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Sample records for vivo potential targets

  1. Combining in vitro protein detection and in vivo antibody detection identifies potential vaccine targets against Staphylococcus aureus during osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Reijer, P Martijn; Sandker, Marjan; Snijders, Susan V; Tavakol, Mehri; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; van Wamel, Willem J B

    2017-02-01

    Currently, little is known about the in vivo human immune response against Staphylococcus aureus during a biofilm-associated infection, such as osteomyelitis, and how this relates to protein production in biofilms in vitro. Therefore, we characterized IgG responses in 10 patients with chronic osteomyelitis against 50 proteins of S. aureus, analyzed the presence of these proteins in biofilms of the infecting isolates on polystyrene (PS) and human bone in vitro, and explored the relation between in vivo and in vitro data. IgG levels against 15 different proteins were significantly increased in patients compared to healthy controls. Using a novel competitive Luminex-based assay, eight of these proteins [alpha toxin, Staphylococcus aureus formyl peptide receptor-like 1 inhibitor (FlipR), glucosaminidase, iron-responsive surface determinants A and H, the putative ABC transporter SACOL0688, staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), and serine-aspartate repeat-containing protein E (SdrE)] were also detected in a majority of the infecting isolates during biofilm formation in vitro. However, 4 other proteins were detected in only a minority of isolates in vitro while, vice versa, 7 proteins were detected in multiple isolates in vitro but not associated with significantly increased IgG levels in patients. Detection of proteins was largely confirmed using a transcriptomic approach. Our data provide further insights into potential therapeutic targets, such as for vaccination, to reduce S. aureus virulence and biofilm formation. At the same time, our data suggest that either in vitro or immunological in vivo data alone should be interpreted cautiously and that combined studies are necessary to identify potential targets.

  2. Targeted in vitro and in vivo gene transfer into T Lymphocytes: potential of direct inhibition of allo-immune activation

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    Mehra Mandeep R

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful inhibition of alloimmune activation in organ transplantation remains one of the key events in achieving a long-term graft survival. Since T lymphocytes are largely responsible for alloimmune activation, targeted gene transfer of gene of cyclin kinase inhibitor p21 into T cells might inhibit their aberrant proliferation. A number of strategies using either adenoviral or lentiviral vectors linked to mono or bispecific antibodies directed against T cell surface markers/cytokines did not yield the desired results. Therefore, this study was designed to test if a CD3promoter-p21 chimeric construct would in vitro and in vivo transfer p21 gene to T lymphocytes and result in inhibition of proliferation. CD3 promoter-p21 chimeric constructs were prepared with p21 in the sense and antisense orientation. For in vitro studies EL4-IL-2 thyoma cells were used and for in vivo studies CD3p21 sense and antisense plasmid DNA was injected intramuscularly in mice. Lymphocyte proliferation was quantified by 3H-thymidine uptake assay; IL-2 mRNA expression was studied by RT-PCR and using Real Time PCR assay, we monitored the CD3, p21, TNF-α and IFN-γ mRNA expression. Results Transfection of CD3p21 sense and antisense in mouse thyoma cell line (EL4-IL-2 resulted in modulation of mitogen-induced proliferation. The intramuscular injection of CD3p21 sense and antisense plasmid DNA into mice also modulated lymphocyte proliferation and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion These results demonstrate a novel strategy of in vitro and in vivo transfer of p21 gene to T cells using CD3-promoter to achieve targeted inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation and immune activation.

  3. Investigation of in vivo potential of scorpion venom against skin tumorigenesis in mice via targeting markers associated with cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Asmari AK

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdulrahman K Al Asmari, Abdul Quaiyoom Khan Research Centre, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world in spite of the advances made in its management. In this study, we investigated the in vivo antitumorigenic potential of the venom obtained from a medically important scorpion species Leiurus quinquestriatus on chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Animals were divided into five groups, with 13 animals in each group. All the treatments were given topically on the shaved dorsal surface of the skin. Animals in Group 1 received vehicle only (0.2 mL acetone. Moreover, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 400 nmol per mouse was applied to all the animals in the remaining four groups. After 1 week, different concentrations of venom (17.5 µg, 35 µg, and 52.5 µg per animal were applied to each animal in the Groups III–V. Thirty minutes after the application of venom, croton oil was applied on the same position where venom was administered to the animals of Groups III–V. Animals in Group II were treated as the positive control (without venom and received croton oil as in Groups III–V. The findings of this study revealed that venom extract of L. quinquestriatus inhibits DMBA + croton oil-induced mouse skin tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity. Venom treatment also decreased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry results showed a downregulation of the expression of molecular markers such as Ki-67, nuclear factor kappa-B, cyclooxygenase-2, B-cell lymphoma-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in venom-treated animals. Our findings suggest that the venom of L. quinquestriatus possesses in vivo anticancer potential and may be used in the development of anticancer molecules. Keywords: Leiurus quinquestriatus, skin cancer, apoptosis, immunosuppression

  4. Integration analysis of quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics data identifies potential targets of frizzled-8 protein-related antiproliferative factor in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Kim, Yongsoo; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Keay, Susan K; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Steen, Hanno; Freeman, Michael R; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Jayoung

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a prevalent and debilitating pelvic disorder generally accompanied by chronic pain combined with chronic urinating problems. Over one million Americans are affected, especially middle-aged women. However, its aetiology or mechanism remains unclear. No efficient drug has been provided to patients. Several urinary biomarker candidates have been identified for IC; among the most promising is antiproliferative factor (APF), whose biological activity is detectable in urine specimens from >94% of patients with both ulcerative and non-ulcerative IC. The present study identified several important mediators of the effect of APF on bladder cell physiology, suggesting several candidate drug targets against IC. In an attempt to identify potential proteins and genes regulated by APF in vivo, and to possibly expand the APF-regulated network identified by stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), we performed an integration analysis of our own SILAC data and the microarray data of Gamper et al. (2009) BMC Genomics 10: 199. Notably, two of the proteins (i.e. MAPKSP1 and GSPT1) that are down-regulated by APF are involved in the activation of mTORC1, suggesting that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is potentially a critical pathway regulated by APF in vivo. Several components of the mTOR pathway are currently being studied as potential therapeutic targets in other diseases. Our analysis suggests that this pathway might also be relevant in the design of diagnostic tools and medications targeting IC. • To enhance our understanding of the interstitial cystitis urine biomarker antiproliferative factor (APF), as well as interstitial cystitis biology more generally at the systems level, we reanalyzed recently published large-scale quantitative proteomics and in vivo transcriptomics data sets using an integration analysis tool that we have developed. • To

  5. In vivo phenytoin-initiated oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in murine maternal hepatic and embryonic tissue organelles: potential molecular targets of chemical teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Wells, P G

    1994-04-01

    The widely used anticonvulsant drug phenytoin may be bioactivated by peroxidases such as prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) to a reactive free radical intermediate that initiates teratogenesis. This in vivo study evaluated the potential molecular targets mediating phenytoin teratogenicity. In vivo phenytoin-induced oxidative tissue damage following bioactivation was quantified in both maternal hepatic and embryonic tissues from pregnant CD-1 mice using lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation and degradation as indices. Pregnant mice were injected with a teratogenic dose of phenytoin, 65 mg/kg ip, during organogenesis on Gestational Day 12. alpha-Phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin trapping agent, 41.5 mg/kg, or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase component of PHS, 10 mg/kg, were injected ip 2 hr before phenytoin treatment, and maternal hepatic and embryonic tissues were obtained at 0, 3, 6, 8, and 24 hr. Phenytoin enhanced lipid peroxidation in maternal plasma, hepatic microsomes, cytosol, mitochondria, and nuclei and in embryonic microsomes, cytosol, and mitochondria (p teratogenicity by PBN and ASA, suggest that peroxidase-catalyzed bioactivation of phenytoin may initiate oxidative damage to lipids and proteins in embryonic tissues, with teratological consequences.

  6. Short hairpin RNA targeting 2B gene of coxsackievirus B3 exhibits potential antiviral effects both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Hailan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxsackievirus B3 is an important infectious agent of viral myocarditis, pancreatitis and aseptic meningitis, but there are no specific antiviral therapeutic reagents in clinical use. RNA interference-based technology has been developed to prevent the viral infection. Methods To evaluate the impact of RNA interference on viral replication, cytopathogenicity and animal survival, short hairpin RNAs targeting the viral 2B region (shRNA-2B expressed by a recombinant vector (pGCL-2B or a recombinant lentivirus (Lenti-2B were tansfected in HeLa cells or transduced in mice infected with CVB3. Results ShRNA-2B exhibited a significant effect on inhibition of viral production in HeLa cells. Furthermore, shRNA-2B improved mouse survival rate, reduced the viral tissues titers and attenuated tissue damage compared with those of the shRNA-NC treated control group. Lenti-2B displayed more effective role in inhibition of viral replication than pGCL-2B in vivo. Conclusions Coxsackievirus B3 2B is an effective target of gene silencing against coxsackievirus B3 infection, suggesting that shRNA-2B is a potential agent for further development into a treatment for enterviral diseases.

  7. Gut proteases target Yersinia invasin in vivo

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    Freund Sandra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia enterocolitica is a common cause of food borne gastrointestinal disease. After oral uptake, yersiniae invade Peyer's patches of the distal ileum. This is accomplished by the binding of the Yersinia invasin to β1 integrins on the apical surface of M cells which overlie follicle associated lymphoid tissue. The gut represents a barrier that severely limits yersiniae from reaching deeper tissues such as Peyer's patches. We wondered if gut protease attack on invasion factors could contribute to the low number of yersiniae invading Peyer's patches. Findings Here we show that invasin is rapidly degraded in vivo by gut proteases in the mouse infection model. In vivo proteolytic degradation is due to proteolysis by several gut proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, and pepsin. Protease treated yersiniae are shown to be less invasive in a cell culture model. YadA, another surface adhesin is cleaved by similar concentrations of gut proteases but Myf was not cleaved, showing that not all surface proteins are equally susceptible to degradation by gut proteases. Conclusions We demonstrate that gut proteases target important Yersinia virulence factors such as invasin and YadA in vivo. Since invasin is completely degraded within 2-3 h after reaching the small intestine of mice, it is no longer available to mediate invasion of Peyer's patches.

  8. p-Hydroxy benzoic acid-conjugated dendrimer nanotherapeutics as potential carriers for targeted drug delivery to brain: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Department of Pharmaceutics (India); Kulhari, Hitesh [CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Medicinal Chemistry & Pharmacology Division (India); Jeengar, Manish Kumar [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Departmentof Pharmacology (India); Khan, Wahid, E-mail: wahid@niperhyd.ac.in; Sistla, Ramakrishna, E-mail: sistla@iict.res.in, E-mail: rksistla@yahoo.com [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Department of Pharmaceutics (India)

    2015-06-15

    Dendrimers which are discrete nanostructures/nanoparticles are emerging as promising candidates for many nanomedicine applications. Ligand-conjugated dendrimer facilitate the delivery of therapeutics in a targeted manner. Small molecules such as p-hydroxyl benzoic acid (pHBA) were found to have high affinity for sigma receptors which are prominent in most parts of central nervous system and tumors. The aim of this study was to synthesize pHBA-dendrimer conjugates as colloidal carrier for site-specific delivery of practically water insoluble drug, docetaxel (DTX) to brain tumors and to determine its targeting efficiency. pHBA, a small molecule ligand was coupled to the surface amine groups of generation 4-PAMAM dendrimer via a carbodiimide reaction and loaded with DTX. The conjugation was confirmed by {sup 1}HNMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. In vitro release of drug from DTX-loaded pHBA-conjugated dendrimer was found to be less as compared to unconjugated dendrimers. The prepared drug delivery system exhibited good physico-chemical stability and decrease in hemolytic toxicity. Cell viability and cell uptake studies were performed against U87MG human glioblastoma cells and formulations exerted considerable anticancer effect than plain drug. Conjugation of dendrimer with pHBA significantly enhanced the brain uptake of DTX which was shown by the recovery of a higher percentage of the dose from the brain following administration of pHBA-conjugated dendrimers compared with unconjugated dendrimer or formulation in clinical use (Taxotere{sup ®}). Therefore, pHBA conjugated dendrimers could be an efficient delivery vehicle for the targeting of anticancer drugs to brain tumors.

  9. In Vivo Tumor Vasculature Targeting of CuS@MSN Based Theranostic Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Hong, Hao; Goel, Shreya; Graves, Stephen A; Orbay, Hakan; Ehlerding, Emily B; Shi, Sixiang; Theuer, Charles P; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2015-01-01

    Actively targeted theranostic nanomedicine may be the key for future personalized cancer management. Although numerous types of theranostic nanoparticles have been developed in the past decade for cancer treatment, challenges still exist in the engineering of biocompatible theranostic nanoparticles with highly specific in vivo tumor targeting capabilities. Here, we report the design, synthesis, surface engineering, and in vivo active vasculature targeting of a new category of theranostic nanoparticle for future cancer management. Water-soluble photothermally sensitive copper sulfide nanoparticles were encapsulated in biocompatible mesoporous silica shells, followed by multistep surface engineering to form the final theranostic nanoparticles. Systematic in vitro targeting, an in vivo long-term toxicity study, photothermal ablation evaluation, in vivo vasculature targeted imaging, biodistribution and histology studies were performed to fully explore the potential of as-developed new theranostic nanoparticles.

  10. In vivo potency revisited - Keep the target in sight.

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    Gabrielsson, Johan; Peletier, Lambertus A; Hjorth, Stephan

    2017-10-10

    Potency is a central parameter in pharmacological and biochemical sciences, as well as in drug discovery and development endeavors. It is however typically defined in terms only of ligand to target binding affinity also in in vivo experimentation, thus in a manner analogous to in in vitro studies. As in vivo potency is in fact a conglomerate of events involving ligand, target, and target-ligand complex processes, overlooking some of the fundamental differences between in vivo and in vitro may result in serious mispredictions of in vivo efficacious dose and exposure. The analysis presented in this paper compares potency measures derived from three model situations. Model A represents the closed in vitro system, defining target binding of a ligand when total target and ligand concentrations remain static and constant. Model B describes an open in vivo system with ligand input and clearance (Cl(L)), adding in parallel to the turnover (ksyn, kdeg) of the target. Model C further adds to the open in vivo system in Model B also the elimination of the target-ligand complex (ke(RL)) via a first-order process. We formulate corresponding equations of the equilibrium (steady-state) relationships between target and ligand, and complex and ligand for each of the three model systems and graphically illustrate the resulting simulations. These equilibrium relationships demonstrate the relative impact of target and target-ligand complex turnover, and are easier to interpret than the more commonly used ligand-, target- and complex concentration-time courses. A new potency expression, labeled L50, is then derived. L50 is the ligand concentration at half-maximal target and complex concentrations and is an amalgamation of target turnover, target-ligand binding and complex elimination parameters estimated from concentration-time data. L50 is then compared to the dissociation constant Kd (target-ligand binding affinity), the conventional Black & Leff potency estimate EC50, and the derived

  11. Quantum Dot-Based Nanoprobes for In Vivo Targeted Imaging

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    Zhu, Yian; Hong, Hao; Xu, Zhi Ping; Li, Zhen; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have attracted tremendous attention over the last decade. The superior optical properties of QDs over conventional organic dyes make them attractive labels for a wide variety of biomedical applications, whereas their potential toxicity and instability in biological environment has puzzled scientific researchers. Much research effort has been devoted to surface modification and functionalization of QDs to make them versatile probes for biomedical applications, and significant progress has been made over the last several years. This review article aims to describe the current state-of-the-art of the synthesis, modification, bioconjugation, and applications of QDs for in vivo targeted imaging. In addition, QD-based multifunctional nanoprobes are also summarized. PMID:24206136

  12. Radiolabelled GLP-1 analogues for in vivo targeting of insulinomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brom, M.; Joosten, L.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Gotthardt, M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2012-01-01

    Internalizing agonists are usually selected for peptide receptor targeting. There is increasing evidence that non-internalizing receptor antagonists can be used for this purpose. We investigated whether the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist exendin(9-39) can be used for in vivo

  13. Targeting dendritic cells in vivo for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina eCaminschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that recognise cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumour immunity elicited using this immunisation strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialisation of DC-subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC-subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumour immunity. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress towards targeting human DC in vivo.

  14. CRISPR-Cas9 Targeting of PCSK9 in Human Hepatocytes In Vivo-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Raghavan, Avanthi; Chen, Tao; Qiao, Lyon; Zhang, Yongxian; Ding, Qiurong; Musunuru, Kiran

    2016-05-01

    Although early proof-of-concept studies of somatic in vivo genome editing of the mouse ortholog of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (Pcsk9) in mice have established its therapeutic potential for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, the unique nature of genome-editing technology-permanent alteration of genomic DNA sequences-mandates that it be tested in vivo against human genes in normal human cells with human genomes to give reliable preclinical insights into the efficacy (on-target mutagenesis) and safety (lack of off-target mutagenesis) of genome-editing therapy before it can be used in patients. We used a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 genome-editing system to target the human PCSK9 gene in chimeric liver-humanized mice bearing human hepatocytes. We demonstrated high on-target mutagenesis (approaching 50%), greatly reduced blood levels of human PCSK9 protein, and minimal off-target mutagenesis. This work yields important information on the efficacy and safety of CRISPR-Cas9 therapy targeting the human PCSK9 gene in human hepatocytes in vivo, and it establishes humanized mice as a useful platform for the preclinical assessment of applications of somatic in vivo genome editing. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  16. Indium-111 labeled gold nanoparticles for in-vivo molecular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Quinn K T; Olariu, Cristina I; Yaffee, Marcus; Taelman, Vincent F; Marincek, Nicolas; Krause, Thomas; Meier, Lorenz; Walter, Martin A

    2014-08-01

    The present report describes the synthesis and biological evaluation of a molecular imaging platform based on gold nanoparticles directly labeled with indium-111. The direct labeling approach facilitated radiolabeling with high activities while maintaining excellent stability within the biological environment. The resulting imaging platform exhibited low interference of the radiolabel with targeting molecules, which is highly desirable for in-vivo probe tracking and molecular targeted tumor imaging. The indium-111 labeled gold nanoparticles were synthesized using a simple procedure that allowed stable labeling of the nanoparticle core with various indium-111 activities. Subsequent surface modification of the particle cores with RGD-based ligands at various densities allowed for molecular targeting of the αvß3 integrin in-vitro and for molecular targeted imaging in human melanoma and glioblastoma models in-vivo. The results demonstrate the vast potential of direct labeling with radioisotopes for tracking gold nanoparticles within biological systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Targeting Promoter-Associated Noncoding RNA In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civenni, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    There are many classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), with wide-ranging functionalities (e.g., RNA editing, mediation of mRNA splicing, ribosomal function). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes, including the regulation of gene expression. Incorrect expression or mutation of lncRNAs has been reported to be associated with several disease conditions, such a malignant transformation in humans. Importantly, pivotal players in tumorigenesis and cancer progression, such as c-Myc, may be regulated by lncRNA at promoter level. The function of lncRNA can be reduced with antisense oligonucleotides that sequester or degrade mature lncRNAs. In alternative, lncRNA transcription can be blocked by small interference RNA (RNAi), which had acquired, recently, broad interested in clinical applications. In vivo-jetPEI™ is a linear polyethylenimine mediating nucleic acid (DNA, shRNA, siRNA, oligonucelotides) delivery with high efficiency. Different in vivo delivery routes have been validated: intravenous (IV), intraperitoneal (IP), intratumoral, subcutaneous, topical, and intrathecal. High levels of nucleic acid delivery are achieved into a broad range of tissues, such as lung, salivary glands, heart, spleen, liver, and prostate upon systemic administration. In addition, in vivo-jetPEI™ is also an efficient carrier for local gene and siRNA delivery such as intratumoral or topical application on the skin. After systemic injection, siRNA can be detected and the levels can be validated in target tissues by qRT-PCR. Targeting promoter-associated lncRNAs with siRNAs (small interfering RNAs) in vivo is becoming an exciting breakthrough for the treatment of human disease.

  18. Cancer ameliorating potential of Phyllanthus amarus: In vivo and in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also significantly reduced the number of aberrant cells and frequency of aberrations per cell in vivo. Conclusion: Ameliorating potential of P. amarus was dose and duration dependant. These extracts significantly reduced the mutagenicity and genotoxicity that were produced due to AFB1 treatment both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Nanoparticles target early-stage breast cancer metastasis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Evgeniya; Zinger, Assaf; da Silva, Dana; Yaari, Zvi; Kajal, Ashima; Vardi-Oknin, Dikla; Goldfeder, Mor; Schroeder, Josh E.; Shainsky-Roitman, Janna; Hershkovitz, Dov; Schroeder, Avi

    2017-10-01

    Despite advances in cancer therapy, treating cancer after it has metastasized remains an unmet clinical challenge. In this study we demonstrate that 100 nm liposomes target triple-negative murine breast-cancer metastases post intravenous administration. Metastatic breast cancer was induced in BALB/c mice either experimentally, by a tail vein injection of 4T1 cells, or spontaneously, after implanting a primary tumor xenograft. To track their biodistribution in vivo the liposomes were labeled with multi-modal diagnostic agents, including indocyanine green and rhodamine for whole-animal fluorescent imaging, gadolinium for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and europium for a quantitative biodistribution analysis. The accumulation of liposomes in the metastases peaked at 24 h post the intravenous administration, similar to the time they peaked in the primary tumor. The efficiency of liposomal targeting to the metastatic tissue exceeded that of a non-liposomal agent by 4.5-fold. Liposomes were detected at very early stages in the metastatic progression, including metastatic lesions smaller than 2 mm in diameter. Surprisingly, while nanoparticles target breast cancer metastasis, they may also be found in elevated levels in the pre-metastatic niche, several days before metastases are visualized by MRI or histologically in the tissue. This study highlights the promise of diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles for treating metastatic cancer, possibly even for preventing the onset of the metastatic dissemination by targeting the pre-metastatic niche.

  20. Potential targets for the treatment of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyston, Charlotte J; Stanley, Joanna L; Baker, Philip N

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a disorder of pregnancy, typically characterized by hypertension and proteinuria observed after the 20th week of gestation. Preeclampsia has dire consequences for both maternal and neonatal health: it is associated with 50,000 - 100,000 annual deaths globally, as well as serious fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, including increased risk of fetal growth restriction and still birth. Despite the severe health, social, and economic costs of preeclampsia, currently the only curative therapy is delivery of the baby and placenta, which itself carries the associated risks of premature birth. The lack of treatments for this condition is attributable to a number of causes, including but not limited to: a partial understanding of the complex pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this complex disease; an inability to sensitively predict women who will go on to develop the disease; and a paucity of robust animal models with which to test new treatments. Recently, progress has been made in identifying potential new therapeutic targets. This review will discuss in detail the evidence supporting further investigation of these targets, which include angiogenic factors, agents that increase vasodilation, anti-inflammatory drugs, substances that reduce oxidative stress, and statins. New therapeutic targets have the potential to make a significant positive impact on maternal and neonatal health. It is exciting that a number of potential therapies are currently being investigated; however, it is also vital that basic research continues to identify potential mechanisms and targets, and that any potential therapy is thoroughly tested before progression to clinical trial.

  1. Manganese G8 dendrimers targeted to oxidation-specific epitopes: in vivo MR imaging of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuyen H; Bryant, Henry; Shapsa, Ari; Street, Hannah; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A; Frank, Joseph A; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Briley-Saebo, Karen C

    2015-03-01

    To determine if manganese (Mn) G8 dendrimers targeted to oxidation-specific epitopes (OSE) allow for in vivo detection of atherosclerotic lesions. OSE have been identified as key factors in atherosclerotic plaque progression and destabilization. Mn offers a potentially clinically translatable alternative to gadolinium-based agents when bioretention and potential toxicity of gadolinium is anticipated. However, to be effective, high payloads of Mn must accumulate intracellularly in macrophages. It was hypothesized that G8 dendrimers targeted to OSE may allow delivery of high Mn payloads, thereby enabling in vivo detection of macrophage-rich plaques. G8 dendrimers were modified to allow conjugation with MnDTPA (758 Mn ion) and the antibody MDA2 that is targeted to malondialdehyde (MDA)-lysine epitopes. Both the untargeted and targeted G8 dendrimers were characterized and their in vivo efficacy evaluated in apoE(-/-) mice over a 96-hour time period after bolus administration of a 0.05 mmol Mn/kg dose using a clinical MR system (3T). Significant enhancement (normalized enhancement >60%, P = 0.0013) of atherosclerotic lesions was observed within a 72-hour time period following administration of the targeted dendrimers. The presence of Mn within atherosclerotic lesions was confirmed using spectroscopic methods (>8 μg Mn/g). Limited signal attenuation (<18%) and Mn deposition (<1 μg Mn/g) was observed in the arterial wall following injection of the untargeted material. This study demonstrates that manganese-labeled dendrimers, allowing a high Mn payload, targeted to OSE may allow in vivo image of atherosclerotic lesions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Response surface optimization, Ex vivo and In vivo investigation of nasal spanlastics for bioavailability enhancement and brain targeting of risperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Fatma Elzahraa; Elsayed, Ibrahim; Gad, Mary Kamal; Elshafeey, Ahmed Hassen; Mohamed, Magdi Ibrahim

    2017-09-15

    Transnasal brain drug targeting could ensure better drug delivery to the brain through the olfactory pathway. Risperidone bioavailability is 66% in extensive metabolizers and 82% in slow metabolizers. The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of the nanovesicular spanlastics to effectively deliver risperidone through the nasal route to the brain and increase its bioavailability. Spanlastics formulae, composed of span and polyvinyl alcohol, were designed based on central composite statistical design. The planned formulae were prepared using ethanol injection method. The prepared formulae were characterized by testing their particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency. The optimized formula having the lowest particle size, polydispersity index, the highest zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency was subjected to further investigations including characterization of its rheological properties, elasticity, transmission electron microscopy, in vitro diffusion, ex vivo permeation, histopathology and in vivo biodistribution. The optimized formula was composed of 5mg/mL span and 30mg/mL polyvinyl alcohol. It showed significantly higher transnasal permeation and better distribution to the brain, when compared to the used control regarding the brain targeting efficiency and the drug transport percentage (2.16 and 1.43 folds increase, respectively). The study introduced a successful and promising formula to directly and effectively carry the drug from nose to brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Metalloproteinases: potential therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    In different inflammatory diseases, many metalloproteinases are over expressed and thought to promote progression of the disease. Understanding roles of these enzymes in disease progression as well as in normal homeostasis is crucial to identify target enzymes for the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the autoimmune inflammatory diseases in which around 1-2 % of the world populations are suffered from. Roles of metalloproteinases are well documented in RA, but so far none of them is proposed to be a target enzyme. However, there are at least three enzymes that can potentially be molecular targets to inhibit progression of RA. Understanding roles of these enzymes in more detail and developing highly selective inhibitors to these enzymes would be essential for novel antimetalloproteinase therapies in future.

  4. RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes for early detection of tumor: In vitro and in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Wei; Su Bo; Meng Shuyan; Ju Lixia; Yan Linghua; Ding Yongmei; Song Yin; Zhou Wei; Li Heyan; Tang Liang; Zhao Yinmin [Research Institute of Oncology, Tongji University Medical School, 507 Zhenmin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhou Caicun, E-mail: caicunzhou@yahoo.com.cn [Research Institute of Oncology, Tongji University Medical School, 507 Zhenmin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Magnetic resonance molecular imaging has emerged as a potential approach for tumor diagnosis in the last few decades. This approach consists of the delivery of MR contrast agents to the tumor by specific targeted carriers. For this purpose, a lipopeptide was constructed by using a cyclic RGD peptide headgroup coupled to palmitic acid anchors via a KGG tripeptide spacer. Targeted paramagnetic liposomes were then prepared by the incorporation of RGD-coupled-lipopeptides into lipid bilayers for specific bounding to tumor. In vitro, study demonstrated that RGD-targeted liposomes exhibited a better binding affinity to targeted cells than non-targeted liposomes. MR imaging of mice bearing A549 tumors with the RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes also resulted in a greater signal enhancement of tumor compared to non-targeted liposomes and pure contrast agents groups. In addition, biodistribution study also showed specific tumor targeting of RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes in vivo. Therefore, RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes prepared in the present study may be a more promising method for early tumor diagnosis.

  5. In vivo genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 mediated homology-independent targeted integration

    KAUST Repository

    Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2016-11-15

    Targeted genome editing via engineered nucleases is an exciting area of biomedical research and holds potential for clinical applications. Despite rapid advances in the field, in vivo targeted transgene integration is still infeasible because current tools are inefficient1, especially for non-dividing cells, which compose most adult tissues. This poses a barrier for uncovering fundamental biological principles and developing treatments for a broad range of genetic disorders2. Based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9)3, 4 technology, here we devise a homology-independent targeted integration (HITI) strategy, which allows for robust DNA knock-in in both dividing and non-dividing cells in vitro and, more importantly, in vivo (for example, in neurons of postnatal mammals). As a proof of concept of its therapeutic potential, we demonstrate the efficacy of HITI in improving visual function using a rat model of the retinal degeneration condition retinitis pigmentosa. The HITI method presented here establishes new avenues for basic research and targeted gene therapies.

  6. Superovulation Response and In vivo Embryo Production Potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Holstein, respectively. And hence, Boran cows' response to superovulation and yield of better quality and number of embryo than their Boran*Holstein counterparts showed the high potential of the breed for in-vivo and in-vitro embyo production.

  7. rAAV-mediated subcellular targeting of optogenetic tools in retinal ganglion cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chaowen; Ivanova, Elena; Zhang, Yi; Pan, Zhuo-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Expression of optogenetic tools in surviving inner retinal neurons to impart retinal light sensitivity has been a new strategy for restoring vision after photoreceptor degeneration. One potential approach for restoring retinal light sensitivity after photoreceptor degeneration is to express optogenetic tools in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). For this approach, restoration of ON and OFF center-surround receptive fields in RGCs, a key feature of visual information processing, may be important. A possible solution is to differentially express depolarizing and hyperpolarizing optogenetic tools, such as channelrhodopsin-2 and halorhodopsin, to the center and peripheral regions of the RGC dendritic field by using protein targeting motifs. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have proven to be a powerful vehicle for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery, including in the retina. Therefore, the search for protein targeting motifs that can achieve rAAV-mediated subcellular targeted expression would be particularly valuable for developing therapeutic applications. In this study, we identified two protein motifs that are suitable for rAAV-mediated subcellular targeting for generating center-surround receptive fields while reducing the axonal expression in RGCs. Resulting morphological dendritic field and physiological response field by center-targeting were significantly smaller than those produced by surround-targeting. rAAV motif-mediated protein targeting could also be a valuable tool for studying physiological function and clinical applications in other areas of the central nervous system.

  8. Obesity: Current and potential pharmacotherapeutics and targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, Vidya; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic that contributes to a number of health complications including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. Pharmacotherapeutic strategies to treat obesity are urgently needed. Research over the past two decades has increased substantially our knowledge of central and peripheral mechanisms underlying homeostatic energy balance. Homeostatic mechanisms involve multiple components including neuronal circuits, some originating in hypothalamus and brain stem, as well as peripherally-derived satiety, hunger and adiposity signals that modulate neural activity and regulate eating behavior. Dysregulation of one or more of these homeostatic components results in obesity. Coincident with obesity, reward mechanisms that regulate hedonic aspects of food intake override the homeostatic regulation of eating. In addition to functional interactions between homeostatic and reward systems in the regulation of food intake, homeostatic signals have the ability to alter vulnerability to drug abuse. Regarding the treatment of obesity, pharmacological monotherapies primarily focus on a single protein target. FDA-approved monotherapy options include phentermine (Adipex-P®), orlistat (Xenical®), lorcaserin (Belviq®) and liraglutide (Saxenda®). However, monotherapies have limited efficacy, in part due to the recruitment of alternate and counter-regulatory pathways. Consequently, a multi-target approach may provide greater benefit. Recently, two combination products have been approved by the FDA to treat obesity, including phentermine/topiramate (Qsymia®) and naltrexone/bupropion (Contrave®). The current review provides an overview of homeostatic and reward mechanisms that regulate energy balance, potential therapeutic targets for obesity and current treatment options, including some candidate therapeutics in clinical development. Finally, challenges in anti-obesity drug development are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  9. Obesity: Current and Potential Pharmacotherapeutics and Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, Vidya; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic that contributes to a number of health complications including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. Pharmacotherapeutic strategies to treat obesity are urgently needed. Research over the past two decades has increased substantially our knowledge of central and peripheral mechanisms underlying homeostatic energy balance. Homeostatic mechanisms involve multiple components including neuronal circuits, some originating in hypothalamus and brain stem, as well as peripherally-derived satiety, hunger and adiposity signals that modulate neural activity and regulate eating behavior. Dysregulation of one or more of these homeostatic components results in obesity. Coincident with obesity, reward mechanisms that regulate hedonic aspects of food intake override the homeostatic regulation of eating. In addition to functional interactions between homeostatic and reward systems in the regulation of food intake, homeostatic signals have the ability to alter vulnerability to drug abuse. Regarding the treatment of obesity, pharmacological monotherapies primarily focus on a single protein target. FDA-approved monotherapy options include phentermine (Adipex-P®), orlistat (Xenical®), lorcaserin (Belviq®) and liraglutide (Saxenda®). However, monotherapies have limited efficacy, in part due to the recruitment of alternate and counter-regulatory pathways. Consequently, a multi-target approach may provide greater benefit. Recently, two combination products have been approved by the FDA to treat obesity, including phentermine/topiramate (Qsymia®) and naltrexone/bupropion (Contrave®). The current review provides an overview of homeostatic and reward mechanisms that regulate energy balance, potential therapeutic targets for obesity and current treatment options, including some candidate therapeutics in clinical development. Finally, challenges in anti-obesity drug development are discussed. PMID:27773782

  10. Organ-targeted high-throughput in vivo biologics screen identifies materials for RNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tsung-Yao; Shi, Peng; Steinmeyer, Joseph D; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Tillberg, Paul; Love, Kevin T; Eimon, Peter M; Anderson, Daniel G; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2014-10-01

    Therapies based on biologics involving delivery of proteins, DNA, and RNA are currently among the most promising approaches. However, although large combinatorial libraries of biologics and delivery vehicles can be readily synthesized, there are currently no means to rapidly characterize them in vivo using animal models. Here, we demonstrate high-throughput in vivo screening of biologics and delivery vehicles by automated delivery into target tissues of small vertebrates with developed organs. Individual zebrafish larvae are automatically oriented and immobilized within hydrogel droplets in an array format using a microfluidic system, and delivery vehicles are automatically microinjected to target organs with high repeatability and precision. We screened a library of lipid-like delivery vehicles for their ability to facilitate the expression of protein-encoding RNAs in the central nervous system. We discovered delivery vehicles that are effective in both larval zebrafish and rats. Our results showed that the in vivo zebrafish model can be significantly more predictive of both false positives and false negatives in mammals than in vitro mammalian cell culture assays. Our screening results also suggest certain structure-activity relationships, which can potentially be applied to design novel delivery vehicles.

  11. Therapeutic Potential of Targeting the Ghrelin Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colldén, Gustav; Tschöp, Matthias H; Müller, Timo D

    2017-04-11

    Ghrelin was discovered in 1999 as the endogenous ligand of the growth-hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR1a). Since then, ghrelin has been found to exert a plethora of physiological effects that go far beyond its initial characterization as a growth hormone (GH) secretagogue. Among the numerous well-established effects of ghrelin are the stimulation of appetite and lipid accumulation, the modulation of immunity and inflammation, the stimulation of gastric motility, the improvement of cardiac performance, the modulation of stress, anxiety, taste sensation and reward-seeking behavior, as well as the regulation of glucose metabolism and thermogenesis. Due to a variety of beneficial effects on systems' metabolism, pharmacological targeting of the endogenous ghrelin system is widely considered a valuable approach to treat metabolic complications, such as chronic inflammation, gastroparesis or cancer-associated anorexia and cachexia. The aim of this review is to discuss and highlight the broad pharmacological potential of ghrelin pathway modulation for the treatment of anorexia, cachexia, sarcopenia, cardiopathy, neurodegenerative disorders, renal and pulmonary disease, gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, inflammatory disorders and metabolic syndrome.

  12. Design and development of receptor-avid peptide conjugates for in-vivo targeting of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    1999-07-01

    Radiometallated peptides that exhibit high specificity for cognate receptors over expressed on cancer cells offer important potential as site-directed diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. The formation of effective radioactive drugs for specific in vivo targeting of cancerous tumors is being facilitated by the integration of novel chelation strategies and receptor-avid derivatives. Significant efforts are being made to design Technetium-99m labeled for diagnostic imaging of cancerous tumors for use in conjunction with Single Photon Emission Tomography instrumentation in nuclear medicine. Receptor avid radiopharmaceutical are also being developed that utilize other radionuclides for imaging and therapeutic applications. Despite the technological challenges that must be overcome, radiolabeled receptor avid peptide conjugates are providing promising site-directed targeting agents for the assessment and treatment of cancerous tumors in humans.

  13. Fluorescent magnetic nanoparticle-labeled mesenchymal stem cells for targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy of in vivo gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jing; Ji, Jiajia; Song, Hua; Qian, Qirong; Wang, Kan; Wang, Can; Cui, Daxiang

    2012-06-01

    How to find early gastric cancer cells in vivo is a great challenge for the diagnosis and therapy of gastric cancer. This study is aimed at investigating the feasibility of using fluorescent magnetic nanoparticle (FMNP)-labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to realize targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy of in vivo gastric cancer. The primary cultured mouse marrow MSCs were labeled with amino-modified FMNPs then intravenously injected into mouse model with subcutaneous gastric tumor, and then, the in vivo distribution of FMNP-labeled MSCs was observed by using fluorescence imaging system and magnetic resonance imaging system. After FMNP-labeled MSCs arrived in local tumor tissues, subcutaneous tumor tissues in nude mice were treated under external alternating magnetic field. The possible mechanism of MSCs targeting gastric cancer was investigated by using a micro-multiwell chemotaxis chamber assay. Results show that MSCs were labeled with FMNPs efficiently and kept stable fluorescent signal and magnetic properties within 14 days, FMNP-labeled MSCs could target and image in vivo gastric cancer cells after being intravenously injected for 14 days, FMNP-labeled MSCs could significantly inhibit the growth of in vivo gastric cancer because of hyperthermia effects, and CCL19/CCR7 and CXCL12/CXCR4 axis loops may play key roles in the targeting of MSCs to in vivo gastric cancer. In conclusion, FMNP-labeled MSCs could target in vivo gastric cancer cells and have great potential in applications such as imaging, diagnosis, and hyperthermia therapy of early gastric cancer in the near future.

  14. Promoting target models by potential measures

    OpenAIRE

    Dubiel, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Direct marketers use target models in order to minimize the spreading loss of sales efforts. The application of target models has become more widespread with the increasing range of sales efforts. Target models are relevant for offline marketers sending printed mails as well as for online marketers who have to avoid intensity. However business has retained its evaluation since the late 1960s. Marketing decision-makers still prefer managerial performance measures of the economic benefit of a t...

  15. Quantification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC delivery to a target site using in vivo confocal microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke J Mortensen

    Full Text Available The ability to deliver cells to appropriate target tissues is a prerequisite for successful cell-based therapy. To optimize cell therapy it is therefore necessary to develop a robust method of in vivo cell delivery quantification. Here we examine Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs labeled with a series of 4 membrane dyes from which we select the optimal dye combination for pair-wise comparisons of delivery to inflamed tissue in the mouse ear using confocal fluorescence imaging. The use of an optimized dye pair for simultaneous tracking of two cell populations in the same animal enables quantification of a test population that is referenced to an internal control population, thereby eliminating intra-subject variations and variations in injected cell numbers. Consistent results were obtained even when the administered cell number varied by more than an order of magnitude, demonstrating an ability to neutralize one of the largest sources of in vivo experimental error and to greatly reduce the number of cells required to evaluate cell delivery. With this method, we are able to show a small but significant increase in the delivery of cytokine pre-treated MSCs (TNF-α & IFN-γ compared to control MSCs. Our results suggest future directions for screening cell strategies using our in vivo cell delivery assay, which may be useful to develop methods to maximize cell therapeutic potential.

  16. Target-specific binding of immunoliposomes in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, E.; Maruyama, K.; Kennel, S.; Klibanov, A.; Torchilin, V.; Ryan, U.; Huang, L.

    1989-01-01

    Our group at the University of Tennessee has been concentrating on using monoclonal antibody for targeting of a liposomal drug carrier system. This paper discusses our initial effort to target these liposomes using an organ-specific monoclonal antibody. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Protein tyrosine phosphatases as potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rong-Jun; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2014-10-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory process in virtually all aspects of cellular functions. Dysregulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a major cause of human diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and neurological diseases. Indeed, protein tyrosine phosphorylation-mediated signaling events offer ample therapeutic targets, and drug discovery efforts to date have brought over two dozen kinase inhibitors to the clinic. Accordingly, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are considered next-generation drug targets. For instance, PTP1B is a well-known targets of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and recent studies indicate that it is also a promising target for breast cancer. SHP2 is a bona-fide oncoprotein, mutations of which cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and solid tumors. In addition, LYP is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes and many other autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes recent findings on several highly recognized PTP family drug targets, including PTP1B, Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2(SHP2), lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), CD45, Fas associated phosphatase-1 (FAP-1), striatal enriched tyrosine phosphatases (STEP), mitogen-activated protein kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), phosphatases of regenerating liver-1 (PRL), low molecular weight PTPs (LMWPTP), and CDC25. Given that there are over 100 family members, we hope this review will serve as a road map for innovative drug discovery targeting PTPs.

  18. Radiometallated receptor-avid peptide conjugates for specific in vivo targeting of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, T.J.; Quinn, T.P.; Volkert, W.A. E-mail: VolkertW@health.missouri.edu

    2001-07-01

    New receptor-avid radiotracers are being developed for site-specific in vivo targeting of a myriad of receptors expressed on cancer cells. This review exemplifies strategies being used to design radiometallated peptide conjugates that maximize uptake in tumors and optimize their in vivo pharmacokinetic properties. Efforts to produce synthetic peptide analogues that target the following three receptor systems are highlighted: Gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone ({alpha}-MSH), and guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C) receptors.

  19. Evaluating the Efficacy of ERG-Targeted Therapy in Vivo for Prostate Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    therapeutic attack and prevention through diet and nutrition . Semin Cancer Biol (2015). In press. PMID: 25869442. 3. Invited Articles (Since the...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0272 TITLE: Evaluating the Efficacy of ERG-Targeted Therapy in Vivo for Prostate Tumors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluating the Efficacy of ERG-Targeted Therapy in Vivo for Prostate Tumors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0272 5c

  20. In vitro and in vivo characterization of microRNA-targeted alphavirus replicon and helper RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, Kurt I; Coffield, V McNeil; Owens, Gary; Goodman, Christin; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Murphy, Michael A; Lewis, Whitney; Timberlake, Sarah; Wansley, Elizabeth K; Berglund, Peter; Smith, Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon vector systems (family Togaviridae) have been developed as expression vectors with demonstrated potential in vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer. The single-cycle nature of virus-like replicon particles (VRP), generated by supplying the structural proteins from separate replicable helper RNAs, is an attractive safety component of these systems. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important cellular RNA regulation elements. Recently, miRNAs have been employed as a mechanism to attenuate or restrict cellular tropism of replication-competent viruses, such as oncolytic adenoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus, and picornaviruses as well as nonreplicating lentiviral and adenoviral vectors. Here, we describe the incorporation of miRNA-specific target sequences into replicable alphavirus helper RNAs that are used in trans to provide the structural proteins required for VRP production. VRP were found to be efficiently produced using miRNA-targeted helper RNAs if miRNA-specific inhibitors were introduced into cells during VRP production. In the absence of such inhibitors, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating helper RNA replication in vitro. When miRNA targets were incorporated into a replicon RNA, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating replicon RNA replication upon delivery of VRP into animals, demonstrating activity in vivo. These data provide the first example of miRNA-specific repression of alphavirus replicon and helper RNA replication and demonstrate the feasibility of miRNA targeting of expression vector helper functions that are provided in trans.

  1. Molecularly self-assembled nucleic acid nanoparticles for targeted in vivo siRNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyukjin; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K. R.; Chen, Yi; Love, Kevin T.; Park, Angela I.; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D.; Sehgal, Alfica; Querbes, William; Zurenko, Christopher S.; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Peng, Chang G.; Charisse, Klaus; Borodovsky, Anna; Manoharan, Muthiah; Donahoe, Jessica S.; Truelove, Jessica; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2012-06-01

    Nanoparticles are used for delivering therapeutics into cells. However, size, shape, surface chemistry and the presentation of targeting ligands on the surface of nanoparticles can affect circulation half-life and biodistribution, cell-specific internalization, excretion, toxicity and efficacy. A variety of materials have been explored for delivering small interfering RNAs (siRNAs)--a therapeutic agent that suppresses the expression of targeted genes. However, conventional delivery nanoparticles such as liposomes and polymeric systems are heterogeneous in size, composition and surface chemistry, and this can lead to suboptimal performance, a lack of tissue specificity and potential toxicity. Here, we show that self-assembled DNA tetrahedral nanoparticles with a well-defined size can deliver siRNAs into cells and silence target genes in tumours. Monodisperse nanoparticles are prepared through the self-assembly of complementary DNA strands. Because the DNA strands are easily programmable, the size of the nanoparticles and the spatial orientation and density of cancer-targeting ligands (such as peptides and folate) on the nanoparticle surface can be controlled precisely. We show that at least three folate molecules per nanoparticle are required for optimal delivery of the siRNAs into cells and, gene silencing occurs only when the ligands are in the appropriate spatial orientation. In vivo, these nanoparticles showed a longer blood circulation time (t1/2 ~ 24.2 min) than the parent siRNA (t1/2 ~ 6 min).

  2. Multimodality imaging in vivo for preclinical assessment of tumor-targeted doxorubicin nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Youn Hwang

    Full Text Available This study presents a new multimodal imaging approach that includes high-frequency ultrasound, fluorescence intensity, confocal, and spectral imaging to improve the preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics in vivo. Here we use this approach to assess in vivo the therapeutic efficacy of the novel chemotherapy construct, HerDox during and after treatment. HerDox is comprised of doxorubicin non-covalently assembled in a viral-like particle targeted to HER2+ tumor cells, causing tumor cell death at over 10-fold lower dose compared to the untargeted drug, while sparing the heart. Whereas our initial proof-of-principle studies on HerDox used tumor growth/shrinkage rates as a measure of therapeutic efficacy, here we show that multimodal imaging deployed during and after treatment can supplement traditional modes of tumor monitoring to further characterize the particle in tissues of treated mice. Specifically, we show here that tumor cell apoptosis elicited by HerDox can be monitored in vivo during treatment using high frequency ultrasound imaging, while in situ confocal imaging of excised tumors shows that HerDox indeed penetrated tumor tissue and can be detected at the subcellular level, including in the nucleus, via Dox fluorescence. In addition, ratiometric spectral imaging of the same tumor tissue enables quantitative discrimination of HerDox fluorescence from autofluorescence in situ. In contrast to standard approaches of preclinical assessment, this new method provides multiple/complementary information that may shorten the time required for initial evaluation of in vivo efficacy, thus potentially reducing the time and cost for translating new drug molecules into the clinic.

  3. Multimodality imaging in vivo for preclinical assessment of tumor-targeted doxorubicin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Park, Jinhyoung; Kang, Bong Jin; Lubow, David J; Chu, David; Farkas, Daniel L; Shung, K Kirk; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a new multimodal imaging approach that includes high-frequency ultrasound, fluorescence intensity, confocal, and spectral imaging to improve the preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics in vivo. Here we use this approach to assess in vivo the therapeutic efficacy of the novel chemotherapy construct, HerDox during and after treatment. HerDox is comprised of doxorubicin non-covalently assembled in a viral-like particle targeted to HER2+ tumor cells, causing tumor cell death at over 10-fold lower dose compared to the untargeted drug, while sparing the heart. Whereas our initial proof-of-principle studies on HerDox used tumor growth/shrinkage rates as a measure of therapeutic efficacy, here we show that multimodal imaging deployed during and after treatment can supplement traditional modes of tumor monitoring to further characterize the particle in tissues of treated mice. Specifically, we show here that tumor cell apoptosis elicited by HerDox can be monitored in vivo during treatment using high frequency ultrasound imaging, while in situ confocal imaging of excised tumors shows that HerDox indeed penetrated tumor tissue and can be detected at the subcellular level, including in the nucleus, via Dox fluorescence. In addition, ratiometric spectral imaging of the same tumor tissue enables quantitative discrimination of HerDox fluorescence from autofluorescence in situ. In contrast to standard approaches of preclinical assessment, this new method provides multiple/complementary information that may shorten the time required for initial evaluation of in vivo efficacy, thus potentially reducing the time and cost for translating new drug molecules into the clinic.

  4. Vascular bed-targeted in vivo gene delivery using tropism-modified adeno-associated viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Lorraine M; Büning, Hildegard; Hunt, Ela; Nicklin, Stuart A; Denby, Laura; Britton, Nicola; Leike, Kristen; Odenthal, Margarete; Drebber, Uta; Hallek, Michael; Baker, Andrew H

    2006-04-01

    Virus-mediated gene delivery is restricted by the infectivity profile of the chosen vector. Targeting the vascular endothelium via systemic delivery has been attempted using peptides isolated in vitro (using either phage or vector display) and implicit reliance on target receptor expression in vivo. This has limited application since endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo differ vastly in receptor profiles and because of the existence of complex endothelial "zip codes" in vivo. We therefore tested whether in vivo phage display combined with adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid modifications would allow in vivo homing to the endothelium residing in defined organs. Extensive in vivo biopanning in rats identified four consensus peptides homing to the lung or brain. Each was incorporated into the VP3 region of the AAV-2 capsid to display the peptide at the virion surface. Peptides that conferred heparan independence were shown to retarget virus to the expected vascular bed in vivo in a preferential manner, determined 28 days post-systemic injection by both virion DNA and transgene expression profiling. Our findings significantly impact the design of viral vectors for targeting individual vascular beds in vivo.

  5. CRISPR/Cas9 – Mediated Precise Targeted Integration In Vivo Using a Double Cut Donor with Short Homology Arms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Yao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Precisely targeted genome editing is highly desired for clinical applications. However, the widely used homology-directed repair (HDR-based genome editing strategies remain inefficient for certain in vivo applications. We here demonstrate a microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ-based strategy for precisely targeted gene integration in transfected neurons and hepatocytes in vivo with efficiencies up to 20%, much higher (up to 10 fold than HDR-based strategy in adult mouse tissues. As a proof of concept of its therapeutic potential, we demonstrate the efficacy of MMEJ-based strategy in correction of Fah mutation and rescue of Fah−/− liver failure mice, offering an efficient approach for precisely targeted gene therapies.

  6. Sphingolipid and Ceramide Homeostasis: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A. Young

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells where they have been attributed a plethora of functions from the formation of structural domains to polarized cellular trafficking and signal transduction. Recent research has identified and characterised many of the key enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism and this has led to a heightened interest in the possibility of targeting these processes for therapies against cancers, Alzheimer's disease, and numerous important human pathogens. In this paper we outline the major pathways in eukaryotic sphingolipid metabolism and discuss these in relation to disease and therapy for both chronic and infectious conditions.

  7. Reactor potential for magnetized target fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, J.E

    2001-06-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a possible pathway to thermonuclear fusion different from both magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion. An imploding cylindrical metal liner compresses a preheated and magnetized plasma configuration until thermonuclear conditions are achieved. In this report the Magnetized Target Fusion concept is evaluated and a zero-dimensional computer model of the plasma, liner and circuit as a connected system is designed. The results of running this code are that thermonuclear conditions are achieved indeed, but only during a very short time. At peak compression the pressure from the compressed plasma and magnetic field is so large reversing the liner implosion into an explosion. The time period of liner motion reversal is termed the dwell time and is crucial to the performance of the fusion system. Parameters as liner thickness and plasma density are certainly of significant importance to the dwell time, but it seems like a reactor based on the MTF principle hardly can become economic if not innovative solutions are introduced. In the report two such solutions are presented as well.

  8. Bilayered near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles based on low molecular weight PEI for tumor-targeted in vivo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Ke [Xi’an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Education Ministry, School of Life Science and Technology (China); Xu, Liang [The University of Kansas, Department of Molecular Biosciences (United States); Wu, Daocheng, E-mail: wudaocheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Xi’an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Education Ministry, School of Life Science and Technology (China)

    2014-12-15

    To improve the tumor fluorescent imaging results in vivo, bilayered nanoparticles encapsulating a lipophilic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindotri-carbocyanine iodide (DiR) were prepared using low molecular weight stearic acid-grafted polyethyleneimine and hyaluronic acid (DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles), which were investigated as a novel NIR fluorescent nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted optical imaging. These nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), infrared (IR) spectra, UV-visual absorption, and fluorescent emission spectra. Their cytotoxicity in vitro and hepatotoxicity in vivo were tested by MTT assay and histological study, respectively. In vivo NIR fluorescence imaging of the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was performed using a Carestream imaging system. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles were sphere shaped with a diameter of approximately 50 nm according to the TEM images. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles had a low cytotoxicity in vitro according to the MTT assay and low hepatotoxicity in vivo as determined in histological studies. The fluorescent emission of DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was stable in pH values of 5–9 in solution, with only slight blue-shifts of the emission maxima at the basic pH range. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles exhibited a substantial tumor-targeting ability in the optical imaging with the use of tumor-bearing mice. These results demonstrated that the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticle is an excellent biocompatible nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted NIR fluorescence imaging with a potential for clinical applications.

  9. Prediction of potential drug targets based on simple sequence properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Luhua

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past decades, research and development in drug discovery have attracted much attention and efforts. However, only 324 drug targets are known for clinical drugs up to now. Identifying potential drug targets is the first step in the process of modern drug discovery for developing novel therapeutic agents. Therefore, the identification and validation of new and effective drug targets are of great value for drug discovery in both academia and pharmaceutical industry. If a protein can be predicted in advance for its potential application as a drug target, the drug discovery process targeting this protein will be greatly speeded up. In the current study, based on the properties of known drug targets, we have developed a sequence-based drug target prediction method for fast identification of novel drug targets. Results Based on simple physicochemical properties extracted from protein sequences of known drug targets, several support vector machine models have been constructed in this study. The best model can distinguish currently known drug targets from non drug targets at an accuracy of 84%. Using this model, potential protein drug targets of human origin from Swiss-Prot were predicted, some of which have already attracted much attention as potential drug targets in pharmaceutical research. Conclusion We have developed a drug target prediction method based solely on protein sequence information without the knowledge of family/domain annotation, or the protein 3D structure. This method can be applied in novel drug target identification and validation, as well as genome scale drug target predictions.

  10. Pharmacokinetic characteristics, pharmacodynamic effect and in vivo antiviral efficacy of liver-targeted interferon alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rycroft

    Full Text Available Interferon alpha (IFNα is used for the treatment of hepatitis B virus infection, and whilst efficacious, it is associated with multiple adverse events caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting IFN directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFNα therapy. Furthermore we investigated whether directing IFN to the reservoir of infection in the liver may improve antiviral efficacy by increasing local concentration in target organs and tissues. Our previous results show that the mIFNα2 fused to an ASGPR specific liver targeting antibody, DOM26h-196-61, results in a fusion protein which retains the activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. In vivo targeting of the liver by mIFNα2-DOM26h-196-61, hereafter referred to as targeted mIFNα2, was observed in microSPECT imaging studies in mice. In this study we show by pharmacokinetic analysis that antibody mediated liver-targeting results in increased uptake and exposure of targeted mIFNα2 in target tissues, and correspondingly reduced uptake and exposure in systemic circulation, clearance organs and non-target tissues. We also show that cytokine activity and antiviral activity of liver-targeted IFN is observed in vivo, but that, contrary to expectations, liver-targeting of mIFNα2 using ASGPR specific dAbs actually leads to a reduced pharmacodynamic effect in target organs and lower antiviral activity in vivo when compared to non-targeted mIFNα2-dAb fusions.

  11. Potential of acylated peptides to target the influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lauster

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For antiviral drug design, especially in the field of influenza virus research, potent multivalent inhibitors raise high expectations for combating epidemics and pandemics. Among a large variety of covalent and non-covalent scaffold systems for a multivalent display of inhibitors, we created a simple supramolecular platform to enhance the antiviral effect of our recently developed antiviral Peptide B (PeBGF, preventing binding of influenza virus to the host cell. By conjugating the peptide with stearic acid to create a higher-order structure with a multivalent display, we could significantly enhance the inhibitory effect against the serotypes of both human pathogenic influenza virus A/Aichi/2/1968 H3N2, and avian pathogenic A/FPV/Rostock/34 H7N1 in the hemagglutination inhibition assay. Further, the inhibitory potential of stearylated PeBGF (C18-PeBGF was investigated by infection inhibition assays, in which we achieved low micromolar inhibition constants against both viral strains. In addition, we compared C18-PeBGF to other published amphiphilic peptide inhibitors, such as the stearylated sugar receptor mimicking peptide (Matsubara et al. 2010, and the “Entry Blocker” (EB (Jones et al. 2006, with respect to their antiviral activity against infection by Influenza A Virus (IAV H3N2. However, while this strategy seems at a first glance promising, the native situation is quite different from our experimental model settings. First, we found a strong potential of those peptides to form large amyloid-like supramolecular assemblies. Second, in vivo, the large excess of cell surface membranes provides an unspecific target for the stearylated peptides. We show that acylated peptides insert into the lipid phase of such membranes. Eventually, our study reveals serious limitations of this type of self-assembling IAV inhibitors.

  12. Retinoids as potential targets for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Rupinder K; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin A and its derivatives, the retinoids, modulate several physiological and pathological processes through their interactions with nuclear retinoid receptor proteins termed as retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). An increasing body of evidence signifies the existence of retinoid signaling in diverse brain areas including cortex, amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and striatum suggesting its involvement in adult brain functions. Defective retinoid signaling has been evidenced in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Reports demonstrate that vitamin A deprived mice exhibit serious defects in spatial learning and memory signifying its importance in the maintenance of memory functions. Retinoid signaling impacts the development of AD pathology through multiple pathways. Ligand activation of RAR and RXR in APP/PS1 transgenic mice ameliorated the symptoms of AD and reduced amyloid accumulation and tau hyperphosphorylation. Retinoids also reduce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by astrocytes and the microglia. Studies also suggest that neuronal cell lines treated with retinoid agonists exhibit an up-regulation in the expression and activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Reports depict that retinoic acid isomers enhance, the expression of genes linked with cholesterol efflux e.g. apoe, abca-1 and abcg-1 proteins in astrocytes. Furthermore numerous studies also indicate antioxidant potential of retinoids. Through this review we concisely summarize the biology of retinoids, emphasizing on their probable neuroprotective mechanisms that will help to elucidate the pivotal role of these receptors in AD pathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dyslipidemia in Obesity: Mechanisms and Potential Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Willem F. Elte

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has become a major worldwide health problem. In every single country in the world, the incidence of obesity is rising continuously and therefore, the associated morbidity, mortality and both medical and economical costs are expected to increase as well. The majority of these complications are related to co-morbid conditions that include coronary artery disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, respiratory disorders and dyslipidemia. Obesity increases cardiovascular risk through risk factors such as increased fasting plasma triglycerides, high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, elevated blood glucose and insulin levels and high blood pressure. Novel lipid dependent, metabolic risk factors associated to obesity are the presence of the small dense LDL phenotype, postprandial hyperlipidemia with accumulation of atherogenic remnants and hepatic overproduction of apoB containing lipoproteins. All these lipid abnormalities are typical features of the metabolic syndrome and may be associated to a pro-inflammatory gradient which in part may originate in the adipose tissue itself and directly affect the endothelium. An important link between obesity, the metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia, seems to be the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues leading to an enhanced hepatic flux of fatty acids from dietary sources, intravascular lipolysis and from adipose tissue resistant to the antilipolytic effects of insulin. The current review will focus on these aspects of lipid metabolism in obesity and potential interventions to treat the obesity related dyslipidemia.

  14. Dyslipidemia in obesity: mechanisms and potential targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klop, Boudewijn; Elte, Jan Willem F; Cabezas, Manuel Castro

    2013-04-12

    Obesity has become a major worldwide health problem. In every single country in the world, the incidence of obesity is rising continuously and therefore, the associated morbidity, mortality and both medical and economical costs are expected to increase as well. The majority of these complications are related to co-morbid conditions that include coronary artery disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, respiratory disorders and dyslipidemia. Obesity increases cardiovascular risk through risk factors such as increased fasting plasma triglycerides, high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, elevated blood glucose and insulin levels and high blood pressure. Novel lipid dependent, metabolic risk factors associated to obesity are the presence of the small dense LDL phenotype, postprandial hyperlipidemia with accumulation of atherogenic remnants and hepatic overproduction of apoB containing lipoproteins. All these lipid abnormalities are typical features of the metabolic syndrome and may be associated to a pro-inflammatory gradient which in part may originate in the adipose tissue itself and directly affect the endothelium. An important link between obesity, the metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia, seems to be the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues leading to an enhanced hepatic flux of fatty acids from dietary sources, intravascular lipolysis and from adipose tissue resistant to the antilipolytic effects of insulin. The current review will focus on these aspects of lipid metabolism in obesity and potential interventions to treat the obesity related dyslipidemia.

  15. Aptamers targeting rabies virus-infected cells inhibit street rabies virus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong-Ru; Hu, Gui-Qiu; Li, Ling; Gao, Yu-Wei; Yang, Song-Tao; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2014-08-01

    Rabies is a viral infection of the CNS that is almost always fatal once symptoms occur. No effective treatment of the disease is available and novel antiviral strategies are urgently required. Street rabies viruses are field isolates known to be highly neurotropic. Aptamers are single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind their targets with high affinity and specificity and thus have potential for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this study, we demonstrate that the aptamers FO24 and FO21, which target RABV-infected cells, can significantly protect mice from a lethal dose of the street rabies virus FJ strain in vivo. Groups receiving preexposure prophylaxis had higher survival rates than the groups receiving postexposure prophylaxis. When mice were inoculated with aptamers (4 nmol) for 24h by intracranial or intramuscular injection prior to intramuscular inoculation with the FJ strain, approximately 60% of the mice survived. These results indicate that the FO21 and FO24 aptamers may be used to develop preventative antiviral therapy against rabies disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Thyroid cancer imaging in vivo by targeting the anti-apoptotic molecule galectin-3.

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    Armando Bartolazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of thyroid nodules increases with age, average 4-7% for the U.S.A. adult population, but it is much higher (19-67% when sub-clinical nodules are considered. About 90% of these lesions are benign and a reliable approach to their preoperative characterization is necessary. Unfortunately conventional thyroid scintigraphy does not allow the distinction among benign and malignant thyroid proliferations but it provides only functional information (cold or hot nodules. The expression of the anti-apoptotic molecule galectin-3 is restricted to cancer cells and this feature has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications. We show here the possibility to obtain thyroid cancer imaging in vivo by targeting galectin-3. METHODS: The galectin-3 based thyroid immuno-scintigraphy uses as radiotracer a specific (99mTc-radiolabeled mAb. A position-sensitive high-resolution mini-gamma camera was used as imaging capture device. Human galectin-3 positive thyroid cancer xenografts (ARO and galectin-3 knockout tumors were used as targets in different experiments in vivo. 38 mice with tumor mass of about 1 gm were injected in the tail vein with 100 microCi of (99mTc-labeled mAb to galectin-3 (30 microg protein/in 100 microl saline solution. Tumor images were acquired at 1 hr, 3 hrs, 6 hrs, 9 hrs and 24 hrs post injection by using the mini-gamma camera. FINDINGS: Results from different consecutive experiments show an optimal visualization of thyroid cancer xenografts between 6 and 9 hours from injection of the radiotracer. Galectin-3 negative tumors were not detected at all. At 6 hrs post-injection galectin-3 expressing tumors were correctly visualized, while the whole-body activity had essentially cleared. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate the possibility to distinguish preoperatively benign from malignant thyroid nodules by using a specific galectin-3 radio-immunotargeting. In vivo imaging of thyroid cancer may allow a better

  17. In vivo imaging of specific drug-target binding at subcellular resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubach, J. M.; Vinegoni, C.; Mazitschek, R.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Cameron, L. A.; Weissleder, R.

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of measuring binding of small-molecule drugs to desired targets in live cells could provide a better understanding of drug action. However, current approaches mostly yield static data, require lysis or rely on indirect assays and thus often provide an incomplete understanding of drug action. Here, we present a multiphoton fluorescence anisotropy microscopy live cell imaging technique to measure and map drug-target interaction in real time at subcellular resolution. This approach is generally applicable using any fluorescently labelled drug and enables high-resolution spatial and temporal mapping of bound and unbound drug distribution. To illustrate our approach we measure intracellular target engagement of the chemotherapeutic Olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, in live cells and within a tumour in vivo. These results are the first generalizable approach to directly measure drug-target binding in vivo and present a promising tool to enhance understanding of drug activity.

  18. Design and In Vivo Characterization of Immunoconjugates Targeting HIV gp160

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kejing; Maresh, Grace A.; Frank, Anderson; Worthylake, David; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Polacino, Patricia; Hamer, Dean H.; Coyne, Cody P.; Rosenblum, Michael G.; Marks, John W.; Chen, Gang; Weiss, Deborah; Ghetie, Victor; Vitetta, Ellen S.; Robinson, James E.; Hu, Shiu-Lok

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The envelope (Env) glycoprotein of HIV is expressed on the surface of productively infected cells and can be used as a target for cytotoxic immunoconjugates (ICs), in which cell-killing moieties, including toxins, drugs, or radionuclides, are chemically or genetically linked to monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) or other targeting ligands. Such ICs could be used to eliminate persistent reservoirs of HIV infection. We have found that MAbs which bind to the external loop of gp41, e.g., MAb 7B2, make highly effective ICs, particularly when used in combination with soluble CD4. We evaluated the toxicity, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the ICs targeted with 7B2 in mice and in simian-human immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques. In the macaques, we tested immunotoxins (ITs), consisting of protein toxins bound to the targeting agent. ITs were well tolerated and initially efficacious but were ultimately limited by their immunogenicity. In an effort to decrease immunogenicity, we tested different toxic moieties, including recombinant toxins, cytotoxic drugs, and tubulin inhibitors. ICs containing deglycosylated ricin A chain prepared from ricin toxin extracted from castor beans were the most effective in killing HIV-infected cells. Having identified immunogenicity as a major concern, we show that conjugation of IT to polyethylene glycol limits immunogenicity. These studies demonstrate that cytotoxic ICs can target virus-infected cells in vivo but also highlight potential problems to be addressed. IMPORTANCE It is not yet possible to cure HIV infection. Even after years of fully effective antiviral therapy, a persistent reservoir of virus-infected cells remains. Here we propose that a targeted conjugate consisting of an anti-HIV antibody bound to a toxic moiety could function to kill the HIV-infected cells that constitute this reservoir. We tested this approach in HIV-infected cells grown in the lab and in animal infections. Our studies demonstrated that these

  19. Targeted decorin gene therapy delivered with adeno-associated virus effectively retards corneal neovascularization in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv R Mohan

    Full Text Available Decorin, small leucine-rich proteoglycan, has been shown to modulate angiogenesis in nonocular tissues. This study tested a hypothesis that tissue-selective targeted decorin gene therapy delivered to the rabbit stroma with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5 impedes corneal neovascularization (CNV in vivo without significant side effects. An established rabbit CNV model was used. Targeted decorin gene therapy in the rabbit stroma was delivered with a single topical AAV5 titer (100 µl; 5×10(12 vg/ml application onto the stroma for two minutes after removing corneal epithelium. The levels of CNV were examined with stereomicroscopy, H&E staining, lectin, collagen type IV, CD31 immunocytochemistry and CD31 immunoblotting. Real-time PCR quantified mRNA expression of pro- and anti-angiogenic genes. Corneal health in live animals was monitored with clinical, slit-lamp and optical coherence tomography biomicroscopic examinations. Selective decorin delivery into stroma showed significant 52% (p<0.05, 66% (p<0.001, and 63% (p<0.01 reduction at early (day 5, mid (day 10, and late (day 14 stages of CNV in decorin-delivered rabbit corneas compared to control (no decorin delivered corneas in morphometric analysis. The H&E staining, lectin, collagen type IV, CD31 immunostaining (57-65, p<0.5, and CD31 immunoblotting (62-67%, p<0.05 supported morphometric findings. Quantitative PCR studies demonstrated decorin gene therapy down-regulated expression of VEGF, MCP1 and angiopoietin (pro-angiogenic and up-regulated PEDF (anti-angiogenic genes. The clinical, biomicroscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that AAV5-mediated decorin gene therapy is safe for the cornea. Tissue-targeted AAV5-mediated decorin gene therapy decreases CNV with no major side effects, and could potentially be used for treating patients.

  20. Targeted in vivo delivery of nucleic acids by lipid-based carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartsch, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the development of targeted liposomal carriers for the delivery of antisense ODN and DNA in vivo to various cell types in the liver. The power of the antisense approach as well as of DNA transfection has been thoroughly characterized in numerous in vitro studies. However,

  1. Ephrin A2 receptor targeting does not increase adenoviral pancreatic cancer transduction in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geer, M.A.; Bakker, C.T.; Koizumi, N.; Mizuguchi, H.; Wesseling, J.G.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Bosma, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To generate an adenoviral vector specifically targeting the EphA2 receptor (EphA2R) highly expressed on pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. METHODS: YSA, a small peptide ligand that binds the EphA2R with high affinity, was inserted into the HI loop of the adenovirus serotype 5 fiber knob. To

  2. In vivo evidence of the targeting of cartilaginous tissue by pyridinium functionalized nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlieras, Jessica; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elizabeth; Vidal, Aurélien; Besse, Sophie; Kryza, David; Truillet, Charles; Mignot, Anna; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Redini, Françoise; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Perriat, Pascal; Janier, Marc; Tillement, Olivier

    2013-04-14

    Ultrasmall gadolinium based particles have been functionalized with positively charged pyridinium quaternary ammonium and labelled with (111)In. Evidence of their active targeting properties towards proteoglycans has been demonstrated in vivo after intravenous injection into rats opening thus a route to cancer imaging and therapy.

  3. Fluorophore-quencher based activatable targeted optical probes for detecting in vivo cancer metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Mikako; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Longmire, Michelle R; Urano, Yasuteru; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2009-01-01

    In vivo molecularly targeted fluorescence imaging of tumors has been proposed as a strategy for improving cancer detection and management. Activatable fluorophores, which increased their fluorescence by 10-fold after binding tumor cells, result in much higher target to background ratios than conventional fluorophores. We developed an in vivo targeted activatable optical imaging probe based on a fluorophore-quencher pair, bound to a targeting moiety. With this system, fluorescence is quenched by the fluorophore-quencher interaction outside cancer cells, but is activated within the target cells by dissociation of the fluorophore-quencher pair. We selected the TAMRA (fluorophore)-QSY7 (quencher) pair and conjugated it to either avidin (targeting the D-galactose receptor) or trastuzumab (a monoclonal antibody against the human epithelial growth factor receptor type2 (HER2/neu)) and evaluated their performance in mouse models of cancer. Two probes, TAMRA-QSY7 conjugated avidin (Av-TM-Q7) and trastuzumab (Traz-TM-Q7) were synthesized. Both demonstrated better than similar self-quenching probes. In vitro fluorescence microscopic studies of SHIN3 and NIH/3T3/HER2+ cells demonstrated that Av-TM-Q7 and Traz-TM-Q7 produced high intracellular fluorescent signal. In vivo imaging with Av-TM-Q7 and Traz-TM-Q7 in mice enabled the detection of small tumors. This molecular imaging probe, based on a fluorophore-quencher pair conjugated to a targeting ligand, successfully detected tumors in vivo due to its high activation ratio and low background signal. Thus, these activatable probes, based on the fluorophore-quencher system, hold promise clinically for "see and treat" strategies of cancer management.

  4. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  5. Assessing the Impact of Tissue Target Concentration Data on Uncertainty in In Vivo Target Coverage Predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A; Luo, H; Chen, X; Singh, P; Bhattacharya, I; Jasper, P; Tolsma, J E; Jones, H M; Zutshi, A; Abraham, A K

    2016-10-01

    Understanding pharmacological target coverage is fundamental in drug discovery and development as it helps establish a sequence of research activities, from laboratory objectives to clinical doses. To this end, we evaluated the impact of tissue target concentration data on the level of confidence in tissue coverage predictions using a site of action (SoA) model for antibodies. By fitting the model to increasing amounts of synthetic tissue data and comparing the uncertainty in SoA coverage predictions, we confirmed that, in general, uncertainty decreases with longitudinal tissue data. Furthermore, a global sensitivity analysis showed that coverage is sensitive to experimentally identifiable parameters, such as baseline target concentration in plasma and target turnover half-life and fixing them reduces uncertainty in coverage predictions. Overall, our computational analysis indicates that measurement of baseline tissue target concentration reduces the uncertainty in coverage predictions and identifies target-related parameters that greatly impact the confidence in coverage predictions. © 2016 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  6. Deletions within its subcellular targeting domain enhance the axon protective capacity of Nmnat2 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde, Stefan; Fox, A Nicole; Freeman, Marc R; Coleman, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    The NAD-synthesising enzyme Nmnat2 is a critical survival factor for axons in vitro and in vivo. We recently reported that loss of axonal transport vesicle association through mutations in its isoform-specific targeting and interaction domain (ISTID) reduces Nmnat2 ubiquitination, prolongs its half-life and boosts its axon protective capacity in primary culture neurons. Here, we report evidence for a role of ISTID sequences in tuning Nmnat2 localisation, stability and protective capacity in vivo. Deletion of central ISTID sequences abolishes vesicle association and increases protein stability of fluorescently tagged, transgenic Nmnat2 in mouse peripheral axons in vivo. Overexpression of fluorescently tagged Nmnat2 significantly delays Wallerian degeneration in these mice. Furthermore, while mammalian Nmnat2 is unable to protect transected Drosophila olfactory receptor neuron axons in vivo, mutant Nmnat2s lacking ISTID regions substantially delay Wallerian degeneration. Together, our results establish Nmnat2 localisation and turnover as a valuable target for modulating axon degeneration in vivo.

  7. Carboplatin loaded Surface modified PLGA nanoparticles: Optimization, characterization, and in vivo brain targeting studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, S; Juna, B C; Cinu, T A; Jyoti, H; Aleykutty, N A

    2016-06-01

    The carboplatin (CP) loaded poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) were formulated by modified solvent evaporation method. Its surface modification is done by 1% polysorbate80 (P80) to improve their entry into the brain after intraperitoneal administration (i.p) via receptor-mediated pathways. A formulation with maximum entrapment efficiency and minimal particle size was optimized by central composite design (CCD) based on mean particle size, and entrapment efficiencies as responses. The optimized formulation was characterized by mean particle size, entrapment efficiency, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The surface modified NPs were analysed for mean particle, zeta potential, FTIR, and in vitro release studies. The spherical particles with mean particle size 161.9nm, 162.4nm and zeta potential value of -26.5, -23.9 were obtained for unmodified and surface modified NPs respectively. The in vitro release experiments of the surface modified PLGA NPs exhibited sustained release for more than 48h, which was in accordance with Higuchi's equation with Fickian diffusion-based release mechanism. The in vivo bio distribution of P80 coated CP loaded PLGA NPs was compared with CP solution, and CP loaded NPs, in adult wistar rats. In the brain, compared with CP solution, both types of NPs especially NPs coated with P80 increased the concentration of carboplatin by 3.27 fold. All these results suggest that the developed formulation may improve the targeted therapy for malignant brain tumors in future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Folate/NIR 797-conjugated albumin magnetic nanospheres: synthesis, characterisation, and in vitro and in vivo targeting evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiusha Tang

    Full Text Available A practical and effective strategy for synthesis of Folate-NIR 797-conjugated Magnetic Albumin Nanospheres (FA-NIR 797-MAN was developed. For this strategy, Magnetic Albumin Nanospheres (MAN, composed of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs and bovine serum albumin (BSA, were covalently conjugated with folic acid (FA ligands to enhance the targeting capability of the particles to folate receptor (FR over-expressing tumours. Subsequently, a near-infrared (NIR fluorescent dye NIR 797 was conjugated with FA-conjugated MAN for in vivo fluorescence imaging. The FA-NIR 797-MAN exhibited low toxicity to a human nasopharyngeal epidermal carcinoma cell line (KB cells. Additionally, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the dynamic behaviour and targeting ability of FA-NIR 797-MAN to KB tumours validated the highly selective affinity of FA-NIR 797-MAN for FR-positive tumours. In summary, the FA-NIR 797-MAN prepared here exhibited great potential for tumour imaging, since the near-infrared fluorescence contrast agents target cells via FR-mediated endocytosis. The high fluorescence intensity together with the targeting effect makes FA-NIR 797-MAN a promising candidate for imaging, monitoring, and early diagnosis of cancer at the molecular and cellular levels.

  9. Can ID repetitive elements serve as cis-acting dendritic targeting elements? An in vivo study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasneem Khanam

    Full Text Available Dendritic localization of mRNA/RNA involves interaction of cis-elements and trans-factors. Small, non-protein coding dendritic BC1 RNA is thought to regulate translation in dendritic microdomains. Following microinjections into cultured cells, BC1 RNA fused to larger mRNAs appeared to impart transport competence to these chimeras, and its 5' ID region was proposed as the cis-acting dendritic targeting element. As these ID elements move around rodent genomes and, if transcribed, form a long RNA stem-loop, they might, thereby, lead to new localizations for targeted gene products. To test their targeting ability in vivo we created transgenic mice expressing various ID elements fused to the 3' UTR of reporter mRNA for Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein. In vivo, neither ID elements nor the BC1 RNA coding region were capable of transporting EGFP RNA to dendrites, although the 3' UTR of alpha-CaMKII mRNA, an established cis-acting element did produce positive results. Other mRNAs containing naturally inserted ID elements are also not found in neuronal dendrites. We conclude that the 5' ID domain from BC1 RNA is not a sufficient dendritic targeting element for mRNAs in vivo.

  10. Non-viral gene therapy that targets motor neurons in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Louise eRogers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in neurological gene therapy is safe delivery of transgenes to sufficient cell numbers from the circulation or periphery. This is particularly difficult for diseases involving spinal cord motor neurons such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. We have examined the feasibility of non-viral gene delivery to spinal motor neurons from intraperitoneal injections of plasmids carried by ‘immunogene’ nanoparticles targeted for axonal retrograde transport using antibodies. PEGylated polyethylenimine (PEI-PEG12 as DNA carrier was conjugated to an antibody (MLR2 to the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR. We used a plasmid (pVIVO2 designed for in vivo gene delivery that produces minimal immune responses, has improved nuclear entry into post mitotic cells and also expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP. MLR2-PEI-PEG12 carried pVIVO2 and was specific for mouse motor neurons in mixed cultures containing astrocytes. While only 8% of motor neurons expressed GFP 72 h post transfection in vitro, when the immunogene was given intraperitonealy to neonatal C57BL/6J mice GFP specific motor neuron expression was observed in 25.4% of lumbar, 18.3% of thoracic and 17.0 % of cervical motor neurons, 72 h post transfection. PEI-PEG12 carrying pVIVO2 by itself did not transfect motor neurons in vivo, demonstrating the need for specificity via the p75NTR antibody MLR2. This is the first time that specific transfection of spinal motor neurons has been achieved from peripheral delivery of plasmid DNA as part of a non-viral gene delivery agent. These results stress the specificity and feasibility of immunogene delivery targeted for p75NTR expressing motor neurons, but suggests that further improvements are required to increase the transfection efficiency of motor neurons in vivo.

  11. Targeting Nanomedicines to Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Specificity of Ligands to Two Different Receptors In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Amanda K; Fuchs, Adrian V; Fletcher, Nicholas L; Thurecht, Kristofer J

    2016-10-01

    This manuscript utilised in vivo multispectral imaging to demonstrate the efficacy of two different nanomedicine formulations for targeting prostate cancer. Pegylated hyperbranched polymers were labelled with fluorescent markers and targeting ligands against two different prostate cancer markers; prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and the protein kinase, EphrinA2 receptor (EphA2). The PSMA targeted nanomedicine utilised a small molecule glutamate urea inhibitor of the protein, while the EphA2 targeted nanomedicine was conjugated to a single-chain variable fragment based on the antibody 4B3 that has shown high affinity to the receptor. Hyperbranched polymers were synthesised bearing the different targeting ligands. In the case of the EphA2-targeting nanomedicine, significant in vitro uptake was observed in PC3 prostate cancer cells that overexpress the receptor, while low uptake was observed in LNCaP cells (that have minimal expression of this receptor). Conversely, the PSMA-targeted nanomedicine showed high uptake in LNCaP cells, with only minor uptake in the PC3 cells. In a dual-tumour xenograft mouse model, the nanomedicines showed high uptake in tumours in which the receptor was overexpressed, with only minimal non-specific accumulation in the low-expression tumours. This work highlighted the importance of clearly defining the target of interest in next-generation nanomedicines, and suggests that dual-targeting in such nanomedicines may be a means to achieve greater efficacy.

  12. Potentialities of the internal target station at the Nuclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Malakhov, A I; Anisimov, Yu S; Artiomov, A S; Bazilev, S N; Khrenov, A N; Kliman, J; Krasnov, V A; Matousek, V; Morhac, M; Starikov, A Yu; Shabunov, A V; Slepnev, V M; Turzó, I

    2000-01-01

    The potentialities of the internal target station used in physics experiments at the Nuclotron, as well as its construction, hardware and software configurations are described. The remote control of the station is performed by means of a PC and is based on operative presentation of the magnetic field cycle, the beam parameters and the target position on screen. Consequently, the space-time trajectory of motion of a chosen target can be determined in an interactive way by an operator. During the accelerator operation the motion is carried out by means of a stepper motor.

  13. [Multi-channel in vivo recording techniques: signal processing of action potentials and local field potentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia-Min; Wang, Ce-Qun; Lin, Long-Nian

    2014-06-25

    Multi-channel in vivo recording techniques are used to record ensemble neuronal activity and local field potentials (LFP) simultaneously. One of the key points for the technique is how to process these two sets of recorded neural signals properly so that data accuracy can be assured. We intend to introduce data processing approaches for action potentials and LFP based on the original data collected through multi-channel recording system. Action potential signals are high-frequency signals, hence high sampling rate of 40 kHz is normally chosen for recording. Based on waveforms of extracellularly recorded action potentials, tetrode technology combining principal component analysis can be used to discriminate neuronal spiking signals from differently spatially distributed neurons, in order to obtain accurate single neuron spiking activity. LFPs are low-frequency signals (lower than 300 Hz), hence the sampling rate of 1 kHz is used for LFPs. Digital filtering is required for LFP analysis to isolate different frequency oscillations including theta oscillation (4-12 Hz), which is dominant in active exploration and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, gamma oscillation (30-80 Hz), which is accompanied by theta oscillation during cognitive processing, and high frequency ripple oscillation (100-250 Hz) in awake immobility and slow wave sleep (SWS) state in rodent hippocampus. For the obtained signals, common data post-processing methods include inter-spike interval analysis, spike auto-correlation analysis, spike cross-correlation analysis, power spectral density analysis, and spectrogram analysis.

  14. Targeting brain cells with glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes: in vitro and in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Heba F; Ahmed, Sayed M; Hassaballah, Ashraf E; Omar, Mahmoud M

    2015-01-01

    Background The blood–brain barrier prevents many drug moieties from reaching the central nervous system. Therefore, glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes have been engineered to enhance the targeting of flucytosine to the brain. Methods Glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes were prepared by thin-film hydration technique and evaluated in the primary brain cells of rats. Lecithin, cholesterol, and span 65 were mixed at 1:1:1 molar ratio. The molar percentage of PEGylated glutathione varied from 0 mol% to 0.75 mol%. The cellular binding and the uptake of the targeted liposomes were both monitored by epifluorescent microscope and flow cytometry techniques. A biodistribution and a pharmacokinetic study of flucytosine and flucytosine-loaded glutathione–modulated liposomes was carried out to evaluate the in vivo brain-targeting efficiency. Results The size of glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes was glutathione increased to reach the maximum at 0.75 mol%. The uptake of the targeted liposomes by brain cells of the rats was three times greater than that of the nontargeted liposomes. An in vivo study showed that the relative efficiency was 2.632±0.089 and the concentration efficiency was 1.590±0.049, and also, the drug-targeting index was 3.670±0.824. Conclusion Overall, these results revealed that glutathione-PEGylated nanoliposomes enhance the effective delivery of flucytosine to brain and could become a promising new therapeutic option for the treatment of the brain infections. PMID:26229435

  15. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Mito-Tempo Protects Against Aldosterone-Induced Renal Injury In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ding

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Growing evidence suggests mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD and the Nlrp3 inflammasome play critical roles in chronic kidney disease (CKD progression. We previously reported that Aldosterone (Aldo-induced renal injury in vitro is directly caused by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS-mediated activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome. Here we aimed to determine whether a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant (Mito-Tempo could prevent Aldo-induced kidney damage in vivo. Methods: C57BL/6J mice were treated with Aldo and/or Mito-Tempo (or ethanol as a control for 4 weeks. Renal injury was evaluated by Periodic Acid-Schiff reagent or Masson’s trichrome staining and electron microscopy. ROS were measured by DCFDA fluorescence and ELISA. MtD was determined by real-time PCR and electron microscopy. Activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS was detected via western blot. Results: Compared with control mice, Aldo-infused mice showed impaired renal function, increased mtROS production and MtD, Nlrp3 inflammasome activation, and elevated ERS. We showed administration of Mito-Tempo significantly improved renal function and MtD, and reduced Nlrp3 inflammasome activation and ERS in vivo. Conclusion: Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants may attenuate Aldo-infused renal injury by inhibiting MtD, the Nlrp3 inflammasome, and ERS in vivo. Therefore, targeting mtROS might be an effective strategy for preventing CKD.

  16. In vivo gene transfer targeting in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with cell surface antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafitte Marie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a deadly malignancy resistant to current therapies. It is critical to test new strategies, including tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. This study tested the possibility to target the transfer of a suicide gene in tumor cells using an oncotropic lentiviral vector. Results Three cell surface markers were evaluated to target the transduction of cells by lentiviruses pseudotyped with a modified glycoprotein from Sindbis virus. Only Mucin-4 and the Claudin-18 proteins were found efficient for targeted lentivirus transductions in vitro. In subcutaneous xenografts of human pancreatic cancer cells models, Claudin-18 failed to achieve efficient gene transfer but Mucin-4 was found very potent. Human pancreatic tumor cells were modified to express a fluorescent protein detectable in live animals by bioimaging, to perform a direct non invasive and costless follow up of the tumor growth. Targeted gene transfer of a bicistronic transgene bearing a luciferase gene and the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene into orthotopic grafts was carried out with Mucin-4 oncotropic lentiviruses. By contrast to the broad tropism VSV-G carrying lentivirus, this oncotropic lentivirus was found to transduce specifically tumor cells, sparing normal pancreatic cells in vivo. Transduced cells disappeared after ganciclovir treatment while the orthotopic tumor growth was slowed down. Conclusion This work considered for the first time three aspect of pancreatic adenocarcinoma targeted therapy. First, lentiviral transduction of human pancreatic tumor cells was possible when cells were grafted orthotopically. Second, we used a system targeting the tumor cells with cell surface antigens and sparing the normal cells. Finally, the TK/GCV anticancer system showed promising results in vivo. Importantly, the approach presented here appeared to be a safer, much more specific and an as efficient way to perform gene

  17. Identification of novel plant peroxisomal targeting signals by a combination of machine learning methods and in vivo subcellular targeting analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingner, Thomas; Kataya, Amr R; Antonicelli, Gerardo E; Benichou, Aline; Nilssen, Kjersti; Chen, Xiong-Yan; Siemsen, Tanja; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Meinicke, Peter; Reumann, Sigrun

    2011-04-01

    In the postgenomic era, accurate prediction tools are essential for identification of the proteomes of cell organelles. Prediction methods have been developed for peroxisome-targeted proteins in animals and fungi but are missing specifically for plants. For development of a predictor for plant proteins carrying peroxisome targeting signals type 1 (PTS1), we assembled more than 2500 homologous plant sequences, mainly from EST databases. We applied a discriminative machine learning approach to derive two different prediction methods, both of which showed high prediction accuracy and recognized specific targeting-enhancing patterns in the regions upstream of the PTS1 tripeptides. Upon application of these methods to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, 392 gene models were predicted to be peroxisome targeted. These predictions were extensively tested in vivo, resulting in a high experimental verification rate of Arabidopsis proteins previously not known to be peroxisomal. The prediction methods were able to correctly infer novel PTS1 tripeptides, which even included novel residues. Twenty-three newly predicted PTS1 tripeptides were experimentally confirmed, and a high variability of the plant PTS1 motif was discovered. These prediction methods will be instrumental in identifying low-abundance and stress-inducible peroxisomal proteins and defining the entire peroxisomal proteome of Arabidopsis and agronomically important crop plants.

  18. Paclitaxel-loaded, folic-acid-targeted and TAT-peptide-conjugated polymeric liposomes: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peiqi; Wang, Hanjie; Yu, Man; Cao, Shuzhen; Zhang, Fei; Chang, Jin; Niu, Ruifang

    2010-09-01

    Folic acid and TAT peptide were conjugated on the octadecyl-quaternized, lysine-modified chitosan-cholesterol polymeric liposomes (FA-TATp-PLs) to investigate their potential feasibility for tumor-targeted drug delivery. FA-TATp-PLs encapsulating paclitaxel or calcein were synthesized and characterized. Cellular uptake of PLs, FA-PLs, TATp-PLs and FA-TATp-PLs was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in folate receptor (FR)-positive KB nasopharyngeal epidermal carcinoma cells and FR-deficient A549 lung cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of paclitaxel-loaded FA-TATp-PLs were also evaluated in KB and A549 cells as well as in a murine KB xenograft model. Our data showed that 80% paclitaxel released from FA-TATp-PLs in 2 weeks. Different from other various PLs, CLSM analyses showed that FA-TATp-PLs had a significantly high efficient intracellular uptake in both KB and A549 cells. These data revealed the targeting effects of folate decoration, the transmembrane ability of TAT peptide as well as a synergistic interaction between them. In addition, paclitaxel-loaded FA-TATp-PLs exhibited a more superior antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo as compared to that with Taxol. FA-TATp-PLs possessing both targeting effect and transmembrane ability may serve as a promising carrier for the intracellular delivery of therapeutic agents.

  19. Metabolic Enzymes of Helminth Parasites: Potential as Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timson, David J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways that extract energy from carbon compounds are essential for an organism's survival. Therefore, inhibition of enzymes in these pathways represents a potential therapeutic strategy to combat parasitic infections. However, the high degree of similarity between host and parasite enzymes makes this strategy potentially difficult. Nevertheless, several existing drugs to treat infections by parasitic helminths (worms) target metabolic enzymes. These include the trivalent antimonials that target phosphofructokinase and Clorsulon that targets phosphoglycerate mutase and phosphoglycerate kinase. Glycolytic enzymes from a variety of helminths have been characterised biochemically, and some inhibitors identified. To date none of these inhibitors have been developed into therapies. Many of these enzymes are externalised from the parasite and so are also of interest in the development of potential vaccines. Less work has been done on tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Again, while some inhibitors have been identified none have been developed into drug-like molecules. Barriers to the development of novel drugs targeting metabolic enzymes include the lack of experimentally determined structures of helminth enzymes, lack of direct proof that the enzymes are vital in the parasites and lack of cell culture systems for many helminth species. Nevertheless, the success of Clorsulon (which discriminates between highly similar host and parasite enzymes) should inspire us to consider making serious efforts to discover novel anthelminthics, which target metabolic enzymes.

  20. Permethrin is a potential thyroid-disrupting chemical: In vivo and in silico envidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenqing; Xu, Chao; Jin, Yuanxiang; Lu, Bin; Lin, Chunmian; Wu, Yongming; Liu, Weiping

    2016-06-01

    Permethrin (PM), one of the most heavily used synthetic pyrethroids, has the potential to interfere with thyroid hormones in mammals, however, the effect is poorly recognized in aquatic organisms. Herein, embryonic zebrafish were exposed to PM (0, 1, 3 and 10μg/L) until 72h post-fertilization. We demonstrated that PM readily accumulated in larvae with a preference for cis-PM, inhibited development and increased thyroxine and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine levels accompanying increase in the transcription of most target genes, i.e., thyroid-stimulating hormone β, deiodinases, thyroid receptors, involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Further Western blot analysis indicated that transthyretin (TTR) protein was significantly increased. Molecular docking analysis and molecular dynamics simulations revealed that PM fits into three hydrophobic binding pocket of TTR, one of the molecular targets of thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals (THDCs), and forms strong van der Waals interactions with six resides of TTR, including Leu8, Leu 101, Leu125, Thr214, Leu218 and Val229, thus altering TTR activity. Both in vivo and in silico studies clearly disclosed that PM potentially disrupts the thyroid endocrine system in fish. This study provides a rapid and cost-effective approach for identifying THDCs and the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Glycan Markers as Potential Immunological Targets in Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong; Wu, Lisa; Liu, Xiaohe

    2017-01-01

    We present here an experimental approach for exploring a new class of tumor biomarkers that are overexpressed by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and are likely targetable in immunotherapy against tumor metastasis. Using carbohydrate microarrays, anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were scanned against a large panel of carbohydrate antigens to identify potential tumor glycan markers. Subsequently, flow cytometry and fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST) were applied to determine whether the identified targets are tumor-specific cell-surface markers and are, therefore, likely suitable for targeted immunotherapy. Finally, the tumor glycan-specific antibodies identified were validated using cancer patients' blood samples for their performance in CTC-detection and immunotyping analysis. In this article, identifying breast CTC-specific glycan markers and targeting mAbs serve as examples to illustrate this tumor biomarker discovery strategy.

  2. Fixation-related potentials : Foveal versus parafoveal target identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Brinkhuis, M.A.B.; Reuderink, B.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2014-01-01

    The P300 event-related potential (ERP) can be used to infer whether an observer is looking at a target or not. Common practice in P300 BCIs and experiments is that observers are asked to fixate their eyes while stimuli are presented. First studies have shown that it is also possible to distinguish

  3. Potentiation of substance p by lysergic acid diethylamide in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoy, W. A.

    1961-01-01

    In doses of 10 μg/kg or more, lysergic acid diethylamide enhanced the fourth potential (DR IV) of the dorsal root potential complex in the cat. Smaller doses of lysergic acid diethylamide did not in themselves alter the DR IV, but revealed an enhancement of the potential by substance P, which by itself had no effect. 2-Bromolysergic acid diethylamide had no action on the dorsal root potentials, but prevented the actions of lysergic acid diethylamide. PMID:13754427

  4. Design of an EGFR-targeting toxin for photochemical delivery: in vitro and in vivo selectivity and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstad, M B; Cheung, L H; Berg, K; Peng, Q; Fremstedal, A S V; Patzke, S; Rosenblum, M G; Weyergang, A

    2015-10-29

    The number of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting drugs in the development for cancer treatment is continuously increasing. Currently used EGFR-targeted monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors have specific limitations related to toxicity and development of resistance, and there is a need for alternative treatment strategies to maximize the clinical potential of EGFR as a molecular target. This study describes the design and production of a novel EGFR-targeted fusion protein, rGel/EGF, composed of the recombinant plant toxin gelonin and EGF. rGel/EGF was custom-made for administration by photochemical internalization (PCI), a clinically tested modality for cytosolic release of macromolecular therapeutics. rGel/EGF lacks efficient mechanisms for endosomal escape and is therefore minimally toxic as monotherapy. However, PCI induces selective and efficient cytosolic release of rGel/EGF in EGFR-expressing target cells by light-directed activation of photosensitizers accumulated selectively in tumor tissue. PCI of rGel/EGF was shown to be highly effective against EGFR-expressing cell lines, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines resistant to cetuximab (Erbitux). Apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy were identified as mechanisms of action following PCI of rGel/EGF in vitro. PCI of rGel/EGF was further shown as a highly tumor-specific and potent modality in vivo, with growth inhibitory effects demonstrated on A-431 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) xenografts and reduction of tumor perfusion and necrosis induction in SCC-026 HNSCC tumors. Considering the small amount of rGel/EGF injected per animal (0.1 mg/kg), the presented in vivo results are highly promising and warrant optimization and production of rGel/EGF for further preclinical evaluation with PCI.

  5. Proteasome activator complex PA28 identified as an accessible target in prostate cancer by in vivo selection of human antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, David; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Ximénez-Embún, Pilar; Fernández-Periáñez, Rodrigo; Martín, M. Teresa; Molina-Privado, Irene; Ruppen-Cañás, Isabel; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Cañamero, Marta; Cuesta, Ángel M.; Compte, Marta; Kremer, Leonor; Bellas, Carmen; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Sanz, Laura; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Antibody cancer therapies rely on systemically accessible targets and suitable antibodies that exert a functional activity or deliver a payload to the tumor site. Here, we present proof-of-principle of in vivo selection of human antibodies in tumor-bearing mice that identified a tumor-specific antibody able to deliver a payload and unveils the target antigen. By using an ex vivo enrichment process against freshly disaggregated tumors to purge the repertoire, in combination with in vivo biopanning at optimized phage circulation time, we have identified a human domain antibody capable of mediating selective localization of phage to human prostate cancer xenografts. Affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry analysis showed that the antibody recognizes the proteasome activator complex PA28. The specificity of soluble antibody was confirmed by demonstrating its binding to the active human PA28αβ complex. Whereas systemically administered control phage was confined in the lumen of blood vessels of both normal tissues and tumors, the selected phage spread from tumor vessels into the perivascular tumor parenchyma. In these areas, the selected phage partially colocalized with PA28 complex. Furthermore, we found that the expression of the α subunit of PA28 [proteasome activator complex subunit 1 (PSME1)] is elevated in primary and metastatic human prostate cancer and used anti-PSME1 antibodies to show that PSME1 is an accessible marker in mouse xenograft tumors. These results support the use of PA28 as a tumor marker and a potential target for therapeutic intervention in prostate cancer. PMID:23918357

  6. PPARδ Activity in Cardiovascular Diseases: A Potential Pharmacological Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Tesse

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, and particularly of PPARα and PPARγ, using selective agonists, is currently used in the treatment of metabolic diseases such as hypertriglyceridemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PPARα and PPARγ anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in cardiovascular cells were extensively clarified in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. In contrast, the role of PPARδ in cardiovascular system is poorly understood. Prostacyclin, the predominant prostanoid released by vascular cells, is a putative endogenous agonist for PPARδ, but only recently PPARδ selective synthetic agonists were found, improving studies about the physiological and pathophysiological roles of PPARδ activation. Recent reports suggest that the PPARδ activation may play a pivotal role to regulate inflammation, apoptosis, and cell proliferation, suggesting that this transcriptional factor could become an interesting pharmacological target to regulate cardiovascular cell apoptosis, proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism.

  7. In Vitro and In Vivo Correlation of Colon-Targeted Compression-Coated Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Maity

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to assess and correlate in vitro drug release with in vivo absorption of prednisolone (PDL from a colon-targeted tablet prepared by compression coating of core tablet. In vivo drug absorption study was conducted using a high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC method, which was developed and validated for the estimation of PDL in rabbit plasma. The calibration curve showed linearity in the concentration range of 0.05 to 50 μg/mL with the correlation coefficient (r of 0.999. The method was specific and sensitive with the limit of detection (LOD and lower limit of quantification (LLOQ of 31.89±1.10 ng/mL and 96.63±3.32 ng/mL, respectively. The extraction recovery (ER of PDL from three different levels of quality control (QC samples ranged from 98.18% to 103.54%. In vitro drug release study revealed that less than 10% drug was released in 6.34 h and almost complete (98.64% drug release was achieved in the following 6 h. In vivo drug absorption study demonstrated lower values of Cmax, AUCtotal, and protracted Tmax from compression-coated tablet. The results confirmed the maximum release of drug in the colon while minimizing release in the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT. An excellent in vitro and in vivo correlation (IVIVC was also achieved after considering the lag time.

  8. Novel siRNA delivery system to target podocytes in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter V Hauser

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Podocytes are injured in several glomerular diseases. To alter gene expression specifically in podocytes in vivo, we took advantage of their active endocytotic machinery and developed a method for the targeted delivery of small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNA. We generated an anti-mouse podocyte antibody that binds to rat and mouse podocytes in vivo. The polyclonal IgG antibody was cleaved into monovalent fragments, while preserving the antigen recognition sites. One Neutravidin molecule was linked to each monovalent IgG via the available sulfohydryl group. Protamine, a polycationic nuclear protein and universal adaptor for anionic siRNA, was linked to the neutravidin via biotin. The delivery system was named shamporter (sheep anti mouse podocyte transporter. Injection of shamporter coupled with either nephrin siRNA or TRPC6 siRNA via tail vein into normal rats substantially reduced the protein levels of nephrin or TRPC6 respectively, measured by western blot analysis and immunostaining. The effect was target specific because other podocyte-specific genes remained unchanged. Shamporter + nephrin siRNA induced transient proteinuria in rats. Control rats injected with shamporter coupled to control-siRNA showed no changes. These results show for the first time that siRNA can be delivered efficiently and specifically to podocytes in vivo using an antibody-delivery system.

  9. Viral microRNAs targeting virus genes promote virus infection in shrimp in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yaodong; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Viral microRNAs (miRNAs), most of which are characterized in cell lines, have been found to play important roles in the virus life cycle to avoid attack by the host immune system or to keep virus in the latency state. Viral miRNAs targeting virus genes can inhibit virus infection. In this study, in vivo findings in Marsupenaeus japonicus shrimp revealed that the viral miRNAs could target virus genes and further promote the virus infection. The results showed that white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-encoded miRNAs WSSV-miR-66 and WSSV-miR-68 were transcribed at the early stage of WSSV infection. When the expression of WSSV-miR-66 and WSSV-miR-68 was silenced with sequence-specific anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs), the number of copies of WSSV and the WSSV-infected shrimp mortality were significantly decreased, indicating that the two viral miRNAs had a great effect on virus infection. It was revealed that the WSSV wsv094 and wsv177 genes were the targets of WSSV-miR-66 and that the wsv248 and wsv309 genes were the targets of WSSV-miR-68. The data demonstrate that the four target genes play negative roles in the WSSV infection. The targeting of the four virus genes by WSSV-miR-66 and WSSV-miR-68 led to the promotion of virus infection. Therefore, our in vivo findings show a novel aspect of viral miRNAs in virus-host interactions.

  10. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang HW

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hung-Wei Yang,1,2 Mu-Yi Hua,1 Hao-Li Liu,3 Chiung-Yin Huang,2 Kuo-Chen Wei21Molecular Medicine Research Center, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, 3Department of Electrical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, TaiwanAbstract: Nanoparticles (NPs play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some

  11. Activation of AKT by hypoxia: a potential target for hypoxic tumors of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stegeman Hanneke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only a minority of cancer patients benefits from the combination of EGFR-inhibition and radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. A potential resistance mechanism is activation of EGFR and/or downstream pathways by stimuli in the microenvironment. The aim of this study was to find molecular targets induced by the microenvironment by determining the in vitro and in vivo expression of proteins of the EGFR-signaling network in 6 HNSCC lines. As hypoxia is an important microenvironmental parameter associated with poor outcome in solid tumors after radiotherapy, we investigated the relationship with hypoxia in vitro and in vivo. Methods Six human HNSCC cell lines were both cultured as cell lines (in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors (in vivo. Expression levels were determined via western blot analysis and localization of markers was assessed via immunofluorescent staining. To determine the effect of hypoxia and pAKT-inhibition on cell survival, cells were incubated at 0.5% O2 and treated with MK-2206. Results We observed strong in vitro-in vivo correlations for EGFR, pEGFR and HER2 (rs=0.77, p=0.10, rs=0.89, p=0.03 and rs=0.93, p=0.02, respectively, but not for pAKT, pERK1/2 or pSTAT3 (all rs0.30. In vivo, pAKT expression was present in hypoxic cells and pAKT and hypoxia were significantly correlated (rs=0.51, p=0.04. We confirmed in vitro that hypoxia induces activation of AKT. Further, pAKT-inhibition via MK-2206 caused a significant decrease in survival in hypoxic cells (p Conclusions These data suggest that (pEGFR and HER2 expression is mostly determined by intrinsic features of the tumor cell, while the activation of downstream kinases is highly influenced by the tumor microenvironment. We show that hypoxia induces activation of AKT both in vitro and in vivo, and that hypoxic cells can be specifically targeted by pAKT-inhibition. Targeting pAKT is thus a potential way to overcome therapy resistance

  12. In Vivo Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals the Cardiac Targets of β-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Andersen, Martin N; Steffensen, Annette B

    2013-01-01

    used quantitative in vivo phosphoproteomics to identify 670 site-specific phosphorylation changes in murine hearts in response to acute treatment with specific βAR agonists. The residues adjacent to the regulated phosphorylation sites exhibited a sequence-specific preference (R......) of the potassium channel KV7.1, increased current amplitude. Our data set represents a quantitative analysis of phosphorylated proteins regulated in vivo upon stimulation of seven-transmembrane receptors, and our findings reveal previously unknown phosphorylation sites that regulate myocardial contractility......-X-X-pS/T), and integrative analysis of sequence motifs and interaction networks suggested that the kinases AMPK (adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase), Akt, and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) mediate βAR signaling, in addition to the well-established pathways mediated by PKA (cyclic adenosine...

  13. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torquato, Salvatore [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  14. Identification of Spt5 target genes in zebrafish development reveals its dual activity in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi Krishnan

    Full Text Available Spt5 is a conserved essential protein that represses or stimulates transcription elongation in vitro. Immunolocalization studies on Drosophila polytene chromosomes suggest that Spt5 is associated with many loci throughout the genome. However, little is known about the prevalence and identity of Spt5 target genes in vivo during development. Here, we identify direct target genes of Spt5 using fog(sk8 zebrafish mutant, which disrupts the foggy/spt5 gene. We identified that fog(sk8 and their wildtype siblings differentially express less than 5% of genes examined. These genes participate in diverse biological processes from stress response to cell fate specification. Up-regulated genes exhibit shorter overall gene length compared to all genes examined. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation in zebrafish embryos, we identified a subset of developmentally critical genes that are bound by both Spt5 and RNA polymerase II. The protein occupancy patterns on these genes are characteristic of both repressive and stimulatory elongation regulation. Together our findings establish Spt5 as a dual regulator of transcription elongation in vivo and identify a small but diverse set of target genes critically dependent on Spt5 during development.

  15. BDNF promotes target innervation of Xenopus mandibular trigeminal axons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeffrey K; Dorey, Karel; Ishibashi, Shoko; Amaya, Enrique

    2007-05-31

    Trigeminal nerves consist of ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular branches that project to distinct regions of the facial epidermis. In Xenopus embryos, the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve extends toward and innervates the cement gland in the anterior facial epithelium. The cement gland has previously been proposed to provide a short-range chemoattractive signal to promote target innervation by mandibular trigeminal axons. Brain derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF is known to stimulate axon outgrowth and branching. The goal of this study is to determine whether BDNF functions as the proposed target recognition signal in the Xenopus cement gland. We found that the cement gland is enriched in BDNF mRNA transcripts compared to the other neurotrophins NT3 and NT4 during mandibular trigeminal nerve innervation. BDNF knockdown in Xenopus embryos or specifically in cement glands resulted in the failure of mandibular trigeminal axons to arborise or grow into the cement gland. BDNF expressed ectodermal grafts, when positioned in place of the cement gland, promoted local trigeminal axon arborisation in vivo. BDNF is necessary locally to promote end stage target innervation of trigeminal axons in vivo, suggesting that BDNF functions as a short-range signal that stimulates mandibular trigeminal axon arborisation and growth into the cement gland.

  16. siRNAs targeted to Smad4 prevent renal fibrosis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshizawa, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Minami; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-09-19

    Renal fibrosis is the final common pathway leading to decreased renal function. No therapy has been established to prevent it. In order to establish a therapeutic approach and target molecule for renal fibrosis, we investigated the effects of Smad4 knockdown by siRNAs on renal fibrosis in vivo. Renal fibrosis mice were produced by single intraperitoneal injection of folic acid. siRNAs targeted to Smad4 (Smad4-siRNAs) (5 nmol) were injected into each mouse by systemic tail vein injection three times per week. Non-targeted siRNAs (control-siRNAs) were injected in the same way for a control group. The siRNAs were delivered to the interstitial fibrous area and tubules. Smad4-siRNAs significantly knocked down Smad4 expression and inhibited renal fibrosis. They also inhibited α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts. Control-siRNAs did not show these effects. The results of this study suggest that Smad4 knockdown is one of the crucial therapeutic options for the prevention of renal fibrosis in vivo.

  17. Immediate in vivo target-specific cancer cell death after near infrared photoimmunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunaga Makoto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Near infrared (NIR photoimmunotherapy (PIT is a new type of cancer treatment based on a monoclonal antibody (mAb-NIR phthalocyanine dye, (IR700 conjugate. In vitro cancer-specific cell death occurs during NIR light exposure in cells previously incubated with mAb-IR700 conjugates. However, documenting rapid cell death in vivo is more difficult. Methods A luciferase-transfected breast cancer cell (epidermal growth factor receptor+, MDA-MB-468luc cells was produced and used for both in vitro and in vivo experiments for monitoring the cell killing effect of PIT. After validation of cytotoxicity with NIR exposure up to 8 J/cm2in vitro, we employed an orthotopic breast cancer model of bilateral MDA-MB-468luc tumors in female athymic mice, which subsequently received a panitumumab-IR700 conjugate in vivo. One side was used as a control, while the other was treated with NIR light of dose ranging from 50 to 150 J/cm2. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI was performed before and after PIT. Results Dose-dependent cell killing and regrowth was successfully monitored by the BLI signal in vitro. Although tumor sizes were unchanged, BLI signals decreased by >95% immediately after PIT in vivo when light intensity was high (>100 J/cm2, however, in mice receiving lower intensity NIR (50 J/cm2, tumors recurred with gradually increasing BLI signal. Conclusion PIT induced massive cell death of targeted tumor cells immediately after exposure of NIR light that was demonstrated with BLI in vivo.

  18. Subcellular Redox Targeting: Bridging in Vitro and in Vivo Chemical Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Marcus J C; Poganik, Jesse R; Ghosh, Souradyuti; Aye, Yimon

    2017-03-17

    Networks of redox sensor proteins within discrete microdomains regulate the flow of redox signaling. Yet, the inherent reactivity of redox signals complicates the study of specific redox events and pathways by traditional methods. Herein, we review designer chemistries capable of measuring flux and/or mimicking subcellular redox signaling at the cellular and organismal level. Such efforts have begun to decipher the logic underlying organelle-, site-, and target-specific redox signaling in vitro and in vivo. These data highlight chemical biology as a perfect gateway to interrogate how nature choreographs subcellular redox chemistry to drive precision redox biology.

  19. Designing nanoconjugates to effectively target pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameel Ahmad Khan

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in America. Monoclonal antibodies are a viable treatment option for inhibiting cancer growth. Tumor specific drug delivery could be achieved utilizing these monoclonal antibodies as targeting agents. This type of designer therapeutic is evolving and with the use of gold nanoparticles it is a promising approach to selectively deliver chemotherapeutics to malignant cells. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs are showing extreme promise in current medicinal research. GNPs have been shown to non-invasively kill tumor cells by hyperthermia using radiofrequency. They have also been implemented as early detection agents due to their unique X-ray contrast properties; success was revealed with clear delineation of blood capillaries in a preclinical model by CT (computer tomography. The fundamental parameters for intelligent design of nanoconjugates are on the forefront. The goal of this study is to define the necessary design parameters to successfully target pancreatic cancer cells.The nanoconjugates described in this study were characterized with various physico-chemical techniques. We demonstrate that the number of cetuximab molecules (targeting agent on a GNP, the hydrodynamic size of the nanoconjugates, available reactive surface area and the ability of the nanoconjugates to sequester EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor, all play critical roles in effectively targeting tumor cells in vitro and in vivo in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer.Our results suggest the specific targeting of tumor cells depends on a number of crucial components 1 targeting agent to nanoparticle ratio 2 availability of reactive surface area on the nanoparticle 3 ability of the nanoconjugate to bind the target and 4 hydrodynamic diameter of the nanoconjugate. We believe this study will help define the design parameters for formulating better strategies for specifically targeting tumors with nanoparticle

  20. Wake potential of swift ion in amorphous carbon target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahnam, Nabil janan; Ahmad, Khalid A.; Aboo Al-Numan, Abdullah Ibrahim

    2017-02-01

    The wake potential and wake phenomena for swift proton in an amorphous carbon target were studied by utilising various dielectric function formalisms, including the Drude dielectric function, the Drude-Lorentz dielectric function and quantum dielectric function. The Drude model results exhibited a damped oscillatory behaviour in the longitudinal direction behind the projectile; the pattern of these oscillations decreases exponentially in the transverse direction. In addition, the wake potential extends slightly ahead of the projectile which also depends on the proton coordinate and velocity. The effect of electron binding on the wake potential, characterised by the ratio ωp2/ω02 = 10 to 0.1, has been studied alongside the Drude-Lorentz dielectric function and quantum dielectric function formalisms; the results evidently show that the wake potential dip depth decreases with more oscillations when the electron density ratio ωp2/ω02 decreases from 10 to 0.1. One of the primary objectives of the present work is to construct a reasonably realistic procedure for simulating the response of target to swift ions by combining an expression for the induced wake potential along with several important dielectric function models; the aim of this research is to reduce computational complexity without sacrificing accuracy. This is regarded as being an efficient strategy in that it creates suitable computer simulation procedures which are relevant to actual solids. After comparing this method with other models, the main differences and similarities have been noted while the end results have proved encouraging.

  1. Polychromatic in vivo imaging of multiple targets using visible and near infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Longmire, Michelle R; Choyke, Peter L

    2013-07-01

    Conventional diagnostic imaging methods such as X-ray CT, MRI, and nuclear medicine are inherently monochromatic meaning that they can depict only one molecular target at a time. Optical imaging has the unique ability to be polychromatic and therefore multi-color imaging employing targeted agents conjugated to fluorophores of varying wavelength enables multiple simultaneous readouts thus providing greater multiplexed information. Numerous successful multicolor imaging techniques have recently been reported using optical imaging in in vivo animal disease models, thus adding to a growing body of research supporting the clinical viability and applicability of these technologies. Herein, we review multicolor optical imaging from the basic chemistry and physics perspective and then extend this to biological and medical applications. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Anti-Genotoxic Potential of Bilirubin In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner, Marlies; Antl, Nadja; Rittmannsberger, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The bile pigment bilirubin is a known antioxidant and is associated with protection from cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) when present in too strong concentrations. Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) might also possess anti-genotoxic potential by preventing oxidative damage to DNA. Moderately el...

  3. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pevzner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  4. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pevzner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  5. The fate of MAb-targeted Cd{sup 125m}Te/ZnS nanoparticles in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, Stephen J. [Graduate School of Medicine, University of TN, Knoxville, TN 37920 (United States)], E-mail: skennel@utmck.edu; Woodward, Jonathan D.; Rondinone, Adam J. [Chemical Sciences Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Science, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wall, Jonathan; Huang Ying [Graduate School of Medicine, University of TN, Knoxville, TN 37920 (United States); Mirzadeh, Saed [Nuclear Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Introduction: Nanoparticles (NP) have potential as carriers for drugs and radioisotopes. Quantitative measures of NP biodistribution in vivo are needed to determine the effectiveness of these carriers. We have used a model system of radiolabeled quantum dots to document the competition between efficient vascular targeting and interaction of the NP with the reticuloendothelial (RE) system. Methods: We have prepared {sup 125m}Te-labeled CdTe NP that are capped with ZnS. Te-125m has a half-life and decay characteristics very similar to those for {sup 125}I. The synthesized particles are stable in aqueous solution and are derivatized with mercaptoacetic acid and then conjugated with specific antibody. To evaluate specific targeting, we used the monoclonal antibody MAb 201B that binds to murine thrombomodulin expressed in the lumen of lung blood vessels. The MAb-targeted NP were tested for targeting performance in vivo using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) imaging, tissue autoradiography and standard organ biodistribution techniques. Biodistribution was also determined in mice that had been depleted of phagocytic cells by use of clodronate-loaded liposomes. Results: Cd{sup 125m}Te/ZnS NP coupled with MAb 201B retained radioisotope and antibody activity and accumulated in lung (>400% injected dose [ID]/g) within 1 h of intravenous injection. Control antibody-coupled NP did not accumulate in lung (<10% ID/g) but accumulated in liver and spleen. Images from microSPECT/CT and autoradiography studies of the targeted NP document this specific uptake and demonstrate uniform distribution in lung with minor accumulation in liver and spleen. Within a few hours, a large fraction of lung-targeted NP redistributed to spleen and liver or was excreted. We hypothesized that NP attract phagocytic cells that engulfed and removed them from circulation. This was confirmed by comparing biodistribution of targeted NP in normal mice versus those

  6. Multifunctional halloysite nanotubes for targeted delivery and controlled release of doxorubicin in-vitro and in-vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuwei; Chen, Jian; Li, Xiufang; Sun, Yanhua; Huang, Shen; Li, Yuqing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Jiangfeng; Zhong, Shian

    2017-09-01

    The current state of cancer therapy encourages researchers to develop novel efficient nanocarriers. Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) are good nanocarrier candidates due to their unique nanoscale (40-80 nm in diamter and 200-500 nm in length) and hollow lumen, as well as good biocompatibility and low cost. In our study, we prepared a type of folate-mediated targeting and redox-triggered anticancer drug delivery system, so that Doxorubicin (DOX) can be specifically transported to tumor sites due to the over-expressed folate-receptors on the surface of cancer cells. Furthermore, it can then be released by the reductive agent glutathione (GSH) in cancer cells where the content of GSH is nearly 103-fold higher than in the extracellular matrix. A series of methods have demonstrated that per-thiol-β-cyclodextrin (β-CD-(SH)7) was successfully combined with HNTs via a redox-responsive disulfide bond, and folic acid-polyethylene glycol-adamantane (FA-PEG-Ad) was immobilized on the HNTs through the strong complexation between β-CD/Ad. In vitro studies indicated that the release rate of DOX raised sharply in dithiothreitol (DTT) reducing environment and the amount of released DOX reached 70% in 10 mM DTT within the first 10 h, while only 40% of DOX was released in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) even after 79 h. Furthermore, the targeted HNTs could be specifically endocytosed by over-expressed folate-receptor cancer cells and significantly accelerate the apoptosis of cancer cells compared to non-targeted HNTs. In vivo studies further verified that the targeted HNTs had the best therapeutic efficacy and no obvious side effects for tumor-bearing nude mice, while free DOX showed damaging effects on normal tissues. In summary, this novel nanocarrier system shows excellent potential for targeted delivery and controlled release of anticancer drugs and provides a potential platform for tumor therapy.

  7. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com .

  8. Photosensitizer-mediated mitochondria-targeting nanosized drug carriers: Subcellular targeting, therapeutic, and imaging potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeon Su; Kwon, Kiyoon; Yoon, Kwonhyeok; Huh, Kang Moo; Kang, Han Chang

    2017-03-30

    Mitochondria-targeting drug carriers have considerable potential because of the presence of many molecular drug targets in the mitochondria and their pivotal roles in cellular viability, metabolism, maintenance, and death. To compare the mitochondria-targeting abilities of triphenylphosphonium (TPP) and pheophorbide a (PhA) in nanoparticles (NPs), this study prepared mitochondria-targeting NPs using mixtures of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-(SS-PhA)2 [mPEG-(SS-PhA)2 or PPA] and TPP-b-poly(ε-caprolactone)-b-TPP [TPP-b-PCL-b-TPP or TPCL], which were designated PPAn-TPCL4-n (0≤n≤4) NPs. With increasing TPCL content, the formed PPAn-TPCL4-n NPs decreased in size from 33nm to 18nm and increased in terms of positive zeta-potentials from -12mV to 33mV. Although the increased TPCL content caused some dark toxicity of the PPAn-TPCL4-n NPs due to the intrinsic positive character of TPCL, the NPs showed strong light-induced killing effects in tumor cells. In addition, the mitochondrial distribution of the PPAn-TPCL4-n NPs was analyzed and imaged by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, respectively. Thus, the PhA-containing NPs specifically targeted the mitochondria, and light stimulation caused PhA-mediated therapeutic effects and imaging functions. Expanding the capabilities of these nanocarriers by incorporating other drugs should enable multiple potential applications (e.g., targeting, therapy, and imaging) for combination and synergistic treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. In vivo CRISPR screening identifies Ptpn2 as a cancer immunotherapy target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manguso, Robert T; Pope, Hans W; Zimmer, Margaret D; Brown, Flavian D; Yates, Kathleen B; Miller, Brian C; Collins, Natalie B; Bi, Kevin; LaFleur, Martin W; Juneja, Vikram R; Weiss, Sarah A; Lo, Jennifer; Fisher, David E; Miao, Diana; Van Allen, Eliezer; Root, David E; Sharpe, Arlene H; Doench, John G; Haining, W Nicholas

    2017-07-27

    Immunotherapy with PD-1 checkpoint blockade is effective in only a minority of patients with cancer, suggesting that additional treatment strategies are needed. Here we use a pooled in vivo genetic screening approach using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing in transplantable tumours in mice treated with immunotherapy to discover previously undescribed immunotherapy targets. We tested 2,368 genes expressed by melanoma cells to identify those that synergize with or cause resistance to checkpoint blockade. We recovered the known immune evasion molecules PD-L1 and CD47, and confirmed that defects in interferon-γ signalling caused resistance to immunotherapy. Tumours were sensitized to immunotherapy by deletion of genes involved in several diverse pathways, including NF-κB signalling, antigen presentation and the unfolded protein response. In addition, deletion of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN2 in tumour cells increased the efficacy of immunotherapy by enhancing interferon-γ-mediated effects on antigen presentation and growth suppression. In vivo genetic screens in tumour models can identify new immunotherapy targets in unanticipated pathways.

  10. Dual peptide-mediated targeted delivery of bioactive siRNAs to oral cancer cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Bryant, Angela A; Zhang, Haiwen; Attaway, Christopher C; Pugh, William; Eggart, Laurence; Sansevere, Robert M; Andino, Lourdes M; Dinh, Lu; Cantini, Liliana P; Jakymiw, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Despite significant advances in cancer treatment, the prognosis for oral cancer remains poor in comparison to other cancer types, including breast, skin, and prostate. As a result, more effective therapeutic modalities are needed for the treatment of oral cancer. Consequently, in the present study, we examined the feasibility of using a dual peptide carrier approach, combining an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting peptide with an endosome-disruptive peptide, to mediate targeted delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells and induce silencing of the targeted oncogene, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A). Fluorescence microscopy, real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and in vivo bioimaging of mice containing orthotopic xenograft tumors were used to examine the ability of the dual peptide carrier to mediate specific delivery of bioactive siRNAs into EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells/tissues. Co-complexation of the EGFR-targeting peptide, GE11R9, with the endosome-disruptive 599 peptide facilitated the specific uptake of siRNAs into oral cancer cells overexpressing EGFR in vitro with optimal gene silencing observed at a 60:30:1 (GE11R9:599:siRNA) molar ratio. Furthermore, when administered systemically to mice bearing xenograft oral tumors, this dual peptide complex mediated increased targeted delivery of siRNAs into tumor tissues in comparison to the 599 peptide alone and significantly enhanced CIP2A silencing. Herein we provide the first report demonstrating the clinical potential of a dual peptide strategy for siRNA-based therapeutics by synergistically mediating the effective targeting and delivery of bioactive siRNAs into EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional manganese dioxide nanosheet for targeted photodynamic therapy and bioimaging in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongchan; Ahn, Seong Min; Lee, Ji-Seon; Kim, Tae Shik; Min, Dal-Hee

    2017-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been widely studied as a promising non-invasive therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. However, the poor solubility of photosensitizer (PS) in aqueous solution and inefficient cell-penetrating capability have limited the target-specific PDT. Herein, we develop a novel targeted photodynamic therapeutic and bioimaging system based on folic acid (FA)-conjugated MnO2 (FA-MnO2) nanosheet as a new carrier of PS, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc). ZnPc loaded FA-MnO2 nanosheet (FA-MnO2/ZnPc) complex is successfully formed by electrostatic interaction and coordination. We find that FA-MnO2/ZnPc complex exhibits excellent targeted delivery of ZnPc into folate receptor positive cancer cells and the ZnPc is released out from the complex via endogenous glutathione (GSH) stimulus, facilitating simultaneous bioimaging and targeted PDT by singlet oxygen (SO) generation upon light irradiation, showing high efficacy with only one tenth of conventional PS dosage in vitro and in vivo.

  12. In Vivo Pulmonary Delivery and Magnetic-Targeting of Dry Powder Nano-in-Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Dominique N; Stromberg, Loreen R; Kunda, Nitesh K; Muttil, Pavan

    2017-11-09

    This brief communication evaluates the cytotoxicity and targeting capability of a dry powder chemotherapeutic. Nano-in-microparticles (NIMs) are a dry powder drug delivery vehicle containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and either doxorubicin (w/w solids) or fluorescent nanospheres (w/v during formulation; as a drug surrogate) in a lactose matrix. In vitro cytotoxicity was evaluated in A549 adenocarcinoma cells using MTS and LDH assays to assess viability and toxicity after 48 h of NIMs exposure. In vivo magnetic-field-dependent targeting of inhaled NIMs was evaluated in a healthy mouse model. Mice were endotracheally administered fluorescently labeled NIMs either as a dry powder or a liquid aerosol in the presence of an external magnet placed over the left lung. Quantification of fluorescence and iron showed a significant increase in both fluorescence intensity and iron content to the left magnetized lung. In comparison, we observed decreased targeting of fluorescent nanospheres to the left lung from an aerosolized liquid suspension, due to the dissociation of SPIONs and nanoparticles during pulmonary administration. We conclude that dry powder NIMs maintain the therapeutic cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and can be better targeted to specific regions of the lung in the presence of a magnetic field, compared to a liquid suspension.

  13. GEMINs: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Spinal Muscular Atrophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eBorg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The motor neuron degenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA remains one of the most frequently inherited causes of infant mortality. Afflicted patients loose the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene but retain one or more copies of SMN2, a homologue that is incorrectly spliced. Primary treatment strategies for SMA aim at boosting SMN protein levels, which are insufficient in patients. SMN is known to partner with a set of diverse proteins collectively known as GEMINs to form a macromolecular complex. The SMN-GEMINs complex is indispensible for chaperoning the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, which are key for pre-mRNA splicing. Pharmaceutics that alleviate the neuromuscular phenotype by restoring the fundamental function of SMN without augmenting its levels are also crucial in the development of an effective treatment. Their use as an adjunct therapy is predicted to enhance benefit to patients. Inspired by the surprising discovery revealing a premier role for GEMINs in snRNP biogenesis together with in vivo studies documenting their requirement for the correct function of the motor system, this review speculates on whether GEMINs constitute valid targets for SMA therapeutic development.

  14. Polyamine Transport and Synthesis in Trichomonas vaginalis: Potential Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Sanchez, Maria Elizbeth; Villalpando, Jose Luis; Quintas-Granados, Laura Itzel; Arroyo, Rossana

    2017-01-01

    Polyamines are essential for many biological processes in all organisms. Here we show a current landscape of studies and strategies implemented for the study of polyamine metabolism, as well as molecular aspects that implicate the role of key enzymes, transport proteins, inhibitors, and the study of novel molecules as potential therapeutic targets. This review focused on the synthesis, interconversion and function of these molecules in Trichomonas vaginalis, a common sexually transmitted parasite of humans. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo bioluminescence imaging of nanostructured lipid carriers for targeting the brain: apomorphine as a model drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Wen, Chih-Jen; Al-Suwayeh, S. A.; Chang, Hui-Wen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Fang, Jia-You

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.

  16. Folate receptor mediated in vivo targeted delivery of human serum albumin coated manganese ferrite magnetic nanoparticles to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidan, A.; Ilhami, F.; Fahmi, M. Z.; Purwanto, B.; Kharisma, R. Z.

    2017-05-01

    Manganese ferrite nanoparticles (MnFe2O4) have received increasing attention due to their remarkable magnetic properties and have been used for various biomedical applications. They have potential applications in magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia for cancer. Both novel applications require a delivery system that will allow nanoparticle to move easily and localization of nanoparticle to the target tissue. In our work, we developed human serum albumin coated manganese ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (HSA-MF NPs). The nanoparticles were prepared using solvothermal method and modified with folic acid for targeted delivery. Structure and morphology of manganese ferrite nanoparticle were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The size of folic acid conjugated HSA-MF NPs (HSA-MF-FA NPs) were studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS). In the in vivo study, we used benzopyrene-induced cancer in mice. We successfully delivered HSA-MF-FA NPs through intravenous tail injection after induction of the tumour. We found that 54% of initial HSA-MF-FA NPs which previously injected localize in the target tissue. While obtained p-value from independent T-test is 0.013 which shows that there is a difference between the control group (HSA-MF NPs) and the treated group (HSA-MF-FA NPs)

  17. Image-based in vivo assessment of targeting accuracy of stereotactic brain surgery in experimental rodent models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Janaki Raman; Vande Velde, Greetje; van Gent, Friso; de Vloo, Philippe; Dresselaers, Tom; Depypere, Maarten; van Kuyck, Kris; Nuttin, Bart; Himmelreich, Uwe; Maes, Frederik

    2016-11-01

    Stereotactic neurosurgery is used in pre-clinical research of neurological and psychiatric disorders in experimental rat and mouse models to engraft a needle or electrode at a pre-defined location in the brain. However, inaccurate targeting may confound the results of such experiments. In contrast to the clinical practice, inaccurate targeting in rodents remains usually unnoticed until assessed by ex vivo end-point histology. We here propose a workflow for in vivo assessment of stereotactic targeting accuracy in small animal studies based on multi-modal post-operative imaging. The surgical trajectory in each individual animal is reconstructed in 3D from the physical implant imaged in post-operative CT and/or its trace as visible in post-operative MRI. By co-registering post-operative images of individual animals to a common stereotaxic template, targeting accuracy is quantified. Two commonly used neuromodulation regions were used as targets. Target localization errors showed not only variability, but also inaccuracy in targeting. Only about 30% of electrodes were within the subnucleus structure that was targeted and a-specific adverse effects were also noted. Shifting from invasive/subjective 2D histology towards objective in vivo 3D imaging-based assessment of targeting accuracy may benefit a more effective use of the experimental data by excluding off-target cases early in the study.

  18. Integrin αvβ3 targeting activity study of different retro-inverso sequences of RGD and their potentiality in the designing of tumor targeting peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yayuan; Mei, Ling; Yu, Qianwen; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2015-12-01

    Retro-inverso peptide represented the isomer of a parent peptide in which the direction of the sequence was reversed and the chirality of each amino acid residue was inverted. Generally, retro-inverso peptides possessed equal or even higher activities compared to the original peptide. RGD was a commonly used ligand for tumor and vascular targeting due to its affinity to integrin αvβ3 receptors. The biological activity study of the isomers of RGD would indeed provide useful suggestions for the design of tumor targeting peptides. Therefore, the tumor targeting activities of octa-arginine which was modified with different retro-inverso sequences of RGD peptide were investigated in this study. Three different tandem peptides (R8-GDGR, R8-GdGr and R8-GdGR) were designed on the basis of R8-GRGD. The tumor targeting activities of these tandem peptides were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, R8-GdGR displayed selective binding affinity to integrin αvβ3 at the cellular level, and exhibited efficient tumor homing and penetrating capabilities in vivo. Meanwhile, R8-GdGR also showed stronger neovessel targeting ability compared to the others. In conclusion, all the results demonstrated that dGR possessed similar biological activity to RGD and was a potential ligand for further designing of tumor targeting peptides.

  19. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mϕ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs.

  20. Mirabegron: potential off target effects and uses beyond the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehvari, Nodi; da Silva Junior, Edilson Dantas; Bengtsson, Tore; Hutchinson, Dana S

    2017-12-15

    The ®3 -adrenoceptor was initially an attractive target by several pharmaceutical companies due to its high expression in rodent adipose tissue, where its activation resulted in decreased adiposity and improved metabolic outputs (such as glucose handling) in animal models of obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, several drugs acting at the β3 -adrenoceptor failed in clinical trials. This was thought to be due to their lack of efficacy at the human receptor. Recently mirabegron, a ®3 -adrenoceptor agonist with human efficacy, was approved in North America, Europe, Japan and Australia for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome. There are indications that mirabegron may act at other receptors/targets, but whether they have any clinical relevance is relatively unknown. Besides overactive bladder syndrome, mirabegron may have other uses such as in the treatment of heart failure or metabolic disease. This review gives an overview on the off-target effects of mirabegron and its potential use in the treatment of other diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Viroporins: structure, function and potential as antiviral targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Claire; Griffin, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    The channel-forming activity of a family of small, hydrophobic integral membrane proteins termed 'viroporins' is essential to the life cycles of an increasingly diverse range of RNA and DNA viruses, generating significant interest in targeting these proteins for antiviral development. Viroporins vary greatly in terms of their atomic structure and can perform multiple functions during the virus life cycle, including those distinct from their role as oligomeric membrane channels. Recent progress has seen an explosion in both the identification and understanding of many such proteins encoded by highly significant pathogens, yet the prototypic M2 proton channel of influenza A virus remains the only example of a viroporin with provenance as an antiviral drug target. This review attempts to summarize our current understanding of the channel-forming functions for key members of this growing family, including recent progress in structural studies and drug discovery research, as well as novel insights into the life cycles of many viruses revealed by a requirement for viroporin activity. Ultimately, given the successes of drugs targeting ion channels in other areas of medicine, unlocking the therapeutic potential of viroporins represents a valuable goal for many of the most significant viral challenges to human and animal health.

  2. Chondroitin Sulfate is the Primary Receptor for a Peptide-Modified AAV That Targets Brain Vascular Endothelium In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, James C; Keiser, Nicholas W; Okulist, Anna; Martins, Inês; Wilson, Matthew S; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-10-14

    Recently, we described a peptide-modified AAV2 vector (AAV-GMN) containing a capsid-displayed peptide that directs in vivo brain vascular targeting and transduction when delivered intravenously. In this study, we sought to identify the receptor that mediates transduction by AAV-GMN. We found that AAV-GMN, but not AAV2, readily transduces the murine brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3, a result that mirrors previously observed in vivo transduction profiles of brain vasculature. Studies in vitro revealed that the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate C, acts as the primary receptor for AAV-GMN. Unlike AAV2, chondroitin sulfate expression is required for cell transduction by AAV-GMN, and soluble chondroitin sulfate C can robustly inhibit AAV-GMN transduction of brain endothelial cells. Interestingly, AAV-GMN retains heparin-binding properties, though in contrast to AAV2, it poorly transduces cells that express heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfate, indicating that the peptide insertion negatively impacts heparan-mediated transduction. Lastly, when delivered directly, this modified virus can transduce multiple brain regions, indicating that the potential of AAV-GMN as a therapeutic gene delivery vector for central nervous system disorders is not restricted to brain vascular endothelium.

  3. Chondroitin Sulfate is the Primary Receptor for a Peptide-Modified AAV That Targets Brain Vascular Endothelium In Vivo

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    James C Geoghegan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we described a peptide-modified AAV2 vector (AAV-GMN containing a capsid-displayed peptide that directs in vivo brain vascular targeting and transduction when delivered intravenously. In this study, we sought to identify the receptor that mediates transduction by AAV-GMN. We found that AAV-GMN, but not AAV2, readily transduces the murine brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3, a result that mirrors previously observed in vivo transduction profiles of brain vasculature. Studies in vitro revealed that the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate C, acts as the primary receptor for AAV-GMN. Unlike AAV2, chondroitin sulfate expression is required for cell transduction by AAV-GMN, and soluble chondroitin sulfate C can robustly inhibit AAV-GMN transduction of brain endothelial cells. Interestingly, AAV-GMN retains heparin-binding properties, though in contrast to AAV2, it poorly transduces cells that express heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfate, indicating that the peptide insertion negatively impacts heparan-mediated transduction. Lastly, when delivered directly, this modified virus can transduce multiple brain regions, indicating that the potential of AAV-GMN as a therapeutic gene delivery vector for central nervous system disorders is not restricted to brain vascular endothelium.

  4. Potential Vaccine Targets against Rabbit Coccidiosis by Immunoproteomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongyan; Dong, Ronglian; Qiu, Baofeng; Jing, Jin; Zhu, Shunxing; Liu, Chun; Jiang, Yingmei; Wu, Liucheng; Wang, Shengcun; Miao, Jin; Shao, Yixiang

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify antigens for a vaccine or drug target to control rabbit coccidiosis. A combination of 2-dimensional electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometric analysis were used to identify novel antigens from the sporozoites of Eimeria stiedae . Protein spots were recognized by the sera of New Zealand rabbits infected artificially with E. stiedae . The proteins were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) analysis in combination with bioinformatics. Approximately 868 protein spots were detected by silver-staining, and a total of 41 immunoreactive protein spots were recognized by anti- E. stiedae sera. Finally, 23 protein spots were successfully identified. The proteins such as heat shock protein 70 and aspartyl protease may have potential as immunodiagnostic or vaccine antigens. The immunoreactive proteins were found to possess a wide range of biological functions. This study is the first to report the proteins recognized by sera of infected rabbits with E. stiedae , which might be helpful in identifying potential targets for vaccine development to control rabbit coccidiosis.

  5. Deep brain stimulation in Huntington's disease: assessment of potential targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mayur; Deogaonkar, Milind

    2015-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder that has very few effective therapeutic interventions. Since the disease has a defined neural circuitry abnormality, neuromodulation could be an option. Case reports, original research, and animal model studies were selected from the databases of Medline and PubMed. All related studies published up to July 2014 were included in this review. The following search terms were used: "Deep brain stimulation," "DBS," "thalamotomy," "pallidal stimulation," and "Huntington's Disease," "HD," "chorea," or "hyperkinetic movement disorders." This review examines potential nodes in the HD circuitry that could be modulated using deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy. With rapid evolution of imaging and ability to reach difficult targets in the brain with refined DBS technology, some phenotypes of HD could potentially be treated with DBS in the near future. Further clinical studies are warranted to validate the efficacy of neuromodulation and to determine the most optimal target for HD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CD47: a potential immunotherapy target for eliminating cancer cells.

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    Kong, F; Gao, F; Li, H; Liu, H; Zhang, Y; Zheng, R; Zhang, Y; Chen, J; Li, X; Liu, G; Jia, Y

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between the immune system and cancer growth and aggravation has been discussed over a century. A number of molecules have been shown to participate in this process. CD47, a normal universally expressed member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, plays multiple functions in immune system. Researches demonstrated that CD47 was also highly expressed on the surface of tumor cells as well as cancer stem cells (CSCs). Whether the highly expressed CD47 was associated with tumor growth, metastasis, recurrence, or drug resistance has become the hotspot. Besides the roles of CD47 in tumor immunoregulation, the monoclonal antibodies targeting CD47 used in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and bladder CSCs were reported, which shed new light on tumor treatment. CSCs have been recognized as the root of tumor drug resistance and recurrence. Whether CD47 on CSCs could serve as a potential target for future anti-cancer treatment forms the focus of our review. Here we highlight the potential roles of CD47 in immune system, and discuss the promising therapeutic application of anti-CD47 antibodies for eliminating tumor cells.

  7. NPY receptors as potential targets for anti-obesity drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2011-07-01

    The neuropeptide Y system has proven to be one of the most important regulators of feeding behaviour and energy homeostasis, thus presenting great potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment of disorders such as obesity and at the other extreme, anorexia. Due to the initial lack of pharmacological tools that are active in vivo, functions of the different Y receptors have been mainly studied in knockout and transgenic mouse models. However, over recent years various Y receptor selective peptidic and non-peptidic agonists and antagonists have been developed and tested. Their therapeutic potential in relation to treating obesity and other disorders of energy homeostasis is discussed in this review. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. MicroRNAs and potential targets in osteosarcoma: review

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    Valerie B. Sampson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children and young adults. Surgery and multi-agent chemotherapy are the standard treatment regimens for this disease. New therapies are being investigated to improve overall survival in patients. Molecular targets that actively modulate cell processes such as cell-cycle control, cell proliferation, metabolism and apoptosis, have been studied, but it remains a challenge to develop novel, effective targeted therapies to treat this heterogeneous and complex disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that play critical roles in regulating cell processes including growth, development and disease. miRNAs function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors to regulate gene and protein expression. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma with the potential for development in disease diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the role of miRNAs and their target genes and evaluate their potential use as therapeutic agents in osteosarcoma. We also summarize the efficacy of inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs or expression of tumor suppressor miRNAs in preclinical models of osteosarcoma. Recent progress on systemic delivery as well as current applications for miRNAs as therapeutic agents has seen the advancement of miR-34a in clinical trials for adult patients with non-resectable primary liver cancer or metastatic cancer with liver involvement. We suggest a global approach to the understanding of the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma may identify candidate miRNAs as promising biomarkers for this rare disease.

  9. In Vivo Models Used for Evaluation of Potential Antigastroduodenal Ulcer Agents

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    Michael Buenor Adinortey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptic ulcer is among the most serious gastrointestinal diseases in the world. Several orthodox drugs are employed for the treatment of the disease. Although these drugs are effective, they produce many adverse effects thus limiting their use. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in alternative therapies, especially those from plants due to their perceived relative lower side effects, ease of accessibility, and affordability. Plant medicines with ethnomedicinal use in peptic ulcer management need to be screened for their effectiveness and possible isolation of lead compounds. This requires use of appropriate animal models of various ulcers. The limited number of antiulcer models for drug development against gastric and duodenal ulcer studies has hindered the progress of targeted therapy in this field. It is, therefore, necessary to review the literature on experimental models used to screen agents with potential antigastroduodenal ulcer activity and explain their biochemical basis in order to facilitate their use in the development of new preventive and curative antiulcer drugs. Clinical trials can then be carried out on agents/drugs that show promise. In this paper, current in vivo animal models of ulcers and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying their induction, their limitations, as well as the challenges associated with their use have been discussed.

  10. Polydopamine-Based Surface Modification of Novel Nanoparticle-Aptamer Bioconjugates for In Vivo Breast Cancer Targeting and Enhanced Therapeutic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei; Zeng, Xiaowei; Wu, Jun; Zhu, Xi; Yu, Xinghua; Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Jinxie; Liu, Gan; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we reported a simple polydopamine (pD)-based surface modification method to prepare novel nanoparticle-aptamer bioconjugates (Apt-pD-DTX/NPs) for in vivo tumor targeting and enhanced therapeutic effects of breast cancer. With simple preparation procedures, the new functionalized Apt-pD-DTX/NPs could maximumly increase the local effective drug concentration on tumor sites, achieving enhanced treatment effectiveness and minimizing side effects. The dopamine polymerization and aptamer conjugation barely changed the characters of NPs. Both in vitro cell experiments (i.e. endocytosis of fluorescent NPs, in vitro cellular targeting and cytotoxicity assays) and in vivo animal studies (i.e. in vivo imaging, biodistribution and antitumor effects of NPs) demonstrated that the Apt-pD-DTX/NPs could achieve significantly high targeting efficiency and enhanced therapeutic effects compared with clinical Taxotere® and NPs without functional modification. Above all, the Apt-pD-DTX/NPs showed great potential as a promising nanoformulation for in vivo breast cancer therapy and the construction of pD-modified NP-aptamer bioconjugates could be of great value in medical use. PMID:26941841

  11. Micro-CT Imaging of RGD-Conjugated Gold Nanorods Targeting Tumor In Vivo

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    Xiaochao Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanomaterials as computed tomography (CT contrast agents at lower X-ray dosage to get a higher contrast have advantages of longer imaging time and lower toxic side effects compared to current contrast agents. As a receptor for Cyclo (Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys (RGD peptide, integrin αvβ3 is overexpressed on some tumor cells and tumor neovasculature. In this paper, we conjugated the RGD peptide on the surface of gold nanorods (AuNRs, designated as RGD-AuNRs, a promising candidate in applications such as tumor targeting and imaging capability for micro-CT imaging. Integrin αvβ3-positive U87 cells and integrin αvβ3-negative HT-29 cells were chosen to establish animal models relatedly and then texted the tumor targeting ability and imaging capability of RGD-AuNRs in vitro and in vivo. The MTT assay and stability measurement showed that RGD-conjugation eliminated their cytotoxicity and improved their biocompatibility and stability. Dark-field imaging of U87 cells and HT-29 cells testified the binding affinities and uptake abilities of RGD-AuNRs, and the results showed that RGD-AuNRs were more specifical to U87 cells. The enhanced micro-CT imaging contrast of intramuscular and subcutaneous injection illustrated the feasibility of RGD-AuNRs to be contrast agents. Furthermore, the micro-CT imaging of targeting U87 and HT-29 tumor models verified the targeting abilities of RGD-AuNRs.

  12. Identification of a Potential Target of Capsaicin by Computational Target Fishing

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    Xuan-yi Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin, the component responsible for the pungency of chili peppers, shows beneficial effects in many diseases, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the potential targets of capsaicin were predicted using PharmMapper and confirmed via chemical-protein interactome (CPI and molecular docking. Carbonic anhydrase 2 was identified as the main disease-related target, with the pharmacophore model matching well with the molecular features of capsaicin. The relation was confirmed by CPI and molecular docking and supported by previous research showing that capsaicin is a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes. The present study provides a basis for understanding the mechanisms of action of capsaicin or those of other natural compounds.

  13. In Vivo Biomolecule Corona around Blood-Circulating, Clinically Used and Antibody-Targeted Lipid Bilayer Nanoscale Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjidemetriou, Marilena; Al-Ahmady, Zahraa; Mazza, Mariarosa; Collins, Richard F; Dawson, Kenneth; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2015-08-25

    The adsorption of proteins and their layering onto nanoparticle surfaces has been called the "protein corona". This dynamic process of protein adsorption has been extensively studied following in vitro incubation of many different nanoparticles with plasma proteins. However, the formation of protein corona under dynamic, in vivo conditions remains largely unexplored. Extrapolation of in vitro formed protein coronas to predict the fate and possible toxicological burden from nanoparticles in vivo is of great interest. However, complete lack of such direct comparisons for clinically used nanoparticles makes the study of in vitro and in vivo formed protein coronas of great importance. Our aim was to study the in vivo protein corona formed onto intravenously injected, clinically used liposomes, based on the composition of the PEGylated liposomal formulation that constitutes the anticancer agent Doxil. The formation of in vivo protein corona was determined after the recovery of the liposomes from the blood circulation of CD-1 mice 10 min postinjection. In comparison, in vitro protein corona was formed by the incubation of liposomes in CD-1 mouse plasma. In vivo and in vitro formed protein coronas were compared in terms of morphology, composition and cellular internalization. The protein coronas on bare (non-PEGylated) and monoclonal antibody (IgG) targeted liposomes of the same lipid composition were also comparatively investigated. A network of linear fibrillary structures constituted the in vitro formed protein corona, whereas the in vivo corona had a different morphology but did not appear to coat the liposome surface entirely. Even though the total amount of protein attached on circulating liposomes correlated with that observed from in vitro incubations, the variety of molecular species in the in vivo corona were considerably wider. Both in vitro and in vivo formed protein coronas were found to significantly reduce receptor binding and cellular internalization of

  14. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a potential targeting agent for delivery of boron to malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capala, J.; Barth, R.F.; Adams, D.M.; Bailey, M.Q.; Soloway, A.H. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Carlsson, J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Sciences

    1994-12-31

    The majority of high grade gliomas express an amplified epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, and this often is associated with an increase in cell surface receptor expression. The rapid internalization and degradation of EGF-EGFR complexes, as well as their high affinity make EGF a potential targeting agent for delivery of {sup 10}B to tumor cells with an amplified number of EGFR. Human glioma cells can expresses as many as 10{sup 5} {minus}10{sup 6} EGF receptors per cell, and if these could be saturated with boronated EGF, then > 10{sup 8} boron atoms would be delivered per cell. Since EGF has a comparatively low molecular weight ({approximately} 6 kD), this has allowed us to construct relatively small bioconjugates containing {approximately} 900 boron atoms per EGF molecule{sup 3}, which also had high affinity for EGFR on tumor cells. In the present study, the feasibility of using EGF receptors as a potential target for therapy of gliomas was investigated by in vivo scintigraphic studies using {sup 131}I{minus} or {sup 99m}{Tc}-labeled EGF in a rat brain tumor model. Our results indicate that intratumorally delivered boron- EGF conjugates might be useful for targeting EGFR on glioma cells if the boron containing moiety of the conjugates persisted intracellularly. Further studies are required, however, to determine if this approach can be used for BNCT of the rat glioma.

  15. Astrocytes pathology in ALS: A potential therapeutic target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Sonja

    2017-06-15

    The mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are multifactorial and include genetic and environmental factors. Nowadays, it is well accepted that neuronal loss is driven by non-cell autonomous toxicity. Non-neuronal cells, such as astrocytes, have been described to significantly contribute to motoneuron cell death and disease progression in cell culture experiments and animal models of ALS. Astrocytes are essential for neuronal survival and function by regulating neurotransmitter and ion homeostasis, immune response, blood flow and glucose uptake, antioxidant defence and growth factor release. Based on their significant functions in "housekeeping" the central nervous system (CNS), they are no longer thought to be passive bystanders but rather contributors to ALS pathogenesis. Findings from animal models have broadened our knowledge about different pathomechanisms in ALS, but therapeutic approaches to impede disease progression failed. So far, there is no cure for ALS and effective medication to slow down disease progression is limited. Targeting only a single aspect of this multifactorial disease may exhibit therapeutic limitations. Hence, novel cellular targets must be defined and new pharmaceutical strategies, such as combinatorial drug therapies are urgently needed. The present review discusses the physiological role of astrocytes and current hypotheses of astrocyte pathology in ALS. Furthermore, recent investigation of potential drug candidates in astrocyte cell culture systems and animal models, as well as data obtained from clinical trials, will be addressed. The central role of astrocytes in ALS pathogenesis makes them a promising target for pharmaceutical interventions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Multiplexed Targeted Quantitative Proteomics Predicts Hepatic Glucuronidation Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaillan, Guillaume; Rouleau, Michèle; Klein, Kathrin; Fallon, John K; Caron, Patrick; Villeneuve, Lyne; Smith, Philip C; Zanger, Ulrich M; Guillemette, Chantal

    2015-09-01

    Phase II metabolism is prominently governed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in humans. These enzymes regulate the bioactivity of many drugs and endogenous small molecules in many organs, including the liver, a major site of regulation by the glucuronidation pathway. This study determined the expression of hepatic UGTs by targeted proteomics in 48 liver samples and by measuring the glucuronidation activity using probe substrates. It demonstrates the sensitivity and accuracy of nano-ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry to establish the complex expression profiles of 14 hepatic UGTs in a single analysis. UGT2B7 is the most abundant UGT in our collection of livers, expressed at 69 pmol/mg microsomal proteins, whereas UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT2B4, and UGT2B15 are similarly abundant, averaging 30-34 pmol/mg proteins. The average relative abundance of these five UGTs represents 81% of the measured hepatic UGTs. Our data further highlight the strong relationships in the expression of several UGTs. Most notably, UGT1A4 correlates with most measured UGTs, and the expression levels of UGT2B4/UGT2B7 displayed the strongest correlation. However, significant interindividual variability is observed for all UGTs, both at the level of enzyme concentrations and activity (coefficient of variation: 45%-184%). The reliability of targeted proteomics quantification is supported by the high correlation between UGT concentration and activity. Collectively, these findings expand our understanding of hepatic UGT profiles by establishing absolute hepatic concentrations of 14 UGTs and further suggest coregulated expression between most abundant hepatic UGTs. Data support the value of multiplexed targeted quantitative proteomics to accurately assess specific UGT concentrations in liver samples and hepatic glucuronidation potential. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. The polycomb repressive complex 2 is a potential target of SUMO modifications.

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    Eva Madi Riising

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2 functions as a transcriptional repressor through a mechanism that involves methylation of Histone H3 at lysine 27. The PRC2 complex activity is essential for cellular proliferation, development, and cell fate decisions. PRC2 target genes include important regulators of development and proliferation as well as tumor suppressor genes. Consistent with this, the activity of several Polycomb group (PcG proteins is deregulated in human cancer suggesting an important role for PcGs in tumor development. Whereas the downstream functions of PcGs are well characterized, the mechanisms of their recruitment to target genes and the regulation of their activity are not fully understood.Here we show that the two PRC2 components SUZ12 and EZH2 are sumoylated in vitro and in vivo. Among several putative sumoylation sites we have mapped the major site of SUZ12 sumoylation. Furthermore, we show that SUZ12 interacts with the E2-conjugating enzyme UBC9 both in vitro and in vivo and that mutation of the SUZ12 sumoylation site does not abolish this binding. Finally, we provide evidence that the E3-ligase PIASXbeta interacts and enhances the sumoylation of SUZ12 in vivo suggesting that PIASXbeta could function as an E3-ligase for SUZ12.Taken together, our data identify sumoylation as a novel post-translational modification of components of the PRC2 complex, which could suggest a potential new mechanism to modulate PRC2 repressive activity. Further work aimed to identify the physiological conditions for these modifications will be required to understand the role of SUZ12 and EZH2 sumoylation in PcG-mediated epigenetic regulation of transcription.

  18. Dihydrofolate reductase: A potential drug target in trypanosomes and leishmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccotto, Fabio; Martin, Andrew C. R.; Laskowski, Roman A.; Thornton, Janet M.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    1998-05-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase has successfully been used as a drug target in the area of anti-cancer, anti-bacterial and anti-malarial chemotherapy. Little has been done to evaluate it as a drug target for treatment of the trypanosomiases and leishmaniasis. A crystal structure of Leishmania major dihydrofolate reductase has been published. In this paper, we describe the modelling of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei dihydrofolate reductases based on this crystal structure. These structures and models have been used in the comparison of protozoan, bacterial and human enzymes in order to highlight the different features that can be used in the design of selective anti-protozoan agents. Comparison has been made between residues present in the active site, the accessibility of these residues, charge distribution in the active site, and the shape and size of the active sites. Whilst there is a high degree of similarity between protozoan, human and bacterial dihydrofolate reductase active sites, there are differences that provide potential for selective drug design. In particular, we have identified a set of residues which may be important for selective drug design and identified a larger binding pocket in the protozoan than the human and bacterial enzymes.

  19. Cognitive 'Omics': Pattern-Based Validation of Potential Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyertyán, István

    2017-02-01

    Despite the abundance of cognitive enhancer mechanisms identified in basic research, drugs approved for cognitive disorders are scarce and of limited efficacy. Although the so-called 'gold-standard' animal assays are well suited to the study of fundamental learning processes, they fail to predict clinical efficacy against complex and robust cognitive defects. Preclinical validation of potential drug targets requires new approaches with higher translational value. Here I propose a rodent cognitive test system that encompasses several learning paradigms each modeling a certain human cognitive domain. Cognitive deficits are brought about by several impairing methods and a particular mechanism of action is tested on each defective cognitive function. The outcome is a cognitive efficacy pattern that should then be matched to the cognitive deficit patterns of the clinical disorders. The best fit will highlight the clinical indication with the greatest chance for success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cytokines: Roles in atherosclerosis disease progression and potential therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Joe W. E.; Ramji, Dipak P.

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the primary cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is a chronic inflammatory disorder in the walls of medium and large arteries. CVD is currently responsible for about one in three global deaths and this is expected to rise in the future due to an increase in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Current therapies for atherosclerosis mainly modulate lipid homeostasis and whilst successful at reducing the risk of a CVD-related death, they are associated with considerable residual risk and various side effects. There is therefore a need for alternative therapies aimed at regulating inflammation in order to reduce atherogenesis. This review will highlight the key role cytokines play during disease progression as well as potential therapeutic strategies to target them. PMID:27357616

  1. In vivo modeling and molecular characterization: a path towards targeted therapy of melanoma brain metastasis

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    Avital eGaziel-Sovran

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis from melanoma remains mostly incurable and the main cause of death from the disease. Early stage clinical trials and case studies show some promise for targeted therapies in the treatment of melanoma brain metastasis. However, the progression-free survival for currently available therapies, although significantly improved, is still very short. The development of new potent agents to eradicate melanoma brain metastasis relies on the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that drive melanoma cells to reach and colonize the brain. The discovery of such mechanisms depends heavily on pre-clinical models that enable the testing of candidate factors and therapeutic agents in vivo. In this review we summarize the effects of available targeted therapies on melanoma brain metastasis in the clinic. We provide an overview of existing pre-clinical models to study the disease and discuss specific molecules and mechanisms reported to modulate different aspects of melanoma brain metastasis and finally, by integrating both clinical and basic data, we summarize both opportunities and challenges currently presented to researchers in the field.

  2. A novel nanoparticle delivery system for in vivo targeting of the sciatic nerve: impact on regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Nádia Pereira; Oliveira, Hugo; Pêgo, Ana Paula; Saraiva, Maria João

    2012-08-01

    Innovative solutions in the development of drug delivery systems targeting the nerve tissue are awaited. In this regard, a novel system for the delivery of drugs to the sciatic nerve was created using nanomedical principles. Chitosan was the vehicle material used in the experiment. Heparin bound to growth factors has been administered to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, and since heparin possesses the appropriate charge to be able to form nanoparticles with chitosan, it appears to be a good candidate to base this new delivery system on. Maximal absorption took place throughout the extracellular matrix at day 15. No major inflammatory response was observed, indicating that this is a safe and biocompatible system for drug delivery to nerves. Sensorimotor performance and nerve regeneration of mice receiving these nanoparticles were superior as compared with controls. Our work demonstrates a versatile nanoparticle delivery system that successfully targets drugs 'in vivo' to the sciatic nerve, opening novel avenues in the field of nanomedicine to the design of therapeutic strategies that enhance axonal regeneration.

  3. In vivo transcriptional targeting into the retinal vasculature using recombinant baculovirus carrying the human flt-1 promoter

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    Vaca Luis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial cells are a target for gene therapy because they are implicated in a number of vascular diseases. Recombinant baculovirus have emerged as novel gene delivery vectors. However, there is no information available concerning the use of endothelial-specific promoters in the context of the baculovirus genome. In the present study, we have generated a recombinant baculovirus containing the human flt-1 promoter (BacFLT-GFP driving the expression of the green fluorescent protein. Transcriptional gene targeting was analyzed in vitro in different mammalian cell lines and in vivo in adult rat retinal vasculature. Results BacFLT-GFP evoked the highest levels of expression in the endothelial cell line BUVEC-E6E7-1, similar to those reached by recombinant baculovirus carrying the CMV promoter (112% relative to BacCMV-GFP, n = 4. Interestingly, BacFLT-GFP directed high levels of expression in rat glioma C6 and in human glioblastoma CH235 cells (34.78% and 47.86% relative to BacCMV-GFP, respectively. Histone deacetylase inhibitors such as butyrate or trichostatin A enhanced the transcriptional activity of both BacCMV-GFP and BacFLT-GFP. Thus, in this study histone deacetylation appears to be a central mechanism for the silencing of baculovirus, independently of the promoter utilized. In vivo transcriptional targeting was demonstrated in adult rat retinal vasculature by intravitreal delivery of BacFLT-GFP and immunohistochemical staining with von Willebrand factor (vWF. Analysis by fluorescence microscopy and deconvolved three-dimensional confocal microscopy of retinal whole mounts obtained after 3 days of baculovirus injection showed that most GFP-expressing cells localized to the inner limiting membrane (ILM and ganglion cell layer (GCL and colocalize with vWF (70%, n = 10 in blood vessels, confirming the endothelial phenotype of the transduced cells. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that the restricted expression

  4. Semaphorin 7A as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Franco, Ana; Eixarch, Herena; Costa, Carme; Gil, Vanessa; Castillo, Mireia; Calvo-Barreiro, Laura; Montalban, Xavier; Del Río, José A; Espejo, Carmen

    2017-08-01

    Semaphorin 7A (sema7A) is classified as an immune semaphorin with dual functions in the immune system and in the central nervous system (CNS). These molecules are of interest due to their potential role in multiple sclerosis (MS), which is a chronic demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of autoimmune origin. In this study, we elucidated the role of sema7A in neuroinflammation using both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. In an in vitro model of neuroinflammation, using cerebellar organotypic slice cultures, we observed that challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin did not affect demyelination or cell death in sema7A-deficient cultures compared to wild-type cultures. Moreover, the in vivo outcome of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in sema7A-deficient mice was altered in an antigen- and adjuvant-dose-dependent manner, while no differences were observed in the wild-type counterparts. Altogether, these results indicate that sema7A is involved in peripheral immunity and CNS inflammation in MS pathogenesis. Indeed, these data suggest that sema7A might be a potential therapeutic target to treat MS and autoimmune conditions.

  5. The HGF inhibitory peptide HGP-1 displays promising in vitro and in vivo efficacy for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lisha; Li, Chunlin; Zhu, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    HGF/MET pathway mediates cancer initiation and development. Thus, inhibition on HGF-initiated MET signaling pathway would provide a new approach to cancer targeted therapeutics. In our study, we identified a targeting peptide candidate binding to HGF which was named HGF binding peptide-1 (HGP-1) via bacterial surface display methods coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). HGP-1 showed the moderate affinity when determined with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique and high specificity in binding to HGF while assessed by fluorescence-based ELISA assay. The results from MTT and in vitro migration assay indicated that HGF-dependent cell proliferation and migration could be inhibited by HGP-1. In vivo administration of HGP-1 led to an effective inhibitory effect on tumor growth in A549 tumor xenograft models. Moreover, findings from Western Blots revealed that HGP-1 could down-regulated the phosphorylation levels of MET and ERK1/2 initiated by HGF, which suggested that HGP-1 could disrupt the activation of HGF/MET signaling to influence the cell activity. All the data highlighted the potential of HGP-1 to be a potent inhibitor for HGF/MET signaling. PMID:26254225

  6. Sample size calculations for clinical trials targeting tauopathies: A new potential disease target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Machulda, Mary M.; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Weigand, Stephen D.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Spychalla, Anthony J.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Disease-modifying therapies are being developed to target tau pathology, and should, therefore, be tested in primary tauopathies. We propose that progressive apraxia of speech should be considered one such target group. In this study, we investigate potential neuroimaging and clinical outcome measures for progressive apraxia of speech and determine sample size estimates for clinical trials. We prospectively recruited 24 patients with progressive apraxia of speech who underwent two serial MRI with an interval of approximately two years. Detailed speech and language assessments included the Apraxia of Speech Rating Scale (ASRS) and Motor Speech Disorders (MSD) severity scale. Rates of ventricular expansion and rates of whole brain, striatal and midbrain atrophy were calculated. Atrophy rates across 38 cortical regions were also calculated and the regions that best differentiated patients from controls were selected. Sample size estimates required to power placebo-controlled treatment trials were calculated. The smallest sample size estimates were obtained with rates of atrophy of the precentral gyrus and supplementary motor area, with both measures requiring less than 50 subjects per arm to detect a 25% treatment effect with 80% power. These measures outperformed the other regional and global MRI measures and the clinical scales. Regional rates of cortical atrophy therefore provide the best outcome measures in progressive apraxia of speech. The small sample size estimates demonstrate feasibility for including progressive apraxia of speech in future clinical treatment trials targeting tau. PMID:26076744

  7. Efforts to control the errant products of a targeted in vivo generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Kappel, Barry J; McDevitt, Michael R; Sgouros, George; Flombaum, Carlos D; Cabassa, Catalina; Scheinberg, David A

    2005-06-01

    Alpha-particle immunotherapy by targeted alpha-emitters or alpha-emitting isotope generators is a novel form of extraordinarily potent cancer therapy. A major impediment to the clinical use of targeted actinium-225 (225Ac) in vivo generators may be the radiotoxicity of the systemically released daughter radionuclides. The daughters, especially bismuth-213 (213Bi), tend to accumulate in the kidneys. We tested the efficacy of various pharmacologic agents and the effect of tumor burden in altering the pharmacokinetics of the 225Ac daughters to modify their renal uptake. Pharmacologic treatments in animals were started before i.v. administration of the HuM195-225Ac generator. 225Ac, francium-221 (221Fr), and 213Bi biodistributions were calculated in each animal at different time points after 225Ac generator injection. Oral metal chelation with 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid (DMPS) or meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) caused a significant reduction (P < 0.0001) in the renal 213Bi uptake; however, DMPS was more effective than DMSA (P < 0.001). The results with DMPS were also confirmed in a monkey model. The renal 213Bi and 221Fr activities were significantly reduced by furosemide and chlorothiazide treatment (P < 0.0001). The effect on renal 213Bi activity was further enhanced by the combination of DMPS with either chlorothiazide or furosemide (P < 0.0001). Competitive antagonism by bismuth subnitrate moderately reduced the renal uptake of 213Bi. The presence of a higher target-tumor burden significantly prevented the renal 213Bi accumulation (P = 0.003), which was further reduced by DMPS treatment (P < 0.0001). Metal chelation, diuresis with furosemide or chlorothiazide, and competitive metal blockade may be used as adjuvant therapies to modify the renal accumulation of 225Ac daughters.

  8. BRCAA1 monoclonal antibody conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for in vivo targeted magnetofluorescent imaging of gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Jian

    2011-05-01

    can target in vivo gastric cancer cells, can be used for simultaneous magnetofluorescent imaging, and may have great potential in applications such as dual-model imaging and local thermal therapy of early gastric cancer in near future.

  9. Mitochondrial VDAC1: A Key Gatekeeper as Potential Therapeutic Target

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    Amadou K. S. Camara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the key source of ATP that fuels cellular functions, and they are also central in cellular signaling, cell division and apoptosis. Dysfunction of mitochondria has been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including neurodegenerative and cardiac diseases, and various types of cancer. One of the key proteins that regulate mitochondrial function is the voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1, the most abundant protein on the outer membrane of mitochondria. VDAC1 is the gatekeeper for the passages of metabolites, nucleotides, and ions; it plays a crucial role in regulating apoptosis due to its interaction with apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins, namely members of the Bcl-2 family of proteins and hexokinase. Therefore, regulation of VDAC1 is crucial not only for metabolic functions of mitochondria, but also for cell survival. In fact, multiple lines of evidence have confirmed the involvement of VDAC1 in several diseases. Consequently, modulation or dysregulation of VDAC1 function can potentially attenuate or exacerbate pathophysiological conditions. Understanding the role of VDAC1 in health and disease could lead to selective protection of cells in different tissues and diverse diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of VDAC1 in the pathogenesis of diseases and as a potentially effective target for therapeutic management of various pathologies.

  10. CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor As Potential Target against Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Aso, Ester; Ferrer, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    The CB2 receptor is one of the components of the endogenous cannabinoid system, a complex network of signaling molecules and receptors involved in the homeostatic control of several physiological functions. Accumulated evidence suggests a role for CB2 receptors in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and indicates their potential as a therapeutic target against this neurodegenerative disease. Levels of CB2 receptors are significantly increased in post-mortem AD brains, mainly in microglia surrounding senile plaques, and their expression levels correlate with the amounts of Aβ42 and β-amyloid plaque deposition. Moreover, several studies on animal models of AD have demonstrated that specific CB2 receptor agonists, which are devoid of psychoactive effects, reduce AD-like pathology, resulting in attenuation of the inflammation associated with the disease but also modulating Aβ and tau aberrant processing, among other effects. CB2 receptor activation also improves cognitive impairment in animal models of AD. This review discusses available data regarding the role of CB2 receptors in AD and the potential usefulness of specific agonists of these receptors against AD.

  11. Type I interferon: potential therapeutic target for psoriasis?

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    Yihong Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease characterized by aberrant epidermal differentiation, surface scale formation, and marked cutaneous inflammation. To better understand the pathogenesis of this disease and identify potential mediators, we used whole genome array analysis to profile paired lesional and nonlesional psoriatic skin and skin from healthy donors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed robust overexpression of type I interferon (IFN-inducible genes and genomic signatures that indicate T cell and dendritic cell infiltration in lesional skin. Up-regulation of mRNAs for IFN-alpha subtypes was observed in lesional skin compared with nonlesional skin. Enrichment of mature dendritic cells and 2 type I IFN-inducible proteins, STAT1 and ISG15, were observed in the majority of lesional skin biopsies. Concordant overexpression of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha-inducible gene signatures occurred at the same disease sites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Up-regulation of TNF-alpha and elevation of the TNF-alpha-inducible gene signature in lesional skin underscore the importance of this cytokine in psoriasis; these data describe a molecular basis for the therapeutic activity of anti-TNF-alpha agents. Furthermore, these findings implicate type I IFNs in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Consistent and significant up-regulation of type I IFNs and their associated gene signatures in psoriatic skin suggest that type I IFNs may be potential therapeutic targets in psoriasis treatment.

  12. Type I interferon: potential therapeutic target for psoriasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yihong; Richman, Laura; Morehouse, Chris; de los Reyes, Melissa; Higgs, Brandon W; Boutrin, Anmarie; White, Barbara; Coyle, Anthony; Krueger, James; Kiener, Peter A; Jallal, Bahija

    2008-07-16

    Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease characterized by aberrant epidermal differentiation, surface scale formation, and marked cutaneous inflammation. To better understand the pathogenesis of this disease and identify potential mediators, we used whole genome array analysis to profile paired lesional and nonlesional psoriatic skin and skin from healthy donors. We observed robust overexpression of type I interferon (IFN)-inducible genes and genomic signatures that indicate T cell and dendritic cell infiltration in lesional skin. Up-regulation of mRNAs for IFN-alpha subtypes was observed in lesional skin compared with nonlesional skin. Enrichment of mature dendritic cells and 2 type I IFN-inducible proteins, STAT1 and ISG15, were observed in the majority of lesional skin biopsies. Concordant overexpression of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha-inducible gene signatures occurred at the same disease sites. Up-regulation of TNF-alpha and elevation of the TNF-alpha-inducible gene signature in lesional skin underscore the importance of this cytokine in psoriasis; these data describe a molecular basis for the therapeutic activity of anti-TNF-alpha agents. Furthermore, these findings implicate type I IFNs in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Consistent and significant up-regulation of type I IFNs and their associated gene signatures in psoriatic skin suggest that type I IFNs may be potential therapeutic targets in psoriasis treatment.

  13. Neurodegeneration in diabetic retina and its potential drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola, Mohammad Shamsul; Alhomida, Abdullah S

    2014-07-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the major complications of diabetes causing vision loss and blindness worldwide. DR is widely recognized as a neurodegenerative disease as evidenced from early changes at cellular and molecular levels in the neuronal component of the diabetic retina, which is further supported by various retinal functional tests indicating functional deficits in the retina soon after diabetes progression. Diabetes alters the level of a number of neurodegenerative metabolites, which increases influx through several metabolic pathways which in turn induce an increase in oxidative stress and a decrease in neurotrophic factors, thereby damage retinal neurons. Loss of neurons may implicate in vascular pathology, a clinical signs of DR observed at later stages of the disease. Here, we discuss diabetes-induced potential metabolites known to be detrimental to neuronal damage and their mechanism of action. In addition, we highlight important neurotrophic factors, whose level have been found to be dysregulated in diabetic retina and may damage neurons. Furthermore, we discuss potential drugs and strategies based on targeting diabetes-induced metabolites, metabolic pathways, oxidative stress, and neurotrophins to protect retinal neurons, which may ameliorate vision loss and vascular damage in DR.

  14. Large anti-HER2/neu liposomes for potential targeted intraperitoneal therapy of micrometastatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofou, Stavroula; Enmon, Richard; Palm, Stig; Kappel, Barry; Zanzonico, Pat; McDevitt, Michael R.; Scheinberg, David A.; Sgouros, George

    2011-01-01

    Effective targeting and killing of intraperitoneally disseminated micrometastases remains a challenge. Objective/Methods In this work, we evaluated the potential of antibody-labeled PEGylated large liposomes as vehicles for direct intraperitoneal (i.p.) drug delivery with the aim to enhance the tumor-to-normal organ ratio and to improve the bioexposure of cancer cells to the delivered therapeutics while shifting the toxicities toward the spleen. These targeted liposomes are designed to combine: (1) specific targeting to and internalization by cancer cells mediated by liposome-conjugated tumor-specific antibodies, (2) slow clearance from the peritoneal cavity, and (3) shift of normal organ toxicities from the liver to the spleen due to their relatively large size. Results Conjugation of anti-HER2/neu antibodies to the surface of large (approximately 600 nm in diameter) PEGylated liposomes results in fast, specific binding of targeted liposomes to cancer cells in vitro, followed by considerable cellular internalization. In vivo, after i.p. administration, these liposomes exhibit fast, specific binding to i.p. cancerous tumors. Large liposomes are slowly cleared from the peritoneal cavity, and they exhibit increased uptake by the spleen relative to the liver, while targeted large liposomes demonstrate specific tumor uptake at early times. Although tissue and tumor uptake are greater for cationic liposomes, the tumor-to-liver and spleen-to-liver ratios are similar for both membrane compositions, suggesting a primary role for the liposome’s size, compared to the liposome’s surface charge. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that large targeted liposomes administered i.p. could be a potent drug-delivery strategy for locoregional therapy of i.p. micrometastatic tumors. PMID:20070139

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi P21: a potential novel target for chagasic cardiomyopathy therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; Alves da Silva, Aline; Teixeira, Samuel Cota; Borges, Bruna Cristina; dos Santos, Marlus Alves; Martins, Flávia Alves; Brígido, Paula Cristina; Rodrigues, Adele Aud; Notário, Ana Flávia Oliveira; Ferreira, Bruno Antônio; Servato, João Paulo Silva; Deconte, Simone Ramos; Lopes, Daiana Silva; Ávila, Veridiana Melo Rodrigues; Araújo, Fernanda de Assis; Tomiosso, Tatiana Carla; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, which is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America. It is estimated that 10%–30% of all infected individuals will acquire chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). The etiology of CCC is multifactorial and involves parasite genotype, host genetic polymorphisms, immune response, signaling pathways and autoimmune progression. Herein we verified the impact of the recombinant form of P21 (rP21), a secreted T. cruzi protein involved in host cell invasion, on progression of inflammatory process in a polyester sponge-induced inflammation model. Results indicated that rP21 can recruit immune cells induce myeloperoxidase and IL-4 production and decrease blood vessels formation compared to controls in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, T. cruzi P21 may be a potential target for the development of P21 antagonist compounds to treat chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26574156

  16. RORα, a Potential Tumor Suppressor and Therapeutic Target of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Du

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The function of the nuclear receptor (NR in breast cancer progression has been investigated for decades. The majority of the nuclear receptors have well characterized natural ligands, but a few of them are orphan receptors for which no ligand has been identified. RORα, one member of the retinoid orphan nuclear receptor (ROR subfamily of orphan receptors, regulates various cellular and pathological activities. RORα is commonly down-regulated and/or hypoactivated in breast cancer compared to normal mammary tissue. Expression of RORα suppresses malignant phenotypes in breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Activity of RORα can be categorized into the canonical and non-canonical nuclear receptor pathways, which in turn regulate various breast cancer cellular function, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion. This information suggests that RORα is a potent tumor suppressor and a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  17. [18F]Fluoroazabenzoxazoles as potential amyloid plaque PET tracers: synthesis and in vivo evaluation in rhesus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Eric D; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Fan, Hong; Zeng, Zhizhen; Gammage, Linda; Miller, Patricia; O'Malley, Stacey; Connolly, Brett; Mulhearn, James; Harrison, Scott T; Wolkenberg, Scott E; Barrow, James C; Williams, David L; Hargreaves, Richard J; Sur, Cyrille; Cook, Jacquelynn J

    2011-11-01

    An (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for amyloid plaque is desirable for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, particularly to enable preventative treatment once effective therapeutics are available. Similarly, such a tracer would be useful as a biomarker for enrollment of patients in clinical trials for evaluation of antiamyloid therapeutics. Furthermore, changes in the level of plaque burden as quantified by an amyloid plaque PET tracer may provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of amyloid-targeted therapeutics. This work describes our approach to evaluate and select a candidate PET tracer for in vivo quantification of human amyloid plaque. Ligands were evaluated for their in vitro binding to human amyloid plaques, lipophilicity and predicted blood-brain barrier permeability. Candidates with favorable in vitro properties were radiolabeled with (18)F and evaluated in vivo. Baseline PET scans in rhesus monkey were conducted to evaluate the regional distribution and kinetics of each tracer using tracer kinetic modeling methods. High binding potential in cerebral white matter and cortical grey matter was considered an unfavorable feature of the candidate tracers. [(18)F]MK-3328 showed the most favorable combination of low in vivo binding potential in white matter and cortical grey matter in rhesus monkeys, low lipophilicity (Log D=2.91) and high affinity for human amyloid plaques (IC(50)=10.5±1.3 nM). [(18)F]MK-3328 was identified as a promising PET tracer for in vivo quantification of amyloid plaques, and further evaluation in humans is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cellular GFP Toxicity and Immunogenicity: Potential Confounders in in Vivo Cell Tracking Experiments.

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    Ansari, Amir Mehdi; Ahmed, A Karim; Matsangos, Aerielle E; Lay, Frank; Born, Louis J; Marti, Guy; Harmon, John W; Sun, Zhaoli

    2016-10-01

    Green Fluorescent protein (GFP), used as a cellular tag, provides researchers with a valuable method of measuring gene expression and cell tracking. However, there is evidence to suggest that the immunogenicity and cytotoxicity of GFP potentially confounds the interpretation of in vivo experimental data. Studies have shown that GFP expression can deteriorate over time as GFP tagged cells are prone to death. Therefore, the cells that were originally marked with GFP do not survive and cannot be accurately traced over time. This review will present current evidence for the immunogenicity and cytotoxicity of GFP in in vivo studies by characterizing these responses.

  19. Non-invasive electrocardiogram detection of in vivo zebrafish embryos using electric potential sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon-Morales, E.; Prance, R. J.; Prance, H.; Aviles-Espinosa, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this letter, we report the continuous detection of the cardiac electrical activity in embryonic zebrafish using a non-invasive approach. We present a portable and cost-effective platform based on the electric potential sensing technology, to monitor in vivo electrocardiogram activity from the zebrafish heart. This proof of principle demonstration shows how electrocardiogram measurements from the embryonic zebrafish may become accessible by using electric field detection. We present preliminary results using the prototype, which enables the acquisition of electrophysiological signals from in vivo 3 and 5 days-post-fertilization zebrafish embryos. The recorded waveforms show electrocardiogram traces including detailed features such as QRS complex, P and T waves.

  20. Pegylated Trastuzumab Fragments Acquire an Increased in Vivo Stability but Show a Largely Reduced Affinity for the Target Antigen

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    Fabio Selis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available PEGylation of biomolecules is a major approach to increase blood stream half-life, stability and solubility of biotherapeutics and to reduce their immunogenicity, aggregation potential and unspecific interactions with other proteins and tissues. Antibodies have generally long half-lives due to high molecular mass and stability toward proteases, however their size lowers to some extent their potential because of a reduced ability to penetrate tissues, especially those of tumor origin. Fab or otherwise engineered smaller fragments are an alternative but are less stable and are much less well retained in circulation. We have here investigated the effects of various PEGylations on the binding properties and in vivo half-life of Fab fragments derived from the enzymatic splitting of Trastuzumab. We find that PEGylation increases the half-life of the molecules but also strongly affects the ability to recognize the target antigen in a way that is dependent on the extent and position of the chemical modification. Data thus support the concept that polyethylene glycol (PEG conjugation on Trastuzumab Fabs increases half-life but reduces their affinity and this is a fine balance, which must be carefully considered for the design of strategies based on the use of antibody fragments.

  1. Pegylated Trastuzumab Fragments Acquire an Increased in Vivo Stability but Show a Largely Reduced Affinity for the Target Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selis, Fabio; Focà, Giuseppina; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Marra, Carla; Di Mauro, Concetta; Saccani Jotti, Gloria; Scaramuzza, Silvia; Politano, Annalisa; Sanna, Riccardo; Ruvo, Menotti; Tonon, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    PEGylation of biomolecules is a major approach to increase blood stream half-life, stability and solubility of biotherapeutics and to reduce their immunogenicity, aggregation potential and unspecific interactions with other proteins and tissues. Antibodies have generally long half-lives due to high molecular mass and stability toward proteases, however their size lowers to some extent their potential because of a reduced ability to penetrate tissues, especially those of tumor origin. Fab or otherwise engineered smaller fragments are an alternative but are less stable and are much less well retained in circulation. We have here investigated the effects of various PEGylations on the binding properties and in vivo half-life of Fab fragments derived from the enzymatic splitting of Trastuzumab. We find that PEGylation increases the half-life of the molecules but also strongly affects the ability to recognize the target antigen in a way that is dependent on the extent and position of the chemical modification. Data thus support the concept that polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugation on Trastuzumab Fabs increases half-life but reduces their affinity and this is a fine balance, which must be carefully considered for the design of strategies based on the use of antibody fragments. PMID:27043557

  2. In vivo characteristics of targeted drug-carrying filamentous bacteriophage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaks Lilach

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines are a new class of nanomedicines that combines biological and chemical components into a modular nanometric drug delivery system. The core of the system is a filamentous phage particle that is produced in the bacterial host Escherichia coli. Target specificity is provided by a targeting moiety, usually an antibody that is displayed on the tip of the phage particle. A large drug payload is chemically conjugated to the protein coat of the phage via a chemically or genetically engineered linker that provides for controlled release of the drug after the particle homed to the target cell. Recently we have shown that targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines can be used to eradicate pathogenic bacteria and cultured tumor cells with great potentiation over the activity of the free untargeted drug. We have also shown that poorly water soluble drugs can be efficiently conjugated to the phage coat by applying hydrophilic aminoglycosides as branched solubility-enhancing linkers. Results With an intention to move to animal experimentation of efficacy, we tested anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines for toxicity and immunogenicity and blood pharmacokinetics upon injection into mice. Here we show that anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines that carry the antibiotic chloramphenicol conjugated via an aminoglycoside linker are non-toxic to mice and are greatly reduced in immunogenicity in comparison to native phage particles or particles to which the drug is conjugated directly and are cleared from the blood more slowly in comparison to native phage particles. Conclusion Our results suggest that aminoglycosides may serve as branched solubility enhancing linkers for drug conjugation that also provide for a better safety profile of the targeted nanomedicine.

  3. In vivo confocal microscopy for the oral cavity: Current state of the field and future potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, N G; Collgros, H; Uribe, P; Ch'ng, S; Rajadhyaksha, M; Guitera, P

    2016-03-01

    Confocal microscopy (CM) has been shown to correlate with oral mucosal histopathology in vivo. The purposes of this review are to summarize what we know so far about in vivo CM applications for oral mucosal pathologies, to highlight some current developments with CM devices relevant for oral applications, and to formulate where in vivo CM could hold further application for oral mucosal diagnosis and management. Ovid Medline® and/or Google® searches were performed using the terms 'microscopy, confocal', 'mouth neoplasms', 'mouth mucosa', 'leukoplakia, oral', 'oral lichen planus', 'gingiva', 'cheilitis', 'taste', 'inflammatory oral confocal', 'mucosal confocal' and 'confocal squamous cell oral'. In summary, inclusion criteria were in vivo use of any type of CM for the human oral mucosa and studies on normal or pathological oral mucosa. Experimental studies attempting to identify proteins of interest and microorganisms were excluded. In total 25 relevant articles were found, covering 8 main topics, including normal oral mucosal features (n=15), oral dysplasia or neoplasia (n=7), inflamed oral mucosa (n=3), taste impairment (n=3), oral autoimmune conditions (n=2), pigmented oral pathology/melanoma (n=1), delayed type hypersensitivity (n=1), and cheilitis glandularis (n=1). The evidence for using in vivo CM in these conditions is poor, as it is limited to mainly small descriptive studies. Current device developments for oral CM include improved probe design. The authors propose that future applications for in vivo oral CM may include burning mouth syndrome, intra-operative mapping for cancer surgery, and monitoring and targeted biopsies within field cancerization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Upregulation of MARCKS in kidney cancer and its potential as a therapeutic target.

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    Chen, C-H; Fong, L W R; Yu, E; Wu, R; Trott, J F; Weiss, R H

    2017-06-22

    Targeted therapeutics, such as those abrogating hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)/vascular endothelial growth factor signaling, are initially effective against kidney cancer (or renal cell carcinoma, RCC); however, drug resistance frequently occurs via subsequent activation of alternative pathways. Through genome-scale integrated analysis of the HIF-α network, we identified the major protein kinase C substrate MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) as a potential target molecule for kidney cancer. In a screen of nephrectomy samples from 56 patients with RCC, we found that MARCKS expression and its phosphorylation are increased and positively correlate with tumor grade. Genetic and pharmacologic suppression of MARCKS in high-grade RCC cell lines in vitro led to a decrease in cell proliferation and migration. We further demonstrated that higher MARCKS expression promotes growth and angiogenesis in vivo in an RCC xenograft tumor. MARCKS acted upstream of the AKT/mTOR pathway, activating HIF-target genes, notably vascular endothelial growth factor-A. Following knockdown of MARCKS in RCC cells, the IC50 of the multikinase inhibitor regorafenib was reduced. Surprisingly, attenuation of MARCKS using the MPS (MARCKS phosphorylation site domain) peptide synergistically interacted with regorafenib treatment and decreased survival of kidney cancer cells through inactivation of AKT and mTOR. Our data suggest a major contribution of MARCKS to kidney cancer growth and provide an alternative therapeutic strategy of improving the efficacy of multikinase inhibitors.

  5. Sandwich-type Au-PEI/DNA/PEI-Dexa nanocomplex for nucleus-targeted gene delivery in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Lifen; He, Yuling; Li, Yanfeng

    2014-08-27

    Many synthetic Au-based cationic nanoparticles (AuNPs) for nonviral gene delivery show high efficiency in vitro, but their excessive charge density, harsh reducing conditions, and nontarget delivery prevent their application in vivo. Herein, we constructed a sandwich-type layered polyethylenimine (PEI)-coated gold nanocomposite outerlaid with a nucleus-targeted Dexamethasone (Dexa), namely, Au-PEI/DNA/PEI-Dexa nanocomplex, for DNA delivery system using a low molecular weight PEI as a mild reducing agent. The nucleus-targeting Au-PEI/DNA/PEI-Dexa nanocomplex with low positive charge and low cytotoxicity condensed DNA and protected from enzymatic degradation. In vitro transfection studies demonstrated that Au-PEI/DNA/PEI-Dexa nanocomplex exhibited much more efficient nucleus transfection than Au-PEI/DNA/PEI without nucleus-targeted residues and commercially available PEI 25 kDa due to the Dexa targeting of the nucleus. Furthermore, the nanocomplex markedly transfected pTRAIL (TRAIL = tumor-necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) to tumors in vivo and subsequently inhibited the tumor growth with minimal side effects. These findings suggest that nucleus-targeting Au-PEI/DNA/PEI-Dexa ternary complexes have promising potential in gene delivery.

  6. Nrf2: a potential therapeutic target for diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Mittal, Ruchika

    2017-08-01

    Different aspects involved in pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy are related to inflammatory and apoptotic pathways. This article summarizes evidence that Nrf2 acts as a bridging link in various inflammatory and apoptotic pathways impacting progression of diabetic neuropathy. Nrf2 is involved in expression of various antioxidant proteins (such as detoxifying enzymes) via antioxidant response element (ARE) binding site. Under normal conditions, Nrf2 is inactive and remains in the cytosol. Hyperglycemia is a strong stimulus for oxidative stress and inflammation that downregulates the activity of Nrf2 through various neuroinflammatory pathways. Acute hyperglycemia increases the expression of Nrf2, but persistent hyperglycemia decreases its expression. This downregulation of Nrf2 causes various microvascular changes, which result in diabetic neuropathy. The key contribution of Nrf2 in progression of diabetic neuropathy has been summarized in the article. Despite involvement of Nrf2 in progression of diabetic neuropathy, targeting Nrf2 activators as a therapeutic potential will provide important new insights into the ways that influence treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Pyruvate kinase M2: a potential target for regulating inflammation

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    Jose Carlos eAlves-Filho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase (PK is the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the last step of glycolysis. Of the four PK isoforms expressed in mammalian cells, PKM2 has generated the most interest due to its impact on changes in cellular metabolism observed in cancer as well as in activated immune cells. As our understanding of dysregulated metabolism in cancer develops, and in light of the growing field of immunometabolism, intense efforts are in place to define the mechanism by which PKM2 regulates the metabolic profile of cancer as well as of immune cells. The enzymatic activity of PKM2 is heavily regulated by endogenous allosteric effectors as well as by intracellular signalling pathways, affecting both the enzymatic activity of PKM2 as a pyruvate kinase and the regulation of the recently described non-canonical nuclear functions of PKM2. We here review the current literature on PKM2 and its regulation, and discuss the potential for PKM2 as a therapeutic target in inflammatory and metabolic disorders.

  8. MPS1 kinase as a potential therapeutic target in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimova, Irina; Ng, June; Harris, Peter; Birks, Diane; Donson, Andrew; Taylor, Michael D; Foreman, Nicholas K; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Vibhakar, Rajeev

    2016-11-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common type of malignant brain tumor that affects children. Although recent advances in chemotherapy and radiation have improved outcomes, high-risk patients perform poorly with significant morbidity. Gene expression profiling has revealed that monopolar spindle 1 (MPS1) (TTK1) is highly expressed in medulloblastoma patient samples compared to that noted in normal cerebellum. MPS1 is a key regulator of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a mitotic mechanism specifically required for proper chromosomal alignment and segregation. The SAC can be activated in aneuploid cancer cells and MPS1 is overexpressed in many types of cancers. A previous study has demonstrated the effectiveness of inhibiting MPS1 with small-molecule inhibitors, but the role of MPS1 in medulloblastoma is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that MPS1 inhibition by shRNA or with a small-molecule drug, NMS-P715, resulted in decreased cell growth, inhibition of clonogenic potential and induction of apoptosis in cells belonging to both the Shh and group 3 medulloblastoma genomic signature. These findings highlight MPS1 as a rational therapeutic target for medulloblastoma.

  9. Exosomes: a potential key target in cardio-renal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eGonzalez-Calero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes have proven roles in regulating immune response, antigen presentation, RNA and protein transfer, and cell–cell (organ–organ interaction/signaling. These microvesicles can be considered a mechanism of non-classical secretion of proteins, and they represent a sub-proteome, thus assisting in the difficult task of biomarker discovery in a biological fluid as urine, plasma or serum. A potential role of exosomes in the cardio-renal syndrome is currently underexplored. Cardiovascular disease (CVD continues to be the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and, particularly, rates of cardiovascular events and death consistently increase as kidney function worsens. In other words, chronic kidney disease acts as a risk multiplier. Unfortunately, the relationship between markers of cardiovascular risk in kidney pathology often differs from that in the general population. Efforts in the search for novel action mechanisms simultaneously operating in both pathologies are thus of maximum interest.This article focuses to the role of exosomes in cardiovascular and renal diseases, in the search for novel key targets of interaction between heart and kidneys.

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Channels as Targets for Phytochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    To date, 28 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been cloned and characterized. They are grouped into six subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence homology: TRP Ankyrin (TRPA), TRP Canonical (TRPC), TRP Melastatin (TRPM), TRP Mucolipin (TRPML), TRP Polycystin (TRPP), and TRP Vanilloid (TRPV). Most of the TRP channels are nonselective cation channels expressed on the cell membrane and exhibit variable permeability ratios for Ca2+ versus Na+. They mediate sensory functions (such as vision, nociception, taste transduction, temperature sensation, and pheromone signaling) and homeostatic functions (such as divalent cation flux, hormone release, and osmoregulation). Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the specific roles of these TRP channels and their activation mechanisms. In this Review, the emphasis will be on the activation of TRP channels by phytochemicals that are claimed to exert health benefits. Recent findings complement the anecdotal evidence that some of these phytochemicals have specific receptors and the activation of which is responsible for the physiological effects. Now, the targets for these phytochemicals are being unveiled; a specific hypothesis can be proposed and tested experimentally to infer a scientific validity of the claims of the health benefits. The broader and pressing issues that have to be addressed are related to the quantities of the active ingredients in a given preparation, their bioavailability, metabolism, adverse effects, excretion, and systemic versus local effects. PMID:24926802

  11. Epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylase: therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Ian F; Dexter, David T

    2013-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder affecting more than 4million people worldwide. The primary motor symptoms of the disease are due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. Dopamine replacement therapies have therefore revolutionised disease management by partially controlling these symptoms. However these drugs can produce debilitating side effects when used long term and do not protect degenerating neurons against death. Recent evidence has highlighted a pathological imbalance in PD between the acetylation and deacetylation of the histone proteins around which deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is coiled, in favour of excessive histone deacetylation. This mechanism of adding/removing acetyl groups to histone lysine residues is one of many epigenetic regulatory processes which control the expression of genes, many of which will be essential for neuronal survival. Hence, such epigenetic modifications may have a pathogenic role in PD. It has therefore been hypothesised that if this pathological imbalance can be corrected with the use of histone deacetylase inhibiting agents then neurodegeneration observed in PD can be ameliorated. This article will review the current literature with regard to epigenetic changes in PD and the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in PD: examining the evidence of the neuroprotective effects of numerous HDACIs in cellular and animal models of Parkinsonian cell death. Ultimately answering the question: does epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylases hold therapeutic potential in PD? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ion Channels in Obesity: Pathophysiology and Potential Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Luiz H C; Souza, Iara L L; Pinheiro, Lílian S; Silva, Bagnólia A

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease related to metabolic disorders and associated with genetic determinants. Currently, ion channels activity has been linked to many of these disorders, in addition to the central regulation of food intake, energetic balance, hormone release and response, as well as the adipocyte cell proliferation. Therefore, the objective of this work is to review the current knowledge about the influence of ion channels in obesity development. This review used different sources of literature (Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) to assess the role of ion channels in the pathophysiology of obesity. Ion channels present diverse key functions, such as the maintenance of physiological homeostasis and cell proliferation. Cell biology and pharmacological experimental evidences demonstrate that proliferating cells exhibit ion channel expression, conductance, and electrical properties different from the resting cells. Thereby, a large variety of ion channels has been identified in the pathogenesis of obesity such as potassium, sodium, calcium and chloride channels, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and transient receptor potential channels. The fundamental involvement of these channels on the generation of obesity leads to the progress in the knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for the obesity pathophysiology, consequently emerging as new targets for pharmacological modulation.

  13. Identification of a New Peptide for Fibrosarcoma Tumor Targeting and Imaging In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Che Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 12-mer amino acid peptide SATTHYRLQAAN, denominated TK4, was isolated from a phage-display library with fibrosarcoma tumor-binding activity. In vivo biodistribution analysis of TK4-displaying phage showed a significant increased phage titer in implanted tumor up to 10-fold in comparison with normal tissues after systemic administration in mouse. Competition assay confirmed that the binding of TK4-phage to tumor cells depends on the TK4 peptide. Intravenous injection of 131I-labeled synthetic TK4 peptide in mice showed a tumor retention of 3.3% and 2.7% ID/g at 1- and 4-hour postinjection, respectively. Tumor-to-muscle ratio was 1.1, 5.7, and 3.2 at 1-, 4-, and 24-hour, respectively, and tumors were imaged on a digital γ-camera at 4-hour postinjection. The present data suggest that TK4 holds promise as a lead structure for tumor targeting, and it could be further applied in the development of diagnostic or therapeutic agent.

  14. Identification of a New Peptide for Fibrosarcoma Tumor Targeting and Imaging In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Che; Lin, Erh-Hsuan; Lee, Yu-Ching; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Kuo, Tsu-Hsiang; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Fu, Ying-Kai; Chen, Haw-Jan; Sun, Ming-Ding; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; WU, Cheng-Wen; Leu, Sy-Jye; Deng, Win-Ping

    2010-01-01

    A 12-mer amino acid peptide SATTHYRLQAAN, denominated TK4, was isolated from a phage-display library with fibrosarcoma tumor-binding activity. In vivo biodistribution analysis of TK4-displaying phage showed a significant increased phage titer in implanted tumor up to 10-fold in comparison with normal tissues after systemic administration in mouse. Competition assay confirmed that the binding of TK4-phage to tumor cells depends on the TK4 peptide. Intravenous injection of 131I-labeled synthetic TK4 peptide in mice showed a tumor retention of 3.3% and 2.7% ID/g at 1- and 4-hour postinjection, respectively. Tumor-to-muscle ratio was 1.1, 5.7, and 3.2 at 1-, 4-, and 24-hour, respectively, and tumors were imaged on a digital γ-camera at 4-hour postinjection. The present data suggest that TK4 holds promise as a lead structure for tumor targeting, and it could be further applied in the development of diagnostic or therapeutic agent. PMID:21151669

  15. An ex vivo feasibility experimental study on targeted cell surgery by high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi Biao; Wu, Junru; Fang, Liao Qiong; Wang, Hua; Li, Fa Qi; Tian, Yun Bo; Gong, Xiao Bo; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Lian; Feng, Ruo

    2012-10-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has become a new noninvasive surgical modality in medicine. A portion of tissue seated inside a patient's body may experience coagulative necrosis after a few seconds of insonification by high intensity focused ultrasound (US) generated by an extracorporeal focusing US transducer. The region of tissue affected by coagulative necrosis (CN) usually has an ellipsoidal shape when the thermal effect due to US absorption plays the dominant role. Its long and short axes are parallel and perpendicular to the US propagation direction respectively. It was shown by ex vivo experiments that the dimension of the short and long axes of the tissue which experiences CN can be as small as 50 μm and 250 μm respectively after one second exposure of US pulse (the spatial and pulse average acoustic power is on the order of tens of Watts and the local acoustic spatial and temporal pulse averaged intensity is on the order of 3 × 104 W/cm2) generated by a 1.6 MHz HIFU transducer of 12 cm diameter and 11 cm geometric focal length (f-number = 0.92). The numbers of cells which suffered CN were estimated to be on the order of 40. This result suggests that HIFU is able to interact with tens of cells at/near its focal zone while keeping the neighboring cells minimally affected, and thus the targeted cell surgery may be achievable.

  16. Extracellular vesicle in vivo biodistribution is determined by cell source, route of administration and targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar P. B. Wiklander

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs have emerged as important mediators of intercellular communication in a diverse range of biological processes. For future therapeutic applications and for EV biology research in general, understanding the in vivo fate of EVs is of utmost importance. Here we studied biodistribution of EVs in mice after systemic delivery. EVs were isolated from 3 different mouse cell sources, including dendritic cells (DCs derived from bone marrow, and labelled with a near-infrared lipophilic dye. Xenotransplantation of EVs was further carried out for cross-species comparison. The reliability of the labelling technique was confirmed by sucrose gradient fractionation, organ perfusion and further supported by immunohistochemical staining using CD63-EGFP probed vesicles. While vesicles accumulated mainly in liver, spleen, gastrointestinal tract and lungs, differences related to EV cell origin were detected. EVs accumulated in the tumour tissue of tumour-bearing mice and, after introduction of the rabies virus glycoprotein-targeting moiety, they were found more readily in acetylcholine-receptor-rich organs. In addition, the route of administration and the dose of injected EVs influenced the biodistribution pattern. This is the first extensive biodistribution investigation of EVs comparing the impact of several different variables, the results of which have implications for the design and feasibility of therapeutic studies using EVs.

  17. Ligand anchored poly(propyleneimine) dendrimers for brain targeting: Comparative in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hemant K; Gajbhiye, Virendra; Kesharwani, Prashant; Jain, Narendra K

    2016-11-15

    The present investigation was aimed at developing various ligands-anchored dendrimers and comparing their brain targeting potential at one platform. Sialic acid (S), glucosamine (G) and concanavalin A (C) anchored poly(propyleneimine) (PPI) dendritic nanoconjugates were developed and evaluated for delivery of anti-cancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX) to the brain. MTT assay on U373MG human astrocytoma cells indicated IC50 values of 0.40, 0.65, 0.95, 2.00 and 3.50μM for PTX loaded SPPI, GPPI, CPPI, PPI formulations, and free PTX, respectively. The invivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies in rats showed significantly higher accumulation of PTX in brain as compared to free PTX. The order of targeting potential of various ligands under investigation was found as sialic acid>glucosamine>concanavalin A. Thus, it can be concluded that sialic acid, glucosamine and Con A can be used as potential ligands to append PPI dendrimers for enhanced delivery of anticancer drugs to the brain for higher therapeutic outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non

  19. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Zhu, Xiao Yan; Liu, Lu Ming; Meng, Zhi Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Digestive system neoplasms are the leading causes of cancer-related death all over the world. Solute carrier (SLC) superfamily is composed of a series of transporters that are ubiquitously expressed in organs and tissues of digestive systems and mediate specific uptake of small molecule substrates in facilitative manner. Given the important role of SLC proteins in maintaining normal functions of digestive system, dysregulation of these protein in digestive system neoplasms may deliver biological and clinical significance that deserves systemic studies. In this review, we critically summarized the recent advances in understanding the role of SLC proteins in digestive system neoplasms. We highlighted that several SLC subfamilies, including metal ion transporters, transporters of glucose and other sugars, transporters of urea, neurotransmitters and biogenic amines, ammonium and choline, inorganic cation/anion transporters, transporters of nucleotide, amino acid and oligopeptide organic anion transporters, transporters of vitamins and cofactors and mitochondrial carrier, may play important roles in mediating the initiation, progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance of digestive system neoplasms. Proteins in these SLC subfamilies may also have diagnostic and prognostic values to particular cancer types. Differential expression of SLC proteins in tumors of digestive system was analyzed by extracting data from human cancer database, which revealed that the roles of SLC proteins may either be dependent on the substrates they transport or be tissue specific. In addition, small molecule modulators that pharmacologically regulate the functions of SLC proteins were discussed for their possible application in the treatment of digestive system neoplasms. This review highlighted the potential of SLC family proteins as drug target for the treatment of digestive system neoplasms.

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia targeting by myxoma virus in vivo depends on cell binding but not permissiveness to infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madlambayan, Gerard J; Bartee, Eric; Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M; Meacham, Amy; Scott, Edward W; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2012-05-01

    Some oncolytic viruses, such as myxoma virus (MYXV), can selectively target malignant hematopoietic cells, while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. This capacity for discrimination creates an opportunity to use oncolytic viruses as ex vivo purging agents of autologous hematopoietic cell grafts in patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses select malignant hematopoietic cells are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how MYXV specifically targets human AML cells. MYXV prevented chloroma formation and bone marrow engraftment of two human AML cell lines, KG-1 and THP-1. The reduction in human leukemia engraftment after ex vivo MYXV treatment was dose-dependent and required a minimum MOI of 3. Both AML cell lines demonstrated MYXV binding to leukemia cell membranes following co-incubation: however, evidence of productive MYXV infection was observed only in THP-1 cells. This observation, that KG-1 can be targeted in vivo even in the absence of in vitro permissive viral infection, contrasts with the current understanding of oncolytic virotherapy, which assumes that virus infection and productive replication is a requirement. Preventing MYXV binding to AML cells with heparin abrogated the purging capacity of MYXV, indicating that binding of infectious virus particles is a necessary step for effective viral oncolysis. Our results challenge the current dogma of oncolytic virotherapy and show that in vitro permissiveness to an oncolytic virus is not necessarily an accurate predictor of oncolytic potency in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal SA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheikh Arslan Sehgal, Mubashir Hassan, Sajid Rashid National Center for Bioinformatics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan Abstract: Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18. Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor–ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. Keywords: migraine, bioinformatics, modeling and docking, KCNK18, TRESK, virtual screening, pharmacoinformatics

  2. A novel photoacoustic nanoprobe of ICG@PEG-Ag2S for atherosclerosis targeting and imaging in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chenxin; Zhang, Yejun; Li, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Wang, Qiangbin

    2016-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cause of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases that have high mortality and disability rates. Because of its unclear pathogenic mechanism and heterogeneous distribution feature, it is still a big challenge to achieve precise diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis at its early stage in vivo. Herein, we fabricated a new ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe by a simple self-assembly of DT-Ag2S QDs, amphipathic C18/PEG polymer molecules and ICG. The ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe showed relatively long blood retention and was selectively accumulated in the region of atherosclerotic plaque due to the lipophilicity of the C18 chain to the atherosclerosis microenvironment, and thus the atherosclerosis was real-time monitored by high contrast-enhanced photoacoustic (PA) imaging of ICG. Combining the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high spatial resolution fluorescence imaging of Ag2S QDs in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) and related histological assessment in vitro, the feasibility of this new nanoprobe for atherosclerosis targeting in an Apoe-/- mouse model was verified. Additionally, hemolysis and coagulation assays of the ICG@PEG-Ag2S revealed its decent hemocompatibility and no histological changes were observed in the main organs of the mouse. Such a simple, multifunctional nanoprobe for targeting and PA imaging of atherosclerosis will have a great potential for future clinical applications.Atherosclerosis is a major cause of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases that have high mortality and disability rates. Because of its unclear pathogenic mechanism and heterogeneous distribution feature, it is still a big challenge to achieve precise diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis at its early stage in vivo. Herein, we fabricated a new ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe by a simple self-assembly of DT-Ag2S QDs, amphipathic C18/PEG polymer molecules and ICG. The ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe showed relatively long blood retention and was selectively

  3. F3-targeted cisplatin-hydrogel nanoparticles as an effective therapeutic that targets both murine and human ovarian tumor endothelial cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Ira; Wang, Shouyan; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Lee, Youg-Eun Koo; Fan, Wenzhe; Gong, Yusong; Burgos-Ojeda, Daniela; Spahlinger, Greg; Kopelman, R; Buckanovich, Ronald J

    2010-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that ovarian cancer may be highly responsive to antivascular therapeutics. We have developed an antivascular tumor therapeutic using the F3 peptide to target cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles (F3-Cis-Np) to tumor vessels. We show that although F3-Cis-Np bind with high specificity to both human ovarian tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells in vitro, they only show cytotoxic activity against the tumor endothelial cells. In vivo these nanoparticles bind primarily to tumor endothelial cells. Therapeutic studies in both flank and orthotopic i.p. murine ovarian tumor models, as well as human tumor xenograft models, show rapid tumor regression with treatment. Treatment was associated with significant vascular necrosis consistent with an antivascular effect. Furthermore, treatment was active in both platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant cell lines. Importantly, we show that F3-Cis-Np bind to human tumor endothelial cells in vitro and to human tumor vessels in vivo. Therapy targeting human vasculature in vivo with F3-Cis-Np led to near complete loss of all human tumor vessels in a murine model of human tumor vasculature. Our studies indicate that F3-targeted vascular therapeutics may be an effective treatment modality in human ovarian cancer. ©2010 AACR.

  4. Assessment of H2S in vivo using the newly developed mitochondria-targeted mass spectrometry probe MitoA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Sabine; Baeza-Garza, Carlos D; Logan, Angela; Rosa, Tiziana; Wedmann, Rudolf; Prime, Tracy A; Martin, Jack L; Saeb-Parsy, Kourosh; Krieg, Thomas; Filipovic, Milos R; Hartley, Richard C; Murphy, Michael P

    2017-05-12

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced endogenously in vivo and has multiple effects on signaling pathways and cell function. Mitochondria can be both an H2S source and sink, and many of the biological effects of H2S relate to its interactions with mitochondria. However, the significance of mitochondrial H2S is uncertain, in part due to the difficulty of assessing changes in its concentration in vivo Although a number of fluorescent H2S probes have been developed these are best suited to cells in culture and cannot be used in vivo To address this unmet need we have developed a mitochondria-targeted H2S probe, MitoA, which can be used to assess relative changes in mitochondrial H2S levels in vivo MitoA comprises a lipophilic triphenylphosphonium (TPP) cation coupled to an aryl azide. The TPP cation leads to the accumulation of MitoA inside mitochondria within tissues in vivo There, the aryl azido group reacts with H2S to form an aryl amine (MitoN). The extent of conversion of MitoA to MitoN thus gives an indication of the levels of mitochondrial H2S in vivo Both compounds can be detected sensitively by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of the tissues, and quantified relative to deuterated internal standards. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of MitoA and show that it can be used to assess changes in mitochondrial H2S levels in vivo As a proof of principle we used MitoA to show that H2S levels increase in vivo during myocardial ischemia. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Radiofrequency-targeted vertebral augmentation versus traditional balloon kyphoplasty: radiographic and morphologic outcomes of an ex vivo biomechanical pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Brian E; Kohm, Andrew C; Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E; Poser, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Traditional balloon kyphoplasty (BK) is a common treatment for symptomatic vertebral compression fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare a novel vertebral augmentation technique, radiofrequency-targeted vertebral augmentation (RF-TVA), to BK for restoration of vertebral height, cavity creation, and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) delivery and interdigitation into the surrounding trabeculae. Methods This ex vivo biomechanical pilot study utilized 16 osteoporotic cadaveric vertebral bodies in a standardized fracture model to compare unipedicular RF-TVA (n = 8) to bipedicular BK (n = 8). Four specimens from each group were tested in loaded and unloaded conditions. All specimens were imaged, assessed for height restoration, and sectioned to observe PMMA distribution. A subset of specimens underwent computed tomography scanning to assess cavity creation and trabecular architecture prior to cement delivery. Results Anterior height restoration was greater with RF-TVA (median: 84%, interquartile range: 62%–95%) compared to BK (median: 69%, interquartile range: 60%–81%), although the difference did not achieve statistical significance (P = 0.16). Anterior height restoration was numerically greater under loaded (median: 70% versus 66%) and unloaded (median: 94% versus 77%) conditions with RF-TVA versus BK. RF-TVA produced more discrete cavities and less native trabecular destruction compared to marked trabecular destruction observed with BK. RF-TVA consistently showed a well-identified focal area of PMMA with an extensive peripheral zone of PMMA interdigitation, providing mechanical interlock into the adjacent intact trabecular matrix. In contrast, BK yielded little evidence of PMMA interdigitation beyond the boundaries created by the balloon tamp due to the crushed trabecular bone peripherally. Conclusion RF-TVA achieves favorable vertebral height restoration with targeted PMMA delivery and less trabecular destruction compared to BK. RF-TVA has

  6. Phosphoproteomic profiling of in vivo signaling in liver by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Demirkan

    Full Text Available Our understanding of signal transduction networks in the physiological context of an organism remains limited, partly due to the technical challenge of identifying serine/threonine phosphorylated peptides from complex tissue samples. In the present study, we focused on signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, which is at the center of a nutrient- and growth factor-responsive cell signaling network. Though studied extensively, the mechanisms involved in many mTORC1 biological functions remain poorly understood.We developed a phosphoproteomic strategy to purify, enrich and identify phosphopeptides from rat liver homogenates. Using the anticancer drug rapamycin, the only known target of which is mTORC1, we characterized signaling in liver from rats in which the complex was maximally activated by refeeding following 48 hr of starvation. Using protein and peptide fractionation methods, TiO(2 affinity purification of phosphopeptides and mass spectrometry, we reproducibly identified and quantified over four thousand phosphopeptides. Along with 5 known rapamycin-sensitive phosphorylation events, we identified 62 new rapamycin-responsive candidate phosphorylation sites. Among these were PRAS40, gephyrin, and AMP kinase 2. We observed similar proportions of increased and reduced phosphorylation in response to rapamycin. Gene ontology analysis revealed over-representation of mTOR pathway components among rapamycin-sensitive phosphopeptide candidates.In addition to identifying potential new mTORC1-mediated phosphorylation events, and providing information relevant to the biology of this signaling network, our experimental and analytical approaches indicate the feasibility of large-scale phosphoproteomic profiling of tissue samples to study physiological signaling events in vivo.

  7. In Vivo Validation of PAPSS1 (3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate synthase 1) as a Cisplatin-sensitizing Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ada W Y; Veinotte, Chansey J; Melong, Nicole; Oh, Min Hee; Chen, Kent; Enfield, Katey S S; Backstrom, Ian; Warburton, Corinna; Yapp, Donald; Berman, Jason N; Bally, Marcel B; Lockwood, William W

    2017-08-08

    Purpose: Our previous screening efforts found that inhibition of PAPSS1 increases the potency of DNA-damaging agents in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Here, we explored the clinical relevance of PAPSS1 and further investigated it as a therapeutic target in preclinical model systems.Experimental Design: PAPSS1 expression and cisplatin IC50 values were assessed in 52 lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Effects of PAPSS1 inhibition on A549 cisplatin sensitivity under hypoxic and starvation conditions, in 3D spheroids, as well as in zebrafish and mouse xenografts, were evaluated. Finally, the association between PAPSS1 expression levels and survival in patients treated with standard chemotherapy was assessed.Results: Our results show a positive correlation between low PAPSS1 expression and increased cisplatin sensitivity in lung adenocarcinoma. In vitro, the potentiation effect was greatest when A549 cells were serum-starved under hypoxic conditions. When treated with low-dose cisplatin, PAPSS1-deficient A549 spheroids showed a 58% reduction in size compared with control cells. In vivo, PAPSS1 suppression and low-dose cisplatin treatment inhibited proliferation of lung tumor cells in zebrafish xenografts and significantly delayed development of subcutaneous tumors in mice. Clinical data suggest that NSCLC and ovarian cancer patients with low PAPSS1 expression survive longer following platinum-based chemotherapy.Conclusions: These results suggest that PAPSS1 inhibition enhances cisplatin activity in multiple preclinical model systems and that low PAPSS1 expression may serve as a biomarker for platin sensitivity in cancer patients. Developing strategies to target PAPSS1 activity in conjunction with platinum-based chemotherapy may offer an approach to improving treatment outcomes. Clin Cancer Res; 1-12. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. MicroRNA let-7g alleviates atherosclerosis via the targeting of LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingxin; Tao, Guizhou; Liu, Qifeng; Liu, Kun; Yang, Xinchun

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic arterial disease and the leading cause of stroke and myocardial infarction. Micro RNAs (miRNAs or miRs) have been reported to act as essential modulators during the progression of atherosclerosis. Although miR-let-7g has been demonstrated to contribute to maintaining endothelial function and vascular homeostasis, it is not known whether miR-let-7g exerts a therapeutic effect on experimental atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of miR-let-7g on atherosclerosis in vivo and in vitro and to explore its underlying mechanisms. Data from our study showed that exogenous lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 or OLR1) overexpression resulted in the significant promotion of proliferation and migration of human aortic smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), whereas such changes induced by LOX-1 were obviously suppressed by transfection of miR-let-7g. We later confirmed that LOX-1 is a potential target of miR-let-7g, and miR-let-7g markedly inhibited LOX-1 expression in ASMCs by directly binding to the 3′ untranslated region of LOX-1. Furthermore, in a hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE−/−) mouse model, intravenous delivery of miR-let-7g mimics obviously attenuated high-fat diet-induced neointima formation and atherosclerotic lesions, accompanied by the significant downregulation of LOX-1, which was consistent with the effect of miR-let-7g on ASMCs. Taken together, our data revealed that miR-let-7g exhibits anti-atherosclerotic activity, at least partially by targeting the LOX-1 signaling pathway. This study suggests that miR-let-7g may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis, and provides novel insight into miRNA-based therapy for this disease. PMID:28535009

  9. Tacrine-Trolox Hybrids: A Novel Class of Centrally Active, Nonhepatotoxic Multi-Target-Directed Ligands Exerting Anticholinesterase and Antioxidant Activities with Low In Vivo Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepovimova, Eugenie; Korabecny, Jan; Dolezal, Rafael; Babkova, Katerina; Ondrejicek, Ales; Jun, Daniel; Sepsova, Vendula; Horova, Anna; Hrabinova, Martina; Soukup, Ondrej; Bukum, Neslihan; Jost, Petr; Muckova, Lubica; Kassa, Jiri; Malinak, David; Andrs, Martin; Kuca, Kamil

    2015-11-25

    Coupling of two distinct pharmacophores, tacrine and trolox, endowed with different biological properties, afforded 21 hybrid compounds as novel multifunctional candidates against Alzheimer's disease. Several of them showed improved inhibitory properties toward acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in relation to tacrine. These hybrids also scavenged free radicals. Molecular modeling studies in tandem with kinetic analysis exhibited that these hybrids target both catalytic active site as well as peripheral anionic site of AChE. In addition, incorporation of the moiety bearing antioxidant abilities displayed negligible toxicity on human hepatic cells. This striking effect was explained by formation of nontoxic metabolites after 1 h incubation in human liver microsomes system. Finally, tacrine-trolox hybrids exhibited low in vivo toxicity after im administration in rats and potential to penetrate across blood-brain barrier. All of these outstanding in vitro results in combination with promising in vivo outcomes highlighted derivative 7u as the lead structure worthy of further investigation.

  10. Senolytic drugs target alveolar epithelial cell function and attenuate experimental lung fibrosis ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Mareike; Korfei, Martina; Mutze, Kathrin; Klee, Stephan; Skronska-Wasek, Wioletta; Alsafadi, Hani N; Ota, Chiharu; Costa, Rita; Schiller, Herbert B; Lindner, Michael; Wagner, Darcy E; Günther, Andreas; Königshoff, Melanie

    2017-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating lung disease with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. The incidence of IPF increases with age, and ageing-related mechanisms such as cellular senescence have been proposed as pathogenic drivers. The lung alveolar epithelium represents a major site of tissue injury in IPF and senescence of this cell population is probably detrimental to lung repair. However, the potential pathomechanisms of alveolar epithelial cell senescence and the impact of senolytic drugs on senescent lung cells and fibrosis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that lung epithelial cells exhibit increased P16 and P21 expression as well as senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity in experimental and human lung fibrosis tissue and primary cells.Primary fibrotic mouse alveolar epithelial type (AT)II cells secreted increased amounts of senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) factors in vitro, as analysed using quantitative PCR, mass spectrometry and ELISA. Importantly, pharmacological clearance of senescent cells by induction of apoptosis in fibrotic ATII cells or ex vivo three-dimensional lung tissue cultures reduced SASP factors and extracellular matrix markers, while increasing alveolar epithelial markers.These data indicate that alveolar epithelial cell senescence contributes to lung fibrosis development and that senolytic drugs may be a viable therapeutic option for IPF. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  11. Set1 and MLL1/2 Target Distinct Sets of Functionally Different Genomic Loci In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Duncan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3 is known to correlate with both active and poised genomic loci, yet many questions remain regarding its functional roles in vivo. We identify functional genomic targets of two H3K4 methyltransferases, Set1 and MLL1/2, in both the stem cells and differentiated tissue of the planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea. We show that, despite their common substrate, these enzymes target distinct genomic loci in vivo, which are distinguishable by the pattern each enzyme leaves on the chromatin template, i.e., the breadth of the H3K4me3 peak. Whereas Set1 targets are largely associated with the maintenance of the stem cell population, MLL1/2 targets are specifically enriched for genes involved in ciliogenesis. These data not only confirm that chromatin regulation is fundamental to planarian stem cell function but also provide evidence for post-embryonic functional specificity of H3K4me3 methyltransferases in vivo.

  12. Siglec-15 is a potential therapeutic target for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Yusuke; Takahata, Masahiko; Mikuni, Shintaro; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Hamano, Hiroki; Angata, Takashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Kinjo, Masataka; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-02-01

    organization of osteoclasts in both RANKL and TNF-α induced osteoclastogenesis. The present findings indicate that Siglec-15 is involved in estrogen deficiency-induced differentiation of osteoclasts and is thus a potential therapeutic target for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fusogenic potential of sperm membrane lipids: nature's wisdom to accomplish targeted gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Shaikh Muhammad; Hasan, Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Nadeem; Khan, Umber; Owais, Mohammad

    2006-04-17

    The membrane-membrane fusion during fertilization of oocyte by spermatozoa is believed to be mainly mediated by so called "fusion proteins". In the present study we have tried to demonstrate that beside the proteins, lipid components of membrane may play an important role in fusion of oocyte with spermatozoa. Conventional membrane-membrane fusion assays were used as means to demonstrate fusogenic potential of human sperm membrane lipids. The liposomes (spermatosomes) made of the lipids isolated from sperm membrane were found to undergo strong membrane-membrane fusion as evident from fluorescence dequenching and resonance energy transfer assays. Furthermore, the fusion of these liposomes with living cells (J774 A.1 macrophage cell line) was demonstrated to result in an effective transfer of a water-soluble fluorescent probe (calcein) to cytosol of the target cell. Lastly, the liposomes were demonstrated to behave like efficient vehicles for the in vivo cytosolic delivery of the antigens to target cells resulting in elicitation of antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses.

  14. Targeting Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase as a Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Restore Adult Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Na; Xu, Tian-Ying; Li, Wen-Lin; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Adult neurogenesis is the process of generating new neurons throughout life in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus of most mammalian species, which is closely related to aging and disease. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also an adipokine known as visfatin, is the rate-limiting enzyme for mammalian nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) salvage synthesis by generating nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide. Recent findings from our laboratory and other laboratories have provided much evidence that NAMPT might serve as a therapeutic target to restore adult neurogenesis. NAMPT-mediated NAD biosynthesis in neural stem/progenitor cells is important for their proliferation, self-renewal, and formation of oligodendrocytes in vivo and in vitro. Therapeutic interventions by the administration of NMN, NAD, or recombinant NAMPT are effective for restoring adult neurogenesis in several neurological diseases. We summarize adult neurogenesis in aging, ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative disease and review the advances of targeting NAMPT in restoring neurogenesis. Specifically, we provide emphasis on the P7C3 family, a class of proneurogenic compounds that are potential NAMPT activators, which might shed light on future drug development in neurogenesis restoration. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Type II transmembrane serine proteases as potential target for anti-influenza drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woo-Jin; Seong, Baik Lin

    2017-11-01

    The outbreak of an influenza pandemic as well as the continued circulation of seasonal influenza highlights the need for effective antiviral therapies. The emergence of drug-resistant strains further necessitates the development of novel antivirals that target the host factors crucial for viral replication. Area covered: This review summarizes the current understanding of the structural and functional properties of type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) as a proteolytic activator of influenza virus infection and discusses their potential as antiviral targets. It also explores the experimental evidence accumulated for inhibitors of TTSPs as novel, broad-spectrum antivirals against various influenza virus subtypes. The review also provides an overview of the properties of small molecules, proteins, and peptides that efficiently inhibit the proteolytic activation of the influenza virus. Expert opinion: TTSPs activate a wide range of influenza virus subtypes including avian influenza viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, via proteolytic cleavage of influenza hemagglutinin (HA) into infection-competent fusogenic conformation. Other viruses such as SARS-, MERS-coronaviruses and human metapneumoviruses may use the same host cell proteases for activation, implying that TTSP inhibition might be a novel strategy for developing broad-spectrum antiviral agents for respiratory viral infections.

  16. The sweet trap in tumors: aerobic glycolysis and potential targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Chen, Xun; Wang, Liantang; Chen, Shangwu

    2016-06-21

    Metabolic change is one of the hallmarks of tumor, which has recently attracted a great of attention. One of main metabolic characteristics of tumor cells is the high level of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. The energy production is much less in glycolysis pathway than that in tricarboxylic acid cycle. The molecular mechanism of a high glycolytic flux in tumor cells remains unclear. A large amount of intermediates derived from glycolytic pathway could meet the biosynthetic requirements of the proliferating cells. Hypoxia-induced HIF-1α, PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway, and many other factors, such as oncogene activation and tumor suppressor inactivation, drive cancer cells to favor glycolysis over mitochondrial oxidation. Several small molecules targeting glycolytic pathway exhibit promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will focus on the latest progress in the regulation of aerobic glycolysis and discuss the potential targets for the tumor therapy.

  17. Structure–function studies of STAR family Quaking proteins bound to their in vivo RNA target sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplova, Marianna; Hafner, Markus; Teplov, Dmitri; Essig, Katharina; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian Quaking (QKI) and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, GLD-1 (defective in germ line development), are evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding proteins, which post-transcriptionally regulate target genes essential for developmental processes and myelination. We present X-ray structures of the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) domain, composed of Qua1, K homology (KH), and Qua2 motifs of QKI and GLD-1 bound to high-affinity in vivo RNA targets containing YUAAY RNA recognition elements (RREs). The KH and Qua2 motifs of the STAR domain synergize to specifically interact with bases and sugar-phosphate backbones of the bound RRE. Qua1-mediated homodimerization generates a scaffold that enables concurrent recognition of two RREs, thereby plausibly targeting tandem RREs present in many QKI-targeted transcripts. Structure-guided mutations reduced QKI RNA-binding affinity in vitro and in vivo, and expression of QKI mutants in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) significantly decreased the abundance of QKI target mRNAs. Overall, our studies define principles underlying RNA target selection by STAR homodimers and provide insights into the post-transcriptional regulatory function of mammalian QKI proteins. PMID:23630077

  18. Structure-function studies of STAR family Quaking proteins bound to their in vivo RNA target sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova, Marianna; Hafner, Markus; Teplov, Dmitri; Essig, Katharina; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J. [MSKCC; (Rockefeller)

    2013-09-27

    Mammalian Quaking (QKI) and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, GLD-1 (defective in germ line development), are evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding proteins, which post-transcriptionally regulate target genes essential for developmental processes and myelination. We present X-ray structures of the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) domain, composed of Qua1, K homology (KH), and Qua2 motifs of QKI and GLD-1 bound to high-affinity in vivo RNA targets containing YUAAY RNA recognition elements (RREs). The KH and Qua2 motifs of the STAR domain synergize to specifically interact with bases and sugar-phosphate backbones of the bound RRE. Qua1-mediated homodimerization generates a scaffold that enables concurrent recognition of two RREs, thereby plausibly targeting tandem RREs present in many QKI-targeted transcripts. Structure-guided mutations reduced QKI RNA-binding affinity in vitro and in vivo, and expression of QKI mutants in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) significantly decreased the abundance of QKI target mRNAs. Overall, our studies define principles underlying RNA target selection by STAR homodimers and provide insights into the post-transcriptional regulatory function of mammalian QKI proteins.

  19. Facile Synthesis of Gd-Cu-In-S/ZnS Bimodal Quantum Dots with Optimized Properties for Tumor Targeted Fluorescence/MR In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weitao; Guo, Weisheng; Gong, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Bingbo; Wang, Sheng; Chen, Na; Yang, Wentao; Tu, Yu; Fang, Xiangming; Chang, Jin

    2015-08-26

    Dual-modal imaging techniques have gained intense attention for their potential role in the dawning era of tumor early accurate diagnosis. Chelate-free robust dual-modal imaging nanoprobes with high efficiency and low toxicity are of essential importance for tumor targeted dual-modal in vivo imaging. It is still a crucial issue to endow Cd-free dual-modal nanoprobes with bright fluorescence as well as high relaxivity. Herein, a facile synthetic strategy was developed to prepare Gd-doped CuInS/ZnS bimodal quantum dots (GCIS/ZnS, BQDs) with optimized properties. The fluorescent properties of the GCIS/ZnS BQDs can be thoroughly optimized by varying reaction temperature, aging time, and ZnS coating. The amount of Gd precursor can be well-controlled to realize the optimized balance between the MR relaxivity and optical properties. The obtained hydrophobic GCIS/ZnS BQDs were surface engineered into aqueous phase with PEGylated dextran-stearyl acid polymeric lipid vesicles (PEG-DS PLVs). Upon the phase transfer, the hydrophilic GCIS/ZnS@PLVs exhibited pronounced near-infrared fluorescence as well as high longitudinal relaxivity (r1 = 9.45 mM(-1) S(-1)) in water with good colloidal stability. In vivo tumor-bearing animal experiments further verified GCIS/ZnS@PLVs could achieve tumor-targeted MR/fluorescence dual-modal imaging. No toxicity was observed in the in vivo and ex vivo experiments. The GCIS/ZnS@PLVs present great potential as bimodal imaging contrast agents for tumor diagnosis.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9 DNA cleavage at SNP-derived PAM enables both in vitro and in vivo KRT12 mutation-specific targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, D G; Moore, J E; Atkinson, S D; Maurizi, E; Allen, E H A; Pedrioli, D M L; McLean, W H I; Nesbit, M A; Moore, C B T

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-based therapeutics hold the possibility for permanent treatment of genetic disease. The potency and specificity of this system has been used to target dominantly inherited conditions caused by heterozygous missense mutations through inclusion of the mutated base in the short-guide RNA (sgRNA) sequence. This research evaluates a novel approach for targeting heterozygous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using CRISPR/Cas9. We determined that a mutation within KRT12, which causes Meesmann's epithelial corneal dystrophy (MECD), leads to the occurrence of a novel protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). We designed an sgRNA complementary to the sequence adjacent to this SNP-derived PAM and evaluated its potency and allele specificity both in vitro and in vivo. This sgRNA was found to be highly effective at reducing the expression of mutant KRT12 mRNA and protein in vitro. To assess its activity in vivo we injected a combined Cas9/sgRNA expression construct into the corneal stroma of a humanized MECD mouse model. Sequence analysis of corneal genomic DNA revealed non-homologous end-joining repair resulting in frame-shifting deletions within the mutant KRT12 allele. This study is the first to demonstrate in vivo gene editing of a heterozygous disease-causing SNP that results in a novel PAM, further highlighting the potential for CRISPR/Cas9-based therapeutics.

  1. Accumulation of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides in tumors and the potential for anticancer drug delivery in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Konishi, Yusuke; Ueda, Masashi; Saji, Hideo; Futaki, Shiroh

    2012-04-30

    We investigated the biodistribution of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) in tumor-xenografted nude mice after intravenous injection of fluorescently labeled CPPs using in vivo imaging. The CPPs used included HIV-1 Tat (48-60), penetratin, and the L- and D-enantiomers of oligoarginines (8, 12, and 16 residues), all of which are reported to have high cell penetration. Among the tested peptides, high accumulation in tumors was observed for the D-form of octaarginine (r8), and glycosaminoglycans played a key role. Injection of an r8-doxorubicin conjugate (4mg doxorubicin/kg) effectively suppressed tumor proliferation, with no significant decrease in mouse weight, whereas administration of doxorubicin itself (6mg/kg), yielding a similar degree of tumor-growth suppression, resulted in significant weight loss. These results suggest the potential of r8 as a prototypic tumor-targeting vector. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Imaging and Biodistribution of Aptamers Targeting the Human Matrix MetalloProtease-9 in Melanomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kryza

    Full Text Available The human Matrix MetalloProtease-9 (hMMP-9 is overexpressed in tumors where it promotes the release of cancer cells thus contributing to tumor metastasis. We raised aptamers against hMMP-9, which constitutes a validated marker of malignant tumors, in order to design probes for imaging tumors in human beings. A chemically modified RNA aptamer (F3B, fully resistant to nucleases was previously described. This compound was subsequently used for the preparation of F3B-Cy5, F3B-S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG and F3B-DOTA. The binding properties of these derivatives were determined by surface plasmon resonance and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Optical fluorescence imaging confirmed the binding to hMMP-9 in A375 melanoma bearing mice. Quantitative biodistribution studies were performed at 30 min, 1h and 2 h post injection of 99mTc-MAG-aptamer and 111In-DOTA-F3B. 99mTc radiolabeled aptamer specifically detected hMMP-9 in A375 melanoma tumors but accumulation in digestive tract was very high. Following i.v. injection of 111In-DOTA-F3B, high level of radioactivity was observed in kidneys and bladder but digestive tract uptake was very limited. Tumor uptake was significantly (student t test, p<0.05 higher for 111In-DOTA-F3B with 2.0%ID/g than for the 111In-DOTA-control oligonucleotide (0.7%ID/g with tumor to muscle ratio of 4.0. Such difference in tumor accumulation has been confirmed by ex vivo scintigraphic images performed at 1h post injection and by autoradiography, which revealed the overexpression of hMMP-9 in sections of human melanomas. These results demonstrate that F3B aptamer is of interest for detecting hMMP-9 in melanoma tumor.

  3. The in vivo developmental potential of porcine skin-derived progenitors and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming-Tao; Yang, Xiaoyu; Lee, Kiho; Mao, Jiude; Teson, Jennifer M; Whitworth, Kristin M; Samuel, Melissa S; Spate, Lee D; Murphy, Clifton N; Prather, Randall S

    2012-09-20

    Multipotent skin-derived progenitors (SKPs) can be traced back to embryonic neural crest cells and are able to differentiate into both neural and mesodermal progeny in vitro. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are capable of self-renewing and can contribute to neuron and glia in the nervous system. Recently, we derived porcine SKPs and NSCs from the same enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgenic fetuses and demonstrated that SKPs could contribute to neural and mesodermal lineages in vivo. However, it remains unclear whether porcine SKPs and NSCs can generate ectoderm and mesoderm lineages or other germ layers in vivo. Embryonic chimeras are a well-established tool for investigating cell lineage determination and cell potency through normal embryonic development. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo developmental potential of porcine SKPs and fetal brain-derived NSCs by chimera production. Porcine SKPs, NSCs, and fibroblasts were injected into precompact in vitro fertilized embryos (IVF) and then transferred into corresponding surrogates 24 h postinjection. We found that porcine SKPs could incorporate into the early embryos and contribute to various somatic tissues of the 3 germ layers in postnatal chimera, and especially have an endodermal potency. However, this developmental potential is compromised when they differentiate into fibroblasts. In addition, porcine NSCs fail to incorporate into host embryos and contribute to chimeric piglets. Therefore, neural crest-derived SKPs may represent a more primitive state than their counterpart neural stem cells in terms of their contributions to multiple cell lineages.

  4. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Suppresses in Vivo X-ray-Induced Targeted and Non-Targeted Effects in Zebrafish Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Y. Kong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper studied the X-ray-induced targeted effect in irradiated zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio, as well as a non-targeted effect in bystander naïve embryos partnered with irradiated embryos, and examined the influence of exogenous nitric oxide (NO on these targeted and non-targeted effects. The exogenous NO was generated using an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP. The targeted and non-targeted effects, as well as the toxicity of the SNAP, were assessed using the number of apoptotic events in the zebrafish embryos at 24 h post fertilization (hpf revealed through acridine orange (AO staining. SNAP with concentrations of 20 and 100 µM were first confirmed to have no significant toxicity on zebrafish embryos. The targeted effect was mitigated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 100 µM SNAP prior to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy but was not alleviated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 µM SNAP. On the other hand, the non-targeted effect was eliminated in the bystander naïve zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 or 100 µM SNAP prior to partnering with zebrafish embryos having been subjected to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy. These findings revealed the importance of NO in the protection against damages induced by ionizing radiations or by radiation-induced bystander signals, and could have important impacts on development of advanced cancer treatment strategies.

  5. In Vivo Near-Infrared Photodynamic Therapy Based on Targeted Upconversion Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aiguo; Wei, Yanchun; Chen, Qun; Xing, Da

    2015-11-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles have shown to be a promising prospect for biological detection and photodynamic therapy (PDT). The focus of this study was to develop an upconversion nanoparticle modified with a targeting peptide and photosensitizer for near-infrared photodynamic therapy. To produce a tumor-targeting nanophotosensitizer with near-infrared excitation, NaYF4:Yb/Er upconversion nanoparticles were first wrapped with O-carboxymethyl chitosan to develop an upconversion rianoplatform and then chemically conjugated with the photosensitizer pyropheophorbide-a (Ppa) and RGD peptide c(RGDyK). The nanoparticle exhibited low dark toxicity and high biocompatibility. When injected into the tail vein of tumor-bearing U87-MG mice, UCNP-Ppa-RGD revealed an enhanced tumor-specific biodistribution and successful therapeutic effect following near-infrared laser irradiation. It possessed a significantly deeper therapeutic depth compared with conventional visible light triggered PDT using Ppa. The results suggest that the nanoplatform has advantages in the spectral application, and the constructed tumor-specific nanoparticle shows high clinical potential to serve not only as a photodynamic imaging reagent but also as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of large or deeply seated tumors.

  6. Tumor-targeting magnetic lipoplex delivery of short hairpin RNA suppresses IGF-1R overexpression of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chunmao; Ding, Chao; Kong, Minjian [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Dong, Aiqiang, E-mail: dr_dongaiqiang@sina.com [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Qian, Jianfang; Jiang, Daming; Shen, Zhonghua [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We compared lipofection with magnetofection about difference of transfection efficiency on delivery a therapeutic gene in vitro and in vivo. {yields} We investigated the difference of shRNA induced by magnetofection and lipofection into A549 cell and subcutaneous tumor to knockdown IGF-1R overexpressed in A549 cell and A549 tumor. {yields} We investigated in vivo shRNA silenced IGF-1R overexpression 24, 48, and 72 h after shRNA intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice by way of magnetofection and lipofection. {yields} Our results showed that magnetofection could achieve therapeutic gene targeted delivery into special site, which contributed to targeted gene therapy of lung cancers. -- Abstract: Liposomal magnetofection potentiates gene transfection by applying a magnetic field to concentrate magnetic lipoplexes onto target cells. Magnetic lipoplexes are self-assembling ternary complexes of cationic lipids with plasmid DNA associated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Type1insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), an important oncogene, is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer and mediates cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. In this study, we evaluated the transfection efficiency (percentage of transfected cells) and therapeutic potential (potency of IGF-1R knockdown) of liposomal magnetofection of plasmids expressing GFP and shRNAs targeting IGF-1R (pGFPshIGF-1Rs) in A549 cells and in tumor-bearing mice as compared to lipofection using Lipofectamine 2000. Liposomal magnetofection provided a threefold improvement in transgene expression over lipofection and transfected up to 64.1% of A549 cells in vitro. In vitro, IGF-1R specific-shRNA transfected by lipofection inhibited IGF-1R protein by 56.1 {+-} 6% and by liposomal magnetofection by 85.1 {+-} 3%. In vivo delivery efficiency of the pGFPshIGF-1R plasmid into the tumor was significantly higher in the liposomal magnetofection group than in the

  7. Nonstructural Proteins of Alphavirus—Potential Targets for Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Abu Bakar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are enveloped, positive single-stranded RNA viruses, typically transmitted by arthropods. They often cause arthralgia or encephalitic diseases in infected humans and there is currently no targeted antiviral treatment available. The re-emergence of alphaviruses in Asia, Europe, and the Americas over the last decade, including chikungunya and o’nyong’nyong viruses, have intensified the search for selective inhibitors. In this review, we highlight key molecular determinants within the alphavirus replication complex that have been identified as viral targets, focusing on their structure and functionality in viral dissemination. We also summarize recent structural data of these viral targets and discuss how these could serve as templates to facilitate structure-based drug design and development of small molecule inhibitors.

  8. Tumor imaging and targeting potential of an Hsp70-derived 14-mer peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Gehrmann

    Full Text Available We have previously used a unique mouse monoclonal antibody cmHsp70.1 to demonstrate the selective presence of a membrane-bound form of Hsp70 (memHsp70 on a variety of leukemia cells and on single cell suspensions derived from solid tumors of different entities, but not on non-transformed cells or cells from corresponding 'healthy' tissue. This antibody can be used to image tumors in vivo and target them for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Tumor-specific expression of memHsp70 therefore has the potential to be exploited for theranostic purposes. Given the advantages of peptides as imaging and targeting agents, this study assessed whether a 14-mer tumor penetrating peptide (TPP; TKDNNLLGRFELSG, the sequence of which is derived from the oligomerization domain of Hsp70 which is expressed on the cell surface of tumor cells, can also be used for targeting membrane Hsp70 positive (memHsp70+ tumor cells, in vitro.The specificity of carboxy-fluorescein (CF- labeled TPP (TPP to Hsp70 was proven in an Hsp70 knockout mammary tumor cell system. TPP specifically binds to different memHsp70+ mouse and human tumor cell lines and is rapidly taken up via endosomes. Two to four-fold higher levels of CF-labeled TPP were detected in MCF7 (82% memHsp70+ and MDA-MB-231 (75% memHsp70+ cells compared to T47D cells (29% memHsp70+ that exhibit a lower Hsp70 membrane positivity. After 90 min incubation, TPP co-localized with mitochondrial membranes in memHsp70+ tumors. Although there was no evidence that any given vesicle population was specifically localized, fluorophore-labeled cmHsp70.1 antibody and TPP preferentially accumulated in the proximity of the adherent surface of cultured cells. These findings suggest a potential association between membrane Hsp70 expression and cytoskeletal elements that are involved in adherence, the establishment of intercellular synapses and/or membrane reorganization.This study demonstrates the specific binding and rapid

  9. Dual in vivo quantification of integrin-targeted and protease-activated agents in cancer using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossodo, Sylvie; Pickarski, Maureen; Lin, Shu-An; Gleason, Alexa; Gaspar, Renee; Buono, Chiara; Ho, Guojie; Blusztajn, Agnieszka; Cuneo, Garry; Zhang, Jun; Jensen, Jayme; Hargreaves, Richard; Coleman, Paul; Hartman, George; Rajopadhye, Milind; Duong, Le Thi; Sur, Cyrille; Yared, Wael; Peterson, Jeffrey; Bednar, Bohumil

    2010-10-01

    Integrins, especially α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5), are upregulated in tumor cells and activated endothelial cells and as such, serve as cancer biomarkers. We developed a novel near-infrared-labeled optical agent for the in vivo detection and quantification of α(v)β(3)/α(v)β(5). A small peptidomimetic α(v)β(3) antagonist was synthesized, coupled to a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye, and tested for binding specificity using integrin-overexpressing cells, inhibition of vitronectin-mediated cell attachment, binding to tumor and endothelial cells in vitro, and competition studies. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, specificity of tumor targeting, and the effect of an antiangiogenic treatment were assessed in vivo. The integrin NIRF agent showed strong selectivity towards α(v)β(3/)α(v)β(5) in vitro and predominant tumor distribution in vivo, allowing noninvasive and real-time quantification of integrin signal in tumors. Antiangiogenic treatment significantly inhibited integrin signal in vivo but had no effect on a cathepsin-cleavable NIR agent. Simultaneous imaging revealed different patterns of distribution reflecting the underlying differences in integrin and cathepsin biology during tumor progression. NIRF-labeled integrin antagonists allow noninvasive molecular fluorescent imaging and quantification of tumors in vivo, improving and providing more refined approaches for cancer detection and treatment monitoring.

  10. Sodium hyaluronate enhances colorectal tumour cell metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Sodium hyaluronate has been used intraperitoneally to prevent postoperative adhesions. However, the effect of sodium hyaluronate on tumour growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo is still unknown. METHODS: Human colorectal tumour cell lines SW480, SW620 and SW707 were treated with sodium hyaluronate (10-500 microg\\/ml) and carboxymethylcellulose (0.125-1 per cent), and tumour cell proliferation and motility were determined in vitro. For the in vivo experiments male BD IX rats were randomized to a sodium hyaluronate group (n = 11; intraperitoneal administration of 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml 0.4 per cent sodium hyaluronate) or a phosphate-buffered saline group (n = 11; 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally). Four weeks later the intraperitoneal tumour load was visualized directly. RESULTS: In vitro sodium hyaluronate increased tumour cell proliferation and motility significantly. Sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell motility appeared to be CD44 receptor dependent, whereas sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell proliferation was CD44 receptor independent. In vivo there was a significantly higher total tumour nodule count in the peritoneal cavity of the sodium hyaluronate-treated group compared with the control (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Sodium hyaluronate enhances tumour metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo, which suggests that use of sodium hyaluronate to prevent adhesions in colorectal cancer surgery may also potentiate intraperitoneal tumour growth. Presented to the Patey Prize Session of the Surgical Research Society and the annual scientific meeting of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland, Brighton, UK, 4-7 May 1999

  11. An in-vivo study for targeted delivery of copper-organic complex to breast cancer using chitosan polymer nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Arindam; Laha, Dipranjan; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Roy, Somenath; Das, Dipak Kumar; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a strategy for targeted delivery of metal-diketo complex, "bis(2,4-pentanedionato) copper(II)" to breast cancer cells both in-vitro and in-vivo. This metal-organic complex induced ROS and subsequently DNA damage as well as mitochondrial membrane depolarization was observed. The mitochondria rupture further triggered apoptosis. For in-vitro targeting strategies, two different approaches were employed, folic acid or her-2 specific peptide (KCCYSL) was attached to stearic acid-modified polymeric Chitosan nanoparticles loaded with metal-organic complex "bis(2,4-pentanedionato)copper(II)". This was tested on two pairs of isogenic cells (FR+/FR- MCf-7 and her2+ /her2- MCF-7) and it was observed that cells expressing the receptor were susceptible to the drug whereas non-expressing isogenic cells were almost un-affected. During in-vivo studies, mice receiving targeted delivery of bis(2,4-pentanedionato) copper (II) had increased survivability and reduced tumor volume compared to non-targeted drug delivery. During toxicity studies for liver enzymes it was also found that the mice receiving targeted drug did not show any sign of liver damage as well as other histology changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamics of Action Potential Initiation in the GABAergic Thalamic Reticular Nucleus In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Fabián; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms of action potential generation is critical to establish the way neural circuits generate and coordinate activity. Accordingly, we investigated the dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) using in vivo intracellular recordings in cats in order to preserve anatomically-intact axo-dendritic distributions and naturally-occurring spatiotemporal patterns of synaptic activity in this structure that regulates the thalamic relay to neocortex. We found a wide operational range of voltage thresholds for action potentials, mostly due to intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and not synaptic activity driven by network oscillations. Varying levels of synchronous synaptic inputs produced fast rates of membrane potential depolarization preceding the action potential onset that were associated with lower thresholds and increased excitability, consistent with TRN neurons performing as coincidence detectors. On the other hand the presence of action potentials preceding any given spike was associated with more depolarized thresholds. The phase-plane trajectory of the action potential showed somato-dendritic propagation, but no obvious axon initial segment component, prominent in other neuronal classes and allegedly responsible for the high onset speed. Overall, our results suggest that TRN neurons could flexibly integrate synaptic inputs to discharge action potentials over wide voltage ranges, and perform as coincidence detectors and temporal integrators, supported by a dynamic action potential threshold. PMID:22279567

  13. Radiofrequency-targeted vertebral augmentation versus traditional balloon kyphoplasty: radiographic and morphologic outcomes of an ex vivo biomechanical pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalton BE

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Brian E Dalton,1 Andrew C Kohm,2 Larry E Miller,3,4 Jon E Block,4 Robert D Poser21Tri-State Neurological Surgeons, Erie, PA, 2DFINE, Inc, San Jose, CA, 3Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Arden, NC, 4The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USAPurpose: Traditional balloon kyphoplasty (BK is a common treatment for symptomatic vertebral compression fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare a novel vertebral augmentation technique, radiofrequency-targeted vertebral augmentation (RF-TVA, to BK for restoration of vertebral height, cavity creation, and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA delivery and interdigitation into the surrounding trabeculae.Methods: This ex vivo biomechanical pilot study utilized 16 osteoporotic cadaveric vertebral bodies in a standardized fracture model to compare unipedicular RF-TVA (n = 8 to bipedicular BK (n = 8. Four specimens from each group were tested in loaded and unloaded conditions. All specimens were imaged, assessed for height restoration, and sectioned to observe PMMA distribution. A subset of specimens underwent computed tomography scanning to assess cavity creation and trabecular architecture prior to cement delivery.Results: Anterior height restoration was greater with RF-TVA (median: 84%, interquartile range: 62%–95% compared to BK (median: 69%, interquartile range: 60%–81%, although the difference did not achieve statistical significance (P = 0.16. Anterior height restoration was numerically greater under loaded (median: 70% versus 66% and unloaded (median: 94% versus 77% conditions with RF-TVA versus BK. RF-TVA produced more discrete cavities and less native trabecular destruction compared to marked trabecular destruction observed with BK. RF-TVA consistently showed a well-identified focal area of PMMA with an extensive peripheral zone of PMMA interdigitation, providing mechanical interlock into the adjacent intact trabecular matrix. In contrast, BK yielded little evidence of PMMA interdigitation

  14. Limiting the protein corona: A successful strategy for in vivo active targeting of anti-HER2 nanobody-functionalized nanostars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hollander, Antoine; Jans, Hilde; Velde, Greetje Vande; Verstraete, Charlotte; Massa, Sam; Devoogdt, Nick; Stakenborg, Tim; Muyldermans, Serge; Lagae, Liesbet; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles hold great promise as anti-cancer theranostic agents against cancer by actively targeting the tumor cells. As this potential has been supported numerously during in vitro experiments, the effective application is hampered by our limited understanding and control of the interactions within complex in vivo biological systems. When these nanoparticles are exposed to a biological environment, their surfaces become covered with proteins and biomolecules, referred to as the protein corona, reducing the active targeting capabilities. We demonstrate a chemical strategy to overcome this issue by reducing the protein corona's thickness by blocking the active groups of the self-assembled monolayer on gold nanostars. An optimal blocking agent, 2-mercapto ethanol, has been selected based on charge and length of the carbon chain. By using a nanobody as a biological ligand of the human epidermal growth factor 2 receptor (HER2), the active targeting is demonstrated in vitro and in vivo in an experimental tumor model by using darkfield microscopy and photoacoustic imaging. In this study, we have established gold nanostars as a conceivable theranostic agent with a specificity for HER2-positive tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Wzy-dependent bacterial capsules as potential drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Daniel J; Standish, Alistair; Kobe, Bostjan; Morona, Renato

    2012-10-01

    The bacterial capsule is a recognized virulence factor in pathogenic bacteria. It likely works as an antiphagocytic barrier by minimizing complement deposition on the bacterial surface. With the continual rise of bacterial pathogens resistant to multiple antibiotics, there is an increasing need for novel drugs. In the Wzy-dependent pathway, the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is regulated by a phosphoregulatory system, whose main components consist of bacterial-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) and their cognate phosphatases. The ability to regulate capsule biosynthesis has been shown to be vital for pathogenicity, because different stages of infection require a shift in capsule thickness, making the phosphoregulatory proteins suitable as drug targets. Here, we review the role of regulatory proteins focusing on Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli and discuss their suitability as targets in structure-based drug design.

  16. Potential neuroimmunological targets in the treatment of anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, R.H.; Tang, Zhen; Baldwin, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    In the translation of psychoneuroimmunology research into clinical practice, one critical step is to identify biomarkers for improved diagnosis and targeting of interventions. Inflammatory markers deserve special attention due to their crucial role linking various health conditions and disorders. In this chapter, we discuss the pivotal roles of cytokines in signalling to the brain and leading to behavioural changes. This is followed by a review of recent research findings into neuroimmunology...

  17. The potential of natural products for targeting PPARα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Rigano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs α, -γ and -β/δ are ligand-activated transcription factors and members of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptor. These receptors play key roles in maintaining glucose and lipid homeostasis by modulating gene expression. PPARs constitute a recognized druggable target and indeed several classes of drugs used in the treatment of metabolic disease symptoms, such as dyslipidemia (fibrates, e.g. fenofibrate and gemfibrozil and diabetes (thiazolidinediones, e.g. rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are ligands for the various PPAR isoforms. More precisely, antidiabetic thiazolidinediones act on PPARγ, while PPARα is the main molecular target of antidyslipidemic fibrates. Over the past few years, our understanding of the mechanism underlying the PPAR modulation of gene expression has greatly increased. This review presents a survey on terrestrial and marine natural products modulating the PPARα system with the objective of highlighting how the incredible chemodiversity of natural products can provide innovative leads for this “hot” target.

  18. FGFR gene alterations in lung squamous cell carcinoma are potential targets for the multikinase inhibitor nintedanib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Masaaki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Tanizaki, Junko; Sakai, Kazuko; Togashi, Yosuke; Terashima, Masato; De Velasco, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Banno, Eri; Nakamura, Yu; Takeda, Masayuki; Ito, Akihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Okamoto, Isamu; Nishio, Kazuto

    2016-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) gene alterations are relatively frequent in lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and are a potential targets for therapy with FGFR inhibitors. However, little is known regarding the clinicopathologic features associated with FGFR alterations. The angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib has shown promising activity in clinical trials for non-small cell lung cancer. We have now applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) to characterize FGFR alterations in LSCC patients as well as examined the antitumor activity of nintedanib in LSCC cell lines positive for FGFR1 copy number gain (CNG). The effects of nintedanib on the proliferation of and FGFR signaling in LSCC cell lines were examined in vitro, and its effects on tumor formation were examined in vivo. A total of 75 clinical LSCC specimens were screened for FGFR alterations by NGS. Nintedanib inhibited the proliferation of FGFR1 CNG-positive LSCC cell lines in association with attenuation of the FGFR1-ERK signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. FGFR1 CNG (10.7%), FGFR1 mutation (2.7%), FGFR2 mutation (2.7%), FGFR4 mutation (5.3%), and FGFR3 fusion (1.3%) were detected in LSCC specimens by NGS. Clinicopathologic features did not differ between LSCC patients positive or negative for FGFR alterations. However, among the 36 patients with disease recurrence after surgery, prognosis was significantly worse for those harboring FGFR alterations. Screening for FGFR alterations by NGS warrants further study as a means to identify patients with LSCC recurrence after surgery who might benefit from nintedanib therapy. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Potentiating angiogenesis arrest in vivo via laser irradiation of peptide functionalised gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pedrosa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-angiogenic therapy has great potential for cancer therapy with several FDA approved formulations but there are considerable side effects upon the normal blood vessels that decrease the potential application of such therapeutics. Chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM has been used as a model to study angiogenesis in vivo. Using a CAM model, it had been previously shown that spherical gold nanoparticles functionalised with an anti-angiogenic peptide can humper neo-angiogenesis. Results Our results show that gold nanoparticles conjugated with an anti-angiogenic peptide can be combined with visible laser irradiation to enhance angiogenesis arrest in vivo. We show that a green laser coupled to gold nanoparticles can achieve high localized temperatures able to precisely cauterize blood vessels. This combined therapy acts via VEGFR pathway inhibition, leading to a fourfold reduction in FLT-1 expression. Conclusions The proposed phototherapy extends the use of visible lasers in clinics, combining it with chemotherapy to potentiate cancer treatment. This approach allows the reduction of dose of anti-angiogenic peptide, thus reducing possible side effects, while destroying blood vessels supply critical for tumour progression.

  20. Potentiating angiogenesis arrest in vivo via laser irradiation of peptide functionalised gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Pedro; Heuer-Jungemann, Amelie; Kanaras, Antonios G; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro V

    2017-11-21

    Anti-angiogenic therapy has great potential for cancer therapy with several FDA approved formulations but there are considerable side effects upon the normal blood vessels that decrease the potential application of such therapeutics. Chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) has been used as a model to study angiogenesis in vivo. Using a CAM model, it had been previously shown that spherical gold nanoparticles functionalised with an anti-angiogenic peptide can humper neo-angiogenesis. Our results show that gold nanoparticles conjugated with an anti-angiogenic peptide can be combined with visible laser irradiation to enhance angiogenesis arrest in vivo. We show that a green laser coupled to gold nanoparticles can achieve high localized temperatures able to precisely cauterize blood vessels. This combined therapy acts via VEGFR pathway inhibition, leading to a fourfold reduction in FLT-1 expression. The proposed phototherapy extends the use of visible lasers in clinics, combining it with chemotherapy to potentiate cancer treatment. This approach allows the reduction of dose of anti-angiogenic peptide, thus reducing possible side effects, while destroying blood vessels supply critical for tumour progression.

  1. DMS-MaPseq for genome-wide or targeted RNA structure probing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubradt, Meghan; Gupta, Paromita; Persad, Sitara; Lambowitz, Alan M; Weissman, Jonathan S; Rouskin, Silvi

    2017-01-01

    Coupling of structure-specific in vivo chemical modification to next-generation sequencing is transforming RNA secondary structure studies in living cells. The dominant strategy for detecting in vivo chemical modifications uses reverse transcriptase truncation products, which introduce biases and necessitate population-average assessments of RNA structure. Here we present dimethyl sulfate (DMS) mutational profiling with sequencing (DMS-MaPseq), which encodes DMS modifications as mismatches using a thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase. DMS-MaPseq yields a high signal-to-noise ratio, can report multiple structural features per molecule, and allows both genome-wide studies and focused in vivo investigations of even low-abundance RNAs. We apply DMS-MaPseq for the first analysis of RNA structure within an animal tissue and to identify a functional structure involved in noncanonical translation initiation. Additionally, we use DMS-MaPseq to compare the in vivo structure of pre-mRNAs with their mature isoforms. These applications illustrate DMS-MaPseq's capacity to dramatically expand in vivo analysis of RNA structure.

  2. DMS-MaPseq for genome-wide or targeted RNA structure probing in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubradt, Meghan; Gupta, Paromita; Persad, Sitara; Lambowitz, Alan M.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Rouskin, Silvi

    2017-01-01

    Coupling structure-specific in vivo chemical modification to next-generation sequencing is transforming RNA secondary structural studies in living cells. The dominant strategy for detecting in vivo chemical modifications uses reverse transcriptase truncation products, which introduces biases and necessitates population-average assessments of RNA structure. Here we present dimethyl sulfate mutational profiling with sequencing (DMS-MaPseq), which encodes DMS modifications as mismatches using a thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase (TGIRT). DMS-MaPseq yields a high signal-to-noise ratio, can report multiple structural features per molecule, and allows both genome-wide studies and focused in vivo investigations of even low abundance RNAs. We apply DMS-MaPseq for the first analysis of RNA structure within an animal tissue and to identify a functional structure involved in non-canonical translation initiation. Additionally, we use DMS-MaPseq to compare the in vivo structure of pre-mRNAs to their mature isoforms. These applications illustrate DMS-MaPseq’s capacity to dramatically expand in vivo analysis of RNA structure. PMID:27819661

  3. Peroxisomal Targeting as a Sensitive Tool to Detect Protein-Small RNA Interactions through in Vivo Piggybacking

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    Marco Incarbone

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are organelles that play key roles in eukaryotic metabolism. Their protein complement is entirely imported from the cytoplasm thanks to a unique pathway that is able to translocate folded proteins and protein complexes across the peroxisomal membrane. The import of molecules bound to a protein targeted to peroxisomes is an active process known as ‘piggybacking’ and we have recently shown that P15, a virus-encoded protein possessing a peroxisomal targeting sequence, is able to piggyback siRNAs into peroxisomes. Here, we extend this observation by analyzing the small RNA repertoire found in peroxisomes of P15-expressing plants. A direct comparison with the P15-associated small RNA retrieved during immunoprecipitation (IP experiments, revealed that in vivo piggybacking coupled to peroxisome isolation could be a more sensitive means to determine the various small RNA species bound by a given protein. This increased sensitivity of peroxisome isolation as opposed to IP experiments was also striking when we analyzed the small RNA population bound by the Tomato bushy stunt virus-encoded P19, one of the best characterized viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSR, artificially targeted to peroxisomes. These results support that peroxisomal targeting should be considered as a novel/alternative experimental approach to assess in vivo interactions that allows detection of labile binding events. The advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  4. Blockade of Aquaporin 1 Inhibits Proliferation, Motility, and Metastatic Potential of Mesothelioma In Vitro but not in an In Vivo Model

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    Sonja Klebe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Malignant mesothelioma (MM is an aggressive tumor of the serosal membranes, mostly the pleura. It is related to asbestos exposure and has a poor prognosis. MM has a long latency period, and incidence is predicted to remain stable or increase until 2020. Currently, no biomarkers for a specific targeted therapy are available. Previously, we observed that expression of aquaporin 1 (AQP1 was an indicator of prognosis in two independent cohorts. Here we determine whether AQP1 inhibition has therapeutic potential in the treatment of MM. Methods. Functional studies were performed with H226 cells and primary MM cells harvested from pleural effusions. AQP1 expression and mesothelial phenotype was determined by immunohistochemistry. AQP1 function was inhibited by a pharmacological blocker (AqB050 or AQP1-specific siRNA. Cell proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent cell growth were assessed. A nude mouse heterotopic xenograft model of MM was utilised for the in vivo studies. Results. Inhibition of AQP1 significantly decreases cell proliferation, metastatic potential, and motility without inducing nonspecific cytotoxicity or increasing apoptosis. In vivo blockade of AQP1 had no biologically significant effect on growth of established tumours. Conclusions. Targeted blockade of AQP1 restricts MM growth and migration in vitro. Further work is warranted to fully evaluate treatment potential in vivo.

  5. Immune evasion by Yersinia enterocolitica: differential targeting of dendritic cell subpopulations in vivo.

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    Stella E Autenrieth

    Full Text Available CD4(+ T cells are essential for the control of Yersinia enterocolitica (Ye infection in mice. Ye can inhibit dendritic cell (DC antigen uptake and degradation, maturation and subsequently T-cell activation in vitro. Here we investigated the effects of Ye infection on splenic DCs and T-cell proliferation in an experimental mouse infection model. We found that OVA-specific CD4(+ T cells had a reduced potential to proliferate when stimulated with OVA after infection with Ye compared to control mice. Additionally, proliferation of OVA-specific CD4(+ T cells was markedly reduced when cultured with splenic CD8α(+ DCs from Ye infected mice in the presence of OVA. In contrast, T-cell proliferation was not impaired in cultures with CD4(+ or CD4(-CD8α(- DCs isolated from Ye infected mice. However, OVA uptake and degradation as well as cytokine production were impaired in CD8α(+ DCs, but not in CD4(+ and CD4(-CD8α(- DCs after Ye infection. Pathogenicity factors (Yops from Ye were most frequently injected into CD8α(+ DCs, resulting in less MHC class II and CD86 expression than on non-injected CD8α(+ DCs. Three days post infection with Ye the number of splenic CD8α(+ and CD4(+ DCs was reduced by 50% and 90%, respectively. The decreased number of DC subsets, which was dependent on TLR4 and TRIF signaling, was the result of a faster proliferation and suppressed de novo DC generation. Together, we show that Ye infection negatively regulates the stimulatory capacity of some but not all splenic DC subpopulations in vivo. This leads to differential antigen uptake and degradation, cytokine production, cell loss, and cell death rates in various DC subpopulations. The data suggest that these effects might be caused directly by injection of Yops into DCs and indirectly by affecting the homeostasis of CD4(+ and CD8α(+ DCs. These events may contribute to reduced T-cell proliferation and immune evasion of Ye.

  6. Cancer ameliorating potential of Phyllanthus amarus: In vivo and in vitro studies against Aflatoxin B1 toxicity

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    Md. Sultan Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Ameliorating potential of P. amarus was dose and duration dependant. These extracts significantly reduced the mutagenicity and genotoxicity that were produced due to AFB1 treatment both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. S100-alarmins: potential therapeutic targets for arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austermann, Judith; Zenker, Stefanie; Roth, Johannes

    2017-07-01

    In arthritis, inflammatory processes are triggered by numerous factors that are released from joint tissues, promoting joint destruction and pathological progression. During inflammation, a novel family of pro-inflammatory molecules called alarmins is released, amplifying inflammation and joint damage. Areas covered: With regard to the role of the alarmins S100A8 and S100A9 in the pathogenesis of arthritis, recent advances and the future prospects in terms of therapeutic implications are considered. Expert opinion: There is still an urgent need for novel treatment strategies addressing the local mechanisms of joint inflammation and tissue destruction, offering promising therapeutic alternatives. S100A8 and S100A9, which are the most up-regulated alarmins during arthritis, are endogenous triggers of inflammation, defining these proteins as promising targets for local suppression of arthritis. In murine models, the blockade of S100A8/S100A9 ameliorates inflammatory processes, including arthritis, and there are several lines of evidence that S100-alarmins may already be targeted in therapeutic approaches in man.

  8. Metabolic Alterations of Thyroid Cancer as Potential Therapeutic Targets

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    Domenico Ciavardelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer (TC is the most frequent endocrine tumor with a growing incidence worldwide. Besides the improvement of diagnosis, TC increasing incidence is probably due to environmental factors and lifestyle modifications. The actual diagnostic criteria for TC classification are based on fine needle biopsy (FNAB and histological examination following thyroidectomy. Since in some cases it is not possible to make a proper diagnosis, classical approach needs to be supported by additional biomarkers. Recently, new emphasis has been given to the altered cellular metabolism of proliferating cancer cells which require high amount of glucose for energy production and macromolecules biosynthesis. Also TC displays alteration of energy metabolism orchestrated by oncogenes activation and tumor suppressors inactivation leading to abnormal proliferation. Furthermore, TC shows significant metabolic heterogeneity within the tumor microenvironment and metabolic coupling between cancer and stromal cells. In this review we focus on the current knowledge of metabolic alterations of TC and speculate that targeting TC metabolism may improve current therapeutic protocols for poorly differentiated TC. Future studies will further deepen the actual understandings of the metabolic phenotype of TC cells and will give the chance to provide novel prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in tumors with a more aggressive behavior.

  9. DEPDC5 as a potential therapeutic target for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kenneth A; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2017-06-01

    Dishevelled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin (DEP) domain-containing protein 5 (DEPDC5) is a protein subunit of the GTPase-activating proteins towards Rags 1 (GATOR1) complex. GATOR1 is a recently identified modulator of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. mTOR is a key regulator of cell proliferation and metabolism; disruption of the mTOR pathway is implicated in focal epilepsy, both acquired and genetic. Tuberous sclerosis is the prototypic mTOR genetic syndrome with epilepsy, however GATOR1 gene mutations have recently been shown to cause lesional and non-lesional focal epilepsy. Areas covered: This review summarizes the mTOR pathway, including regulators and downstream effectors, emphasizing recent developments in the understanding of the complex role of the GATOR1 complex. We review the epilepsy types associated with mTOR overactivity, including tuberous sclerosis, polyhydramnios megalencephaly symptomatic epilepsy, cortical dysplasia, non-lesional focal epilepsy and post-traumatic epilepsy. Currently available mTOR inhibitors are discussed, primarily rapamycin analogs and ATP competitive mTOR inhibitors. Expert opinion: DEPDC5 is an attractive therapeutic target in focal epilepsy, as effects of DEPDC5 agonists would likely be anti-epileptogenic and more selective than currently available mTOR inhibitors. Therapeutic effects might be synergistic with certain existing dietary therapies, including the ketogenic diet.

  10. Identification of potential target genes for the tomato fruit-ripening regulator RIN by chromatin immunoprecipitation

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    Nakano Toshitsugu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During ripening, climacteric fruits increase their ethylene level and subsequently undergo various physiological changes, such as softening, pigmentation and development of aroma and flavor. These changes occur simultaneously and are caused by the highly synchronized expression of numerous genes at the onset of ripening. In tomatoes, the MADS-box transcription factor RIN has been regarded as a key regulator responsible for the onset of ripening by acting upstream of both ethylene- and non-ethylene-mediated controls. However, except for LeACS2, direct targets of RIN have not been clarified, and little is known about the transcriptional cascade for ripening. Results Using immunoprecipitated (IPed DNA fragments recovered by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP with anti-RIN antibody from ripening tomato fruit, we analyzed potential binding sites for RIN (CArG-box sites in the promoters of representative ripening-induced genes by quantitative PCR. Results revealed nearly a 5- to 20-fold enrichment of CArG boxes in the promoters of LeACS2, LeACS4, PG, TBG4, LeEXP1, and LeMAN4 and of RIN itself, indicating direct interaction of RIN with their promoters in vivo. Moreover, sequence analysis and genome mapping of 51 cloned IPed DNAs revealed potential RIN binding sites. Quantitative PCR revealed that four of the potential binding sites were enriched 4- to 17-fold in the IPed DNA pools compared with the controls, indicating direct interaction of RIN with these sites in vivo. Near one of the four CArG boxes we found a gene encoding a protein similar to thioredoxin y1. An increase in the transcript level of this gene was observed with ripening in normal fruit but not in the rin mutant, suggesting that RIN possibly induces its expression. Conclusions The presented results suggest that RIN controls fruit softening and ethylene production by the direct transcriptional regulation of cell-wall-modifying genes and ethylene biosynthesis genes

  11. Intracerebral Event-related Potentials to Subthreshold Target Stimuli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázdil, M.; Rektor, I.; Daniel, P.; Dufek, M.; Jurák, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 4 (2001), s. 650-661 ISSN 1388-2457 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/98/0490 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : event-related potentials * intracerebral recordings * oddball paradigm Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.922, year: 2001

  12. HDAC8, A Potential Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNST.

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    Gonzalo Lopez

    Full Text Available HDAC isoform-specific inhibitors may improve the therapeutic window while limiting toxicities. Developing inhibitors against class I isoforms poses difficulties as they share high homology among their catalytic sites; however, HDAC8 is structurally unique compared to other class I isoforms. HDAC8 inhibitors are novel compounds and have affinity for class I HDAC isoforms demonstrating anti-cancer effects; little is known about their activity in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST. Recently, we demonstrated anti-MPNST efficacy of HDAC8i in human and murine-derived MPNST pre-clinical models; we now seek to consider the potential therapeutic inhibition of HDAC8 in MPNST.Four Human MPNST cell lines, a murine-derived MPNST cell line, and two HDAC8 inhibitors (PCI-34051, PCI-48012; Pharmacyclics, Inc. Sunnyvale, CA were studied. Proliferation was determined using MTS and clonogenic assays. Effects on cell cycle were determined via PI FACS analysis; effects on apoptosis were determined using Annexin V-PI FACS analysis and cleaved caspase 3 expression. In vivo growth effects of HDAC8i were evaluated using MPNST xenograft models. 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify potential HDAC8 deacetylation substrates.HDAC8i induced cell growth inhibition and marked S-phase cell cycle arrest in human and murine-derived MPNST cells. Relative to control, HDAC8i induced apoptosis in both human and murine-derived MPNST cells. HDAC8i exhibited significant effects on MPNST xenograft growth (p=0.001 and tumor weight (p=0.02. Four potential HDAC8 substrate targets were identified using a proteomic approach: PARK7, HMGB1, PGAM1, PRDX6.MPNST is an aggressive sarcoma that is notoriously therapy-resistant, hence the urgent need for improved anti-MPNST therapies. HDAC8 inhibition may be useful for MPNST by improving efficacy while limiting toxicities as compared to pan-HDACis.

  13. Cryptophycins: cytotoxic cyclodepsipeptides with potential for tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Christine; Figueras, Eduard; Borbely, Adina N; Sewald, Norbert

    2017-07-01

    Cryptophycins are a class of 16-membered highly cytotoxic macrocyclic depsipeptides isolated from cyanobacteria. The biological activity is based on their ability to interact with tubulin. They interfere with microtubule dynamics and prevent microtubules from forming correct mitotic spindles, which causes cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Their strong antiproliferative activities with 100-fold to 1000-fold potency compared with those of paclitaxel and vinblastine have been observed. Cryptophycins are highly promising drug candidates, as their biological activity is not negatively affected by P-glycoprotein, a drug efflux system commonly found in multidrug-resistant cancer cell lines and solid tumors. Cryptophycin-52 had been investigated in phase II clinical trials but failed because of its high neurotoxicity. Recently, cryptophycin conjugates with peptides and antibodies have been developed for targeted delivery in tumor therapy. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Tumor-colonizing bacteria: a potential tumor targeting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Chao; Wang, Jiansheng

    2014-08-01

    In 1813, Vautier published his observation of tumor regression in patients who had suffered from gas gangrene. Since then, many publications have described the use of bacteria as antitumor therapy. For example, Bifidobacterium and Clostridium have been shown to selectively colonize tumors and to reduce tumor size. In addition, recent studies have focused on the use of genetic engineering to induce the expression of pro-drug converting enzymes, cytokines, specific antibodies, or suicide genes in tumor-colonizing bacteria. Moreover, some animal experiments have reported the treatment of tumors with engineered bacteria, and few side effects were observed. Therefore, based on these advances in tumor targeting therapy, bacteria may represent the next generation of cancer therapy.

  15. Endocannabinoid signaling in female reproductive events: a potential therapeutic target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 30 years after the discovery in 1964 of the psychoactive ingredient of cannabis (Cannabis sativa), Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, its endogenous counterparts were discovered and collectively termed endocannabinoids (eCBs): N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide) in 1992 and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in 1995. Since then, intense research has identified additional eCBs and an ensemble of proteins that bind, synthesize and degrade them, the so-called eCB system. Altogether, these new compounds have been recognized as key mediators of several aspects of human pathophysiology, and in particular of female fertility. Here, the main features of the eCB system are presented, in order to put in a better perspective the relevance of eCB signaling in virtually all steps of human reproduction and to highlight emerging hopes that elements of this system might indeed become novel targets to combat fertility problems.

  16. In vivo aging of orthodontic alloys: implications for corrosion potential, nickel release, and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliades, Theodore; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2002-06-01

    Despite the large number of studies investigating nickel release from orthodontic stainless steel and nickel-titanium alloys, there is a lack of conclusive evidence with respect to the composition and kinetics of the corrosive products released. The objective of this review is to address the critical issues of corrosion potential and nickel leaching from alloys by investigating the effect of intraoral conditions on the surface reactivity of the materials. After an overview of fundamentals of metallurgical structure of orthodontic alloys, we provide an analysis of corrosion processes occurring in vivo. We present recent evidence suggesting the formation of a proteinaceous biofilm on retrieved orthodontic materials that later undergoes calcification. We illustrate the vastly irrelevant surface structure of in vivo- vs in vitro-aged alloys and discuss the potential implications of this pattern in the reactivity of the materials. Finally, we present a comprehensive review of the issue of nickel release, based on three perspectives: its biologic effects, the methods used for studying its release, and nickel-induced hypersensitivity in orthodontic patients.

  17. In vivo Raman spectroscopy detects increased epidermal antioxidative potential with topically applied carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Caspers, P. J.; van der Pol, A.; Richter, H.; Patzelt, A.; Zastrow, L.; Darvin, M.; Sterry, W.; Fluhr, J. W.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the distribution of the carotenoids as a marker for the complete antioxidative potential in human skin was investigated before and after the topical application of carotenoids by in vivo Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 785 nm. The carotenoid profile was assessed after a short term topical application in 4 healthy volunteers. In the untreated skin, the highest concentration of natural carotenoids was detected in different layers of the stratum corneum (SC) close to the skin surface. After topical application of carotenoids, an increase in the antioxidative potential in the skin could be observed. Topically applied carotenoids penetrate deep into the epidermis down to approximately 24 μm. This study supports the hypothesis that antioxidative substances are secreted via eccrine sweat glands and/or sebaceous glands to the skin surface. Subsequently they penetrate into the different layers of the SC.

  18. RAGE and Soluble RAGE: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Koyama, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2007-01-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is known to be involved in microvascular complications in diabetes. RAGE is also profoundly associated with macrovascular complications in diabetes through regulation of atherogenesis, angiogenic response, vascular injury, and inflammatory response. The potential significance of RAGE in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease appears not to be confined solely to nondiabetic rather than diabetic conditions. Numerous truncated forms of RAGE...

  19. Using Click Chemistry to Identify Potential Drug Targets in Plasmodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Plasmodium. 67 68 3 Introduction 69 70 Malaria infection begins with the infection by Plasmodium ‘sporozoites’ of the liver. After 71 asexual...the Plasmodium mammalian cycle. Identifying parasite proteins that are required for liver infection can lead to novel drugs against malaria . For the...sporozoite infection and whose inhibition could be exploited to prevent the first step of a malaria infection. Thus, we have identified two potential

  20. Aquaporin-4: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Cerebral Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghui Tang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporin-4 (AQP4 is a family member of water-channel proteins and is dominantly expressed in the foot process of glial cells surrounding capillaries. The predominant expression at the boundaries between cerebral parenchyma and major fluid compartments suggests the function of aquaporin-4 in water transfer into and out of the brain parenchyma. Accumulating evidences have suggested that the dysregulation of aquaporin-4 relates to the brain edema resulting from a variety of neuro-disorders, such as ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, trauma, etc. During edema formation in the brain, aquaporin-4 has been shown to contribute to the astrocytic swelling, while in the resolution phase, it has been seen to facilitate the reabsorption of extracellular fluid. In addition, aquaporin-4-deficient mice are protected from cytotoxic edema produced by water intoxication and brain ischemia. However, aquaporin-4 deletion exacerbates vasogenic edema in the brain of different pathological disorders. Recently, our published data showed that the upregulation of aquaporin-4 in astrocytes probably contributes to the transition from cytotoxic edema to vasogenic edema. In this review, apart from the traditional knowledge, we also introduce our latest findings about the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and microRNA-29b on aquaporin-4, which could provide powerful intervention tools targeting aquaporin-4.

  1. Erythropoietin Pathway: A Potential Target for the Treatment of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongyang Ma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, accumulating evidence from both clinical and experimental studies has indicated that erythropoietin may have antidepressant effects. In addition to the kidney and liver, many organs have been identified as secretory tissues for erythropoietin, including the brain. Its receptor is expressed in cerebral and spinal cord neurons, the hypothalamus, hippocampus, neocortex, dorsal root ganglia, nerve axons, and Schwann cells. These findings may highlight new functions for erythropoietin, which was originally considered to play a crucial role in the progress of erythroid differentiation. Erythropoietin and its receptor signaling through JAK2 activate multiple downstream signaling pathways including STAT5, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and MAPK. These factors may play an important role in inflammation and neuroprogression in the nervous system. This is particularly true for the hippocampus, which is possibly related to learning, memory, neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations. Thus, the influence of erythropoietin on the downstream pathways known to be involved in the treatment of depression makes the erythropoietin-related pathway an attractive target for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Focusing on erythropoietin may help us understand the pathogenic mechanisms of depression and the molecular basis of its treatment.

  2. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayorca-Guiliani A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Alejandro Mayorca-Guiliani, Janine T Erler Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: The extracellular matrix (ECM is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Extensive research has revealed how the LOX proteins participate in every stage of cancer progression, and two family members, LOX and LOX-like 2, have been linked to metastasis, the final stage of cancer responsible for over 90% of cancer patient deaths. However, LOX biosynthesis results in by-product with antiproliferative properties in certain cancers, and LOX enzymes may have different effects depending on the molecular network in which they are active. Therefore, the design of therapies targeting the LOX family needs to be guided by the molecular makeup of the individual disease and will probably require other agents to act on both the LOX enzymes and their associated network. Keywords: cancer, extracellular matrix, lysyl oxidase, metastasis

  3. AAC as a Potential Target Gene to Control Verticillium dahliae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Verticillium dahliae invades the roots of host plants and causes vascular wilt, which seriously diminishes the yield of cotton and other important crops. The protein AAC (ADP, ATP carrier is responsible for transferring ATP from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm. When V. dahliae protoplasts were transformed with short interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting the VdAAC gene, fungal growth and sporulation were significantly inhibited. To further confirm a role for VdAAC in fungal development, we generated knockout mutants (ΔVdACC. Compared with wild-type V. dahliae (Vd wt, ΔVdAAC was impaired in germination and virulence; these impairments were rescued in the complementary strains (ΔVdAAC-C. Moreover, when an RNAi construct of VdAAC under the control of the 35S promoter was used to transform Nicotiana benthamiana, the expression of VdAAC was downregulated in the transgenic seedlings, and they had elevated resistance against V. dahliae. The results of this study suggest that VdAAC contributes to fungal development, virulence and is a promising candidate gene to control V. dahliae. In addition, RNAi is a highly efficient way to silence fungal genes and provides a novel strategy to improve disease resistance in plants.

  4. Erythropoietin Pathway: A Potential Target for the Treatment of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chongyang; Cheng, Fafeng; Wang, Xueqian; Zhai, Changming; Yue, Wenchao; Lian, Yajun; Wang, Qingguo

    2016-05-06

    During the past decade, accumulating evidence from both clinical and experimental studies has indicated that erythropoietin may have antidepressant effects. In addition to the kidney and liver, many organs have been identified as secretory tissues for erythropoietin, including the brain. Its receptor is expressed in cerebral and spinal cord neurons, the hypothalamus, hippocampus, neocortex, dorsal root ganglia, nerve axons, and Schwann cells. These findings may highlight new functions for erythropoietin, which was originally considered to play a crucial role in the progress of erythroid differentiation. Erythropoietin and its receptor signaling through JAK2 activate multiple downstream signaling pathways including STAT5, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and MAPK. These factors may play an important role in inflammation and neuroprogression in the nervous system. This is particularly true for the hippocampus, which is possibly related to learning, memory, neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations. Thus, the influence of erythropoietin on the downstream pathways known to be involved in the treatment of depression makes the erythropoietin-related pathway an attractive target for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Focusing on erythropoietin may help us understand the pathogenic mechanisms of depression and the molecular basis of its treatment.

  5. Targeted treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical potential of obinutuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolej L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lukáš Smolej 4th Department of Internal Medicine – Hematology, University Hospital Hradec Králové and Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic Abstract: Introduction of targeted agents revolutionized the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL in the past decade. Addition of chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab to chemotherapy significantly improved efficacy including overall survival (OS in untreated fit patients; humanized anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab and fully human anti-CD20 antibody ofatumumab lead to improvement in refractory disease. Novel small molecule inhibitors such as ibrutinib and idelalisib demonstrated excellent activity and were very recently licensed in relapsed/refractory CLL. Obinutuzumab (GA101 is the newest monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of CLL. This novel, glycoengineered, type II humanized anti-CD20 antibody is characterized by enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and direct induction of cell death compared to type I antibodies. Combination of obinutuzumab and chlorambucil yielded significantly better OS in comparison to chlorambucil monotherapy in untreated comorbid patients. These results led to approval of obinuzutumab for the treatment of CLL. Numerous clinical trials combining obinutuzumab with other cytotoxic drugs and novel small molecules are currently under way. This review focuses on the role of obinutuzumab in the treatment of CLL. Keywords: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, anti-CD20 antibodies, chlorambucil, rituximab, ofatumumab, obinutuzumab, overall survival

  6. Targeted treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical potential of obinutuzumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolej, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of targeted agents revolutionized the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in the past decade. Addition of chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab to chemotherapy significantly improved efficacy including overall survival (OS) in untreated fit patients; humanized anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab and fully human anti-CD20 antibody ofatumumab lead to improvement in refractory disease. Novel small molecule inhibitors such as ibrutinib and idelalisib demonstrated excellent activity and were very recently licensed in relapsed/refractory CLL. Obinutuzumab (GA101) is the newest monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of CLL. This novel, glycoengineered, type II humanized anti-CD20 antibody is characterized by enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and direct induction of cell death compared to type I antibodies. Combination of obinutuzumab and chlorambucil yielded significantly better OS in comparison to chlorambucil monotherapy in untreated comorbid patients. These results led to approval of obinuzutumab for the treatment of CLL. Numerous clinical trials combining obinutuzumab with other cytotoxic drugs and novel small molecules are currently under way. This review focuses on the role of obinutuzumab in the treatment of CLL.

  7. Nutraceuticals: Potential for Chondroprotection and Molecular Targeting of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Leong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. There is no cure for OA, and no effective treatments which arrest or slow its progression. Current pharmacologic treatments such as analgesics may improve pain relief but do not alter OA disease progression. Prolonged consumption of these drugs can result in severe adverse effects. Given the nature of OA, life-long treatment will likely be required to arrest or slow its progression. Consequently, there is an urgent need for OA disease-modifying therapies which also improve symptoms and are safe for clinical use over long periods of time. Nutraceuticals—food or food products that provide medical or health benefits, including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease—offer not only favorable safety profiles, but may exert disease- and symptom-modification effects in OA. Forty-seven percent of OA patients use alternative medications, including nutraceuticals. This review will overview the efficacy and mechanism of action of commonly used nutraceuticals, discuss recent experimental and clinical data on the effects of select nutraceuticals, such as phytoflavonoids, polyphenols, and bioflavonoids on OA, and highlight their known molecular actions and limitations of their current use. We will conclude with a proposed novel nutraceutical-based molecular targeting strategy for chondroprotection and OA treatment.

  8. CD30 is a potential therapeutic target in malignant mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabir, Snehal; Kresak, Adam; Yang, Michael; Fu, Pingfu; Wildey, Gary; Dowlati, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    CD30 is a cytokine receptor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFRSF8) that acts as a regulator of apoptosis. The presence of CD30 antigen is important in the diagnosis of Hodgkin’s disease and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. There have been sporadic reports of CD30 expression in non-lymphoid tumors, including malignant mesothelioma. Given the remarkable success of brentuximab vedotin, an antibody-drug conjugate directed against CD30 antigen, in lymphoid malignancies, we undertook a study to examine the incidence of CD30 in mesothelioma and to investigate the ability to target CD30 antigen in mesothelioma. Mesothelioma tumor specimens (N = 83) were examined for CD30 expression by immunohistochemistry. Positive CD30 expression was noted in 13 mesothelioma specimens, primarily those of epithelial histology. There was no significant correlation of CD30 positivity with either tumor grade, stage or survival. Examination of four mesothelioma cell lines (H28, H2052, H2452, and 211H) for CD30 expression by both FACS analysis and confocal microscopy showed that CD30 antigen localized to the cell membrane. Brentuximab vedotin treatment of cultured mesothelioma cells produced a dose-dependent decrease in cell growth and viability at clinically relevant concentrations. Our studies validate the presence of CD30 antigen in a subgroup of epithelial-type mesothelioma tumors and indicate that selected mesothelioma patients may derive benefit from brentuximab vedotin treatment. PMID:25589494

  9. Nano-sized metabolic precursors for heterogeneous tumor-targeting strategy using bioorthogonal click chemistry in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmin; Jung, Seulhee; Koo, Heebeom; Na, Jin Hee; Yoon, Hong Yeol; Shim, Man Kyu; Park, Jooho; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Seulki; Pomper, Martin G; Kwon, Ick Chan; Ahn, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2017-12-01

    Herein, we developed nano-sized metabolic precursors (Nano-MPs) for new tumor-targeting strategy to overcome the intrinsic limitations of biological ligands such as the limited number of biological receptors and the heterogeneity in tumor tissues. We conjugated the azide group-containing metabolic precursors, triacetylated N-azidoacetyl-d-mannosamine to generation 4 poly(amidoamine) dendrimer backbone. The nano-sized dendrimer of Nano-MPs could generate azide groups on the surface of tumor cells homogeneously regardless of cell types via metabolic glycoengineering. Importantly, these exogenously generated 'artificial chemical receptors' containing azide groups could be used for bioorthogonal click chemistry, regardless of phenotypes of different tumor cells. Furthermore, in tumor-bearing mice models, Nano-MPs could be mainly localized at the target tumor tissues by the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect, and they successfully generated azide groups on tumor cells in vivo after an intravenous injection. Finally, we showed that these azide groups on tumor tissues could be used as 'artificial chemical receptors' that were conjugated to bioorthogonal chemical group-containing liposomes via in vivo click chemistry in heterogeneous tumor-bearing mice. Therefore, overall results demonstrated that our nano-sized metabolic precursors could be extensively applied to new alternative tumor-targeting technique for molecular imaging and drug delivery system, regardless of the phenotype of heterogeneous tumor cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In Vivo Detection of c-MET Expression in a Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis Model Using Molecularly Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rheal A. Towner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional growth factor scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptor, c-MET, have been implicated in the genesis and malignant progression of numerous human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinomas. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas in the United States has increased noticeably over the past two decades and is listed as the fifth major cancer in men worldwide. In this study, we used a choline-deficient l-amino acid (CDAA-defined rat hepatocarcinogenesis model to visualize increased in vivo expression of the c-MET antigen in neoplastic lesion formation with the use of a super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO–anti-c-MET molecularly targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. SPIO–anti-c-MET was used for the first time to detect overexpression of c-MET in neoplastic nodules and tumors within the livers of CDAA-treated rats, as determined by a decrease in MRI signal intensity and a decrease in regional T2 values. Specificity for the binding of the molecularly targeted anti-c-MET contrast agent was determined using rat hepatoma (H4-II-E-C3 cell cultures and immunofluorescence microscopic imaging of the targeting agents within neoplastic liver tissue 1 to 2 hours following intravenous administration of SPIO–anti-c-MET and MRI investigation. This method has the ability to visualize in vivo the overexpression of c-MET at early developmental stages of tumor formation.

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Efficacy of Self-Assembling RGD Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Delivery of Paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Poonam; Li, Xiaoling; Wrischnik, Lisa; Jasti, Bhaskara

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work was to compare the efficacy of self-assembling cyclic and linear RGD peptide amphiphiles as carriers for delivering paclitaxel to αvβ3 integrin overexpressing tumors. Linear (C18-ADA5-RGD) and cyclic (C18-ADA5-cRGDfK) peptide amphiphiles were synthesized and characterized for CMC, aggregation number and micelle stability using fluorescence spectroscopy methods. Size and morphology of micelles was studied using TEM. Fluorescence polarization and confocal microscopy assays were established to compare binding and internalization of micelles. The targeting efficacy was studied in A2058 cells using cytotoxicity assay as well as in vivo in melanoma xenograft mouse model. The linear and cyclic RGD amphiphiles exhibited CMC of 25 and 8 μM, respectively, formed nano-sized spherical micelles and showed competitive binding to αvβ3 integrin protein. FITC-loaded RGD micelles rapidly internalized into A2058 melanoma cells. Paclitaxel-loaded RGD micelles exhibited higher cytotoxicity compared with free drug in A2058 cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Cyclic RGD micelles exhibited better targeting efficacy but were less effective compared to linear RGD micelles as drug delivery vehicle due to lower drug solubilization capacity and lesser kinetic stability. Results from the study proved the effectiveness of self-assembling low molecular weight RGD amphiphiles as carriers for targeted delivery of paclitaxel.

  12. uPAR as anti-cancer target: evaluation of biomarker potential, histological localization, and antibody-based therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K; Illemann, Martin; Sørensen, Tine Thurison

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of proteins in the extracellular matrix is crucial for the multistep process of cancer invasion and metastasis. Compelling evidence has demonstrated the urokinase receptor (uPAR) and its cognate ligand, the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), to play critical roles in the concerted......, and a potential diagnostic and predictive impact of the different uPAR forms has been reported. Hence, pericellular proteolysis seems to be a suitable target for anti-cancer therapy and numerous approaches have been pursued. Targeting of this process may be achieved by preventing the binding of uPA to u......PAR on the cell surface and/or by direct inhibition of the catalytic activity of uPA. Both strategies have been pursued and inhibition of these functions has shown effect in xenogenic cancer models. Pericellular proteolysis has also been inhibited in vivo in mouse models of wound healing and hepatic fibrinolysis...

  13. Potential targets in the search for extraterrestrial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the potential for increasing understanding of the origins of terrestrial life by examination of other planets. If living organisms should be found on another planet, they could only have been transported from an inhabited planet or originated independently. The fundamental chemical and structural attributes of terrestrial organisms are so remarkably uniform that any living forms outside the terrestrial blueprint would almost certainly be regarded as alien organisms. It has been shown experimentally by various investigators that life can exist in an extremely wide range of temperatures and pressures. The presence of an atmosphere appears to be necessary.

  14. The effect of nanoparticle polyethylene glycol surface density on ligand-directed tumor targeting studied in vivo by dual modality imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, Sjoerd; Helgesen, Emily; Hektoen, Helga H.; Huuse, Else Marie; Jarzyna, Peter A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Haraldseth, Olav; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2012-01-01

    The development and application of nanoparticles as in vivo delivery vehicles for therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents has seen a drastic growth over the last decades. Novel imaging techniques allow real-time in vivo study of nanoparticle accumulation kinetics at the level of the cell and targeted

  15. Rescue of Targeted Regions of Mammalian Chromosomes by in Vivo Recombination in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, Natalya; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Barrett, J. Carl; Larionov, Vladimir; Koi, Minoru

    1998-01-01

    In contrast to other animal cell lines, the chicken pre-B cell lymphoma line, DT40, exhibits a high level of homologous recombination, which can be exploited to generate site-specific alterations in defined target genes or regions. In addition, the ability to generate human/chicken monochromosomal hybrids in the DT40 cell line opens a way for specific targeting of human genes. Here we describe a new strategy for direct isolation of a human chromosomal region that is based on targeting of the chromosome with a vector containing a yeast selectable marker, centromere, and an ARS element. This procedure allows rescue of the targeted region by transfection of total genomic DNA into yeast spheroplasts. Selection for the yeast marker results in isolation of chromosome sequences in the form of large circular yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) up to 170 kb in size containing the targeted region. These YACs are generated by homologous recombination in yeast between common repeated sequences in the targeted chromosomal fragment. Alternatively, the targeted region can be rescued as a linear YACs when a YAC fragmentation vector is included in the yeast transformation mixture. Because the entire isolation procedure of the chromosomal region, once a target insertion is obtained, can be accomplished in ∼1 week, the new method greatly expands the utility of the homologous recombinationproficient DT40 chicken cell system. PMID:9647640

  16. Plasmodium glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: A potential malaria diagnostic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Robert G E; Hurdayal, Ramona; Choveaux, David; Przyborski, Jude M; Coetzer, Theresa H T; Goldring, J P Dean

    2017-08-01

    Malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are immunochromatographic tests detecting Plasmodial histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aldolase. HRP2 is only expressed by Plasmodium falciparum parasites and the protein is not expressed in several geographic isolates. LDH-based tests lack sensitivity compared to HRP2 tests. This study explored the potential of the Plasmodial glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), as a new malaria diagnostic biomarker. The P. falciparum and P. yoelii proteins were recombinantly expressed in BL21(DE3) Escherischia coli host cells and affinity purified. Two epitopes (CADGFLLIGEKKVSVFA and CAEKDPSQIPWGKCQV) specific to P. falciparum GAPDH and one common to all mammalian malaria species (CKDDTPIYVMGINH) were identified. Antibodies were raised in chickens against the two recombinant proteins and the three epitopes and affinity purified. The antibodies detected the native protein in parasite lysates as a 38 kDa protein and immunofluorescence verified a parasite cytosolic localization for the native protein. The antibodies suggested a 4-6 fold higher concentration of native PfGAPDH compared to PfLDH in immunoprecipitation and ELISA formats, consistent with published proteomic data. PfGAPDH shows interesting potential as a malaria diagnostic biomarker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Microwave Confocal Detection and Thermal Therapy for Breast Cancer: Adaptive Phased Array System for In-Vivo Mapping/Targeting Telomerase Activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    York, Robert

    2002-01-01

    .... The first area of research is developing biocompatible vectors with high microwave absorbing and scattering materials, enhancing in-vivo localization of target cells, where the activity of specific markers is present...

  18. Identification of Novel Plant Peroxisomal Targeting Signals by a Combination of Machine Learning Methods and in Vivo Subcellular Targeting Analyses[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingner, Thomas; Kataya, Amr R.; Antonicelli, Gerardo E.; Benichou, Aline; Nilssen, Kjersti; Chen, Xiong-Yan; Siemsen, Tanja; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Meinicke, Peter; Reumann, Sigrun

    2011-01-01

    In the postgenomic era, accurate prediction tools are essential for identification of the proteomes of cell organelles. Prediction methods have been developed for peroxisome-targeted proteins in animals and fungi but are missing specifically for plants. For development of a predictor for plant proteins carrying peroxisome targeting signals type 1 (PTS1), we assembled more than 2500 homologous plant sequences, mainly from EST databases. We applied a discriminative machine learning approach to derive two different prediction methods, both of which showed high prediction accuracy and recognized specific targeting-enhancing patterns in the regions upstream of the PTS1 tripeptides. Upon application of these methods to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, 392 gene models were predicted to be peroxisome targeted. These predictions were extensively tested in vivo, resulting in a high experimental verification rate of Arabidopsis proteins previously not known to be peroxisomal. The prediction methods were able to correctly infer novel PTS1 tripeptides, which even included novel residues. Twenty-three newly predicted PTS1 tripeptides were experimentally confirmed, and a high variability of the plant PTS1 motif was discovered. These prediction methods will be instrumental in identifying low-abundance and stress-inducible peroxisomal proteins and defining the entire peroxisomal proteome of Arabidopsis and agronomically important crop plants. PMID:21487095

  19. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of antitumor drug-loaded aptamer targeted single-walled carbon nanotubes system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hou, Lin; Jiao, Xiaojing; Yandan, Ji; Zhu, Xiali; Hongji, Li; Chen, Xiaozhe; Ren, Junxiao; Xia, Yadan; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-01-01

    A multifunctional tumor-targeting drug delivery system employing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as drug carriers, AS1411 as targeting ligand and doxorubicine (DOX) as a model chemotherapy drug was constructed. Firstly, SWCNT were modified with F68 (4.0 mg/ml) by ultrasonic dispersing technology due to the action of hydrophobic force and Van der Waals force, endowing SWCNT water dispersions and biocompatibility. Meanwhile, DOX could be easily absorbed on the surface of SWCNT by the π-π stacking, electrostatic adsorption and hydrophobic interactions. Finally, AS1411 was attached to the surface of DOX-SWCNT by the π-π stacking and electrostatic adsorption to obtain a tumor-targeting delivery system. Cellular uptake, anti-tumor effect in vitro and in vivo, cell cycle and apoptosis and biodistribution of AS1411-DOX-SWCNT were investigated, compared with the DOX solution. This AS1411-mediated DOX-loaded SWCNT (AS1411-DOX-SWCNT) delivery system not only retained both optical properties of SWCNT and cytotoxicity of DOX but also could accumulate in tumors, which facilitated combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy. AS1411-DOX-SWCNT could effectively promote DOX cellular uptake and then increase intracellular accumulation as a targeting delivery system. AS1411-DOX-SWCNT by NIR laser excited could trigger S phase arrest and the late stage apoptotic on PC3 cancer cells. The investigation in vivo further confirmed that this system possessed higher tumor targeting capacity and antitumor efficacy than DOX, especially with NIR laser irradiation.

  20. Introduction to the special issue: GIS-based mineral potential targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mahyar; Nykänen, Vesa

    2017-04-01

    Mineral potential targeting using geographical information system is an efficient technique to delimit a study area for further exploration of mineral deposits. This introduction presents an overview of the mineral potential modeling methods and future perspectives of research in the fields of target generation and summarizes the papers that have been incorporated into this Special Issue of the Journal of African Earth Sciences.

  1. In vivo ectopic implantation model to assess human mesenchymal progenitor cell potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarrategi, Ander; Perez-Tavarez, Raquel; Rodriguez-Milla, Miguel Angel; Cubillo, Isabel; Mulero, Francisca; Alfranca, Arantzazu; Lopez-Lacomba, Jose Luis; García-Castro, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Clinical interest on human mesenchymal progenitor cells (hMPC) relies on their potential applicability in cell-based therapies. An in vitro characterization is usually performed in order to define MPC potency. However, in vitro predictions not always correlate with in vivo results and thus there is no consensus in how to really assess cell potency. Our goal was to provide an in vivo testing method to define cell behavior before therapeutic usage, especially for bone tissue engineering applications. In this context, we wondered whether bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) would proceed in an osteogenic microenvironment. Based on previous approaches, we developed a fibrin/ceramic/BMP-2/hBMSCs compound. We implanted the compound during only 2 weeks in NOD-SCID mice, either orthotopically to assess its osteoinductive property or subcutaneously to analyze its adequacy as a cell potency testing method. Using fluorescent cell labeling and immunohistochemistry techniques, we could ascertain cell differentiation to bone, bone marrow, cartilage, adipocyte and fibrous tissue. We observed differences in cell potential among different batches of hBMSCs, which did not strictly correlate with in vitro analyses. Our data indicate that the method we have developed is reliable, rapid and reproducible to define cell potency, and may be useful for testing cells destined to bone tissue engineering purposes. Additionally, results obtained with hMPCs from other sources indicate that our method is suitable for testing any potentially implantable mesenchymal cell. Finally, we propose that this model could successfully be employed for bone marrow niche and bone tumor studies.

  2. p53 Abnormalities and Potential Therapeutic Targeting in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Teoh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available p53 abnormalities are regarded as an independent prognostic marker in multiple myeloma. Patients harbouring this genetic anomaly are commonly resistant to standard therapy. Thus, various p53 reactivating agents have been developed in order to restore its tumour suppressive abilities. Small molecular compounds, especially, have gained popularity in its efficacy against myeloma cells. For instance, promising preclinical results have steered both nutlin-3 and PRIMA-1 into phase I/II clinical trials. This review summarizes different modes of p53 inactivation in myeloma and highlights the current p53-based therapies that are being utilized in the clinic. Finally, we discuss the potential and promise that the novel small molecules possess for clinical application in improving the treatment outcome of myeloma.

  3. DTMiner: identification of potential disease targets through biomedical literature mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Zhang, Meizhuo; Xie, Yanping; Wang, Fan; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Kenny Q; Wei, Jia

    2016-12-01

    Biomedical researchers often search through massive catalogues of literature to look for potential relationships between genes and diseases. Given the rapid growth of biomedical literature, automatic relation extraction, a crucial technology in biomedical literature mining, has shown great potential to support research of gene-related diseases. Existing work in this field has produced datasets that are limited both in scale and accuracy. In this study, we propose a reliable and efficient framework that takes large biomedical literature repositories as inputs, identifies credible relationships between diseases and genes, and presents possible genes related to a given disease and possible diseases related to a given gene. The framework incorporates name entity recognition (NER), which identifies occurrences of genes and diseases in texts, association detection whereby we extract and evaluate features from gene-disease pairs, and ranking algorithms that estimate how closely the pairs are related. The F1-score of the NER phase is 0.87, which is higher than existing studies. The association detection phase takes drastically less time than previous work while maintaining a comparable F1-score of 0.86. The end-to-end result achieves a 0.259 F1-score for the top 50 genes associated with a disease, which performs better than previous work. In addition, we released a web service for public use of the dataset. The implementation of the proposed algorithms is publicly available at http://gdr-web.rwebox.com/public_html/index.php?page=download.php The web service is available at http://gdr-web.rwebox.com/public_html/index.php CONTACT: jenny.wei@astrazeneca.com or kzhu@cs.sjtu.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Lentiviral expression of GAD67 and CCK promoter-driven opsins to target interneurons in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantoan Ritter, Laura; Macdonald, Douglas C; Ritter, Georg; Escors, David; Chiara, Francesca; Cariboni, Anna; Schorge, Stephanie; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Collins, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate the activity of interneurons with optogenetic tools offers the possibility of interfering with diseases caused by altered neuronal inhibition and synchrony, including epilepsy and schizophrenia. To develop vectors for therapeutic approaches, targeting optogenetic constructs to interneurons is therefore a key requirement. We investigated whether the interneuron-specific promoters glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)67 and cholecystokinin (CCK) allowed targeted lentiviral delivery of opsins to interneurons as a whole, or specifically CCK+ interneurons. We generated lentiviral (LV) plasmids encoding channelrhodopsin (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR) tagged with fluorophores and driven by GAD67 or CCK promoters. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) and LV vectors carrying opsins driven by pyramidal cell promoters were used as controls. We transduced neuronal cultures and rodent brain in vivo, immunostained specimens 6-8 weeks after in vivo injection and 7-14 days after in vitro transduction, and evaluated volume and specificity of expression by confocal microscopy. In vitro, 90% (19/21) of LV-CCK-NpHR2.0-EYFP expressing neurons were CCK+. In vivo, LV-GAD67-ChR2-mCherry was expressed in 2.6% (5/193), LV-GAD67-NpHR2.0-EYFP in approximately 15% (43/279) and LV-CCK-NpHR2.0-EYFP in 47% (9/19) of hippocampal GABA+ interneurons. GAD67 vectors expressed in larger volumes than CCK-driven constructs. AAV vector controls achieved the largest expression volumes. LV-CCK-NpHR2.0-EYFP may be useful for targeting CCK+ interneurons in culture. GAD67/CCK-driven lentiviral constructs are expressed in vivo, although expression is not specific for interneurons. Overall, expression levels are low compared to opsins driven by pyramidal cell promoters. A better understanding of GAD67 and CCK promoter structure or alternative techniques is required to reliably target opsins to interneurons using viral vectors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Human memory CD8 T cell effector potential is epigenetically preserved during in vivo homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsamed, Hossam A; Moustaki, Ardiana; Fan, Yiping; Dogra, Pranay; Ghoneim, Hazem E; Zebley, Caitlin C; Triplett, Brandon M; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Youngblood, Ben

    2017-06-05

    Antigen-independent homeostasis of memory CD8 T cells is vital for sustaining long-lived T cell-mediated immunity. In this study, we report that maintenance of human memory CD8 T cell effector potential during in vitro and in vivo homeostatic proliferation is coupled to preservation of acquired DNA methylation programs. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of primary human naive, short-lived effector memory (TEM), and longer-lived central memory (TCM) and stem cell memory (TSCM) CD8 T cells identified effector molecules with demethylated promoters and poised for expression. Effector-loci demethylation was heritably preserved during IL-7- and IL-15-mediated in vitro cell proliferation. Conversely, cytokine-driven proliferation of TCM and TSCM memory cells resulted in phenotypic conversion into TEM cells and was coupled to increased methylation of the CCR7 and Tcf7 loci. Furthermore, haploidentical donor memory CD8 T cells undergoing in vivo proliferation in lymphodepleted recipients also maintained their effector-associated demethylated status but acquired TEM-associated programs. These data demonstrate that effector-associated epigenetic programs are preserved during cytokine-driven subset interconversion of human memory CD8 T cells. © 2017 Abdelsamed et al.

  6. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo anti-arthritic potential of Berberis calliobotrys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamgeer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was commenced to evaluate the anti-arthritic effect of 70% methanol extract and n-butanol and aqueous fractions of Berberis calliobotrys using both in vitro and in vivo arthritis models. Extract and fractions were investigated in vitro for inhibition of protein (bovine serum and egg albumin denaturation and human red blood cell membrane stabilization. In vivo anti-arthritic activity of extract and fractions at 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg was assessed using turpentine oil and formaldehyde-induced arthritis, while, 200 mg/kg dose was evaluated against complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced arthritis. B. calliobotrys produced significant (p<0.001 dose dependent inhibition of protein denaturation and human red blood cell membrane stabilization. In turpentine oil, formaldehyde and complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced arthritis models, B. calliobotrys significantly (p<0.001 reduced joint and paw swelling. B. calliobotrys markedly improved body weight, hematology profile, radiological and histopathological parameters in complete Freund’s adjuvant model. It could be concluded that B. calliobotrys holds anti-arthritic potential, supporting its traditional use in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. In vitro and in vivo germ line potential of stem cells derived from newborn mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W Dyce

    Full Text Available We previously reported that fetal porcine skin-derived stem cells were capable of differentiation into oocyte-like cells (OLCs. Here we report that newborn mice skin-derived stem cells are also capable of differentiating into early OLCs. Using stem cells from mice that are transgenic for Oct4 germline distal enhancer-GFP, germ cells resulting from their differentiation are expected to be GFP(+. After differentiation, some GFP(+ OLCs reached 40-45 µM and expressed oocyte markers. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that ∼ 0.3% of the freshly isolated skin cells were GFP(+. The GFP-positive cells increased to ∼ 7% after differentiation, suggesting that the GFP(+ cells could be of in vivo origin, but are more likely induced upon being cultured in vitro. To study the in vivo germ cell potential of skin-derived cells, they were aggregated with newborn ovarian cells, and transplanted under the kidney capsule of ovariectomized mice. GFP(+ oocytes were identified within a subpopulation of follicles in the resulting growth. Our finding that early oocytes can be differentiated from mice skin-derived cells in defined medium may offer a new in vitro model to study germ cell formation and oogenesis.

  8. Initiation of Targeted Nanodrug Delivery in Vivo by a Multifunctional Magnetic Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jianhua; Zhang, Yi; Dong, Zhirui; Jia, Jianbo; Zhu, Jiannan; Miao, Xiaoyuan; Yan, Bing

    2017-06-21

    Implant-mediated targeted drug delivery without an external magnetic field is very challenging. In this work, we report targeted nanodrug delivery initiated by a Fe3O4/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) implant scaffold with high magnetism. The implant scaffold is biocompatible and durable. It effectively attracts nanodrugs to its surface, thus killing cancer cells. These findings provide a proof of concept for the magnetic implant-directed nanodrug targeting without the need for an external magnetic field. This approach may further facilitate more precise medical treatments.

  9. Unintended Sunburn: A Potential Target for Sun Protection Messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine F. H. McLeod

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New Zealand (NZ has the highest melanoma incidence rate in the world. Primary prevention efforts focus on reducing sunburn incidence and increasing sun protective practices in the population. However, sunburn from excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR remains common. To reduce sunburn incidence, it is important to examine those individuals who experience unintended sunburn. This study aims to use data from the NZ Triennial Sun Protection Survey to describe respondents who were not intending to tan but were sunburnt after outdoor UVR exposure. Information on sociodemographics, concurrent weather conditions, sun protection attitudes and knowledge, and outdoor behaviour was also collected. The results showed 13.5% of respondents’ experienced unintended sunburn during the survey weekend but had not attempted to obtain a tan that summer. Respondents who reported unintended sunburn were more likely than others to have been near water and in unshaded areas, used sunscreen, had higher SunSmart knowledge scores, had lower positive attitudes towards tanning, and were outdoors for a longer duration with less body coverage. As sunburn was unintended these respondents’ outdoor sun protective behaviours may be amenable to change. Future public health initiatives should focus on increasing sun protection (clothing and shade and reducing potential barriers to sun protection.

  10. The Woman's Heart: Insights into New Potential Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfrilli, Daniele; Pofi, Ricardo; Feola, Tiziana; Lenzi, Andrea; Giannetta, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an increasingly common cause of death in women. There is as yet no consensus on the analysis of cardiovascular risk factors with regard to the specific, personalised treatment of pre- and post-menopausal women. Clinically significant cardioprotective and antiremodelling effects have been observed in animal and human studies exploring chronic inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5). The relationship between the heart, estrogens and PDE5 inhibitors (PDE5is) remains unclear. Experimental data suggest potential beneficial effects on cardiac geometry, function, endothelial function and microvascular coronary flow in women. It was recently postulated that the efficacy of PDE5is is estrogen-dependent in female heart disease. A registered randomised, placebo-controlled study, RECOGITO (NCT01803828), aimed at identifying the genderspecific efficacy of long-term PDE5 inhibition in diabetic cardiomyopathy, is currently recruiting patients. Estrogen receptor modulation could be a new promising approach to heart protection via PDE5is. PDE5is could be indicated as a gender-oriented strategy in modulated cardiac dysfunction and remodelling and in cardiac risk factors for selected cardiovascular diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Targeting distinct myeloid cell populations in vivo using polymers, liposomes and microbubbles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ergen, C.; Heymann, F.; Al Rawashdeh, W.; Gremse, F.; Bartneck, M.; Panzer, U.; Pola, Robert; Pechar, Michal; Storm, G.; Mohr, N.; Barz, M.; Zentel, R.; Kiessling, F.; Trautwein, C.; Lammers, T.; Tacke, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 114, January (2017), s. 106-120 ISSN 0142-9612 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : targeted delivery * nanomedicine * macrophages Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 8.402, year: 2016

  12. Targeting B16 tumors in vivo with peptide-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan; Bekah, Devesh; Teodoro, Jose G.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and peptide conjugation on the biodistribution of ultrasmall (2.7 nm) gold nanoparticles in mice bearing B16 melanoma allografts. Nanoparticles were delivered intravenously, and biodistribution was measured at specific timepoints by organ digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. All major organs were examined. Two peptides were tested: the cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD, which targets integrins); and a recently described peptide derived from the myxoma virus. We found the greatest specific tumor delivery using the myxoma peptide, with or without PEGylation. Un-PEGylated cRGD performed poorly, but PEGylated RGD showed a significant transient collection in the tumor. Liver and kidney were the primary targets of all constructs. None of the particles were able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although it was able to deliver Au to B16 cells, the myxoma peptide did not show any cytotoxic activity against these cells, in contrast to previous reports. These results indicate that the effect of passive targeting by PEGylation and active targeting by peptides can be independent or combined, and that they should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis when designing new nanosystems for targeted therapies. Both myxoma peptide and cRGD should be considered for specific targeting to melanoma, but a thorough investigation of the cytotoxicity of the myxoma peptide to different cell lines remains to be performed.

  13. Assessing the neuronal serotonergic target-based antidepressant stratagem: impact of in vivo interaction studies and knockout models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, R; Mahesh, R

    2008-09-01

    Depression remains a challenge in the field of affective neuroscience, despite a steady research progress. Six out of nine basic antidepressant mechanisms rely on serotonin neurotransmitter system. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the significance of serotonin receptors (5-HT(1-3,6,7)), its signal transduction pathways and classical down stream targets (including neurotrophins, neurokinins, other peptides and their receptors) in antidepressant drug action. Serotonergic control of depression embraces the recent molecular requirements such as influence on proliferation, neurogenesis, plasticity, synaptic (re)modeling and transmission in the central nervous system. The present progress report analyses the credibility of each protein as therapeutically relevant target of depression. In vivo interaction studies and knockout models which identified these targets are foreseen to unearth new ligands and help them transform to drug candidates. The importance of the antidepressant assay selection at the preclinical level using salient animal models/assay systems is discussed. Such test batteries would definitely provide antidepressants with faster onset, efficacy in resistant (and co-morbid) types and with least adverse effects. Apart from the selective ligands, only those molecules which bring an overall harmony, by virtue of their affinities to various receptor subtypes, could qualify as effective antidepressants. Synchronised modulation of various serotonergic sub-pathways is the basis for a unique and balanced antidepressant profile, as that of fluoxetine (most exploited antidepressant) and such a profile may be considered as a template for the upcoming antidepressants. In conclusion, 5-HT based multi-targeted antidepressant drug discovery supported by in vivo interaction studies and knockout models is advocated as a strategy to provide classic molecules for clinical trials.

  14. Antibody-directed double suicide gene therapy targeting of MUC1- positive leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Ya; Wang, Wen-Qian; Zhao, Yu; Li, Xu-Dong; Fang, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Dong-Jun; Xiao, Ruo-Zhi; Huang, Ren-Wei; Pan, Guang-Jin; Liu, Jia-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Our aim was to specifically transfer the cytosine deaminase (CD) and thymidine kinase (TK) genes into mucin 1 (MUC1)-positive leukemia cells by anti-MUC1 antibody directed infection of replication-defective lentivirus and to evaluate the targeted cytotoxicity of double suicide genes to leukemia. The target gene vector (containing CD and TK) and envelope (containing GFP and anti-MUC1) and packaging plasmids were cotransfected into 293T cells to produce the recombinant lentivirus. Suicide genes in virus-infected leukemia cells (U937, Jurkat, and K562) were detected by western blot. The cytotoxicity and bystander effect in vitro and the therapeutic effect in vivo were detected after treatment with the prodrugs. The results revealed that combined treatment with prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and ganciclovir (GCV) inhibited leukemia cell growth and caused significant bystander effect than treatment with either prodrug alone. TK/GCV treatment alone induced degeneration and cell death while the effect of CD/5-FC alone mainly caused vacuolar degeneration and necrosis. The addictive effects of combinatorial use of GCV and 5-FC mainly induced swelling of the mitochondria followed by necrosis of the leukemia cells. In vivo experiments revealed that both single and combinatorial prodrug treatments could prolong the survival time of leukemic mice. In summary, anti-MUC1 antibody directed lentiviral vector successfully transduced dual suicide genes and exerted targeted cytotoxicity against MUC1 positive leukemia cells. This targeted lentiviral dual suicide gene delivering system provides a promising approach for clinical treatment of leukemia in future.

  15. Ex vivo confocal imaging with contrast agents for the detection of oral potentially malignant lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hallani, S; Poh, C F; Macaulay, C E; Follen, M; Guillaud, M; Lane, P

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the potential use of real-time confocal microscopy in the non-invasive detection of occult oral potentially malignant lesions. Our objectives were to select the best fluorescence contrast agent for cellular morphology enhancement, to build an atlas of confocal microscopic images of normal human oral mucosa, and to determine the accuracy of confocal microscopy to recognize oral high-grade dysplasia lesions on live human tissue. Five clinically used fluorescent contrast agents were tested in vitro on cultured human cells and validated ex vivo on human oral mucosa. Images acquired ex vivo from normal and diseased human oral biopsies with bench-top fluorescent confocal microscope were compared to conventional histology. Image analyzer software was used as an adjunct tool to objectively compare high-grade dysplasia versus low-grade dysplasia and normal epithelium. Acriflavine Hydrochloride provided the best cellular contrast by preferentially staining the nuclei of the epithelium. Using topical application of Acriflavine Hydrochloride followed by confocal microscopy, we could define morphological characteristics of each cellular layer of the normal human oral mucosa, building an atlas of histology-like images. Applying this technique to diseased oral tissue specimen, we were also able to accurately diagnose the presence of high-grade dysplasia through the increased cellularity and changes in nuclear morphological features. Objective measurement of cellular density by quantitative image analysis was a strong discriminant to differentiate between high-grade dysplasia and low-grade dysplasia lesions. Pending clinical investigation, real-time confocal microscopy may become a useful adjunct to detect precancerous lesions that are at high risk of cancer progression, direct biopsy and delineate excision margins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. In vivo imaging of tumour xenografts with an antibody targeting the potassium channel Kv10.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napp, Joanna; Pardo, Luis A; Hartung, Franziska; Tietze, Lutz F; Stühmer, Walter; Alves, Frauke

    2016-10-01

    The Kv10.1 (Eag1) voltage-gated potassium channel represents a promising molecular target for novel cancer therapies or diagnostic purposes. Physiologically, it is only expressed in the brain, but it was found overexpressed in more than 70 % of tumours of diverse origin. Furthermore, as a plasma membrane protein, it is easily accessible to extracellular interventions. In this study we analysed the feasibility of the anti-Kv10.1 monoclonal antibody mAb62 to target tumour cells in vitro and in vivo and to deliver therapeutics to the tumour. Using time-domain near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging in a subcutaneous MDA-MB-435S tumour model in nude mice, we showed that mAb62-Cy5.5 specifically accumulates at the tumour for at least 1 week in vivo with a maximum intensity at 48 h. Blocking experiments with an excess of unlabelled mAb62 and application of the free Cy5.5 fluorophore demonstrate specific binding to the tumour. Ex vivo NIRF imaging of whole tumours as well as NIRF imaging and microscopy of tumour slices confirmed the accumulation of the mAb62-Cy5.5 in tumours but not in brain tissue. Moreover, mAb62 was conjugated to the prodrug-activating enzyme β-D-galactosidase (β-gal; mAb62-β-gal). The β-gal activity of the mAb62-β-gal conjugate was analysed in vitro on Kv10.1-expressing MDA-MB-435S cells in comparison to control AsPC-1 cells. We show that the mAb62-β-gal conjugate possesses high β-gal activity when bound to Kv10.1-expressing MDA-MB-435S cells. Moreover, using the β-gal activatable NIRF probe DDAOG, we detected mAb62-β-gal activity in vivo over the tumour area. In summary, we could show that the anti-Kv10.1 antibody is a promising tool for the development of novel concepts of targeted cancer therapy.

  17. In vivo targeted molecular magnetic resonance imaging of free radicals in diabetic cardiomyopathy within mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, R A; Smith, N; Saunders, D; Carrizales, J; Lupu, F; Silasi-Mansat, R; Ehrenshaft, M; Mason, R P

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. We present a method for in vivo observation of free radical events within murine diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study reports on in vivo imaging of protein/lipid radicals using molecular MRI (mMRI) and immuno-spin trapping (IST) in diabetic cardiac muscle. To detect free radicals in diabetic cardiomyopathy, streptozotocin (STZ)-exposed mice were given 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and administered an anti-DMPO probe (biotin-anti-DMPO antibody-albumin-Gd-DTPA). For controls, non-diabetic mice were given DMPO (non-disease control), and administered an anti-DMPO probe; or diabetic mice were given DMPO but administered a non-specific IgG contrast agent instead of the anti-DMPO probe. DMPO administration started at 7 weeks following STZ treatment for 5 days, and the anti-DMPO probe was administered at 8 weeks for MRI detection. MRI was used to detect a significant increase (p radicals in cardiac tissue than non-diabetic mice.

  18. Robotic Automation of In Vivo Two-Photon Targeted Whole-Cell Patch-Clamp Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annecchino, Luca A; Morris, Alexander R; Copeland, Caroline S; Agabi, Oshiorenoya E; Chadderton, Paul; Schultz, Simon R

    2017-08-30

    Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiological recording is a powerful technique for studying cellular function. While in vivo patch-clamp recording has recently benefited from automation, it is normally performed "blind," meaning that throughput for sampling some genetically or morphologically defined cell types is unacceptably low. One solution to this problem is to use two-photon microscopy to target fluorescently labeled neurons. Combining this with robotic automation is difficult, however, as micropipette penetration induces tissue deformation, moving target cells from their initial location. Here we describe a platform for automated two-photon targeted patch-clamp recording, which solves this problem by making use of a closed loop visual servo algorithm. Our system keeps the target cell in focus while iteratively adjusting the pipette approach trajectory to compensate for tissue motion. We demonstrate platform validation with patch-clamp recordings from a variety of cells in the mouse neocortex and cerebellum. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Placental Nano-vesicles Target to Specific Organs and Modulate Vascular Tone In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mancy; Stanley, Joanna L; Chen, Q; James, Joanna L; Stone, Peter R; Chamley, Larry W

    2017-11-01

    How do nano-vesicles extruded from normal first trimester human placentae affect maternal vascular function? Placental nano-vesicles affect the ability of systemic mesenteric arteries to undergo endothelium- and nitric oxide- (NO-) dependent vasodilation in vivo in pregnant mice. Dramatic cardiovascular adaptations occur during human pregnancy, including a substantial decrease in total peripheral resistance in the first trimester. The human placenta constantly extrudes extracellular vesicles that can enter the maternal circulation and these vesicles may play an important role in feto-maternal communication. Human placental nano-vesicles were administered into CD1 mice via a tail vein and their localization and vascular effects at 30 min and 24 h post-injection were investigated. Nano-vesicles from normal first trimester human placentae were collected and administered into pregnant (D12.5) or non-pregnant female mice. After either 30 min or 24 h of exposure, all major organs were dissected for imaging (n = 7 at each time point) while uterine and mesenteric arteries were dissected for wire myography (n = 6 at each time point). Additional in vitro studies using HMEC-1 endothelial cells were also conducted to investigate the kinetics of interaction between placental nano-vesicles and endothelial cells. Nano-vesicles from first trimester human placentae localized to the lungs, liver and kidneys 24 h after injection into pregnant mice (n = 7). Exposure of pregnant mice to placental nano-vesicles for 30 min in vivo increased the vasodilatory response of mesenteric arteries to acetylcholine, while exposure for 24 h had the opposite effect (P nano-vesicles did not affect the function of uterine arteries or mesenteric arteries from non-pregnant mice. Placental nano-vesicles rapidly interacted with endothelial cells via a combination of phagocytosis, endocytosis and cell surface binding in vitro. N/A. As it is not ethical to administer labelled placental nano-vesicles to

  20. Preparation of novel butyryl galactose ester-modified coix component microemulsions and evaluation on hepatoma-targeting in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming Jian; Qu, Ding; Chen, Yan; Liu, Cong Yan; Liu, Yu Ping; Ding, Xue Fang

    2016-11-01

    The butyryl galactose ester-modified coix component microemulsions (But-Gal-CMEs) was developed for enhanced liver tumor-specific targeting. The study was aimed to evaluate the hepatoma-targeting potential of But-Gal-CMEs in vitro and in vivo. But-Gal-CMEs with a uniform spherical shape exhibited a small particle size (56.68 ± 0.07 nm), a narrow polydispersity (PDI, 0.144 ± 0.005) and slightly negative surface charge (-0.102 ± 0.008 mV). In the cell uptake studies, But-Gal-CMEs showed a significant enhancement on the intracellular fluorescent intensity on HepG2 cells model, which was 1.93-fold higher relative to coix component microemulsions (CMEs). The IC50 of But-Gal-CMEs against HepG2 cells was 64.250 μg/mL, which was notably stronger than that of CMEs. In the cell apoptosis studies, compared with CMEs, But-Gal-CMEs (50 μg/mL) treatment resulted in a 1.34-fold rise in total apoptosis cells of HepG2. In the biodistribution studies in vivo, the intratumorous fluorescence of Cy5-loaded But-Gal-CMEs was 1.43-fold higher relative to that of Cy5-loaded CMEs, suggesting an obviously enhanced accumulation in the tumor sites. Taken as together, But-Gal could be incorporated into the coix component microemulsions as a novel ligand for realizing hepatoma-targeting drugs delivery.

  1. Gene expression profiling using nanostring digital RNA counting to identify potential target antigens for melanoma immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Rachel E; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Rosati, Shannon F; Zheng, Zhili; Wunderlich, John R; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2013-09-15

    The success of immunotherapy for the treatment of metastatic cancer is contingent on the identification of appropriate target antigens. Potential targets must be expressed on tumors but show restricted expression on normal tissues. To maximize patient eligibility, ideal target antigens should be expressed on a high percentage of tumors within a histology and, potentially, in multiple different malignancies. A Nanostring probeset was designed containing 97 genes, 72 of which are considered potential candidate genes for immunotherapy. Five established melanoma cell lines, 59 resected metastatic melanoma tumors, and 31 normal tissue samples were profiled and analyzed using Nanostring technology. Of the 72 potential target genes, 33 were overexpressed in more than 20% of studied melanoma tumor samples. Twenty of those genes were identified as differentially expressed between normal tissues and tumor samples by ANOVA analysis. Analysis of normal tissue gene expression identified seven genes with limited normal tissue expression that warrant further consideration as potential immunotherapy target antigens: CSAG2, MAGEA3, MAGEC2, IL13RA2, PRAME, CSPG4, and SOX10. These genes were highly overexpressed on a large percentage of the studied tumor samples, with expression in a limited number of normal tissue samples at much lower levels. The application of Nanostring RNA counting technology was used to directly quantitate the gene expression levels of multiple potential tumor antigens. Analysis of cell lines, 59 tumors, and normal tissues identified seven potential immunotherapy targets for the treatment of melanoma that could increase the number of patients potentially eligible for adoptive immunotherapy. ©2013 AACR.

  2. Evaluating the Efficacy of ERG Targeted Therapy in vivo for Prostate Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Eilertsen. Favorable outcomes in locally advanced and node positive prostate cancer patients treated with combined pelvic IMRT and androgen deprivation...G. Pomper, Ashley Ross. Study of PSMA-targeted 18F-DCFPyL PET/CT in the Evaluation of Men with an Elevated PSA Following Radical Prostatectomy

  3. Targeted Dual-Modality Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: An Ex Vivo Kidney Perfusion Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekman, M.C.H.; Boerman, O.C.; Weijert, M. de; Bos, D.L.; Oosterwijk, E.; Langenhuijsen, H.F.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Rijpkema, M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Antibodies labeled with both a near-infrared fluorescent dye and a radionuclide can be used for tumor-targeted intraoperative dual-modality imaging. Girentuximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody against carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), an antigen expressed in 95% of clear cell renal cell

  4. Bacteroidales Secreted Antimicrobial Proteins Target Surface Molecules Necessary for Gut Colonization and Mediate Competition In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Kevin G; Coyne, Michael J; Gentyala, Rahul R; Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Comstock, Laurie E

    2016-08-23

    We recently showed that human gut Bacteroidales species secrete antimicrobial proteins (BSAPs), and we characterized in vitro the first such BSAP produced by Bacteroides fragilis In this study, we identified a second potent BSAP produced by the ubiquitous and abundant human gut species Bacteroides uniformis The two BSAPs contain a membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain but share very little sequence similarity. We identified the target molecules of BSAP-sensitive cells and showed that each BSAP targets a different class of surface molecule: BSAP-1 targets an outer membrane protein of sensitive B. fragilis strains, and BSAP-2 targets the O-antigen glycan of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of sensitive B. uniformis strains. Species-wide genomic and phenotypic analyses of B. fragilis and B. uniformis showed that BSAP-producing strains circumvent killing by synthesizing an orthologous nontargeted surface molecule. The BSAP genes are adjacent to the gene(s) encoding their target replacements, suggesting coacquisition. Using a gnotobiotic mouse competitive-colonization model, we found that the BSAP surface targets are important for colonization of the mammalian gut, thereby explaining why they are maintained in sensitive strains and why they were replaced rather than deleted in BSAP-producing strains. Using isogenic BSAP-producing, -sensitive, and -resistant strains, we show that a BSAP-producing strain outcompetes a sensitive strain but not a resistant strain in the mammalian gut. Human gut metagenomic datasets reveal that BSAP-1-sensitive strains do not cooccur with BSAP-1-producing strains in human gut microbiotas, further supporting the idea that BSAPs are important competitive factors with relevance to the strain-level composition of the human gut microbiota. We know relatively little about the ecology of the human intestinal microbiota and the combination of factors that dictate which strains and species occupy an individual's gut microbial community

  5. Polymeric immunonanoparticles for active tumor targeting: preparation, characterization and "in vivo" evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Cirstoiu, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    L'objectif de cette thèse a été de développer et d'évaluer l'efficacité d'un nouveau traitement du cancer ovarien par ciblage actif de la tumeur, en utilisant des immunonanoparticules polymériques biodégradables chargées en paclitaxel. Dans un premier temps, on a mis au point des immunonanoparticules fonctionnalisées en surface par des anticorps monoclonaux: Herceptin® (trastuzumab, anti-HER2). Ensuite, des études in vitro et in vivo ont été menées pour déterminer l'efficacité de cette nouvel...

  6. Targeted in vivo inhibition of specific protein-protein interactions using recombinant antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Zábrady

    Full Text Available With the growing availability of genomic sequence information, there is an increasing need for gene function analysis. Antibody-mediated "silencing" represents an intriguing alternative for the precise inhibition of a particular function of biomolecules. Here, we describe a method for selecting recombinant antibodies with a specific purpose in mind, which is to inhibit intrinsic protein-protein interactions in the cytosol of plant cells. Experimental procedures were designed for conveniently evaluating desired properties of recombinant antibodies in consecutive steps. Our selection method was successfully used to develop a recombinant antibody inhibiting the interaction of ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEIN 3 with such of its upstream interaction partners as the receiver domain of CYTOKININ INDEPENDENT HISTIDINE KINASE 1. The specific down-regulation of the cytokinin signaling pathway in vivo demonstrates the validity of our approach. This selection method can serve as a prototype for developing unique recombinant antibodies able to interfere with virtually any biomolecule in the living cell.

  7. Equol an isoflavonoid: potential for improved prostate health, in vitro and in vivo evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background To determine: in vitro binding affinity of equol for 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5alpha-DHT), in vitro effects of equol treatment in human prostate cancer (LNCap) cells, and in vivo effects of equol on rat prostate weight and circulating levels of sex steroid hormones. Methods First, in vitro equol binding affinity for 5alpha-DHT was determined using 14C5alpha-DHT combined with cold 5alpha-DHT (3.0 nM in all samples). These steroids were incubated with increasing concentrations of equol (0-2,000 nM) and analyzed by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. 14C5alpha-DHT peak/profiles were determined by scintillation counting of column fractions. Using the 14C5alpha-DHT peak (0 nM equol) as a reference standard, a binding curve was generated by quantifying shifts in the 14C5alpha-DHT peaks as equol concentrations increased. Second, equol's in vitro effects on LNCap cells were determined by culturing cells (48 hours) in the presence of increasing concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (vehicle-control), 5alpha-DHT, equol or 5alpha-DHT+equol. Following culture, prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels were quantified via ELISA. Finally, the in vivo effects of equol were tested in sixteen male Long-Evans rats fed a low isoflavone diet. From 190-215 days, animals received 0.1cc s.c. injections of either DMSO-control vehicle (n = 8) or 1.0 mg/kg (body weight) of equol (in DMSO) (n = 8). At 215 days, body and prostate weights were recorded, trunk blood was collected and serum assayed for luteinizing hormone (LH), 5alpha-DHT, testosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels. Results Maximum and half maximal equol binding to 5alpha-DHT occurred at approximately 100 nM and 4.8 nM respectively. LNCap cells cultured in the presence of 5alpha-DHT significantly increased PSA levels. However, in the presence of 5alpha-DHT+equol, equol blocked the significant increases in PSA levels from LNCap cells. In vivo equol treatment significantly decreased rat prostate weights and serum

  8. iEquol an isoflavonoid: potential for improved prostate health, in vitro and in vivo evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamaker Amy N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine: in vitro binding affinity of equol for 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5alpha-DHT, in vitro effects of equol treatment in human prostate cancer (LNCap cells, and in vivo effects of equol on rat prostate weight and circulating levels of sex steroid hormones. Methods First, in vitro equol binding affinity for 5alpha-DHT was determined using 14C5alpha-DHT combined with cold 5alpha-DHT (3.0 nM in all samples. These steroids were incubated with increasing concentrations of equol (0-2,000 nM and analyzed by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. 14C5alpha-DHT peak/profiles were determined by scintillation counting of column fractions. Using the 14C5alpha-DHT peak (0 nM equol as a reference standard, a binding curve was generated by quantifying shifts in the 14C5alpha-DHT peaks as equol concentrations increased. Second, equol's in vitro effects on LNCap cells were determined by culturing cells (48 hours in the presence of increasing concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO (vehicle-control, 5alpha-DHT, equol or 5alpha-DHT+equol. Following culture, prostate specific antigen (PSA levels were quantified via ELISA. Finally, the in vivo effects of equol were tested in sixteen male Long-Evans rats fed a low isoflavone diet. From 190-215 days, animals received 0.1cc s.c. injections of either DMSO-control vehicle (n = 8 or 1.0 mg/kg (body weight of equol (in DMSO (n = 8. At 215 days, body and prostate weights were recorded, trunk blood was collected and serum assayed for luteinizing hormone (LH, 5alpha-DHT, testosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels. Results Maximum and half maximal equol binding to 5alpha-DHT occurred at approximately 100 nM and 4.8 nM respectively. LNCap cells cultured in the presence of 5alpha-DHT significantly increased PSA levels. However, in the presence of 5alpha-DHT+equol, equol blocked the significant increases in PSA levels from LNCap cells. In vivo equol treatment significantly decreased rat prostate

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: a potential target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Karli; Malik, Bilal; Gray, Anna L; La Spada, Albert R; Hanna, Michael G; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Greensmith, Linda

    2014-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked degenerative motor neuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion in the polyglutamine encoding CAG repeat of the androgen receptor gene. There is evidence implicating endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease, including polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease and in motor neuron disease, where cellular stress disrupts functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to induction of the unfolded protein response. We examined whether endoplasmic reticulum stress is also involved in the pathogenesis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice that carry 100 pathogenic polyglutamine repeats in the androgen receptor, and develop a late-onset neuromuscular phenotype with motor neuron degeneration, were studied. We observed a disturbance in endoplasmic reticulum-associated calcium homeostasis in cultured embryonic motor neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice, which was accompanied by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress reduced the endoplasmic reticulum-associated cell death pathway. Examination of spinal cord motor neurons of pathogenic mice at different disease stages revealed elevated expression of markers for endoplasmic reticulum stress, confirming an increase in this stress response in vivo. Importantly, the most significant increase was detected presymptomatically, suggesting that endoplasmic reticulum stress may play an early and possibly causal role in disease pathogenesis. Our results therefore indicate that the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway could potentially be a therapeutic target for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and related polyglutamine diseases. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  10. Human ex-vivo action potential model for pro-arrhythmia risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Guy; Ratchada, Phachareeya; Miron, Yannick; Steiner, Guido; Ghetti, Andre; Miller, Paul E; Reynolds, Jack A; Wang, Ken; Greiter-Wilke, Andrea; Polonchuk, Liudmila; Traebert, Martin; Gintant, Gary A; Abi-Gerges, Najah

    2016-01-01

    While current S7B/E14 guidelines have succeeded in protecting patients from QT-prolonging drugs, the absence of a predictive paradigm identifying pro-arrhythmic risks has limited the development of valuable drug programs. We investigated if a human ex-vivo action potential (AP)-based model could provide a more predictive approach for assessing pro-arrhythmic risk in man. Human ventricular trabeculae from ethically consented organ donors were used to evaluate the effects of dofetilide, d,l-sotalol, quinidine, paracetamol and verapamil on AP duration (APD) and recognized pro-arrhythmia predictors (short-term variability of APD at 90% repolarization (STV(APD90)), triangulation (ADP90-APD30) and incidence of early afterdepolarizations at 1 and 2Hz to quantitatively identify the pro-arrhythmic risk. Each drug was blinded and tested separately with 3 concentrations in triplicate trabeculae from 5 hearts, with one vehicle time control per heart. Electrophysiological stability of the model was not affected by sequential applications of vehicle (0.1% dimethyl sulfoxide). Paracetamol and verapamil did not significantly alter anyone of the AP parameters and were classified as devoid of pro-arrhythmic risk. Dofetilide, d,l-sotalol and quinidine exhibited an increase in the manifestation of pro-arrhythmia markers. The model provided quantitative and actionable activity flags and the relatively low total variability in tissue response allowed for the identification of pro-arrhythmic signals. Power analysis indicated that a total of 6 trabeculae derived from 2 hearts are sufficient to identify drug-induced pro-arrhythmia. Thus, the human ex-vivo AP-based model provides an integrative translational assay assisting in shaping clinical development plans that could be used in conjunction with the new CiPA-proposed approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Significant mucosal sIgA production after a single oral or parenteral administration using in vivo CD40 targeting in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Ko; Chen, Chang-Hsin; Vuong, Christine N; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Waghela, Suryakant D; Mwangi, Waithaka; Bielke, Lisa R; Hargis, Billy M; Berghman, Luc R

    2016-10-01

    Many pathogens enter the host through mucosal surfaces and spread rapidly via the circulation. The most effective way to prevent disease is to establish mucosal and systemic immunity against the pathogen. However, current vaccination programs in poultry industry require repeated administrations of live-attenuated virus or large amounts (10 to 100μg) of antigen together with adjuvant to induce specific secretory IgA immune responses at the mucosal effector sites. In the present study, we show that a single administration of 0.4μg of oligopeptide complexed with an agonistic anti-chicken CD40 (chCD40) monoclonal antibody (Mab) effectively targets antigen-presenting cells of the bird's mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue in vivo, and induces peptide-specific secretory IgA (sIgA) in the trachea 7days post administration. Anti-chCD40 Mab-peptide complex was administered once to four-week old male Leghorns via various mucosal routes (orally, via cloacal drinking, or oculo-nasally) or via subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization. Immunization through any of the three mucosal induction routes induced significant peptide-specific mucosal sIgA responses 7 and 14days after immunization. Interestingly, s.c. injection of the complex also induced mucosal sIgA. Our data suggest in vivo targeting of CD40 as a potential adjuvant platform, particularly for the purpose of enhancing and speeding up mucosal vaccine responses in chickens, and potentially other food animals. This is the first study able to elicit specific sIgA immune responses in remote mucosal sites with a single administration of only 0.4μg of antigen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification and Characterization of Genes Involved in Leishmania Pathogenesis: The Potential for Drug Target Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Duncan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and characterizing Leishmania donovani genes and the proteins they encode for their role in pathogenesis can reveal the value of this approach for finding new drug targets. Effective drug targets are likely to be proteins differentially expressed or required in the amastigote life cycle stage found in the patient. Several examples and their potential for chemotherapeutic disruption are presented. A pathway nearly ubiquitous in living cells targeted by anticancer drugs, the ubiquitin system, is examined. New findings in ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers in Leishmania show how disruption of those pathways could point to additional drug targets. The programmed cell death pathway, now recognized among protozoan parasites, is reviewed for some of its components and evidence that suggests they could be targeted for antiparasitic drug therapy. Finally, the endoplasmic reticulum quality control system is involved in secretion of many virulence factors. How disruptions in this pathway reduce virulence as evidence for potential drug targets is presented.

  13. Melanin-manganese nanoparticles with ultrahigh efficient clearance in vivo for tumor-targeting T1magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Sun, Jinghua; Li, Liping; Peng, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Ruiping; Wang, Binquan

    2017-12-19

    Endogenous biomaterials in organisms, with native biocompatibility and biodegradability, appear more advantageous in the development of nanoscale diagnostic and therapeutic systems for future clinical translation. Herein, a novel tumor-targeting Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent was developed based on Mn 2+ -chelating ultrasmall water-soluble melanin nanoparticles (MNP-PEG-Mn). The nanoparticles, with a size of about 5.6 nm, presented high chelation stability and showed negligible cytotoxicity as estimated by MTT assay. Moreover, the r 1 longitudinal relaxivity (20.56 mM -1 s -1 ) of MNP-PEG-Mn was much higher than that of Gadodiamide (6.00 mM -1 s -1 ), which is a clinically approved MRI contrast agent. In vivo MRI experiments revealed excellent tumor-targeting specificity after tumor-bearing mice were intravenously injected with MNP-PEG-Mn. Additionally, MNP-PEG-Mn could be excreted via renal and hepatobiliary pathways with negligible toxicity to body tissues. These preliminary results indicated the clinically translatable potential of MNP-PEG-Mn as a T 1 MRI contrast agent for tumor-targeted imaging.

  14. Ulex europaeus 1 lectin targets microspheres to mouse Peyer's patch M-cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, N; Clark, M A; Jepson, M A; Hirst, B H

    1998-03-01

    The interaction of latex microspheres with mouse Peyer's patch membranous M-cells was studied in a mouse gut loop model after the microspheres were coated with a variety of agents. Carboxylated microspheres (diameter 0.5 micron) were covalently coated with lectins Ulex europaeus 1, Concanavalin A, Euonymus europaeus and Bandeiraea simplicifolia 1 isolectin-B4, human immunoglobulin A or bovine serum albumin. Of the treatments examined, only Ulex europaeus (UEA1) resulted in significant selective binding of microspheres to M-cells. UEA1-coated microspheres bound to M-cells at a level 100-fold greater than BSA-coated microspheres, but binding to enterocytes was unaffected. Incubation of UEA1-coated microspheres with alpha-L-fucose reduced M-cell binding to a level comparable with BSA-coated microspheres. This indicated that targeting by UEA1 was via a carbohydrate receptor on the M-cell surface. Adherence of UEA1-coated microspheres to M-cells occurred within 10 min of inoculation into mouse gut loops and UEA1-coated microspheres were transported to 10 microns below the apical surface of M-cells within 60 min of inoculation. UEA1-coated microspheres also targeted mouse Peyer's patch M-cells after intragastric administration. These results demonstrated that altering the surface chemistry of carboxylated polystyrene microspheres increased M-cell targeting, suggesting a strategy to enhance delivery of vaccine antigens to the mucosal immune system.

  15. PharmMapper 2017 update: a web server for potential drug target identification with a comprehensive target pharmacophore database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Shen, Yihang; Wang, Shiwei; Li, Shiliang; Zhang, Weilin; Liu, Xiaofeng; Lai, Luhua; Pei, Jianfeng; Li, Honglin

    2017-05-03

    The PharmMapper online tool is a web server for potential drug target identification by reversed pharmacophore matching the query compound against an in-house pharmacophore model database. The original version of PharmMapper includes more than 7000 target pharmacophores derived from complex crystal structures with corresponding protein target annotations. In this article, we present a new version of the PharmMapper web server, of which the backend pharmacophore database is six times larger than the earlier one, with a total of 23 236 proteins covering 16 159 druggable pharmacophore models and 51 431 ligandable pharmacophore models. The expanded target data cover 450 indications and 4800 molecular functions compared to 110 indications and 349 molecular functions in our last update. In addition, the new web server is united with the statistically meaningful ranking of the identified drug targets, which is achieved through the use of standard scores. It also features an improved user interface. The proposed web server is freely available at http://lilab.ecust.edu.cn/pharmmapper/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. NPY receptors as potential targets for anti‐obesity drug development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide Y system has proven to be one of the most important regulators of feeding behaviour and energy homeostasis, thus presenting great potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment...

  17. Osteoblast-targeted overexpression of TAZ increases bone mass in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yeon Yang

    Full Text Available Osteoblasts are derived from mesenchymal progenitors. Differentiation to osteoblasts and adipocytes is reciprocally regulated. Transcriptional coactivator with a PDZ-binding motif (TAZ is a transcriptional coactivator that induces differentiation of mesenchymal cells into osteoblasts while blocking differentiation into adipocytes. To investigate the role of TAZ on bone metabolism in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress TAZ under the control of the procollagen type 1 promoter (Col1-TAZ. Whole body bone mineral density (BMD of 6- to 19-week-old Col-TAZ mice was 4% to 7% higher than that of their wild-type (WT littermates, whereas no difference was noticed in Col.1-TAZ female mice. Microcomputed tomography analyses of proximal tibiae at 16 weeks of age demonstrated a significant increase in trabecular bone volume (26.7% and trabecular number (26.6% with a reciprocal decrease in trabecular spacing (14.2% in Col1-TAZ mice compared with their WT littermates. In addition, dynamic histomorphometric analysis of the lumbar spine revealed increased mineral apposition rate (42.8% and the serum P1NP level was also significantly increased (53% in Col.1-TAZ mice. When primary calvaria cells were cultured in osteogenic medium, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity was significantly increased and adipogenesis was significantly suppressed in Col1-TAZ mice compared with their WT littermates. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that expression of collagen type 1, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, ALP, osterix, and Runx2 was significantly increased in calvaria cells from Col1-TAZ mice compared to their WT littermates. In vitro, TAZ enhanced Runx2-mediated transcriptional activity while suppressing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling pathway. TAZ also enhanced transcriptional activity from 3TP-Lux, which reflects transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β-mediated signaling. In addition, TAZ enhanced TGF

  18. Listeriolysin S Is a Streptolysin S-Like Virulence Factor That Targets Exclusively Prokaryotic CellsIn Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quereda, Juan J; Nahori, Marie A; Meza-Torres, Jazmín; Sachse, Martin; Titos-Jiménez, Patricia; Gomez-Laguna, Jaime; Dussurget, Olivier; Cossart, Pascale; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier

    2017-04-04

    Streptolysin S (SLS)-like virulence factors from clinically relevant Gram-positive pathogens have been proposed to behave as potent cytotoxins, playing key roles in tissue infection. Listeriolysin S (LLS) is an SLS-like hemolysin/bacteriocin present among Listeria monocytogenes strains responsible for human listeriosis outbreaks. As LLS cytotoxic activity has been associated with virulence, we investigated the LLS-specific contribution to host tissue infection. Surprisingly, we first show that LLS causes only weak red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis in vitro and neither confers resistance to phagocytic killing nor favors survival of L. monocytogenes within the blood cells or in the extracellular space (in the plasma). We reveal that LLS does not elicit specific immune responses, is not cytotoxic for eukaryotic cells, and does not impact cell infection by L. monocytogenes Using in vitro cell infection systems and a murine intravenous infection model, we actually demonstrate that LLS expression is undetectable during infection of cells and murine inner organs. Importantly, upon intravenous animal inoculation, L. monocytogenes is found in the gastrointestinal system, and only in this environment LLS expression is detected in vivo Finally, we confirm that LLS production is associated with destruction of target bacteria. Our results demonstrate therefore that LLS does not contribute to L. monocytogenes tissue injury and virulence in inner host organs as previously reported. Moreover, we describe that LlsB, a putative posttranslational modification enzyme encoded in the LLS operon, is necessary for murine inner organ colonization. Overall, we demonstrate that LLS is the first SLS-like virulence factor targeting exclusively prokaryotic cells during in vivo infections. IMPORTANCE The most severe human listeriosis outbreaks are caused by L. monocytogenes strains harboring listeriolysin S (LLS), previously described as a cytotoxin that plays a critical role in host inner

  19. Phenylthiazole Antibacterial Agents Targeting Cell Wall Synthesis Exhibit Potent Activity in Vitro and in Vivo against Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Haroon; Younis, Waleed; Chen, Lu; Peters, Christine E; Pogliano, Joe; Pogliano, Kit; Cooper, Bruce; Zhang, Jianan; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman; Oldfield, Eric; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2017-03-23

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial species, such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), necessitates the development of new antimicrobials. Here, we investigate the spectrum of antibacterial activity of three phenylthiazole-substituted aminoguanidines. These compounds possess potent activity against VRE, inhibiting growth of clinical isolates at concentrations as low as 0.5 μg/mL. The compounds exerted a rapid bactericidal effect, targeting cell wall synthesis. Transposon mutagenesis suggested three possible targets: YubA, YubB (undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP)), and YubD. Both UPPP as well as undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase were inhibited by compound 1. YubA and YubD are annotated as transporters and may also be targets because 1 collapsed the proton motive force in membrane vesicles. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, we demonstrate that two compounds (1, 3, at 20 μg/mL) retain potent activity in vivo, significantly reducing the burden of VRE in infected worms. Taken altogether, the results indicate that compounds 1 and 3 warrant further investigation as novel antibacterial agents against drug-resistant enterococci.

  20. The potential of isotopically enriched magnesium to study bone implant degradation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Johannes; Martinelli, Elisabeth; Weinberg, Annelie M; Zitek, Andreas; Irrgeher, Johanna; Meischel, Martin; Stanzl-Tschegg, Stefanie E; Mingler, Bernhard; Prohaska, Thomas

    2017-03-15

    This pilot study highlights the substantial potential of using isotopically enriched (non-radioactive) metals to study the fate of biodegradable metal implants. It was possible to show that magnesium (Mg) release can be observed by combining isotopic mass spectrometry and isotopic pattern deconvolution for data reduction, even at low amounts of Mg released a from slowly degrading (26)Mg enriched (>99%) Mg metal. Following implantation into rats, structural in vivo changes were monitored by μCT. Results showed that the applied Mg had an average degradation rate of 16±5μmyear(-1), which corresponds with the degradation rate of pure Mg. Bone and tissue extraction was performed 4, 24, and 52weeks after implantation. Bone cross sections were analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to determine the lateral (26)Mg distribution. The (26)Mg/(24)Mg ratios in digested tissue and excretion samples were analyzed by multi collector ICP-MS. Isotope pattern deconvolution in combination with ICP-MS enabled detection of Mg pin material in amounts as low as 200ppm in bone tissues and 20ppm in tissues up to two fold increased Mg levels with a contribution of pin-derived Mg of up to 75% (4weeks) and 30% (24weeks) were found adjacent to the implant. After complete degradation, no visual bone disturbance or residual pin-Mg could be detected in cortical bone. In organs, increased Δ(26)Mg/(24)Mg values up to 16‰ were determined compared to control samples. Increased Δ(26)Mg/(24)Mg values were detected in serum samples at a constant total Mg level. In contrast to urine, feces did not show a shift in the (26)Mg/(24)Mg ratios. This investigation showed that the organism is capable of handling excess Mg well and that bones fully recover after degradation. Magnesium alloys as bone implants have faced increasing attention over the past years. In vivo degradation and metabolism studies of these implant materials have shown the promising application

  1. Realizing the Clinical Potential of Cancer Nanotechnology by Minimizing Toxicological and Targeted Delivery Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Sharma, Arati; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the potential to make smart drugs that would be capable of targeting cancer but not normal cells and loading combinations of cooperating agents into a single nano-sized particle to more effectively treat this disease. However, to realize the full potential of this technology the negative aspects associated with these nanoparticles needs to be overcome. This review discusses concerns in the field limiting realization of the full clinical potential of this technology, which are toxicity and targeted delivery. Strategies to overcome these hurdles are also reviewed which could lead to attainment of the full clinical potential of this exciting technology. PMID:23139207

  2. Realizing the clinical potential of cancer nanotechnology by minimizing toxicologic and targeted delivery concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Sharma, Arati; Robertson, Gavin P

    2012-11-15

    Nanotechnology has the potential to make smart drugs that would be capable of targeting cancer but not normal cells and to load combinations of cooperating agents into a single nanosized particle to more effectively treat this disease. However, to realize the full potential of this technology, the negative aspects associated with these nanoparticles need to be overcome. This review discusses concerns in the field limiting realization of the full clinical potential of this technology, which are toxicity and targeted delivery. Strategies to overcome these hurdles are also reviewed, which could lead to attainment of the full clinical potential of this exciting technology. ©2012 AACR.

  3. Acute In Vivo Electrophysiological Recordings of Local Field Potentials and Multi-unit Activity from the Hyperdirect Pathway in Anesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haumesser, Jens K; Kühn, Johanna; Güttler, Christopher; Nguyen, Dieu-Huong; Beck, Maximilian H; Kühn, Andrea A; van Riesen, Christoph

    2017-06-22

    Converging evidence shows that many neuropsychiatric diseases should be understood as disorders of large-scale neuronal networks. To better understand the pathophysiological basis of these diseases, it is necessary to precisely characterize in which way the processing of information is disturbed between the different neuronal parts of the circuit. Using extracellular in vivo electrophysiological recordings, it is possible to accurately delineate neuronal activity within a neuronal network. The application of this method has several advantages over alternative techniques, e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging and calcium imaging, as it allows a unique temporal and spatial resolution and does not rely on genetically engineered organisms. However, the use of extracellular in vivo recordings is limited since it is an invasive technique that cannot be universally applied. In this article, a simple and easy to use method is presented with which it is possible to simultaneously record extracellular potentials such as local field potentials and multiunit activity at multiple sites of a network. It is detailed how a precise targeting of subcortical nuclei can be achieved using a combination of stereotactic surgery and online analysis of multi-unit recordings. Thus, it is demonstrated, how a complete network such as the hyperdirect cortico-basal ganglia loop can be studied in anesthetized animals in vivo.

  4. Inhaled Cadmium Oxide Nanoparticles: Their in Vivo Fate and Effect on Target Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dumkova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amount of heavy metals used in manufacturing equivalently increases hazards of environmental pollution by industrial products such as cadmium oxide (CdO nanoparticles. Here, we aimed to unravel the CdO nanoparticle destiny upon their entry into lungs by inhalations, with the main focus on the ultrastructural changes that the nanoparticles may cause to tissues of the primary and secondary target organs. We indeed found the CdO nanoparticles to be transported from the lungs into secondary target organs by blood. In lungs, inhaled CdO nanoparticles caused significant alterations in parenchyma tissue including hyperemia, enlarged pulmonary septa, congested capillaries, alveolar emphysema and small areas of atelectasis. Nanoparticles were observed in the cytoplasm of cells lining bronchioles, in the alveolar spaces as well as inside the membranous pneumocytes and in phagosomes of lung macrophages. Nanoparticles even penetrated through the membrane into some organelles including mitochondria and they also accumulated in the cytoplasmic vesicles. In livers, inhalation caused periportal inflammation and local hepatic necrosis. Only minor changes such as diffusely thickened filtration membrane with intramembranous electron dense deposits were observed in kidney. Taken together, inhaled CdO nanoparticles not only accumulated in lungs but they were also transported to other organs causing serious damage at tissue as well as cellular level.

  5. Cre Fused with RVG Peptide Mediates Targeted Genome Editing in Mouse Brain Cells In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhiyuan; Sun, Zhaolin; Li, Pan; Feng, Tao; Wu, Sen

    2016-12-14

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short peptides that can pass through cell membranes. CPPs can facilitate the cellular entry of proteins, macromolecules, nanoparticles and drugs. RVG peptide (RVG hereinafter) is a 29-amino-acid CPP derived from a rabies virus glycoprotein that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter brain cells. However, whether RVG can be used for genome editing in the brain has not been reported. In this work, we combined RVG with Cre recombinase for bacterial expression. The purified RVG-Cre protein cut plasmids in vitro and traversed cell membranes in cultured Neuro2a cells. By tail vein-injecting RVG-Cre into Cre reporter mouse lines mTmG and Rosa26lacZ, we demonstrated that RVG-Cre could target brain cells and achieve targeted somatic genome editing in adult mice. This direct delivery of the gene-editing enzyme protein into mouse brains with RVG is much safer than plasmid- or viral-based methods, holding promise for further applications in the treatment of various brain diseases.

  6. The Cyclic Peptide Ecumicin Targeting ClpC1 Is Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Kim, Jin-Yong; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Akopian, Tatos; Hong, Seungpyo; Jin, Ying-Yu; Kandror, Olga; Kim, Jong-Woo; Lee, In-Ae; Lee, Sun-Young; McAlpine, James B.; Mulugeta, Surafel; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Wang, Yuehong; Yang, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Tae-Mi; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Pauli, Guido F.; Cho, Sanghyun

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) has lent urgency to finding new drug leads with novel modes of action. A high-throughput screening campaign of >65,000 actinomycete extracts for inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis viability identified ecumicin, a macrocyclic tridecapeptide that exerts potent, selective bactericidal activity against M. tuberculosis in vitro, including nonreplicating cells. Ecumicin retains activity against isolated multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis. The subcutaneous administration to mice of ecumicin in a micellar formulation at 20 mg/kg body weight resulted in plasma and lung exposures exceeding the MIC. Complete inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth in the lungs of mice was achieved following 12 doses at 20 or 32 mg/kg. Genome mining of lab-generated, spontaneous ecumicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains identified the ClpC1 ATPase complex as the putative target, and this was confirmed by a drug affinity response test. ClpC1 functions in protein breakdown with the ClpP1P2 protease complex. Ecumicin markedly enhanced the ATPase activity of wild-type (WT) ClpC1 but prevented activation of proteolysis by ClpC1. Less stimulation was observed with ClpC1 from ecumicin-resistant mutants. Thus, ClpC1 is a valid drug target against M. tuberculosis, and ecumicin may serve as a lead compound for anti-TB drug development. PMID:25421483

  7. Rapid and accurate tumor-target bio-imaging through specific in vivo biosynthesis of a fluorescent europium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Wang, Jianling; Li, Qiwei; Dong, Xiawei; Ge, Wei; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Xuerui; Liu, Hongde; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Xuemei

    2016-04-01

    A new and facile method for rapidly and accurately achieving tumor targeting fluorescent images has been explored using a specifically biosynthesized europium (Eu) complex in vivo and in vitro. It demonstrated that a fluorescent Eu complex could be bio-synthesized through a spontaneous molecular process in cancerous cells and tumors, but not prepared in normal cells and tissues. In addition, the proteomics analyses show that some biological pathways of metabolism, especially for NADPH production and glutamine metabolism, are remarkably affected during the relevant biosynthesis process, where molecular precursors of europium ions are reduced to fluorescent europium complexes inside cancerous cells or tumor tissues. These results proved that the specific self-biosynthesis of a fluorescent Eu complex by cancer cells or tumor tissues can provide a new strategy for accurate diagnosis and treatment strategies in the early stages of cancers and thus is beneficial for realizing precise surgical intervention based on the relevant cheap and readily available agents.

  8. Direct Keap1-Nrf2 disruption as a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease.

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    Fiona Kerr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nrf2, a transcriptional activator of cell protection genes, is an attractive therapeutic target for the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. Current Nrf2 activators, however, may exert toxicity and pathway over-activation can induce detrimental effects. An understanding of the mechanisms mediating Nrf2 inhibition in neurodegenerative conditions may therefore direct the design of drugs targeted for the prevention of these diseases with minimal side-effects. Our study provides the first in vivo evidence that specific inhibition of Keap1, a negative regulator of Nrf2, can prevent neuronal toxicity in response to the AD-initiating Aβ42 peptide, in correlation with Nrf2 activation. Comparatively, lithium, an inhibitor of the Nrf2 suppressor GSK-3, prevented Aβ42 toxicity by mechanisms independent of Nrf2. A new direct inhibitor of the Keap1-Nrf2 binding domain also prevented synaptotoxicity mediated by naturally-derived Aβ oligomers in mouse cortical neurons. Overall, our findings highlight Keap1 specifically as an efficient target for the re-activation of Nrf2 in AD, and support the further investigation of direct Keap1 inhibitors for the prevention of neurodegeneration in vivo.

  9. Specific targeting of whole lymphoma cells to dendritic cells ex vivo provides a potent antitumor vaccine

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    Mocikat Ralph

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DC pulsed with tumor-derived antigenic material have widely been used in antitumor vaccination protocols. However, the optimal strategy of DC loading has not yet been established. Our aim was to define requirements of optimal DC vaccines in terms of in vivo protection in a murine B-cell lymphoma model. Methods We compare various loading reagents including whole parental and modified tumor cells and a single tumor-specific antigen, namely the lymphoma idiotype (Id. Bone marrow-derived DC were pulsed in vitro and used for therapy of established A20 lymphomas. Results We show that a vaccine with superior antitumor efficacy can be generated when DC are loaded with whole modified tumor cells which provide both (i antigenic polyvalency and (ii receptor-mediated antigen internalization. Uptake of cellular material was greatly enhanced when the tumor cells used for DC pulsing were engineered to express an anti-Fc receptor immunoglobulin specificity. Upon transfer of these DC, established tumor burdens were eradicated in 50% of mice. By contrast, pulsing DC with unmodified lymphoma cells or with the lymphoma Id, even when it was endowed with the anti-Fc receptor binding arm, was far less effective. A specific humoral anti-Id response could be detected, particularly following delivery of Id protein-pulsed DC, but it was not predictive of tumor protection. Instead a T-cell response was pivotal for successful tumor protection. Interaction of the transferred DC with CD8+ T lymphocytes seemed to play a role for induction of the immune response but was dispensable when DC had received an additional maturation stimulus. Conclusion Our analyses show that the advantages of specific antigen redirection and antigenic polyvalency can be combined to generate DC-based vaccines with superior antitumor efficacy. This mouse model may provide information for the standardization of DC-based vaccination protocols.

  10. The heme biosynthetic pathway of the obligate Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi as a potential anti-filarial drug target.

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    Bo Wu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Filarial parasites (e.g., Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, and Wuchereria bancrofti are causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, which are among the most disabling of neglected tropical diseases. There is an urgent need to develop macro-filaricidal drugs, as current anti-filarial chemotherapy (e.g., diethylcarbamazine [DEC], ivermectin and albendazole can interrupt transmission predominantly by killing microfilariae (mf larvae, but is less effective on adult worms, which can live for decades in the human host. All medically relevant human filarial parasites appear to contain an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia. This alpha-proteobacterial mutualist has been recognized as a potential target for filarial nematode life cycle intervention, as antibiotic treatments of filarial worms harboring Wolbachia result in the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatments both in vitro and in vivo. Human trials have confirmed this approach, although the length of treatments, high doses required and medical counter-indications for young children and pregnant women warrant the identification of additional anti-Wolbachia drugs.Genome sequence analysis indicated that enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis might constitute a potential anti-Wolbachia target set. We tested different heme biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in ex vivo B. malayi viability assays and report a specific effect of N-methyl mesoporphyrin (NMMP, which targets ferrochelatase (FC, the last step. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates evolutionarily significant divergence between Wolbachia heme genes and their human homologues. We therefore undertook the cloning, overexpression and analysis of several enzymes of this pathway alongside their human homologues, and prepared proteins for drug targeting. In vitro enzyme assays revealed a approximately 600-fold difference in drug sensitivities to succinyl acetone (SA between Wolbachia and human 5

  11. Listeriolysin S Is a Streptolysin S-Like Virulence Factor That Targets Exclusively Prokaryotic Cells In Vivo

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    Juan J. Quereda

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptolysin S (SLS-like virulence factors from clinically relevant Gram-positive pathogens have been proposed to behave as potent cytotoxins, playing key roles in tissue infection. Listeriolysin S (LLS is an SLS-like hemolysin/bacteriocin present among Listeria monocytogenes strains responsible for human listeriosis outbreaks. As LLS cytotoxic activity has been associated with virulence, we investigated the LLS-specific contribution to host tissue infection. Surprisingly, we first show that LLS causes only weak red blood cell (RBC hemolysis in vitro and neither confers resistance to phagocytic killing nor favors survival of L. monocytogenes within the blood cells or in the extracellular space (in the plasma. We reveal that LLS does not elicit specific immune responses, is not cytotoxic for eukaryotic cells, and does not impact cell infection by L. monocytogenes. Using in vitro cell infection systems and a murine intravenous infection model, we actually demonstrate that LLS expression is undetectable during infection of cells and murine inner organs. Importantly, upon intravenous animal inoculation, L. monocytogenes is found in the gastrointestinal system, and only in this environment LLS expression is detected in vivo. Finally, we confirm that LLS production is associated with destruction of target bacteria. Our results demonstrate therefore that LLS does not contribute to L. monocytogenes tissue injury and virulence in inner host organs as previously reported. Moreover, we describe that LlsB, a putative posttranslational modification enzyme encoded in the LLS operon, is necessary for murine inner organ colonization. Overall, we demonstrate that LLS is the first SLS-like virulence factor targeting exclusively prokaryotic cells during in vivo infections.

  12. The Angiogenic Potential of DPSCs and SCAPs in an In Vivo Model of Dental Pulp Regeneration

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    Petra Hilkens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate vascularization, a restricting factor for the survival of engineered tissues, is often promoted by the addition of stem cells or the appropriate angiogenic growth factors. In this study, human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs and stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs were applied in an in vivo model of dental pulp regeneration in order to compare their regenerative potential and confirm their previously demonstrated paracrine angiogenic properties. 3D-printed hydroxyapatite scaffolds containing DPSCs and/or SCAPs were subcutaneously transplanted into immunocompromised mice. After twelve weeks, histological and ultrastructural analysis demonstrated the regeneration of vascularized pulp-like tissue as well as mineralized tissue formation in all stem cell constructs. Despite the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro, the stem cell constructs did not display a higher vascularization rate in comparison to control conditions. Similar results were found after eight weeks, which suggests both osteogenic/odontogenic differentiation of the transplanted stem cells and the promotion of angiogenesis in this particular setting. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate the successful formation of vascularized pulp-like tissue in 3D-printed scaffolds containing dental stem cells, emphasizing the promising role of this approach in dental tissue engineering.

  13. Antioxidant properties of potentially probiotic bacteria: in vitro and in vivo activities.

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    Amaretti, Alberto; di Nunzio, Mattia; Pompei, Anna; Raimondi, Stefano; Rossi, Maddalena; Bordoni, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-four strains of lactic acid bacteria (seven Bifidobacterium, 11 Lactobacillus, six Lactococcus, and 10 Streptococcus thermophilus) were assayed in vitro for antioxidant activity against ascorbic and linolenic acid oxidation (TAA(AA) and TAA(LA)), trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), intracellular glutathione (TGSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Wide dispersion of each of TAA(AA), TAA(LA), TEAC, TGSH, and SOD occurred within bacterial groups, indicating that antioxidative properties are strain specific. The strains Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DSMZ 23032, Lactobacillus acidophilus DSMZ 23033, and Lactobacillus brevis DSMZ 23034 exhibited among the highest TAA(AA), TAA(LA), TEAC, and TGSH values within the lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. These strains were used to prepare a potentially antioxidative probiotic formulation, which was administered to rats at the dose of 10(7), 10(8), and 10(9) cfu/day for 18 days. The probiotic strains colonized the colon of the rats during the trial and promoted intestinal saccharolytic metabolism. The analysis of plasma antioxidant activity, reactive oxygen molecules level, and glutathione concentration, revealed that, when administered at doses of at least 10(8) cfu/day, the antioxidant mixture effectively reduced doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress. Probiotic strains which are capable to limit excessive amounts of reactive radicals in vivo may contribute to prevent and control several diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Infectious Potential of Coxiella burnetii: A Study on Belgian Livestock Isolates

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    Mori, Marcella; Boarbi, Samira; Michel, Patrick; Bakinahe, Raïssa; Rits, Katleen; Wattiau, Pierre; Fretin, David

    2013-01-01

    Q-fever is a zoonosis caused by the gram-negative obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii. Since its discovery, and particularly following the recent outbreaks in the Netherlands, C. burnetii appeared as a clear public health concern. In the present study, the infectious potential displayed by goat and cattle isolates of C. burnetii was compared to a reference strain (Nine Mile) using both in vitro (human HeLa and bovine macrophage cells) and in vivo (BALB/c mice) models. The isolates had distant genomic profiles with one - the goat isolate - being identical to the predominant strain circulating in the Netherlands during the 2007–2010 outbreaks. Infective doses were established with ethidium monoazide-PCR for the first time here applied to C. burnetii. This method allowed for the preparation of reproducible and characterized inocula thanks to its capacity to discriminate between live and dead cells. Globally, the proliferative capacity of the Nine Mile strain in cell lines and mice was higher compared to the newly isolated field strains. In vitro, the bovine C. burnetii isolate multiplied faster in a bovine macrophage cell line, an observation tentatively explained by the preferential specificity of this strain for allogeneic host cells. In the BALB/c mouse model, however, the goat and bovine isolates multiplied at about the same rate indicating no peculiar hypervirulent behavior in this animal model. PMID:23840751

  15. Rapid synthesis of highly luminescent and stable Au20 nanoclusters for active tumor-targeted imaging in vitro and in vivo

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    Zhang, Pu; Yang, Xiao Xi; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Ning Wei; Xiong, Zu Hong; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Rapid synthesis of protein-stabilized Au20 nanoclusters (Au20NCs) with high fluorescence quantum yield (QY) up to ~15% is successfully achieved by manipulating the reaction kinetics. The as-obtained Au20NCs, identified by mass spectrometry, have an average size of 2.6 nm, with strong fluorescence emission at 620 nm (2.00 eV) upon excitation at either 370 nm (3.35 eV) or 470 nm (2.64 eV). The advantages of the as-obtained Au20NCs, including small sizes, high fluorescence QY, excellent photostability, non-toxicity, and good stability in biological media, make them ideal candidates as good luminescent probes for optical imaging in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the uptake of Au20NCs by both cancer cells and tumor-bearing nude mice can be improved by receptor-mediated internalization, compared with that by passive targeting. Because of their selective accumulation at the tumor sites, the Au20NC probes can be used as potential indicators for cancer diagnosis. This work not only provides a new understanding of the rapid synthesis of highly luminescent Au20NCs but also demonstrates that the functionalized-Au20NCs are excellent probes for active tumor-targeted imaging in vitro and in vivo.Rapid synthesis of protein-stabilized Au20 nanoclusters (Au20NCs) with high fluorescence quantum yield (QY) up to ~15% is successfully achieved by manipulating the reaction kinetics. The as-obtained Au20NCs, identified by mass spectrometry, have an average size of 2.6 nm, with strong fluorescence emission at 620 nm (2.00 eV) upon excitation at either 370 nm (3.35 eV) or 470 nm (2.64 eV). The advantages of the as-obtained Au20NCs, including small sizes, high fluorescence QY, excellent photostability, non-toxicity, and good stability in biological media, make them ideal candidates as good luminescent probes for optical imaging in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the uptake of Au20NCs by both cancer cells and tumor-bearing nude mice can be improved by receptor

  16. In vivo targeting of metastatic breast cancer via tumor vasculature-specific nano-graphene oxide.

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    Yang, Dongzhi; Feng, Liangzhu; Dougherty, Casey A; Luker, Kathryn E; Chen, Daiqin; Cauble, Meagan A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Luker, Gary D; Ross, Brian D; Liu, Zhuang; Hong, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of neovasculatures, is a critical process during cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. Targeting of angiogenic markers on the tumor vasculature can result in more efficient delivery of nanomaterials into tumor since no extravasation is required. Herein we demonstrated efficient targeting of breast cancer metastasis in an experimental murine model with nano-graphene oxide (GO), which was conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR). FSHR has been confirmed to be a highly selective tumor vasculature marker, which is abundant in both primary and metastatic tumors. These functionalized GO nano-conjugates had diameters of ∼120 nm based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and dynamic laser scattering (DLS) measurement. (64)Cu was incorporated as a radiolabel which enabled the visualization of these GO conjugates by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Breast cancer lung metastasis model was established by intravenous injection of click beetle green luciferase-transfected MDA-MB-231 (denoted as cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells into female nude mice and the tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Systematic in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate the stability, targeting efficacy and specificity, and tissue distribution of GO conjugates. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy examination confirmed the targeting specificity of FSHR-mAb attached GO conjugates against cellular FSHR. More potent and persistent uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-GO-FSHR-mAb in cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231 nodules inside the lung was witnessed when compared with that of non-targeted GO conjugates ((64)Cu-NOTA-GO). Histology evaluation also confirmed the vasculature accumulation of GO-FSHR-mAb conjugates in tumor at early time points while they were non-specifically captured in liver and spleen. In addition, these GO conjugates can serve as good drug carriers

  17. Molecular Design of Bisphosphonate-Modified Proteins for Efficient Bone Targeting In Vivo.

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    Hidemasa Katsumi

    Full Text Available To establish a rational molecular design for bisphosphonate (BP-modified proteins for efficient bone targeting, a pharmacokinetic study was performed using a series of alendronate (ALN, a nitrogen-containing BP, modified proteins with various molecular weights and varying degrees of modification. Four proteins with different molecular weight-yeast glutathione reductase (GR; MW: 112,000 Da, bovine serum albumin (BSA; MW: 67,000 Da, recombinant human superoxide dismutase (SOD; MW: 32,000 Da, and chicken egg white lysozyme (LZM; MW: 14,000 Da-were modified with ALN to obtain ALN-modified proteins. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the tissue distribution of the ALN-modified and unmodified proteins was performed after radiolabeling them with indium-111 (111In by using a bifunctional chelating agent. Calculation of tissue uptake clearances revealed that the bone uptake clearances of 111In-ALN-modified proteins were proportional to the degree of ALN modification. 111In-GR-ALN and BSA-ALN, the two high-molecular-weight proteins, efficiently accumulated in bones, regardless of the degree of ALN modification. Approximately 36 and 34% of the dose, respectively, was calculated to be delivered to the bones. In contrast, the maximum amounts taken up by bone were 18 and 13% of the dose for 111In-SOD-ALN(32 and LZM-ALN(9, respectively, because of their high renal clearance. 111In-SOD modified with both polyethylene glycol (PEG and ALN (111In-PEG-SOD-ALN was efficiently delivered to the bone. Approximately 36% of the dose was estimated to be delivered to the bones. In an experimental bone metastasis mouse model, treatment with PEG-SOD-ALN significantly reduced the number of tumor cells in the bone of the mice. These results indicate that the combination of PEG and ALN modification is a promising approach for efficient bone targeting of proteins with a high total-body clearance.

  18. EMMPRIN-Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles for In Vivo Visualization and Regression of Acute Myocardial Infarction.

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    Cuadrado, Irene; Piedras, Maria Jose Garcia Miguel; Herruzo, Irene; Turpin, Maria Del Carmen; Castejón, Borja; Reventun, Paula; Martin, Ana; Saura, Marta; Zamorano, Jose Luis; Zaragoza, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation may represent a mechanism for cardiac protection against ischemia. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) is highly expressed in response to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and induces activation of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. We targeted EMMPRIN with paramagnetic/fluorescent micellar nanoparticles conjugated with the EMMPRIN binding peptide AP-9 (NAP9), or an AP-9 scrambled peptide as a negative control (NAPSC). We found that NAP9 binds to endogenous EMMPRIN in cultured HL1 myocytes and in mouse hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (IR). Injection of NAP9 at the time of or one day after IR, was enough to reduce progression of myocardial cell death when compared to CONTROL and NAPSC injected mice (infarct size in NAP9 injected mice: 32%±6.59 vs 46%±9.04 or NAPSC injected mice: 48%±7.64). In the same way, cardiac parameters were recovered to almost healthy levels (LVEF NAP9 63% ± 7.24 vs CONTROL 42% ± 4.74 or NAPSC 39% ± 6.44), whereas ECM degradation was also reduced as shown by inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activation. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) scans have shown a signal enhancement in the left ventricle of NAP9 injected mice with respect to non-injected, and to mice injected with NAPSC. A positive correlation between CMR enhancement and Evans-Blue/TTC staining of infarct size was calculated (R:0.65). Taken together, these results point to EMMPRIN targeted nanoparticles as a new approach to the mitigation of ischemic/reperfusion injury.

  19. Tetrac-conjugated polymersomes for integrin-targeted delivery of camptothecin to colon adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

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    Alibolandi, Mona; Rezvani, Rouhollah; Farzad, Sara Amel; Taghdisi, Seyed Mohammad; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-10-30

    In this study, we prepared tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) conjugated PEG-PLGA polymersomes for the targeted delivery of camptothecin to colon adenocarcinoma. Tetrac, which binds to integrin αvβ3 with high affinity and specificity, was covalently conjugated to the surface of the PEGylated polymersomal formulation of camptothecin (CPT). The hydrodynamic and morphological properties of the prepared system were evaluated using TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and DLS (dynamic light scattering) experiments. Camptothecin was encapsulated in the polymersomal system with encapsulation efficiency and loading content of 84±10.12 and 4.2±0.82, respectively. The in vitro release profile of camptothecin from the polymersomal formulation revealed the sustained release pattern. In vitro cytotoxicity experiments confirmed that the tetrac-conjugated camptothecin loaded-polymersomes had higher cellular toxicity towards integrin-overexpressed HT29 and C26 colorectal cancer cells than integrin-negative CHO cell line. The in vivo tumor inhibitory effect of tetrac-conjugated camptothecin loaded-polymersomes demonstrated an enhanced therapeutic index of integrin targeted polymersomal formulation over both non-targeted polymersomal formulation and free camptothecin in C26 tumor bearing mice. The obtained results demonstrated that the prepared tetrac-conjugated polymersomes were able to control the release of camptothecin, and significantly increase the therapeutic index of compthotecin. This study demonstrates the versatility of integrin-targeted tetrac-conjugated PEG-PLGA polymersomal formulation as an anti-cancer nano-pharmaceutical platform. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. mTORC1 is a target of nordihydroguaiaretic acid to prevent breast tumor growth in vitro and in vivo.

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    Zhang, Yue; Xu, Song; Lin, Jun; Yao, Guangyu; Han, Zelong; Liang, Bo; Zou, Zhenhong; Chen, Zhenguo; Song, Qiancheng; Dai, Yifan; Gao, Tianming; Liu, Anling; Bai, Xiaochun

    2012-11-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a natural phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush Larrea divaricata, which has anti-tumor activities both in vitro and in vivo. Its analogs are in clinical development for use in refractory solid tumors. But the mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effect of NDGA are not fully understood. In this study, we identified mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) as a target of NDGA both in cultured breast cancer cells and in xenograft models. NDGA effectively inhibited basal level of mTORC1 but not mTORC2 activity in breast cancer cell lines. NDGA also suppressed mTORC1 downstream signaling such as expression of cyclin D1, hypoxia-inducible factor-α and VEGF, and prevented proliferation in breast cancer cells. Although NDGA stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) signaling, which negatively regulates mTORC1, AMPK and TSC2 deletion could not diminish the inhibition of mTORC1 by NDGA. Subsequent studies revealed that NDGA may also direct target mTORC1 complex because NDGA suppressed amino acids- and insulin-stimulated mTORC1 and acted like rapamycin to disrupt mTOR-Raptor interaction. Most importantly, NDGA repressed breast tumor growth and targeted mTORC1 and its downstream signaling in xenograft models. Together our data provide a novel mechanism for NDGA activity which could help explain its anti-cancer activity. Disruption of mTOR-Raptor complex and activation of AMPK/TSC signaling may contribute to inhibitory effects of NDGA against mTORC1. Our data also raise the possibility that NDGA, as an mTORC1 inhibitor, may have a broad spectrum of action on breast cancers.

  1. An evolved ribosome-inactivating protein targets and kills human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo

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    Green David E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few treatment options exist for patients with metastatic melanoma, resulting in poor prognosis. One standard treatment, dacarbazine (DTIC, shows low response rates ranging from 15 to 25 percent with an 8-month median survival time. The development of targeted therapeutics with novel mechanisms of action may improve patient outcome. Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs such as Shiga-like Toxin 1 (SLT-1 represent powerful scaffolds for developing selective anticancer agents. Here we report the discovery and properties of a single chain ribosome-inactivating protein (scRIP derived from the cytotoxic A subunit of SLT-1 (SLT-1A, harboring the 7-amino acid peptide insertion IYSNKLM (termed SLT-1AIYSNKLM allowing the toxin variant to selectively target and kill human melanoma cells. Results SLT-1AIYSNKLM was able to kill 7 of 8 human melanoma cell lines. This scRIP binds to 518-A2 human melanoma cells with a dissociation constant of 18 nM, resulting in the blockage of protein synthesis and apoptosis in such cells. Biodistribution and imaging studies of radiolabeled SLT-1AIYSNKLM administered intravenously into SCID mice bearing a human melanoma xenograft indicate that SLT-1AIYSNKLM readily accumulates at the tumor site as opposed to non-target tissues. Furthermore, the co-administration of SLT-1AIYSNKLM with DTIC resulted in tumor regression and greatly increased survival in this mouse xenograft model in comparison to DTIC or SLT-1AIYSNKLM treatment alone (115 day median survival versus 46 and 47 days respectively; P values IYSNKLM is stable in serum and its intravenous administration resulted in modest immune responses following repeated injections in CD1 mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the evolution of a scRIP template can lead to the discovery of novel cancer cell-targeted compounds and in the case of SLT-1AIYSNKLM can specifically kill human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Precision-cut kidney slices (PCKS to study development of renal fibrosis and efficacy of drug targeting ex vivo

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    Fariba Poosti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal fibrosis is a serious clinical problem resulting in the greatest need for renal replacement therapy. No adequate preventive or curative therapy is available that could be clinically used to target renal fibrosis specifically. The search for new efficacious treatment strategies is therefore warranted. Although in vitro models using homogeneous cell populations have contributed to the understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in renal fibrosis, these models poorly mimic the complex in vivo milieu. Therefore, we here evaluated a precision-cut kidney slice (PCKS model as a new, multicellular ex vivo model to study the development of fibrosis and its prevention using anti-fibrotic compounds. Precision-cut slices (200-300 μm thickness were prepared from healthy C57BL/6 mouse kidneys using a Krumdieck tissue slicer. To induce changes mimicking the fibrotic process, slices were incubated with TGFβ1 (5 ng/ml for 48 h in the presence or absence of the anti-fibrotic cytokine IFNγ (1 µg/ml or an IFNγ conjugate targeted to PDGFRβ (PPB-PEG-IFNγ. Following culture, tissue viability (ATP-content and expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III were determined using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Slices remained viable up to 72 h of incubation, and no significant effects of TGFβ1 and IFNγ on viability were observed. TGFβ1 markedly increased α-SMA, fibronectin and collagen I mRNA and protein expression levels. IFNγ and PPB-PEG-IFNγ significantly reduced TGFβ1-induced fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III mRNA expression, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The PKCS model is a novel tool to test the pathophysiology of fibrosis and to screen the efficacy of anti-fibrotic drugs ex vivo in a multicellular and pro-fibrotic milieu. A major advantage of the slice model is that it can be used not only for animal but also for (fibrotic human kidney tissue.

  3. Induction of miR-137 by Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Directly Targets Sp1 Protein Translation and Mediates Its Anticancer Activity Both In Vitro and In Vivo.

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    Zeng, Xingruo; Xu, Zhou; Gu, Jiayan; Huang, Haishan; Gao, Guangxun; Zhang, Xiaoru; Li, Jingxia; Jin, Honglei; Jiang, Guosong; Sun, Hong; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-03-01

    Our recent studies found that isorhapontigenin (ISO) showed a significant inhibitory effect on human bladder cancer cell growth, accompanied with cell-cycle G0-G1 arrest as well as downregulation of Cyclin D1 expression at transcriptional level via inhibition of Sp1 transactivation in bladder cancer cells. In the current study, the potential ISO inhibition of bladder tumor formation has been explored in a xenograft nude mouse model, and the molecular mechanisms underlying ISO inhibition of Sp1 expression and anticancer activities have been elucidated both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the studies demonstrated that ISO treatment induced the expression of miR-137, which in turn suppressed Sp1 protein translation by directly targeting Sp1 mRNA 3'-untranslated region (UTR). Similar to ISO treatment, ectopic expression of miR-137 alone led to G0-G1 cell growth arrest and inhibition of anchorage-independent growth in human bladder cancer cells, which could be completely reversed by overexpression of GFP-Sp1. The inhibition of miR-137 expression attenuated ISO-induced inhibition of Sp1/Cyclin D1 expression, induction of G0-G1 cell growth arrest, and suppression of cell anchorage-independent growth. Taken together, our studies have demonstrated that miR-137 induction by ISO targets Sp1 mRNA 3'-UTR and inhibits Sp1 protein translation, which consequently results in reduction of Cyclin D1 expression, induction of G0-G1 growth arrest, and inhibition of anchorage-independent growth in vitro and in vivo. Our results have provided novel insights into understanding the anticancer activity of ISO in the therapy of human bladder cancer. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. A peptide targeting an interaction interface disrupts the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer to block signaling and function in vitro and in vivo: effective selective antagonism

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    Hasbi, Ahmed; Perreault, Melissa L.; Shen, Maurice Y. F.; Zhang, Lucia; To, Ryan; Fan, Theresa; Nguyen, Tuan; Ji, Xiaodong; O'Dowd, Brian F.; George, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer has emerging physiological relevance and a postulated role in different neuropsychiatric disorders, such as drug addiction, depression, and schizophrenia, there is a need for pharmacological tools that selectively target such receptor complexes in order to analyze their biological and pathophysiological functions. Since no selective antagonists for the D1-D2 heteromer are available, serial deletions and point mutations were used to precisely identify the amino acids involved in an interaction interface between the receptors, residing within the carboxyl tail of the D1 receptor that interacted with the D2 receptor to form the D1-D2 receptor heteromer. It was determined that D1 receptor carboxyl tail residues 404Glu and 405Glu were critical in mediating the interaction with the D2 receptor. Isolated mutation of these residues in the D1 receptor resulted in the loss of agonist activation of the calcium signaling pathway mediated through the D1-D2 receptor heteromer. The physical interaction between the D1 and D2 receptor could be disrupted, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation and BRET analysis, by a small peptide generated from the D1 receptor sequence that contained these amino acids, leading to a switch in G-protein affinities and loss of calcium signaling, resulting in the inhibition of D1-D2 heteromer function. The use of the D1-D2 heteromer-disrupting peptide in vivo revealed a pathophysiological role for the D1-D2 heteromer in the modulation of behavioral despair. This peptide may represent a novel pharmacological tool with potential therapeutic benefits in depression treatment.—Hasbi, A., Perreault, M. L., Shen, M. Y. F., Zhang, L., To, R., Fan, T., Nguyen, T., Ji, X., O'Dowd, B. F., George, S. R. A peptide targeting an interaction interface disrupts the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer to block signaling and function in vitro and in vivo: effective selective antagonism. PMID:25063849

  5. Protease-functionalized mucus penetrating microparticles: In-vivo evidence for their potential.

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    Mahmood, Arshad; Laffleur, Flavia; Leonaviciute, Gintare; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2017-10-30

    The focus of the current study was to explore whether immobilization of proteases to microparticles could result in their enhanced penetration into mucus. The proteases papain (PAP) and bromelain (BROM) were covalently attached to a polyacrylate (PAA; Carbopol 971P) via amide bond formation based on carbodiimide reaction. Microparticles containing these conjugates were generated via ionic gelation with calcium chloride and were characterized regarding size, surface charge, enzymatic activity and fluorescein diacetate (FDA) loading efficiency. Furthermore, mucus penetration potential of these microparticles was evaluated in-vitro on freshly collected porcine intestinal mucus, on intact intestinal mucosa and in-vivo in Sprague-Dawley rats. Results showed mean diameter of microparticles ranging between 2-3μm and surface charge between -8 to -18mV. The addition of PAA-microparticles to porcine intestinal mucus led to a 1.39-fold increase in dynamic viscosity whereas a 3.10- and 2.12-fold decrease was observed in case of PAA-PAP and PAA-BROM microparticles, respectively. Mucus penetration studies showed a 4.27- and 2.21- fold higher permeation of FDA loaded PAA-PAP and PAA-BROM microparticles as compared to PAA microparticles, respectively. Extent of mucus diffusion determined via silicon tube assay illustrated 3.96- fold higher penetration for PAA-PAP microparticles and 1.99- fold for PAA-BROM microparticles. An in-vitro analysis on porcine intestinal mucosa described up to 16- and 7.35-fold higher degree of retention and furthermore, during in-vivo evaluation in Sprague-Dawley rats a 3.35- and 2.07-fold higher penetration behavior was observed in small intestine for PAA-PAP and PAA-BROM microparticles as compared to PAA microparticles, respectively. According to these results, evidence for microparticles decorated with proteases in order to overcome the mucus barrier and to reach the absorption lining has been provided that offers wide ranging applications in mucosal

  6. Senolytic drugs target?alveolar epithelial cell function and attenuate experimental lung fibrosis ex vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Mareike; Korfei, Martina; Mutze, Kathrin; Klee, Stephan; Skronska-Wasek, Wioletta; Alsafadi, Hani N.; Ota, Chiharu; Costa, Rita; Schiller, Herbert B.; Lindner, Michael; Wagner, Darcy E; G?nther, Andreas; K?nigshoff, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating lung disease with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. The incidence of IPF increases with age, and ageing-related mechanisms such as cellular senescence have been proposed as pathogenic drivers. The lung alveolar epithelium represents a major site of tissue injury in IPF and senescence of this cell population is probably detrimental to lung repair. However, the potential pathomechanisms of alveolar epithelial cell senescence and...

  7. Recent advances in in vivo genotoxicity testing: prediction of carcinogenic potential using comet and micronucleus assay in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung Hun; Kwon, Jee Young; Lee, Jong Kwon; Seo, Young Rok

    2013-12-01

    Genotoxic events have been known as crucial step in the initiation of cancer. To assess the risk of cancer, genotoxicity assays, including comet, micronucleus (MN), chromosomal aberration, bacterial reverse, and sister chromatid exchange assay, can be performed. Compared with in vitro genotoxicity assay, in vivo genotoxicity assay has been used to verify in vitro assay result and definitely provide biological significance for certain organs or cell types. The comet assay can detect DNA strand breaks as markers of genotoxicity. Methods of the in vivo comet assay have been established by Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM) validation studies depending on tissue and sample types. The MN can be initiated by segregation error and lagging acentric chromosome fragment. Methods of the in vivo MN assay have been established by Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guidelines and many studies. Combining the in vivo comet and MN assay has been regarded as useful methodology for evaluating genetic damage, and it has been used in the assessment of potential carcinogenicity by complementarily presenting two distinct endpoints of the in vivo genotoxicity individual test. Few studies have investigated the quantitative relation between in vivo genotoxicity results and carcinogenicity. Extensive studies emphasizes that positive correlation is detectable. This review summarizes the results of the in vivo comet and MN assays that have investigated the genotoxicity of carcinogens as classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) carcinogenicity database. As a result, these genotoxicity data may provide meaningful information for the assessment of potential carcinogenicity and for implementation in the prevention of cancer.

  8. Individuals' attentional bias toward an envied target's name: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jun; Liu, Yongfang; Zhang, Entao; Luo, Junlong; Chen, Jie

    2013-08-29

    Individuals may pay more attention to information about envied targets. Thus, we further investigate the neural correlates underlying the cognitive processing of envy-related stimuli. Participants read information about target persons characterized by two domains: levels of possession and self-relevance of comparison. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were then recorded for three target names (high-envy, moderate-envy, and low-envy) while participants performed a three-stimulus oddball task. The results showed that high- and moderate-envy target names elicited larger P300 amplitudes than did low-envy target names. Specifically, high-envy target names elicited larger P300 amplitudes than did low-envy target names at the left, central, and right sites; in contrast, moderate-envy target names elicited larger P300 amplitudes than did low-envy target names only at central sites. P300 amplitudes did not differ between high- and moderate-envy target names. Thus, we extend previous behavioral findings by showing that people preferentially attend toward envy-related stimuli, as reflected by enhanced P300 amplitudes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The NS3 and NS4A genes as the targets of RNA interference inhibit replication of Japanese encephalitis virus in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Wu, Rui; Liu, Hanyang; Wen, Xintian; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Ma, Xiaoping; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Qin; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-12-15

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that can cause acute encephalitis with a high fatality rate. RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool to silence gene expression and a potential therapy for virus infection. In this study, the antiviral ability of eight shRNA expression plasmids targeting different sites of the NS3 and NS4A genes of JEV was determined in BHK21 cells and mice. The pGP-NS3-3 and pGP-NS4A-4 suppressed 93.9% and 82.0% of JEV mRNA in cells, respectively. The virus titer in cells was reduced approximately 950-fold by pretreating with pGP-NS3-4, and 640-fold by pretreating with pGP-NS4A-4. The results of western blot and immunofluorescence analysis showed JEV E protein and viral load in cells were remarkably inhibited by shRNA expression plasmids. The viral load in brains of mice pretreated with pGP-NS3-4 or pGP-NS4A-4 were reduced approximately 2400-fold and 800-fold, respectively, and the survival rate of mice challenged with JEV were 70% and 50%, respectively. However, the antiviral ability of shRNA expression plasmids was decreased over time. This study indicates that RNAi targeting of the NS3 and NS4A genes of JEV can sufficiently inhibit the replication of JEV in vitro and in vivo, and NS3 and NS4A genes might be potential targets of molecular therapy for JEV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Finding potential drug targets against Shigella flexneri through druggable proteome exploration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Uzzal Hossain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Background: Shigella flexneri is a gram negative bacteria that causes the infectious disease ‘shigellosis’. Shigella flexneri (S. flexneri is responsible for developing diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps in human. Antibiotics are mostly given to patients infected with shigella. Resistance to antibiotics can hinder its treatment significantly. Upon identification of essential therapeutic targets, vaccine and drug could be effective therapy for the treatment of shigellosis. Methods: The study was designed for the identification and qualitative characterization for potential drug targets from S. flexneri by using the subtractive genome analysis. A set of computational tools were used to identify essential proteins those are required for the survival of S. flexneri. Total proteome (13503 proteins of S. flexneri was retrieved from NCBI and further analyzed by subtractive channel analysis. After identification of the metabolic proteins we have also performed its qualitative characterization to pave the way for the identification of promising drug targets. Results: Subtractive analysis revealed that a list of 53 targets of S. flexneri were human non-homologous essential metabolic proteins that might be used for potential drug targets. We have also found that 11 drug targets are involved in unique pathway. Most of these proteins are cytoplasmic, can be used as broad spectrum drug targets, can interact with other proteins and show the druggable properties. The functionality and drug binding site analysis suggest a promising effective way to design the new drugs against S. flexneri. Conclusion: We have identified 13 potential novel drug and one vaccine target(s against S. flexneri. The outcome might also be used as module as well as circuit design in systems biology. Keywords: S. flexneri, drug target, therapeutics, metabolic proteins, proteome

  11. Extra Domain B Fibronectin as a Target for Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Rheumatoid Arthritis Affected Joints In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Vollmer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated a molecular imaging approach for the detection of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by targeting the extra domain B (ED-B of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. ED-B is a highly conserved domain (identical in human and rats that is produced by alternative splicing during embryonic development and during vascular remodeling such as angiogenesis. The hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis is synovitis leading to both angiogenesis in the synovium and the promotion of cartilage and bone disruption. For in vivo diagnostics, the ED-B-binding single-chain antibody fragment AP39 was used as a targeting probe. It was covalently linked to the near-infrared dye tetrasulfocyanine (TSC to be visualized by near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The resulting AP39-TSC conjugate was intravenously administered to rats with collagen-induced arthritis and the respective controls. Ovalbumin-TSC was used as control conjugate. Optical imaging over a time period of 24 hours using a planar imaging setup resulted in a clear enhancement of fluorescence intensity in joints with moderate to severe arthritis compared with control joints between 3 and 8 hours postinjection. Given that AP39 is a fully human antibody fragment, this molecular imaging approach for arthritis detection might be translated to humans.

  12. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of anti-nucleolin-targeted magnetic PLGA nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin as a theranostic agent for enhanced targeted cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosafer, Jafar; Abnous, Khalil; Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-04-01

    A superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs)/doxorubicin (Dox) co-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-based nanoparticles targeted with AS1411 aptamer (Apt) against murine C26 colon carcinoma cells is successfully developed via a modified multiple emulsion solvent evaporation method for theranostic purposes. The mean size of SPIO/Dox-NPs (NPs) was 130nm with a narrow particle size distribution and Dox loading of 3.0%. The SPIO loading of 16.0% and acceptable magnetic properties are obtained and analyzed using thermogravimetric and vibration simple magnetometer analysis, respectively. The best release profile from NPs was observed in PBS at pH 7.4, in which very low burst release was observed. Nucleolin is a targeting ligand to facilitate anti-tumor delivery of AS1411-targeted NPs. The Apt conjugation to NPs (Apt-NPs) enhanced cellular uptake of Dox in C26 cancer cells. Apt-NPs enhance the cytotoxicity effect of Dox followed by a significantly higher tumor inhibition and prolonged animal survival in mice bearing C26 colon carcinoma xenografts. Furthermore, Apt-NPs enhance the contrast of magnetic resonance images in tumor site. Altogether, these Apt-NPs could be considered as a powerful tumor-targeted delivery system for their potential as dual therapeutic and diagnostic applications in cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. In vivo tumor targeting and imaging with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody-conjugated dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wan-Ju; Liang, Chan-Jung; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Wang, Shu-Huei; Lai, I-Rue; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Chang, Fu-Hsiung; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Yang, Shieh-Yueh; Wu, Chau-Chung; Chen, Yuh-Lien

    2012-01-01

    -VEGF-NPs have potential for use as a molecular-targeted tumor imaging agent in vivo.

  14. Concomitant expression of several peptide receptors in neuroendocrine tumours: molecular basis for in vivo multireceptor tumour targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Waser, Beatrice

    2003-05-01

    Peptide receptors have been found to represent excellent targets for in vivo cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent in vitro studies have shown that many cancers can overexpress not only one but several peptide receptors concomitantly. One of the challenges for nuclear medicine in this field in the coming decade will be to take advantage of the co-expression of peptide receptors for multireceptor tumour targeting. In vitro receptor studies can reveal which peptide receptor is overexpressed in which tumour and which receptors are co-expressed in an individual tumour; such knowledge is a prerequisite for successful in vivo development. One group of tumours of particular interest in this respect is the neuroendocrine tumours, which have previously been shown often to express peptide receptors. This review summarises our investigations of the concomitant expression of 13 different peptide receptors, in more than 100 neuroendocrine tumours of the human intestine, pancreas and lung, using in vitro receptor autoradiography with subtype-selective ligands. The incidence and density of the somatostatin receptors sst(1)-sst(5), the VIP receptors VPAC(1) and VPAC(2), the CCK(1) and CCK(2) receptors, the three bombesin receptor subtypes BB(1) (NMB receptor), BB(2) (GRP receptor) and BB(3), and GLP-1 receptors were evaluated. While the presence of VPAC(1) and sst(2) was detected in the majority of these neuroendocrine tumours, the other receptors, more differentially expressed, revealed a characteristic receptor pattern in several tumour types. Ileal carcinoids expressed sst(2) and VPAC(1) receptors in virtually all cases and had CCK(1), CCK(2), sst(1) or sst(5) in approximately half of the cases; they were the only tumours of this series to express NMB receptors. Insulinomas were characterised by a very high incidence of GLP-1, CCK(2) and VPAC(1) receptors, with the GLP-1 receptors expressed in a particularly high density; they expressed sst(2) in two-thirds and sst(1) in

  15. Concomitant expression of several peptide receptors in neuroendocrine tumours: molecular basis for in vivo multireceptor tumour targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Waser, Beatrice [Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, University of Berne, Murtenstrasse 31, PO Box 62, 3010, Berne (Switzerland)

    2003-05-01

    Peptide receptors have been found to represent excellent targets for in vivo cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent in vitro studies have shown that many cancers can overexpress not only one but several peptide receptors concomitantly. One of the challenges for nuclear medicine in this field in the coming decade will be to take advantage of the co-expression of peptide receptors for multireceptor tumour targeting. In vitro receptor studies can reveal which peptide receptor is overexpressed in which tumour and which receptors are co-expressed in an individual tumour; such knowledge is a prerequisite for successful in vivo development. One group of tumours of particular interest in this respect is the neuroendocrine tumours, which have previously been shown often to express peptide receptors. This review summarises our investigations of the concomitant expression of 13 different peptide receptors, in more than 100 neuroendocrine tumours of the human intestine, pancreas and lung, using in vitro receptor autoradiography with subtype-selective ligands. The incidence and density of the somatostatin receptors sst{sub 1}-sst{sub 5}, the VIP receptors VPAC{sub 1} and VPAC{sub 2}, the CCK{sub 1} and CCK{sub 2} receptors, the three bombesin receptor subtypes BB{sub 1} (NMB receptor), BB{sub 2} (GRP receptor) and BB{sub 3}, and GLP-1 receptors were evaluated. While the presence of VPAC{sub 1} and sst{sub 2} was detected in the majority of these neuroendocrine tumours, the other receptors, more differentially expressed, revealed a characteristic receptor pattern in several tumour types. Ileal carcinoids expressed sst{sub 2} and VPAC{sub 1} receptors in virtually all cases and had CCK{sub 1}, CCK{sub 2}, sst{sub 1} or sst{sub 5} in approximately half of the cases; they were the only tumours of this series to express NMB receptors. Insulinomas were characterised by a very high incidence of GLP-1, CCK{sub 2} and VPAC{sub 1} receptors, with the GLP-1 receptors expressed in a

  16. Dopaminergic mechanisms of target detection - P300 event related potential and striatal dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogarell, Oliver; Padberg, Frank; Karch, Susanne; Segmiller, Felix; Juckel, Georg; Mulert, Christoph; Hegerl, Ulrich; Tatsch, Klaus; Koch, Walter

    2011-12-30

    The P300 is a cortically generated event related potential (ERP) widely used in neurophysiological research since it is related to cognitive functions and central information processing. Intracerebral recordings and functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that this potential is generated by various brain regions including frontal, temporal and parietal cortices. Regarding the neurochemical background, clinical and genetic investigations suggest that dopaminergic neurons could be involved in the generation of the P300. However, there is no direct evidence in vivo that P300 amplitudes and latencies are related to dopaminergic parameters. The aim of this study was to further elucidate dopaminergic aspects of the P300 ERP by combining neurophysiological and nuclear medicine assessments in vivo. Patients with a major depressive episode underwent both P300 recordings and dynamic [¹²³I] IBZM SPECT for the evaluation of striatal dopamine D₂/D₃-receptor availability. There were statistically significant positive correlations of the striatal dopamine D₂/D₃-receptor status with P300 amplitudes and significant negative correlations with P300 latencies. Using this combined approach, the study presents direct evidence in vivo that the central dopaminergic system might play an important role in the generation of the P300 and that central dopaminergic activity could be involved in the modulation of P300 parameters. This association might be of relevance for the interpretation of P300 studies in psychiatric disorders. 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. U1 Adaptor Oligonucleotides Targeting BCL2 and GRM1 Suppress Growth of Human Melanoma Xenografts In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Goraczniak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available U1 Adaptor is a recently discovered oligonucleotide-based gene-silencing technology with a unique mechanism of action that targets nuclear pre-mRNA processing. U1 Adaptors have two distinct functional domains, both of which must be present on the same oligonucleotide to exert their gene-silencing function. Here, we present the first in vivo use of U1 Adaptors by targeting two different human genes implicated in melanomagenesis, B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2 and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1, in a human melanoma cell xenograft mouse model system. Using a newly developed dendrimer delivery system, anti-BCL2 U1 Adaptors were very potent and suppressed tumor growth at doses as low as 34 µg/kg with twice weekly intravenous (iv administration. Anti-GRM1 U1 Adaptors suppressed tumor xenograft growth with similar potency. Mechanism of action was demonstrated by showing target gene suppression in tumors and by observing that negative control U1 Adaptors with just one functional domain show no tumor suppression activity. The anti-BCL2 and anti-GRM1 treatments were equally effective against cell lines harboring either wild-type or a mutant V600E B-RAF allele, the most common mutation in melanoma. Treatment of normal immune-competent mice (C57BL6 indicated no organ toxicity or immune stimulation. These proof-of-concept studies represent an in-depth (over 800 mice in ~108 treatment groups validation that U1 Adaptors are a highly potent gene-silencing therapeutic and open the way for their further development to treat other human diseases.

  18. Potential neoplastic evolution of Vero cells: in vivo and in vitro characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, N A; Renzi, S; Piovani, G; Ajmone Marsan, P; Bomba, L; Villa, R; Ferrari, M; Dotti, S

    2017-10-01

    Vero cell lines are extensively employed in viral vaccine manufacturing. Similarly to all established cells, mutations can occur during Vero cells in vitro amplification which can result in adverse features compromising their biological safety. To evaluate the potential neoplastic evolution of these cells, in vitro transformation test, gene expression analysis and karyotyping were compared among low- (127 and 139 passages) and high-passage (passage 194) cell lines, as well as transformed colonies (TCs). In vivo tumorigenicity was also tested to confirm preliminary in vitro data obtained for low passage lines and TCs. Moreover, Vero cells cultivated in foetal bovine serum-free medium and derived from TCs were analysed to investigate the influence of cultivation methods on tumorigenic evolution. Low-passage Vero developed TCs in soft agar, without showing any tumorigenic evolution when inoculated in the animal model. Karyotyping showed a hypo-diploid modal chromosome number and rearrangements with no difference among Vero cell line passages and TCs. These abnormalities were reported also in serum-free cultivated Vero. Gene expression revealed that high-passage Vero cells had several under-expressed and a few over-expressed genes compared to low-passage ones. Gene ontology revealed no significant enrichment of pathways related to oncogenic risk. These findings suggest that in vitro high passage, and not culture conditions, induces Vero transformation correlated to karyotype and gene expression alterations. These data, together with previous investigations reporting tumour induction in high-passage Vero cells, suggest the use of low-passage Vero cells or cell lines other than Vero to increase the safety of vaccine manufacturing.

  19. Inflammation-Induced Cell Proliferation Potentiates DNA Damage-Induced Mutations In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Orsolya; Gong, Guanyu; Olipitz, Werner; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations are a critical driver of cancer initiation. While extensive studies have focused on exposure-induced mutations, few studies have explored the importance of tissue physiology as a modulator of mutation susceptibility in vivo. Of particular interest is inflammation, a known cancer risk factor relevant to chronic inflammatory diseases and pathogen-induced inflammation. Here, we used the fluorescent yellow direct repeat (FYDR) mice that harbor a reporter to detect misalignments during homologous recombination (HR), an important class of mutations. FYDR mice were exposed to cerulein, a potent inducer of pancreatic inflammation. We show that inflammation induces DSBs (γH2AX foci) and that several days later there is an increase in cell proliferation. While isolated bouts of inflammation did not induce HR, overlap between inflammation-induced DNA damage and inflammation-induced cell proliferation induced HR significantly. To study exogenously-induced DNA damage, animals were exposed to methylnitrosourea, a model alkylating agent that creates DNA lesions relevant to both environmental exposures and cancer chemotherapy. We found that exposure to alkylation damage induces HR, and importantly, that inflammation-induced cell proliferation and alkylation induce HR in a synergistic fashion. Taken together, these results show that, during an acute bout of inflammation, there is a kinetic barrier separating DNA damage from cell proliferation that protects against mutations, and that inflammation-induced cell proliferation greatly potentiates exposure-induced mutations. These studies demonstrate a fundamental mechanism by which inflammation can act synergistically with DNA damage to induce mutations that drive cancer and cancer recurrence. PMID:25647331

  20. Alkaloids in Erythrina by UPLC-ESI-MS and In Vivo Hypotensive Potential of Extractive Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liara Merlugo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythrina species are used in popular medicine as sedative, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory, and antihypertensive. In this work, we investigated the chemical composition of extracts obtained from leaves of E. falcata and E. crista-galli. The hypotensive potential of E. falcata and the mechanism of action were also studied. The extracts were obtained by maceration and infusion. The total content of phenolic compounds and flavonoids was estimated by spectrophotometric methods. The chemical constituents were studied performing a chromatographic analysis by UPLC-ESI-MS. For in vivo protocols, blood pressure and heart rate were measured by the invasive hemodynamic monitoring method. Different concentrations of extracts and drugs such as L-NAME, losartan, hexamethonium, and propranolol were administrated i.v. The results of total phenolic contents for E. falcata and E. crista-galli were 1.3193–1.4989 mgGAE/mL for maceration and 0.8771–0.9506 mgGAE/mL for infusion. In total flavonoids, the content was 7.7829–8.1976 mg RE/g for maceration and 9.3471–10.4765 RE mg/g for infusion. The chemical composition was based on alkaloids, suggesting the presence of erythristemine, 11β-methoxyglucoerysodine, erysothiopine, 11β-hydroxyerysodine-glucose, and 11-hydroxyerysotinone-rhamnoside. A potent dose-dependent hypotensive effect was observed for E. falcata, which may be related to the route of β-adrenergic receptors.

  1. Dextran-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles as potential cancer drug carriers in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingli; Li, Houli; Luo, Zhiyi; Kong, Jian; Wan, Yinsheng; Zheng, Lemin; Zhang, Qinlu; Niu, Hongxin; Vermorken, Alphons; van de Ven, Wim; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xikun; Li, Fuqiang; Guo, Lili; Cui, Yali

    2015-06-01

    Dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (DSPIONs) have gained considerable interest, because of their biocompatibility and biosafety in clinics. Doxorubicin (Dox), a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, always has limited applications in clinical therapy due to its serious side effects of dose-limiting irreversible cardiotoxicity and myelo suppression. Herein, DSPIONs were synthesized and developed as magnetic carriers for doxorubicin. The Dox-DSPION conjugates were evaluated in the in vitro test of Dox release, which showed pH-dependence with the highest release percentage of 50.3% at pH 5.0 and the lowest release percentage of 11.8% in a physiological environment. The cytotoxicity of DSPIONs and Dox-DSPIONs evaluated by the MTT assay indicated that DSPIONs had no cytotoxicity and the conjugates had significantly reduced the toxicity (IC50 = 1.36 μg mL-1) compared to free Dox (IC50 = 0.533 μg mL-1). Furthermore, confocal microscopic data of cell uptake suggest that less cytotoxicity of Dox-DSPIONs may be attributed to the cellular internalization of the conjugates and sustainable release of Dox from the formulation in the cytoplasm. More importantly, the results from the rabbit VX2 liver tumor model test under an external magnetic field showed that the conjugates had approximately twice the anti-tumor activity and two and a half times the animal survival rate, respectively, compared to free Dox. Collectively, our data have demonstrated that Dox-DSPIONs have less toxicity with better antitumor effectiveness in in vitro and in vivo applications, suggesting that the conjugates have potential to be developed into chemo-therapeutic formulations.

  2. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a (18F-labeled high affinity NOTA conjugated bombesin antagonist as a PET ligand for GRPR-targeted tumor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Varasteh

    Full Text Available Expression of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR in prostate cancer suggests that this receptor can be used as a potential molecular target to visualize and treat these tumors. We have previously investigated an antagonist analog of bombesin (D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2, RM26 conjugated to 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N''-triacetic acid (NOTA via a diethylene glycol (PEG2 spacer (NOTA-P2-RM26 labeled with (68Ga and (111In. We found that this conjugate has favorable properties for in vivo imaging of GRPR-expression. The focus of this study was to develop a (18F-labelled PET agent to visualize GRPR. NOTA-P2-RM26 was labeled with (18F using aluminum-fluoride chelation. Stability, in vitro binding specificity and cellular processing tests were performed. The inhibition efficiency (IC50 of the [(natF]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 was compared to that of the (natGa-loaded peptide using (125I-Tyr(4-BBN as the displacement radioligand. The pharmacokinetics and in vivo binding specificity of the compound were studied. NOTA-P2-RM26 was labeled with (18F within 1 h (60-65% decay corrected radiochemical yield, 55 GBq/µmol. The radiopeptide was stable in murine serum and showed high specific binding to PC-3 cells. [(natF]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 showed a low nanomolar inhibition efficiency (IC50=4.4±0.8 nM. The internalization rate of the tracer was low. Less than 14% of the cell-bound radioactivity was internalized after 4 h. The biodistribution of [(18F]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 demonstrated rapid blood clearance, low liver uptake and low kidney retention. The tumor uptake at 3 h p.i. was 5.5±0.7 %ID/g, and the tumor-to-blood, -muscle and -bone ratios were 87±42, 159±47, 38±16, respectively. The uptake in tumors, pancreas and other GRPR-expressing organs was significantly reduced when excess amount of non-labeled peptide was co-injected. The low uptake in bone suggests a high in vivo stability of the Al-F bond. High contrast PET image was obtained 3 h p

  3. Folic Acid Conjugated Chitosan for Targeted Delivery of siRNA to Activated Macrophages in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Chuanxu; Gao, Shan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Activated macrophages play an important role in the initiation and development of inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study is to develop a delivery system that targets siRNA to activated macrophages. Exploiting the presence of folate receptors on the surface of activated macrophages, folic acid...... was conjugated to chitosan (FA–CS) and used to formulate siRNA into nanoparticles capable of cell specific delivery. The physiochemical properties of the nanoparticles, including size, zeta-potential and encapsulation efficiency, were characterized and the intracellular uptake and gene silencing efficiency were......–CS can be a potential siRNA carrier for anti-inflammatory therapy...

  4. Identification of multi-targeted anti-migraine potential of nystatin and development of its brain targeted chitosan nanoformulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotra, Priti; Thakur, Aman; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Shailendra Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The complex pathophysiology involved in migraine necessitates the drug treatment to act on several receptors simultaneously. The present investigation was an attempt to discover the unidentified anti-migraine activity of the already marketed drugs. Shared featured pharmacophore modeling was employed for this purpose on six target receptors (β2 adrenoceptor, Dopamine D3, 5HT1B, TRPV1, iGluR5 kainate and CGRP), resulting in the generation of five shared featured pharmacophores, which were further subjected to virtual screening of the ligands obtained from Drugbank database. Molecular docking, performed on the obtained hit compounds from virtual screening, indicated nystatin to be the only active lead against the receptors iGluR5 kainate receptor (1VSO), CGRP (3N7R), β2 adrenoceptor (3NYA) and Dopamine D3 (3PBL) with a high binding energy of -11.1, -10.9, -10.2 and -12kcal/mole respectively. The anti-migraine activity of nystatin was then adjudged by fabricating its brain targeted chitosan nanoparticles. Its brain targeting efficacy, analyzed qualitatively by confocal laser scanning microscopy, demonstrated a significant amount of drug reaching the brain. The pharmacodynamic models on Swiss male albino mice revealed significant anti-migraine activity of the nanoformulation. The present study reports for the first time the therapeutic potential of nystatin in migraine management, hence opening avenues for its future exploration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Indirect targeting of IGF receptor signaling in vivo by substrate-selective inhibition of PAPP-A proteolytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Bhanu; Savjani, Gopal; Kumar, Ajay; Conover, Cheryl A.; Oxvig, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is involved in certain human cancers, and the feasibility of directly targeting the IGF receptor has been actively investigated. However, recent evidence from clinical trials suggests that this approach can be problematic. We have developed an alternative strategy to indirectly inhibit the IGF signaling by targeting the metalloproteinase, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A). PAPP-A associated with the cell surface cleaves IGF binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4), when IGF is bound to IGFBP-4, and thereby increases IGF bioavailability for receptor activation in an autocrine/paracrine manner. We hypothesized that inhibition of PAPP-A would suppress excessive local IGF signaling in tissues where this is caused by increased PAPP-A proteolytic activity. To test this hypothesis, we developed an inhibitory monoclonal antibody, mAb 1/41, which targets a unique substrate-binding exosite of PAPP-A. This inhibitor selectively and specifically inhibits proteolytic cleavage of IGFBP-4 with an inhibitory constant (Ki) of 135 pM. In addition, it inhibited intracellular signaling of the IGF receptor (AKT phosphorylation) in monolayers of A549 cells, an IGF-responsive lung cancer-derived cell line found to express high levels of PAPP-A. We further showed that mAb 1/41 is effective towards PAPP-A bound to cell surfaces, and that it is capable of inhibiting PAPP-A activity in vivo. Using a murine xenograft model of A549 cells, we demonstrated that mAb 1/41 administered intraperitoneally significantly inhibited tumor growth. Analysis of xenograft tumor tissue recovered from treated mice showed penetration of mAb 1/41, reduced IGFBP-4 proteolysis, and reduced AKT phosphorylation. Our study provides proof of concept that IGF signaling can be selectively reduced by targeting a regulatory proteinase that functions extracellularly, upstream of the IGF receptor. PAPP-A targeting thus represents an alternative therapeutic strategy for

  6. Tumor Targeting Potential of Lipid-Based Nano-Pharmaceuticals (LNPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kshitij; Yavlovich, Amichai; Puri, Anu; Blumenthal, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated targeted drug delivery has become the modality of interest for cancer/tumor therapy as it reduces the undesirable delivery to normal cells and improves efficacy of the pharmaceuticals. Among all the nanosystems, lipid-based nano-pharmaceuticals (LNPs) have been most extensively studied for cancer therapy. Doxil formulation was the first LNP that has been approved for cancer treatment. When conjugated with ligands, LNPs can be targeted to tumor cells. This chapter focuses on the targeting potential of LNPs for cancer therapy. We will discuss the advantages of enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect (passive targeting) for preferential tumor accumulation of LNPs, the importance of pegylation to avoid reticulo-endothelial system uptake and active targeting strategies using various targeting ligands that can be coupled to the LNP surface to target the tumor region (tumor cells/tumor vasculature). Targeted LNPs show higher binding affinity, greater intracellular localization and thereby increased cancer cell killing in comparison to non targeted LNPs. However, contrasting reports exist that pose challenges to the notion that targeted LNPs are advantageous. Recent trends have also demonstrated the concept of dual targeting that simultaneously homes LNPs to receptors on the tumor cells and biomarkers expressed on the tumor vasculature. In addition, targeting with multiple ligands on the LNPs has also been explored. These approaches may prove to be a better answer for next generation of LNPs for delivery of anti-cancer agents. However, more extensive studies are required to get their clinical approval in anti-cancer therapy.

  7. Mapping calcium phosphate activated gene networks as a strategy for targeted osteoinduction of human progenitors in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyckmans, J.; Roberts, S.J.; Bolander, J.; Schrooten, J.; Chen, C.S.; Luyten, F.P.

    2014-01-01

    Although calcium phosphate-containing biomaterials are promising scaffolds for bone regenerative strategies, the osteoinductive capacity of such materials is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous mechanisms of in vivo calcium phosphate-driven, ectopic bone formation could be identified and used to induce enhanced differentiation in vitro of the same progenitor population. To accomplish this, human periosteum derived cells (hPDCs) were seeded on hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffolds (calcium phosphate rich matrix or CPRM), or on decalcified scaffolds (calcium phosphate depleted matrix or CPDM), followed by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice to trigger ectopic bone formation. In this system, osteoblast differentiation occurred in CPRM scaffolds, but not in CPDM scaffolds. Gene expression was assessed by human full-genome microarray at 20 hours after seeding, and 2, 8 and 18 days after implantation. In both matrices, implantation of the cell constructs triggered a similar gene expression cascade, however, gene expression dynamics progressed faster in CPRM scaffolds than in CPDM scaffolds. The difference in gene expression dynamics was associated with differential activation of hub genes and molecular signaling pathways related to calcium signaling (CREB), inflammation (TNFα, NFkB, and IL6) and bone development (TGFβ, β-catenin, BMP, EGF, and ERK signaling). Starting from this set of pathways, a growth factor cocktail was developed that robustly enhanced osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that through the identification and subsequent stimulation of genes, proteins and signaling pathways associated with calcium phosphate mediated osteoinduction, a focused approach to develop targeted differentiation protocols in adult progenitor cells can be achieved. PMID:23537666

  8. Identification of potential target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 and HUVEC cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulec, Cagri, E-mail: cagri.gulec@gmail.com; Coban, Neslihan, E-mail: neslic@istanbul.edu.tr; Ozsait-Selcuk, Bilge, E-mail: ozsaitb@istanbul.edu.tr; Sirma-Ekmekci, Sema, E-mail: semasirma@gmail.com; Yildirim, Ozlem, E-mail: ozlm-yildirim@hotmail.com; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan, E-mail: nihanerginel@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    ROR-alpha is a nuclear receptor, activity of which can be modulated by natural or synthetic ligands. Due to its possible involvement in, and potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, we aimed to identify ROR-alpha target genes in monocytic and endothelial cell lines. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by tiling array (ChIP-on-chip) for ROR-alpha in monocytic cell line THP1 and endothelial cell line HUVEC. Following bioinformatic analysis of the array data, we tested four candidate genes in terms of dependence of their expression level on ligand-mediated ROR-alpha activity, and two of them in terms of promoter occupancy by ROR-alpha. Bioinformatic analyses of ChIP-on-chip data suggested that ROR-alpha binds to genomic regions near the transcription start site (TSS) of more than 3000 genes in THP1 and HUVEC. Potential ROR-alpha target genes in both cell types seem to be involved mainly in membrane receptor activity, signal transduction and ion transport. While SPP1 and IKBKA were shown to be direct target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 monocytes, inflammation related gene HMOX1 and heat shock protein gene HSPA8 were shown to be potential target genes of ROR-alpha. Our results suggest that ROR-alpha may regulate signaling receptor activity, and transmembrane transport activity through its potential target genes. ROR-alpha seems also to play role in cellular sensitivity to environmental substances like arsenite and chloroprene. Although, the expression analyses have shown that synthetic ROR-alpha ligands can modulate some of potential ROR-alpha target genes, functional significance of ligand-dependent modulation of gene expression needs to be confirmed with further analyses.

  9. Identification of potential target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 and HUVEC cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Cagri; Coban, Neslihan; Ozsait-Selcuk, Bilge; Sirma-Ekmekci, Sema; Yildirim, Ozlem; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan

    2017-04-01

    ROR-alpha is a nuclear receptor, activity of which can be modulated by natural or synthetic ligands. Due to its possible involvement in, and potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, we aimed to identify ROR-alpha target genes in monocytic and endothelial cell lines. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by tiling array (ChIP-on-chip) for ROR-alpha in monocytic cell line THP1 and endothelial cell line HUVEC. Following bioinformatic analysis of the array data, we tested four candidate genes in terms of dependence of their expression level on ligand-mediated ROR-alpha activity, and two of them in terms of promoter occupancy by ROR-alpha. Bioinformatic analyses of ChIP-on-chip data suggested that ROR-alpha binds to genomic regions near the transcription start site (TSS) of more than 3000 genes in THP1 and HUVEC. Potential ROR-alpha target genes in both cell types seem to be involved mainly in membrane receptor activity, signal transduction and ion transport. While SPP1 and IKBKA were shown to be direct target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 monocytes, inflammation related gene HMOX1 and heat shock protein gene HSPA8 were shown to be potential target genes of ROR-alpha. Our results suggest that ROR-alpha may regulate signaling receptor activity, and transmembrane transport activity through its potential target genes. ROR-alpha seems also to play role in cellular sensitivity to environmental substances like arsenite and chloroprene. Although, the expression analyses have shown that synthetic ROR-alpha ligands can modulate some of potential ROR-alpha target genes, functional significance of ligand-dependent modulation of gene expression needs to be confirmed with further analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Resting potential, oncogene-induced tumorigenesis, and metastasis: the bioelectric basis of cancer in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobikin, Maria; Chernet, Brook; Lobo, Daniel; Levin, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Cancer may result from localized failure of instructive cues that normally orchestrate cell behaviors toward the patterning needs of the organism. Steady-state gradients of transmembrane voltage (Vmem) in non-neural cells are instructive, epigenetic signals that regulate pattern formation during embryogenesis and morphostatic repair. Here, we review molecular data on the role of bioelectric cues in cancer and present new findings in the Xenopus laevis model on how the microenvironment's biophysical properties contribute to cancer in vivo. First, we investigated the melanoma-like phenotype arising from serotonergic signaling by ‘instructor’ cells—a cell population that is able to induce a metastatic phenotype in normal melanocytes. We show that when these instructor cells are depolarized, blood vessel patterning is disrupted in addition to the metastatic phenotype induced in melanocytes. Surprisingly, very few instructor cells need to be depolarized for the hyperpigmentation phenotype to occur; we present a model of antagonistic signaling by serotonin receptors that explains the unusual all-or-none nature of this effect. In addition to the body-wide depolarization-induced metastatic phenotype, we investigated the bioelectrical properties of tumor-like structures induced by canonical oncogenes and cancer-causing compounds. Exposure to carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) induces localized tumors, but has a broad (and variable) effect on the bioelectric properties of the whole body. Tumors induced by oncogenes show aberrantly high sodium content, representing a non-invasive diagnostic modality. Importantly, depolarized transmembrane potential is not only a marker of cancer but is functionally instructive: susceptibility to oncogene-induced tumorigenesis is significantly reduced by forced prior expression of hyperpolarizing ion channels. Importantly, the same effect can be achieved by pharmacological manipulation of endogenous chloride channels, suggesting

  11. Tumor microenvironment: driving forces and potential therapeutic targets for breast cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-Yan; Shao, Zhi-Min; Li, Da-Qiang

    2017-03-29

    Distant metastasis to specific target organs is responsible for over 90% of breast cancer-related deaths, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. Mounting evidence suggests that the interplay between breast cancer cells and the target organ microenvironment is the key determinant of organ-specific metastasis of this lethal disease. Here, we highlight new findings and concepts concerning the emerging role of the tumor microenvironment in breast cancer metastasis; we also discuss potential therapeutic intervention strategies aimed at targeting components of the tumor microenvironment.

  12. Use of in vivo phycocyanin fluorescence to monitor potential microcystin-producing cyanobacterial biovolume in a drinking water source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, N; Zamyadi, A; Prévost, M; Bird, D F; Dorner, S

    2011-02-01

    The source water of a drinking water treatment plant prone to blooms, dominated by potential microcystin-producing cyanobacteria, was monitored for two seasons in 2007-2008. In the 2008 season, the median value for potential microcystin-producing cyanobacterial biovolume was 87% of the total phytoplankton biovolume in the untreated water of the plant. Depth profiles taken above the plant's intake identified three sampling days at high risk for the contamination of the plant's raw water with potentially toxic cyanobacteria. Chlorophyceae and Bacillariophyceae caused false positive values to be generated by the phycocyanin probe when cyanobacteria represented a small fraction of the total phytoplanktonic biovolume present. However, there was little interference with the phycocyanin probe readings by other algal species when potential microcystin-producing cyanobacteria dominated the phytoplankton of the plant's untreated water. A two-tiered method for source water monitoring, using in vivo phycocyanin fluorescence, is proposed based on (1) a significant relationship between in vivo phycocyanin fluorescence and cyanobacterial biovolume and (2) the calculated maximum potential microcystin concentration produced by dominant Microcystis sp. biovolume. This method monitors locally-generated threshold values for cyanobacterial biovolume and microcystin concentrations using in vivo phycocyanin fluorescence.

  13. Critical analysis of the potential for therapeutic targeting of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inokuchi M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mikito Inokuchi,1 Keiji Kato,1 Kazuyuki Kojima,2 Kenichi Sugihara1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, 2Department of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Multidisciplinary treatment including chemotherapy has become the global standard of care for patients with metastatic gastric cancer (mGC; nonetheless, survival remains poor. Although many molecular-targeted therapies have been developed for various cancers, only anti-HER2 treatment has produced promising results in patients with mGC. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR plays a key role in cell proliferation, antiapoptosis, and metastasis in signaling pathways from the tyrosine kinase receptor, and its activation has been demonstrated in gastric cancer (GC cells. This review discusses the clinical relevance of mTOR in GC and examines its potential as a therapeutic target in patients with mGC. Preclinical studies in animal models suggest that suppression of the mTOR pathway inhibits the proliferation of GC cells and delays tumor progression. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been evaluated as second- or third-line treatment in clinical trials. Adverse events were well tolerated although the effectiveness of everolimus alone was limited. Everolimus is now being evaluated in combination with chemotherapy in Phase III clinical studies in this subgroup of patients. Two Phase III studies include exploratory biomarker research designed to evaluate the predictive value of the expression or mutation of molecules related to the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These biomarker studies may lead to the realization of targeted therapy for selected patients with mGC in the future. Keywords: gastric cancer, mTOR, everolimus

  14. Ex-vivo Potential of Cadaveric and Fresh Limbal Tissues to Regenerate Cultured Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vemuganti Geeta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate and compare the ex-vivo growth potential and formation of cultured corneal epithelium from residual corneo-limbal rings obtained from the operating room after penetrating keratoplasty, and fresh limbal tissues from patients undergoing routine cataract surgery. Methods: With the approval of the Institutional Review Board and informed consent from patients, 1-2mm of limbal tissues from 15 patients and 31 tissues from the cadaveric limbal ring preserved in MK medium (16 tissues and Optisol (15 tissues were used for the study. Donor data included age, time lapse between death and collection, collection and preservation and preservation and culture. Tiny bits of the limbal tissue were explanted on the de-epithelialised human amniotic membrane prepared following standard guidelines, and cultured using Human Corneal Epithelial cell medium. Radial growth from the explant was observed and measured by phase contrast microscopy over 2-4 weeks. After adequate confluent growth, whole mount preparation of the membrane was made and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Part of the membrane was fixed in formalin and processed for routine histologic examination. The sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Results: Forty-six tissues were evaluated from 42 eyes (15 from patients, 31 from cadaveric eyes with a mean age of 55.3 years ± 21.23 years (range 18 years - 110 years. The growth pattern observed was similar in all the positive cases with clusters of cells budding from the explant over 24- 72 hours, and subsequent formation of a monolayer over the next 2-3 weeks. The stained whole mount preparation showed a radial growth of cells around explants with diameter ranging from 5 to 16mm. Histologic evaluation of the membrane confirmed the growth of 2-3 cell-layered epithelium over the amniotic membrane. Cultivated epithelium around explant cell cultures was observed in 100% (15/15 of limbal tissue obtained from patients, as against

  15. Dual targeting of Bcl-2 and VEGF: a potential strategy to improve therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anai, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Noboru; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Motoyoshi; Porvasnik, Stacy; Urbanek, Cydney; Cao, Wengang; Goodison, Steve; Rosser, Charles J

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Bcl-2 overexpression stimulates angiogenesis in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells, thus giving these tumors a growth advantage. To further elucidate the relationship between Bcl-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in PC-3-Bcl-2 cells, tumorigenicity and angiogenesis were evaluated in our in vitro and in vivo model treated with antisense Bcl-2 oligodeoxynucleotide (ASO) and bevacizumab. In vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays, as well as a xenograft tumor model of the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3-Bcl-2, were subjected to ASO alone, bevacizumab alone, or the combination of ASO and bevacizumab. Protein-based assays (e.g., immunohistochemical staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) were utilized to detect molecular changes. Interestingly, targeting Bcl-2 with ASO resulted in the inhibition of in vitro tube formation and inhibition of angiogenesis in Matrigel plugs similar to treatment with bevacizumab. In our PC-3-Bcl-2 xenograft model, ASO alone resulted in 41% reduction in tumor size, bevacizumab alone resulted in a 50% reduction in tumor size, whereas the combination of ASO with bevacizumab was associated with >95% reduction in tumor volume. Reduction in tumor size in all groups was associated with reduction in Bcl-2 and VEGF expression, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of angiogenesis and its associated chemokine production. These findings confirm that Bcl-2 is a pivotal target for cancer therapy and thus, further study of this novel combination of Bcl-2 reduction and angiogenic targeting in human tumors is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Combination-targeting to multiple endothelial cell adhesion molecules modulates binding, endocytosis, and in vivo biodistribution of drug nanocarriers and their therapeutic cargoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papademetriou, Iason; Tsinas, Zois; Hsu, Janet; Muro, Silvia

    2014-08-28

    Designing of drug nanocarriers to aid delivery of therapeutics is an expanding field that can improve medical treatments. Nanocarriers are often functionalized with elements that recognize cell-surface molecules involved in subcellular transport to improve targeting and endocytosis of therapeutics. Combination-targeting using several affinity elements further modulates this outcome. The most studied example is endothelial targeting via multiple cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), which mimics the strategy of leukocytes to adhere and traverse the vascular endothelium. Yet, the implications of this strategy on intracellular transport and in vivo biodistribution remain uncharacterized. We examined this using nanocarriers functionalized for dual- or triple-targeting to intercellular, platelet-endothelial, and/or vascular CAMs (ICAM-1, PECAM-1, VCAM-1). These molecules differ in expression level, location, pathological stimulation, and/or endocytic pathway. In endothelial cells, binding of PECAM-1/VCAM-1-targeted nanocarriers was intermediate to single-targeted counterparts and enhanced in disease-like conditions. ICAM-1/PECAM-1-targeted nanocarriers surpassed PECAM-1/VCAM-1 in control, but showed lower selectivity toward disease-like conditions. Triple-targeting resulted in binding similar to ICAM-1/PECAM-1 combination and displayed the highest selectivity in disease-like conditions. All combinations were effectively internalized by the cells, with slightly better performance when targeting receptors of different endocytic pathways. In vivo, ICAM-1/PECAM-1-targeted nanocarriers outperformed PECAM-1/VCAM-1 in control and disease-like conditions, and triple-targeted counterparts slightly enhanced this outcome in some organs. As a result, delivery of a model therapeutic cargo (acid sphingomyelinase, deficient in Niemann-Pick disease A-B) was enhanced to all affected organs by triple-targeted nanocarriers, particularly in disease-like conditions. Therefore, multi-CAM targeting

  17. Naringin inhibits growth potential of human triple-negative breast cancer cells by targeting β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongzhong; Yang, Bing; Huang, Jing; Xiang, Tingxiu; Yin, Xuedong; Wan, Jingyuan; Luo, Fuling; Zhang, Li; Li, Hongyuan; Ren, Guosheng

    2013-07-18

    Triple-negative (ER-/PR-/HER2-) breast cancer (TNBC) is a severe clinical problem because of its relatively poorer prognosis, aggressive behavior and lack of targeted therapies. Naringin, a major flavonoid extracted from citrus fruits, has been reported to exert promising anticancer activities. However, the detailed antitumor mechanism of naringin still remains enigmatic. In this study, TNBC cell lines-based in vitro and in vivo models were used to explore the anticancer effect and mechanism of naringin. Our data demonstrated that naringin inhibited cell proliferation, and promoted cell apoptosis and G1 cycle arrest, accompanied by increased p21 and decreased survivin. Meanwhile, β-catenin signaling pathway was found to be suppressed by naringin. In contrast, over-expressing β-catenin by adenoviral vector system in TNBC cells reversed the antitumor activity of naringin, and regulated p21 and survivin. Correspondingly, the antitumor potential of naringin was also observed in naringin-treated MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice, while immunohistochemical analysis of tumors from naringin-treated mice showed higher expression of p21 and lower expression of survivin and active β-catenin. Taken together, these results indicate that naringin could inhibit growth potential of TNBC cells by modulating β-catenin pathway, which suggests naringin might be used as a potential supplement for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Grape polyphenols inhibit Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and potentiate the effects of gefitinib in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie F

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that a combination of dietary grape polyphenols resveratrol, quercetin, and catechin (RQC), at low concentrations, was effective at inhibiting metastatic cancer progression. Herein, we investigate the molecular mechanisms of RQC in breast cancer and explore the potential of RQC as a potentiation agent for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapeutic gefitinib. Our in vitro experiments showed RQC induced apoptosis in gefitinib-resistant breast cancer cells via regulation of a myriad of proapoptotic proteins. Because the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is often elevated during development of anti-EGFR therapy resistance, the effect of RQC on the mTOR upstream effector Akt and the negative regulator AMP kinase (AMPK) was investigated. RQC was found to reduce Akt activity, induce the activation of AMPK, and inhibit mTOR signaling in breast cancer cells. Combined RQC and gefitinib decreased gefitinib resistant breast cancer cell viability to a greater extent than RQC or gefitinib alone. Moreover, RQC inhibited Akt and mTOR and activated AMPK even in the presence of gefitinib. Our in vivo experiments showed combined RQC and gefitinib was more effective than the individual treatments at inhibiting mammary tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice. Therefore, RQC treatment inhibits breast cancer progression and may potentiate anti-EGFR therapy by inhibition of Akt/mTOR signaling.

  19. In Vivo Targeting of Cutaneous Melanoma Using an Melanoma Stimulating Hormone-Engineered Human Protein Cage with Fluorophore and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tracers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vannucci, Luca; Falvo, E.; Failla, C. M.; Carbo, M.; Fornara, M.; Canese, R.; Cecchetti, S.; Rajsiglová, Lenka; Stakheev, Dmitry; Křižan, Jiří; Boffi, A.; Carpinelli, G.; Morea, V.; Ceci, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2015), s. 81-92 ISSN 1550-7033 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Protein-Based Nanoparticles * Ferritin * In Vivo Melanoma-Targeting Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.929, year: 2015

  20. VCAM-1 specific PEGylated SAINT-based lipoplexes deliver siRNA to activated endothelium in vivo but do not attenuate target gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leus, Niek G J; Morselt, Henriëtte W M; Zwiers, Peter J; Kowalski, Piotr S; Ruiters, Marcel H J; Molema, Grietje; Kamps, Jan A A M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years much research in RNA nanotechnology has been directed to develop an efficient and clinically suitable delivery system for short interfering RNA (siRNA). The current study describes the in vivo siRNA delivery using PEGylated antibody-targeted SAINT-based-lipoplexes (referred to as

  1. Therapeutic potentials of naringin on polymethylmethacrylate induced osteoclastogenesis and osteolysis, in vitro and in vivo assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li N

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nianhu Li,1,2,* Zhanwang Xu,2,* Paul H Wooley,1,3 Jianxin Zhang,2 Shang-You Yang1,3 1Department of Surgery, Orthopedics, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Wichita, KS, USA; 2Department of Orthopedics, Affiliated Hospital to Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, People's Republic of China; 3Orthopaedic Research Institute, Via Christi Wichita Hospitals, Wichita, KS, USA *The first two authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Wear debris associated periprosthetic osteolysis represents a major pathological process associated with the aseptic loosening of joint prostheses. Naringin is a major flavonoid identified in grapefruit. Studies have shown that naringin possesses many pharmacological properties including effects on bone metabolism. The current study evaluated the influence of naringin on wear debris induced osteoclastic bone resorption both in vitro and in vivo. The osteoclast precursor cell line RAW 264.7 was cultured and stimulated with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA particles followed by treatment with naringin at several doses. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, calcium release, and gene expression profiles of TRAP, cathepsin K, and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B were sequentially evaluated. PMMA challenged murine air pouch and the load bearing tibia titanium pin-implantation mouse models were used to evaluate the effects of naringin in controlling PMMA induced bone resorption. Histological analyses and biomechanical pullout tests were performed following the animal experimentation. The in vitro data clearly demonstrated the inhibitory effects of naringin in PMMA induced osteoclastogenesis. The naringin dose of 10 µg/mL exhibited the most significant influence on the suppression of TRAP activities. Naringin treatment also markedly decreased calcium release in the stimulated cell culture medium. The short-term air pouch mouse study revealed that local injection of naringin

  2. Identification and validation of potential conserved microRNAs and their targets in peach (Prunus persica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhihong; Luo, Xiaoyan; Shi, Ting; Cai, Bin; Zhang, Zhen; Cheng, Zongming; Zhuang, Weibing

    2012-09-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small, endogenous, non-coding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression at the transcriptional or the post-transcriptional level. Although a large number of miRNAs have been identified in many plant species, especially from model plants and crops, they remain largely unknown in peach. In this study, 110 potential miRNAs belonging to 37 families were identified using computational methods. A total of 43 potential targets were found for 21 families based on near-perfect or perfect complementarity between the plant miRNA and the target sequences. A majority of the targets were transcription factors which play important roles in peach development. qRT-PCR analysis of RNA samples prepared from different peach tissues for 25 miRNA families revealed that miRNAs were differentially expressed in different tissues. Furthermore, two target genes were experimentally verified by detection of the miRNA-mediated mRNA cleavage sites in peach using RNA ligase-mediated 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE). Finally, we studied the expression pattern of the two target genes in three different tissues of peach to further understand the mechanism of the interaction between miRNAs and their target genes.

  3. The Combined Use of in Silico, in Vitro, and in Vivo Analyses to Assess Anti-cancerous Potential of a Bioactive Compound from Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niveshika

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Escalating incidences of cancer, especially in developed and developing countries, demand evaluation of potential unexplored natural drug resources. Here, anticancer potential of 9-Ethyliminomethyl-12-(morpholin-4-ylmethoxy-5,8,13,16-tetraaza -hexacene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (EMTAHDCA isolated from fresh water cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001 was screened through in silico, in vitro, and in vivo studies. For in silico analysis, EMTAHDCA was selected as ligand and 11 cancer related proteins (Protein Data Bank ID: 1BIX, 1NOW, 1TE6, 2RCW, 2UVL, 2VCJ, 3CRY, 3HQU, 3NMQ, 5P21, and 4B7P which are common targets of various anticancer drugs were selected as receptors. The results obtained from in silico analysis showed that EMTAHDCA has strong binding affinity for all the 11 target protein receptors. The ability of EMTAHDCA to bind active sites of cancer protein targets indicated that it is functionally similar to commercially available anticancer drugs. For assessing cellular metabolic activities, in vitro studies were performed by using calorimetric assay viz. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT. Results showed that EMTAHDCA induced significant cytotoxic response against Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA cells in a dose and time dependent manner with an inhibitory concentration (IC50 value of 372.4 ng/mL after 24 h of incubation. However, in case of normal bone marrow cells, the EMTAHDCA did not induce cytotoxicity as the IC50 value was not obtained even with higher dose of 1,000 ng/mL EMTAHDCA. Further, in vivo studies revealed that the median life span/survival days of tumor bearing mice treated with EMTAHDCA increased significantly with a fold change of ~1.9 and 1.81 corresponding to doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg body weight (B.W. of EMTAHDCA respectively, as compared to the DL group. Our results suggest that 5 mg/kg B.W. is effective since the dose of 10 mg/kg B.W. did not show any significant difference as compared to 5 mg/kg B

  4. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors Induce Tumor Cell Apoptosis In Vivo Primarily by Inhibiting VEGF Expression and Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Frost

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We found that rapalog mTOR inhibitors induce G1 arrest in the PTEN-null HS Sultan B-cell lymphoma line in vitro, but that administration of rapalogs in a HS Sultan xenograft model resulted in significant apoptosis, and that this correlated with induction of hypoxia and inhibition of neoangiogenesis and VEGF expression. Mechanistically, rapalogs prevent cap-dependent translation, but studies have shown that cap-independent, internal ribosome entry site (IRES-mediated translation of genes, such as c-myc and cyclin D, can provide a fail-safe mechanism that regulates tumor survival. Therefore, we tested if IRES-dependent expression of VEGF could likewise regulate sensitivity of tumor cells in vivo. To achieve this, we developed isogenic HS Sultan cell lines that ectopically express the VEGF ORF fused to the p27 IRES, an IRES sequence that is insensitive to AKT-mediated inhibition of IRES activity and effective in PTEN-null tumors. Mice challenged with p27-VEGF transfected tumor cells were more resistant to the antiangiogenic and apoptotic effects of the rapalog, temsirolimus, and active site mTOR inhibitor, pp242. Our results confirm the critical role of VEGF expression in tumors during treatment with mTOR inhibitors and underscore the importance of IRES activity as a resistance mechanism to such targeted therapy.

  5. Engineered AAV vector minimizes in vivo targeting of transduced hepatocytes by capsid-specific CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Ashley T; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Markusic, David M; Finn, Jonathan D; Hinderer, Christian; Zhou, Shangzhen; Ostrov, David A; Srivastava, Arun; Ertl, Hildegund C J; Terhorst, Cox; High, Katherine A; Mingozzi, Federico; Herzog, Roland W

    2013-03-21

    Recent clinical trials have shown that evasion of CD8(+) T-cell responses against viral capsid is critical for successful liver-directed gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for hemophilia. Preclinical models to test whether use of alternate serotypes or capsid variants could avoid this deleterious response have been lacking. Here, the ability of CD8(+) T cells ("cap-CD8," specific for a capsid epitope presented by human B*0702 or murine H2-L(d) molecules) to target AAV-infected hepatocytes was investigated. In a murine model based on adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded cap-CD8, AAV2-transduced livers showed CD8(+) T-cell infiltrates, transaminitis, significant reduction in factor IX transgene expression, and loss of transduced hepatocytes. AAV8 gene transfer resulted in prolonged susceptibility to cap-CD8, consistent with recent clinical findings. In contrast, using an AAV2(Y-F) mutant capsid, which is known to be less degraded by proteasomes, preserved transgene expression and largely avoided hepatotoxicity. In vitro assays confirmed reduced major histocompatibility complex class I presentation of this capsid and killing of human or murine hepatocytes compared with AAV2. In conclusion, AAV capsids can be engineered to substantially reduce the risk of destruction by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, whereas use of alternative serotypes per se does not circumvent this obstacle.

  6. In-vivo and in-vitro selective targeting of the retinal pigment epithelium using a laser-scanning device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Clemens; Framme, Carsten; Schnell, Susanne; Schuele, Georg; Brinkmann, Ralf; Lin, Charles P.

    2002-06-01

    Laser photocoagulation is a well-established treatment modality for a variety of retinal disorders, but is difficult to use near the fovea due to thermal retinal destruction. Certain diseases, such as drusen maculopathy, are thought to be caused by a dysfunction of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium. For those diseases selective targeting of the RPE, sparing the adjoining photoreceptors, might be the appropriate treatment to avoid laser scotoma, as it has been shown with application of a train of ms laser pulses by Birngruber and Roider. Our new approach is to use a conventional green cw laser and rapidly scan a small laser spot over the retina so as to produce microsecond(s) -illumination at each RPE cell. Two scanning devices were developed using acousto-optic deflectors. For the in vitro experiments the ED50 value RPE cell damage was 170 mW with 100 exposures, scanning with a speed of 1 spot diameter/3 microsecond(s) . In vivo experiments demonstrated an angiographic ED50 threshold of 66 mW for 100 exposures while scanning with an effective illumination time of 5 microsecond(s) . The ophthalmoscopic threshold was higher than a factor of 2 times the angiographic ED50. Using separated scan lines we show selectivity in the form of surviving cells in between irradiated lines. Selective destruction of RPE cells is possible using laser-scanning devices.

  7. In vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging of FAP-expressing tumors with activatable FAP-targeted, single-chain Fv-immunoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüger, Ronny; Tansi, Felista L; Rabenhold, Markus; Steiniger, Frank; Kontermann, Roland E; Fahr, Alfred; Hilger, Ingrid

    2014-07-28

    Molecular and cellular changes that precede the invasive growth of solid tumors include the release of proteolytic enzymes and peptides in the tumor stroma, the recruitment of phagocytic and lymphoid infiltrates and alteration of the extracellular matrix. The reactive tumor stroma consists of a large number of myofibroblasts, characterized by high expression of fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP). FAP, a type-II transmembrane sialoglycoprotein is an attractive target in diagnosis and therapy of several pathologic disorders especially cancer. In the underlying work, a fluorescence-activatable liposome (fluorescence-quenched during circulation and fluorescence activation upon cellular uptake), bearing specific single-chain Fv fragments directed against FAP (scFv'FAP) was developed, and its potential for use in fluorescence diagnostic imaging of FAP-expressing tumor cells was evaluated by whole body fluorescence imaging. The liposomes termed anti-FAP-IL were prepared via post-insertion of ligand-phospholipid-conjugates into preformed DY-676-COOH-containing liposomes. The anti-FAP-IL revealed a homogeneous size distribution and showed specific interaction and binding with FAP-expressing cells in vitro. The high level of fluorescence quenching of the near-infrared fluorescent dye sequestered in the aqueous interior of the liposomes enables fluorescence imaging exclusively upon uptake and degradation by cells, which results in fluorescence activation. Only FAP-expressing cells were able to take up and activate fluorescence of anti-FAP-IL in vitro. Furthermore, anti-FAP-IL accumulated selectively in FAP-expressing xenograft models in vivo, as demonstrated by blocking experiments using free scFv'FAP. The local tumor fluorescence intensities were in agreement with the intrinsic degree of FAP-expression in different xenograft models. Thus, anti-FAP-IL can serve as a suitable in vivo diagnostic tool for pathological disorders accompanied by high FAP

  8. CYP2E1 Potentiates Ethanol-induction of Hypoxia and HIF-1α in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Wu, Defeng; Yang, Lili; Gan, Lixia; Cederbaum, Arthur I

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol induces hypoxia and elevates HIF-1α in the liver. CYP2E1 plays a role in the mechanisms by which ethanol generates oxidative stress, fatty liver and liver injury. The current study evaluated whether CYP2E1 contributes to ethanol-induced hypoxia and activation of HIF-1α in vivo and whether HIF-1α protects against or promotes CYP2E1-dependent toxicity in vitro. Wild type (WT), CYP2E1-knockin (KI) and CYP2E1 knockout (KO) mice were fed ethanol chronically; pair fed controls received isocaloric dextrose. Ethanol produced liver injury in the KI mice to a much greater extent than in the WT and KO mice. Protein levels of HIF-1α and downstream targets of HIF-1α activation were elevated in the ethanol-fed KI mice compared to the WT and KO mice. Levels of HIF prolylhydroxlase 2 which promotes HIF-1α degradation were decreased in the ethanol-fed KI mice in association with the increases in HIF-1α. Hypoxia occurred in the ethanol-fed CYP2E1 KI mice as shown by an increased area of staining using the hypoxia-specific marker pimonidazole. Hypoxia was lower in the ethanol-fed WT mice and lowest in the ethanol fed KO mice and all the dextrose-fed mice. In situ double staining showed that pimonidazole and CYP2E1 were co-localized to the same area of injury in the hepatic centrilobule. Increased protein levels of HIF-1α were also found after acute ethanol treatment of KI mice. Treatment of HepG2 E47 cells which express CYP2E1 with ethanol plus arachidonic (AA) acid or ethanol plus buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) which depletes GSH caused loss of cell viability to greater extent than in HepG2 C34 cells which do not express CYP2E1. These treatments elevated protein levels of HIF-1α to a greater extent in E47 cells than C34 cells. 2-Methoxyestradiol, an inhibitor of HIF-1α, blunted the toxic effects of ethanol plus AA and ethanol plus BSO in the E47 cells in association with inhibition of HIF-1α. The HIF-1α inhibitor also blocked the elevated oxidative stress produced

  9. Potential targets in the discovery of new hair growth promoters for androgenic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ruchy; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai

    2014-07-01

    Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is the major type of scalp hair loss affecting 60 - 70% of the population worldwide. It is caused by two potent androgens, namely testosterone (T) and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT). Till date, only two FDA-approved synthetic drugs, minoxidil and finasteride, are used to cure AGA with only 35 and 48% success, respectively; therefore, a search for new drug based on the mechanism of androgens action is still needed. Relevant literature was reviewed to identify current therapeutic targets and treatments for AGA. The potential targets are classified into three categories: i) 5α-reductase; ii) androgen receptor and iii) growth-factor-producing genes related to hair growth. Relevant assay systems using the right targets are required in order to obtain specific and effective drugs for AGA treatment. It is unlikely that single targeted agents will be sufficient for treating AGA, and therefore, it would be a challenge to obtain compounds with multiple activities.

  10. Mito-methyl coumarin, a novel mitochondria-targeted drug with great antitumor potential was synthesized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanan; Xu, Wenqing

    2017-07-15

    Due to higher transmembrane potential of tumor cells, enhanced accumulation of cationic drugs in tumor mitochondria has been attributed to a higher (more negative inside) mitochondrial transmembrane potential compared with normal cells, emerging researchers are focus on developing mitochondria-targeted antitumor drugs. Coumarins showed great potential on antitumor, but mitochondria-targeted coumarin derivatives have not been reported. In the present study, we synthesized mitochondria-targeted-methyl coumarin (mito-methyl coumarin) through coupling 6-methyl coumarin to TPP. We confirmed that mito-methyl coumarin inhibited HeLa cells proliferation selectively, induced ROS generation, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, promoted mitochondria Ca 2+ accumulation, decreased mitochondria mass and induced HeLa cells apoptosis, but methyl coumarin did not. These results demonstrate that we succeed in synthesizing a novel mitochondria-targeted drug, mito-methyl coumarin, which is effective in inhibiting HeLa cells proliferation and inducing HeLa cells apoptosis through promoting ROS generation and mitochondria Ca 2+ accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of MiR-181a as a potential therapeutic target in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Purpose: To investigate microRNA-181 (miR-181) as a potential therapeutic target in osteoarthritis. (OA). Methods: MiR-181 ... in the treatment of OA. Keywords: MicroRNA, Osteoarthritis, Apoptosis, B-cell lymphoma 2, Transfection, Chondrocytes .... 500 ng total RNA using a specific stem-loop primer. Following this ...

  12. Evaluation of MiR-181a as a potential therapeutic target in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate microRNA-181 (miR-181) as a potential therapeutic target in osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: MiR-181 expression was evaluated in articular cartilage samples obtained from OA patients undergoing knee arthroplasty and non-OA (control) patients undergoing other orthopedic procedures. Following the ...

  13. HIV life cycle and potential targets for drug activity | Miller | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV life cycle and potential targets for drug activity. S Miller. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  14. The potential for bio-optical imaging of biomaterial-associated infection in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjollema, Jelmer; Sharma, Prashant K.; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Engelsman, Anton F.; Busscher, Henk J.

    This review presents the current state of Bioluminescence and Fluorescent Imaging technologies (BLI and FLI) as applied to Biomaterial-Associated Infections (BAI). BLI offers the opportunity to observe the in vivo course of BAI in small animals without the need to sacrifice animals at different time

  15. Light dependence of calcium and membrane potential measured in blowfly photoreceptors in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberwinkler, J; Stavenga, DG

    Light adaptation in insect photoreceptors is caused by an increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. To better understand this process, we measured the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in vivo as a function of adapting light intensity in the white-eyed blowfly mutant chalky. We developed a technique

  16. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of antidiabetic potential of extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recipes were extracted in water according to traditional usage and screened in vitro to assess glucose uptake in C2C12 muscle cells and glucose production by the H4IIE liver cells (through inhibition of glucose-6-phosphatase, the rate limiting enzyme) and in vivo through the oral glucose tolerance test in normal mice (2 ...

  17. Acute and subchronic in-vivo effects of Ferula hermonis L. and Sambucus nigra L. and their potential active isolates in a diabetic mouse model of neuropathic pain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raafat, K; El-Lakany, A

    2015-01-01

    ...) and Sambucus nigra L. aqueous (Elder) extracts, and their potential active isolates; for acute (6 h) and subchronic (8 days) glucose homeostasis, in vivo antioxidant potential and DN amelioration in alloxan-induced DM mice model...

  18. Mercury-induced hepatotoxicity in zebrafish: in vivo mechanistic insights from transcriptome analysis, phenotype anchoring and targeted gene expression validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathavan Sinnakaruppan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is a prominent environmental contaminant that causes detrimental effects to human health. Although the liver has been known to be a main target organ, there is limited information on in vivo molecular mechanism of mercury-induced toxicity in the liver. By using transcriptome analysis, phenotypic anchoring and validation of targeted gene expression in zebrafish, mercury-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated and a number of perturbed cellular processes were identified and compared with those captured in the in vitro human cell line studies. Results Hepato-transcriptome analysis of mercury-exposed zebrafish revealed that the earliest deregulated genes were associated with electron transport chain, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, nuclear receptor signaling and apoptotic pathway, followed by complement system and proteasome pathway, and thereafter DNA damage, hypoxia, Wnt signaling, fatty acid synthesis, gluconeogenesis, cell cycle and motility. Comparative meta-analysis of microarray data between zebrafish liver and human HepG2 cells exposed to mercury identified some common toxicological effects of mercury-induced hepatotoxicity in both models. Histological analyses of liver from mercury-exposed fish revealed morphological changes of liver parenchyma, decreased nucleated cell count, increased lipid vesicles, glycogen and apoptotic bodies, thus providing phenotypic evidence for anchoring of the transcriptome analysis. Validation of targeted gene expression confirmed deregulated gene-pathways from enrichment analysis. Some of these genes responding to low concentrations of mercury may serve as toxicogenomic-based markers for detection and health risk assessment of environmental mercury contaminations. Conclusion Mercury-induced hepatotoxicity was triggered by oxidative stresses, intrinsic apoptotic pathway, deregulation of nuclear receptor and kinase activities including Gsk3 that deregulates Wnt signaling

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Investigation of the Potential of Amorphous Microporous Silica as a Protein Delivery Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Chaudhari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delivering growth factors (GFs at bone/implant interface needs to be optimized to achieve faster osseointegration. Amorphous microporous silica (AMS has a potential to be used as a carrier and delivery platform for GFs. In this work, adsorption (loading and release (delivery mechanism of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA, from AMS was investigated in vitro as well as in vivo. In general, strong BSA adsorption to AMS was observed. The interaction was stronger at lower pH owing to favorable electrostatic interaction. In vitro evaluation of BSA release revealed a peculiar release profile, involving a burst release followed by a 6 h period without appreciable BSA release and a further slower release later. Experimental data supporting this observation are discussed. Apart from understanding protein/biomaterial (BSA/AMS interaction, determination of in vivo protein release is an essential aspect of the evaluation of a protein delivery system. In this regard micropositron emission tomography (μ-PET was used in an exploratory experiment to determine in vivo BSA release profile from AMS. Results suggest stronger in vivo retention of BSA when adsorbed on AMS. This study highlights the possible use of AMS as a controlled protein delivery platform which may facilitate osseointegration.

  20. Genomic identification of potential targets unique to Candida albicans for the discovery of antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Himanshu; Luqman, Suaib; Meena, Abha; Khan, Feroz

    2014-01-01

    Despite of modern antifungal therapy, the mortality rates of invasive infection with human fungal pathogen Candida albicans are up to 40%. Studies suggest that drug resistance in the three most common species of human fungal pathogens viz., C. albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus (causing mortality rate up to 90%) and Cryptococcus neoformans (causing mortality rate up to 70%) is due to mutations in the target enzymes or high expression of drug transporter genes. Drug resistance in human fungal pathogens has led to an imperative need for the identification of new targets unique to fungal pathogens. In the present study, we have used a comparative genomics approach to find out potential target proteins unique to C. albicans, an opportunistic fungus responsible for severe infection in immune-compromised human. Interestingly, many target proteins of existing antifungal agents showed orthologs in human cells. To identify unique proteins, we have compared proteome of C. albicans [SC5314] i.e., 14,633 total proteins retrieved from the RefSeq database of NCBI, USA with proteome of human and non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results showed that 4,568 proteins were identified unique to C. albicans as compared to those of human and later when these unique proteins were compared with S. cerevisiae proteome, finally 2,161 proteins were identified as unique proteins and after removing repeats total 1,618 unique proteins (42 functionally known, 1,566 hypothetical and 10 unknown) were selected as potential antifungal drug targets unique to C. albicans.

  1. Unbiased analysis of potential targets of breast cancer susceptibility loci by Capture Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Nicola H.; Broome, Laura R.; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nick; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Nagano, Takashi; Andrews, Simon; Wingett, Steven; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Assiotis, Ioannis; Fenwick, Kerry; Maguire, Sarah L.; Campbell, James; Natrajan, Rachael; Lambros, Maryou; Perrakis, Eleni; Ashworth, Alan; Fraser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common variants that are associated with breast cancer risk. Most of these variants map to non-protein-coding regions and several map to gene deserts, regions of several hundred kilobases lacking protein-coding genes. We hypothesized that gene deserts harbor long-range regulatory elements that can physically interact with target genes to influence their expression. To test this, we developed Capture Hi-C (CHi-C), which, by incorporating a sequence capture step into a Hi-C protocol, allows high-resolution analysis of targeted regions of the genome. We used CHi-C to investigate long-range interactions at three breast cancer gene deserts mapping to 2q35, 8q24.21, and 9q31.2. We identified interaction peaks between putative regulatory elements (“bait fragments”) within the captured regions and “targets” that included both protein-coding genes and long noncoding (lnc) RNAs over distances of 6.6 kb to 2.6 Mb. Target protein-coding genes were IGFBP5, KLF4, NSMCE2, and MYC; and target lncRNAs included DIRC3, PVT1, and CCDC26. For one gene desert, we were able to define two SNPs (rs12613955 and rs4442975) that were highly correlated with the published risk variant and that mapped within the bait end of an interaction peak. In vivo ChIP-qPCR data show that one of these, rs4442975, affects the binding of FOXA1 and implicate this SNP as a putative functional variant. PMID:25122612

  2. The PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 displays promising in vitro and in vivo efficacy for targeted medulloblastoma therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Martin I.; Pietsch, Torsten; Dilloo, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Deregulation of the Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signalling network is a hallmark of oncogenesis. Also medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children, is characterized by high levels of AKT phosphorylation and activated PI3K signalling in medulloblastoma is associated with enhanced cellular motility, survival and chemoresistency underscoring its role of as a potential therapeutic target. Here we demonstrate that GDC-0941, a highly specific PI3K inhibitor with good clinical tolerability and promising anti-neoplastic activity in adult cancer, also displays anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in pediatric human medulloblastoma cell lines. Loss in cell viability is accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of AKT, a downstream target of PI3K. Furthermore, we show that GDC-0941 attenuates the migratory capacity of medulloblastoma cells and targets subpopulations expressing the stem cell marker CD133. GDC-0941 also synergizes with the standard medulloblastoma chemotherapeutic etoposide. In an orthotopic xenograft model of the most aggressive human medulloblastoma variant we document that oral adminstration of GDC-0941 impairs tumor growth and significantly prolongs survival. These findings provide a rational to further investigate GDC-0941 alone and in combination with standard chemotherapeutics for medulloblastoma treatment. PMID:25596739

  3. Potential impact of miR-137 and its targets in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie eWright

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The significant impact of microRNAs (miRNAs on disease pathology is becoming increasingly evident. These small non-coding RNAs have the ability to post-transcriptionally silence the expression of thousands of genes. Therefore, dysregulation of even a single miRNA could confer a large polygenic effect. Schizophrenia is a genetically complex illness thought to involve multiple genes each contributing a small risk. Large genome-wide association studies identified miR-137, a miRNA shown to be involved in neuronal maturation, as one of the top risk genes. To assess the potential mechanism of impact of miR-137 in this disorder and identify its targets, we used a combination of literature searches, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA, and freely accessible bioinformatics resources. Using TargetScan and the Schizophrenia Gene Resource (SZGR database, we found that in addition to CSMD1, C10orf26, CACNA1C, TCF4, and ZNF804A, five schizophrenia risk genes whose transcripts are also validated miR-137 targets, there are other schizophrenia-associated genes that may be targets of miR-137, including ERBB4, GABRA1, GRIN2A, GRM5, GSK3B, NRG2 and HTR2C. IPA analyses of all the potential targets identified several nervous system functions as the top canonical pathways including synaptic long-term potentiation, a process implicated in learning and memory mechanisms and recently shown to be altered in patients with schizophrenia. Among the subset of targets involved in nervous system development and function, the top scoring pathways were ephrin receptor signaling and axonal guidance, processes that are critical for proper circuitry formation and were shown to be disrupted in schizophrenia. These results suggest that miR-137 may indeed play a substantial role in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia by regulating networks involved in neural development and brain function.

  4. In vivo reinsertion of excised episomes by the V(DJ recombinase: a potential threat to genomic stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Vanura

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available It has long been thought that signal joints, the byproducts of V(DJ recombination, are not involved in the dynamics of the rearrangement process. Evidence has now started to accumulate that this is not the case, and that signal joints play unsuspected roles in events that might compromise genomic integrity. Here we show both ex vivo and in vivo that the episomal circles excised during the normal process of receptor gene rearrangement may be reintegrated into the genome through trans-V(DJ recombination occurring between the episomal signal joint and an immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor target. We further demonstrate that cryptic recombination sites involved in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations constitute hotspots of insertion. Eventually, the identification of two in vivo cases associating episomal reintegration and chromosomal translocation suggests that reintegration events are linked to genomic instability. Altogether, our data suggest that V(DJ-mediated reintegration of episomal circles, an event likely eluding classical cytogenetic screenings, might represent an additional potent source of genomic instability and lymphoid cancer.

  5. In vivo reinsertion of excised episomes by the V(D)J recombinase: a potential threat to genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanura, Katrina; Montpellier, Bertrand; Le, Trang; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Navarro, Jean-Marc; Cabaud, Olivier; Roulland, Sandrine; Vachez, Elodie; Prinz, Immo; Ferrier, Pierre; Marculescu, Rodrig; Jäger, Ulrich; Nadel, Bertrand

    2007-03-01

    It has long been thought that signal joints, the byproducts of V(D)J recombination, are not involved in the dynamics of the rearrangement process. Evidence has now started to accumulate that this is not the case, and that signal joints play unsuspected roles in events that might compromise genomic integrity. Here we show both ex vivo and in vivo that the episomal circles excised during the normal process of receptor gene rearrangement may be reintegrated into the genome through trans-V(D)J recombination occurring between the episomal signal joint and an immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor target. We further demonstrate that cryptic recombination sites involved in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations constitute hotspots of insertion. Eventually, the identification of two in vivo cases associating episomal reintegration and chromosomal translocation suggests that reintegration events are linked to genomic instability. Altogether, our data suggest that V(D)J-mediated reintegration of episomal circles, an event likely eluding classical cytogenetic screenings, might represent an additional potent source of genomic instability and lymphoid cancer.

  6. In vivo Evaluation of PEGylated 64Cu-liposomes with Theranostic and Radiotherapeutic Potential using Micro PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anncatrine Luisa; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Binderup, Tina

    2016-01-01

    . Liposomes with 5 and 10 mol% PEG were characterizedwith respect to size, charge, and 64Cu- and 177Lu-loadingefficiency. The tumor imaging potential of 64Cu-loadedliposomes was evaluated in terms of in vivo biodistribution,tumor accumulation and tumor-to-muscle (T/M) ratios, usingPET imaging. The potential...... of PEGylated liposomes for diagnosticand therapeutic applications was further evaluatedthrough dosimetry analysis using OLINDA/EXM software.The 64Cu-liposomes were used as biological surrogates toestimate the organ and tumor kinetics of 177Lu-liposomes.High remote loading efficiency (>95 %) was obtainedfor...

  7. SLC7A5 act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in myelodysplastic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Song, Jing; Chen, Bobin; Xu, Xiaoping; Lin, Guowei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogenous group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by increased risk of leukemic transformation. This study identifies microRNAs(miRNA) and miRNA targets that might represent leukemic transformation markers for MDS. Methods Based on our previously established nested case-control study cohort of MDS patients, we chose paired patients to undergo Angilent 8 × 15K human miRNA microarrays. Target prediction analysis was administrated using targetscan 5.1 software. We further investigated the function of target gene in MDS cell line using siRNA method, including cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, cell cycle and electron microscope. Results Finally we screened a subset of 7 miRNAs to be significantly differentially expressed between the case (at the end of follow up with leukemic transformation) and control group (at the end of follow up without leukemic transformation). Target prediction analysis revealed SLC7A5 was the common target gene of these 7 miRNAs. Further study on the function of SLC7A5 gene in SKM-1 cell line showed that downregulation of SLC7A5 inhibited SKM-1 cells proliferation, increased apoptosis and caused cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 stage. Conclusion Our data indicate that SLC7A5 gene may act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in MDS. PMID:26657287

  8. Reversal of renal dysfunction by targeted administration of VEGF into the stenotic kidney: a novel potential therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chade, Alejandro R; Kelsen, Silvia

    2012-05-15

    Renal microvascular (MV) damage and loss contribute to the progression of renal injury in renovascular disease (RVD). Whether a targeted intervention in renal microcirculation could reverse renal damage is unknown. We hypothesized that intrarenal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy will reverse renal dysfunction and decrease renal injury in experimental RVD. Unilateral renal artery stenosis (RAS) was induced in 14 pigs, as a surrogate of chronic RVD. Six weeks later, renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were quantified in vivo in the stenotic kidney using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Then, intrarenal rhVEGF-165 or vehicle was randomly administered into the stenotic kidneys (n = 7/group), they were observed for 4 additional wk, in vivo studies were repeated, and then renal MV density was quantified by 3D micro-CT, and expression of angiogenic factors and fibrosis was determined. RBF and GFR, MV density, and renal expression of VEGF and downstream mediators such as p-ERK 1/2, Akt, and eNOS were significantly reduced after 6 and at 10 wk of untreated RAS compared with normal controls. Remarkably, administration of VEGF at 6 wk normalized RBF (from 393.6 ± 50.3 to 607.0 ± 45.33 ml/min, P < 0.05 vs. RAS) and GFR (from 43.4 ± 3.4 to 66.6 ± 10.3 ml/min, P < 0.05 vs. RAS) at 10 wk, accompanied by increased angiogenic signaling, augmented renal MV density, and attenuated renal scarring. This study shows promising therapeutic effects of a targeted renal intervention, using an established clinically relevant large-animal model of chronic RAS. It also implies that disruption of renal MV integrity and function plays a pivotal role in the progression of renal injury in the stenotic kidney. Furthermore, it shows a high level of plasticity of renal microvessels to a single-dose VEGF-targeted intervention after established renal injury, supporting promising renoprotective effects of a novel potential therapeutic intervention to

  9. Fluorescence lifetime FRET non-invasive imaging of breast cancer xenografts provides a measure of target engagement in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkouskaya, Alena; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier; Barroso, Margarida

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FLIM-FRET) is a unique non-invasive imaging platform to monitor and quantify in vivo target engagement in pre-clinical studies. FLIM FRET is a valuable tool in targeted drug delivery due to its nanoscale-range molecular resolution that detects near-infrared labeled ligand binding to dimerized receptors followed by their uptake into cancer cells in vivo. Various imaging platforms, including PET, lack the ability to directly discriminate between unbound and internalized ligands. Since transferrin receptor (TfR) level is significantly elevated in cancer cells compared to non-cancerous cells, transferrin (Tf) has been successfully used in molecular imaging and targeted anti-cancer drug delivery. The dimeric nature of TfR allows for the quantification of Tf internalization into cancer cells by measuring FLIM FRET between receptor-bound Tf donor and acceptor NIR fluorophore pairs, based on the reduction of donor fluorophore lifetime in live mice. We analyzed tumor morphology, the level of expression of TfR, estrogen receptor (ER) and Tf accumulation in human breast cancer tumor xenografts. We found a remarkable heterogeneity of breast cancer tumors regarding their size, cell density, TfR and ER expression and Tf uptake. The results of this study confirm a strong correlation between in vivo NIR FLIM FRET and ex vivo evaluation of Tf uptake into tumor tissues, thus validating FD% as a robust measure of the target engagement of TfR-Tf in tumor cells in vivo.

  10. The potential of DBP gels containing intervertebral disc cells for annulus fibrosus supplementation: in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jeong Eun; Kim, Eun Young; Ahn, Woo Young; Lee, Yu Jeong; Lee, Dongwon; Reis, Rui; Khang, Gilson

    2015-11-01

    Demineralized bone particle (DBP), which is widely used as a biomaterial in the field of tissue engineering, contains various bioactive molecules, such as cytokines. For this reason, in this study we investigated the effects of injectable DBP gels on cell proliferation, inflammation and maintenance of the shape of DBP gels as a scaffold able to substitute for intervertebral discs (IVDs) in vivo. DBP gels were fabricated with different percentages (5% and 10%) of DBP powder and 3% acetic acid, including 0.02% pepsin. DBP gels with 1 × 10(6) annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were implanted into the dorsal subcutaneous region of BALB/C-nu mice for 1, 2 and 3 weeks. Cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay. The effect of DBP gels on the inflammatory response was analysed by measuring the amount of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) released. Also, histological methods were carried out to analyse the response of DBP gels in vivo. This study demonstrated that injectable DBP gels are able to provide physical scaffolds for growing IVD cells in vivo. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Synergistic effects of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction and TAT peptide on gene transfection: an experimental study in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiyi; Zhang, Ping; Ren, Jianli; Ran, Haitao; Zheng, Yuanyi; Li, Pan; Zhang, Qunxia; Zhang, Maohui; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-09-28

    Cell-permeable peptides (CPPs) and ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) have tremendous potential for gene delivery. However, their applications are limited due to nonspecificity of CPPs and low transfection efficiency of UTMD. Here, we developed a 'smart' gene delivery system by encapsulating TAT peptide (TATp) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene within lipid microbubbles, in which TATp was protected from being enzymatically cleaved and HGF gene was protected from degradation. This new strategy had synergistic effects of UTMD and TATp on gene transfection. We investigated the efficacy and safety of HGF gene transfection mediated by the combination of UTMD and TATp in vitro and in vivo. The results from MTT assay and flow cytometry analyses indicated that the combination of UTMD and TATp could enhance HGF gene expression in HUVECs without any significant side effect on cell viability. In rat myocardial infarction models, we demonstrated that the protein and mRNA expressions of HGF in myocardium caused by the combination of UTMD and TATp were the highest. Histopathological findings demonstrated that the combination of UTMD and TATp enhanced myocardial microvasculature and ameliorated myocardial fibrosis. In conclusion, the combination of UTMD and TATp might be a safe and efficient technique for gene delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondria-Targeted Nitroxide, Mito-CP, Suppresses Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Cell Survival In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starenki, Dmytro

    2013-01-01

    Context: Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine tumor mainly caused by mutations in the RET proto-oncogene. For MTC therapy, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved vandetanib and cabozantinib, multikinase inhibitors targeting RET and other tyrosine kinase receptors of vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, or hepatocyte growth factor. Nevertheless, not all patients with the progressive MTC respond to these drugs, requiring the development of additional therapeutic modalities that have distinct activity. Objective: We aimed to evaluate mitochondria-targeted carboxy-proxyl (Mito-CP), a mitochondria-targeted redox-sensitive agent, for its tumor-suppressive efficacy against MTC. Design: In vitro cultures of 2 human MTC cell lines, TT and MZ-CRC-1, and TT xenografts in mice were treated with Mito-CP in comparison with vandetanib. The effects on cell survival/death, RET expression, mitochondrial integrity, and oxidative stress were determined. Results: Contrary to vandetanib, Mito-CP induced RET downregulation and strong cytotoxic effects in both cell lines in vitro, including caspase-dependent apoptosis. These effects were accompanied by mitochondrial membrane depolarization, decreased oxygen consumption, and increased oxidative stress in cells. Intriguingly, Mito-CP–induced cell death, but not RET downregulation, was partially inhibited by the reactive oxygen species scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine, indicating that Mito-CP mediates tumor-suppressive effects via redox-dependent as well as redox-independent mechanisms. Orally administered Mito-CP effectively suppressed TT xenografts in mice, with an efficacy comparable to vandetanib and relatively low toxicity to animals. Conclusion: Our results suggest that Mito-CP can effectively suppress MTC cell growth/survival via a mechanism distinct from vandetanib effects. Mitochondrial targeting may be a potential strategy for MTC therapy. PMID:23509102

  13. Comparative proteome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A global overview of in vivo targets of the yeast activator protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun He

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of the yeast activator protein 1 (Yap1p increases under stress conditions, which leads to enhanced transcription of a number of genes encoding protective enzymes or other proteins. To obtain a global overview of changes in expression of Yap1p-targeted proteins, we compared a Yap1p-overexpressing transformant with a control transformant by triplicate analysis of the proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE. Proteins of interest were identified using MALDI-MS or LC-MS/MS. Results The relative quantities of 55 proteins were elevated significantly upon overexpression of Yap1p, and most of these proteins were found to have a Yap1p-binding site upstream of their coding sequences. Interestingly, the main metabolic enzymes in the glycolysis and pyruvate-ethanol pathways showed a significant increase in the Yap1p-overexpressing transformant. Moreover, a comparison of our proteome data with transcriptome data from the literature suggested which proteins were regulated at the level of the proteome, and which proteins were regulated at the level of the transcriptome. Eight proteins involved in stress response, including seven heat-shock and chaperone proteins, were significantly more abundant in the Yap1p-overexpressing transformant. Conclusions We have investigated the general protein composition in Yap1p-overexpressing S. cerevisiae using proteomic techniques, and quantified the changes in the expression of the potential Yap1p-targeted proteins. Identification of the potential Yap1p targets and analysis of their role in cellular processes not only give a global overview of the ubiquitous cellular changes elicited by Yap1p, but also provide the framework for understanding the mechanisms behind Yap1p-regulated stress response in yeast.

  14. Comparative proteome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a global overview of in vivo targets of the yeast activator protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, He; Kieselbach, Thomas; Jönsson, Leif J

    2012-06-09

    The activity of the yeast activator protein 1 (Yap1p) increases under stress conditions, which leads to enhanced transcription of a number of genes encoding protective enzymes or other proteins. To obtain a global overview of changes in expression of Yap1p-targeted proteins, we compared a Yap1p-overexpressing transformant with a control transformant by triplicate analysis of the proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Proteins of interest were identified using MALDI-MS or LC-MS/MS. The relative quantities of 55 proteins were elevated significantly upon overexpression of Yap1p, and most of these proteins were found to have a Yap1p-binding site upstream of their coding sequences. Interestingly, the main metabolic enzymes in the glycolysis and pyruvate-ethanol pathways showed a significant increase in the Yap1p-overexpressing transformant. Moreover, a comparison of our proteome data with transcriptome data from the literature suggested which proteins were regulated at the level of the proteome, and which proteins were regulated at the level of the transcriptome. Eight proteins involved in stress response, including seven heat-shock and chaperone proteins, were significantly more abundant in the Yap1p-overexpressing transformant. We have investigated the general protein composition in Yap1p-overexpressing S. cerevisiae using proteomic techniques, and quantified the changes in the expression of the potential Yap1p-targeted proteins. Identification of the potential Yap1p targets and analysis of their role in cellular processes not only give a global overview of the ubiquitous cellular changes elicited by Yap1p, but also provide the framework for understanding the mechanisms behind Yap1p-regulated stress response in yeast.

  15. Selection of binding targets in parasites using phage-display and aptamer libraries in vivo and in vitro

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    Renata Rosito Tonelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasite infections are largely dependent on interactions between pathogen and different host cell populations to guarantee a successful infectious process. This is particularly true for obligatory intracellular parasites as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Leishmania, to name a few. Adhesion to and entry into the cell are essential steps requiring specific parasite and host cell molecules. The large amount of possible involved molecules poses additional difficulties for their identification by the classical biochemical approaches. In this respect, the search for alternative techniques should be pursued. Among them two powerful methodologies can be employed, both relying upon the construction of highly diverse combinatorial libraries of peptides or oligonucleotides that randomly bind with high affinity to targets on the cell surface and are selectively displaced by putative ligands. These are, respectively, the peptide-based phage display and the oligonucleotide-based aptamer techniques.The phage display technique has been extensively employed for the identification of novel ligands in vitro and in vivo in different areas such as cancer, vaccine development and epitope mapping. Particularly, phage display has been employed in the investigation of pathogen-host interactions. Although this methodology has been used for some parasites with encouraging results, in trypanosomatids its use is, as yet, scanty. RNA and DNA aptamers, developed by the SELEX process (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, were described over two decades ago and since then contributed to a large number of structured nucleic acids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes or for the understanding of the cell biology. Similarly to the phage display technique scarce use of the SELEX process has been used in the probing of parasite-host interaction.In this review, an overall survey on the use of both phage display and aptamer technologies in different pathogenic

  16. Targeted delivery to cartilage is critical for in vivo efficacy of insulin-like growth factor 1 in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffredo, Francesco S; Pancoast, James R; Cai, Lei; Vannelli, Todd; Dong, Jesse Z; Lee, Richard T; Patwari, Parth

    2014-05-01

    Acute articular injuries lead to an increased risk of progressive joint damage and osteoarthritis (OA), and no therapies are currently available to repair or protect the injured joint tissue. Intraarticular delivery of therapeutic proteins has been limited by their rapid clearance from the joint space and lack of retention within cartilage. The aim of this study was to test whether targeted delivery to cartilage by fusion with a heparin-binding domain would be sufficient to prolong the in vivo function of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). We produced a humanized and optimized recombinant HB-IGF-1 fusion protein. By injecting HB-IGF-1, IGF-1, or saline alone into the knee joints of adult Lewis rats, we tested whether fusion with a heparin-binding domain 1) altered the kinetics of retention in joint tissues, 2) prolonged functional stimulation as measured by radiolabel incorporation, and 3) enhanced efficacy in a rat model of surgically induced OA, using weekly injections. Fusion of heparin-binding domain with IGF-1 prolonged retention in articular and meniscal cartilage from <1 day to 8 days after injection. Unmodified IGF-1 had no functional effect 2 days after injection, whereas HB-IGF-1 stimulated meniscal cartilage at least 4 days after injection. HB-IGF-1, but not IGF-1, significantly slowed cartilage damage in a rat model of OA. Heparin-binding domain fusions can transform rapidly cleared proteins into potential intraarticular therapies by targeting them to cartilage. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R Inhibits Osteosarcoma Angiogenesis in the In Vivo Gelfoam® Assay Visualized by Color-coded Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyuna, Tasuku; Tome, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Murakami, Takashi; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Kanaya, Fuminori; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    We previously developed a color-coded imaging model that can quantify the length of nascent blood vessels using Gelfoam® implanted in nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP) nude mice. In this model, nascent blood vessels selectively express GFP. We also previously showed that osteosarcoma cells promote angiogenesis in this assay. We have also previously demonstrated the tumor-targeting bacteria Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) can inhibit or regress all tested tumor types in mouse models. The aim of the present study was to determine if S. typhimurium A1-R could inhibit osteosarcoma angiogenesis in the in vivo Gelfoam® color-coded imaging assay. Gelfoam® was implanted subcutaneously in ND-GFP nude mice. Skin flaps were made 7 days after implantation and 143B-RFP human osteosarcoma cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were injected into the implanted Gelfoam. After establishment of tumors in the Gelfoam®, control-group mice were treated with phosphate buffered saline via tail-vein injection (iv) and the experimental group was treated with S. typhimurium A1-R iv Skin flaps were made at day 7, 14, 21, and 28 after implantation of the Gelfoam® to allow imaging of vascularization in the Gelfoam® using a variable-magnification small-animal imaging system and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Nascent blood vessels expressing ND-GFP extended into the Gelfoam® over time in both groups. However, the extent of nascent blood-vessel growth was significantly inhibited by S. typhimurium A1-R treatment by day 28. The present results indicate S. typhimurium A1-R has potential for anti-angiogenic targeted therapy of osteosarcoma. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. LINGO-1 and AMIGO3, potential therapeutic targets for neurological and dysmyelinating disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Foale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leucine rich repeat proteins have gained considerable interest as therapeutic targets due to their expression and biological activity within the central nervous system. LINGO-1 has received particular attention since it inhibits axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in a RhoA dependent manner while inhibiting leucine rich repeat and immunoglobulin-like domain-containing protein 1 (LINGO-1 disinhibits neuron outgrowth. Furthermore, LINGO-1 suppresses oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production. Inhibiting the action of LINGO-1 encourages remyelination both in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, LINGO-1 antagonists show promise as therapies for demyelinating diseases. An analogous protein to LINGO-1, amphoterin-induced gene and open reading frame-3 (AMIGO3, exerts the same inhibitory effect on the axonal outgrowth of central nervous system neurons, as well as interacting with the same receptors as LINGO-1. However, AMIGO3 is upregulated more rapidly after spinal cord injury than LINGO-1. We speculate that AMIGO3 has a similar inhibitory effect on oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production as with axogenesis. Therefore, inhibiting AMIGO3 will likely encourage central nervous system axonal regeneration as well as the production of myelin from local oligodendrocyte precursor cell, thus providing a promising therapeutic target and an area for future investigation.

  19. PPARγ as a Potential Target to Treat Airway Mucus Hypersecretion in Chronic Airway Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchun Shen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway mucus hypersecretion (AMH is a key pathophysiological feature of chronic airway inflammatory diseases such as bronchial asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. AMH contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic airway inflammatory diseases, and it is associated with reduced lung function and high rates of hospitalization and mortality. It has been suggested that AMH should be a target in the treatment of chronic airway inflammatory diseases. Recent evidence suggests that a key regulator of airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, and remodeling is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and lipid metabolism. PPARγ is expressed in structural, immune, and inflammatory cells in the lung. PPARγ is involved in mucin production, and PPARγ agonists can inhibit mucin synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that PPARγ is a novel target in the treatment of AMH and that further work on this transcription factor may lead to new therapies for chronic airway inflammatory diseases.

  20. LINGO-1 and AMIGO3, potential therapeutic targets for neurological and dysmyelinating disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foale, Simon; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Fulton, Daniel; Ahmed, Zubair

    2017-08-01

    Leucine rich repeat proteins have gained considerable interest as therapeutic targets due to their expression and biological activity within the central nervous system. LINGO-1 has received particular attention since it inhibits axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in a RhoA dependent manner while inhibiting leucine rich repeat and immunoglobulin-like domain-containing protein 1 (LINGO-1) disinhibits neuron outgrowth. Furthermore, LINGO-1 suppresses oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production. Inhibiting the action of LINGO-1 encourages remyelination both in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, LINGO-1 antagonists show promise as therapies for demyelinating diseases. An analogous protein to LINGO-1, amphoterin-induced gene and open reading frame-3 (AMIGO3), exerts the same inhibitory effect on the axonal outgrowth of central nervous system neurons, as well as interacting with the same receptors as LINGO-1. However, AMIGO3 is upregulated more rapidly after spinal cord injury than LINGO-1. We speculate that AMIGO3 has a similar inhibitory effect on oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production as with axogenesis. Therefore, inhibiting AMIGO3 will likely encourage central nervous system axonal regeneration as well as the production of myelin from local oligodendrocyte precursor cell, thus providing a promising therapeutic target and an area for future investigation.

  1. Discovery of a natural product-like iNOS inhibitor by molecular docking with potential neuroprotective effects in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hai-Jing; Liu, Li-Juan; Chong, Cheong-Meng; Lu, Lihua; Wang, Modi; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Chan, Philip Wai Hong; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we applied structure-based virtual screening techniques to identify natural product or natural product-like inhibitors of iNOS. The iNOS inhibitory activity of the hit compounds was characterized using cellular assays and an in vivo zebrafish larvae model. The natural product-like compound 1 inhibited NO production in LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 macrophages, without exerting cytotoxic effects on the cells. Significantly, compound 1 was able to reverse MPTP-induced locomotion deficiency and neurotoxicity in an in vivo zebrafish larval model. Hence, compound 1 could be considered as a scaffold for the further development of iNOS inhibitors for potential anti-inflammatory or anti-neurodegenerative applications.

  2. In Vivo Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Depends on the Source and the Isolation Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bortolotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have been isolated from different tissues following a variety of different procedures. Here, we comparatively assess the ex vivo and in vivo properties of MSCs isolated from either adipose tissue or bone marrow by different purification protocols. After MSC transplantation into a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia, clinical and histological analysis revealed that bone marrow MSCs purified on adhesive substrates exerted the best therapeutic activity, preserving tissue viability and promoting formation of new arterioles without directly transdifferentiating into vascular cells. In keeping with these observations, these cells abundantly expressed cytokines involved in vessel maturation and cell retention. These findings indicate that the choice of MSC source and purification protocol is critical in determining the therapeutic potential of these cells and warrant the standardization of an optimal MSC isolation procedure in order to select the best conditions to move forward to more effective clinical experimentation.

  3. Evaluation of the potential of Mycobacterium smegmatis as vaccine Candidate against tuberculosis by in silico and in vivo studies

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    Le Thuy Nguyen Thi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we scanned multiple published databases of gene expression in vivo of M. tuberculosis at different phases of infection in animals and humans, to select 38 proteins that are highly expressed in the active, latent and reactivation phases. The selected proteins were predicted for T and B epitopes. For each proteins, the regions containing T and B epitopes were selected at the same time to look for identical epitopes on M. smegmatis based on sequence alignments. Preliminary studies of humoral immunogenicity and cross-reactivity with M. tuberculosis in mice using two M. smegmatis-derived experimental vaccines were carried out, demonstrating the immunogenicity of M. smegmatis proteoliposomes and the recognition of M. tuberculosis proteins by the sera of animals immunized with this vaccine candidate. The conjunction of in silico and in vivo studies suggested the potential for future evaluation of M. smegmatis as vaccine candidate against tuberculosis using different strategies

  4. Targeting Ras signaling in AML: RALB is a small GTPase with big potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Emily J; Eckfeldt, Craig E

    2017-07-06

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating malignancy for which novel treatment approaches are desperately needed. Ras signaling is an attractive therapeutic target for AML because a large proportion of AMLs have mutations in NRAS, KRAS, or genes that activate Ras signaling, and key Ras effectors are activated in virtually all AML patient samples. This has inspired efforts to develop Ras-targeted treatment strategies for AML. Due to the inherent difficulty and disappointing efficacy of targeting Ras proteins directly, many have focused on inhibiting Ras effector pathways. Inhibiting the major oncogenic Ras effectors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and/or phosphatidylinositiol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, has generally demonstrated modest efficacy for AML. While this may be in part related to functional redundancy between these pathways, it is now clear that other Ras effectors have key oncogenic roles. Specifically, the Ras-like (Ral) GTPases have emerged as critical mediators of Ras-driven transformation and AML cell survival. Our group recently uncovered a critical role for RALB signaling in leukemic cell survival and a potential mediator of relapse following Ras-targeted therapy in AML. Furthermore, we found that RALB signaling is hyperactivated in AML patient samples, and inhibiting RALB has potent anti-leukemic activity in preclinical AML models. While key questions remain regarding the importance of RALB signaling across the genetically diverse spectrum of AML, the specific mechanism(s) that promotes leukemic cell survival downstream of RALB, and how to pharmacologically target RALB signaling effectively - RALB has emerged as a critical Ras effector and potential therapeutic target for AML.

  5. Field and action potential recordings in heart slices: correlation with established in vitro and in vivo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Herbert M; Bussek, Alexandra; Hoffmann, Michael; Beckmann, Rolf; Lohmann, Horst; Schmidt, Matthias; Wettwer, Erich

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Action potential (AP) recordings in ex vivo heart preparations constitute an important component of the preclinical cardiac safety assessment according to the ICH S7B guideline. Most AP measurement models are sensitive, predictive and informative but suffer from a low throughput. Here, effects of selected anti-arrhythmics (flecainide, quinidine, atenolol, sotalol, dofetilide, nifedipine, verapamil) on field/action potentials (FP/AP) of guinea pig and rabbit ventricular slices are presented and compared with data from established in vitro and in vivo models. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Data from measurements of membrane currents (hERG, INa), AP/FP (guinea pig and rabbit ventricular slices), AP (rabbit Purkinje fibre), haemodynamic/ECG parameters (conscious, telemetered dog) were collected, compared and correlated to complementary published data (focused literature search). KEY RESULTS The selected anti-arrhythmics, flecainide, quinidine, atenolol, sotalol, dofetilide, nifedipine and verapamil, influenced the shape of AP/FP of guinea pig and rabbit ventricular slices in a manner similar to that observed for rabbit PF. The findings obtained from slice preparations are in line with measurements of membrane currents in vitro, papillary muscle AP in vitro and haemodynamic/ECG parameters from conscious dogs in vivo, and were also corroborated by published data. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS FP and AP recordings from heart slices correlated well with established in vitro and in vivo models in terms of pharmacology and predictability. Heart slice preparations yield similar results as papillary muscle but offer enhanced throughput for mechanistic investigations and may substantially reduce the use of laboratory animals. PMID:22074238

  6. The prolactin receptor as a therapeutic target in human diseases: browsing new potential indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, Vincent; Touraine, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) signaling has emerged as a relevant target in breast and prostate cancers. This has encouraged various laboratories to develop compounds targeting the PRL receptor (PRLR). As the latter is widely distributed, it is timely to address whether other conditions could also benefit from such inhibitors. The authors briefly overview the two classes of PRLR blockers, which involve: i) PRL-core based analogs that have been validated as competitive antagonists in various preclinical models, and ii) anti-PRLR neutralizing antibodies that are currently in clinical Phase I for advanced breast and prostate cancers. The main purpose of this review is to discuss the multiple organs/diseases that may be considered as potential targets/indications for such inhibitors. This is done in light of reports suggesting that PRLR expression/signaling is increased in disease, and/or that systemic or locally elevated PRL levels correlate with (or promote) organ pathogenesis. The two immediate challenges in the field are i) to provide the scientific community with potent anti-prolactin receptor antibodies to map prolactin receptor expression in target organs, and ii) to take advantage of the availability of functionally validated PRLR blockers to establish the relevance of these potential indications in humans.

  7. Omen: identifying potential spear-phishing targets before the email is sent.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Jeremy Daniel.

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a two year project focused on a common social engineering attack method called "spear phishing". In a spear phishing attack, the user receives an email with information specifically focused on the user. This email contains either a malware-laced attachment or a link to download the malware that has been disguised as a useful program. Spear phishing attacks have been one of the most effective avenues for attackers to gain initial entry into a target network. This project focused on a proactive approach to spear phishing. To create an effective, user-specific spear phishing email, the attacker must research the intended recipient. We believe that much of the information used by the attacker is provided by the target organization's own external website. Thus when researching potential targets, the attacker leaves signs of his research in the webserver's logs. We created tools and visualizations to improve cybersecurity analysts' abilities to quickly understand a visitor's visit patterns and interests. Given these suspicious visitors and log-parsing tools, analysts can more quickly identify truly suspicious visitors, search for potential spear-phishing targeted users, and improve security around those users before the spear phishing email is sent.

  8. Targeting Heat Shock Proteins 60 and 70 of Toxoplasma gondii as a Potential Drug Target: In Silico Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwinder, Kaur; Kho, Mee Teck; Chee, Phui Mun; Lim, Wui Zhuan; Yap, Ivan K S; Choi, Sy Bing; Yam, Wai Keat

    2016-12-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) 60 and 70 are postulated as a potential drug target for toxoplasmosis due to its importance in the developmental and survival of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). As of today, there have been no reports on three-dimensional (3D) structure of Hsp60 and Hsp70 deposited in the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank. Hence, this study was conducted to predict 3D structures for Hsp60 and Hsp70 in T. gondii by homology modeling. Selection of the best predicted model was done based on multiple scoring functions. In addition, virtual screening was performed to short-list chemical compounds from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Diversity Set III in search of potential inhibitor against Hsp60 and Hsp70 in T. gondii. Prior to virtual screening, binding sites of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were predicted using various servers and were used as the center in docking studies. The Hsps were docked against known natural ligands to validate the method used in estimating free energy of binding (FEB) and possible interactions between ligand and protein. Virtual screening was performed with a total of 1560 compounds from the NCI Diversity Set III. The compounds were ranked subsequently according to their FEB. Molecular basis of interactions of the top five ranked compounds was investigated using Ligplot+. The major interactions exhibited were hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions in binding to Hsp60 and Hsp70. The results obtained provided information and guidelines for the development of inhibitors for Hsp60 and Hsp70 in T. gondii.

  9. Lithium inhibits tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through targeting hedgehog-GLI signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonglu Peng

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a critical role in the initiation and development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA and represents an attractive target for PDA treatment. Lithium, a clinical mood stabilizer for mental disorders, potently inhibits the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β that promotes the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome degradation of GLI1, an important downstream component of hedgehog signaling. Herein, we report that lithium inhibits cell proliferation, blocks G1/S cell-cycle progression, induces cell apoptosis and suppresses tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through down-regulation of the expression and activity of GLI1. Moreover, lithium synergistically enhances the anti-cancer effect of gemcitabine. These findings further our knowledge of mechanisms of action for lithium and provide a potentially new therapeutic strategy for PDA through targeting GLI1.

  10. Immunohistochemical detection of a potential molecular therapeutic target for canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Mami; Hoshino, Yuki; Izumi, Yusuke; Takagi, Satoshi

    2016-05-03

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a progressive malignant neoplasm of dogs for which there is currently no effective treatment. A recent study suggested that receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), the PI3K/Akt/m-TOR and MAPK pathways are all activated in canine and human HSA. The aim of the present study was to investigate the overexpression of these proteins by immunohistochemistry in canine splenic HSA to identify potential molecular therapeutic targets. A total of 10 splenic HSAs and two normal splenic samples surgically resected from dogs were sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological diagnosis or analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The expression of RTKs, c-kit, VEGFR-2 and PDGFR-2, as well as PI3K/Akt/m-TOR and MEK was higher in canine splenic HSAs compared to normal spleens. These proteins may therefore be potential therapeutic targets in canine splenic HSA.

  11. Adipokines: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Vascular Dysfunction in Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity

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    Mostafa Wanees Ahmed El husseny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipokines are bioactive molecules that regulate several physiological functions such as energy balance, insulin sensitization, appetite regulation, inflammatory response, and vascular homeostasis. They include proinflammatory cytokines such as adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as adiponectin, as well as vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules. In obesity and type II diabetes mellitus (DM, insulin resistance causes impairment of the endocrine function of the perivascular adipose tissue, an imbalance in the secretion of vasoconstrictor and vasodilator molecules, and an increased production of reactive oxygen species. Recent studies have shown that targeting plasma levels of adipokines or the expression of their receptors can increase insulin sensitivity, improve vascular function, and reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Several reviews have discussed the potential of adipokines as therapeutic targets for type II DM and obesity; however, this review is the first to focus on their therapeutic potential for vascular dysfunction in type II DM and obesity.

  12. Hypoxia increases mouse satellite cell clone proliferation maintaining both in vitro and in vivo heterogeneity and myogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, Luca; Piccoli, Martina; Franzin, Chiara; Pozzobon, Michela; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells (SCs) are essential for postnatal muscle growth and regeneration, however, their expansion potential in vitro is limited. Recently, hypoxia has been used to enhance proliferative abilities in vitro of various primary cultures. Here, by isolating SCs from single mouse hindlimb skeletal myofibers, we were able to distinguish two subpopulations of clonally cultured SCs (Low Proliferative Clones--LPC--and High Proliferative Clones--HPC), which, as shown in rat skeletal muscle, were present at a fixed proportion. In addition, culturing LPC and HPC at a low level of oxygen we observed a two fold increased proliferation both for LPC and HPC. LPC showed higher myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) expression than HPC, particularly under the hypoxic condition. Notably, a different myogenic potential between LPC and HPC was retained in vivo: green fluorescent protein (GFP)+LPC transplantation in cardiotoxin-injured Tibialis Anterior led to a higher number of new GFP+muscle fibers per transplanted cell than GFP+HPC. Interestingly, the in vivo myogenic potential of a single cell from an LPC is similar if cultured both in normoxia and hypoxia. Therefore, starting from a single satellite cell, hypoxia allows a larger expansion of LPC than normal O(2) conditions, obtaining a consistent amount of cells for transplantation, but maintaining their myogenic regeneration potential.

  13. pH-mediated potentiation of aminoglycosides kills bacterial persisters and eradicates in vivo biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeaux, David; Chauhan, Ashwini; Létoffé, Sylvie; Fischer, Frédéric; de Reuse, Hilde; Beloin, Christophe; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2014-11-01

    Limitations in treatment of biofilm-associated bacterial infections are often due to subpopulation of persistent bacteria (persisters) tolerant to high concentrations of antibiotics. Based on the increased aminoglycoside efficiency under alkaline conditions, we studied the combination of gentamicin and the clinically compatible basic amino acid L-arginine against planktonic and biofilm bacteria both in vitro and in vivo. Using Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli bioluminescent strains, we studied the combination of L-arginine and gentamicin against planktonic persisters through time-kill curves of late stationary-phase cultures. In vitro biofilm tolerance towards gentamicin was assessed using PVC 96 well-plates assays. Efficacy of gentamicin as antibiotic lock treatment (ALT) at 5 mg/mL at different pH was evaluated in vivo using a model of totally implantable venous access port (TIVAP) surgically implanted in rats. We demonstrated that a combination of gentamicin and the clinically compatible basic amino acid L-arginine increases in vitro planktonic and biofilm susceptibility to gentamicin, with 99% mortality amongst clinically relevant pathogens, i.e. S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa persistent bacteria. Moreover, although gentamicin local treatment alone showed poor efficacy in a clinically relevant in vivo model of catheter-related infection, gentamicin supplemented with L-arginine led to complete, long-lasting eradication of S. aureus and E. coli biofilms, when used locally. Given that intravenous administration of L-arginine to human patients is well tolerated, combined use of aminoglycoside and the non-toxic adjuvant L-arginine as catheter lock solution could constitute a new option for the eradication of pathogenic biofilms. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. {sup 18}F-labeled benzylpiperidine benzisoxazole: a potential radioligand for in vivo mapping of acetylcholinesterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y.; Choi, Y. S.; Kim, Y. R.; Baek, J. Y.; Kim, S. E.; Choi, Y.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, B. T. [Sungkyunkwon University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been an important cholinergic marker for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease since biochemical finding on severe loss of its activity in this disease. In this study, benzylpiperidine benzisoxazole (1), a potent AChE inhibitor (IC{sub 50}=0.33 nM), was labeled with {sup 18}F and evaluated for in vivo mapping of AChE. Fluorine-substituted derivatives of 1 were synthesized and their in vitro binding affinities to AChE were measured using Ellmans method. 4-[{sup 18}F]F-1 was selected and synthesized by reductive alkylation of the piperidine precursor with 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzaldehyde. In vitro autoradiography was performed by incubating rat brain coronal slices with the radioligand at 4 .deg. C for 60 min, and in vivo tissue distribution studies were carried out in mice. In vitro assay data showed that fluorine-substituted derivatives of 1 exhibited similar binding affinities to the unsubstituted ligand (1). 4-[{sup 18}F]F-1 was synthesized in 25-50% radiochemical yield and with high specific activity (>37 GBq/{mu}mol). In autoradiograms of 4-[{sup 18}F]F-1, high uptake in striatal region was clearly shown, which was completely inhibited in the presence of the unlabeled ligand. Tissue distribution studies demonstrated that the order of uptake was well correlated with the known density of AChE in mouse brain and results of the in vitro autoradiography, showing a high striatum to cerebellum uptake ratio (3 at 90 min). This study demonstrated that 4-[{sup 18}F]F-1 may be a good candidate for in vivo mapping of AChE.

  15. Apolipoprotein A-II Plus Lipid Emulsion Enhance Cell Growth via SR-B1 and Target Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohel M Julovi

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein A-II (ApoA-II is down regulated in the sera of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC patients, which may be due to increase utilization of high density lipoprotein (HDL lipid by pancreatic cancer tissue. This study examined the influence of exogenous ApoA-II on lipid uptake and cell growth in pancreatic cancer (PC both in vitro and in vivo.Cryo transmission electron microscopy (TEM examined ApoA-II's influence on morphology of SMOFLipid emulsion. The influence of ApoA-II on proliferation of cancer cell lines was determined by incubating them with lipid+/-ApoA-II and anti-SR-B1 antibody. Lipid was labeled with the fluorophore, DiD, to trace lipid uptake by cancer cells in vitro by confocal microscopy and in vivo in PDAC patient derived xenograft tumours (PDXT by fluorescence imaging. Scavenger receptor class B type-1(SR-B1 expression in PDAC cell lines and in PDAC PDXT was measured by western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively.ApoA-II spontaneously converted lipid emulsion into very small unilamellar rHDL like vesicles (rHDL/A-II and enhanced lipid uptake in PANC-1, CFPAC-1 and primary tumour cells as shown by confocal microscopy. SR-B1 expression was 13.2, 10.6, 3.1 and 2.3 fold higher in PANC-1, MIAPaCa-2, CFPAC-1 and BxPC3 cell lines than the normal pancreatic cell line (HPDE6 and 3.7 fold greater in PDAC tissue than in normal pancreas. ApoA-II plus lipid significantly increased the uptake of labeled lipid and promoted cell growth in PANC-1, MIAPaCa-2, CFPAC-1 and BxPC3 cells which was inhibited by anti SR-B1 antibody. Further, ApoA-II increased the uptake of lipid in xenografts by 3.4 fold.Our data suggest that ApoA-II enhance targeting potential of lipid in pancreatic cancer which may have imaging and drug delivery potentialities.

  16. The in vivo rodent test systems for assessment of carcinogenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Jan-Willem; Spindler, Per

    2002-01-01

    mouse models, the RasH2 and Tg.AC transgenic mouse models, and the neonatal mouse model. The "ICH Guideline S1B on Testing for Carcinogenicity of Pharmaceuticals" advocates that carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals, when needed, might be carried out choosing one 2-year rodent carcinogenicity study...... (rat) plus one other study that supplements the 2-year study and providing additional information that is not readily available from the 2-year study: either (1) a short- or medium-term in vivo rodent test system or (2) a 2-year carcinogenicity study in a second rodent species (mouse). Another topic...

  17. Internal combustion engine run on biogas is a potential solution to meet Indonesia emission target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, Himsar

    2017-09-01

    Indonesia has released two different Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets. The first target, released in 2009, is reduction GHG emissions 26% from Business-as-Usual (BAU) level using own budget and up 41% if supported international aids by 2020. The second target is reduction 29% and 41% from BAU by 2030 using own budget and with international support, respectively. In this paper, the BAU emissions and emissions reduction target of these two targets are elaborated. In addition, the characteristics of emissions from transportation sector are discussed. One of the potential mitigation actions is switching fuel in transportation sector. The results the most promising mitigation action in the transportation is switching oil fuel with biofuel. The Government of Indonesia (GoI) focuses on using biodiesel and bioethanol to run internal combustion engine in transportation sector and biogas is aimed to fuel power plant unit. However, there is very limited of success stories on using biogas in the power plant. The barriers and challenges will be discussed here. It is suggested to run internal combustion engine with biogas.

  18. The Potential of Targeting Ribosome Biogenesis in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunfei Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overall survival for patients with ovarian cancer (OC has shown little improvement for decades meaning new therapeutic options are critical. OC comprises multiple histological subtypes, of which the most common and aggressive subtype is high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC. HGSOC is characterized by genomic structural variations with relatively few recurrent somatic mutations or dominantly acting oncogenes that can be targeted for the development of novel therapies. However, deregulation of pathways controlling homologous recombination (HR and ribosome biogenesis has been observed in a high proportion of HGSOC, raising the possibility that targeting these basic cellular processes may provide improved patient outcomes. The poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitor olaparib has been approved to treat women with defects in HR due to germline BRCA mutations. Recent evidence demonstrated the efficacy of targeting ribosome biogenesis with the specific inhibitor of ribosomal RNA synthesis, CX-5461 in v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC-driven haematological and prostate cancers. CX-5461 has now progressed to a phase I clinical trial in patients with haematological malignancies and phase I/II trial in breast cancer. Here we review the currently available targeted therapies for HGSOC and discuss the potential of targeting ribosome biogenesis as a novel therapeutic approach against HGSOC.

  19. Doxorubicin-loaded micelle targeting MUC1: a potential therapeutics for triple negative breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khondee, Supang; Chittasupho, Chuda; Tima, Singkome; Anuchapreeda, Songyot

    2017-07-12

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive disease associated with poor prognosis and lack of validated targeted therapy. Thus chemotherapy is a main adjuvant treatment for TNBC patients, but it associates with severe toxicities. For a better treatment outcome, we developed an alternative therapeutic, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles targeting human mucin1 protein (MUC1) that is less toxic, more effective and targeted to TNBC. From many candidate peptides, QNDRHPR-GGGSK (QND) and HSQLPQV-GGGSK (HSQ), were identified computationally, synthesized and purified using solid phase peptide synthesis and semi-preparative HPLC. The peptides showed significant high binding to MUC1 expressing cells using a fluorescent microscope. The peptides were then conjugated on pegylated octadecyl lithocholate copolymer. DOX-encapsulated micelles were formed through self-assembly. MUC1-targeted micelles were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Drug entrapment efficiency was examined using a microplate reader. Cytotoxicity and binding and uptake were also investigated. Two types of DOX-loaded micelles with different targeting peptides, QND or HSQ, were developed. DOX-loaded micelles were spherical in shape with average particle size around 300-320 nm. Drug entrapment efficiency of untargeted and targeted DOX micelles was about 71-93%. Targeted QND-DOX and HSQ-DOX micelles exhibited significantly higher cytotoxicity compared to free DOX and untargeted DOX micelles on BT549-Luc cells. In addition, significantly greater binding and uptake were observed for QND-DOX and HSQ-DOX micelles on BT549-Luc and T47D cells. Taken together, these results suggested that QND-DOX and HSQ-DOX micelles have a potential application in the treatment of TNBC-expressing MUC1. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Potential impact of spatially targeted adult tuberculosis vaccine in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sourya; Chatterjee, Susmita; Rao, Krishna D; Dowdy, David W

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most promising vaccines in the pipeline for tuberculosis (TB) target adolescents and adults. Unlike for childhood vaccines, high-coverage population-wide vaccination is significantly more challenging for adult vaccines. Here, we aimed to estimate the impact of vaccine delivery strategies that were targeted to high-incidence geographical 'hotspots' compared with randomly allocated vaccination. We developed a spatially explicit mathematical model of TB transmission that distinguished these hotspots from the general population. We evaluated the impact of targeted and untargeted vaccine delivery strategies in India--a country that bears more than 25% of global TB burden, and may be a potential early adopter of the vaccine. We collected TB notification data and conducted a demonstration study in the state of Gujarat to validate our estimates of heterogeneity in TB incidence. We then projected the impact of randomly vaccinating 8% of adults in a single mass campaign to a spatially targeted vaccination preferentially delivered to 80% of adults in the hotspots, with both strategies augmented by continuous adolescent vaccination. In consultation with vaccine developers, we considered a vaccine efficacy of 60%, and evaluated the population-level impact after 10 years of vaccination. Spatial heterogeneity in TB notification (per 100,000/year) was modest in Gujarat: 190 in the hotspots versus 125 in the remaining population. At this level of heterogeneity, the spatially targeted vaccination was projected to reduce TB incidence by 28% after 10 years, compared with a 24% reduction projected to achieve via untargeted vaccination--a 1.17-fold augmentation in the impact of vaccination by spatially targeting. The degree of the augmentation was robust to reasonable variation in natural history assumptions, but depended strongly on the extent of spatial heterogeneity and mixing between the hotspot and general population. Identifying high-incidence hotspots and quantifying

  1. The Potentially Affected Fraction for Target Species: Additional data and calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Traas TP; Luttik R; Posthumus R; ECO; CSR

    1998-01-01

    In studying the possibilities for mapping toxic pressure of contaminants (expressed as Potentially Affected Fraction, PAF) on such target species as butterflies, dragonflies, amphibians, reptiles and plants, the toxicity data available for butterflies, damselflies, dragonflies and reptiles were found to be insufficient. Low PAF values (less than 1%) for copper, zinc and cadmium were found for amphibians at median surface water concentrations. PAF calculations for higher plants indicate a high...

  2. Ghrelin is a prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gr?nberg, Malin; Ahlin, Cecilia; Naeser, Ylva; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Holmberg, Lars; Fj?llskog, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are gastrointestinal peptides, encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Both are expressed in breast cancer tissue and ghrelin has been implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Despite recent advances in breast cancer management the need for new prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer remains high. We studied the prognostic impact of ghrelin and obestatin in women with node negative breast cancer. Within a cohort of women with breast cancer...

  3. The Mitochondria-targeted Nitroxide JP4-039 Augments Potentially Lethal Irradiation Damage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    RAJAGOPALAN, MALOLAN S.; GUPTA, KANIKA; EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; FRANICOLA, DARCY; ZHANG, XICHEN; WANG, HONG; ZHAO, HONG; TYURIN, VLADIMIR A.; PIERCE, JOSHUA G.; KAGAN, VALERIAN E.; WIPF, PETER; KANAI, ANTHONY J.; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2009-01-01

    It was unknown if a mitochondria-targeted nitroxide (JP4-039) could augment potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) of cells in quiescence. We evaluated 32D cl 3 murine hematopoietic progenitor cells which were irradiated and then either centrifuged to pellets (to simulate PLDR conditions) or left in exponential growth for 0, 24, 48 or 72 h. Pelleted cells demonstrated cell cycle arrest with a greater percentage in the G1-phase than did exponentially growing cells. Irradiation survival curves...

  4. Tumor subtype-specific cancer-testis antigens as potential biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets for cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Jun; Caballero, Otavia L.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Weinstein, John N.; Riggins, Gregory J.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Zhao, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are potential targets for cancer immunotherapy because of their restricted expression in immune-privileged germ cells and various malignancies. Current application of CT-based immunotherapy has been focused on CT expression-rich tumors such as melanoma and lung cancers. In this study, we surveyed CT expression using the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets for ten common cancer types. We show that, CT expression is specific and enriched within certain cancer molecul...

  5. siRNAs targeting PB2 and NP genes potentially inhibit replication of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, we have designed three siRNAs (PB2-2235, PB2-479 and NP-865) targeting PB2 and NP genes of avian influenza virus and evaluated their potential, measured by hemagglutination (HA), plaque reduction and Real time RT-PCR assay, in inhibiting H5N1 virus (A/chicken/Navapur/7972/2006) replication in ...

  6. Potential and Dunkelfeld offenders: two neglected target groups for prevention of child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Gerard A; Mundt, Ingrid A; Feelgood, Steven; Hupp, Elena; Neutze, Janina; Ahlers, Christoph J; Goecker, David; Beier, Klaus M

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about men who have not yet committed child sexual abuse but may be at risk of doing so (potential offenders) and the factors that distinguish these men from undetected child sexual abuse offenders with a sexual interest in children (Dunkelfeld offenders). The present study describes and compares potential and Dunkelfeld offenders, which can be viewed as ideal target groups for (primary) prevention efforts with respect to child sexual abuse. Also, this study seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of using a telephone screening procedure to conduct research with these groups. Using a computer assisted telephone interview (CATI), data on demographics, mental health, sexuality, criminal history, and victim characteristics were collected from respondents in a nation-wide media campaign, which informed potential (re-)offenders of child sexual abuse of a research and treatment project. Many participants reported recurrent sexual fantasies involving minors, as well as related distress, suggesting a high prevalence of pedophilia and hebephilia. More than half feared they would sexually abuse a minor, and Dunkelfeld offenders reported 3.2 victims on average. Group comparisons revealed that Dunkelfeld offenders were, for example, more likely to perceive themselves being at risk of offending, compared to potential offenders. The results suggest that targeting potential and Dunkelfeld offenders could prove a worthwhile approach in the prevention of child sexual abuse.

  7. RNA interference against cancer/testis genes identifies dual specificity phosphatase 21 as a potential therapeutic target in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qing; Li, Kun-Yu; Chen, Hui; Dai, Ji-Hong; Zhai, Yang-Yang; Wang, Qun; Li, Niu; Wang, Yu-Ping; Han, Ze-Guang

    2014-02-01

    Cancer/testis (CT) antigens have been considered therapeutic targets for treating cancers. However, a central question is whether their expression contributes to tumorigenesis or if they are functionally irrelevant by-products derived from the process of cellular transformation. In any case, these CT antigens are essential for cancer cell survival and may serve as potential therapeutic targets. Recently, the cell-based RNA interference (RNAi) screen has proven to be a powerful approach for identifying potential therapeutic targets. In this study we sought to identify new CT antigens as potential therapeutic targets for human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and 179 potential CT genes on the X chromosome were screened through a bioinformatics analysis of gene expression profiles. Then an RNAi screen against these potential CT genes identified nine that were required for sustaining the survival of Focus and PLC/PRF/5 cells. Among the nine genes, the physiologically testis-restricted dual specificity phosphatase 21 (DUSP21) encoding a dual specificity phosphatase was up-regulated in 39 (33%) of 118 human HCC specimens. Ectopic DUSP21 had no obvious impact on proliferation and colony formation in HCC cells. However, DUSP21 silencing significantly suppressed cell proliferation, colony formation, and in vivo tumorigenicity in HCC cells. The administration of adenovirus-mediated RNAi and an atelocollagen/siRNA mixture against endogenous DUSP21 significantly suppressed xenograft HCC tumors in mice. Further investigations showed that DUSP21 knockdown led to arrest of the cell cycle in G1 phase, cell senescence, and expression changes of some factors with functions in the cell cycle and/or senescence. Furthermore, the antiproliferative role of DUSP21 knockdown is through activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in HCC. DUSP21 plays an important role in sustaining HCC cell proliferation and may thus act as a potential therapeutic target in HCC treatment. © 2013 by

  8. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  9. Potential role of DNA methylation as a facilitator of target search processes for transcription factors through interplay with methyl-CpG-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemme, Catherine A; Marquez, Rolando; Luu, Ross H; Iwahara, Junji

    2017-07-27

    Eukaryotic genomes contain numerous non-functional high-affinity sequences for transcription factors. These sequences potentially serve as natural decoys that sequester transcription factors. We have previously shown that the presence of sequences similar to the target sequence could substantially impede association of the transcription factor Egr-1 with its targets. In this study, using a stopped-flow fluorescence method, we examined the kinetic impact of DNA methylation of decoys on the search process of the Egr-1 zinc-finger protein. We analyzed its association with an unmethylated target site on fluorescence-labeled DNA in the presence of competitor DNA duplexes, including Egr-1 decoys. DNA methylation of decoys alone did not affect target search kinetics. In the presence of the MeCP2 methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD), however, DNA methylation of decoys substantially (∼10-30-fold) accelerated the target search process of the Egr-1 zinc-finger protein. This acceleration did not occur when the target was also methylated. These results suggest that when decoys are methylated, MBD proteins can block them and thereby allow Egr-1 to avoid sequestration in non-functional locations. This effect may occur in vivo for DNA methylation outside CpG islands (CGIs) and could facilitate localization of some transcription factors within regulatory CGIs, where DNA methylation is rare. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Novel Pyrazole Derivatives Effectively Inhibit Osteoclastogenesis, a Potential Target for Treating Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ting-Hao; Lin, Tzu-Hung; Yang, Rong-Sen; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Fu, Wen-Mei; Hung, Hsin-Yi

    2015-06-25

    As human beings live longer, age-related diseases such as osteoporosis will become more prevalent. Intolerant side effects and poor responses to current treatments are observed. Therefore, novel effective therapeutic agents are greatly needed. Here, pyrazole derivatives were designed and synthesized, and their osteoclastogenesis inhibitory effects both in vitro and in vivo were evaluated. The most promising compound 13 with a 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl group inhibited markedly in vitro osteoclastogenesis as well as the bone resorption activity of osteoclasts. Compound 13 affected osteoclast's early proliferation and differentiation more than later fusion and maturation stages. In ovariectomized (OVX) mice, compound 13 can inhibit the loss of trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone number, and trabecular thickness. Moreover, compound 13 can antagonize OVX-induced reduction of serum bone resorption marker and then compensatory increase of the bone formation marker. To sum up, compound 13 has high potential to be developed into a novel therapeutic agent for treating osteoporosis in the future.

  11. CD47 is a Potential Target for the Treatment of Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChunPing Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aims to investigate the effect of CD47 on the development of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC and the therapeutic potential of monoclonal antibody against CD47 and its ligand SIRPα in the treatment of LSCC. Methods: We firstly detected the expressions of CD47 mRNA and protein in LSCC and para-carcinoma tissues, introduced the most efficient CD47siRNA sequence into LSCC cells by lentiviral transfection and employed three monoclonal antibodies to evaluate their anti-LSCC effects in vitro and in vivo. Results: We observed that the mRNA and protein expressions of CD47 in LSCC tissue had significant increase in LSCC tissues compared with those in para-carcinoma tissue (p Conclusion: The results suggested a critical role of CD47 in LSCC development and the promising treatment of antiCD47/SIRPα and/or CD47siRNA in LSCC.

  12. Vitiligo blood transcriptomics provides new insights into disease mechanisms and identifies potential novel therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey-Rao, Rama; Sinha, Animesh A

    2017-01-28

    Significant gaps remain regarding the pathomechanisms underlying the autoimmune response in vitiligo (VL), where the loss of self-tolerance leads to the targeted killing of melanocytes. Specifically, there is incomplete information regarding alterations in the systemic environment that are relevant to the disease state. We undertook a genome-wide profiling approach to examine gene expression in the peripheral blood of VL patients and healthy controls in the context of our previously published VL-skin gene expression profile. We used several in silico bioinformatics-based analyses to provide new insights into disease mechanisms and suggest novel targets for future therapy. Unsupervised clustering methods of the VL-blood dataset demonstrate a "disease-state"-specific set of co-expressed genes. Ontology enrichment analysis of 99 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) uncovers a down-regulated immune/inflammatory response, B-Cell antigen receptor (BCR) pathways, apoptosis and catabolic processes in VL-blood. There is evidence for both type I and II interferon (IFN) playing a role in VL pathogenesis. We used interactome analysis to identify several key blood associated transcriptional factors (TFs) from within (STAT1, STAT6 and NF-kB), as well as "hidden" (CREB1, MYC, IRF4, IRF1, and TP53) from the dataset that potentially affect disease pathogenesis. The TFs overlap with our reported lesional-skin transcriptional circuitry, underscoring their potential importance to the disease. We also identify a shared VL-blood and -skin transcriptional "hot spot" that maps to chromosome 6, and includes three VL-blood dysregulated genes (PSMB8, PSMB9 and TAP1) described as potential VL-associated genetic susceptibility loci. Finally, we provide bioinformatics-based support for prioritizing dysregulated genes in VL-blood or skin as potential therapeutic targets. We examined the VL-blood transcriptome in context with our (previously published) VL-skin transcriptional profile to address

  13. A comparative study of the chondrogenic potential between synthetic and natural scaffolds in an in vivo bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ju Huang, Shu-Rui Yang, I-Ming Chu, Eric M Brey, Hui-Yi Hsiao and Ming-Huei Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical demand for cartilage tissue engineering is potentially large for reconstruction defects resulting from congenital deformities or degenerative disease due to limited donor sites for autologous tissue and donor site morbidities. Cartilage tissue engineering has been successfully applied to the medical field: a scaffold pre-cultured with chondrocytes was used prior to implantation in an animal model. We have developed a surgical approach in which tissues are engineered by implantation with a vascular pedicle as an in vivo bioreactor in bone and adipose tissue engineering. Collagen type II, chitosan, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA and polycaprolactone (PCL were four commonly applied scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering. To expand the application of the same animal model in cartilage tissue engineering, these four scaffolds were selected and compared for their ability to generate cartilage with chondrocytes in the same model with an in vivo bioreactor. Gene expression and immunohistochemistry staining methods were used to evaluate the chondrogenesis and osteogenesis of specimens. The result showed that the PLGA and PCL scaffolds exhibited better chondrogenesis than chitosan and type II collagen in the in vivo bioreactor. Among these four scaffolds, the PCL scaffold presented the most significant result of chondrogenesis embedded around the vascular pedicle in the long-term culture incubation phase.

  14. A comparative study of the chondrogenic potential between synthetic and natural scaffolds in an in vivo bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jung-Ju; Yang, Shu-Rui; Chu, I.-Ming; Brey, Eric M.; Hsiao, Hui-Yi; Cheng, Ming-Huei

    2013-10-01

    The clinical demand for cartilage tissue engineering is potentially large for reconstruction defects resulting from congenital deformities or degenerative disease due to limited donor sites for autologous tissue and donor site morbidities. Cartilage tissue engineering has been successfully applied to the medical field: a scaffold pre-cultured with chondrocytes was used prior to implantation in an animal model. We have developed a surgical approach in which tissues are engineered by implantation with a vascular pedicle as an in vivo bioreactor in bone and adipose tissue engineering. Collagen type II, chitosan, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) were four commonly applied scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering. To expand the application of the same animal model in cartilage tissue engineering, these four scaffolds were selected and compared for their ability to generate cartilage with chondrocytes in the same model with an in vivo bioreactor. Gene expression and immunohistochemistry staining methods were used to evaluate the chondrogenesis and osteogenesis of specimens. The result showed that the PLGA and PCL scaffolds exhibited better chondrogenesis than chitosan and type II collagen in the in vivo bioreactor. Among these four scaffolds, the PCL scaffold presented the most significant result of chondrogenesis embedded around the vascular pedicle in the long-term culture incubation phase.

  15. Kaempferol-Phospholipid Complex: Formulation, and Evaluation of Improved Solubility, In Vivo Bioavailability, and Antioxidant Potential of Kaempferol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshan R. Telange

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The current work describes the formulation and evaluation of a phospholipid complex of kaempferol to enhance the latter’s aqueous solubility, in vitro dissolution rate, in vivo antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities, and oral bioavailability. The kaempferol-phospholipid complex was synthesized using a freeze-drying method with the formulation being optimized using a full factorial design (32 approach. Our results include the validation of the mathematical model in order to ascertain the role of specific formulation and process variables that contribute favorably to the formulation’s development. The final product was characterized and confirmed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-NMR, and Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD analysis. The aqueous solubility and the in vitro dissolution rate were enhanced compared to that of pure kaempferol. The in vivo antioxidant properties of the kaempferol-phospholipid complex were evaluated by measuring its impact on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-intoxicated rats. The optimized phospholipid complex improved the liver function test parameters to a significant level by restoration of all elevated liver marker enzymes in CCl4-intoxicated rats. The complex also enhanced the in vivo antioxidant potential by increasing levels of GSH (reduced glutathione, SOD (superoxide dismutase, catalase and decreasing lipid peroxidation, compared to that of pure kaempferol. The final optimized phospholipid complex also demonstrated a significant improvement in oral bioavailability demonstrated by improvements to key pharmacokinetic parameters, compared to that of pure kaempferol.

  16. Complex Role of the Mitochondrial Targeting Signal in the Function of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Revealed by Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Transgenesis in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Goro; Ishii, Tomohiro; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam; Jo, Youngah; Bahat, Assaf; Orly, Joseph; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Parker, Keith L.

    2008-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) stimulates the regulated production of steroid hormones in the adrenal cortex and gonads by facilitating the delivery of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane. To explore key aspects of StAR function within bona fide steroidogenic cells, we used a transgenic mouse model to explore the function of StAR proteins in vivo. We first validated this transgenic bacterial artificial chromosome reconstitution system by targeting enhanced green...

  17. Evaluation of Novel Antimouse VEGFR2 Antibodies as Potential Antiangiogenic or Vascular Targeting Agents for Tumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Ran

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We generated a panel of eight rat IgG2a monoclonal antibodies with high affinity for mouse VEGFR2 (KDR/Flk-1, the main receptor that mediates the angiogenic effect of VEGF-A. The antibodies (termed RAFL, Rat Anti Flk bound to dividing endothelial cells more strongly than they did to nondividing cells. Most of the RAFL antibodies blocked [125I]VEGF165 binding to VEGFR2. Three of eight antibodies localized to VEGFR2-positive tumor endothelium after intravenous injection into mice bearing orthotopic MDA-MB-231 breast carcinomas, as judged by indirect immunohistochemistry. An average of 60% of vessels in the tumors was stained. The majority (50–80% of vessels were also stained in a variety of other human and murine tumors growing in mice. The antibodies did not bind detectably to the vascular endothelium in normal heart, lung, liver, and brain cortex, whereas the vascular endothelium in kidney glomerulus and pancreatic islets was stained. Treatment of mice bearing orthotopic MDA-MB-231 tumors with RAFL-1 antibody inhibited tumor growth by an average of 48% and reduced vascular density by 65%, compared to tumors in mice treated with control IgG. Vascular damage was not observed in normal organs, including kidneys and pancreas. These studies demonstrate that anti-VEGFR2 antibodies have potential for vascular targeting and imaging of tumors in vivo.

  18. Engineering Intrinsically Zirconium‐89 Radiolabeled Self‐Destructing Mesoporous Silica Nanostructures for In Vivo Biodistribution and Tumor Targeting Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goel, Shreya; Chen, Feng; Luan, Shijie; Valdovinos, Hector F; Shi, Sixiang; Graves, Stephen A; Ai, Fanrong; Barnhart, Todd E; Theuer, Charles P; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    .... The as‐synthesized bMSNs are intrinsically radiolabeled with oxophilic zirconium‐89 ( 89 Zr, t 1/2 = 78.4 h) radionuclide to track their in vivo pharmacokinetics via positron emission tomography imaging...

  19. In vitro and in vivo effects of free and chalcones-loaded nanoemulsions: insights and challenges in targeted cancer chemotherapies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winter, Evelyn; Pizzol, Carine Dal; Locatelli, Claudriana; Silva, Adny H; Conte, Aline; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise D; Nunes, Ricardo J; Yunes, Rosendo A; Creckzynski-Pasa, Tânia B

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, we encapsulated chalcones in a nanoemulsion and compared their effect with the respective free compounds in leukemia and in non-tumoral cell lines, as well as in an in vivo model...

  20. In Vivo Pharmacodynamic Target Assessment of Delafloxacin against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Murine Lung Infection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepak, Alexander J; Andes, David R

    2016-08-01

    observed with escalating doses of delafloxacin. Maximal organism reductions ranged from 2 log10 to more than 4 log10 The median free-drug AUC/MIC magnitude associated with net stasis for each species group was 1.45, 0.56, and 40.3 for S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, and K. pneumoniae, respectively. AUC/MIC targets for the 1-log kill endpoint were 2- to 5-fold higher. Delafloxacin demonstrated in vitro and in vivo potency against a diverse group of pathogens, including those with phenotypic drug resistance to other classes. These results have potential relevance for clinical dose selection and evaluation of susceptibility breakpoints for delafloxacin for the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections involving these pathogens. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Near-infrared emission Ba3(PO4)2:Mn5+ phosphor and potential application in vivo fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, RenPing; Yu, Xiaoguang; Sun, Xinyuan; Cao, Chunyan; Qiu, JianRong

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescence imaging in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II, 1000-1350 nm) is attracting attention due to negligible tissue scattering and lower tissue autofluorescence, etc. Here, Ba3(PO4)2:Mn5+ phosphor is prepared via solid state reaction method in air, and NIR emission band peaking at ∼1191 nm in the NIR-II region is observed. According to experiment results, Ba3(PO4)2:Mn5+ phosphor has a great potential for the study of the NIR-II fluorescence imaging in vivo.

  2. Photoacoustic spectroscopy to evaluate the potentiality of bee-propolis as UV protector: In vivo test in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehn, E.; Silva, K. C.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.; Franco, S. L.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, the Photoacoustic Spectroscopy was employed to evaluate the potentiality of bee-propolis as UV protector. The experiments were performed to obtain the creams optical absorption spectra in the UV spectral region and also to evaluate in vivo the penetration rate of the obtained product in humans. The results showed the spectral response of the developed bee-propolis creams, and also revealed that two hours after the application about 40 % of the cream signal was still detected on the skin surface.

  3. Phenotype and functional evaluation of ex vivo generated antigen-specific immune effector cells with potential for therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuhong; Huang, Yuju; Liang, Yin; Ho, Yuchin; Wang, Yichen; Chang, Lung-Ji

    2009-01-01

    Ex vivo activation and expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy has demonstrated great success. To improve safety and therapeutic efficacy, increased antigen specificity and reduced non-specific response of the ex vivo generated immune cells are necessary. Here, using a complete protein-spanning pool of pentadecapeptides of the latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a weak viral antigen which is associated with EBV lymphoproliferative diseases, we investigated the phenotype and function of immune effector cells generated based on IFN-γ or CD137 activation marker selection and dendritic cell (DC) activation. These ex vivo prepared immune cells exhibited a donor- and antigen-dependent T cell response; the IFN-γ-selected immune cells displayed a donor-related CD4- or CD8-dominant T cell phenotype; however, the CD137-enriched cells showed an increased ratio of CD4 T cells. Importantly, the pentadecapeptide antigens accessed both class II and class I MHC antigen processing machineries and effectively activated EBV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Phenotype and kinetic analyses revealed that the IFN-γ and the CD137 selections enriched more central memory T (Tcm) cells than did the DC-activation approach, and after expansion, the IFN-γ-selected effector cells showed the highest level of antigen-specificity and effector activities. While all three approaches generated immune cells with comparable antigen-specific activities, the IFN-γ selection followed by ex vivo expansion produced high quality and quantity of antigen-specific effector cells. Our studies presented the optimal approach for generating therapeutic immune cells with potential for emergency and routine clinical applications. PMID:19660111

  4. Inducible in vivo silencing of Brd4 identifies potential toxicities of sustained BET protein inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolden, Jessica E; Tasdemir, Nilgun; Dow, Lukas E; van Es, Johan H; Wilkinson, John E; Zhao, Zhen; Clevers, Hans; Lowe, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    BET family proteins are novel therapeutic targets for cancer and inflammation and represent the first chromatin readers against which small-molecule inhibitors have been developed. First-generation BET inhibitors have shown therapeutic efficacy in preclinical models, but the consequences of

  5. Multicolor in vivo targeted imaging to guide real-time surgery of HER2-positive micrometastases in a two-tumor coincident model of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Michelle; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2009-06-01

    One of the primary goals of oncological molecular imaging is to accurately identify and characterize malignant tissues in vivo. Currently, molecular imaging relies on targeting a single molecule that while overexpressed in malignancy, is often also expressed at lower levels in normal tissue, resulting in reduced tumor to background ratios. One approach to increasing the specificity of molecular imaging in cancer is to use multiple probes each with distinct fluorescence to target several surface antigens simultaneously, in order to identify tissue expression profiles, rather than relying on the expression of a single target. This next step forward in molecular imaging will rely on characterization of tissue based on fluorescence and therefore will require the ability to simultaneously identify several optical probes each attached to different targeting ligands. We created a novel 'coincident' ovarian cancer mouse model by coinjecting each animal with two distinct cell lines, HER2+/red fluorescent protein (RFP)- SKOV3 and HER2-/RFP+ SHIN3-RFP, in order to establish a model of disease in which animals simultaneously bore tumors with two distinct phenotypes (HER2+/RFP-, HER2-/RFP+), which could be utilized for multicolor imaging. The HER2 receptor of the SKOV3 cell line was targeted with a trastuzumab-rhodamine green conjugate to create green tumor implants, whereas the RFP plasmid of the SHIN3 cells created red tumor implants. We demonstrate that real-time in vivo multicolor imaging is feasible and that fluorescence characteristics can then serve to guide the surgical removal of disease.

  6. Tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein as a scaffold to assemble an octavalent peptide nanoprobe for enhanced tumor targeting and intracellular uptake in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haiming; Yang, Jie; Jin, Honglin; Huang, Chuan; Fu, Jianwei; Yang, Fei; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2011-06-01

    Relatively weak tumor affinities and short retention time in vivo hinder the application of targeting peptides in tumor molecular imaging. Multivalent strategies based on various scaffolds have been utilized to improve the ability of peptide-receptor binding or extend the clearance time of peptide-based probes. Here, we use a tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein (tfRFP) as a scaffold to create a self-assembled octavalent peptide fluorescent nanoprobe (Octa-FNP) using a genetic engineering approach. The multiligand connecting, fluorophore labeling and nanostructure formation of Octa-FNP were performed in one step. In vitro studies showed Octa-FNP is a 10-nm fluorescent probe with excellent serum stability. Cellular uptake of Octa-FNP by human nasopharyngeal cancer 5-8F cells is 15-fold of tetravalent probe, ∼80-fold of monovalent probe and ∼600-fold of nulvalent tfRFP. In vivo enhanced tumor targeting and intracellular uptake of Octa-FNP were confirmed using optical imaging and Western blot analysis. It achieved extremely high contrast of Octa-FNP signal between tumor tissue and normal organs, especially seldom Octa-FNP detected in liver and spleen. Owing to easy preparation, precise structural and functional control, and multivalent effect, Octa-FNP provides a powerful tool for tumor optical molecular imaging and evaluating the targeting ability of numerous peptides in vivo.

  7. Polarization speckle imaging as a potential technique for in vivo skin cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Lui, Harvey; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I; Lee, Tim K

    2013-06-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the Western world. In order to accurately detect the disease, especially malignant melanoma-the most fatal form of skin cancer-at an early stage when the prognosis is excellent, there is an urgent need to develop noninvasive early detection methods. We believe that polarization speckle patterns, defined as a spatial distribution of depolarization ratio of traditional speckle patterns, can be an important tool for skin cancer detection. To demonstrate our technique, we conduct a large in vivo clinical study of 214 skin lesions, and show that statistical moments of the polarization speckle pattern could differentiate different types of skin lesions, including three common types of skin cancers, malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and two benign lesions, melanocytic nevus and seborrheic keratoses. In particular, the fourth order moment achieves better or similar sensitivity and specificity than many well-known and accepted optical techniques used to differentiate melanoma and seborrheic keratosis.

  8. Polarization speckle imaging as a potential technique for in vivo skin cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Lui, Harvey; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lee, Tim K.

    2013-06-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the Western world. In order to accurately detect the disease, especially malignant melanoma-the most fatal form of skin cancer-at an early stage when the prognosis is excellent, there is an urgent need to develop noninvasive early detection methods. We believe that polarization speckle patterns, defined as a spatial distribution of depolarization ratio of traditional speckle patterns, can be an important tool for skin cancer detection. To demonstrate our technique, we conduct a large in vivo clinical study of 214 skin lesions, and show that statistical moments of the polarization speckle pattern could differentiate different types of skin lesions, including three common types of skin cancers, malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and two benign lesions, melanocytic nevus and seborrheic keratoses. In particular, the fourth order moment achieves better or similar sensitivity and specificity than many well-known and accepted optical techniques used to differentiate melanoma and seborrheic keratosis.

  9. Novel Synthetic Oxazines Target NF-κB in Colon Cancer In Vitro and Inflammatory Bowel Disease In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananda, Hanumappa; Sukhorukov, Alexey Yu; Shanmugam, Muthu K.; Sundaram, Mahalingam S.; Nayaka, Siddaiah Chandra; Girish, Kesturu S.; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M. E.; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Sethi, Gautam; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) has been linked with the pathogenesis of several proinflammatory diseases including number of cancers and inflammatory bowel diseases. In the present work, we evaluated the anticancer activity of 1,2-oxazines derivatives against colorectal cancer cell lines and identified 2-((2-acetyl-6,6-dimethyl-4-phenyl-5,6-dihydro-2H-1,2-oxazin-3-yl)methyl)isoindoline-1,3-dione (API) as the lead anticancer agent among the tested compounds. The apoptosis inducing effect of API was demonstrated using flow cytometry analysis and measuring the caspase 3/7 activity in API treated cells. Based on the literature on inhibition of NF-κB by oxazines, we evaluated the effect of 1,2-oxazines against the ability of NF-κB binding to DNA, NF-κB-dependent luciferase expression and IκBα phosphorylation. We found that, API abrogate constitutive activation of NF-κB and inhibits IκBα phosphorylation in HCT116 cells. Our in silico analysis revealed the binding of oxazines to the hydrophobic cavity that present between the interface of p65 and IκBα. Given the relevance with aberrant activation of NF-κB in inflammation bowel disease (IBD), we evaluated the effect of API on dextran sulphate sodium-induced IBD mice model. The treatment of IBD induced mice with API decreased the myeloperoxidase activity in colonic extract, modulated the colon length and serum levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-10. Furthermore, the histological analysis revealed the restoration of the distorted cryptic epithelial structure of colon in the API treated animals. In conclusion, we comprehensively validated the NF-κB inhibitory efficacy of API that targets NF-κB in in vitro colon cancer and an in vivo inflammatory bowel disease model. PMID:27685808

  10. Dual-Targeting Nanoparticles for In Vivo Delivery of Suicide Genes to Chemotherapy-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Emiliano; Deng, Yang; Shapiro, Erik M; Bortolomai, Ileana; Lopez, Salvatore; Lin, Ken; Bellone, Stefania; Cui, Jiajia; Menderes, Gulden; Black, Jonathan D; Schwab, Carlton L; Bonazzoli, Elena; Yang, Fan; Predolini, Federica; Zammataro, Luca; Altwerger, Gary; de Haydu, Christopher; Clark, Mitchell; Alvarenga, Julio; Ratner, Elena; Azodi, Masoud; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Schwartz, Peter E; Litkouhi, Babak; Saltzman, W Mark; Santin, Alessandro D

    2017-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer. Claudin-3 and -4, the receptors for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), are overexpressed in more than 70% of these tumors. Here, we synthesized and characterized poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) modified with the carboxy-terminal-binding domain of CPE (c-CPE-NP) for the delivery of suicide gene therapy to chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer cells. As a therapeutic payload, we generated a plasmid encoding for the diphtheria toxin subunit-A (DT-A) under the transcriptional control of the p16 promoter, a gene highly differentially expressed in ovarian cancer cells. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence demonstrated that c-CPE-NPs encapsulating the cytomegalovirus (CMV) GFP plasmid (CMV GFP c-CPE-NP) were significantly more efficient than control NPs modified with a scrambled peptide (CMV GFP scr-NP) in transfecting primary chemotherapy-resistant ovarian tumor cell lines in vitro (P = 0.03). Importantly, c-CPE-NPs encapsulating the p16 DT-A vector (p16 DT-A c-CPE-NP) were significantly more effective than control p16 DT-A scr-NP in inducing ovarian cancer cell death in vitro (% cytotoxicity: mean ± SD = 32.9 ± 0.15 and 7.45 ± 7.93, respectively, P = 0.03). In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated efficient transfection of tumor cells within 12 hours after intraperitoneal injection of CMV GFP c-CPE-NP in mice harboring chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer xenografts. Finally, multiple intraperitoneal injections of p16 DT-A c-CPE-NP resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth compared with control NP in chemotherapy-resistant tumor-bearing mice (P = 0.041). p16 DT-A c-CPE-NP may represent a novel dual-targeting therapeutic approach for the selective delivery of gene therapy to chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(2); 323-33. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Characterization of tumor-targeting Ag2S quantum dots for cancer imaging and therapy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Li, Bowen; Zhang, Min; Sun, Kang; Wang, Yiran; Peng, Kerui; Ao, Mengdi; Guo, Yiran; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-10-01

    Nanomedicine platforms that have the potential to simultaneously provide the function of molecular imaging and therapeutic treatment in one system are beneficial to address the challenges of cancer heterogeneity and adaptive resistance. In this study, Cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD), a less-expensive active tumor targeting tri-peptide, and doxorubicin (DOX), a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, were covalently attached to Ag2S quantum dots (QDs) to form the nano-conjugates Ag2S-DOX-cRGD. The optical characterization of Ag2S-DOX-cRGD manifested the maintenance of QDs fluorescence, which suggested the potential of Ag2S for monitoring intracellular and systemic drug distribution. The low biotoxicity of Ag2S QDs indicated that they are promisingly safe nanoparticles for bio-applications. Furthermore, the selective imaging and favorable tumor inhibition of the nanoconjugates were demonstrated at both cell and animal levels. These results indicated a promising future for the utilization of Ag2S QDs as a kind of multi-functional nano platform to achieve imaging-visible nano-therapeutics.

  12. Cellular Signaling Pathway Alterations and Potential Targeted Therapies for Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Giunti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parafollicular C-cell-derived medullary thyroid cancer (MTC comprises 3% to 4% of all thyroid cancers. While cytotoxic treatments have been shown to have limited efficacy, targeted molecular therapies that inhibit rearranged during transfection (RET and other tyrosine kinase receptors that are mainly involved in angiogenesis have shown great promise in the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced MTC. Multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as vandetanib, which is already approved for the treatment of progressive MTC, and cabozantinib have shown distinct advantages with regard to rates of disease response and control. However, these types of tyrosine kinase inhibitor compounds are able to concurrently block several types of targets, which limits the understanding of RET as a specific target. Moreover, important resistances to tyrosine kinase inhibitors can occur, which limit the long-term efficacy of these treatments. Deregulated cellular signaling pathways and genetic alterations in MTC, particularly the activation of the RAS/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR cascades and RET crosstalk signaling, are now emerging as novel and potentially promising therapeutic treatments for aggressive MTC.

  13. Characterisation of the Candida albicans Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Ppt2 as a Potential Antifungal Drug Target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine S Dobb

    Full Text Available Antifungal drugs acting via new mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat the increasing numbers of severe fungal infections caused by pathogens such as Candida albicans. The phosphopantetheinyl transferase of Aspergillus fumigatus, encoded by the essential gene pptB, has previously been identified as a potential antifungal target. This study investigated the function of its orthologue in C. albicans, PPT2/C1_09480W by placing one allele under the control of the regulatable MET3 promoter, and deleting the remaining allele. The phenotypes of this conditional null mutant showed that, as in A. fumigatus, the gene PPT2 is essential for growth in C. albicans, thus fulfilling one aspect of an efficient antifungal target. The catalytic activity of Ppt2 as a phosphopantetheinyl transferase and the acyl carrier protein Acp1 as a substrate were demonstrated in a fluorescence transfer assay, using recombinant Ppt2 and Acp1 produced and purified from E.coli. A fluorescence polarisation assay amenable to high-throughput screening was also developed. Therefore we have identified Ppt2 as a broad-spectrum novel antifungal target and developed tools to identify inhibitors as potentially new antifungal compounds.

  14. Investigation of potential targets of Porphyromonas CRISPRs among the genomes of Porphyromonas species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Masaki; Maruyama, Fumito; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    The oral bacterial species Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, has plastic genomes that may be driven by homologous recombination with exogenous deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is incorporated by natural transformation and conjugation. However, bacteriophages and plasmids, both of which are main resources of exogenous DNA, do not exist in the known P. gingivalis genomes. This could be associated with an adaptive immunity system conferred by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (cas) genes in P. gingivalis as well as innate immune systems such as a restriction-modification system. In a previous study, few immune targets were predicted for P. gingivalis CRISPR/Cas. In this paper, we analyzed 51 P. gingivalis genomes, which were newly sequenced, and publicly available genomes of 13 P. gingivalis and 46 other Porphyromonas species. We detected 6 CRISPR/Cas types (classified by sequence similarity of repeat) in P. gingivalis and 12 other types in the remaining species. The Porphyromonas CRISPR spacers with potential targets in the genus Porphyromonas were approximately 23 times more abundant than those with potential targets in other genus taxa (1,720/6,896 spacers vs. 74/6,896 spacers). Porphyromonas CRISPR/Cas may be involved in genome plasticity by exhibiting selective interference against intra- and interspecies nucleic acids. PMID:28837670

  15. Myeloid-specific Rictor deletion induces M1 macrophage polarization and potentiates in vivo pro-inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T Festuccia

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt axis plays a central role in attenuating inflammation upon macrophage stimulation with toll-like receptor (TLR ligands. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2 relays signal from PI3K to Akt but its role in modulating inflammation in vivo has never been investigated. To evaluate the role of mTORC2 in the regulation of inflammation in vivo, we have generated a mouse model lacking Rictor, an essential mTORC2 component, in myeloid cells. Primary macrophages isolated from myeloid-specific Rictor null mice exhibited an exaggerated response to TLRs ligands, and expressed high levels of M1 genes and lower levels of M2 markers. To determine whether the loss of Rictor similarly affected inflammation in vivo, mice were either fed a high fat diet, a situation promoting chronic but low-grade inflammation, or were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, which mimics an acute, severe septic inflammatory condition. Although high fat feeding contributed to promote obesity, inflammation, macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue and systemic insulin resistance, we did not observe a significant impact of Rictor loss on these parameters. However, mice lacking Rictor exhibited a higher sensitivity to septic shock when injected with LPS. Altogether, these results indicate that mTORC2 is a key negative regulator of macrophages TLR signalling and that its role in modulating inflammation is particularly important in the context of severe inflammatory challenges. These observations suggest that approaches aimed at modulating mTORC2 activity may represent a possible therapeutic approach for diseases linked to excessive inflammation.

  16. Pharmacological targeting of the ephrin receptor kinase signalling by GLPG1790 in vitro and in vivo reverts oncophenotype, induces myogenic differentiation and radiosensitizes embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Megiorni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EPH (erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptors are clinically relevant targets in several malignancies. This report describes the effects of GLPG1790, a new potent pan-EPH inhibitor, in human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS cell lines. Methods EPH-A2 and Ephrin-A1 mRNA expression was quantified by real-time PCR in 14 ERMS tumour samples and in normal skeletal muscle (NSM. GLPG1790 effects were tested in RD and TE671 cell lines, two in vitro models of ERMS, by performing flow cytometry analysis, Western blotting and immunofluorescence experiments. RNA interfering experiments were performed to assess the role of specific EPH receptors. Radiations were delivered using an x-6 MV photon linear accelerator. GLPG1790 (30 mg/kg in vivo activity alone or in combination with irradiation (2 Gy was determined in murine xenografts. Results Our study showed, for the first time, a significant upregulation of EPH-A2 receptor and Ephrin-A1 ligand in ERMS primary biopsies in comparison to NSM. GLPG1790 in vitro induced G1-growth arrest as demonstrated by Rb, Cyclin A and Cyclin B1 decrease, as well as by p21 and p27 increment. GLPG1790 reduced migratory capacity and clonogenic potential of ERMS cells, prevented rhabdosphere formation and downregulated CD133, CXCR4 and Nanog stem cell markers. Drug treatment committed ERMS cells towards skeletal muscle differentiation by inducing a myogenic-like phenotype and increasing MYOD1, Myogenin and MyHC levels. Furthermore, GLPG1790 significantly radiosensitized ERMS cells by impairing the DNA double-strand break repair pathway. Silencing of both EPH-A2 and EPH-B2, two receptors preferentially targeted by GLPG1790, closely matched the effects of the EPH pharmacological inhibition. GLPG1790 and radiation combined treatments reduced tumour mass by 83% in mouse TE671 xenografts. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest that altered EPH signalling plays a key role in ERMS development and that

  17. In Vivo Optical Imaging for Targeted Drug Kinetics and Localization for Oral Surgery and Super-Resolution, Facilitated by Printed Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Brian Z.

    Many human cancer cell types over-express folate receptors, and this provides an opportunity to develop targeted anti-cancer drugs. For these drugs to be effective, their kinetics must be well understood in vivo and in deep tissue where tumors occur. We demonstrate a method for imaging these parameters by incorporating a kinetic compartment model and fluorescence into optical diffusion tomography (ODT). The kinetics were imaged in a live mouse, and found to be in agreement with previous in vitro studies, demonstrating the validity of the met