols of beer and wort proteome analysis are described.

  15. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  16. Dynamic longitudinal investigation of individual nerve endings in the skin of anesthetized mice using in vivo two-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuryev, Mikhail; Khiroug, Leonard

    2012-04-01

    Visualization of individual cutaneous nerve endings has previously relied on laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light or electron microscopy. We present a method for non-invasive, longitudinal two-photon microscopy of single nerve endings within the skin of anesthetized transgenic mice. Besides excellent signal-to-background ratio and nanometer-scale spatial resolution, this method offers time-lapse ``movies'' of pathophysiological changes in nerve fine structure over minutes, hours, days or weeks. Structure of keratinocytes and dermal matrix is visualized simultaneously with nerve endings, providing clear landmarks for longitudinal analysis. We further demonstrate feasibility of dissecting individual nerve fibers with infra-red laser and monitoring their degradation and regeneration. In summary, our excision-free optical biopsy technique is ideal for longitudinal microscopic analysis of animal skin and skin innervations in vivo and can be applied widely in preclinical models of chronic pain, allergies, skin cancers and a variety of dermatological disorders.

  17. Proteomics in uveal melanoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramasamy, Pathma

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with an incidence of 5-7 per million per year. It is associated with the development of metastasis in about 50% of cases, and 40% of patients with uveal melanoma die of metastatic disease despite successful treatment of the primary tumour. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years are 65%, 50% and 45% respectively. Unlike progress made in many other areas of cancer, uveal melanoma is still poorly understood and survival rates have remained similar over the past 25 years. Recently, advances made in molecular genetics have improved our understanding of this disease and stratification of patients into low risk and high risk for developing metastasis. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed using proteomic methods. This review will give an overview of various proteomic technologies currently employed in life sciences research, and discuss proteomic studies of uveal melanoma.

  18. Mixing proteomics and alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovinger, David M

    2006-08-01

    Techniques for high-throughput measurement of protein expression and posttranslational modification are just beginning to be applied to alcohol research. Studies using this proteomic approach to examine tissue from alcoholic humans and alcohol-exposed nonhuman primates have appeared in the last year. In the present issue of Alcohol, Bell et al. present the first such analysis of brain protein expression in relation to alcohol drinking in rodents. This study found changes in several interesting classes of proteins, including molecules involved in vesicular neurotransmitter release, cellular metabolism, and cell structure. These new and exciting findings are discussed in relation to the proteomics studies in primates, and the future of proteomics in the alcohol research field.

  19. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  20. [Proteomics in infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Sara; Párraga-Niño, Noemí; García-Núñez, Marian; Sabrià, Miquel

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diseases have a high incidence in the population, causing a major impact on global health. In vitro culture of microorganisms is the first technique applied for infection diagnosis which is laborious and time consuming. In recent decades, efforts have been focused on the applicability of "Omics" sciences, highlighting the progress provided by proteomic techniques in the field of infectious diseases. This review describes the management, processing and analysis of biological samples for proteomic research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. Interlaboratory studies and initiatives developing standards for proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexander R.; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Dufresne, Craig P.; Friedman, David B.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Mechtler, Karl; Phinney, Brett S.; Rose, Kristie L.; Rudnick, Paul A.; Searle, Brian C.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Weintraub, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Proteomics is a rapidly transforming interdisciplinary field of research that embraces a diverse set of analytical approaches to tackle problems in fundamental and applied biology. This view-point article highlights the benefits of interlaboratory studies and standardization initiatives to enable investigators to address many of the challenges found in proteomics research. Among these initiatives, we discuss our efforts on a comprehensive performance standard for characterizing PTMs by MS that was recently developed by the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Proteomics Standards Research Group (sPRG). PMID:23319436

  2. An investigation into the depth of penetration of low level laser therapy through the equine tendon in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Teresa

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Low level laser therapy (LLLT is frequently used in the treatment of wounds, soft tissue injury and in pain management. The exact penetration depth of LLLT in human tissue remains unspecified. Similar uncertainty regarding penetration depth arises in treating animals. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that transmission of LLLT in horses is increased by clipping the hair and/or by cleaning the area to be treated with alcohol, but is unaffected by coat colour. A LLLT probe (810 nm, 500 mW was applied to the medial aspect of the superficial flexor tendon of seventeen equine forelimbs in vivo. A light sensor was applied to the lateral aspect, directly opposite the laser probe to measure the amount of light transmitted. Light transmission was not affected by individual horse, coat colour or leg. However, it was associated with leg condition (F = 4.42, p = 0.0032. Tendons clipped dry and clipped and cleaned with alcohol, were both associated with greater transmission of light than the unprepared state. Use of alcohol without clipping was not associated with an increase in light transmission. These results suggest that, when applying laser to a subcutaneous structure in the horse, the area should be clipped and cleaned beforehand.

  3. The pathogenesis of Randall's plaque: a papilla cartography of Ca compounds through an ex vivo investigation based on XANES spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Xavier; Bazin, Dominique; Jungers, Paul; Reguer, Solenn; Thiaudière, Dominique; Daudon, Michel

    2010-05-01

    At the surface of attached kidney stones, a particular deposit termed Randall's plaque (RP) serves as a nucleus. This structural particularity as well as other major public health problems such as diabetes type-2 may explain the dramatic increase in urolithiasis now affecting up to 20% of the population in the industrialized countries. Regarding the chemical composition, even if other phosphate phases such as whitlockite or brushite can be found as minor components (less than 5%), calcium phosphate apatite as well as amorphous carbonated calcium phosphate (ACCP) are the major components of most RPs. Through X-ray absorption spectroscopy performed at the Ca K-absorption edge, a technique specific to synchrotron radiation, the presence and crystallinity of the Ca phosphate phases present in RP were determined ex vivo. The sensitivity of the technique was used as well as the fact that the measurements can be performed directly on the papilla. The sample was stored in formol. Moreover, a first mapping of the chemical phase from the top of the papilla to the deep medulla is obtained. Direct structural evidence of the presence of ACCP as a major constituent is given for the first time. This set of data, coherent with previous studies, shows that this chemical phase can be considered as one precursor in the genesis of RP.

  4. PROTEOMICS in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Pedro M.; Silva, Tomé S.; Dias, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Over the last forty years global aquaculture presented a growth rate of 6.9% per annum with an amazing production of 52.5million tonnes in 2008, and a contribution of 43% of aquatic animal food for human consumption. In order to meet the world's health requirements of fish protein, a continuous g...... nutritional, health or quality properties for functional foods and the integration of proteomics techniques in addressing this challenging issue. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Farm animal proteomics.......Over the last forty years global aquaculture presented a growth rate of 6.9% per annum with an amazing production of 52.5million tonnes in 2008, and a contribution of 43% of aquatic animal food for human consumption. In order to meet the world's health requirements of fish protein, a continuous...... of proteomics in seafood biology research. Proteomics, as a powerful comparative tool, has therefore been increasingly used over the last decade to address different questions in aquaculture, regarding welfare, nutrition, health, quality, and safety. In this paper we will give an overview of these biological...

  5. The minotaur proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; García, Guadalupe Espadas; Paz, Marcia Ivonne Peña

    2010-01-01

    Cell culture is a fundamental tool in proteomics where mammalian cells are cultured in vitro using a growth medium often supplemented with 5-15% FBS. Contamination by bovine proteins is difficult to avoid because of adherence to the plastic vessel and the cultured cells. We have generated peptides...... strategies to minimize erroneous identifications and an augmented contaminant database are presented....

  6. Shaping the mitochondrial proteome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabaldon, T.; Huynen, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles that originated from a single bacterial endosymbiosis some 2 billion years ago. The transition from the ancestral endosymbiont to the modern mitochondrion has been accompanied by major changes in its protein content, the so-called proteome. These changes

  7. “Seed Proteomics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteomic analysis of seeds encounters some specific problems that do not impinge on analyses of other plant cells, tissues, or organs. There are anatomic considerations. Seeds comprise the seed coat, the storage organ(s), and the embryonic axis. Are these to be studied individually or as a compo...

  8. Xylem sap proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bernonville, Thomas Dugé; Albenne, Cécile; Arlat, Matthieu; Hoffmann, Laurent; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of xylem sap has recently become a major field of interest to understand several biological questions related to plant development and responses to environmental clues. The xylem sap appears as a dynamic fluid undergoing changes in its proteome upon abiotic and biotic stresses. Unlike cell compartments which are amenable to purification in sufficient amount prior to proteomic analysis, the xylem sap has to be collected in particular conditions to avoid contamination by intracellular proteins and to obtain enough material. A model plant like Arabidopsis thaliana is not suitable for such an analysis because efficient harvesting of xylem sap is difficult. The analysis of the xylem sap proteome also requires specific procedures to concentrate proteins and to focus on proteins predicted to be secreted. Indeed, xylem sap proteins appear to be synthesized and secreted in the root stele or to originate from dying differentiated xylem cells. This chapter describes protocols to collect xylem sap from Brassica species and to prepare total and N-glycoprotein extracts for identification of proteins by mass spectrometry analyses and bioinformatics.

  9. Cutting edge proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Espadas, Guadalupe; Molina, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Tryptic digestion is an important component of most proteomics experiments, and trypsin is available from many sources with a cost that varies by more than 1000-fold. This high-mass-accuracy LC-MS study benchmarks six commercially available trypsins with respect to autolytic species and sequence ...

  10. Proteomics beyond trypsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsiatsiani, Liana|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/380468506; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332

    2015-01-01

    Peptide-centered shotgun analysis of proteins has been the core technology in mass spectrometry based proteomics and has enabled numerous biological discoveries, such as the large-scale charting of protein-protein interaction networks, the quantitative analysis of protein post-translational

  11. Non-Invasive Assessment of Skin Barrier Properties: Investigating Emerging Tools for In Vitro and In Vivo Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emer Duffy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the development of non-invasive tools for studying the properties of skin, due to the potential for non-destructive sampling, reduced ethical concerns and the potential comparability of results in vivo and in vitro. The present research focuses on the use of a range of non-invasive approaches for studying skin and skin barrier properties in human skin and human skin equivalents (HSE. Analytical methods used include pH measurements, electrical sensing of the epidermis and detection of volatile metabolic skin products. Standard probe based measurements of pH and the tissue dielectric constant (TDC are used. Two other more novel approaches that utilise wearable platforms are also demonstrated here that can assess the electrical properties of skin and to profile skin volatile species. The potential utility of these wearable tools that permit repeatability of testing and comparability of results is considered through application of our recently reported impedance-based tattoo sensors and volatile samplers on both human participants and HSEs. The HSE exhibited a higher pH (6.5 and TDC (56 than human skin (pH 4.9–5.6, TDC 29–36, and the tattoo sensor revealed a lower impedance signal for HSEs, suggesting the model could maintain homeostasis, but in a different manner to human skin, which demonstrated a more highly resistive barrier. Characterisation of volatiles showed a variety of compound classes emanating from skin, with 16 and 27 compounds identified in HSEs and participants respectively. The continuing development of these tools offers potential for improved quality and relevance of data, and potential for detection of changes that are undetectable in traditional palpable and visual assessments, permitting early detection of irritant reactions.

  12. Morphological and functional properties of the conducting human airways investigated by in vivo CT and in vitro MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Tristan; Wendt, Christine H; Coletti, Filippo

    2017-11-02

    The accurate representation of the human airway anatomy is crucial for understanding and modeling the structure-function relationship in both healthy and diseased lungs. The present knowledge in this area is based on morphometric studies of excised lung casts, partially complemented by in vivo studies in which computed tomography (CT) was used on a small number of subjects. In the present study, we analyze CT scans of a cohort of healthy subjects and obtain comprehensive morphometric information down to the seventh generation of bronchial branching, including airway diameter, length, branching angle, and rotation angle. While some of the geometrical parameters (such as the child-to-parent branch diameter ratio) are found to be in line with accepted values, for others (such as the branch length-to-diameter ratio) our findings challenge the common assumptions. We also evaluate several metrics of self-similarity, including the fractal dimension of the airway tree. Additionally, we use phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to obtain the volumetric flow field in the 3D printed airway model of one of the subjects during steady inhalation. This is used to relate structural and functional parameters and, in particular, to close the power-law relationship between branch flow rate and diameter. The diameter exponent is found to be significantly lower than in the usually assumed Poiseuille regime, which we attribute to the strong secondary (i.e. transverse) velocity component. The strength of the secondary velocity with respect to the axial component exceeds the levels found in idealized airway models, and persists within the first seven generations. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  13. Prevalence of middle mesial canals in mandibular molars after guided troughing under high magnification: an in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Adham A; Deutsch, Allan S; Solomon, Charles S

    2015-02-01

    A limited number of in vivo studies have discussed the prevalence of middle mesial canals in root canal systems of mandibular molars. The reported results have varied between 1% and 25%, with no detailed description of the depth and direction of troughing needed to identify such small canal orifices. The objective of the present study was to determine (1) the prevalence of a middle mesial canal before and after troughing by using a standardized troughing technique, (2) the pathway of the middle mesial canal in relation to the mesiobuccal (MB) and mesiolingual (ML) canals, and (3) its correlation with the patient's age. Ninety-one mandibular molars from 87 patients were included in this study. The patient's age and tooth number were recorded. After access cavity preparation, a standardized troughing technique was performed between MB and ML canals to search for a middle mesial canal by using a dental operating microscope. If a middle mesial canal was located, it was recorded as separate or as joining the MB or the ML canals. Results were statistically analyzed by using Z test and logistic regression. A middle mesial canal was found in 42 of 91 mandibular molars (46.2%). Six middle mesial canals were located after conventional access preparation (6.6%). The other 36 were located after standardized troughing (39.6%). The results were statistically significant (P magnification, troughing, and patient's age appeared to be determining factors in accessing the middle mesial canal. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genomes to Proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panisko, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Daly, Don S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Scott E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  15. The Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics Assembles the Largest Proteome Database Resource for Plant Systems Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weckwerth, Wolfram; Baginsky, Sacha; Van Wijk, Klass; Heazlewood, Joshua; Millar, Harvey

    2009-12-01

    In the past 10 years, we have witnessed remarkable advances in the field of plant molecular biology. The rapid development of proteomic technologies and the speed with which these techniques have been applied to the field have altered our perception of how we can analyze proteins in complex systems. At nearly the same time, the availability of the complete genome for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was released; this effort provides an unsurpassed resource for the identification of proteins when researchers use MS to analyze plant samples. Recognizing the growth in this area, the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) established a subcommittee for A. thaliana proteomics in 2006 with the objective of consolidating databases, technique standards, and experimentally validated candidate genes and functions. Since the establishment of the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics (MASCP), many new approaches and resources have become available. Recently, the subcommittee established a webpage to consolidate this information (www.masc-proteomics.org). It includes links to plant proteomic databases, general information about proteomic techniques, meeting information, a summary of proteomic standards, and other relevant resources. Altogether, this website provides a useful resource for the Arabidopsis proteomics community. In the future, the website will host discussions and investigate the cross-linking of databases. The subcommittee members have extensive experience in arabidopsis proteomics and collectively have produced some of the most extensive proteomics data sets for this model plant (Table S1 in the Supporting Information has a list of resources). The largest collection of proteomics data from a single study in A. thaliana was assembled into an accessible database (AtProteome; http://fgcz-atproteome.unizh.ch/index.php) and was recently published by the Baginsky lab.1 The database provides links to major Arabidopsis online

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Trauma-Induced Heterotopic Ossification Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    orthopaedic trauma study population • Harvest serial serum & wound fluid samples from subjects at risk for HO development • Examine clinical fluids for...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0097 TITLE: Proteomic Analysis of Trauma -Induced Heterotopic Ossification Formation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Proteomic Analysis of Trauma -Induced Heterotopic Ossification Formation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-2-0097 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  17. Market opportunity in computational proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvi, Enal

    2002-03-01

    The current exuberance on the potential of proteomics as a means to deploy the wealth of the human genome is expected to last into the coming years. Unlike the genome, a finite entity with a fixed number of base pairs of the genetic material, the proteome is "plastic", changing throughout growth and development and environmental stresses, as well as in pathological situations. Our proteomes change over time, and therefore there is no one proteome; the proteome is for practical purposes an infinite entity. It is therefore crucial to build systems that are capable of manipulating the information content that is the proteome, thence the need for computational proteomics as a discipline. In this Market View article, we present the industry landscape that is emerging in the computational proteomics space. This space is still in its infancy and for the most part undefined; therefore we seek to present the market opportunity in informatics in the drug discovery space and then extend that to an examination of industry trends in proteomics. Thus, the gestalt is a set of predictions as to the evolution of the landscape in computational proteomics over the coming years.

  18. Functional proteomics within the genus Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Maria; Calasso, Maria; Cavallo, Noemi; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Lactobacillus are mainly used for the manufacture of fermented dairy, sourdough, meat, and vegetable foods or used as probiotics. Under optimal processing conditions, Lactobacillus strains contribute to food functionality through their enzyme portfolio and the release of metabolites. An extensive genomic diversity analysis was conducted to elucidate the core features of the genus Lactobacillus, and to provide a better comprehension of niche adaptation of the strains. However, proteomics is an indispensable "omics" science to elucidate the proteome diversity, and the mechanisms of regulation and adaptation of Lactobacillus strains. This review focuses on the novel and comprehensive knowledge of functional proteomics and metaproteomics of Lactobacillus species. A large list of proteomic case studies of different Lactobacillus species is provided to illustrate the adaptability of the main metabolic pathways (e.g., carbohydrate transport and metabolism, pyruvate metabolism, proteolytic system, amino acid metabolism, and protein synthesis) to various life conditions. These investigations have highlighted that lactobacilli modulate the level of a complex panel of proteins to growth/survive in different ecological niches. In addition to the general regulation and stress response, specific metabolic pathways can be switched on and off, modifying the behavior of the strains. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Power of positive thinking in quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengaud, Jean

    2015-09-01

    Derivatization of proteins with specific isotope reagents has been widely explored for quantitative proteomics where the relative abundances of proteins present in different complex samples are compared by MS. This represents an interesting arena for innovation, where protein chemistry and MS are associated for the best of both worlds. Among the numerous reagents developed, those that introduce a permanent positive charge, such as (N-succinimidyloxycarbonylmethyl)-tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP), increase the ionizability of their targets and thus improve the sensitivity of the approach. TMPP labeling also modifies the hydrophobicity and changes the peptide fragmentation pattern. Because TMPP reacts preferably with the N-termini of proteins and peptides, its use has been explored for proteogenomics and de novo protein sequencing. In this issue of Proteomics, Shen et al. (Proteomics 2015, 15, 2903-2909) show that accurate quantitation of proteins can be obtained with light/heavy TMPP-labeling of peptides, which can be easily prepared and desalted in a homemade C8-SCX-C8 stagetip, and then monitored by nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. Their results demonstrate enhanced sequence coverage compared with other approaches. Combined with an efficient enrichment procedure, the higher sensitivity of this "positive attitude" reagent may facilitate much deeper investigations into the quantitative proteomics of complex samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Implications of adipose-derived stromal cells in a 3D culture system for osteogenic differentiation: an in vitro and in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Francis H; Werner, Brian C; Liang, Haixiang; Shang, Hulan; Yang, Ning; Li, Xudong; Shimer, Adam L; Balian, Gary; Katz, Adam J

    2013-01-01

    Healthy mammalian cells in normal tissues are organized in complex three-dimensional (3D) networks that display nutrient and signaling gradients. Conventional techniques that grow cells in a 2D monolayer fail to reproduce the environment that is observed in vivo. In recent years, 3D culture systems have been used to mimic tumor microenvironments in cancer research and to emulate embryogenesis in stem cell cultures. However, there have been no studies exploring the ability for adipose-derived stromal (ADS) cells in a 3D culture system to undergo osteogenic differentiation. To characterize and investigate the in vitro and in vivo potential for human ADS cells in a novel 3D culture system to undergo osteogenic differentiation. Basic science and laboratory study. Human ADS cells were isolated and prepared as either a 2D monolayer or 3D multicellular aggregates (MAs). Multicellular aggregates were formed using the hanging droplet technique. Cells were treated in osteogenic medium in vitro, and cellular differentiation was investigated using gene expression, histology, and microCT at 1-, 2-, and 4-week time points. In vivo investigation involved creating a muscle pouch by developing the avascular muscular interval in the vastus lateralis of male athymic rats. Specimens were then pretreated with osteogenic medium and surgically implanted as (1) carrier (Matrigel) alone (control), (2) carrier with human ADS cells in monolayer, or (3) human ADS cells as MAs. In vivo evidence of osteogenic differentiation was evaluated with micro computed tomography and histologic sectioning at a 2-week time point. Human ADS cells cultured by the hanging droplet technique successfully formed MAs at the air-fluid interface. Adipose-derived stromal cells cultured in monolayer or as 3D MAs retain their ability to self-replicate and undergo multilineage differentiation as confirmed by increased runx2/Cbfa2, ALP, and OCN and increased matrix mineralization on histologic sectioning

  1. The Proteome of Filter-Grown Caco-2 Cells With a Focus on Proteins Involved in Drug Disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ölander, Magnus; Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Matsson, Pär; Lundquist, Patrik; Artursson, Per

    2016-02-01

    Caco-2 cells are widely used in studies of intestinal cell physiology and drug transport. Here, the global proteome of filter-grown Caco-2 cells was quantified using the total protein approach and compared with the human colon and jejunum proteomes. In total, 8096 proteins were identified. In-depth analysis of proteins defining enterocyte differentiation-including brush-border hydrolases, integrins, and adherens and tight junctions-gave near-complete coverage of the expected proteins. Three hundred twenty-seven absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion proteins were identified, including 112 solute carriers and 20 ATP-binding cassette transporters. OATP2B1 levels were 16-fold higher in Caco-2 cells than in jejunum. To investigate the impact of this difference on in vitro-in vivo extrapolations, we studied the uptake kinetics of the OATP2B1 substrate pitavastatin in Caco-2 monolayers, and found that the contribution of OATP2B1 was 60%-70% at clinically relevant intestinal concentrations. Pitavastatin kinetics was combined with transporter concentrations to model the contribution of active transport and membrane permeation in the jejunum. The lower OATP2B1 expression in jejunum led to a considerably lower transporter contribution (Caco-2 proteome. We also demonstrate the crucial importance of considering transporter expression levels for correct interpretation of drug transport routes across the human intestine. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of the holographic interference microscope for investigation of ozone therapy influence on blood erythrocytes of patients in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishko, Tatyana V.; Titar, V. P.; Barchotkina, T. M.; Tishko, D. N.

    2004-09-01

    The holographic methods of phase micro-objects visualization (the holographic phase contrast method and the method of holographic interferometry) are considered. Comparative analysis of classical and holographic methods in microscopy of phase micro-objects is carried out. An arrangement of the holographic interference microscope realizing the holographic methods and experimental results of 3-D imaging of native blood erythrocytes are presented. It is shown that 3-D morphology of blood erythrocytes reflects and determines the state of a human organism and those different physical and chemical factors and internal pathologies influence erythrocytes morphology. The holographic interference microscope was used for investigation of ozone therapy influence on human blood erythrocytes. Blood samples of 60 patients of different age with neurosensoric hardness of hearing before and after ozone therapy were investigated. It was shown that all patients have changed erythrocytes mrophology. Ozone therapy treatment results in normalization of erythrocytes morphology of patients.

  3. Quantification of functional brace forces for posterior cruciate ligament injuries on the knee joint: an in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrade, Robert F; Smith, Sean D; Wilson, Katharine J; Wijdicks, Coen A

    2015-10-01

    Counteracting posterior translation of the tibia with an anterior force on the posterior proximal tibia has been demonstrated clinically to improve posterior knee laxity following posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. This study quantified forces applied to the posterior proximal tibia by two knee braces designed for treatment of PCL injuries. The forces applied by two knee braces to the posterior proximal tibia and in vivo three-dimensional knee kinematics of six adult, male, healthy volunteer subjects (mean ± standard deviation: height, 182.5 ± 5.2 cm; body mass, 83.2 ± 9.3 kg; body mass index, 24.9 ± 1.5 kg/m(2); age, 25.8 ± 2.9 years) were measured using a custom pressure mapping technique and traditional surface marker motion capture techniques, while subjects performed three functional activities. The activities included seated unloaded knee flexion, squatting, and stair descent in a new generation dynamic force (DF) PCL brace and a static force (SF) PCL brace. During unloaded flexion at the lowest force level setting, the force applied by the DF brace increased as a function of flexion angle (slope = 0.7 N/°; p brace effect. Force applied by the SF brace did not significantly change as a function of flexion angle (slope = 0.0 N/°; n.s.). By 45° of flexion, the average force applied by the DF brace (48.1 N) was significantly larger (p brace (25.0 N). The difference in force continued to increase as flexion angle increased. During stair descent, average force (mean ± standard deviation) at toe off was significantly higher (p = 0.013) for the DF brace (78.7 ± 21.6 N) than the SF brace (37.3 ± 7.2 N). Similar trends were observed for squatting and for the higher force level settings. The DF brace applied forces to the posterior proximal tibia that dynamically increased with increased flexion angle. Additionally, the DF brace applied significantly larger forces at higher flexion angles compared to the SF brace

  4. Identification of Hypoxia-Regulated Proteins Using MALDI-Mass Spectrometry Imaging Combined with Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djidja, Marie-Claude; Chang, Joan; Hadjiprocopis, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    quantitative proteomics combined with MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Here we present a comprehensive hypoxic proteome study and are the first to investigate changes in situ using tumor samples. In vitro quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of the hypoxic proteome was performed on breast cancer...... data were also developed, and computational mapping of MALDI-MSI data to IHC results was applied for data validation. The results and limitations of the methodologies described are discussed....

  5. Effects of Elaidic Acid on Lipid Metabolism in HepG2 Cells, Investigated by an Integrated Approach of Lipidomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendel Nielsen, Lone; Hansen, Toke Peter Krogager; Young, Clifford

    2013-01-01

    Trans fatty acid consumption in the human diet can cause adverse health effects, such as cardiovascular disease, which is associated with higher total cholesterol, a higher low density lipoprotein-cholesterol level and a decreased high density lipoprotein-cholesterol level. The aim of the study w...... occurred at the phospholipid level. Our findings contribute to the explanation on how trans fatty acids from the diet can cause modifications in plasma cholesterol levels by inducing abundance changes in several hepatic proteins and the hepatic membrane composition.......Trans fatty acid consumption in the human diet can cause adverse health effects, such as cardiovascular disease, which is associated with higher total cholesterol, a higher low density lipoprotein-cholesterol level and a decreased high density lipoprotein-cholesterol level. The aim of the study...... was to elucidate the hepatic response to the most abundant trans fatty acid in the human diet, elaidic acid, to help explain clinical findings on the relationship between trans fatty acids and cardiovascular disease. The human HepG2 cell line was used as a model to investigate the hepatic response to elaidic acid...

  6. Investigation of in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of flavonoids rich extract from the berries of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa(Ait.) Hassk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pingping; Ma, Guangzhi; Li, Nianghui; Deng, Qian; Yin, Yanyan; Huang, Ruqiang

    2015-04-15

    This study investigated the in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of the flavonoids rich extract from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Hassk (R. tomentosa) berries. The in vitro antioxidant assay demonstrated that the flavonoids rich extract (62.09% rutin equivalent) extracted by ethanol and purified by AB-8 macroporous resin was strong in reducing power, superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical and DPPH radical scavenging activity, as well as inhibiting lipid peroxidation. In the in vivo assays, the flavonoids rich extract significantly enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes in serums of mice after they were administered with the extract. The results suggested that the flavonoids rich extract from R. tomentosa fruits possesses potent antioxidant properties. In addition, the chemical compositions of flavonoids rich extract were identified by UPLC-TOF-MS/MS. Six flavonoids were tentatively identified as myricetin, quercetin, dihydromyricetin, kaempferol, quercetin 7,4'-diglucoside and vitexin. Therefore, R. tomentosa berries could be used as a new source of antioxidant ingredient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. C4 photosynthetic machinery: insights from maize chloroplast proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi eZhao

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available C4 plants exhibit much higher CO2 assimilation rates than C3 plants. The specialized differentiation of mesophyll cell (M and bundle sheath cell (BS type chloroplasts is unique to C4 plants and improves photosynthesis efficiency. Maize (Zea mays is an important crop and model with C4 photosynthetic machinery. Current high-throughput quantitative proteomics approaches (e.g., 2DE, iTRAQ, and shotgun proteomics have been employed to investigate maize chloroplast structure and function. These proteomic studies have provided valuable information on C4 chloroplast protein components, photosynthesis, and other metabolic mechanisms underlying chloroplast biogenesis, stromal and membrane differentiation, as well as response to salinity, high/low temperature, and light stress. This review presents an overview of proteomics advances in maize chloroplast biology.

  8. Drought-Responsive Mechanisms in Plant Leaves Revealed by Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Cai, Xiaofeng; Xu, Chenxi; Wang, Quanhua; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-10-18

    Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that requires a global view to understand its underlying mechanism. The proteomic aspects of plant drought response have been extensively investigated in model plants, crops and wood plants. In this review, we summarize recent proteomic studies on drought response in leaves to reveal the common and specialized drought-responsive mechanisms in different plants. Although drought-responsive proteins exhibit various patterns depending on plant species, genotypes and stress intensity, proteomic analyses show that dominant changes occurred in sensing and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species scavenging, osmotic regulation, gene expression, protein synthesis/turnover, cell structure modulation, as well as carbohydrate and energy metabolism. In combination with physiological and molecular results, proteomic studies in leaves have helped to discover some potential proteins and/or metabolic pathways for drought tolerance. These findings provide new clues for understanding the molecular basis of plant drought tolerance.

  9. Quantitative proteomic analysis of yeast DNA replication proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takashi; Stead, David A; Hiraga, Shin-ichiro; ten Have, Sara; Donaldson, Anne D

    2012-06-01

    Chromatin is dynamically regulated, and proteomic analysis of its composition can provide important information about chromatin functional components. Many DNA replication proteins for example bind chromatin at specific times during the cell cycle. Proteomic investigation can also be used to characterize changes in chromatin composition in response to perturbations such as DNA damage, while useful information is obtained by testing the effects on chromatin composition of mutations in chromosome stability pathways. We have successfully used the method of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for quantitative proteomic analysis of normal and pathological changes to yeast chromatin. Here we describe this proteomic method for analyzing changes to Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin, illustrating the procedure with an analysis of the changes that occur in chromatin composition as cells progress from a G1 phase block (induced by alpha factor) into S phase (in the presence of DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitation of dopamine transporter blockade by methylphenidate: first in vivo investigation using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and a dedicated small animal SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Wirrwar, Andreas; Antke, Christina; Arkian, Shahram; Mueller, Hans-Wilhelm; Larisch, Rolf [Heinrich-Heine University, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Duesseldorf (Germany); Schramm, Nils [Research Center Juelich, Central Laboratory for Electronics, Juelich (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of assessing dopamine transporter binding after treatment with methylphenidate in the rat using a recently developed high-resolution small animal single-photon emission computed tomograph (TierSPECT) and [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT. [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT was administered intravenously 1 h after intraperitoneal injection of methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. Animals underwent scanning 2 h after radioligand administration. The striatum was identified by superimposition of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans with bone metabolism and perfusion scans obtained with {sup 99m}Tc-DPD and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin, respectively. As these tracers do not pass the blood-brain barrier, their distribution permits the identification of extracerebral anatomical landmarks such as the orbitae and the harderian glands. The cerebellum was identified by superimposing [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans with images of brain perfusion obtained with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO. Methylphenidate-treated animals and vehicle-treated animals yielded striatal equilibrium ratios (V''{sub 3}) of 0.24{+-}0.26 (mean {+-} SD) and 1.09{+-}0.42, respectively (ttest, two-tailed, p<0.0001). Cortical V''{sub 3} values amounted to 0.05{+-}0.28 (methylphenidate) and 0.3{+-}0.39 (saline, p=0.176). This first in vivo study of rat dopamine transporter binding after pre-treatment with methylphenidate showed a mean reduction of 78% in striatal [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT accumulation. The results can be interpreted in terms of a pharmacological blockade in the rat striatum and show that in vivo quantitation of dopamine transporter binding is feasible with [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and the TierSPECT. This may be of future relevance for in vivo investigations on rat models of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Furthermore, our findings suggest that investigations in other animal models, e.g. of Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, may be feasible using SPECT radioligands and

  11. Examining hemodialyzer membrane performance using proteomic technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Mario; Pieroni, Luisa; Di Liberato, Lorenzo; Sirolli, Vittorio; Urbani, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    The success and the quality of hemodialysis therapy are mainly related to both clearance and biocompatibility properties of the artificial membrane packed in the hemodialyzer. Performance of a membrane is strongly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire during the extracorporeal procedure. Recognition that a number of medium-high molecular weight solutes, including proteins and protein-bound molecules, are potentially toxic has prompted the development of more permeable membranes. Such membrane engineering, however, may cause loss of vital proteins, with membrane removal being nonspecific. In addition, plasma proteins can be adsorbed onto the membrane surface upon blood contact during dialysis. Adsorption can contribute to the removal of toxic compounds and governs the biocompatibility of a membrane, since surface-adsorbed proteins may trigger a variety of biologic blood pathways with pathophysiologic consequences. Over the last years, use of proteomic approaches has allowed polypeptide spectrum involved in the process of hemodialysis, a key issue previously hampered by lack of suitable technology, to be assessed in an unbiased manner and in its full complexity. Proteomics has been successfully applied to identify and quantify proteins in complex mixtures such as dialysis outflow fluid and fluid desorbed from dialysis membrane containing adsorbed proteins. The identified proteins can also be characterized by their involvement in metabolic and signaling pathways, molecular networks, and biologic processes through application of bioinformatics tools. Proteomics may thus provide an actual functional definition as to the effect of a membrane material on plasma proteins during hemodialysis. Here, we review the results of proteomic studies on the performance of hemodialysis membranes, as evaluated in terms of solute removal efficiency and blood-membrane interactions. The evidence collected indicates that the information provided by proteomic

  12. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox...... PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  13. Subnuclear proteomics in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C; Piersma, Sander R

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in nuclear phenotype and chromosome structure are key features of cancer cells. Investigation of the protein determinants of nuclear subfractions in cancer may yield molecular insights into aberrant chromosome function and chromatin organization and in addition may yield biomarkers...... for early cancer detection. Here we evaluate a proteomics work flow for profiling protein constituents in subnuclear domains in colorectal cancer tissues and apply this work flow to a comparative analysis of the nuclear matrix fraction in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissue samples. First, we...... established the reproducibility of the entire work flow. In a reproducibility analysis of three nuclear matrix fractions independently isolated from the same colon tumor homogenate, 889 of 1,047 proteins (85%) were reproducibly identified at high confidence (minimally two peptides per protein at 99...

  14. In-vivo laser induced urethral stricture animal model for investigating the potential of LDR-brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Lellig, Katja; Bader, Markus; Stief, Christian; Weidlich, Patrick; Wechsel, G.; Assmann, Walter; Becker, R.; Fedorova, O.; Khoder, Wael

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Treatment of urethral strictures is a major challenge in urology. For investigation of different treatment methods an animal model was developed by reproducible induction of urethral strictures in rabbits to mimic the human clinical situation. By means of this model the potential of endoluminal LDR brachytherapy using β-irradiation as prophylaxis of recurrent urethral strictures investigated. Material and Methods: A circumferential urethral stricture was induced by energy deposition using laser light application (wavelength λ=1470 nm, 10 W, 10 s, applied energy 100 J) in the posterior urethra of anaesthetized New Zealand White male rabbits. The radial light emitting fiber was introduced by means of a children resectoscope (14F). The grade of urethral stricture was evaluated in 18 rabbits using videourethroscopy and urethrography at day 28 after stricture induction. An innovative catheter was developed based on a β-irradiation emitting foil containing 32P, which was wrapped around the application system. Two main groups (each n=18) were separated. The "internal urethrotomy group" received after 28days of stricture induction immediately after surgical urethrotomy of the stricture the radioactive catheter for one week in a randomized, controlled and blinded manner. There were 3 subgroups with 6 animals each receiving 0 Gy, 15 Gy and 30 Gy. In contrast animals from the "De Nuovo group" received directly after the stricture induction (day 0) the radioactive catheter also for the duration of one week divided into the same dose subgroups. In order to determine the radiation tolerance of the urethral mucosa, additional animals without any stricture induction received a radioactive catheter applying a total dose of 30 Gy (n=2) and 15 Gy (n=1). Cystourethrography and endoscopic examination of urethra were performed on all operation days for monitoring treatment progress. Based on these investigation a classification of the stricture size was performed and

  15. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... context to be defined for them. There are indications that some of these proteins add novel activities to mitochondrial protein complexes in plants....

  16. Computing the functional proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien, Edward J.; Palsson, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Constraint-based models enable the computation of feasible, optimal, and realized biological phenotypes from reaction network reconstructions and constraints on their operation. To date, stoichiometric reconstructions have largely focused on metabolism, resulting in genome-scale metabolic models (M....... Specifically, ME-Models enable the prediction of transcriptome and proteome allocation and limitations, and basal expression states and regulatory needs. Continued expansion in reconstruction content and constraints will result in an increasingly refined representation of cellular composition and behavior....

  17. Post-injury ex vivo model to investigate effects and toxicity of pharmacological treatment in rings of rabbit aortic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finking, G; Wolkenhauer, M; Lenz, C; Hanke, H

    2000-01-01

    Animal experiments are widely accepted in arteriosclerosis research. The aim of the present study was to establish an organ culture model (rings of rabbit aortic vessels) to investigate inhibitory estrogen effects on post injury neointima formation in the vessel wall and to examine whether these effects are cytotoxic. Estrogens are used for secondary prevention of atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women (estrogen replacement therapy/ERT). Phytoestrogens as well as the ovarian 17 beta-estradiol have been demonstrated to inhibit proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells which are key events in atherogenesis and restenosis after coronary angioplasty. In situ endothelial denudation of the thoracic and abdominal aorta was performed in female rabbits by a 3F Fogarty catheter. Segments of 5 mm were randomized in groups of n = 12 and held in culture. 17 beta-estradiol, Genistein and Daidzein were applied in concentrations of 20 microM, 30 microM, and 40 microM. Groups without estrogen treatment served as controls. The segments were investigated after 21 days. Afterwards, 3 further groups (n = 12) were held with the lowest concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol or the two phytoestrogens having been evaluated to inhibit the neointima formation significantly. After 21 days of treatment these sections were held in medium only for another 7 days to proof whether these segments were still able to proliferate. A denuded control group was held in medium only over 28 days. Compared to controls, 30 microM 17 beta-estradiol, 20 microM Genistein, and 40 microM Daidzein inhibited neointima formation significantly over 21 days. After another 7 days of cultivation in medium only the amount of neointima formation was comparable to that of non-estrogen-treated controls after 21 days. We therefore suggest that the demonstrated inhibitory effect is not explained by toxicity. In conclusion, by the use of this organ culture model it was possible to demonstrate non-toxic post

  18. Investigation of left and right lateral fluid percussion injury in C57BL6/J mice: In vivo functional consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurman, Lesley D; Smith, Terry L; Morales, Anthony J; Lee, Nancy N; Reeves, Thomas M; Phillips, Linda L; Lichtman, Aron H

    2017-07-13

    Although rodent models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) reliably produce cognitive and motor disturbances, behavioral characterization resulting from left and right hemisphere injuries remains unexplored. Here we examined the functional consequences of targeting the left versus right parietal cortex in lateral fluid percussion injury, on Morris water maze (MWM) spatial memory tasks (fixed platform and reversal) and neurological motor deficits (neurological severity score and rotarod). In the MWM fixed platform task, right lateral injury produced a small delay in acquisition rate compared to left. However, injury to either hemisphere resulted in probe trial deficits. In the MWM reversal task, left-right performance deficits were not evident, though left lateral injury produced mild acquisition and probe trial deficits compared to sham controls. Additionally, left and right injury produced similar neurological motor task deficits, impaired righting times, and lesion volumes. Injury to either hemisphere also produced robust ipsilateral, and modest contralateral, morphological changes in reactive microglia and astrocytes. In conclusion, left and right lateral TBI impaired MWM performance, with mild fixed platform acquisition rate differences, despite similar motor deficits, histological damage, and glial cell reactivity. Thus, while both left and right lateral TBI produce cognitive deficits, laterality in mouse MWM learning and memory merits consideration in the investigation of TBI-induced cognitive consequences. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. In vivo Investigation of Anti-diabetic Properties of Ripe Onion Juice in Normal and Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Won; Lee, Hyung-Seok; Cha, Yong-Jun; Joo, Woo-Hong; Kang, Dae-Ook; Moon, Ja-Young

    2013-01-01

    The acute and subacute hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic effects of drinkable ripe onion juice (Commercial product name is “Black Onion Extract”) were investigated in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. For tests of acute and subacute hypoglycemic effects, ripe onion juice (5 and 15 mL/kg b.w.) was administered by oral gavage to normal Sprague Dawley rats and measurements of fasting glucose levels and oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Tolbutamide was used as a reference drug at a single oral dose of 250 mg/kg b.w. To test anti-hyper-glycemic activity, the ripe onion juice was administered to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by oral gavage at single dose of 15 mL/kg b.w. per day for 7 consecutive days. Oral administration of the ripe onion juice at either dosed level of 5 or 15 mL/kg b.w. showed no remarkable acute hypoglycemic effect in normal rats. The two dosed levels caused a relatively small reduction, only 18% and 12% (5 and 15 mL/kg b.w., respectively) decrease in glucose levels at 2 h after glucose loading in normal rats. However, at 3 h after glucose loading, blood glucose levels in the ripe onion juice-dosed rats were decreased to the corresponding blood glucose level in tolbutamide-dosed rats. Although showing weak hypoglycemic potential compared to that of tolbutamide, oral administration of ripe onion juice (15 mL/kg b.w.) for a short period (8 days) resulted in a slight reduction in the blood glucose levels that had elevated in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that the commercial product “Black Onion Extract” may possess anti-hyperglycemic potential in diabetes. PMID:24471128

  20. Ex vivo investigation on the postoperative integrity of the apical constriction after the sole use of electronic working length determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgin, Michael; Grundmann, Markus J; Tchorz, Jörg P; Frank, Wilhelm; Kielbassa, Andrej M

    2017-09-01

    The present study investigated the accuracy of root canal preparation with regard to the integrity of the apical constriction (AC) using two different working length determination approaches: (1) the electronic method of working length determination (EWLD), and (2) the radiologic "gold standard" method (GS). Simulation models were constructed by arranging extracted human teeth by means of silicon bolstered gingiva masks, along with a conductive medium (alginate). Electronic working length determination (group 1; EWLD) and radiologic plus initial electronic working length determination for posterior comparability (group 2; GS) preceded manual root canal preparation of teeth in both groups. Master cones were inserted according to working lengths obtained from the group specific method. Subsequently, root apices (n=36) were longitudinally sectioned using a diamond-coated bur. The distance between the achieved apical endpoint of the endodontic preparation and the apical constriction (AC) was measured using digital photography. Then, distances between radiologically identified apical endpoints and AC (GS-AC) were compared with the corresponding distances EWLD-AC. Moreover, the postoperative status of the AC was examined with regard to both preparation approaches. Differences between distances GS-AC and EWLD-AC were not statistically significant (p >0.401) (Mann-Whitney-U). Among EWLD samples, 83% of the master cones exhibiting tugback at final insertion terminated close to the apical constriction (±0.5 mm), and no impairment of the minor diameter's integrity was observed. The sole use of EWLD allowed for a high accuracy of measurements and granted precise preparation of the apical regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In vivo and qualitative studies investigating the translational potential of microneedles for use in the older population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Helen L; Hughes, Carmel M; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2017-05-15

    Microneedles (MNs) are a novel transdermal drug delivery platform, rapidly progressing from a substantive evidence base, towards commercialisation. As part of this transition, it is important to consider the future use of MNs by older people in order to ensure optimal therapeutic outcomes for this unique and increasing population group. This paper, therefore, considers the use of MNs by those aged over 65 years, investigating insertion parameters in ageing skin, alongside the feasibility and acceptability of the technology. Hydrogel-forming MN arrays were applied to seven subjects aged over 65 years, with breach of the stratum corneum confirmed using optical coherence tomography. Insertion depths recorded in each case were similar to a comparative group, aged 20-30 years. Skin recovery was, however, demonstrated to occur at a slower rate in the older subjects, as measured using transepidermal water loss. Qualitative methods, including focus groups and semi-structured interviews, were employed to collect the views and opinions of older people and community pharmacists respectively. The overall consensus was positive, with a number of benefits to MN-mediated drug delivery identified, such as reduced dosing frequency, improved adherence and an alternative delivery route where oral or injectable medication was precluded. Concerns centred on practical issues associated with age-related functional decline, including, for example, reduced dexterity and skin changes. The presentation of this work collectively provides the first convincing report of the importance of further translational research in this area to support future MN use in older people, ensuring an age-appropriate delivery platform.

  2. Viewing the proteome: how to visualize proteomics data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oveland, Eystein; Muth, Thilo; Rapp, Erdmann; Martens, Lennart; Berven, Frode S; Barsnes, Harald

    2015-04-01

    Proteomics has become one of the main approaches for analyzing and understanding biological systems. Yet similar to other high-throughput analysis methods, the presentation of the large amounts of obtained data in easily interpretable ways remains challenging. In this review, we present an overview of the different ways in which proteomics software supports the visualization and interpretation of proteomics data. The unique challenges and current solutions for visualizing the different aspects of proteomics data, from acquired spectra via protein identification and quantification to pathway analysis, are discussed, and examples of the most useful visualization approaches are highlighted. Finally, we offer our ideas about future directions for proteomics data visualization. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. MitoMiner: a data warehouse for mitochondrial proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anthony C; Blackshaw, James A; Robinson, Alan J

    2012-01-01

    MitoMiner (http://mitominer.mrc-mbu.cam.ac.uk/) is a data warehouse for the storage and analysis of mitochondrial proteomics data gathered from publications of mass spectrometry and green fluorescent protein tagging studies. In MitoMiner, these data are integrated with data from UniProt, Gene Ontology, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, HomoloGene, Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes and PubMed. The latest release of MitoMiner stores proteomics data sets from 46 studies covering 11 different species from eumetazoa, viridiplantae, fungi and protista. MitoMiner is implemented by using the open source InterMine data warehouse system, which provides a user interface allowing users to upload data for analysis, personal accounts to store queries and results and enables queries of any data in the data model. MitoMiner also provides lists of proteins for use in analyses, including the new MitoMiner mitochondrial proteome reference sets that specify proteins with substantial experimental evidence for mitochondrial localization. As further mitochondrial proteomics data sets from normal and diseased tissue are published, MitoMiner can be used to characterize the variability of the mitochondrial proteome between tissues and investigate how changes in the proteome may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial-associated diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, diabetes, heart failure and the ageing process.

  4. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics: existing capabilities and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, Thomas E.; Aryal, Uma K.; Hengel, Shawna M.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Kelly, Ryan T.; Robinson, Errol W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-21

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides a means for identification, characterization, and quantification of biomolecules that are integral components of the processes essential for life. Characterization of proteins present in a biological system at the proteome and sub-proteomes (e.g., the phosphoproteome, proteoglycome, or degradome/peptidome) levels provides a foundation for understanding fundamental aspects as well as potentially a range of translational applications. Emerging technologies such as ion mobility separations coupled with mass spectrometry and microchip-based - proteome measurements combined with continued enhancement of MS instrumentation and separation techniques, such as reversed phase liquid chromatography and potentially capillary electrophoresis, show great promise for both broad undirected as well as targeted measurements and will be critical for e.g., the proteome-wide characterization of post translational modifications and identification, or the verification, and validation of potential biomarkers of disease. MS-based proteomics is also increasingly demonstrating great potential for contributing to our understanding of the dynamics, reactions, and roles proteins and peptides play advancing our understanding of biology on a system wide level for a wide range of applications, from investigations of microbial communities, bioremediation, and human health and disease states alike.

  5. Enrichment proteomics challenges and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is based on two technology projects from the Centre for BioSystems Genomics (CBSG), entitled ‘Comparative proteomics on Plant Pathogen interactions through enrichment of the N-glycoproteome and tagged-glycoproteome’ (TD7) and ‘Plasma Membrane proteomics for Plant

  6. The investigational Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 induces defects in cell viability and cell-cycle progression in malignant bladder cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ning; Singh, Kamini; Mir, Maria C; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel; Dreicer, Robert; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Zhongfa; Teh, Bin T; Almasan, Alexandru; Hansel, Donna E

    2013-04-01

    Despite more than 70,000 new cases of bladder cancer in the United States annually, patients with advanced disease have a poor prognosis due to limited treatment modalities. We evaluated Aurora kinase A, identified as an upregulated candidate molecule in bladder cancer, as a potential therapeutic target. Gene expression in human bladder cancer samples was evaluated using RNA microarray and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Effects of the Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 (Millennium) on cell dynamics in malignant T24 and UM-UC-3 and papilloma-derived RT4 bladder cells were evaluated in vitro and in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. A set of 13 genes involved in the mitotic spindle checkpoint, including Aurora kinases A and B, were upregulated in human urothelial carcinoma compared with normal urothelium. The Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 induced cell-cycle arrest, aneuploidy, mitotic spindle failure, and apoptosis in the human bladder cancer cell lines T24 and UM-UC-3. MLN8237 also arrested tumor growth when administered orally over 4 weeks in a mouse bladder cancer xenograft model. Finally, in vitro sequential administration of MLN8237 with either paclitaxel or gemcitabine resulted in synergistic cytotoxic effects in T24 cells. Mitotic spindle checkpoint dysfunction is a common characteristic of human urothelial carcinoma and can be exploited with pharmacologic Aurora A inhibition. Given our demonstration of the ability of the Aurora A inhibitor MLN8237 to inhibit growth of bladder cancer in vitro and in vivo, we conclude that Aurora kinase inhibitors warrant further therapeutic investigation in bladder cancer. ©2013 AACR.

  7. The investigational Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 induces defects in cell viability and cell cycle progression in malignant bladder cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ning; Singh, Kamini; Mir, Maria C.; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel; Dreicer, Robert; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Zhongfa; Teh, Bin T.; Almasan, Alexandru; Hansel, Donna E.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite over 70,000 new cases of bladder cancer in the United States annually, patients with advanced disease have a poor prognosis due to limited treatment modalities. We evaluated Aurora kinase A, identified as an upregulated candidate molecule in bladder cancer, as a potential therapeutic target. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Gene expression in human bladder cancer samples was evaluated using RNA microarray and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR. Effects of the Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 (Millennium) on cell dynamics in malignant T24 and UM-UC-3 and papilloma-derived RT4 bladder cells were evaluated in vitro and in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. RESULTS A set of 13 genes involved in the mitotic spindle checkpoint, including Aurora kinases A and B, were upregulated in human urothelial carcinoma compared to normal urothelium. The Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 induced cell cycle arrest, aneuploidy, mitotic spindle failure, and apoptosis in the human bladder cancer cell lines T24 and UM-UC-3. MLN8237 also arrested tumor growth when administered orally over 4 weeks in a mouse bladder cancer xenograft model. Finally, in vitro sequential administration of MLN8237 with either paclitaxel or gemcitabine resulted in synergistic cytotoxic effects in T24 cells. CONCLUSIONS Mitotic spindle checkpoint dysfunction is a common characteristic of human urothelial carcinoma, and can be exploited with pharmacologic Aurora A inhibition. Given our demonstration of the ability of the Aurora A inhibitor MLN8237 to inhibit growth of bladder cancer in vitro and in vivo, we conclude that Aurora kinase inhibitors warrant further therapeutic investigation in bladder cancer. PMID:23403633

  8. Hepatic proteome sensitivity in rainbow trout after chronically exposed to a human pharmaceutical verapamil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Li, Ping; Sulc, Miroslav; Hulak, Martin; Randak, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Verapamil (VRP), a cardiovascular pharmaceutical widely distributed and persistent in the aquatic environment, has potential toxicity to fish and other aquatic organisms. However, the molecular mechanisms that lead to these toxic effects are not well known. In the present study, proteomic analysis has been performed to investigate the protein patterns that are differentially expressed in liver of rainbow trout exposed to sublethal concentrations of VRP (0.5, 27.0, and 270 μg/liter) for 42 days. Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was employed to detect and identify the protein profiles. The analysis revealed that the expression of six hepatic acidic proteins were markedly altered in the treatment groups compared with the control group; three proteins especially were significantly down-regulated in fish exposed to VRP at environmental related concentration (0.5 μg/liter). These results suggested that the VRP induce mechanisms against oxidative stress (glucose-regulated protein 78 and 94 and protein disulfide-isomerase A3) and adaptive changes in ion transference regulation (calreticulin, hyperosmotic glycine-rich protein). Furthermore, for the first time, protein Canopy-1 was found to be significantly down-regulated in fish by chronic exposure to VRP at environmental related levels. Overall, our work supports that fish hepatic proteomics analysis serves as an in vivo model for monitoring the residual pharmaceuticals in aquatic environment and can provide valuable insight into the molecular events in VRP-induced toxicity in fish and other organisms.

  9. [The influence of doxorubicin incorporated in phospholipid drug delivery nanosystem on HEPG2 cells proteome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetzova, K G; Kazlas, E V; Torkhovskaya, T I; Karalkin, P A; Vachrushev, I V; Zakharova, T S; Sanzhakov, M A; Moshkovskiy, S A; Ipatova, O M

    2015-01-01

    A phospholipid drug delivery nanosystem with particle size up to 30 nm elaborated at the Institute of Biomedical Chemistry has been used earlier for incorporation of doxorubicin (Doxolip). This system demonstrated higher antitumor effect in vivo as compared with free doxorubicin. In this study the effect of this nanosystem containing doxorubicin on HepG2 cell proteome has been investigated. Cells were incubated in a medium containing phospholipid nanoparticles (0.5 mg/ml doxorubicin, 10 mg/mL phosphatidylcholine). After incubation for 48 h their survival represented 10% as compared with untreated cells. Cell proteins were analyzed by quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by identification of differentially expressed proteins with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The phospholipid transport nanosystem itself insignificantly influenced the cell proteome thus confirming previous data on its safety. Doxorubicin, as both free substance and Doxolip (i.e. included into phospholipid nanoparticles) induced changes in expression of 28 proteins. Among these proteins only four of them demonstrated different in response to the effect of the free drug substance and Doxolip. Doxolip exhibited a more pronounced effect on expression of certain proteins; the latter indirectly implies increased penetration of the drug substance (included into nanoparticles) into the tumor cells. Increased antitumor activity of doxorubicin included into phospholipid nanoparticles may be associated with more active increase of specific protein expression.

  10. An Optimized Shotgun Strategy for the Rapid Generation of Comprehensive Human Proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Dorte B; Kelstrup, Christian D; Batth, Tanveer S

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the challenge of comprehensively cataloging the complete human proteome from a single-cell type using mass spectrometry (MS)-based shotgun proteomics. We modify a classical two-dimensional high-resolution reversed-phase peptide fractionation scheme and optimize a protocol ...

  11. Proteomics as a tool to gain more insight into sub-lethal toxicological effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on a modern analytical method, proteomics, to investigate its use in the field of toxicological research. Proteomics is a high resolution method which separates all proteins present in a sample at a clearly defined state and compares this pattern to another one, under slightly

  12. Urinary proteomic profiling in severe obesity and obstructive sleep apnoea with CPAP treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian W Seetho

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: The urinary proteome is compared in OSA with CPAP and without OSA in severe obesity. The effects of CPAP on OSA may lead to changes in the urinary peptides but further research work is needed to investigate the potential role for urinary proteomics in characterising urinary peptide profiles in OSA.

  13. Bead Based Proteome Enrichment Enhances Features of the Protein Elution Plate (PEP for Functional Proteomic Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel functional proteomics technology called PEP(Protein Elution Plate was developed to separate complex proteomes from natural sources and analyze protein functions systematically. The technology takes advantage of the powerful resolution of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-D Gels. The modification of electrophoretic conditions in combination with a high-resolution protein elution plate supports the recovery of functionally active proteins. As 2DE(2-Dimensional Electrophoresis resolution can be limited by protein load, we investigated the use of bead based enrichment technologies, called AlbuVoid™ and KinaSorb™ to determine their effect on the proteomic features which can be generated from the PEP platform. Using a variety of substrates and enzyme activity assays, we report on the benefits of combining bead based enrichment to improve the signal report and the features generated for Hexokinase, Protein Kinase, Protease, and Alkaline Phosphatase activities. As a result, the PEP technology allows systematic analysis of large enzyme families and can build a comprehensive picture of protein function from a complex proteome, providing biological insights that could otherwise not be observed if only protein abundances were analyzed.

  14. A proteomics performance standard to support measurement quality in proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley-Green, Ashley; Bunk, David; Rudnick, Paul; Kilpatrick, Lisa; Phinney, Karen

    2012-04-01

    The emergence of MS-based proteomic platforms as a prominent technology utilized in biochemical and biomedical research has increased the need for high-quality MS measurements. To address this need, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reference material (RM) 8323 yeast protein extract is introduced as a proteomics quality control material for benchmarking the preanalytical and analytical performance of proteomics-based experimental workflows. RM 8323 yeast protein extract is based upon the well-characterized eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae and can be utilized in the design and optimization of proteomics-based methodologies from sample preparation to data analysis. To demonstrate its utility as a proteomics quality control material, we coupled LC-MS/MS measurements of RM 8323 with the NIST MS Quality Control (MSQC) performance metrics to quantitatively assess the LC-MS/MS instrumentation parameters that influence measurement accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility. Due to the complexity of the yeast proteome, we also demonstrate how NIST RM 8323, along with the NIST MSQC performance metrics, can be used in the evaluation and optimization of proteomics-based sample preparation methods. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Proteomic Contributions to Medicinal Plant Research: From Plant Metabolism to Pharmacological Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Hashiguchi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is a clinical practice of utilizing medicinal plant derivatives for therapeutic purposes. It has an enduring history worldwide and plays a significant role in the fight against various diseases. Herbal drug combinations often exhibit synergistic therapeutic action compared with single-constituent dosage, and can also enhance the cytotoxicity induced by chemotherapeutic drugs. To explore the mechanism underlying the pharmacological action of herbs, proteomic approaches have been applied to the physiology of medicinal plants and its effects on animals. This review article focuses on the existing proteomics-based medicinal plant research and discusses the following topics: (i plant metabolic pathways that synthesize an array of bioactive compounds; (ii pharmacological action of plants tested using in vivo and in vitro studies; and (iii the application of proteomic approaches to indigenous plants with scarce sequence information. The accumulation of proteomic information in a biological or medicinal context may help in formulating the effective use of medicinal plants.

  16. Comparing perilymph proteomes across species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jonathan C; Lord, Megan S; Pinyon, Jeremy L; Wise, Andrew K; Lovell, Nigel H; Carter, Paul M; Enke, Ya Lang; Housley, Gary D; Green, Rylie A

    2018-01-01

    Biological components of perilymph affect the electrical performance of cochlear implants. Understanding the perilymph composition of common animal models will improve the understanding of this impact and improve the interpretation of results from animal studies and how it relates to humans. Analysis and comparison of the proteomes of human, guinea pig, and cat perilymph. Multiple perilymph samples from both guinea pigs and cats were analysed via liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Proteins were identified using the Mascot database. Human data were obtained from a published dataset. Proteins identified were refined to form a proteome for each species. Over 200 different proteins were found per species. There were 81, 39, and 64 proteins in the final human, guinea pig, and cat proteomes, respectively. Twenty-one proteins were common to all three species. Fifty-two percent of the cat proteome was found in the human proteome, and 31% of the guinea pig was common to human. The cat proteome had similar complexity to the human proteome in three protein classes, whereas the guinea pig had a similar complexity in two. The presence of albumin was significantly higher in human perilymph than in the other two species. Immunoglobulins were more abundant in the human than in the cat proteome. Perilymph proteomes were compared across three species. The degree of crossover of proteins of both guinea pig and cat with human indicate that these animals suitable models for the human cochlea, albeit the cat perilymph is a closer match. NA. Laryngoscope, 128:E47-E52, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. An investigation of heat shock protein 27 and P-glycoprotein mediated multi-drug resistance in breast cancer using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feifei; Yang, Ting; Fang, Danjun; Xu, Qingqing; Chen, Yun

    2014-08-28

    One missing puzzle piece to study heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) in P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR) was the amount of HSP27 and the extent of its phosphorylation in the biological context. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS)-based targeted proteomics allows researchers to monitor associated proteins and their modification simultaneously and quantitatively. In this study, a targeted proteomics assay was first developed and validated for the quantification of HSP27 and its phosphorylated forms. Using this assay, the level of HSP27 was determined in non-tumoral cells MCF-10A, parental drug-sensitive cancer cells MCF-7/WT and drug-resistant cancer cells MCF-7/ADR. A decrease of HSP27 expression was observed in P-gp overexpressed MCF-7/ADR cells. A quantitative time-course analysis of both HSP27 and P-gp in doxorubicin (DOX)-treated MCF-7/WT cells also implied that HSP27 may participate in the P-gp modulation. Furthermore, stoichiometry of site-specific HSP27 phosphorylation indicated that DOX treatment rapidly induced the HSP27 phosphorylation at Ser82. Moreover, conventional analytical methods were also performed for a comparison. LC/MS/MS-based targeted proteomics turns out to be a promising quantification approach for the study of proteins in the preclinical and clinical environment. Unfortunately, rare studies applied this technology to detect multiple associated proteins or protein modification in one experiment. This study demonstrated the potential of LC/MS/MS-based targeted proteomics to understand the cell events in a more accurate context of biological system. By the quantitative time-course analysis of HSP27 and its phosphorylated forms at sites of Ser15 and Ser82, the possible role of HSP27 in P-gp mediated MDR was suggested. Further development of targeted proteomics in future may provide more insight into signal transduction pathways upon perturbation of a protein network or changes to a panel of proposed

  18. Differential expression proteomics of human colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Roberto; Solazzo, Michela; Fantappié, Ornella; Elfering, Sarah; Pantaleo, Pietro; Bechi, Paolo; Cianchi, Fabio; Ettl, Adam; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2006-06-01

    The focus of this study was to use differential protein expression to investigate operative pathways in early stages of human colon cancer. Colorectal cancer represents an ideal model system to study the development and progression of human tumors, and the proteomic approach avoids overlooking posttranslational modifications not detected by microarray analyses and the limited correlation between transcript and protein levels. Colon cancer samples, confined to the intestinal wall, were analyzed by expression proteomics and compared with matched samples from normal colon tissue. Samples were processed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and spots differentially expressed and consistent across all patients were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analyses and by Western blot analyses. After differentially expressed proteins and their metabolic pathways were analyzed, the following main conclusions were achieved for tumor tissue: 1) a shift from beta-oxidation, as the main source of energy, to anaerobic glycolysis was observed owed to the alteration of nuclear- versus mitochondrial-encoded proteins and other proteins related to fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism; 2) lower capacity for Na(+) and K(+) cycling; and 3) operativity of the apoptosis pathway, especially the mitochondrial one. This study of the human colon cancer proteome represents a step toward a better understanding of the metabolomics of colon cancer at early stages confined to the intestinal wall.

  19. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tue Bjerg Bennike

    2015-12-01

    In addition, we analyzed the proteome of human plasma, and compared the proteomes to the obtained porcine synovial fluid proteome. The proteome of the two body fluids were found highly similar, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. The healthy porcine synovial fluid proteomics data, human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935.

  20. Investigation of phytochemical contents, in vitro antioxidant and antibacterial behavior and in vivo anti-inflammatory potential of Ecballium elaterium methanol fruits extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir FELHI

    Full Text Available Abstract Ecballium elaterium species are mostly used as therapeutic agents and food ingredient. The current work was designed to investigate phytochemical contents, antioxidant, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties of methanol fruits extract of Ecballium elaterium. Good antioxidant activity was observed with IC50 values of 156 ± 4 and 377 ± 6 μg/mL for DPPH and ABTS, respectively, and EC50 of 126 ± 4 µg/mL for FRAP assays, which is related with their richness in total phenolic, flavonoid and condensed tannins contents. The results of antibacterial activity showed the effectiveness of methanol extract against Bacillus cereus with value of inhibition zone diameter of 15 ± 0 mm and a MIC and MBC values of 6 ± 0 and 12 ± 0 mg/mL, respectively. The in vivo anti-inflammatory effects have been also studied by carrageenan induced rat paw edema assay and the results revealed that a dose of 75 mg/kg induced a significant inhibition of 66.4% at 2 h. FT-IR spectral data justified the presence of biological functional groups such as ─OH, C─H, C─O, C─C and C=O. These results highlighted the potential using of Ecballium elaterium fruits extract as natural antimicrobial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents for food applications and for the pharmaceutical industry.

  1. Exosome Proteome of U-87MG Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohyun Chun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membrane vesicles between 30 and 100 nm in diameter secreted by many cell types, and are associated with a wide range of physiological and/or pathological processes. Exosomes containing proteins, lipids, mRNA, and microRNA contribute to cell-to-cell communication and cell-to-environment regulation, however, their biological functions are not yet fully understood. In this report, exosomes in the glioblastoma cell line, U-87MG, were isolated and the proteome was investigated. In addition, exosome proteome changes in U-87MG cells exposed to a low temperature were investigated to elucidate whether the exosome proteome could respond to an external stimulus. Cell culture medium was collected, and exosomes were isolated by continuous centrifugation eliminating cell debris, nucleic acids, and other particles. The morphology of exosomes was observed by cryo-tunneling electron microscopy. According to 2-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, certain proteins including collagen type VI alpha 1, putative RNA-binding protein 15B chain A, substrate induced remodeling of the active site regulates HTRA1, coatomer protein complex-subunit beta 2, myosin-heavy chain 1, and keratin-type I cytoskeletal 9 showed differences between the control proteome and the low temperature-exposed proteome.

  2. Proteomics Approaches Shed New Light on Traditional Iranian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahhed, Mina; Poursaleh, Zohreh

    2016-05-01

    Until now, Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) had been extensively based on Iranian philosophy in theoretical approach in diagnosis and treatment, with doubts on academic medicine. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of temperaments, herbal standardization, and quality control had been with the obscurity of functional molecules and their action mechanisms. Proteomics is a potent board to the mechanistic investigation of ITM and has been comprehensively applied profile drug-regulated proteins. In this review, we assessed the application of this modern molecular biological method in the identification of temperaments and drug targets of ITM. All available studies related to proteomics in traditional medicine, alternative and complementary medicine, including books, journals, and other references were studied and assessed. The present review showed the phenotypes of the various temperaments in healthy individuals, that is to say, same proteins with different dynamic properties. Therefore, the usefulness of proteomics seems authoritative to understand the means by which the molecular pathways protected in ITM. This might be also the key clinical viewpoint on this new approach for enabling the integration of Iranian traditional medicine and modern biological science and technology, as well for upholding the internationalization of ITM. Proteomics, as a powerful tool for systems biology, is an essential research methodology for understanding the mechanisms of traditional medicine. Further investigation on the applications of advanced proteomics in temperaments, herbal standardization, and quality control in ITM is recommended.

  3. CPTAC Team Releases Targeted Proteomic Assays for Ovarian Cancer | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigators in the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), announces the public release of 98 targeted mass spectrometry-based assays for ovarian cancer research studies.  Chosen based on proteogenomic observations from the recently published multi-institutional collaborative project between PNNL and Johns Hopkins University that comprehensively examined the collections of proteins in the tumors of ovarian cancer patients (highlighted in a paper in

  4. Proteomics of Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Raquel; Prats, Elena; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi cause important yield losses in crops. In order to develop efficient and environmental friendly crop protection strategies, molecular studies of the fungal biological cycle, virulence factors, and interaction with its host are necessary. For that reason, several approaches have been performed using both classical genetic, cell biology, and biochemistry and the modern, holistic, and high-throughput, omic techniques. This work briefly overviews the tools available for studying Plant Pathogenic Fungi and is amply focused on MS-based Proteomics analysis, based on original papers published up to December 2009. At a methodological level, different steps in a proteomic workflow experiment are discussed. Separate sections are devoted to fungal descriptive (intracellular, subcellular, extracellular) and differential expression proteomics and interactomics. From the work published we can conclude that Proteomics, in combination with other techniques, constitutes a powerful tool for providing important information about pathogenicity and virulence factors, thus opening up new possibilities for crop disease diagnosis and crop protection. PMID:20589070

  5. Statistical Contributions to Proteomic Research

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Jeffrey S.; Keith A. Baggerly; Howard B Gutstein; Coombes, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomic profiling has the potential to impact the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of various diseases. A number of different proteomic technologies are available that allow us to look at many proteins at once, and all of them yield complex data that raise significant quantitative challenges. Inadequate attention to these quantitative issues can prevent these studies from achieving their desired goals, and can even lead to invalid results. In this chapter, we describe various ways the in...

  6. Imaging beyond the proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pamela V.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging technologies developed in the early 20th century achieved contrast solely by relying on macroscopic and morphological differences between the tissues of interest and the surrounding tissues. Since then, there has been a movement toward imaging at the cellular and molecular level in order to visualize biological processes. This rapidly growing field is known as molecular imaging. In the last decade, many methodologies for imaging proteins have emerged. However, most of these approaches cannot be extended to imaging beyond the proteome. Here, we highlight some of the recently developed technologies that enable imaging of non-proteinaceous molecules in the cell: lipids, signalling molecules, inorganic ions, glycans, nucleic acids, small-molecule metabolites, and protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and methylation. PMID:22801420

  7. The Succinated Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkley, Eric D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Frizell, Norma

    2014-03-30

    Succination is a chemical modification of cysteine in protein by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in concert with mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress in adipocytes grown in high glucose medium and in adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. Increased succination of proteins is also detected in the kidney of a fumarase conditional knock-out mouse which develops renal tumors. Keap1, the gatekeeper of the antioxidant response, was identified as a major succinated protein in renal cancer cells, suggesting that succination may play a role in activation of the antioxidant response. A wide range of proteins is subject to succination, including enzymes, adipokines, cytoskeletal proteins and ER chaperones with functional cysteine residues. There is also significant overlap between succinated and glutathionylated proteins, and with proteins containing cysteine residues that are readily oxidized to the sulfenic (cysteic) acid. Succination of adipocyte proteins is inhibited by uncouplers, which discharge the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and by ER stress inhibitors. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress or dysfunction in chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and cancer, and recent studies suggest that succination is a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative and ER stress, and cellular progression toward apoptosis. In this article, we review the history of the succinated proteome and the challenges associated with measuring this non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins by proteomics approaches.

  8. Skeletal muscle proteomics: current approaches, technical challenges and emerging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohlendieck Kay

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal muscle fibres represent one of the most abundant cell types in mammals. Their highly specialised contractile and metabolic functions depend on a large number of membrane-associated proteins with very high molecular masses, proteins with extensive posttranslational modifications and components that exist in highly complex supramolecular structures. This makes it extremely difficult to perform conventional biochemical studies of potential changes in protein clusters during physiological adaptations or pathological processes. Results Skeletal muscle proteomics attempts to establish the global identification and biochemical characterisation of all members of the muscle-associated protein complement. A considerable number of proteomic studies have employed large-scale separation techniques, such as high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or liquid chromatography, and combined them with mass spectrometry as the method of choice for high-throughput protein identification. Muscle proteomics has been applied to the comprehensive biochemical profiling of developing, maturing and aging muscle, as well as the analysis of contractile tissues undergoing physiological adaptations seen in disuse atrophy, physical exercise and chronic muscle transformation. Biomedical investigations into proteome-wide alterations in skeletal muscle tissues were also used to establish novel biomarker signatures of neuromuscular disorders. Importantly, mass spectrometric studies have confirmed the enormous complexity of posttranslational modifications in skeletal muscle proteins. Conclusions This review critically examines the scientific impact of modern muscle proteomics and discusses its successful application for a better understanding of muscle biology, but also outlines its technical limitations and emerging techniques to establish new biomarker candidates.

  9. Proteomics in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Approach Using Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Fadi H; Yau, Yunki; Wasinger, Valerie C; Leong, Rupert W

    2017-09-01

    Recently, proteomics studies have provided important information on the role of proteins in health and disease. In the domain of inflammatory bowel disease, proteomics has shed important light on the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of inflammation and has contributed to the discovery of some putative clinical biomarkers of disease activity. By being able to obtain a large number of specimens from multiple sites and control for confounding environmental, genetic, and metabolic factors, proteomics studies using animal models of colitis offered an alternative approach to human studies. Our aim is to review the information and lessons acquired so far from the use of proteomics in animal models of colitis. These studies helped understand the importance of different proteins at different stages of the disease and unraveled the different pathways that are activated or inhibited during the inflammatory process. Expressed proteins related to inflammation, cellular structure, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and energy depletion advanced the knowledge about the reaction of intestinal cells to inflammation and repair. The role of mesenteric lymphocytes, exosomes, and the intestinal mucosal barrier was emphasized in the inflammatory process. In addition, studies in animal models revealed mechanisms of the beneficial effects of some therapeutic interventions and foods or food components on intestinal inflammation by monitoring changes in protein expression and paved the way for some new possible inflammatory pathways to target in the future. Advances in proteomics technology will further clarify the interaction between intestinal microbiota and IBD pathogenesis and investigate the gene-environmental axis of IBD etiology.

  10. Skeletal muscle proteomics: current approaches, technical challenges and emerging techniques

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ohlendieck, Kay

    2011-02-01

    Abstract Background Skeletal muscle fibres represent one of the most abundant cell types in mammals. Their highly specialised contractile and metabolic functions depend on a large number of membrane-associated proteins with very high molecular masses, proteins with extensive posttranslational modifications and components that exist in highly complex supramolecular structures. This makes it extremely difficult to perform conventional biochemical studies of potential changes in protein clusters during physiological adaptations or pathological processes. Results Skeletal muscle proteomics attempts to establish the global identification and biochemical characterisation of all members of the muscle-associated protein complement. A considerable number of proteomic studies have employed large-scale separation techniques, such as high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or liquid chromatography, and combined them with mass spectrometry as the method of choice for high-throughput protein identification. Muscle proteomics has been applied to the comprehensive biochemical profiling of developing, maturing and aging muscle, as well as the analysis of contractile tissues undergoing physiological adaptations seen in disuse atrophy, physical exercise and chronic muscle transformation. Biomedical investigations into proteome-wide alterations in skeletal muscle tissues were also used to establish novel biomarker signatures of neuromuscular disorders. Importantly, mass spectrometric studies have confirmed the enormous complexity of posttranslational modifications in skeletal muscle proteins. Conclusions This review critically examines the scientific impact of modern muscle proteomics and discusses its successful application for a better understanding of muscle biology, but also outlines its technical limitations and emerging techniques to establish new biomarker candidates.

  11. Proteomic analysis of human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after subsgemental exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Matthew W; Thompson, J Will; Que, Loretta G; Yang, Ivana V; Schwartz, David A; Moseley, M Arthur; Marshall, Harvey E

    2013-05-03

    The analysis of airway fluid, as sampled by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), provides a minimally invasive route to interrogate lung biology in health and disease. Here, we used immunodepletion, coupled with gel- and label-free LC-MS/MS, for quantitation of the BAL fluid (BALF) proteome in samples recovered from human subjects following bronchoscopic instillation of saline, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or house dust mite antigen into three distinct lung subsegments. Among more than 200 unique proteins quantified across nine samples, neutrophil granule-derived and acute phase proteins were most highly enriched in the LPS-exposed lobes. Of these, peptidoglycan response protein 1 was validated and confirmed as a novel marker of neutrophilic inflammation. Compared to a prior transcriptomic analysis of airway cells in this same cohort, the BALF proteome revealed a novel set of response factors. Independent of exposure, the enrichment of tracheal-expressed proteins in right lower lung lobes suggests a potential for constitutive intralobar variability in the BALF proteome; sampling of multiple lung subsegments also appears to aid in the identification of protein signatures that differentiate individuals at baseline. Collectively, this proof-of-concept study validates a robust workflow for BALF proteomics and demonstrates the complementary nature of proteomic and genomic techniques for investigating airway (patho)physiology.

  12. Investigation of lithium distribution in the rat brain ex vivo using lithium-7 magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging at 17.2 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Jacques; Hanak, Anne-Sophie; Chevillard, Lucie; Djemaï, Boucif; Risède, Patricia; Giacomini, Eric; Poupon, Joël; Barrière, David André; Bellivier, Frank; Mégarbane, Bruno; Boumezbeur, Fawzi

    2017-11-01

    Lithium is the first-line mood stabilizer for the treatment of patients with bipolar disorder. However, its mechanisms of action and transport across the blood-brain barrier remain poorly understood. The contribution of lithium-7 magnetic resonance imaging (7 Li MRI) to investigate brain lithium distribution remains limited because of the modest sensitivity of the lithium nucleus and the expected low brain concentrations in humans and animal models. Therefore, we decided to image lithium distribution in the rat brain ex vivo using a turbo-spin-echo imaging sequence at 17.2 T. The estimation of lithium concentrations was performed using a phantom replacement approach accounting for B1 inhomogeneities and differential T1 and T2 weighting. Our MRI-derived lithium concentrations were validated by comparison with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements ([Li]MRI  = 1.18[Li]MS , R = 0.95). Overall, a sensitivity of 0.03 mmol/L was achieved for a spatial resolution of 16 μL. Lithium distribution was uneven throughout the brain (normalized lithium content ranged from 0.4 to 1.4) and was mostly symmetrical, with consistently lower concentrations in the metencephalon (cerebellum and brainstem) and higher concentrations in the cortex. Interestingly, low lithium concentrations were also observed close to the lateral ventricles. The average brain-to-plasma lithium ratio was 0.34 ± 0.04, ranging from 0.29 to 0.39. Brain lithium concentrations were reasonably correlated with plasma lithium concentrations, with Pearson correlation factors ranging from 0.63 to 0.90. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Synthesis and biodistribution of novel magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH) nanopolymer radiolabeled with iodine-131 and investigation its fate in vivo for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcıbaşı, Uğur; Avcıbaşı, Nesibe; Akalın, Hilmi Arkut; Ediz, Melis; Demiroğlu, Hasan; Gümüşer, Fikriye Gül; Özçalışkan, Emir; Türkcan, Ceren; Uygun, Deniz Aktaş; Akgöl, Sinan

    2013-10-01

    Herein, we investigated the biological uptake, distribution, and radiopharmaceutical potential of a novel molecule based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and anilinephtalein (APH) in the metabolism of Albino Wistar rats. In order to achieve this, we synthesized APH using organic synthesis methods and copolymerized APH with HEMA using a common polymerization method, surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. In the presence of Fe3O4 particles, we obtained a new generation magnetic-nano-scale polymer, magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH). This new molecule was chemically identified and approved by several characterization methods using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron spin resonance, atomic force microscope, and Zeta particle-size analysis. To evaluate the biological activity in live metabolism and anti-cancer potential of mag-poly(HEMA-APH), molecule was radioiodinated by a widely used labeling technique, iodogen method, with a gamma diffuser radionuclide, 131I. Thin-layer radiochromatography experiments demonstrated that 131I binded to nanopolymer with the labeling yield of 90 %. Lipophilicity and stability experiments were conducted to determine the condition of cold and labeled mag-poly(HEMA-APH) in rat blood and lipid medium. Results demonstrated that radioiodinated molecule stayed as an intact complex in rat metabolism for 24 h and experimental lipophilicity was determined as 0.12 ± 0.02. In vivo results obtained by imaging and biological distribution experiments indicated that mag-poly(HEMA-APH) labeled with 131I [131I-mag-poly(HEMA-APH)] highly incorporated into tissues of the uterus, the ovarian, the prostate, and the lungs in rat metabolism. Based on these results, it may be evaluated that novel mag-poly(HEMA-APH) molecule labeled with 131I is a compound which has a significant potential for being used as an anti-cancer agent. Certain results can only be obtained whether this

  14. Recent 5-year Findings and Technological Advances in the Proteomic Study of HIV-associated Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 mainly relies on host factors to complete its life cycle. Hence, it is very important to identify HIV-regulated host proteins. Proteomics is an excellent technique for this purpose because of its high throughput and sensitivity. In this review, we summarized current technological advances in proteomics, including general isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC, as well as subcellular proteomics and investigation of posttranslational modifications. Furthermore, we reviewed the applications of proteomics in the discovery of HIV-related diseases and HIV infection mechanisms. Proteins identified by proteomic studies might offer new avenues for the diagnosis and treatment of HIV infection and the related diseases.

  15. Fishing the PTM proteome with chemical approaches using functional solid phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Cheng; Jiang, Hucong; Yang, Pengyuan; Lu, Haojie

    2015-11-21

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are covalent additions of functional groups to proteins and are known to play essential roles in biological processes. Covalently attached PTMs are usually present at substoichiometric levels, implying that a PTM proteome is often present in only a small fraction of the entire proteome. The low abundance of PTMs creates a tremendous analytical challenge for PTM proteomics. New analytical strategies, especially enrichment approaches, are required to allow the comprehensive determination of PTMs. Solid-phase capture of PTMs through chemical reactions provides the most specific approach for fishing the PTM proteome, and based on these chemical reactions, a variety of novel functional nanomaterials have been developed. This review mainly focuses on the currently available chemical approaches for investigating PTMs, as well as the functional solid phases used for PTM proteome separation.

  16. Clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy: current overview and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Kui; Li, Qifu; Nice, Edouard C; Zhang, Haiyuan; Huang, Canhua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common disease that is a leading cause of death worldwide. Currently, early detection and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for more effective management of cancer. Importantly, protein profiling using clinical proteomic strategies, with spectacular sensitivity and precision, offer excellent promise for the identification of potential biomarkers that would direct the development of targeted therapeutic anticancer drugs for precision medicine. In particular, clinical sample sources, including tumor tissues and body fluids (blood, feces, urine and saliva), have been widely investigated using modern high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analysis, to pursue the possibilities of precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy. Discussed in this review are the current advantages and limitations of clinical proteomics, the available strategies of clinical proteomics for the management of precision medicine, as well as the challenges and future perspectives of clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy.

  17. Recent 5-year Findings and Technological Advances in the Proteomic Study of HIV-associated Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijun; Jia, Xiaofang; Jin, Jun-O; Lu, Hongzhou; Tan, Zhimi

    2017-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) mainly relies on host factors to complete its life cycle. Hence, it is very important to identify HIV-regulated host proteins. Proteomics is an excellent technique for this purpose because of its high throughput and sensitivity. In this review, we summarized current technological advances in proteomics, including general isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), as well as subcellular proteomics and investigation of posttranslational modifications. Furthermore, we reviewed the applications of proteomics in the discovery of HIV-related diseases and HIV infection mechanisms. Proteins identified by proteomic studies might offer new avenues for the diagnosis and treatment of HIV infection and the related diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Hair Follicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishioka, Noriaki; Terada, Masahiro; Yamada, Shin; Seki, Masaya; Takahashi, Rika; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Higashibata, Akira; Mukai, Chiaki

    2013-02-01

    Hair root cells actively divide in a hair follicle, and they sensitively reflect physical conditions. By analyzing the human hair, we can know stress levels on the human body and metabolic conditions caused by microgravity environment and cosmic radiation. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has initiated a human research study to investigate the effects of long-term space flight on gene expression and mineral metabolism by analyzing hair samples of astronauts who stayed in the International Space Station (ISS) for 6 months. During long-term flights, the physiological effects on astronauts include muscle atrophy and bone calcium loss. Furthermore, radiation and psychological effects are important issue to consider. Therefore, an understanding of the effects of the space environment is important for developing countermeasures against the effects experienced by astronauts. In this experiment, we identify functionally important target proteins that integrate transcriptome, mineral metabolism and proteome profiles from human hair. To compare the protein expression data with the gene expression data from hair roots, we developed the protein processing method. We extracted the protein from five strands of hair using ISOGEN reagents. Then, these extracted proteins were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. These collected profiles will give us useful physiological information to examine the effect of space flight.

  19. Multimarker proteomic profiling for the prediction of cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Lemesle

    Full Text Available Risk stratification of patients with systolic chronic heart failure (HF is critical to better identify those who may benefit from invasive therapeutic strategies such as cardiac transplantation. Proteomics has been used to provide prognostic information in various diseases. Our aim was to investigate the potential value of plasma proteomic profiling for risk stratification in HF. A proteomic profiling using surface enhanced laser desorption ionization - time of flight - mass spectrometry was performed in a case/control discovery population of 198 patients with systolic HF (left ventricular ejection fraction <45%: 99 patients who died from cardiovascular cause within 3 years and 99 patients alive at 3 years. Proteomic scores predicting cardiovascular death were developed using 3 regression methods: support vector machine, sparse partial least square discriminant analysis, and lasso logistic regression. Forty two ion m/z peaks were differentially intense between cases and controls in the discovery population and were used to develop proteomic scores. In the validation population, score levels were higher in patients who subsequently died within 3 years. Similar areas under the curves (0.66 - 0.68 were observed for the 3 methods. After adjustment on confounders, proteomic scores remained significantly associated with cardiovascular mortality. Use of the proteomic scores allowed a significant improvement in discrimination of HF patients as determined by integrated discrimination improvement and net reclassification improvement indexes. In conclusion, proteomic analysis of plasma proteins may help to improve risk prediction in HF patients.

  20. Changes to the Aqueous Humor Proteome during Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Andrea Kaeslin

    Full Text Available To investigate the aqueous humor proteome in patients with glaucoma and a control group.Aqueous humor was obtained from five human donors diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG and five age- and sex-matched controls undergoing cataract surgery. Quantitative proteome analysis of the aqueous humor by hyper reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (HRM-MS based on SWATH technology was performed.Expression levels of 87 proteins were found to be different between glaucomatous and control aqueous humor. Of the 87 proteins, 34 were significantly upregulated, whereas 53 proteins were downregulated in the aqueous humor from glaucoma patients compared to controls. Differentially expressed proteins were found to be involved in cholesterol-related, inflammatory, metabolic, antioxidant as well as proteolysis-related processes.Glaucoma leads to profound changes to the aqueous humor proteome consistent with an altered metabolic state, an inflammatory response and impaired antioxidant defense.

  1. Proteomics for Allergy: from Proteins to the Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nony, Emmanuel; Le Mignon, Maxime; Brier, Sébastien; Martelet, Armelle; Moingeon, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Proteomics encompasses a variety of approaches unraveling both the structural features, post-translational modifications, and abundance of proteins. As of today, proteomic studies have shed light on the primary structure of about 850 allergens, enabling the design of microarrays for improved molecular diagnosis. Proteomic methods including mass spectrometry allow as well to investigate protein-protein interactions, thus yielding precise information on critical epitopes on the surface of allergens. Mass spectrometry is now being applied to the unambiguous identification, characterization, and comprehensive quantification of allergens in a variety of matrices, as diverse as food samples and allergen immunotherapy drug products. As such, it represents a method of choice for quality testing of allergen immunotherapy products.

  2. A proteomics perspective: from animal welfare to food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassols, Anna; Turk, Romana; Roncada, Paola

    2014-03-01

    A fundamental issue of farm animal welfare is to keep animals clinically healthy, without disease or stress, particularly in intensive breeding, in order to produce safe and quality food. This issue is highly relevant for the food industry worldwide as they are directly linked to public health and welfare. The aim of this review is to explore how proteomics can assess and improve the knowledge useful for the strategic management of products of animal origin. Useful indications are provided about the latest proteomics tools for the development of novel biotechnologies serving the public health. The multivariate proteomics approach provides the bases for the discovery of biomarkers useful to investigate adaptation syndromes and oxidative stress. These two responses represent the milestones for the study of animal welfare. Moreover their implementation in the characterization and standardization of raw materials, process development, and quality and safety control of the final product of animal origin represents the current frontier in official surveillance and tests development.

  3. Application of proteomics in study of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jiangang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most fatal malignant tumors worldwide. As an important part of cutting-edge research fields, proteomics has been widely used in the studies of related diseases and has currently become a crucial experimental approach to research on HCC. Significantly expressed proteins can be identified as potential biomarkers for early diagnosis and targets for therapeutic drugs for HCC. Moreover, they can be used for prediction of the recurrence and prognosis of HCC, as well as for investigation of pathogenesis of the disease. The proteomic results from worldwide clinical studies of HCC are summarized, and it is suggested that the clinical application of results of basic research on HCC proteomics will bring great benefit to the diagnosis and treatment of HCC.

  4. Cardiac extracellular matrix proteomics: Challenges, techniques, and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Wei; Dalgliesh, Ailsa J; López, Javier E; Griffiths, Leigh G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has emerged as a dynamic tissue component, providing not only structural support, but also functionally participating in a wide range of signaling events during development, injury, and disease remodeling. Investigation of dynamic changes in cardiac ECM proteome is challenging due to the relative insolubility of ECM proteins, which results from their macromolecular nature, extensive post-translational modification (PTM), and tendency to form protein complexes. Finally, the relative abundance of cellular and mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue further complicates cardiac ECM proteomic approaches. Recent developments of various techniques to enrich and analyze ECM proteins are playing a major role in overcoming these challenges. Application of cardiac ECM proteomics in disease tissues can further provide spatial and temporal information relevant to disease diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and engineering of therapeutic candidates for cardiac repair and regeneration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Personalized proteomic profiles enabled by advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cristobal Gonzalez de Durana, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338769706

    2017-01-01

    The major aim of the work presented in this thesis was to generate personalized proteomics profiles by improving the chromatographic aspects of the proteomic experiment. In the first chapter an overview of proteomics is given and several practical aspects of a proteomic workflow are highlighted. An

  6. CPTAC Releases Cancer Proteome Confirmatory Colon Study Data | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) announces the release of the cancer proteome confirmatory colon study data. The goal of the study is to analyze the proteomes of approximately 100 confirmatory colon tumor patients, which includes tumor and adjacent normal samples, with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiling.

  7. Comparison of In-Vitro and Ex-Vivo Wound Healing Assays for the Investigation of Diabetic Wound Healing and Demonstration of a Beneficial Effect of a Triterpene Extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ueck

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a frequent cause for chronic, difficult-to-treat wounds. New therapies for diabetic wounds are urgently needed and in-vitro or ex-vivo test systems are essential for the initial identification of new active molecules. The aim of this study is to compare in-vitro and ex-vivo test systems for their usability for early drug screening and to investigate the efficacy of a birch bark triterpene extract (TE that has been proven ex-vivo and clinically to accelerate non-diabetic wound healing (WH, in a diabetic context. We investigated in-vitro models for diabetic WH, i.e. scratch assays with human keratinocytes from diabetic donors or cultured under hyperglycaemic conditions and a newly developed porcine ex-vivo hyperglycaemic WH model for their potential to mimic delayed diabetic WH and for the influence of TE in these test systems. We show that keratinocytes from diabetic donors often fail to exhibit significantly delayed WH. For cells under hyperglycaemic conditions significant decrease is observed but is influenced by choice of medium and presence of supplements. Also, donor age plays a role. Interestingly, hyperglycaemic effects are mainly hyperosmolaric effects in scratch assays. Ex-vivo models under hyperglycaemic conditions show a clear and substantial decrease of WH, and here both glucose and hyperosmolarity effects are involved. Finally, we provide evidence that TE is also beneficial for ex-vivo hyperglycaemic WH, resulting in significantly increased length of regenerated epidermis to 188±16% and 183±11% (SEM; p<0.05 compared to controls when using two different TE formulations. In conclusion, our results suggest that microenvironmental influences are important in WH test systems and that therefore the more complex hyperglycaemic ex-vivo model is more suitable for early drug screening. Limitations of the in-vitro and ex-vivo models are discussed. Furthermore our data recommend TE as a promising candidate for in-vivo

  8. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: A meta-analysis of response patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, Ksenia J., E-mail: ksenia.groh@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Suter, Marc J.-F. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Systems Science, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We compared reported proteome changes induced by various stressors in zebrafish. • Several proteins groups frequently responding to diverse stressors were identified. • These included energy metabolism enzymes, heat shock and cytoskeletal proteins. • Insufficient proteome coverage impedes identification of more specific responses. • Further research needs for proteomics in ecotoxicology are discussed. - Abstract: Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action

  9. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro and in vivo investigation of chitosan-coated poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for intestinal delivery of exendin-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengshu; Zhang, Yong; Feng, Jiao; Gu, Tiejun; Dong, Qingguang; Yang, Xu; Sun, Yanan; Wu, Yongge; Chen, Yan; Kong, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Exendin-4 is an incretin mimetic agent approved for type 2 diabetes treatment. However, the required frequent injections restrict its clinical application. Here, the potential use of chitosan-coated poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (CS-PLGA) nanoparticles was investigated for intestinal delivery of exendin-4. Methods and results Nanoparticles were prepared using a modified water–oil–water (w/o/w) emulsion solvent-evaporation method, followed by coating with chitosan. The physical properties, particle size, and cell toxicity of the nanoparticles were examined. The cellular uptake mechanism and transmembrane permeability were performed in Madin-Darby canine kidney-cell monolayers. Furthermore, in vivo intraduodenal administration of exendin-4-loaded nanoparticles was carried out in rats. The PLGA nanoparticle coating with chitosan led to a significant change in zeta potential, from negative to positive, accompanied by an increase in particle size of ~30 nm. Increases in both the molecular weight and degree of deacetylation of chitosan resulted in an observable increase in zeta potential but no apparent change in the particle size of ~300 nm. Both unmodified PLGA and chitosan-coated nanoparticles showed only slight cytotoxicity. Use of different temperatures and energy depletion suggested that the cellular uptake of both types of nanoparticles was energy-dependent. Further investigation revealed that the uptake of PLGA nanoparticles occurred via caveolin-mediated endocytosis and that of CS-PLGA nanoparticles involved both macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, as evidenced by using endocytic inhibitors. However, under all conditions, CS-PLGA nanoparticles showed a greater potential to be transported into cells, as shown by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Transmembrane permeability analysis showed that unmodified and modified PLGA nanoparticles could improve the transport of exendin-4 by up to 8.9- and 16.5-fold, respectively

  10. Recent advances in proteomics: towards the human proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Huang, Canhua; Nice, Edouard

    2014-06-01

    After the successful completion of the Human Genome project in 2003, the next major challenge was to understand when and where the encoded proteins were expressed, and to generate a map of the complex, interconnected pathways, networks and molecular systems (the human proteome) that, taken together, control the workings of all cells, tissues, organs and organisms. Proteomics will be fundamental for such studies. This review summarizes the key discoveries that laid down the foundations for proteomics as we now know it, and describes key recent technological advances that will undoubtedly contribute to achieving the initial goal of the Human Proteome Organization of identifying and characterizing at least one protein product and representative post-translational modifications, single amino acid polymorphisms and splice variant isoforms from the 20,300 human protein-coding genes within the next 10 years. Successful unraveling of the human proteome will undoubtedly improve our understanding of human biology at the cellular level and lay the foundations for improved diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic and preventive medical outcomes as we enter the era of personalized medicine. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Highlights of recent articles on data mining in genomics & proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This editorial elaborates on investigations consisting of different “OMICS” technologies and their application to biological sciences. In addition, advantages and recent development of the proteomic, genomic and data mining technologies are discussed. This information will be useful to scientists ...

  12. Application of chemical proteomics to biomarker discovery in cardiac research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aye, T.T.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is primarily focused on (i.) exploring chemical probes to increase sensitivity and specificity for the investigation of low abundant cardiac proteins applicable to both biology and biomarker discovery, and (ii.) exploiting different aspects of mass spectrometry-based proteomics for

  13. CPTAC | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is a national effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of large-scale proteome and genome analysis, or proteogenomics.

  14. Effects of different industrial heating processes of milk on site-specific protein modifications and their relationship to in vitro and in vivo digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yasuaki; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2014-05-07

    Heating processes are applied to milk and dairy products to ensure their microbiological safety and shelf lives. However, how differences in "industrial" thermal treatments affect protein digestibility is still equivocal. In this study, raw milk was subjected to pasteurization, three kinds of ultra-high-temperature (UHT) treatment, and in-can sterilization and was investigated by in vitro and in vivo digestion and proteomic methods. In-can sterilized milk, followed by UHT milk samples, showed a rapid decrease in protein bands during the course of digestion. However, protein digestibility determined by a Kjeldahl procedure showed insignificant differences. Proteomic analysis revealed that lactulosyllysine, which reflects a decrease in protein digestibility, in α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and caseins was higher in in-can sterilized milk, followed by UHT milk samples. Thus, industrial heating may improve the digestibility of milk proteins by denaturation, but the improvement is likely to be offset by heat-derived modifications involved in decreased protein digestibility.

  15. Proteomics in evolutionary ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, B; Millar, A H

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary ecologists are traditionally gene-focused, as genes propagate phenotypic traits across generations and mutations and recombination in the DNA generate genetic diversity required for evolutionary processes. As a consequence, the inheritance of changed DNA provides a molecular explanation for the functional changes associated with natural selection. A direct focus on proteins on the other hand, the actual molecular agents responsible for the expression of a phenotypic trait, receives far less interest from ecologists and evolutionary biologists. This is partially due to the central dogma of molecular biology that appears to define proteins as the 'dead-end of molecular information flow' as well as technical limitations in identifying and studying proteins and their diversity in the field and in many of the more exotic genera often favored in ecological studies. Here we provide an overview of a newly forming field of research that we refer to as 'Evolutionary Proteomics'. We point out that the origins of cellular function are related to the properties of polypeptide and RNA and their interactions with the environment, rather than DNA descent, and that the critical role of horizontal gene transfer in evolution is more about coopting new proteins to impact cellular processes than it is about modifying gene function. Furthermore, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes generate a remarkable diversity of mature proteins from a single gene, and the properties of these mature proteins can also influence inheritance through genetic and perhaps epigenetic mechanisms. The influence of post-transcriptional diversification on evolutionary processes could provide a novel mechanistic underpinning for elements of rapid, directed evolutionary changes and adaptations as observed for a variety of evolutionary processes. Modern state-of the art technologies based on mass spectrometry are now available to identify and quantify peptides, proteins, protein

  16. Impact of Urbanization on the Proteome of Birch Pollen and Its Chemotactic Activity on Human Granulocytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bryce, M; Drews, O; Schenk, M.F; Menzel, A; Estrella, N; Weichenmeier, I; Smulders, M.J.M; Buters, J; Ring, J; Görg, A; Behrendt, H; Traidl-Hoffmann, C

    .... The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of urbanization on birch pollen. The birch pollen proteome was investigated in order to identify differences in protein abundance between pollen from rural and urban areas...

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L.; Chaerkady, Raghothama

    2012-01-01

    To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multidimens......To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis...

  18. Analysis of mass spectrometry data in proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole N

    2008-01-01

    The systematic study of proteins and protein networks, that is, proteomics, calls for qualitative and quantitative analysis of proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a key analytical technology in current proteomics and modern mass spectrometers generate large amounts of high-quality da...... some of the basic concepts and current approaches to the analysis of MS and MS/MS data in proteomics....

  19. The proteome browser web portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Robert J A; Yu, Simon; Kannan, Anitha; Christiansen, Jeffrey H; Beitz, Anthony; Hancock, William S; Nice, Edouard; Smith, A Ian

    2013-01-04

    In 2010, the Human Proteome Organization launched the Human Proteome Project (HPP), aimed at identifying and characterizing the proteome of the human body. To support complete coverage, one arm of the project will take a gene- or chromosomal-centric strategy (C-HPP) aimed at identifying at least one protein product from each protein-coding gene. Despite multiple large international biological databases housing genomic and protein data, there is currently no single system that integrates updated pertinent information from each of these data repositories and assembles the information into a searchable format suitable for the type of global proteomics effort proposed by the C-HPP. We have undertaken the goal of producing a data integration and analysis software system and browser for the C-HPP effort and of making data collections from this resource discoverable through metadata repositories, such as Australian National Data Service's Research Data Australia. Here we present our vision and progress toward the goal of developing a comprehensive data integration and analysis software tool that provides a snapshot of currently available proteomic related knowledge around each gene product, which will ultimately assist in analyzing biological function and the study of human physiology in health and disease.

  20. Perfluorooctanoic acid for shotgun proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Sekhar Rao Kadiyala

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe the novel use of a volatile surfactant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, for shotgun proteomics. PFOA was found to solubilize membrane proteins as effectively as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. PFOA concentrations up to 0.5% (w/v did not significantly inhibit trypsin activity. The unique features of PFOA allowed us to develop a single-tube shotgun proteomics method that used all volatile chemicals that could easily be removed by evaporation prior to mass spectrometry analysis. The experimental procedures involved: 1 extraction of proteins in 2% PFOA; 2 reduction of cystine residues with triethyl phosphine and their S-alkylation with iodoethanol; 3 trypsin digestion of proteins in 0.5% PFOA; 4 removal of PFOA by evaporation; and 5 LC-MS/MS analysis of the resulting peptides. The general applicability of the method was demonstrated with the membrane preparation of photoreceptor outer segments. We identified 75 proteins from 1 µg of the tryptic peptides in a single, 1-hour, LC-MS/MS run. About 67% of the proteins identified were classified as membrane proteins. We also demonstrate that a proteolytic (18O labeling procedure can be incorporated after the PFOA removal step for quantitative proteomic experiments. The present method does not require sample clean-up devices such as solid-phase extractions and membrane filters, so no proteins/peptides are lost in any experimental steps. Thus, this single-tube shotgun proteomics method overcomes the major drawbacks of surfactant use in proteomic experiments.

  1. Nanotechnologies in proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yuri D; Govorun, Vadim M; Bykov, Victor A; Archakov, Alexander I

    2006-03-01

    Progress in proteomic researches is largely determined by development and implementation of new methods for the revelation and identification of proteins in biological material in a wide concentration range (from 10(-3) M to single molecules). The most perspective approaches to address this problem involve (i) nanotechnological physicochemical procedures for the separation of multicomponent protein mixtures; among these of particular interest are biospecific nanotechnological procedures for selection of proteins from multicomponent protein mixtures with their subsequent concentration on solid support; (ii) identification and counting of single molecules by use of molecular detectors. The prototypes of biospecific nanotechnological procedures, based on the capture of ligand biomolecules by biomolecules of immobilized ligate and the concentration of the captured ligands on appropriate surfaces, are well known; these are affinity chromatography, magnetic biobeads technology, different biosensor methods, etc. Here, we review the most promising nanotechnological approaches for selection of proteins and kinetic characterization of their complexes based on these biospecific methods with subsequent MS/MS identification of proteins and protein complexes. Two major groups of methods for the analysis and identification of individual molecules and their complexes by use of molecular detectors will be reviewed: scanning probe microscopy (SPM) (including atomic-force microscopy) and cryomassdetector technology.

  2. Synthesis and biodistribution of novel magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH) nanopolymer radiolabeled with iodine-131 and investigation its fate in vivo for cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Ugur, E-mail: uguravcibasi@yahoo.com [Celal Bayar University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science (Turkey); Avc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Nesibe [Ege University, Ege Higher Vocational School (Turkey); Akal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I n, Hilmi Arkut; Ediz, Melis; Demiroglu, Hasan [Celal Bayar University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science (Turkey); Guemueser, Fikriye Guel [Celal Bayar University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine (Turkey); Oezcal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Emir; Tuerkcan, Ceren [Ege University, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey); Uygun, Deniz Aktas [Adnan Menderes University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science (Turkey); Akgoel, Sinan [Ege University, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey)

    2013-10-15

    Herein, we investigated the biological uptake, distribution, and radiopharmaceutical potential of a novel molecule based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and anilinephtalein (APH) in the metabolism of Albino Wistar rats. In order to achieve this, we synthesized APH using organic synthesis methods and copolymerized APH with HEMA using a common polymerization method, surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. In the presence of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles, we obtained a new generation magnetic-nano-scale polymer, magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH). This new molecule was chemically identified and approved by several characterization methods using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron spin resonance, atomic force microscope, and Zeta particle-size analysis. To evaluate the biological activity in live metabolism and anti-cancer potential of mag-poly(HEMA-APH), molecule was radioiodinated by a widely used labeling technique, iodogen method, with a gamma diffuser radionuclide, {sup 131}I. Thin-layer radiochromatography experiments demonstrated that {sup 131}I binded to nanopolymer with the labeling yield of 90 %. Lipophilicity and stability experiments were conducted to determine the condition of cold and labeled mag-poly(HEMA-APH) in rat blood and lipid medium. Results demonstrated that radioiodinated molecule stayed as an intact complex in rat metabolism for 24 h and experimental lipophilicity was determined as 0.12 {+-} 0.02. In vivo results obtained by imaging and biological distribution experiments indicated that mag-poly(HEMA-APH) labeled with {sup 131}I [{sup 131}I-mag-poly(HEMA-APH)] highly incorporated into tissues of the uterus, the ovarian, the prostate, and the lungs in rat metabolism. Based on these results, it may be evaluated that novel mag-poly(HEMA-APH) molecule labeled with {sup 131}I is a compound which has a significant potential for being used as an anti-cancer agent. Certain

  3. 177Lu-labeled HPMA copolymers utilizing cathepsin B and S cleavable linkers: synthesis, characterization and preliminary in vivo investigation in a pancreatic cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbomo, Sunny M; Shi, Wen; Wagh, Nilesh K; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Brusnahan, Susan K; Garrison, Jered C

    2013-07-01

    A major barrier to the advancement of therapeutic nanomedicines has been the non-target toxicity caused by the accumulation of the drug delivery systems in organs associated with the reticuloendothelial system, particularly the liver and spleen. Herein, we report the development of peptide based metabolically active linkers (MALs) that are enzymatically cleaved by cysteine cathepsin B and S, two proteases highly expressed in the liver and spleen. The overall goal of this approach is to utilize the MALs to lower the non-target retention and toxicity of radiolabeled drug delivery systems, thus resulting in higher diagnostic and radiotherapeutic efficacy. In this study three MALs (MAL0, MAL1 and MAL2) were investigated. MAL1 and MAL2 are composed of known substrates of cathepsin B and S, respectively, while MAL0 is a non-cleavable control. Both MAL1 and MAL2 were shown to undergo enzymatic cleavage with the appropriate cathepsin protease. Subsequent to conjugation to the HPMA copolymer and radiolabeling with (177)Lu, the peptide-polymer conjugates were renamed (177)Lu-metabolically active copolymers ((177)Lu-MACs) with the corresponding designations: (177)Lu-MAC0, (177)Lu-MAC1 and (177)Lu-MAC2. In vivo evaluation of the (177)Lu-MACs was performed in an HPAC human pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse model. (177)Lu-MAC1 and (177)Lu-MAC2 demonstrated 3.1 and 2.1 fold lower liver retention, respectively, compared to control ((177)Lu-MAC0) at 72h post-injection. With regard to spleen retention, (177)Lu-MAC1 and (177)Lu-MAC2 each exhibited a nearly fourfold lower retention, relative to control, at the 72h time point. However, the tumor accumulation of the (177)Lu-MAC0 was two to three times greater than (177)Lu-MAC1 and (177)Lu-MAC2 at the same time point. The MAL approach demonstrated the capability of substantially reducing the non-target retention of the (177)Lu-labeled HPMA copolymers. While further studies are needed to optimize the pharmacokinetics of the (177)Lu

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Anticancer TCMs Targeted at Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is a rich resource of anticancer drugs. Increasing bioactive natural compounds extracted from TCMs are known to exert significant antitumor effects, but the action mechanisms of TCMs are far from clear. Proteomics, a powerful platform to comprehensively profile drug-regulated proteins, has been widely applied to the mechanistic investigation of TCMs and the identification of drug targets. In this paper, we discuss several bioactive TCM products including terpenoids, flavonoids, and glycosides that were extensively investigated by proteomics to illustrate their antitumor mechanisms in various cancers. Interestingly, many of these natural compounds isolated from TCMs mostly exert their tumor-suppressing functions by specifically targeting mitochondria in cancer cells. These TCM components induce the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the accumulation of ROS, initiating apoptosis cascade signaling. Proteomics provides systematic views that help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the TCM in tumor cells; it bears the inherent limitations in uncovering the drug-protein interactions, however. Subcellular fractionation may be coupled with proteomics to capture and identify target proteins in mitochondria-enriched lysates. Furthermore, translating mRNA analysis, a new technology profiling the drug-regulated genes in translatome level, may be integrated into the systematic investigation, revealing global information valuable for understanding the action mechanism of TCMs.

  5. Species Extrapolation of Life-Stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models to Investigate the Developmental Toxicology of Ethanol Using In vitro to In vivo (IVIVE) Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    To provide useful alternatives to in vivo animal studies, in vitro assays for dose-response assessments of xenobiotic chemicals must use concentrations in media and target tissues that are within biologically-plausible limits. Determining these concentrations is a complex matter,...

  6. Schistosoma bovis-host interplay: Proteomics for knowing and acting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Escudero, Eduardo; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Oleaga, Ana

    2017-07-01

    Schistosoma bovis is a parasite of ruminants that causes significant economic losses to farmers throughout Africa, Southwestern Asia and the Mediterranean. Additionally, recent studies have reported its zoonotic potential through the formation of S. bovis×Schistosoma haematobium hybrids. As observed in the Schistosoma species infecting humans, it is assumed that S. bovis has also evolved host regulatory molecules that ensure its long-term survival in the bloodstream of its host. Since these molecules could be potential targets for the development of new drugs and anti-schistosome vaccines, their identification and functional characterization were undertaken. With this aim in mind, the molecular interface between S. bovis and its vertebrate host was subjected to a series of proteomic studies, which started with the analysis of the proteomes of the S. bovis moieties exposed to the host, namely, the excretory/secretory products and the tegument surface. Thus, a wealth of novel molecular information of S. bovis was obtained, which in turn allowed the identification of several parasite proteins with fibrinolytic and anticoagulant activities that could be used by S. bovis to regulate the host defensive systems. Following on, the host interface was investigated by studying the proteome of the host vascular endothelium surface at two points along the infection: in the lung vessels during the schistosomula migration and in the portal vein after the parasites have reached adulthood and sexual maturity. These studies have provided original data regarding the proteomes of the endothelial cell surface of pulmonary vasculature and portal vein in S. bovis-infected animals, and have shown significant changes in these proteomes associated with infection. This review compiles current information and the analyses of all the proteomic data from S. bovis and the S. bovis-host interface, including the molecular and functional characterization of S. bovis proteins that were found to

  7. Proteomics revisits the cancer metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Deng, Cao; Yang, Tao; Dong, Qiang; Chen, Ya; Nice, Edouard C; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2011-08-01

    Many cancer cells utilize aerobic glycolysis (also known as the 'Warburg effect'), instead of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, to generate the energy necessary for diverse cellular processes. In tumor cells, mitochondria play more important roles in anabolism, for instance, de novo lipid biosynthesis and glutamine-dependent anaplerosis to fuel robust cell growth and proliferation. Proteomic analysis of tumor-related alterations of metabolism-associated proteins clearly indicates that such metabolic reprogramming contributes to cancer cell survival and cancer progression. Moreover, proteomics-based systems biology provides a powerful tool to re-evaluate the metabolic phenotype and regulatory mechanism associated with malignant cancer cells, and underscores their implications for cancer diagnosis and therapy. This article will address recent exciting advances in the understanding of cancer cell metabolism using proteomics-based systems biology approaches.

  8. Milk of Greek sheep and goat breeds; characterization by means of proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Katsafadou, Angeliki I; Pierros, Vasileios; Kontopodis, Evangelos; Fthenakis, George C; Arsenos, George; Karkabounas, Spyridon Ch; Tzora, Athina; Skoufos, Ioannis; Tsangaris, George Th

    2016-09-16

    Over the past 30years there has been a growing interest to unravel the dynamic framework of the milk proteome, and now that available technology is mature enough to enable techniques of protein fractionation and identification, this process is on-going. Due to its rarity and unique biological traits, as well as its growing financial value, milk of dairy Greek animals is continuously attracting interest from both the scientific community and industry. In the present study we employed cutting-edge proteomics methodologies to investigate and characterize, in depth, the proteome of whey from all pure-breed Greek sheep and goats. A mean of >500 protein groups were identified in whey from each breed of each animal species, reporting for the first time the proteome dataset of this precious biological material. Given its high nutritional value, the protein properties exposed herein will govern future steps in optimizing characteristics and features of sheep and goat milk products. In the present study we employed cutting-edge proteomics methodologies to investigate and characterize, in depth, the proteome of milk from all pure-breed Greek sheep and goats. A mean of >500 protein groups were identified in milk whey from each breed of each animal species, reporting for the first time the proteome dataset of this precious biological material. Given its high nutritional value, the protein properties exposed herein will govern future steps in optimizing characteristics and features of sheep and goat milk products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Proteomic Insights on the Metabolism of Penicillium janczewskii during the Biotransformation of the Plant Terpenoid Labdanolic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Isabel; Varela, Adélia; Frija, Luís M T; Estevão, Mónica A S; Planchon, Sébastien; Renaut, Jenny; Afonso, Carlos A M; Silva Pereira, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Plant terpenoids compose a natural source of chemodiversity of exceptional value. Many of these compounds own biological/pharmacological activity, others are regarded as unique chemical skeletons for the synthesis of derivatives with improved properties. Functional chemical modification of terpenoids through biotransformation frequently relies on the use of Ascomycota strains, but information on major cellular responses is still largely lacking. Penicillium janczewskii mediates a stereo-selective hydroxylation of labdanolic acid (LA)-terpenoid found abundantly in Cistus ladanifer-producing 3β-hydroxy-labdanolic acid with yields >90%. Herein, combined analyses of mycelial and extracellular differential proteomes demonstrated that the plant terpenoid increased stress responses, especially against oxidative stress (e.g., accumulation of superoxide dismutase) and apparently altered mitochondria functioning. One putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase differentially accumulated in the secretome and the terpenoid bioconversion was inhibited in vivo in the presence of a P450 inhibitor. The stereo-selective hydroxylation of the plant terpenoid is likely mediated by P450 enzymes, yet its unequivocal identity remains unclear. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that proteomics was used to investigate how a plant terpenoid impacts the metabolism of a filamentous fungus during its efficiently biotransformation. Our findings may encourage the development of new strategies for the valorization of plant natural resources through biotechnology.

  10. Proteomic Insights on the Metabolism of Penicillium janczewskii during the Biotransformation of the Plant Terpenoid Labdanolic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martins

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant terpenoids compose a natural source of chemodiversity of exceptional value. Many of these compounds own biological/pharmacological activity, others are regarded as unique chemical skeletons for the synthesis of derivatives with improved properties. Functional chemical modification of terpenoids through biotransformation frequently relies on the use of Ascomycota strains, but information on major cellular responses is still largely lacking. Penicillium janczewskii mediates a stereo-selective hydroxylation of labdanolic acid (LA—terpenoid found abundantly in Cistus ladanifer—producing 3β-hydroxy-labdanolic acid with yields >90%. Herein, combined analyses of mycelial and extracellular differential proteomes demonstrated that the plant terpenoid increased stress responses, especially against oxidative stress (e.g., accumulation of superoxide dismutase and apparently altered mitochondria functioning. One putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase differentially accumulated in the secretome and the terpenoid bioconversion was inhibited in vivo in the presence of a P450 inhibitor. The stereo-selective hydroxylation of the plant terpenoid is likely mediated by P450 enzymes, yet its unequivocal identity remains unclear. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that proteomics was used to investigate how a plant terpenoid impacts the metabolism of a filamentous fungus during its efficiently biotransformation. Our findings may encourage the development of new strategies for the valorization of plant natural resources through biotechnology.

  11. The proteome landscape of Giardia lamblia encystation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faso, Carmen; Bischof, Sylvain; Hehl, Adrian B

    2013-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is an intestinal protozoan parasite required to survive in the environment in order to be transmitted to a new host. To ensure parasite survival, flagellated trophozoites colonizing the small intestine differentiate into non-motile environmentally-resistant cysts which are then shed in the environment. This cell differentiation process called encystation is characterized by significant morphological remodeling which includes secretion of large amounts of cyst wall material. Although much is known about the transcriptional regulation of encystation and the synthesis and trafficking of cyst wall material, the investigation of global changes in protein content and abundance during G. lamblia encystation is still unaddressed. In this study, we report on the quantitative analysis of the G. lamblia proteome during encystation using tandem mass spectrometry. Quantification of more than 1000 proteins revealed major changes in protein abundance in early, mid and late encystation, notably in constitutive secretory protein trafficking. Early stages of encystation were marked by a striking decrease of endoplasmic reticulum-targeted variant-specific surface proteins and significant increases in cytoskeleton regulatory components, NEK protein kinases and proteins involved in protein folding and glycolysis. This was in stark contrast to cells in the later stages of encystation which presented a surprisingly similar proteome composition to non-encysting trophozoites. Altogether these data constitute the first quantitative atlas of the Giardia proteome covering the whole process of encystation and point towards an important role for post-transcriptional control of gene expression in Giardia differentiation. Furthermore, our data provide a valuable resource for the community-based annotation effort of the G. lamblia genome, where almost 70% of all predicted gene models remains "hypothetical".

  12. The Proteome Landscape of Giardia lamblia Encystation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehl, Adrian B.

    2013-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is an intestinal protozoan parasite required to survive in the environment in order to be transmitted to a new host. To ensure parasite survival, flagellated trophozoites colonizing the small intestine differentiate into non-motile environmentally-resistant cysts which are then shed in the environment. This cell differentiation process called encystation is characterized by significant morphological remodeling which includes secretion of large amounts of cyst wall material. Although much is known about the transcriptional regulation of encystation and the synthesis and trafficking of cyst wall material, the investigation of global changes in protein content and abundance during G. lamblia encystation is still unaddressed. In this study, we report on the quantitative analysis of the G. lamblia proteome during encystation using tandem mass spectrometry. Quantification of more than 1000 proteins revealed major changes in protein abundance in early, mid and late encystation, notably in constitutive secretory protein trafficking. Early stages of encystation were marked by a striking decrease of endoplasmic reticulum-targeted variant-specific surface proteins and significant increases in cytoskeleton regulatory components, NEK protein kinases and proteins involved in protein folding and glycolysis. This was in stark contrast to cells in the later stages of encystation which presented a surprisingly similar proteome composition to non-encysting trophozoites. Altogether these data constitute the first quantitative atlas of the Giardia proteome covering the whole process of encystation and point towards an important role for post-transcriptional control of gene expression in Giardia differentiation. Furthermore, our data provide a valuable resource for the community-based annotation effort of the G. lamblia genome, where almost 70% of all predicted gene models remains “hypothetical”. PMID:24391747

  13. Centennial paper: Proteomics in animal science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippolis, J D; Reinhardt, T A

    2008-09-01

    Proteomics holds significant promise as a method for advancing animal science research. The use of this technology in animal science is still in its infancy. The ability of proteomics to simultaneously identify and quantify potentially thousands of proteins is unparalleled. In this review, we will discuss basic principles of doing a proteomic experiment. In addition, challenges and limitations of proteomics will be considered, stressing those that are unique to animal sciences. The current proteomic research in animal sciences will be discussed, and the potential uses for this technology will be highlighted.

  14. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-05-13

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed.

  15. Proteomic classification of breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, Dalia

    2012-11-01

    Being a significant health problem that affects patients in various age groups, breast cancer has been extensively studied to date. Recently, molecular breast cancer classification has advanced significantly with the availability of genomic profiling technologies. Proteomic technologies have also advanced from traditional protein assays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry to more comprehensive approaches including mass spectrometry and reverse phase protein lysate arrays (RPPA). The purpose of this manuscript is to review the current protein markers that influence breast cancer prediction and prognosis and to focus on novel advances in proteomic classification of breast cancer.

  16. Scientific Workflow Management in Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Jeroen S.; Deelder, André M.; Palmblad, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Data processing in proteomics can be a challenging endeavor, requiring extensive knowledge of many different software packages, all with different algorithms, data format requirements, and user interfaces. In this article we describe the integration of a number of existing programs and tools in Taverna Workbench, a scientific workflow manager currently being developed in the bioinformatics community. We demonstrate how a workflow manager provides a single, visually clear and intuitive interface to complex data analysis tasks in proteomics, from raw mass spectrometry data to protein identifications and beyond. PMID:22411703

  17. Investigation of complexes with bone affinity using the In vivo generator system {sup 166} Dy/{sup 166} Ho; Investigacion de complejos con afinidad osea utilizando el Sistema de Generador in vivo {sup 166} Dy/{sup 166} Ho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedraza L, M

    2006-07-01

    The importance of this original research lies in the fact that it has proven that the [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system is a stable complex that can be used as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. Multiple myeloma and other hematological malignancies have been treated by myeloablative radiotherapy/chemotherapy and subsequent stem cell transplantation. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 166}Ho-DOTMP or {sup 153}Sm-DTMP, have been proposed for delivering ablative radiation doses to marrow in multiple myeloma and other hematological malignancies or have shown excellent results in palliative bone metastasis pain therapy, respectively. As lanthanides have similar chemical characteristics the phosphonate with bone affinity (EDTMP) labeled with Dy/Ho can be used for marrow ablation while causing minimal irradiation to normal organs. This in vivo generator system has not been previously reported. The aim of this research was to label EDTMP (ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate) with {sup 166}Dy/{sup 166}Ho; to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo stability of both {sup 166}Dy-EDTMP and {sup 166}Ho-EDTMP complexes when the daughter {sup 166}Ho is formed as a dysprosium decay product; to determine the bone marrow cytotoxic and genotoxic effect in mice and to evaluate, by histopathology, the myeloablative potential of the [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system. {sup 166}Dy was obtained by neutron irradiation of enriched {sup 164}Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} in a TRIGA Mark III reactor. Labeling was carried out in an aqueous phosphate medium at pH 8.0 by addition of {sup 166}DyCl{sub 3} to EDTMP at a molar ratio 1:1.75, with >99 % radiochemical purity, as determined by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In vitro studies demonstrated that {sup 166}Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP is unstable after dilution in saline but stable in human serum with no translocation of the daughter nucleus

  18. Proteomic Research Funding Opportunity | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    To expand the understanding of how cells sense and respond to changes in their physical environment, the NCI is seeking to perform proteomic assays on the panel of cell lines grown on a variety of substrates. These assays will provide insight into changes in protein levels or phosphorylation changes that could reflect the activity of mechano-transduction pathways.

  19. Bioinformatics Resources for In Silico Proteome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruess Manuela

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the growing field of proteomics, tools for the in silico analysis of proteins and even of whole proteomes are of crucial importance to make best use of the accumulating amount of data. To utilise this data for healthcare and drug development, first the characteristics of proteomes of entire species—mainly the human—have to be understood, before secondly differentiation between individuals can be surveyed. Specialised databases about nucleic acid sequences, protein sequences, protein tertiary structure, genome analysis, and proteome analysis represent useful resources for analysis, characterisation, and classification of protein sequences. Different from most proteomics tools focusing on similarity searches, structure analysis and prediction, detection of specific regions, alignments, data mining, 2D PAGE analysis, or protein modelling, respectively, comprehensive databases like the proteome analysis database benefit from the information stored in different databases and make use of different protein analysis tools to provide computational analysis of whole proteomes.

  20. Blue native-gel electrophoresis proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, Kelly; King, Adrienne; Bailey, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    The importance of the mitochondrion in maintaining normal cellular physiology has long been appreciated. Recently there has been an upsurge in mitochondrial research due to increased recognition that a number of diseases are caused by defective functioning of this key intracellular organelle. Given this, along with advances made in proteomics technologies, the mitochondrion is clearly recognized as a top candidate for proteomics analysis. However, mitochondrial proteomics is not a trivial undertaking due to physicochemical properties that impair the resolution of inner mitochondrial membrane proteins when using conventional proteomic gel electrophoresis procedures. To circumvent such problems, many laboratories have adapted blue native-gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE), a specialized type of native-gel electrophoresis, to generate high-resolution proteomic maps of the oxidative phosphorylation system. In this short overview the concepts and methods of BN-PAGE are presented, which demonstrate the power of using this complementary proteomics approach to identify alterations in the mitochondrial proteome that contribute to disease.

  1. An Ultrasound Image-Based Dynamic Fusion Modeling Method for Predicting the Quantitative Impact of In Vivo Liver Motion on Intraoperative HIFU Therapies: Investigations in a Porcine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Apoutou N'Djin

    Full Text Available Organ motion is a key component in the treatment of abdominal tumors by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU, since it may influence the safety, efficacy and treatment time. Here we report the development in a porcine model of an Ultrasound (US image-based dynamic fusion modeling method for predicting the effect of in vivo motion on intraoperative HIFU treatments performed in the liver in conjunction with surgery. A speckle tracking method was used on US images to quantify in vivo liver motions occurring intraoperatively during breathing and apnea. A fusion modeling of HIFU treatments was implemented by merging dynamic in vivo motion data in a numerical modeling of HIFU treatments. Two HIFU strategies were studied: a spherical focusing delivering 49 juxtapositions of 5-second HIFU exposures and a toroidal focusing using 1 single 40-second HIFU exposure. Liver motions during breathing were spatially homogenous and could be approximated to a rigid motion mainly encountered in the cranial-caudal direction (f = 0.20 Hz, magnitude > 13 mm. Elastic liver motions due to cardiovascular activity, although negligible, were detectable near millimeter-wide sus-hepatic veins (f = 0.96 Hz, magnitude 75%. Fusion modeling predictions were preliminarily validated in vivo and showed the potential of using a long-duration toroidal HIFU exposure to accelerate the ablation process during breathing (from 0.5 to 6 cm3 · min(-1. To improve HIFU treatment control, dynamic fusion modeling may be interesting for assessing numerically focusing strategies and motion compensation techniques in more realistic conditions.

  2. An Ultrasound Image-Based Dynamic Fusion Modeling Method for Predicting the Quantitative Impact of In Vivo Liver Motion on Intraoperative HIFU Therapies: Investigations in a Porcine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Djin, W. Apoutou; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Melodelima, David

    2015-01-01

    Organ motion is a key component in the treatment of abdominal tumors by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU), since it may influence the safety, efficacy and treatment time. Here we report the development in a porcine model of an Ultrasound (US) image-based dynamic fusion modeling method for predicting the effect of in vivo motion on intraoperative HIFU treatments performed in the liver in conjunction with surgery. A speckle tracking method was used on US images to quantify in vivo liver motions occurring intraoperatively during breathing and apnea. A fusion modeling of HIFU treatments was implemented by merging dynamic in vivo motion data in a numerical modeling of HIFU treatments. Two HIFU strategies were studied: a spherical focusing delivering 49 juxtapositions of 5-second HIFU exposures and a toroidal focusing using 1 single 40-second HIFU exposure. Liver motions during breathing were spatially homogenous and could be approximated to a rigid motion mainly encountered in the cranial-caudal direction (f = 0.20Hz, magnitude >13mm). Elastic liver motions due to cardiovascular activity, although negligible, were detectable near millimeter-wide sus-hepatic veins (f = 0.96Hz, magnitude HIFU exposure in stationary tissues (Dice Similarity Coefficient: DSCHIFU ablations during respiration, either by juxtaposing “cigar-shaped” lesions with spherical HIFU exposures, or by generating one large single lesion with toroidal HIFU exposures (DSC>75%). Fusion modeling predictions were preliminarily validated in vivo and showed the potential of using a long-duration toroidal HIFU exposure to accelerate the ablation process during breathing (from 0.5 to 6 cm3·min-1). To improve HIFU treatment control, dynamic fusion modeling may be interesting for assessing numerically focusing strategies and motion compensation techniques in more realistic conditions. PMID:26398366

  3. A Novel In Vivo Joint Loading System to Investigate the Effect of Daily Mechanical Load on a Healing Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Stasiak, Mark; Imhauser, Carl; Packer, Jonathan; Bedi, Asheesh; Brophy, Robert; Kovacevic, David; Jackson, Kent; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Rodeo, Scott; Torzilli, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We designed and validated a novel knee joint fixation/distraction system to study tendon–to-bone healing in an in vivo rat model of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The system uses an external fixator to apply a cyclic distraction of the knee joint while monitoring the resultant force developed across the joint, thus providing a temporal indication of structural changes during the healing process of the bone-tendon-bone reconstruction. The validation was performed using an opt...

  4. In vivo metabolic investigation of moxifloxacin using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in combination with online hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, B; Ramesh, M; Borkar, Roshan M; Srinivas, R; Padiya, Raju; Banerjee, Sanjay K

    2012-08-30

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of death from an infectious disease and moxifloxacin is an effective drug as compared to other fluoroquinolones. To date only two metabolites of the drug are known. Therefore, the present study on characterization of hitherto unknown in vivo metabolites of moxifloxacin using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) is undertaken. In vivo metabolites of moxifloxacin have been identified and characterized by using LC/ESI-MS/MS in combination with an online hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange technique. To identify in vivo metabolites, blood, urine and faeces samples were collected after oral administration of moxifloxacin to Sprague-Dawley rats. The samples were prepared using an optimized sample preparation approach involving protein precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction followed by solid-phase extraction and LC/MS/MS analysis. A total of nine phase I and ten phase II metabolites of moxifloxacin have been identified in urine samples including N-sulphated, glucuronide and hydroxylated metabolites which are also observed in plasma samples. In faeces samples, only the N-sulphated metabolite is observed. The structures of metabolites have been elucidated based on fragmentation patterns, accurate mass measurements and online H/D exchange LC/MS/MS experiments. Online H/D exchange experiments are used to support the identification and structural characterization of drug metabolites. A total of 19 in vivo metabolites of moxifloxacin have been characterized using LC/ESI-MS/MS in combination with accurate mass measurements and online H/D exchange experiments. The main phase I metabolites of moxifloxacin are hydroxylated, decarbonylated, desmethylated and desmethylhydroxylated metabolites which undergo subsequent phase II glucuronidation pathways. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Lemon peel and Limoncello liqueur: a proteomic duet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoli, Elisa; Colzani, Mara; Aldini, Giancarlo; Citterio, Attilio; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2013-08-01

    Combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLLs) have been adopted for investigating the proteomes of lemon peels and pulp, of a home-made alcoholic infusion of peels and of a very popular Italian liqueur called "Limoncello", stated to be an infusion of the flavedo (the outer, yellow skin of lemons). The aim of this study was not only to perform the deepest investigation so far of the lemon peel proteome but also to assess the genuineness of the commercial liqueur via a three-pronged attack. First, different extraction techniques have been used for the characterization of the peel (and additionally of the pulp) proteome, secondly a home-made infusion has been analysed and finally the proteome of the commercial drink was checked. The peel (the flavedo, not the underlying layer called albedo) proteome has been evaluated via prior capture with CPLLs at different pH values (2.2 and 7.2). Via mass spectrometry analysis of the recovered fractions, after elution of the captured populations in 4% boiling SDS, we could identify a total of 1011 unique gene products in the peel extracts and 674 in the pulp, 264 proteins in the home-made infusion and just 8 proteins (and protein fragments), together with 12 peptides, in one Italian Limoncello produced in the Sorrento Region, thus proving the genuineness of this product. On the contrary, cheaper Limoncellos were devoid of any protein/peptide, casting doubts on their production from vegetable extracts. This could be the starting point for investigating the genuineness and natural origin of commercial drinks in order to protect consumers from adulterated products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Principles of proteome allocation are revealed using proteomic data and genome-scale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Laurence; Yurkovich, James T.; Lloyd, Colton J.

    2016-01-01

    Integrating omics data to refine or make context-specific models is an active field of constraint-based modeling. Proteomics now cover over 95% of the Escherichia coli proteome by mass. Genome-scale models of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression (ME) compute proteome allocation linked...... to metabolism and fitness. Using proteomics data, we formulated allocation constraints for key proteome sectors in the ME model. The resulting calibrated model effectively computed the "generalist" (wild-type) E. coli proteome and phenotype across diverse growth environments. Across 15 growth conditions...

  7. Quantitative proteomics of Chlorobaculum tepidum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenby, Lasse Gaarde; Szymanska, Monika; Holkenbrink, Carina

    2011-01-01

    Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum is a green sulfur bacterium that oxidizes sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate for photosynthetic growth. To gain insight into the sulfur metabolism, the proteome of Cba. tepidum cells sampled under different growth conditions has been quantified using a rapid g...

  8. Periodontal Proteomics: Wonders Never Cease!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Kapoor, Shalini; Saksena, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are vital parts of living organisms, as they are integral components of the physiological metabolic pathways of cells. Periodontal tissues comprise multicompartmental groups of interacting cells and matrices that provide continuous support, attachment, proprioception, and physical protection for the teeth. The proteome map, that is, complete catalogue of the matrix and cellular proteins expressed in alveolar bone, cementum, periodontal ligament, and gingiva, is to be explored for more in-depth understanding of periodontium. The ongoing research to understand the signalling pathways that allow cells to divide, differentiate, and die in controlled manner has brought us to the era of proteomics. Proteomics is defined as the study of all proteins including their relative abundance, distribution, posttranslational modifications, functions, and interactions with other macromolecules, in a given cell or organism within a given environment and at a specific stage in the cell cycle. Its application to periodontal science can be used to monitor health status, disease onset, treatment response, and outcome. Proteomics can offer answers to critical, unresolved questions such as the biological basis for the heterogeneity in gingival, alveolar bone, and cemental cell populations. PMID:24490073

  9. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  10. The potato tuber mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper

    ) and in silico-predicted mitochondrial proteins (2000-3000). Thus, before starting to look for oxidized peptides, we wanted to expand the current compendium of plant mitochondrial proteins while obtaining what could be termed the "baseline proteome" from our model organelle, the potato tuber mitochondrion. Its...

  11. Unravelling the nuclear matrix proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C; Jimenez, Connie R

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear matrix (NM) model posits the presence of a protein/RNA scaffold that spans the mammalian nucleus. The NM proteins are involved in basic nuclear function and are a promising source of protein biomarkers for cancer. Importantly, the NM proteome is operationally defined as the proteins...

  12. Proteomic responses of fruits to environmental stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhulong eChan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fruits and vegetables are extremely susceptible to decay and easily lose commercial value after harvest. Different strategies have been developed to control postharvest decay and prevent quality deterioration during postharvest storage, including cold storage, controlled atmosphere, and application of biotic and abiotic stimulus. In this review, mechanisms related to protein level responses of host side and pathogen side were characterized. Protein extraction protocols have been successfully developed for recalcitrant, low protein content fruit tissues. Comparative proteome profiling and functional analysis revealed that defense related proteins, energy metabolism and antioxidant pathway played important roles in fruits in response to storage conditions and exogenous elicitor treatments. Secretome of pathogenic fungi has been well investigated and the results indicated that hydrolytic enzymes were the key virulent factors for the pathogen infection. These protein level changes shed new light on interaction among fruits, pathogens and environmental conditions. Potential postharvest strategies to reduce risk of fruit decay were further proposed based on currently available proteomic data.

  13. Rapid and Deep Proteomes by Faster Sequencing on a Benchtop Quadrupole Ultra-High-Field Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Christian D; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa R; Batth, Tanveer Singh

    2014-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics is a powerful technology for global analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Here, we investigate faster sequencing speed of the latest Q Exactive HF mass spectrometer, which features an ultra-high-field Orbitrap mass analyzer. Proteome coverage is evalu......Shotgun proteomics is a powerful technology for global analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Here, we investigate faster sequencing speed of the latest Q Exactive HF mass spectrometer, which features an ultra-high-field Orbitrap mass analyzer. Proteome coverage...... per second or up to 600 new peptides sequenced per gradient minute. We identify 4400 proteins from one microgram of HeLa digest using a one hour gradient, which is an approximately 30% improvement compared to previous instrumentation. In addition, we show very deep proteome coverage can be achieved...

  14. Proteomic Mapping of the Immune Response to Gluten in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0293 TITLE: Proteomic Mapping of the Immune Response to Gluten in Children with Autism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Sep 2014 – 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Proteomic Mapping of the Immune Response to Gluten in Children with Autism 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and defects in GI function in the context of autism . Our newly published data indicate that children with autism exhibit

  15. Data for whole and mitochondrial proteome of human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Shekari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here pertain to the research article entitled “Proteome Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Organelles” (Shekariet al., 2017 [1]. In the present article we endeavour to locate new proteins and pathways in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs by mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis. We have analyzed total and mitochondrial proteins extracted from three biological replicates of the hESC H9 cell line according to mass spectrometry proteomics and bioinformatics investigations.

  16. On Marathons and Sprints: An Integrated Quantitative Proteomics and Transcriptomics Analysis of Differences Between Slow and Fast Muscle Fibers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Hannes C. A.; Ruhs, Aaron; Konzer, Anne; Mendler, Luca; Bruckskotten, Mark; Looso, Mario; Günther, Stefan; Boettger, Thomas; Krüger, Marcus; Braun, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue contains slow as well as fast twitch muscle fibers that possess different metabolic and contractile properties. Although the distribution of individual proteins in fast and slow fibers has been investigated extensively, a comprehensive proteomic analysis, which is key for any systems biology approach to muscle tissues, is missing. Here, we compared the global protein levels and gene expression profiles of the predominantly slow soleus and fast extensor digitorum longus muscles using the principle of in vivo stable isotope labeling with amino acids based on a fully lysine-6 labeled SILAC-mouse. We identified 551 proteins with significant quantitative differences between slow soleus and fast extensor digitorum longus fibers out of >2000 quantified proteins, which greatly extends the repertoire of proteins differentially regulated between both muscle types. Most of the differentially regulated proteins mediate cellular contraction, ion homeostasis, glycolysis, and oxidation, which reflect the major functional differences between both muscle types. Comparison of proteomics and transcriptomics data uncovered the existence of fiber-type specific posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms resulting in differential accumulation of Myosin-8 and α-protein kinase 3 proteins and mRNAs among others. Phosphoproteome analysis of soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles identified 2573 phosphosites on 973 proteins including 1040 novel phosphosites. The in vivo stable isotope labeling with amino acids-mouse approach used in our study provides a comprehensive view into the protein networks that direct fiber-type specific functions and allows a detailed dissection of the molecular composition of slow and fast muscle tissues with unprecedented resolution. PMID:22210690

  17. On marathons and Sprints: an integrated quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics analysis of differences between slow and fast muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Hannes C A; Ruhs, Aaron; Konzer, Anne; Mendler, Luca; Bruckskotten, Mark; Looso, Mario; Günther, Stefan; Boettger, Thomas; Krüger, Marcus; Braun, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue contains slow as well as fast twitch muscle fibers that possess different metabolic and contractile properties. Although the distribution of individual proteins in fast and slow fibers has been investigated extensively, a comprehensive proteomic analysis, which is key for any systems biology approach to muscle tissues, is missing. Here, we compared the global protein levels and gene expression profiles of the predominantly slow soleus and fast extensor digitorum longus muscles using the principle of in vivo stable isotope labeling with amino acids based on a fully lysine-6 labeled SILAC-mouse. We identified 551 proteins with significant quantitative differences between slow soleus and fast extensor digitorum longus fibers out of >2000 quantified proteins, which greatly extends the repertoire of proteins differentially regulated between both muscle types. Most of the differentially regulated proteins mediate cellular contraction, ion homeostasis, glycolysis, and oxidation, which reflect the major functional differences between both muscle types. Comparison of proteomics and transcriptomics data uncovered the existence of fiber-type specific posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms resulting in differential accumulation of Myosin-8 and α-protein kinase 3 proteins and mRNAs among others. Phosphoproteome analysis of soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles identified 2573 phosphosites on 973 proteins including 1040 novel phosphosites. The in vivo stable isotope labeling with amino acids-mouse approach used in our study provides a comprehensive view into the protein networks that direct fiber-type specific functions and allows a detailed dissection of the molecular composition of slow and fast muscle tissues with unprecedented resolution.

  18. Proteome coverage prediction with infinite Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Manfred; Aebersold, Ruedi; Buhmann, Joachim M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is the predominant method to comprehensively characterize complex protein mixtures such as samples from prefractionated or complete proteomes. In order to maximize proteome coverage for the studied sample, i.e. identify as many traceable proteins as possible, LC-MS/MS experiments are typically repeated extensively and the results combined. Proteome coverage prediction is the task of estimating the number of peptide discoveries of future LC-MS/MS experiments. Proteome coverage prediction is important to enhance the design of efficient proteomics studies. To date, there does not exist any method to reliably estimate the increase of proteome coverage at an early stage. Results: We propose an extended infinite Markov model DiriSim to extrapolate the progression of proteome coverage based on a small number of already performed LC-MS/MS experiments. The method explicitly accounts for the uncertainty of peptide identifications. We tested DiriSim on a set of 37 LC-MS/MS experiments of a complete proteome sample and demonstrated that DiriSim correctly predicts the coverage progression already from a small subset of experiments. The predicted progression enabled us to specify maximal coverage for the test sample. We demonstrated that quality requirements on the final proteome map impose an upper bound on the number of useful experiment repetitions and limit the achievable proteome coverage. Contact: manfredc@inf.ethz.ch; jbuhmann@inf.ethz.ch PMID:19477982

  19. Zeus, Aesculapius, Amalthea and the proteome of goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Fasoli, Elisa; Saletti, Rosaria; Muccilli, Vera; Gallina, Serafina; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Foti, Salvatore

    2015-10-14

    The goat whey proteome has been explored in depth via capture with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLLs) at three different pH values. A total of 452 unique species have been tabulated, a proteome discovery so far unmatched in any single other investigation of milk from any mammalian species. This massive discovery is probably related to: i) the extraordinary load of proteins onto the CPLL beads (i.e. 2 g for each different pH captures) vs. barely 100 μL of beads; ii) the high resolution/high mass accuracy of mass spectral data; and iii) the use of two complementary tools, Mascot and PEAKS, each one contributing to a set of unique protein IDs. Due to the relative paucity of available protein annotations for goat, only 10% of the identified proteins belong to the capra, whereas 52% are specific of sheep and 37% are homologous to that of bovine milk. This work reports the largest description so far of the goat milk proteome, which has been compared with cow's milk proteome and would thus help to understand the importance of low-abundance proteins with respect to the unique biological properties of this nutrient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Advancing Proteomics Research through Collaboration | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the areas of sharing proteomics reagents and protocols and also in regulatory science.

  1. Investigating an approach to identifying the biomechanical differences between intercostal cartilage in subjects with pectus excavatum and normals in vivo: preliminary assessment of normal subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechowicz, Krzysztof; McKenzie, Frederic; Yan, Zhenzhen; Bawab, Sebastian; Ringleb, Stacie

    2009-02-01

    The cause of pectus excavatum (PE) is unknown and little research has been done to assess the material properties of the PE costal cartilage. One source reported, after studying ex vivo various properties of the costal cartilage in cases of PE that the biomechanical stability of PE cartilage is decreased when compared to that of normals. Building on this idea, it would be beneficial to measure the biomechanical properties of the costal cartilages in vivo to further determine the differences between PE subjects and normals. An approach to doing this would be to use a modified FARO arm, which can read applied loads and resulting deflections. These values can be used to establish a finite element model of the chest area of a person with PE. So far, a validated technique for the registration between a CT based 3D model of the ribcage and a skin surface scan in case of PE has been addressed. On the basis of the data gathered from 10 subjects with normal chests using a robot arm, stylus and 3D laser scanner, we tried to evaluate the influence of inter-measurement respiration of a subject on results accuracy and the possibility of using the stylus for deflection measurement. In addition, we established the best strategy for taking measurements.

  2. Melatonin reduces hypoxic-ischaemic (HI) induced autophagy and apoptosis: An in vivo and in vitro investigation in experimental models of neonatal HI brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingying; Wang, Zhouguang; Liu, Yanlong; Pan, Shulin; Zhang, Hao; Fang, Mingchu; Jiang, Huai; Yin, Jiayu; Zou, Shuangshuang; Li, Zhenmao; Zhang, Hongyu; Lin, Zhenlang; Xiao, Jian

    2017-07-13

    Melatonin has neuroprotective effects in many diseases, including neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic (HI) brain injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of melatonin both in vivo and in vitro and associated molecular mechanisms behind these effects. Postnatal day 7 male and female rat pups were subjected to unilateral HI, melatonin was injected intraperitoneally 1h before HI and an additional six doses were administered at 24h intervals. The pups were sacrificed at 24h and 7 d after HI. Pre-treatment with melatonin significantly reduced brain damage at 7 d after HI, with 15mg/kg melatonin achieving over 30% recovery in tissue loss compared to vehicle-treated animals. Autophagy and apoptotic cell death as indicated by autophagy associated proteins, cleaved caspase 3 and Tunel staining, was significantly inhibited after melatonin treatment in vivo as well as in PC12 cells. Melatonin treatment also significantly increased the GAP43 in the cortex. In conclusion, melatonin treatment reduced neonatal rat brain injury after HI, and this appeared to be related to inhibiting autophagy as well as reducing apoptotic cell death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Integration of Cardiac Proteome Biology and Medicine by a Specialized Knowledgebase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Nobel C.; Li, Haomin; Li, Hua; Lam, Maggie P.Y.; Jimenez, Rafael C.; Kim, Christina S.; Deng, Ning; Kim, Allen K.; Choi, Jeong Ho; Zelaya, Ivette; Liem, David; Meyer, David; Odeberg, Jacob; Fang, Caiyun; Lu, Hao-jie; Xu, Tao; Weiss, James; Duan, Huilong; Uhlen, Mathias; Yates, John R.; Apweiler, Rolf; Ge, Junbo; Hermjakob, Henning; Ping, Peipei

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Omics sciences enable a systems-level perspective in characterizing cardiovascular biology. Integration of diverse proteomics data via a computational strategy will catalyze the assembly of contextualized knowledge, foster discoveries through multidisciplinary investigations, and minimize unnecessary redundancy in research efforts. Objective The goal of this project is to develop a consolidated cardiac proteome knowledgebase with novel bioinformatics pipeline and web portals, thereby serving as a new resource to advance cardiovascular biology and medicine. Methods and Results We created Cardiac Organellar Protein Atlas Knowledgebase (COPaKB), a centralized platform of high quality cardiac proteomic data, bioinformatics tools and relevant cardiovascular phenotypes. Currently, COPaKB features eight organellar modules, comprising 4,203 LC-MS/MS experiments from human, mouse, drosophila and C. elegans as well as expression images of 10,924 proteins in human myocardium. In addition, the Java-coded bioinformatics tools provided by COPaKB enable cardiovascular investigators in all disciplines to retrieve and analyze pertinent organellar protein properties of interest. Conclusions COPaKB (www.HeartProteome.org) provides an innovative and interactive resource, which connects research interests with the new biological discoveries in protein sciences. With an array of intuitive tools in this unified web server, non-proteomics investigators can conveniently collaborate with proteomics specialists to dissect the molecular signatures of cardiovascular phenotypes. PMID:23965338

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Kveim Reagent Identifies Targets of Cellular Immunity in Sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Christian; Thillai, Muhunthan; Parker, Robert; Siddiqui, Nazneen; Potiphar, Lee; Goldin, Rob; Timms, John F; Wells, Athol U; Kon, Onn M; Wickremasinghe, Melissa; Mitchell, Donald; Weeks, Mark E; Lalvani, Ajit

    2017-01-01

    Kveim-reagent (Kv) skin testing was a historical method of diagnosing sarcoidosis. Intradermal injection of treated sarcoidosis spleen tissue resulted in a granuloma response at injection site by 4-6 weeks. Previous work indicates proteins as the possible trigger of this reaction. We aimed to identify Kv-specific proteins and characterise the ex vivo response of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from sarcoidosis, tuberculosis and healthy control patients when stimulated with both Kv and selected Kv-specific proteins. Kv extracts were separated by 1D-SDS-PAGE and 2D-DIGE and then underwent mass spectrometric analysis for protein identification. Sarcoidosis and control PBMCs were first stimulated with Kv and then with three selected recombinant protein candidates which were identified from the proteomic analysis. PBMC secreted cytokines were subsequently measured by Multiplex Cytokine Assay. We observed significantly increased IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion from Kv-stimulated PBMCs of sarcoidosis patients vs. PBMCs from healthy volunteers (IFN-γ: 207.2 pg/mL vs. 3.86 pg/mL, p = 0.0018; TNF-α: 2375 pg/mL vs. 42.82 pg/mL, p = 0.0003). Through proteomic approaches we then identified 74 sarcoidosis tissue-specific proteins. Of these, 3 proteins (vimentin, tubulin and alpha-actinin-4) were identified using both 1D-SDS-PAGE and 2D-DIGE. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005150. Increased cytokine secretion was subsequently observed with vimentin stimulation of sarcoidosis PBMCs vs. tuberculosis PBMCs (IFN-γ: 396.6 pg/mL vs 0.1 pg/mL, p = 0.0009; TNF-α: 1139 pg/mL vs 0.1 pg/mL, psarcoidosis PBMCs compared to PBMCs from healthy controls (IFN-γ: 396.6 pg/mL vs. 0.1 pg/mL, p = 0.014; TNF-α: 1139 pg/mL vs 42.29 pg/mL, p = 0.027). No difference was found in cytokine secretion between sarcoidosis and control PBMCs when stimulated with either tubulin or alpha-actinin-4. Stimulation with both Kveim reagent and vimentin induces a specific pro

  5. Quantitative Interaction Proteomics of Neurodegenerative Disease Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Hosp

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Several proteins have been linked to neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs, but their molecular function is not completely understood. Here, we used quantitative interaction proteomics to identify binding partners of Amyloid beta precursor protein (APP and Presenilin-1 (PSEN1 for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntingtin (HTT for Huntington’s disease, Parkin (PARK2 for Parkinson’s disease, and Ataxin-1 (ATXN1 for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. Our network reveals common signatures of protein degradation and misfolding and recapitulates known biology. Toxicity modifier screens and comparison to genome-wide association studies show that interaction partners are significantly linked to disease phenotypes in vivo. Direct comparison of wild-type proteins and disease-associated variants identified binders involved in pathogenesis, highlighting the value of differential interactome mapping. Finally, we show that the mitochondrial protein LRPPRC interacts preferentially with an early-onset AD variant of APP. This interaction appears to induce mitochondrial dysfunction, which is an early phenotype of AD.

  6. Identification of Thalidomide-Specific Transcriptomics and Proteomics Signatures during Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meganathan, Kesavan; Jagtap, Smita; Wagh, Vilas; Winkler, Johannes; Gaspar, John Antonydas; Hildebrand, Diana; Trusch, Maria; Lehmann, Karola; Hescheler, Jürgen; Schlüter, Hartmut; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic development can be partially recapitulated in vitro by differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Thalidomide is a developmental toxicant in vivo and acts in a species-dependent manner. Besides its therapeutic value, thalidomide also serves as a prototypical model to study teratogenecity. Although many in vivo and in vitro platforms have demonstrated its toxicity, only a few test systems accurately reflect human physiology. We used global gene expression and proteomics profiling (two dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) coupled with Tandem Mass spectrometry) to demonstrate hESC differentiation and thalidomide embryotoxicity/teratogenecity with clinically relevant dose(s). Proteome analysis showed loss of POU5F1 regulatory proteins PKM2 and RBM14 and an over expression of proteins involved in neuronal development (such as PAK2, PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3) after 14 days of differentiation. The genomic and proteomic expression pattern demonstrated differential expression of limb, heart and embryonic development related transcription factors and biological processes. Moreover, this study uncovered novel possible mechanisms, such as the inhibition of RANBP1, that participate in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of proteins and inhibition of glutathione transferases (GSTA1, GSTA2), that protect the cell from secondary oxidative stress. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated that a combination of transcriptomics and proteomics, along with consistent differentiation of hESCs, enabled the detection of canonical and novel teratogenic intracellular mechanisms of thalidomide. PMID:22952932

  7. Proteomic analysis to unravel the complex venom proteome of eastern India Naja naja: Correlation of venom composition with its biochemical and pharmacological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sumita; Chanda, Abhishek; Kalita, Bhargab; Islam, Taufikul; Patra, Aparup; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2017-03-06

    The complex venom proteome of the eastern India (EI) spectacled cobra (Naja naja) was analyzed using tandem mass spectrometry of cation-exchange venom fractions. About 75% of EI N. naja venom proteins were naja venom with a percent composition of about 28.4% and 71.6% respectively were distributed over 15 venom protein families. The three finger toxins (63.8%) and phospholipase A2s (11.4%) were the most abundant families of non-enzymatic and enzymatic proteins, respectively. nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis demonstrated the occurrence of acetylcholinesterase, phosphodiesterase, cholinesterase and snake venom serine proteases in N. naja venom previously not detected by proteomic analysis. ATPase, ADPase, hyaluronidase, TAME, and BAEE-esterase activities were detected by biochemical analysis; however, due to a limitation in the protein database depository they were not identified in EI N. naja venom by proteomic analysis. The proteome composition of EI N. naja venom was well correlated with its in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties in experimental animals and envenomed human. Proteomic analysis reveals the complex and diverse protein profile of EI N. naja venom which collectively contributes to the severe pathophysiological manifestation upon cobra envenomation. The study has also aided in comprehending the compositional variation in venom proteins of N. naja within the Indian sub-continent. In addition, this study has also identified several enzymes in EI N. naja venom which were previously uncharacterized by proteomic analysis of Naja venom. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evolution of Clinical Proteomics and its Role in Medicine | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research authored a review of the current state of clinical proteomics in the peer-reviewed Journal of Proteome Research. The review highlights outcomes from the CPTC program and also provides a thorough overview of the different technologies that have pushed the field forward. Additionally, the review provides a vision for moving the field forward through linking advances in genomic and proteomic analysis to develop new, molecularly targeted interventions.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Human Tooth Pulp: Proteomics of Human Tooth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eckhardt, Adam; Jágr, Michal; Pataridis, Statis; Mikšík, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 12 (2014), s. 1961-1966 ISSN 0099-2399 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/0453; GA MZd(CZ) NT14324 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : dentin * human pulp * tandem mass spectrometry * tooth proteome * 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 3.375, year: 2014

  10. Establishment of a root proteome reference map for the model legume Medicago truncatula using the expressed sequence tag database for peptide mass fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathesius, U; Keijzers, Guido; Natera, S H

    2001-01-01

    We have established a proteome reference map for Medicago truncatula root proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with peptide mass fingerprinting to aid the dissection of nodulation and root developmental pathways by proteome analysis. M. truncatula has been chosen as a model....... This proteome map will be updated continuously (http://semele.anu.edu.au/2d/2d.html) and will be a powerful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of root symbioses in legumes....

  11. Proteomics reveals the effects of sustained weight loss on the human plasma proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geyer, Philipp E; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Tyanova, Stefka

    2016-01-01

    by a year of weight maintenance. Using mass spectrometry-based plasma proteome profiling, we measured 1,294 plasma proteomes. Longitudinal monitoring of the cohort revealed individual-specific protein levels with wide-ranging effects of losing weight on the plasma proteome reflected in 93 significantly...

  12. Evolutionary conservation of the mature oocyte proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Lotan

    2014-06-01

    Significance: The current study provides the first proteomic profile of an oocyte of a cnidarian organism the starlet sea anemone N. vectensis and gives new insights on the ancient origin of an oocyte proteome template. The comparative analysis with a chordate oocyte suggests that the oocyte proteome predates the divergence of the cnidarian and bilaterian lineages. In addition, the data generated in the study will serve as a valuable resource for further developmental and evolutional studies.

  13. Host Proteome Research in HIV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Honghao

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has been widely used in the last few years to look for new biomarkers and decipher the mechanism of HIV?host interaction. Herein, we review the recent developments of HIV/AIDS proteomic research, including the samples used in HIV/AIDS related research, the technologies used for proteomic study, the diagnosis biomarkers of HIV-associated disease especially HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment, the mechanisms of HIV?host interaction, HIV-associated dementia, substance abuse, and ...

  14. Proteome analysis of potato juice and tuber vacuoles from cv. Kuras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene

    from the vacuoles of mature potato tuber. A comprehensive investigation of the vacuolar proteome and a detailed analysis of the identified proteins and their possible roles in vacuolar function were carried out. A primary requirement of any proteomic analysis of an organelle is purity of the isolated......-grown potato tubers cv. Kuras were used for isolation of vacuoles in order to do an organelle based proteome analysis and to gain a better fundament for understanding the vacuolar targeting mechanisms in plants.   In this study complementary methods were used to identify high and low abundance proteins derived...... organelle. A method was developed for isolation of highly purified intact vacuoles. The proteome analysis of the purified vacuoles involved separation of native soluble proteins by gel filtration with Superdex 200 into nine fractions. Each fraction was analyzed in two ways, by SDS-PAGE followed by protein...

  15. A comparative proteomic study on the effects of metal pollution in oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lanlan; Ji, Chenglong; Wu, Huifeng; Tan, Qiaoguo; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-11-15

    The metal pollution has posed great risk on the coastal organisms along the Jiulongjiang Estuary in South China. In this work, two-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics was applied to the oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis from metal pollution sites to characterize the proteomic responses to metal pollution. Metal accumulation and proteomic responses indicated that the oysters from BJ site were more severely contaminated than those from FG site. Compared with those oyster samples from the clean site (JZ), metal pollution induced cellular injuries, oxidative and immune stresses in oyster heapatopancreas from both BJ and FG sites via differential metabolic pathways. In addition, metal pollution in BJ site induced disturbance in energy and lipid metabolisms in oysters. Results indicated that cathepsin L and ferritin GF1 might be the biomarkers of As and Fe in oyster C. hongkongensis, respectively. This study demonstrates that proteomics is a useful tool for investigating biological effects induced by metal pollution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tissue proteomics in pancreatic cancer study: discovery, emerging technologies and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Kelly, Kimberly; Chen, Ru

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose and treat. The advances of proteomics technology, especially quantitative proteomics, have stimulated a great interest to apply this technology for pancreatic cancer study. A variety of tissue proteomics approaches have been applied to investigate pancreatic cancer and the associated diseases. These studies were carried out with various goals, aiming to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic tumorigenesis, to improve therapeutic treatment and to identify cancer associated protein signatures, signaling events as well as interactions between cancer cells and tumor microenvironment. Here, we provide an overview on the tissue proteomics studies of pancreatic cancer reported in the past few years in light of discovery and technology development. PMID:23125171

  17. Elucidating Host-Pathogen Interactions Based on Post-Translational Modifications Using Proteomics Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Jers, Carsten; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    display host specificity through a complex network of molecular interactions that aid their survival and propagation. Co-infection states further lead to complications by increasing the microbial burden and risk factors. Quantitative proteomics based approaches and post-translational modification analysis...... can be efficiently applied to gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms involved. The measurement of the proteome and post-translationally modified proteome dynamics using mass spectrometry, results in a wide array of information, such as significant changes in protein expression, protein...... abundance, the modification status, the site occupancy level, interactors, functional significance of key players, potential drug targets, etc. This mini review discusses the potential of proteomics to investigate the involvement of post-translational modifications in bacterial pathogenesis and host...

  18. Aging synaptic mitochondria exhibit dynamic proteomic changes while maintaining bioenergetic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauch, Kelly L; Purnell, Phillip R; Fox, Howard S

    2014-04-01

    Aging correlates with a progressive impairment of mitochondrial homeostasis and is an influential factor for several forms of neurodegeneration. However, the mechanisms underlying age-related alterations in synaptosomal mitochondria, a neuronal mitochondria population highly susceptible to insults and critical for brain function, remain incompletely understood. Therefore this study investigates the synaptic mitochondrial proteomic and bioenergetic alterations that occur with age. The utilization of a state of the art quantitative proteomics approach allowed for the comparison of protein expression levels in synaptic mitochondria isolated from 5 (mature), 12 (old), and 24 (aged) month old mice. During the process of aging we find that dynamic proteomic alterations occur in synaptic mitochondria. Despite direct (mitochondrial DNA deletions) and indirect (increased antioxidant protein levels) signs of mitochondrial damage in the aged mice, there was an overall maintenance of mitochondrial function. Therefore the synaptic mitochondrial proteomic changes that occur with aging correlate with preservation of synaptic mitochondrial function.

  19. Disruption of in vivo chronic lymphocytic leukemia tumor-microenvironment interactions by ibrutinib - findings from an investigator initiated phase 2 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Carsten U; Herman, Sarah E M; Maric, Irina

    2016-01-01

    of tumor cells from the microenvironment. While the on-target effects on CLL cells are well defined, the impact on the microenvironment is less well studied. We therefore sought to characterize the in vivo effects of ibrutinib on the tumor microenvironment. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Patients received single...... the chemoattraction of CLL cells. CONCLUSIONS: In conjunction with inhibition of BCR signaling, these changes in the tumor microenvironment likely contribute to the anti-tumor activity of ibrutinib and may impact the efficacy of immunotherapeutic strategies in patients with CLL.......PURPOSE: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells depend on microenvironmental interactions for proliferation and survival that are at least partially mediated through B cell receptor (BCR) signaling. Ibrutinib, a Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, disrupts BCR signaling and leads to the egress...

  20. Investigation of skin permeation, ex vivo inhibition of venom-induced tissue destruction, and wound healing of African plants used against snakebites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marianne Molander; Stærk, Dan; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-01-01

    . Materials and methods Extracts which had previously shown in vitro inhibitory activity against necrosis enzymes, were tested in an ex vivo air–liquid-interface model, and a wound healing scratch assay as well as for their ability to permeate the skin barrier and inhibit venom induced cell death. Results...... Of the 14 water extracts and 16 ethanol extracts tested at a concentration of 10 μg/mL, only the ethanol extracts of Tamarindus indica and Paullinia pinnata resulted in a small but significant increase in cell migration of around 10% compared to treatment with buffer after 24 h treatment. The remaining...... extracts showed no effect, or they even delayed the cell migration compared to the treatment with buffer. After 48 h treatment, 10 of the tested extracts showed a decreased cell migration compared to no treatment. At a 100 μg/mL concentration all the extracts inhibited cell migration and five extracts...

  1. An in Vitro and in Vivo Investigation of Bivalent Ligands That Display Preferential Binding and Functional Activity for Different Melanocortin Receptor Homodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensing, Cody J; Freeman, Katie T; Schnell, Sathya M; Adank, Danielle N; Speth, Robert C; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2016-04-14

    Pharmacological probes for the melanocortin receptors have been utilized for studying various disease states including cancer, sexual function disorders, Alzheimer's disease, social disorders, cachexia, and obesity. This study focused on the design and synthesis of bivalent ligands to target melanocortin receptor homodimers. Lead ligands increased binding affinity by 14- to 25-fold and increased cAMP signaling potency by 3- to 5-fold compared to their monovalent counterparts. Unexpectedly, different bivalent ligands showed preferences for particular melanocortin receptor subtypes depending on the linker that connected the binding scaffolds, suggesting structural differences between the various dimer subtypes. Homobivalent compound 12 possessed a functional profile that was unique from its monovalent counterpart providing evidence of the discrete effects of bivalent ligands. Lead compound 7 significantly decreased feeding in mice after intracerebroventricular administration. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a melanocortin bivalent ligand's in vivo physiological effects.

  2. Differential proteome analysis of chikungunya virus infection on host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Li-Ping Thio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused multiple unprecedented and re-emerging outbreaks in both tropical and temperate countries. Despite ongoing research efforts, the underlying factors involved in facilitating CHIKV replication during early infection remains ill-characterized. The present study serves to identify host proteins modulated in response to early CHIKV infection using a proteomics approach. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The whole cell proteome profiles of CHIKV-infected and mock control WRL-68 cells were compared and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE. Fifty-three spots were found to be differentially modulated and 50 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Eight were significantly up-regulated and 42 were down-regulated. The mRNA expressions of 15 genes were also found to correlate with the corresponding protein expression. STRING network analysis identified several biological processes to be affected, including mRNA processing, translation, energy production and cellular metabolism, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP and cell cycle regulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study constitutes a first attempt to investigate alteration of the host cellular proteome during early CHIKV infection. Our proteomics data showed that during early infection, CHIKV affected the expression of proteins that are involved in mRNA processing, host metabolic machinery, UPP, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 regulation (in favour of virus survival, replication and transmission. While results from this study complement the proteomics results obtained from previous late host response studies, functional characterization of these proteins is warranted to reinforce our understanding of their roles during early CHIKV infection in humans.

  3. Biomaterial surface proteomic signature determines interaction with epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tran, Simon D; Abughanam, Ghada; Laurenti, Marco; Zuanazzi, David; Mezour, Mohamed A; Xiao, Yizhi; Cerruti, Marta; Siqueira, Walter L; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-05-01

    Cells interact with biomaterials indirectly through extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Accordingly, it could be hypothesized that the surface proteomic signature of a biomaterial might determine its interaction with cells. Here, we present a surface proteomic approach to test this hypothesis in the specific case of biomaterial-epithelial cell interactions. In particular, we determined the surface proteomic signature of different biomaterials exposed to the ECM of epithelial cells (basal lamina). We revealed that the biomaterial surface chemistry determines the surface proteomic profile, and subsequently the interaction with epithelial cells. In addition, we found that biomaterials with surface chemistries closer to that of percutaneous tissues, such as aminated PMMA and aminated PDLLA, promoted higher selective adsorption of key basal lamina proteins (laminins, nidogen-1) and subsequently improved their interactions with epithelial cells. These findings suggest that mimicking the surface chemistry of natural percutaneous tissues can improve biomaterial-epithelial integration, and thus provide a rationale for the design of improved biomaterial surfaces for skin regeneration and percutaneous medical devices. Failure of most biomaterials originates from the inability to predict and control the influence of their surface properties on biological phenomena, particularly protein adsorption, and cellular behaviour, which subsequently results in unfavourable host response. Here, we introduce a surface-proteomic screening approach using a label-free mass spectrometry technique to decipher the adsorption profile of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on different biomaterials, and correlate it with cellular behaviour. We demonstrated that the way a biomaterial selectively interacts with specific ECM proteins of a given tissue seems to determine the interactions between the cells of that tissue and biomaterials. Accordingly, this approach can

  4. Preparation, characterization and investigation of in vitro and in vivo biological properties of strontium-modified calcium phosphate cement for bone defect repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Masaeli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the invitro and invivo performance of a 3 wt% of strontium additive hydroxyapatite calcium phosphate cements (CPC. Materials and Methods: The prepared calcium phosphate cement was characterized with XRD, FTIR, setting time, STA and in vitro and in vivo biological analyses. The MTT assay ALP activities as in vitro study and radiological and histological examinations as in vivo study between the three groups of 3 wt% Sr-HA/CPC, CPC and control were performed and compared. Data were analyzed using T-test and One-way ANOVA. Results: XRD analysis demonstrated that by increasing the ratio of Powder/Liquid (P/L, the crystallinity of the prepared cement increased. The substitution of strontium instead of calcium in CPC could also alter the crystal structure, including some structural disorder. However, in the CPC with no strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA, no significant increase in the crystallinity was observed. SEM observations revealed CPC with increasing P/L ratio, the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals arising from the interaction of solid and liquid phase of cement was decreased. Also, the addition of Sr within Ca site culminated in a dramatic increase in crystallinity of hydroxyapatite. In vitro biological properties ascertained that addition of 3 wt. % Sr-HA into CPC enhanced MTT assay and ALP activity, which could be due to the presence of strontium ions. The histological study showed that greater remodeling was seen at 4 weeks after implantation when the 3 wt% Sr-HA/CPC was used. Conclusion: The obtained results cleared that CPC can be a potential candidate as a carrier with strontium additives for bone remodeling and regeneration.

  5. Two-photon microscopy imaging of thy1GFP-M transgenic mice: a novel animal model to investigate brain dendritic cell subsets in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Laperchia

    Full Text Available Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent proteins in specific cell populations are widely used for in vivo brain studies with two-photon fluorescence (TPF microscopy. Mice of the thy1GFP-M line have been engineered for selective expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP in neuronal populations. Here, we report that TPF microscopy reveals, at the brain surface of these mice, also motile non-neuronal GFP+ cells. We have analyzed the behavior of these cells in vivo and characterized in brain sections their immunophenotype.With TPF imaging, motile GFP+ cells were found in the meninges, subarachnoid space and upper cortical layers. The striking feature of these cells was their ability to move across the brain parenchyma, exhibiting evident shape changes during their scanning-like motion. In brain sections, GFP+ cells were immunonegative to antigens recognizing motile cells such as migratory neuroblasts, neuronal and glial precursors, mast cells, and fibroblasts. GFP+ non-neuronal cells exhibited instead the characteristic features and immunophenotype (CD11c and major histocompatibility complex molecule class II immunopositivity of dendritic cells (DCs, and were immunonegative to the microglial marker Iba-1. GFP+ cells were also identified in lymph nodes and blood of thy1GFP-M mice, supporting their identity as DCs. Thus, TPF microscopy has here allowed the visualization for the first time of the motile behavior of brain DCs in situ. The results indicate that the thy1GFP-M mouse line provides a novel animal model for the study of subsets of these professional antigen-presenting cells in the brain. Information on brain DCs is still very limited and imaging in thy1GFP-M mice has a great potential for analyses of DC-neuron interaction in normal and pathological conditions.

  6. Two-Photon Microscopy Imaging of thy1GFP-M Transgenic Mice: A Novel Animal Model to Investigate Brain Dendritic Cell Subsets In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperchia, Claudia; Allegra Mascaro, Anna L.; Sacconi, Leonardo; Andrioli, Anna; Mattè, Alessandro; De Franceschi, Lucia; Grassi-Zucconi, Gigliola; Bentivoglio, Marina; Buffelli, Mario; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent proteins in specific cell populations are widely used for in vivo brain studies with two-photon fluorescence (TPF) microscopy. Mice of the thy1GFP-M line have been engineered for selective expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in neuronal populations. Here, we report that TPF microscopy reveals, at the brain surface of these mice, also motile non-neuronal GFP+ cells. We have analyzed the behavior of these cells in vivo and characterized in brain sections their immunophenotype. With TPF imaging, motile GFP+ cells were found in the meninges, subarachnoid space and upper cortical layers. The striking feature of these cells was their ability to move across the brain parenchyma, exhibiting evident shape changes during their scanning-like motion. In brain sections, GFP+ cells were immunonegative to antigens recognizing motile cells such as migratory neuroblasts, neuronal and glial precursors, mast cells, and fibroblasts. GFP+ non-neuronal cells exhibited instead the characteristic features and immunophenotype (CD11c and major histocompatibility complex molecule class II immunopositivity) of dendritic cells (DCs), and were immunonegative to the microglial marker Iba-1. GFP+ cells were also identified in lymph nodes and blood of thy1GFP-M mice, supporting their identity as DCs. Thus, TPF microscopy has here allowed the visualization for the first time of the motile behavior of brain DCs in situ. The results indicate that the thy1GFP-M mouse line provides a novel animal model for the study of subsets of these professional antigen-presenting cells in the brain. Information on brain DCs is still very limited and imaging in thy1GFP-M mice has a great potential for analyses of DC-neuron interaction in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23409142

  7. Proteomic biomarkers in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M D; Nogal, A; Molina-Pinelo, S; Carnero, A; Paz-Ares, L

    2013-09-01

    The correct understanding of tumour development relies on the comprehensive study of proteins. They are the main orchestrators of vital processes, such as signalling pathways, which drive the carcinogenic process. Proteomic technologies can be applied to cancer research to detect differential protein expression and to assess different responses to treatment. Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related death in the world. Mostly diagnosed at late stages of the disease, lung cancer has one of the lowest 5-year survival rates at 15 %. The use of different proteomic techniques such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), isotope labelling (ICAT, SILAC, iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry may yield new knowledge on the underlying biology of lung cancer and also allow the development of new early detection tests and the identification of changes in the cancer protein network that are associated with prognosis and drug resistance.

  8. Farm animal proteomics - A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Emøke; Danielsen, Marianne; Hollung, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    In agricultural sciences as in all other areas of life science, the implementation of proteomics and other post-genomic tools is an important step towards more detailed understanding of the complex biological systems that control physiology and pathology of living beings. Farm animals are raised...... and cattle are relevant not only for farm animal sciences, but also for adding to our understanding of complex biological mechanisms of health and disease in humans. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the specific topics of interest within farm animal proteomics, and to highlight some...... in large-scale operations, with the aim to obtain animal products for human consumption. Hence, understanding the biological traits that impact yield and quality of these products is the specific aim of much biological experimentation. However, most of the data gathered from experiments on e.g. swine...

  9. Discovery based and targeted Mass Spectrometry in farm animal proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Emøke

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances in mass spectrometry have greatly improved accuracy and speed of analyses of proteins and biochemical pathways. These proteome technologies have transformed research and diagnostic methods in the biomedical fields, and in food and farm animal sciences proteomics can be used...... to investigate and monitor specific marker proteins and peptides within complex food matrices, as for example, for guaranteeing safety and quality of processed and stored foods like cheese and cured meat. Likewise, specific diagnostic markers associated with compromised welfare, or with early infections can...... for investigating farm animal biology. SRM is particularly important for validation biomarker candidates This talk will introduce the use of different mass spectrometry approaches through examples related to food quality and animal welfare, including studies of gut health in pigs, host pathogen interactions...

  10. Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; He, Jianbo; Shen, Dejun; Saxton, Romaine E.; Chang, Helena R.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field not only in the field of biology but also in translational cancer research. In recent years, mass spectrometry and associated technologies have been explored to identify proteins or a set of proteins specific to a given disease, for the purpose of disease detection and diagnosis. Such biomarkers are being investigated in samples including cells, tissues, serum/plasma, and other types of body fluids. When sufficiently refined, proteomic technologies may pave the way for early detection of cancer or individualized therapy for cancer. Mass spectrometry approaches coupled with bioinformatic tools are being developed for biomarker discovery and validation. Understanding basic concepts and application of such technology by investigators in the field may accelerate the clinical application of protein biomarkers in disease management. PMID:19662217

  11. Proteomics of a fuzzy organelle: interphase chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustatscher, Georg; Hégarat, Nadia; Wills, Karen L H; Furlan, Cristina; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Hochegger, Helfrid; Rappsilber, Juri

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin proteins mediate replication, regulate expression, and ensure integrity of the genome. So far, a comprehensive inventory of interphase chromatin has not been determined. This is largely due to its heterogeneous and dynamic composition, which makes conclusive biochemical purification difficult, if not impossible. As a fuzzy organelle, it defies classical organellar proteomics and cannot be described by a single and ultimate list of protein components. Instead, we propose a new approach that provides a quantitative assessment of a protein's probability to function in chromatin. We integrate chromatin composition over a range of different biochemical and biological conditions. This resulted in interphase chromatin probabilities for 7635 human proteins, including 1840 previously uncharacterized proteins. We demonstrate the power of our large-scale data-driven annotation during the analysis of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) regulation in chromatin. Quantitative protein ontologies may provide a general alternative to list-based investigations of organelles and complement Gene Ontology. PMID:24534090

  12. Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation in Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard Remko; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    , Orbitrap and ion mobility instruments. Together they offer various and complementary capabilities in terms of ionization, sensitivity, speed, resolution, mass accuracy, dynamic range and methods of fragmentation. Mass spectrometers can acquire qualitative and quantitative information on a large scale....... In terms of desired outcome, cost and time, combining and choosing between available instrumentation and methodologies is key to find the best analytical strategy suiting a particular proteomics experiment....

  13. Global proteome analysis in plants by means of peptide libraries and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Boschetti, Egisto

    2016-06-30

    Like in animals plant proteins are differently expressed by organ with, for instance, few high abundance species such as RuBisCO in leaves colonizing the analytical space. Contrary to animals, a very large number of plant proteins are present at particularly low concentrations and in the presence of an excessive amount of polysaccharides and other natural polymers. This situation renders the functional investigations particularly challenging since the understanding of plant expression and interaction commences with the particularly laborious proteome deciphering. This fact impacts the investigations on protein differential biosynthesis in response to various stresses of physical, chemical and biological nature. This review updates the technical situation of global protein analysis while making a point on profiling changes resulting from external aggressions throughout recently published data. Within this context the importance of the combinatorial peptide ligand library methodology as an approach for facilitating the differential expression analysis is highlighted. The present review covers in extenso the latest progresses made in plant proteomics analyses with the use of the combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) methodology. It well documents the ability of the CPLL technology in greatly extending the coverage of such proteomes, particularly in regard to the discovery and identification of low-abundance proteins, whose signal is obscured not only by the high-abundance species, as typically occurring in animal proteomics, but also by the overwhelming presence of plant polymers, such as polysaccharides, polyphenols, fibers and the like. The review covers the proteomics analysis aspect of modifications contingent upon plant stresses of physical, chemical and biological nature, as well as the discovery of hidden allergens on fruits and vegetable and their undiscovered proteomes. A sure conclusion can be made: no matter what mass spectrometry experts say, pre

  14. In vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Bruce A; Lenning, Jacob; Khetarpal, Nikita; Tran, Catherine; Wu, Johnny Y; Berri, Ali M; Dernay, Kristin; Haacke, E Mark; Shafie-Khorassani, Fatema; Podolsky, Robert H; Gant, John C; Maimaiti, Shaniya; Thibault, Olivier; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Bennett, Brian M; Roberts, Robin

    2017-09-01

    Hippocampus oxidative stress is considered pathogenic in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), and in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Angelman syndrome (AS). Yet clinical benefits of antioxidant treatment for these diseases remain unclear because conventional imaging methods are unable to guide management of therapies in specific hippocampus subfields in vivo that underlie abnormal behavior. Excessive production of paramagnetic free radicals in nonhippocampus brain tissue can be measured in vivo as a greater-than-normal 1/ T 1 that is quenchable with antioxidant as measured by quench-assisted (Quest) MRI. Here, we further test this approach in phantoms, and we present proof-of-concept data in models of AD-like and AS hippocampus oxidative stress that also exhibit impaired spatial learning and memory. AD-like models showed an abnormal gradient along the CA1 dorsal-ventral axis of excessive free radical production as measured by Quest MRI, and redox-sensitive calcium dysregulation as measured by manganese-enhanced MRI and electrophysiology. In the AS model, abnormally high free radical levels were observed in dorsal and ventral CA1. Quest MRI is a promising in vivo paradigm for bridging brain subfield oxidative stress and behavior in animal models and in human patients to better manage antioxidant therapy in devastating neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases.-Berkowitz, B. A., Lenning, J., Khetarpal, N., Tran, C., Wu, J. Y., Berri, A. M., Dernay, K., Haacke, E. M., Shafie-Khorassani, F., Podolsky, R. H., Gant, J. C., Maimaiti, S., Thibault, O., Murphy, G. G., Bennett, B. M., Roberts, R. In vivo imaging of prodromal hippocampus CA1 subfield oxidative stress in models of Alzheimer disease and Angelman syndrome. © FASEB.

  15. Forensic Proteomics of Poxvirus Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunschel, David S.; Tulman, Edan; Engelmann, Heather E.; Clowers, Brian H.; Geary, Steven J.; Robinson, Aaron C.; Liao, Xiaofen

    2013-08-27

    The field of microbial forensics has recently sought to develop methods to discern biological signatures to indicate production methods for biological agents. Viral agents have received less attention to date. Their obligate propagation in living cells makes purification from cellular material a challenge. This leads to potential carryover of protein-rich signature of their production system. Here we have explored a proteomic analysis of Vaccinia virus as a model poxvirus system in which to compare samples of virus propagated in different cell lines and subjected to different purification schemes. The proteomic data sets indicated viral, host cell and culture medium proteins, and several layers of data analysis were applied to build confidence in the peptide identification and capture information on the taxonomic utility of each. The analysis showed clear shifts in protein profiles with virus purification, with successive gradient purification steps showing different levels of viral protein enrichment. Peptides from cellular proteins, including those present in purified virus preparations, provided signatures which enabled discrimination of cell line substrates, including distinguishing between cells derived from different primate species. The ability to discern multiple aspects of viral production demonstrates the potential value of proteomic analysis as tool for microbial forensics.

  16. Genomics and proteomics in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baak, J P A; Path, F R C; Hermsen, M A J A; Meijer, G; Schmidt, J; Janssen, E A M

    2003-06-01

    Cancer development is driven by the accumulation of DNA changes in the approximately 40000 chromosomal genes. In solid tumours, chromosomal numerical/structural aberrations are common. DNA repair defects may lead to genome-wide genetic instability, which can drive further cancer progression. The genes code the actual players in the cellular processes, the 100000-10 million proteins, which in (pre)malignant cells can also be altered in a variety of ways. Over the past decade, our knowledge of the human genome and Genomics (the study of the human genome) in (pre)malignancies has increased enormously and Proteomics (the analysis of the protein complement of the genome) has taken off as well. Both will play an increasingly important role. In this article, a short description of the essential molecular biological cell processes is given. Important genomic and proteomic research methods are described and illustrated. Applications are still limited, but the evidence so far is exciting. Will genomics replace classical diagnostic or prognostic procedures? In breast cancers, the gene expression array is stronger than classical criteria, but in endometrial hyperplasia, quantitative morphological features are more cost-effective than genetic testing. It is still too early to make strong statements, the more so because it is expected that genomics and proteomics will expand rapidly. However, it is likely that they will take a central place in the understanding, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of (pre)cancers of many different sites.

  17. Proteomics of Rice Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongli eHe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Seed is a condensed form of plant. Under suitable environmental conditions, it can resume the metabolic activity from physiological quiescent status, and mobilize the reserves, biosynthesize new proteins, regenerate organelles and cell membrane, eventually protrude the radicle and enter into seedling establishment. So far, how these activities are regulated in a coordinated and sequential manner is largely unknown. With the availability of more and more genome sequence information and the development of mass spectrometry (MS technology, proteomics has been widely applied in analyzing the mechanisms of different biological processes, and proved to be very powerful. Regulation of rice seed germination is critical for rice cultivation. In recent years, a lot of proteomic studies have been conducted in exploring the gene expression regulation, reserves mobilization and metabolisms reactivation, which brings us new insights on the mechanisms of metabolism regulation during this process. Nevertheless, it also invokes a lot of questions. In this mini-review, we summarized the progress in the proteomic studies of rice seed germination. The current challenges and future perspectives were also discussed, which might be helpful for the following studies.

  18. Deciphering Proteomic Signatures of Early Diapause in Nasonia

    OpenAIRE

    Wolschin, Florian; Gadau, J?rgen

    2009-01-01

    Insect diapause is an alternative life-history strategy used to increase longevity and survival in harsh environmental conditions. Even though some aspects of diapause are well investigated, broader scale studies that elucidate the global metabolic adjustments required for this remarkable trait, are rare. In order to better understand the metabolic changes during early insect diapause, we used a shotgun proteomics approach on early diapausing and non-diapausing larvae of the recently sequence...

  19. Data Portal | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CPTAC Data Portal is a centralized repository for the public dissemination of proteomic sequence datasets collected by CPTAC, along with corresponding genomic sequence datasets.  In addition, available are analyses of CPTAC's raw mass spectrometry-based data files (mapping of spectra to peptide sequences and protein identification) by individual investigators from CPTAC and by a Common Data Analysis Pipeline.

  20. Proteomics--a blessing or a curse? Application of proteomics technology to transplant medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienzl-Wagner, Katrin; Pratschke, Johann; Brandacher, Gerald

    2011-09-15

    Proteomics has emerged as a powerful tool in clinical biomarker research. In the field of transplantation, proteomics aims not only at developing noninvasive tools for immune monitoring and identifying biomarkers of allograft rejection but also to gain mechanistic insights into the pathophysiology of an alloimmune response and hence defining new therapeutic targets. A basic knowledge of proteomic technology is a prerequisite to appreciate the complex data generated and required for critical evaluation/interpretation of proteomic-driven studies. This review provides an overview of proteomic approaches and its underlying concepts and discusses the advantages, clinical implications, challenges, and limitations of this exciting modality in transplantation.

  1. Study on the effect of irradiation on algae by proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Il; Yoon, Yo Han; Kim, Jae Hun

    2010-06-15

    Algae has been utilized as food material from long time ago, and recently newly recognized as functional materials and the source of bio-fuel. But, the study on the algae is just beginning and the study on protein expression and growth by the change of condition was not reported. In this study, the effect of radiation on the protein expression was investigated for the protection mechanisms and new genome source and furthermore, isolation of new mutant strains. To monitor the growth of algae, absorbance and FDA staining methods were developed and the content of lipid of algae species were measured. With these methods, the radiation sensitivity of algae species was determined. To investigate the proteome of algae, 2D-electrophoresis methods was applied. From the comparison of proteomes, the radiation specific expressed protein was identified as thioredoxin-h and its nucleotide sequences was defined. The expression of thioredoxin-h was further defined on the mRNA level. Also, the extract of algae species was analyzed for its antioxidant activity and polyphenolic content. The changes in antioxidant activity of extract by radiation was investigated. From the radiation experiments, mutant Spirogyra species having higher resistant against radical stress was obtained. The mutant strain has higher antioxidant activity. This results can provide the proteome date and mutation technology of algae and further contribute in the activation of fishery industry and national health enhancement

  2. A Proteomic Approach Suggests Unbalanced Proteasome Functioning Induced by the Growth-Promoting Bacterium Kosakonia radicincitans in Arabidopsis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katja Witzel; Suayib Üstün; Monika Schreiner; Rita Grosch; Frederik Börnke; Silke Ruppel

    2017-01-01

    ... productivity and sustainable production systems. We used a proteomics approach to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying plant growth promotion in the interaction of Kosakonia radicincitans DSM 16656 with Arabidopsis thaliana...

  3. Muscle Tissue Damage Induced by the Venom of Bothrops asper: Identification of Early and Late Pathological Events through Proteomic Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herrera, Cristina; Macêdo, Jéssica Kele A; Feoli, Andrés; Escalante, Teresa; Rucavado, Alexandra; Gutiérrez, José María; Fox, Jay W

    2016-01-01

    The time-course of the pathological effects induced by the venom of the snake Bothrops asper in muscle tissue was investigated by a combination of histology, proteomic analysis of exudates collected...

  4. Proteomic analysis of tumor tissue in CT-26 implanted BALB/C mouse after treatment with ascorbic acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jihye; Lee, Gunsup; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Sukchan; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Na, Byungjo; Park, Seyeon

    2012-01-01

    .... Proteome changes of tumor tissue were investigated after intraperitoneal administration of a high concentration of ascorbic acid in BALB/C mice implanted with CT-26 cancer cells using two-dimensional...

  5. A meta-proteomics approach to study the interspecies interactions affecting microbial biofilm development in a model community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herschend, Jakob; Damholt, Zacharias Brimnes Visby; Marquard, Andrea Marion

    2017-01-01

    to the complexity of these biological systems. Here we apply a meta-proteomics approach to investigate the mechanisms influencing biofilm formation in a model consortium of four bacterial soil isolates; Stenotrophomonas rhizophila, Xanthomonas retroflexus, Microbacterium oxydans and Paenibacillus amylolyticus...

  6. The influence of raw and processed garlic and onions on plasma classical and non-classical atherosclerosis indices: investigations in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinstein, Shela; Leontowicz, Hanna; Leontowicz, Maria; Jastrzebski, Zenon; Najman, Katarzyna; Tashma, Zev; Katrich, Elena; Heo, Buk-Gu; Cho, Ja-Yong; Park, Yun-Jum; Trakhtenberg, Simon

    2010-05-01

    Garlic and white and red varieties of onion were subjected to processing by a variety of culinary methods, and bioactive compounds then determined. For in vivo studies, 84 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 14 diet groups, each of six rats, including two control groups (one with no supplementation and one with cholesterol supplementation only). During the 30-day trial, the basal diets of the other 12 groups were supplemented with 1% cholesterol and raw or processed vegetables. Both raw red onion and red onion subjected to blanching for 90 s hindered the rise in plasma lipids more than the other vegetables studied in the supplemented diets. The decrease in antioxidant activity compared to the cholesterol-supplemented control group was significantly less for the group fed with red onion subjected to blanching for 90 s. No histological changes were detected in the studied organs of rats that had been fed cholesterol. In conclusion, blanching for 90 s most fully preserved the bioactive compounds and antioxidant potentials, and hindered the rise in plasma lipid levels and the decrease in plasma antioxidant activity of rats fed cholesterol. Alkaline phosphatase levels correlated with classical atherosclerosis indices, and determination of alkaline phosphatase is suggested as an additional index in atherosclerosis testing. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Investigation of silicon carbon nitride nanocomposite films as a wear resistant layer in vitro and in vivo for joint replacement applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y; Liu, D G; Bai, W Q; Tu, J P

    2017-05-01

    Silicon-contained CNx nanocomposite films were prepared using the ion beam assisted magnetron sputtering under different nitrogen gas pressure. With increase of the nitrogen pressure, silicon and nitrogen content of the CNx films drastically increase, and is saturated as the PN2 reach about 40%. Surface roughness and the contact angle are increase, while the friction coefficient decreased. The CNx film with 5.7at.% Si content possess the lowest friction coefficient of only 0.07, and exhibited the best tribological properties. The impact of CNx films with different silicon content on the growth and the activation of osteoblasts were compared to that of Ti6Al4V. The incorporation of silicon in the CNx film also showed an increase cell adhesion. Bonding structure and surface energy were determined to be the factors contributing to the improved biocompatibility. Macrophages attached to 5.7at.% Si contained CNx films down regulated their production of cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, employed with Si contained CNx coated joint replacements, which were implanted subcutaneously into Sprague-Dawley mice for up to 36days, the tissue reaction and capsule formation was significantly decreased compared to that of Ti6Al4V. A mouse implantation study demonstrated the excellent in vivo biocompatibility and functional reliability of wear resist layer for joint replacements with a Si doped a-CNx coating for 36days. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A vibration investigation of a flat surface contact to skull bone for direct bone conduction transmission in sheep skulls in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Hamidreza; Håkansson, Bo; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns; Johansson, Carina B; Tjellström, Anders; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Bergqvist, Tomas; Olsson, Joakim

    2013-06-01

    Bone conduction implant (BCI) attached with a flat surface contact will offer efficient and linear vibration transmission over time. Despite that percutaneous bone conduction devices (PBCD) are successful in treating patients with conductive hearing loss, there are some drawbacks related to the need of a permanent skin penetration. The BCI system is designed as an alternative to the PBCD because it leaves the skin intact. BCI dummy implants were installed in 3 sheep skulls in vivo to study the vibration transmission characteristics over time. Mechanical point impedances and vibration transfer response functions of the BCI implants were measured at the time of surgery and after a healing period of 8 months. In 1 sheep both implants healed without complications. In the other 2 sheep, the implants were either partially loose or lost to follow up. In the sheep with stable implants, it was found by the resonance frequency shift of the mechanical point impedance that a firmer integration between the implant and bone tissue as seen in osseointegrated surfaces developed over time. It was also shown that the transcranial vibration transmission remains stable and linear. Providing bone chips in the contact between the implant and the bone did not enhance vibration transmission. The surgical procedure for installing the BCI dummy implants was uneventful. The mechanical point impedances and vibration transfer response functions indicate that the BCI implants integrate and that transmission conditions remain stable over time.

  9. In vitro and in vivo investigation of the efficacy of arylimidamide DB1831 and its mesylated salt form--DB1965--against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane França da Silva

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is caused by infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. At present, nifurtimox and benznidazole, both compounds developed empirically over four decades ago, represent the chemotherapeutic arsenal for treating this highly neglected disease. However, both drugs present variable efficacy depending on the geographical area and the occurrence of natural resistance, and are poorly effective against the later chronic stage. As a part of a search for new therapeutic opportunities to treat chagasic patients, pre-clinical studies were performed to characterize the activity of a novel arylimidamide (AIA--DB1831 (hydrochloride salt and DB1965 (mesylate salt against T. cruzi. These AIAs displayed a high trypanocidal effect in vitro against both relevant forms in mammalian hosts, exhibiting a high selectivity index and a very high efficacy (IC(50 value/48 h of 5-40 nM against intracellular parasites. DB1965 shows high activity in vivo in acute experimental models (mouse of T. cruzi, showing a similar effect to benznidazole (Bz when compared under a scheme of 10 daily consecutive doses with 12.5 mg/kg. Although no parasitological cure was observed after treating with 20 daily consecutive doses, a combined dosage of DB1965 (5 mg/kg with Bz (50 mg/kg resulted in parasitaemia clearance and 100% animal survival. In summary, our present data confirmed that aryimidamides represent promising new chemical entities against T. cruzi in therapeutic schemes using the AIA alone or in combination with other drugs, like benznidazole.

  10. Formulation, in vitro drug release and in vivo human X-ray investigation of polysaccharide based drug delivery systems for targeting 5-fluorouracil to the colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidramappa Mallikarjun Chickpetty

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research study was to develop 5-fluorouracil compression coated tablets by using biodegradable polysaccharide polymer locust bean gum (LBG and hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC as coating materials. The fast disintegrating core tablets containing 50 mg of 5-fluorouracil were compression coated with LBG and HPMC in different ratios (8:1, 7:2 and 6:3 with a coat weight of 300, 400 and 500 mg. In vitro dissolution data indicated that the formulation (CLH63 with a coat weight of 500 mg containing LBG and HPMC in the ratio 6:3 gave the best release profile (0% in first 5 hour and 96.18% in 24 hours. DSC and FTIR results indicated no possibility of interaction between drug and polymers or other excipients. In vivo human X-ray studies revealed that formulation CLH63 was able to resist breakdown in the stomach and small intestine. The disintegration of the tablet occurred in the colon between 8 to 16 hours of post dose. By the present study, it can be concluded that the LBG and HPMC based compression coated tablets of 5-fluorouracil will be useful strategy for colonic delivery of 5-fluorouracil without being released in upper gastrointestinal region for the safe and effective management of colon cancer.

  11. NCI's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium 1st Annual Scientific Symposium | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    On behalf of the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, you are invited to the First Annual CPTAC Scientific Symposium on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. The purpose of this symposium, which consists of plenary and poster sessions, is for investigators from CPTAC community and beyond to share and discuss novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data.

  12. Proteomic characterization and comparison of mammalian milk fat globule proteomes by iTRAQ analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongxin; Zheng, Nan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yangdong; Han, Rongwei; Ma, Lu; Zhao, Shengguo; Li, Songli; Guo, Tongjun; Wang, Jiaqi

    2015-02-26

    Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins are known to be involved in many biological functions; however, their components and inter-species complexity have not yet been completely elucidated. We investigated the protein composition of the MFGM-enriched fraction from Holstein, Jersey, yak, buffalo, goat, camel, horse, and human. Extracted proteins from the MFGM-enriched fractions were identified and quantified by an iTRAQ proteomic approach. We identified 520 protein species categorized as biological processes, cellular components and molecular function according to their annotation. Cellular process, localization, transport, signal transduction, and response to stimulus were the most common biological processes; binding and catalytic activities were the most prevalent molecular functions. Pathway analysis revealed several pathways, including glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling, and fatty acid biosynthesis. Quantified MFGM-enriched proteins were subjected to discriminative proteomic profiling by principal component analysis and a hierarchical clustering method, and then organized into four major clusters: (1) Holstein, Jersey, and yak milk; (2) buffalo and goat milk; (3) Holstein, Jersey, buffalo, yak, and goat milk; and (4) camel, horse, and human milk. These novel quantitative data provide insight into the protein composition of the MFGM and their potential physiological functions, and highlight the significant differences in the MFGM fractions among mammalian species. Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins have exhibited a relatively larger diversity than other milk fractions, and implicated health beneficial effects. Proteomic analysis of MFGM protein was mainly focused on human, bovine and goat in previous studies. Recently, there is an increasing demand for natural milk from minor dairy animals. Differences in protein components were not yet elucidated that required the integration of this information across

  13. BioAfrica's HIV-1 Proteomics Resource: Combining protein data with bioinformatics tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Michelle

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most Internet online resources for investigating HIV biology contain either bioinformatics tools, protein information or sequence data. The objective of this study was to develop a comprehensive online proteomics resource that integrates bioinformatics with the latest information on HIV-1 protein structure, gene expression, post-transcriptional/post-translational modification, functional activity, and protein-macromolecule interactions. The BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteomics Resource http://bioafrica.mrc.ac.za/proteomics/index.html is a website that contains detailed information about the HIV-1 proteome and protease cleavage sites, as well as data-mining tools that can be used to manipulate and query protein sequence data, a BLAST tool for initiating structural analyses of HIV-1 proteins, and a proteomics tools directory. The Proteome section contains extensive data on each of 19 HIV-1 proteins, including their functional properties, a sample analysis of HIV-1HXB2, structural models and links to other online resources. The HIV-1 Protease Cleavage Sites section provides information on the position, subtype variation and genetic evolution of Gag, Gag-Pol and Nef cleavage sites. The HIV-1 Protein Data-mining Tool includes a set of 27 group M (subtypes A through K reference sequences that can be used to assess the influence of genetic variation on immunological and functional domains of the protein. The BLAST Structure Tool identifies proteins with similar, experimentally determined topologies, and the Tools Directory provides a categorized list of websites and relevant software programs. This combined database and software repository is designed to facilitate the capture, retrieval and analysis of HIV-1 protein data, and to convert it into clinically useful information relating to the pathogenesis, transmission and therapeutic response of different HIV-1 variants. The HIV-1 Proteomics Resource is readily accessible through the BioAfrica website at

  14. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle: Focus on Insulin Resistance and Exercise Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul S. Deshmukh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence, of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs. Mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle proteomics are challenging. This review describes the technical limitations of skeletal muscle proteomics as well as emerging developments in proteomics workflow with respect to samples preparation, liquid chromatography (LC, MS and computational analysis. These technologies have not yet been fully exploited in the field of skeletal muscle proteomics. Future studies that involve state-of-the-art proteomics technology will broaden our understanding of exercise-induced adaptations as well as molecular pathogenesis of insulin resistance. This could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  15. Proteomic Biomarkers for Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacerovsky, Marian; Lenco, Juraj; Musilova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    This review aimed to identify, synthesize, and analyze the findings of studies on proteomic biomarkers for spontaneous preterm birth (PTB). Three electronic databases (Medline, Embase, and Scopus) were searched for studies in any language reporting the use of proteomic biomarkers for PTB published...

  16. Statistical data processing in clinical proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, S.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Smilde, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses data analysis strategies for the discovery of biomarkers in clinical proteomics. Proteomics studies produce large amounts of data, characterized by few samples of which many variables are measured. A wealth of classification methods exists for extracting information from the

  17. Application of proteomics in Chinese medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, William Chi-Shing

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics technologies can be applied to simultaneously study the function, organization, diversity, and dynamic variety of a cell or a whole tissue. The integrative approach of proteomics is in line with the holistic concept and practices of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). In this review, the technologies of proteomics, their adoption leverages the depth and breadth of TCM research are introduced. This article presents some examples to illustrate the use of proteomics technologies in the study of pharmacological effects and their action mechanisms relevant to TCM. Proteomics technologies could be used to screen the target molecules of the TCM actions, identify new bioactive components, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of their effects. With proteomics approaches, it was found that the Siwu decoction could regulate the protein expression of the bone marrow of blood (Xue) deficient mice, including some proteins and enzymes involved in the hemopoiesis system. Ganoderma lucidum spores might promote the survival and axon regeneration of injured spinal motor neurons in rats by regulating the expression levels of proteins involved in the energy and tissue regeneration system. Polygonatum zanlanscianense Pamp exhibited cytotoxicity towards human myeloblast leukemia HL-60 cells through multiple apoptosis-including pathways. Panax ginseng might be beneficial to patients suffering from diabetes mellitus and its complications by alleviating inflammation. Taken together with a discussion on the challenges and perspectives, this paper provides an overview of the recent developments of proteomics technologies in TCM research, and contends that proteomics will play an important role in the modernization and internationalization of TCM.

  18. Proteogenomics | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteogenomics, or the integration of proteomics with genomics and transcriptomics, is an emerging approach that promises to advance basic, translational and clinical research.  By combining genomic and proteomic information, leading scientists are gaining new insights due to a more complete and unified understanding of complex biological processes.

  19. Proteomics: Protein Identification Using Online Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eurich, Chris; Fields, Peter A.; Rice, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is an emerging area of systems biology that allows simultaneous study of thousands of proteins expressed in cells, tissues, or whole organisms. We have developed this activity to enable high school or college students to explore proteomic databases using mass spectrometry data files generated from yeast proteins in a college laboratory…

  20. Proteome-Wide Quantitation by SILAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing improvements in instrumentation, fractionation techniques, and enrichment procedures have dramatically increased the coverage of the proteome achievable via LC-MS/MS-based methodologies, opening the call for approaches to quantitatively assess differences at a proteome-wide scale. Stable...

  1. The promise of proteomics in animal science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteomics hold significant promise as a method for advancing animal science research. The use of this technology in animal science is still in its infancy. The ability of proteomics to simultaneously identify and quantify potentially thousands of proteins is unparalleled. In this review, we will...

  2. Centennial Paper: Proteomics in animal science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteomics holds significant promise as a method for advancing animal science research. The use of this technology in animal science is still in its infancy. The ability of proteomics to simultaneously identify and quantify potentially thousands of proteins is unparalleled. In this review, we wil...

  3. Ionic Liquid - Microemulsions Assisting in the Transdermal Delivery of Dencichine: Preparation, In-vitro and In-vivo Evaluations, and Investigation of the Permeation Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengxiao; Zhu, Junxiao; Zhang, Ding; Yang, Ye; Zheng, Luyao; Qu, Yuan; Yang, Xiaoyan; Cui, Xiuming

    2017-11-02

    A novel microemulsion was developed and characterized for topical delivery of Dencichine (Den). Two imidazaolium ionic liquid, 1-hydroxyethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([HOEIM]Cl) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dodecanesulfate ([BMIM]C12SO3) were incorporated into the aqueous and surfactant phases respectively for the remarkable enhancement on skin permeation. The nano-carrier was developed and optimized based on a pseudo-ternary phase diagram. The optimized formulation was composed of 50% water/[HOEIM]Cl mix (1:1) as water phase, 20% Tween 80/[BMIM]C12SO3 mix (1:1) as surfactant, 10% propylene glycol as co-surfactant and 20% IPM as oil phase. The o/w microemulsion was then characterized for droplets sizes (47.7±1.5nm), zeta potential (-14.83±3.64mV), viscosity (31±4 mPa) and pH (6.71±0.04). In-vitro skin permeation assay suggested the strong enhancement of ILs formulation on the topical delivery of Den, which was approximately 10-fold that of the drug aqueous solution. It was found that the nano-carrier can reduce the skin barrier properties by disrupting the regular and compact arrangements of corneocytes, and moderating the surface properties of the stratum corneum, as evidenced by Transdermal Water Loss Evaluation (TEWL), Differential Scanning Calorimetery (DSC) and attenuated total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Furthermore, the in-vivo pharmacodynamic evaluation indicated the significant hemostatic activity of Den by the topical application of the vehicle. Additionally, the formulation showed minor cell toxicity and skin irritation. Therefore, our work suggested that the ionic liquid microemulsion can be a promising nano-scale vehicle for the topical application of Den to produce desirable pharmacological effects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Formulation design of a highly hygroscopic drug (pyridostigmine bromide) for its hygroscopic character improvement and investigation of in vitro/in vivo dissolution properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuh-Tyng; Tsai, Tong-Rong; Cheng, Chun-Jen; Cham, Thau-Ming; Lai, Tsun-Fwu; Chuo, Wen-Ho

    2007-04-01

    Pyridostigmine bromide (PB) sustained-release (SR) pellets were developed by extrusion-spheronization and fluid-bed methods using Taguchi experimental and 2(3) full factorial design. In vitro studies, the 2(3) full factorial design was utilized to search for the optimal SR pellets with specific release rate at different time intervals (release percent of 2, 6, 12, and 24 hr were 6.24, 33.48, 75.18, and 95.26%, respectively) which followed a zero-order mechanism (n=0.93). The results of moisture absorption by Karl Fischer has shown the optimum SR pellets at 25 degrees C/60% RH, 30 degrees C/65% RH, and 40 degrees C/75% RH chambers from 1 hr-4 weeks, attributing that the moisture absorption was not significantly increased. In the in vivo study, the results of the bioavailability data showed the Tmax (from 0.65+/-0.082 hr-4.82+/-2.12 hr) and AUC0-30 hr (from 734.88+/-230.68 ng/mL.hr-1454.86+/-319.28 ng/mL.hr) were prolonged and increased, as well as Cmax (from 251.87+/-27.51 ng/mL-115.08+/-14.87 ng/mL) was decreased for optimum SR-PB pellets when compared with commercial immediate-release (IR) tablets. Furthermore, a good linear regression relationship (r=0.9943) was observed between the fraction dissolution and fraction absorption for the optimum SR pellets. In this study, the formulation design not only improved the hygroscopic character of PB but also achieved the SR effect.

  5. Phenobarbital induces alterations in the proteome of hepatocytes and mesenchymal cells of rat livers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Klepeisz

    Full Text Available Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs. A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme.

  6. Comparative mitochondrial proteomics: perspective in human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yujie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mitochondria are the most complex and the most important organelles of eukaryotic cells, which are involved in many cellular processes, including energy metabolism, apoptosis, and aging. And mitochondria have been identified as the "hot spot" by researchers for exploring relevant associated dysfunctions in many fields. The emergence of comparative proteomics enables us to have a close look at the mitochondrial proteome in a comprehensive and effective manner under various conditions and cellular circumstances. Two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry is still the most popular techniques to study comparative mitochondrial proteomics. Furthermore, many new techniques, such as ICAT, MudPIT, and SILAC, equip researchers with more flexibilities inselecting proper methods. This article also reviews the recent development of comparative mitochondrial proteomics on diverse human diseases. And the results of mitochondrial proteomics enhance a better understanding of the pathogenesis associated with mitochondria and provide promising therapeutic targets.

  7. Rabbit muscle proteomics: a great leap forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, André Martinho

    2013-08-01

    The rabbit is an important species as both a production animal and as a model organism in physiology, pharmaceutical, and numerous other studies. Similar to other species, the rabbit skeletal muscle proteome has been characterized, first using 2DE mapping and more recently using high-throughput shotgun proteomics. This article is a commentary on "Shotgun proteomics analysis of the sarcoplasmic reticulum preparations from rabbit skeletal muscle" (Z. Liu et al., Proteomics, 2013, 13, 2335-2338). Herein, we present the reasons why the manuscript is of high relevance to three major fields: farm animal, rabbit, and muscle/meat proteomics. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Explore, Visualize, and Analyze Functional Cancer Proteomic Data Using the Cancer Proteome Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Akbani, Rehan; Zhao, Wei; Lu, Yiling; Weinstein, John N; Mills, Gordon B; Liang, Han

    2017-11-01

    Reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA) represent a powerful functional proteomic approach to elucidate cancer-related molecular mechanisms and to develop novel cancer therapies. To facilitate community-based investigation of the large-scale protein expression data generated by this platform, we have developed a user-friendly, open-access bioinformatic resource, The Cancer Proteome Atlas (TCPA, http://tcpaportal.org), which contains two separate web applications. The first one focuses on RPPA data of patient tumors, which contains >8,000 samples of 32 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas and other independent patient cohorts. The second application focuses on the RPPA data of cancer cell lines and contains >650 independent cell lines across 19 lineages. Many of these cell lines have publicly available, high-quality DNA, RNA, and drug screening data. TCPA provides various analytic and visualization modules to help cancer researchers explore these datasets and generate testable hypotheses in an effective and intuitive manner. Cancer Res; 77(21); e51-54. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Current approaches on viral infection: proteomics and functional validations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie eZheng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Viruses could manipulate cellular machinery to ensure their continuous survival and thus become parasites of living organisms. Delineation of sophisticated host responses upon virus infection is a challenging task. It lies in identifying the repertoire of host factors actively involved in the viral infectious cycle and characterizing host responses qualitatively and quantitatively during viral pathogenesis. Mass spectrometry based proteomics could be used to efficiently study pathogen-host interactions and virus-hijacked cellular signaling pathways. Moreover, direct host and viral responses upon infection could be further investigated by activity based functional validation studies. These approaches involve drug inhibition of secretory pathway, immunofluorescence staining, dominant negative mutation of protein target, real time PCR, small interfering siRNA-mediated knockdown, and molecular cloning studies. In this way, functional validation could gain novel insights into the high-content proteomic dataset in an unbiased and comprehensive way.

  10. Proteomic effects of wet cupping (Al-hijamah).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaiman, Amer A

    2018-01-01

    Wet cupping (Al-hijamah) is a therapeutic technique practiced worldwide as a part of the Unani system of medicine. It involves bloodletting from acupoints on a patient's skin to produce a therapeutic outcome. A thorough review of research articles on wet cupping with relevance to proteomics field that are indexed by Google Scholar, PubMed, and/or Science Direct databases was performed. Eight original research articles were summarized in this paper. Overall, wet cupping did not have a significant effect on C-reactive protein, Hsp-27, sister chromatid exchanges, and cell replication index. In contrast, wet cupping was found to produce higher oxygen saturation, eliminate lactate from subcutaneous tissues, remove blood containing higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide, and produce higher activity of myeloperoxidase. The proteomic effects of wet cupping therapy have not been adequately investigated. Thus, future studies on wet cupping that use systemic and sound protocols to avoid bias should be conducted.

  11. Insights into the virulence of oral biofilms: discoveries from proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuboniwa, Masae; Tribble, Gena D; Hendrickson, Erik L; Amano, Atsuo; Lamont, Richard J; Hackett, Murray

    2012-06-01

    This review covers developments in the study of polymicrobial communities, biofilms and selected areas of host response relevant to dental plaque and related areas of oral biology. The emphasis is on recent studies in which proteomic methods, particularly those using mass spectrometry as a readout, have played a major role in the investigation. The last 5-10 years have seen a transition of such methods from the periphery of oral biology to the mainstream, as in other areas of biomedical science. For reasons of focus and space, the authors do not discuss biomarker studies relevant to improved diagnostics for oral health, as this literature is rather substantial in its own right and deserves a separate treatment. Here, global gene regulation studies of plaque-component organisms, biofilm formation, multispecies interactions and host-microbe interactions are discussed. Several aspects of proteomics methodology that are relevant to the studies of multispecies systems are commented upon.

  12. Labelling, biodistribution and compartmental analysis of N-acetylcysteine labelled with Tc-99m. Comparative investigation with with sup 9 sup 9 sup m Tc-MIBI in an in vivo tumoral model

    CERN Document Server

    Faintuch, B L

    1997-01-01

    Labelling and biodistribution studies were done with two different ligands, respectively Methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), employing Tc-99m as a tracer. The main objective was to assess the pharmacokinetic properties of the second substance, aiming at its possible application in cancer diagnosis. To this purpose an in vivo investigation was done using healthy and tumor-bearing rats with experimental cancer. Images of tumor-bearing rats registered in a scintillation camera indicated that with sup 9 sup 9 sup m Tc-MIBI none of the two selected times was adequate for visualization of the cancer mass. In contrast, sup 9 sup 9 sup m Tc-NAC permitted clear identification of the humor, four hours after injection. The results have demonstrated that sup 9 sup 9 sup m Tc-NAC is a radiopharmaceutical with affinity for cancer tissue and promising for further investigation concerning imaging diagnosis of tumors.

  13. Guided bone regeneration of non-contained mandibular buccal bone defects using deproteinized bovine bone mineral and a collagen membrane: an experimental in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Mariano; Ferrantino, Luca; Vignoletti, Fabio; de Sanctis, Massimo; Berglundh, Tord

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this pre-clinical in vivo study was to analyse different stages of wound healing after guided bone regeneration in non-contained mandibular buccal bone defects. Eighteen female beagle dogs, between 1.5 and 2 years old, were used. Buccal bone defects were created in the mandible following extraction of the mesial roots of M1, P4, the distal root of P3 and booth roots of P2. Augmentation procedures of the healed defects were performed 3 months later using a bone replacement graft (T1), an absorbable collagen membrane (T2) or a combination of both procedures (T3). Using a randomized block study design, four stages of healing in two groups of dogs were examined (4 days, 2, 6 weeks and 3 months). The animals were euthanized, and biopsies obtained at the end of each of the study periods were prepared for histological examination. The different reconstructive procedures resulted in regenerated tissue compartments of varying size that contained newly formed bone, non-mineralized tissue and bone augmentation biomaterial when a bone replacement graft was used. While the proportions of mineralized tissue increased and non-mineralized tissue decreased over time in the three groups, the changes in proportions of the DBBM material were small. Initial defect depth, healing time and treatment group significantly influenced the percentage of mineralized tissue obtained. The multivariate multilevel analysis showed that significantly larger area proportions of mineralized tissue were obtained when the T2 sites were compared with T1 and T3 sites, what highlights the importance of the barrier membrane effect for attaining new bone formation. Only in the larger size defects (M1) total ROI at T3 and T1 sites was significantly larger than at T2, what highlights the importance of using a bone replacement graft as a space maintenance scaffold. It is suggested that healing following augmentation of non-contained buccal bone defects was characterized by a gradual shift in the

  14. Systematically experimental investigation on carcinogenesis or tumorigenicity of VERO cell lines of different karyotypes in nude mice in vivo used for viral vaccine manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Li; Ji, Liang; Li, Liu-Jin; Huang, Gao-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Many cell lines used for vaccine production have a potentially strong tumorigenic character. Some of those routinely used need to be checked at different passage numbers for this characteristic. Using HeLa cell cultures as positive controls, and primary canine kidney cell (CKC) or feline kidney cell (FKC) cultures purified in vitro on passage three as negative controls, the tumorigenicity of VERO cell sublines was tested in 219 nude mice. The master cell stocks (MCS) and working cell banks (WCB) of eight strains of VERO African green monkey kidney cell (AGMKC) line used for canine, feline and mink vaccine preparation were established in China. The hypo-tetra-ploid JA or hyper-diploid KA strain of VERO line was highly tumorigenic. These data showed a variable chromosome karyotype of VERO line, and contraindicated the use of JA or KA strain of VERO line for the preparation of attenuated viral vaccines. JA or KA strain of VERO line could be a substitute for HeLa line as a positive-control malignant tumor (MT) cell model. The non-carcinogenic YB, JC, M and JB strains of VERO line were therefore selected for the preparation of modified live rabies viral vaccine in place of BHK-21. The cell sub-lines are comparatively stable in terms of their heritable characters, and show little significant changes between passages. In summary, we have found that: 1) the tumorigenicity of cell line is different among different-karyotypic cells; 2) it is the genetic characteristics of chromosomes of cell lines that determines their tumorigenicity, but with species-specific carcinogenicity; 3) the chromosome number variation of cell lines has positive relationship with their carcinogenesis; 4) highly variable strains of tumor cell line can be selected quickly and successfully in nude mice by alternate cultivation in vitro and in vivo. Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) was evolved in nude mice inoculated with violently variable HeLa or VERO cells. The importance of assessing the

  15. Tumorigenic potential of pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) in vivo investigated using a transgenic mouse model, and effects of cross breeding with p53 (+/-) transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Miranda Y; Farghaly, Hanan; Kakar, Sham S

    2012-11-20

    Pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG) is an oncogene that is overexpressed in variety of tumors and exhibits characteristics of a transforming gene. Previous transgenic mouse models to access the tumorigenic potential in the pituitary and ovary have resulted in dysplasia without formation of visible tumors, possibly due to the insufficient expression of PTTG. PTTG expression level is critical for ovarian tumorigenesis in a xenograft model. Therefore, the tumorigenic function of PTTG in vivo remains unclear. We generated a transgenic mouse that overexpresses PTTG driven by the CMV promoter to determine whether PTTG functions as a transforming oncogene that is capable of initiating tumorigenesis. Transgenic animals were generated by microinjection of PTTG transgene into the male pronucleus of FVB 0.5 day old embryos. Expression levels of PTTG in tissues of transgenic animals were analyzed using an immunohistochemical analysis. H&E staining and immunohistostaining were performed to examine the type of tumor in transgenic and PTTG transgenic/p53+/- animals. PTTG transgenic offspring (TgPTTG) were monitored for tumor development at various ages. H&E analysis was performed to identify the presence of cancer and hyperplastic conditions verified with the proliferation marker PCNA and the microvessel marker CD31. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine transgene expression, revealing localization to the epithelium of the fallopian tube, with more generalized expression in the liver, lung, kidney, and spleen. At eight months of age, 2 out of 15 TgPTTG developed ovarian cancer, 2 out of 15 developed benign tumors, 2 out of 15 developed cervical dysplasia, and 3 out of 15 developed adenomyosis of the uterus. At ten months of age, 2 out of 10 TgPTTG developed adenocarcinoma of the ovary, 1 out of 10 developed a papillary serous adenocarcinoma, and 2 out of 10 presented with atypia of ovarian epithelial cells. Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process, often requiring

  16. Tumorigenic potential of pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG in vivo investigated using a transgenic mouse model, and effects of cross breeding with p53 (+/− transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Miranda Y

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG is an oncogene that is overexpressed in variety of tumors and exhibits characteristics of a transforming gene. Previous transgenic mouse models to access the tumorigenic potential in the pituitary and ovary have resulted in dysplasia without formation of visible tumors, possibly due to the insufficient expression of PTTG. PTTG expression level is critical for ovarian tumorigenesis in a xenograft model. Therefore, the tumorigenic function of PTTG in vivo remains unclear. We generated a transgenic mouse that overexpresses PTTG driven by the CMV promoter to determine whether PTTG functions as a transforming oncogene that is capable of initiating tumorigenesis. Methods Transgenic animals were generated by microinjection of PTTG transgene into the male pronucleus of FVB 0.5 day old embryos. Expression levels of PTTG in tissues of transgenic animals were analyzed using an immunohistochemical analysis. H&E staining and immunohistostaining were performed to examine the type of tumor in transgenic and PTTG transgenic/p53+/- animals. Results PTTG transgenic offspring (TgPTTG were monitored for tumor development at various ages. H&E analysis was performed to identify the presence of cancer and hyperplastic conditions verified with the proliferation marker PCNA and the microvessel marker CD31. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine transgene expression, revealing localization to the epithelium of the fallopian tube, with more generalized expression in the liver, lung, kidney, and spleen. At eight months of age, 2 out of 15 TgPTTG developed ovarian cancer, 2 out of 15 developed benign tumors, 2 out of 15 developed cervical dysplasia, and 3 out of 15 developed adenomyosis of the uterus. At ten months of age, 2 out of 10 TgPTTG developed adenocarcinoma of the ovary, 1 out of 10 developed a papillary serous adenocarcinoma, and 2 out of 10 presented with atypia of ovarian epithelial cells

  17. The proteome of Populus nigra woody root: response to bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trupiano, Dalila; Rocco, Mariapina; Renzone, Giovanni; Scaloni, Andrea; Viscosi, Vincenzo; Chiatante, Donato; Scippa, Gabriella S.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Morphological and biomechanical alterations occurring in woody roots of many plant species in response to mechanical stresses are well documented; however, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating these important alterations. The first forest tree genome to be decoded is that of Populus, thereby providing a tool with which to investigate the mechanisms controlling adaptation of woody roots to changing environments. The aim of this study was to use a proteomic approach to investigate the response of Populus nigra woody taproot to mechanical stress. Methods To simulate mechanical perturbations, the taproots of 30 one-year-old seedlings were bent to an angle of 90 ° using a steel net. A spatial and temporal two-dimensional proteome map of the taproot axis was obtained. We compared the events occurring in the above-bending, central bending and below-bending sectors of the taproot. Key Results The first poplar woody taproot proteome map is reported here; a total of 207 proteins were identified. Spatial and temporal proteomic analysis revealed that factors involved in plant defence, metabolism, reaction wood formation and lateral root development were differentially expressed in the various sectors of bent vs. control roots, seemingly in relation to the distribution of mechanical forces along the stressed woody taproots. A complex interplay among different signal transduction pathways involving reactive oxygen species appears to modulate these responses. Conclusions Poplar woody root uses different temporal and spatial mechanisms to respond to mechanical stress. Long-term bending treatment seem to reinforce the defence machinery, thereby enabling the taproot to better overcome winter and to be ready to resume growth earlier than controls. PMID:22437664

  18. Proteome responses to nitrate in bioethanol production contaminant Dekkera bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Adauto Gomes Barbosa; Pestana-Calsa, Maria Clara; de Morais, Marcos Antonio; Calsa, Tercilio

    2014-06-02

    Dekkera bruxellensis is an industrially relevant yeast, especially in bioethanol production. The capacity of D. bruxellensis to assimilate nitrate can confer advantages of this yeast over Saccharomyces cerevisiae at industrial conditions. In the present work we present the consequences of nitrate assimilation, using ammonium as reference, to the proteomics of D. bruxellensis. Thirty-four protein spots were overproduced in nitrate medium and were identified by MS-TOF/TOF analysis and were putatively identified by using local Mascot software. Apart from the overexpression of genes of nitrate metabolism, ATP synthesis and PPP and TCA pathways previously reported, cultivation on nitrate induced overproduction of glycolytic enzymes, which corroborate the high energy demand and NADH availability for nitrate assimilation. Overproduction of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) protein was also observed. Proteomic profile of D. bruxellensis cultivated in nitrate and described in the present work agrees with the hypothesis of metabolic flux regulation, making available the energy in the form of NADH to support nitrate assimilation. This work contributes with an initial picture of proteins presenting differential accumulation in industrial contaminant yeast, in strict association with possible metabolic responses to nitrate as sole nitrogen source in cultivation medium. The present study investigated the gene expression at translational level of yeast D. bruxellensis for nitrate assimilation. This study corroborated with biological models that consider the ability to assimilate this nitrogen source confers advantages on this yeast during the fermentation process industry. However, larger studies are needed in this way as our group is investigating new proteins under LC-MS/MS approach. Together, these studies will help in understanding the operation of networks and cellular regulation of the process of assimilation of nitrogen sources for the D. bruxellensis, unravelling new aspects of

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Mamestra Brassicae Nucleopolyhedrovirus Progeny Virions from Two Different Hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianhai Hou

    Full Text Available Mamestra brassicae nucleopolyhedrovirus (MabrNPV has a wide host range replication in more than one insect species. In this study, a sequenced MabrNPV strain, MabrNPV-CTa, was used to perform proteomic analysis of both BVs and ODVs derived from two infected hosts: Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera exigua. A total of 82 and 39 viral proteins were identified in ODVs and BVs, respectively. And totally, 23 and 76 host proteins were identified as virion-associated with ODVs and BVs, respectively. The host proteins incorporated into the virus particles were mainly involved in cytoskeleton, signaling, vesicle trafficking, chaperone and metabolic systems. Some host proteins, such as actin, cyclophilin A and heat shock protein 70 would be important for viral replication. Several host proteins involved in immune response were also identified in BV, and a C-type lectin protein was firstly found to be associated with BV and its family members have been demonstrated to be involved in entry process of other viruses. This study facilitated the annotation of baculovirus genome, and would help us to understand baculovirus virion structure. Furthermore, the identification of host proteins associated with virions produced in vivo would facilitate investigations on the involvement of intriguing host proteins in virus replication.

  20. Synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics

    CERN Document Server

    Pechkova, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the current state of research in both synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics from different laboratories worldwide. The book presents recent research results in the most advanced methods of synchrotron radiation analysis, protein micro- and nano crystallography, X-ray scattering and X-ray optics, coherent X-Ray diffraction, and laser cutting and contactless sample manipulation are described in details. The book focuses on biological applications and highlights important aspects such as radiation damage and molecular modeling.

  1. Plasma proteome analysis of patients with type 1 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Hansen, Henning Gram; Lajer, Maria

    2010-01-01

    As part of a clinical proteomics program focused on diabetes and its complications we are looking for new and better protein biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. The search for new and better biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy has, with a few exceptions, previously focused on either hypothesis......-driven studies or urinary based investigations. To date only two studies have investigated the proteome of blood in search for new biomarkers, and these studies were conducted in sera from patients with type 2 diabetes. This is the first reported in depth proteomic study where plasma from type 1 diabetic...... patients was investigated with the goal of finding improved candidate biomarkers to predict diabetic nephropathy. In order to reach lower concentration proteins in plasma a pre-fractionation step, either hexapeptide bead-based libraries or anion exchange chromatography, was performed prior to surface...

  2. Use of WGS data for investigation of a long-term NDM-1-producing Citrobacter freundii outbreak and secondary in vivo spread of blaNDM-1 to Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerum, Anette M; Hansen, Frank; Nielsen, Hans Linde; Jakobsen, Lotte; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S; Jensen, Paw; Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Hasman, Henrik; Fuglsang-Damgaard, David

    2016-11-01

    An outbreak of NDM-1-producing Citrobacter freundii and possible secondary in vivo spread of bla NDM-1 to other Enterobacteriaceae were investigated. From October 2012 to March 2015, meropenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae were detected in 45 samples from seven patients at Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. In silico resistance genes, Inc plasmid types and STs (MLST) were obtained from WGS data from 24 meropenem-resistant isolates (13 C. freundii, 6 Klebsiella pneumoniae, 4 Escherichia coli and 1 Klebsiella oxytoca) and 1 meropenem-susceptible K. oxytoca. The sequences of the meropenem-resistant C. freundii isolates were compared by phylogenetic analyses. In vitro susceptibility to 21 antimicrobial agents was tested. Furthermore, in vitro conjugation and plasmid characterization was performed. From the seven patients, 13 highly clonal ST18 NDM-1-producing C. freundii were isolated. The ST18 NDM-1-producing C. freundii isolates were only susceptible to tetracycline, tigecycline, colistin and fosfomycin (except for the C. freundii isolates from Patient 2 and Patient 7, which were additionally resistant to tetracycline). The E. coli and K. pneumoniae from different patients belonged to different STs, indicating in vivo transfer of bla NDM-1 in the individual patients. This was further supported by in vitro conjugation and detection of a 154 kb IncA/C2 plasmid with bla NDM-1 . Patient screenings failed to reveal any additional cases. None of the patients had a history of recent travel abroad and the source of the bla NDM-1 plasmid was unknown. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an NDM-1-producing C. freundii outbreak and secondary in vivo spread of an IncA/C2 plasmid with bla NDM-1 to other Enterobacteriaceae. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Labelling, biodistribution and compartmental analysis of N-acetylcysteine labelled with Tc-99m. Comparative investigation with with {sup 99m} Tc-MIBI in an in vivo tumoral model; Estudo de marcacao, biodistribuicao e analise compartimental da N-acetil cisteina marcada com Tc-99m. Investigacao comparativa com MIBI-{sup 99m}Tc em modelo tumoral in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faintuch, Bluma Linkowski

    1997-07-01

    Labelling and biodistribution studies were done with two different ligands, respectively Methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), employing Tc-99m as a tracer. The main objective was to assess the pharmacokinetic properties of the second substance, aiming at its possible application in cancer diagnosis. To this purpose an in vivo investigation was done using healthy and tumor-bearing rats with experimental cancer. Images of tumor-bearing rats registered in a scintillation camera indicated that with {sup 99m} Tc-MIBI none of the two selected times was adequate for visualization of the cancer mass. In contrast, {sup 99m} Tc-NAC permitted clear identification of the humor, four hours after injection. The results have demonstrated that {sup 99m} Tc-NAC is a radiopharmaceutical with affinity for cancer tissue and promising for further investigation concerning imaging diagnosis of tumors. (author)

  4. Analysis of the proteome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for methylarginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Jason K K; Hart-Smith, Gene; Erce, Melissa A; Wilkins, Marc R

    2013-09-06

    Arginine methylation is a post-translational modification that has been implicated in a plethora of cellular processes. In the present manuscript, using two antimethylarginine antibodies and combinatorial deletion mutants of arginine methyltransferases, we found evidence of widespread arginine methylation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome. Immunoprecipitation was used for enrichment of methylarginine-containing proteins, which were identified via tandem mass spectrometry. From this, we identified a total of 90 proteins, of which 5 were previously known to be methylated. The proteins identified were involved in known methylarginine-associated biological functions such as RNA processing, nuclear transport, carbohydrate metabolic process, GMP biosynthetic process and protein folding. Through in vivo methylation by the incorporation of [3H]-methyl groups, we validated the methylation of 7 proteins (Ded1, Imd4, Lhp1, Nop1, Cdc11, Gus1, Pob3). By LC-MS/MS, we then confirmed a total of 15 novel methylarginine sites on 5 proteins (Ded1, Lhp1, Nop1, Pab1, and Ugp1). By examination of methylation on proteins from the triple knockout of methyltransferases Hmt1, Hsl7, Rmt2, we present evidence for the existence of additional unidentified arginine methyltransferases in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome.

  5. Personalized medicine beyond genomics: alternative futures in big data-proteomics, environtome and the social proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Vural; Dove, Edward S; Gürsoy, Ulvi K; Şardaş, Semra; Yıldırım, Arif; Yılmaz, Şenay Görücü; Ömer Barlas, I; Güngör, Kıvanç; Mete, Alper; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2017-01-01

    No field in science and medicine today remains untouched by Big Data, and psychiatry is no exception. Proteomics is a Big Data technology and a next generation biomarker, supporting novel system diagnostics and therapeutics in psychiatry. Proteomics technology is, in fact, much older than genomics and dates to the 1970s, well before the launch of the international Human Genome Project. While the genome has long been framed as the master or "elite" executive molecule in cell biology, the proteome by contrast is humble. Yet the proteome is critical for life-it ensures the daily functioning of cells and whole organisms. In short, proteins are the blue-collar workers of biology, the down-to-earth molecules that we cannot live without. Since 2010, proteomics has found renewed meaning and international attention with the launch of the Human Proteome Project and the growing interest in Big Data technologies such as proteomics. This article presents an interdisciplinary technology foresight analysis and conceptualizes the terms "environtome" and "social proteome". We define "environtome" as the entire complement of elements external to the human host, from microbiome, ambient temperature and weather conditions to government innovation policies, stock market dynamics, human values, political power and social norms that collectively shape the human host spatially and temporally. The "social proteome" is the subset of the environtome that influences the transition of proteomics technology to innovative applications in society. The social proteome encompasses, for example, new reimbursement schemes and business innovation models for proteomics diagnostics that depart from the "once-a-life-time" genotypic tests and the anticipated hype attendant to context and time sensitive proteomics tests. Building on the "nesting principle" for governance of complex systems as discussed by Elinor Ostrom, we propose here a 3-tiered organizational architecture for Big Data science such as

  6. Comprehensive analysis of temporal alterations in cellular proteome of Bacillus subtilis under curcumin treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panga Jaipal Reddy

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a natural dietary compound with antimicrobial activity against various gram positive and negative bacteria. This study aims to investigate the proteome level alterations in Bacillus subtilis due to curcumin treatment and identification of its molecular/cellular targets to understand the mechanism of action. We have performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis of B. subtilis AH75 strain at different time intervals of curcumin treatment (20, 60 and 120 min after the drug exposure, three replicates to compare the protein expression profiles using two complementary quantitative proteomic techniques, 2D-DIGE and iTRAQ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive longitudinal investigation describing the effect of curcumin treatment on B. subtilis proteome. The proteomics analysis revealed several interesting targets such UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase 1, putative septation protein SpoVG and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit. Further, in silico pathway analysis using DAVID and KOBAS has revealed modulation of pathways related to the fatty acid metabolism and cell wall synthesis, which are crucial for cell viability. Our findings revealed that curcumin treatment lead to inhibition of the cell wall and fatty acid synthesis in addition to differential expression of many crucial proteins involved in modulation of bacterial metabolism. Findings obtained from proteomics analysis were further validated using 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC assay for respiratory activity, resazurin assay for metabolic activity and membrane integrity assay by potassium and inorganic phosphate leakage measurement. The gene expression analysis of selected cell wall biosynthesis enzymes has strengthened the proteomics findings and indicated the major effect of curcumin on cell division.

  7. Mass spectrometry based proteomics profiling of human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zeng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human monocyte is an important cell type which is involved in various complex human diseases. To better understand the biology of human monocytes and facilitate further studies, we developed the first comprehensive proteome knowledge base specifically for human monocytes by integrating both in vivo and in vitro datasets. The top 2000 expressed genes from in vitro datasets and 779 genes from in vivo experiments were integrated into this study. Altogether, a total of 2237 unique monocyte-expressed genes were cataloged. Biological functions of these monocyte-expressed genes were annotated and classified via Gene Ontology (GO analysis. Furthermore, by extracting the overlapped genes from in vivo and in vitro datasets, a core gene list including 541 unique genes was generated. Based on the core gene list, further gene-disease associations, pathway and network analyses were performed. Data analyses based on multiple bioinformatics tools produced a large body of biologically meaningful information, and revealed a number of genes such as SAMHD1, G6PD, GPD2 and ENO1, which have been reported to be related to immune response, blood biology, bone remodeling, and cancer respectively. As a unique resource, this study can serve as a reference map for future in-depth research on monocytes biology and monocyte-involved human diseases.

  8. Mass spectrometry based proteomics profiling of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yong; Deng, Fei-Yan; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Lan; He, Hao; Xu, Chao; Tian, Qing; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Zhang, Li-Shu; Hu, Hong-Gang; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2017-02-01

    Human monocyte is an important cell type which is involved in various complex human diseases. To better understand the biology of human monocytes and facilitate further studies, we developed the first comprehensive proteome knowledge base specifically for human monocytes by integrating both in vivo and in vitro datasets. The top 2000 expressed genes from in vitro datasets and 779 genes from in vivo experiments were integrated into this study. Altogether, a total of 2237 unique monocyte-expressed genes were cataloged. Biological functions of these monocyte-expressed genes were annotated and classified via Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. Furthermore, by extracting the overlapped genes from in vivo and in vitro datasets, a core gene list including 541 unique genes was generated. Based on the core gene list, further gene-disease associations, pathway and network analyses were performed. Data analyses based on multiple bioinformatics tools produced a large body of biologically meaningful information, and revealed a number of genes such as SAMHD1, G6PD, GPD2 and ENO1, which have been reported to be related to immune response, blood biology, bone remodeling, and cancer respectively. As a unique resource, this study can serve as a reference map for future in-depth research on monocytes biology and monocyte-involved human diseases.

  9. Network-based analysis of proteomic profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Limsoon

    2016-01-26

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is a widely used and powerful tool for profiling systems-wide protein expression changes. It can be applied for various purposes, e.g. biomarker discovery in diseases and study of drug responses. Although RNA-based high-throughput methods have been useful in providing glimpses into the underlying molecular processes, the evidences they provide are indirect. Furthermore, RNA and corresponding protein levels have been known to have poor correlation. On the other hand, MS-based proteomics tend to have consistency issues (poor reproducibility and inter-sample agreement) and coverage issues (inability to detect the entire proteome) that need to be urgently addressed. In this talk, I will discuss how these issues can be addressed by proteomic profile analysis techniques that use biological networks (especially protein complexes) as the biological context. In particular, I will describe several techniques that we have been developing for network-based analysis of proteomics profile. And I will present evidence that these techniques are useful in identifying proteomics-profile analysis results that are more consistent, more reproducible, and more biologically coherent, and that these techniques allow expansion of the detected proteome to uncover and/or discover novel proteins.

  10. The proteome of baker's yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonczarowska-Jorge, Humberto; Zahedi, René P; Sickmann, Albert

    2017-03-01

    In the past decade mass spectrometry-based proteomics has greatly contributed to shaping our knowledge about Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria, from the initial identification of novel essential components in purified protein complexes, to the actual characterization of the mitochondrial proteome, the specific analysis of mitochondrial subcompartment proteomes, and the study of regulatory mechanisms that govern mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, we provide an overview of relevant mitochondrial proteome studies and furthermore discuss future possibilities how proteomics will further improve our existing understanding of mitochondria. Although mitochondria were the first organelles that have been intensively studied using proteomics, indeed the recent progress and development of more powerful and sensitive methods, instrumentation and data analysis strategies indicate that we are only beginning to exploit the full potential of mitochondrial proteomics and its possibilities to decipher cell biology. Beside mere (quantitative) inventory under different conditions, this will for instance include studying the role of multiple post-translational modifications in mitochondrial homeostasis as well as the system-wide mapping of protein-protein complexes and protein-lipid interactions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. A Combined Metabolomic and Proteomic Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Hajduk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot study was to apply a novel combined metabolomic and proteomic approach in analysis of gestational diabetes mellitus. The investigation was performed with plasma samples derived from pregnant women with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 18 and a matched control group (n = 13. The mass spectrometry-based analyses allowed to determine 42 free amino acids and low molecular-weight peptide profiles. Different expressions of several peptides and altered amino acid profiles were observed in the analyzed groups. The combination of proteomic and metabolomic data allowed obtaining the model with a high discriminatory power, where amino acids ethanolamine, l-citrulline, l-asparagine, and peptide ions with m/z 1488.59; 4111.89 and 2913.15 had the highest contribution to the model. The sensitivity (94.44% and specificity (84.62%, as well as the total group membership classification value (90.32% calculated from the post hoc classification matrix of a joint model were the highest when compared with a single analysis of either amino acid levels or peptide ion intensities. The obtained results indicated a high potential of integration of proteomic and metabolomics analysis regardless the sample size. This promising approach together with clinical evaluation of the subjects can also be used in the study of other diseases.

  12. Lens culinaris Medik. seed proteome: analysis to identify landrace markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ialicicco, Manuela; Viscosi, Vincenzo; Arena, Simona; Scaloni, Andrea; Trupiano, Dalila; Rocco, Mariapina; Chiatante, Donato; Scippa, Gabriella S

    2012-12-01

    Unlike modern cultivars selected for their growth performances in specific environmental conditions, local landraces have a high genetic variability that is an important resource for plant breeding. Consequent to their high adaptation to different environmental conditions, these landraces may have evolved adaptive gene complexes To promote the survival of endangered lentil landraces, we previously investigated the genetic relationship between two ancient landraces cultivated in the Molise region (Capracotta and Conca Casale, south-central Italy) and widely spread commercial varieties using an integrated approach consisting of morphological, DNA and protein characterization. In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to compare the mature seed proteomes of the Capracotta and Conca Casale lentil landraces. Multivariate analysis of 145 differentially expressed protein spots demonstrated that 52 proteins are required to discriminate among the two landraces. Therefore, these 52 proteins can be considered "landrace markers". The results of this study show that the combination of proteomics and multivariate analysis can be used to identify physiological and/or environmental markers, and is thus a powerful tool that complements the analysis of biodiversity in plant ecotypes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Proteomic analysis of post translational modifications in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qian; Chen, Zhuo; Ge, Feng

    2016-02-16

    Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria and the only prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. Recently, cyanobacteria have attracted great interest due to their crucial roles in global carbon and nitrogen cycles and their ability to produce clean and renewable biofuels. To survive in various environmental conditions, cyanobacteria have developed a complex signal transduction network to sense environmental signals and implement adaptive changes. The post-translational modifications (PTMs) systems play important regulatory roles in the signaling networks of cyanobacteria. The systematic investigation of PTMs could contribute to the comprehensive description of protein species and to elucidate potential biological roles of each protein species in cyanobacteria. Although the proteomic studies of PTMs carried out in cyanobacteria were limited, these data have provided clues to elucidate their sophisticated sensing mechanisms that contribute to their evolutionary and ecological success. This review aims to summarize the current status of PTM studies and recent publications regarding PTM proteomics in cyanobacteria, and discuss the novel developments and applications for the analysis of PTMs in cyanobacteria. Challenges, opportunities and future perspectives in the proteomics studies of PTMs in cyanobacteria are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of stage-specific breast markers using quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheed, Sadr-ul; Rustogi, Nitin; Scally, Andrew; Wilson, Julie; Thygesen, Helene; Loizidou, Maria A; Hadjisavvas, Andreas; Hanby, Andrew; Speirs, Valerie; Loadman, Paul; Linforth, Richard; Kyriacou, Kyriacos; Sutton, Chris W

    2013-12-06

    Matched healthy and diseased tissues from breast cancer patients were analyzed by quantitative proteomics. By comparing proteomic profiles of fibroadenoma (benign tumors, three patients), DCIS (noninvasive cancer, three patients), and invasive ductal carcinoma (four patients), we identified protein alterations that correlated with breast cancer progression. Three 8-plex iTRAQ experiments generated an average of 826 protein identifications, of which 402 were common. After excluding those originating from blood, 59 proteins were significantly changed in tumor compared with normal tissues, with the majority associated with invasive carcinomas. Bioinformatics analysis identified relationships between proteins in this subset including roles in redox regulation, lipid transport, protein folding, and proteasomal degradation, with a substantial number increased in expression due to Myc oncogene activation. Three target proteins, cofilin-1 and p23 (increased in invasive carcinoma) and membrane copper amine oxidase 3 (decreased in invasive carcinoma), were subjected to further validation. All three were observed in phenotype-specific breast cancer cell lines, normal (nontransformed) breast cell lines, and primary breast epithelial cells by Western blotting, but only cofilin-1 and p23 were detected by multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry analysis. All three proteins were detected by both analytical approaches in matched tissue biopsies emulating the response observed with proteomics analysis. Tissue microarray analysis (361 patients) indicated cofilin-1 staining positively correlating with tumor grade and p23 staining with ER positive status; both therefore merit further investigation as potential biomarkers.

  15. Proteome Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi Response to Environmental Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, Thomas E.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Yang, Xiaohua; Nicora, Carrie D.; Camp, David G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-11-02

    We examined global changes in protein expression in the B31 strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, in response to two environmental cues (pH and temperature) chosen for their reported similarity to those encountered at different stages of the organism’s life cycle. Multidimensional nano-liquid chromatographic separations coupled with tandem mass spectrometry were used to examine the array of proteins (i.e., the proteome) of B. burgdorferi for different pH and temperature culture conditions. Changes in pH and temperature elicited in vitro adaptations of this spirochete known to cause Lyme disease and led to alterations in protein expression that are associated with increased microbial pathogenesis. We identified 1031 proteins that represent 59% of the annotated genome of B. burgdorferi and elucidated a core proteome of 414 proteins that were present in all environmental conditions investigated. Observed changes in protein abundances indicated varied replicon usage, as well as proteome functional distributions between the in vitro cell culture conditions. Surprisingly, the pH and temperature conditions that mimicked B. burgdorferi residing in the gut of a fed tick showed a marked reduction in protein diversity. Additionally, the results provide us with leading candidates for exploring how B. burgdorferi adapts to and is able to survive in a wide variety of environmental conditions and lay a foundation for planned in situ studies of B. burgdorferi isolated from the tick midgut and infected animals.

  16. Dissecting the C. elegans response during infection using quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karina Trankjær; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kristensen, Anders Riis

    2008-01-01

    The adherent invasive E. coli isolated from patients with Crohn’s disease in humans is pathogenic for C. elegans. We show here that when C. elegans feeds on the pathogenic E. coli, the life span is shortened significantly compared to the normal laboratory food, the OP50 E. coli. In this study the...... process. By analyzing the changes in the C. elegans proteome throughout infection we will be able to identify and follow pathways and effector proteins in the early, mid and late phase of the innate immune response towards this pathogenic E. coli.  ...... the infection process is followed using GFP-expressing bacteria and persistence assays. A quantitative proteomic approach was used to follow the C. elegans host response during the infection process. C. elegans were metabolic labeled with the stable isotope 15N and samples from three different time points......, many of which also have been found in studies using other pathogens. So far, large-scale investigations of the C. elegans immune response have been performed using micro-arrays. This study is the first to make use of quantitative proteomics to directly follow the protein dynamics during the infection...

  17. Personalized Proteome Profiles of Healthy and Tumor Human Colon Organoids Reveal Both Individual Diversity and Basic Features of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Alba; van den Toorn, Henk W P; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2017-01-03

    Diseases at the molecular level are complex and patient dependent, necessitating development of strategies that enable precision treatment to optimize clinical outcomes. Organoid technology has recently been shown to have the potential to recapitulate the in vivo characteristics of the original individual's tissue in a three-dimensional in vitro culture system. Here, we present a quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and a comparative transcriptomic analysis of human colorectal tumor and healthy organoids derived, in parallel, from seven patients. Although gene and protein signatures can be derived to distinguish the tumor organoid population from healthy organoids, our data clearly reveal that each patient possesses a distinct organoid signature at the proteomic level. We demonstrate that a personalized patient-specific organoid proteome profile can be related to the diagnosis of a patient and with future development contribute to the generation of personalized therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid and Deep Proteomes by Faster Sequencing on a Benchtop Quadrupole Ultra-High-Field Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Christian D; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa R; Batth, Tanveer Singh

    2014-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics is a powerful technology for global analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Here, we investigate faster sequencing speed of the latest Q Exactive HF mass spectrometer, which features an ultra-high-field Orbitrap mass analyzer. Proteome coverage is evalu......Shotgun proteomics is a powerful technology for global analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Here, we investigate faster sequencing speed of the latest Q Exactive HF mass spectrometer, which features an ultra-high-field Orbitrap mass analyzer. Proteome coverage...... in less than 24 hours of analysis time by offline high pH reversed-phase peptide fractionation from which we identify more than 140,000 unique peptide sequences. This is comparable to state-of-the-art multi-day, multi-enzyme efforts. Finally the acquisition methods are evaluated for single-shot...

  19. NIH Common Fund - Disruptive Proteomics Technologies - Challenges and Opportunities | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Request for Information (RFI) is directed toward determining how best to accelerate research in disruptive proteomics technologies. The Disruptive Proteomics Technologies (DPT) Working Group of the NIH Common Fund wishes to identify gaps and opportunities in current technologies and methodologies related to proteome-wide measurements.  For the purposes of this RFI, “disruptive” is defined as very rapid, very significant gains, similar to the "disruptive" technology development that occurred in DNA sequencing technology.

  20. Profiling the Proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Dormancy and Reactivation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Vipin; Raghunandanan, Sajith; Gomez, Roshna Lawrence; Jose, Leny; Surendran, Arun; Ramachandran, Ranjit; Pushparajan, Akhil Raj; Mundayoor, Sathish; Jaleel, Abdul; Kumar, Ramakrishnan Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, still remains a major global health problem. The main obstacle in eradicating this disease is the ability of this pathogen to remain dormant in macrophages, and then reactivate later under immuno-compromised conditions. The physiology of hypoxic nonreplicating M. tuberculosis is well-studied using many in vitro dormancy models. However, the physiological changes that take place during the shift from dormancy to aerobic growth (reactivation) have rarely been subjected to a detailed investigation. In this study, we developed an in vitro reactivation system by re-aerating the virulent laboratory strain of M. tuberculosis that was made dormant employing Wayne's dormancy model, and compared the proteome profiles of dormant and reactivated bacteria using label-free one-dimensional LC/MS/MS analysis. The proteome of dormant bacteria was analyzed at nonreplicating persistent stage 1 (NRP1) and stage 2 (NRP2), whereas that of reactivated bacteria was analyzed at 6 and 24 h post re-aeration. Proteome of normoxially grown bacteria served as the reference. In total, 1871 proteins comprising 47% of the M. tuberculosis proteome were identified, and many of them were observed to be expressed differentially or uniquely during dormancy and reactivation. The number of proteins detected at different stages of dormancy (764 at NRP1, 691 at NRP2) and reactivation (768 at R6 and 983 at R24) was very low compared with that of the control (1663). The number of unique proteins identified during normoxia, NRP1, NRP2, R6, and R24 were 597, 66, 56, 73, and 94, respectively. We analyzed various biological functions during these conditions. Fluctuation in the relative quantities of proteins involved in energy metabolism during dormancy and reactivation was the most significant observation we made in this study. Proteins that are up-regulated or uniquely expressed during reactivation from dormancy offer to be attractive targets for therapeutic

  1. Leaf proteome analysis of transgenic plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carli, Mariasole; Villani, Maria Elena; Renzone, Giovanni; Nardi, Luca; Pasquo, Alessandra; Franconi, Rosella; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Desiderio, Angiola

    2009-02-01

    The expression of exogenous antibodies in plant is an effective strategy to confer protection against viral infection or to produce molecules with pharmaceutical interest. However, the acceptance of the transgenic technology to obtain self-protecting plants depends on the assessment of their substantial equivalence compared to non-modified crops with an established history of safe use. In fact, the possibility exists that the introduction of transgenes in plants may alter expression of endogenous genes and/or normal production of metabolites. In this study, we investigated whether the expression in plant of recombinant antibodies directed against viral proteins may influence the host leaf proteome. Two transgenic plant models, generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, were analyzed for this purpose, namely, Lycopersicon esculentum cv. MicroTom and Nicotiana benthamiana, expressing recombinant antibodies against cucumber mosaic virus and tomato spotted wilt virus, respectively. To obtain a significant representation of plant proteomes, optimized extraction procedures have been devised for each plant species. The proteome repertoire of antibody-expressing and control plants was compared by 2-DE associated to DIGE technology. Among the 2000 spots detected within the gels, about 10 resulted differentially expressed in each transgenic model and were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and muLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS procedures. Protein variations were restricted to a limited number of defined differences with an average ratio below 2.4. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were related to photosynthesis or defense function. The overall results suggest that the expression of recombinant antibodies in both systems does not significantly alter the leaf proteomic profile, contributing to assess the biosafety of resistant plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

  2. Analysis of the surface, secreted, and intracellular proteome of Propionibacterium acnes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Propionibacterium acnes, plays an important role in acne vulgaris and other diseases. However, understanding of the exact mechanisms of P. acnes pathogenesis is limited. Few studies have investigated its proteome, which is essential for vaccine development. Here, we comprehensively investigate the proteome of P. acnes strain ATCC 6919, including secreted, cell wall, membrane, and cytosolic fractions in three types of growth media. A total of 531 proteins were quantified using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer and bioinformatically categorized for localization and function. Several, including PPA1939, a highly expressed surface and secreted protein, were identified as potential vaccine candidates.

  3. Statistical issues in the design and planning of proteomic profiling experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, David A

    2015-01-01

    The statistical design of a clinical proteomics experiment is a critical part of well-undertaken investigation. Standard concepts from experimental design such as randomization, replication and blocking should be applied in all experiments, and this is possible when the experimental conditions are well understood by the investigator. The large number of proteins simultaneously considered in proteomic discovery experiments means that determining the number of required replicates to perform a powerful experiment is more complicated than in simple experiments. However, by using information about the nature of an experiment and making simple assumptions this is achievable for a variety of experiments useful for biomarker discovery and initial validation.

  4. Proteomics and the dynamic plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2010-01-01

    plasma membrane is of particular interest, by not only serving as a barrier between the "cell interior" and the external environment, but moreover by organizing and clustering essential components to enable dynamic responses to internal and external stimuli. Defining and characterizing the dynamic plasma...... the challenges in functional proteomic studies of the plasma membrane. We review the recent progress in MS-based plasma membrane proteomics by presenting key examples from eukaryotic systems, including mammals, yeast and plants. We highlight the importance of enrichment and quantification technologies required...... for detailed functional and comparative analysis of the dynamic plasma membrane proteome....

  5. Proteomics: a subcellular look at spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Satya P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male-factor infertility presents a vexing problem for many reproductively active couples. Many studies have focused on abnormal sperm parameters. Recent advances in proteomic techniques, especially in mass spectrometry, have aided in the study of sperm and more specifically, sperm proteins. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on the various proteomic techniques, and their usefulness in diagnosing sperm dysfunction and potential applications in the clinical setting. Methods Review of PubMed database. Key words: spermatozoa, proteomics, protein, proteome, 2D-PAGE, mass spectrometry. Results Recently employed proteomic methods, such as two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and differential in gel electrophoresis, have identified numerous sperm-specific proteins. They also have provided a further understanding of protein function involved in sperm processes and for the differentiation between normal and abnormal states. In addition, studies on the sperm proteome have demonstrated the importance of post-translational modifications, and their ability to bring about physiological changes in sperm function. No longer do researchers believe that in order for them to elucidate the biochemical functions of genes, mere knowledge of the human genome sequence is sufficient. Moreover, a greater understanding of the physiological function of every protein in the tissue-specific proteome is essential in order to unravel the biological display of the human genome. Conclusion Recent advances in proteomic techniques have provided insight into sperm function and dysfunction. Several multidimensional separation techniques can be utilized to identify and characterize spermatozoa. Future developments in bioinformatics can further assist researchers in understanding the vast amount of data collected in proteomic studies. Moreover, such advances in proteomics may help to decipher metabolites

  6. Proteomics: a subcellular look at spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Stefan S; Kashou, Anthony H; Benjamin, David J; Yadav, Satya P; Agarwal, Ashok

    2011-03-22

    Male-factor infertility presents a vexing problem for many reproductively active couples. Many studies have focused on abnormal sperm parameters. Recent advances in proteomic techniques, especially in mass spectrometry, have aided in the study of sperm and more specifically, sperm proteins. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on the various proteomic techniques, and their usefulness in diagnosing sperm dysfunction and potential applications in the clinical setting. Review of PubMed database. Key words: spermatozoa, proteomics, protein, proteome, 2D-PAGE, mass spectrometry. Recently employed proteomic methods, such as two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and differential in gel electrophoresis, have identified numerous sperm-specific proteins. They also have provided a further understanding of protein function involved in sperm processes and for the differentiation between normal and abnormal states. In addition, studies on the sperm proteome have demonstrated the importance of post-translational modifications, and their ability to bring about physiological changes in sperm function. No longer do researchers believe that in order for them to elucidate the biochemical functions of genes, mere knowledge of the human genome sequence is sufficient. Moreover, a greater understanding of the physiological function of every protein in the tissue-specific proteome is essential in order to unravel the biological display of the human genome. Recent advances in proteomic techniques have provided insight into sperm function and dysfunction. Several multidimensional separation techniques can be utilized to identify and characterize spermatozoa. Future developments in bioinformatics can further assist researchers in understanding the vast amount of data collected in proteomic studies. Moreover, such advances in proteomics may help to decipher metabolites which can act as biomarkers in the detection of sperm impairments and

  7. Proteomics perspectives in rotator cuff research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersen, Maria Hee Jung; Frost, Poul; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2015-01-01

    tendinopathies, and to evaluate perspectives of proteomics – the comprehensive study of protein composition - in tendon research. Materials and Methods We conducted a systematic search of the literature published between 1 January 1990 and 18 December 2012 in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included...... proteomics technologies may be a way to identify protein profiles (including non-prespecified proteins) that characterise specific tendon disorders or stages of tendinopathy. Thus, our results suggested an untapped potential for proteomics in tendon research....

  8. Tyrosine-Nitrated Proteins: Proteomic and Bioanalytical Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batthyány, Carlos; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Lima, Analía; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    "Nitroproteomic" is under active development, as 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins constitutes a footprint left by the reactions of nitric oxide-derived oxidants that are usually associated to oxidative stress conditions. Moreover, protein tyrosine nitration can cause structural and functional changes, which may be of pathophysiological relevance for human disease conditions. Biological protein tyrosine nitration is a free radical process involving the intermediacy of tyrosyl radicals; in spite of being a nonenzymatic process, nitration is selectively directed toward a limited subset of tyrosine residues. Precise identification and quantitation of 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins has represented a "tour de force" for researchers. Recent Advances: A small number of proteins are preferential targets of nitration (usually less than 100 proteins per proteome), contrasting with the large number of proteins modified by other post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and, notably, S-nitrosation. Proteomic approaches have revealed key features of tyrosine nitration both in vivo and in vitro, including selectivity, site specificity, and effects in protein structure and function. Identification of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins and mapping nitrated residues is challenging, due to low abundance of this oxidative modification in biological samples and its unfriendly beh