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Sample records for vivo preclinical studies

  1. ARFI ultrasound for in vivo hemostasis assessment postcardiac catheterization, part I: preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behler, Russell H; Scola, Mallory R; Nichols, Timothy C; Bellinger, Dwight A; Gallippi, Caterina M

    2009-07-01

    The world wide prevalence of cardiovascular disease leads to over seven million annual percutaneous coronary catheterization procedures, the majority of which exploit femoral artery access. Femoral puncture sites ('arteriotomies') can be associated with severe vessel complications after sheath removal if hemostasis is not properly achieved. Hemostasis onset is routinely determined by examination for bleeding at the skin puncture; however, clotting along the puncture path can obscure subcutaneous bleeding, and therefore hemostasis is blindly assessed. We hypothesize that hemostasis assessment can be un-blinded by Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) ultrasound. In this first of a two-part series, we present in vivo ARFI hemostasis imaging data obtained in relevant canine models of femoral artery puncture. Above arteriotomies, ARFI-induced displacements were large (3.5 to >5.0 microm) relative to surrounding soft tissue soon after needle removal, which was consistent with our expectation for pooled extravasated blood. ARFI-induced displacements above arteriotomies decreased in magnitude (to approximately 2 microm) some time after needle removal and suggested the onset of hemostasis. This preclinical investigation served as proof of concept and justification for a pilot human study, which is presented in part two of this series.

  2. The Natural Fungal Metabolite Beauvericin Exerts Anticancer Activity In Vivo: A Pre-Clinical Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilos, Daniela; Rodríguez-Carrasco, Yelko; Englinger, Bernhard; Timelthaler, Gerald; van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Sulyok, Michael; Boecker, Simon; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Heffeter, Petra; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita; Berger, Walter

    2017-08-24

    Recently, in vitro anti-cancer properties of beauvericin, a fungal metabolite were shown in various cancer cell lines. In this study, we assessed the specificity of this effect by comparing beauvericin cytotoxicity in malignant versus non-malignant cells. Moreover, we tested in vivo anticancer effects of beauvericin by treating BALB/c and CB-17/SCID mice bearing murine CT-26 or human KB-3-1-grafted tumors, respectively. Tumor size and weight were measured and histological sections were evaluated by Ki-67 and H/E staining as well as TdT-mediated-dUTP-nick-end (TUNEL) labeling. Beauvericin levels were determined in various tissues and body fluids by LC-MS/MS. In addition to a more pronounced activity against malignant cells, we detected decreased tumor volumes and weights in beauvericin-treated mice compared to controls in both the allo- and the xenograft model without any adverse effects. No significant differences were detected concerning percentages of proliferating and mitotic cells in tumor sections from treated and untreated mice. However, a significant increase of necrotic areas within whole tumor sections of beauvericin-treated mice was found in both models corresponding to an enhanced number of TUNEL-positive, i.e., apoptotic, cells. Furthermore, moderate beauvericin accumulation was detected in tumor tissues. In conclusion, we suggest beauvericin as a promising novel natural compound for anticancer therapy.

  3. Preclinical Study of Antineoplastic Sinoporphyrin Sodium-PDT via In Vitro and In Vivo Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui; Li, Chao; Jiang, Zhihuan; Li, Wanfang; Wang, Aiping; Wei, Jinfeng

    2017-01-11

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) investigations have seen stable increases and the development of new photosensitizers is a heated topic. Sinoporphyrin sodium is a new photosensitizer isolated from Photofrin. This article evaluated its anticancer effects by clonogenic assays, MTT assays and xenograft experiments in comparison to Photofrin. The clonogenicity inhibition rates of sinoporphyrin sodium-PDT towards four human cancer cell lines ranged from 85.5% to 94.2% at 0.5 μg/mL under 630 nm irradiation of 30 mW/cm² for 180 s. For MTT assays, the IC 50 ranges of Photofrin-PDT and sinoporphyrin sodium-PDT towards human cancer cells were 0.3 μg/mL to 5.5 μg/mL and 0.1 μg/mL to 0.8 μg/mL under the same irradiation conditions, respectively. The IC 50 values of Photofrin-PDT and sinoporphyrin sodium-PDT towards human skin cells, HaCaT, were 10 μg/mL and 1.0 μg/mL, respectively. Esophagus carcinoma and hepatoma xenograft models were established to evaluate the in vivo antineoplastic efficacy. A control group, Photofrin-PDT group (20 mg/kg) and sinoporphyrin sodium group at three doses, 0.5 mg/kg, 1 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg, were set. Mice were injected with photosensitizers 24 h before 60 J 630 nm laser irradiation. The tumor weight inhibition ratio of 2 mg/kg sinoporphyrin sodium-PDT reached approximately 90%. Besides, the tumor growths were significantly slowed down by 2 mg/kg sinoporphyrin sodium-PDT, which was equivalent to 20 mg/kg Photofrin-PDT. In sum, sinoporphyrin sodium-PDT showed great anticancer efficacy and with a smaller dose compared with Photofrin. Further investigations are warranted.

  4. The roles of epigallocatechin-3-gallate in the treatment of neuropathic pain: an update on preclinical in vivo studies and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimonte S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Bimonte,1,* Marco Cascella,1,* Vincenzo Schiavone,2 Farrokh Mehrabi-Kermani,3 Arturo Cuomo1 1Division of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Istituto Nazionale Tumori – IRCCS – “Fondazione G. Pascale”, Naples, Italy; 2Division of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Hospital “Pineta Grande”, Castel Volturno, Caserta, Italy; 3Division of Neurosurgery, Hospital “Pineta Grande”, Castel Volturno, Caserta, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Neuropathic pain (NP is a complex and chronic disease caused by lesions or defects of the somatosensory nervous system. The treatments normally used for managing NP usually lack efficacy. Several animal models of NP have been engineered in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying NP and to find alternative molecules to use as new therapeutic agents. Preclinical in vivo studies identified the epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, a main active component of green tea (Camellia sinensis, as a possible therapeutic molecule for NP treatment due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Interestingly, it has been shown that EGCG reduced bone cancer pain. The purpose of this article is to discuss the potential use of EGCG for control and treatment of NP, by reviewing the preclinical studies reported in the literature and by shedding light on the potential schemes based on EGCG’s application in clinical practices. Keywords: epigallocatechin-3-gallate, EGCG, natural compound, neuropathic pain, animal models of neuropathic pain, cancer bone pain

  5. Pre-clinical studies of toxin-specific Nanobodies: Evidence of in vivo efficacy to prevent fatal disturbances provoked by scorpion envenoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hmila, Issam [Laboratoire des Venins et Toxines, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, 13 Place Pasteur, BP-74, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Cosyns, Bernard [Laboratory of In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium); Tounsi, Hayfa [Service d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, 13 Place Pasteur, BP-74, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Roosens, Bram; Caveliers, Vicky [Laboratory of In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium); Abderrazek, Rahma Ben [Laboratoire des Venins et Toxines, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, 13 Place Pasteur, BP-74, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Boubaker, Samir [Service d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, 13 Place Pasteur, BP-74, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Muyldermans, Serge [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussel (Belgium); Department of Structural Biology, VIB, Brussels (Belgium); El Ayeb, Mohamed [Laboratoire des Venins et Toxines, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, 13 Place Pasteur, BP-74, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Bouhaouala-Zahar, Balkiss, E-mail: balkiss.bouhaouala@pasteur.rns.tn [Laboratoire des Venins et Toxines, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, 13 Place Pasteur, BP-74, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Faculté de Médecine de Tunis, Université de Tunis-El Manar (Tunisia); Lahoutte, Tony [Laboratory of In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Scorpions represent a significant threat to humans and animals in various countries throughout the world. Recently, we introduced Nanobodies (Nbs) to combat more efficiently scorpion envenoming and demonstrated the performance of NbAahIF12 and NbAahII10 to neutralize scorpion toxins of Androctonus australis hector venom. A bispecific Nb construct (NbF12-10) comprising these two Nbs is far more protective than the classic Fab′{sub 2} based therapy and is the most efficient antivenom therapy against scorpion sting in preclinical studies. Now we investigate the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of {sup 99m}Tc labeled Nbs by in vivo imaging in rodents and compared these data with those of the Fab′{sub 2} product (PAS). The pharmacodynamics of the Nbs was investigated in rats by in vivo echocardiography and it is shown that NbF12-10 prevents effectively the hemodynamic disturbances induced by a lethal dose of venom. Moreover, even a late injection of NbF12-10 restores the heart rate and brings the blood pressure to baseline values. Histology confirms that NbF12-10 prevents lung and heart lesions of treated mice after envenoming. In conjunction, in this preclinical study, we provide proof of concept that NbF12-10 prevents effectively the fatal disturbances induced by Androctonus venom, and that the Nanobody based therapeutic has a potential to substitute the classic Fab′{sub 2} based product as immunotherapeutic in scorpion envenoming. Further clinical study using larger cohorts of animals should be considered to confirm the full protecting potential of our NbF12-10. -- Highlights: ► Nanobody therapy prevents the hemodynamic disturbances induced by a lethal dose. ► Late injection of Nanobody restores hemodynamic parameters to baseline values. ► Nanobody therapy prevents lung and heart lesions of treated mice after envenoming. ► Labeled Nanobody and Fab’2 pharmacokinetics curves reach plateau in favour of Nanobody.

  6. Recommendations for Benchmarking Preclinical Studies of Nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidczyk, Charlene M; Russell, Luisa M; Searson, Peter C

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticle-based delivery systems provide new opportunities to overcome the limitations associated with traditional small-molecule drug therapy for cancer and to achieve both therapeutic and diagnostic functions in the same platform. Preclinical trials are generally designed to assess therapeutic potential and not to optimize the design of the delivery platform. Consequently, progress in developing design rules for cancer nanomedicines has been slow, hindering progress in the field. Despite the large number of preclinical trials, several factors restrict comparison and benchmarking of different platforms, including variability in experimental design, reporting of results, and the lack of quantitative data. To solve this problem, we review the variables involved in the design of preclinical trials and propose a protocol for benchmarking that we recommend be included in in vivo preclinical studies of drug-delivery platforms for cancer therapy. This strategy will contribute to building the scientific knowledge base that enables development of design rules and accelerates the translation of new technologies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. A new preclinical approach for treating chronic osteomyelitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus: in vitro and in vivo study on photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PAmT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, João Alves; de Carvalho, Fabíola Bastos; Trindade, Renan Ferreira; de Assis, Patrícia Nascimento; de Almeida, Paulo Fernando; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa

    2014-03-01

    Osteomyelitis is an acute or chronic inflammation in the marrow spaces in the superficial or cortical bone, and can be associated with bacterial or fungal infections. Chronic osteomyelitis represents a major health problem due to its difficult treatment and increased morbidity. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PAmT) is a treatment based on a cytotoxic photochemical reaction in which a bright light produced by a laser system and an active photosensitizer absorbed by cells leads to a process of activation that induces a series of metabolic reactions that culminates a bacterial killing. The aim of the present randomized study was to evaluate, by in vitro and in vivo microbiological analysis, the effects of PAmT on tibial surgical bone defects in rats infected by Staphylococcus aureus using bacterial counts carried out immediately and after 30 days after treatment as outcome measure. In the preliminary in vitro study, a diode laser (λ660 nm; 40 mW; ϕ = 0.4 cm(2); 5 or 10 J/cm(2)) and 5, 10, and 15 μg/mL toluidine blue were tested, and the best parameter was chosen for the in vivo study. The concentration of 5 μg/mL was selected to perform the decontamination of S. aureus-infected tibial bone defects in rats. The findings were subjected to statistical analysis. For all PAmTs groups, with the different concentrations, treatment showed significant reductions (p < 0.001) in the amount of bacteria. The in vivo study PAmT group presented a bacterial reduction of 97.4% (p < 0.001). The PAmT using toluidine blue was effective in reducing the number of S. aureus in both in vitro and in vivo studies.

  8. Preclinical Multimodal Molecular Imaging Using 18 F-FDG PET/CT and MRI in a Phase I Study of a Knee Osteoarthritis in In Vivo Canine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Menendez, Maria I.; Hettlich, Bianca Felicitas; Wei, Lai; Knopp, Michael V.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use a multimodal molecular imaging approach to serially assess regional metabolic changes in the knee in an in vivo anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) canine model of osteoarthritis (OA). Five canine underwent ACLT in one knee and the contralateral knee served as uninjured control. Prior, 3, 6, and 12 weeks post-ACLT, the dogs underwent 18F-fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imag...

  9. Preclinical Multimodal Molecular Imaging Using 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI in a Phase I Study of a Knee Osteoarthritis in In Vivo Canine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I. Menendez DVM, PhD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to use a multimodal molecular imaging approach to serially assess regional metabolic changes in the knee in an in vivo anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT canine model of osteoarthritis (OA. Five canine underwent ACLT in one knee and the contralateral knee served as uninjured control. Prior, 3, 6, and 12 weeks post-ACLT, the dogs underwent 18F-fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The MRI was coregistered with the PET/CT, and 3-dimensional regions of interest (ROIs were traced manually and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax were evaluated. 18F-fluoro-d-glucose SUVmax in the ACLT knee ROIs was significantly higher compared to the uninjured contralateral knees at 3, 6, and 12 weeks. Higher 18F-FDG uptake observed in ACLT knees compared to the uninjured knees reflects greater metabolic changes in the injured knees over time. Knee 18F-FDG uptake in an in vivo ACLT canine model using combined PET/CT and MRI demonstrated to be highly sensitive in the detection of metabolic alterations in osseous and nonosteochondral structures comprising the knee joint. 18F-fluoro-d-glucose appeared to be a capable potential imaging biomarker for early human knee OA diagnosis, prognosis, and management.

  10. Preclinical Multimodal Molecular Imaging Using18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI in a Phase I Study of a Knee Osteoarthritis in In Vivo Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Maria I; Hettlich, Bianca; Wei, Lai; Knopp, Michael V

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use a multimodal molecular imaging approach to serially assess regional metabolic changes in the knee in an in vivo anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) canine model of osteoarthritis (OA). Five canine underwent ACLT in one knee and the contralateral knee served as uninjured control. Prior, 3, 6, and 12 weeks post-ACLT, the dogs underwent 18 F-fluoro-d-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI was coregistered with the PET/CT, and 3-dimensional regions of interest (ROIs) were traced manually and maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) were evaluated. 18 F-fluoro-d-glucose SUV max in the ACLT knee ROIs was significantly higher compared to the uninjured contralateral knees at 3, 6, and 12 weeks. Higher 18 F-FDG uptake observed in ACLT knees compared to the uninjured knees reflects greater metabolic changes in the injured knees over time. Knee 18 F-FDG uptake in an in vivo ACLT canine model using combined PET/CT and MRI demonstrated to be highly sensitive in the detection of metabolic alterations in osseous and nonosteochondral structures comprising the knee joint. 18 F-fluoro-d-glucose appeared to be a capable potential imaging biomarker for early human knee OA diagnosis, prognosis, and management.

  11. Multimodality imaging in vivo for preclinical assessment of tumor-targeted doxorubicin nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Youn Hwang

    Full Text Available This study presents a new multimodal imaging approach that includes high-frequency ultrasound, fluorescence intensity, confocal, and spectral imaging to improve the preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics in vivo. Here we use this approach to assess in vivo the therapeutic efficacy of the novel chemotherapy construct, HerDox during and after treatment. HerDox is comprised of doxorubicin non-covalently assembled in a viral-like particle targeted to HER2+ tumor cells, causing tumor cell death at over 10-fold lower dose compared to the untargeted drug, while sparing the heart. Whereas our initial proof-of-principle studies on HerDox used tumor growth/shrinkage rates as a measure of therapeutic efficacy, here we show that multimodal imaging deployed during and after treatment can supplement traditional modes of tumor monitoring to further characterize the particle in tissues of treated mice. Specifically, we show here that tumor cell apoptosis elicited by HerDox can be monitored in vivo during treatment using high frequency ultrasound imaging, while in situ confocal imaging of excised tumors shows that HerDox indeed penetrated tumor tissue and can be detected at the subcellular level, including in the nucleus, via Dox fluorescence. In addition, ratiometric spectral imaging of the same tumor tissue enables quantitative discrimination of HerDox fluorescence from autofluorescence in situ. In contrast to standard approaches of preclinical assessment, this new method provides multiple/complementary information that may shorten the time required for initial evaluation of in vivo efficacy, thus potentially reducing the time and cost for translating new drug molecules into the clinic.

  12. Multimodality imaging in vivo for preclinical assessment of tumor-targeted doxorubicin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Park, Jinhyoung; Kang, Bong Jin; Lubow, David J; Chu, David; Farkas, Daniel L; Shung, K Kirk; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a new multimodal imaging approach that includes high-frequency ultrasound, fluorescence intensity, confocal, and spectral imaging to improve the preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics in vivo. Here we use this approach to assess in vivo the therapeutic efficacy of the novel chemotherapy construct, HerDox during and after treatment. HerDox is comprised of doxorubicin non-covalently assembled in a viral-like particle targeted to HER2+ tumor cells, causing tumor cell death at over 10-fold lower dose compared to the untargeted drug, while sparing the heart. Whereas our initial proof-of-principle studies on HerDox used tumor growth/shrinkage rates as a measure of therapeutic efficacy, here we show that multimodal imaging deployed during and after treatment can supplement traditional modes of tumor monitoring to further characterize the particle in tissues of treated mice. Specifically, we show here that tumor cell apoptosis elicited by HerDox can be monitored in vivo during treatment using high frequency ultrasound imaging, while in situ confocal imaging of excised tumors shows that HerDox indeed penetrated tumor tissue and can be detected at the subcellular level, including in the nucleus, via Dox fluorescence. In addition, ratiometric spectral imaging of the same tumor tissue enables quantitative discrimination of HerDox fluorescence from autofluorescence in situ. In contrast to standard approaches of preclinical assessment, this new method provides multiple/complementary information that may shorten the time required for initial evaluation of in vivo efficacy, thus potentially reducing the time and cost for translating new drug molecules into the clinic.

  13. Preclinical studies of low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is a major cause of disability and health care costs. Current treatments are inadequate for many patients. A number of preclinical models have been developed that attempt to mimic aspects of clinical conditions that contribute to low back pain. These involve application of nucleus pulposus material near the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG), chronic compression of the DRG, or localized inflammation of the DRG. These models, which are primarily implemented in rats, have many common features including behavioral hypersensitivity of the hindpaw, enhanced excitability and spontaneous activity of sensory neurons, and locally elevated levels of inflammatory mediators including cytokines. Clinically, epidural injection of steroids (glucocorticoids) is commonly used when more conservative treatments fail, but clinical trials evaluating these treatments have yielded mixed results. There are relatively few preclinical studies of steroid effects in low back pain models. One preclinical study suggests that the mineralocorticoid receptor, also present in the DRG, may have pro-inflammatory effects that oppose the activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Although the glucocorticoid receptor is the target of anti-inflammatory steroids, many clinically used steroids activate both receptors. This could be one explanation for the limited effects of epidural steroids in some patients. Additional preclinical research is needed to address other possible reasons for limited efficacy of steroids, such as central sensitization or presence of an ongoing inflammatory stimulus in some forms of low back pain. PMID:23537369

  14. Gas transport during in vitro and in vivo preclinical testing of inert gas therapies

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    Ira Katz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New gas therapies using inert gases such as xenon and argon are being studied, which require in vitro and in vivo preclinical experiments. Examples of the kinetics of gas transport during such experiments are analyzed in this paper. Using analytical and numerical models, we analyze an in vitro experiment for gas transport to a 96 cell well plate and an in vivo delivery to a small animal chamber, where the key processes considered are the wash-in of test gas into an apparatus dead volume, the diffusion of test gas through the liquid media in a well of a cell test plate, and the pharmacokinetics in a rat. In the case of small animals in a chamber, the key variable controlling the kinetics is the chamber wash-in time constant that is a function of the chamber volume and the gas flow rate. For cells covered by a liquid media the diffusion of gas through the liquid media is the dominant mechanism, such that liquid depth and the gas diffusion constant are the key parameters. The key message from these analyses is that the transport of gas during preclinical experiments can be important in determining the true dose as experienced at the site of action in an animal or to a cell.

  15. Perspective: Recommendations for benchmarking pre-clinical studies of nanomedicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidczyk, Charlene M.; Russell, Luisa M.; Searson, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based delivery systems provide new opportunities to overcome the limitations associated with traditional small molecule drug therapy for cancer, and to achieve both therapeutic and diagnostic functions in the same platform. Pre-clinical trials are generally designed to assess therapeutic potential and not to optimize the design of the delivery platform. Consequently, progress in developing design rules for cancer nanomedicines has been slow, hindering progress in the field. Despite the large number of pre-clinical trials, several factors restrict comparison and benchmarking of different platforms, including variability in experimental design, reporting of results, and the lack of quantitative data. To solve this problem, we review the variables involved in the design of pre-clinical trials and propose a protocol for benchmarking that we recommend be included in in vivo pre-clinical studies of drug delivery platforms for cancer therapy. This strategy will contribute to building the scientific knowledge base that enables development of design rules and accelerates the translation of new technologies. PMID:26249177

  16. Preclinical Studies for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtig, Mark B.; Buschmann, Michael D.; Fortier, Lisa A.; Hoemann, Caroline D.; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Sah, Robert L.; Whiteside, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Investigational devices for articular cartilage repair or replacement are considered to be significant risk devices by regulatory bodies. Therefore animal models are needed to provide proof of efficacy and safety prior to clinical testing. The financial commitment and regulatory steps needed to bring a new technology to clinical use can be major obstacles, so the implementation of highly predictive animal models is a pressing issue. Until recently, a reductionist approach using acute chondral defects in immature laboratory species, particularly the rabbit, was considered adequate; however, if successful and timely translation from animal models to regulatory approval and clinical use is the goal, a step-wise development using laboratory animals for screening and early development work followed by larger species such as the goat, sheep and horse for late development and pivotal studies is recommended. Such animals must have fully organized and mature cartilage. Both acute and chronic chondral defects can be used but the later are more like the lesions found in patients and may be more predictive. Quantitative and qualitative outcome measures such as macroscopic appearance, histology, biochemistry, functional imaging, and biomechanical testing of cartilage, provide reliable data to support investment decisions and subsequent applications to regulatory bodies for clinical trials. No one model or species can be considered ideal for pivotal studies, but the larger animal species are recommended for pivotal studies. Larger species such as the horse, goat and pig also allow arthroscopic delivery, and press-fit or sutured implant fixation in thick cartilage as well as second look arthroscopies and biopsy procedures. PMID:26069576

  17. In vivo stabilization of a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist enhances pet imaging and radionuclide therapy of prostate cancer in preclinical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Chatalic, Kristell; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Gent, Dik; Nock, Berthold; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    textabstractA single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP)...

  18. Mitotically inactivated embryonic stem cells can be used as an in vivo feeder layer to nurse damaged myocardium after acute myocardial infarction: a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Richard K; Chen, You-hong; Verda, Larissa; Lucena, Carolina; Navale, Shankararao; Johnson, Jesse; Han, Xiaoqiang; Lomasney, Jon; Baker, Jessa M; Ngai, Ka-Leung; Kino, Aya; Carr, James; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero

    2012-10-26

    Various types of viable stem cells have been reported to result in modest improvement in cardiac function after acute myocardial infarction. The mechanisms for improvement from different stem cell populations remain unknown. To determine whether irradiated (nonviable) embryonic stem cells (iESCs) improve postischemic cardiac function without adverse consequences. After coronary artery ligation-induced cardiac infarction, either conditioned media or male murine or male human iESCs were injected into the penumbra of ischemic myocardial tissue of female mice or female rhesus macaque monkeys, respectively. Murine and human iESCs, despite irradiation doses that prevented proliferation and induced cell death, significantly improved cardiac function and decreased infarct size compared with untreated or media-treated controls. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of the Y chromosome revealed disappearance of iESCs within the myocardium, whereas 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine assays revealed de novo in vivo cardiomyocyte DNA synthesis. Microarray gene expression profiling demonstrated an early increase in metabolism, DNA proliferation, and chromatin remodeling pathways, and a decrease in fibrosis and inflammatory gene expression compared with media-treated controls. As a result of irradiation before injection, ex vivo and in vivo iESC existence is transient, yet iESCs provide a significant improvement in cardiac function after acute myocardial infarction. The mechanism(s) of action of iESCs seems to be related to cell-cell exchange, paracrine factors, and a scaffolding effect between iESCs and neighboring host cardiomyocytes.

  19. Glucosylceramide and Glucosylsphingosine Quantitation by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry to Enable In Vivo Preclinical Studies of Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease.

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    Hamler, Rick; Brignol, Nastry; Clark, Sean W; Morrison, Sean; Dungan, Leo B; Chang, Hui H; Khanna, Richie; Frascella, Michelle; Valenzano, Kenneth J; Benjamin, Elfrida R; Boyd, Robert E

    2017-08-15

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene that encodes the lysosomal enzyme acid β-glucosidase (GCase). Reduced GCase activity primarily leads to the accumulation of two substrates, glucosylceramide (GlcCer) and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph). Current treatment options have not been shown to ameliorate the neurological pathology observed in the most severe forms of GD, clearly representing an unmet medical need. To better understand the relationship between GlcCer and GlcSph accumulation and ultimately their connection with the progression of neurological pathology, we developed LC-MS/MS methods to quantify GlcCer and GlcSph in mouse brain tissue. A significant challenge in developing these methods was the chromatographic separation of GlcCer and GlcSph from the far more abundant isobaric galactosyl epimers naturally occurring in white matter. After validation of both methods, we evaluated the levels of both substrates in five different GD mouse models, and found significant elevation of brain GlcSph in all five, while GlcCer was elevated in only one of the five models. In addition, we measured GlcCer and GlcSph levels in the brains of wild-type mice after administration of the GCase inhibitor conduritol β-epoxide (CBE), as well as the nonlysosomal β-glucosidase (GBA2) inhibitor N-butyldeoxygalactonojirimycin (NB-DGJ). Inhibition of GCase by CBE resulted in elevation of both sphingolipids; however, inhibition of GBA2 by NB-DGJ resulted in elevation of GlcCer only. Taken together, these data support the idea that GlcSph is a more selective and sensitive biomarker than GlcCer for neuronopathic GD in preclinical models.

  20. Fluorescent Nanoprobes Dedicated to in Vivo Imaging: From Preclinical Validations to Clinical Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Texier

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With the fast development, in the last ten years, of a large choice of set-ups dedicated to routine in vivo measurements in rodents, fluorescence imaging techniques are becoming essential tools in preclinical studies. Human clinical uses for diagnostic and image-guided surgery are also emerging. In comparison to low-molecular weight organic dyes, the use of fluorescent nanoprobes can improve both the signal sensitivity (better in vivo optical properties and the fluorescence biodistribution (passive “nano” uptake in tumours for instance. A wide range of fluorescent nanoprobes have been designed and tested in preclinical studies for the last few years. They will be reviewed and discussed considering the obstacles that need to be overcome for their potential everyday use in clinics. The conjugation of fluorescence imaging with the benefits of nanotechnology should open the way to new medical applications in the near future.

  1. Glass-Fiber-based MR-safe Guidewire for MR Imaging-guided Endovascular Interventions: In Vitro and Preclinical in Vivo Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massmann, Alexander; Buecker, Arno; Schneider, Guenther K

    2017-08-01

    Purpose To evaluate glass-fiber-based guidewires that are safe for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided endovascular interventions by using a phantom and an in vivo swine model. Materials and Methods MR imaging-safe guidewires were made from micropultruded glass and/or aramid fibers and epoxy resin with diameters of 0.89 mm (0.035 inch) for standard and stiff guidewires and 0.36 mm (0.014 inch) for micro guidewires. MR imaging visibility and mechanical properties were assessed in a pulsatile flow model. After approval was obtained from the institutional animal care and use committee, MR imaging guidewires were evaluated for standard endovascular procedures in nine pigs. Real-time steady-state free-precession sequences were used for MR imaging-guided catheterization, balloon dilation, and stent implantation into aorto-iliac/visceral arteries and the vena cava (temporal resolution, five images per second; and spatial resolution, 150-mm field of view, and 128 × 128 matrix) with a 1.5-T clinical imager. Visualization with the guidewires was rated on a four-point scale, handling was rated on a three-point scale, and catheterization times for different vessel regions were determined by two interventional radiologists. Afterward, handling ratings and catheterization times were obtained for standard nitinol guidewires during x-ray-based fluoroscopy. Cannulation times, signal intensity in each vessel region, and visualization and handling ratings were measured for the MR imaging guidewires. Bland-Altman analysis was performed for inter- and intraobserver variability of cannulation time. Spearman rank correlation was used to compare handling of MR imaging guidewires and standard nitinol guidewires. Results MR imaging guidewires were characterized by good to excellent visibility, with a continuous artifact of 2 mm in diameter and 4 × 8-mm ball-shaped tip marker. Stiffness, flexibility, and guidance reflected comparable times for all in vitro and in vivo procedures with

  2. In Vivo Stabilization of a Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist Enhances PET Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy of Prostate Cancer in Preclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatalic, Kristell L S; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; de Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; van Gent, Dik C; Nock, Berthold A; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske M; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    A single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Here we show for the first time that co-injection of a NEP inhibitor (phosphoramidon (PA)) can lead to an impressive enhancement of diagnostic sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of the theranostic (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168 GRPR-antagonist. Co-injection of PA (300 µg) led to stabilization of (177)Lu-JMV4168 in murine peripheral blood. In PC-3 tumor-bearing mice, PA co-injection led to a two-fold increase in tumor uptake of (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168, 1 h after injection. In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (68)Ga-JMV4168, PA co-injection substantially enhanced PC-3 tumor signal intensity. Radionuclide therapy with (177)Lu-JMV4168 resulted in significant regression of PC-3 tumor size. Radionuclide therapy efficacy was confirmed by production of DNA double strand breaks, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Increased survival rates were observed in mice treated with (177)Lu-JMV4168 plus PA as compared to those without PA. This data shows that co-injection of the enzyme inhibitor PA greatly enhances the theranostic potential of GRPR-radioantagonists for future application in PCa patients.

  3. In vivo evaluation of biofunctionalized implant surfaces with a synthetic peptide (P-15) and its impact on osseointegration. A preclinical animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christian M; Koepple, Markus; Moest, Tobias; Neumann, Konrad; Weisel, Tamara; Schlegel, Karl Andreas

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of the study was to investigate a biofunctionalized implant surface with electrochemically deposition of hydroxyapatite and the synthetic peptide (P-15) and its effect on osseointegration. Three modified implant types of ANKYLOS ® C/X implants were used; (1) machined implants used as negative control (M, n = 20), (2) implants with the FRIADENT ® plus surface (grit blasted and acid-etched) used as positive control (P, n = 20), and (3) implants with a biomimetic surface consisting of hydroxyapatite and the synthetic 15 aminoacids containing peptide P-15 (BP, n = 40). The implants were randomly inserted in the mandibles of 10 beagle dogs following 4 months after tooth extraction (P1-P4). Three animals were sacrificed 2 and 7 days after implant insertion, respectively, and four animals were sacrificed 6 months post implant insertion. Bone-to-implant contacts (BICs) were analyzed via histomorphometrical analyses at five different region of interests (ROIs); two at the middle part on either side of the implant (ROI 1/4), two at the apical part of the implant at each side (ROI 2/3), and one at the tip of the implant (ROI 5). All implant surfaces showed a high level of osseointegration and osteoconductivity. The cumulative implant survival rate (CSR) was 93.8%, 100% in the M, 85% in the P, and 95% in the BP group. No statistical difference in BICs at ROI 1/4, 2/3, and 5 could be shown between implant types following 2 and 7 days of healing. BIC values increased in all groups over time. After 6 months of healing the BP group showed superiority in BIC in ROI 2/3 (73.2 ± 15.6%) compared to the P (48.3 ± 10.6%) and M group (66.3 ± 30.2%) with a significant difference between BP and P (P = 0.002). It is hypothesized, that the surface biofunctionalization improves peri-implant bone formation and remodeling, leading to an increased bone-to implant contact. However, within the limitations of the study set-up no benefit in the early phase of

  4. Preclinical Bioassay of a Polypropylene Mesh for Hernia Repair Pretreated with Antibacterial Solutions of Chlorhexidine and Allicin: An In Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Köhler, Bárbara; García-Moreno, Francisca; Brune, Thierry; Pascual, Gemma; Bellón, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic mesh infection constitutes one of the major complications following hernia repair. Antimicrobial, non-antibiotic biomaterials have the potential to reduce bacterial adhesion to the mesh surface and adjacent tissues while avoiding the development of novel antibiotic resistance. This study assesses the efficacy of presoaking reticular polypropylene meshes in chlorhexidine or a chlorhexidine and allicin combination (a natural antibacterial agent) for preventing bacterial infection in a short-time hernia-repair rabbit model. Partial hernia defects (5 x 2 cm) were created on the lateral right side of the abdominal wall of New Zealand White rabbits (n = 21). The defects were inoculated with 0.5 mL of a 106 CFU/mL Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 strain and repaired with a DualMesh Plus antimicrobial mesh or a Surgipro mesh presoaked in either chlorhexidine (0.05%) or allicin-chlorhexidine (900 μg/mL-0.05%). Fourteen days post-implant, mesh contraction was measured and tissue specimens were harvested to evaluate bacterial adhesion to the implant surface (via sonication, S. aureus immunolabeling), host-tissue incorporation (via staining, scanning electron microscopy) and macrophage response (via RAM-11 immunolabeling). The polypropylene mesh showed improved tissue integration relative to the DualMesh Plus. Both the DualMesh Plus and the chlorhexidine-soaked polypropylene meshes exhibited high bacterial clearance, with the latter material showing lower bacterial yields. The implants from the allicin-chlorhexidine group displayed a neoformed tissue containing differently sized abscesses and living bacteria, as well as a diminished macrophage response. The allicin-chlorhexidine coated implants exhibited the highest contraction. The presoaking of reticular polypropylene materials with a low concentration of chlorhexidine provides the mesh with antibacterial activity without disrupting tissue integration. Due to the similarities found with the antimicrobial Dual

  5. Preclinical Bioassay of a Polypropylene Mesh for Hernia Repair Pretreated with Antibacterial Solutions of Chlorhexidine and Allicin: An In Vivo Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Pérez-Köhler

    Full Text Available Prosthetic mesh infection constitutes one of the major complications following hernia repair. Antimicrobial, non-antibiotic biomaterials have the potential to reduce bacterial adhesion to the mesh surface and adjacent tissues while avoiding the development of novel antibiotic resistance. This study assesses the efficacy of presoaking reticular polypropylene meshes in chlorhexidine or a chlorhexidine and allicin combination (a natural antibacterial agent for preventing bacterial infection in a short-time hernia-repair rabbit model.Partial hernia defects (5 x 2 cm were created on the lateral right side of the abdominal wall of New Zealand White rabbits (n = 21. The defects were inoculated with 0.5 mL of a 106 CFU/mL Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 strain and repaired with a DualMesh Plus antimicrobial mesh or a Surgipro mesh presoaked in either chlorhexidine (0.05% or allicin-chlorhexidine (900 μg/mL-0.05%. Fourteen days post-implant, mesh contraction was measured and tissue specimens were harvested to evaluate bacterial adhesion to the implant surface (via sonication, S. aureus immunolabeling, host-tissue incorporation (via staining, scanning electron microscopy and macrophage response (via RAM-11 immunolabeling.The polypropylene mesh showed improved tissue integration relative to the DualMesh Plus. Both the DualMesh Plus and the chlorhexidine-soaked polypropylene meshes exhibited high bacterial clearance, with the latter material showing lower bacterial yields. The implants from the allicin-chlorhexidine group displayed a neoformed tissue containing differently sized abscesses and living bacteria, as well as a diminished macrophage response. The allicin-chlorhexidine coated implants exhibited the highest contraction.The presoaking of reticular polypropylene materials with a low concentration of chlorhexidine provides the mesh with antibacterial activity without disrupting tissue integration. Due to the similarities found with the antimicrobial

  6. Oncolysis by paramyxoviruses: preclinical and clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Matveeva

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies demonstrate that a broad spectrum of human malignant cells can be killed by oncolytic paramyxoviruses, which include cells of ecto-, endo-, and mesodermal origin. In clinical trials, significant reduction in size or even complete elimination of primary tumors and established metastases are reported. Different routes of viral administration (intratumoral, intravenous, intradermal, intraperitoneal, or intrapleural, and single- versus multiple-dose administration schemes have been explored. The reported side effects are grade 1 and 2, with the most common among them being mild fever. Some advantages in using paramyxoviruses as oncolytic agents versus representatives of other viral families exist. The cytoplasmic replication results in a lack of host genome integration and recombination, which makes paramyxoviruses safer and more attractive candidates for widely used therapeutic oncolysis in comparison with retroviruses or some DNA viruses. The list of oncolytic paramyxovirus representatives includes attenuated measles virus (MV, mumps virus (MuV, low pathogenic Newcastle disease (NDV, and Sendai (SeV viruses. Metastatic cancer cells frequently overexpress on their surface some molecules that can serve as receptors for MV, MuV, NDV, and SeV. This promotes specific viral attachment to the malignant cell, which is frequently followed by specific viral replication. The paramyxoviruses are capable of inducing efficient syncytium-mediated lyses of cancer cells and elicit strong immunomodulatory effects that dramatically enforce anticancer immune surveillance. In general, preclinical studies and phase 1–3 clinical trials yield very encouraging results and warrant continued research of oncolytic paramyxoviruses as a particularly valuable addition to the existing panel of cancer-fighting approaches.

  7. In vivo preclinical photoacoustic imaging of tumor vasculature development and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Jan; Johnson, Peter; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Pedley, Barbara; Beard, Paul

    2012-05-01

    The use of a novel all-optical photoacoustic scanner for imaging the development of tumor vasculature and its response to a therapeutic vascular disrupting agent is described. The scanner employs a Fabry-Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor for mapping the photoacoustic waves and an image reconstruction algorithm based upon attenuation-compensated acoustic time reversal. The system was used to noninvasively image human colorectal tumor xenografts implanted subcutaneously in mice. Label-free three-dimensional in vivo images of whole tumors to depths of almost 10 mm with sub-100-micron spatial resolution were acquired in a longitudinal manner. This enabled the development of tumor-related vascular features, such as vessel tortuosity, feeding vessel recruitment, and necrosis to be visualized over time. The system was also used to study the temporal evolution of the response of the tumor vasculature following the administration of a therapeutic vascular disrupting agent (OXi4503). This revealed the well-known destruction and recovery phases associated with this agent. These studies illustrate the broader potential of this technology as an imaging tool for the preclinical and clinical study of tumors and other pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  8. Preclinical studies of alcohol binge drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabbe, John C.; Harris, R. Adron; Koob, George F.

    2011-01-01

    Binge drinking is prevalent and has serious biomedical consequences. In children, adolescents, and young adults, it is a prominent risk factor for later development of alcohol-use disorders. Many preclinical models have been employed to study the genetic risks for and biomedical consequences of alcohol drinking. However, these models historically did not result in blood-alcohol concentrations (BACs) exceding 80 mg%; this relatively modest level is the threshold that currently defines a binge session, according to the NIAAA and CDC. Nevertheless, in alcohol-dependent rodents, binge drinking has been well documented. Key neurobiological substrates localized to brain reward and stress systems have been identified. Studies of newer models of binge drinking without dependence are reviewed here. In these models, rodents, non-human primates, and flies will drink enough to reach high BACs. They often display observable signs of intoxication. The neurobiological consequences of these episodes of binge drinking without dependence are reviewed, preliminary evidence for roles for GABA, glutamate, opioid peptides, and corticotropin releasing factor are discussed, as is the need for more work to identify the antecedents and consequences of binge drinking in both animal models and humans. PMID:21272009

  9. In vivo preclinical verification of a multimodal diffuse reflectance and correlation spectroscopy system for sensing tissue perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakela, Julia M.; Lee, Seung Yup; Hedrick, Taylor L.; Vishwanath, Karthik; Helton, Michael C.; Chung, Yooree G.; Kolodziejski, Noah J.; Staples, Christopher J.; McAdams, Daniel R.; Fernandez, Daniel E.; Christian, James F.; O'Reilly, Jameson; Farkas, Dana; Ward, Brent B.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2017-02-01

    In reconstructive surgery, impeded blood flow in microvascular free flaps due to a compromise in arterial or venous patency secondary to blood clots or vessel spasms can rapidly result in flap failures. Thus, the ability to detect changes in microvascular free flaps is critical. In this paper, we report progress on in vivo pre-clinical testing of a compact, multimodal, fiber-based diffuse correlation and reflectance spectroscopy system designed to quantitatively monitor tissue perfusion in a porcine model's surgically-grafted free flap. We also describe the device's sensitivity to incremental blood flow changes and discuss the prospects for continuous perfusion monitoring in future clinical translational studies.

  10. In vivo preclinical evaluation of the accuracy of toroidal-shaped HIFU treatments using a tumor-mimic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N' Djin, W A; Melodelima, D; Parmentier, H; Chapelon, J Y [Inserm, U556, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Rivoire, M [Institute of Experimental Surgery-Centre Leon Berard, Lyon, F-69008 (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003 (France)], E-mail: apoutou.ndjin@inserm.fr

    2010-04-21

    The pig is an ideal animal model for preclinical evaluation of HIFU treatments, especially in the liver. However, there is no liver tumor model available for pigs. In this work, we propose to study an in vivo tumor-mimic model as a tool for evaluating if a sonographycally guided HIFU treatment, delivered by a toroidal-shaped device dedicated for the treatment of liver metastases, is correctly located in the liver. One centimeter tumor-mimics were created in liver tissues. These tumor-mimics were detectable on ultrasound imaging and on gross pathology. Two studies were carried out. First, an in vivo study of tolerance at mid-term (30 days, 10 pigs) revealed that tumor-mimics are suitable for studying HIFU treatments at a preclinical stage, since local and biological tolerances were excellent. The dimensions of the tumor-mimics were reproducible (diameter at day 0: 9.7 {+-} 2.0 mm) and were the same as a function of time (p = 0.64). A second in vivo study was carried out in ten pigs. Tumor mimics were used as targets in liver tissues in order to determine if the HIFU treatment is correctly located in the liver. A procedure of extensive HIFU ablation using multiple HIFU lesions juxtaposed manually was then tested on eight tumor-mimics. In 88% of the cases (seven out of eight), tumor-mimics were treated with negative margins ({>=}1 mm) in all directions. On average, negative margins measured 10.0 {+-} 6.7 mm. These tumor-mimics constitute an excellent reference for studying in vivo the accuracy of HIFU therapy in the liver.

  11. A multimode optical imaging system for preclinical applications in vivo: technology development, multiscale imaging, and chemotherapy assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Ljubimova, Julia; Gross, Zeev; Gray, Harry B; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K; Farkas, Daniel L

    2012-08-01

    Several established optical imaging approaches have been applied, usually in isolation, to preclinical studies; however, truly useful in vivo imaging may require a simultaneous combination of imaging modalities to examine dynamic characteristics of cells and tissues. We developed a new multimode optical imaging system designed to be application-versatile, yielding high sensitivity, and specificity molecular imaging. We integrated several optical imaging technologies, including fluorescence intensity, spectral, lifetime, intravital confocal, two-photon excitation, and bioluminescence, into a single system that enables functional multiscale imaging in animal models. The approach offers a comprehensive imaging platform for kinetic, quantitative, and environmental analysis of highly relevant information, with micro-to-macroscopic resolution. Applied to small animals in vivo, this provides superior monitoring of processes of interest, represented here by chemo-/nanoconstruct therapy assessment. This new system is versatile and can be optimized for various applications, of which cancer detection and targeted treatment are emphasized here.

  12. Preliminary study for small animal preclinical hadrontherapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, G. [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, IBFM CNR-LATO, Cefalú (Italy); Pisciotta, P., E-mail: pietro.pisciotta@ibfm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, IBFM CNR-LATO, Cefalú (Italy); National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Romano, F. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Cammarata, F.; Marchese, V.; Forte, G.I.; Lamia, D.; Minafra, L.; Bravatá, V. [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, IBFM CNR-LATO, Cefalú (Italy); Acquaviva, R. [University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Gilardi, M.C. [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, IBFM CNR-LATO, Cefalú (Italy); Cuttone, G. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy)

    2017-02-21

    gamma index test. This work represents the first step towards the realization of a preclinical hadrontherapy facility at INFN-LNS in Catania for the future in vivo studies.

  13. Preliminary study for small animal preclinical hadrontherapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Romano, F.; Cammarata, F.; Marchese, V.; Forte, G. I.; Lamia, D.; Minafra, L.; Bravatá, V.; Acquaviva, R.; Gilardi, M. C.; Cuttone, G.

    2017-02-01

    gamma index test. This work represents the first step towards the realization of a preclinical hadrontherapy facility at INFN-LNS in Catania for the future in vivo studies.

  14. Preclinical In vivo Imaging for Fat Tissue Identification, Quantification, and Functional Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzola, Pasquina; Boschi, Federico; Moneta, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Zancanaro, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Localization, differentiation, and quantitative assessment of fat tissues have always collected the interest of researchers. Nowadays, these topics are even more relevant as obesity (the excess of fat tissue) is considered a real pathology requiring in some cases pharmacological and surgical approaches. Several weight loss medications, acting either on the metabolism or on the central nervous system, are currently under preclinical or clinical investigation. Animal models of obesity have been developed and are widely used in pharmaceutical research. The assessment of candidate drugs in animal models requires non-invasive methods for longitudinal assessment of efficacy, the main outcome being the amount of body fat. Fat tissues can be either quantified in the entire animal or localized and measured in selected organs/regions of the body. Fat tissues are characterized by peculiar contrast in several imaging modalities as for example Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) that can distinguish between fat and water protons thank to their different magnetic resonance properties. Since fat tissues have higher carbon/hydrogen content than other soft tissues and bones, they can be easily assessed by Computed Tomography (CT) as well. Interestingly, MRI also discriminates between white and brown adipose tissue (BAT); the latter has long been regarded as a potential target for anti-obesity drugs because of its ability to enhance energy consumption through increased thermogenesis. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) performed with 18F-FDG as glucose analog radiotracer reflects well the metabolic rate in body tissues and consequently is the technique of choice for studies of BAT metabolism. This review will focus on the main, non-invasive imaging techniques (MRI, CT, and PET) that are fundamental for the assessment, quantification and functional characterization of fat deposits in small laboratory animals. The contribution of optical techniques, which are currently regarded with

  15. Preclinical in vivo imaging for fat tissue identification, quantification and functional characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquina Marzola

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Localization, differentiation and quantitative assessment of fat tissues have always collected the interest of researchers. Nowadays, these topics are even more relevant as obesity (the excess of fat tissue is considered a real pathology requiring in some cases pharmacological and surgical approaches. Several weight loss medications, acting either on the metabolism or on the central nervous system, are currently under preclinical or clinical investigation. Animal models of obesity have been developed which are widely used in pharmaceutical research. The assessment of candidate drugs in animal models requires non-invasive methods for longitudinal assessment of efficacy, the main outcome being the amount of body fat. Fat tissues can be either quantified in the entire animal or localized and measured in selected organs/regions of the body. Fat tissues are characterized by peculiar contrast in several imaging modalities as for example Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI that can distinguish between fat and water protons thank to their different magnetic resonance properties. Since fat tissues have higher carbon/hydrogen content than other soft tissues and bones, they can be easily assessed by Computed Tomography (CT as well. Interestingly, MRI also discriminates between white and brown adipose tissue; the latter has long been regarded as a potential target for anti-obesity drugs because of its ability to enhance energy consumption through increased thermogenesis. Positron Emission Tomography (PET performed with 18F-FDG as glucose analogue radiotracer reflects well the metabolic rate in body tissues and consequently is the technique of choice for studies of BAT metabolism. This review will focus on the main, non-invasive imaging techniques (MRI, CT and PET that are fundamental for the assessment, quantification and functional characterization of fat deposits in small laboratory animals. The contribution of optical techniques, which are currently regarded

  16. Analgesia in Amphibians: Preclinical Studies and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Preclinical studies of analgesia in amphibians or recommendations for clinical use of analgesics in amphibian species are extremely limited. This article briefly reviews the issues surrounding the use of analgesics in amphibians starting with common definitions of pain and analgesia when applied to non-human animals. Nociceptive and endogenous opioid systems in amphibians are reviewed and results of preclinical research on opioid and non-opioid analgesics summarized. Recommended opioid and non-opioid analgesics are summarized and practical recommendations made for their clinical use. PMID:21074701

  17. Advanced Pre-clinical Research Approaches and Models to Studying Pediatric Anesthetic Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng eWang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Advances in pediatric and obstetric surgery have resulted in an increase in the duration and complexity of anesthetic procedures. A great deal of concern has recently arisen regarding the safety of anesthesia in infants and children. Because of obvious limitations, it is not possible to thoroughly explore the effects of anesthetic agents on neurons in vivo in human infants or children. However, the availability of some advanced pre-clinical research approaches and models, such as imaging technology both in vitro and in vivo, stem cell and nonhuman primate experimental models, have provided potentially invaluable tools for examining the developmental effects of anesthetic agents. This review discusses the potential application of some sophisticaled research approaches, e.g., calcium imaging, in stem cell-derived in vitro models, especially human embryonic neural stem cells, along with their capacity for proliferation and their potential for differentiation, to dissect relevant mechanisms underlying the etiology of the neurotoxicity associated with developmental exposures to anesthetic agents. Also, this review attempts to discuss several advantages for using the developing rhesus monkey models (in vivo, when combined with dynamic molecular imaging approaches, in addressing critical issues related to the topic of pediatric sedation/anesthesia. These include the relationships between anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity, dose response, time-course and developmental stage at time of exposure (in vivo studies, serving to provide the most expeditious platform toward decreasing the uncertainty in extrapolating pre-clinical data to the human condition.

  18. Blood cytokines as biomarkers of in vivo toxicity in preclinical safety assessment: considerations for their use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Jacqueline M

    2010-09-01

    In the drive to develop drugs with well-characterized and clinically monitorable safety profiles, there is incentive to expand the repertoire of safety biomarkers for toxicities without routine markers or premonitory detection. Biomarkers in blood are pursued because of specimen accessibility, opportunity for serial monitoring, quantitative measurement, and the availability of assay platforms. Cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors (here referred to collectively as cytokines) show robust modulation in proximal events of inflammation, immune response, and repair. These are key general processes in many toxicities; therefore, cytokines are commonly identified during biomarker discovery studies. In addition, multiplexed cytokine immunoassays are easily applied to biomarker discovery and routine toxicity studies to measure blood cytokines. However, cytokines pose several challenges as safety biomarkers because of a short serum half-life; low to undetectable baseline levels; lack of tissue-specific or toxicity-specific expression; complexities related to cytokine expression with multiorgan involvement; and species, strain, and interindividual differences. Additional challenges to their application are caused by analytical, methodological, and study design-related variables. A final consideration is the strength of the relationship between changes in cytokine levels and the development of phenotypic or functional manifestations of toxicity. These factors should inform the integrated judgment-based qualification of novel biomarkers in preclinical, and potentially clinical, risk assessment. The dearth of robust, predictive cytokine biomarkers for specific toxicities is an indication of the significant complexity of these challenges. This review will consider the current state of the science and recommendations for appropriate application of cytokines in preclinical safety assessment.

  19. Thymoquinone as a Potential Adjuvant Therapy for Cancer Treatment: Evidence from Preclinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G.M. Mostofa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thymoquinone (TQ, the main bioactive component of Nigella sativa, has been found to exhibit anticancer effects in numerous preclinical studies. Due to its multitargeting nature, TQ interferes in a wide range of tumorigenic processes and counteracts carcinogenesis, malignant growth, invasion, migration, and angiogenesis. Moreover, TQ can specifically sensitize tumor cells toward conventional cancer treatments (e.g., radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy and simultaneously minimize therapy-associated toxic effects in normal cells. In this review, we summarized the adjuvant potential of TQ as observed in various in vitro and in vivo animal models and discussed the pharmacological properties of TQ to rationalize its supplementary role in potentiating the efficacy of standard therapeutic modalities namely surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. Altogether, we suggest further comprehensive evaluation of TQ in preclinical and clinical levels to delineate its implied utility as a novel complementary adjuvant therapy for cancer treatment.

  20. submitter Preclinical in vivo application of $^{152}$Tb-DOTANOC: a radiolanthanide for PET imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Cristina; Johnston, Karl; Köster, Ulli; Schmid, Raffaella; Türler, Andreas; van der Meulen, Nicholas P

    2016-01-01

    Background:Terbium has attracted the attention of researchers and physicians due to the existence of four medically interesting radionuclides, potentially useful for SPECT and PET imaging, as well as for α- and $β^−$-radionuclide therapy. The aim of this study was to produce $^{152}$Tb $(T_{1/2} = 17.5 h, E_{β+av} = 1140 keV)$ and evaluate it in a preclinical setting in order to demonstrate its potential for PET imaging. For this purpose, DOTANOC was used for targeting the somatostatin receptor in AR42J tumor-bearing mice. Methods: $^{152}$Tb was produced by proton-induced spallation of tantalum targets, followed by an online isotope separation process at ISOLDE/CERN. After separation of $^{152}$Tb using cation exchange chromatography, it was directly employed for radiolabeling of DOTANOC. PET/CT scans were performed with AR42J tumor-bearing mice at different time points after injection of $^{152}$Tb-DOTANOC which was applied at variable molar peptide amounts. 177Lu-DOTANOC was prepared and used...

  1. Contribution of Large Pig for Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion and Transplantation Studies: The Preclinical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Giraud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal experimentation is necessary to characterize human diseases and design adequate therapeutic interventions. In renal transplantation research, the limited number of in vitro models involves a crucial role for in vivo models and particularly for the porcine model. Pig and human kidneys are anatomically similar (characterized by multilobular structure in contrast to rodent and dog kidneys unilobular. The human proximity of porcine physiology and immune systems provides a basic knowledge of graft recovery and inflammatory physiopathology through in vivo studies. In addition, pig large body size allows surgical procedures similar to humans, repeated collections of peripheral blood or renal biopsies making pigs ideal for medical training and for the assessment of preclinical technologies. However, its size is also its main drawback implying expensive housing. Nevertheless, pig models are relevant alternatives to primate models, offering promising perspectives with developments of transgenic modulation and marginal donor models facilitating data extrapolation to human conditions.

  2. Pre-clinical evaluation of a diode-based In vivo dosimetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo, G. [National Oncology Institute, Havana (Cuba)

    1998-12-31

    Diode detector systems are routinely used in a number of departments for the quality assurance of the delivered dose in radiation oncology (1,2,3,4,5). The main advantage of diode detectors for in vivo dosimetry (over TLDs, film dosimetry, ionization chambers) is that results are immediately available in real time, do not need external bias voltage and are more sensitive for the same detection volume than ionization chambers thereby allowing a direct and immediate check of the treatment accuracy. Also, is important to mention that is possible to obtain different accuracy levels. For example, in the case of the measurements designed for evaluating the dosimetric accuracy of a new treatment technique for dose escalation studies the action level should be tighter (the order of 2 % to 4 %, 2 standard deviations) than for routine measurements aiming to discover and correct for errors in the treatment of individual patients ({+-} 5 % - 10 % or to avoid mis administrations (10 % - 15 %). This work describes the calibration method adopted and the evaluation of the accuracy and precision of in vivo dosimetry at Co 60 and 23 MV photon energies. Extensive phantoms measurements were made to determine the influence of physical conditions on the diode response. Parameters investigated included diode linearity, leakage, and measurement reproducibility, as well as the field size, SSD, and angular dependence. the practical consequences of these measurements are reported. There is still some controversy as to whether in vivo (diode) dosemeters are required for routine quality assurance purposes. Our work has shown that while care must be taken in choosing and handling diode detector systems they are able to provide an efficient and effective method of ensuring the dose delivered to the patient during treatment is within acceptable limits. (Author)

  3. Preclinical in vivo Performance of Novel Biodegradable, Electrospun Poly(lactic acid and Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid Nanocomposites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Holderegger

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone substitute materials have witnessed tremendous development over the past decades and autogenous bone may still be considered the gold standard for many clinicians and clinical approaches in order to rebuild and restore bone defects. However, a plethora of novel xenogenic and synthetic bone substitute materials have been introduced in recent years in the field of bone regeneration. As the development of bone is actually a calcification process within a collagen fiber arrangement, the use of scaffolds in the formation of fibers may offer some advantages, along with additional handling characteristics. This review focuses on material characteristics and degradation behavior of electrospun biodegradable polyester scaffolds. Furthermore, we concentrated on the preclinical in vivo performance with regard to bone regeneration in preclinical studies. The major findings are as follows: Scaffold composition and architecture determine its biological behavior and degradation characteristics; The incorporation of inorganic substances and/or organic substances within composite scaffolds enhances new bone formation; L-poly(lactic acid and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid composite scaffolds, especially when combined with basic substances like hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate or demineralized bone powder, seem not to induce inflammatory tissue reactions in vivo.

  4. Preclinical in vivo Performance of Novel Biodegradable, Electrospun Poly(lactic acid) and Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Nanocomposites: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holderegger, Claudia; Schmidlin, Patrick R.; Weber, Franz E.; Mohn, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Bone substitute materials have witnessed tremendous development over the past decades and autogenous bone may still be considered the gold standard for many clinicians and clinical approaches in order to rebuild and restore bone defects. However, a plethora of novel xenogenic and synthetic bone substitute materials have been introduced in recent years in the field of bone regeneration. As the development of bone is actually a calcification process within a collagen fiber arrangement, the use of scaffolds in the formation of fibers may offer some advantages, along with additional handling characteristics. This review focuses on material characteristics and degradation behavior of electrospun biodegradable polyester scaffolds. Furthermore, we concentrated on the preclinical in vivo performance with regard to bone regeneration in preclinical studies. The major findings are as follows: Scaffold composition and architecture determine its biological behavior and degradation characteristics; The incorporation of inorganic substances and/or organic substances within composite scaffolds enhances new bone formation; L-poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) composite scaffolds, especially when combined with basic substances like hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate or demineralized bone powder, seem not to induce inflammatory tissue reactions in vivo. PMID:28793481

  5. Preclinical Development and In Vivo Efficacy of Ceftiofur-PLGA Microparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Vilos

    Full Text Available Drug delivery systems based on polymeric microparticles represent an interesting field of development for the treatment of several infectious diseases for humans and animals. In this work, we developed PLGA microparticles loaded with ceftiofur (PLGA-cef, a third- generation cephalosporin that is used exclusively used in animals. PLGA-cef was prepared by the double emulsion w/o/w method, and exhibited a diameter in the range of 1.5-2.2 μm, and a negative ζ potential in the range of -35 to -55 mV. The loading yield of PLGA-cef was ~7% and encapsulation efficiency was approximately 40%. The pharmacokinetic study demonstrated a sustained release profile of ceftiofur for 20 days. PLGA-cef administrated in a single dose was more effective than ceftiofur non-encapsulated in rats challenged with S. Typhimurium. The in vivo toxicological evaluation showed that PLGA-cef did not affect the blood biochemical, hematological and hemostasis parameters. Overall, the PLGA-cef showed slow in vivo release profile, high antibacterial efficacy, and low toxicity. The results obtained supports the safe application of PLGA-cef as sustained release platform in the veterinary industry.

  6. Preclinical and clinical safety studies on DNA vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, Johanna A C; Mooi, Frits R; Berbers, Guy A M; Aerts, Leon A G J M van; Ovelgönne, Hans; Kimman, Tjeerd G

    2007-01-01

    DNA vaccines are based on the transfer of genetic material, encoding an antigen, to the cells of the vaccine recipient. Despite high expectations of DNA vaccines as a result of promising preclinical data their clinical utility remains unproven. However, much data is gathered in preclinical and

  7. [Formulation and stability of suspensions for preclinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgalassi, S; Perini, G; Giannaccini, B; Saettone, M F; Lodi, A

    1997-11-01

    In preclinical studies, poorly soluble drugs are usually administered orally to experimental animals as suspensions. The present study was aimed at providing data allowing predictive estimations of the stability of such suspensions. To this purpose aqueous suspensions of three drugs (griseofulvin, ibuprofen and indomethacin) were prepared at different concentrations using four different suspending agents: sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), microcrystalline cellulose/carboxymethylcellulose (MC/CMC), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and jota carragenaan (CJ). The physical and physico-chemical characteristics of the drugs, the rheological properties of the suspending media and of the corresponding drug suspensions, and the physical and chemical stability of the suspensions was then evaluated. The type of suspending agent, rather than the physical characteristics of the drug, appeared to exert the main influence on the physical stability of suspensions. The most stable formulations were produced by suspending agents with low-temperature gelation characteristics (CJ) or with thixotropic flux (MC/CMC).

  8. A preclinical model for the analysis of genetically modified human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Serrano, Fernando; Meana, Alvaro; Muñoz, Marta; Garcia, Marta; Muñoz, Evangelina; Martin, Clara; Bernad, Antonio; Jorcano, José Luis

    2002-05-20

    Although skin is perhaps the most accessible of all somatic tissues for therapeutic gene transfer, it is a challenging site when attempting gene delivery. In addition to the transience of gene expression, important obstacles to cutaneous gene therapy have included the inability to sustain gene expression in a large proportion of keratinocytes within a given skin compartment. In this study, we have developed a novel experimental strategy that allows long-term regeneration of entirely genetically engineered human skin on the backs of NOD/SCID mice. Primary human keratinocytes were infected with a retroviral vector encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) produced by transient transfection of 293T cells. EGFP expression allowed cell-sorting selection of a polyclonal population of productively transduced keratinocytes that were assembled in a live fibroblast-containing fibrin dermal matrix and orthotopically grafted onto mice. Epifluorescent illumination of the transplanted zone allowed in vivo monitoring of the genetically modified graft. EGFP-positive human skin was present on mice for 22 weeks after grafting. In addition, frozen sections prepared from the grafts displayed consistently strong EGFP-based fluorescence in all epidermal strata at every time point examined. Persistence of transgene expression was further confirmed through EGFP protein immunodetection. Purified EGFP-positive keratinocytes grafted as part of the fibrin-based artificial skin were capable of generating multilayer human epidermis on mice, with well-developed granulosum and corneum strata, and clearly defined rete ridges. Finally, the large proportion of transduced keratinocytes in our grafts allowed us to study, for the first time, the long-term in vivo clonal reconstitution pattern of the regenerated skin. Analysis of the provirus insertion sites indicates that a discrete number of epidermal stem cell clones was responsible for the maintenance of human skin regenerated in NOD

  9. Novel epigenetic target therapy for prostate cancer: a preclinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Naldi

    Full Text Available Epigenetic events are critical contributors to the pathogenesis of cancer, and targeting epigenetic mechanisms represents a novel strategy in anticancer therapy. Classic demethylating agents, such as 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine, hold the potential for reprograming somatic cancer cells demonstrating high therapeutic efficacy in haematological malignancies. On the other hand, epigenetic treatment of solid tumours often gives rise to undesired cytotoxic side effects. Appropriate delivery systems able to enrich Decitabine at the site of action and improve its bioavailability would reduce the incidence of toxicity on healthy tissues. In this work we provide preclinical evidences of a safe, versatile and efficient targeted epigenetic therapy to treat hormone sensitive (LNCap and hormone refractory (DU145 prostate cancers. A novel Decitabine formulation, based on the use of engineered erythrocyte (Erythro-Magneto-Hemagglutinin Virosomes, EMHVs drug delivery system (DDS carrying this drug, has been refined. Inside the EMHVs, the drug was shielded from the environment and phosphorylated in its active form. The novel magnetic EMHV DDS, endowed with fusogenic protein, improved the stability of the carried drug and exhibited a high efficiency in confining its delivery at the site of action in vivo by applying an external static magnetic field. Here we show that Decitabine loaded into EMHVs induces a significant tumour mass reduction in prostate cancer xenograft models at a concentration, which is seven hundred times lower than the therapeutic dose, suggesting an improved pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of drug. These results are relevant for and discussed in light of developing personalised autologous therapies and innovative clinical approach for the treatment of solid tumours.

  10. In vivo biocompatibility of Resilon compared with gutta-percha in a pre-clinical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo biocompatibility of Resilon, compared with gutta-percha, at short and long-term following implantation in a rat subcutaneous implantation model. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were implanted subcutaneously with either Resilon or gutta-percha or were sham controls. Tissues were harvested at 8 days or 60 days after implantation and were evaluated histologically for inflammation and fibrous encapsulation. The severity of histologic injury, scored on a scale of 0-4 and quantitative analysis of the capsule wall thickness were determined for statistical analysis. Data were analyzed by Student t-test, one-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis or Mann-Whitney′s tests as appropriate. A value of P ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: No behavioral changes or visible signs of physical impairment were observed at 8 days or 60 days post-implantation. Histopathologic observation of the implanted sites at each time-point showed that both Resilon and gutta-percha implants induced foreign body reaction, showing minimal to mild inflammatory reactions in most cases, which diminished significantly with time. Compared with gutta-percha, the capsule wall was thinner (P > 0.05 after Resilon implantation at day 8 and significantly (P = 0.01 thicker at day 60. In addition, capsule wall thickness showed a trend to increase with time after implantation in the Resilon groups (P > 0.05, opposed to the significant decrease (P = 0.016 observed after implantation in the gutta-percha groups, suggesting lesser long-term biocompatibility of Resilon. Conclusion: Our findings validate Resilon as an in vivo biocompatible material. However, our data suggest that long-term biocompatibility of Resilon, despite validated, is inferior to that of gutta-percha control.

  11. PopED lite: An optimal design software for preclinical pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yasunori; Sundqvist, Monika; Hooker, Andrew C; Gennemark, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Optimal experimental design approaches are seldom used in preclinical drug discovery. The objective is to develop an optimal design software tool specifically designed for preclinical applications in order to increase the efficiency of drug discovery in vivo studies. Several realistic experimental design case studies were collected and many preclinical experimental teams were consulted to determine the design goal of the software tool. The tool obtains an optimized experimental design by solving a constrained optimization problem, where each experimental design is evaluated using some function of the Fisher Information Matrix. The software was implemented in C++ using the Qt framework to assure a responsive user-software interaction through a rich graphical user interface, and at the same time, achieving the desired computational speed. In addition, a discrete global optimization algorithm was developed and implemented. The software design goals were simplicity, speed and intuition. Based on these design goals, we have developed the publicly available software PopED lite (http://www.bluetree.me/PopED_lite). Optimization computation was on average, over 14 test problems, 30 times faster in PopED lite compared to an already existing optimal design software tool. PopED lite is now used in real drug discovery projects and a few of these case studies are presented in this paper. PopED lite is designed to be simple, fast and intuitive. Simple, to give many users access to basic optimal design calculations. Fast, to fit a short design-execution cycle and allow interactive experimental design (test one design, discuss proposed design, test another design, etc). Intuitive, so that the input to and output from the software tool can easily be understood by users without knowledge of the theory of optimal design. In this way, PopED lite is highly useful in practice and complements existing tools. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-invasive, Contrast-enhanced Spectral Imaging of Breast Cancer Signatures in Preclinical Animal Models In vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Ren, Songyang; Park, Sangyong; Farkas, Daniel L

    2010-10-02

    We report here a non-invasive multispectral imaging platform for monitoring spectral reflectance and fluorescence images from primary breast carcinoma and metastatic lymph nodes in preclinical rat model in vivo. The system is built around a monochromator light source and an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for spectral selection. Quantitative analysis of the measured reflectance profiles in the presence of a widely-used lymphazurin dye clearly demonstrates the capability of the proposed imaging platform to detect tumor-associated spectral signatures in the primary tumors as well as metastatic lymphatics. Tumor-associated changes in vascular oxygenation and interstitial fluid pressure are reasoned to be the physiological sources of the measured reflectance profiles. We also discuss the translational potential of our imaging platform in intra-operative clinical setting.

  13. Optical emission of 223 Radium: in vitro and in vivo preclinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Federico; De Sanctis, Francesco; Spinelli, Antonello E

    2017-10-20

    223 Radium (223 Ra) is widely used in Nuclear medicine to treat patients with osseous metastatic prostate cancer. In clinical practice 223 Ra cannot be imaged directly, however gamma photons produced by its short-lived daughter nuclides can be captured by conventional gamma cameras. In this work we show that 223 Ra and its short-lived daughter nuclides can be detected with optical imaging techniques. The light emission of 223 Ra was investigated in vitro using different setups in order to clarify the mechanism of light production. The results demonstrate that the luminescence of the 223 Ra chloride solution, usually employed in clinical treatments, is compatible with Cerenkov luminescence having an emission spectrum that is almost indistinguishable from Cerenkov radiation one. This study proves that luminescence imaging can be successfully employed to detect 223 Ra in vivo in mice by imaging whole body 223 Ra biodistribution and more precisely its uptake in bones. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of autogenous PRGF+β-TCP with or without a collagen membrane on bone formation and implant osseointegration in large size bone defects. A preclinical in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batas, Leonidas; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Papadimitriou, Serafim; Nyengaard, Jens R; Konstantinidis, Antonios

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the adjunctive use of a collagen membrane enhances bone formation and implant osseointegration in non-contained defects grafted with chair-side prepared autologous platelet-rich growth factor (PRGF) adsorbed on a β-TCP particulate carrier. Large box-type defects (10 × 6 mm; W × D) were prepared in the edentulated and completely healed mandibles of six Beagles dogs. An implant with moderately rough surface was placed in the center of each defect leaving the coronal 6 mm of the implant not covered with bone. The remaining defect space was then filled out with chair-side prepared autologous PRGF adsorbed on β-TCP particles and either covered with a collagen membrane (PRGF/β-TCP+CM) (6 defects) or left without a membrane (PRGF/β-TCP) (5 defects). Histology 4 months post-op showed new lamellar and woven bone formation encompassing almost entirely the defect and limited residual β-TCP particles. Extent of osseointegration of the previously exposed portion of the implants varied, but in general was limited. Within the defect, new mineralized bone (%) averaged 43.2 ± 9.86 vs. 39.9 ± 13.7 in the PRGF/β-TCP+CM and PRGF/β-TCP group (P = 0.22) and relative mineralized bone-to-implant contact (%) averaged 26.2 ± 16.45 vs. 35.91 ± 24.45, respectively (P = 0.5). First, bone-to-implant contact from the implant top was 4.1 ± 1.5 and 3.2 ± 2.3 (P = 0.9), in the PRGF/β-TCP+CM and PRGF/β-TCP group, respectively. Implantation of chair-side prepared autologous PRGF adsorbed on a β-TCP carrier in non-contained peri-implant defects resulted in large amounts of bone regeneration, but osseointegration was limited. Provisions for GBR with a collagen membrane did not significantly enhance bone regeneration or implant osseointegration. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Value of shared preclinical safety studies – The eTOX database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Briggs

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A first analysis of a database of shared preclinical safety data for 1214 small molecule drugs and drug candidates extracted from 3970 reports donated by thirteen pharmaceutical companies for the eTOX project (www.etoxproject.eu is presented. Species, duration of exposure and administration route data were analysed to assess if large enough subsets of homogenous data are available for building in silico predictive models. Prevalence of treatment related effects for the different types of findings recorded were analysed. The eTOX ontology was used to determine the most common treatment-related clinical chemistry and histopathology findings reported in the database. The data were then mined to evaluate sensitivity of established in vivo biomarkers for liver toxicity risk assessment. The value of the database to inform other drug development projects during early drug development is illustrated by a case study.

  16. Bosutinib: a review of preclinical studies in chronic myelogenous leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschelli, Frank; Arndt, Kim; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2010-07-01

    Bosutinib (SKI-606) is an orally active Src and Abl kinase inhibitor presently in Phase III trials for treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), and in Phase II trials for treatment of breast cancer. Bosutinib is a potent antiproliferative and proapoptotic agent in CML cells and inhibits Bcr-Abl mediated signalling at nanomolar concentrations. Short-term administration of bosutinib causes regression of K562 and KU812 CML tumour xenografts. BaF3 murine myeloid cells expressing wild-type Bcr-Abl are sensitive to bosutinib treatment, as are BaF3 cells expressing many imatinib-resistant forms of Bcr-Abl. Recent studies indicate that bosutinib is active against a broader spectrum of kinases than originally believed. These additional inhibitory activities have interesting possibilities for further clinical development. This review will focus on preclinical studies supporting the clinical development of bosutinib for treatment of CML, with a discussion on the broader potential of this agent in other oncology indications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antidepressant mechanism of ketamine: perspective from preclinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eScheuing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A debilitating mental disorder, major depressive disorder is a leading cause of global disease burden. Existing antidepressant drugs are not adequate for the majority of depressed patients, and large clinical studies have demonstrated their limited efficacy and slow response onset. Growing evidence of low-dose ketamine’s rapid and potent antidepressant effects offers strong potential for future antidepressant agents. However, ketamine has considerable drawbacks such as its abuse potential, psychomimetic effects, and increased oxidative stress in the brain, thus limiting its widespread clinical use. To develop superior antidepressant drugs, it is crucial to better understand ketamine’s antidepressant mechanism of action. Recent preclinical studies indicate that ketamine’s antidepressant mechanism involves mammalian target of rapamycin pathway activation and subsequent synaptogenesis in the prefrontal cortex, as well as glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3B inactivation. Adjunct GSK-3B inhibitors, such as lithium, can enhance ketamine’s efficacy by augmenting and prolonging its antidepressant effects. Given the potential for depressive relapses, lithium in addition to ketamine is a promising solution for this clinical issue.

  18. Gelatin-based Hydrogel Degradation and Tissue Interaction in vivo: Insights from Multimodal Preclinical Imaging in Immunocompetent Nude Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondera, Christoph; Hauser, Sandra; Krüger-Genge, Anne; Jung, Friedrich; Neffe, Axel T; Lendlein, Andreas; Klopfleisch, Robert; Steinbach, Jörg; Neuber, Christin; Pietzsch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels based on gelatin have evolved as promising multifunctional biomaterials. Gelatin is crosslinked with lysine diisocyanate ethyl ester (LDI) and the molar ratio of gelatin and LDI in the starting material mixture determines elastic properties of the resulting hydrogel. In order to investigate the clinical potential of these biopolymers, hydrogels with different ratios of gelatin and diisocyanate (3-fold (G10_LNCO3) and 8-fold (G10_LNCO8) molar excess of isocyanate groups) were subcutaneously implanted in mice (uni- or bilateral implantation). Degradation and biomaterial-tissue-interaction were investigated in vivo (MRI, optical imaging, PET) and ex vivo (autoradiography, histology, serum analysis). Multimodal imaging revealed that the number of covalent net points correlates well with degradation time, which allows for targeted modification of hydrogels based on properties of the tissue to be replaced. Importantly, the degradation time was also dependent on the number of implants per animal. Despite local mechanisms of tissue remodeling no adverse tissue responses could be observed neither locally nor systemically. Finally, this preclinical investigation in immunocompetent mice clearly demonstrated a complete restoration of the original healthy tissue.

  19. Acoustic radiation force beam sequence performance for detection and material characterization of atherosclerotic plaques: preclinical, ex vivo results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behler, Russell H; Czernuszewicz, Tomasz J; Wu, Chih-Da; Nichols, Timothy C; Zhu, Hongtu; Homeister, Jonathon W; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Gallippi, Caterina M

    2013-12-01

    This work presents preclinical data demonstrating performance of acoustic radiation force (ARF)-based elasticity imaging with five different beam sequences for atherosclerotic plaque detection and material characterization. Twelve trained, blinded readers evaluated parametric images taken ex vivo under simulated in vivo conditions of 22 porcine femoral arterial segments. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was carried out to quantify reader performance using spatially-matched immunohistochemistry for validation. The beam sequences employed had high sensitivity (sens) and specificity (spec) for detecting Type III+ plaques (sens: 85%, spec: 79%), lipid pools (sens: 80%, spec: 86%), fibrous caps (sens: 86%, spec: 82%), calcium (sens: 96%, spec: 85%), collagen (sens: 78%, spec: 77%), and disrupted internal elastic lamina (sens: 92%, spec: 75%). 1:1 single-receive tracking yielded the highest median areas under the ROC curve (AUC), but was not statistically significantly higher than 4:1 parallel-receive tracking. Excitation focal configuration did not result in statistically different AUCs. Overall, these results suggest ARF-based imaging is relevant to detecting and characterizing plaques and support its use for diagnosing and monitoring atherosclerosis.

  20. A crowdsourcing model for creating preclinical medical education study tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bow, Hansen C; Dattilo, Jonathan R; Jonas, Andrea M; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2013-06-01

    During their preclinical course work, medical students must memorize and recall substantial amounts of information. Recent trends in medical education emphasize collaboration through team-based learning. In the technology world, the trend toward collaboration has been characterized by the crowdsourcing movement. In 2011, the authors developed an innovative approach to team-based learning that combined students' use of flashcards to master large volumes of content with a crowdsourcing model, using a simple informatics system to enable those students to share in the effort of generating concise, high-yield study materials. The authors used Google Drive and developed a simple Java software program that enabled students to simultaneously access and edit sets of questions and answers in the form of flashcards. Through this crowdsourcing model, medical students in the class of 2014 at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine created a database of over 16,000 questions that corresponded to the Genes to Society basic science curriculum. An analysis of exam scores revealed that students in the class of 2014 outperformed those in the class of 2013, who did not have access to the flashcard system, and a survey of students demonstrated that users were generally satisfied with the system and found it a valuable study tool. In this article, the authors describe the development and implementation of their crowdsourcing model for creating study materials, emphasize its simplicity and user-friendliness, describe its impact on students' exam performance, and discuss how students in any educational discipline could implement a similar model of collaborative learning.

  1. In vivo preclinical cancer and tissue engineering applications of absolute oxygen imaging using pulse EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Boris; Kotecha, Mrignayani; Halpern, Howard J.

    2017-07-01

    The value of any measurement and a fortiori any measurement technology is defined by the reproducibility and the accuracy of the measurements. This implies a relative freedom of the measurement from factors confounding its accuracy. In the past, one of the reasons for the loss of focus on the importance of imaging oxygen in vivo was the difficulty in obtaining reproducible oxygen or pO2 images free from confounding variation. This review will briefly consider principles of electron paramagnetic oxygen imaging and describe how it achieves absolute oxygen measurements. We will provide a summary review of the progress in biomedical EPR imaging, predominantly in cancer biology research, discuss EPR oxygen imaging for cancer treatment and tissue graft assessment for regenerative medicine applications.

  2. The effect of learning styles and study behavior on success of preclinical students in pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Halil Asci; Esin Kulac; Mekin Sezik; F Nihan Cankara; Ekrem Cicek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of learning styles and study behaviors on preclinical medical students′ pharmacology exam scores in a non-Western setting. Materials and Methods: Grasha-Reichmann Student Learning Study Scale and a modified Study Behavior Inventory were used to assess learning styles and study behaviors of preclinical medical students (n = 87). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the independent effect of gender, age, learning style, and study behavior on ph...

  3. Preclinical In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of [18F]FE@SUPPY for Cancer PET Imaging: Limitations of a Xenograft Model for Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Balber

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging probes such as PET-tracers have the potential to improve the accuracy of tumor characterization by directly visualizing the biochemical situation. Thus, molecular changes can be detected early before morphological manifestation. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR is described to be highly expressed in colon cancer cell lines and human colorectal cancer (CRC, suggesting this receptor as a tumor marker. The aim of this preclinical study was the evaluation of F18FE@SUPPY as a PET-tracer for CRC using in vitro imaging and in vivo PET imaging. First, affinity and selectivity of FE@SUPPY and its metabolites were determined, proving the favorable binding profile of FE@SUPPY. The human adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29 was characterized regarding its hA3AR expression and was subsequently chosen as tumor graft. Promising results regarding the potential of F18FE@SUPPY as a PET-tracer for CRC imaging were obtained by autoradiography as ≥2.3-fold higher accumulation of F18FE@SUPPY was found in CRC tissue compared to adjacent healthy colon tissue from the same patient. Nevertheless, first in vivo studies using HT-29 xenografts showed insufficient tumor uptake due to (1 poor conservation of target expression in xenografts and (2 unfavorable pharmacokinetics of F18FE@SUPPY in mice. We therefore conclude that HT-29 xenografts are not adequate to visualize hA3ARs using F18FE@SUPPY.

  4. Overview of Pre-Clinical and Clinical Studies Targeting Angiogenesis in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Kelly E.; Gore, Jesse; Korc, Murray

    2016-01-01

    The importance of angiogenesis in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and its therapeutic potential have been explored in both pre-clinical and clinical studies. Human PDACs overexpress a number of angiogenic factors and their cognate high-affinity receptors, and anti-angiogenic agents reduce tumor volume, metastasis, and microvessel density (MVD), and improve survival in subcutaneous and orthotopic pre-clinical models. Nonetheless, clinical trials using anti-angiogenic therapy have been overwhelmingly unsuccessful. This review will focus on these pre-clinical and clinical studies, the potential reasons for failure in the clinical setting, and ways these shortcomings could be addressed in future investigations of angiogenic mechanisms in PDAC. PMID:26723874

  5. Preclinical Development of an In Vivo BCG Challenge Model for Testing Candidate TB Vaccine Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minassian, Angela M.; Ronan, Edward O.; Poyntz, Hazel; Hill, Adrian V. S.; McShane, Helen

    2011-01-01

    There is an urgent need for an immunological correlate of protection against tuberculosis (TB) with which to evaluate candidate TB vaccines in clinical trials. Development of a human challenge model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) could facilitate the detection of such correlate(s). Here we propose a novel in vivo Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) challenge model using BCG immunization as a surrogate for M.tb infection. Culture and quantitative PCR methods have been developed to quantify BCG in the skin, using the mouse ear as a surrogate for human skin. Candidate TB vaccines have been evaluated for their ability to protect against a BCG skin challenge, using this model, and the results indicate that protection against a BCG skin challenge is predictive of BCG vaccine efficacy against aerosol M.tb challenge. Translation of these findings to a human BCG challenge model could enable more rapid assessment and down selection of candidate TB vaccines and ultimately the identification of an immune correlate of protection. PMID:21629699

  6. Innovations in preclinical biology: ex vivo engineering of a human kidney tissue microperfusion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Edward J; Wang, Zhican; Voellinger, Jenna L; Yeung, Cathy K; Shen, Danny D; Thummel, Kenneth E; Zheng, Ying; Ligresti, Giovanni; Eaton, David L; Muczynski, Kimberly A; Duffield, Jeremy S; Neumann, Thomas; Tourovskaia, Anna; Fauver, Mark; Kramer, Greg; Asp, Elizabeth; Himmelfarb, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Kidney disease is a public health problem that affects more than 20 million people in the US adult population, yet little is understood about the impact of kidney disease on drug disposition. Consequently there is a critical need to be able to model the human kidney and other organ systems, to improve our understanding of drug efficacy, safety, and toxicity, especially during drug development. The kidneys in general, and the proximal tubule specifically, play a central role in the elimination of xenobiotics. With recent advances in molecular investigation, considerable information has been gathered regarding the substrate profiles of the individual transporters expressed in the proximal tubule. However, we have little knowledge of how these transporters coupled with intracellular enzymes and influenced by metabolic pathways form an efficient secretory and reabsorptive mechanism in the renal tubule. Proximal tubular secretion and reabsorption of xenobiotics is critically dependent on interactions with peritubular capillaries and the interstitium. We plan to robustly model the human kidney tubule interstitium, utilizing an ex vivo three-dimensional modular microphysiological system with human kidney-derived cells. The microphysiological system should accurately reflect human physiology, be usable to predict renal handling of xenobiotics, and should assess mechanisms of kidney injury, and the biological response to injury, from endogenous and exogenous intoxicants.

  7. Integration of preclinical and clinical knowledge to predict intravenous PK in human: bilastine case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozmediano, Valvanera; Ortega, Ignacio; Lukas, John C; Gonzalo, Ana; Rodriguez, Monica; Lucero, Maria Luisa

    2014-03-01

    Modern pharmacometrics can integrate and leverage all prior proprietary and public knowledge. Such methods can be used to scale across species or comparators, perform clinical trial simulation across alternative designs, confirm hypothesis and potentially reduce development burden, time and costs. Crucial yet typically lacking in integration is the pre-clinical stage. Prediction of PK in man, using in vitro and in vivo studies in different animal species, is increasingly well theorized but could still find wider application in drug development. The aim of the present work was to explore methods for bridging pharmacokinetic knowledge from animal species (i.v. and p.o.) and man (p.o.) into i.v. in man using the antihistamine drug bilastine as example. A model, predictive of i.v. PK in man, was developed on data from two pre-clinical species (rat and dog) and p.o. in man bilastine trials performed earlier. In the knowledge application stage, two different approaches were used to predict human plasma concentration after i.v. of bilastine: allometry (several scaling methods) and a semi-physiological method. Both approaches led to successful predictions of key i.v. PK parameters of bilastine in man. The predictive i.v. PK model was validated using later data from a clinical study of i.v. bilastine. Introduction of such knowledge in development permits proper leveraging of all emergent knowledge as well as quantification-based exploration of PK scenario, e.g. in special populations (pediatrics, renal insufficiency, comedication). In addition, the methods permit reduction or elimination and certainly optimization of learning trials, particularly those concerning alternative off-label administration routes.

  8. NOD/scid IL-2Rgnull mice: a preclinical model system to evaluate human dendritic cell-based vaccine strategies in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spranger Stefani

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date very few systems have been described for preclinical investigations of human cellular therapeutics in vivo. However, the ability to carry out comparisons of new cellular vaccines in vivo would be of substantial interest for design of clinical studies. Here we describe a humanized mouse model to assess the efficacy of various human dendritic cell (DC preparations. Two reconstitution regimes of NOD/scid IL2Rgnull (NSG mice with adult human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were evaluated for engraftment using 4-week and 9-week schedules. This led to selection of a simple and rapid protocol for engraftment and vaccine evaluation that encompassed 4 weeks. Methods NSG recipients of human PBMC were engrafted over 14 days and then vaccinated twice with autologous DC via intravenous injection. Three DC vaccine formulations were compared that varied generation time in vitro (3 days versus 7 days and signals for maturation (with or without Toll-like receptor (TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists using MART-1 as a surrogate antigen, by electroporating mature DC with in vitro transcribed RNA encoding full length protein. After two weekly vaccinations, the splenocyte populations containing human lymphocytes were recovered 7 days later and assessed for MART-1-specific immune responses using MHC-multimer-binding assays and functional assessment of specific killing of melanoma tumor cell lines. Results Human monocyte-derived DC generated in vitro in 3 days induced better MART-1-specific immune responses in the autologous donor T cells present in the humanized NSG mice. Moreover, consistent with our in vitro observations, vaccination using mature DC activated with TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists resulted in enhanced immune responses in vivo. These findings led to a ranking of the DC vaccine effects in vivo that reflected the hierarchy previously found for these mature DC variations in vitro. Conclusions This humanized mouse model system enables

  9. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for Evaluating the Heart in Preclinical Studies of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Dongsheng; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A; Blain, Alison; Kass, David A; McNally, Elizabeth M; Metzger, Joseph M; Spurney, Christopher F; Kinnett, Kathi

    2016-02-01

    A recent working group meeting focused on contemporary cardiac issues in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was hosted by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in collaboration with the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy. An outcome of this meeting was to provide freely available detailed protocols for preclinical animal studies. The goal of these protocols is to improve the quality and reproducibility of cardiac preclinical studies aimed at developing new therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of DMD cardiomyopathy.

  10. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of tubulin inhibitors with non-small cell lung cancer pre-clinical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lama R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic small molecule tubulin inhibitors have many advantages as novel anti-cancer agents compared to the current tubulin inhibitors generated from natural products. Our previous studies led to the design and synthesis of a series of novel tubulin inhibitors. Some of these compounds also inhibited heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27, and showed promising in vitro anti-cancer activities in several breast cancer cell lines at sub nano-molar concentrations. However, whether these compounds could suppress tumor growth in animals was not investigated yet. In the current study, to identify the best drug candidates, therapeutic efficacy of the representative compounds from previous analyses was evaluated using non-small cell lung cancer preclinical models. These agents dose-dependently inhibited the growth of lung cancer cells in both monolayer cultures and three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. Several compounds also showed promising tumor growth suppressive activity in nude mice xenograft model

  11. Scaling-Up and Production of Therapeutic Antibodies for Preclinical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are increasingly used for treatment of various diseases, mostly cancer therapy and auto-immune diseases. New chimeric, humanized, or fully-human antibodies specific to novel or already validated targets are being developed in many academic labs as well as in commercial entities. A validation of antibodies in preclinical settings is an important component of the road from discovery to clinic. Preparing sufficient amount of high-quality antibodies for preclinical studies i...

  12. Preclinical studies of indapamide, a new 2-methylindoline antihypertensive diuretic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruss, T.; Wolf, P.S.

    1983-07-01

    Indapamide is a new indoline antihypertensive diuretic agent whose chemical structure differs substantially from those of the thiazides. The hydrophobic indoline moiety of indapamide confers a lipid solubility to the molecule that is 5 to 80 times greater than that of the thiazide diuretics. Thus indapamide accumulates in vascular smooth muscle at a concentration 10 times higher than that of protein-free perfusate. The affinity of indapamide for vascular smooth muscle manifests itself in vitro and in vivo as a decrease in reactivity following various pharmacologic interventions. Moreover, in vitro studies have demonstrated that indapamide decreases the inward calcium current and the transmembrane influx of calcium. The diuretic effect of indapamide is predominantly due to inhibition of sodium reabsorption at the cortical diluting segment of the distal convoluted tubule. In animal studies, intravenous indapamide has no effect on glomerular filtration rate or renal blood flow. Indapamide is well absorbed and extensively metabolized in animals and humans, with biliary excretion being the predominant route of elimination in animals. Most important, repeat administration of indapamide to dogs with both kidneys removed produces no accumulation of intact indapamide or its metabolites. Extensive drug safety studies in animals indicate that indapamide produces no overt toxicity and exhibits a good margin of safety.

  13. Cytotoxicity of Cyanoacrylate-Based Tissue Adhesives and Short-Term Preclinical In Vivo Biocompatibility in Abdominal Hernia Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Pascual

    Full Text Available Cyanoacrylate(CA-based tissue adhesives, although not widely used, are a feasible option to fix a mesh during abdominal hernia repair, due to its fast action and great bond strength. Their main disadvantage, toxicity, can be mitigated by increasing the length of their alkyl chain. The objective was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility in hernia repair of CAs currently used in clinical practice (Glubran(n-butyl and Ifabond(n-hexyl and a longer-chain CA (OCA(n-octyl, that has never been used in the medical field.Formaldehyde release and cytotoxicity of unpolymerized(UCAs and polymerized CAs(PCAs were evaluated by macroscopic visual assessment, flow cytometry and Alamar Blue assays. In the preclinical evaluation, partial defects were created in the rabbit abdominal wall and repaired by fixing polypropylene prostheses using the CAs. At 14 days post-surgery, animals were euthanized for morphology, macrophage response and cell damage analyses.Formaldehyde release was lower as the molecular weight of the monomer increased. The longest side-chain CA(OCA showed the highest cytotoxicity in the UCA condition. However, after polymerization, was the one that showed better behavior on most occasions. In vivo, all CAs promoted optimal mesh fixation without displacements or detachments. Seroma was evident with the use of Glubran, (four of six animals: 4/6 and Ifabond (2/6, but it was reduced with the use of OCA (1/6. Significantly greater macrophage responses were observed in groups where Glubran and Ifabond were used vs. sutures and OCA. TUNEL-positive cells were significantly higher in the Glubran and OCA groups vs. the suture group.Although mild formaldehyde release occurred, OCA was the most cytotoxic during polymerization but the least once cured. The CAs promoted proper mesh fixation and have potential to replace traditional suturing techniques in hernia repair; the CAs exhibited good tissue integration and effective short

  14. A miniaturized extracorporeal membrane oxygenator with integrated rotary blood pump: preclinical in vivo testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Ruedger; Bensberg, Ralf; Arens, Jutta; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Rossaint, Rolf; Henzler, Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can achieve sufficient gas exchange in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. A highly integrated extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (HEXMO) was developed to reduce filling volume and simplify management. Six female pigs were connected to venovenous HEXMO with a total priming volume of 125 ml for 4 hours during hypoxemia induced by a hypoxic inspired gas mixture. Animals were anticoagulated with intravenous heparin. Gas exchange, hemodynamics, hemolysis, and coagulation activation were examined. One device failed at the magnetic motor coupling of the integrated diagonal pump. In the remaining five experiments, the oxygenation increased significantly (arterial oxygen saturation [SaO2] from 79 ± 5% before HEXMO to 92% ± 11% after 4 hours) facilitated by a mean oxygen transfer of 66 ± 29 ml/dl through the oxygenator. The CO2 elimination by the HEXMO reduced arterial PaCO2 only marginal. Extracorporeal blood flow was maintained at 32% ± 6% of cardiac output. Hemodynamic instability or hemolysis was not observed. The plasmatic coagulation was only mildly activated without significant platelet consumption. The HEXMO prototype provided sufficient gas exchange to prevent hypoxemia. This proof of concept study supports further development and design modifications to increase performance and to reduce coagulation activation for potential long-term application.

  15. Preclinical Testing of Novel Radiotracers for Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Sijbesma, Jurgen; Doorduin, Janine; Elsinga, Philippus; de Vries, Erik; Glaudemans, Andor; Medema, Jitze; van Zanten, Annie K; Dierckx, Rudi; Ahaus, Cees T B

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical tests of novel radiotracers in experimental animals are required to move tracer candidates from the stage of in vitro testing to the stage of toxicity testing and finally studies in human volunteers. Such preclinical tests are aimed at demonstrating: (1) specific in vivo interaction of

  16. Management and potentialities of primary cancer cultures in preclinical and translational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserocchi, Giacomo; Mercatali, Laura; Liverani, Chiara; De Vita, Alessandro; Spadazzi, Chiara; Pieri, Federica; Bongiovanni, Alberto; Recine, Federica; Amadori, Dino; Ibrahim, Toni

    2017-11-07

    The use of patient-derived primary cell cultures in cancer preclinical assays has increased in recent years. The management of resected tumor tissue remains complex and a number of parameters must be respected to obtain complete sample digestion and optimal vitality yield. We provide an overview of the benefits of correct primary cell culture management using different preclinical methodologies, and describe the pros and cons of this model with respect to other kinds of samples. One important advantage is that the heterogeneity of the cell populations composing a primary culture partially reproduces the tumor microenvironment and crosstalk between malignant and healthy cells, neither of which is possible with cell lines. Moreover, the use of patient-derived specimens in innovative preclinical technologies, such as 3D systems or bioreactors, represents an important opportunity to improve the translational value of the results obtained. In vivo models could further our understanding of the crosstalk between tumor and other tissues as they enable us to observe the systemic and biological interactions of a complete organism. Although engineered mice are the most common model used in this setting, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) species has recently been recognized as an innovative experimental system. In fact, the transparent body and incomplete immune system of zebrafish embryos are especially useful for evaluating patient-derived tumor tissue interactions in healthy hosts. In conclusion, ex vivo systems represent an important tool for cancer research, but samples require correct manipulation to maximize their translational value.

  17. Regenerative medicine in Huntington's disease: Strengths and weaknesses of preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglione, A M; Popoli, P; Calamandrei, G

    2017-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by impairment in motor, cognitive and psychiatric domains. Currently, there is no specific therapy to act on the onset or progression of HD. The marked neuronal death observed in HD is a main argument in favour of stem cells (SCs) transplantation as a promising therapeutic perspective to replace the population of lost neurons and restore the functionality of the damaged circuitry. The availability of rodent models of HD encourages the investigation of the restorative potential of SCs transplantation longitudinally. However, the results of preclinical studies on SCs therapy in HD are so far largely inconsistent; this hampers the individuation of the more appropriate model and precludes the comparative analysis of transplant efficacy on behavioural end points. Thus, this review will describe the state of the art of in vivo research on SCs therapy in HD, analysing in a translational perspective the strengths and weaknesses of animal studies investigating the therapeutic potential of cell transplantation on HD progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of learning styles and study behavior on success of preclinical students in pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asci, Halil; Kulac, Esin; Sezik, Mekin; Cankara, F Nihan; Cicek, Ekrem

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of learning styles and study behaviors on preclinical medical students' pharmacology exam scores in a non-Western setting. Grasha-Reichmann Student Learning Study Scale and a modified Study Behavior Inventory were used to assess learning styles and study behaviors of preclinical medical students (n = 87). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the independent effect of gender, age, learning style, and study behavior on pharmacology success. Collaborative (40%) and competitive (27%) dominant learning styles were frequent in the cohort. The most common study behavior subcategories were study reading (40%) and general study habits (38%). Adequate listening and note-taking skills were associated with pharmacology success, whereas students with adequate writing skills had lower exam scores. These effects were independent of gender. Preclinical medical students' study behaviors are independent predictive factors for short-term pharmacology success.

  19. The effect of learning styles and study behavior on success of preclinical students in pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asci, Halil; Kulac, Esin; Sezik, Mekin; Cankara, F. Nihan; Cicek, Ekrem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of learning styles and study behaviors on preclinical medical students’ pharmacology exam scores in a non-Western setting. Materials and Methods: Grasha–Reichmann Student Learning Study Scale and a modified Study Behavior Inventory were used to assess learning styles and study behaviors of preclinical medical students (n = 87). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the independent effect of gender, age, learning style, and study behavior on pharmacology success. Results: Collaborative (40%) and competitive (27%) dominant learning styles were frequent in the cohort. The most common study behavior subcategories were study reading (40%) and general study habits (38%). Adequate listening and note-taking skills were associated with pharmacology success, whereas students with adequate writing skills had lower exam scores. These effects were independent of gender. Conclusions: Preclinical medical students’ study behaviors are independent predictive factors for short-term pharmacology success. PMID:26997716

  20. Pre-clinical in vivo models for the screening of bone biomaterials for oral/craniofacial indications: focus on small-animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Andreas; Sculean, Anton; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Buser, Daniel; Klinge, Björn

    2015-06-01

    Preclinical in vivo experimental studies are performed for evaluating proof-of-principle concepts, safety and possible unwanted reactions of candidate bone biomaterials before proceeding to clinical testing. Specifically, models involving small animals have been developed for screening bone biomaterials for their potential to enhance bone formation. No single model can completely recreate the anatomic, physiologic, biomechanic and functional environment of the human mouth and jaws. Relevant aspects regarding physiology, anatomy, dimensions and handling are discussed in this paper to elucidate the advantages and disadvantages of small-animal models. Model selection should be based not on the 'expertise' or capacities of the team, but rather on a scientifically solid rationale, and the animal model selected should reflect the question for which an answer is sought. The rationale for using heterotopic or orthotopic testing sites, and intraosseous, periosseous or extraskeletal defect models, is discussed. The paper also discusses the relevance of critical size defect modeling, with focus on calvarial defects in rodents. In addition, the rabbit sinus model and the capsule model in the rat mandible are presented and discussed in detail. All animal experiments should be designed with care and include sample-size and study-power calculations, thus allowing generation of meaningful data. Moreover, animal experiments are subject to ethical approval by the relevant authority. All procedures and the postoperative handling and care, including postoperative analgesics, should follow best practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Radiolabeled bombesin analogs for prostate cancer diagnosis: preclinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faintuch, Bluma Linkowski [Radiopharmacy Center, Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil)], E-mail: blfaintuch@hotmail.com; Teodoro, Rodrigo [Radiopharmacy Center, Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Duatti, Adriano [Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, 44100 (Italy); Muramoto, Emiko [Radiopharmacy Center, Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Faintuch, Salomao [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Smith, Charles J. [Department of Radiology, Missouri University Research Reactor, and Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Institute, University of Missouri-Columbia, The Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Introduction: Radionuclide imaging can be a useful tool for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Bombesin (BBN) is a molecule with high affinity for gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) receptors which are over-expressed in that tumor. This report compares {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-{beta}Ala-BBN(7-14)NH2 [{sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BBN] and {sup 99m}Tc{identical_to}N(PNP6)-Cys-{beta}Ala-BBN(7-14)NH2 [{sup 99m}TcN(PNP6)-Cys-BBN] with regard to labeling procedures as well as in vitro and in vivo evaluation (biodistribution and scintigraphic imaging). Methods: Peptide synthesis was performed in an automated peptide synthesizer. HYNIC-BBN was radiolabeled with pertechnetate using tricine and ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) as coligands. Cys- BBN was radiolabeled in a two-step procedure with the preparation of the precursor {sup 99m}Tc-Nitrido first and then introducing diphosphine (PNP6). Radiochemical evaluation of conjugates, as well as studies of stability, transchelation toward cysteine, and partition coefficient were done. Biological studies included internalization, biodistribution in healthy animals and in animals bearing PC3 cancer cells with acquisition of images from the tumor-bearing animals. Results: Both complexes showed a high radiochemical yield along with good stability. Biodistribution studies pointed out strong renal excretion for the former complex due to its hydrophilic profile and marked hepatobiliary excretion for the latter, corresponding to observed lipophilicity. Tumor uptake was higher for {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BBN and the same occurred with internalization findings, which exceeded those of {sup 99m}TcN(PNP6)-BBN. Blocking studies in mice bearing PC-3 tumor cells revealed significantly reduced pancreas and tumor uptake, demonstrating receptor specificity of the conjugates. Conclusion: The best radiotracer was {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BBN on the basis of high radiochemical yield, fast radiolabeling procedure without need for a purification step, and more consistent tumor

  2. Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer: A Preclinical Dosimetry Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea D.; Etienne, Wiguins; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; McNerny, Katie L.; Mashal, Alireza; Nouls, John; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Beyer, Wayne F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes a preclinical investigation of the feasibility of thermotherapy treatment of bladder cancer with Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH), performed by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Materials and Methods The bladders of twenty-five female rats were instilled with magnetite-based nanoparticles, and hyperthermia was induced using a novel small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder, CO). We aimed to increase the bladder lumen temperature to 42°C in <10 min and maintain that temperature for 60 min. Temperatures were measured within the bladder lumen and throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec, Canada). An MRI analysis was used to confirm the effectiveness of the catheterization method to deliver and maintain various nanoparticle volumes within the bladder. Thermal dosimetry measurements recorded the temperature rise of rat tissues for a variety of nanoparticle exposure conditions. Results Thermal dosimetry data demonstrated our ability to raise and control the temperature of rat bladder lumen ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C with minimal heating of surrounding normal tissues. MRI scans confirmed the homogenous nanoparticle distribution throughout the bladder. Conclusion These data demonstrate that our MFH system with magnetite-based nanoparticles provide well-localized heating of rat bladder lumen with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues. PMID:24050253

  3. Evaluation of in vivo responses of sorafenib therapy in a preclinical mouse model of PTEN-deficient of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yutaka; De Velasco, Marco A; Kura, Yurie; Nozawa, Masahiro; Hatanaka, Yuji; Oki, Takashi; Ozeki, Takayuki; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Minami, Takafumi; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-08

    Despite recent advances in the treatment for advanced prostate cancer, outcomes remain poor. This lack of efficacy has prompted the development of alternative treatment strategies. In the present study we investigate the effects of the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib in a genetically engineered mouse model of prostate cancer and explore the rational combination with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. Conditional prostate specific PTEN-deficient knockout mice were utilized to determine the pharmacodynamic and chemopreventive effects of sorafenib. This mouse model was also used to examine the therapeutic efficacy of sorafenib alone or in combination with everolimus. Preclinical efficacy was assessed by comparing the reduction of tumor burden, proliferation, angiogenesis and the induction of apoptosis. Molecular responses were assessed by immunohistochemical, TUNEL and western blot assays. Pharmacodynamic analysis revealed that a single dose of sorafenib decreased activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling axis at doses of 30-60 mg/kg, but activated JAK/STAT3 signaling. Levels of cleaved casapase-3 increased in a dose dependent manner. Chemoprevention studies showed that chronic sorafenib administration was capable of inhibiting tumor progression through the reduction of cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis and the induction of apoptosis. In intervention models of established castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer, treatment with sorafenib provided modest but statistically insignificant reduction in tumor burden. However, sorafenib significantly inhibited cancer cell proliferation and MVD but had minimal effects on the induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, the administration of sorafenib increased the expression levels of the androgen receptor, p-GSK3β and p-ERK1/2 in castration-resistant prostate cancers. In both intervention models, combination therapy demonstrated a clear tendency of enhanced antitumor effects over monotherapy. Notably, the

  4. Bimodal spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of hypertrophic skin tissue: pre-clinical experimentation, spectral data selection and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Honghui; Gisquet, Héloïse; Guillemin, F.; Blondel, Walter C. P. M.

    2011-07-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was two folds: firstly, we would like to investigate the efficiency of bimodal spectroscopic technique in characterization of hypertrophic scarring tissue deliberately created on a preclinical model (rabbit's ear); on the other hand, we evaluate the inhibition effect of an anti-inflammatory medication (tacrolimus) on hypertrophic formation in scar by using our bimodal spectroscopic system. Study design: This study was conducted on 20 New Zealand Rabbits receiving hypertrophic scarring treatment on their ears. Fluorescence and Diffuse Reflectance spectra were collected from each scar, amongst which some had received tacrolimus treatment. Features were extracted from corrected spectral data and analyzed to classify the scarring tissues into hypertrophic or non-hypertrophic. Diagnostic algorithms were developed with the use of k-NN classifier and validated by comparing to histological classification result with Leave-one- out cross validation. Results and discussion: The accuracy of our bimodal spectroscopy method for detecting hypertrophic scarring scar tissue was good (sensibility: 90.84%, specificity: 94.44%). The features used for classification were mainly extracted from the spectra exited at 360, 410 and 420 nm. This indicates that the difference between the spectra acquired from hypertrophic and non-hypertrophic tissue may be due to the different intensity distribution of several fluorophores (collagen,elastin and NADH) excited in this range, or to the change in proportion of tissue layers (epidermis and dermis) explored by the CEFS in use.

  5. Microbeam evolution: From single cell irradiation to preclinical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghita, Mihaela; Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; Fukunaga, Hisanori

    2018-01-01

    of radiation to selected individual cells in vitro or even to target subcellular organelles. These abilities have led to the development of a range of microbeam facilities around the world allowing the delivery of precisely defined beams of charged particles, X-rays, or electrons. In addition, microbeams have......Purpose: This review follows the development of microbeam technology from the early days of single cell irradiations, to investigations of specific cellular mechanisms and to the development of new treatment modalities in vivo. A number of microbeam applications are discussed with a focus...

  6. The Development of a New Medical Device for Standardized Episiotomy: A Pre-Clinical Validation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Femke; Piersma, Dorine; Veersema, Sebastiaan; van der Post, Joris; Roovers, Jan-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the validation and optimization process for a new innovative medical device to create a standardized episiotomy. We performed a preclinical validation study. This study was performed at the University hospital. Animal, cadaver. Together with technical engineers,

  7. Efficacy and Mechanisms of Aerobic Exercise on Cancer Initiation, Progression, and Metastasis: A Critical Systematic Review of In Vivo Preclinical Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Kathleen A; Peace, Ralph M; Betof, Allison S; Dewhirst, Mark W; Jones, Lee W

    2016-07-15

    A major objective of the emerging field of exercise-oncology research is to determine the efficacy of, and biological mechanisms by which, aerobic exercise affects cancer incidence, progression, and/or metastasis. There is a strong inverse association between self-reported exercise and the primary incidence of several forms of cancer; similarly, emerging data suggest that exercise exposure after a cancer diagnosis may improve outcomes for early-stage breast, colorectal, or prostate cancer. Arguably, critical next steps in the development of exercise as a candidate treatment in cancer control require preclinical studies to validate the biological efficacy of exercise, identify the optimal "dose", and pinpoint mechanisms of action. To evaluate the current evidence base, we conducted a critical systematic review of in vivo studies investigating the effects of exercise in cancer prevention and progression. Studies were evaluated on the basis of tumor outcomes (e.g., incidence, growth, latency, metastasis), dose-response, and mechanisms of action, when available. A total of 53 studies were identified and evaluated on tumor incidence (n = 24), tumor growth (n = 33), or metastasis (n = 10). We report that the current evidence base is plagued by considerable methodologic heterogeneity in all aspects of study design, endpoints, and efficacy. Such heterogeneity precludes meaningful comparisons and conclusions at present. To this end, we provide a framework of methodologic and data reporting standards to strengthen the field to guide the conduct of high-quality studies required to inform translational, mechanism-driven clinical trials. Cancer Res; 76(14); 4032-50. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Tissue Engineering of the Urethra: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Preclinical and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteegden, Luuk R M; de Jonge, Paul K J D; IntHout, Joanna; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Feitz, Wout F J; de Vries, Rob B M; Daamen, Willeke F

    2017-10-01

    Urethra repair by tissue engineering has been extensively studied in laboratory animals and patients, but is not routinely used in clinical practice. To systematically investigate preclinical and clinical evidence of the efficacy of tissue engineering for urethra repair in order to stimulate translation of preclinical studies to the clinic. A systematic search strategy was applied in PubMed and EMBASE. Studies were independently screened for relevance by two reviewers, resulting in 80 preclinical and 23 clinical studies of which 63 and 13 were selected for meta-analysis to assess side effects, functionality, and study completion. Analyses for preclinical and clinical studies were performed separately. Full circumferential and inlay procedures were assessed independently. Evaluated parameters included seeding of cells and type of biomaterial. Meta-analysis revealed that cell seeding significantly reduced the probability of encountering side effects in preclinical studies. Remarkably though, cells were only sparsely used in the clinic (4/23 studies) and showed no significant reduction of side effects. ln 21 out of 23 clinical studies, decellularized templates were used, while in preclinical studies other biomaterials showed promising outcomes as well. No direct comparison to current clinical practice could be made due to the limited number of randomized controlled studies. Due to a lack of controlled (pre)clinical studies, the efficacy of tissue engineering for urethra repair could not be determined. Meta-analysis outcome measures were similar to current treatment options described in literature. Surprisingly, it appeared that favorable preclinical results, that is inclusion of cells, were not translated to the clinic. Improved (pre)clinical study designs may enhance clinical translation. We reviewed all available literature on urethral tissue engineering to assess the efficacy in preclinical and clinical studies. We show that improvements to (pre)clinical study

  9. Use of preclinical dog studies and absorption modeling to facilitate late stage formulation bridging for a BCS II drug candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesisoglou, Filippos

    2014-02-01

    Formulation changes are common during drug development either due to clinical or manufacturing considerations. These changes especially at later stages of drug development oftentimes raise questions on the potential impact of a new formulation on bioavailability. In this work, the preclinical assessment of formulation bridging risk for a Biopharmaceutics Classification System II development compound is presented. Early clinical studies were conducted using a liquid-filled capsule (LFC). To assess the feasibility of a conventional solid dosage form, an initial analysis was conducted using absorption modeling which indicated conventional formulation of micronized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) could be a viable option. Subsequently, test formulations were prepared and tested in vivo in dogs. The solid formulations were able to match exposures of the LFC capsule in the dog model; in addition, a sensitivity to API PSD was observed in line with the modeling predictions. When tested in the clinic, the conventional solid formulation resulted in exposures of approximately 25% lower compared to the LFC on an equivalent dose basis; however, bridging with a small dose adjustment would be feasible. The outcome of the clinical study was better predicted by the modeling approach while the dog model appeared to somewhat overestimate absorption. Through the use of preclinical tools and modeling and simulation, a risk assessment around formulation bridging can be conducted and inform formulation decisions or subsequent clinical study designs.

  10. Preclinical studies identify novel targeted pharmacological strategies for treatment of human malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favoni, Roberto E; Daga, Antonio; Malatesta, Paolo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of human malignant pleural mesothelioma (hMPM) is still increasing worldwide. hMPM prognosis is poor even if the median survival time has been slightly improved after the introduction of the up-to-date chemotherapy. Nevertheless, large phase II/III trials support the combination of platinum derivatives and pemetrexed or raltitrexed, as preferred first-line schedule. Better understanding of the molecular machinery of hMPM will lead to the design and synthesis of novel compounds targeted against pathways identified as crucial for hMPM cell proliferation and spreading. Among them, several receptors tyrosine kinase show altered activity in subsets of hMPM. This observation suggests that these kinases might represent novel therapeutic targets in this chemotherapy-resistant disease. Over these foundations, several promising studies are ongoing at preclinical level and novel molecules are currently under evaluation as well. Yet, established tumour cell lines, used for decades to investigate the efficacy of anticancer agents, although still the main source of drug efficacy studies, after long-term cultures tend to biologically diverge from the original tumour, limiting the predictive potential of in vivo efficacy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of malignant cells capable of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, are believed to play an essential role in cancer initiation, growth, metastasization and relapse, being responsible of chemo- and radiotherapy refractoriness. According to the current carcinogenesis theory, CSCs represent the tumour-initiating cell (TIC) fraction, the only clonogenic subpopulation able to originate a tumour mass. Consequently, the recently described isolation of TICs from hMPM, the proposed main pharmacological target for novel antitumoural drugs, may contribute to better dissect the biology and multidrug resistance pathways controlling hMPM growth. PMID:22289125

  11. Maxillary sinus floor augmentation with injectable calcium phosphate cements: a pre-clinical study in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, J.W.M.; Klijn, R.J.; Meijer, G.J.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this pre-clinical study was to evaluate the biological performance of two injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) composite materials containing poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) microspheres with different properties in a maxillary sinus floor elevation model in

  12. Acute and sub-chronic pre-clinical toxicological study of Averrhoa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work was to accomplish a preclinical toxicological study of the hydroalcoholic extract (HE) from A. carambola leaves. Wistar rats and Swiss mice, both male and female, were used in these experiments. The rats were used in the acute toxicity assessment, with the extract administered at doses of 0.1 to ...

  13. Cranberries and Cancer: An Update of Preclinical Studies Evaluating the Cancer Inhibitory Potential of Cranberry and Cranberry Derived Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. Weh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cranberries are rich in bioactive constituents reported to influence a variety of health benefits, ranging from improved immune function and decreased infections to reduced cardiovascular disease and more recently cancer inhibition. A review of cranberry research targeting cancer revealed positive effects of cranberries or cranberry derived constituents against 17 different cancers utilizing a variety of in vitro techniques, whereas in vivo studies supported the inhibitory action of cranberries toward cancers of the esophagus, stomach, colon, bladder, prostate, glioblastoma and lymphoma. Mechanisms of cranberry-linked cancer inhibition include cellular death induction via apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy; reduction of cellular proliferation; alterations in reactive oxygen species; and modification of cytokine and signal transduction pathways. Given the emerging positive preclinical effects of cranberries, future clinical directions targeting cancer or premalignancy in high risk cohorts should be considered.

  14. Experimental design and reporting standards for improving the internal validity of pre-clinical studies in the field of pain: Consensus of the IMI-Europain consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knopp, K.L.; Stenfors, C.; Baastrup, Cathrine Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    , and significantly impacts the interpretation of failed attempts to replicate published findings. Evidence suggests that systematic biases in experimental design and conduct and insufficiencies in reporting play significant roles in poor reproducibility across pre-clinical studies. It then follows...... is focused on two aspects: experimental design and conduct, and study reporting. Results Minimum requirements for experimental design and conduct were agreed upon across the dimensions of animal characteristics, sample size calculations, inclusion and exclusion criteria, random allocation to groups......, allocation concealment, and blinded assessment of outcome. Building upon the Animals in Research: Reporting in vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines, reporting standards were developed for pre-clinical studies of pain. These include specific recommendations for reporting on ethical issues, experimental design...

  15. Preclinical studies of epigenetic therapies targeting histone modifiers in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth eHuffman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options for lung cancer patients have been generally limited to standard therapies or targeted interventions which involve a small number of known mutations. Although the targeted therapies are initially successful, they most often result in drug resistance, relapse and mortality. We now know that the complexity of lung cancer comes not only from genomic changes, but also from aberrant epigenetic regulatory events. Epigenetic therapies have shown promise as single agents in the treatment of hematological malignancies but have yet to meet this expectation in solid tumors thus fostering researchers to pursue new approaches in the development and use of epigenetic interventions. Here, we review some recent pre-clinical findings involving the use of drugs targeting histone modifying enzymes both as single agents and as co-therapies against lung cancer. A greater understanding of the impact of these epigenetic compounds in lung cancer signaling is needed and further evaluation in vivo is warranted in several cases based on the pre-clinical activity of a subset of compounds discussed in this review, including drugs co-targeting HDACs and EGFR, targeting Brd4 and targeting Jumonji histone demethylases.

  16. Antiobesity Effects of Anthocyanins in Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Azzini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural phytochemicals present in foods, including anthocyanins, might play a role in attenuating obesity by producing a decrease in weight and adipose tissue. This review focused on current knowledge about anthocyanins’ role in obesity and its related comorbidities reported in animal models and humans. We summarized their target identification and mechanism of action through several pathways and their final effects on health and well-being. Into consideration of ongoing researches, we highlighted the following key points: a healthy relationship between anthocyanin supplementation and antiobesity effects suffers of the same pros and cons evidenced when the beneficial responses to other phytochemical treatments towards different degenerative diseases have been considered; the different dosage applied in animal versus clinical studies; the complex metabolism and biotransformation to which anthocyanins and phytochemicals are subjected in the intestine and tissues; the possibility that different components present in the supplemented mixtures can interact generating antagonistic, synergistic, or additive effects difficult to predict, and the difference between prevention and therapy. The evolution of the field must seriously consider the need to establish new and adequate cellular and animal models which may, in turn, allow the design of more efficient and prevention-targeted clinical studies.

  17. Preclinical study evaluating a novel trocar site closure system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker PA

    2016-04-01

    times while improving closure safety. Initial animal studies have shown that the neoClose® device yields a durable fascial closure that is easy to adopt from a technical standpoint.Keywords: trocal closure, laparoscopy, trocar hernia, closure device

  18. Accelerating drug discovery for Alzheimer's disease: best practices for preclinical animal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Shineman, Diana W; Basi, Guriqbal S.; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Colton, Carol A; Greenberg, Barry D; Hollister, Beth A; Lincecum, John; Leblanc, Gabrielle G.; Lee, Linda (Bobbi) H; Luo, Feng; Morgan, Dave; Morse, Iva; Refolo, Lorenzo M; Riddell, David R.; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Animal models have contributed significantly to our understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As a result, over 300 interventions have been investigated and reported to mitigate pathological phenotypes or improve behavior in AD animal models or both. To date, however, very few of these findings have resulted in target validation in humans or successful translation to disease-modifying therapies. Challenges in translating preclinical studies to clinical...

  19. Learning style preferences: A study of Pre-clinical Medical Students in Barbados

    OpenAIRE

    NKEMCHO OJEH; NATASHA SOBERS-GRANNUM; UMA GAUR; ALAYA UDUPA; MD. ANWARUL AZIM MAJUMDER

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Educators need to be aware of different learning styles to effectively tailor instructional strategies and methods to cater to the students’ learning needs and support a conductive learning environment. The VARK [an acronym for visual (V), aural (A), read/write (R) and kinesthetic (K)] instrument is a useful model to assess learning styles. The aim of this study was to use the VARK questionnaire to determine the learning styles of pre-clinical medical students in order to compar...

  20. Exploratory study of factors related to educational scores of first preclinical year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitticharoon, Chantacha; Srisuma, Sorachai; Kanavitoon, Sawita; Summachiwakij, Sarayut

    2014-03-01

    The relationships among the scores of major subjects taught in the first preclinical year of a Thai medical school, previous academic achievements, and daily life activities are rarely explored. We therefore performed an exploratory study identifying various factors possibly related to the educational scores of these medical students. Questionnaires were sent out to all first preclinical year medical students, with 79.8% being returned (245/307 questionnaires). Positive correlations were revealed between the premedical year grade point average (pre-MD GPA) and anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry scores (R = 0.664, 0.521, and 0.653, respectively, P motivation to study medicine, student satisfaction with biochemistry, and exam performance expectations (R = 0.794, R(2) = 0.630, P < 0.001). In conclusion, pre-MD GPA and the percentage of expected reading are factors involved in producing good academic results in the first preclinical year. Anatomy and biochemistry, but not physiology, scores are influenced by satisfaction.

  1. Stance instability in preclinical SCA1 mutation carriers: A 4-year prospective posturography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanetti, Lorenzo; Alpini, Dario; Mattei, Valentina; Castaldo, Anna; Mongelli, Alessia; Brenna, Greta; Gellera, Cinzia; Mariotti, Caterina

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to study postural balance in preclinical Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) mutation carriers to identify and observe specific motor functional deficit before evident clinical manifestation. Participants were 9 asymptomatic SCA1 mutation carriers (6M/3F), aged 31.8±7years (range 22-44), and 17 age-matched non-carrier controls (5M/12F) (age 18-42). Subjects underwent postural tests on a force platform (Tetrax®-IBS, Sunlight Medical Ltd.) with and without visual feedback. Amount of body sway was represented by stability index (ST). Tests were repeated after 2- and 4-years. Estimated years to onset were calculated. In controls, ST was unchanged from baseline to 4-year evaluations in all standing conditions. SCA1 mutation carriers performed similarly to controls in the postural tasks with open eyes, whereas in conditions without visual feedback SCA1 carriers had significantly higher ST than controls at all longitudinal evaluations. Close-to-disease onset carriers (≤7years) showed more prominent time-dependent stance abnormalities (p<0.0001 for all comparisons). Traceable and progressive postural abnormalities can be observed in preclinical close-to-onset SCA1 carriers. Quantitative analysis of stance could represent a promising outcome measure in clinical trials including preclinical subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Self-reported preclinical mobility limitation and fall history as predictors of future falls in older women: prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Heinonen, A; Viljanen, A

    2010-01-01

    with preclinical mobility limitation had almost 4-fold (incidence rate ratios 3.77; 95% CI 1.02-13.92) and those with manifest mobility limitation almost 15-fold (14.66; 2.72-79.00) adjusted risk for future falls compared to those with no mobility limitation and no previous falls. Among women without fall history......We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation, described as modification of task performance without perception of difficulty, predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. Our results suggest that combined measure of self-reported preclinical mobility limitation...... and fall history may offer one possibility for inexpensive fall-risk evaluation in clinical practice. INTRODUCTION: We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. METHODS: The study population consisted of 428 community...

  3. Topically used herbal products for the treatment of hair loss: preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Anna; Herman, Andrzej P

    2017-10-01

    Currently available conventional therapies of hair loss using synthetic drugs are still imperfect and have a number of limitations. Their effectiveness as well as the safety of their use is often questioned. It has led to an increased interest in alternative treatments with fewer side-effects such as formulations containing herbs and/or their active constituents. For this purpose several electronic databases and hand-searched references were used to summarize current knowledge regarding topically used herbal products for the treatment of hair loss acquired on the basis of preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, mechanism of their action, follicular penetration and possible adverse effect of herbal products will be also described.

  4. Characterization of preclinical in vitro and in vivo ADME properties and prediction of human PK using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for YQA-14, a new dopamine D3 receptor antagonist candidate for treatment of drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Zhuang, Xiaomei; Yang, Cuiping; Li, Zheng; Xiong, Shan; Zhang, Zhiwei; Li, Jin; Lu, Chuang; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2014-07-01

    YQA-14 is a novel and selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist, with potential for the treatment of drug addiction. However, earlier compounds in its structural class tend to have poor oral bioavailability. The objectives of this study were to characterize the preclinical absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties and pharmacokinetics (PK) of YQA-14, then to simulate the clinical PK of YQA-14 using a physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model to assess the likelihood of developing YQA-14 as a clinical candidate. For human PK prediction, PBPK models were first built in preclinical species, rats and dogs, for validation purposes. The model was then modified by input of human in vitro ADME data obtained from in vitro studies. The study data showed that YQA-14 is a basic lipophilic compound, with rapid absorption (Tmax ~ 1 h) in both rats and dogs. Liver microsomal clearances and in vivo clearances were moderate in rats and dogs consistent with the moderate bioavailability observed in both species. The PBPK models built for rats and dogs simulated the observed PK data well in both species. The PBPK model refined with human data predicted that YQA-14 would have a clearance of 8.0 ml/min/kg, a volume distribution of 1.7 l/kg and a bioavailability of 16.9%. These acceptable PK properties make YQA-14 an improved candidate for further research and development as a potential dopamine D3R antagonism for the treatment of drug addiction in the clinic. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Preclinical anticancer effectiveness of a fraction from Casearia sylvestris and its component Casearin X: in vivo and ex vivo methods and microscopy examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Paulo Michel Pinheiro; Bezerra, Daniel Pereira; Silva, Jurandy do Nascimento; da Costa, Marcília Pinheiro; Ferreira, José Roberto de Oliveira; Alencar, Nylane Maria Nunes; Figueiredo, Ingrid Samantha Tavares de; Cavalheiro, Alberto José; Machado, Camila Maria Longo; Chammas, Roger; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Moraes, Manoel Odorico de; Pessoa, Claudia

    2016-06-20

    Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae) is found in South America and presents antiulcerogenic, cytotoxic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antihypertensive activities. To assess the in vivo and ex vivo antitumor action of a fraction with casearins (FC) and its main component - Casearin X-isolated from C. sylvestris leaves. Firstly, Sarcoma 180 bearing Swiss mice were treated with FC and Cas X for 7 days. Secondly, BALB/c nude animals received hollow fibers with colon carcinoma (HCT-116) or glioblastoma (SF-295) cells and were treated with FC for 4 days. On 5th day, proliferation was determined by MTT assay. FC 10 and 25mg/kg/day i.p. and 50mg/kg/day oral and Cas X 25mg/kg/day i.p. and 50mg/kg/day oral revealed tumor growth inhibition rates of 35.8, 86.2, 53.7, 90.0 and 65.5% and such tumors demonstrated rare mitoses and coagulation necrosis areas. Similarly, FC reduced multiplying of HCT-116 and SF-295 cells when evaluated by the Hollow Fiber Assay (2.5 and 5mg/kg/day i.p. and 25 and 50mg/kg/day oral), with cell growth inhibition rates ranging from 33.3 to 67.4% (p<0.05). Flow cytometry experiments revealed that FC reduced membrane integrity and induced DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization (p<0.05). FC and Cas X were efficient antitumor substances against murine and human cancer cells and caused reversible morphological changes in liver, kidneys and spleens, emphasizing clerodane diterpenes as an emerging class of anticancer molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation with in vivo optical coherence tomography and histology of the vascular effects of the everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold at two years following implantation in a healthy porcine coronary artery model: implications of pilot results for future pre-clinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.D. Gogas (Bill); M. Radu (Maria); Y. Onuma (Yoshinobu); L. Perkins (Laura); J.C. Powers (Jennifer C.); J. Gomez-Lara (Josep); V. Farooq (Vasim); H.M. Garcia-Garcia (Hector); R. Diletti (Roberto); R. Rapoza (Richard); R. Virmani (Renu); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTo quantify with in vivo OCT and histology, the device/vessel interaction after implantation of the bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS). We evaluated the area and thickness of the strut voids previously occupied by the polymeric struts, and the neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) area

  7. Preclinical medical students′ usage of electronic devices in lectures: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex W. H. Hui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Electronic devices such as laptops, tablets, and smartphones are commonly used in clinical clerkships, problem-based learning, and practicals. However, there is limited literature on electronic device usage in medical lectures. This study aimed to (1 assess preclinical medical students′ pattern and reason for electronic device usage in lectures and (2 assess the effect of lecture content and student factors on device usage. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study from the year 1 to 3 medical students of the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong. The data was collected through self-administrated questionnaires. The questionnaire was distributed twice to the same cohort of students, once after their basic medical science lectures, another after humanities lectures. Categorical variables were compared by Chi-squared test or Fisher′s exact test; continuous variables were compared by Mann-Whitney U-test or Kruskal-Wallis H-test. Results: Five hundred and seventy-nine valid questionnaires were collected. Students spent more time on electronic devices for learning in science lectures when compared with humanities lectures (P < 0.001. In contrast, students spent more time for nonlearning purposes in humanities lectures (P < 0.001. In science lectures, the mode of admission to medical school (P < 0.05 and year of study (P < 0.001 were factors affecting the device usage. Conclusions: Lecture content, mode of admission, and year of study have a significant impact on the electronic device usage in preclinical medical lectures. Appropriate interventions are necessary to help the students make better use of their devices and decrease the time spent on nonlearning purposes, particularly in humanities lectures.

  8. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis of preclinical studies: why perform them and how to appraise them critically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Emily S; Currie, Gillian L; McCann, Sarah K; Macleod, Malcolm R; Howells, David W

    2014-05-01

    The use of systematic review and meta-analysis of preclinical studies has become more common, including those of studies describing the modeling of cerebrovascular diseases. Empirical evidence suggests that too many preclinical experiments lack methodological rigor, and this leads to inflated treatment effects. The aim of this review is to describe the concepts of systematic review and meta-analysis and consider how these tools may be used to provide empirical evidence to spur the field to improve the rigor of the conduct and reporting of preclinical research akin to their use in improving the conduct and reporting of randomized controlled trials in clinical research. As with other research domains, systematic reviews are subject to bias. Therefore, we have also suggested guidance for their conduct, reporting, and critical appraisal.

  9. The interactions of anticancer agents with tea catechins: current evidence from preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Weihu; Lu, Weidong; Han, Mei; Qiao, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    Tea catechins exhibit a broad range of pharmacological activities that impart beneficial effects on human health. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), one of the major tea catechins, has been widely associated with cancer prevention and treatment. In addition, tea catechins in combination with anticancer drugs are being evaluated as a new cancer treatment strategy. However, the interactions of anticancer drugs with tea catechins are largely unknown. Accumulated data indicate significant interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, such as synergistic tumor inhibition or antagonist activity. Therefore, it is critical to understand comprehensively the effects of tea catechins on anticancer drugs. Focusing on evidence from preclinical studies, this paper will review the interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, including pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics effects. We hope that by detailing the interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, more attention will be directed to this important therapeutic combination in the future.

  10. Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Takuji [Cytopatholgy Division, Tohkai Cytopathology Institute, Cancer Research and Prevention (TCI-CaRP), 5-1-2 Minami-uzura, Gifu 500-8285 (Japan); Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan)

    2012-07-16

    Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described.

  11. Synthesis and preclinical pharmacokinetic study of DHA-10, a novel potential antifungal pogostone analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Zhou, Yanfen; Zhu, Jianwei; Ma, Bo; Fang, Zheng; Zhang, Qi

    2017-09-01

    The emergence of fungal disease calls for the urgency of development of novel drug. In this study, we developed a novel pogostone analogue, DHA-10 and investigated its preclinical pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, excretion and protein binding rate in rats. DHA-10 was synthesized with dehydroacetic acid (DHA) as the starting material and the structure confirmed by NMR and HRMS. The LC-MS/MS was applied to quantitative analysis of DHA-10 concentrations in the biological samples. DHA-10 was eliminated rapidly in rat plasma with half-lives of 3.39 ± 0.5, 3.24 ± 0.32 and 3.80 ± 0.40 h after single oral doses of 70, 140 and 280 mg/kg, respectively, and showed linear pharmacokinetic within the examined dosage range. The oral bioavailability of DHA-10 was 69.09 ± 3.9%. DHA-10 distributed widely in tissues with highest tissue concentration was found in small intestine at 2.5 h postdose, followed by the stomach, liver and uterus. Approximately, 1.50 ± 0.26% and 9.12 ± 2.53% of parent drug was excreted via the urine and faeces within 48 h, respectively; 1.45 ± 0.12% was excreted into the bile up to 36 h after a single oral administration of 140 mg/kg. Binding rate of DHA-10 with plasma protein was about 78.80 ± 1.75% in a concentration-independent manner. DHA-10 was successfully synthesized and characterized. The preclinical pharmacokinetics study in rats supported the further development of this new antifungal candidate compound. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. Observations of veterinary medicine students' approaches to study in pre-clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Marion T; Irwin, Jane A; Bannon, Finian J; Mulholland, Clive W; Baird, Alan W

    2004-01-01

    This study has two purposes. The first is to explore an instrument of evaluation of the approaches to study (deep, strategic, and surface) adopted by students in the pre-clinical years of their veterinary degree program. The second is to examine relationships between these approaches and a broad range of further factors deemed relevant to the veterinary medicine context. We envisage that a greater knowledge of how these students learn will aid curriculum reform in a way that will enrich the learning experience of veterinary students. A questionnaire consisting of the 52-question Approaches to Study Inventory (ASI) and an additional 49 questions relating mainly to teaching, assessment, and study skills was distributed to 215 veterinary medicine (MVB) students in their pre-clinical years of study. Factor analysis was used to ensure that the ASI section of the questionnaire maintained previously reported structure. The internal reliability of the approaches measured was tested using Cronbach alpha analysis. The approaches were described as frequency distributions. Associations between the parameters (deep, strategic, and surface) and 49 additional context-specific factors were investigated using loglinear analysis. (1) Factor analysis revealed that the integrity and structure of the instrument in this context was generally comparable to previous studies. (2) The impact of a high workload was evident in the surface approach, with fear of failure becoming a strong motivating factor and syllabus boundness a widely used strategy. (3) Associations made between the approaches and 49 context-specific factors showed strong associations between both workload and lack of prior knowledge with the surface approach. (4) Grades were associated positively with both the deep and strategic approaches but negatively with the surface approach. (5) A range of learning and study skills were associated positively with the deep and strategic approaches and negatively with the surface

  13. Antinociceptive properties of shikonin: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhawana; Chakraborty, Sabyasachi; Saha, Soumya; Chandel, Sunita Gulabsingh; Baranwal, Atul Kumar; Banerjee, Manish; Chatterjee, Mousumi; Chaudhury, Ashok

    2016-07-01

    Shikonin possess a diverse spectrum of pharmacological properties in multiple therapeutic areas. However, the nociceptive effect of shikonin is not largely known. To investigate the antinociceptive potential of shikonin, panel of GPCRs, ion channels, and enzymes involved in pain pathogenesis were studied. To evaluate the translation of shikonin efficacy in vivo, it was tested in 3 established rat pain models. Our study reveals that shikonin has significant inhibitory effect on pan sodium channel/N1E115 and NaV1.7 channel with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 7.6 μmol/L and 6.4 μmol/L, respectively, in a cell-based assay. Shikonin exerted significant dose dependent antinociceptive activity at doses of 0.08%, 0.05%, and 0.02% w/v in pinch pain model. In mechanical hyperalgesia model, dose of 10 and 3 mg/kg (intraperitoneal) produced dose-dependent analgesia and showed 67% and 35% reversal of hyperalgesia respectively at 0.5 h. Following oral administration, it showed 39% reversal at 30 mg/kg dose. When tested in first phase of formalin induced pain, shikonin at 10 mg/kg dose inhibited paw flinching by ∼71%. In all studied preclinical models, analgesic effect was similar or better than standard analgesic drugs. The present study unveils the mechanistic role of shikonin on pain modulation, predominantly via sodium channel modulation, suggesting that shikonin could be developed as a potential pain blocker.

  14. Abuse liability assessment in preclinical drug development: predictivity of a translational approach for abuse liability testing using methylphenidate in four standardized preclinical study models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuns, Greet B A; Geys, Helena M; Geuens, Sonja M A; Stinissen, Piet; Meert, Theo F

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical abuse liability assessment of novel clinical CNS-active candidates involves several tests, addressing different aspects characteristic for abuse potential, which are considered predictive for substance abuse of these candidates, thus ensuring an appropriate translational approach. To demonstrate how such a strategy could work, a known drug of abuse, methylphenidate was evaluated in a full rodent test battery, comprising four test models, and in accordance with the requirements of the FDA, ICH and EMA guidelines. Methylphenidate was tested orally at 2.5, 5 or 10mg/kg for its physical dependence potential in a repeated dose non-precipitated withdrawal test, for its drug profiling in a drug discrimination learning procedure (single escalating doses), and for its reinforcing properties in a conditioned place preference test (alternate dosing days) and an intravenous self-administration procedure (0.05 to 1mg/kg/IV infusion during 5 daily 1-h test sessions). The stimulant d-amphetamine served as positive control and was administered subcutaneously at 0.8mg/kg in the first three test models. In the intravenous self-administration procedure rats were habituated to intravenously self-administer d-amphetamine at 0.06mg/kg/IV infusion prior to methylphenidate substitution. Cessation of subchronic dosing up to 10mg/kg methylphenidate led to sustained or even exacerbated effects on locomotion and behavior, body temperature, body weight, food consumption, and alteration of the diurnal rhythm during withdrawal. Clear generalization to d-amphetamine was obtained in the drug discrimination test at 5 and 10mg/kg. Distinct reinforcing properties were present in the conditioned place preference test at 10mg/kg and in the intravenous self-administration study from 0.05mg/kg/IV infusion onwards. The maximum plasma exposure after oral administration of methylphenidate over the dose ranges tested in the present rat studies covered at least 1.9-fold to 18.9-fold the

  15. Preclinical studies identify non-apoptotic low-level caspase-3 as therapeutic target in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Luyet

    Full Text Available The majority of pemphigus vulgaris (PV patients suffer from a live-threatening loss of intercellular adhesion between keratinocytes (acantholysis. The disease is caused by auto-antibodies that bind to desmosomal cadherins desmoglein (Dsg 3 or Dsg3 and Dsg1 in mucous membranes and skin. A currently unresolved controversy in PV is whether apoptosis is involved in the pathogenic process. The objective of this study was to perform preclinical studies to investigate apoptotic pathway activation in PV pathogenesis with the goal to assess its potential for clinical therapy. For this purpose, we investigated mouse and human skin keratinocyte cultures treated with PV antibodies (the experimental Dsg3 monospecific antibody AK23 or PV patients IgG, PV mouse models (passive transfer of AK23 or PVIgG into adult and neonatal mice as well as PV patients' biopsies (n=6. A combination of TUNEL assay, analyses of membrane integrity, early apoptotic markers such as cleaved poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP and the collapse of actin cytoskeleton failed to provide evidence for apoptosis in PV pathogenesis. However, the in vitro and in vivo PV models, allowing to monitor progression of lesion formation, revealed an early, transient and low-level caspase-3 activation. Pharmacological inhibition confirmed the functional implication of caspase-3 in major events in PV such as shedding of Dsg3, keratin retraction, proliferation including c-Myc induction, p38MAPK activation and acantholysis. Together, these data identify low-level caspase-3 activation downstream of disrupted Dsg3 trans- or cis-adhesion as a major event in PV pathogenesis that is non-synonymous with apoptosis and represents, unlike apoptotic components, a promising target for clinical therapy. At a broader level, these results posit that an impairment of adhesive functions in concert with low-level, non-lethal caspase-3 activation can evoke profound cellular changes which may be of relevance for other

  16. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  17. Exercise as a potential treatment for drug abuse: Evidence from preclinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Andrew Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies reveal that individuals who engage in regular aerobic exercise are less likely to use and abuse illicit drugs. Until recently, very few studies had examined the causal influences that mediate this relationship, and it was not clear whether exercise was effective at reducing substance use and abuse. In the past few years, several preclinical studies have revealed that exercise reduces drug self-administration in laboratory animals. These studies have revealed that exercise produces protective effects in procedures designed to model different transitional phases that occur during the development of, and recover from, a substance use disorder (e.g., acquisition, maintenance, escalation, and relapse/reinstatement of drug use. Moreover, recent studies have revealed several behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exercise that may be responsible for its protective effects in these assays. Collectively, these studies have provided convincing evidence to support the development of exercise-based interventions to reduce compulsive patterns of drug intake in clinical and at-risk populations.

  18. Design and Reporting of Targeted Anticancer Preclinical Studies: A Meta-Analysis of Animal Studies Investigating Sorafenib Antitumor Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattina, James; MacKinnon, Nathalie; Henderson, Valerie C; Fergusson, Dean; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-08-15

    The validity of preclinical studies of candidate therapeutic agents has been questioned given their limited ability to predict their fate in clinical development, including due to design flaws and reporting bias. In this study, we examined this issue in depth by conducting a meta-analysis of animal studies investigating the efficacy of the clinically approved kinase inhibitor, sorafenib. MEDLINE, Embase, and BIOSIS databases were searched for all animal experiments testing tumor volume response to sorafenib monotherapy in any cancer published until April 20, 2012. We estimated effect sizes from experiments assessing changes in tumor volume and conducted subgroup analyses based on prespecified experimental design elements associated with internal, construct, and external validity. The meta-analysis included 97 experiments involving 1,761 animals. We excluded 94 experiments due to inadequate reporting of data. Design elements aimed at reducing internal validity threats were implemented only sporadically, with 66% reporting animal attrition and none reporting blinded outcome assessment or concealed allocation. Anticancer activity against various malignancies was typically tested in only a small number of model systems. Effect sizes were significantly smaller when sorafenib was tested against either a different active agent or combination arm. Trim and fill suggested a 37% overestimation of effect sizes across all malignancies due to publication bias. We detected a moderate dose-response in one clinically approved indication, hepatocellular carcinoma, but not in another approved malignancy, renal cell carcinoma, or when data were pooled across all malignancies tested. In support of other reports, we found that few preclinical cancer studies addressed important internal, construct, and external validity threats, limiting their clinical generalizability. Our findings reinforce the need to improve guidelines for the design and reporting of preclinical cancer studies

  19. Medicinal Plants in the Treatment of Colitis: Evidence from Preclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Marília T; Cercato, Luana M; Oliveira, Janaíne P; Camargo, Enilton A

    2017-05-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition whose treatment includes aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, and immunomodulators. Medicinal plants seem to be an important alternative treatment for this condition. They have been the subject of a great number of studies in recent years. This study was conducted to systematically review the medicinal plants tested in experimental models of ulcerative colitis. We conducted a systematic literature search through specialized databases (PUBMED, SCOPUS, EMBASE, MEDLINE, LILACS, SCIELO, and SCISEARCH) and selected articles published between January 2000 and June 21, 2016 by using "medicinal plants" and "ulcerative colitis" as key words. Sixty-eight studies were included, and the families Asteraceae and Lamiaceae presented the largest number of studies, but plants from several other families were cited; many of them have shown good results in experimental animals. However, only a few species (such as Andrographis paniculata and Punica granatum) have undergone clinical tests against ulcerative colitis, and the observation that many preclinical studies reviewed are purely descriptive has certainly contributed to this fact. Chemical constituents (mainly flavonoids and terpenes) seem to play a role in the effects of the plants. Thus, the data herein reviewed reinforce the potential of medicinal plants as a source of alternative approaches to the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Mean sojourn time of preclinical gastric cancer in Korean men: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Shin, Sang Yop; Kim, Eun Hee

    2014-07-01

    This retrospective cohort study aimed to estimate the mean sojourn time (MST) of preclinical gastric cancer in Korean men. The subjects consisted of voluntary male screenees aged 40 to 69 years who underwent subsequent screening gastroscopies after testing negative at a baseline screening performed between January 2007 and December 2011. A new case was defined if gastric cancer cells were present in the biopsy specimens obtained from gastroscopy. The follow-up period was calculated as the number of person-years between the date of baseline screening gastroscopy and positive findings at a subsequent screening. The MST was calculated using transition rates of gastric cancer to determine the best screening interval. Of the 171 979 voluntary male screenees, 61 688 (36%) underwent subsequent screening gastroscopies between January 2007 and December 2011. A total of 91 incident cases were found during 19 598 598 person-years of follow-up. The MST of gastric cancer was 2.37 years (95% confidence intervals, 1.92 to 2.96), and those aged 40 to 49 years had a shorter MST than those 50 to 69 years did. These findings support the 2-year interval of screening recommended by the nationwide gastric cancer screening program in Korea. Further studies for the age-specific MST among women are needed. This retrospective cohort study aimed to estimate the mean sojourn time (MST) of preclinical gastric cancer in Korean men. The subjects consisted of voluntary male screenees aged 40 to 69 years who underwent subsequent screening gastroscopies after testing negative at a baseline screening performed between January 2007 and December 2011. A new case was defined if gastric cancer cells were present in the biopsy specimens obtained from gastroscopy. The follow-up period was calculated as the number of person-years between the date of baseline screening gastroscopy and positive findings at a subsequent screening. The MST was calculated using transition rates of gastric cancer to determine

  1. Piperine as a potential anti-cancer agent: a Review on Preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manayi, Azadeh; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Setzer, William N; Jafari, Samineh

    2017-05-23

    Recently many studies showed anticancer activities of piperine, a pungent alkaloid found in black pepper and some other Piper species. We attempted to summarize acquired data that support anticancer potential of this natural agent. Piperine has been reported to possess effective chemopreventive activity. It has been studied to affect several mechanisms of action, in brief enhancing antioxidant system, increasing level and activity of detoxifying enzymes and suppressing stem cell self-renewal. Moreover, piperine has been found to inhibit proliferation and survival of various cancerous cell lines via modulating cell cycle progression and exhibiting anti-apoptotic activity, respectively. This compound has been shown to modify activity of various enzymes and transcription factors to inhibit invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Interestingly, piperine has exhibited antimutagenic activity and also inhibited activity and expression of multidrug resistance transporters such as P-gp and MRP-1. Besides, about all reviewed studies have reported selective cytotoxic activity of piperine on cancerous cells in compared with normal cells. Altogether, the studies completely underline promising candidacy of piperine for further development. The collected preclinical data we provided in this article can be useful in the design of future researches especially clinical trials with piperine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Review of Preclinical and Clinical Studies of Bone Marrow-Derived Cell Therapies for Intracerebral Hemorrhage

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    Paulo Henrique Rosado-de-Castro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the second leading cause of mortality worldwide, causing millions of deaths annually, and is also a major cause of disability-adjusted life years. Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately 10 to 27% of all cases and has a fatality rate of about 50% in the first 30 days, with limited treatment possibilities. In the past two decades, the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived cells (particularly mesenchymal stem cells and mononuclear cells has been intensively investigated in preclinical models of different neurological diseases, including models of intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. More recently, clinical studies, most of them small, unblinded, and nonrandomized, have suggested that the therapy with bone marrow-derived cells is safe and feasible in patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. This review discusses the available evidence on the use of bone marrow-derived cells to treat hemorrhagic strokes. Distinctive properties of animal studies are analyzed, including study design, cell dose, administration route, therapeutic time window, and possible mechanisms of action. Furthermore, clinical trials are also reviewed and discussed, with the objective of improving future studies in the field.

  3. Learning style preferences: A study of pre-clinical medical students in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeh, Nkemcho; Sobers-Grannum, Natasha; Gaur, Uma; Udupa, Alaya; Majumder, Md Anwarul Azim

    2017-10-01

    Educators need to be aware of different learning styles to effectively tailor instructional strategies and methods to cater to the students' learning needs and support a conductive learning environment. The VARK [an acronym for visual (V), aural (A), read/write (R) and kinesthetic (K)] instrument is a useful model to assess learning styles. The aim of this study was to use the VARK questionnaire to determine the learning styles of pre-clinical medical students in order to compare the perceived and assessed learning style preferences, assess gender differences in learning style preferences, and determine whether any relationships exists between awareness of learning styles and academic grades, age, gender and learning modality. The VARK questionnaire was administered to pre-clinical students taking a variety of courses in the first three years of the undergraduate MB BS degree programme at the Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados in 2014. The majority of the students were multimodal learners with no differences observed between males (59.5%) and females (60.0%), with tetramodal being the most common. Read/write (33.8%) followed by kinesthetic (32.5%) were the most common learning style preferences. The sensory modality preference for females was read/write (34.2%) and for males it was kinesthetic (40.5%). Significant differences were observed between the perceived and assessed learning style preferences with a majority of visual and read/write learners correctly matching their perceived to their actual learning styles. Awareness of learning styles was associated with learning modality but not with academic performance, age or gender. Overall, 60.7% of high achievers used multimodal learning compared to 56.9% low achievers. The findings from this study indicated that the VARK tool was useful in gathering information about different learning styles, and might assist educators in designing blended teaching

  4. Learning style preferences: A study of Pre-clinical Medical Students in Barbados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NKEMCHO OJEH

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Educators need to be aware of different learning styles to effectively tailor instructional strategies and methods to cater to the students’ learning needs and support a conductive learning environment. The VARK [an acronym for visual (V, aural (A, read/write (R and kinesthetic (K] instrument is a useful model to assess learning styles. The aim of this study was to use the VARK questionnaire to determine the learning styles of pre-clinical medical students in order to compare the perceived and assessed learning style preferences, assess gender differences in learning style preferences, and determine whether any relationships exists between awareness of learning styles and academic grades, age, gender and learning modality. Methods: The VARK questionnaire was administered to preclinical students taking a variety of courses in the first three years of the undergraduate MB BS degree programme at the Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados in 2014. Results: The majority of the students were multimodal learners with no differences observed between males (59.5% and females (60.0%, with tetramodal being the most common. Read/write (33.8% followed by kinesthetic (32.5% were the most common learning style preferences. The sensory modality preference for females was read/write (34.2% and for males it was kinesthetic (40.5%. Significant differences were observed between the perceived and assessed learning style preferences with a majority of visual and read/write learners correctly matching their perceived to their actual learning styles. Awareness of learning styles was associated with learning modality but not with academic performance, age or gender. Overall, 60.7% of high achievers used multimodal learning compared to 56.9% low achievers. Conclusion: The findings from this study indicated that the VARK tool was useful in gathering information about different learning styles, and might

  5. Learning style preferences: A study of pre-clinical medical students in Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    OJEH, NKEMCHO; SOBERS-GRANNUM, NATASHA; GAUR, UMA; UDUPA, ALAYA; MAJUMDER, MD.ANWARUL AZIM

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Educators need to be aware of different learning styles to effectively tailor instructional strategies and methods to cater to the students’ learning needs and support a conductive learning environment. The VARK [an acronym for visual (V), aural (A), read/write (R) and kinesthetic (K)] instrument is a useful model to assess learning styles. The aim of this study was to use the VARK questionnaire to determine the learning styles of pre-clinical medical students in order to compare the perceived and assessed learning style preferences, assess gender differences in learning style preferences, and determine whether any relationships exists between awareness of learning styles and academic grades, age, gender and learning modality. Methods: The VARK questionnaire was administered to pre-clinical students taking a variety of courses in the first three years of the undergraduate MB BS degree programme at the Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados in 2014. Results: The majority of the students were multimodal learners with no differences observed between males (59.5%) and females (60.0%), with tetramodal being the most common. Read/write (33.8%) followed by kinesthetic (32.5%) were the most common learning style preferences. The sensory modality preference for females was read/write (34.2%) and for males it was kinesthetic (40.5%). Significant differences were observed between the perceived and assessed learning style preferences with a majority of visual and read/write learners correctly matching their perceived to their actual learning styles. Awareness of learning styles was associated with learning modality but not with academic performance, age or gender. Overall, 60.7% of high achievers used multimodal learning compared to 56.9% low achievers. Conclusion: The findings from this study indicated that the VARK tool was useful in gathering information about different learning styles, and might assist

  6. Examination performances of German and international medical students in the preclinical studying-term--a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D; Resch, F; Duelli, R; Möltner, A; Huber, J; Karimian Jazi, K; Amr, A; Eckart, W; Herzog, W; Nikendei, C

    2014-01-01

    Medical students with a migration background face several specific problems during their studies. International surveys show first indications that this group of students performs worse in written, oral or practical exams. However, so far, nothing is known about the performance of international students in written pre-clinical tests as well as in pre-clinical State Examinations for German-speaking countries. A descriptive, retrospective analysis of the exam performances of medical students in the pre-clinical part of their studies was conducted at the Faculty of Medicine of Heidelberg in for the year 2012. Performance in written tests of the final exams in the second (N=276), third (N=292) and fourth semester (N=285) were compared between German students, students from EU countries and students from non-EU countries. Same comparison was drawn for the performance in the oral exam of the First State Examination in the period from 2009 - 2012 (N=1137). German students performed significantly better than students with a non-EU migration background both in all written exams and in the oral State Examination (all pstudents with an EU migration background was significantly better than that of students with a non-EU background in the written exam at the end of the third and fourth semester (pstudents completed the oral exam of the First State Examination significantly earlier than students with a non-EU migration background (students with a country of origin outside of the European Union has to be seen as a high-risk group among students with a migration background. For this group, there is an urgent need for early support to prepare for written and oral examinations.

  7. Examination performances of German and international medical students in the preclinical studying-term – A descriptive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D.; Resch, F.; Duelli, R.; Möltner, A.; Huber, J.; Karimian Jazi, K.; Amr, A.; Eckart, W.; Herzog, W.; Nikendei, C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students with a migration background face several specific problems during their studies. International surveys show first indications that this group of students performs worse in written, oral or practical exams. However, so far, nothing is known about the performance of international students in written pre-clinical tests as well as in pre-clinical State Examinations for German-speaking countries. Method: A descriptive, retrospective analysis of the exam performances of medical students in the pre-clinical part of their studies was conducted at the Faculty of Medicine of Heidelberg in for the year 2012. Performance in written tests of the final exams in the second (N=276), third (N=292) and fourth semester (N=285) were compared between German students, students from EU countries and students from non-EU countries. Same comparison was drawn for the performance in the oral exam of the First State Examination in the period from 2009 - 2012 (N=1137). Results: German students performed significantly better than students with a non-EU migration background both in all written exams and in the oral State Examination (all pstudents with an EU migration background was significantly better than that of students with a non-EU background in the written exam at the end of the third and fourth semester (pstudents completed the oral exam of the First State Examination significantly earlier than students with a non-EU migration background (students with a country of origin outside of the European Union has to be seen as a high-risk group among students with a migration background. For this group, there is an urgent need for early support to prepare for written and oral examinations. PMID:25228931

  8. Preclinical Metabolism, Pharmacokinetics and In Vivo Analysis of New Blood-Brain-Barrier Penetrant Fingolimod Analogues: FTY720-C2 and FTY720-Mitoxy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius O Enoru

    similar to FTY720, except without phosphorylated species that cause S1P1-mediated-immunosuppression; and (iii stimulated in vivo PP2A activity, all of which encourage additional preclinical assessment.

  9. Mean Sojourn Time of Preclinical Gastric Cancer in Korean Men: A Retrospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Myon Bae

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This retrospective cohort study aimed to estimate the mean sojourn time (MST of preclinical gastric cancer in Korean men. Methods: The subjects consisted of voluntary male screenees aged 40 to 69 years who underwent subsequent screening gastroscopies after testing negative at a baseline screening performed between January 2007 and December 2011. A new case was defined if gastric cancer cells were present in the biopsy specimens obtained from gastroscopy. The follow-up period was calculated as the number of person-years between the date of baseline screening gastroscopy and positive findings at a subsequent screening. The MST was calculated using transition rates of gastric cancer to determine the best screening interval. Results: Of the 171 979 voluntary male screenees, 61 688 (36% underwent subsequent screening gastroscopies between January 2007 and December 2011. A total of 91 incident cases were found during 19 598 598 person-years of follow-up. The MST of gastric cancer was 2.37 years (95% confidence intervals, 1.92 to 2.96, and those aged 40 to 49 years had a shorter MST than those 50 to 69 years did. Conclusions: These findings support the 2-year interval of screening recommended by the nationwide gastric cancer screening program in Korea. Further studies for the age-specific MST among women are needed.

  10. Copper-64 Dichloride as Theranostic Agent for Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Preclinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a median survival time less than one year. To date, there are only a limited number of effective agents available for GBM therapy and this does not seem to add much survival advantage over the conventional approach based on surgery and radiotherapy. Therefore, the development of novel therapeutic approaches to GBM is essential and those based on radionuclide therapy could be of significant clinical impact. Experimental evidence has clearly demonstrated that cancer cells have a particularly high fractional content of copper inside the nucleus compared to normal cells. This behavior can be conveniently exploited both for diagnosis and for delivering therapeutic payloads (theranostic of the radionuclide copper-64 into the nucleus of cancerous cells by intravenous administration of its simplest chemical form as dichloride salt [64Cu]CuCl2. To evaluate the potential theranostic role of [64Cu]CuCl2 in GBM, the present work reports results from a preclinical study carried out in a xenografted GBM tumor mouse model. Biodistribution data of this new agent were collected using a small-animal PET tomograph. Subsequently, groups of tumor implanted nude mice were treated with [64Cu]CuCl2 to simulate single- and multiple-dose therapy protocols, and results were analyzed to estimate therapeutic efficacy.

  11. Bosutinib : a review of preclinical and clinical studies in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Francesca; Piazza, Rocco; Vagge, Elisabetta; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematopoietic stem cell disease. It is characterized by a Bcr-Abl (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson leukemia virus) tyrosine kinase fusion protein produced from the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib was the first targeted therapy licensed for patients with chronic-phase CML. In recent years, many other TKIs have been approved for the treatment of patients with CML. For this reason, the choice of the best strategy treatment has become increasingly complex. Bosutinib , a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, has shown potent activity against CML and it has been approved by the US FDA for the treatment of chronic, accelerated or blast-phase Ph+ CML. This review was conducted to describe the preclinical and clinical activity of bosutinib and the safety and tolerability of the drug in the treatment of CML. Included studies were identified through a search of electronic databases in July 2013 and relevant conference proceedings. Imatinib continues to represent the treatment of choice for CML. However, some patients develop resistance or intolerance to imatinib or to other second-generation TKIs. Bosutinib shows a good therapeutic activity with a benign safety profile, no cardiovascular toxicity, and offers an important therapeutic addition to the armamentarium that physicians can use against resistant CML.

  12. Copper-64 Dichloride as Theranostic Agent for Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Cristina; Asabella, Artor Niccoli; Villano, Carlo; Giacobbi, Beatrice; Coccetti, Daniela; Panichelli, Paola; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a median survival time less than one year. To date, there are only a limited number of effective agents available for GBM therapy and this does not seem to add much survival advantage over the conventional approach based on surgery and radiotherapy. Therefore, the development of novel therapeutic approaches to GBM is essential and those based on radionuclide therapy could be of significant clinical impact. Experimental evidence has clearly demonstrated that cancer cells have a particularly high fractional content of copper inside the nucleus compared to normal cells. This behavior can be conveniently exploited both for diagnosis and for delivering therapeutic payloads (theranostic) of the radionuclide copper-64 into the nucleus of cancerous cells by intravenous administration of its simplest chemical form as dichloride salt [(64)Cu]CuCl2. To evaluate the potential theranostic role of [(64)Cu]CuCl2 in GBM, the present work reports results from a preclinical study carried out in a xenografted GBM tumor mouse model. Biodistribution data of this new agent were collected using a small-animal PET tomograph. Subsequently, groups of tumor implanted nude mice were treated with [(64)Cu]CuCl2 to simulate single- and multiple-dose therapy protocols, and results were analyzed to estimate therapeutic efficacy.

  13. Correlates of preclinical cardiovascular disease in Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw A Andrew

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high frequency of premature death from cardiovascular disease in indigenous Australians is often attributed to the high prevalence of risk factors, especially type II diabetes mellitus (DM. We evaluated the relationship of ethnicity to atherosclerotic burden, as evidenced by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT, independent of risk factor status. Methods We studied 227 subjects (147 men; 50 ± 13 y: 119 indigenous subjects with (IDM, n = 54, and without DM (InDM, n = 65, 108 Caucasian subjects with (CDM, n = 52, and without DM (CnDM, n = 56. IMT was measured according to standard methods and compared with clinical data and cardiovascular risk factors. Results In subjects both with and without DM, IMT was significantly greater in indigenous subjects. There were no significant differences in gender, body mass index (BMI, systolic blood pressure (SBP, or diastolic blood pressure (DBP between any of the groups, and subjects with DM showed no difference in plasma HbA1c. Cardiovascular risk factors were significantly more prevalent in indigenous subjects. Nonetheless, ethnicity (β = -0.34; p Conclusion Ethnicity appears to be an independent correlate of preclinical cardiovascular disease, even after correction for the high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in indigenous Australians. Standard approaches to control currently known risk factors are vital to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease, but in themselves may be insufficient to fully address the high prevalence in this population.

  14. Recent Developments in ADC Technology: Preclinical Studies Signal Future Clinical Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Penelope M; Rabuka, David

    2017-11-08

    The antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) field is in a transitional period. Older approaches to conjugate composition and dosing regimens still dominate the ADC clinical pipeline, but preclinical work is driving a rapid evolution in how we strategize to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity towards better therapeutic outcomes. These advances are largely based upon a body of investigational studies that together offer a deeper understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) and drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) fates of both the intact conjugate and its small-molecule component. Knowing where the drug goes and how it is processed allows mechanistic connections to be drawn with commonly observed clinical toxicities. The field is also starting to consider ADC interactions with the immune system and potential synergistic therapeutic opportunities therein. In an indication of future directions for the field, antibody conjugates bearing non-cytotoxic small-molecule payloads are being developed to reduce side effects associated with treatment of chronic diseases. ADCs are not a magic bullet to cure disease. However, they will increasingly become valuable therapeutic tools to improve patient outcomes across a variety of indications.

  15. Incorporating iPads into a preclinical curriculum: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paul; Dumenco, Luba; Doyle, Richard; Dollase, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of technology into medical education is critical for learners. Little is known about the effect of integrating iPad technology into undergraduate medical education. We introduced iPads into the first-year curriculum in 2011-2012. We aimed to evaluate students' use of, and attitudes toward, the iPad. We administered two surveys to students during the 2011-2012 academic year. Additionally, we conducted focus groups to further evaluate the effectiveness of iPad integration into the curriculum. Survey data reflect mixed attitudes toward the use of the iPad in the preclinical curriculum. While a vast majority of students agree "the iPad has value in the medical curriculum" (79% in the first survey; 65% in the second survey), there was a decrease over time in the view that "the iPad is a positive addition to the curriculum" (75% in the first survey; 49% in the second survey). Focus group data indicate students appreciate certain aspects of iPad use in the curriculum, including improved curriculum interactivity, but the majority believe it cannot replace printed handouts at this time. The iPad provides some benefits in undergraduate medical education. More studies are necessary to determine how the iPad is best incorporated into medical education.

  16. Efficacy of stem cells on periodontal regeneration: Systematic review of pre-clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, S A; Sergio, N Z; Misawa, M Y O; Villar, C C

    2017-10-01

    This systematic review aims to evaluate mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) periodontal regenerative potential in animal models. MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS databases were searched for quantitative pre-clinical controlled animal model studies that evaluated the effect of local administration of MSC on periodontal regeneration. The systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement guidelines. Twenty-two studies met the inclusion criteria. Periodontal defects were surgically created in all studies. In seven studies, periodontal inflammation was experimentally induced following surgical defect creation. Differences in defect morphology were identified among the studies. Autogenous, alogenous and xenogenous MSC were used to promote periodontal regeneration. These included bone marrow-derived MSC, periodontal ligament (PDL)-derived MSC, dental pulp-derived MSC, gingival margin-derived MSC, foreskin-derived induced pluripotent stem cells, adipose tissue-derived MSC, cementum-derived MSC, periapical follicular MSC and alveolar periosteal cells. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneities in study designs. In most of the studies, local MSC implantation was not associated with adverse effects. The use of bone marrow-derived MSC for periodontal regeneration yielded conflicting results. In contrast, PDL-MSC consistently promoted increased PDL and cementum regeneration. Finally, the adjunct use of MSC improved the regenerative outcomes of periodontal defects treated with membranes or bone substitutes. Despite the quality level of the existing evidence, the current data indicate that the use of MSC may provide beneficial effects on periodontal regeneration. The various degrees of success of MSC in periodontal regeneration are likely to be related to the use of heterogeneous cells. Thus, future studies need to identify phenotypic profiles of highly regenerative MSC populations. © 2017 John Wiley

  17. Robust modeling in screening studies: estimation of sensitivity and preclinical sojourn time distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu; Zelen, Marvin

    2005-10-01

    In early-detection clinical trials, quantities such as the sensitivity of the screening modality and the preclinical duration of the disease are important to describe the natural history of the disease and its interaction with a screening program. Assume that the schedule of a screening program is periodic and that the sojourn time in the preclinical state has a piecewise density function. Modeling the preclinical sojourn time distribution as a piecewise density function results in robust estimation of the distribution function. Our aim is to estimate the piecewise density function and the examination sensitivity using both generalized least squares and maximum likelihood methods. We carried out extensive simulations to evaluate the performance of the methods of estimation. The different estimation methods provide complimentary tools to obtain the unknown parameters. The methods are applied to three breast cancer early-detection trials.

  18. The effect of radiofrequency ablation on different organs: Ex vivo and in vivo comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo Na [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyunchul, E-mail: rhimhc@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dongil; Kim, Young-sun; Lee, Min Woo; Chang, Ilsoo; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo K. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purposes of this study are to evaluate the ex vivo and in vivo efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on different porcine tissues by the ablation of three different sites simultaneously. Materials and methods: A multichannel RFA system, enables three separate tumors to be ablated simultaneously, was used. RFA procedures were applied to normal porcine liver, kidney, and muscle together ex vivo (n = 12) and in vivo (n = 17). Pre-impedances, defined as baseline systemic impedances of tissues before beginning RFA, and the areas of ablation zones were measured and compared. Results: The areas of ablation zones among three organs had a significant difference in decreasing order as follows: liver, muscle, and kidney in the ex vivo study (p = 0.001); muscle, liver, and kidney in the in vivo study (p < 0.0001). The areas of ablation zones between ex vivo and in vivo had a significant difference in the liver and muscle (each p < 0.05). There was no significant correlation between the areas of ablation zones and pre-impedances in both studies. Conclusions: Renal RFA produced the smallest ablation zone in both in vivo and ex vivo studies. Muscular RFA demonstrated the largest ablation zone in the in vivo study, and hepatic RFA showed the largest ablation zone in the ex vivo study. This variability in the tissues should be considered for performing an optimized RFA for each organ site.

  19. Facilitating healthcare decisions by assessing the certainty in the evidence from preclinical animal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijmans, Carlijn R.; de Vries, Rob B. M.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Leeflang, Mariska M.; IntHout, Joanna; Wever, Kimberley E.; Hooft, Lotty; de Beer, Hans; Kuijpers, Ton; Macleod, Malcolm R.; Sena, Emily S.; ter Riet, Gerben; Morgan, Rebecca L.; Thayer, Kristina A.; Rooney, Andrew A.; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Schünemann, Holger J.

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory animal studies are used in a wide range of human health related research areas, such as basic biomedical research, drug research, experimental surgery and environmental health. The results of these studies can be used to inform decisions regarding clinical research in humans, for example the decision to proceed to clinical trials. If the research question relates to potential harms with no expectation of benefit (e.g., toxicology), studies in experimental animals may provide the only relevant or controlled data and directly inform clinical management decisions. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are important tools to provide robust and informative evidence summaries of these animal studies. Rating how certain we are about the evidence could provide important information about the translational probability of findings in experimental animal studies to clinical practice and probably improve it. Evidence summaries and certainty in the evidence ratings could also be used (1) to support selection of interventions with best therapeutic potential to be tested in clinical trials, (2) to justify a regulatory decision limiting human exposure (to drug or toxin), or to (3) support decisions on the utility of further animal experiments. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach is the most widely used framework to rate the certainty in the evidence and strength of health care recommendations. Here we present how the GRADE approach could be used to rate the certainty in the evidence of preclinical animal studies in the context of therapeutic interventions. We also discuss the methodological challenges that we identified, and for which further work is needed. Examples are defining the importance of consistency within and across animal species and using GRADE’s indirectness domain as a tool to predict translation from animal models to humans. PMID:29324741

  20. Facilitating healthcare decisions by assessing the certainty in the evidence from preclinical animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijmans, Carlijn R; de Vries, Rob B M; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Rovers, Maroeska M; Leeflang, Mariska M; IntHout, Joanna; Wever, Kimberley E; Hooft, Lotty; de Beer, Hans; Kuijpers, Ton; Macleod, Malcolm R; Sena, Emily S; Ter Riet, Gerben; Morgan, Rebecca L; Thayer, Kristina A; Rooney, Andrew A; Guyatt, Gordon H; Schünemann, Holger J; Langendam, Miranda W

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory animal studies are used in a wide range of human health related research areas, such as basic biomedical research, drug research, experimental surgery and environmental health. The results of these studies can be used to inform decisions regarding clinical research in humans, for example the decision to proceed to clinical trials. If the research question relates to potential harms with no expectation of benefit (e.g., toxicology), studies in experimental animals may provide the only relevant or controlled data and directly inform clinical management decisions. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are important tools to provide robust and informative evidence summaries of these animal studies. Rating how certain we are about the evidence could provide important information about the translational probability of findings in experimental animal studies to clinical practice and probably improve it. Evidence summaries and certainty in the evidence ratings could also be used (1) to support selection of interventions with best therapeutic potential to be tested in clinical trials, (2) to justify a regulatory decision limiting human exposure (to drug or toxin), or to (3) support decisions on the utility of further animal experiments. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach is the most widely used framework to rate the certainty in the evidence and strength of health care recommendations. Here we present how the GRADE approach could be used to rate the certainty in the evidence of preclinical animal studies in the context of therapeutic interventions. We also discuss the methodological challenges that we identified, and for which further work is needed. Examples are defining the importance of consistency within and across animal species and using GRADE's indirectness domain as a tool to predict translation from animal models to humans.

  1. Phospholipogenic Pharmaceuticals Are Associated with a Higher Incidence of Histological Findings than Nonphospholipogenic Pharmaceuticals in Preclinical Toxicology Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda R. Barone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While phospholipidosis is thought to be an adaptive response to chemical challenge, many phospholipogenic compounds are known to display adverse effects in preclinical species and humans. To investigate the link between phospholipogenic administration and incidence of preclinical histological signals, an internal AstraZeneca in vivo toxicology report database was searched to identify phospholipogenic and nonphospholipogenic compounds. The datasets assembled comprised 46 phospholipogenic and 62 nonphospholipogenic compounds. The phospholipogenic potential of these compounds was confirmed by a pathologist's interpretation and was supported by well-validated in silico and in vitro models. The phospholipogenic dataset contained 37 bases, 4 neutral compounds, 3 zwitterions, and 1 acid, whereas the nonphospholipogenic dataset contained 9 bases, 34 neutrals, 1 zwitterion, and 18 acids. Histologic findings were tracked for adrenal gland; bone marrow; kidney; liver; lung; lymph node; spleen; thymus; and reproductive organs. On average, plasma exposures were higher in animals dosed with the nonphospholipogenics. Phospholipogenics yielded proportionally more histologic changes (exclusive of phospholipidosis itself in all organs. Statistically significant higher frequencies of liver necrosis, alveolitis/pneumonitis, as well as lymphocytolysis in the thymus, lymph nodes, and spleen occurred in response to phospholipogenics compared to that for nonphospholipogenics.

  2. A novel preservative-free seasonal influenza vaccine safety and immune response study in the frame of preclinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsenbayeva, Gulbanu; Volgin, Yevgeniy; Kassenov, Markhabat; Issagulov, Timur; Bogdanov, Nikolay; Nurpeisova, Ainur; Sagymbay, Altynay; Abitay, Ruslan; Stukova, Marina; Sansyzbay, Abylay; Khairullin, Berik

    2017-07-01

    The paper describes the results of preclinical testing of the preparation "Vaccine allantoic split-virus inactivated against seasonal influenza." Acute toxicity and local irritating effect, anaphylactic reactions to different antigens (vaccine and ovalbumin), delayed-type hypersensitivity to ram erythrocytes, humoral immune response in hemaggtination reaction, immunogenic activity was studied in laboratory animals of various species (mice, rats, guinea pigs). Comparative analysis of the results from testing immunogenic activity of the preparation under study and the commercial influenza vaccines was performed. The preclinical testing has demonstrated safety and immune response of the seasonal split influenza vaccine, so it may be recommended for clinical study on limited contingent of volunteers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Miltefosine Lipid Nanocapsules for Single Dose Oral Treatment of Schistosomiasis Mansoni: A Preclinical Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha M Eissa

    Full Text Available Miltefosine (MFS is an alkylphosphocholine used for the local treatment of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer and oral therapy of visceral leishmaniasis. Recently, the drug was reported in in vitro and preclinical studies to exert significant activity against different developmental stages of schistosomiasis mansoni, a widespread chronic neglected tropical disease (NTD. This justified MFS repurposing as a potential antischistosomal drug. However, five consecutive daily 20 mg/kg doses were needed for the treatment of schistosomiasis mansoni in mice. The present study aims at enhancing MFS efficacy to allow for a single 20mg/kg oral dose therapy using a nanotechnological approach based on lipid nanocapsules (LNCs as oral nanovectors. MFS was incorporated in LNCs both as membrane-active structural alkylphospholipid component and active antischistosomal agent. MFS-LNC formulations showed high entrapment efficiency (EE%, good colloidal properties, sustained release pattern and physical stability. Further, LNCs generally decreased MFS-induced erythrocyte hemolytic activity used as surrogate indicator of membrane activity. While MFS-free LNCs exerted no antischistosomal effect, statistically significant enhancement was observed with all MFS-LNC formulations. A maximum effect was achieved with MFS-LNCs incorporating CTAB as positive charge imparting agent or oleic acid as membrane permeabilizer. Reduction of worm load, ameliorated liver pathology and extensive damage of the worm tegument provided evidence for formulation-related efficacy enhancement. Non-compartmental analysis of pharmacokinetic data obtained in rats indicated independence of antischistosomal activity on systemic drug exposure, suggesting possible gut uptake of the stable LNCs and targeting of the fluke tegument which was verified by SEM. The study findings put forward MFS-LNCs as unique oral nanovectors combining the bioactivity of MFS and biopharmaceutical advantages of LNCs

  4. Miltefosine Lipid Nanocapsules for Single Dose Oral Treatment of Schistosomiasis Mansoni: A Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Maha M; El-Moslemany, Riham M; Ramadan, Alyaa A; Amer, Eglal I; El-Azzouni, Mervat Z; El-Khordagui, Labiba K

    2015-01-01

    Miltefosine (MFS) is an alkylphosphocholine used for the local treatment of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer and oral therapy of visceral leishmaniasis. Recently, the drug was reported in in vitro and preclinical studies to exert significant activity against different developmental stages of schistosomiasis mansoni, a widespread chronic neglected tropical disease (NTD). This justified MFS repurposing as a potential antischistosomal drug. However, five consecutive daily 20 mg/kg doses were needed for the treatment of schistosomiasis mansoni in mice. The present study aims at enhancing MFS efficacy to allow for a single 20mg/kg oral dose therapy using a nanotechnological approach based on lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) as oral nanovectors. MFS was incorporated in LNCs both as membrane-active structural alkylphospholipid component and active antischistosomal agent. MFS-LNC formulations showed high entrapment efficiency (EE%), good colloidal properties, sustained release pattern and physical stability. Further, LNCs generally decreased MFS-induced erythrocyte hemolytic activity used as surrogate indicator of membrane activity. While MFS-free LNCs exerted no antischistosomal effect, statistically significant enhancement was observed with all MFS-LNC formulations. A maximum effect was achieved with MFS-LNCs incorporating CTAB as positive charge imparting agent or oleic acid as membrane permeabilizer. Reduction of worm load, ameliorated liver pathology and extensive damage of the worm tegument provided evidence for formulation-related efficacy enhancement. Non-compartmental analysis of pharmacokinetic data obtained in rats indicated independence of antischistosomal activity on systemic drug exposure, suggesting possible gut uptake of the stable LNCs and targeting of the fluke tegument which was verified by SEM. The study findings put forward MFS-LNCs as unique oral nanovectors combining the bioactivity of MFS and biopharmaceutical advantages of LNCs, allowing targeting

  5. Preclinical in vivo and in vitro comparison of the translocator protein PET ligands [{sup 18}F]PBR102 and [{sup 18}F]PBR111

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberl, S.; Wen, L. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of Molecular Imaging (PET and Nuclear Medicine), Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Katsifis, A. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of Molecular Imaging (PET and Nuclear Medicine), Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Faculty of Pharmacy, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Peyronneau, M.A. [Universite Paris-Saclay, CEA-SHFJ, IMIV, CEA, Inserm, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, Orsay (France); Henderson, D.; Loc' h, C.; Verschuer, J.; Lam, P.; Mattner, F. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of Molecular Imaging (PET and Nuclear Medicine), Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Greguric, I.; Pham, T. [ANSTO, Radiochemistry and Radiotracers Platform, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Mohamed, A. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of Molecular Imaging (PET and Nuclear Medicine), Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Fulham, M.J. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of Molecular Imaging (PET and Nuclear Medicine), Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2017-02-15

    To determine the metabolic profiles of the translocator protein ligands PBR102 and PBR111 in rat and human microsomes and compare their in vivo binding and metabolite uptake in the brain of non-human primates (Papio hamadryas) using PET-CT. In vitro metabolic profiles of PBR102 and PBR111 in rat and human liver microsomes were assessed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. [{sup 18}F]PBR102 and [{sup 18}F]PBR111 were prepared by nucleophilic substitution of their corresponding p-toluenesulfonyl precursors with [{sup 18}F]fluoride. List mode PET-CT brain imaging with arterial blood sampling was performed in non-human primates. Blood plasma measurements and metabolite analysis, using solid-phase extraction, provided the metabolite profile and metabolite-corrected input functions for kinetic model fitting. Blocking and displacement PET-CT scans, using PK11195, were performed. Microsomal analyses identified the O-de-alkylated, hydroxylated and N-de-ethyl derivatives of PBR102 and PBR111 as the main metabolites. The O-de-alkylated compounds were the major metabolites in both species; human liver microsomes were less active than those from rat. Metabolic profiles in vivo in non-human primates and previously published rat experiments were consistent with the microsomal results. PET-CT studies showed that K{sub 1} was similar for baseline and blocking studies for both radiotracers; V{sub T} was reduced during the blocking study, suggesting low non-specific binding and lack of appreciable metabolite uptake in the brain. [{sup 18}F]PBR102 and [{sup 18}F]PBR111 have distinct metabolic profiles in rat and non-human primates. Radiometabolites contributed to non-specific binding and confounded in vivo brain analysis of [{sup 18}F]PBR102 in rodents; the impact in primates was less pronounced. Both [{sup 18}F]PBR102 and [{sup 18}F]PBR111 are suitable for PET imaging of TSPO in vivo. In vitro metabolite studies can be used to predict in vivo radioligand metabolism and

  6. Pharmacokinetics of chemotherapeutic agents in pregnancy: a preclinical and clinical study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calsteren, K. van; Verbesselt, R.; Ottevanger, N.; Halaska, M.; Heyns, L.; Bree, R. de; Bruijn, E. de; Chai, D.; Delforge, M.; Noens, L.; Renard, V.; Witteveen, E.; Rob, L.; Hoon, J. de; Amant, F.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of physiologic changes of pregnancy on pharmacokinetics of chemotherapeutic agents. DESIGN: A preclinical and a clinical case-control trial. SETTING: Institute of Primate Research Nairobi and collaborating hospitals in Belgium, the Netherlands and Czech Republic.

  7. Effect of anti-diabetic drugs on bone metabolism: Evidence from preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Mohammad; Khan, Rashid Ali; Kalam, Abul; Venkata, Shiva Kumar; Kandhare, Amit Dattatraya; Ghosh, Pinaki; Sharma, Manju

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with abnormal bone health and an increased risk of fracture even though patients have normal or higher BMD. The mechanisms behind diabetes mellitus- induced various skeletal disorders remain unclear. Anti-diabetic drugs may have negative or positive impact on bone metabolism. For instance, thiazolidinediones increases the bone loss and risk of fracture possibly through PPARγ activation in bone marrow cells and hamper osteoblastogenesis via decreasing Runx2 transcription factor, IGF-1 and Wnt signalling pathways. In contrast, metformin and sulfonylureas have a neutral or positive effect on bone health and reduced risk of fracture. Results from the preclinical and clinical studies convey conflicting findings over insulin safety profile on bone health. Incretin-based therapy (GLP-1 receptor agonist and DPP-4 inhibitors) and SGLT2 inhibitors are currently marketed anti- diabetic drugs. While evidence from animal studies suggest that incretin-based therapy have anabolic effect on bone, limited clinical data of DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonist indicated a neutral effect on the bone health and risk of fracture. SGLT2 inhibitors may cause bone loss or increase fracture risk due to altered calcium, phosphate and sodium concentration. Therefore, safety concerns of anti-diabetic drugs are crucial for the management of diabetes mellitus. In this review, analysis of the available evidence for effect of anti-diabetic drugs on the bone metabolism and fracture risk in diabetes mellitus is described. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Preclinical usability study of multiple augmented reality concepts for K-wire placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marius; Fuerst, Bernhard; Lee, Sing Chun; Fotouhi, Javad; Habert, Severine; Weidert, Simon; Euler, Ekkehard; Osgood, Greg; Navab, Nassir

    2016-06-01

    In many orthopedic surgeries, there is a demand for correctly placing medical instruments (e.g., K-wire or drill) to perform bone fracture repairs. The main challenge is the mental alignment of X-ray images acquired using a C-arm, the medical instruments, and the patient, which dramatically increases in complexity during pelvic surgeries. Current solutions include the continuous acquisition of many intra-operative X-ray images from various views, which will result in high radiation exposure, long surgical durations, and significant effort and frustration for the surgical staff. This work conducts a preclinical usability study to test and evaluate mixed reality visualization techniques using intra-operative X-ray, optical, and RGBD imaging to augment the surgeon's view to assist accurate placement of tools. We design and perform a usability study to compare the performance of surgeons and their task load using three different mixed reality systems during K-wire placements. The three systems are interventional X-ray imaging, X-ray augmentation on 2D video, and 3D surface reconstruction augmented by digitally reconstructed radiographs and live tool visualization. The evaluation criteria include duration, number of X-ray images acquired, placement accuracy, and the surgical task load, which are observed during 21 clinically relevant interventions performed by surgeons on phantoms. Finally, we test for statistically significant improvements and show that the mixed reality visualization leads to a significantly improved efficiency. The 3D visualization of patient, tool, and DRR shows clear advantages over the conventional X-ray imaging and provides intuitive feedback to place the medical tools correctly and efficiently.

  9. Electrospun vascular scaffold for cellularized small diameter blood vessels: A preclinical large animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Young Min; Ahn, Hyunhee; Arenas-Herrera, Juan; Kim, Cheil; Abolbashari, Mehran; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J; Lee, Sang Jin

    2017-09-01

    The strategy of vascular tissue engineering is to create a vascular substitute by combining autologous vascular cells with a tubular-shaped biodegradable scaffold. We have previously developed a novel electrospun bilayered vascular scaffold that provides proper biological and biomechanical properties as well as structural configuration. In this study, we investigated the clinical feasibility of a cellularized vascular scaffold in a preclinical large animal model. We fabricated the cellularized vascular construct with autologous endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-derived endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) followed by a pulsatile bioreactor preconditioning. This fully cellularized vascular construct was tested in a sheep carotid arterial interposition model. After preconditioning, confluent and mature EC and SMC layers in the scaffold were achieved. The cellularized constructs sustained the structural integrity with a high degree of graft patency without eliciting an inflammatory response over the course of the 6-month period in sheep. Moreover, the matured EC coverage on the lumen and a thick smooth muscle layer were formed at 6months after transplantation. We demonstrated that electrospun bilayered vascular scaffolds in conjunction with autologous vascular cells may be a clinically applicable alternative to traditional prosthetic vascular graft substitutes. This study demonstrates the utility of tissue engineering to provide platform technologies for rehabilitation of patients recovering from severe, devastating cardiovascular diseases. The long-term goal is to provide alternatives to vascular grafting using bioengineered blood vessels derived from an autologous cell source with a functionalized vascular scaffold. This novel bilayered vascular construct for engineering blood vessels is designed to offer "off-the-shelf" availability for clinical translation. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Alterations in the rate of binge ethanol consumption: implications for preclinical studies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsenbardt, David N; Boehm, Stephen L

    2014-09-01

    The rate at which alcohol (ethanol) is consumed has direct impact on its behavioral and subjective effects. For this reason, alterations in the pattern of ethanol consumption as a function of drinking history might be critical to the development and maintenance of alcoholism. Furthermore, because pharmacological interventions aimed at disrupting the motivation to consume ethanol are dependent on the brain/plasma concentrations present when an individual is most likely to engage in consumption of this substance, characterizing temporal drinking patterns might be useful to determine the timing of such treatments. The primary goal of the present study was to evaluate alterations in the timecourse of daily binge (drinking-in-the-dark; DID) ethanol consumption. We gave 14 daily 2 hour DID ethanol or water access sessions to male C57BL/6J (B6) mice using a state of the art volumetric drinking monitoring device. We then, primarily as a proof-of-principle, used the GABAB allosteric modulator GS39783 (GS) to determine how this compound influenced the timecourse of binge-like ethanol intake. The rate of ethanol consumption increased dramatically over sessions with the majority occurring in the first few minutes of the final session. Additionally, ethanol consumption occurring immediately following access was almost completely abolished in mice pre-treated with GS; an effect which was ethanol-specific only at this early time interval. These data characterize progressive alterations in the rate of ethanol intake using the DID model and suggest that careful consideration of prior ethanol history and timing of drug administration are warranted when interpreting results of pre-clinical drug administration studies.

  11. Electrophysiological mechanisms of Brugada syndrome: insights from pre-clinical and clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Tse

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome (BrS, is a primary electrical disorder predisposing affected individuals to sudden cardiac death via the development of ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (VT/VF. Originally, BrS was linked to mutations in the SCN5A, which encodes for the cardiac Na+ channel. To date, variants in 19 genes have been implicated in this condition, with 11, 5, 3 and 1 genes affecting the Na+, K+, Ca2+ and funny currents, respectively. Diagnosis of BrS is based on ECG criteria of coved- or saddle-shaped ST segment elevation and/or T-wave inversion with or without drug challenge. Three hypotheses based on abnormal depolarization, abnormal repolarization and current-load-mismatch have been put forward to explain the electrophysiological mechanisms responsible for BrS. Evidence from computational modelling, pre-clinical and clinical studies illustrates that molecular abnormalities found in BrS lead to alterations in excitation wavelength (λ, which ultimately elevates arrhythmic risk. A major challenge for clinicians in managing this condition is the difficulty in predicting the subset of patients who will suffer from life-threatening VT/VF. Several repolarization risk markers have been used thus far, but these neglect the contributions of conduction abnormalities in the form of slowing and dispersion. Indices incorporating both repolarization and conduction and based on the concept of λ have recently been proposed. These may have better predictive values than the existing markers. Current treatment options are pharmacotherapy to reduce the occurrence of VT/VF or to abort these episodes, and interventions include implantable cardioverter-defibrillator insertion or radiofrequency ablation of abnormal arrhythmic substrate.

  12. Pre-clinical study of drug combinations that reduce breast cancer burden due to aberrant mTOR and metabolism promoted by LKB1 loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Vieira, Rafaela; Goguen, Donna; Bentley, Heidi A.; Bowen, Chris V.; Marignani, Paola A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapies that simultaneously target activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and cell metabolism are urgently needed. The goal of our study was to identify therapies that effectively inhibited both mTOR activity and cancer cell metabolism in primary tumors in vivo. Using our mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer promoted by loss of LKB1 expression in an ErbB2 activated model; referred to as LKB1−/−NIC mice, we evaluated the effect of novel therapies in vivo on primary tumors. Treatment of LKB1−/−NIC mice with AZD8055 and 2-DG mono-therapies significantly reduced mammary gland tumorigenesis by inhibiting mTOR pathways and glycolytic metabolism; however simultaneous inhibition of these pathways with AZD8055/2-DG combination was significantly more effective at reducing tumor volume and burden. At the molecular level, combination treatment inhibited mTORC1/mTORC2 activity, selectively inhibited mitochondria function and blocked MAPK pro-survival signaling responsible for the ERK-p90RSK feedback loop. Our findings suggest that loss of LKB1 expression be considered a marker for metabolic dysfunction given its role in regulating AMPK and mTOR function. Finally, the outcome of our pre-clinical study confirms therapies that simultaneously target mTORC1/mTORC2 and glycolytic metabolism in cancer produce the best therapeutic outcome for the treatment of patients harboring metabolically active HER2 positive breast cancers. PMID:25436981

  13. In vitro and in vivo preclinical profile of abediterol (LAS100977), an inhaled long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist, compared with indacaterol, olodaterol and vilanterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparici, Mònica; Gavaldà, Amadeu; Ramos, Israel; Carcasona, Carla; Otal, Raquel; Fernández-Blanco, Joan Antoni; Montero, Jose Luís; García, Vicente Marco; López, Rosa; De Alba, Jorge; Doe, Christopher; Puig, Carlos; Vilella, Dolors; Miralpeix, Montserrat

    2016-01-05

    Abediterol is a novel long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) currently in development for once-daily combination maintenance therapy of asthma and COPD. This study investigated the preclinical profile of abediterol in terms of affinity, potency, selectivity, duration of action and cardiac effects in comparison to the marketed once-daily LABAs indacaterol, olodaterol and vilanterol. Abediterol was the compound with the highest in vitro potency for dog, guinea pig and human β2-adrenoceptors. In electrical field stimulated guinea pig trachea, abediterol demonstrated 5-, 44- and 77-fold greater potency than olodaterol, indacaterol and vilanterol, respectively. In anaesthetised guinea pigs, inhaled abediterol was also the most potent compound, with 5-20 times higher bronchoprotective potency than other once-daily LABAs against acetylcholine. The bronchoprotective half-life of abediterol in guinea pigs was 36h compared with 51h for indacaterol, 47h for olodaterol, and 18h for vilanterol. In anaesthetised dogs, abediterol also inhibited acetylcholine-induced bronchoconstriction, with higher potency than olodaterol and vilanterol [ID40 (dose inhibiting bronchoconstriction by 40%) of 0.059µg/kg, 0.180µg/kg and 2.870µg/kg, respectively]. In parallel, effects on heart rate in dogs were also measured. Abediterol showed greater safety index (defined as the ratio of the maximal dose without effect on heart rate and the ID40) than olodaterol and vilanterol (10.5 versus 4.9 and 2.4, respectively). Taken together, these data suggest that abediterol offers potent bronchodilation and a sustained duration of action suited to once-daily dosing, plus a reduced potential for class-related cardiac side effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Preclinical safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution studies with Ad35K++ protein: a novel rituximab cotherapeutic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Richter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rituximab is a mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody targeted toward CD20. It is efficient as first-line therapy of CD20-positive B-cell malignancies. However, a large fraction of treated patients relapse with rituximab-resistant disease. So far, only modest progress has been made in treatment options for rituximab refractory patients. One of the mechanisms for rituximab resistance involves the upregulation of CD46, which is a key cell surface protein that blocks the activation of complement. We have recently developed a technology that depletes CD46 from the cell surface and thereby sensitizes tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. This technology is based on a small recombinant protein, Ad35K++ that binds with high affinity to CD46. In preliminary studies using a 6 × histidinyl tagged protein, we had demonstrated that intravenous Ad35K++ injection in combination with rituximab was safe and increased rituximab-mediated killing of CD20-positive target cells in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs. The presence of the tag, while allowing for easy purification by Ni-NTA chromatography, has the potential to increase the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein. For clinical application, we therefore developed an Ad35K++ protein without His-tag. In the present study, we performed preclinical studies in two animal species (mice and NHPs with this protein demonstrating its safety and efficacy. These studies estimated the Ad35K++ dose range and treatment regimen to be used in patients. Furthermore, we showed that intravenous Ad35K++ injection triggers the shedding of the CD46 extracellular domain in xenograft mouse tumor models and in macaques. Shed serum CD46 can be measured in the serum and can potentially be used as a pharmacodynamic marker for monitoring Ad35K++ activity in patient undergoing treatment with this agent. These studies create the basis for an investigational new drug application for the use of Ad35K++ in combination with

  15. In question: the scientific value of preclinical safety pharmacology and toxicology studies with cell-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broichhausen, Christiane; Riquelme, Paloma; Ahrens, Norbert; Wege, Anja K; Koehl, Gudrun E; Schlitt, Hans J; Banas, Bernhard; Fändrich, Fred; Geissler, Edward K; Hutchinson, James A

    2014-01-01

    A new cell-based medicinal product containing human regulatory macrophages, known as Mreg_UKR, has been developed and conforms to expectations of a therapeutic drug. Here, Mreg_UKR was subjected to pharmacokinetic, safety pharmacology, and toxicological testing, which identified no adverse reactions. These results would normally be interpreted as evidence of the probable clinical safety of Mreg_UKR; however, we contend that, owing to their uncertain biological relevance, our data do not fully support this conclusion. This leads us to question whether there is adequate scientific justification for preclinical safety testing of similar novel cell-based medicinal products using animal models. In earlier work, two patients were treated with regulatory macrophages prior to kidney transplantation. In our opinion, the absence of acute or chronic adverse effects in these cases is the most convincing available evidence of the likely safety of Mreg_UKR in future recipients. On this basis, we consider that safety information from previous clinical investigations of related cell products should carry greater weight than preclinical data when evaluating the safety profile of novel cell-based medicinal products. By extension, we argue that omitting extensive preclinical safety studies before conducting small-scale exploratory clinical investigations of novel cell-based medicinal products data may be justifiable in some instances.

  16. Microbial contamination of the white coats among preclinical and clinical dental students: A comparative cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Pydi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: White coat is associated with standard of professionalism and care and helps in gaining the trust of their patients. On the other hand, these white coats are known to be potentially contaminated with pathogenic bacteria and there has been always a concern about the risk of transmitting pathogenic bacteria in hospital settings. Aims: The aim was to know the difference in microbial contamination of white coats between preclinical and clinical dental students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study done on dental students in a dental institution in a South Indian state. Fifty dental students (25 preclinical and 25 clinical were included. Sterile saline dipped cotton swabs were used to collect samples from predetermined areas. Chi-square test and Mann-Whitney U-test were used to test the significance. SPSS version 20 was used for analysis. Results: Clinical students (16% had more pathogens on their white coats than preclinical students (8%, whereas nonpathogenic commensals were more in nonclinical students (84% compared to clinical students. Conclusions: White coats are contaminated by bacteria, but further research should be carried to know the virulence of these bacteria in susceptible individuals.

  17. In question: the scientific value of preclinical safety pharmacology and toxicology studies with cell-based therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Broichhausen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new cell-based medicinal product containing human regulatory macrophages, known as Mreg_UKR, has been developed and conforms to expectations of a therapeutic drug. Here, Mreg_UKR was subjected to pharmacokinetic, safety pharmacology, and toxicological testing, which identified no adverse reactions. These results would normally be interpreted as evidence of the probable clinical safety of Mreg_UKR; however, we contend that, owing to their uncertain biological relevance, our data do not fully support this conclusion. This leads us to question whether there is adequate scientific justification for preclinical safety testing of similar novel cell-based medicinal products using animal models. In earlier work, two patients were treated with regulatory macrophages prior to kidney transplantation. In our opinion, the absence of acute or chronic adverse effects in these cases is the most convincing available evidence of the likely safety of Mreg_UKR in future recipients. On this basis, we consider that safety information from previous clinical investigations of related cell products should carry greater weight than preclinical data when evaluating the safety profile of novel cell-based medicinal products. By extension, we argue that omitting extensive preclinical safety studies before conducting small-scale exploratory clinical investigations of novel cell-based medicinal products data may be justifiable in some instances.

  18. An extended range generic immunoassay for total human therapeutic antibodies in preclinical pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Colin M; Pearson, Josh T; Patel, Vimal; Wienkers, Larry C; Greene, Robert J

    2013-07-31

    Bioanalytical support of discovery programs for human monoclonal antibody therapies involves quantitation by immunoassay. Historically, preclinical samples have been analyzed by the traditional Enzyme-Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA). We investigated transferring our generic ELISA for quantitating human IgG constructs in preclinical serum samples to an automated microfluidics immunoassay platform based on nanoscale streptavidin bead columns. Transfer of our immunoassay to the automated platform resulted in not only the anticipated reduction in analysts' time required for manual manipulation (ELISA) but also a substantial increase in the dynamic range of the immunoassay. The generic nature and wide dynamic range of this automated microcolumn immunoassay permit bioanalytical support of novel therapeutic candidates without the need to develop new, specific assay reagents and minimize the chances that sample reassays will be required due to out of range concentration results. Improved process efficiencies and enhanced workflow during the analysis of preclinical PK samples that enable high throughput assessment of a human monoclonal antibody lead in early discovery programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668, a new tracer for imaging venous thromboemboli: pre-clinical biodistribution and incorporation into plasma clots in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, David [Grove Centre, Research and Development, GE Healthcare Bio-Sciences, Little Chalfont (United Kingdom); Uppsala University Hospital, Institution of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Section of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Lewis, Joanne; Battle, Mark; Lear, Rochelle; Farrar, Gill; Barnett, D.J.; Godden, Vanessa; Oliveira, Alexandra; Coombes, Catherine [Grove Centre, Research and Development, GE Healthcare Bio-Sciences, Little Chalfont (United Kingdom); Ahlstroem, Haakan [Uppsala University Hospital, Institution of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Section of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 is a new radiotracer being developed to aid the diagnosis of thromboembolism. The structure of NC100668 is similar to a region of human {alpha}{sub 2}-antiplasmin, which is a substrate for factor XIIIa (FXIIIa). The purpose of this study was to confirm the uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 into forming plasma clot and to establish the biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 in Wistar rats. The in vitro plasma clot uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 and other compounds with known affinities to FXIIIa was measured using a plasma clot assay. The biodistribution and blood clot uptake of radioactivity of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 in normal Wistar rats and those bearing experimentally induced deep vein thrombi were investigated. The in vitro uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 was greater than that for [{sup 14}C]dansyl cadaverine, a known substrate of FXIIIa in the plasma clot assay. The biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 in male and female Wistar rats up to 24 h p.i. showed that radioactivity was rapidly excreted, predominantly into the urine, with very little background tissue retention. In vivo the uptake and retention of {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 into the blood clot was greater than could be accounted for by non-specific accumulation of the radiotracer within the blood clot. {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 was retained by plasma clots in vitro and blood clots in vivo. No significant tissue retention which could interfere with the ability to image thrombi in vivo was observed. This evidence suggests that {sup 99m}Tc-NC100668 might be useful in the detection of thromboembolism. (orig.)

  20. Preclinical dose number and its application in understanding drug absorption risk and formulation design for preclinical species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuelfing, W Peter; Daublain, Pierre; Kesisoglou, Filippos; Templeton, Allen; McGregor, Caroline

    2015-04-06

    In the drug discovery setting, the ability to rapidly identify drug absorption risk in preclinical species at high doses from easily measured physical properties is desired. This is due to the large number of molecules being evaluated and their high attrition rate, which make resource-intensive in vitro and in silico evaluation unattractive. High-dose in vivo data from rat, dog, and monkey are analyzed here, using a preclinical dose number (PDo) concept based on the dose number described by Amidon and other authors (Pharm. Res., 1993, 10, 264-270). PDo, as described in this article, is simply calculated as dose (mg/kg) divided by compound solubility in FaSSIF (mg/mL) and approximates the volume of biorelevant media per kilogram of animal that would be needed to fully dissolve the dose. High PDo values were found to be predictive of difficulty in achieving drug exposure (AUC)-dose proportionality in in vivo studies, as could be expected; however, this work analyzes a large data set (>900 data points) and provides quantitative guidance to identify drug absorption risk in preclinical species based on a single solubility measurement commonly carried out in drug discovery. Above the PDo values defined, >50% of all in vivo studies exhibited poor AUC-dose proportionality in rat, dog, and monkey, and these values can be utilized as general guidelines in discovery and early development to rapidly assess risk of solubility-limited absorption for a given compound. A preclinical dose number generated by biorelevant dilutions of formulated compounds (formulated PDo) was also evaluated and defines solubility targets predictive of suitable AUC-dose proportionality in formulation development efforts. Application of these guidelines can serve to efficiently identify compounds in discovery that are likely to present extreme challenges with respect to solubility-limited absorption in preclinical species as well as reduce the testing of poor formulations in vivo, which is a key

  1. Evaluation of focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants: a preclinical safety study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Robert K.; Wise, Andrew K.; Enke, Ya Lang; Carter, Paul M.; Fallon, James B.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Cochlear implants (CIs) have a limited number of independent stimulation channels due to the highly conductive nature of the fluid-filled cochlea. Attempts to develop highly focused stimulation to improve speech perception in CI users includes the use of simultaneous stimulation via multiple current sources. Focused multipolar (FMP) stimulation is an example of this approach and has been shown to reduce interaction between stimulating channels. However, compared with conventional biphasic current pulses generated from a single current source, FMP is a complex stimulus that includes extended periods of stimulation before charge recovery is achieved, raising questions on whether chronic stimulation with this strategy is safe. The present study evaluated the long-term safety of intracochlear stimulation using FMP in a preclinical animal model of profound deafness. Approach. Six cats were bilaterally implanted with scala tympani electrode arrays two months after deafening, and received continuous unilateral FMP stimulation at levels that evoked a behavioural response for periods of up to 182 d. Electrode impedance, electrically-evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) and auditory brainstem responses (EABRs) were monitored periodically over the course of the stimulation program from both the stimulated and contralateral control cochleae. On completion of the stimulation program cochleae were examined histologically and the electrode arrays were evaluated for evidence of platinum (Pt) corrosion. Main results. There was no significant difference in electrode impedance between control and chronically stimulated electrodes following long-term FMP stimulation. Moreover, there was no significant difference between ECAP and EABR thresholds evoked from control or stimulated cochleae at either the onset of stimulation or at completion of the stimulation program. Chronic FMP stimulation had no effect on spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) survival when compared with

  2. Choosing preclinical study models of diabetic retinopathy: key problems for consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi XS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Xue-Song Mi,1,2 Ti-Fei Yuan,3,4 Yong Ding,1 Jing-Xiang Zhong,1 Kwok-Fai So4,5 1Department of Ophthalmology, First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Anatomy, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 3School of Psychology, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 5Guangdong-Hongkong-Macau Institute of Central Nervous System, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Diabetic retinopathy (DR is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus in the eye. Although the clinical treatment for DR has already developed to a relative high level, there are still many urgent problems that need to be investigated in clinical and basic science. Currently, many in vivo animal models and in vitro culture systems have been applied to solve these problems. Many approaches have also been used to establish different DR models. However, till now, there has not been a single study model that can clearly and exactly mimic the developmental process of the human DR. Choosing the suitable model is important, not only for achieving our research goals smoothly, but also, to better match with different experimental proposals in the study. In this review, key problems for consideration in choosing study models of DR are discussed. These problems relate to clinical relevance, different approaches for establishing models, and choice of different species of animals as well as of the specific in vitro culture systems. Attending to these considerations will deepen the understanding on current study models and optimize the experimental design for the final goal of preventing DR. Keywords: animal model, in vitro culture, ex vivo culture, neurovascular dysfunction

  3. Dementia, preclinical studies in neurodegeneration and its potential for translational medicine in SouthAmerica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Patricia Cardona Gomez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Latin-American people with dementia will increase in a 368% in 2050, higher than USA and Europe. In addition, to sporadic dementia type Alzheimer and vascular dementia progression after Cerebrovascular disease, the statistics are increased in Colombia by specific populations affected with pure neurodegenerative and vascular dementias like autosomical dominant familial Alzheimer´s disease and CADASIL. In spite of the enormous human and economical effort and investment, neither sporadic nor genetic kinds of dementia progression have been prevented or blocked yet. Currently, exist several animal models that partially solve the understanding of the neurodegenerative etiopathogenesis and its treatment. However, when the potential therapies are translated to humans, those do not work or present a limited action. Main difficulties are the diverse comorbility associated to the cause and/or several affected brain regions, reducing the efficacy of some therapies which are limited to a tissue-specific action or modulating a kind of neurotransmission. Global investigation suggests that a general prevention could be achieved with the improvement in the quality of lifestyle, including healthy diet, physical and mental activity, and avoiding mechanical or chemical pro-inflammatory events in an early stage in the most of non-communicable diseases. In this review, we present some molecular targets and preclinical studies in animal models to propose strategies that could be useful in a future translation to prevent or block neurodegeneration: One is gene therapy silencing pathogenic genes in critical brain areas where excitotoxicity arise and spread. Another is to take advantage of the natural source and its wide biodiversity of natural products some of them identified by the blocking and prevention of neurodegeneration. On the other side, the casuistic of pure dementias in the Latin-American region give an exceptional opportunity to understand the pathogenesis

  4. Challenges for Preclinical Investigations of Human Biofield Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Bengston, William

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical models for studying the effects of the human biofield have great potential to advance our understanding of human biofield modalities, which include external qigong, Johrei, Reiki, therapeutic touch, healing touch, polarity therapy, pranic healing, and other practices. A short history of Western biofield studies using preclinical models is presented and demonstrates numerous and consistent examples of human biofields significantly affecting biological systems both in vitro and in vivo. Methodological issues arising from these studies and practical solutions in experimental design are presented. Important questions still left unanswered with preclinical models include variable reproducibility, dosing, intentionality of the practitioner, best preclinical systems, and mechanisms. Input from the biofield practitioners in the experimental design is critical to improving experimental outcomes; however, the development of standard criteria for uniformity of practice and for inclusion of multiple practitioners is needed. Research in human biofield studies involving preclinical models promises a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of biofield therapies and will be important in guiding clinical protocols and integrating treatments with conventional medical therapies. PMID:26665042

  5. Recent advances and novel strategies in pre-clinical formulation development: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amit K; Agnihotri, Sunil A

    2011-12-20

    Preclinical profiling for a New Chemical Entity (NCE), if carried out carefully, can be a good predictor of human clinical outcome. Along with the pre-clinical study design a thorough understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the drug candidate and a careful selection of the formulation development strategy are of high importance. The study scientist can experience various challenges in executing a pre-clinical study. This review article provides an overview of the significance of pre-formulation study parameters and their relevance to preclinical studies. Various physico-chemical properties such as solubility, partition co-efficient, and permeability are attributes critical to the performance of the drug substance. This article presents unique formulation development strategies for the successful completion of pre-clinical studies. Formulation development approach for a pre-clinical study involves taking into consideration various important factors such as duration of the study, Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) of the drug, intended duration of action and the desired route of administration. These parameters play key role in the selection of solubilizers, surfactants, co-solvents and optimum pH for the formulation. Two most common routes of administration in the early screening of pharmaceuticals viz., oral and intravenous are emphasized. The article also describes recent advances in preclinical formulation development including selected examples of in vivo preclinical models for anti-cancer, anti-viral, anti-diabetic and anti-hypertensive drugs. Adherence to the regulatory requirement is also the key to successful completion of the preclinical development. An overview of preclinical formulation development along with basic concepts and the recent studies conducted in the past decade are presented in this review. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. In vivo and ex vivo confocal endomicroscopy of pancreatic cystic lesions: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Somashekar G; Modi, Rohan M; Kamboj, Amrit K; Swanson, Benjamin J; Hart, Phil A; Dillhoff, Mary E; Manilchuk, Andrei; Schmidt, Carl R; Conwell, Darwin L

    2017-05-14

    To investigate the reproducibility of the in vivo endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) - guided needle based confocal endomicroscopy (nCLE) image patterns in an ex vivo setting and compare these to surgical histopathology for characterizing pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs). In a prospective study evaluating EUS-nCLE for evaluation of PCLs, 10 subjects underwent an in vivo nCLE (AQ-Flex nCLE miniprobe; Cellvizio, MaunaKea, Paris, France) during EUS and ex vivo probe based CLE (pCLE) of the PCL (Gastroflex ultrahigh definition probe, Cellvizio) after surgical resection. Biopsies were obtained from ex vivo CLE-imaged areas for comparative histopathology. All subjects received intravenous fluorescein prior to EUS and pancreatic surgery for in vivo and ex vivo CLE imaging respectively. A total of 10 subjects (mean age 53 ± 12 years; 5 female) with a mean PCL size of 34.8 ± 14.3 mm were enrolled. Surgical histopathology confirmed 2 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), 3 mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs), 2 cystic neuroendocrine tumors (cystic-NETs), 1 serous cystadenoma (SCA), and 2 squamous lined PCLs. Characteristic in vivo nCLE image patterns included papillary projections for IPMNs, horizon-type epithelial bands for MCNs, nests and trabeculae of cells for cystic-NETs, and a "fern pattern" of vascularity for SCA. Identical image patterns were observed during ex vivo pCLE imaging of the surgically resected PCLs. Both in vivo and ex vivo CLE imaging findings correlated with surgical histopathology. In vivo nCLE patterns are reproducible in ex vivo pCLE for all major neoplastic PCLs. These findings add further support the application of EUS-nCLE as an imaging biomarker in the diagnosis of PCLs.

  7. Preclinical Studies of Signaling Pathways in a Mutant Mouse Model of Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    prostate cancer in a preclinical mouse model. J Clin Invest 118, 3051-3064. 4) Wang, X., Kruithof-de Julio , M., Economides, K. D., Walker, D., Yu, H...Park R, Conti PS, Moats R, Berns A, Shi W, Zhou Z, et al. 2007. Mouse models of prostate adenocarcinoma with the capacity to monitor spontaneous...1779–1786. Ma X, Ziel-van der Made AC, Autar B, van der Korput HA, Vermeij M, van Duijn P, Cleutjens KB, de Krijger R, Krimpenfort P, Berns A, et al

  8. Cannabinoids and Dementia: A Review of Clinical and Preclinical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Halpern

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has been shown to be associated with neurodegenerative diseases and dementia. We review the preclinical and clinical data on cannabinoids and four neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntington’s disease (HD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and vascular dementia (VD. Numerous studies have demonstrated an involvement of the cannabinoid system in neurotransmission, neuropathology and neurobiology of dementias. In addition, several candidate compounds have demonstrated efficacy in vitro. However, some of the substances produced inconclusive results in vivo. Therefore, only few trials have aimed to replicate the effects seen in animal studies in patients. Indeed, the literature on cannabinoid administration in patients is scarce. While preclinical findings suggest causal treatment strategies involving cannabinoids, clinical trials have only assessed the suitability of cannabinoid receptor agonists, antagonists and cannabidiol for the symptomatic treatment of dementia. Further research is needed, including in vivo models of dementia and human studies.

  9. In Vitro Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells into Functional β Islets Under 2D and 3D Culture Conditions and In Vivo Preclinical Validation of 3D Islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Bipasha; Sudheer, P Shenoy

    2016-01-01

    Since the advent of pluripotent stem cells, (embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells), applications of such pluripotent stem cells are of prime importance. Indeed, scientists are involved in studying the basic biology of pluripotent stem cells, but equal impetus is there to direct the pluripotent stem cells into multiple lineages for cell therapy applications. Scientists across the globe have been successful, to a certain extent, in obtaining cells of definitive endoderm and also pancreatic β islets by differentiating human pluripotent stem cells. Pluripotent stem cell differentiation protocols aim at mimicking in vivo embryonic development. As in vivo embryonic development is a complex process and involves interplay of multiple cytokines, the differentiation protocols also involve a stepwise use of multiple cytokines. Indeed the novel markers for pancreas organogenesis serve as the roadmaps to develop new protocols for pancreatic differentiation from pluripotent stem cells. Earliest developed protocols for pancreas differentiation involved "Nestin selection pathway," a pathway common for both neuronal and pancreatic differentiation lead to the generation of cells that were a combination of cells from neuronal lineage. Eventually with the discovery of hierarchy of β cell transcription factors like Pdx1, Pax4, and Nkx2.2, forced expression of such transcription factors proved successful in converting a pluripotent stem cell into a β cell. Protocols developed almost half a decade ago to the recent ones rather involve stepwise differentiations involving various cytokines and could generate as high as 25 % functional insulin-positive cells in vitro. Most advanced protocols for β islet differentiations from human pluripotent stem cells focused on 3D culture conditions, which reportedly produced 60-65 % functional β islet cells. Here, we describe the protocol for differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into functional β cells under both 2D and 3D

  10. Impact of the Genetics and Source of Preclinical Safety Animal Models on Study Design, Results, and Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Karyn

    2017-01-01

    It has been long established that not only the species but also the strain and supplier of rodents used in preclinical safety studies can have a significant impact on the outcome of studies due to variability in their genetic background and thus spontaneous pathologic findings. In addition, local husbandry, housing, and other environmental conditions may have effects on the development and expression of comorbidities, particularly in longer-term or chronic studies. More recently, similar effects related to the source, including genetic and environmental variability, have been recognized in cynomolgus macaques ( Macaca fascicularis). The increased use of cynomolgus macaques from various sources of captive-bred animals (including nonnative, U.S./European Union-based breeding facilities or colonies) can affect study design and study results and outcome. It is important to acknowledge and understand the impact of this variability on the results and interpretation of research studies. This review includes recent examples where variability of preclinical animal models (rats and monkeys) affected the postmortem observations highlighting its relevance to study design or interpretation in safety studies.

  11. Use of explant models as a tool to assess the anti HIV activity of microbicides in preclinical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Villegas, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Villegas, G. (2016). Use of explant models as a tool to assess the anti HIV activity of microbicides in preclinical studies. (Tesis de posgrado). Bernal, Argentina: Universidad Nacional de Quilmes. Actualmente existe una necesidad, no alcanzada todavía de proteger a las mujeres contra las enfermedades de transmisión sexual y el embarazo no deseado. En 2013 se produjeron 2,1 millones de nuevas infecciones por VIH y 1,5 millones de muertes debidas al VIH/SIDA en todo el mundo. Los casos repo...

  12. Optimization of MOSFET calibration for in vivo dosimetry in radiosurgery: reduction of measurement uncertainties in pre-clinical conditions; Optimisation de la calibration de MOSFET pour la dosimetrie in vivo en radiochirurgie: reduction des incertitudes de mesure en conditions precliniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sors, A.; Berry, I.; Franceries, X. [UMR 825 ' imagerie cerebrale et handicaps neurologiques' , Inserm, Toulouse (France); Cassol, E.; Duthil, P. [Unite de radiophysique et de radioprotection, CHU de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Hallil, A. [Best medical Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Latorzeff, I.; Lotterie, J.A. [Centre de radiochirurgie stereotaxique, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Redon, A. [Groupe Oncorad Garonne, Montauban (France)

    2011-10-15

    The objective of this study is to assess the conventional formulas of equivalent square for fields with irregular geometry, by transposing the optimized calibration method which has been previously developed, to micro-MOSFET. The study has been performed on a 6 MV Novalis apparatus equipped with micro-multi-blades collimators (BrainLab). The average dose bias reaches 2.66 per cent for all field sizes. Therefore, it appears that the joint use of the square inverse of distances and of conventional formulas of equivalent square results in an acceptable in vivo dosimetry precision. Short communication

  13. Preclinical Studies Evaluating Subacute Toxicity and Therapeutic Efficacy of LQB-118 in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Júnior, Edézio Ferreira; Martins, Thiago Martino; Canto-Cavalheiro, Marilene Marcuzzo; Marques, Paulo Roberto; Portari, Elyzabeth Avvad; Coelho, Marsen Garcia Pinto; Netto, Chaquip Daher; Costa, Paulo Roberto Ribeiro; Sabino, Katia Costa de Carvalho; Torres-Santos, Eduardo Caio

    2016-06-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and is the second major cause of death by parasites, after malaria. The arsenal of drugs against leishmaniasis is small, and each has a disadvantage in terms of toxicity, efficacy, price, or treatment regimen. Our group has focused on studying new drug candidates as alternatives to current treatments. The pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 was designed and synthesized based on molecular hybridization, and it exhibited antiprotozoal and anti-leukemic cell line activities. Our previous work demonstrated that LQB-118 was an effective treatment for experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. In this study, we observed that treatment with 10 mg/kg of body weight/day LQB-118 orally inhibited the development of hepatosplenomegaly with a 99% reduction in parasite load. An in vivo toxicological analysis showed no change in the clinical, biochemical, or hematological parameters. Histologically, all of the analyzed organs were normal, with the exception of the liver, where focal points of necrosis with leukocytic infiltration were observed at treatment doses 5 times higher than the therapeutic dose; however, these changes were not accompanied by an increase in transaminases. Our findings indicate that LQB-118 is effective at treating different clinical forms of leishmaniasis and presents no relevant signs of toxicity at therapeutic doses; thus, this framework is demonstrated suitable for developing promising drug candidates for the oral treatment of leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Preclinical profile of cabazitaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrignaud, Patricia; Semiond, Dorothée; Benning, Veronique; Beys, Eric; Bouchard, Hervé; Gupta, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    First-generation taxanes have changed the treatment paradigm for a wide variety of cancers, but innate or acquired resistance frequently limits their use. Cabazitaxel is a novel second-generation taxane developed to overcome such resistance. In vitro, cabazitaxel showed similar antiproliferative activity to docetaxel in taxane-sensitive cell lines and markedly greater activity in cell lines resistant to taxanes. In vivo, cabazitaxel demonstrated excellent antitumor activity in a broad spectrum of docetaxel-sensitive tumor xenografts, including a castration-resistant prostate tumor xenograft, HID28, where cabazitaxel exhibited greater efficacy than docetaxel. Importantly, cabazitaxel was also active against tumors with innate or acquired resistance to docetaxel, suggesting therapeutic potential for patients progressing following taxane treatment and those with docetaxel-refractory tumors. In patients with tumors of the central nervous system (CNS), and in patients with pediatric tumors, therapeutic success with first-generation taxanes has been limited. Cabazitaxel demonstrated greater antitumor activity than docetaxel in xenograft models of CNS disease and pediatric tumors, suggesting potential clinical utility in these special patient populations. Based on therapeutic synergism observed in an in vivo tumor model, cabazitaxel is also being investigated clinically in combination with cisplatin. Nonclinical evaluation of the safety of cabazitaxel in a range of animal species showed largely reversible changes in the bone marrow, lymphoid system, gastrointestinal tract, and male reproductive system. Preclinical safety signals of cabazitaxel were consistent with the previously reported safety profiles of paclitaxel and docetaxel. Clinical observations with cabazitaxel were consistent with preclinical results, and cabazitaxel is indicated, in combination with prednisone, for the treatment of patients with hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer previously treated

  15. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 2: a review of clinical studies with supporting preclinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-04-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms 'anxiety' OR 'anxiety disorder' OR 'generalized anxiety disorder' OR 'social phobia' OR 'post-traumatic stress disorder' OR 'panic disorder' OR 'agoraphobia' OR 'obsessive compulsive disorder' in combination with the search terms 'Herb*' OR 'Medicinal Plants' OR 'Botanical Medicine' OR 'Chinese herb*', in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora, Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium

  16. Natural Compounds for the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis: A Proposal Based on Multi-Targeted Osteoclastic Regulation and on a Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shiqiang; Cheng, Jianwen; Zhao, Jinmin; Yao, Felix; Xu, Jiake

    2017-07-11

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis affecting approximately 2% to 3% of the population globally, and is characterized by both peripheral articular manifestations and axial skeletal involvement. Conventional therapies for PsA have not been fully satisfactory, though natural products (NPs) have been shown to be highly effective and represent important treatment options for psoriasis. PsA is a multigenic autoimmune disease with both environmental and genetic factors contributing to its pathogenesis. Accordingly, it is likely that the use of natural compounds with a multi-targeted approach will enable us to develop better therapies for PsA and related disorders. PsA, either on joint damage or on bone erosion, has been shown to respond to anti-psoriatic pharmacotherapy (APP), APP-like NPs, and their natural compounds. This study aims to uncover specific natural compounds for improved PsA remedies. Specifically, by targeting bone erosion caused by increased osteoclastic bone resorption, we aim to predict the key signaling pathways affected by natural compounds. Further, the study will explore their anti-arthritis effects using an in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approach. Following the signaling pathway prediction, a preclinical efficacy study on animal models will be undertaken. Collectively, this work will discover lead compounds with improved therapeutic effects on PsA. We hypothesize that 9 potential APP-like NPs will have therapeutic effects on arthritis via the modulation of osteoclast bone resorption and signaling pathways. For in silico identification, the Latin name of each NP will be identified using the Encyclopedia of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Encyclopedia of TCM). The biological targets of NPs will be predicted or screened using the Herbal Ingredients' Targets (HIT) database. With the designed search terms, DrugBank will be used to further filter the above biological targets. Protein ANnotation THrough Evolutionary Relationship

  17. Application of a Micropatterned Cocultured Hepatocyte System To Predict Preclinical and Human-Specific Drug Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, T Eric; Wang, Shuai; Cox, Loretta M; Moen, Mark A; Krzyzewski, Stacy; Ukairo, Okechukwu; Obach, R Scott

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory animal models are the industry standard for preclinical risk assessment of drug candidates. Thus, it is important that these species possess profiles of drug metabolites that are similar to those anticipated in human, since metabolites also could be responsible for biologic activities or unanticipated toxicity. Under most circumstances, preclinical species reflect human in vivo metabolites well; however, there have been several notable exceptions, and understanding and predicting these exceptions with an in vitro system would be very useful. Human micropatterned cocultured (MPCC) hepatocytes have been shown to recapitulate human in vivo qualitative metabolic profiles, but the same demonstration has not been performed yet for laboratory animal species. In this study, we investigated several compounds that are known to produce human-unique metabolites through CYP2C9, UGT1A4, aldehyde oxidase (AO), or N-acetyltransferase that were poorly covered or not detected at all in the selected preclinical species. To perform our investigation we used 24-well MPCC hepatocyte plates having three individual human donors and a single donor each of monkey, dog, and rat to study drug metabolism at four time points per species. Through the use of the multispecies MPCC hepatocyte system, the metabolite profiles of the selected compounds in human donors effectively captured the qualitative in vivo metabolite profile with respect to the human metabolite of interest. Human-unique metabolites that were not detected in vivo in certain preclinical species (normally dog and rat) were also not generated in the corresponding species in vitro, confirming that the MPCC hepatocytes can provide an assessment of preclinical species metabolism. From these results, we conclude that multispecies MPCC hepatocyte plates could be used as an effective in vitro tool for preclinical understanding of species metabolism relative to humans and aid in the choice of appropriate preclinical models

  18. Raloxifene, an oestrogen-receptor-beta-targeted therapy, inhibits androgen-independent prostate cancer growth: results from preclinical studies and a pilot phase II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazer, Ronald L; Jain, Anjali; Galkin, Anna V; Cinman, Nadya; Nguyen, Koo N; Natale, Ronald B; Gross, Mitchell; Green, Leland; Bender, Leon I; Holden, Stuart; Kaplan, Leslie; Agus, David B

    2006-04-01

    To determine, in preclinical in vivo animal and in clinical studies, whether raloxifene (a selective oestrogen-receptor (ER) modulator that targets ER-beta and induces apoptosis in vitro in androgen-independent prostate cancer, AIPC cells) affects prostate cell differentiation, proliferation and carcinogenesis, and in the pilot phase II clinical trial, the response rate and duration of patients with AIPC treated with a daily oral dose of raloxifene. Tumour proliferation rate in response to raloxifene treatment, and molecular markers of cell cycle and apoptosis, were evaluated in established ER-beta-positive androgen-dependent (AD) CWR22 and AI CWRSA9 human xenograft prostate cancer models. Twenty-one patients with AIPC and evidence of disease progression were enrolled into the clinical trial and given daily oral raloxifene. There was significant growth inhibition by raloxifene in the ADPC and AIPC xenograft models (CWR22 68%, P < 0.010; CWRSA9 64%, P < 0.001), with no tumour regression. There was evidence of G1 arrest by increased p27kip1 expression in the raloxifene-treated group. Eighteen patients comprised the efficacy analysis, as three withdrew before the first evaluation. At the first evaluation, five men had stable disease and continued on the study for a median of five cycles. The longest response was 17 cycles. Drug related toxicity was minimal. Raloxifene has activity in xenograft models, slowing disease progression. This translated to possible disease stabilization in patients with AIPC. Further studies are warranted.

  19. Dermotropic Leishmania donovani in Sri Lanka: visceralizing potential in clinical and preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariyawasam, K K G D U L; Selvapandiyan, A; Siriwardana, H V Y D; Dube, A; Karunanayake, P; Senanayake, S A S C; Dey, R; Gannavaram, S; Nakhasi, H L; Karunaweera, N D

    2017-11-08

    The visceralizing potential of apparently dermotropic Leishmania donovani in Sri Lanka (L. donovani-SL) was investigated through long-term follow-up of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) patients and in vivo and in vitro experimental infection models. CL patients (n = 250) treated effectively with intra-lesional antimony therapy were followed-up six monthly for 4 years. There was no clinical evidence of visceralization of infection (VL) during this period. Infection of BALB/c mice with L. donovani-SL (test) through intra-dermal route led to the development of cutaneous lesions at the site of inoculation with no signs of systemic dissemination, in contrast to the observations made in animals similarly infected with a visceralizing strain of L. donovani-1S (control). Cytokine (IL-10, IFN-γ) release patterns of splenocytes and lymph node cell cultures derived from mice primed with experimental infections (with either test or control parasites) revealed significantly high IFN-γ response associated with test mice with CL, while prominent IL-10 levels were observed in association with control mice with VL. Furthermore, diminished infection efficiency, intracellular growth and survival of L. donovani-SL parasites compared with L. donovani-1S were evident through in vitro macrophage infection experiments. These studies confirm, for the first time, the essential dermotropic nature of L. donovani-SL suggesting natural attenuation of virulence of local parasite strains.

  20. Preclinical studies of vascular acting photosensitizer bacteriopheophorbide for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Luck, David; Beckers, Jill; Huang, Zheng

    2004-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with vascular acting photosensitizer pd-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad), is investigated as an alternative modality for the total ablation of prostate cancer. In vivo normal canine prostate is used as the animal model. Interstitial PDT was performed by irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm, 150 mW/cm) to activate the IV infused photosensitizer drug. The prostate and its adjacent tissues were harvested and subjected to histopathological examination. At one-week post PDT, the animals recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Prostatic urethra and prostate adjacent tissues (bladder and underlying colon) were well preserved. PDT induced prostate lesions were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis. Prostate lesions could be detected by MRI scan as early as 48 h post PDT. Maximum lesion size of 1.5 cm3 and 2.9 cm3 could be achieved at 50 J/cm and 100 J/cm, respectively, with interstitial treatment using a single 1-cm diffuser fiber, suggesting the Tookad-PDT is very effective in ablating prostatic tissue. Pharmacokinetic studies show that the photosensitizer is cleared rapidly from the circulation. In conclusion, the novel photosensitizer Tookad mediated PDT may provide an effective alternative to treat localized prostate cancer.

  1. Kinase activation profile associated with TGF-β-dependent migration of HCC cells: a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransvea, Emilia; Mazzocca, Antonio; Santamato, Angela; Azzariti, Amalia; Antonaci, Salvatore; Giannelli, Gianluigi

    2011-07-01

    To identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor cell migration is essential for developing agents that can prevent the relapse or the metastatic spread of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we investigated the effects of the transforming growth factor-β receptor I inhibitor LY2109761 on two different human HCC cell lines, in vitro and in vivo. LY2109761 inhibits HCC migration in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibition is associated with the decreased phosphorylation of SMAD-2, FAK and β1-integrin, and with increased levels of E-cadherin. By contrast, LY2109761 did not alter the phosphorylation pattern of p38MAPkinase. In a two- and a three-day time-course and in dose-titration experiments, LY2109761 inhibited HCC migration as well as phospho-SMAD-2 and the adhesion proteins. LY2109761 showed the best effect on day 2 at 1 nM and for 3 days at 100 nM concentration. This suggests that maximum effects were sustained for several days and were not dependent on excess concentrations. Finally, in a xenograft model of HCC, LY2109761 strongly inhibits tumor growth, intravasation and metastasis at the aforementioned lower concentrations. In conclusion, inhibition of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) appears to occur at low concentrations of LY2109761 that displays multiple effects on kinases that control HCC cell migration. These findings may help the design of future clinical trials with inhibitors of TGF-β.

  2. A method for comparing intra-tumoural radioactivity uptake heterogeneity in preclinical positron emission tomography studies

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    Grafström, Jonas; Ahlzén, Hanna-Stina [Division of Biochemistry, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Stone-Elander, Sharon [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); PET Radiochemistry, Neuroradiology Department, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-09-08

    Non-uniformity influences the interpretation of nuclear medicine based images and consequently their use in treatment planning and monitoring. However, no standardised method for evaluating and ranking heterogeneity exists. Here, we have developed a general algorithm that provides a ranking and a visualisation of the heterogeneity in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) images. The code of the algorithm was written using the Matrix Laboratory software (MATLAB). Parameters known to influence the heterogeneity (distances between deviating peaks, gradients and size compensations) were incorporated into the algorithm. All data matrices were mathematically constructed in the same format with the aim of maintaining overview and control. Histograms visualising the spread and frequency of contributions to the heterogeneity were also generated. The construction of the algorithm was tested using mathematically generated matrices and by varying post-processing parameters. It was subsequently applied in comparisons of radiotracer uptake in preclinical images in human head and neck carcinoma and endothelial and ovarian carcinoma xenografts. Using the developed algorithm, entire tissue volumes could be assessed and gradients could be handled in an indirect manner. Similar-sized volumes could be compared without modifying the algorithm. Analyses of the distribution of different tracers gave results that were generally in accordance with single plane preclinical images, indicating that it could appropriately handle comparisons of targeting vs. non-targeting tracers and also for different target levels. Altering the reconstruction algorithm, pixel size, tumour ROI volumes and lower cut-off limits affected the calculated heterogeneity factors in expected directions but did not reverse conclusions about which tumour was more or less heterogeneous. The algorithm constructed is an objective and potentially user-friendly tool for one-to-one comparisons of heterogeneity in

  3. Chronic pain and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: translational implications from preclinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grilli M

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mariagrazia Grilli Laboratory of Neuroplasticity, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy Abstract: Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (ahNG occurs in the human brain. Adult generated neurons have been proposed to functionally contribute to relevant hippocampal functions such as learning and memory, mood regulation, and stress response. Learning, environmental enrichment, and physical exercise exert positive effects on ahNG. In parallel, these proneurogenic stimuli have been shown to ameliorate cognitive performance and/or depressive-like behavior in animal models. Conversely, aging, social isolation, and chronic stress exert negative effects on ahNG. Interestingly, reduction of hippocampal neurogenesis is suggested to potentially contribute to cognitive decline and mood alterations associated with aging and several neuropsychiatric disorders. Clinical observation demonstrates that patients affected by chronic pain often exhibit increased anxiety and depression, impaired cognitive flexibility, and memory capacities. As of today, our understanding of the molecular and cellular events that may underlie the comorbidity of chronic pain, depression, and cognitive impairment is limited. Herein we review recent preclinical data suggesting that chronic pain may induce profound changes in hippocampal plasticity, including reduced ahNG. We discuss the possibility that deregulated hippocampal neurogenesis in chronic pain may, at least in part, contribute to cognitive and mood alterations. Based on this hypothesis, the mechanisms underlying chronic pain-associated changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and related functions need to be addressed experimentally. One interesting feature of ahNG is its susceptibility to pharmacological modulation. Again, based on preclinical data we discuss the possibility that, at least in principle, distinct analgesic drugs commonly used in chronic pain states (typical and atypical

  4. [Modeling the academic performance of medical students in basic sciences and pre-clinical courses: a longitudinal study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Denisse; Mena, Beltrán; Oliva, Rose; Pedrals, Nuria; Padilla, Oslando; Bitran, Marcela

    2009-10-01

    The study of predictors of academic performance is relevant for medical education. Most studies of academic performance use global ratings as outcome measure, and do not evaluate the influence of the assessment methods. To model by multivariate analysis, the academic performance of medical considering, besides academic and demographic variables, the methods used to assess students' learning and their preferred modes of information processing. Two hundred seventy two students admitted to the medical school of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile from 2000 to 2003. Six groups of variables were studied to model the students' performance in five basic science courses (Anatomy, Biology, Calculus, Chemistry and Physics) and two pre-clinical courses (Integrated Medical Clinic I and IT). The assessment methods examined were multiple choice question tests, Objective Structured Clinical Examination and tutor appraisal. The results of the university admission tests (high school grades, mathematics and biology tests), the assessment methods used, the curricular year and previous application to medical school, were predictors of academic performance. The information processing modes influenced academic performance, but only in interaction with other variables. Perception (abstract or concrete) interacted with the assessment methods, and information use (active or reflexive), with sex. The correlation between the real and predicted grades was 0.7. In addition to the academic results obtained prior to university entrance, the methods of assessment used in the university and the information processing modes influence the academic performance of medical students in basic and preclinical courses.

  5. Nebulized anticoagulants in lung injury in critically ill patients—an updated systematic review of preclinical and clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juschten, Jenny; Tuinman, Pieter R.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Dixon, Barry; Levi, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia, inhalation trauma and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), typical causes of lung injury in critically ill patients, are all three characterized by dysregulated inflammation and coagulation in the lungs. Nebulized anticoagulants are thought to have beneficial effects as they could attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy and maybe even affect pulmonary inflammation. A systematic search of the medical literature was performed using terms referring to aspects of the condition (‘pneumonia’, ‘inhalation trauma’ and ‘ARDS’), the intervention (‘nebulized’, ‘vaporized’, and ‘aerosolized’) and anticoagulants limited to agents that are commercially available and frequently given or tested in critically ill patients [‘heparin’, ‘danaparoid’, ‘activated protein C’ (APC), ‘antithrombin’ (AT) and ‘tissue factor pathway inhibitor’ (TFPI)]. The systematic search identified 16 articles reporting on preclinical studies and 11 articles reporting on human trials. All nebulized anticoagulants attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy in preclinical studies using various models for lung injury, but the effects on inflammation are less consistent. Nebulized heparin, danaparoid and TFPI, but not APC and AT also reduced systemic coagulation. Nebulized heparin in lung injury patients shows contradictory results, and there is concern over systemic side effects of this strategy. Future studies need to focus on the way to nebulize anticoagulants, as well as on efficient but safe dosages, and other side effects. PMID:29264361

  6. Nebulized anticoagulants in lung injury in critically ill patients-an updated systematic review of preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juschten, Jenny; Tuinman, Pieter R; Juffermans, Nicole P; Dixon, Barry; Levi, Marcel; Schultz, Marcus J

    2017-11-01

    Pneumonia, inhalation trauma and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), typical causes of lung injury in critically ill patients, are all three characterized by dysregulated inflammation and coagulation in the lungs. Nebulized anticoagulants are thought to have beneficial effects as they could attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy and maybe even affect pulmonary inflammation. A systematic search of the medical literature was performed using terms referring to aspects of the condition ('pneumonia', 'inhalation trauma' and 'ARDS'), the intervention ('nebulized', 'vaporized', and 'aerosolized') and anticoagulants limited to agents that are commercially available and frequently given or tested in critically ill patients ['heparin', 'danaparoid', 'activated protein C' (APC), 'antithrombin' (AT) and 'tissue factor pathway inhibitor' (TFPI)]. The systematic search identified 16 articles reporting on preclinical studies and 11 articles reporting on human trials. All nebulized anticoagulants attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy in preclinical studies using various models for lung injury, but the effects on inflammation are less consistent. Nebulized heparin, danaparoid and TFPI, but not APC and AT also reduced systemic coagulation. Nebulized heparin in lung injury patients shows contradictory results, and there is concern over systemic side effects of this strategy. Future studies need to focus on the way to nebulize anticoagulants, as well as on efficient but safe dosages, and other side effects.

  7. Combined targeting of EGFR-dependent and VEGF-dependent pathways: rationale, preclinical studies and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Giampaolo; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Gasparini, Giampietro

    2008-09-01

    Cellular heterogeneity, redundancy of molecular pathways and effects of the microenvironment contribute to the survival, motility and metastasis of cells in solid tumors. It is unlikely that tumors are entirely dependent on only one abnormally activated signaling pathway; consequently, treatment with an agent that interferes with a single target may be insufficient. Combined blockade of functionally linked and relevant multiple targets has become an attractive therapeutic strategy. The EGFR and ERBB2 (HER2) pathways and VEGF-dependent angiogenesis have a pivotal role in cancer pathogenesis and progression. Robust experimental evidence has shown that these pathways are functionally linked and has demonstrated a suggested role for VEGF in the acquired resistance to anti-ERBB drugs when these receptors are pharmacologically blocked. Combined inhibition of ERBB and VEGF signaling interferes with a molecular feedback loop responsible for acquired resistance to anti-ERBB agents and promotes apoptosis while ablating tumor-induced angiogenesis. To this aim, either two agents highly selective against VEGF and ERBB respectively, or, alternatively, a single multitargeted agent, can be used. Preclinical studies have proven the efficacy of both these approaches and early clinical studies have provided encouraging results. This Review discusses the experimental rationale for, preclinical studies of and clinical trials on combined blockade of ERBB and VEGF signaling.

  8. Structural and Preclinical Studies of Computationally Designed Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors for Treating HIV infection

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    Kudalkar, Shalley N.; Beloor, Jagadish; Chan, Albert H.; Lee, Won-Gil; Jorgensen, William L.; Kumar, Priti; Anderson, Karen S.

    2017-02-06

    The clinical benefits of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) are hindered by their unsatisfactory pharmacokinetic (PK) properties along with the rapid development of drug-resistant variants. However, the clinical efficacy of these inhibitors can be improved by developing compounds with enhanced pharmacological profiles and heightened antiviral activity. We used computational and structure-guided design to develop two next-generation NNRTI drug candidates, compounds I and II, which are members of a class of catechol diethers. We evaluated the preclinical potential of these compounds in BALB/c mice because of their high solubility (510 µg/ml for compound I and 82.9 µg/ml for compound II), low cytotoxicity, and enhanced antiviral activity against wild-type (WT) HIV-1 RT and resistant variants. Additionally, crystal structures of compounds I and II with WT RT suggested an optimal binding to the NNRTI binding pocket favoring the high anti-viral potency. A single intraperitoneal dose of compounds I and II exhibited a prolonged serum residence time of 48 hours and concentration maximum (Cmax) of 4000- to 15,000-fold higher than their therapeutic/effective concentrations. These Cmax values were 4- to 15-fold lower than their cytotoxic concentrations observed in MT-2 cells. Compound II showed an enhanced area under the curve (0–last) and decreased plasma clearance over compound I and efavirenz, the standard of care NNRTI. Hence, the overall (PK) profile of compound II was excellent compared with that of compound I and efavirenz. Furthermore, both compounds were very well tolerated in BALB/c mice without any detectable acute toxicity. Taken together, these data suggest that compounds I and II possess improved anti-HIV-1 potency, remarkable in vivo safety, and prolonged in vivo circulation time, suggesting strong potential for further development as new NNRTIs for the potential treatment of HIV infection.

  9. Pre-clinical evaluation of soybean-based wound dressings and dermal substitute formulations in pig healing and non-healing in vivo models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostislav V Shevchenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, a new class of natural biomaterials derived from de-fatted soybean flour processed by either thermoset or extraction procedures has been developed. These biomaterials uniquely combine adaptability to various clinical applications to proven tissue regeneration properties. In the present work, the biomaterials were formulated either as hydrogel or as paste formulation and their potential as wound dressing material or as dermal substitute was assessed by two in vivo models in pig skin: The healing full-thickness punch biopsy model and the non-healing full-thickness polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE chamber model. The results clearly show that collagen deposition is induced by the presence of these biomaterials. A unique pattern of early inflammatory response, eliciting neutrophils and controlling macrophage infiltration, is followed by tissue cell colonization of the wound bed with a significant deposition of collagen fibers. The study also highlighted the importance in the use of optimal formulations and appropriate handling upon implantation. In large size, non-healing wounds, wound dermis was best obtained with the paste formulation as hydrogels appeared to be too loose to ensure lasting scaffolding properties. On the contrary, packing of the granules during the application of paste reduced biomaterial degradation rate and prevent the penetration of newly vascularized tissue, thus impeding grafting of split-thickness autologous skin grafts on the dermal substitute base.

  10. Impact of a Differential Learning Approach on Practical Exam Performance: A Controlled Study in a Preclinical Dental Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabel, Sven-Olav; Pabel, Anne-Kathrin; Schmickler, Jan; Schulz, Xenia; Wiegand, Annette

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if differential learning in a preclinical dental course impacted the performance of dental students in a practical exam (preparation of a gold partial crown) immediately after the training session and 20 weeks later compared to conventional learning. This controlled study was performed in a preclinical course in operative dentistry at a dental school in Germany. Third-year students were trained in preparing gold partial crowns by using either the conventional learning (n=41) or the differential learning approach (n=32). The differential learning approach consisted of 20 movement exercises with a continuous change of movement execution during the learning session, while the conventional learning approach was mainly based on repetition, a methodological series of exercises, and correction of preparations during the training phase. Practical exams were performed immediately after the training session (T1) and 20 weeks later (T2, retention test). Preparations were rated by four independent and blinded examiners. At T1, no significant difference between the performance (exam passed) of the two groups was detected (conventional learning: 54.3%, differential learning: 68.0%). At T2, significantly more students passed the exam when trained by the differential learning approach (68.8%) than by the conventional learning approach (18.9%). Interrater reliability was moderate (Kappa: 0.57, T1) or substantial (Kappa: 0.67, T2), respectively. These results suggest that a differential learning approach can increase the manual skills of dental students.

  11. Pre-clinical and clinical walking kinematics in female breeding pigs with lameness: A nested case-control cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakakis, S; Guy, J H; Syranidis, I; Johnson, G R; Edwards, S A

    2015-07-01

    Gait profiles were investigated in a cohort of female pigs experiencing a lameness period prevalence of 29% over 17 months. Gait alterations before and during visually diagnosed lameness were evaluated to identify the best quantitative clinical lameness indicators and early predictors for lameness. Pre-breeding gilts (n= 84) were recruited to the study over a period of 6 months, underwent motion capture every 5 weeks and, depending on their age at entry to the study, were followed for up to three successive gestations. Animals were subject to motion capture in each parity at 8 weeks of gestation and on the day of weaning (28 days postpartum). During kinematic motion capture, the pigs walked on the same concrete walkway and an array of infra-red cameras was used to collect three dimensional coordinate data of reflective skin markers attached to the head, trunk and limb anatomical landmarks. Of 24 pigs diagnosed with lameness, 19 had preclinical gait records, whilst 18 had a motion capture while lame. Depending on availability, data from one or two preclinical motion capture 1-11 months prior to lameness and on the day of lameness were analysed. Lameness was best detected and evaluated using relative spatiotemporal gait parameters, especially vertical head displacement and asymmetric stride phase timing. Irregularity in the step-to-stride length ratio was elevated (deviation  ≥ 0.03) in young pigs which presented lameness in later life (odds ratio 7.2-10.8). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preclinical toxicity evaluation of AAV for pain: evidence from human AAV studies and from the pharmacology of analgesic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleticha, Josef; Heilmann, Lukas F; Evans, Christopher H; Asokan, Aravind; Samulski, Richard Jude; Beutler, Andreas S

    2014-09-02

    Gene therapy with adeno-associated virus (AAV) has advanced in the last few years from promising results in animal models to >100 clinical trials (reported or under way). While vector availability was a substantial hurdle a decade ago, innovative new production methods now routinely match the scale of AAV doses required for clinical testing. These advances may become relevant to translational research in the chronic pain field. AAV for pain targeting the peripheral nervous system was proven to be efficacious in rodent models several years ago, but has not yet been tested in humans. The present review addresses the steps needed for translation of AAV for pain from the bench to the bedside focusing on pre-clinical toxicology. We break the potential toxicities into three conceptual categories of risk: First, risks related to the delivery procedure used to administer the vector. Second, risks related to AAV biology, i.e., effects of the vector itself that may occur independently of the transgene. Third, risks related to the effects of the therapeutic transgene. To identify potential toxicities, we consulted the existing evidence from AAV gene therapy for other nervous system disorders (animal toxicology and human studies) and from the clinical pharmacology of conventional analgesic drugs. Thereby, we identified required preclinical studies and charted a hypothetical path towards a future phase I/II clinical trial in the oncology-palliative care setting.

  13. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening to enhance temozolomide delivery for glioblastoma treatment: a preclinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chen Wei

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to assess the preclinical therapeutic efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-monitored focused ultrasound (FUS-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption to enhance Temozolomide (TMZ delivery for improving Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM treatment. MRI-monitored FUS with microbubbles was used to transcranially disrupt the BBB in brains of Fisher rats implanted with 9L glioma cells. FUS-BBB opening was spectrophotometrically determined by leakage of dyes into the brain, and TMZ was quantitated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma by LC-MS\\MS. The effects of treatment on tumor progression (by MRI, animal survival and brain tissue histology were investigated. Results demonstrated that FUS-BBB opening increased the local accumulation of dyes in brain parenchyma by 3.8-/2.1-fold in normal/tumor tissues. Compared to TMZ alone, combined FUS treatment increased the TMZ CSF/plasma ratio from 22.7% to 38.6%, reduced the 7-day tumor progression ratio from 24.03 to 5.06, and extended the median survival from 20 to 23 days. In conclusion, this study provided preclinical evidence that FUS BBB-opening increased the local concentration of TMZ to improve the control of tumor progression and animal survival, suggesting its clinical potential for improving current brain tumor treatment.

  14. Application of tetra-isopalmitoyl ascorbic acid in cosmetic formulations: stability studies and in vivo efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia Campos, Patrícia M B G; Gianeti, Mirela D; Camargo, Flávio B; Gaspar, Lorena R

    2012-11-01

    Liposoluble vitamin C derivatives, such as tetra-isopalmitoyl ascorbic acid (IPAA), are often used in dermocosmetic products due to their higher stability than vitamin C free form as well as its proposed effects in skin; however, there are no studies analyzing IPAA stability or its in vivo effects when present in dermocosmetic formulations. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate chemical stability and pre-clinical and clinical efficacy of dermocosmetic formulations containing IPAA in skin hydration and microrelief. Chemical stability of the formulations added with 1% IPAA was evaluated by heat stress during 35 days by HPLC. For pre-clinical evaluation, experimental formulations were topically applied on hairless skin mice during 5 days and animal skins were analyzed by non-invasive biophysic techniques (water content of stratum corneum, TEWL, viscoelasticity, and microrelief) and by histopathological studies. For clinical efficacy tests, the formulations were topically applied to the forearm and face of human volunteers, and 3h and 15 days after applications, the skins were evaluated by the same non-invasive techniques mentioned before. Results showed that formulations containing IPAA had medium stability and had pronounced moisturizing effects on stratum corneum and on viable epidermis. These formulations also improved skin microrelief especially in relation to skin smoothness and roughness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Two-Dimensional High Definition Versus Three-Dimensional Endoscopy in Endonasal Skull Base Surgery: A Comparative Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampinelli, Vittorio; Doglietto, Francesco; Mattavelli, Davide; Qiu, Jimmy; Raffetti, Elena; Schreiber, Alberto; Villaret, Andrea Bolzoni; Kucharczyk, Walter; Donato, Francesco; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Nicolai, Piero

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) endoscopy has been recently introduced in endonasal skull base surgery. Only a relatively limited number of studies have compared it to 2-dimensional, high definition technology. The objective was to compare, in a preclinical setting for endonasal endoscopic surgery, the surgical maneuverability of 2-dimensional, high definition and 3D endoscopy. A group of 68 volunteers, novice and experienced surgeons, were asked to perform 2 tasks, namely simulating grasping and dissection surgical maneuvers, in a model of the nasal cavities. Time to complete the tasks was recorded. A questionnaire to investigate subjective feelings during tasks was filled by each participant. In 25 subjects, the surgeons' movements were continuously tracked by a magnetic-based neuronavigator coupled with dedicated software (ApproachViewer, part of GTx-UHN) and the recorded trajectories were analyzed by comparing jitter, sum of square differences, and funnel index. Total execution time was significantly lower with 3D technology (P endoscopy more frequently than experts. A minority (14%) of beginners experienced discomfort with 3D endoscopy. Analysis of jitter showed a trend toward increased effectiveness of surgical maneuvers with 3D endoscopy. Sum of square differences and funnel index analyses documented better values with 3D endoscopy in experts. In a preclinical setting for endonasal skull base surgery, 3D technology appears to confer an advantage in terms of time of execution and precision of surgical maneuvers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Preclinical evaluation of the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac adipose tissue progenitor cells using umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells: a direct comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea-Gil, Isaac; Monguió-Tortajada, Marta; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Borràs, Francesc E; Roura, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based strategies to regenerate injured myocardial tissue have emerged over the past decade, but the optimum cell type is still under scrutiny. In this context, human adult epicardial fat surrounding the heart has been characterized as a reservoir of mesenchymal-like progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs) with potential clinical benefits. However, additional data on the possibility that these cells could trigger a deleterious immune response following implantation are needed. Thus, in the presented study, we took advantage of the well-established low immunogenicity of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to comparatively assess the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac ATDPCs in an in vitro allostimulatory assay using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Similar to UCBMSCs, increasing amounts of seeded cardiac ATDPCs suppressed the alloproliferation of T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, TNFα, and IFNγ) was also specifically modulated by the different numbers of cardiac ATDPCs cocultured. In summary, we show that cardiac ATDPCs abrogate T cell alloproliferation upon stimulation with allogeneic mature MDDCs, suggesting that they could further regulate a possible harmful immune response in vivo. Additionally, UCBMSCs can be considered as valuable tools to preclinically predict the immunogenicity of prospective regenerative cells.

  17. Preclinical Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties of Cardiac Adipose Tissue Progenitor Cells Using Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Direct Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Perea-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based strategies to regenerate injured myocardial tissue have emerged over the past decade, but the optimum cell type is still under scrutiny. In this context, human adult epicardial fat surrounding the heart has been characterized as a reservoir of mesenchymal-like progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs with potential clinical benefits. However, additional data on the possibility that these cells could trigger a deleterious immune response following implantation are needed. Thus, in the presented study, we took advantage of the well-established low immunogenicity of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs to comparatively assess the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac ATDPCs in an in vitro allostimulatory assay using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. Similar to UCBMSCs, increasing amounts of seeded cardiac ATDPCs suppressed the alloproliferation of T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, TNFα, and IFNγ was also specifically modulated by the different numbers of cardiac ATDPCs cocultured. In summary, we show that cardiac ATDPCs abrogate T cell alloproliferation upon stimulation with allogeneic mature MDDCs, suggesting that they could further regulate a possible harmful immune response in vivo. Additionally, UCBMSCs can be considered as valuable tools to preclinically predict the immunogenicity of prospective regenerative cells.

  18. In vivo preclinical low field MRI monitoring of tumor growth following a suicide gene therapy in an ortho-topic mice model of human glioblastoma;Controle par IRM bas champ in vivo de l'efficacite d'une therapie genique par gene suicide dans un modele murin de glioblastome orthotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, E.; Goetz, Ch.; Aubertin, G.; Constantinesco, A.; Choquet, Ph. [Service de biophysique et medecine nucleaire, hopital de Hautepierre, CHRU de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Institut de mecanique des fluides et des solides, CNRS, universite de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Kintz, J.; Accart, N.; Grellier, B.; Erbs, Ph.; Rooke, R. [Transgene SA, parc d' innovation, 67 - Illkirch Graffenstaden (France)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose The aim of this study was to monitor in vivo with low field MRI growth of a murine ortho-topic glioma model following a suicide gene therapy. Methods The gene therapy consisted in the stereotactic injection in the mice brain of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (M.V.A.) vector encoding for a suicide gene (FCU1) that transforms a non toxic pro-drug 5-fluoro-cytosine (5-F.C.) to its highly cytotoxic derivatives 5-fluorouracil (5-F.U.) and 5-fluoro-uridine-5 monophosphate (5-F.U.M.P.). Using a warmed-up imaging cell, sequential 3D T1 and T2 0.1T MRI brain examinations were performed on 16 Swiss female nu/nu mice bearing ortho-topic human glioblastoma (U 87-MG cells). The 6-week in vivo MRI follow-up consisted in a weekly measurement of the intracerebral tumor volume leading to a total of 65 examinations. Mice were divided in four groups: sham group (n = 4), sham group treated with 5-F.C. only (n = 4), sham group with injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector only (n = 4), therapy group administered with M.V.A.-FCU1 vector and 5-F.C. (n = 4). Measurements of tumor volumes were obtained after manual segmentation of T1- and T2-weighted images. Results Intra-observer and inter-observer tumor volume measurements show no significant differences. No differences were found between T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups. A significant statistical difference (p < 0.05) in T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups and the animals treated with the intratumoral injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector in combination with 2 weeks per os 5-F.C. administration was demonstrated. Conclusion Preclinical low field MRI was able to monitor efficacy of suicide gene therapy in delaying the tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model of ortho-topic glioblastoma. (authors)

  19. Preclinical safety study of a recombinant Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine formulated with aluminum adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HogenEsch, Harm; Dunham, Anisa; Burlet, Elodie; Lu, Fangjia; Mosley, Yung-Yi C; Morefield, Garry

    2017-02-01

    A recombinant vaccine composed of a fusion protein formulated with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant is under development for protection against diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes. The safety and local reactogenicity of the vaccine was assessed by a comprehensive series of clinical, pathologic and immunologic tests in preclinical experiments. Outbred mice received three intramuscular injections of 1/5th of the human dose (0.1 ml) and rabbits received two injections of the full human dose. Control groups received adjuvant or protein antigen. The vaccine did not cause clinical evidence of systemic toxicity in mice or rabbits. There was a transient increase of peripheral blood neutrophils after the third vaccination of mice. In addition, the concentration of acute phase proteins serum amyloid A and haptoglobin was significantly increased 1 day after injection of the vaccine in mice. There was mild transient swelling and erythema of the injection site in both mice and rabbits. Treatment-related pathology was limited to inflammation at the injection site and accumulation of adjuvant-containing macrophages in the draining lymph nodes. In conclusion, the absence of clinical toxicity in two animal species suggest that the vaccine is safe for use in a phase I human clinical trial. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Reproducibility of results in preclinical studies: a perspective from the bone field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolagas, Stavros C; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2014-10-01

    The biomedical research enterprise-and the public support for it-is predicated on the belief that discoveries and the conclusions drawn from them can be trusted to build a body of knowledge which will be used to improve human health. As in all other areas of scientific inquiry, knowledge and understanding grow by layering new discoveries upon earlier ones. The process self-corrects and distills knowledge by discarding false ideas and unsubstantiated claims. Although self-correction is inexorable in the long-term, in recent years biomedical scientists and the public alike have become alarmed and deeply troubled by the fact that many published results cannot be reproduced. The chorus of concern reached a high pitch with a recent commentary from the NIH Director, Francis S. Collins, and Principal Deputy Director, Lawrence A. Tabak, and their announcement of specific plans to enhance reproducibility of preclinical research that relies on animal models. In this invited perspective, we highlight the magnitude of the problem across biomedical fields and address the relevance of these concerns to the field of bone and mineral metabolism. We also suggest how our specialty journals, our scientific organizations, and our community of bone and mineral researchers can help to overcome this troubling trend. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  1. A Preclinical Study Evaluating AAVrh10-Based Gene Therapy for Sanfilippo Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winner, Leanne K; Beard, Helen; Hassiotis, Sofia; Lau, Adeline A; Luck, Amanda J; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2016-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA) is predominantly a disorder of the central nervous system, caused by a deficiency of sulfamidase (SGSH) with subsequent storage of heparan sulfate-derived oligosaccharides. No widely available therapy exists, and for this reason, a mouse model has been utilized to carry out a preclinical assessment of the benefit of intraparenchymal administration of a gene vector (AAVrh10-SGSH-IRES-SUMF1) into presymptomatic MPS IIIA mice. The outcome has been assessed with time, measuring primary and secondary storage material, neuroinflammation, and intracellular inclusions, all of which appear as the disease progresses. The vector resulted in predominantly ipsilateral distribution of SGSH, with substantially less detected in the contralateral hemisphere. Vector-derived SGSH enzyme improved heparan sulfate catabolism, reduced microglial activation, and, after a time delay, ameliorated GM3 ganglioside accumulation and halted ubiquitin-positive lesion formation in regions local to, or connected by projections to, the injection site. Improvements were not observed in regions of the brain distant from, or lacking connections with, the injection site. Intraparenchymal gene vector administration therefore has therapeutic potential provided that multiple brain regions are targeted with vector, in order to achieve widespread enzyme distribution and correction of disease pathology.

  2. Preclinical Study on GRPR-Targeted (68)Ga-Probes for PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yao; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    (NODAGA). The resulting NODAGA-SCH1 was then radiolabeled with (68)Ga and evaluated for PET imaging of PCa. Compared with (68)Ga-NODAGA-JMV594 probe, (68)Ga-NODAGA-SCH1 exhibited excellent PET/CT imaging properties on PC-3 tumor-bearing nude mice, such as high tumor uptake (5.80 ± 0.42 vs 3.78 ± 0.28%ID...... the kidney and the liver. Overall, (68)Ga-NODAGA-SCH1 showed promising in vivo properties and is a promising candidate for translation into clinical PET-imaging of PCa patients.......Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeted positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly promising approach for imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) in small animal models and patients. Developing a GRPR-targeted PET probe with excellent in vivo performance such as high tumor uptake, high...

  3. Anticancer Potential of Citrus Juices and Their Extracts: A Systematic Review of Both Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santa Cirmi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: During the last decades, a huge body of evidence has been accumulated suggesting that Citrus fruits and their juices might have a role in preventing many diseases including cancer.Objective: To summarize the numerous evidences on the potential of Citrus juices and their extracts as anticancer agents.Data sources: A systematic review of articles written in English using MEDLINE (1946-present, EMBASE (1974-present and Web of Sciences (1970-present was performed independently by two reviewers. Search terms included Citrus, Citrus aurantifolia, Citrus sinensis, Citrus paradisi, Citrus fruits, Citrus fruits extract, cancer, neoplasm, neoplasia, tumor, metastasis, carcinogenesis, proliferation. The last search was performed on March 16th, 2017.Study selection: Study selection and systematic review were carried out in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA statement. Prior to the beginning of the review, Authors defined a checklist for inclusion criteria, thus including articles which meet the following: (i published on peer-reviewed scientific journals; (ii Citrus juice used alone; (iii extracts derived from Citrus juice; (iii for preclinical studies, an exposure time to Citrus juices and their extracts more than 24 h. Reviews, meta-analyses, conference abstracts and book chapters were excluded.Data extraction: Three reviewers independently performed the extraction of articles.Data synthesis: 22 papers met our inclusion criteria and were eligible for inclusion in the final review. According to the kind of study, the selected ones were further divided in preclinical (n = 20 and observational (n = 2 studies.Conclusion: The studies discussed in this review strongly corroborate the role of Citrus juices and their derivatives as potential resource against cancer.

  4. Anticancer Potential of Citrus Juices and Their Extracts: A Systematic Review of Both Preclinical and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirmi, Santa; Maugeri, Alessandro; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Calapai, Gioacchino; Schumacher, Udo; Navarra, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Background: During the last decades, a huge body of evidence has been accumulated suggesting that Citrus fruits and their juices might have a role in preventing many diseases including cancer. Objective: To summarize the numerous evidences on the potential of Citrus juices and their extracts as anticancer agents. Data sources: A systematic review of articles written in English using MEDLINE (1946-present), EMBASE (1974-present) and Web of Sciences (1970-present) was performed independently by two reviewers. Search terms included Citrus, Citrus aurantifolia, Citrus sinensis, Citrus paradisi, Citrus fruits, Citrus fruits extract, cancer, neoplasm, neoplasia, tumor, metastasis, carcinogenesis, proliferation. The last search was performed on March 16th, 2017. Study selection: Study selection and systematic review were carried out in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Prior to the beginning of the review, Authors defined a checklist for inclusion criteria, thus including articles which meet the following: (i) published on peer-reviewed scientific journals; (ii) Citrus juice used alone; (iii) extracts derived from Citrus juice; (iii) for preclinical studies, an exposure time to Citrus juices and their extracts more than 24 h. Reviews, meta-analyses, conference abstracts and book chapters were excluded. Data extraction: Three reviewers independently performed the extraction of articles. Data synthesis: 22 papers met our inclusion criteria and were eligible for inclusion in the final review. According to the kind of study, the selected ones were further divided in preclinical (n = 20) and observational (n = 2) studies. Conclusion: The studies discussed in this review strongly corroborate the role of Citrus juices and their derivatives as potential resource against cancer.

  5. Taking Journal Clubs off Autopilot: A Case Study of Teaching Literature Evaluation Skills to Preclinical MD/PhD Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Rebecca L; Schneider, Marguerite Reid; Heubi, James E

    2013-12-01

    Researchers designed learner-directed journal clubs to develop literature evaluation skills in preclinical students. Sessions balanced student-led discussion with structured objectives and faculty support. During the pilot with preclinical MD/PhD students, self-rated mastery improved over all 17 measured objectives. Six exercises have since been incorporated into the full medical school curriculum.

  6. [Classification of results of studying blood plasma with laser correlation spectroscopy based on semiotics of preclinical and clinical states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovoĭ, K S; Kryzhanovskiĭ, G N; Musiĭchuk, Iu I; Noskin, L A; Klopov, N V; Noskin, V A; Starodub, N F

    1998-01-01

    The usage of laser correlation spectroscopy for verification of preclinical and clinical states is substantiated. Developed "semiotic" classifier for solving the problems of preclinical and clinical states is presented. The substantiation of biological algorithms as well as the mathematical support and software for the proposed classifier for the data of laser correlation spectroscopy of blood plasma are presented.

  7. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy of stratum corneum: a pre-clinical validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Polefka, T G

    2008-02-01

    Skin moisturization is not only important for maintaining skin functional properties but also has great impact on the skin's aesthetic properties. The top layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), plays a key role in protecting and preventing against external aggressions as well as in regulating water flux in and out. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is the first commercially available technique that provides a non-invasive, in vivo method to determine depth profiles of water concentration in the skin, however, in this case it was applied in an in vitro setting. As the first phase of validating the usefulness of confocal Raman microspectroscopy, we used porcine skin as a surrogate for human skin. Water concentration profiles were obtained using confocal Raman microspectroscopy from isolated pigskin SC and compared with that using the Karl Fischer titration method. The two methods correlated very well with a regression coefficient of 1.07 as well as a correlation coefficient, R(2) = 0.989, which demonstrated the consistency and accuracy of confocal Raman microspectroscopy for water concentration determination. To evaluate the instrument's response to different skin care/cleansing products, a wide range of products were tested to compare their skin moisturization ability. Among those tested were a lotion, commercial soap bar, syndet bar, traditional non-emollient shower gel (water, Sodium Laureth Ether Sulfate (SLES), cocamidopropyl betaine system) and emollient containing shower gel (water, sunflower oil, SLES, cocamidopropyl betaine, glycerin, petrolatum). The results were consistent with what was expected. The water content on skin treated with (A) lotion was significantly higher than the non-treated control; (B) syndet bar-treated skin had a significantly higher water content than soap-based bar-treated sites; (C) non-emollient shower gel washed sites were more moisturized than soap-based bar-treated samples; and (D) emollient shower gel-treated skin was

  8. A systematic review of methodology applied during preclinical anesthetic neurotoxicity studies: important issues and lessons relevant to the design of future clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disma, Nicola; Mondardini, Maria C; Terrando, Niccolò; Absalom, Anthony R; Bilotta, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical evidence suggests that anesthetic agents harm the developing brain thereby causing long-term neurocognitive impairments. It is not clear if these findings apply to humans, and retrospective epidemiological studies thus far have failed to show definitive evidence that anesthetic agents are harmful to the developing human brain. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the preclinical studies published over the past decade, with a focus on methodological issues, to facilitate the comparison between different preclinical studies and inform better design of future trials. The literature search identified 941 articles related to the topic of neurotoxicity. As the primary aim of this systematic review was to compare methodologies applied in animal studies to inform future trials, we excluded a priori all articles focused on putative mechanism of neurotoxicity and the neuroprotective agents. Forty-seven preclinical studies were finally included in this review. Methods used in these studies were highly heterogeneous-animals were exposed to anesthetic agents at different developmental stages, in various doses and in various combinations with other drugs, and overall showed diverse toxicity profiles. Physiological monitoring and maintenance of physiological homeostasis was variable and the use of cognitive tests was generally limited to assessment of specific brain areas, with restricted translational relevance to humans. Comparison between studies is thus complicated by this heterogeneous methodology and the relevance of the combined body of literature to humans remains uncertain. Future preclinical studies should use better standardized methodologies to facilitate transferability of findings from preclinical into clinical science. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Preclinical models to establish innovative therapy strategies : Ex‑vivo assessment of head and neck tumor chemo- and immune responses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, G; Dietz, A

    2016-07-01

    The pharmacological treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is currently experiencing an expansion of the spectrum of targeting therapies. It can be expected that use of immune modulators, e.g., checkpoint-inhibitors, and their combination with chemotherapy will lead to a plethora of therapeutic options in the near future, from which the best one for the individual patient can be selected. HNSCCs are heterogeneous in their biology, and responses to chemotherapy are nonuniform and often only observable in subgroups. It would be valuable to know the chance of success of a particular treatment in advance. Evidence-based selection of the best individual treatment is difficult, since predictive biomarkers which are assessable prior to the treatment decision and reliably indicate the suitability of particular therapeutics are lacking. Pretherapeutic predictive ex-vivo chemoresponse testing of HNSCC biopsy specimens could enable identification of responders and allow a more suitable therapy regimen to be chosen for potential non-responders, without exposing them to likely ineffective therapy attempts. However, early ex-vivo assays failed regarding reliable prediction of therapeutic success, even with tolerable doses of pharmaceuticals and, in particular, their combinations. Predictive testing was hence deemed improper for the clinic. Improved methodology has now led to a reappraisal of predictive testing and its additional use in analysis of antitumor immune responses ex vivo. Here we describe recent advances and new results from ex-vivo chemoresponse testing of HNSCC and highlight their ability to facilitate establishment of innovative therapy strategies.

  10. Pharmacologically Inactive Bisphosphonates as an Alternative Strategy for Targeting Osteoclasts: In Vivo Assessment of 5-Fluorodeoxyuridine-Alendronate in a Preclinical Model of Breast Cancer Bone Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schem, Christian; Tower, Robert J; Kneissl, Philipp; Rambow, Anna-Christina; Campbell, Graeme M; Desel, Christine; Damm, Timo; Heilmann, Thorsten; Fuchs, Sabine; Zuhayra, Maaz; Trauzold, Anna; Glüer, Claus C; Schott, Sarah; Tiwari, Sanjay

    2017-03-01

    Bisphosphonates have effects that are antiresorptive, antitumor, and antiapoptotic to osteoblasts and osteocytes, but an effective means of eliciting these multiple activities in the treatment of bone metastases has not been identified. Antimetabolite-bisphosphonate conjugates have potential for improved performance as a class of bone-specific antineoplastic drugs. The primary objective of the study was to determine whether an antimetabolite-bisphosphonate conjugate will preserve bone formation concomitant with antiresorptive and antitumor activity. 5-FdU-ale, a highly stable conjugate between the antimetabolite 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine and the bisphosphonate alendronate, was tested for its therapeutic efficacy in a mouse model of MDA-MB231 breast cancer bone metastases. In vitro testing revealed osteoclasts to be highly sensitive to 5-FdU-ale. In contrast, osteoblasts had significantly reduced sensitivity. Tumor cells were resistant in vitro but in vivo tumor burden was nevertheless significantly reduced compared with untreated mice. Sensitivity to 5-FdU-ale was not mediated through inhibition of farnesyl diphosphate synthase activity, but cell cycle arrest was observed. Although serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) levels were greatly reduced by both drugs, there was no significant decrease in the serum bone formation marker osteocalcin with 5-FdU-ale treatment. In contrast, there was more than a fivefold decrease in serum osteocalcin levels with alendronate treatment (p < 0.001). This finding is supported by time-lapse micro-computed tomography analyses, which revealed bone formation volume to be on average 1.6-fold higher with 5-FdU-ale treatment compared with alendronate (p < 0.001). We conclude that 5-FdU-ale, which is a poor prenylation inhibitor but maintains potent antiresorptive activity, does not reduce bone formation and has cytostatic antitumor efficacy. These results document that conjugation of an antimetabolite with

  11. NIH initiative to balance sex of animals in preclinical studies: generative questions to guide policy, implementation, and metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In May of 2014, the NIH Director together with the Director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health announced plans to take a multi-dimensional approach to address the over reliance on male cells and animals in preclinical research. The NIH is engaging the scientific community in the development of policies to improve the sex balance in research. The present, past, and future presidents of the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences, in order to encourage thoughtful discussion among scientists, pose a series of questions to generate ideas in three areas: 1. research strategies, 2. educational strategies, and 3. strategies to monitor effectiveness of policies to improve the sex balance in research. By promoting discussion within the scientific community, a consensus will evolve that will move science forward in a productive and effective manner. PMID:25780556

  12. Neuroinflammatory pathways as treatment targets and biomarker candidates in epilepsy: emerging evidence from preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Erwin A; Aronica, Eleonora; Vezzani, Annamaria; Ravizza, Teresa

    2017-10-04

    Accumulating evidence indicates an important pathophysiological role of brain inflammation in epilepsy. In this review, we will provide an update of specific inflammatory pathways that have been proposed to be crucial in the underlying molecular mechanisms of epilepsy, including the interleukin-1 receptor/toll-like receptor signaling, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, complement signaling and chemokines. Furthermore, by drawing on evidence from preclinical and clinical studies we will discuss the potential of these signaling pathways targets for novel therapeutic interventions that control drug-resistant seizures or have disease-modifying effects. Finally, we will assess the use of these inflammatory pathways as potential biomarkers for the development of epilepsy or to measure the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. The oblique radiographic technique for bone height measurements on edentulous mandibles - A preclinical study and an introduction to the clinical use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellingsma, K; Batenburg, RHK; Meijer, HJA; Raghoebar, GM; Kropmans, TJB

    Objective. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of mandibular angulation, position, and shape of the edentulous mandible on the distortion of its image on lateral oblique radiographs in a preclinical study. Suggestions far the clinical use of this technique are made. Study design. Five

  14. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara

    OpenAIRE

    Badakhshan Mahdi Pour; Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. Methods: The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. Results: All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Conclusions: Methanolic...

  15. Bioengineered Temporomandibular Joint Disk Implants: Study Protocol for a Two-Phase Exploratory Randomized Preclinical Pilot Trial in 18 Black Merino Sheep (TEMPOJIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Florencio Gil; González-García, Raúl; Little, Christopher B; Mónico, Lisete; Pinho, Mário; Santos, Fábio Abade; Carrapiço, Belmira; Gonçalves, Sandra Cavaco; Morouço, Pedro; Alves, Nuno; Moura, Carla; Wang, Yadong; Jeffries, Eric; Gao, Jin; Sousa, Rita; Neto, Lia Lucas; Caldeira, Daniel; Salvado, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Background Preclinical trials are essential to test efficacious options to substitute the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk. The contemporary absence of an ideal treatment for patients with severe TMJ disorders can be related to difficulties concerning the appropriate study design to conduct preclinical trials in the TMJ field. These difficulties can be associated with the use of heterogeneous animal models, the use of the contralateral TMJ as control, the absence of rigorous randomized controlled preclinical trials with blinded outcomes assessors, and difficulties involving multidisciplinary teams. Objective This study aims to develop a new, reproducible, and effective study design for preclinical research in the TMJ domain, obtaining rigorous data related to (1) identify the impact of bilateral discectomy in black Merino sheep, (2) identify the impact of bilateral discopexy in black Merino sheep, and (3) identify the impact of three different bioengineering TMJ discs in black Merino sheep. Methods A two-phase exploratory randomized controlled preclinical trial with blinded outcomes is proposed. In the first phase, nine sheep are randomized into three different surgical bilateral procedures: bilateral discectomy, bilateral discopexy, and sham surgery. In the second phase, nine sheep are randomized to bilaterally test three different TMJ bioengineering disk implants. The primary outcome is the histological gradation of TMJ. Secondary outcomes are imaging changes, absolute masticatory time, ruminant time per cycle, ruminant kinetics, ruminant area, and sheep weight. Results Previous preclinical studies in this field have used the contralateral unoperated side as a control, different animal models ranging from mice to a canine model, with nonrandomized, nonblinded and uncontrolled study designs and limited outcomes measures. The main goal of this exploratory preclinical protocol is to set a new standard for future preclinical trials in oromaxillofacial surgery

  16. Antimicrobial Blue Light Therapy for Infectious Keratitis: Ex Vivo and In Vivo Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Kochevar, Irene E; Behlau, Irmgard; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Fenghua; Wang, Yucheng; Sun, Xiaodong; Hamblin, Michael R; Dai, Tianhong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of antimicrobial blue light (aBL) as an alternative or adjunctive therapeutic for infectious keratitis. We developed an ex vivo rabbit model and an in vivo mouse model of infectious keratitis. A bioluminescent strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used as the causative pathogen, allowing noninvasive monitoring of the extent of infection in real time via bioluminescence imaging. Quantitation of bacterial luminescence was correlated to colony-forming units (CFU). Using the ex vivo and in vivo models, the effectiveness of aBL (415 nm) for the treatment of keratitis was evaluated as a function of radiant exposure when aBL was delivered at 6 or 24 hours after bacterial inoculation. The aBL exposures calculated to reach the retina were compared to the American National Standards Institute standards to estimate aBL retinal safety. Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis fully developed in both the ex vivo and in vivo models at 24 hours post inoculation. Bacterial luminescence in the infected corneas correlated linearly to CFU (R2 = 0.921). Bacterial burden in the infected corneas was rapidly and significantly reduced (>2-log10) both ex vivo and in vivo after a single exposure of aBL. Recurrence of infection was observed in the aBL-treated mice at 24 hours after aBL exposure. The aBL toxicity to the retina is largely dependent on the aBL transmission of the cornea. Antimicrobial blue light is a potential alternative or adjunctive therapeutic for infectious keratitis. Further studies of corneal and retinal safety using large animal models, in which the ocular anatomies are similar to that of humans, are warranted.

  17. The Devil Is in the Details: Incomplete Reporting in Preclinical Animal Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc T Avey

    Full Text Available Incomplete reporting of study methods and results has become a focal point for failures in the reproducibility and translation of findings from preclinical research. Here we demonstrate that incomplete reporting of preclinical research is not limited to a few elements of research design, but rather is a broader problem that extends to the reporting of the methods and results. We evaluated 47 preclinical research studies from a systematic review of acute lung injury that use mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as a treatment. We operationalized the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments reporting guidelines for pre-clinical studies into 109 discrete reporting sub-items and extracted 5,123 data elements. Overall, studies reported less than half (47% of all sub-items (median 51 items; range 37-64. Across all studies, the Methods Section reported less than half (45% and the Results Section reported less than a third (29%. There was no association between journal impact factor and completeness of reporting, which suggests that incomplete reporting of preclinical research occurs across all journals regardless of their perceived prestige. Incomplete reporting of methods and results will impede attempts to replicate research findings and maximize the value of preclinical studies.

  18. Digital Radiography for Determination of Primary Tooth Length: In Vivo and Ex Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Basso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Methods for determining the root canal length of the primary tooth should yield accurate and reproducible results. In vitro studies show some limitations, which do not allow their findings to be directly transferred to a clinical situation. Aim. To compare the accuracy of radiographic tooth length obtained from in vivo digital radiograph with that obtained from ex vivo digital radiograph. Method. Direct digital radiographs of 20 upper primary incisors were performed in teeth (2/3 radicular resorption that were radiographed by an intraoral sensor, according to the long-cone technique. Teeth were extracted, measured, and mounted in a resin block, and then radiographic template was used to standardise the sensor-target distance (30 cm. The apparent tooth length (APTL was obtained from the computer screen by means of an electronic ruler accompanying the digital radiography software (CDR 2.0, whereas the actual tooth length (ACTL was obtained by means of a digital calliper following extraction. Data were compared to the ACTL by variance analysis and Pearson’s correlation test. Results. The values for APTL obtained from in vivo radiography were slightly underestimated, whereas those values obtained from ex vivo were slightly overestimated. No significance was observed (P≤0.48 between APTL and ACTL. Conclusion. The length of primary teeth estimated by in vivo and ex vivo comparisons using digital radiography was found to be similar to the actual tooth length.

  19. Preclinical profile of cabazitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrignaud P

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patricia Vrignaud,1 Dorothée Semiond,2 Veronique Benning,2 Eric Beys,2 Hervé Bouchard,3 Sunil Gupta4 1Sanofi Oncology, Vitry-sur-Seine, France; 2Sanofi DSAR, Alfortville, France; 3Sanofi LGCR, Vitry-sur-Seine, France; 4Sanofi Oncology, Cambridge, MA, USA Abstract: First-generation taxanes have changed the treatment paradigm for a wide variety of cancers, but innate or acquired resistance frequently limits their use. Cabazitaxel is a novel second-generation taxane developed to overcome such resistance. In vitro, cabazitaxel showed similar antiproliferative activity to docetaxel in taxane-sensitive cell lines and markedly greater activity in cell lines resistant to taxanes. In vivo, cabazitaxel demonstrated excellent antitumor activity in a broad spectrum of docetaxel-sensitive tumor xenografts, including a castration-resistant prostate tumor xenograft, HID28, where cabazitaxel exhibited greater efficacy than docetaxel. Importantly, cabazitaxel was also active against tumors with innate or acquired resistance to docetaxel, suggesting therapeutic potential for patients progressing following taxane treatment and those with docetaxel-refractory tumors. In patients with tumors of the central nervous system (CNS, and in patients with pediatric tumors, therapeutic success with first-generation taxanes has been limited. Cabazitaxel demonstrated greater antitumor activity than docetaxel in xenograft models of CNS disease and pediatric tumors, suggesting potential clinical utility in these special patient populations. Based on therapeutic synergism observed in an in vivo tumor model, cabazitaxel is also being investigated clinically in combination with cisplatin. Nonclinical evaluation of the safety of cabazitaxel in a range of animal species showed largely reversible changes in the bone marrow, lymphoid system, gastrointestinal tract, and male reproductive system. Preclinical safety signals of cabazitaxel were consistent with the previously reported

  20. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, Badakhshan Mahdi; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Methanolic extract of L. camara is relatively safe on short-term exposure.

  1. Pre-clinical antigenicity studies of an innovative multivalent vaccine for human visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecílio, Pedro; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Fernández, Laura; Moreno, Javier; Carrillo, Eugenia; Requena, José M; Fichera, Epifanio; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N; Kamhawi, Shaden; Oliveira, Fabiano; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Gradoni, Luigi; Glueck, Reinhard; Gupta, Gaurav; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2017-11-01

    The notion that previous infection by Leishmania spp. in endemic areas leads to robust anti-Leishmania immunity, supports vaccination as a potentially effective approach to prevent disease development. Nevertheless, to date there is no vaccine available for human leishmaniasis. We optimized and assessed in vivo the safety and immunogenicity of an innovative vaccine candidate against human visceral leishmaniasis (VL), consisting of Virus-Like Particles (VLP) loaded with three different recombinant proteins (LJL143 from Lutzomyia longipalpis saliva as the vector-derived (VD) component, and KMP11 and LeishF3+, as parasite-derived (PD) antigens) and adjuvanted with GLA-SE, a TLR4 agonist. No apparent adverse reactions were observed during the experimental time-frame, which together with the normal hematological parameters detected seems to point to the safety of the formulation. Furthermore, measurements of antigen-specific cellular and humoral responses, generally higher in immunized versus control groups, confirmed the immunogenicity of the vaccine formulation. Interestingly, the immune responses against the VD protein were reproducibly more robust than those elicited against leishmanial antigens, and were apparently not caused by immunodominance of the VD antigen. Remarkably, priming with the VD protein alone and boosting with the complete vaccine candidate contributed towards an increase of the immune responses to the PD antigens, assessed in the form of increased ex vivo CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation against both the PD antigens and total Leishmania antigen (TLA). Overall, our immunogenicity data indicate that this innovative vaccine formulation represents a promising anti-Leishmania vaccine whose efficacy deserves to be tested in the context of the "natural infection".

  2. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo characterization of the fully human monoclonal IgM antibody KBPA101 specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype IATS-O11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Michael P; Zuercher, Adrian W; Imboden, Martin A

    2010-01-01

    Antigenic Typing System (IATS) serotype O11 with high avidity (5.81 x 10(7) M(-1) +/- 2.8 x 10(7) M(-1)) without cross-reacting with other serotypes. KBPA101 specifically opsonized the P. aeruginosa of IATS O11 serotype and mediated complement-dependent phagocytosis in vitro by the human monocyte-like cell...... line HL-60 at a very low concentration (half-maximal phagocytosis at 0.16 ng/ml). In vivo evaluation of KBPA101 demonstrated a dose-response relationship for protection against systemic infections in a murine burn wound sepsis model, where 70 to 100% of animals were protected against lethal challenges...

  3. Preclinical Studies of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) Administration in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangde; Fang, Qiuhong; Kim, Huijung

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been pre-clinically utilized in the treatment of a variety of kinds of diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of the current study was to systematically review and conduct a meta-analysis on the published pre-clinical studies of MSC administration in the treatment of COPD in animal models. A systematic search of electronic databases was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software (Version 3). The pooled Hedges's g with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) was adopted to assess the effect size. Random effect model was used due to the heterogeneity between the studies. A total of 20 eligible studies were included in the current systematic review. The overall meta-analysis showed that MSC administration was significantly in favor of attenuating acute lung injury (Hedges's g = -2.325 ± 0.145 with 95% CI: -2.609 ~ -2.040, P COPD is through ameliorating airway inflammation (Hedges's g = -2.956 ± 0.371 with 95% CI: -3.683 ~ -2.229, Preview and meta-analysis suggest a promising role for MSCs in COPD treatment. Although the COPD models may not truly mimic COPD patients, these pre-clinical studies demonstrate that MSC hold promise in the treatment of chronic lung diseases including COPD. The mechanisms of MSCs role in preclinical COPD treatment may be associated with attenuating airway inflammation as well as stimulating lung tissue repair.

  4. [Does the transition to clinical training change students' perception of career choice, physician's character and preclinical studies?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotan, Eyal; Kimhi, Oded; Lishner, Michael; Notzer, Netta

    2010-04-01

    In Israel, the transition to clinical training in hospitals is the first direct encounter of the medical student with the reality of the profession. This is a significant socialization step for his upcoming professional decisions. This study aimed to identify how this encounter influences students' perceptions of career choice, physician's character and preclinical studies. Fourth year Israeli medical students at the Tel Aviv University voluntarily completed a questionnaire before and after their first clinical clerkship. The questionnaire was comprised of 30 5-point Likert scale statements and 3 multiple choice questions with the possibility to add remarks. The random response rate was 90% (81/90) before the clerkship and 82% (90/110) at its end. Results indicate that the students are satisfied with their medical studies at both junctures. However, after the clerkship, 23% of the students consider alternatives to clinical medicine compared with only 6% before, and 16% would rethink studying medicine. Physicians are perceived as professional, compassionate, respectful to colleagues and actively participating in students' education. Physicians' levels of workload and bitterness are evaluated as high and moderate, respectively, while their levels of reward and satisfaction with medicine are evaluated as low and moderate, respectively. Their evaluation of the contribution of preclinical studies as preparation for clinical studies had not changed after the clerkship and was moderate, and earlier exposure to patients and clinical relevancy of the learned subjects were preferred. The students enter the medical world highly satisfied, and this feeling shall be maintained until the stage of being independent physicians and choosing their specialties. The picture that evolved, in which a high proportion of the students consider alternatives to clinical medicine, is disappointing. Educators should be aware of their role model function not only in knowledge and skills, but

  5. Safety data on 19 vehicles for use in 1 month oral rodent pre-clinical studies: administration of hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin causes renal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healing, Guy; Sulemann, Tabassum; Cotton, Peter; Harris, Jayne; Hargreaves, Adam; Finney, Rowena; Kirk, Sarah; Schramm, Carolin; Garner, Clare; Pivette, Perrine; Burdett, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Potential new drugs are assessed in pre-clinical in vivo studies to determine their safety profiles. The drugs are formulated in vehicles suitable for the route of administration and the physicochemical properties of the drug, aiming to achieve optimal exposure in the test species. The availability of safety data on vehicles is often limited (incomplete data, access restricted/private databases). Nineteen potentially useful vehicles that contained new and/or increased concentrations of excipients and for which little safety data have been published were tested. Vehicles were dosed orally once daily to HanWistar rats for a minimum of 28 days and a wide range of toxicological parameters were assessed. Only 30% (w/v) hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin was found unsuitable owing to effects on liver enzymes (AST, ALT and GLDH), urinary volume and the kidneys (tubular vacuolation and tubular pigment). 20% (v/v) oleic acid caused increased salivation and hence this vehicle should be used with caution. As 40% (v/v) tetraethylene glycol affected urinary parameters, its use should be carefully considered, particularly for compounds suspected to impact the renal system and studies longer than 1 month. There were no toxicologically significant findings with 10% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide, 20% (v/v) propylene glycol, 33% (v/v) Miglyol®812, 20% (w/v) Kolliphor®RH40, 10% (w/v) Poloxamer 407, 5% (w/v) polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 or 10% (v/v) Labrafil®M1944. All other vehicles tested caused isolated or low magnitude effects which would not prevent their use. The aim of sharing these data, including adverse findings, is to provide meaningful information for vehicle selection, thereby avoiding repetition of animal experimentation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Combined analysis of pharmacokinetic and efficacy data of preclinical studies with statins markedly improves translation of drug efficacy to human trialss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, E. van de; Kleemann, R.; Jansen, H.T.; Duyvenvoorde, W. van; Offerman, E.H.; Wortelboer, H.M.; DeGroot, J.

    2013-01-01

    Correct prediction of human pharmacokinetics (PK) and the safety and efficacy of novel compounds based on preclinical data, is essential but often fails. In the current study, we aimed to improve the predictive value of ApoE*3Leiden (E3L) trans-genic mice regarding the cholesterol-lowering efficacy

  7. Ocular ketoconazole-loaded proniosomal gels: formulation, ex vivo corneal permeation and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbary, Ghada A; Amin, Maha M; Zakaria, Mohamed Y

    2017-11-01

    Vesicular drug carriers for ocular delivery have gained a real potential. Proniosomal gels as ocular drug carriers have been proven to be an effective way to improve bioavailability and patient compliance. Formulation and in vitro/ex vivo/in vivo characterization of ketoconazole (KET)-loaded proniosomal gels for the treatment of ocular keratitis. The effect of formulation variables; HLB value, type and concentration of non-ionic surfactants (Tweens, Spans, Brijs and Pluronics) with or without lecithin on the entrapment efficiency (EE%), vesicle size and in vitro KET release was evaluated. An ex vivo corneal permeation study to determine the level of KET in the external eye tissue of albino rabbits and an in vivo assessment of the level of KET in the aqueous humors were performed. In vivo evaluation showed an increase in bioavailability up to 20-folds from the optimum KET proniosomal gel formula in the aqueous humor compared to drug suspension (KET-SP). The selected formulae were composed of spans being hydrophobic suggesting the potential use of a more hydrophobic surfactant as Span during the formulation of formulae. Factors that stabilize the vesicle membrane and increase the entrapment efficiency of KET (namely low HLB, long alkyl chain, high phase transition temperature) slowed down the release profile. Proniosomal gels as drug delivery carriers were proven to be a promising approach to increase corneal contact and permeation as well as retention time in the eye resulting in a sustained action and enhanced bioavailability.

  8. Evaluation of dietetic product innovations: the relative role of preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrides, Maria; Gibson, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    A variety of systems are used to establish efficacy of food ingredients. Immortal human cell lines have the advantage of rapid throughput and often have the ability to point to mechanisms of action. Transgenic and natural variants of animals (usually rats and mice) have proven to be extremely useful in elucidating effects in vivo, although extrapolation of results to humans has risks. Animal models are also useful in establishing safety and toxic levels of ingredients. Human trials have the most relevance to society. Types of evidence for efficacy rise from improved status level in subjects as a result of eating food (long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid, levels in erythrocytes), change in surrogate markers as a result of eating food (plasma cholesterol or glutathione peroxidase activity), change in a physiological outcome (such as visual evoked potential acuity or heart rate variability) through to the highest level of evidence, a change in a clinical outcome (improved global development, reduction in infections) established in randomized controlled trials. Ultimately, there is a need for tests of pragmatic interventions that can easily be incorporated into usual dietary practices of the culture in which it is tested. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. In Vivo Cytogenetic Studies on Aspartame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entissar S. AlSuhaibani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartame (a-Laspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methylester is a dipeptide low-calorie artificial sweetener that is widely used as a nonnutritive sweetener in foods and drinks. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic breakdown products (phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol was investigated in vivo using chromosomal aberration (CA test and sister chromatid exchange (SCE test in the bone marrow cells of mice. Swiss Albino male mice were exposed to aspartame (3.5, 35, 350 mg/kg body weight. Bone marrow cells isolated from femora were analyzed for chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. Treatment with aspartame induced dose dependently chromosome aberrations at all concentrations while it did not induce sister chromatid exchanges. On the other hand, aspartame did not decrease the mitotic index (MI. However, statistical analysis of the results show that aspartame is not significantly genotoxic at low concentration.

  10. Minibeam radiotherapy with small animal irradiators; in vitro and in vivo feasibility studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyar, Soha; Inscoe, Christina R.; O’Brian, E. Timothy; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z.

    2017-12-01

    Minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) delivers an ultrahigh dose of x-ray (⩾100 Gy) in 200–1000 µm beams (peaks), separated by wider non-irradiated regions (valleys) usually as a single temporal fraction. Preclinical studies performed at synchrotron facilities revealed that MBRT is able to ablate tumors while maintaining normal tissue integrity. The main purpose of the present study was to develop an efficient and accessible method to perform MBRT using a conventional x-ray irradiator. We then tested this new method both in vitro and in vivo. Using commercially available lead ribbon and polyethylene sheets, we constructed a collimator that converted the cone beam of an industrial irradiator to 44 identical beams (collimator size  ≈  4  ×  10 cm). The dosimetry characteristics of the generated beams were evaluated using two different radiochromic films (beam FWHM  =  246  ±  32 µm center-to-center  =  926  ±  23 µm peak-to-valley dose ratio  =  24.35  ±  2.10 collimator relative output factor  =  0.84  ±  0.04). Clonogenic assays demonstrated the ability of our method to induce radiobiological cell death in two radioresistant murine tumor cell lines (TRP  =  glioblastoma B16-F10  =  melanoma). A radiobiological equivalent dose (RBE) was calculated by evaluating the acute skin response to graded doses of MBRT and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Normal mouse skin demonstrated resistance to doses up to 150 Gy on peak. MBRT significantly extended the survival of mice with flank melanoma tumors compared to CRT when RBE were applied (overall p  <  0.001). Loss of spatial resolution deep in the tissue has been a major concern. The beams generated using our collimator maintained their resolution in vivo (mouse brain tissue) and up to 10 cm deep in the radiochromic film. In conclusion, the initial dosimetric, in vitro and in vivo evaluations confirmed the

  11. Preclinical evaluation of an MR-compatible microwave ablation system and comparison with a standard microwave ablation system in an ex vivo bovine liver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Rüdiger; Kessler, David-Emanuel; Weiss, Jakob; Clasen, Stephan; Pereira, Philippe L; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Rempp, Hansjörg

    2017-09-01

    Evaluation of a newly developed MR-compatible microwave ablation system with focus on ablation performance and comparison with a corresponding standard microwave ablation system. A total of 52 ablations were performed with a non-cooled microwave ablation system in an ex vivo bovine liver model using the following settings: [A] 16G-standard antenna, 2 cm active tip, 2.4 m cable; [B] MR-compatible 16G-antenna, 2 cm active tip, 2.4 m cable; [C] MR-compatible 16G-antenna, 2 cm active tip, extended 6 m cable; and [D] MR-compatible 16G-antenna, 4 cm active tip, extended 6 m cable. Ablation durations were 3, 5 and 10 min, and additionally 15 min for [D]. Ablations zones were measured for short-axis diameter (SA) and long-axis diameter (LA). Settings [A]-[C] were compared regarding SA, volume (V) and generator energy output (E) with analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer post hoc test. Ablation performance of the MR-compatible settings [C] and [D] were compared regarding SA, V, E and sphericity index (SA/LA) with unpaired t-test. p standard system.

  12. The novel deacetylase inhibitor AR-42 demonstrates pre-clinical activity in B-cell malignancies in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Lucas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available While deacetylase (DAC inhibitors show promise for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, those introduced to date are weak inhibitors of class I and II DACs or potent inhibitors of class I DAC only, and have shown suboptimal activity or unacceptable toxicities. We therefore investigated the novel DAC inhibitor AR-42 to determine its efficacy in B-cell malignancies.In mantle cell lymphoma (JeKo-1, Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (697 cell lines, the 48-hr IC(50 (50% growth inhibitory concentration of AR-42 is 0.61 microM or less. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL patient cells, the 48-hr LC(50 (concentration lethal to 50% of AR-42 is 0.76 microM. AR-42 produces dose- and time-dependent acetylation both of histones and tubulin, and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis that is not reduced in the presence of stromal cells. AR-42 also sensitizes CLL cells to TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL, potentially through reduction of c-FLIP. AR-42 significantly reduced leukocyte counts and/or prolonged survival in three separate mouse models of B-cell malignancy without evidence of toxicity.Together, these data demonstrate that AR-42 has in vitro and in vivo efficacy at tolerable doses. These results strongly support upcoming phase I testing of AR-42 in B-cell malignancies.

  13. Antitumor activity of the two epipodophyllotoxin derivatives VP-16 and VM-26 in preclinical systems: a comparison of in vitro and in vivo drug evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P B; Roed, H; Skovsgaard, T

    1990-01-01

    The epipodophyllotoxines VP-16 and VM-26 are chemically closely related. VM-26 has been found to be considerably more potent than VP-16 in vitro in a number of investigations. Although the drugs have been known for greater than 20 years, they have not been compared at clearly defined equitoxic....../kg daily (95% confidence limits, 7.4-11.8) for VP-16 and 3.4 (2.5-4.5) mg/kg daily for VM-26. In vitro, we found VM-26 to be 6-10 times more potent than VP-16 in a clonogenic assay on murine tumors P388 and L1210 leukemia and Ehrlich ascites. This pattern was also demonstrated in a multidrug......-resistant subline of Ehrlich selected for resistance to daunorubicin (Ehrlich/DNR+), as it was 30 times less sensitive than Ehrlich cells to both VP-16 and VM-26. Using 90%, 45%, and 22% of the LD10 on the same murine tumors in vivo, we found that the effect of the two drugs was equal as evaluated by both...

  14. Preclinical development and first-in-human study of ATX-MS-1467 for immunotherapy of MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Heather B; Rigden, Rachel; Martin, Keith F; Scolding, Neil J; Wraith, David C

    2015-06-01

    The study was designed to test the efficacy of ATX-MS-1467 in a relevant preclinical model and to assess its safety for the treatment of patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). ATX-MS-1467 was tested for its ability to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the (Ob x DR2)F1 mouse both before and after disease onset. Safety was assessed by clinical assessment, MRI analysis, and the measurement of immune responses to self- and nonself-antigens in patients with SPMS. ATX-MS-1467 displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of EAE and was more effective than glatiramer acetate in the treatment of ongoing disease in humanized mice. A phase 1 open-label dose-escalating study demonstrated that ATX-MS-1467 was safe and well-tolerated in a group of 6 patients with SPMS, up to a dose of 800 µg. The results of this study support further development of ATX-MS-1467 in a clinical trial powered to investigate the immunologic and clinical benefits of treatment in relapsing-remitting MS. This study provides Class IV evidence that ATX-MS-1467 is safe and tolerated in a group of 6 patients with SPMS.

  15. Preclinical study of using multiphoton microscopy to diagnose liver cancer and differentiate benign and malignant liver lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Gang; Wu, Xiufeng; Zhou, Dong; Xie, Shusen; Jiang, Jiahao; Ying, Mingang; Jia, Fan; Chen, Jianxin; Zhou, Jian

    2012-02-01

    Recently, the miniaturized multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and multiphoton probe allow the clinical use of multiphoton endoscopy for diagnosing cancer via ``optical biopsy''. The purpose of this study was to establish MPM optical diagnostic features for liver cancer and evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MPM optical diagnosis. Firstly, we performed a pilot study to establish the MPM diagnostic features by investigating 60 surgical specimens, and found that high-resolution MPM images clearly demonstrated apparent differences between benign and malignant liver lesions in terms of their tissue architecture and cell morphology. Cancer cells, characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei, and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, were identified by MPM images, which were comparable to hematoxylin-eosin staining images. Secondly, we performed a blinded study to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MPM optical diagnosis by investigating another 164 specimens, and found that the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MPM diagnosis was 96.32%, 96.43%, and 96.34%, respectively. In conclusion, it is feasible to use MPM to diagnose liver cancer and differentiate benign and malignant liver lesions. This preclinical study provides the groundwork for further using multiphoton endoscopy to perform real-time noninvasive ``optical biopsy'' for liver lesions in the near future.

  16. Preclinical evaluation of the supercritical extract of azadirachta indica (neem) leaves in vitro and in vivo on inhibition of prostate cancer tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang; Kohli, Manish; Bergen, H Robert; Cheville, John C; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Cao, Hong; Young, Charles Y F; Tindall, Donald J; McNiven, Mark A; Donkena, Krishna Vanaja

    2014-05-01

    Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, has gained worldwide prominence because of its medical properties, namely antitumor, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycemic, antifungal, and antibacterial activities. Despite these promising results, gaps remain in our understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of neem compounds and their potential for use in clinical trials. We investigated supercritical extract of neem leaves (SENL) for the following: molecular targets in vitro, in vivo efficacy to inhibit tumor growth, and bioactive compounds that exert antitumor activity. Treatment of LNCaP-luc2 prostate cancer cells with SENL suppressed dihydrotestosterone-induced androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen levels. SENL inhibited integrin β1, calreticulin, and focal adhesion kinase activation in LNCaP-luc2 and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Oral administration of SENL significantly reduced LNCaP-luc2 xenograft tumor growth in mice with the formation of hyalinized fibrous tumor tissue, reduction in the prostate-specific antigen, and increase in AKR1C2 levels. To identify the active anticancer compounds, we fractionated SENL by high-pressure liquid chromatography and evaluated 16 peaks for cytotoxic activity. Four of the 16 peaks exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against prostate cancer cells. Mass spectrometry of the isolated peaks suggested the compounds with cytotoxic activity were nimbandiol, nimbolide, 2',3'-dihydronimbolide, and 28-deoxonimbolide. Analysis of tumor tissue and plasma samples from mice treated with SENL indicated 28-deoxonimbolide and nimbolide as the bioactive compounds. Overall, our data revealed the bioactive compounds in SENL and suggested that the anticancer activity could be mediated through alteration in androgen receptor and calreticulin levels in prostate cancer.

  17. Preclinical Evaluation of the Supercritical Extract of Azadirachta Indica (Neem) Leaves In Vitro and In Vivo on Inhibition of Prostate Cancer Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang; Kohli, Manish; Bergen, H. Robert; Cheville, John C.; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Cao, Hong; Young, Charles Y.F.; Tindall, Donald J.; McNiven, Mark A.; Donkena, Krishna Vanaja

    2015-01-01

    Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, has gained worldwide prominence because of its medical properties, namely antitumor, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycemic, antifungal, and antibacterial activities. Despite these promising results, gaps remain in our understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of neem compounds and their potential for use in clinical trials. We investigated supercritical extract of neem leaves (SENL) for the following: molecular targets in vitro, in vivo efficacy to inhibit tumor growth, and bioactive compounds that exert antitumor activity. Treatment of LNCaP-luc2 prostate cancer cells with SENL suppressed dihydrotestosterone-induced androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen levels. SENL inhibited integrin β1, calreticulin, and focal adhesion kinase activation in LNCaP-luc2 and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Oral administration of SENL significantly reduced LNCaP-luc2 xenograft tumor growth in mice with the formation of hyalinized fibrous tumor tissue, reduction in the prostate-specific antigen, and increase in AKR1C2 levels. To identify the active anticancer compounds, we fractionated SENL by high-pressure liquid chromatography and evaluated 16 peaks for cytotoxic activity. Four of the 16 peaks exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against prostate cancer cells. Mass spectrometry of the isolated peaks suggested the compounds with cytotoxic activity were nimbandiol, nimbolide, 2′,3′-dihydronimbolide, and 28-deoxonim-bolide. Analysis of tumor tissue and plasma samples from mice treated with SENL indicated 28-deoxonim-bolide and nimbolide as the bioactive compounds. Overall, our data revealed the bioactive compounds in SENL and suggested that the anticancer activity could be mediated through alteration in androgen receptor and calreticulin levels in prostate cancer. PMID:24674886

  18. The Impact of the Low Molecular Weight Heparin Tinzaparin on the Sensitization of Cisplatin-Resistant Ovarian Cancers-Preclinical In Vivo Evaluation in Xenograft Tumor Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas; Pfankuchen, Daniel Bastian; Wantoch von Rekowski, Kathleen; Schlesinger, Martin; Reipsch, Franziska; Bendas, Gerd

    2017-05-03

    Resistance formation of tumors against chemotherapeutics is the major obstacle in clinical cancer therapy. Although low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is an important component in oncology referring to guideline-based antithrombotic prophylaxis of tumor patients, a potential interference of LMWH with chemoresistance is unknown. We have recently shown that LMWH reverses the cisplatin resistance of A2780cis human ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Here we address the question whether this LMWH effect is also valid under in vivo conditions. Therefore, we established tumor xenografts of A2780 and cisplatin resistant A2780cis cells in nude mice and investigated the impact of daily tinzaparin applications (10 mg/kg BW) on anti-tumor activity of cisplatin (6 mg/kg BW, weekly) considering the tumor growth kinetics. Intratumoral platinum accumulation was detected by GF-AAS. Xenografts of A2780 and A2780cis cells strongly differed in cisplatin sensitivity. As an overall consideration, tinzaparin co-treatment affected the response to cisplatin of A2780cis, but not A2780 tumors in the later experimental time range. A subgroup analysis confirmed that initially smaller A2780cis tumors benefit from tinzaparin, but also small A2780 xenografts. Tinzaparin did not affect cisplatin accumulation in A2780cis xenografts, but strongly increased the platinum content in A2780, obviously related to morphological differences in both xenografts. Although we cannot directly confirm a return of A2780cis cisplatin resistance by tinzaparin, as shown in vitro, the present findings give reason to discuss heparin effects on cytostatic drug efficiency for small tumors and warrants further investigation.

  19. Tissue engineering human small-caliber autologous vessels using a xenogenous decellularized connective tissue matrix approach: preclinical comparative biomechanical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Jörg; Schmiedl, Andreas; Cebotari, Serghei; Karck, Matthias; Mertsching, Heike; Haverich, Axel; Kallenbach, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    Suggesting that bioartificial vascular scaffolds cannot but tissue-engineered vessels can withstand biomechanical stress, we developed in vitro methods for preclinical biological material testings. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of revitalization of xenogenous scaffolds on biomechanical stability of tissue-engineered vessels. For measurement of radial distensibility, a salt-solution inflation method was used. The longitudinal tensile strength test (DIN 50145) was applied on bone-shaped specimen: tensile/tear strength (SigmaB/R), elongation at maximum yield stress/rupture (DeltaB/R), and modulus of elasticity were determined of native (NAs; n = 6), decellularized (DAs; n = 6), and decellularized carotid arteries reseeded with human vascular smooth muscle cells and human vascular endothelial cells (RAs; n = 7). Radial distensibility of DAs was significantly lower (113%) than for NAs (135%) (P caliber vascular graft testing, this study proved that revitalization of decellularized connective tissue scaffolds led to vascular graft stability able to withstand biomechanical stress mimicking the human circulation. This tissue engineering approach provides a sufficiently stable autologized graft. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. An observational study investigating the impact of simulated patients in teaching communication skills in preclinical dietetic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S J; Davidson, Z E

    2016-08-01

    Simulated patients (SPs) are often used in dietetics for the teaching and assessment of communication skills. The present study aimed to determine the impact of a SP encounter on communication skills in undergraduate preclinical dietetic students in the context of the resources required for delivering this educational strategy. This observational study collected assessment data from four cohorts of third-year dietetic students to examine the effect of participation in SP-embedded Objective Structured Clinical Exams. Students completed two SP interviews, 2 weeks apart, and communication skills were measured on both occasions. A subgroup of students received a video of their SP encounter. Differences between the two SP interview scores were compared to assess the impact of the SP encounter on communication skills. The required staff and resources were described. Data were collected involving 215 students. Out of 30 marks, there was a modest mean (SD) improvement in communication skills from the first to the second SP interview of 2.5 (4.2) (P communication skills, with failing students demonstrating the greatest improvement between SP encounters. There were no observed benefits for the subset of students who received videos. Providing repeat SP interview opportunities results in only modest improvement in communication skills for most students. The use of SPs needs to be considered in context of the substantial costs and resources involved and tailored to student ability. © 2015 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  1. Common handling procedures conducted in preclinical safety studies result in minimal hepatic gene expression changes in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudong D He

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling is a tool to gain mechanistic understanding of adverse effects in response to compound exposure. However, little is known about how the common handling procedures of experimental animals during a preclinical study alter baseline gene expression. We report gene expression changes in the livers of female Sprague-Dawley rats following common handling procedures. Baseline gene expression changes identified in this study provide insight on how these changes may affect interpretation of gene expression profiles following compound exposure. Rats were divided into three groups. One group was not subjected to handling procedures and served as controls for both handled groups. Animals in the other two groups were weighed, subjected to restraint in Broome restrainers, and administered water via oral gavage daily for 1 or 4 days with tail vein blood collections at 1, 2, 4, and 8 hours postdose on days 1 and 4. Significantly altered genes were identified in livers of animals following 1 or 4 days of handling when compared to the unhandled animals. Gene changes in animals handled for 4 days were similar to those handled for 1 day, suggesting a lack of habituation. The altered genes were primarily immune function related genes. These findings, along with a correlating increase in corticosterone levels suggest that common handling procedures may cause a minor immune system perturbance.

  2. Validation of the Filovirus Plaque Assay for Use in Preclinical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-02

    use across multiple institutions performing BSL-4 studies. After standardization studies were completed, Good Laboratory Practices (GLP)-compliant...animal model studies and regulated studies for the advanced development of medical countermeasures (MCM) under Good Laboratory Practice-compliant (GLP...Bioreclamation (Westbury, NY). Reagents for culturing of cells: 1× MEM ( Cat . No. 10010249, Cellgro, Manassas, VA, USA) in plates, supplemented with 5

  3. Generation and characterization of recombinant feline beta-galactosidase for preclinical enzyme replacement therapy studies in GM1 gangliosidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Martin, Douglas R; Morrison, Nancy E; Hwang, Misako; Cochran, Anna M; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Baker, Henry J; Cox, Nancy R

    2008-06-01

    Lysosomal beta-galactosidase is required for the degradation of GM1 ganglioside and other glycolipids and glycoproteins with a terminal galactose moiety. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to the lysosomal storage disorder, GM1 gangliosidosis, marked by severe neurodegeneration resulting in premature death. As a step towards preclinical studies for enzyme replacement therapy in an animal model of GM1 gangliosidosis, a feline beta-galactosidase cDNA was cloned into a mammalian expression vector and subsequently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. The enzyme secreted into culture medium exhibited specific activity on two synthetic substrates as well as on the native beta-galactosidase substrate, GM1 ganglioside. The enzyme was purified from transfected CHO-K1 cell culture medium by chromatography on PATG-agarose. The affinity-purified enzyme preparation consisted mainly of the protein with approximate molecular weight of 94 kDa and displayed immunoreactivity with antibodies raised against a 16-mer synthetic peptide corresponding to C-terminal amino acid sequence deduced from the feline beta-galactosidase cDNA.

  4. Selected recent in vivo studies on chemical measurements in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdi, S; Ren, L; Fathali, H; Li, X; Ewing, A G

    2015-06-07

    In vivo measurements of neurotransmitters and related compounds have provided a better understanding of the chemical interactions that are a major part in functioning of brains. In addition, a great deal of technology has been developed to measure chemical species in other areas of living organisms. A key part of this work has been sampling technologies as well as direct measurements in vivo. This is extremely important when sampling from the smallest animal systems. Yet, very small invertebrate systems are excellent models and often have better defined and more easily manipulated genetics. This review focuses on in vivo measurements, electrochemical methods, fluorescence techniques, and sampling and is further narrowed to work over approximately the last three years. Rapid developments of in vivo studies in these model systems should aid in finding solutions to biological and bioanalytical challenges related to human physiological functions and neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. A method to study in vivo stability of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surana, Sunaina; Bhatia, Dhiraj; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-11-01

    DNA nanostructures are rationally designed, synthetic, nanoscale assemblies obtained from one or more DNA sequences by their self-assembly. Due to the molecularly programmable as well as modular nature of DNA, such designer DNA architectures have great potential for in cellulo and in vivo applications. However, demonstrations of functionality in living systems necessitates a method to assess the in vivo stability of the relevant nanostructures. Here, we outline a method to quantitatively assay the stability and lifetime of various DNA nanostructures in vivo. This exploits the property of intact DNA nanostructures being uptaken by the coelomocytes of the multicellular model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. These studies reveal that the present fluorescence based assay in coelomocytes of C. elegans is an useful in vivo test bed for measuring DNA nanostructure stability. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reform in Teaching Preclinical Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Yu; Li, Kun; Yao, Hong; Xu, Xiao-Juan; Cai, Qiao-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Pathophysiology is a scientific discipline that studies the onset and progression of pathological conditions and diseases, and pathophysiology is one of the core courses in most preclinical medical curricula. In China, most medical schools house a Department of Pathophysiology, in contrast to medical schools in many developed countries. The staff…

  7. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib affects ovulation but not ovarian reserve in mouse: A preclinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bernard (Valérie); J. Bouilly (Justine); P. Kramer (Piet); N. Carré (Nadège); M. Schlumberger (Martin); J.A. Visser (Jenny A.); J. Young (Jacques); N.B. Binart (Nadine Binart)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the study was to evaluate ovarian toxicity of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sunitinib, since only scarce data are available on gonadal function after this treatment. Six-weekold female mice received orally, once daily, vehicle or sunitinib (50 mg/kg/d) during 5 weeks.

  8. Wound-Healing Potential of Cultured Epidermal Sheets Is Unaltered after Lyophilization: A Preclinical Study in Comparison to Cryopreserved CES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyophilized Cultured Epidermal Sheets (L-CES have been reported to be as effective as the cryopreserved CES (F-CES in treating skin ulcers. However, unlike F-CES, no preclinical study assessing wound-healing effects has been conducted for L-CES. The present study was set out to investigate the microstructure, cytokine profile, and wound-healing effects of L-CES in comparison to those of F-CES. Keratinocytes were cultured to prepare CES, followed by cryopreservation at −70°C and lyophilization. Under microscopic observation, intact cells with apparent intracellular junctions were observed in L-CES. The L-CES, like fresh CES, consisted of three to four well-maintained epidermal layers, as shown by the expression of keratins, involucrin, and p63. There were no differences in the epidermal layer or protein expression between L-CES and F-CES, and both CES were comparable to fresh CES. TGF-α, EGF, VEGF, IL-1α, and MMPs were detected in L-CES at levels similar to those in F-CES. In a mouse study, wounds treated with L-CES or F-CES completely healed at least 4 days faster than untreated wounds. CES-treated wounds completely healed by day 10, while the untreated wounds did not heal by day 14. Masson’s trichrome staining showed that collagen deposition in the CES-treated wounds was highly increased in the dermis of the wound center compared to that in the control wounds. Thus, this study demonstrates that L-CES is as clinically effective as F-CES for wound treatment.

  9. A longitudinal study of empathy in pre-clinical and clinical medical students and clinical supervisors

    OpenAIRE

    Mahoney, Sarah; Sladek, Ruth M; Neild, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background Although appropriate empathy in health professionals is essential, a loss of empathy can occur during medical education. The structure of clinical learning may be one factor that is implicated in a loss of empathy. This study examines student and doctor empathy, and possible associations between empathy and the structure of clinical learning. Methods There were three groups of participants: medical students (n?=?281), who completed a longitudinal survey consisting of the Jefferson ...

  10. Validation of the Filovirus Plaque Assay for Use in Preclinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C. Shurtleff

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A plaque assay for quantitating filoviruses in virus stocks, prepared viral challenge inocula and samples from research animals has recently been fully characterized and standardized for use across multiple institutions performing Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4 studies. After standardization studies were completed, Good Laboratory Practices (GLP-compliant plaque assay method validation studies to demonstrate suitability for reliable and reproducible measurement of the Marburg Virus Angola (MARV variant and Ebola Virus Kikwit (EBOV variant commenced at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID. The validation parameters tested included accuracy, precision, linearity, robustness, stability of the virus stocks and system suitability. The MARV and EBOV assays were confirmed to be accurate to ±0.5 log10 PFU/mL. Repeatability precision, intermediate precision and reproducibility precision were sufficient to return viral titers with a coefficient of variation (%CV of ≤30%, deemed acceptable variation for a cell-based bioassay. Intraclass correlation statistical techniques for the evaluation of the assay’s precision when the same plaques were quantitated by two analysts returned values passing the acceptance criteria, indicating high agreement between analysts. The assay was shown to be accurate and specific when run on Nonhuman Primates (NHP serum and plasma samples diluted in plaque assay medium, with negligible matrix effects. Virus stocks demonstrated stability for freeze-thaw cycles typical of normal usage during assay retests. The results demonstrated that the EBOV and MARV plaque assays are accurate, precise and robust for filovirus titration in samples associated with the performance of GLP animal model studies.

  11. AAV-mediated gene therapy for choroideremia: preclinical studies in personalized models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyullatha Vasireddy

    Full Text Available Choroideremia (CHM is an X- linked retinal degeneration that is symptomatic in the 1(st or 2(nd decade of life causing nyctalopia and loss of peripheral vision. The disease progresses through mid-life, when most patients become blind. CHM is a favorable target for gene augmentation therapy, as the disease is due to loss of function of a protein necessary for retinal cell health, Rab Escort Protein 1 (REP1.The CHM cDNA can be packaged in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV, which has an established track record in human gene therapy studies, and, in addition, there are sensitive and quantitative assays to document REP1 activity. An animal model that accurately reflects the human condition is not available. In this study, we tested the ability to restore REP1 function in personalized in vitro models of CHM: lymphoblasts and induced pluripotent stems cells (iPSCs from human patients. The initial step of evaluating safety of the treatment was carried out by evaluating for acute retinal histopathologic effects in normal-sighted mice and no obvious toxicity was identified. Delivery of the CHM cDNA to affected cells restores REP1 enzymatic activity and also restores proper protein trafficking. The gene transfer is efficient and the preliminary safety data are encouraging. These studies pave the way for a human clinical trial of gene therapy for CHM.

  12. Alzheimer's disease and gut microbiota modifications: The long way between preclinical studies and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Cesare; Santangelo, Rosaria

    2017-12-09

    Recent studies have suggested the role of an infectious component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In light of this, research has focused on some bacteria constituting the intestinal microbial flora which can produce amyloid. Once generated, the latter hypothetically triggers a systemic inflammatory response which compromises complex brain functions, such as learning and memory. Clinical studies have shown that, in cognitively impaired elderly patients with brain amyloidosis, there is lower abundance in the gut of E. rectale and B. fragilis, two bacterial species which have an anti-inflammatory activity, versus a greater amount of pro-inflammatory genera such as Escherichia/Shigella. According to these findings, some clinical studies have demonstrated that supplementation with Lactobacilli- and Bifidobacteria- based probiotics has improved cognitive, sensory and emotional functions in subjects with AD. Moreover, certain herbal products, in particular dietetic polyphenols, have proved capable of restoring dysbiosis and, therefore, their prebiotic role could be effective in counteracting the onset of AD regardless of their activity of free radical scavenging or enhancement of the cell stress response. One of the recent greatest novelties in the field of neurodegenerative diseases is the chance to prevent or slow down AD progression with agents, such as probiotics and prebiotics, acting outside the central nervous system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. SU-F-R-01: Preclinical Radioimmunogenomics Study to Design Personalized Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, H [Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Radiogenomics is an active area of research to find clinical correlation between genomics and radiotherapy outcomes. In this era, many different biological issues should be taken into account. In this study we aimed to introduce “Radioimmunogenomics” as a new approach to study immunogetics issue regard to radiotherapy induced clinical manifestations. Methods: We studied different immunological pathways and signaling molecules which underling radiation response of normal and malignant tissues. In the other hand, we found many genes and proteins are responsible to radiation effects on biological tissues. We defined a theoretical framework to correlate these genes with radiotherapy outcomes as TCP and NTCP biological dose tools. Results: Our theoretical results showed, high-throughput immunogenomics biomarkers can be correlated with radiotherapy outcomes. Genes regarding to inflammation, apoptosis, repair molecules and many other immunological markers can be defined as radioimmune markers to predict radiotherapy response. Conclusion: Radioimmunogenomics can be used as a new personalized radiotherapy research area to enhance treatment outcome as well as quality of life.

  14. Long-term drug administration in the adult zebrafish using oral gavage for cancer preclinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Dang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zebrafish are a major model for chemical genetics, and most studies use embryos when investigating small molecules that cause interesting phenotypes or that can rescue disease models. Limited studies have dosed adults with small molecules by means of water-borne exposure or injection techniques. Challenges in the form of drug delivery-related trauma and anesthesia-related toxicity have excluded the adult zebrafish from long-term drug efficacy studies. Here, we introduce a novel anesthetic combination of MS-222 and isoflurane to an oral gavage technique for a non-toxic, non-invasive and long-term drug administration platform. As a proof of principle, we established drug efficacy of the FDA-approved BRAFV600E inhibitor, Vemurafenib, in adult zebrafish harboring BRAFV600E melanoma tumors. In the model, adult casper zebrafish intraperitoneally transplanted with a zebrafish melanoma cell line (ZMEL1 and exposed to daily sub-lethal dosing at 100 mg/kg of Vemurafenib for 2 weeks via oral gavage resulted in an average 65% decrease in tumor burden and a 15% mortality rate. In contrast, Vemurafenib-resistant ZMEL1 cell lines, generated in culture from low-dose drug exposure for 4 months, did not respond to the oral gavage treatment regimen. Similarly, this drug treatment regimen can be applied for treatment of primary melanoma tumors in the zebrafish. Taken together, we developed an effective long-term drug treatment system that will allow the adult zebrafish to be used to identify more effective anti-melanoma combination therapies and opens up possibilities for treating adult models of other diseases.

  15. Long-term drug administration in the adult zebrafish using oral gavage for cancer preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Michelle; Henderson, Rachel E; Garraway, Levi A; Zon, Leonard I

    2016-07-01

    Zebrafish are a major model for chemical genetics, and most studies use embryos when investigating small molecules that cause interesting phenotypes or that can rescue disease models. Limited studies have dosed adults with small molecules by means of water-borne exposure or injection techniques. Challenges in the form of drug delivery-related trauma and anesthesia-related toxicity have excluded the adult zebrafish from long-term drug efficacy studies. Here, we introduce a novel anesthetic combination of MS-222 and isoflurane to an oral gavage technique for a non-toxic, non-invasive and long-term drug administration platform. As a proof of principle, we established drug efficacy of the FDA-approved BRAF(V600E) inhibitor, Vemurafenib, in adult zebrafish harboring BRAF(V600E) melanoma tumors. In the model, adult casper zebrafish intraperitoneally transplanted with a zebrafish melanoma cell line (ZMEL1) and exposed to daily sub-lethal dosing at 100 mg/kg of Vemurafenib for 2 weeks via oral gavage resulted in an average 65% decrease in tumor burden and a 15% mortality rate. In contrast, Vemurafenib-resistant ZMEL1 cell lines, generated in culture from low-dose drug exposure for 4 months, did not respond to the oral gavage treatment regimen. Similarly, this drug treatment regimen can be applied for treatment of primary melanoma tumors in the zebrafish. Taken together, we developed an effective long-term drug treatment system that will allow the adult zebrafish to be used to identify more effective anti-melanoma combination therapies and opens up possibilities for treating adult models of other diseases. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of wound healing activity of Lantana camara L. - a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B Shivananda; Raju, S Sivachandra; Eversley, Mathew; Ramsubhag, Adash

    2009-02-01

    Lantana camara is used in herbal medicine for the treatment of skin itches, as an antiseptic for wounds, and externally for leprosy and scabies. The objective of our study was to investigate excision wound healing activity of the leaf extract of L. camara in rats. The animals were divided into two groups of 12 each in both the models. The test group animals were treated with the aqueous extract of L. camara (100 mg/kg/day) topically and the control group animals were left untreated. Wound healing efficacy was measured by determining the morphological and biochemical parameters. Wound healing time, wound contraction and synthesis of collagen were monitored periodically. Antimicrobial activities of the extract against the microorganisms were also assessed. Treatment of the wounds with extract enhanced significantly the rate of wound contraction (98%), synthesis of collagen and decreased mean wound healing time. These studies demonstrate that L. camara is effective in healing excision wounds in the experimental animal and could be evaluated as a therapeutic agent in tissue repair processes associated with skin injuries. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A Preclinical Study of Laryngeal Motor-Evoked Potentials as a Marker Vagus Nerve Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimonprez, Annelies; Raedt, Robrecht; De Taeye, Leen; Larsen, Lars Emil; Delbeke, Jean; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl

    2015-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment for refractory epilepsy and depression. Previous studies using invasive recording electrodes showed that VNS induces laryngeal motor-evoked potentials (LMEPs) through the co-activation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and subsequent contractions of the laryngeal muscles. The present study investigates the feasibility of recording LMEPs in chronically VNS-implanted rats, using a minimally-invasive technique, to assess effective current delivery to the nerve and to determine optimal VNS output currents for vagal fiber activation. Three weeks after VNS electrode implantation, signals were recorded using an electromyography (EMG) electrode in the proximity of the laryngeal muscles and a reference electrode on the skull. The VNS output current was gradually ramped up from 0.1 to 1.0 mA in 0.1 mA steps. In 13/27 rats, typical LMEPs were recorded at low VNS output currents (median 0.3 mA, IQR 0.2-0.3 mA). In 11/27 rats, significantly higher output currents were required to evoke electrophysiological responses (median 0.7 mA, IQR 0.5-0.7 mA, p vagus nerve. Furthermore, our results suggest that low output currents are sufficient to activate vagal fibers.

  18. Preclinical studies on the reinforcing effects of cannabinoids. A tribute to the scientific research of Dr. Steve Goldberg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanda, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Rationale The reinforcing effects of most abused drugs have been consistently demonstrated and studied in animal models, although those of marijuana were not, until the demonstration fifteen years ago that THC could serve as a reinforcer in self-administration (SA) procedures in squirrel monkeys. Until then, those effects were inferred using indirect assessments. Objectives The aim of this manuscript is to review the primary preclinical procedures used to indirectly and directly infer reinforcing effects of cannabinoid drugs. Methods Results will be reviewed from studies of cannabinoid-discrimination, intracranial-self-stimulation (ICSS), conditioned place preference (CPP), as well as change in levels of dopamine assessed in brain areas related to reinforcement, and finally from self-administration procedures. For each procedure, an evaluation will be made of the predictive validity in detecting the potential abuse liability of cannabinoids based on seminal papers, with the addition of selected reports from more recent years especially those from Dr. Goldberg’s research group. Results and Conclusions ICSS and CPP do not provide consistent results for the assessment of potential for abuse of cannabinoids. However, drug-discrimination and neurochemistry procedures appear to detect potential for abuse of cannabinoids, as well as several novel “designer cannabinoid drugs.” Though after 15 years it remains somewhat problematic transfer the self-administration model of marijuana abuse from squirrel monkeys to other species, studies with the former species have substantially advanced the field, and several reports have been published with consistent self-administration of cannabinoid agonists in rodents. PMID:27026633

  19. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Ernesto Nicolás Gulin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%. Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction.

  20. Influence of Teaching Strategies and its Order of Exposure on Pre-Clinical Teeth Arrangement - A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyapalan, Karthigeyan; Mani, Uma Maheswari; Christian, Jayanth; Seenivasan, Madhan Kumar; Natarajan, Parthasarathy; Vaidhyanathan, Anand Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Teeth arrangement is a vital skill for the undergraduate dental student. The attainment of skills depends largely on the methodology of teaching. In a dental curriculum, the students are exposed to a wide variety of inputs and teaching methodologies from different sources. The educational unit in dental school must identify the sequence of teaching methods that enhance the learning and practising ability of students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of three different teaching methodologies for teeth arrangement and compare the differences between the orders of exposure to each teaching methodology on the development of teeth arrangement skills. The first year B.D.S students were study participants and were divided into three groups A, B, C. They were exposed to three teaching patterns namely live demonstration with video assisted teaching, group discussion with hand-outs and lectures with power point presentation. After each teaching methodology, their skill was assessed. The groups were exposed to three methodologies in different order for three arrangements. The scores obtained were analysed using Kruskal Wallis rank sum test and Dunn test for statistical significance. Significantly higher scores in the teeth arrangement procedure were obtained by the Group A students who were exposed initially to live demonstration with video-assisted teaching. Difference in the scores was noted among and within the groups. The difference between Group A and Group C was statistically significant after both first and third teeth arrangement (p=0.0031, p=0.0057). The study suggests each pre-clinical practice should begin with a live demonstration to enhance immediate learning absorption followed by lectures with power point presentation and group discussion for retention of knowledge and memory retrieval.

  1. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%). Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction. PMID:26587586

  2. Curcumin nanoformulations : A review of pharmaceutical properties and preclinical studies and clinical data related to cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naksuriya, Ornchuma; Okonogi, Siriporn; Schiffelers, Raymond M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/212909509; Hennink, Wim E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070880409

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural yellow phenolic compound, is present in many kinds of herbs, particularly in Curcuma longa Linn. (turmeric). It is a natural antioxidant and has shown many pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-cancer, and anti-Alzheimer in both preclinical

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for salivary gland dysfunction and xerostomia: a systematic review of preclinical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, David Hebbelstrup; Oliveri, Roberto Stefan; Trojahn-Kølle, Stig-Frederik

    2014-01-01

    The most severe forms of xerostomia and salivary gland dysfunction, as well as a severely reduced quality of life, are seen in Sjögren syndrome (SS) and after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. For both conditions, no effective regenerative therapies yet exist. Thus, the aim of this article...... was to assess, through systematic review, the potential benefit of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy in radiation-induced and SS-related salivary gland dysfunction and xerostomia. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the World Health Organization...... gland dysfunction and xerostomia. Nonetheless, the preliminary studies identified in the present review were encouraging for further research....

  4. Systematic Approach to Remediation in Basic Science Knowledge for Preclinical Students: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Francis

    Remediation of pre-clerkship students for deficits in basic science knowledge should help them overcome their learning deficiencies prior to clerkship. However, very little is known about remediation in basic science knowledge during pre-clerkship. This study utilized the program theory framework to collect and organize mixed methods data of the remediation plan for pre-clerkship students who failed their basic science cognitive examinations in a Canadian medical school. This plan was analyzed using a logic model narrative approach and compared to literature on the learning theories. The analysis showed a remediation plan that was strong on governance and verification of scores, but lacked: clarity and transparency of communication, qualified remedial tutors, individualized diagnosis of learner's deficits, and student centered learning. Participants admitted uncertainty about the efficacy of the remediation process. A remediation framework is proposed that includes student-centered participation, individualized learning plan and activities, deliberate practice, feedback, reflection, and rigorous reassessment.

  5. A feasibility study of soft embalmed human breast tissue for preclinical trials of HIFU- preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Joyce; Yang, Yang; Purdie, Colin; Eisma, Roos; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer in women in the UK, accounting for 30% of all new cancers in women, with an estimated 49,500 new cases in 20101. With the widespread negative publicity around over-diagnosis and over-treatment of low risk breast cancers, interest in the application of non-invasive treatments such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has increased. Development has begun of novel US transducers and platforms specifically designed for use with breast lesions, so as to improve the range of breast lesions that can be safely treated. However, before such transducers can be evaluated in patients in clinical trials, there is a need to establish their efficacy. A particular issue is the accuracy of temperature monitoring of FUS with MRI in the breast, since the presence of large amounts of surrounding fat can hinder temperature measurement. An appropriate anatomical model that imposes similar physical constraints to the breast and that responds to FUS in the same way would be extremely advantageous. The aim of this feasibility study is to explore the use of Thiel embalmed cadaveric tissue for these purposes. We report here the early results of laboratory-based experiments sonicating dissected breast samples from a Thiel embalmed soft human cadaver with high body mass index (BMI). A specially developed MRI compatible chamber and sample holder was developed to secure the sample and ensure reproducible sonications at the transducer focus. The efficacy of sonication was first studied with chicken breast and porcine tissue. The experiments were then repeated with the dissected fatty breast tissue samples from the soft-embalmed human cadavers. The sonicated Thiel breast tissue was examined histopathologically, which confirmed the absence of any discrete lesion. To investigate further, fresh chicken breast tissue was embalmed and the embalmed tissue was sonicated with the same parameters. The results confirmed the

  6. Preclinical in vivo activity of a combination gemcitabine/liposomal doxorubicin against cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer (A2780/CDDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, D; Fruscella, E; Ferlini, C; Apollonio, P; Mancuso, S; Scambia, G

    2006-01-01

    Both gemcitabine and liposomal doxorubicin are antineoplastic drugs with clinical activity in platinum-refractory ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antitumor activity of a combination gemcitabine/liposomal doxorubicin administered to athymic mice bearing cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer (A2780/CDDP) xenografts. Emphasis was on the use of very low doses of each drug and of different dosing schedules. Data obtained showed that combined treatment with 80 mg/kg gemcitabine and 15 mg/kg liposomal doxorubicin produced a significant enhancement of antitumor activity compared with monotherapy at the same doses of these agents. Noteworthy is the fact that the majority of xenograft-bearing animals receiving the combination therapy demonstrated a complete tumor regression at the end of the study. A similar trend was observed when doses of both drugs were reduced to 20 mg/kg gemcitabine and to 6 mg/kg liposomal doxorubicin. Again, three out of ten mice receiving the combination were tumor free at the end of the study. No significant differences were observed in antitumor activity when comparing the simultaneous vs the consecutive dosing schedule. Remarkably, no additive toxicity was observed in any experimental trials. These data encourage clinical trials to prove the advantages of this combination treatment with respect to the single-agent chemotherapy in platinum-refractory ovarian cancer patients.

  7. [Pharmacokinetic design for the preclinical phase. Application to the study of an anthracenone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame-Reyna, M; Guerrero-Olazarán, M; Belmontes-Hernández, R; Viader-Salvadó, J M

    1994-01-01

    T-514 is a toxic substance of Karwinskia humboldtiana which has been described as a possible anticancer agent. An animal model (New Zeland white rabbit) was selected for pharmacokinetic studies that would allow the performance of surgical techniques to catheterize central vessels in order to obtain blood samples at short time intervals. A nonlinear regression analysis method was used to fit the plasmatic concentration data to a multiexponential mathematical function; a computer program based on Marquant's iterating algorithm was used to fit the experimental curves. In the present work we show the advantage of introducing two catheters of different diameters in the jugular vein using modifications of the Seldinger and Braunüle techniques: a catheter of small diameter (18 G) is used to introduce the drug and a larger one (16 G) to sample at different times. The larger diameter catheter facilitates a rapid sampling of blood (two mL/s) which is essential to determine the initial phase of the distribution process (alpha phase). The behavior of T-514 corresponded to a two-compartment model with a biexponential equation C = 0.35 e-0.13(t-2) + 0.17 e-0.03(t-2).

  8. Contributions of GABA to alcohol responsivity during adolescence: Insights from preclinical and clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveri, Marisa M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a considerable body of literature demonstrating that adolescence is a unique age period, which includes rapid and dramatic maturation of behavioral, cognitive, hormonal and neurobiological systems. Most notably, adolescence is also a period of unique responsiveness to alcohol effects, with both hyposensitivity and hypersensitivity observed to the various effects of alcohol. Multiple neurotransmitter systems are undergoing fine-tuning during this critical period of brain development, including those that contribute to the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. The role of developmental maturation of the γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) system, however, has received less attention in contributing to age-specific alcohol sensitivities. This review integrates GABA findings from human magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies as they may translate to understanding adolescent-specific responsiveness to alcohol effects. Better understanding of the vulnerability of the GABA system both during adolescent development, and in psychiatric conditions that include alcohol dependence, could point to a putative mechanism, boosting brain GABA, that may have increased effectiveness for treating alcohol abuse disorders. PMID:24631274

  9. Electric field characteristics of electroconvulsive therapy with individualized current amplitude: a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Hee; Lisanby, Sarah H; Laine, Andrew F; Peterchev, Angel V

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics of the electric field induced in the brain by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with individualized current amplitude. The electric field induced by bilateral (BL), bifrontal (BF), right unilateral (RUL), and frontomedial (FM) ECT electrode configurations was computed in anatomically realistic finite element models of four nonhuman primates (NHPs). We generated maps of the electric field strength relative to an empirical neural activation threshold, and determined the stimulation strength and focality at fixed current amplitude and at individualized current amplitudes corresponding to seizure threshold (ST) measured in the anesthetized NHPs. The results show less variation in brain volume stimulated above threshold with individualized current amplitudes (16-36%) compared to fixed current amplitude (30-62%). Further, the stimulated brain volume at amplitude-titrated ST is substantially lower than that for ECT with conventional fixed current amplitudes. Thus individualizing the ECT stimulus current could compensate for individual anatomical variability and result in more focal and uniform electric field exposure across different subjects compared to the standard clinical practice of using high, fixed current for all patients.

  10. Wound healing activity of Persea americana (avocado) fruit: a preclinical study on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B S; Raju, S S; Chalapathi Rao, A V

    2008-03-01

    Avocado (Persea americana) oil is rich in nutrient waxes, proteins and minerals, as well as vitamins A, D and E. It is an excellent source of enrichment for dry, damaged or chapped skin. This study aimed to evaluate the wound-healing activity of fruit extract of Persea americana in rats. The effect of topical and oral administration of Persea americana fruit extract (300 mg/kg/day) on excision and dead space wound models was evaluated. The rats used in the excision wound model were divided into four groups of five each and received either topical or oral treatment. The rats used in the dead space wound model were divided into two groups of five each and were treated orally. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction, period of epithelialisation, granulation tissue weight and hydoxyproline content. In the excision wound model, complete healing (full epithelialisation) was observed on average on day 14 in the rats who receive oral or topical treatment. In contrast, the controls took approximately 17 days to heal completely. The extract-treated wounds were found to epithelialise faster than the controls (p < 0.001). Wet and dry granulation tissue weight and the hydroxyproline content of the tissue obtained from extract-treated animals used in the dead space wound model were significantly higher (p < 0.05) compared with the controls. Rate of wound contraction, epithelialisation time together with the hydroxyproline content and histological observations support the use of Persea americana in the management of wound healing.

  11. The Usefulness of Systematic Reviews of Animal Experiments for the Design of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rob B. M.; Wever, Kimberley E.; Avey, Marc T.; Stephens, Martin L.; Sena, Emily S.; Leenaars, Marlies

    2014-01-01

    The question of how animal studies should be designed, conducted, and analyzed remains underexposed in societal debates on animal experimentation. This is not only a scientific but also a moral question. After all, if animal experiments are not appropriately designed, conducted, and analyzed, the results produced are unlikely to be reliable and the animals have in effect been wasted. In this article, we focus on one particular method to address this moral question, namely systematic reviews of previously performed animal experiments. We discuss how the design, conduct, and analysis of future (animal and human) experiments may be optimized through such systematic reviews. In particular, we illustrate how these reviews can help improve the methodological quality of animal experiments, make the choice of an animal model and the translation of animal data to the clinic more evidence-based, and implement the 3Rs. Moreover, we discuss which measures are being taken and which need to be taken in the future to ensure that systematic reviews will actually contribute to optimizing experimental design and thereby to meeting a necessary condition for making the use of animals in these experiments justified. PMID:25541545

  12. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CYTOLOGIC AND COLPOSCOPIC FINDINGS IN PRECLINICAL CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penagaluru

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The cytologic diagnosis of cervical smears has become a very important screening test for the detection of pre-invasive and invasive cervical epithelial abnormalities. MATERIALS AND METHODS It is a prospective study conducted for a period of 1 year in 100 women who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Colposcopy, PAP smear and biopsy were done. RESULTS Majority 70.5% i.e., (12/17 of CIN occurred in the age group of 30-49 years. Among the 9 women who took OCP, 12% (2/17 had CIN. Incidence of CIN in the permanently sterilized group was 59% (10/17 and among IUCD user was 5.9% (1/17. Among women who were diagnosed to have CIN, 70.5% (12/17 complained of excessive vaginal discharge 11.7% (2/17 of women had post-coital bleeding. PAP smear had a sensitivity of 29% and a specificity of 88% which was attributed to the high number of false, negative smears. Colposcopy showed a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 81%. Sensitivity was more than pap smear but specificity was less than pap smear. Accuracy of Colposcopy was found to be 82% which was comparatively more accurate than pap smear (78%. CONCLUSIONS COLPOSCOPY offers an excellent tool in evaluating cervical lesions. It is an easy and perspective method and its importance lies in teaching, diagnosis and management of cervical lesions, both neoplastic and non-neoplastic.

  13. GABAergic contributions to alcohol responsivity during adolescence: insights from preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveri, Marisa M

    2014-08-01

    There is a considerable body of literature demonstrating that adolescence is a unique age period, which includes rapid and dramatic maturation of behavioral, cognitive, hormonal and neurobiological systems. Most notably, adolescence is also a period of unique responsiveness to alcohol effects, with both hyposensitivity and hypersensitivity observed to the various effects of alcohol. Multiple neurotransmitter systems are undergoing fine-tuning during this critical period of brain development, including those that contribute to the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. The role of developmental maturation of the γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) system, however, has received less attention in contributing to age-specific alcohol sensitivities. This review integrates GABA findings from human magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies as they may translate to understanding adolescent-specific responsiveness to alcohol effects. Better understanding of the vulnerability of the GABA system both during adolescent development, and in psychiatric conditions that include alcohol dependence, could point to a putative mechanism, boosting brain GABA, that may have increased effectiveness for treating alcohol use disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Modulation of radiation-induced oral mucositis by pentoxifylline: Preclinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Sylvia; Bozsaky, Eva [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Schmidt, Margret [Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Dresden; Wolfram, Kathrin; Haagen, Julia; Habelt, Bettina; Puttrich, Martin [Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-10-29

    Oral mucositis is a frequent early side effect of radio(chemo)therapy of head-and-neck malignancies. The epithelial radiation response is accompanied by inflammatory reactions; their interaction with epithelial processes remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) on the oral mucosal radiation response in the mouse tongue model. Irradiation comprised fractionation (5 fractions of 3 Gy/week) over 1 (days 0-4) or 2 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11), followed by graded local top-up doses (day 7/14), in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. PTX (15 mg/kg subcutaneously) was applied once daily over varying time intervals. Ulceration of mouse tongue epithelium, corresponding to confluent mucositis, was analyzed as the clinically relevant endpoint. With fractionated irradiation over 1 week, PTX administration significantly reduced the incidence of mucosal reactions when initiated before (day - 5) the onset of fractionation; a trend was observed for start of PTX treatment on day 0. Similarly, PTX treatment combined with 2 weeks of fractionation had a significant effect on ulcer incidence in all but one experiment. This clearly illustrates the potential of PTX to ameliorate oral mucositis during daily fractionated irradiation. PTX resulted in a significant reduction of oral mucositis during fractionated irradiation, which may be attributed to stimulation of mucosal repopulation processes. The biological basis of this effect, however, needs to be clarified in further, detailed mechanistic studies. (orig.) [German] Die orale Mukositis ist eine haeufige fruehe Nebenwirkung der Radio(chemo)therapie von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Die epitheliale Strahlenreaktion wird von Entzuendungserscheinungen begleitet; deren Interaktion mit epithelialen Prozessen ist derzeit unklar. Ziel der vorliegenden Untersuchung war die quantitative Erfassung des Effekts einer Behandlung mit Pentoxifyllin (PTX) auf die Strahlenreaktion der Mundschleimhaut

  15. Development of telmisartan in the therapy of spinal cord injury: pre-clinical study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin CM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chien-Min Lin,1,* Jo-Ting Tsai,2,* Chen Kuei Chang,1 Juei-Tang Cheng,3 Jia-Wei Lin11Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shuang Ho Hospital-Taipei Medical University, 3Institute of Medical Science, College of Health Science, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan City, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Decrease of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-δ (PPARδ expression has been observed after spinal cord injury (SCI. Increase of PPARδ may improve the damage in SCI. Telmisartan, the antihypertensive agent, has been mentioned to increase the expression of PPARδ. Thus, we are going to screen the effectiveness of telmisartan in SCI for the development of it in clinical application.Methods: In the present study, we used compressive SCI in rats. Telmisartan was then used to evaluate the influence in rats after SCI. Change in PPARδ expression was identified by Western blots. Also, behavioral tests were performed to check the recovery of damage.Results: Recovery of damage from SCI was observed in telmisartan-treated rats. Additionally, this action of telmisartan was inhibited by GSK0660 at the dose sufficient to block PPARδ. However, metformin at the dose enough to activate adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase failed to produce similar action as telmisartan. Thus, mediation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in this action of telmisartan can be rule out. Moreover, telmisartan reversed the expressions of PPARδ in rats with SCI.Conclusion: The obtained data suggest that telmisartan can improve the damage of SCI in rats through an increase in PPARδ expression. Thus, telmisartan is useful to be developed as an agent in the therapy of SCI.Keywords: PPARδ, AMPK, spinal cord injury, angiotensin receptor blocker, metformin

  16. Chronic Electrical Stimulation with a Suprachoroidal Retinal Prosthesis: A Preclinical Safety and Efficacy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, David A. X.; Williams, Richard A.; Allen, Penelope J.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Luu, Chi D.; Salinas-LaRosa, Cesar M.; Finch, Sue; Ayton, Lauren N.; Saunders, Alexia L.; McPhedran, Michelle; McGowan, Ceara; Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B.; Wise, Andrew K.; Yeoh, Jonathan; Xu, Jin; Feng, Helen; Millard, Rodney; McWade, Melanie; Thien, Patrick C.; Williams, Chris E.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    electrode impedance remained stable for stimulation durations of up to 15 weeks. This study has demonstrated the safety and efficacy of suprachoroidal stimulation with charge balanced stimulus currents. PMID:24853376

  17. Preclinical pharmacology and toxicology study of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin, a novel dual cancer-specific oncolytic adenovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yanxin [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); Guo, Huanhuan [Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); Changchun Brother Biotech Co., Ltd., Changchun, 130000 (China); Hu, Ningning; He, Dongyun [Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); The Key Laboratory of Jilin Province for Zoonosis Prevention and Control, Changchun 130122 (China); Zhang, Shi [Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); School of Clinical Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun 130001 (China); Chu, Yunjie [Affiliated Hospital of Changchun University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Changchun 130021 (China); Huang, Yubin [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Li, Xiao, E-mail: lixiao06@mails.jlu.edu.cn [Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); The Key Laboratory of Jilin Province for Zoonosis Prevention and Control, Changchun 130122 (China); Sun, LiLi, E-mail: linjiaxiaoya@163.com [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Tumor Hospital of Jilin Province, Changchun 130012 (China); Jin, Ningyi, E-mail: ningyij@126.com [Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); The Key Laboratory of Jilin Province for Zoonosis Prevention and Control, Changchun 130122 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that conditionally replicating adenovirus is safe. We constructed an oncolytic adenovirus, Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin, using a cancer-specific promoter (human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, hTERTp) and a cancer cell-selective apoptosis-inducing gene (Apoptin). Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin was proven effective both in vitro and in vivo in our previous study. In this study, the preclinical safety profiles of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin in animal models were investigated. At doses of 5.0 × 10{sup 8}, 2.5 × 10{sup 9}, and 1.25 × 10{sup 10} viral particles (VP)/kg, Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin had no adverse effects on mouse behavior, muscle cooperation, sedative effect, digestive system, and nervous systems, or on beagle cardiovascular and respiratory systems at 5.0 × 10{sup 8}, 2.5 × 10{sup 9}, and 1.25 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg doses. In acute toxicity tests in mice, the maximum tolerated dose > 5 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg. There was no inflammation or ulceration at the injection sites within two weeks. In repeat-dose toxicological studies, the no observable adverse effect levels of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin in rats (1.25 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg) and beagles (2.5 × 10{sup 9} VP/kg) were 62.5- and 12.5-fold of the proposed clinical dose, respectively. The anti-virus antibody was produced in animal sera. Bone marrow examination revealed no histopathological changes. Guinea pigs sensitized by three repeated intraperitoneal injections of 1.35 × 10{sup 10} VP/mL Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin each and challenged by one intravenous injection of 1.67 × 10{sup 8} VP/kg Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin did not exhibit any sign of systemic anaphylaxis. Our data from different animal models suggest that Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin is a safe anti-tumor therapeutic agent. - Highlights: • We use the rodents and non-rodents animal models to evaluation Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin. • Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin is a safe anti-tumor therapeutic agent. • Demonstrate the safety and feasibility dose of injected Ad

  18. Effects of the Natural β-Carboline Alkaloid Harmine, a Main Constituent of Ayahuasca, in Memory and in the Hippocampus: A Systematic Literature Review of Preclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Rafael G; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2017-01-01

    Harmine is a natural β-carboline alkaloid found in several botanical species, such as the Banisteriopsis caapi vine used in the preparation of the hallucinogenic beverage ayahuasca and the seeds of Syrian rue (Peganum harmala). Preclinical studies suggest that harmine may have neuroprotective and cognitive-enhancing effects, and retrospective/observational investigations of the mental health of long-term ayahuasca users suggest that prolonged use of this harmine-rich hallucinogen is associated with better neuropsychological functioning. Thus, in order to better investigate these possibilities, we performed a systematic literature review of preclinical studies analyzing the effects of harmine on hippocampal neurons and in memory-related behavioral tasks in animal models. We found two studies involving hippocampal cell cultures and nine studies using animal models. Harmine administration was associated with neuroprotective effects such as reduced excitotoxicity, inflammation, and oxidative stress, and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. Harmine also improved memory/learning in several animal models. These effects seem be mediated by monoamine oxidase or acetylcholinesterase inhibition, upregulation of glutamate transporters, decreases in reactive oxygen species, increases in neurotrophic factors, and anti-inflammatory effects. The neuroprotective and cognitive-enhancing effects of harmine should be further investigated in both preclinical and human studies.

  19. Allopregnanolone preclinical acute pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies to predict tolerability and efficacy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W Irwin

    /kg. The predicted MTD in human female is 0.37mg/kg. In male rats the NOAEL and MTD were less than those determined for female. Outcomes of these PK/PD studies predict a safe and efficacious dose range for initial clinical trials of allopregnanolone for Alzheimer's disease. These findings have translational relevance to multiple neurodegenerative conditions.

  20. A longitudinal study of empathy in pre-clinical and clinical medical students and clinical supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Sarah; Sladek, Ruth M; Neild, Tim

    2016-10-18

    Although appropriate empathy in health professionals is essential, a loss of empathy can occur during medical education. The structure of clinical learning may be one factor that is implicated in a loss of empathy. This study examines student and doctor empathy, and possible associations between empathy and the structure of clinical learning. There were three groups of participants: medical students (n = 281), who completed a longitudinal survey consisting of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy and an open question about empathy at the beginning and end of the 2013 academic year; private doctors (medical practitioners) in South Australia (n = 78) who completed a survey consisting of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy and an open question about empathy at the end of the students' academic year; and doctors (medical practitioners) from public teaching hospitals (n = 72) in southern Adelaide, South Australia who completed a survey consisting of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy at the end of the students' academic year . Year one students' empathy scores at the end of the year (102.8 ± 17.7) were significantly lower than at the start of the year (112.3 ± 9.6) p empathy scores by year groups or across the two time points. Empathy scores were almost identical for private and hospital clinicians and higher than average scores for students. Free-text comments highlighted the importance students and doctors place on empathy. Students described issues that adversely affected their empathy, including specific incidents, systemic issues, and course structure, but also described some positive role models. Doctors' comments focused on the importance of empathy but qualified its meaning in the therapeutic setting. Medical students and practitioners alike ascribe importance to empathy in clinical practice, yet its developmental course remains poorly understood with possible decrement across the course of medical education. A more sophisticated understanding of empathy

  1. Is there a causal relationship between genetic changes and radiomics-based image features? An in vivo preclinical experiment with doxycycline inducible GADD34 tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panth, Kranthi Marella; Leijenaar, Ralph T H; Carvalho, Sara; Lieuwes, Natasja G; Yaromina, Ala; Dubois, Ludwig; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    The central hypothesis of "radiomics" is that imaging features reflect tumor phenotype and genotype. Until now only correlative studies have been performed. The main objective of our study is to determine whether a causal relationship exists between genetic changes and image features. The secondary objective is to assess whether the combination with radiotherapy (RT) influences these image features. HCT116 doxycycline (dox) inducible GADD34 cells were grown as xenografts in the flanks of NMRI-nu mice. GADD34 overexpression decreases hypoxic fraction. Radiomics analyses were performed on computed tomography images obtained at 40kVp and again at 80kVp for validation, before radiotherapy at a volume of 200mm(3), 4days post RT (10Gy) and 500mm(3). To select reproducible features test-retest experiments were performed at baseline. Gene induction and/or irradiation translated into significant changes in radiomics features. Post irradiation, 17 features for 40kVp and 9 features for 80kVp differed significantly between dox+ and dox- combined with RT. 8 and 4 of these features remained consistent for 40 and 80kVp, respectively. Radiomics is able to identify early effects of changed gene expression combined with radiation treatment in tumors with similar volumes which are not visible to human eye. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. The prevalence and correlations of medical student burnout in the pre-clinical years: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurkiewicz, Rebecca; Korenstein, Deborah; Fallar, Robert; Ripp, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Burnout is a psychological syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and impaired personal accomplishment induced by repeated workplace stressors. Current research suggests that physician burnout may have its origins in medical school. The consequences of medical student burnout include both personal and professional distress, loss of empathy, and poor health. We hypothesized that burnout occurs prior to the initiation of the clinical years of medical education. This was a cross-sectional survey administered to third-year medical students at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (MSSM) in New York, New York (a traditional-style medical school with a marked division between pre-clinical and clinical training occurring at the beginning of the third year). Survey included an instrument used to measure job burnout, a sleep deprivation screen, and questions related to demographic information, current rotation, psychiatric history, time spent working/studying, participation in extracurricular activities, social support network, autonomy and isolation. Of the 86 medical students who participated, 71% met criteria for burnout. Burnt out students were significantly more likely to suffer from sleep deprivation (p = 0.0359). They were also more likely to disagree with the following statements: "I have control over my daily schedule" (p = 0.0286) and "I am confident that I will have the knowledge and skills necessary to become an intern when I graduate" (p = 0.0263). Our findings show that burnout is present at the beginning of the third year of medical school, prior to the initiation of the clinical years of medical training. Medical student burnout is quite common, and early efforts should be made to empower medical students to both build the knowledge and skills necessary to become capable physicians, as well as withstand the emotional, mental, and physical challenges inherent to medical school.

  3. Preventing Electromagnetic Pulse Irradiation Damage on Testis Using Selenium-rich Cordyceps Fungi. A Preclinical Study in Young Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xia; Wang, Yafeng; Lang, Haiyang; Lin, Yanyun; Guo, Qiyan; Yang, Mingjuan; Guo, Juan; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Junye; Liu, Yaning; Zeng, Lihua; Guo, Guozhen

    2017-02-01

    Networked 21st century society, globalization, and communications technologies are paralleled by the rise of electromagnetic energy intensity in our environments and the growing pressure of the environtome on human biology and health. The latter is the entire complement of environmental factors, including the electromagnetic energy and the technologies that generate them, enacting on the digital citizen in the new century. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) irradiation might have serious damaging effects not only on electronic equipment but also in the whole organism and reproductive health, through nonthermal effects and oxidative stress. We sought to determine whether EMP exposure (1) induces biological damage on reproductive health and (2) the extent to which selenium-rich Cordyceps fungi (daily coadministration) offer protection on the testicles and spermatozoa. In a preclinical randomized study, 3-week-old male BALB/c mice were repeatedly exposed to EMP (peak intensity 200 kV/m, pulse edge 3.5 ns, pulse width 15 ns, 0.1 Hz, and 400 pulses/day) 5 days per week for four consecutive weeks, with or without coadministration of daily selenium-rich Cordyceps fungi (100 mg/kg). Testicular index and spermatozoa formation were measured at baseline and 1, 7, 14, 28, and 60 day time points after EMP exposure. The group without Cordyceps cotreatment displayed decreased spermatozoa formation, shrunk seminiferous tubule diameters, and diminished antioxidative capacity at 28 and 60 days after exposure (p radiation in the current age of networked society and digital citizenship.

  4. Preclinical episodes of orofacial pain symptoms and their association with healthcare behaviors in the OPPERA prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Gary D.; Sanders, Anne E.; Bair, Eric; Brownstein, Naomi; Dampier, Dawn; Knott, Charles; Fillingim, Roger; Maixner, William O.; Smith, Shad; Greenspan, Joel; Dubner, Ron; Ohrbach, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The course of preclinical pain symptoms sheds light on the etiology and prognosis of chronic pain. We aimed to quantify rates of developing initial- and recurrent-symptoms of painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and to evaluate associations with health behaviors. In the OPPERA prospective cohort study, 2,719 people aged 18-44 years with lifetime absence of TMD when enrolled completed 25,103 quarterly (three-monthly) questionnaires during amedian 2.3-year follow-up period. Questionnaires documented TMD symptom episodes, headache, other body pain, health care attendance and analgesic usage and. Kaplan-Meier methods for clustered data estimated symptom-free survival time. Multivariable models assessed demographic variation in TMD symptom rates and evaluated associations with healthcare and analgesic use. One third of people developed TMD symptoms and for one quarter of symptomatic episodes, pain intensity was severe. Initial TMD symptoms developed at anannual rate of 18.8 episodes per 100 people. The annual rate more than doubled for first-recurrence and doubled again for second-or-subsequent recurrence such that, one year after first recurrence, 71% of people experienced second recurrence. The overall rate increased with age and was greater in African-Americans and lower in Asians relative to Whites. The probability of TMD symptoms was strongly associated with concurrent episodes of headache and body pain and with past episodes of TMD symptoms. Episodes of TMD symptoms, headache and body pain were associated with increases of ~10% in probability of analgesic usage and healthcare attendance. Yet, even when TMD, headache and body pain occurred concurrently, 27% of people neither attended healthcare nor used analgesics. PMID:23531476

  5. Influence of local administration of pamidronate on extraction socket healing--a histomorphometric proof-of-principle pre-clinical in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Kai R; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Calvo-Guirado, José-Luis; Schneider, David; Fickl, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of local administration of pamidronate histomorphometrically, adsorbed on a collagenated porcine bone substitute, on extraction socket healing. Two American Fox-hound dogs were used within this proof-of-principle study. Following endodontic treatment of the distal root of the three lower premolars, the teeth were hemisected, and the mesial roots were extracted flapless. The sockets were then loosely filled, in a split-mouth fashion, with a collagenated porcine bone substitute (Osteobiol Gen-Os; CPB), rehydrated either with 90 mg/ml pamidronate (Aredia(®) ; test) or with sterile saline (control). Extraction sockets were sealed with connective tissue punches obtained from the palate and secured with sutures. After 4 months of healing, specimens containing the socket sites and remaining roots were retrieved and histomorphometrically examined. Histological evaluation of the sections revealed substantial differences in healing patterns. Control sites presented with various amounts of newly formed bone and no evidence of CPB inside the socket; in contrast, limited amounts of bone were observed at test sites, which were filled with CPB mainly embedded in connective tissue. Only minor differences were observed between test and control sites regarding vertical bone loss (buccal bone: -1.01 mm vs. -1.15 mm; lingual bone: -0.92 mm vs. -1.15 mm). Horizontal bone loss was nearly three times higher in control sites comparing to sites treated with pamidronate (-2.19 ± 1.81 mm vs. -0.80 ± 0.91 mm) at a level corresponding to 3 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Local administration of pamidronate adsorbed on a collagenated porcine bone substitute in particulate form appeared to delay extraction socket healing, but may also reduce post-extraction dimensional changes in terms of horizontal bone width. Additionally, pamidronate appears to obstruct resorption of the porcine bone substitute. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by

  6. Preclinical studies with Apoptin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Pietersen (Alexandra)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe chicken anaemia virus was cloned in 1990 and analysis of its three proteins led to the serendipitous finding that viral protein 3, or Apoptin, induces apoptosis in many cultured human tumour cells but not in their normal counterparts. The ensuing question, whether the activity and

  7. Can evaluation of a dental procedure at the outset of learning predict later performance at the preclinical level? A pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Polyzois, Ioannis

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of conventional pre-clinical training in dentistry and to determine if evaluation of a dental procedure at the beginning of dental training can be a predictor for future performance. A group of second year dental students with no previous experience in operative dentistry were asked to prepare a conventional class I cavity on a lower first molar typodont. Their first preparation was carried out after an introductory lecture and a demonstration and their second at the end of conventional training. The prepared typodonts were coded and blindly scored for the traditional assessment criteria of outline form, retention form, smoothness, cavity depth and cavity margin angulation. Once the codes were broken, a paired t-test was used to compare the difference between the means of before and after scores (P<0.0001) and a Pearson\\'s linear correlation to test the association (r=0.4). From the results of this study, we could conclude that conventional preclinical training results in a significant improvement in the manual skills of the dental students and that the dental procedure used had only a limited predictive value for later performance at the preclinical level.

  8. Education Predicts Incidence of Preclinical Mobility Disability in Initially High-Functioning Older Women. The Women’s Health and Aging Study II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Patricia C.; Xue, Qian-Li; Tian, Jing; Thorpe, Roland J.; Fried, Linda P.

    2011-01-01

    Background. To examine the impact of educational attainment on the incidence of preclinical mobility disability (PCD). Methods. The Women's Health and Aging II Study is a prospective observational cohort study of 436 initially high-functioning community-dwelling women aged 70–79 years at baseline in Baltimore, Maryland. We measured the association of highest attained education level with preclinical mobility disability (PCD) over an 11-year period. PCD is defined as self-reported modification in any of four tasks without reporting difficulty in those tasks. The tasks were walking ½ mile, climbing up steps, doing heavy housework, and getting in/out of bed or chair. Results. Participants with less than 9 years of education were more likely to acquire incident PCD (hazard ratio: 3.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.2–7.7) than their counterparts with more education after adjusting for income, marital status, number of diseases, and high self-efficacy. Conclusions. Lower education level is an independent predictor of incident preclinical mobility disability. This association has important implications for primary and secondary prevention and can be easily assessed in clinical encounters. PMID:21382883

  9. Education predicts incidence of preclinical mobility disability in initially high-functioning older women. The Women's Health and Aging Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Patricia C; Szanton, Sarah L; Xue, Qian-Li; Tian, Jing; Thorpe, Roland J; Fried, Linda P

    2011-05-01

    To examine the impact of educational attainment on the incidence of preclinical mobility disability (PCD). The Women's Health and Aging II Study is a prospective observational cohort study of 436 initially high-functioning community-dwelling women aged 70-79 years at baseline in Baltimore, Maryland. We measured the association of highest attained education level with preclinical mobility disability (PCD) over an 11-year period. PCD is defined as self-reported modification in any of four tasks without reporting difficulty in those tasks. The tasks were walking ½ mile, climbing up steps, doing heavy housework, and getting in/out of bed or chair. Participants with less than 9 years of education were more likely to acquire incident PCD (hazard ratio: 3.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-7.7) than their counterparts with more education after adjusting for income, marital status, number of diseases, and high self-efficacy. Lower education level is an independent predictor of incident preclinical mobility disability. This association has important implications for primary and secondary prevention and can be easily assessed in clinical encounters.

  10. Canine prostate models in preclinical studies of minimally invasive interventions: part I, canine prostate anatomy and prostate cancer models

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Fei; B?ez-D?az, Claudia; S?nchez-Margallo, Francisco Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The high prevalence of prostate cancer (PCa) in elderly men and technical advances in early detection of localized PCa have led to continued efforts to develop new therapeutic options of minimally invasive nature in current urologic oncology community. Increasing newly emerging therapies are undergoing preclinical tests on the technical feasibility, efficacy and safety in animal experiments. The dog is an ideal large animal because of its similar anatomy to human and the capability allowing t...

  11. Persistence of DNA studied in different ex vivo and in vivo rat models simulating the human gut situation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilcks, A.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Joosten, R.G.; Jacobsen, B.B.L.; Aarts, H.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of DNA sequences from genetically modified plants to persist in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. PCR analysis and transformation assays were used to study DNA persistence and integrity in various ex vivo and in vivo systems using gnotobiotic rats. DNA

  12. The neuroprotective agent CNTF decreases neuronal metabolites in the rat striatum: an in vivo multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-de Sauvage, Maria-Angeles; Flament, Julien; Bramoulle, Yann; Ben Haim, Lucile; Guillermier, Martine; Berniard, Aurélie; Aurégan, Gwennaëlle; Houitte, Diane; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Bonvento, Gilles; Hantraye, Philippe; Valette, Julien; Escartin, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is neuroprotective against multiple pathologic conditions including metabolic impairment, but the mechanisms are still unclear. To delineate CNTF effects on brain energy homeostasis, we performed a multimodal imaging study, combining in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, and in situ glutamate imaging by chemical exchange saturation transfer. Unexpectedly, we found that CNTF expression through lentiviral gene transfer in the rat striatum significantly decreased the levels of neuronal metabolites (N-acetyl-aspartate, N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate, and glutamate). This preclinical study shows that CNTF remodels brain metabolism, and suggests that decreased levels of neuronal metabolites may occur in the absence of neuronal dysfunction. PMID:25833344

  13. Preclinical and clinical validation of a novel oxygenation imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Mazhar, Amaan; Lee, Bernard T.; Cuccia, David J.; Stockdale, Alan; Oketokoun, Rafiou; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Durr, Nicholas; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Frangioni, John V.

    2011-02-01

    Introduction: Two major disadvantages of currently available oxygenation probes are the need for contact with the skin and long measurement stabilization times. A novel oxygenation imaging device based on spatial frequency domain and spectral principles has been designed, validated preclinically on pigs, and validated clinically on humans. Importantly, this imaging system has been designed to operate under the rigorous conditions of an operating room. Materials and Methods: Optical properties reconstruction and wavelength selection have been optimized to allow fast and reliable oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin imaging under realistic conditions. In vivo preclinical validation against commercially available contact oxygenation probes was performed on pigs undergoing arterial and venous occlusions. Finally, the device was used clinically to image skin flap oxygenation during a pilot study on women undergoing breast reconstruction after mastectomy. Results: A novel illumination head containing a spatial light modulator (SLM) and a novel fiber-coupled high power light source were constructed. Preclinical experiments showed similar values between local probes and the oxygenation imaging system, with measurement times of the new system being 300 cm2). Conclusion: A novel optical-based oxygenation imaging system has the potential to replace contact probes during human surgery and to provide quantitative, wide-field measurements in near real-time.

  14. Coagulation Management in Jersey Calves: An ex vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröning, Sabine; Maas, Judith; van Geul, Svenja; Rossaint, Rolf; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Grottke, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Jersey calves are frequently used as an experimental animal model for in vivo testing of cardiac assist devices or orthopedic implants. In this ex vivo study, we analyzed the coagulation system of the Jersey calves and the potential of human-based coagulation management to circumvent perioperative bleeding complications during surgery. Experimental Procedure: Blood from 7 Jersey calves was subjected to standard laboratory tests and thromboelastometry analysis. An ex vivo model of dilutional coagulopathy was used to study the effects of fibrinogen or prothrombin complex concentrate supplementation. Fibrinolysis was induced with tissue plasminogen activator to identify potential therapeutic strategies involving tranexamic acid or aprotinin. Furthermore, anticoagulation strategies were evaluated by incubating the blood samples with dabigatran or rivaroxaban. Baseline values for thromboelastometry and standard laboratory parameters, including prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, antithrombin III, and D-dimers, were established. Fifty percent diluted blood showed a statistically significant impairment of hemostasis. The parameters significantly improved after the administration of fibrinogen or prothrombin complex concentrate. Tranexamic acid and aprotinin ameliorated tissue plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis. Both dabigatran and rivaroxaban significantly prolonged the coagulation parameters. In this ex vivo study, coagulation factors, factor concentrate, antifibrinolytic reagents, and anticoagulants regularly used in the clinic positively impacted coagulation parameters in Jersey calf blood. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Matched preclinical designs for improved translatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aittokallio, Tero; Scherer, Andreas; Poutanen, Matti; Freedman, Leonard P

    2017-05-10

    A more stratified preclinical design strategy will increase the statistical power and reproducibility of animal studies and their translatability. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. In vivo study of human skin using pulsed terahertz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickwell, E [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Cole, B E [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Fitzgerald, A J [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Pepper, M [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Wallace, V P [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-07

    Studies in terahertz (THz) imaging have revealed a significant difference between skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma) and healthy tissue. Since water has strong absorptions at THz frequencies and tumours tend to have different water content from normal tissue, a likely contrast mechanism is variation in water content. Thus, we have previously devised a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) model which is able to closely simulate the interaction of THz radiation with water. In this work we investigate the interaction of THz radiation with normal human skin on the forearm and palm of the hand in vivo. We conduct the first ever systematic in vivo study of the response of THz radiation to normal skin. We take in vivo reflection measurements of normal skin on the forearm and palm of the hand of 20 volunteers. We compare individual examples of THz responses with the mean response for the areas of skin under investigation. Using the in vivo data, we demonstrate that the FDTD model can be applied to biological tissue. In particular, we successfully simulate the interaction of THz radiation with the volar forearm. Understanding the interaction of THz radiation with normal skin will form a step towards developing improved imaging algorithms for diagnostic detection of skin cancer and other tissue disorders using THz radiation.

  17. Preclinical Animal Models for Temporomandibular Joint Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarza, Alejandro J; Brown, Bryan N; Arzi, Boaz; Ângelo, David Faustino; Chung, William; Badylak, Stephen F; Detamore, Michael

    2018-01-02

    There is a paucity of in vivo studies that investigate the safety and efficacy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) tissue regeneration approaches, in part due to the lack of established animal models. Review of disease models for study of TMJ is presented herein with an attempt to identify relevant preclinical animal models for TMJ tissue engineering, with emphasis on the disc and condyle. Although degenerative joint disease models have been mainly performed on mice, rats, and rabbits, preclinical regeneration approaches must employ larger animal species. There remains controversy regarding the preferred choice of larger animal models between the farm pig, minipig, goat, sheep, and dog. The advantages of the pig and minipig include their well characterized anatomy, physiology, and tissue properties. The advantages of the sheep and goat are their easier surgical access, low cost per animal, and its high tissue availability. The advantage of the dog is that the joint space is confined, so migration of interpositional devices should be less likely. However, each species has limitations as well. For example, the farm pig has continuous growth until about 18 months of age, and difficult surgical access due to the zygomatic arch covering the lateral aspect of joint. The minipig is not widely available and somewhat costly. The sheep and the goat are herbivores, and their TMJs mainly function in translation. The dog is a carnivore, and the TMJ is a hinge joint that can only rotate. Although no species provides the gold standard for all preclinical TMJ tissue engineering approaches, the goat and sheep have emerged as the leading options, with the minipig as the choice when cost is less of a limitation; and with the dog and farm pig serving as acceptable alternatives. Finally, naturally occurring TMJ disorders in domestic species may be harnessed on a preclinical trial basis as a clinically relevant platform for translation.

  18. Preclinical drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodniewicz, Teresa; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    Life sciences provide reasonably sound prognosis for a number and nature of therapeutic targets on which drug design could be based, and search for new chemical entities--future new drugs, is now more than ever based on scientific principles. Nevertheless, current very long and incredibly costly drug discovery and development process is very inefficient, with attrition rate spanning from many thousands of new chemical structures, through a handful of validated drug leads, to single successful new drug launches, achieved in average after 13 years, with compounded cost estimates from hundreds of thousands to over one billion US dollars. Since radical pharmaceutical innovation is critically needed, number of new research projects concerning this area is steeply rising outside of big pharma industry--both in academic environment and in small private companies. Their prospective success will critically depend on project management, which requires combined knowledge of scientific, technical and legal matters, comprising regulations concerning admission of new drug candidates to be subjects of clinical studies. This paper attempts to explain basic rules and requirements of drug development within preclinical study period, in case of new chemical entities of natural or synthetic origin, which belong to low molecular weight category.

  19. Assessing the neuronal serotonergic target-based antidepressant stratagem: impact of in vivo interaction studies and knockout models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, R; Mahesh, R

    2008-09-01

    Depression remains a challenge in the field of affective neuroscience, despite a steady research progress. Six out of nine basic antidepressant mechanisms rely on serotonin neurotransmitter system. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the significance of serotonin receptors (5-HT(1-3,6,7)), its signal transduction pathways and classical down stream targets (including neurotrophins, neurokinins, other peptides and their receptors) in antidepressant drug action. Serotonergic control of depression embraces the recent molecular requirements such as influence on proliferation, neurogenesis, plasticity, synaptic (re)modeling and transmission in the central nervous system. The present progress report analyses the credibility of each protein as therapeutically relevant target of depression. In vivo interaction studies and knockout models which identified these targets are foreseen to unearth new ligands and help them transform to drug candidates. The importance of the antidepressant assay selection at the preclinical level using salient animal models/assay systems is discussed. Such test batteries would definitely provide antidepressants with faster onset, efficacy in resistant (and co-morbid) types and with least adverse effects. Apart from the selective ligands, only those molecules which bring an overall harmony, by virtue of their affinities to various receptor subtypes, could qualify as effective antidepressants. Synchronised modulation of various serotonergic sub-pathways is the basis for a unique and balanced antidepressant profile, as that of fluoxetine (most exploited antidepressant) and such a profile may be considered as a template for the upcoming antidepressants. In conclusion, 5-HT based multi-targeted antidepressant drug discovery supported by in vivo interaction studies and knockout models is advocated as a strategy to provide classic molecules for clinical trials.

  20. Ticagrelor Does Not Inhibit Adenosine Transport at Relevant Concentrations: A Randomized Cross-Over Study in Healthy Subjects In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T N A van den Berg

    Full Text Available In patients with myocardial infarction, ticagrelor reduces cardiovascular and sepsis-related mortality, and can cause dyspnea. It is suggested that this is caused by adenosine receptor stimulation, because in preclinical studies, ticagrelor blocks the nucleoside transporter and increases cellular ATP release. We now investigated the effects of ticagrelor on the adenosine system in humans in vivo.In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in 14 healthy subjects, we have tested whether ticagrelor (180 mg affects adenosine- and dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation, as surrogates of nucleoside uptake inhibition and adenosine formation, respectively. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was measured. Primary endpoint was adenosine-induced vasodilation.Ticagrelor did not affect adenosine- or dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was not affected by ticagrelor. In vitro, ticagrelor dose-dependently inhibited nucleoside uptake, but only at supra-physiological concentrations.In conclusion, at relevant plasma concentration, ticagrelor does not affect adenosine transport, nor adenosine formation in healthy subjects. Therefore, it is unlikely that this mechanism is a relevant pleiotropic effect of ticagrelor.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01996735.

  1. Ticagrelor Does Not Inhibit Adenosine Transport at Relevant Concentrations: A Randomized Cross-Over Study in Healthy Subjects In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongen, G. A.; van den Broek, P. H. H.; Bilos, A.; Donders, A. R. T.; Gomes, M. E.; Riksen, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In patients with myocardial infarction, ticagrelor reduces cardiovascular and sepsis-related mortality, and can cause dyspnea. It is suggested that this is caused by adenosine receptor stimulation, because in preclinical studies, ticagrelor blocks the nucleoside transporter and increases cellular ATP release. We now investigated the effects of ticagrelor on the adenosine system in humans in vivo. Experimental Approach In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in 14 healthy subjects, we have tested whether ticagrelor (180 mg) affects adenosine- and dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation, as surrogates of nucleoside uptake inhibition and adenosine formation, respectively. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was measured. Primary endpoint was adenosine-induced vasodilation. Key Results Ticagrelor did not affect adenosine- or dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was not affected by ticagrelor. In vitro, ticagrelor dose-dependently inhibited nucleoside uptake, but only at supra-physiological concentrations. Conclusion and Implications In conclusion, at relevant plasma concentration, ticagrelor does not affect adenosine transport, nor adenosine formation in healthy subjects. Therefore, it is unlikely that this mechanism is a relevant pleiotropic effect of ticagrelor. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01996735 PMID:26509673

  2. Pre-clinical development as microbicide of zinc tetra-ascorbo-camphorate, a novel terpenoid derivative: Potent in vitro inhibitory activity against both R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1 strains without significant in vivo mucosal toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannarini Aurèle

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Terpenoid derivatives originating from many plants species, are interesting compounds with numerous biological effects, such as anti-HIV-1 activity. The zinc tetra-ascorbo-camphorate complex (or "C14", a new monoterpenoid derivative was evaluated in vitro for its anti-HIV-1 activity on both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection of primary target cells (macrophages, dendritic cells and T cells and on HIV-1 transfer from dendritic cells to T cells. Results The toxicity study was carried out in vitro and also with the New Zealand White rabbit vaginal irritation model. C14 was found to be no cytotoxic at high concentrations (CC50 > 10 μM and showed to be a potential HIV-1 inhibitor of infection of all the primary cells tested (EC50 = 1 μM. No significant changes could be observed in cervicovaginal tissue of rabbit exposed during 10 consecutive days to formulations containing up to 20 μM of C14. Conclusion Overall, these preclinical studies suggest that zinc tetra-ascorbo-camphorate derivative is suitable for further testing as a candidate microbicide to prevent male-to-female heterosexual acquisition of HIV-1.

  3. Persistence of DNA studied in different ex vivo and in vivo rat models simulating the human gut situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; van Hoek, A.H.A.M.; Joosten, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of DNA sequences from genetically modified plants to persist in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. PCR analysis and transformation assays were used to study DNA persistence and integrity in various ex vivo and in vivo systems using gnotobiotic rats. DNA...... studied was either plasmid DNA, naked plant DNA or plant DNA embedded in maize flour. Ex vivo experiments performed by incubating plant DNA in intestinal samples, showed that DNA is rapidly degraded in the upper part of the GI tract whereas degradation is less severe in the lower part. In contrast...

  4. Sources of variation in the design of preclinical studies assessing the effects of amphetamine-type stimulants in pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell-Dowling, Kate; Kelly, John P

    2015-02-15

    The prevalence of drug use during pregnancy has increased in recent years and the amount of drug-exposed babies has therefore increased. In order to assess the risk associated with this there has been an increase in the amount of preclinical studies investigating the effects of prenatal and postnatal drug exposure on the offspring. There are many challenges associated with investigating the developmental and behavioural effects of drugs of abuse in animal models and ensuring that such models are appropriate and clinically relevant. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the variation in the design of preclinical studies investigating the effects of the amphetamine-type stimulants taken during pregnancy and/or lactation in animal models. Methamphetamine, methylendioxymethamphetamine and amphetamine were included in this review. The protocols used for exploring the effects of these drugs when taking during pregnancy and/or lactation were investigated and summarised into maternal experimental variables and offspring experimental variables. Maternal experimental variables include animals used, mating procedures and drug treatment and offspring experimental variables include litter standardisation, cross fostering, weaning and behaviours and parameters assessed. The findings in this paper suggest that there is a large diversity and little consistency among these studies and so the interpretation of these results may not be as clinically relevant as previously thought. For this reason, the importance of steering the preclinical studies in a direction that is most clinically relevant will be an important future recommendation. This will also allow us to be more confident in the results obtained and confident that the human situation is being replicated as closely as possible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunomodulatory effect of Moringa peregrina leaves, ex vivo and in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Oran, Sawsan Atallah; Hassuneh, Mona Rushdie; Al-Qaralleh, Haitham Naief; Rayyan, Walid Abu; Al-Thunibat, Osama Yosef; Mallah, Eyad; Abu-Rayyan, Ahmed; Salem, Shadi

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the in vivo and ex vivo immunomodulatory effect of the ethanol leaves extract of Moringa peregrina in Balb/c mice. For this study, five groups of 5 Balb/c mice were given a single acute subtoxic oral dose of the ethanolic extract at 1.13, 11.30, 23.40 and 113.4 mg/kg and the immunomodulatory effect was assessed on the 6th day following the ingestion. In the (non-functional) assessment, the effect of the extract on the body weight, relative lymphoid organ weight, splenic cellularity and peripheral blood hematologic parameters were evaluated. While in the immunomodulation assessment (functional), we investigated the effect of the extract on the proliferative capacity of splenic lymphocytes and peripheral T and B lymphocytes using mitogen blastogenesis, mixed allogeneic MLR and IgM-Plaque forming cells assays. The ingestion of M. peregrina extract caused a significant increase in the body weight, weight and number of cells of spleen and lymph nodes of the treated mice. Furthermore, the count of RBCs, WBCs, platelets, hemoglobin concentration and PCV % were increased by the extract treatment in a dose-dependent manner. M. peregrina enhanced the proliferative responses of splenic lymphocytes for both T cell and B-cell mitogens. Likewise, the mixed lymphocyte reaction MLR assay has revealed a T-cell dependent proliferation enhancement in the extract treated mice. Moreover, the oral administration of M. peregrina leaves extracts significantly increased PFCs/106 splenocytes in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, subtoxic acute doses of M. peregrina extract demonstrated significant potential as an immunomodulatory agent even at the lowest dose of 1.13 mg/kg. PMID:29204086

  6. Immunomodulatory effect of Moringa peregrina leaves, ex vivo and in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Salameh Al-Majali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the in vivo and ex vivo immunomodulatory effect of the ethanol leaves extract of Moringa peregrina in Balb/c mice. For this study, five groups of 5 Balb/c mice were given a single acute subtoxic oral dose of the ethanolic extract at 1.13, 11.30, 23.40 and 113.4 mg/kg and the immunomodulatory effect was assessed on the 6th day following the ingestion. In the (non-functional assessment, the effect of the extract on the body weight, relative lymphoid organ weight, splenic cellularity and peripheral blood hematologic parameters were evaluated. While in the immunomodulation assessment (functional, we investigated the effect of the extract on the proliferative capacity of splenic lymphocytes and peripheral T and B lymphocytes using mitogen blastogenesis, mixed allogeneic MLR and IgM-Plaque forming cells assays. The ingestion of M. peregrina extract caused a significant increase in the body weight, weight and number of cells of spleen and lymph nodes of the treated mice. Furthermore, the count of RBCs, WBCs, platelets, hemoglobin concentration and PCV % were increased by the extract treatment in a dose-dependent manner. M. peregrina enhanced the proliferative responses of splenic lymphocytes for both T cell and B-cell mitogens. Likewise, the mixed lymphocyte reaction MLR assay has revealed a T-cell dependent proliferation enhancement in the extract treated mice. Moreover, the oral administration of M. peregrina leaves extracts significantly increased PFCs/10 6 splenocytes in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, subtoxic acute doses of M. peregrina extract demonstrated significant potential as an immunomodulatory agent even at the lowest dose of 1.13 mg/kg.

  7. In Vivo Assessment of Muscle Contractility in Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Shama R; Valencia, Ana P; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    In patients with muscle injury or muscle disease, assessment of muscle damage is typically limited to clinical signs, such as tenderness, strength, range of motion, and more recently, imaging studies. Animal models provide unmitigated access to histological samples, which provide a "direct measure" of damage. However, even with unconstrained access to tissue morphology and biochemistry assays, the findings typically do not account for loss of muscle function. Thus, the most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is assessment of its primary function, which is to produce contractile force. The majority of animal models testing contractile force have been limited to the muscle groups moving the ankle, with advantages and disadvantages depending on the equipment. Here, we describe in vivo methods to measure torque, to produce a reliable muscle injury, and to follow muscle function within the same animal over time. We also describe in vivo methods to measure tension in the leg and thigh muscles.

  8. Recognition of pre-clinical signs of dementia: A qualitative study exploring the experiences of family carers and professional care assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Catharine; Feldman, Gerald

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the study was to identify pre-clinical signs of dementia by exploring the experiences of family care-givers and professional care assistants. Dementia results in disability, emotional strain and financial loss for people with dementia, family members and nations. Informal identification of social and behavioural risk signifiers could facilitate timely interventions with potential to delay onset of serious disability. A retrospective qualitative approach using a naturalistic interpretive design was used. Focus groups enabled in-depth understanding of the participants' experiences of life or work with people who subsequently developed dementia. Purposive sampling was used to recruit family carers and professional carers who had cared for people who later developed dementia. The data from focus groups were fully transcribed, and anonymised; and transcripts analysed by two researchers. These researchers coded and analysed the transcripts independently; subsequently overlapping and similar themes were identified and consensus reached on final themes. A third researcher was invited to review the analysis and ensure trustworthiness of the study findings. Findings revealed that pre-clinical signs of dementia were identifiable in retrospect Participants' accounts resulted in four themes, 'Lowered Threshold of Frustration'' (LTF), 'Insight and Coping Strategies', 'Early signs of poor memory' and 'Alarming Events'. Earlier recognition of pre-clinical signs of dementia would allow affected individuals to follow health promotion advice and plan for the future. Identification of social exclusion prior to diagnosis has implications for anti-stigma campaigns and development of 'dementia-friendly communities'. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Study on advancement of in vivo counting using mathematical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinase, Sakae [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-05-01

    To obtain an assessment of the committed effective dose, individual monitoring for the estimation of intakes of radionuclides is required. For individual monitoring of exposure to intakes of radionuclides, direct measurement of radionuclides in the body - in vivo counting- is very useful. To advance in a precision in vivo counting which fulfills the requirements of ICRP 1990 recommendations, some problems, such as the investigation of uncertainties in estimates of body burdens by in vivo counting, and the selection of the way to improve the precision, have been studied. In the present study, a calibration technique for in vivo counting application using Monte Carlo simulation was developed. The advantage of the technique is that counting efficiency can be obtained for various shapes and sizes that are very difficult to change for phantoms. To validate the calibration technique, the response functions and counting efficiencies of a whole-body counter installed in JAERI were evaluated using the simulation and measurements. Consequently, the calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. The method for the determination of counting efficiency curves as a function of energy was developed using the present technique and a physiques correction equation was derived from the relationship between parameters of correction factor and counting efficiencies of the JAERI whole-body counter. The uncertainties in body burdens of {sup 137}Cs estimated with the JAERI whole-body counter were also investigated using the Monte Carlo simulation and measurements. It was found that the uncertainties of body burdens estimated with the whole-body counter are strongly dependent on various sources of uncertainty such as radioactivity distribution within the body and counting statistics. Furthermore, the evaluation method of the peak efficiencies of a Ge semi-conductor detector was developed by Monte Carlo simulation for optimum arrangement of Ge semi-conductor detectors for

  10. Nanomedicines for cancer therapy: state-of-the-art and limitations to pre-clinical studies that hinder future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidczyk, Charlene; Russell, Luisa; Searson, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The ability to efficiently deliver a drug or gene to a tumor site is dependent on a wide range of factors including circulation time, interactions with the mononuclear phagocyte system, extravasation from circulation at the tumor site, targeting strategy, release from the delivery vehicle, and uptake in cancer cells. Nanotechnology provides the possibility of creating delivery systems where the design constraints are decoupled, allowing new approaches for reducing the unwanted side effects of systemic delivery, increasing tumor accumulation, and improving efficacy. The physico-chemical properties of nanoparticle-based delivery platforms introduce additional complexity associated with pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation. To assess the impact of nanoparticle-based delivery systems, we first review the design strategies and pharmacokinetics of FDA-approved nanomedicines. Next we review nanomedicines under development, summarizing the range of nanoparticle platforms, strategies for targeting, and pharmacokinetics. We show how the lack of uniformity in preclinical trials prevents systematic comparison and hence limits advances in the field.

  11. Preclinical study of a Kv11.1 potassium channel activator as antineoplastic approach for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushiro-Lopes, Daniela F; Hegel, Alexandra D; Rao, Vidhya; Wyatt, Debra; Baker, Andrew; Breuer, Eun-Kyoung; Osipo, Clodia; Zartman, Jeremiah J; Burnette, Miranda; Kaja, Simon; Kouzoukas, Dimitrios; Burris, Sarah; Jones, W Keith; Gentile, Saverio

    2018-01-09

    Potassium ion (K + ) channels have been recently found to play a critical role in cancer biology. Despite that pharmacologic manipulation of ion channels is recognized as an important therapeutic approach, very little is known about the effects of targeting of K + channels in cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that use of the Kv11.1 K + channel activator NS1643 inhibits tumor growth in an in vivo model of breast cancer. Tumors exposed to NS1643 had reduced levels of proliferation markers, high expression levels of senescence markers, increased production of ROS and DNA damage compared to tumors of untreated mice. Importantly, mice treated with NS1643 did not exhibit significant cardiac dysfunction. In conclusion, pharmacological stimulation of Kv11.1 activity produced arrested TNBC-derived tumor growth by generating DNA damage and senescence without significant side effects. We propose that use of Kv11.1 channels activators could be considered as a possible pharmacological strategy against breast tumors.

  12. Simvastatin Hydroxy Acid Fails to Attain Sufficient Central Nervous System Tumor Exposure to Achieve a Cytotoxic Effect: Results of a Preclinical Cerebral Microdialysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yogesh T; Jacus, Megan O; Davis, Abigail D; Boulos, Nidal; Turner, David C; Vuppala, Pradeep K; Freeman, Burgess B; Gilbertson, Richard J; Stewart, Clinton F

    2016-04-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors were potent hits against a mouse ependymoma cell line, but their effectiveness against central nervous system tumors will depend on their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and attain a sufficient exposure at the tumor. Among 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors that had activity in vitro, we prioritized simvastatin (SV) as the lead compound for preclinical pharmacokinetic studies based on its potential for central nervous system penetration as determined from in silico models. Furthermore, we performed systemic plasma disposition and cerebral microdialysis studies of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in a murine model of ependymoma to characterize plasma and tumor extracellular fluid (tECF) pharmacokinetic properties. The murine dosage of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was equivalent to the maximum tolerated dose in patients (7.5 mg/kg, p.o.) based on equivalent plasma exposure of simvastatin acid (SVA) between the two species. SV is rapidly metabolized in murine plasma with 15 times lower exposure compared with human plasma. SVA exposure in tECF was tumor to plasma partition coefficient of SVA was tumor growth inhibition; therefore, SV was not carried forward in subsequent preclinical efficacy studies. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. The functions of laminins: lessons from in vivo studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, M C; Christiano, A M; Engvall, E

    1996-01-01

    here. Instead, I will focus on the recent evidence gathered from gene knock out experiments in mice and from naturally occurring human and mouse gene mutations. The most obvious lesson from the above studies--other than demonstrating the importance of laminins in general--is that the structural......, through interactions with various receptors. It is interesting that the in vivo studies summarized above support both activities. In the case of laminin 5 mutations, the phenotypic consequence appears to be due primarily to the loss of an important structural link between the epithelial cytokeratins...

  14. Comparative Pharmaceutical Evaluation of Candesartan and Candesartan Cilexetil: Physicochemical Properties, In Vitro Dissolution and Ex Vivo In Vivo Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Ahmed M; Allam, Ahmed N; Abdallah, Ossama Y

    2017-09-25

    The aim of the present work is to answer the question is it possible to replace the ester prodrug candesartan cilexetil (CC) by its active metabolite candesartan (C) to bypass the in vivo variable effect of esterase enzymes. A comparative physicochemical evaluation was conducted through solubility, dissolution, and stability studies; additionally, ex vivo permeation and in vivo studies were assessed. C demonstrated higher solubility over CC at alkaline pH. Moreover, dissolution testing using the pharmacopeial method showed better release profile of C even in the absence of surfactant in the testing medium. Both drugs demonstrated a slight degradation in acidic pH after short-term stability. Instead, shifting to alkaline pH of 6.5 and 7.4 showed superiority of C solution stability compared to CC solution. The ex vivo permeation results demonstrated that the parent compound C has a significant (P candesartan for clinical use similarly to azilsartan and its prodrug.

  15. Preclinical Study of Treatment Response in HCT-116 Cells and Xenografts with 1H-decoupled 31P MRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darpolor, Moses M.; Kennealey, Peter T.; Carl Le, H; Zakian, Kristen L.; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Rizwan, Asif; Chen, Jin-Hong; Sambol, Elliot B.; Schwartz, Gary K.; Singer, Samuel; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2011-01-01

    The topoisomerase I inhibitor, irinotecan, and its active metabolite SN-38 have been shown to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest without significant cell death in human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-116). Subsequent treatment of these G2/M-arrested cells with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, induced these cells to undergo apoptosis. The goal of this study was to develop a noninvasive metabolic biomarker for early tumor response and target inhibition of irinotecan followed by flavopiridol treatment in a longitudinal study. A total of eleven mice bearing HCT-116 xenografts were separated into two cohorts where one cohort was administered saline and the other treated with a sequential course of irinotecan followed by flavopiridol. Each mouse xenograft was longitudinally monitored with proton (1H)-decoupled phosphorus (31P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) before and after treatment. A statistically significant decrease in phosphocholine (p = 0.0004) and inorganic phosphate (p = 0.0103) levels were observed in HCT-116 xenografts following treatment, which were evidenced within twenty-four hours of treatment completion. Also, a significant growth delay was found in treated xenografts. To discern the underlying mechanism for the treatment response of the xenografts, in vitro HCT-116 cell cultures were investigated with enzymatic assays, cell cycle analysis, and apoptotic assays. Flavopiridol had a direct effect on choline kinase as measured by a 67% reduction in the phosphorylation of choline to phosphocholine. Cells treated with SN-38 alone underwent 83±5% G2/M cell cycle arrest compared to untreated cells. In cells, flavopiridol alone induced 5±1% apoptosis while the sequential treatment (SN-38 then flavopiridol) resulted in 39±10% apoptosis. In vivo 1H-decoupled 31P MRS indirectly measures choline kinase activity. The decrease in phosphocholine may be a potential indicator of early tumor response to the sequential treatment of irinotecan followed

  16. Quantification of Lung Metastases from In Vivo Mouse Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Joan; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has made significant progress in terms of understanding and targeting primary tumors; however, the challenge remains for the successful treatment of metastatic cancers. This highlights the importance to use in vivo models to study the metastatic process, as well as for preclinical...

  17. EPR Oximetry Sensor-Developing a TAM Derivative for In Vivo Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boś-Liedke, Agnieszka; Walawender, Magdalena; Woźniak, Anna; Flak, Dorota; Gapiński, Jacek; Jurga, Stefan; Kucińska, Małgorzata; Plewiński, Adam; Murias, Marek; Elewa, Marwa; Lampp, Lisa; Imming, Peter; Tadyszak, Krzysztof

    2017-09-04

    Oxygenation is one of the most important physiological parameters of biological systems. Low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) is associated with various pathophysiological processes in different organs. Hypoxia is of special importance in tumor therapy, causing poor response to treatment. Triaryl methyl (TAM) derivative radicals are commonly used in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) as sensors for quantitative spatial tissue oxygen mapping. They are also known as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and fluorescence imaging compounds. We report the properties of the TAM radical tris(2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-4-carboxy-phenyl)methyl, (PTMTC), a potential multimodal (EPR/fluorescence) marker. PTMTC was spectrally analyzed using EPR and characterized by estimation of its sensitivity to the oxygen in liquid environment suitable for intravenous injection (1 mM PBS, pH = 7.4). Further, fluorescent emission of the radical was measured using the same solvent and its quantum yield was estimated. An in vitro cytotoxicity examination was conducted in two cancer cell lines, HT-29 (colorectal adenocarcinoma) and FaDu (squamous cell carcinoma) and followed by uptake studies. The stability of the radical in different solutions (PBS pH = 7.4, cell media used for HT-29 and FaDu cells culturing and cytotoxicity procedure, full rat blood and blood plasma) was determined. Finally, a primary toxicity test of PTMTC was carried out in mice. Results of spectral studies confirmed the multimodal properties of PTMTC. PTMTC was demonstrated to be not absorbed by cancer cells and did not interfere with luciferin-luciferase based assays. Also in vitro and in vivo tests showed that it was non-toxic and can be freely administrated till doses of 250 mg/kg BW via both i.v. and i.p. injections. This work illustrated that PTMTC is a perfect candidate for multimodal (EPR/fluorescence) contrast agent in preclinical studies.

  18. Essentials for starting a pediatric clinical study (4): Clinical pediatric safety planning based on preclinical toxicity studies and pediatric pharmacovigilance guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Neha

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile toxicology studies in animals provide useful information to guide monitoring of potential adverse effects in children especially on growth and development. In order to continue to gain knowledge and build upon these preclinical studies, recent experience has suggested that additional approaches for monitoring of safety concerns in the pediatric population may be required. Recently, pediatric guidance has become available from the health authorities which provide pharmacovigilance concepts as they specifically relate to drugs being developed for pediatric indications. Clinical trials are typically not robust enough to detect rare or delayed safety effects as the pediatric trials are relatively short-term. Furthermore, such long term or rare effects may not be detected via standard voluntary postmarketing surveillance. Safety monitoring of children with Juvenile Inflammatory Arthritis (JIA) taking nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)s will be used as an example to describe a post-marketing risk management and pharmacovigilance program that serves to better evaluate safety data from various sources. The intent of this program is to identify adverse events (AE), including events with longer latency, which may be associated with NSAID use in a pediatric population. In this presentation, the 4 major components of the program are to be addressed. Such a program may serve as a model to proactively generate and monitor safety data in order to identify AEs that may be associated with new therapeutics for a pediatric population.

  19. Tendinopathies and platelet-rich plasma (PRP): from pre-clinical experiments to therapeutic use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaux, Jean-François; Drion, Pierre; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The restorative properties of platelets, through the local release of growth factors, are used in various medical areas. This article reviews fundamental and clinical research relating to platelet-rich plasma applied to tendinous lesions. Materials and method: Articles in French and English, published between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014. dealing with PRP and tendons were searched for using the Medline and Scopus data bases. Results: Forty-seven articles were identified which addressed pre-clinical and clinical studies: 27 relating to in vitro and in vivo animal studies and 20 relating to human studies. Of these, five addressed lateral epicondylitis, two addressed rotator cuff tendinopathies, ten dealt with patellar tendinopathies and three looked at Achilles tendinopathies. Conclusions: The majority of pre-clinical studies show that PRP stimulates the tendon’s healing process. However, clinical series remain more controversial and level 1, controlled, randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26195890

  20. Tendinopathies and platelet-rich plasma (PRP: from pre-clinical experiments to therapeutic use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaux JF

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The restorative properties of platelets, through the local release of growth factors, are used in various medical areas. This article reviews fundamental and clinical research relating to platelet-rich plasma applied to tendinous lesions. Materials and method: Articles in French and English, published between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014. dealing with PRP and tendons were searched for using the Medline and Scopus data bases. Results: Forty-seven articles were identified which addressed pre-clinical and clinical studies: 27 relating to in vitro and in vivo animal studies and 20 relating to human studies. Of these, five addressed lateral epicondylitis, two addressed rotator cuff tendinopathies, ten dealt with patellar tendinopathies and three looked at Achilles tendinopathies. Conclusions: The majority of pre-clinical studies show that PRP stimulates the tendon's healing process. However, clinical series remain more controversial and level 1, controlled, randomised studies are still needed.

  1. An ex vivo culture system to study thyroid development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmarcelle, Anne-Sophie; Villacorte, Mylah; Hick, Anne-Christine; Pierreux, Christophe E

    2014-06-06

    The thyroid is a bilobated endocrine gland localized at the base of the neck, producing the thyroid hormones T3, T4, and calcitonin. T3 and T4 are produced by differentiated thyrocytes, organized in closed spheres called follicles, while calcitonin is synthesized by C-cells, interspersed in between the follicles and a dense network of blood capillaries. Although adult thyroid architecture and functions have been extensively described and studied, the formation of the "angio-follicular" units, the distribution of C-cells in the parenchyma and the paracrine communications between epithelial and endothelial cells is far from being understood. This method describes the sequential steps of mouse embryonic thyroid anlagen dissection and its culture on semiporous filters or on microscopy plastic slides. Within a period of four days, this culture system faithfully recapitulates in vivo thyroid development. Indeed, (i) bilobation of the organ occurs (for e12.5 explants), (ii) thyrocytes precursors organize into follicles and polarize, (iii) thyrocytes and C-cells differentiate, and (iv) endothelial cells present in the microdissected tissue proliferate, migrate into the thyroid lobes, and closely associate with the epithelial cells, as they do in vivo. Thyroid tissues can be obtained from wild type, knockout or fluorescent transgenic embryos. Moreover, explants culture can be manipulated by addition of inhibitors, blocking antibodies, growth factors, or even cells or conditioned medium. Ex vivo development can be analyzed in real-time, or at any time of the culture by immunostaining and RT-qPCR. In conclusion, thyroid explant culture combined with downstream whole-mount or on sections imaging and gene expression profiling provides a powerful system for manipulating and studying morphogenetic and differentiation events of thyroid organogenesis.

  2. Robotic cholecystectomy using Revo-i Model MSR-5000, the newly developed Korean robotic surgical system: a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jin Hong; Lee, Woo Jung; Park, Dong Won; Yea, Hye Jin; Kim, Se Hoon; Kang, Chang Moo

    2017-08-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become the standard option for gastrointestinal surgeries. However, laparoscopic procedures require extended training times and are difficult for inexperienced surgeons. Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery facilitates easy adaptation of laparoscopic procedures, but robotic surgical systems are expensive. In addition, their cost has remained high because there is currently only one manufacturer of commercially available systems. Recently, a new Korean robotic surgical system, Revo-i, has been developed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of Revo-i by performing robotic cholecystectomy in a porcine model. After approval by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Yonsei University Health System, cholecystectomy was performed in four pigs using the Revo-i robotic surgical system. Operative time and perioperative complications were recorded, and all animals were observed for postoperative complications for 2 weeks after surgery RESULTS: Robotic cholecystectomy was completed successfully and without gallbladder perforation in all cases. The mean operative time was 78 ± 12 min, the mean docking time was 4.5 ± 2.52 min, and the mean console time was 49.8 ± 14.17 min. There were no perioperative complications, and none of the animal used for the in vivo models exhibited abnormal behavior during the postoperative observation period. These preliminary results verify the safety and efficacy of robotic cholecystectomy using the Revo-i robotic surgical system. Human trials are slated to begin accordingly.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Gareth

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bortezomib is a highly selective, reversible inhibitor of the 26S proteasome that is indicated for single-agent use in the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least 2 prior therapies and are progressing on their most recent therapy. Clinical investigations have been completed or are under way to evaluate the safety and efficacy of bortezomib alone or in combination with chemotherapy in multiple myeloma, both at relapse and presentation, as well as in other cancer types. The antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiangiogenic, and antitumor activities of bortezomib result from proteasome inhibition and depend on the altered degradation of a host of regulatory proteins. Exposure to bortezomib has been shown to stabilize p21, p27, and p53, as well as the proapoptotic Bid and Bax proteins, caveolin-1, and inhibitor κB-α, which prevents activation of nuclear factor κB-induced cell survival pathways. Bortezomib also promoted the activation of the proapoptotic c-Jun-NH2 terminal kinase, as well as the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. The anticancer effects of bortezomib as a single agent have been demonstrated in xenograft models of multiple myeloma, adult T-cell leukemia, lung, breast, prostate, pancreatic, head and neck, and colon cancer, and in melanoma. In these preclinical in vivo studies, bortezomib treatment resulted in decreased tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis, as well as increased survival and tumor apoptosis. In several in vitro and/or in vivo cancer models, bortezomib has also been shown to enhance the antitumor properties of several antineoplastic treatments. Importantly, bortezomib was generally well tolerated and did not appear to produce additive toxicities when combined with other therapies in the dosing regimens used in these preclinical in vivo investigations. These findings provide a rationale for further clinical trials using bortezomib alone or in combination regimens with

  4. Free radicals induced by sunlight in different spectral regions - in vivo versus ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohan, Silke B; Müller, Robert; Albrecht, Stephanie; Mink, Kathrin; Tscherch, Kathrin; Ismaeel, Fakher; Lademann, Jürgen; Rohn, Sascha; Meinke, Martina C

    2016-05-01

    Sunlight represents an exogenous factor stimulating formation of free radicals which can induce cell damage. To assess the effect of the different spectral solar regions on the development of free radicals in skin, in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigations with human volunteers and ex vivo studies on excised human and porcine skin were carried out. For all skin probes, the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region stimulates the most intensive radical formation, followed by the visible (VIS) and the near infrared (NIR) regions. A comparison between the different skin models shows that for UV light, the fastest and highest production of free radicals could be detected in vivo, followed by excised porcine and human skin. The same distribution pattern was found for the VIS/NIR spectral regions, whereby the differences in radical formation between in vivo and ex vivo were less pronounced. An analysis of lipid composition in vivo before and after exposure to UV light clearly showed modifications in several skin lipid components; a decrease of ceramide subclass [AP2] and an increase of ceramide subclass [NP2], sodium cholesterol sulphate and squalene (SQ) were detectable. In contrast, VIS/NIR irradiation led to an increase of ceramides [AP2] and SCS, and a decrease of SQ. These results, which are largely comparable for the different skin models investigated in vivo and ex vivo, indicate that radiation exposure in different spectral regions strongly influences radical production in skin and also results in changes in skin lipid composition, which is essential for barrier function. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Fiducial markers for MR histological correlation in ex vivo or short-term in vivo animal experiments: a screening study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvière, Olivier; Reynolds, Carol; Le, Yuan; Lai, Jinping; Roberts, Lewis R; Felmlee, Joel P; Ehman, Richard L

    2006-01-01

    To test injectable fiducial markers for magnetic resonance (MR) histological correlation in ex vivo or in vivo animal experiments. A total of 35 potential markers were tested ex vivo in pork muscle. The end-points were: 1) visibility, size, and shape on MR images and at macroscopic examination; 2) 24-hour stability; and 3) microscopic appearance. Selected markers were injected in vivo (rabbit's muscle and breast tumor tissue) to test their three-hour in vivo stability and their potential toxicity. Finally, different dilutions of the two best markers were assessed again through the same screening tests to determine whether their size on MR images could be customized by dilution. Two fluid acrylic paints containing inorganic pigments were found to be potentially interesting markers. On MR images, they created well-defined susceptibility artifacts. The markers made with iridescent bronze paint (iron oxide coated mica particles) were readily visible on microscopy and their size on MR images could be customized by dilution. The iridescent stainless steel paint (iron, chromium, nickel) created ex vivo the smallest markers in tissue but needed colloidal iron staining to be visible on microscopy and could not be easily diluted. Fluid acrylic paints are potentially interesting markers for MR histological correlation. Further studies are needed to assess their long-term properties.

  6. Enhancing radiotherapy for lung cancer using immunoadjuvants delivered in situ from new design radiotherapy biomaterials: a preclinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yao; Yasmin-Karim, Sayeda; Moreau, Michele; Sinha, Neeharika; Sajo, Erno; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2016-12-01

    Studies show that radiotherapy of a primary tumor in combination with immunoadjuvants (IA) can result in increased survival or immune-mediated regression of metastasis outside the radiation field, a phenomenon known as abscopal effect. However, toxicities due to repeated systematic administration of IA have been shown to be a major obstacle in clinical trials. To minimize the toxicities and prime a more potent immune response, Ngwa et al have proposed that inert radiotherapy biomaterials such as fiducials could be upgraded to multifunctional ones loaded with IA for in situ delivery directly into the tumor sub-volume at no additional inconvenience to patients. In this preliminary study, the potential of such an approach is investigated for lung cancer using anti-CD40 antibody. First the benefit of using the anti-CD40 delivered in situ to enhance radiotherapy was tested in mice with subcutaneous tumors generated with the Lewis Lung cancer cell line LL/2 (LLC-1). The tumors were implanted on both flanks of the mice to simulate metastasis. Tumors on one flank were treated with and without anti-CD40 and the survival benefits compared. An experimentally determined in vivo diffusion coefficient for nanoparticles was then employed to estimate the time for achieving intratumoral distribution of the needed minimal concentrations of anti-CD40 nanoparticles if released from a multifuntional radiotherapy biomaterials. The studies show that the use of anti-CD40 significantly enhanced radiotherapy effect, slowing the growth of the treated and untreated tumors, and increasing survival. Meanwhile our calculations indicate that for a 2-4 cm tumor and 7 mg g-1 IA concentrations, it would take 4.4-17.4 d, respectively, following burst release, for the required concentration of IA nanoparticles to accumulate throughout the tumor during image-guided radiotherapy. The distribution of IA could be customized as a function of loading concentrations or nanoparticle size to fit current

  7. Photoacoustic analysis of thyroid cancer in vivo: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Min-Hee; Jo, Kwanhoon; Ha, Jeonghoon; Kim, Yongmin; Lim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Chulhong

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers. About 3-8% of the people in the United States have thyroid nodules, and 5-15% of these nodules are malignant. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a standard procedure to diagnose malignity of nodules. However, about 10-20% of FNABs produce indeterminable results, which leads to repeat biopsies and unnecessary surgical operations. We have explored photoacoustic (PA) imaging as a new method to identify cancerous nodules. In a pilot study to test its feasibility, we recruited patients with thyroid nodules (currently 36 cases with 21 malignant and 15 benign nodules), acquired in vivo PA and ultrasound (US) images of the nodules in real time using a recently-developed clinical PA/US imaging system, and analyzed the acquired data offline. The preliminary results show that malignant and benign nodules could be differentiated by utilizing their PA amplitudes at different excitation wavelengths. This is the first in vivo PA analysis of thyroid nodules. Although a larger-scale study is needed for statistical significance, the preliminary results show the good potential of PA imaging as a non-invasive tool for triaging thyroid cancer.

  8. Nanomedicines for cancer therapy: state-of-the-art and limitations to pre-clinical studies that hinder future developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene eDawidczyk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to efficiently deliver a drug or gene to a tumor site is dependent on a wide range of factors including circulation time, interactions with the mononuclear phagocyte system, extravasation from circulation at the tumor site, targeting strategy, release from the delivery vehicle, and uptake in cancer cells. Nanotechnology provides the possibility of creating delivery systems where the design constraints are decoupled, allowing new approaches for reducing the unwanted side effects of systemic delivery, increasing tumor accumulation, and improving efficacy. The physico-chemical properties of nanoparticle-based delivery platforms introduce additional complexity associated with pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation. To assess the impact of nanoparticle-based delivery systems, we first review the design strategies and pharmacokinetics of FDA-approved nanomedicines. Next we review nanomedicines under development, summarizing the range of nanoparticle platforms, strategies for targeting, and pharmacokinetics. We show how the lack of uniformity in preclinical trials prevents systematic comparison and hence limits advances in the field.

  9. Ticagrelor Does Not Inhibit Adenosine Transport at Relevant Concentrations: A Randomized Cross-Over Study in Healthy Subjects In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, T.N.A. van den; Messaoudi, S. El; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Broek, P.H.H. van den; Bilos, A.; Donders, A.R.T.; Gomes, M.E.; Riksen, N.P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In patients with myocardial infarction, ticagrelor reduces cardiovascular and sepsis-related mortality, and can cause dyspnea. It is suggested that this is caused by adenosine receptor stimulation, because in preclinical studies, ticagrelor blocks the nucleoside transporter

  10. Comparative In vivo, Ex vivo, and In vitro Toxicity Studies of Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to reduce the number of animals in engineered nanomaterials (ENM) toxicity testing have resulted in the development of numerous alternative toxicity testing methods, but in vivo and in vitro results are still evolving and variable. This inconsistency could be due to the f...

  11. Preclinical Data on Efficacy of 10 Drug-Radiation Combinations: Evaluations, Concerns, and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen B. Stone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical testing of new therapeutic interventions requires comprehensive, high-quality preclinical data. Concerns regarding quality of preclinical data have been raised in recent reports. This report examines the data on the interaction of 10 drugs with radiation and provides recommendations for improving the quality, reproducibility, and utility of future studies. The drugs were AZD6244, bortezomib, 17-DMAG, erlotinib, gefitinib, lapatinib, oxaliplatin/Lipoxal, sunitinib (Pfizer, Corporate headquarters, New York, NY, thalidomide, and vorinostat. METHODS: In vitro and in vivo data were tabulated from 125 published papers, including methods, radiation and drug doses, schedules of administration, assays, measures of interaction, presentation and interpretation of data, dosimetry, and conclusions. RESULTS: In many instances, the studies contained inadequate or unclear information that would hamper efforts to replicate or intercompare the studies, and that weakened the evidence for designing and conducting clinical trials. The published reports on these drugs showed mixed results on enhancement of radiation response, except for sunitinib, which was ineffective. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for improved experimental design, execution, and reporting of preclinical testing of agents that are candidates for clinical use in combination with radiation. A checklist is provided for authors and reviewers to ensure that preclinical studies of drug-radiation combinations meet standards of design, execution, and interpretation, and report necessary information to ensure high quality and reproducibility of studies. Improved design, execution, common measures of enhancement, and consistent interpretation of preclinical studies of drug-radiation interactions will provide rational guidance for prioritizing drugs for clinical radiotherapy trials and for the design of such trials.

  12. Preclinical biomarker qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, John-Michael; Porter, Amy C

    2017-01-01

    Biomarkers are ubiquitously used within drug development programs in both nonclinical species and in humans to assess safety and efficacy of novel compounds. To routinely apply such novel biomarkers with certainty, a well-defined data package is necessary for review and endorsement by regulatory agencies including the US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency. This type of endorsement is known as regulatory qualification. Novel approaches are being applied to speed the process, lower the resource intensity, and increase the accessibility of biomarker qualification data and it is likely that consortia will continue to play a fundamental role in the qualification process by bringing together like-minded stakeholders focused on specific tools to accelerate drug development. This article will focus on learnings from the previous three nonclinical biomarker qualification projects, as well as discuss the progression of preclinical biomarker projects into the clinical qualification space and the current strategy for the use of nonclinical biomarker data in the translational qualification of clinical biomarkers; much like nonclinical information is used in the approval of drug development candidates. Impact statement This minireview provides an overview of the history of preclinical biomarker qualification by summarizing the three examples of this type of qualification with US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency. In addition, an overview of the biomarker qualification process is included to educate key stakeholders with links to relevant white papers that provide information on current evidentiary considerations. The manuscript also provides new information on the evolution of the role that preclinical qualification plays in clinical qualification of biomarkers and the novel approaches that are being utilized to improve the

  13. The value of the UK Clinical Aptitude Test in predicting pre-clinical performance: a prospective cohort study at Nottingham Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James David

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT was introduced in 2006 as an additional tool for the selection of medical students. It tests mental ability in four distinct domains (Quantitative Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning, Abstract Reasoning, and Decision Analysis, and the results are available to students and admissions panels in advance of the selection process. As yet the predictive validity of the test against course performance is largely unknown. The study objective was to determine whether UKCAT scores predict performance during the first two years of the 5-year undergraduate medical course at Nottingham. Methods We studied a single cohort of students, who entered Nottingham Medical School in October 2007 and had taken the UKCAT. We used linear regression analysis to identify independent predictors of marks for different parts of the 2-year preclinical course. Results Data were available for 204/260 (78% of the entry cohort. The UKCAT total score had little predictive value. Quantitative Reasoning was a significant independent predictor of course marks in Theme A ('The Cell', (p = 0.005, and Verbal Reasoning predicted Theme C ('The Community' (p Conclusion This limited study from a single entry cohort at one medical school suggests that the predictive value of the UKCAT, particularly the total score, is low. Section scores may predict success in specific types of course assessment. The ultimate test of validity will not be available for some years, when current cohorts of students graduate. However, if this test of mental ability does not predict preclinical performance, it is arguably less likely to predict the outcome in the clinical years. Further research from medical schools with different types of curriculum and assessment is needed, with longitudinal studies throughout the course.

  14. The role of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and addiction:Combining preclinical evidence with human Positron Emission Tomography (PET studies

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    Sylvia eTerbeck

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present review, we deliver an overview of the involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 activity and density in pathological anxiety, mood disorders and addiction. Specifically, we will describe mGluR5 studies in humans that employed Positron Emission Tomography (PET and combined the findings with preclinical animal research. This combined view of different methodological approaches — from basic neurobiological approaches to human studies — might give a more comprehensive and clinically relevant view of mGluR5 function in mental health than the view on preclinical data alone. We will also review the current research data on mGluR5 along the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC. Firstly, we found evidence of abnormal glutamate activity related to the positive and negative valence systems, which would suggest that antagonistic mGluR5 intervention has prominent anti-addictive, anti-depressive and anxiolytic effects. Secondly, there is evidence that mGluR5 plays in important role in systems for social functioning and the response to social stress. Finally, mGluR5’s important role in sleep homeostasis suggests that this glutamate receptor may play an important role in RDoC’s arousal and modulatory systems domain. Glutamate was previously mostly investigate in non-human studies, however initial human clinical PET research now also supports the hypothesis that, by mediating brain excitability, neuroplasticity and social cognition, abnormal metabotropic glutamate activity might predispose individuals to a broad range of psychiatric problems.

  15. Inebilizumab, a B Cell-Depleting Anti-CD19 Antibody for the Treatment of Autoimmune Neurological Diseases: Insights from Preclinical Studies

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    Ding Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Exaggerated or inappropriate responses by B cells are an important feature in many types of autoimmune neurological diseases. The recent success of B-cell depletion in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS has stimulated the development of novel B-cell-targeting therapies with the potential for improved efficacy. CD19 has emerged as a promising target for the depletion of B cells as well as CD19-positive plasmablasts and plasma cells. Inebilizumab (MEDI-551, an anti-CD19 antibody with enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against B cells, is currently being evaluated in MS and neuromyelitis optica. This review discusses the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders, summarizes the development of inebilizumab, and analyzes the recent results for inebilizumab treatment in an autoimmune encephalitis mouse model. The novel insights obtained from these preclinical studies can potentially guide future investigation of inebilizumab in patients.

  16. In vitro and in vivo studies on biodegradable magnesium alloy

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    Lida Hou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure, mechanical property, electrochemical behavior and biocompatibility of magnesium alloy (BioDe MSM™ were studied in the present work. The experimental results demonstrated that grain refining induced by extrusion improves the alloy strength significantly from 162 MPa for the as-cast alloy to 241 MPa for the as-extruded one. The anticorrosion properties of the as-extruded alloy also increased. Furthermore, the hemolysis ratio was decreased from 4.7% for the as-cast alloy to 2.9% for the as-extruded one, both below 5%. BioDe MSM™ alloy shows good biocompatibility after being implanted into the dorsal muscle and the femoral shaft of the New Zealand rabbit, respectively, and there are no abnormalities after short-term implantation. In vivo observation indicated that the corrosion rate of this alloy varies with different implantation positions, with higher degradation rate in the femur than in the muscle.

  17. A Preclinical Translational Study of the Cardioprotective Effects of Plasma-Derived Alpha-1 Anti-trypsin in Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Adolfo G; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Marchetti, Carlo; Narayan, Pratyush; Del Buono, Marco G; Capuano, Marialessia; Prestamburgo, Andrea; Catapano, Simone; Salloum, Fadi N; Abbate, Antonio; Toldo, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    The area of myocardial infarction continues to expand for hours after reperfusion. The injured but viable myocardium may be salvaged if the signals leading to cell death are interrupted. Activation of the caspase-1 inflammasome in the heart shortly after ischemia-reperfusion contributes to the final infarct size. Plasma-derived α-1 anti-trypsin (AAT) has shown to inhibit inflammasome formation in vitro and in vivo. To explore the potential translational clinical value of AAT as a therapeutic, we conducted a series of preclinical experiments designed to simulate clinically relevant scenarios. Adult male CD1 mice were used. The left anterior descending coronary artery was ligated for 30 or 75 minutes followed by reperfusion, to explore different severity of ischemic injury. Plasma-derived AAT (Prolastin C) was administered intraperitoneally after reperfusion, without pretreatment, exploring 3 different doses (60, 120, and 180 mg/kg). In a subgroup of mice, we administered Prolastin C with a delay of 30 minutes after reperfusion to simulate the clinical context of delayed administration, and we also used a model of permanent coronary artery ligation without reperfusion. Finally, we tested whether a single dose at reperfusion was sufficient to maintain a benefit in the longer term (7 days). Infarct size was measured by 3 different and independent methodologies: pathology, plasma levels of troponin I, and wall motion abnormalities at echocardiography. Prolastin C given at reperfusion after 30 minutes of ischemia provided a powerful reduction in infarct size (>50% reduction in all methodology used, all P infarct size. Plasma-derived AAT (Prolastin C) given as an adjunct to reperfusion powerfully limits the final infarct size across a wide range of experiments in the mouse reproducing clinically relevant scenarios, such as variable duration of ischemia, delay in administration in the drug, and a large therapeutic index.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled DOTA-derivatized cyclic minigastrin analogs for targeting cholecystokinin receptor expressing malignancies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guggenberg, E. von; Rangger, C.; Sosabowski, J.; Laverman, P.; Reubi, J.C.; Virgolini, I.J.; Decristoforo, C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Targeting of cholecystokinin receptor expressing malignancies such as medullary thyroid carcinoma is currently limited by low in vivo stability of radioligands. To increase the stability, we have developed and preclinically evaluated two cyclic

  19. Preclinical molecular imaging using PET and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Gunter; Abolmaali, Nasreddin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging fundamentally changes the way we look at cancer. Imaging paradigms are now shifting away from classical morphological measures towards the assessment of functional, metabolic, cellular, and molecular information in vivo. Interdisciplinary driven developments of imaging methodology and probe molecules utilizing animal models of human cancers have enhanced our ability to non-invasively characterize neoplastic tissue and follow anti-cancer treatments. Preclinical molecular imaging offers a whole palette of excellent methodology to choose from. We will focus on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, since they provide excellent and complementary molecular imaging capabilities and bear high potential for clinical translation. Prerequisites and consequences of using animal models as surrogates of human cancers in preclinical molecular imaging are outlined. We present physical principles, values and limitations of PET and MRI as molecular imaging modalities and comment on their high potential to non-invasively assess information on hypoxia, angiogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression, metabolism, and cell trafficking in preclinical cancer research.

  20. Preclinical Evaluation of a Lentiviral Vector for Huntingtin Silencing

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    Karine Cambon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder resulting from a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin (HTT protein. There is currently no cure for this disease, but recent studies suggest that RNAi to downregulate the expression of both normal and mutant HTT is a promising therapeutic approach. We previously developed a small hairpin RNA (shRNA, vectorized in an HIV-1-derived lentiviral vector (LV, that reduced pathology in an HD rodent model. Here, we modified this vector for preclinical development by using a tat-independent third-generation LV (pCCL backbone and removing the original reporter genes. We demonstrate that this novel vector efficiently downregulated HTT expression in vitro in striatal neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs of HD patients. It reduced two major pathological HD hallmarks while triggering a minimal inflammatory response, up to 6 weeks after injection, when administered by stereotaxic surgery in the striatum of an in vivo rodent HD model. Further assessment of this shRNA vector in vitro showed proper processing by the endogenous silencing machinery, and we analyzed gene expression changes to identify potential off-targets. These preclinical data suggest that this new shRNA vector fulfills primary biosafety and efficiency requirements for further development in the clinic as a cure for HD.

  1. Preclinical Evaluation of a Lentiviral Vector for Huntingtin Silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, Karine; Zimmer, Virginie; Martineau, Sylvain; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Jarrige, Margot; Bugi, Aurore; Miniarikova, Jana; Rey, Maria; Hassig, Raymonde; Dufour, Noelle; Auregan, Gwenaelle; Hantraye, Philippe; Perrier, Anselme L; Déglon, Nicole

    2017-06-16

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder resulting from a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) protein. There is currently no cure for this disease, but recent studies suggest that RNAi to downregulate the expression of both normal and mutant HTT is a promising therapeutic approach. We previously developed a small hairpin RNA (shRNA), vectorized in an HIV-1-derived lentiviral vector (LV), that reduced pathology in an HD rodent model. Here, we modified this vector for preclinical development by using a tat-independent third-generation LV (pCCL) backbone and removing the original reporter genes. We demonstrate that this novel vector efficiently downregulated HTT expression in vitro in striatal neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of HD patients. It reduced two major pathological HD hallmarks while triggering a minimal inflammatory response, up to 6 weeks after injection, when administered by stereotaxic surgery in the striatum of an in vivo rodent HD model. Further assessment of this shRNA vector in vitro showed proper processing by the endogenous silencing machinery, and we analyzed gene expression changes to identify potential off-targets. These preclinical data suggest that this new shRNA vector fulfills primary biosafety and efficiency requirements for further development in the clinic as a cure for HD.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy of the prostate: a preclinical study with radiological and pathological correlation using customised MRI-based moulds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Ari; Yerram, Nitin K; Trivedi, Hari; Dreher, Matthew R; Oila, Juha; Hoang, Anthony N; Volkin, Dmitry; Nix, Jeffrey; Turkbey, Baris; Bernardo, Marcelino; Haines, Diana C; Benjamin, Compton J; Linehan, W Marston; Choyke, Peter; Wood, Bradford J; Ehnholm, Gösta J; Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Pinto, Peter A

    2013-08-01

    To characterise the feasibility and safety of a novel transurethral ultrasound (US)-therapy device combined with real-time multi-plane magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based temperature monitoring and temperature feedback control, to enable spatiotemporally precise regional ablation of simulated prostate gland lesions in a preclinical canine model. To correlate ablation volumes measured with intra-procedural cumulative thermal damage estimates, post-procedural MRI, and histopathology. Three dogs were treated with three targeted ablations each, using a prototype MRI-guided transurethral US-therapy system (Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland). MRI provided images for treatment planning, guidance, real-time multi-planar thermometry, as well as post-treatment evaluation of efficacy. After treatment, specimens underwent histopathological analysis to determine the extent of necrosis and cell viability. Statistical analyses (Pearson's correlation, Student's t-test) were used to evaluate the correlation between ablation volumes measured with intra-procedural cumulative thermal damage estimates, post-procedural MRI, and histopathology. MRI combined with a transurethral US-therapy device enabled multi-planar temperature monitoring at the target as well as in surrounding tissues, allowing for safe, targeted, and controlled ablations of prescribed lesions. Ablated volumes measured by cumulative thermal dose positively correlated with volumes determined by histopathological analysis (r(2) 0.83, P MRI showed a positive correlation with non-viable areas on histopathological analysis (r(2) 0.89, P MRI (r(2) 0.77, P 0.05, Student's t-test). MRI-guided transurethral US therapy enabled safe and targeted ablations of prescribed lesions in a preclinical canine prostate model. Ablation volumes were reliably predicted by intra- and post-procedural imaging. Clinical studies are needed to confirm the feasibility, safety, oncological control, and functional outcomes of this therapy in

  3. Efficacy of multiple exposure with low level He-Ne laser dose on acute wound healing: a pre-clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    Investigations on the use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for wound healing especially with the red laser light have demonstrated its pro-healing potential on a variety of pre-clinical and surgical wounds. However, until now, in LLLT the effect of multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation on acute wound healing on well-designed pre-clinical model is not much explored. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of multiple exposure of low dose Helium Neon laser on healing progression of full thickness excision wounds in Swiss albino mice. Further, the efficacy of the multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation was compared with the single exposure of optimum dose. Full thickness excision wounds (circular) of 15 mm diameter were created, and subsequently illuminated with the multiple exposures (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 exposure/ week until healing) of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 4.02 mWcm-2) laser at 0.5 Jcm-2 along with single exposure of optimum laser dose (2 J/cm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Classical biophysical parameters such as contraction kinetics, area under the curve and the mean healing time were documented as the assessment parameters to examine the efficacy of multiple exposures with low level laser dose. Experimental findings substantiated that either single or multiple exposures of 0.5 J/cm2 failed to produce any detectable alterations on wound contraction, area under the curve and mean healing time compared to single exposure of optimum dose (2 Jcm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Single exposure of optimum, laser dose was found to be ideal for acute wound healing.

  4. The Economics of Reproducibility in Preclinical Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard P Freedman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low reproducibility rates within life science research undermine cumulative knowledge production and contribute to both delays and costs of therapeutic drug development. An analysis of past studies indicates that the cumulative (total prevalence of irreproducible preclinical research exceeds 50%, resulting in approximately US$28,000,000,000 (US$28B/year spent on preclinical research that is not reproducible-in the United States alone. We outline a framework for solutions and a plan for long-term improvements in reproducibility rates that will help to accelerate the discovery of life-saving therapies and cures.

  5. Electron microscopy methods for studying in vivo DNA replication intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the DNA replication process requires structural insight. The combination of psoralen crosslinking and electron microscopy has been extensively exploited to reveal the fine architecture of in vivo DNA replication intermediates. This approach proved instrumental to uncover the basic mechanisms of DNA duplication, as well as the perturbation of this process by genotoxic treatments. The replication structures need to the stabilized in vivo (by psoralen crosslinking) prior to extraction and enrichment procedures, finally leading to the visualization at the transmission electron microscope. This chapter outlines the procedures required to visualize in vivo replication intermediates of genomic DNA, extracted from budding yeast or cultured mammalian cells.

  6. Mood Disorders Are Glial Disorders: Evidence from In Vivo Studies

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    Matthias L. Schroeter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been suggested that mood disorders can be characterized by glial pathology as indicated by histopathological postmortem findings. Here, we review studies investigating the glial marker S100B in serum of patients with mood disorders. This protein might act as a growth and differentiation factor. It is located in, and may actively be released by, astro- and oligodendrocytes. Studies consistently show that S100B is elevated in mood disorders; more strongly in major depressive than bipolar disorder. Successful antidepressive treatment reduces S100B in major depression whereas there is no evidence of treatment effects in mania. In contrast to the glial marker S100B, the neuronal marker protein neuron-specific enolase is unaltered. By indicating glial alterations without neuronal changes, serum S100B studies confirm specific glial pathology in mood disorders in vivo. S100B can be regarded as a potential diagnostic biomarker for mood disorders and as a biomarker for successful antidepressive treatment.

  7. Placental glucose transfer: a human in vivo study.

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    Ane M Holme

    Full Text Available The placental transfer of nutrients is influenced by maternal metabolic state, placenta function and fetal demands. Human in vivo studies of this interplay are scarce and challenging. We aimed to establish a method to study placental nutrient transfer in humans. Focusing on glucose, we tested a hypothesis that maternal glucose concentrations and uteroplacental arterio-venous difference (reflecting maternal supply determines the fetal venous-arterial glucose difference (reflecting fetal consumption.Cross-sectional in vivo study of 40 healthy women with uncomplicated term pregnancies undergoing planned caesarean section. Glucose and insulin were measured in plasma from maternal and fetal sides of the placenta, at the incoming (radial artery and umbilical vein and outgoing vessels (uterine vein and umbilical artery.There were significant mean (SD uteroplacental arterio-venous 0.29 (0.23 mmol/L and fetal venous-arterial 0.38 (0.31 mmol/L glucose differences. The transplacental maternal-fetal glucose gradient was 1.22 (0.42 mmol/L. The maternal arterial glucose concentration was correlated to the fetal venous glucose concentration (r = 0.86, p<0.001, but not to the fetal venous-arterial glucose difference. The uteroplacental arterio-venous glucose difference was neither correlated to the level of glucose in the umbilical vein, nor fetal venous-arterial glucose difference. The maternal-fetal gradient was correlated to fetal venous-arterial glucose difference (r = 0.8, p<0.001 and the glucose concentration in the umbilical artery (r = -0.45, p = 0.004. Glucose and insulin concentrations were correlated in the mother (r = 0.52, p = 0.001, but not significantly in the fetus. We found no significant correlation between maternal and fetal insulin values.We did not find a relation between indicators of maternal glucose supply and the fetal venous-arterial glucose difference. Our findings indicate that the maternal-fetal glucose gradient is significantly

  8. A mouse model for studying the interaction of bisdioxopiperazines with topoisomerase IIα in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, Morten; Vinding, Annemette; Füchtbauer, Annette C.

    2007-01-01

    their intracellular iron chelating activity. In an attempt to distinguish between these possibilities, we here present a transgenic mouse model aimed at identifying the contribution of topoisomerase IIα to the effects of bisdioxopiperazines. A tyrosine 165 to serine mutation (Y165S) in topoisomerase IIα, demonstrated......-opened hydrolysis products are strong iron chelator. The clinically approved analog ICRF-187 is a pharmacological modulator of topoisomerase II poisons such as etoposide in preclinical animal models. ICRF-187 is also used to protect against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy and has recently been approved...... as an antidote for alleviating tissue damage and necrosis after accidental anthracycline extravasation. This dual modality of bisdioxopiperazines, including ICRF-187, raises the question of whether their pharmacological in vivo effects are mediated through interaction with topoisomerase II or via...

  9. Microenvironmental influence on pre-clinical activity of polo-like kinase inhibition in multiple myeloma: implications for clinical translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas W McMillin

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinases (PLKs play an important role in cell cycle progression, checkpoint control and mitosis. The high mitotic index and chromosomal instability of advanced cancers suggest that PLK inhibitors may be an attractive therapeutic option for presently incurable advanced neoplasias with systemic involvement, such as multiple myeloma (MM. We studied the PLK 1, 2, 3 inhibitor BI 2536 and observed potent (IC50<40 nM and rapid (commitment to cell death <24 hrs in vitro activity against MM cells in isolation, as well as in vivo activity against a traditional subcutaneous xenograft mouse model. Tumor cells in MM patients, however, don't exist in isolation, but reside in and interact with the bone microenvironment. Therefore conventional in vitro and in vivo preclinical assays don't take into account how interactions between MM cells and the bone microenvironment can potentially confer drug resistance. To probe this question, we performed tumor cell compartment-specific bioluminescence imaging assays to compare the preclinical anti-MM activity of BI 2536 in vitro in the presence vs. absence of stromal cells or osteoclasts. We observed that the presence of these bone marrow non-malignant cells led to decreased anti-MM activity of BI 2536. We further validated these results in an orthotopic in vivo mouse model of diffuse MM bone lesions where tumor cells interact with non-malignant cells of the bone microenvironment. We again observed that BI 2536 had decreased activity in this in vivo model of tumor-bone microenvironment interactions highlighting that, despite BI 2536's promising activity in conventional assays, its lack of activity in microenvironmental models raises concerns for its clinical development for MM. More broadly, preclinical drug testing in the absence of relevant tumor microenvironment interactions may overestimate potential clinical activity, thus explaining at least in part the gap between preclinical vs. clinical efficacy in MM

  10. Portable high-intensity focused ultrasound system with 3D electronic steering, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms: a preclinical study in pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Woo; Lee, Jae Young; Hwang, Eui Jin; Hwang, In Pyeong; Woo, Sung Min; Lee, Chang Joo; Park, Eun Joo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of a new portable ultrasonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USg-HIFU) system with a 3-dimensional (3D) electronic steering transducer, a simultaneous ablation and imaging module, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms. To address the accuracy of the transducer, hydrophones in a water chamber were used to assess the generation of sonic fields. An animal study was also performed in five pigs by ablating in vivo thighs by single-point sonication (n=10) or volume sonication (n=10) and ex vivo kidneys by single-point sonication (n=10). Histological and statistical analyses were performed. In the hydrophone study, peak voltages were detected within 1.0 mm from the targets on the y- and z-axes and within 2.0-mm intervals along the x-axis (z-axis, direction of ultrasound propagation; y- and x-axes, perpendicular to the direction of ultrasound propagation). Twenty-nine of 30 HIFU sessions successfully created ablations at the target. The in vivo porcine thigh study showed only a small discrepancy (width, 0.5-1.1 mm; length, 3.0 mm) between the planning ultrasonograms and the pathological specimens. Inordinate thermal damage was not observed in the adjacent tissues or sonic pathways in the in vivo thigh and ex vivo kidney studies. Our study suggests that this new USg-HIFU system may be a safe and accurate technique for ablating soft tissues and encapsulated organs.

  11. In vivo localization studies in the stramenopile alga Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moog, Daniel; Stork, Simone; Reislöhner, Sven; Grosche, Christopher; Maier, Uwe-G

    2015-02-01

    The tiny eustigmatophyte Nannochloropsis sp. recently emerged as a promising model organism for biotechnology as it possesses a considerably high cellular oil content interesting for biodiesel production. Furthermore, the alga was shown to be genetically well accessible providing powerful tools for biotechnological engineering as well as basic research. Nannochloropsis sp. can be transformed very efficiently taking advantage of homologous recombination, however, so far it remained unclear whether these organisms are also suitable model systems for in vivo protein localization studies due to their small cell size. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first protein localization studies based on the expression of chimeric fluorescent fusion proteins in the genus Nannochloropsis using N. oceanica CCMP1779 as a model organism. Besides expressing a cytosolic green fluorescent protein (GFP), the reporter could be directed into subcellular structures such as the mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum and secretory pathway as well as the complex plastid including the periplastidal compartment and the stroma via fusion of specific N-terminal targeting sequences. These results expand the potential of N. oceanica as a model system in biotechnology as well as cellular biology for which now an almost complete molecular tool set exists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of human follicular thyroid cancer cell lines in preclinical mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley N Reeb

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Follicular thyroid cancer (FTC is the second most common type of thyroid cancers. In order to develop more effective personalized therapies, it is necessary to thoroughly evaluate patient-derived cell lines in in vivo preclinical models before using them to test new, targeted therapies. This study evaluates the tumorigenic and metastatic potential of a panel of three human FTC cell lines (WRO, FTC-238, and TT1609-CO2 with defined genetic mutations in two in vivo murine models: an orthotopic thyroid cancer model to study tumor progression and a tail vein injection model to study metastasis. All cell lines developed tumors in the orthotopic model, with take rates of 100%. Notably, WRO-derived tumors grew two to four times faster than tumors arising from the FTC-238 and TT2609-CO2 cell lines. These results mirrored those of a tail vein injection model for lung metastasis: one hundred percent of mice injected with WRO cells in the tail vein exhibited aggressive growth of bilateral lung metastases within 35 days. In contrast, tail vein injection of FTC-238 or TT2609-CO2 cells did not result in lung metastasis. Together, our work demonstrates that these human FTC cell lines display highly varied tumorigenic and metastatic potential in vivo with WRO being the most aggressive cell line in both orthotopic and lung metastasis models. This information will be valuable when selecting cell lines for preclinical drug testing.

  13. Radiochemistry, pre-clinical studies and first clinical investigation of 90Y-labeled hydroxyapatite (HA) particles prepared utilizing 90Y produced by (n,γ) route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimalnath, K V; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Rajeswari, A; Sarma, H D; Nuwad, Jitendra; Pandey, Usha; Kamaleshwaran, K; Shinto, Ajit; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-05-01

    The scope of using no carrier added (NCA) (90)Y [T(1/2) = 64.1 h, Eβ(max) = 2.28 MeV] obtained from (90)Sr/(90)Y generator in radiation synovectomy (RSV) is widely accepted. In the present study, the prospect of using (90)Y produced by (n,γ) route in a medium flux research reactor for use in RSV was explored. Yttrium-90 was produced by thermal neutron irradiation of Y(2)O(3) target at a neutron flux of ~1×10(14) n/cm(2).s for 14 d. The influence of various experimental parameters were systematically investigated and optimized to arrive at the most favorable conditions for the formulation of (90)Y labeled hydroxyapatite (HA) using HA particles of 1-10 μm size range. An optimized kit formulation strategy was developed for convenient one-step compounding of (90)Y-HA, which is easily adaptable at hospital radiopharmacy. The pre-clinical biological evaluation of (90)Y-HA particles was studied by carrying out biodistribution and bioluminiscence imaging studies in Wistar rats. The first clinical investigation using the radiolabeled preparation was performed on a patient suffering from chronic arthritis in knee joint by administering 185 MBq (90)Y-HA formulated at the hospital radiopharmacy deploying the proposed strategy. Yttrium-90 was produced with a specific activity of 851 ± 111 MBq/mg and radionuclidic purity of 99.95 ± 0.02%. (90)Y-labeled HA particles (185 ± 10 MBq doses) were formulated in high radiochemical purity (>99%) and excellent in vitro stability. The preparation showed promising results in pre-clinical studies carried out in Wistar rats. The preliminary results of the first clinical investigation of (90)Y-HA preparation in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis in knee joints demonstrated the effectiveness of the formulation prepared using (90)Y produced via (n,γ) route in the management of the disease. The studies revealed that effective utilization of (90)Y produced via (n,γ) route in a medium flux research reactor coupled with the developed

  14. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: "Ex vivo" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Meleti, Marco; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Rocca, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-30

    Stabilization of implant abutments through electric impulses at high voltage for a very short time (electrowelding) was developed in the Eighties. In 2009, the same procedure was performed through the use of laser (laser welding) The aim of this study is to compare electrowelding and laser welding for intra-oral implant abutments stabilization on "ex vivo models" (pig jaws). Six bars were welded with two different devices (Nd:YAG laser and Electrowelder) to eighteen titanium implant abutment inserted in three pig jaws. During the welding process, thermal increase was recorded, through the use of k-thermocouples, in the bone close to the implants. The strength of the welded joints was evaluated by a traction test after the removal of the implants. For temperature measurements a descriptive analysis and for traction test "values unpaired t test with Welch's correction" were performed: the significance level was set at Pwelding gives a lower thermal increase than Electrowelding at the bone close to implants (Mean: 1.97 and 5.27); the strength of laser welded joints was higher than that of Electrowelding even if nor statistically significant. (Mean: 184.75 and 168.29) CONCLUSION: Electrowelding seems to have no advantages, in term of thermal elevation and strength, while laser welding may be employed to connect titanium implants for immediate load without risks of thermal damage at surrounding tissues.

  15. In vivo studies of biotin absorption in distal rat intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have extended their previous studies of biotin absorption in rat proximal jejunum (PJ) to examine biotin absorptive capacity of rat ileum (I) and proximal colon (PC) using in vivo intestinal loop technique. Intestinal loops (2.5 cm) were filled with 0.3 ml of solution containing (/sup 3/H)-biotin and (/sup 14/C)-inulin in phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Biotin absorption was determined on the basis of luminal biotin disappearance after correction for inulin recovery and averaged (pmol/loop-10 min; X +/- SEM). In related experiments, 5-cm loops of PJ, distal I (DI), or PC were filled with 0.5 ml of solution of similar composition (1.0 ..mu..M biotin). The abdominal cavity was closed and the rats were allowed to recover from anesthesia, then sacrificed 3 hr after injection. Biotin absorption averaged 96.2% (PJ), 93.2% (DI), and 25.8% (PC) of the dose administered. These differences were reflected in the radioactive biotin content of plasma and intestinal loop, kidney, and liver. These data demonstrate significant biotin absorption in rat DI and PC, as required if the intestinal microflora are to be considered as a source of biotin for the host.

  16. In Vivo Toxicity Studies of Europium Hydroxide Nanorods in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Abdel Moneim, Soha S.; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit; Patra, Sujata; Eshed, Michal; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Gedanken, Aharon; Shah, Vijay H; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanide nanoparticles and nanorods have been widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in biomedical nanotechnology due to their fluorescence properties and pro-angiogenic to endothelial cells, respectively. Recently, we have demonstrated that europium (III) hydroxide [EuIII(OH)3] nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique and characterized by several physico-chemical techniques, can be used as pro-angiogenic agents which introduce future therapeutic treatment strategies for severe ischemic heart/limb disease, and peripheral ischemic disease. The toxicity of these inorganic nanorods to endothelial cells was supported by several in vitro assays. To determine the in vivo toxicity, these nanorods were administered to mice through intraperitoneal injection (IP) everyday over a period of seven days in a dose dependent (1.25 to 125 mgKg−1day−1) and time dependent manner (8–60 days). Bio-distribution of europium elements in different organs was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Short-term (S-T) and long-term (L-T) toxicity studies (mice sacrificed on day 8 and 60 for S-T and L-T, respectively) show normal blood hematology and serum clinical chemistry with the exception of a slight elevation of liver enzymes. Histological examination of nanorod treated vital organs (liver, kidney, spleen and lungs) showed no or only mild histological changes that indicate mild toxicity at the higher dose of nanorods. PMID:19616569

  17. Gravitational physiology of human immune cells: a review of in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoli, A.

    1996-01-01

    The study of the function of immune cells in microgravity has been studied for more than 20 years in several laboratories. It is clear today that the immune system is depressed in more than 50% of the astronauts during and after space flight and that the activation of T lymphocytes by mitogens in vitro changes dramatically. This article gives an overview of the gravitational studies conducted by our laboratory in Spacelab, in MIR station, in sounding rockets and on the ground in the clinostat and the centrifuge. Three experimental approaches are followed in our work: (i) Ex vivo studies are performed with blood samples drawn from astronauts; (ii) in vivo studies are based on the application of seven antigens to the skin of the astronauts; (iii) in vitro studies are carried out with immune cells purified from the blood of healthy donors (not astronauts). The data from our in vivo and ex vivo studies are in agreement with those of other laboratories and show that the immunological function is depressed in the majority of astronauts as a consequence of the stress of space flight rather than by a direct influence of gravity on the cell. Immune depression may become a critical hazard on long duration flights on space stations or to other planets. In vitro experiments show that cultures of free-floating lymphocytes and monocytes undergo a dramatic depression of activation by the mitogen concanavalin A, while activation is more than doubled when the cells are attached to microcarrier beads. Such effects may be attributed to both direct and indirect effects of gravitational unloading on basic biological mechanisms of the cell. While the in vitro data are very important to clarify certain aspects of the biological mechanism of T cells activation, they are not descriptive of the changes of the immunological function of the astronauts.

  18. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Susanne J; Toberer, Matthias; Keis, Oliver; Tolks, Daniel; Fischer, Martin R; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC) method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: to analyse the motivation and satisfaction of the students in a biochemistry seminar through the use of the e-learning-based IC method, to investigate the acceptance against the IC teaching method in biochemistry, and to compare the learning success achieved using the IC approach with that of a traditional course. We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee "New Media" [30] in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students), but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the

  19. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühl, Susanne J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee “New Media” in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students, but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the acquisition of knowledge by MC exams.Results: On a Likert scale from 1 (strongly disagree to 6 (strongly agree, the students in the IC intervention groups could be seen to be much more motivated (5.53 than students in the control group (4.01. Students in the IC intervention groups also recognised the

  20. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Susanne J.; Toberer, Matthias; Keis, Oliver; Tolks, Daniel; Fischer, Martin R.; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC) method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: to analyse the motivation and satisfaction of the students in a biochemistry seminar through the use of the e-learning-based IC method, to investigate the acceptance against the IC teaching method in biochemistry, and to compare the learning success achieved using the IC approach with that of a traditional course. We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee “New Media” [30] in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students), but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires

  1. Preclinical Study of Novel Gene Silencer Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide Targeting Human TGF-β1 Promoter for Hypertrophic Scar/span>s in a Common Marmoset Primate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Jun; Fukuda, Noboru; Inoue, Takashi; Nakai, Shigeki; Saito, Kosuke; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Nagase, Hiroki; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Itoh, Toshio; Soma, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report a preclinical study of a pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide that targets the human transforming growth factor (hTGF)-β1 gene as a novel transcriptional gene silencer in a common marmoset primate model. We designed and then synthesized PI polyamides to target the hTGF-β1 promoter. We examined effects of seven PI polyamides (GB1101-1107) on the expression of hTGF-β1 mRNA stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in human vascular smooth muscle cells. GB1101, GB1105 and GB1106 significantly inhibited hTGF-β1 mRNA expression. We examined GB1101 as a PI polyamide to hTGF-β1 for hypertrophic scar/span>s in marmosets in vivo. Injection of GB1101 completely inhibited hypertrophic scar formation at 35 days post-incision and inhibited cellular infiltration, TGF-β1 and vimentin staining, and epidermal thickness. Mismatch polyamide did not affect hypertrophic scarring or histological changes. Epidermis was significantly thinner with GB1101 than with water and mismatch PI polyamides. We developed the PI polyamides for practical ointment medicines for the treatment of hypertrophic scar/span>s. FITC-labeled GB1101 with solbase most efficiently distributed in the nuclei of epidermal keratinocytes, completely suppressed hypertropic scarring at 42 days after incision, and considerably inhibited epidermal thickness and vimentin-positive fibroblasts. PI polyamides targeting hTGF-β1 promoter with solbase ointment will be practical medicines for treating hypertrophic scar/span>s after surgical operations and skin burns. PMID:25938472

  2. In vivo mouse myocardial (31)P MRS using three-dimensional image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (3D ISIS): technical considerations and biochemical validations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakermans, A.J.; Abdurrachim, D.; Nierop, B.J. van; Koeman, A.; Kroon, I. van der; Baartscheer, A.; Schumacher, C.A.; Strijkers, G.J.; Houten, S.M.; Zuurbier, C.J.; Nicolay, K.; Prompers, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    (31)P MRS provides a unique non-invasive window into myocardial energy homeostasis. Mouse models of cardiac disease are widely used in preclinical studies, but the application of (31)P MRS in the in vivo mouse heart has been limited. The small-sized, fast-beating mouse heart imposes challenges

  3. System vaccinology for the evaluation of influenza vaccine safety by multiplex gene detection of novel biomarkers in a preclinical study and batch release test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuo Mizukami

    Full Text Available Vaccines are beneficial and universal tools to prevent infectious disease. Thus, safety of vaccines is strictly evaluated in the preclinical phase of trials and every vaccine batch must be tested by the National Control Laboratories according to the guidelines published by each country. Despite many vaccine production platforms and methods, animal testing for safety evaluation is unchanged thus far. We recently developed a systems biological approach to vaccine safety evaluation where identification of specific biomarkers in a rat pre-clinical study evaluated the safety of vaccines for pandemic H5N1 influenza including Irf7, Lgals9, Lgalsbp3, Cxcl11, Timp1, Tap2, Psmb9, Psme1, Tapbp, C2, Csf1, Mx2, Zbp1, Ifrd1, Trafd1, Cxcl9, β2m, Npc1, Ngfr and Ifi47. The current study evaluated whether these 20 biomarkers could evaluate the safety, batch-to-batch and manufacturer-to-manufacturer consistency of seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine using a multiplex gene detection system. When we evaluated the influenza HA vaccine (HAv from four different manufactures, the biomarker analysis correlated to findings from conventional animal use tests, such as abnormal toxicity test. In addition, sensitivity of toxicity detection and differences in HAvs were higher and more accurate than with conventional methods. Despite a slight decrease in body weight caused by HAv from manufacturer B that was not statistically significant, our results suggest that HAv from manufacturer B is significantly different than the other HAvs tested with regard to Lgals3bp, Tapbp, Lgals9, Irf7 and C2 gene expression in rat lungs. Using the biomarkers confirmed in this study, we predicted batch-to-batch consistency and safety of influenza vaccines within 2 days compared with the conventional safety test, which takes longer. These biomarkers will facilitate the future development of new influenza vaccines and provide an opportunity to develop in vitro methods of evaluating batch

  4. N-glycan PK Profiling Using a High Sensitivity nanoLCMS Work-Flow with Heavy Stable Isotope Labeled Internal Standard and Application to a Preclinical Study of an IgG1 Biopharmaceutical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higel, Fabian; Seidl, Andreas; Demelbauer, Uwe; Viertlboeck-Schudy, Margot; Koppenburg, Vera; Kronthaler, Ulrich; Sörgel, Fritz; Friess, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    In this study an innovative, highly sensitive work-flow is presented that allows the analysis of a possible influence of individual glyco-variants on pharmacokinetics already during pre-clinical development. Possible effects on the pharmacokinetics caused by glyco-variants have been subject of several studies with in part contradictory results which can be related to differences in the set-up. Using 96-well plate based affinity purification an IgG1 antibody was isolated from preclinical samples and glycans were analyzed individually by nanoLCMS. Prerequisite was a reference standard based on stable heavy isotope labeled glycans. The high sensitivity and low sample consumption enabled the integration into the preclinical development program. The data of an IgG1 biopharmaceutical from a preclinical rabbit study showed that some N-glycoforms have a different PK profile compared with the average of all molecule variants as determined by ELISA. IgG1 high mannose glycoforms M5 and M6 were removed from circulation at a higher rate. The results of the preclinical study demonstrated the applicability of the developed innovative workflow. The PK profile of glyco-variants could be determined individually. It was concluded that M6 was converted by mannosidases in circulation to M5 which in turn was selectively cleared by mannose receptor binding which is in-line with previously published results. Therefore the developed technology delivers reliable results and can be applied for PK profiling of other mAbs and other types of biopharmaceuticals.

  5. Ex vivo and in vivo topographic studies of bladder by optical coherence tomography (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniltchenko, Dmitri; Sachs, Markus D.; Lankenau, Eva; Koenig, Frank; Burkhardt, Mick; Huettmann, Gereon; Kristiansen, Glen; Schnorr, Dietmar; Al-Shukri, Salman; Loening, Stefan A.

    2005-06-01

    Conventional imaging modalities like CT or ultrasonography have a spatial resolution of 70-1000 rim. OCT is a new method by which light of a certain wavelength is introduced into a fiberglass optic to measure tissue structures of up to 2.5 mm depth with a spatial resolution of up to 10-15 μm. We utilized the Tomograph Sirius 713, developed at the Medical Laser Centre in cooperation with 4-Optics AG, Lubeck, Germany. This apparatus uses a special Super- Luminescence-Diode (SLD) that produces light within the near infrared wavelength, with a central wavelength of 1300 nm. The coherence length is reduced to 15 μm. The light is introduced into a fiberglass optic which is several meters long and is easy to handle. To measure the depth of invasion and position of urothelial bladder tumors, the fiberglass optic is attached to a regular endoscope (Wolf, Knittlingen, Germany) via an OCT adapter. That way, in parallel to the regular endoscopic view of the bladder mucosa with or without pathologic findings, an OCT picture of the superficial as well as the deeper muscle layers is visible online. OCT was used to obtain 945 images from the bladder in vivo und ex vivo of 65 patients. OCT of normal bladder mucosa allows to image a cross section of up to 2.5 mm. It is possible to distinguish transitional epithelium, lamina propria, smooth muscles and capillaries. In cystitis, the thickness of the mucosa is constant, but the distinction between the different layers is blurred. In squamous metaplasia there is thickening of the epithelial layer, with preservation of lamination of the lower layers. In transitional cell carcinoma there is a complete loss of the regular layered structure. It is easily possible to distinguish the border between tumour and normal bladder tissue. OCT is a new high-resolution imaging procedure. It has the potential to improve the diagnostics of the urothelium and its lesions. In conjunction with a highly sensitive orientating procedure like fluorescence

  6. In and ex vivo breast disease study by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raniero, L.; Canevari, R. A.; Ramalho, L. N. Z.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, Raman spectra in the 900-1,800 cm(-1) wavenumber region of in vivo and ex vivo breast tissues of both healthy mice (normal) and mice with induced mammary gland tumors (abnormal) were measured. In the case of the in vivo tissues, the Raman spectra were collected for both transcutaneous...... (with skin) and skin-removed tissues. To identify the spectral differences between normal and cancer breast tissue, the paired t-test was carried out for each wavenumber using the whole spectral range from both groups. Quadratic discriminate analysis based on principal component analysis (PCA) was also...... used to determine and evaluate differences in the Raman spectra for the various samples as a basis for diagnostic purposes. The differences in the Raman spectra of the samples were due to biochemical changes at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. The sensitivity and specificity...

  7. Erythropoietin-coated ZP-microneedle transdermal system: preclinical formulation, stability, and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Elaine E; Ameri, Mahmoud; Wang, Xiaomei; Maa, Yuh-Fun; Daddona, Peter E

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of coating formulated recombinant human erythropoietin alfa (EPO) on a titanium microneedle transdermal delivery system, ZP-EPO, and assess preclinical patch delivery performance. Formulation rheology and surface activity were assessed by viscometry and contact angle measurement. EPO liquid formulation was coated onto titanium microneedles by dip-coating and drying. Stability of coated EPO was assessed by SEC-HPLC, CZE and potency assay. Preclinical in vivo delivery and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in rats with EPO-coated microneedle patches and compared to subcutaneous EPO injection. Studies demonstrated successful EPO formulation development and coating on microneedle arrays. ZP-EPO patch was stable at 25°C for at least 3 months with no significant change in % aggregates, isoforms, or potency. Preclinical studies in rats showed the ZP-EPO microneedle patches, coated with 750 IU to 22,000 IU, delivered with high efficiency (75-90%) with a linear dose response. PK profile was similar to subcutaneous injection of commercial EPO. Results suggest transdermal microneedle patch delivery of EPO is feasible and may offer an efficient, dose-adjustable, patient-friendly alternative to current intravenous or subcutaneous routes of administration.

  8. Qualichem In Vivo: A Tool for Assessing the Quality of In Vivo Studies and Its Application for Bisphenol A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxim, Laura; van der Sluijs, Jeroen P.

    2014-01-01

    In regulatory toxicology, quality assessment of in vivo studies is a critical step for assessing chemical risks. It is crucial for preserving public health studies that are considered suitable for regulating chemicals are robust. Current procedures for conducting quality assessments in safety agencies are not structured, clear or consistent. This leaves room for criticism about lack of transparency, subjective influence and the potential for insufficient protection provided by resulting safety standards. We propose a tool called “Qualichem in vivo” that is designed to systematically and transparently assess the quality of in vivo studies used in chemical health risk assessment. We demonstrate its use here with 12 experts, using two controversial studies on Bisphenol A (BPA) that played an important role in BPA regulation in Europe. The results obtained with Qualichem contradict the quality assessments conducted by expert committees in safety agencies for both of these studies. Furthermore, they show that reliance on standardized guidelines to ensure scientific quality is only partially justified. Qualichem allows experts with different disciplinary backgrounds and professional experiences to express their individual and sometimes divergent views—an improvement over the current way of dealing with minority opinions. It provides a transparent framework for expressing an aggregated, multi-expert level of confidence in a study, and allows a simple graphical representation of how well the study integrates the best available scientific knowledge. Qualichem can be used to compare assessments of the same study by different health agencies, increasing transparency and trust in the work of expert committees. In addition, it may be used in systematic evaluation of in vivo studies submitted by industry in the dossiers that are required for compliance with the REACH Regulation. Qualichem provides a balanced, common framework for assessing the quality of studies that may

  9. The Role of Three-Dimensional Scaffolds in Treating Long Bone Defects: Evidence from Preclinical and Clinical Literature—A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Roffi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long bone defects represent a clinical challenge. Bone tissue engineering (BTE has been developed to overcome problems associated with conventional methods. The aim of this study was to assess the BTE strategies available in preclinical and clinical settings and the current evidence supporting this approach. A systematic literature screening was performed on PubMed database, searching for both preclinical (only on large animals and clinical studies. The following string was used: “(Scaffold OR Implant AND (Long bone defect OR segmental bone defect OR large bone defect OR bone loss defect.” The search retrieved a total of 1573 articles: 51 preclinical and 4 clinical studies were included. The great amount of preclinical papers published over the past few years showed promising findings in terms of radiological and histological evidence. Unfortunately, this in vivo situation is not reflected by a corresponding clinical impact, with few published papers, highly heterogeneous and with small patient populations. Several aspects should be further investigated to translate positive preclinical findings into clinical protocols: the identification of the best biomaterial, with both biological and biomechanical suitable properties, and the selection of the best choice between cells, GFs, or their combination through standardized models to be validated by randomized trials.

  10. Route of Delivery Modulates the Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Myocardial Infarction: A Meta-Analysis of Preclinical Studies and Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanelidis, Anthony J; Premer, Courtney; Lopez, Juan; Balkan, Wayne; Hare, Joshua M

    2017-03-31

    Accumulating data support a therapeutic role for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy; however, there is no consensus on the optimal route of delivery. We tested the hypothesis that the route of MSC delivery influences the reduction in infarct size and improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). We performed a meta-analysis investigating the effect of MSC therapy in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy preclinical studies (58 studies; n=1165 mouse, rat, swine) which revealed a reduction in infarct size and improvement of LVEF in all animal models. Route of delivery was analyzed in AMI swine studies and clinical trials (6 clinical trials; n=334 patients). In AMI swine studies, transendocardial stem cell injection reduced infarct size (n=49, 9.4% reduction; 95% confidence interval, -15.9 to -3.0), whereas direct intramyocardial injection, intravenous infusion, and intracoronary infusion indicated no improvement. Similarly, transendocardial stem cell injection improved LVEF (n=65, 9.1% increase; 95% confidence interval, 3.7 to 14.5), as did direct intramyocardial injection and intravenous infusion, whereas intracoronary infusion demonstrated no improvement. In humans, changes of LVEF paralleled these results, with transendocardial stem cell injection improving LVEF (n=46, 7.0% increase; 95% confidence interval, 2.7 to 11.3), as did intravenous infusion, but again intracoronary infusion demonstrating no improvement. MSC therapy improves cardiac function in animal models of both AMI and chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy. The route of delivery seems to play a role in modulating the efficacy of MSC therapy in AMI swine studies and clinical trials, suggesting the superiority of transendocardial stem cell injection because of its reduction in infarct size and improvement of LVEF, which has important implications for the design of future studies. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. A Novel Inherently Radiopaque Bead for Transarterial Embolization to Treat Liver Cancer - A Pre-clinical Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duran, Rafael; Sharma, Karun; Dreher, Matthew R; Ashrafi, Koorosh; Mirpour, Sahar; Lin, MingDe; Schernthaner, Ruediger E; Schlachter, Todd R; Tacher, Vania; Lewis, Andrew L; Willis, Sean; den Hartog, Mark; Radaelli, Alessandro; Negussie, Ayele H; Wood, Bradford J; Geschwind, Jean-François H

    2016-01-01

    .... The objective of our study was to characterize inherently radiopaque beads (RO Beads) in terms of physicomechanical properties, deliverability and imaging visibility in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model...

  12. Preclinical and Clinical Studies on Antioxidative, Antihypertensive and Cardioprotective Effect of Marine Proteins and Peptides—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida-Johanne Jensen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High seafood consumption has traditionally been linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases, mainly due to the lipid lowering effects of the long chained omega 3 fatty acids. However, fish and seafood are also excellent sources of good quality proteins and emerging documentation show that, upon digestion, these proteins are sources for bioactive peptides with documented favorable physiological effects such as antioxidative, antihypertensive and other cardioprotective effects. This documentation is mainly from in vitro studies, but also animal studies are arising. Evidence from human studies evaluating the positive health effects of marine proteins and peptides are scarce. In one study, a reduction in oxidative stress after intake of cod has been documented and a few human clinical trials have been performed evaluating the effect on blood pressure. The results are, however, inconclusive. The majority of the human clinical trials performed to investigate positive health effects of marine protein and lean fish intake, has focused on blood lipids. While some studies have documented a reduction in triglycerides after intake of lean fish, others have documented no effects.

  13. Noradrenergic and dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease : preclinical studies on L-threo-DOPS, decarboxylase inhibitors and transdermal lisuride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen-Kamerbeek, Wilma Dianne Johanna

    1994-01-01

    Bij de palliatieve behandeling van de ziekte van Parkinson (PD) blijken nog veel symptomen niet op de gebruikelijke therapie met dopamine (DA) suppleterende of dopaminomimetische farmaka te reageren. De studies bijeen gebracht in dit proefschrift beschrijven twee alternatieve benaderingen in de

  14. Cardiac Stem Cell Treatment in Myocardial Infarction : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Preclinical Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, Peter Paul; Végh, Anna M D; Jansen of Lorkeers, Sanne Johanna; van Hout, Gerardus P; Currie, Gillian L; Sena, Emily S; Gremmels, Hendrik; Buikema, Jan Willem; Goumans, Marie-Jose; Macleod, Malcolm R; Doevendans, Pieter A; Chamuleau, Steven A J; Sluijter, Joost P.G.

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: Cardiac stem cells (CSC) therapy has been clinically introduced for cardiac repair after myocardial infarction (MI). To date there has been no systematic overview and meta-analysis of studies using CSC therapy for MI. OBJECTIVE: Here, we used meta-analysis to establish the overall effect

  15. Multiple stent delivery system Multi-LOC, a new technology for spot-stenting of the femoropopliteal artery - proof of concept study in a preclinical large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigl, Martin; Dudeck, Oliver; Jung, Johannes; Koelble, Heinz; Amendt, Klaus

    2017-10-01

    A new stent system was studied in a porcine model to evaluate its feasibility for spot-stenting of the femoropopliteal artery. In a preliminary study in a single pig, handling and mechanical features of the novel multiple stent delivery system were tested. The Multi-LOC system demonstrated great feasibility regarding its pushability, trackability, and crossability. Excellent visibility of the individual stents allowed exact anatomically controlled implantation. In our main study, four to five short Multi-LOC stents (13 mm long) were implanted into the femoropopliteal arteries of six domestic pigs and long (60 to 100 mm) self-expandable nitinol stents were implanted into the same target vessel contralaterally to allow for intraindividual comparison. After four weeks survival under dual antiplatelet treatment, control angiography was performed. The animals were euthanized, stented vessels were explanted, and histologic sections were examined for the presence of neointimal formation. Multi-LOC stents demonstrated no occlusion of the femoropopliteal axis (0 vs. 1 occlusion distal to a control stent), no stent fractures (0 out of 26 vs. 2 out of 6 control stents), and lower percentage diameter stenosis (0.564 ± 0.056 vs. 0.712 ± 0.089; p = 0.008) and length of stenosis (19.715 ± 5.225 vs. 39.397 ± 11.182; p = 0.007) compared to a standard control stent, which was similar in total length to the multiple stented artery segment. Histological examination confirmed myointimal hyperplasia underlying in-stent stenosis. The multiple stent delivery system was studied in a porcine model, which demonstrated its feasibility. Preclinical experience revealed favourable results concerning stent fracture, restenosis, and patency of spot-stented femoropopliteal arteries.

  16. Acceleration of tendon healing using US guided intratendinous injection of bevacizumab: First pre-clinical study on a murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallaudière, Benjamin, E-mail: bendallau64@hotmail.fr [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Inserm U698, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Lempicki, Marta [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Pesquer, Lionel [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Louedec, Liliane [Inserm U698, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Preux, Pierre Marie [Laboratoire de Biostatistiques, Faculté de médecine, Limoges (France); Meyer, Philippe [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Hess, Agathe [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Durieux, Marie Hèlène Moreau [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Hummel, Vincent; Larbi, Ahmed [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Deschamps, Lydia [Service d’ Anatomopathologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Tendinopathy shows early disorganized collagen fibers with neo-angiogenesis on histology. Peri-tendinous injection of corticosteroid is the commonly accepted strategy despite the abscence of inflammation in tendinosis. The aim of our study was to assess the potential of intratendinous injection of an anti-angiogenic drug (bevacizumab, AA) to treat tendinopathy in a murine model of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy, and to evaluate its local toxicity. Materials and method: Forty rats (160 patellar and Achilles tendons) were used for this study. We induced tendinosis (T+) in 80 tendons by injecting under ultrasonography (US) guidance Collagenase 1{sup ®} (day 0 = D0, patellar = 40 and Achilles = 40). Clinical examination and tendon US were performed at D3, immediately followed by either AA (AAT+, n = 40) or physiological serum (PST+, n = 40, control) US-guided intratendinous injection. Follow-up at D6 and D13 using clinical, US and histology, and comparison between the 2 groups were performed. To study AA toxicity we compared the 80 remaining normal tendons (T−) after injecting AA in 40 (AAT−). Results: All AAT+ showed a better joint mobilization compared to PST+ at D6 (p = 0.004) with thinner US tendon diameters (p < 0.004), and less disorganized collagen fibers and neovessels on histology (p < 0.05). There was no difference at D13 regarding clinical status, US tendon diameter and histology (p > 0.05). Comparison between AAT− and T− showed no AA toxicity on tendon (p = 0.18). Conclusion: Our study suggests that high dose mono-injection of AA in tendinosis, early after the beginning of the disease, accelerates tendon's healing, with no local toxicity.

  17. Noradrenergic and dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease: preclinical studies on L-threo-DOPS, decarboxylase inhibitors and transdermal lisuride

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen-Kamerbeek, Wilma Dianne Johanna

    1994-01-01

    Bij de palliatieve behandeling van de ziekte van Parkinson (PD) blijken nog veel symptomen niet op de gebruikelijke therapie met dopamine (DA) suppleterende of dopaminomimetische farmaka te reageren. De studies bijeen gebracht in dit proefschrift beschrijven twee alternatieve benaderingen in de farmacotherapeutische behandeliig van PD: versterking van de noradrenerge neurotransrnissie met behulp van een precursor van noradrenaline (NA), en het ontwikkelen van een eenvoudig transdermaal toedie...

  18. Transoral robotic-assisted thyroidectomy with central neck dissection: preclinical cadaver feasibility study and proposed surgical technique

    OpenAIRE

    Richmon, Jeremy D.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Kandil, Emad; Moore, Michael W.; Garcia, Jose Armando; Tufano, Ralph P.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a transoral robotic-assisted technique to access the thyroid gland has been introduced. Despite the advantages this approach may have over other minimally invasive and robotic-assisted techniques, we found that the placement of the camera through the floor of mouth led to restricted freedom of movement. We describe our modification to this technique to overcome this problem. In a study using two fresh human cadavers, the camera port of the da Vinci robot was placed in the midline or...

  19. Human skeletal muscle xenograft as a new preclinical model for muscle disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanfan; King, Oliver D; Rahimov, Fedik; Jones, Takako I; Ward, Christopher W; Kerr, Jaclyn P; Liu, Naili; Emerson, Charles P; Kunkel, Louis M; Partridge, Terence A; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2014-06-15

    Development of novel therapeutics requires good animal models of disease. Disorders for which good animal models do not exist have very few drugs in development or clinical trial. Even where there are accepted, albeit imperfect models, the leap from promising preclinical drug results to positive clinical trials commonly fails, including in disorders of skeletal muscle. The main alternative model for early drug development, tissue culture, lacks both the architecture and, usually, the metabolic fidelity of the normal tissue in vivo. Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility and validity of human to mouse xenografts as a preclinical model of myopathy. Human skeletal muscle biopsies transplanted into the anterior tibial compartment of the hindlimbs of NOD-Rag1(null) IL2rγ(null) immunodeficient host mice regenerate new vascularized and innervated myofibers from human myogenic precursor cells. The grafts exhibit contractile and calcium release behavior, characteristic of functional muscle tissue. The validity of the human graft as a model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is demonstrated in disease biomarker studies, showing that gene expression profiles of xenografts mirror those of the fresh donor biopsies. These findings illustrate the value of a new experimental model of muscle disease, the human muscle xenograft in mice, as a feasible and valid preclinical tool to better investigate the pathogenesis of human genetic myopathies and to more accurately predict their response to novel therapeutics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. [Preclinical studies of an adsorbed diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine (ADTP-vaccine) with acellular pertussis component].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaĭtsev, E M; Britsina, M V; Bazhanova, I G; Mertsalova, N U; Ozeretskovskaia, M N; Ermolova, E V; Plekhanova, N G; Mikhaĭlova, N A; Kolyshkin, V A; Zverev, V V

    2013-01-01

    Evaluate standardness of antigenic composition of pertussis component, completeness of sorption of pertussis, diphtheria and tetanus components, specific activity and safety of experimental series ofADTP-vaccine with acellular pertussis component (ADTaP-vaccine). The content of separate antigens (pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin and agglutinogens 1, 2, 3) in samples of acellular pertussis component of ADTaP-vaccine and completeness of sorption of pertussis component of ADTaP-vaccine were evaluated by using enzyme immunoassay. Completeness of sorption of diphtheria and tetanus components were determined in flocculation reaction and antitoxin-binding reactions, respectively. Protective activity ofADTaP-vaccine was studied in model ofmeningoencephalitis development in mice infected with Bordetella pertussis (strain 18323) neurotropic virulent culture, protective activity oftetanus component - by survival of mice after administration of tetanus toxin, protective activity of diphtheria component - by survival of guinea pigs after administration of diphtheria toxin. Safety of preparations was evaluated in tests of acute and chronic toxicity with carrying out pathomorphologic studies including immature animals. All the studied experimental series ofADTaP-vaccine were standard by content of separate antigens of pertussis microbe. All the ADTaP-vaccine components were completely sorbed on aluminium hydroxide gel. By protective activity ADTaP preparations satisfied the WHO requirements. The preparations were non-toxic in acute and chronic toxicity and did not induce pathomorphologic changes including immature animals. Experimental samples of ADTaP-vaccine by specific activity and safety satisfied WHO requirements.

  1. Endogenous testosterone and its relationship to preclinical and clinical measures of cardiovascular disease in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinath, Reshmi; Hill Golden, Sherita; Carson, Kathryn A; Dobs, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that endogenous testosterone (T) levels in males may be implicated in cardiovascular disease (CVD), however further clarification is needed. We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between endogenous plasma T and mean carotid intima media thickness (cIMT), and the longitudinal relationship with incident clinical CVD events, cardiac mortality, and all-cause mortality using male participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. This study involved a subset of men from visit 4 of the ARIC study. The study was conducted in a community based cohort. Males who provided a morning blood sample excluding those taking androgen therapy, with prevalent coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, or heart failure (HF) (n = 1558). None. Plasma T by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and carotid IMT using high resolution B-mode ultrasound were obtained at visit 4. Incident CHD, HF, cardiac mortality, and all-cause mortality were identified by surveillance through 2010 (median 12.8 years). Lower T was significantly associated with higher body mass index, greater waist circumference, diabetes, hypertension, lower HDL, and never smoking (P = 0.01). T was not associated with mean cIMT in unadjusted or adjusted analyses. Following multivariable adjustment, there was no association of quartile (Q) of T with incident CHD [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87 (95% CI = 0.60-1.26) for Q1; 0.97 (95% CI = 0.69-1.38) for Q2; 0.97 (95% CI = 0.69-1.36) for Q3 compared to reference of Q4] or for incident HF [HR = 0.77 (95% CI = 0.46-1.29) for Q1; 0.72 (95% CI = 0.43-1.21) for Q2; 0.87 (95% CI = 0.53-1.42) for Q3 compared to reference of Q4]. Similarly there was no association of Q of T with mortality or cardiac-associated mortality. Low male plasma T is cross-sectionally associated with key CVD risk factors, but after adjustment there was no association with mean cIMT, incident cardiac events, or mortality. Our results are reassuring that neither high

  2. Review of the bioanalytical methods for the determination of methotrexate and its metabolites in in vitro, preclinical and clinical studies: Case studies and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Harilal; Giri, Poonam; Ghoghari, Ashok; Delvadia, Prashant; Syed, Muzeeb; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2017-01-01

    Methotrexate is an old drug that has found use in several therapeutic areas, such as cancer to treat various malignancies, rheumatoid arthtritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Owing to its structural properties of possessing two carboxylic acid groups and having low native fluorescence, it has provided technical challenges for development of bioanalytical methods. Also, in vivo metabolism leading to circulatory metabolites such as 7-hydroxymethotrexate and 2,4-diamino N10 -methylpteroic acid, as well as the formation of polyglutamate metabolites intracellularly have added further complexity for the assays in terms of the analytes that need to be quantified in addition to methotrexate. The present review is aimed at providing a concise tabular summary of chromatographic assays with respect to method nuances including assay/chromatographic conditions, key validation parameters and applicable remarks. Several case studies are reviewed under various subheadings to provide the challenges involved in the method development for methotrexate and metabolites. Finally, a discussion section is devoted to overall perspectives obtained from this review. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Preclinical development and qualification of ZFN-mediated CCR5 disruption in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L DiGiusto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy for HIV-1 infection is a promising alternative to lifelong combination antiviral drug treatment. Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 is the coreceptor required for R5-tropic HIV-1 infection of human cells. Deletion of CCR5 renders cells resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1 infection, and the potential for cure has been shown through allogeneic stem cell transplantation with naturally occurring homozygous deletion of CCR5 in donor hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC. The requirement for HLA-matched HSPC bearing homozygous CCR5 deletions prohibits widespread application of this approach. Thus, a strategy to disrupt CCR5 genomic sequences in HSPC using zinc finger nucleases was developed. Following discussions with regulatory agencies, we conducted IND-enabling preclinical in vitro and in vivo testing to demonstrate the feasibility and (preclinical safety of zinc finger nucleases-based CCR5 disruption in HSPC. We report here the clinical-scale manufacturing process necessary to deliver CCR5-specific zinc finger nucleases mRNA to HSPC using electroporation and the preclinical safety data. Our results demonstrate effective biallelic CCR5 disruption in up to 72.9% of modified colony forming units from adult mobilized HSPC with maintenance of hematopoietic potential in vitro and in vivo. Tumorigenicity studies demonstrated initial product safety; further safety and feasibility studies are ongoing in subjects infected with HIV-1 (NCT02500849@clinicaltrials.gov.

  4. Cartilage Health in Knees Treated with Metal Resurfacing Implants or Untreated Focal Cartilage Lesions: A Preclinical Study in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Carranza, Nicolas; Hultenby, Kjell; Lagerstedt, Anne Sofie; Schupbach, Peter; Berg, Hans E

    2017-07-01

    Background Full-depth cartilage lesions do not heal and the long-term clinical outcome is uncertain. In the symptomatic middle-aged (35-60 years) patient, treatment with metal implants has been proposed. However, the cartilage health surrounding these implants has not been thoroughly studied. Our objective was to evaluate the health of cartilage opposing and adjacent to metal resurfacing implants. Methods The medial femoral condyle was operated in 9 sheep bilaterally. A metallic resurfacing metallic implant was immediately inserted into an artificially created 7.5 mm defect while on the contralateral knee the defect was left untreated. Euthanasia was performed at 6 months. Six animals, of similar age and study duration, from a previous study were used for comparison in the evaluation of cartilage health adjacent to the implant. Cartilage damage to joint surfaces within the knee, cartilage repair of the defect, and cartilage adjacent to the implant was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Results Six animals available for evaluation of cartilage health within the knee showed a varying degree of cartilage damage with no statistical difference between defects treated with implants or left untreated ( P = 0.51; 95% CI -3.7 to 6.5). The cartilage adjacent to the implant (score 0-14; where 14 indicates no damage) remained healthy in these 6 animals showing promising results (averaged 10.5; range 9-11.5, SD 0.95). Cartilage defects did not heal in any case. Conclusion Treatment of a critical size focal lesion with a metal implant is a viable alternative treatment.

  5. Preclinical and Clinical Studies Demonstrate That the Proprietary Herbal Extract DA-5512 Effectively Stimulates Hair Growth and Promotes Hair Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Young Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The proprietary DA-5512 formulation comprises six herbal extracts from traditional oriental plants historically associated with therapeutic and other applications related to hair. Here, we investigated the effects of DA-5512 on the proliferation of human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs in vitro and on hair growth in C57BL/6 mice and conducted a clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of DA-5512. DA-5512 significantly enhanced the viability of hDPCs in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05, and 100 ppm of DA-5512 and 1 μM minoxidil (MXD significantly increased the number of Ki-67-positive cells, compared with the control group (p<0.05. MXD (3% and DA-5512 (1%, 5% significantly stimulated hair growth and increased the number and length of hair follicles (HFs versus the controls (each p<0.05. The groups treated with DA-5512 exhibited hair growth comparable to that induced by MXD. In clinical study, we detected a statistically significant increase in the efficacy of DA-5512 after 16 weeks compared with the groups treated with placebo or 3% MXD (p<0.05. In conclusion, DA-5512 might promote hair growth and enhance hair health and can therefore be considered an effective option for treating hair loss.

  6. Generic automated method for liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry based monoclonal antibody quantitation for preclinical pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Spellman, Daniel S; Song, Yaoli; Choi, Bernard; Hatcher, Nathan G; Tomazela, Daniela; Beaumont, Maribel; Tabrizifard, Mohammad; Prabhavalkar, Deepa; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Harrelson, Jane; Bateman, Kevin P

    2014-09-02

    Quantitation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAb) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for pharmacokinetic (PK) studies is becoming an essential complement to traditional antibody-based ligand binding assays (LBA). Here we show an automated method to perform LC-MS/MS-based quantitation, with IgG1 conserved peptides, a heavy isotope labeled mAb internal standard, and anti-human Fc enrichment. All reagents in the method are commercially available with no requirement to develop novel assay-specific reagents. The method met traditional quantitative LC-MS/MS assay analytical characteristics in terms of precision, accuracy, and specificity. The method was applied to the pharmacokinetic study of a mAb dosed in cynomolgus monkey, and the results were compared with the immunoassay data. This methodology has the potential to benefit and accelerate the early biopharmaceutical development process, particularly by enabling PK analysis across species and candidate molecules with minimal method development.

  7. A Preclinical Study in Rhesus Macaques for Cystic Fibrosis to Assess Gene Transfer and Transduction by AAV1 and AAV5 with a Dual-Luciferase Reporter System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggino, William B; Benson, Janet; Seagrave, JeanClare; Yan, Ziying; Engelhardt, John; Gao, Guangping; Conlon, Thomas J; Cebotaru, Liudmila

    2017-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease that is potentially treatable by gene therapy. Since the identification of the gene encoding CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a number of preclinical and clinical trials have been conducted using the first generation of adeno-associated virus, AAV2. All these studies showed that AAV gene therapy for CF is safe, but clinical benefit was not clearly demonstrated. Thus, a new generation of AAV vectors based on other serotypes is needed to move the field forward. This study tested two AAV serotypes (AAV1 and AAV5) using a dual-luciferase reporter system with firefly and Renilla luciferase genes packaged into AAV1 or AAV5, respectively. Two male and two female Rhesus macaques were each instilled in their lungs with both serotypes using a Penn-Century microsprayer. Both AAV1 and AAV5 vector genomes were detected in all the lung samples when measured at the time of necropsy, 45 days after instillation. However, the vector genome number for AAV1 was at least 10-fold higher than for AAV5. Likewise, luciferase activity was also detected in the same samples at 45 days. AAV1-derived activity was not statistically greater than that derived from AAV5. These data suggest that gene transfer is greater for AAV1 than for AAV5 in macaque lungs. Serum neutralizing antibodies were increased dramatically against both serotypes but were less abundant with AAV1 than with AAV5. No adverse events were noted, again indicating that AAV gene therapy is safe. These results suggest that with more lung-tropic serotypes such as AAV1, new clinical studies of gene therapy using AAV are warranted.

  8. Prolonged Pemetrexed Infusion Plus Gemcitabine in Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Preclinical Rationale and Phase II Study Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passardi, Alessandro; Fanini, Francesca; Turci, Livia; Foca, Flavia; Rosetti, Paola; Ruscelli, Silvia; Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Valgiusti, Martina; Dazzi, Claudio; Marangolo, Maurizio

    2017-08-01

    Difficulties in translating in vitro results into clinical practice are inevitable.Further efforts to verify the efficacy of alternative schedules of pemetrexed in solid tumors are encouraged. We investigated the cytotoxic activity of pemetrexed in combination with several drugs (gemcitabine, carboplatin, vinorelbine, and mitomycin C) using different exposure schedules in three colon cancer cell lines. The best results were obtained with the following schedule: a prolonged pemetrexed exposure followed by a 48-hour wash-out and then gemcitabine. This combination was then advanced to a phase II clinical trial. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer in progression after standard treatment were included in the study. Adequate bone marrow reserve, normal hepatic and renal function, and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-2 were required. Treatment consisted of an 8-hour intravenous infusion of pemetrexed 150 mg/m(2) on day 1 and a 30-minute intravenous infusion of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) on day 3 of each cycle, repeated every 14 days. Fourteen patients were enrolled onto the study (first step). No objective responses were seen, and evidence of stable disease was observed in only one of the 12 evaluable patients. The most important grade 3-4 side effects were hematological toxicity (neutropenia 64.2%, thrombocytopenia 71.4%, anemia 28.7%), fatigue (50.0%), and stomatitis (21.5%). Median overall survival and time to progression were 5.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.9-7.1) and 2.1 months (95% CI: 1.7-2.8), respectively. The experimental pemetrexed-gemcitabine combination proved to be inactive and moderately toxic. © AlphaMedPress; the data published online to support this summary is the property of the authors.

  9. Child and Adolescent Behavior Inventory (CABI): A New Instrument for Epidemiological Studies and Pre-Clinical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetti, Carlo; Pittau, Andrea; Carta, Valeria; Campus, Grazia; Littarru, Roberta; Ledda, Maria Giuseppina; Zuddas, Alessandro; Fancello, Giuseppina Sannio

    2013-01-01

    Some questionnaires have already been elaborated to collect information from parents of children and adolescents, both as preparation for clinical evaluation and for screening and epidemiological studies. Here a new questionnaire, the CABI, is proposed, and it is validated in a population of 8-10 year-old children. Compared to existing questionnaires, the CABI has been organized so as to be of medium length, with items concerning the most significant symptoms indicated by the DSM-IV-TR for the pertinent disorders, and covering a wider range than existing instruments. There is no charge for its use. The answers of the parents of 302 children in the last 3 years of primary school provided the normative data. A discriminant validation was done for internalizing and externalizing disorders and as a comparison with self-administered anxiety and depression scales. Exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency were also performed. Distribution of scores on the main scales in the normal population shows positive skewness, with the most frequent score being zero. A highly discriminant capability was found in regard to the sample of children with internalizing and externalizing disorders, with high correlation with the self-administered anxiety and depression scales. The CABI appears to be capable, at least for 8-10 year-old children, of effectively discriminating those with pathological symptoms from those without. Compared with the widely- used CBCL, it has the advantages of a lower number of items, which should facilitate parental collaboration especially in epidemiological studies, and of being free of charge.

  10. Distribution based nearest neighbor imputation for truncated high dimensional data with applications to pre-clinical and clinical metabolomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jasmit S; Rai, Shesh N; DeFilippis, Andrew P; Hill, Bradford G; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Brock, Guy N

    2017-02-20

    High throughput metabolomics makes it possible to measure the relative abundances of numerous metabolites in biological samples, which is useful to many areas of biomedical research. However, missing values (MVs) in metabolomics datasets are common and can arise due to both technical and biological reasons. Typically, such MVs are substituted by a minimum value, which may lead to different results in downstream analyses. Here we present a modified version of the K-nearest neighbor (KNN) approach which accounts for truncation at the minimum value, i.e., KNN truncation (KNN-TN). We compare imputation results based on KNN-TN with results from other KNN approaches such as KNN based on correlation (KNN-CR) and KNN based on Euclidean distance (KNN-EU). Our approach assumes that the data follow a truncated normal distribution with the truncation point at the detection limit (LOD). The effectiveness of each approach was analyzed by the root mean square error (RMSE) measure as well as the metabolite list concordance index (MLCI) for influence on downstream statistical testing. Through extensive simulation studies and application to three real data sets, we show that KNN-TN has lower RMSE values compared to the other two KNN procedures as well as simpler imputation methods based on substituting missing values with the metabolite mean, zero values, or the LOD. MLCI values between KNN-TN and KNN-EU were roughly equivalent, and superior to the other four methods in most cases. Our findings demonstrate that KNN-TN generally has improved performance in imputing the missing values of the different datasets compared to KNN-CR and KNN-EU when there is missingness due to missing at random combined with an LOD. The results shown in this study are in the field of metabolomics but this method could be applicable with any high throughput technology which has missing due to LOD.

  11. Thermal diffusivity and perfusion constants from in vivo MR-guided focussed ultrasound treatments: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Christopher R; Rieke, Viola; Ghanouni, Pejman; Payne, Allison

    2017-06-26

    This study investigates the feasibility of non-invasively determining thermal diffusivity (α) and the Pennes perfusion parameter (w) from pre-clinical and clinical magnetic resonance-guided focussed ultrasound (MRgFUS) temperature data. Pre-clinical MRgFUS experiments were performed in rabbit muscle (N = 3, 28 sonications) using three-dimensional MR thermometry. Eight sonications were made in a clinical QA phantom with two-dimensional thermometry. Retrospective property determination was performed on clinical uterine fibroid (N = 8, 9 sonications) and desmoid tumour (N = 4, 7 sonications) data. The property determination method fits an analytical solution to MRgFUS temperatures in the coronal MR plane, including all temperatures acquired during heating and one cooling image. When possible, additional cooling data were acquired for property determination. Rabbit α and w from Heating Data (α = 0.164 mm2s-1, w = 7.9 kg m-3 s-1) and Heating and Cooling Data (α = 0.146 mm2s-1, w = 3.3 kg m-3 s-1) were within the range of gold-standard invasive measurements, with >50% reduction in variability by including cooling data. QA phantom property determination with cooling data yielded properties within 3% of expected values (α = 0.144 mm2s-1, w = 0.0 kg m-3 s-1), a difference that was not statistically significant (p = 0.053). Uterine fibroid (Heating Data: α = 0.212 mm2s-1, w = 11.0 kg m-3 s-1) and desmoid tumour (Heating & Cooling Data: α = 0.245 mm2s-1, w = 4.7 kg m-3 s-1) properties are feasible but lack independent verification. Thermal diffusivity and the Pennes perfusion parameter can be obtained from in vivo data and with clinical MRgFUS protocols. Property values are consistently improved by including cooling data. The utility of this property determination method will increase as clinical protocols implement improved temperature imaging.

  12. A Metadata Analysis of Oxidative Stress Etiology in Preclinical Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Benefits of Antioxidant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Bond

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, induced by an imbalance of free radicals, incites neurodegeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS. In fact, a mutation in antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 accounts for 20% of familial ALS cases. However, the variance among individual studies examining ALS oxidative stress clouds corresponding conclusions. Therefore, we construct a comprehensive, temporal view of oxidative stress and corresponding antioxidant therapy in preclinical ALS by mining published quantitative experimental data and performing metadata analysis of 41 studies. In vitro aggregate analysis of innate oxidative stress inducers, glutamate and hydrogen peroxide, revealed 70–90% of cell death coincides to inducer exposure equivalent to 30–50% peak concentration (p < 0.05. A correlative plateau in cell death suggests oxidative stress impact is greatest in early-stage neurodegeneration. In vivo SOD1-G93A transgenic ALS mouse aggregate analysis of heat shock proteins (HSPs revealed HSP levels are 30% lower in muscle than spine (p < 0.1. Overall spine HSP levels, including HSP70, are mildly upregulated in SOD1-G93A mice compared to wild type, but not significantly (p > 0.05. Thus, innate HSP compensatory responses to oxidative stress are simply insufficient, a result supportive of homeostatic system instability as central to ALS etiology. In vivo aggregate analysis of antioxidant therapy finds SOD1-G93A ALS mouse survival duration significantly increases by 11.2% (p << 0.001 but insignificantly decreases onset age by 2%. Thus, the aggregate antioxidant treatment effect on survival in preclinical ALS is not sufficient to overcome clinical heterogeneity, which explains the literature disparity between preclinical and clinical antioxidant survival benefit. The aggregate effect sizes on preclinical ALS survival and onset illustrate that present antioxidants, alone, are not sufficient to halt ALS, which underscores its multi-factorial nature

  13. The methodological quality assessment tools for preclinical and clinical studies, systematic review and meta-analysis, and clinical practice guideline: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiantao; Zhang, Yonggang; Kwong, Joey S W; Zhang, Chao; Li, Sheng; Sun, Feng; Niu, Yuming; Du, Liang

    2015-02-01

    To systematically review the methodological assessment tools for pre-clinical and clinical studies, systematic review and meta-analysis, and clinical practice guideline. We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Reviewers Manual, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP), Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN), and the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) up to May 20th, 2014. Two authors selected studies and extracted data; quantitative analysis was performed to summarize the characteristics of included tools. We included a total of 21 assessment tools for analysis. A number of tools were developed by academic organizations, and some were developed by only a small group of researchers. The JBI developed the highest number of methodological assessment tools, with CASP coming second. Tools for assessing the methodological quality of randomized controlled studies were most abundant. The Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias is the best available tool for assessing RCTs. For cohort and case-control studies, we recommend the use of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS) is an excellent tool for assessing non-randomized interventional studies, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (ARHQ) methodology checklist is applicable for cross-sectional studies. For diagnostic accuracy test studies, the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2) tool is recommended; the SYstematic Review Centre for Laboratory animal Experimentation (SYRCLE) risk of bias tool is available for assessing animal studies; Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) is a measurement tool for systematic reviews/meta-analyses; an 18-item tool has been developed for appraising case series studies, and the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation (AGREE

  14. Preclinical safety and efficacy studies with an affinity-enhanced epithelial junction opener and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Richter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A central treatment resistance mechanism in solid tumors is the maintenance of epithelial junctions between malignant cells that prevent drug penetration into the tumor. We have developed a small recombinant protein (JO-1 that triggers the transient opening of intercellular junctions and thus increases the efficacy of monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapeutic drugs without causing toxicity in mouse tumor models. Here, we provide data toward the clinical translation of an affinity-enhanced version of JO-1, which we call JO-4, in combination with PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD/Doxil for ovarian cancer therapy. We have presented X-ray crystallography data suggesting a structural basis for the higher affinity of JO-4 to DSG2. We also confirmed JO-4 efficacy in a xenograft model with primary ovarian cancer cells showing that JO-4 can salvage Doxil therapy when given at a dose that was threefold lower than the therapeutic dose. Furthermore, we tested the safety of intravenous JO-4 alone and in combination with Doxil in Macaca fascicularis, an adequate animal model for predicting toxicity in humans. Our studies did not show critical JO-4-related toxicity or an increase of Doxil-related side effects. Our efficacy and safety data will help to support an Investigational new drug-filing for a JO-4/Doxil combination treatment.

  15. Resilience to the effects of social stress: Evidence from clinical and preclinical studies on the role of coping strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susan K.; Bhatnagar, Seema

    2014-01-01

    The most common form of stress encountered by people stems from one's social environment and is perceived as more intense than other types of stressors. One feature that may be related to differential resilience or vulnerability to stress is the type of strategy used to cope with the stressor, either active or passive coping. This review focuses on models of social stress in which individual differences in coping strategies produce resilience or vulnerability to the effects of stress. Neurobiological mechanisms underlying these individual differences are discussed. Overall, the literature suggests that there are multiple neural mechanisms that underlie individual differences in stress-induced resilience and vulnerability. How these mechanisms interact with one another to produce a resilient or vulnerable phenotype is not understood and such mechanisms have been poorly studied in females and in early developmental periods. Finally, we propose that resilience may be stress context specific and resilience phenotypes may need to be fine-tuned to suit a shifting environment. PMID:25580450

  16. 337 Expansion of Dendritic Cells Using FLT3 Ligand to Treat Glioblastoma: A Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzon-Muvdi, Tomas; Mangraviti, Antonella; Theodros, Debebe; Kim, Eileen; Yellin, Michael Jay; Marsh, Henry; Lim, Michael

    2016-08-01

    FLT3L induces expansion and recruitment of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) into the brain. By increasing antigen presentation, FLT3L agonists may enhance an immune response against glioblastoma (GBM). Previous results suggest that the antitumor response generated by FLT3 is secondary to production of interferon gamma. We studied the effect of FLT3L treatment of mice with a syngeneic GBM model. Under ACUC approval, 32 mice underwent implantation of 130 000 GL261 cells in the left striatum using a stereotactic frame. The presence of tumor was confirmed by bioluminescence imaging at day 7. Mice were randomly assigned to 4 groups: Control, FLT3 (courtesy of Celldex) treatment, Poly IC treatment, and FLT3+Poly IC treatment. Survival was assessed using log-rank analysis and described using Kaplan-Meier curves. A survival experiment demonstrated that FLT3L treatment of mice resulted in 50% long-term survival of mice and improved survival compared with control groups (P = .001). Addition of Poly IC (TLR3 agonist), did not add survival benefit. The present work suggests that an increase in antigen presentation by enhancing and recruiting dendritic cells into the brain and brain tumor may be beneficial and a potential therapeutic strategy for patients with GBM. The mechanism of this phenomenon is currently under investigation, but includes increased secretion of interferon gamma. Additionally, increased antigen presentation may aid the immune system mount a significant antitumor immune response. Further experiments evaluating the proportion of T cells that have been exposed to antigen are currently underway.

  17. Does standoff material affect acoustic radiation force impulse elastography? A preclinical study of a modified elastography phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerieth, Katharina; Gaßmann, Bernhard; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Kemmner, Stephan; Heemann, Uwe; Stock, Konrad Friedrich

    2017-07-28

    This study was conducted to determine the influence of standoff material on acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) measurements in an elasticity phantom by using two different probes. Using ARFI elastography, 10 observers measured the shear wave velocity (SWV, m/sec) in different lesions of an elasticity phantom with a convex 4C1 probe and a linear 9L4 probe. The experimental setup was expanded by the use of an interposed piece of porcine muscle as standoff material. The probe pressure on the phantom was registered. Faulty ARFI measurements occurred more often when quantifying the hardest lesion (74.0 kPa 4.97 m/sec) by the 9L4 probe with the porcine muscle as a standoff material interposed between the probe and the phantom. The success rate for ARFI measurements in these series was 52.4%, compared with 99.5% in the other series. The SWV values measured with the 9L4 probe were significantly higher (3.33±1.39 m/sec vs. 2.60±0.74 m/sec, Pmaterial were lower than those without the muscle (significant for 9L4, P=0.040). The deviation from the reference value and the variance increased significantly with the 9L4 probe if the muscle was in situ (B=0.27, P=0.004 and B=0.32, Pstudy, the pressure exerted by the operator had no effect on the SWV values. The presence of porcine muscle acting as a standoff material influenced the occurrence of failed measurements as well as the variance and the accuracy of the measured values. The linear high-frequency probe was particularly affected.

  18. A Novel Inherently Radiopaque Bead for Transarterial Embolization to Treat Liver Cancer - A Pre-clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Rafael; Sharma, Karun; Dreher, Matthew R; Ashrafi, Koorosh; Mirpour, Sahar; Lin, MingDe; Schernthaner, Ruediger E; Schlachter, Todd R; Tacher, Vania; Lewis, Andrew L; Willis, Sean; den Hartog, Mark; Radaelli, Alessandro; Negussie, Ayele H; Wood, Bradford J; Geschwind, Jean-François H

    2016-01-01

    Embolotherapy using microshperes is currently performed with soluble contrast to aid in visualization. However, administered payload visibility dimishes soon after delivery due to soluble contrast washout, leaving the radiolucent bead's location unknown. The objective of our study was to characterize inherently radiopaque beads (RO Beads) in terms of physicomechanical properties, deliverability and imaging visibility in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. RO Beads, which are based on LC Bead® platform, were compared to LC Bead. Bead size (light microscopy), equilibrium water content (EWC), density, X-ray attenuation and iodine distribution (micro-CT), suspension (settling times), deliverability and in vitro penetration were investigated. Fifteen rabbits were embolized with either LC Bead or RO Beads + soluble contrast (iodixanol-320), or RO Beads+dextrose. Appearance was evaluated with fluoroscopy, X-ray single shot, cone-beam CT (CBCT). Both bead types had a similar size distribution. RO Beads had lower EWC (60-72%) and higher density (1.21-1.36 g/cc) with a homogeneous iodine distribution within the bead's interior. RO Beads suspension time was shorter than LC Bead, with durable suspension (>5 min) in 100% iodixanol. RO Beads ≤300 µm were deliverable through a 2.3-Fr microcatheter. Both bead types showed similar penetration. Soluble contrast could identify target and non-target embolization on fluoroscopy during administration. However, the imaging appearance vanished quickly for LC Bead as contrast washed-out. RO Beads+contrast significantly increased visibility on X-ray single shot compared to LC Bead+contrast in target and non-target arteries (P=0.0043). Similarly, RO beads demonstrated better visibility on CBCT in target arteries (P=0.0238) with a trend in non-target arteries (P=0.0519). RO Beads+dextrose were not sufficiently visible to monitor embolization using fluoroscopy. RO Beads provide better conspicuity to determine target and non-target embolization

  19. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Mice Models to Study Blastocystis spp. Adhesion, Colonization and Pathology: Closer to Proving Koch's Postulates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitara S R Ajjampur

    Full Text Available Blastocystis spp. are widely prevalent extra cellular, non-motile anerobic protists that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. Although Blastocystis spp. have been associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome and urticaria, their clinical significance has remained controversial. We established an ex vivo mouse explant model to characterize adhesion in the context of tissue architecture and presence of the mucin layer. Using confocal microscopy with tissue whole mounts and two axenic isolates of Blastocystis spp., subtype 7 with notable differences in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC, isolate B (ST7-B and isolate H (more adhesive, ST7-H, we showed that adhesion is both isolate dependent and tissue trophic. The more adhesive isolate, ST7-H was found to bind preferentially to the colon tissue than caecum and terminal ileum. Both isolates were also found to have mucinolytic effects. We then adapted a DSS colitis mouse model as a susceptible model to study colonization and acute infection by intra-caecal inoculation of trophic Blastocystis spp.cells. We found that the more adhesive isolate ST7-H was also a better colonizer with more mice shedding parasites and for a longer duration than ST7-B. Adhesion and colonization was also associated with increased virulence as ST7-H infected mice showed greater tissue damage than ST7-B. Both the ex vivo and in vivo models used in this study showed that Blastocystis spp. remain luminal and predominantly associated with mucin. This was further confirmed using colonic loop experiments. We were also successfully able to re-infect a second batch of mice with ST7-H isolates obtained from fecal cultures and demonstrated similar histopathological findings and tissue damage thereby coming closer to proving Koch's postulates for this parasite.

  20. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Mice Models to Study Blastocystis spp. Adhesion, Colonization and Pathology: Closer to Proving Koch's Postulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajjampur, Sitara S R; Png, Chin Wen; Chia, Wan Ni; Zhang, Yongliang; Tan, Kevin S W

    2016-01-01

    Blastocystis spp. are widely prevalent extra cellular, non-motile anerobic protists that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. Although Blastocystis spp. have been associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome and urticaria, their clinical significance has remained controversial. We established an ex vivo mouse explant model to characterize adhesion in the context of tissue architecture and presence of the mucin layer. Using confocal microscopy with tissue whole mounts and two axenic isolates of Blastocystis spp., subtype 7 with notable differences in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), isolate B (ST7-B) and isolate H (more adhesive, ST7-H), we showed that adhesion is both isolate dependent and tissue trophic. The more adhesive isolate, ST7-H was found to bind preferentially to the colon tissue than caecum and terminal ileum. Both isolates were also found to have mucinolytic effects. We then adapted a DSS colitis mouse model as a susceptible model to study colonization and acute infection by intra-caecal inoculation of trophic Blastocystis spp.cells. We found that the more adhesive isolate ST7-H was also a better colonizer with more mice shedding parasites and for a longer duration than ST7-B. Adhesion and colonization was also associated with increased virulence as ST7-H infected mice showed greater tissue damage than ST7-B. Both the ex vivo and in vivo models used in this study showed that Blastocystis spp. remain luminal and predominantly associated with mucin. This was further confirmed using colonic loop experiments. We were also successfully able to re-infect a second batch of mice with ST7-H isolates obtained from fecal cultures and demonstrated similar histopathological findings and tissue damage thereby coming closer to proving Koch's postulates for this parasite.

  1. Laser welding to assist penetrating keratoplasty: in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menabuoni, Luca; Mincione, F.; Mincione, G. P.; Pini, Roberto

    1998-01-01

    Laser-induced corneal welding has been tested in vivo to perform experimental trials of penetrating keratoplasty (corneal transplantation). Twenty rabbits of 2500 - 3500 g in weight were selected to undergo laser-assisted corneal transplantation and then subjected to follow up on 2 - 15 postoperative days. Good sealing along the entire cut length was obtained soon after the surgical operation. Histology examinations evidenced that the laser-assisted surgical procedure provides a satisfactory healing process of corneal tissue in times that are substantially shorter than those of the conventional procedure.

  2. Preclinical Efficacy Testing in Middle-Aged Rats: Nicotinamide, a Novel Neuroprotectant, Demonstrates Diminished Preclinical Efficacy after Controlled Cortical Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, Alicia A.; Chandrashekar, Rupa; Beare, Jason; Hoane, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Age is a consistent predictor of poor outcome following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although the elderly population has one of the highest rates of TBI-related hospitalization and death, few preclinical studies have attempted to model and treat TBI in the aged population. Recent studies have indicated that nicotinamide (NAM), a soluble B-group vitamin, improved functional recovery in experimental models of TBI in young animals. The purpose of the present study was to examine the preclinical...

  3. SU-D-304-04: Pre-Clinical Feasibility Study for Intensity Modulated Grid Proton Therapy (IMgPT) Using a Newly Developed Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiamas, P; Moskvin, V; Shin, J; Axente, M; Pirlepesov, F; Krasin, M; Merchant, T; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to characterize and evaluate intensity-modulated proton grid therapy (IMgPT) using a clinical proton beam. Methods: A TOPAS MC model of a new developmental mode (pre-clinical) of the Hitachi proton therapy system (PROBEAT) was used for simulation and characterization of proton grid therapy. TOPAS simulations of different energy ranges, depths and spot separation distances were performed. LET spectra for various energies and depths were produced with FLUKA MC code for evaluation potential interplay between planning parameters and their effect on the characterization of areas (valley) between spots. IMgPT planning aspects (spot spacing, skin dose, peak-to-valley ratios, beam selection, etc.) were evaluated for different phantom and patient cases. Raysearch software (v4.51) was used to perform the evaluation. Results: Calculated beam peak-to-valley ratios scenarios showed strong energy and depth dependence with ratios to be larger for higher energies and shallower depths. Peak-to-valley ratios for R90 range and for spot spacing of 1cm varied from 30% (E = 221.3 MeV, depth 30.6 cm) to 80% (E = 70.3 MeV, depth 4 cm). LET spectra calculations showed spectral hardening with depth, which might potential increase, spot separation distance and improve peak-to-valley ratios. IMgPT optimization, using constant spot spacing, showed skin dose reduction between peak regions of dose due to the irradiation of less skin. Single beam for bulky shallower tumors might be a potential candidate for proton grid therapy. Conclusions: Proton grid therapy using a clinical beam is a promising technique that reduces skin dose between peak regions of dose and may be suitable for the treatment of shallow tumors. IMgPT may be considered for use when bystander effects in off peak regions would be appropriate.

  4. Initial testing (stage 1) of the notch inhibitor PF-03084014, by the pediatric preclinical testing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol, Hernan; Maris, John M; Kang, Min H; Reynolds, C Patrick; Kolb, E Anders; Gorlick, Richard; Keir, Stephen T; Wu, Jianrong; Kurmasheva, Raushan T; Houghton, Peter J; Smith, Malcolm A; Lock, Richard B; Lyalin, Dmitry

    2014-08-01

    PF-03084014, a γ-secretase inhibitor, was tested against the PPTP in vitro cell line panel (1.0 nM to 10 μM) and against the in vivo xenograft panels (administered orally twice daily on Days 1-7 and 15-21). PF-03084014 demonstrated limited in vitro activity, with no cell line achieving ≥50% inhibition. PF-03084014 induced significant differences in EFS distribution in 14 of 35 (40%) solid tumor xenografts, and 1 of 9 ALL xenografts (which lacked a NOTCH1 mutation), but objective responses were not observed. PF-03084014 demonstrated limited single agent activity in vitro and in vivo against the pediatric preclinical models studied. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Preclinical Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that brain tumors, including glioblastoma multiforme, contain a subpopulation of cancer cells that display stem cell ...point to multinucleated giant cells ; and arrows in E and F indicate re- active astrocytes. J: Survival curves of Mut1, Mut2, Mut3, and p53 null (p53...in myelinating oligodendro- cytes (Figure 8J, arrows). These data support the model that, in vivo, glioblastoma cells have the stem cell capacity to

  6. Experimental Design and Data Analysis of In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ying; Lin, Hui-Min

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to provide researchers who conduct in vivo fluorescence imaging studies with guidance in statistical aspects in the experimental design and data analysis of such studies. In the first half of this chapter, we introduce the key statistical components for designing a sound in vivo experiment. Particular emphasis is placed on the issues and designs that pertain to fluorescence imaging studies. Examples representing several popular types of fluorescence imaging experiments are provided as case studies to demonstrate how to appropriately design such studies. In the second half of this chapter, we explain the fundamental statistical concepts and methods used in the data analysis of typical in vivo experiments. We also provide specific examples in in vivo imaging studies to illustrate the key steps of analysis procedure.

  7. Preclinical assessment of infant formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Infant formulas are the sole or predominant source of nutrition for many infants and are fed during a sensitive period of development and may therefore have short- and long-term consequences for infant health. Preclinical safety assessment therefore needs to include both short-term and long-term studies in animals. It is recommended that procedures are instituted by which experts may serve as independent scientists for companies developing novel products, without having their integrity compromised, and later serve the legislative institutions. A two-level assessment approach to determine the potential toxicity of a novel ingredient, its metabolites, and their effects in the matrix on developing organ systems has been suggested by IOM. This appears reasonable, as novel ingredients can be of different levels of concern. The use of modern methods in genomics and proteomics should be considered in these evaluation processes as well as novel methods to evaluate outcomes, including metabolomics and molecular techniques to assess the microbiome. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Lipid nanoparticles for transdermal delivery of flurbiprofen: formulation, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Vobalaboina

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of the study is to prepare aqueous dispersions of lipid nanoparticles – flurbiprofen solid lipid nanoparticles (FLUSLN and flurbiprofen nanostructured lipid carriers (FLUNLC by hot homogenization followed by sonication technique and then incorporated into the freshly prepared hydrogels for transdermal delivery. They are characterized for particle size, for all the formulations, more than 50% of the particles were below 300 nm after 90 days of storage at RT. DSC analyses were performed to characterize the state of drug and lipid modification. Shape and surface morphology were determined by TEM which revealed fairly spherical shape of the formulations. Further they were evaluated for in vitro drug release characteristics, rheological behaviour, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. The pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen in rats following application of SLN gel (A1 and NLC gel (B1 for 24 h were evaluated. The Cmax of the B1 formulation was 38.67 ± 2.77 μg/ml, which was significantly higher than the A1 formulation (Cmax = 21.79 ± 2.96 μg/ml. The Cmax and AUC of the B1 formulation were 1.8 and 2.5 times higher than the A1 gel formulation respectively. The bioavailability of flurbiprofen with reference to oral administration was found to increase by 4.4 times when gel formulations were applied. Anti-inflammatory effect in the Carrageenan-induced paw edema in rat was significantly higher for B1 and A1 formulation than the orally administered flurbiprofen. Both the SLN and NLC dispersions and gels enriched with SLN and NLC possessed a sustained drug release over period of 24 h but the sustained effect was more pronounced with the SLN and NLC gel

  9. CD40 ligand is necessary and sufficient to support primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells in culture: a tool for in vitro preclinical studies with primary B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Frantz, Aric M; Williams, Christina; Thomas, Rachael; Burnett, Robert C; Avery, Anne C; Breen, Matthew; Mason, Nicola J; O'Brien, Timothy D; Modiano, Jaime F

    2012-07-01

    Established cell lines are utilized extensively to study tumor biology and preclinical therapeutic development. However, they may not accurately recapitulate the heterogeneity of their corresponding primary disease. B-cell tumor cells are especially difficult to maintain under conventional culture conditions, limiting access to samples that faithfully represent this disease for preclinical studies. Here, we used primary canine diffuse large B-cell lymphoma to establish a culture system that reliably supports the growth of these cells. CD40 ligand, either expressed by feeder cells or provided as a soluble two-trimeric form, was sufficient to support primary lymphoma cells in vitro. The tumor cells retained their original phenotype, clonality and known karyotypic abnormalities after extended expansion in culture. Finally, we illustrate the utility of the feeder cell-free culture system for comparable assessment of cytotoxicity using dog and human B-cell malignancies. We conclude that this system has broad applications for in vitro preclinical development for B-cell malignancies.

  10. Preclinical electrogastrography in experimental pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Květina, Jaroslav; Varayil, Jithinraj Edakkanambeth; Ali, Shahzad Marghoob; Kuneš, Martin; Bureš, Jan; Tachecí, Ilja; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kopáčová, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Surface electrogastrography (EGG) is a non-invasive means of recording gastric myoelectric activity or slow waves from cutaneous leads placed over the stomach. This paper provides a comprehensive review of preclinical EGG. Our group recently set up and worked out the methods for EGG in experimental pigs. We gained our initial experience in the use of EGG in assessment of porcine gastric myoelectric activity after volume challenge and after intragastric administration of itopride and erythromycin. The mean dominant frequency in pigs is comparable with that found in humans. EGG in experimental pigs is feasible. Experimental EGG is an important basis for further preclinical projects in pharmacology and toxicology. PMID:21217873

  11. Bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 containing lumbrokinase isolated from Lumbricus rubellus: ex vivo, in vivo, and pharmaceutic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjandrawinata, Raymond R; Trisina, Jessica; Rahayu, Puji; Prasetya, Lorentius Agung; Hanafiah, Aang; Rachmawati, Heni

    2014-01-01

    DLBS1033 is a bioactive protein fraction isolated from Lumbricus rubellus that tends to be unstable when exposed to the gastrointestinal environment. Accordingly, appropriate pharmaceutical development is needed to maximize absorption of the protein fraction in the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo stability assays were performed to study the stability of the bioactive protein fraction in gastric conditions. The bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 was found to be unstable at low pH and in gastric fluid. The "enteric coating" formulation showed no leakage in gastric fluid-like medium and possessed a good release profile in simulated intestinal medium. DLBS1033 was absorbed through the small intestine in an intact protein form, confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) analysis. This result confirmed that an enteric coating formula using methacrylic acid copolymer could protect DLBS1033 from the acidic condition of the stomach by preventing the release of DLBS1033 in the stomach, while promoting its release when reaching the intestine. From the blood concentration-versus-time curve, (99m)Tc-DLBS1033 showed a circulation half-life of 70 minutes. This relatively long biological half-life supports its function as a thrombolytic protein. Thus, an enteric delivery system is considered the best approach for DLBS1033 as an oral thrombolytic agent.

  12. International symposium on in vivo body composition studies: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This booklet contains the program and individual abstracts for papers presented at the International symposium on in vivo body composition studies. The presentations were divided into five sessions. Individual abstracts were indexed for the Energy Data Base. (DT)

  13. Ex-vivo permeation study of chlorin e6-polyvinylpyrrolidone complexes through the chick chorioallantoic membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutoprapat, Romchat; Chan, Lai W; Heng, Paul W S

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the influence of the hydrophilic polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the ex-vivo permeability of the poorly water-soluble photosensitizer, chlorin e6 (Ce6) using the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. The CAM was removed from the fertilized chicken egg at embryo age of 15 days. The permeation profiles of Ce6 and PVP complexes (Ce6-PVP) at 1:0, 1:1, 1:10, 1:50 and 1:100 w/w in different pH conditions were first studied using the CAM model with Franz diffusion cell over 8 h. The solution viscosity of the formulations and apparent solubility of Ce6 were also investigated. The permeability of Ce6 was found to be directly proportional to the amount of PVP used and the apparent solubility of Ce6. Permeability was only marginally affected by the solution viscosity of the formulations. The permeability of Ce6 was lowered in the acidic pH. Ce6-PVP at 1:100 w/w gave the highest percentage release of Ce6 across the CAM, with 23% at pH 3 and 55% at pH 7.4, after 8 h, respectively. The present work suggests that PVP had served as penetration enhancer for the poorly water-soluble Ce6 and the CAM can serve as a useful biological membrane model for preclinical permeability study of biological and pharmaceutical substances. The Ce6-PVP formulation at 1:100 w/w can be applied for the further clinical investigation. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Preclinical evaluation and test-retest studies of [{sup 18}F]PSS232, a novel radioligand for targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu{sub 5})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milicevic Sephton, Selena; Mueller Herde, Adrienne; Keller, Claudia; Ruedisuehli, Sonja; Schibli, Roger; Kraemer, Stefanie D.; Ametamey, Simon M. [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences of ETH, PSI and USZ, Zurich (Switzerland); Mu, Linjing [University Hospital Zuerich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zuerich (Switzerland); Auberson, Yves [Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-01-15

    A novel, {sup 18}F-labelled metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu{sub 5}) derivative of [{sup 11}C]ABP688 ([{sup 11}C]1), [{sup 18}F]PSS232 ([{sup 18}F]5), was evaluated in vitro and in vivo for its potential as a PET agent and was used in test-retest reliability studies The radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]5 was accomplished via a one-step reaction using a mesylate precursor. In vitro stability was determined in PBS and plasma, and with liver microsomal enzymes. Metabolite studies were performed using rat brain extracts, blood and urine. In vitro autoradiography was performed on horizontal slices of rat brain using 1 and 8, antagonists for mGlu{sub 5} and mGlu{sub 1}, respectively. Small-animal PET, biodistribution, and test-retest studies were performed in Wistar rats. In vivo, dose-dependent displacement studies were performed using 6 and blocking studies with 7. [{sup 18}F]5 was obtained in decay-corrected maximal radiochemical yield of 37 % with a specific activity of 80 - 400 GBq/μmol. Treatment with rat and human microsomal enzymes in vitro for 60 min resulted in 20 % and 4 % of hydrophilic radiometabolites, respectively. No hydrophilic decomposition products or radiometabolites were found in PBS or plasma. In vitro autoradiography on rat brain slices showed a heterogeneous distribution consistent with the known distribution of mGlu{sub 5} with high binding to hippocampal and cortical regions, and negligible radioactivity in the cerebellum. Similar distribution of radioactivity was found in PET images. Under displacement conditions with 6, reduced [{sup 18}F]5 binding was found in all brain regions except the cerebellum. 7 reduced binding in the striatum by 84 % on average. Test-retest studies were reproducible with a variability ranging from 6.8 % to 8.2 %. An extended single-dose toxicity study in Wistar rats showed no compound-related adverse effects. The new mGlu{sub 5} radiotracer, [{sup 18}F]5, showed specific and selective in vitro and in vivo

  15. The 4-vessel Sampling Approach to Integrative Studies of Human Placental Physiology In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Ane M; Holm, Maia B; Roland, Marie C P; Horne, Hildegunn; Michelsen, Trond M; Haugen, Guttorm; Henriksen, Tore

    2017-08-02

    The human placenta is highly inaccessible for research while still in utero. The current understanding of human placental physiology in vivo is therefore largely based on animal studies, despite the high diversity among species in placental anatomy, hemodynamics and duration of the pregnancy. The vast majority of human placenta studies are ex vivo perfusion studies or in vitro trophoblast studies. Although in vitro studies and animal models are essential, extrapolation of the results from such studies to the human placenta in vivo is uncertain. We aimed to study human placenta physiology in vivo at term, and present a detailed protocol of the method. Exploiting the intraabdominal access to the uterine vein just before the uterine incision during planned cesarean section, we collect blood samples from the incoming and outgoing vessels on the maternal and fetal sides of the placenta. When combining concentration measurements from blood samples with volume blood flow measurements, we are able to quantify placental and fetal uptake and release of any compound. Furthermore, placental tissue samples from the same mother-fetus pairs can provide measurements of transporter density and activity and other aspects of placental functions in vivo. Through this integrative use of the 4-vessel sampling method we are able to test some of the current concepts of placental nutrient transfer and metabolism in vivo, both in normal and pathological pregnancies. Furthermore, this method enables the identification of substances secreted by the placenta to the maternal circulation, which could be an important contribution to the search for biomarkers of placenta dysfunction.

  16. Evaluation of bioaccumulation using in vivo laboratory and field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, Annie V; Woodburn, Kent B; Koelmans, Albert A; Parkerton, Thomas F; McElroy, Anne E; Borgå, Katrine

    2009-10-01

    A primary consideration in the evaluation of chemicals is the potential for substances to be absorbed and retained in an organism's tissues (i.e., bioaccumulated) at concentrations sufficient to pose health concerns. Substances that exhibit properties that enable biomagnification in the food chain (i.e., amplification of tissue concentrations at successive trophic levels) are of particular concern due to the elevated long-term exposures these substances pose to higher trophic organisms, including humans. Historically, biomarkers of in vivo chemical exposure (e.g., eggshell thinning, bill deformities) retrospectively led to the identification of such compounds, which were later categorized as persistent organic pollutants. Today, multiple bioaccumulation metrics are available to quantitatively assess the bioaccumulation potential of new and existing chemicals and identify substances that, upon or before environmental release, may be characterized as persistent organic pollutants. This paper reviews the various in vivo measurement approaches that can be used to assess the bioaccumulation of chemicals in aquatic or terrestrial species using laboratory-exposed, field-deployed, or collected organisms. Important issues associated with laboratory measurements of bioaccumulation include appropriate test species selection, test chemical dosing methods, exposure duration, and chemical and statistical analyses. Measuring bioaccumulation at a particular field site requires consideration of which test species to use and whether to examine natural populations or to use field-deployed populations. Both laboratory and field methods also require reliable determination of chemical concentrations in exposure media of interest (i.e., water, sediment, food or prey, etc.), accumulated body residues, or both. The advantages and disadvantages of various laboratory and field bioaccumulation metrics for assessing biomagnification potential in aquatic or terrestrial food chains are discussed

  17. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging System for in Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinuddin Hassan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a fluorescence lifetime imaging system for small animals is presented. Data were collected by scanning a region of interest with a measurement head, a linear fiber array with fixed separations between a single source fiber and several detection fibers. The goal was to localize tumors and monitor their progression using specific fluorescent markers. We chose a near-infrared contrast agent, Alexa Fluor 750 (Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA. Preliminary results show that the fluorescence lifetime for this dye was sensitive to the immediate environment of the fluorophore (in particular, pH, making it a promising candidate for reporting physiologic changes around a fluorophore. To quantify the intrinsic lifetime of deeply embedded fluorophores, we performed phantom experiments to investigate the contribution of photon migration effects on observed lifetime by calculating the fluorescence intensity decay time. A previously proposed theoretical model of migration, based on random walk theory, is also substantiated by new experimental data. The developed experimental system has been used for in vivo mouse imaging with Alexa Fluor 750 contrast agent conjugated to tumor-specific antibodies (trastuzumab [Herceptin]. Three-dimensional mapping of the fluorescence lifetime indicates lower lifetime values in superficial breast cancer tumors in mice.

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Therapy Provides Cardioprotection Via Control of Post-Ischemic Inflammation: An Experimental Study in a Pre-Clinical Pig Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, Rabea; Lange, Philipp; Petersen, Björn; Gottlieb, Elena; Ng, Judy King Man; Finger, Stefanie; Horstkotte, Jan; Lee, Seungmin; Thormann, Michael; Knorr, Maike; El-Aouni, Chiraz; Boekstegers, Peter; Reichart, Bruno; Wenzel, Philip; Niemann, Heiner; Kupatt, Christian

    2015-07-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible stress-responsive enzyme converting heme to bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and free iron, which exerts anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects. Although efficient cardioprotection after HO-1 overexpression has been reported in rodents, its role in attenuating post-ischemic inflammation is unclear. This study assessed the efficacy of recombinant adenoassociated virus (rAAV)-encoding human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) in attenuating post-ischemic inflammation in a murine and a porcine ischemia/reperfusion model. Murine ischemia was induced by 45 min of left anterior descending occlusion, followed by 24 h of reperfusion and functional as well as fluorescent-activated cell sorting analysis. Porcine hearts were subjected to 60 min of ischemia and 24h of reperfusion before hemodynamic and histologic analyses were performed. Human microvascular endothelial cells transfected with hHO-1 displayed an attenuated interleukin-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression, resulting in reduced monocytic THP-1 cell recruitment in vitro. In murine left anterior descending occlusion and reperfusion, the post-ischemic influx of CD45(+) leukocytes, Ly-6G(+) neutrophils, and Ly-6C(high) monocytes was further exacerbated in HO-1-deficient hearts and reversed by rAAV.hHO-1 treatment. Conversely, in our porcine model of ischemia, the post-ischemic influx of myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophils and CD14(+) monocytes was reduced by 49% and 87% after rAAV.hHO-1 transduction, similar to hHO-1 transgenic pigs. Functionally, rAAV.hHO-1 and hHO-1 transgenic left ventricles displayed a smaller loss of ejection fraction than control animals. Whereas HO-1 deficiency exacerbates post-ischemic cardiac inflammation in mice, hHO-1 gene therapy attenuates inflammation after ischemia and reperfusion in murine and porcine hearts. Regional hHO-1 gene therapy provides cardioprotection in a pre-clinical porcine ischemia/reperfusion model. Copyright © 2015 American

  19. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON INFLAMMATION : II. EXPERIMENTAL CHEMICAL INFLAMMATION IN VIVO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, E P

    1923-03-31

    1. None of the salts tested produce a marked inflammation in vivo in concentrations under 10 per cent. Potassium salts and the different citrates produced atypical inflammatory reactions in mice, but not in frogs. There was no true inflammation, however, characterized by blood vessel changes, migration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and erythrocytes, and fluid exudation. 2. Synergistic action occurs when equal parts of strontium and magnesium salts are employed. There is a change in the appearance of the mesentery without a true inflammation, and this change does not occur with either salt alone. 3. Amino-acids and amines as a class do not produce inflammation, but histamine produces a marked inflammatory reaction in frogs and mice. 4. Tyramine does not cause an inflammatory reaction but has other marked effects; agglutination thrombi occur within the smaller blood vessels, both veins and arteries; in frogs there is a rapid clumping of the white blood cells followed by a true coagulation with strands of fibrin and entanglement of erythrocytes. This is very widespread and often kills the animal within an hour after injection. In mice it is the erythrocytes that clump and coagulation occurs very much later, usually at the end of 24 hours; still later there is complete absorption of the coagulated masses and the mesenteric circulation returns to normal. None of the mice died during the stage of clumping, and the clots never extended up the larger vessels as they did in the frogs. These effects are similar to the phenomena observed in the in vitro work, in which clumping of the cells appeared constantly. 5. Cantharidinum, histamine, and turpentine produced the most rapid and marked inflammation of any substances tried. These substances are all strongly positively chemotactic in vitro. The differences occurring when these substances are used in different species is a quantitative rather than a qualitative one, the body temperature being of some importance. Papain acted

  20. Kinetics of corneal epithelium turnover in vivo. Studies of lovastatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenedella, R.J.; Fleschner, C.R. (Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, MO (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The authors developed a direct chemical approach for estimating the rate of turnover of the corneal epithelium in vivo. The method was used to examine the effects of lovastatin, a potent inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, on proliferation and turnover of the epithelium. Corneal DNA was labeled by pulse injection (IP) of the rat with 3H-thymidine, and 3H-labeled DNA was recovered from peripheral and central corneas over the next 15 days. Only the epithelium became labeled, and the loss of label by cell desquamation began 3 days after injection. The loss of 3H-DNA from the cornea (peripheral plus central region) followed first-order kinetics. The half-life of the disappearance was about 3 days. The peripheral cornea became more highly labeled than the central cornea and began to lose 3H-DNA before the central cornea. These observations support the possibility of a higher mitotic rate in the peripheral region and the centripetal movement of a population of peripheral epithelial cells in the normal cornea. The half-lives of the disappearance of 3H-DNA from peripheral and central corneas measured between days 5 and 15 postinjection were identical, both at 3 days. Complete turnover of the corneal epithelium would, therefore, require about 2 weeks (4-5 half-lives). Treatment of the rat with lovastatin had no obvious effects upon the proliferation or turnover of the corneal epithelium. Although lovastatin inhibited corneal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the key regulatory enzyme of cholesterol synthesis, the cornea compensated by induction of this enzyme so that there was no net inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in the cornea.

  1. Stratum corneum damage and ex vivo porcine skin water absorption - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch Lynggaard, C; Bang Knudsen, D; Jemec, G B E

    2009-01-01

    A simple ex vivo screening technique would be of interest for mass screening of substances for potential barrier disruptive qualities. Ex vivo water absorption as a marker of skin barrier integrity was studied on pig ear skin. Skin water absorption was quantified by weighing and weight changes were...... found to reflect prehydration barrier damage. It is suggested that this simple model may be elaborated to provide a rapid, economical screening tool for potential skin irritants....

  2. Preclinical medical student observations associated with later professionalism concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Cynthia A; Lambros, M Ann; Atkinson, Hal H; Russell, Greg; Fitch, Michael T

    2017-01-01

    Professionalism is a core physician competency and identifying students at risk for poor professional development early in their careers may allow for mentoring. This study identified indicators in the preclinical years associated with later professionalism concerns. A retrospective analysis of observable indicators in the preclinical and clinical years was conducted using two classes of students (n = 226). Relationships between five potential indicators of poor professionalism in the preclinical years and observations related to professional concerns in the clinical years were analyzed. Fifty-three medical students were identified with at least one preclinical indicator and one professionalism concern during the clinical years. Two observable preclinical indicators were significantly correlated with unprofessional conduct during the clinical years: Three or more absences from attendance-required sessions (odds ratio 4.47; p=.006) and negative peer assessment (odds ratio 3.35; p=.049). We identified two significant observable preclinical indicators associated with later professionalism concerns: excessive absences and negative peer assessments. Early recognition of students at risk for future professionalism struggles would provide an opportunity for proactive professional development prior to the clinical years, when students' permanent records may be affected. Peer assessment, coupled with attention to frequent absences, may be a method to provide early recognition.

  3. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  4. Bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 containing lumbrokinase isolated from Lumbricus rubellus: ex vivo, in vivo, and pharmaceutic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandrawinata RR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Raymond R Tjandrawinata,1 Jessica Trisina,1 Puji Rahayu,1 Lorentius Agung Prasetya,1 Aang Hanafiah,2 Heni Rachmawati3 1Dexa Laboratories of Biomolecular Sciences, Dexa Medica, Cikarang, Indonesia; 2National Nuclear Energy Agency, Bandung, Indonesia; 3School of Pharmacy, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia Abstract: DLBS1033 is a bioactive protein fraction isolated from Lumbricus rubellus that tends to be unstable when exposed to the gastrointestinal environment. Accordingly, appropriate pharmaceutical development is needed to maximize absorption of the protein fraction in the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo stability assays were performed to study the stability of the bioactive protein fraction in gastric conditions. The bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 was found to be unstable at low pH and in gastric fluid. The “enteric coating” formulation showed no leakage in gastric fluid–like medium and possessed a good release profile in simulated intestinal medium. DLBS1033 was absorbed through the small intestine in an intact protein form, confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE analysis. This result confirmed that an enteric coating formula using methacrylic acid copolymer could protect DLBS1033 from the acidic condition of the stomach by preventing the release of DLBS1033 in the stomach, while promoting its release when reaching the intestine. From the blood concentration–versus-time curve, 99mTc-DLBS1033 showed a circulation half-life of 70 minutes. This relatively long biological half-life supports its function as a thrombolytic protein. Thus, an enteric delivery system is considered the best approach for DLBS1033 as an oral thrombolytic agent. Keywords: bioactive protein fraction, enteric coated tablet, pharmacodynamic

  5. A rapid ex vivo tissue model for optimising drug detection and ionisation in MALDI imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, K; Aichler, M; Sun, N; Buck, A; Li, Z; Fernandez, I E; Hauck, S M; Zitzelsberger, H; Eickelberg, O; Janssen, K P; Keller, U; Walch, A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish an ex vivo model for a faster optimisation of sample preparation procedures, for example matrix choice, in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) drug imaging studies. The ionisation properties of four drugs, afatinib, erlotinib, irinotecan and pirfenidone, were determined in an ex vivo tissue experiment by spotting decreasing dilution series onto liver sections. Hereby, the drug signals were distinctly detectable using different matrix compounds, which allowed the selection of the optimal matrix for each drug. The analysis of afatinib and erlotinib yielded high drug signals with α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid matrix, whereas 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid was identified as optimal matrix for irinotecan and pirfenidone detection. Our method was validated by a MALDI drug imaging approach of in vivo treated mouse tissue resulting in corresponding findings, indicating the spotting method as an appropriate approach to determine the matrix of choice. The present study shows the accordance between the detection of ex vivo spotted drugs and in vivo administered drugs by MALDI-TOF and MALDI-FT-ICR imaging, which has not been demonstrated so far. Our data suggest the ex vivo tissue spotting method as an easy and reliable model to optimise MALDI imaging measurements and to predict drug detection in tissue sections derived from treated mice prior to the recruitment of laboratory animals, which helps to save animals, time and costs.

  6. In vitro and in vivo study of commercial calcium phosphate cement HydroSet™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Niall W; Blunn, Gordon; Karpukhina, Natalia; Davis, Graham; de Godoy, Roberta Ferro; Wilson, Rory M; Coathup, Melanie; Onwordi, Lyris; Quak, Wen Yu; Hill, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The commercial calcium phosphate cement, HydroSet™, was investigated in vitro, studying phase formation, compressive strength and setting time, followed by an ovine in vivo study to measure osseointegration, bone apposition and bone-to-graft contact. The X-ray diffraction and 31 P Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) results showed the initial formation of octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite at one hour. Over 7 days the octacalcium phosphate transformed to apatite, which was the only crystalline phase of the cement at 28 days. This apatite phase is thought to be a calcium deficient apatite. In the scanning electron microscopy, histological images of 12-week ovine in vivo results showed a high degree of osseointegration, 92.5%. Compressive strength comparisons between in vitro and in vivo measurements showed a dramatic difference between the in vitro measurements (highest 25.4 MPa) and in vivo (95 MPa), attributed to bone ingrowth into the cement in vivo. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time phase evolution of HydroSet™ and the properties studied in vitro complement the in vivo evaluation of the cement in a publication. The significance of the new finding of initial formation of octacalcium phosphate in this cement is discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 21-30, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. In vivo toxicity studies of fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrivá, L; Font, G; Manyes, L

    2015-04-01

    This review summarizes the information regarding the in vivo studies of Fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade. The most common studies are classified as subacute toxicity, subchronic toxicity, acute toxicity, toxicokinetic studies and teratogenicity in order of importance. The most used animals in in vivo studies are pigs, rats, chickens and mice. Fumonisin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, nivalenol and T-2 toxin are the most studied fusarotoxins. Studies with combinations of mycotoxins are also frequent, deoxynivalenol generally being one of them. The predominant route of administration is oral, administered mostly in the form of naturally contaminated feed. Other administration routes also used are intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous. In vivo research on Fusarium mycotoxins has increased since 2010 highlighting the need for such studies in the field of food and feed safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Berberine: metabolic and cardiovascular effects in preclinical and clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arrigo FG Cicero

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Arrigo FG Cicero1, Sibel Ertek21Internal Medicine, Aging and Kidney Diseases Department, Sant’Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; 2Ufuk University, Medical Faculty, Dr Ridvan Ege Hospital, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: Berberine is a plant alkaloid with numerous biological activities. A large body of preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies support different pharmacological actions of berberine that could be potentially useful in the management of metabolic diseases associated with high cardiovascular disease risk, such as mixed hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. Moreover, it seems that berberine also exerts anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative effects that could play a role in the development of atherosclerosis and its clinical consequences. Recently, the metabolic effects of berberine have been demonstrated in humans, opening new perspectives for the use of this molecule in patient therapy. Larger and longer clinical studies need to be carried out to implement the definition of the therapeutic role of berberine in humans.Keywords: berberine, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cholesterol

  9. Pre-Clinical Models of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren J Becher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG is a rare and incurable brain tumor that arises in the brainstem of children predominantly between the ages of six and eight. Its intricate morphology and involvement of normal pons tissue precludes surgical resection, and the standard of care today remains fractionated radiation alone. In the past 30 years, there have been no significant advances made in the treatment of DIPG. This is largely because we lack good models of DIPG and therefore have little biological basis for treatment. In recent years however, due to increased biopsy and acquisition of autopsy specimens, research is beginning to unravel the genetic and epigenetic drivers of DIPG. Insight gleaned from these studies has led to improvements in approaches to both model these tumors in the lab, as well as to potentially treat them in the clinic. This review will detail the initial strides towards modeling DIPG in animals, which included allograft and xenograft rodent models using non-DIPG glioma cells. Important advances in the field came with the development of in vitro cell and in vivo xenograft models derived directly from autopsy material of DIPG patients or from human embryonic stem cells. Lastly, we will summarize the progress made in the development of genetically engineered mouse models of DIPG. Cooperation of studies incorporating all of these modeling systems to both investigate the unique mechanisms of gliomagenesis in the brainstem and to test potential novel therapeutic agents in a preclinical setting will result in improvement in treatments for DIPG patients.

  10. Manufacture of Third-Generation Lentivirus for Preclinical Use, with Process Development Considerations for Translation to Good Manufacturing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gándara, Carolina; Affleck, Valerie; Stoll, Elizabeth Ann

    2018-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors are used in laboratories around the world for in vivo and ex vivo delivery of gene therapies, and increasingly clinical investigation as well as preclinical applications. The third-generation lentiviral vector system has many advantages, including high packaging capacity, stable gene expression in both dividing and post-mitotic cells, and low immunogenicity in the recipient organism. Yet, the manufacture of these vectors is challenging, especially at high titers required for direct use in vivo, and further challenges are presented by the process of translating preclinical gene therapies toward manufacture of products for clinical investigation. The goals of this paper are to report the protocol for manufacturing high-titer third-generation lentivirus for preclinical testing and to provide detailed information on considerations for translating preclinical viral vector manufacture toward scaled-up platforms and processes in order to make gene therapies under Good Manufacturing Practice that are suitable for clinical trials.

  11. Radiochemical studies, pre-clinical investigation and preliminary clinical evaluation of170Tm-EDTMP prepared using in-house freeze-dried EDTMP kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tapas; Shinto, Ajit; Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai K; Sarma, Haladhar D; Mohammed, Sahiralam Khan; Mitra, Arpit; Lad, Sangita; Rajan, M G R; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the present work is to formulate 170 Tm-EDTMP using an in-house freeze-dried EDTMP kit and evaluate its potential as a bone pain palliation agent. Patient dose of 170 Tm-EDTMP was prepared with high radiochemical purity using the lyophilized kit at room temperature within 15min. Pre-clinical evaluation in normal Wistar rats revealed selective skeletal accumulation with extended retention. Preliminary clinical investigation in 8 patients with disseminated skeletal metastases exhibited selective uptake in the bone and retention therein for a long duration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel antithrombotic effect of sulforaphane via activation of platelet adenylate cyclase: ex vivo and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Chen, Wei-Fan; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Duen-Suey; Hsiao, George; Hsu, Chung-Yi; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate, which can be found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cabbage. Sulforaphane was found to have very potent inhibitory effects on tumor growth through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of sulforaphane on platelet activation and its relative issues. Activation of platelets caused by arterial thrombosis is relevant to a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine the in vivo antithrombotic effects of sulforaphane and its possible mechanisms in platelet activation. Sulforaphane (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) was effective in reducing the mortality of ADP-induced acute pulmonary thromboembolism in mice. Other in vivo studies also revealed that sulforaphane (0.25 mg/kg) significantly prolonged platelet plug formation in mice. In addition, sulforaphane (15-75 μM) exhibited more-potent activity of inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Sulforaphane inhibited platelet activation accompanied by inhibiting relative Ca(2+) mobilization; phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt; and hydroxyl radical (OH(●)) formation. Sulforaphane markedly increased cyclic (c)AMP, but not cyclic (c)GMP levels, and stimulated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation. SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, but not ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxal in-1-one), an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, obviously reversed the sulforaphane-mediated effects on platelet aggregation; PKC activation, p38 MAPK, Akt and VASP phosphorylation; and OH(●) formation. Furthermore, a PI3-kinase inhibitor (LY294002) and a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) both significantly diminished PKC activation and p38 MAPK and Akt phosphorylation; in contrast, a PKC inhibitor (RO318220) did not diminish p38 MAPK or Akt phosphorylation stimulated by collagen. This

  13. In vivo endoscopic multi-beam optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standish, Beau A; Mariampillai, Adrian; Munce, Nigel R; Leung, Michael K K; Vitkin, I Alex [Deptartment of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Lee, Kenneth K C; Yang, Victor X D [Ontario Cancer Institute/University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)], E-mail: standish@ee.ryerson.ca

    2010-02-07

    A multichannel optical coherence tomography (multi-beam OCT) system and an in vivo endoscopic imaging probe were developed using a swept-source OCT system. The distal optics were micro-machined to produce a high numerical aperture, multi-focus fibre optic array. This combination resulted in a transverse design resolution of <10 {mu}m full width half maximum (FWHM) throughout the entire imaging range, while also increasing the signal intensity within the focus of the individual channels. The system was used in a pre-clinical rabbit study to acquire in vivo structural images of the colon and ex vivo images of the oesophagus and trachea. A good correlation between the structural multi-beam OCT images and H and E histology was achieved, demonstrating the feasibility of this high-resolution system and its potential for in vivo human endoscopic imaging.

  14. A review of preclinical safety data for magnevist (gadopentetate dimeglumine) in the context of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Hofmeister, Rainer; Ernst, Rainer; Pietsch, Hubertus; Sieber, Martin A; Walter, Jacob

    2010-09-01

    Magnevist (gadopentetate dimeglumine, Bayer Healthcare, Bayer) is a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) for magnetic resonance imaging approved for clinical use in various indications since 1988. A possible association between the administration of GBCAs to patients with severe kidney impairment, and a condition first identified in 2000 and later described as "nephrogenic systemic fibrosis" (NSF), was published in early 2006. In the light of this reported association and the published histologic findings of certain NSF patients, Bayer, with support of external experts, reassessed the preclinical safety data from in vivo studies in healthy rats and dogs that were conducted with Magnevist during the drug development process in the mid-80s. These studies, which were performed according to standard regulatory requirements as defined in pertinent guidelines and which were conducted before the reported association between GBCAs and NSF, were not specifically designed to detect NSF-like lesions. Instead, the intention of this reassessment was to analyze whether the acquired knowledge on NSF would lead to a revised interpretation of the original preclinical data. Studies on repeat-dose toxicity of Magnevist performed in the mid-80s with healthy rats and dogs were re-evaluated, with special emphasis on the retrospective analysis of morphologic findings which have come to be considered potentially suggestive of NSF. In particular, histologic slides of the skin of repeat-dose toxicity studies were re-examined by Bayer pathologists, with a special focus on the occurrence of morphologic lesions that have subsequently been identified as consistent with NSF. In addition, slides from selected studies were also subjected to a blinded external peer review by an independent international Pathology Working Group. A review of the preclinical data from the repeated-dose toxicity studies provided no evidence for toxicological effects after administration of Magnevist, which could be

  15. Nonwoven-based gelatin/polycaprolactone membrane proves suitability in a preclinical assessment for treatment of soft tissue defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Simon; Angarano, Marco; Fabritius, Martin; Mülhaupt, Rolf; Dard, Michel; Obrecht, Marcel; Tomakidi, Pascal; Steinberg, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    Standard preclinical assessments in vitro often have limitations regarding their transferability to human beings, mainly evoked by their nonhuman and tissue-different/nontissue-specific source. Here, we aimed at employing tissue-authentic simple and complex interactive fibroblast-epithelial cell systems and their in vivo-relevant biomarkers for preclinical in vitro assessment of nonwoven-based gelatin/polycaprolactone membranes (NBMs) for treatment of soft tissue defects. NBMs were composed of electrospun gelatin and polycaprolactone nanofiber nonwovens. Scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with actin/focal contact integrin fluorescence revealed successful adhesion and proper morphogenesis of keratinocytes and fibroblasts, along with cells' derived extracellular matrix deposits. The "feel-good factor" of cells under study on the NBM was substantiated by forming a confluent connective tissue entity, which was concomitant with a stratified epithelial equivalent. Immunohistochemistry proved tissue authenticity over time by abundance of the biomarker vimentin in the connective tissue entity, and chronological increase of keratins KRT1/10 and involucrin expression in epithelial equivalents. Suitability of the novel NBM as wound dressing was evidenced by an almost completion of epithelial wound closure in a pilot mini-pig study, after a surgical intervention-caused gingival dehiscence. In summary, preclinical assessment by tissue-authentic cell systems and the animal pilot study revealed the NBM as an encouraging therapeutic medical device for prospective clinical applications.

  16. Nonwoven-Based Gelatin/Polycaprolactone Membrane Proves Suitability in a Preclinical Assessment for Treatment of Soft Tissue Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Simon; Angarano, Marco; Fabritius, Martin; Mülhaupt, Rolf; Dard, Michel; Obrecht, Marcel; Tomakidi, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Standard preclinical assessments in vitro often have limitations regarding their transferability to human beings, mainly evoked by their nonhuman and tissue-different/nontissue-specific source. Here, we aimed at employing tissue-authentic simple and complex interactive fibroblast-epithelial cell systems and their in vivo-relevant biomarkers for preclinical in vitro assessment of nonwoven-based gelatin/polycaprolactone membranes (NBMs) for treatment of soft tissue defects. NBMs were composed of electrospun gelatin and polycaprolactone nanofiber nonwovens. Scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with actin/focal contact integrin fluorescence revealed successful adhesion and proper morphogenesis of keratinocytes and fibroblasts, along with cells' derived extracellular matrix deposits. The “feel-good factor” of cells under study on the NBM was substantiated by forming a confluent connective tissue entity, which was concomitant with a stratified epithelial equivalent. Immunohistochemistry proved tissue authenticity over time by abundance of the biomarker vimentin in the connective tissue entity, and chronological increase of keratins KRT1/10 and involucrin expression in epithelial equivalents. Suitability of the novel NBM as wound dressing was evidenced by an almost completion of epithelial wound closure in a pilot mini-pig study, after a surgical intervention-caused gingival dehiscence. In summary, preclinical assessment by tissue-authentic cell systems and the animal pilot study revealed the NBM as an encouraging therapeutic medical device for prospective clinical applications. PMID:24494668

  17. Kinetic modeling in pre-clinical positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntner, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Pre-clinical positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved in the last few years from pure visualization of radiotracer uptake and distribution towards quantification of the physiological parameters. For reliable and reproducible quantification the kinetic modeling methods used to obtain relevant parameters of radiotracer tissue interaction are important. Here we present different kinetic modeling techniques with a focus on compartmental models including plasma input models and reference tissue input models. The experimental challenges off deriving the plasma input function in rodents and the effect of anesthesia are discussed. Finally, in vivo application of kinetic modeling in various areas of pre-clinical research is presented and compared to human data. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. A radiotracer for In vivo studies of acetylcholinesterase: p-[{sup 18}F]fluorodonepezil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y.; Choi, Y. S.; Choi, Y.; Kim, S. E.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, B. T. [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. W. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of senile dementia caused by lack of acetylcholine in central nervous system, and in vivo studies of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) have been carried out using many radiolabeled AChE inhibitors (donepezil, tacrine, physostigmine, CP-126,998, etc). Donepezil, a FDA approved drug for AD is now in clinical use. Therefore, we synthesized and evaluated p-[{sup 18}F]fluorodonepezil in mice. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that p-[{sup 18}F]fluorodonepezil binds non-specifically in vivo and does not suffer from metabolism in mouse brain. This study suggests that radioligands with higher binding affinity may be required to visualize AChE in vivo and further studies are needed to develop better radiotracers.

  19. Evaluation of the pharmacodynamic effects of MGCD0103 from preclinical models to human using a novel HDAC enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfils, Claire; Kalita, Ann; Dubay, Marja; Siu, Lillian L; Carducci, Michael A; Reid, Gregory; Martell, Robert E; Besterman, Jeffrey M; Li, Zuomei

    2008-06-01

    The pharmacodynamic properties of MGCD0103, an isotype-selective inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC), were evaluated in preclinical models and patients with a novel whole-cell HDAC enzyme assay. Boc-Lys(epsilon-Ac)-AMC, a HDAC substrate with fluorescent readout, was found to be cell permeable and was used to monitor MGCD0103-mediated HDAC inhibition in cultured cancer cells in vitro, in peripheral WBC ex vivo, in mice in vivo, and in human patients. MGCD0103 inhibited HDAC activity in several human cancer cell lines in vitro and in human peripheral WBC ex vivo in a dose-dependent manner. Unlike suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, the HDAC inhibitory activity of MGCD0103 was time dependent and sustained for at least 24 hours following drug removal in peripheral WBC ex vivo. Inhibitory activity of MGCD0103 was sustained for at least 8 hours in vivo in mice and 48 hours in patients with solid tumors. HDAC inhibitory activity of MGCD0103 in peripheral WBC correlated with induction of histone acetylation in blood and in implanted tumors in mice. In cancer patients, sustained pharmacodynamic effect of MGCD0103 was visualized only by dose-dependent enzyme inhibition in peripheral WBC but not by histone acetylation analysis. This study shows that MGCD0103 has sustained pharmacodynamic effects that can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo with a cell-based HDAC enzyme assay.

  20. Imaging of Small Vessels Using Photoacoustics: An In Vivo Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siphanto, Ronald I.; Kolkman, R.G.M.; Huisjes, A.; Pilatou, M.H.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Adrichem, Leon N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Background and Objectives The ability to correctly visualize the architectural arrangement of microvasculature is valuable to many diverse fields in medicine. In this study, we applied photoacoustics (PA) to obtain high-resolution images of submillimeter blood vessels. - Study Design/Materials and

  1. [{sup 11}C]S.L.(25.1188), a new radioligand to study the monoamine oxidase type B with PET: preclinical characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, W.; Valette, H.; Peyronneau, M.A.; Bramoulle, Y.; Coulon, C.; Dolle, F.; Bottlaender, M. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, IIBM/DSV, 91 - Orsay (France); Curet, O.; George, P. [Sanofi-Aventis, 92 - Bagneux (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction. - Monoamine oxidase (M.A.O.) is a flavin containing enzyme, that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of various amines and neurotransmitters. Two isoforms exist, M.A.O.-A and M.A.O.-B. Variations in M.A.O. activity may be associated to human disease such as Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Few radiotracers have been developed for M.A.O. PET studies such as [{sup 11}C]deprenyl, an irreversible M.A.O.-B inhibitor. Recently an oxazolidinone derivative, S.L.- 25.1188 ((S)-5-methoxy-methyl-3-[6-(4,4,4-tri-fluoro butoxy)- benzo[d]isoxazol-3-yl]-oxazolidin-2-one), belonging to a new generation of selective and reversible M.A.O.-B inhibitors was developed and showed in vitro a high selectivity for M.A.O.B. [1]. The aim of this study was to characterize [{sup 11}C]S.L.- 25.1188 as radioligand for in vivo PET examination of M.A.O.-B. Materials and methods. - PET studies of the brain distribution were carried out in male Papio anubis baboons. Selectivity and reversibility of [{sup 11}C]S.L.-25.1188 binding for M.A.O.-B was assessed by pre-treatment or displacement experiments (30 min before and after tracer injection, respectively) using reference ligands for M.A.O.-B (deprenyl: 2 mg/kg i.v. and lazabemide: 0.5 mg/kg i.v.) or by displacement experiments using unlabelled S.L.-25.1188 (1 mg/kg, i.v., 30 min after tracer injection). Distribution volume (D.V.) was calculated using 2-tissue-compartment model. The saturable binding following pre-treatment with deprenyl was considered as the specific binding. Results. - After injection, [1{sup 1C}]S.L.-25.1188 presents a rapid phase of distribution in blood (about 5 min), followed by a elimination with T1/2 of 75 min. The Blood to plasma concentration ratio was constant during the experimentation (0.9 {+-} .04) consistent with a similar kinetic of [{sup 11}C]S.L.- 25.1188 in both blood and plasma. Metabolism analysis showed that [{sup 11}C]S.L.-25.1188 is stable in vivo. In the brain, uptake in different areas was

  2. Tissue dynamics and regenerative outcome in two resorbable non-cross-linked collagen membranes for guided bone regeneration: A preclinical molecular and histological study in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Omar; Dahlin, Anna; Gasser, Angelines; Dahlin, Christer

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the molecular and structural patterns of bone healing during guided bone regeneration (GBR), comparing two resorbable non-cross-linked collagen membranes. Trabecular bone defects in rat femurs were filled with deproteinized bovine bone (DBB) and covered with either a membrane comprising collagen and elastin (CXP) or collagen (BG). Samples were harvested after 3 and 21 days for histology/histomorphometry and gene expression analysis. Gene expression