WorldWideScience

Sample records for vivo mapping macromolecular

  1. Macromolecular target prediction by self-organizing feature maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gisbert; Schneider, Petra

    2017-03-01

    Rational drug discovery would greatly benefit from a more nuanced appreciation of the activity of pharmacologically active compounds against a diverse panel of macromolecular targets. Already, computational target-prediction models assist medicinal chemists in library screening, de novo molecular design, optimization of active chemical agents, drug re-purposing, in the spotting of potential undesired off-target activities, and in the 'de-orphaning' of phenotypic screening hits. The self-organizing map (SOM) algorithm has been employed successfully for these and other purposes. Areas covered: The authors recapitulate contemporary artificial neural network methods for macromolecular target prediction, and present the basic SOM algorithm at a conceptual level. Specifically, they highlight consensus target-scoring by the employment of multiple SOMs, and discuss the opportunities and limitations of this technique. Expert opinion: Self-organizing feature maps represent a straightforward approach to ligand clustering and classification. Some of the appeal lies in their conceptual simplicity and broad applicability domain. Despite known algorithmic shortcomings, this computational target prediction concept has been proven to work in prospective settings with high success rates. It represents a prototypic technique for future advances in the in silico identification of the modes of action and macromolecular targets of bioactive molecules.

  2. MAP_CHANNELS: a computation tool to aid in the visualization and characterization of solvent channels in macromolecular crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juers, Douglas H; Ruffin, Jon

    2014-12-01

    A computation tool is described that facilitates visualization and characterization of solvent channels or pores within macromolecular crystals. A scalar field mapping the shortest distance to protein surfaces is calculated on a grid covering the unit cell and is written as a map file. The map provides a multiscale representation of the solvent channels, which when viewed in standard macromolecular crystallographic software packages gives an intuitive sense of the solvent channel architecture. The map is analysed to yield descriptors of the topology and the morphology of the solvent channels, including bottleneck radii, tortuosity, width variation and anisotropy.

  3. Automated structure refinement of macromolecular assemblies from cryo-EM maps using Rosetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Song, Yifan; Barad, Benjamin A; Cheng, Yifan; Fraser, James S; DiMaio, Frank

    2016-09-26

    Cryo-EM has revealed the structures of many challenging yet exciting macromolecular assemblies at near-atomic resolution (3-4.5Å), providing biological phenomena with molecular descriptions. However, at these resolutions, accurately positioning individual atoms remains challenging and error-prone. Manually refining thousands of amino acids - typical in a macromolecular assembly - is tedious and time-consuming. We present an automated method that can improve the atomic details in models that are manually built in near-atomic-resolution cryo-EM maps. Applying the method to three systems recently solved by cryo-EM, we are able to improve model geometry while maintaining the fit-to-density. Backbone placement errors are automatically detected and corrected, and the refinement shows a large radius of convergence. The results demonstrate that the method is amenable to structures with symmetry, of very large size, and containing RNA as well as covalently bound ligands. The method should streamline the cryo-EM structure determination process, providing accurate and unbiased atomic structure interpretation of such maps.

  4. Implementation of fast macromolecular proton fraction mapping on 1.5 and 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanners: preliminary experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnykh, V.; Korostyshevskaya, A.

    2017-08-01

    Macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) is a biophysical parameter describing the amount of macromolecular protons involved into magnetization exchange with water protons in tissues. MPF represents a significant interest as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarker of myelin for clinical applications. A recent fast MPF mapping method enabled clinical translation of MPF measurements due to time-efficient acquisition based on the single-point constrained fit algorithm. However, previous MPF mapping applications utilized only 3 Tesla MRI scanners and modified pulse sequences, which are not commonly available. This study aimed to test the feasibility of MPF mapping implementation on a 1.5 Tesla clinical scanner using standard manufacturer’s sequences and compare the performance of this method between 1.5 and 3 Tesla scanners. MPF mapping was implemented on 1.5 and 3 Tesla MRI units of one manufacturer with either optimized custom-written or standard product pulse sequences. Whole-brain three-dimensional MPF maps obtained from a single volunteer were compared between field strengths and implementation options. MPF maps demonstrated similar quality at both field strengths. MPF values in segmented brain tissues and specific anatomic regions appeared in close agreement. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of fast MPF mapping using standard sequences on 1.5 T and 3 T clinical scanners.

  5. Local analysis of strains and rotations for macromolecular electron microscopy maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Ramos, A.; Prieto, F.; Melero, R.; Martin-Benito, J.; Jonic, S.; Navas-Calvente, J.; Vargas, J.; Oton, J.; Abrishami, V.; Rosa-Trevin, J.L. de la; Gomez-Blanco, J.; Vilas, J.L.; Marabini, R.; Carazo, R.; Sorzano, C.O.S.

    2016-07-01

    Macromolecular complexes can be considered as molecular nano-machines that must have mobile parts in order to perform their physiological functions. The reordering of their parts is essential to execute their task. These rearrangements induce local strains and rotations which, after analyzing them, may provide relevant information about how the proteins perform their function. In this project these deformations of the macromolecular complexes are characterized, translating into a “mathematical language” the conformational changes of the complexes when they perform their function. Electron Microscopy (EM) volumes are analyzed using a method that uses B-splines as its basis functions. It is shown that the results obtained are consistent with the conformational changes described in their corresponding reference publications. (Author)

  6. Determination of macromolecular exchange and PO2 in the microcirculation: a simple system for in vivo fluorescence and phosphorescence videomicroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres L.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a system with two epi-illumination sources, a DC-regulated lamp for transillumination and mechanical switches for rapid shift of illumination and detection of defined areas (250-750 µm² by fluorescence and phosphorescence videomicroscopy. The system permits investigation of standard microvascular parameters, vascular permeability as well as intra- and extravascular PO2 by phosphorescence quenching of Pd-meso-tetra (4-carboxyphenyl porphine (PORPH. A Pechan prism was used to position a defined region over the photomultiplier and TV camera. In order to validate the system for in vivo use, in vitro tests were performed with probes at concentrations that can be found in microvascular studies. Extensive in vitro evaluations were performed by filling glass capillaries with solutions of various concentrations of FITC-dextran (diluted in blood and in saline mixed with different amounts of PORPH. Fluorescence intensity and phosphorescence decay were determined for each mixture. FITC-dextran solutions without PORPH and PORPH solutions without FITC-dextran were used as references. Phosphorescence decay curves were relatively unaffected by the presence of FITC-dextran at all concentrations tested (0.1 µg/ml to 5 mg/ml. Likewise, fluorescence determinations were performed in the presence of PORPH (0.05 to 0.5 mg/ml. The system was successfully used to study macromolecular extravasation and PO2 in the rat mesentery circulation under controlled conditions and during ischemia-reperfusion.

  7. In vivo mapping of vascular inflammation using multimodal imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R Jarrett

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Plaque vulnerability to rupture has emerged as a critical correlate to risk of adverse coronary events but there is as yet no clinical method to assess plaque stability in vivo. In the search to identify biomarkers of vulnerable plaques an association has been found between macrophages and plaque stability--the density and pattern of macrophage localization in lesions is indicative of probability to rupture. In very unstable plaques, macrophages are found in high densities and concentrated in the plaque shoulders. Therefore, the ability to map macrophages in plaques could allow noninvasive assessment of plaque stability. We use a multimodality imaging approach to noninvasively map the distribution of macrophages in vivo. The use of multiple modalities allows us to combine the complementary strengths of each modality to better visualize features of interest. Our combined use of Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI allows high sensitivity PET screening to identify putative lesions in a whole body view, and high resolution MRI for detailed mapping of biomarker expression in the lesions.Macromolecular and nanoparticle contrast agents targeted to macrophages were developed and tested in three different mouse and rat models of atherosclerosis in which inflamed vascular plaques form spontaneously and/or are induced by injury. For multimodal detection, the probes were designed to contain gadolinium (T1 MRI or iron oxide (T2 MRI, and Cu-64 (PET. PET imaging was utilized to identify regions of macrophage accumulation; these regions were further probed by MRI to visualize macrophage distribution at high resolution. In both PET and MR images the probes enhanced contrast at sites of vascular inflammation, but not in normal vessel walls. MRI was able to identify discrete sites of inflammation that were blurred together at the low resolution of PET. Macrophage content in the lesions was confirmed by histology.The multimodal

  8. In vivo and ex vivo sentinel node mapping does not identify the same lymph nodes in colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helene Schou; Bennedsen, Astrid Louise Bjørn; Burgdorf, Stefan Kobbelgaard

    2017-01-01

    sentinel node mapping in vivo with indocyanine green and ex vivo with methylene blue in order to evaluate if the sentinel lymph nodes can be identified by both techniques. METHODS: Patients with colon cancer UICC stage I-III were included from two institutions in Denmark from February 2015 to January 2016....... In vivo sentinel node mapping with indocyanine green during laparoscopy and ex vivo sentinel node mapping with methylene blue were performed in all patients. RESULTS: Twenty-nine patients were included. The in vivo sentinel node mapping was successful in 19 cases, and ex vivo sentinel node mapping...... mapping. Lymph node metastases were found in 10 patients, and only two had metastases in a sentinel node. CONCLUSION: Placing a deposit in relation to the tumor by indocyanine green in vivo or of methylene blue ex vivo could only identify sentinel lymph nodes in a small group of patients....

  9. In vivo and ex vivo sentinel node mapping does not identify the same lymph nodes in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Helene Schou; Bennedsen, Astrid Louise Bjørn; Burgdorf, Stefan Kobbelgaard; Eriksen, Jens Ravn; Eiholm, Susanne; Toxværd, Anders; Riis, Lene Buhl; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2017-07-01

    Identification of lymph nodes and pathological analysis is crucial for the correct staging of colon cancer. Lymph nodes that drain directly from the tumor area are called "sentinel nodes" and are believed to be the first place for metastasis. The purpose of this study was to perform sentinel node mapping in vivo with indocyanine green and ex vivo with methylene blue in order to evaluate if the sentinel lymph nodes can be identified by both techniques. Patients with colon cancer UICC stage I-III were included from two institutions in Denmark from February 2015 to January 2016. In vivo sentinel node mapping with indocyanine green during laparoscopy and ex vivo sentinel node mapping with methylene blue were performed in all patients. Twenty-nine patients were included. The in vivo sentinel node mapping was successful in 19 cases, and ex vivo sentinel node mapping was successful in 13 cases. In seven cases, no sentinel nodes were identified. A total of 51 sentinel nodes were identified, only one of these where identified by both techniques (2.0%). In vivo sentinel node mapping identified 32 sentinel nodes, while 20 sentinel nodes were identified by ex vivo sentinel node mapping. Lymph node metastases were found in 10 patients, and only two had metastases in a sentinel node. Placing a deposit in relation to the tumor by indocyanine green in vivo or of methylene blue ex vivo could only identify sentinel lymph nodes in a small group of patients.

  10. Uncertainty estimations for quantitative in vivo MRI T1 mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polders, Daniel L.; Leemans, Alexander; Luijten, Peter R.; Hoogduin, Hans

    2012-11-01

    Mapping the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) of brain tissue is of great interest for both clinical research and MRI sequence development. For an unambiguous interpretation of in vivo variations in T1 images, it is important to understand the degree of variability that is associated with the quantitative T1 parameter. This paper presents a general framework for estimating the uncertainty in quantitative T1 mapping by combining a slice-shifted multi-slice inversion recovery EPI technique with the statistical wild-bootstrap approach. Both simulations and experimental analyses were performed to validate this novel approach and to evaluate the estimated T1 uncertainty in several brain regions across four healthy volunteers. By estimating the T1 uncertainty, it is shown that the variation in T1 within anatomic regions for similar tissue types is larger than the uncertainty in the measurement. This indicates that heterogeneity of the inspected tissue and/or partial volume effects can be the main determinants for the observed variability in the estimated T1 values. The proposed approach to estimate T1 and its uncertainty without the need for repeated measurements may also prove to be useful for calculating effect sizes that are deemed significant when comparing group differences.

  11. Mapping tissue oxygen in vivo by photoacoustic lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Choi, Jeung-Hwan; Jiang, Chunlan; Bischof, John; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2013-03-01

    Oxygen plays a key role in the energy metabolism of living organisms. Any imbalance in the oxygen levels will affect the metabolic homeostasis and lead to pathophysiological diseases. Hypoxia, a status of low tissue oxygen, is a key factor in tumor biology as it is highly prominent in tumor tissues. However, clinical tools for assessing tissue oxygenation are limited. The gold standard is polarographic needle electrode which is invasive and not capable of mapping (imaging) the oxygen content in tissue. We applied the method of photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) of oxygen-sensitive dye to small animal tissue hypoxia research. PALI is new technology for direct, non-invasive imaging of oxygen. The technique is based on mapping the oxygen-dependent transient optical absorption of Methylene Blue (MB) by pump-probe photoacoustic imaging. Our studies show the feasibility of imaging of dissolved oxygen distribution in phantoms. In vivo experiments demonstrate that the hypoxia region is consistent with the site of subcutaneously xenografted prostate tumor in mice with adequate spatial resolution and penetration depth.

  12. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebelung, Sven; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Aachen (Germany); Pufe, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration. (orig.)

  13. Macromolecular ion accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Jung-Lee; Lai, Szu-Hsueh; Chu, Ming-Lee; Wang, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2012-07-03

    Presented herein are the development of macromolecular ion accelerator (MIA) and the results obtained by MIA. This new instrument utilizes a consecutive series of planar electrodes for the purpose of facilitating stepwise acceleration. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is employed to generate singly charged macromolecular ions. A regular Z-gap microchannel plate (MCP) detector is mounted at the end of the accelerator to record the ion signals. In this work, we demonstrated the detection of ions with the mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio reaching 30,000,000. Moreover, we showed that singly charged biomolecular ions can be accelerated with the voltage approaching 1 MV, offering the evidence that macromolecular ions can possess much higher kinetic energy than ever before.

  14. In vivo monitoring of sorafenib therapy effects on experimental prostate carcinomas using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and macromolecular contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyran, Clemens C; Schwarz, Bettina; Paprottka, Philipp M; Sourbron, Steven; von Einem, Jobst C; Dietrich, Olaf; Hinkel, Rabea; Clevert, Dirk A; Bruns, Christiane J; Reiser, Maximilian F; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2013-12-16

    To investigate dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with macromolecular contrast media (MMCM) to monitor the effects of the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib on subcutaneous prostate carcinomas in rats with immunohistochemical validation. Copenhagen rats, implanted with prostate carcinoma allografts, were randomized to the treatment group (n = 8) or the control group (n = 8). DCE-MRI with albumin-(Gd-DTPA)35 was performed at baseline and after 1 week using a clinical 3-Tesla system. The treatment group received sorafenib, 10 mg/kg body weight daily. Kinetic analysis yielded quantitative parameters of tumor endothelial permeability-surface area product (PS; ml/100 ml/min) and fractional blood volume (Vb, %). Tumors were harvested on day 7 for immunohistochemical analysis. In sorafenib-treated tumors, PS (0.62 ± 0.20 vs 0.08 ± 0.09 ml/100 ml/min; P effects of a 1-week, daily treatment course of sorafenib on experimental prostate carcinoma allografts.

  15. Complex macromolecular chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatzas, Anastasis; Iatrou, Hermis; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Inoue, Kyouichi; Sugiyama, Kenji; Hirao, Akira

    2008-07-01

    By combining two living polymerizations, anionic and ring opening (ROP), the following novel multiblock multicomponent linear and miktoarm star (micro-star) polymer/polypeptide hybrids (macromolecular chimeras) were synthesized: Linear, PBLL-b-PBLG-b-PS-b-PBLG-b-PBLL; 3micro-stars, (PS)2(PBLG or PBLL), (PS)(PI)(PBLG or PBLL); 4micro-stars, (PS)2[P(alpha-MeS)](PBLG or PBLL), (PS)2(PBLG or PBLL)2 [PS, polystyrene; PI, polyisoprene; P(alpha-MeS), poly(alpha-methylstyrene); PBLG, poly(gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate); and PBLL, poly(-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine)]. The procedure involves (a) the synthesis of end- or in-chain amino-functionalized polymers, by anionic polymerization high vacuum techniques and appropriate linking chemistry and (b) the use of the amino groups for the ROP of alpha-amino acid carboxyanhydrides (NCAs). Molecular characterization revealed the high molecular weight and compositional homogeneity of the macromolecular chimeras prepared. The success of the synthesis was based mainly on the high vacuum techniques used for the ROP of NCAs, ensuring the avoidance of unwanted polymerization mechanisms and termination reactions.

  16. Reproducibility of T2 * mapping in the human cerebral cortex in vivo at 7 tesla MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Sindhuja T; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Sormani, Maria Pia; Fan, Audrey P; Louapre, Céline; Mainero, Caterina

    2015-08-01

    To assess the test-retest reproducibility of cortical mapping of T2 * relaxation rates at 7 Tesla (T) MRI. T2 * maps have been used for studying cortical myelo-architecture patterns in vivo and for characterizing conditions associated with changes in iron and/or myelin concentration. T2 * maps were calculated from 7T multi-echo T2 *-weighted images acquired during separate scanning sessions on 8 healthy subjects. The reproducibility of surface-based cortical T2 * mapping was assessed at different depths of the cortex; from pial surface (0% depth) towards gray/white matter boundary (100% depth), across cortical regions and hemispheres, using coefficients of variation (COVs = SD/mean) between each couple (scan-rescan) of average T2 * measurements. Average cortical T2 * was significantly different among 25%, 50%, and 75% depths (analysis of variance, P < 0.001). Coefficient of variations were very low within cortical regions, and whole cortex (average COV = 0.83-1.79%), indicating a high degree of reproducibility in T2 * measures. Surface-based mapping of T2 * relaxation rates as a function of cortical depth is reproducible and could prove useful for studying the laminar architecture of the cerebral cortex in vivo, and for investigating physiological and pathological states associated with changes in iron and/or myelin concentration. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Rotation-Induced Macromolecular Spooling of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Sean, David; Berard, Daniel J.; Wolf, Julian; Dragoman, Justin; Battat, Sophie; Slater, Gary W.; Leslie, Sabrina R.

    2017-07-01

    Genetic information is stored in a linear sequence of base pairs; however, thermal fluctuations and complex DNA conformations such as folds and loops make it challenging to order genomic material for in vitro analysis. In this work, we discover that rotation-induced macromolecular spooling of DNA around a rotating microwire can monotonically order genomic bases, overcoming this challenge. We use single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize long DNA strands deforming and elongating in shear flow near a rotating microwire, in agreement with numerical simulations. While untethered DNA is observed to elongate substantially, in agreement with our theory and numerical simulations, strong extension of DNA becomes possible by introducing tethering. For the case of tethered polymers, we show that increasing the rotation rate can deterministically spool a substantial portion of the chain into a fully stretched, single-file conformation. When applied to DNA, the fraction of genetic information sequentially ordered on the microwire surface will increase with the contour length, despite the increased entropy. This ability to handle long strands of DNA is in contrast to modern DNA sample preparation technologies for sequencing and mapping, which are typically restricted to comparatively short strands, resulting in challenges in reconstructing the genome. Thus, in addition to discovering new rotation-induced macromolecular dynamics, this work inspires new approaches to handling genomic-length DNA strands.

  18. Life in a Crowd: Macromolecular Crowding and Confinement Effects on Protein Interactions in Living Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Margaret

    2007-03-01

    Biological polymers carry out their functions in living systems where the environment is very concentrated or crowded by macromolecules. Physically, the composition of a cell is more than ``a sack of water''; its consistency is closer to Jell-O. Experiments suggests that, because of this macromolecular crowding effect that confines polymeric dynamics, the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein folding and the association rate constants of protein-protein interactions in a cell (in vivo) are very different from that ina diluted test tube (in vitro). In order to quantitatively understand macromolecular crowding and confinement effects on protein dynamics, we used coarse-grained models that physically captured interactions between crowders and a protein. The folding rates of a model protein nonmonotonically increased with the volume fraction of the crowders. At lower volume fractions, depletion-induced attractions from crowders could be mapped according to the spherical confinement model. A result of spherical confinement was the destabilization of denatured states by disallowing extended configurations that were longer than the pore size. However, at higher volume fractions, conformational fluctuations of a protein were susceptible to the shape of the confining condition. Thus, an approximation of the spherical confinement to mimic crowding effects was no longer effective.

  19. Spatial Configuration of Macromolecular Chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    highlight in this lecture give promise of far-reaching advances in our understanding of macromolecular ... in articles of commerce. The chemical bonds in macromolecules differ in no discernible respect from those in ... The number and variety of configurations (or conformations in the language of organic chemistry) that.

  20. Recent advances in macromolecular prodrugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Camilla Frich; Zelikin, Alexander N.

    2017-01-01

    Macromolecular prodrugs (MP) are high molar mass conjugates, typically carrying several copies of a drug or a drug combination, designed to optimize delivery of the drug, that is — its pharmacokinetics. From its advent several decades ago, design of MP has undergone significant development and es...

  1. How accurate is MOLLI T1 mapping in vivo? Validation by spin echo methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell A Cooper

    Full Text Available T1 mapping is a promising quantitative tool for assessing diffuse cardiomyopathies. The purpose of this study is to quantify in vivo accuracy of the Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI cardiac T1 mapping sequence against the spin echo gold standard, which has not been done previously. T1 accuracy of MOLLI was determined by comparing with the gold standard inversion recovery spin echo sequence in the calf muscle, and with a rapid inversion recovery fast spin echo sequence in the heart. T1 values were obtained with both conventional MOLLI fitting and MOLLI fitting with inversion efficiency correction. In the calf (n = 6, conventional MOLLI fitting produced inconsistent T1 values with error ranging from 8.0% at 90° to 17.3% at 30°. Modified MOLLI fitting with inversion efficiency correction improved error to under 7.4% at all flip angles. In the heart (n = 5, modified MOLLI fitting with inversion correction reduced T1 error to 5.5% from 14.0% by conventional MOLLI fitting. This study shows that conventional MOLLI fitting can lead to significant in vivo T1 errors when not accounting for the lower adiabatic inversion efficiency often experienced in vivo.

  2. In vivo mapping of current density distribution in brain tissues during deep brain stimulation (DBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2017-01-01

    New methods for in vivo mapping of brain responses during deep brain stimulation (DBS) are indispensable to secure clinical applications. Assessment of current density distribution, induced by internally injected currents, may provide an alternative method for understanding the therapeutic effects of electrical stimulation. The current flow and pathway are affected by internal conductivity, and can be imaged using magnetic resonance-based conductivity imaging methods. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is an imaging method that can enable highly resolved mapping of electromagnetic tissue properties such as current density and conductivity of living tissues. In the current study, we experimentally imaged current density distribution of in vivo canine brains by applying MREIT to electrical stimulation. The current density maps of three canine brains were calculated from the measured magnetic flux density data. The absolute current density values of brain tissues, including gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid were compared to assess the active regions during DBS. The resulting current density in different tissue types may provide useful information about current pathways and volume activation for adjusting surgical planning and understanding the therapeutic effects of DBS.

  3. Initial study on in vivo conductivity mapping of breast cancer using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaewook; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Joonsung; Nam, Yoonho; Kim, Min-Oh; Choi, Narae; Kim, Sooyeon; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    To develop and apply a method to measure in vivo electrical conductivity values using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in subjects with breast cancer. A recently developed technique named MREPT (MR electrical properties tomography) together with a novel coil combination process was used to quantify the conductivity values. The overall technique was validated using a phantom study. In addition, 90 subjects were imaged (50 subjects with previously biopsy-confirmed breast tumor and 40 normal subjects), which was approved by our institutional review board (IRB). A routine clinical protocol, specifically a T2 -weighted FSE (fast spin echo) imaging data, was used for reconstruction of conductivity. By employing the coil combination, the relative error in the conductivity map was reduced from ~70% to 10%. The average conductivity values in breast cancers regions (0.89 ± 0.33S/m) was higher compared to parenchymal tissue (0.43 S/m, P conductivity compared to benign cases (0.56 S/m, n = 5) (P conductivity compared to in situ cancers (0.57 S/m) (P conductivity mapping of breast cancers is feasible using a noninvasive in vivo MREPT technique combined with a coil combination process. The method may provide a tool in the MR diagnosis of breast cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Multi-spectral mapping of in vivo skin hemoglobin and melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Spigulis, Janis; Saknite, Inga

    2010-04-01

    The multi-spectral imaging technique has been used for distant mapping of in-vivo skin chromophores by analyzing spectral data at each reflected image pixel and constructing 2-D maps of the relative concentrations of oxy-/deoxyhemoglobin and melanin. Instead of using a broad visible-NIR spectral range, this study focuses on narrowed spectral band 500-700 nm, so speeding-up the signal processing procedure. Regression analysis confirmed that superposition of three Gaussians is optimal analytic approximation for the oxy-hemoglobin absorption tabular spectrum in this spectral band, while superposition of two Gaussians fits well for deoxy-hemoglobin absorption and exponential function - for melanin absorption. The proposed approach was clinically tested for three types of in-vivo skin provocations - ultraviolet irradiance, chemical reaction with vinegar essence and finger arterial occlusion. Spectral range 500-700 nm provided better sensitivity to oxy-hemoglobin changes and higher response stability to melanin than two reduced ranges 500-600 nm and 530-620 nm.

  5. {sup 18}F-labeled benzylpiperidine benzisoxazole: a potential radioligand for in vivo mapping of acetylcholinesterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y.; Choi, Y. S.; Kim, Y. R.; Baek, J. Y.; Kim, S. E.; Choi, Y.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, B. T. [Sungkyunkwon University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been an important cholinergic marker for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease since biochemical finding on severe loss of its activity in this disease. In this study, benzylpiperidine benzisoxazole (1), a potent AChE inhibitor (IC{sub 50}=0.33 nM), was labeled with {sup 18}F and evaluated for in vivo mapping of AChE. Fluorine-substituted derivatives of 1 were synthesized and their in vitro binding affinities to AChE were measured using Ellmans method. 4-[{sup 18}F]F-1 was selected and synthesized by reductive alkylation of the piperidine precursor with 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzaldehyde. In vitro autoradiography was performed by incubating rat brain coronal slices with the radioligand at 4 .deg. C for 60 min, and in vivo tissue distribution studies were carried out in mice. In vitro assay data showed that fluorine-substituted derivatives of 1 exhibited similar binding affinities to the unsubstituted ligand (1). 4-[{sup 18}F]F-1 was synthesized in 25-50% radiochemical yield and with high specific activity (>37 GBq/{mu}mol). In autoradiograms of 4-[{sup 18}F]F-1, high uptake in striatal region was clearly shown, which was completely inhibited in the presence of the unlabeled ligand. Tissue distribution studies demonstrated that the order of uptake was well correlated with the known density of AChE in mouse brain and results of the in vitro autoradiography, showing a high striatum to cerebellum uptake ratio (3 at 90 min). This study demonstrated that 4-[{sup 18}F]F-1 may be a good candidate for in vivo mapping of AChE.

  6. Real-time mapping of the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Zhivov, Andrey; Stachs, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to produce two-dimensional reconstruction maps of the living corneal sub-basal nerve plexus by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy in real time. CLSM source data (frame rate 30Hz, 384x384 pixel) were used to create large-scale maps of the scanned area by selecting the Automatic Real Time (ART) composite mode. The mapping algorithm is based on an affine transformation. Microscopy of the sub-basal nerve plexus was performed on normal and LASIK eyes as well as on rabbit eyes. Real-time mapping of the sub-basal nerve plexus was performed in large-scale up to a size of 3.2mm x 3.2mm. The developed method enables a real-time in vivo mapping of the sub-basal nerve plexus which is stringently necessary for statistically firmed conclusions about morphometric plexus alterations.

  7. Mapping of normal corneal K-structures by in vivo laser confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokogawa, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Akira; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa

    2008-09-01

    To produce 2-dimensional reconstruction maps of normal human corneal fibrous structures beneath the Bowman layer (K-structures) by in vivo laser confocal microscopy and to show association of structures with the anterior corneal mosaic (ACM). Central corneal regions of 3 healthy volunteers were scanned. Acquired images of K-structures for each eye were arranged and mapped into a subconfluent montage. For each subject, electrical tracings of K-structures were superimposed on a slit-lamp photograph of the ACM produced by rubbing the eyelid. A mean of 677 +/- 211 images of K-structures were obtained for each eye. Mean dimensions of the mapped areas were 5.88 +/- 0.50 (horizontal) and 3.51 +/- 1.37 mm (vertical). In all subjects, K-structures formed a netlike pattern (mean area, 0.082 +/- 0.051 mm), and electrical tracings had good concordance with the ACM. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to elucidate the overall distribution of K-structures in normal human corneas. The netlike pattern of K-structures corresponded well with ACM pattern. These results support the hypothesis that the K-structures are the anterior collagen fiber bundles running at the posterior surface of the Bowman layer and thus are the structural basis for ACM formation.

  8. Global mapping of protein-DNA interactions in vivo by digital genomic footprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselberth, Jay R; Chen, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Zhihong; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Reynolds, Alex P; Thurman, Robert E; Neph, Shane; Kuehn, Michael S; Noble, William S; Fields, Stanley; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2009-04-01

    The orchestrated binding of transcriptional activators and repressors to specific DNA sequences in the context of chromatin defines the regulatory program of eukaryotic genomes. We developed a digital approach to assay regulatory protein occupancy on genomic DNA in vivo by dense mapping of individual DNase I cleavages from intact nuclei using massively parallel DNA sequencing. Analysis of >23 million cleavages across the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome revealed thousands of protected regulatory protein footprints, enabling de novo derivation of factor binding motifs and the identification of hundreds of new binding sites for major regulators. We observed striking correspondence between single-nucleotide resolution DNase I cleavage patterns and protein-DNA interactions determined by crystallography. The data also yielded a detailed view of larger chromatin features including positioned nucleosomes flanking factor binding regions. Digital genomic footprinting should be a powerful approach to delineate the cis-regulatory framework of any organism with an available genome sequence.

  9. In vivo Mapping of Local Cerebral Blood Flow by Xenon-Enhanced Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, David; Good, Walter F.; Wolfson, Sidney K.; Yonas, Howard; Shabason, Leonard

    1982-03-01

    A noninvasive technique has been developed to measure and display local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) in vivo. In this procedure, nonradioactive xenon gas is inhaled and the temporal changes in radiographic enhancement produced by the inhalation are measured by sequential computerized tomography. The time-dependent xenon concentrations in various anatomical units in the brain are used to derive both the local partition coefficient and the LCBF. Functional mapping of blood flow with excellent anatomical specificity has been obtained in the baboon brain. The response of LCBF to stimuli such as changes in carbon dioxide concentrations as well as the variability in LCBF in normal and diseased tissue can be easily demonstrated. This method is applicable to the study of human physiology and pathologic blood flow alterations.

  10. Data Mining of Macromolecular Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beusekom, Bart; Perrakis, Anastassis; Joosten, Robbie P

    2016-01-01

    The use of macromolecular structures is widespread for a variety of applications, from teaching protein structure principles all the way to ligand optimization in drug development. Applying data mining techniques on these experimentally determined structures requires a highly uniform, standardized structural data source. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) has evolved over the years toward becoming the standard resource for macromolecular structures. However, the process selecting the data most suitable for specific applications is still very much based on personal preferences and understanding of the experimental techniques used to obtain these models. In this chapter, we will first explain the challenges with data standardization, annotation, and uniformity in the PDB entries determined by X-ray crystallography. We then discuss the specific effect that crystallographic data quality and model optimization methods have on structural models and how validation tools can be used to make informed choices. We also discuss specific advantages of using the PDB_REDO databank as a resource for structural data. Finally, we will provide guidelines on how to select the most suitable protein structure models for detailed analysis and how to select a set of structure models suitable for data mining.

  11. In vivo visualization using MRI T2 mapping of induced osteochondrosis and osteochondritis dissecans lesions in goats undergoing controlled exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Ferenc; David, Frédéric H; LaFond, Elizabeth; Wang, Luning; Ellermann, Jutta M; Carlson, Cathy S

    2017-04-01

    In vivo visualization of subclinical osteochondrosis (OC) lesions, characterized by necrosis of epiphyseal growth cartilage, is necessary to clarify the pathogenesis of this disease. Hence, our objectives were to demonstrate induced necrosis of the epiphyseal cartilage in vivo using MRI and to monitor progression or resolution of resulting lesions. We also aimed to improve the goat model of OC by introducing controlled exercise. Vascular supply to the epiphyseal cartilage was surgically interrupted in four 5-day-old goats to induce ischemic cartilage necrosis in a medial femoral condyle. Starting 3 weeks postoperatively, goats underwent daily controlled exercise until euthanasia at 6, 10, 11 (n = 2) weeks postoperatively. T2 maps of operated and control femora were obtained in vivo at 3 (n = 4), 6 (n = 4), 9 (n = 3), and 11 (n = 2) weeks postoperatively using a 3 T MR scanner. In vivo MRI findings were validated against MRI results obtained ex vivo at 9.4 T in three goats and compared to histological results in all goats. Surgical interruption of the vascular supply caused ischemic cartilage necrosis in three out of four goats. T2 maps obtained in vivo at 3 T identified regions of increased relaxation time consistent with discrete areas of cartilage necrosis 3-11 weeks postoperatively and demonstrated delayed progression of the ossification front at 9 (n = 1) and 11 (n = 2) weeks postoperatively. In vivo MRI findings were confirmed by ex vivo MRI at 9.4 T and by histology. Identification of cartilage necrosis in clinical patients in the early stages of OC using T2 maps may provide valuable insight into the pathogenesis of this condition. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:868-875, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Energy transfer in macromolecular arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David L.; Jenkins, Robert D.

    2003-11-01

    Macromolecular systems comprised of many light-sensitive centres (the photosynthetic unit, dendrimers, and other highly symmetric multichromophore arrays) are important structures offering challenges to theoreticians and synthetic chemists alike. Here we outline novel photophysical interactions predicted and observed in such arrays. Using the tools of molecular quantum electrodynamics (QED) we present quantum amplitudes for a variety of higher-order resonance energy transfer (RET) schemes associated with well-known nonlinear optical effects such as two- and three-photon absorption. The initial analysis is extended to account for situations where the participant donor species are identical and exist in a highly symmetric environment, leading to the possible formation of excitons. It emerges from the QED theory that such excitons are closely associated with the higher-order RET processes. General results are interpreted by analyzing particular molecular architectures which offer interesting features such as rate enhancement or limitation and exciton pathway quenching. Applications in the areas of photosynthesis, molecular logic gates and low-intensity fluorescence energy transfer are predicted.

  13. Macromolecular networks and intelligence in microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans V Westerhoff

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms persist by virtue of complex interactions among many components organized into dynamic, environment-responsive networks that span multiple scales and dimensions. Biological networks constitute a type of Information and Communication Technology (ICT: they receive information from the outside and inside of cells, integrate and interpret this information, and then activate a response. Biological networks enable molecules within cells, and even cells themselves, to communicate with each other and their environment. We have become accustomed to associating brain activity – particularly activity of the human brain – with a phenomenon we call intelligence. Yet, four billion years of evolution could have selected networks with topologies and dynamics that confer traits analogous to this intelligence, even though they were outside the intercellular networks of the brain. Here, we explore how macromolecular networks in microbes confer intelligent characteristics, such as memory, anticipation, adaptation and reflection and we review current understanding of how network organization reflects the type of intelligence required for the environments in which they were selected. We propose that, if we were to leave terms such as human and brain out of the defining features of intelligence, all forms of life – from microbes to humans – exhibit some or all characteristics consistent with intelligence. We then review advances in genome-wide data production and analysis, especially in microbes, that provide a lens into microbial intelligence and propose how the insights derived from quantitatively characterizing biomolecular networks may enable synthetic biologists to create intelligent molecular networks for biotechnology, possibly generating new forms of intelligence, first in silico and then in vivo.

  14. Ex Vivo Signaling Protein Mapping in T Lymphocytes in the Psoriatic Arthritis Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Ugo; Martini, Veronica; Accordi, Benedetta; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Felicetti, Mara; Frallonardo, Paola; Facco, Monica; Boso, Daniele; Molena, Beatrice; Zambello, Renato; Ramonda, Roberta; Cozzi, Franco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Basso, Giuseppe; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Doria, Andrea; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We assessed signaling protein mapping in total T cells, to analyze the proportions of T regulatory (Treg) and TCD4+ effector (Teff) cell phenotypes, and the respective interleukin 6Rα (IL-6Rα) expression in the inflammatory microenvironment of synovial fluid (SF) of patients with sustained psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Our approach was to measure the IL-6 level in SF using a multiplex bead immunoassay. Reverse-phase protein array was used to assess Janus kinase (JAK) 1 and JAK2, extra-cellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), signal transducer and activator and transcription (STAT) 1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins in total T cell lysates from SF of patients with PsA. Frequencies of CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ CD4+ Th cells producing IL-17A and IL-17F (Th17) and CD4+CD25high intracellular forkhead box transcription factor+ (FOXP3+) phenotypes, and the percentage of Treg- and Teff- cells were quantified in SF and matched peripheral blood (PB) of patients with PsA and PB of healthy controls (HC) by flow cytometry. Our results were the following: In PsA SF samples, a coordinate increase of JAK1, ERK1/2, STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins was found in total T cells in SF of PsA; where IL-6 levels were higher than in PB from HC. Expanded CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ Th17, CD4+ CD25- Teff- and CD4+CD25(high) FoxP3+Treg subsets, showing similar levels of enhanced IL-6Rδ expression, were confined to PsA joints. In our studies, the transcriptional network profile identified by ex vivo signaling protein mapping in T lymphocytes in PsA joints revealed the complex interplay between IL-1, IL-6, and IL-23 signaling and differentiation of Th17 cells and CD4+Tregs in sustained joint inflammation in PsA.

  15. Fast and reproducible in vivo T1 mapping of the human cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Marco; Schneider, Torben; Prados, Ferran; Grussu, Francesco; Yiannakas, Marios C; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Samson, Rebecca S

    2017-07-24

    To develop a fast and robust method for measuring T1 in the whole cervical spinal cord in vivo, and to assess its reproducibility. A spatially nonselective adiabatic inversion pulse is combined with zonally oblique-magnified multislice echo-planar imaging to produce a reduced field-of-view inversion-recovery echo-planar imaging protocol. Multi- inversion time data are obtained by cycling slice order throughout sequence repetitions. Measurement of T1 is performed using 12 inversion times for a total protocol duration of 7 min. Reproducibility of regional T1 estimates is assessed in a scan-rescan experiment on five heathy subjects. Regional mean (standard deviation) T1 was: 1108.5 (±77.2) ms for left lateral column, 1110.1 (±83.2) ms for right lateral column, 1150.4 (±102.6) ms for dorsal column, and 1136.4 (±90.8) ms for gray matter. Regional T1 estimates showed good correlation between sessions (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.89 (P value T1 estimates in the cervical spinal cord are reproducible using inversion-recovery zonally oblique-magnified multislice echo-planar imaging. The short acquisition time and large coverage of this method paves the way for accurate T1 mapping for various spinal cord pathologies. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins.As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l.We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of proteins (amyloidogenic proteins and non-amyloidogenic proteins has been

  17. Three-dimensional quantitative T1 and T2 mapping of the carotid artery: Sequence design and in vivo feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Bram F; Poot, Dirk H J; Liem, Madieke I; Smits, Loek P; Gao, Shan; Kotek, Gyula; Klein, Stefan; Nederveen, Aart J

    2016-03-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3D) T1 and T2 mapping protocol for the carotid artery is presented. A 3D black-blood imaging sequence was adapted allowing carotid T1 and T2 mapping using multiple flip angles and echo time (TE) preparation times. B1 mapping was performed to correct for spatially varying deviations from the nominal flip angle. The protocol was optimized using simulations and phantom experiments. In vivo scans were performed on six healthy volunteers in two sessions, and in a patient with advanced atherosclerosis. Compensation for patient motion was achieved by 3D registration of the inter/intrasession scans. Subsequently, T1 and T2 maps were obtained by maximum likelihood estimation. Simulations and phantom experiments showed that the bias in T1 and T2 estimation was T1 and T2 values for carotid vessel wall were 844 ± 96 and 39 ± 5 ms, with good repeatability across scans. Patient data revealed altered T1 and T2 values in regions of atherosclerotic plaque. The 3D T1 and T2 mapping of the carotid artery is feasible using variable flip angle and variable TE preparation acquisitions. We foresee application of this technique for plaque characterization and monitoring plaque progression in atherosclerotic patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Peanut lectin crystallography and macromolecular structural studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-08-06

    Aug 6, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 6. Peanut lectin crystallography and macromolecular structural studies in India. M Vijayan. Perspectives Volume 32 Issue 6 September 2007 pp 1059-1066. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Determining the architectures of macromolecular assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alber, Frank; Dokudovskaya, Svetlana; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Zhang, Wenzhu; Kipper, Julia; Devos, Damien; Suprapto, Adisetyantari; Karni-Schmidt, Orit; Williams, Rosemary; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej

    2007-01-01

    To understand the workings of a living cell, we need to know the architectures of its macromolecular assemblies. Here we show how proteomic data can be used to determine such structures. The process involves the collection of sufficient and diverse high-quality data, translation of these data into

  20. Macromolecular peroxo complexes of Vanadium (V) and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Macromolecular metal complexes; peroxovanadates; peroxomolybdates; enzyme inhibitors; polymer-supported metal catalysts; bromoperoxidases. ... activity with phosphohydrolase enzyme vis-à-vis free peroxovanadium (pV) or peroxomolybdenum (pMo) complexes, and their activity in biomimetic oxidative bromination ...

  1. Automated data collection for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Graeme; McAuley, Katherine E

    2011-09-01

    An overview, together with some practical advice, is presented of the current status of the automation of macromolecular crystallography (MX) data collection, with a focus on MX beamlines at Diamond Light Source, UK. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Three-dimensional optical micro-angiography maps directional blood perfusion deep within microcirculation tissue beds in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruikang K [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR 97237 (United States)

    2007-12-07

    Optical micro-angiography (OMAG) is a recently developed method of imaging localized blood perfusion at capillary level resolution within microcirculatory beds. This paper reports that the OMAG is capable of directional blood perfusion mapping in vivo. This is achieved simply by translating the mirror located in the reference arm back and forth while 3D imaging is performed. The mirror which moves toward the incident beam gives the blood perfusion that flows away from the beam direction and vice versa. The approach is experimentally demonstrated by imaging of a flow phantom and then cerebro-vascular perfusion of a live mouse with cranium intact.

  3. Zirconium phosphatidylcholine-based nanocapsules as an in vivo degradable drug delivery system of MAP30, a momordica anti-HIV protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caizhen, Guo; Yan, Gao; Ronron, Chang; Lirong, Yang; Panpan, Chu; Xuemei, Hu; Yuanbiao, Qiao; Qingshan, Li

    2015-04-10

    An essential in vivo drug delivery system of a momordica anti-HIV protein, MAP30, was developed through encapsulating in chemically synthesized matrices of zirconium egg- and soy-phosphatidylcholines, abbreviated to Zr/EPC and Zr/SPC, respectively. Matrices were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffractometry studies. Zr/EPC granule at an approximate diameter of 69.43±7.78 nm was a less efficient encapsulator than the granule of Zr/SPC. Interlayer spacing of the matrices encapsulating MAP30 increased from 8.8 and 9.7 Å to 7.4 and 7.9 nm, respectively. In vivo kinetics on degradation and protein release was performed by analyzing the serum sampling of intravenously injected SPF chickens. The first order and biphasic variations were obtained for in vivo kinetics using equilibrium dialysis. Antimicrobial and anti-HIV assays yielded greatly decreased MIC50 and EC50 values of nanoformulated MAP30. An acute toxicity of MAP30 encapsulated in Zr/EPC occurred at a single intravenous dose above 14.24 mg/kg bw in NIH/KM/ICR mice. The folding of MAP30 from Zr/EPC sustained in vivo chickens for more than 8 days in high performance liquid chromatography assays. These matrices could protect MAP30 efficiently with strong structure retention, lowered toxicity and prolonged in vivo life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional optical coherence tomography for high-resolution mapping of cilia beat frequency in the mouse oviduct in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Burton, Jason C.; Behringer, Richard R.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-02-01

    Since mouse is a superior model for genetic analysis of human disorders, reproductive studies in mice have significant implications on further understanding of fertility and infertility in humans. Fertilized oocytes are transported through the reproductive tract by motile cilia lining the lumen of the oviduct as well as by oviduct contractions. While the role of cilia is well recognized, ciliary dynamics in the oviduct is not well understood, largely owing to the lack of live imaging approaches. Here, we report in vivo micro-scale mapping of cilia and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the mouse oviduct using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This functional imaging method is based on spectral analysis of the OCT speckle variations produced by the beat of cilia in the oviduct, which does not require exogenous contrast agents. Animal procedures similar to the ones used for production of transgenic mice are utilized to expose the reproductive organs for imaging in anesthetized females. In this paper, we first present in vivo structural imaging of the mouse oviduct capturing the oocyte and the preimplantation embryo and then show the result of depth-resolved high-resolution CBF mapping in the ampulla of the live mouse. These data indicate that this structural and functional OCT imaging approach can be a useful tool for a variety of live investigations of mammalian reproduction and infertility.

  5. Quantitative magnetic resonance temperature mapping for real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation of the liver: an ex vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seror, Olivier [ERT CNRS/Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire d' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle, Bordeaux (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris/CHU Paris XIII, Service de Radiologie Hopital Jean Verdier, Bondy (France); Universite Paris 13, UPRES EA 3409, UFR SMBH, Bobigny (France); Lepetit-Coiffe, Matthieu; Quesson, Bruno; Moonen, Chrit T.W [ERT CNRS/Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire d' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle, Bordeaux (France); Trillaud, Herve [ERT CNRS/Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire d' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle, Bordeaux (France); Hopital Saint-Andre, CHU Bordeaux, Service de Radiologie, Bordeaux (France)

    2006-10-15

    We evaluated the feasibility and accuracy of real-time magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry for monitoring radiofrequency (RF) ablation in the liver. Continuous MR temperature mapping was used to monitor bipolar RF ablations performed in ex vivo livers with and without flow using two parallel electrodes. Macroscopic inspection of ablation zones was compared with thermal dose maps (TDm) and T1-weighted inversion recovery turbo spin echo (IR-TSE) images for their size and shape and the influence of flow. Pearson's correlation (r), Bland and Altman tests and kappa ({chi}K) tests were performed. The mean differences in ablation zone size between macroscopic and TDm and IR-TSE measurements were +4 mm and -2 mm, respectively. TDm was well correlated with macroscopy (r=0.77 versus r=0.44 for IR-TSE). TDm was found to be more precise for shape recognition ({chi}K=0.73 versus {chi}K=0.55 for IR-TSE) and for detection of an intact ring of liver due to the cooling effect of flow which was impossible with IR-TSE. Simultaneous monitoring of RF ablation by MR thermometry is feasible and reliable for predicting the shape of ablation zones and the impact of the heat-sink effect of flow. Further studies are needed to confirm these results in vivo. (orig.)

  6. Self-luminescing BRET-FRET near-infrared dots for in vivo lymph-node mapping and tumour imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liqin; Shuhendler, Adam J; Rao, Jianghong

    2012-01-01

    Strong autofluorescence from living tissues, and the scattering and absorption of short-wavelength light in living tissues, significantly reduce sensitivity of in vivo fluorescence imaging. These issues can be tackled by using imaging probes that emit in the near-infrared wavelength range. Here we describe self-luminescing near-infrared-emitting nanoparticles employing an energy transfer relay that integrates bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, enabling in vivo near-infrared imaging without external light excitation. Nanoparticles were 30-40 nm in diameter, contained no toxic metals, exhibited long circulation time and high serum stability, and produced strong near-infrared emission. Using these nanoparticles, we successfully imaged lymphatic networks and vasculature of xenografted tumours in living mice. The self-luminescing feature provided excellent tumour-to-background ratio (>100) for imaging very small tumours (2-3 mm in diameter). Our results demonstrate that these new nanoparticles are well suited to in vivo imaging applications such as lymph-node mapping and cancer imaging.

  7. An indirect method for in vivo T2 mapping of [1-(13) C] pyruvate using hyperpolarized (13) C CSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Eunhae; Lee, Hansol; Lee, Joonsung; Yang, Seungwook; Choi, Young-Suk; Wang, Eunkyung; Song, Ho-Taek; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2017-05-01

    An indirect method for in vivo T2 mapping of (13) C-labeled metabolites using T2 and T2 * information of water protons obtained a priori is proposed. The T2 values of (13) C metabolites are inferred using the relationship to T2 ' of coexisting (1) H and the T2 * of (13) C metabolites, which is measured using routine hyperpolarized (13) C CSI data. The concept is verified with phantom studies. Simulations were performed to evaluate the extent of T2 estimation accuracy due to errors in the other measurements. Also, bias in the (13) C T2 * estimation from the (13) C CSI data was studied. In vivo experiments were performed from the brains of normal rats and a rat with C6 glioma. Simulation results indicate that the proposed method provides accurate and unbiased (13) C T2 values within typical experimental settings. The in vivo studies found that the estimated T2 of [1-(13) C] pyruvate using the indirect method was longer in tumor than in normal tissues and gave values similar to previous reports. This method can estimate localized T2 relaxation times from multiple voxels using conventional hyperpolarized (13) C CSI and can potentially be used with time resolved fast CSI. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W; Robinson, James I; Nettleship, Joanne E; Owens, Raymond J; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E; Grimes, Jonathan M; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S; Stuart, David I; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-05-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  9. Atrial electromechanical cycle length mapping in paced canine hearts in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costet, Alexandre; Bunting, Ethan; Grondin, Julien; Gambhir, Alok; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-07-01

    Atrial arrhythmias affect millions of people worldwide. Characterization and study of arrhythmias in the atria in the clinic is currently performed point by point using mapping catheters capable of generating maps of the electrical activation rate or cycle length. In this paper, we describe a new ultrasound-based mapping technique called electromechanical cycle length mapping (ECLM) capable of estimating the electromechanical activation rate, or cycle length, i.e., the rate of the mechanical activation of the myocardium which follows the electrical activation. ECLM relies on frequency analysis of the incremental strain within the atria and can be performed in a single acquisition. ECLM was validated in a canine model paced from the left atrial appendage, against pacing rates within the reported range of cycle lengths previously measured during atrial arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation. Correlation between the global estimated electromechanical cycle lengths and pacing rates was shown to be excellent (slope = 0.983, intercept = 3.91, r(2) = 0.9999). The effect of the number of cardiac cycles on the performance of ECLM was also investigated and the reproducibility of ECLM was demonstrated (error between consecutive acquisitions for all pacing rates: 6.3 ± 4.3%). These findings indicate the potential of ECLM for noninvasively characterizing atrial arrhythmias and provide feedback on the treatment planning of catheter ablation procedures in the clinic.

  10. Potassium permanganate as a probe to map DNA-protein interactions in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spicuglia, S.; Kumar, S.; Chasson, L.; Payet-Bornet, D.; Ferrier, P.

    2004-01-01

    Potassium permanganate (KMnO4) has widely been used in genomic footprinting assays to map unusual gene structures, including the melting DNA block in transcriptional elongation that results from promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase (Pol) II complexes. Although it has been assumed that

  11. Stochastic dynamics of macromolecular-assembly networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Leonor; Vilar, Jose

    2006-03-01

    The formation and regulation of macromolecular complexes provides the backbone of most cellular processes, including gene regulation and signal transduction. The inherent complexity of assembling macromolecular structures makes current computational methods strongly limited for understanding how the physical interactions between cellular components give rise to systemic properties of cells. Here we present a stochastic approach to study the dynamics of networks formed by macromolecular complexes in terms of the molecular interactions of their components [1]. Exploiting key thermodynamic concepts, this approach makes it possible to both estimate reaction rates and incorporate the resulting assembly dynamics into the stochastic kinetics of cellular networks. As prototype systems, we consider the lac operon and phage λ induction switches, which rely on the formation of DNA loops by proteins [2] and on the integration of these protein-DNA complexes into intracellular networks. This cross-scale approach offers an effective starting point to move forward from network diagrams, such as those of protein-protein and DNA-protein interaction networks, to the actual dynamics of cellular processes. [1] L. Saiz and J.M.G. Vilar, submitted (2005). [2] J.M.G. Vilar and L. Saiz, Current Opinion in Genetics & Development, 15, 136-144 (2005).

  12. Macromolecular nanotheranostics for multimodal anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huis in't Veld, Ruben; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E.; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2011-10-01

    Macromolecular carrier materials based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) are prototypic and well-characterized drug delivery systems that have been extensively evaluated in the past two decades, both at the preclinical and at the clinical level. Using several different imaging agents and techniques, HPMA copolymers have been shown to circulate for prolonged periods of time, and to accumulate in tumors both effectively and selectively by means of the Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect. Because of this, HPMA-based macromolecular nanotheranostics, i.e. formulations containing both drug and imaging agents within a single formulation, have been shown to be highly effective in inducing tumor growth inhibition in animal models. In patients, however, as essentially all other tumor-targeted nanomedicines, they are generally only able to improve the therapeutic index of the attached active agent by lowering its toxicity, and they fail to improve the efficacy of the intervention. Bearing this in mind, we have recently reasoned that because of their biocompatibility and their beneficial biodistribution, nanomedicine formulations might be highly suitable systems for combination therapies. In the present manuscript, we briefly summarize several exemplary efforts undertaken in this regard in our labs in the past couple of years, and we show that long-circulating and passively tumor-targeted macromolecular nanotheranostics can be used to improve the efficacy of radiochemotherapy and of chemotherapy combinations.

  13. Visualizing Neuromodulation In Vivo: TANGO-Mapping of Dopamine Signaling Reveals Appeptite Control of Sugar Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Hidehiko K.; de-Leon, Shlomo Ben-Tabou; Wong, Allan M.; Jagadish, Smitha; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Barnea, Gilad; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Axel, Richard; Anderson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Behavior cannot be predicted from a “connectome,” because the brain contains a chemical “map” of neuromodulation superimposed upon its synaptic connectivity map. Neuromodulation changes how neural circuits process information in different states, such as hunger or arousal. Here we describe a novel, genetically based method to map, in an unbiased and brain-wide manner, sites of neuromodulation under different conditions in the Drosophila brain. This method, and genetic perturbations, reveal that the well-known effect of hunger to enhance behavioral sensitivity to sugar is mediated, at least in part, by the release of dopamine onto primary gustatory sensory neurons, which enhances sugar-evoked calcium influx. These data reinforce the concept that sensory neurons constitute an important locus for state-dependent gain-control of behavior, and introduce a new methodology that can be extended to other neuromodulators and model organisms. PMID:22304923

  14. Mapping soil deformation around plant roots using in vivo 4D X-ray Computed Tomography and Digital Volume Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, S D; Gillard, F; Soper, N; Mavrogordato, M N; Sinclair, I; Roose, T

    2016-06-14

    The mechanical impedance of soils inhibits the growth of plant roots, often being the most significant physical limitation to root system development. Non-invasive imaging techniques have recently been used to investigate the development of root system architecture over time, but the relationship with soil deformation is usually neglected. Correlative mapping approaches parameterised using 2D and 3D image data have recently gained prominence for quantifying physical deformation in composite materials including fibre-reinforced polymers and trabecular bone. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) are computational techniques which use the inherent material texture of surfaces and volumes, captured using imaging techniques, to map full-field deformation components in samples during physical loading. Here we develop an experimental assay and methodology for four-dimensional, in vivo X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) and apply a Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) approach to the data to quantify deformation. The method is validated for a field-derived soil under conditions of uniaxial compression, and a calibration study is used to quantify thresholds of displacement and strain measurement. The validated and calibrated approach is then demonstrated for an in vivo test case in which an extending maize root in field-derived soil was imaged hourly using XCT over a growth period of 19h. This allowed full-field soil deformation data and 3D root tip dynamics to be quantified in parallel for the first time. This fusion of methods paves the way for comparative studies of contrasting soils and plant genotypes, improving our understanding of the fundamental mechanical processes which influence root system development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Motion compensation for ultrasound thermal imaging using motion-mapped reference model: an in vivo mouse study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Joonho; Kim, Sun Kwon; Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Kiwan; Kong, Dong Geon; Bang, Won-Chul

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound (US)-based thermal imaging is very sensitive to tissue motion, which is a major obstacle to apply US temperature monitoring to noninvasive thermal therapies of in vivo subjects. In this study, we aim to develop a motion compensation method for stable US thermal imaging in in vivo subjects. Based on the assumption that the major tissue motion is approximately periodic caused by respiration, we propose a motion compensation method for change in backscattered energy (CBE) with multiple reference frames. Among the reference frames, the most similar reference to the current frame is selected to subtract the respiratory-induced motions. Since exhaustive reference searching in all stored reference frames can impede real-time thermal imaging, we improve the reference searching by using a motion-mapped reference model. We tested our method in six tumor-bearing mice with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sonication in the tumor volume until the temperature had increased by 7°C. The proposed motion compensation was evaluated by root-mean-square-error (RMSE) analysis between the estimated temperature by CBE and the measured temperature by thermocouple. As a result, the mean ±SD RMSE in the heating range was 1.1±0.1°C with the proposed method, while the corresponding result without motion compensation was 4.3±2.6°C. In addition, with the idea of motion-mapped reference frame, total processing time to produce a frame of thermal image was reduced in comparison with the exhaustive reference searching, which enabled the motion-compensated thermal imaging in 15 frames per second with 150 reference frames under 50% HIFU duty ratio.

  16. In Vivo Experiments with Intraluminal Ultrasound Applicator Compatible with ``Real-Time'' MR Temperature Mapping, designed for Oesophagus Tumour Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melodelima, D.; Salomir, R.; Mougenot, C.; Theillère, Y.; Moonen, C.; Cathignol, D.

    2005-03-01

    High intensity ultrasound has shown considerable ability to produce precise and deep thermal coagulation necrosis. Focused, cylindrical, spherical or plane transducers have been used to induce high temperature elevation in tissues, in order to coagulate proteins and kill cells. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been used, with focused transducers and cylindrical interstitial applicators, to monitor temperature distribution and provide temperature feedback control during heating procedures. The active part of intraluminal applicators is positioned very close to the target region. It is therefore essential to provide accurate monitoring of heat deposition in the tissue layer near the transducer, in order to control the extension of coagulation necrosis. The purpose of this study was to develop a 10-mm diameter intraluminal ultrasound applicator, designed to treat oesophageal cancers and compatible with "real-time" MR temperature mapping. The ultrasound applicator was tested in vivo under real time, PRF based, fast MR temperature monitoring. Experiments were performed in vivo on pig oesophagus. Respiratory-gated, MR thermometry was performed with segmented EPI gradient echo sequences. Post treatment follow up was performed with MRI in oesophagus and liver. Excellent MR compatibility was demonstrated. Thermal lesions identified on post-treatment follow up showed good correlation with on line MR thermometry data. This study demonstrated the feasibility of oesophageal thermal ablation using intraluminal ultrasound and on line MR temperature monitoring.

  17. Mapping in-vivo optic nerve head strains caused by intraocular and intracranial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H.; Grimm, J.; Wang, B.; Smith, M. A.; Gogola, A.; Nelson, S.; Tyler-Kabara, E.; Schuman, J.; Wollstein, G.; Sigal, I. A.

    2017-02-01

    Although it is well documented that abnormal levels of either intraocular (IOP) or intracranial pressure (ICP) can lead to potentially blinding conditions, such as glaucoma and papilledema, little is known about how the pressures actually affect the eye. Even less is known about potential interplay between their effects, namely how the level of one pressure might alter the effects of the other. Our goal was to measure in-vivo the pressure-induced stretch and compression of the lamina cribrosa due to acute changes of IOP and ICP. The lamina cribrosa is a structure within the optic nerve head, in the back of the eye. It is important because it is in the lamina cribrosa that the pressure-induced deformations are believed to initiate damage to neural tissues leading to blindness. An eye of a rhesus macaque monkey was imaged in-vivo with optical coherence tomography while IOP and ICP were controlled through cannulas in the anterior chamber and lateral ventricle, respectively. The image volumes were analyzed with a newly developed digital image correlation technique. The effects of both pressures were highly localized, nonlinear and non-monotonic, with strong interactions. Pressure variations from the baseline normal levels caused substantial stretch and compression of the neural tissues in the posterior pole, sometimes exceeding 20%. Chronic exposure to such high levels of biomechanical insult would likely lead to neural tissue damage and loss of vision. Our results demonstrate the power of digital image correlation technique based on non-invasive imaging technologies to help understand how pressures induce biomechanical insults and lead to vision problems.

  18. In vivo inflammation mapping of periodontal disease based on diffuse reflectance spectral imaging: a clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Betsy, Joseph; Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Nisha, Unni G.; Prasantila, Janam; Subhash, Narayanan

    2013-02-01

    Since conventional techniques using periodontal probes have inherent drawbacks in the diagnosis of different grades of gingival inflammation, development of noninvasive screening devices becomes significant. Diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra recorded with white light illumination is utilized to detect periodontal inflammation from the oxygenated hemoglobin absorption ratio R620/R575. A multispectral imaging system is utilized to record narrow-band DR images at 575 and 620 nm from the anterior sextant of the gingivia of 15 healthy volunteers and 25 patients (N=40). An experienced periodontist assesses the level of gingival inflammation at each site through periodontal probing and assigns diagnosis as healthy, mild, moderate, or severe inflammation. The DR image ratio R620/R575 computed for each pixel (8-μm resolution) from the monochrome images is pseudo-color-mapped to identify gingival inflammation sites. The DR image ratio values at each site are compared with clinical diagnosis to estimate the specificity and sensitivity of the DR imaging technique in inflammation mapping. The high diagnostic accuracy is utilized to detect underlying inflammation in six patients with a previous history of periodontitis.

  19. Enhancement and Passive Acoustic Mapping of Cavitation from Fluorescently Tagged Magnetic Resonance-Visible Magnetic Microbubbles In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Owen, Joshua; Smart, Sean; Coviello, Christian; Coussios, Constantin-C; Carlisle, Robert; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-12-01

    Previous work has indicated the potential of magnetically functionalized microbubbles to localize and enhance cavitation activity under focused ultrasound exposure in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate magnetic targeting of microbubbles for promotion of cavitation in vivo. Fluorescently labelled magnetic microbubbles were administered intravenously in a murine xenograft model. Cavitation was induced using a 0.5-MHz focused ultrasound transducer at peak negative focal pressures of 1.2-2.0 MPa and monitored in real-time using B-mode imaging and passive acoustic mapping. Magnetic targeting was found to increase the amplitude of the cavitation signal by approximately 50% compared with untargeted bubbles. Post-exposure magnetic resonance imaging indicated deposition of magnetic nanoparticles in tumours. Magnetic targeting was similarly associated with increased fluorescence intensity in the tumours after the experiments. These results suggest that magnetic targeting could potentially be used to improve delivery of cavitation-mediated therapy and that passive acoustic mapping could be used for real-time monitoring of this process. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo mapping of a protective linear neutralizing epitope at the N-terminus of alpha hemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscherwitz, Jon; Muñoz-Planillo, Raul; Yu, Fen; Núñez, Gabriel; Cease, Kemp B

    2014-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large and diverse burden of human disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The dynamic challenge of this pathogen is exemplified by the emergence of highly virulent community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain USA300, which threatens both healthy and vulnerable individuals and constitutes a public health imperative in the United States. Though S. aureus employs many virulence factors that enable infectivity and evasion of host defenses, evidence suggests that the increased production of alpha hemolysin may be a critical contributor to the increased virulence of USA300. To enable and inform immunological targeting of alpha hemolysin, we sought to precisely map a neutralizing epitope that we hypothesized existed in the N-terminal domain. Using an in vivo mapping strategy employing peptide immunogens and an optimized in vitro toxin neutralization assay, we identified a linear neutralizing determinant in the N-terminal 19 amino acids of alpha hemolysin. Affinity purified rabbit antibody against this neutralizing epitope was shown to be highly effective at mitigating dermonecrosis in inbred and outbred mice challenged with USA300. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a linear neutralizing epitope in alpha hemolysin, and the delineation of this determinant should inform and facilitate the rational design and development of an efficacious, epitope-focused or multivalent vaccine against S. aureus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Celebrating macromolecular crystallography: A personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abad-Zapatero, Celerino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The twentieth century has seen an enormous advance in the knowledge of the atomic structures that surround us. The discovery of the first crystal structures of simple inorganic salts by the Braggs in 1914, using the diffraction of X-rays by crystals, provided the critical elements to unveil the atomic structure of matter. Subsequent developments in the field leading to macromolecular crystallography are presented with a personal perspective, related to the cultural milieu of Spain in the late 1950’s. The journey of discovery of the author, as he developed professionally, is interwoven with the expansion of macromolecular crystallography from the first proteins (myoglobin, hemoglobin to the ‘coming of age’ of the field in 1971 and the discoveries that followed, culminating in the determination of the structure of the ribosomes at the turn of the century. A perspective is presented exploring the future of the field and also a reflection about the future generations of Spanish scientists.El siglo XX ha sido testigo del increíble avance que ha experimentado el conocimiento de la estructura atómica de la materia que nos rodea. El descubrimiento de las primeras estructuras atómicas de sales inorgánicas por los Bragg en 1914, empleando difracción de rayos X con cristales, proporcionó los elementos clave para alcanzar tal conocimiento. Posteriores desarrollos en este campo, que condujeron a la cristalografía macromolecular, se presentan aquí desde una perspectiva personal, relacionada con el contexto cultural de la España de la década de los 50. La experiencia del descubrimiento científico, durante mi desarrollo profesional, se integra en el desarrollo de la cristalografía macromolecular, desde las primeras proteínas (míoglobina y hemoglobina, hasta su madurez en 1971 que, con los posteriores descubrimientos, culmina con la determinación del la estructura del ribosoma. Asimismo, se explora el futuro de esta disciplina y se

  2. In Vivo Mapping of Vascular Inflammation Using the Translocator Protein Tracer 18F-FEDAA1106

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Cuhlmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive imaging methods are required to monitor the inflammatory content of atherosclerotic plaques. FEDAA1106 (N-(5-fluoro- 2-phenoxyphenyl-N-(2-(2-fluoroethoxy-5-methoxybenzyl acetamide is a selective ligand for TSPO-18kDa (also known as peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, which is expressed by activated macrophages. We compared 18F-FEDAA1106 and 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D- glucose (18F-FDG, a marker of glucose metabolism for positron emission tomographic (PET imaging of vascular inflammation. This was tested using a murine model in which focal inflammation was induced in the carotid artery via placement of a constrictive cuff. Immunostaining revealed CD68-positive cells (macrophages at a disturbed flow site located downstream from the cuff. Dynamic PET imaging using 18F-FEDAA1106 or 18F-FDG was registered to anatomic data generated by computed tomographic (CT/CT angiography. Standardized uptake values were significantly increased at cuffed compared to contralateral arteries using either 18F-FEDAA1106 (p < .01 or FDG (p < .05. However, the 18F-FEDAA1106 signal was significantly higher at the inflamed disturbed flow region compared to the noninflamed uniform flow regions, whereas differences in FDG uptake were less distinct. We conclude that 18F-FEDAA1106 can be used in vivo for detection of vascular inflammation. Moreover, the signal pattern of 18F-FEDAA1106 corresponded with vascular inflammation more specifically than FDG uptake.

  3. In vivo mapping of the functional regions of the DEAD-box helicase Vasa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoush Dehghani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The maternally expressed Drosophila melanogaster DEAD-box helicase Vasa (Vas is necessary for many cellular and developmental processes, including specification of primordial germ cells (pole cells, posterior patterning of the embryo, piRNA-mediated repression of transposon-encoded mRNAs, translational activation of gurken (grk mRNA, and completion of oogenesis itself. Vas protein accumulates in the perinuclear nuage in nurse cells soon after their specification, and then at stage 10 Vas translocates to the posterior pole plasm of the oocyte. We produced a series of transgenic constructs encoding eGFP-Vas proteins carrying mutations affecting different regions of the protein, and analyzed in vivo which Vas functions each could support. We identified novel domains in the N- and C-terminal regions of the protein that are essential for localization, transposon repression, posterior patterning, and pole cell specification. One such functional region, the most C-terminal seven amino acids, is specific to Vas orthologues and is thus critical to distinguishing Vas from other closely related DEAD-box helicases. Surprisingly, we also found that many eGFP-Vas proteins carrying mutations that would be expected to abrogate DEAD-box helicase function localized to the nuage and posterior pole, and retained the capacity to support oogenesis, although they did not function in embryonic patterning, pole cell specification, grk activation, or transposon repression. We conclude from these experiments that Vas, a multifunctional protein, uses different domains and different molecular associations to carry out its various cellular and developmental roles.

  4. Multiscale macromolecular simulation: role of evolving ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singharoy, A; Joshi, H; Ortoleva, P J

    2012-10-22

    Multiscale analysis provides an algorithm for the efficient simulation of macromolecular assemblies. This algorithm involves the coevolution of a quasiequilibrium probability density of atomic configurations and the Langevin dynamics of spatial coarse-grained variables denoted order parameters (OPs) characterizing nanoscale system features. In practice, implementation of the probability density involves the generation of constant OP ensembles of atomic configurations. Such ensembles are used to construct thermal forces and diffusion factors that mediate the stochastic OP dynamics. Generation of all-atom ensembles at every Langevin time step is computationally expensive. Here, multiscale computation for macromolecular systems is made more efficient by a method that self-consistently folds in ensembles of all-atom configurations constructed in an earlier step, history, of the Langevin evolution. This procedure accounts for the temporal evolution of these ensembles, accurately providing thermal forces and diffusions. It is shown that efficiency and accuracy of the OP-based simulations is increased via the integration of this historical information. Accuracy improves with the square root of the number of historical timesteps included in the calculation. As a result, CPU usage can be decreased by a factor of 3-8 without loss of accuracy. The algorithm is implemented into our existing force-field based multiscale simulation platform and demonstrated via the structural dynamics of viral capsomers.

  5. Macromolecular recognition in the Protein Data Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janin, Joël, E-mail: joel.janin@ibbmc.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire d’Enzymologie et de Biochimie Structurales, UPR9063, CNRS, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Institut de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, UMR8619, Bâtiment 430, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Rodier, Francis [Laboratoire d’Enzymologie et de Biochimie Structurales, UPR9063, CNRS, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chakrabarti, Pinak [Department of Biochemistry, Bose Institute, P-1/12 CIT Scheme VIIM, Calcutta 700 054 (India); Bahadur, Ranjit P. [Institut de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, UMR8619, Bâtiment 430, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Department of Biochemistry, Bose Institute, P-1/12 CIT Scheme VIIM, Calcutta 700 054 (India); Laboratoire d’Enzymologie et de Biochimie Structurales, UPR9063, CNRS, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-01-01

    X-ray structures in the PDB illustrate both the specific recognition of two polypeptide chains in protein–protein complexes and dimeric proteins and their nonspecific interaction at crystal contacts. Crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank illustrate the diversity of biological macromolecular recognition: transient interactions in protein–protein and protein–DNA complexes and permanent assemblies in homodimeric proteins. The geometric and physical chemical properties of the macromolecular interfaces that may govern the stability and specificity of recognition are explored in complexes and homodimers compared with crystal-packing interactions. It is found that crystal-packing interfaces are usually much smaller; they bury fewer atoms and are less tightly packed than in specific assemblies. Standard-size interfaces burying 1200–2000 Å{sup 2} of protein surface occur in protease–inhibitor and antigen–antibody complexes that assemble with little or no conformation changes. Short-lived electron-transfer complexes have small interfaces; the larger size of the interfaces observed in complexes involved in signal transduction and homodimers correlates with the presence of conformation changes, often implicated in biological function. Results of the CAPRI (critical assessment of predicted interactions) blind prediction experiment show that docking algorithms efficiently and accurately predict the mode of assembly of proteins that do not change conformation when they associate. They perform less well in the presence of large conformation changes and the experiment stimulates the development of novel procedures that can handle such changes.

  6. The role of macromolecular stability in desiccation tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolkers, W.F.

    1998-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis concerns a study on the molecular interactions that play a role in the macromolecular stability of desiccation-tolerant higher plant organs. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy was used as the main experimental technique to assess macromolecular

  7. Mass distributions of a macromolecular assembly based on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Macromolecular assemblies containing multiple protein subunits and having masses in the megadalton (MDa) range are involved in most of the functions of a living cell. Because of variation in the number and masses of subunits, macromolecular assemblies do not have a unique mass, but rather a mass distribution.

  8. Feasibility of real-time MR thermal dose mapping for predicting radiofrequency ablation outcome in the myocardium in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin, Solenn; Bour, Pierre; Lepetit-Coiffé, Matthieu; Ozenne, Valéry; Denis de Senneville, Baudouin; Schneider, Rainer; Vaussy, Alexis; Chaumeil, Arnaud; Cochet, Hubert; Sacher, Frédéric; Jaïs, Pierre; Quesson, Bruno

    2017-01-25

    Clinical treatment of cardiac arrhythmia by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) currently lacks quantitative and precise visualization of lesion formation in the myocardium during the procedure. This study aims at evaluating thermal dose (TD) imaging obtained from real-time magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry on the heart as a relevant indicator of the thermal lesion extent. MR temperature mapping based on the Proton Resonance Frequency Shift (PRFS) method was performed at 1.5 T on the heart, with 4 to 5 slices acquired per heartbeat. Respiratory motion was compensated using navigator-based slice tracking. Residual in-plane motion and related magnetic susceptibility artifacts were corrected online. The standard deviation of temperature was measured on healthy volunteers (N = 5) in both ventricles. On animals, the MR-compatible catheter was positioned and visualized in the left ventricle (LV) using a bSSFP pulse sequence with active catheter tracking. Twelve MR-guided RFA were performed on three sheep in vivo at various locations in left ventricle (LV). The dimensions of the thermal lesions measured on thermal dose images, on 3D T1-weighted (T1-w) images acquired immediately after the ablation and at gross pathology were correlated. MR thermometry uncertainty was 1.5 °C on average over more than 96% of the pixels covering the left and right ventricles, on each volunteer. On animals, catheter repositioning in the LV with active slice tracking was successfully performed and each ablation could be monitored in real-time by MR thermometry and thermal dosimetry. Thermal lesion dimensions on TD maps were found to be highly correlated with those observed on post-ablation T1-w images (R = 0.87) that also correlated (R = 0.89) with measurements at gross pathology. Quantitative TD mapping from real-time rapid CMR thermometry during catheter-based RFA is feasible. It provides a direct assessment of the lesion extent in the myocardium with precision in the range of one

  9. Genome-Wide Mapping of Collier In Vivo Binding Sites Highlights Its Hierarchical Position in Different Transcription Regulatory Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde de Taffin

    Full Text Available Collier, the single Drosophila COE (Collier/EBF/Olf-1 transcription factor, is required in several developmental processes, including head patterning and specification of muscle and neuron identity during embryogenesis. To identify direct Collier (Col targets in different cell types, we used ChIP-seq to map Col binding sites throughout the genome, at mid-embryogenesis. In vivo Col binding peaks were associated to 415 potential direct target genes. Gene Ontology analysis revealed a strong enrichment in proteins with DNA binding and/or transcription-regulatory properties. Characterization of a selection of candidates, using transgenic CRM-reporter assays, identified direct Col targets in dorso-lateral somatic muscles and specific neuron types in the central nervous system. These data brought new evidence that Col direct control of the expression of the transcription regulators apterous and eyes-absent (eya is critical to specifying neuronal identities. They also showed that cross-regulation between col and eya in muscle progenitor cells is required for specification of muscle identity, revealing a new parallel between the myogenic regulatory networks operating in Drosophila and vertebrates. Col regulation of eya, both in specific muscle and neuronal lineages, may illustrate one mechanism behind the evolutionary diversification of Col biological roles.

  10. Challenges and Perspectives in the Macromolecular Flatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servalli, Marco

    2017-06-28

    Polymer chemistry has recently welcomed a new addition to its field: the planar macromolecules known as two-dimensional polymers (2DPs). These topologically planar and crystalline monolayer covalent sheets are reminiscent of molecular fishermen's nets and apart from being conceptually very interesting for the field of macro-molecular chemistry, they also show some potential applications as novel 2D materials. This article reviews how the field has developed five years after the first 2DP was synthesised in 2012. After a brief historical introduction, the main synthetic approaches will be discussed providing concrete examples of 2DPs and highlighting the challenges associated with the synthesis and especially structural characterisation of these fascinating macro-molecules. Finally an overview on their potential applications such as membranes for gas separation, rewritable molecular paper and miniaturisation of optical devices will be presented.

  11. Fluoride uptake in human teeth from fluoride-releasing restorative material in vivo and in vitro: two-dimensional mapping by EPMA-WDX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Iwami, Y; Unezaki, T; Tomii, Y; Ebisu, S

    2001-01-01

    Class V cavities were prepared in the upper and lower left second premolars from an individual under infiltration anesthesia. The cavities were filled with fluoride- releasing resin (TF). One month later, the teeth were extracted. As a control (in vitro), the upper and lower right second premolars were extracted at the time of the cavity preparation in vivo. Immediately after extraction, class V cavities were prepared and filled with TF, and immersed in normal saline solution for 1 month at 37 degrees C. All four premolars were bisected longitudinally and the fluoride uptake around the cavity wall on the cut surface was measured using an electron probe microanalyzer-wavelength dispersive X-ray method. The fluoride uptake was given in the form of a two-dimensional map. Comparison of the observed values of each corresponding part of the tooth in vivo and in vitro revealed no characteristic differences. The maps were quite analogous as a whole.

  12. In-Field, In Situ, and In Vivo 3-Dimensional Elemental Mapping for Plant Tissue and Soil Analysis Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjiang Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensing and mapping element distributions in plant tissues and its growth environment has great significance for understanding the uptake, transport, and accumulation of nutrients and harmful elements in plants, as well as for understanding interactions between plants and the environment. In this study, we developed a 3-dimensional elemental mapping system based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy that can be deployed in- field to directly measure the distribution of multiple elements in living plants as well as in the soil. Mapping is performed by a fast scanning laser, which ablates a micro volume of a sample to form a plasma. The presence and concentration of specific elements are calculated using the atomic, ionic, and molecular spectral characteristics of the plasma emission spectra. Furthermore, we mapped the pesticide residues in maize leaves after spraying to demonstrate the capacity of this method for trace elemental mapping. We also used the system to quantitatively detect the element concentrations in soil, which can be used to further understand the element transport between plants and soil. We demonstrate that this method has great potential for elemental mapping in plant tissues and soil with the advantages of 3-dimensional and multi-elemental mapping, in situ and in vivo measurement, flexible use, and low cost.

  13. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  14. Feasibility of in vivo three-dimensional T 2* mapping using dicarboxy-PROXYL and CW-EPR-based single-point imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Harue; Komarov, Denis A; Yasui, Hironobu; Matsumoto, Shingo; Inanami, Osamu; Kirilyuk, Igor A; Khramtsov, Valery V; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo three-dimensional (3D) relaxation time T 2* mapping of a dicarboxy-PROXYL radical using continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging. Isotopically substituted dicarboxy-PROXYL radicals, 3,4-dicarboxy-2,2,5,5-tetra(2H3)methylpyrrolidin-(3,4-2H2)-(1-15N)-1-oxyl (2H,15N-DCP) and 3,4-dicarboxy-2,2,5,5-tetra(2H3)methylpyrrolidin-(3,4-2H2)-1-oxyl (2H-DCP), were used in the study. A clonogenic cell survival assay was performed with the 2H-DCP radical using squamous cell carcinoma (SCC VII) cells. The time course of EPR signal intensities of intravenously injected 2H,15N-DCP and 2H-DCP radicals were determined in tumor-bearing hind legs of mice (C3H/HeJ, male, n = 5). CW-EPR-based single-point imaging (SPI) was performed for 3D T 2* mapping. 2H-DCP radical did not exhibit cytotoxicity at concentrations below 10 mM. The in vivo half-life of 2H,15N-DCP in tumor tissues was 24.7 ± 2.9 min (mean ± standard deviation [SD], n = 5). The in vivo time course of the EPR signal intensity of the 2H,15N-DCP radical showed a plateau of 10.2 ± 1.2 min (mean ± SD) where the EPR signal intensity remained at more than 90% of the maximum intensity. During the plateau, in vivo 3D T 2* maps with 2H,15N-DCP were obtained from tumor-bearing hind legs, with a total acquisition time of 7.5 min. EPR signals of 2H,15N-DCP persisted long enough after bolus intravenous injection to conduct in vivo 3D T 2* mapping with CW-EPR-based SPI.

  15. Fast lesion mapping during HIFU treatment using harmonic motion imaging guided focused ultrasound (HMIgFUS) in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang; Wang, Shutao; Payen, Thomas; Konofagou, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    The successful clinical application of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation depends on reliable monitoring of the lesion formation. Harmonic motion imaging guided focused ultrasound (HMIgFUS) is an ultrasound-based elasticity imaging technique, which monitors HIFU ablation based on the stiffness change of the tissue instead of the echo intensity change in conventional B-mode monitoring, rendering it potentially more sensitive to lesion development. Our group has shown that predicting the lesion location based on the radiation force-excited region is feasible during HMIgFUS. In this study, the feasibility of a fast lesion mapping method is explored to directly monitor the lesion map during HIFU. The harmonic motion imaging (HMI) lesion map was generated by subtracting the reference HMI image from the present HMI peak-to-peak displacement map, as streamed on the computer display. The dimensions of the HMIgFUS lesions were compared against gross pathology. Excellent agreement was found between the lesion depth (r 2  =  0.81, slope  =  0.90), width (r 2  =  0.85, slope  =  1.12) and area (r 2  =  0.58, slope  =  0.75). In vivo feasibility was assessed in a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. These findings demonstrate that HMIgFUS can successfully map thermal lesions and monitor lesion development in real time in vitro and in vivo. The HMIgFUS technique may therefore constitute a novel clinical tool for HIFU treatment monitoring.

  16. Fast lesion mapping during HIFU treatment using harmonic motion imaging guided focused ultrasound (HMIgFUS) in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang; Wang, Shutao; Payen, Thomas; Konofagou, Elisa

    2017-04-21

    The successful clinical application of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation depends on reliable monitoring of the lesion formation. Harmonic motion imaging guided focused ultrasound (HMIgFUS) is an ultrasound-based elasticity imaging technique, which monitors HIFU ablation based on the stiffness change of the tissue instead of the echo intensity change in conventional B-mode monitoring, rendering it potentially more sensitive to lesion development. Our group has shown that predicting the lesion location based on the radiation force-excited region is feasible during HMIgFUS. In this study, the feasibility of a fast lesion mapping method is explored to directly monitor the lesion map during HIFU. The harmonic motion imaging (HMI) lesion map was generated by subtracting the reference HMI image from the present HMI peak-to-peak displacement map, as streamed on the computer display. The dimensions of the HMIgFUS lesions were compared against gross pathology. Excellent agreement was found between the lesion depth (r 2   =  0.81, slope  =  0.90), width (r 2   =  0.85, slope  =  1.12) and area (r 2   =  0.58, slope  =  0.75). In vivo feasibility was assessed in a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. These findings demonstrate that HMIgFUS can successfully map thermal lesions and monitor lesion development in real time in vitro and in vivo. The HMIgFUS technique may therefore constitute a novel clinical tool for HIFU treatment monitoring.

  17. Sentinel nodes are identifiable in formalin-fixed specimens after surgeon-performed ex vivo sentinel lymph node mapping in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Fraser McLean

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, the technique of sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping has been applied to colorectal cancer. One aim was to ultrastage patients who were deemed node negative by routine pathologic processing but who went on to develop systemic disease. Such a group may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. METHODS: With fully informed consent and ethical approval, 37 patients with primary colorectal cancer and 3 patients with large adenomas were prospectively mapped. Isosulfan blue dye (1 to 2 mL) was injected around tumors within 5 to 10 minutes of resection. After gentle massage to recreate in vivo lymph flow, specimens were placed directly into formalin. During routine pathologic analysis, all nodes were bivalved, and blue-staining nodes were noted. These later underwent multilevel step sectioning with hematoxylin and eosin and cytokeratin staining. RESULTS: SLNs were found in 39 of 40 patients (98% sensitivity), with an average of 4.1 SLNs per patient (range, 1-8). In 14 of 16 (88% specificity) patients with nodal metastases on routine reporting, SLN status was in accordance. Focused examination of SLNs identified occult tumor deposits in 6 (29%) of 21 node-negative patients. No metastatic cells were found in SLNs draining the three adenomas. CONCLUSIONS: The ability to identify SLNs after formalin fixation increases the ease and applicability of SLN mapping in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, the sensitivity and specificity of this simple ex vivo method for establishing regional lymph node status were directly comparable to those in previously published reports.

  18. Mapping measures of microscopic diffusion anisotropy in human brain white matter in vivo with double-wave-vector diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, Marco; Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate that rotationally invariant measures of the diffusion anisotropy on a microscopic scale can be mapped in human brain white matter in vivo. Echo-planar imaging experiments (resolution 3.0 × 3.0 × 3.0 mm(3) ) involving two diffusion-weighting periods (δ = 22 ms, Δ = 25 ms) in the same acquisition, so-called double-wave-vector or double-pulsed-field-gradient diffusion-weighting experiments, were performed on a 3 T whole-body magnetic resonance system with a long mixing time ( τm=45 ms) between the two diffusion weightings. The disturbing influences of background gradient fields, eddy currents, and the finite mixing time can be minimized using 84 direction combinations based on nine directions and their antipodes. In healthy volunteers, measures of the microscopic diffusion anisotropy ( IMA and MA indexes) could be mapped in white matter across the human brain. The measures were independent (i) of the absolute orientation of the head and of the diffusion directions and (ii) of the predominant fiber orientation. Compared to the fractional anisotropy derived from the conventional diffusion tensor, the double-wave-vector indexes exhibit a narrower distribution, which could reflect their independence of the fiber orientation distribution. Mapping measures of the microscopic diffusion anisotropy in human brain white matter is feasible in vivo and could help to characterize tissue microstructure in the healthy and pathological brain. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Macromolecular Antioxidants and Dietary Fiber in Edible Seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Pintos, Nerea; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Buschmann, Alejandro H; Vergara-Salinas, José Rodrigo; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo; Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio

    2017-02-01

    Seaweeds are rich in different bioactive compounds with potential uses in drugs, cosmetics and the food industry. The objective of this study was to analyze macromolecular antioxidants or nonextractable polyphenols, in several edible seaweed species collected in Chile (Gracilaria chilensis, Callophyllis concepcionensis, Macrocystis pyrifera, Scytosyphon lomentaria, Ulva sp. and Enteromorpha compressa), including their 1st HPLC characterization. Macromolecular antioxidants are commonly ignored in studies of bioactive compounds. They are associated with insoluble dietary fiber and exhibit significant biological activity, with specific features that are different from those of both dietary fiber and extractable polyphenols. We also evaluated extractable polyphenols and dietary fiber, given their relationship with macromolecular antioxidants. Our results show that macromolecular antioxidants are a major polyphenol fraction (averaging 42% to total polyphenol content), with hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids and flavonols being the main constituents. This fraction also showed remarkable antioxidant capacity, as determined by 2 complementary assays. The dietary fiber content was over 50% of dry weight, with some samples exhibiting the target proportionality between soluble and insoluble dietary fiber for adequate nutrition. Overall, our data show that seaweed could be an important source of commonly ignored macromolecular antioxidants. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  20. RECENT ADVANCES IN MACROMOLECULAR HYDRODYNAMIC MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Sergio R.

    2010-01-01

    The modern implementation of the boundary element method (S.R. Aragon, J. Comput. Chem. 25(2004)1191–12055) has ushered unprecedented accuracy and precision for the solution of the Stokes equations of hydrodynamics with stick boundary conditions. This article begins by reviewing computations with the program BEST of smooth surface objects such as ellipsoids, the dumbbell, and cylinders that demonstrate that the numerical solution of the integral equation formulation of hydrodynamics yields very high precision and accuracy. When BEST is used for macromolecular computations, the limiting factor becomes the definition of the molecular hydrodynamic surface and the implied effective solvation of the molecular surface. Studies on 49 different proteins, ranging in molecular weight from 9 to over 400 kDa, have shown that a model using a 1.1 A thick hydration layer describes all protein transport properties very well for the overwhelming majority of them. In addition, this data implies that the crystal structure is an excellent representation of the average solution structure for most of them. In order to investigate the origin of a handful of significant discrepancies in some multimeric proteins (over −20% observed in the intrinsic viscosity), the technique of Molecular Dynamics simulation (MD) has been incorporated into the research program. A preliminary study of dimeric α-chymotrypsin using approximate implicit water MD is presented. In addition I describe the successful validation of modern protein force fields, ff03 and ff99SB, for the accurate computation of solution structure in explicit water simulation by comparison of trajectory ensemble average computed transport properties with experimental measurements. This work includes small proteins such as lysozyme, ribonuclease and ubiquitin using trajectories around 10 ns duration. We have also studied a 150 kDa flexible monoclonal IgG antibody, trastuzumab, with multiple independent trajectories encompassing over

  1. Complex Macromolecular Architectures by Living Cationic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Reem D.

    2015-05-01

    Poly (vinyl ether)-based graft polymers have been synthesized by the combination of living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers with other living or controlled/ living polymerization techniques (anionic and ATRP). The process involves the synthesis of well-defined homopolymers (PnBVE) and co/terpolymers [PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE (ABC type) and PSiDEGVE-b-PnBVE-b-PSiDEGVE (CAC type)] by sequential living cationic polymerization of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiDEGVE), using mono-functional {[n-butoxyethyl acetate (nBEA)], [1-(2-chloroethoxy) ethyl acetate (CEEA)], [1-(2-(2-(t-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl acetate (SiDEGEA)]} or di-functional [1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol di(1-ethyl acetate) (cHMDEA), (VEMOA)] initiators. The living cationic polymerizations of those monomers were conducted in hexane at -20 0C using Et3Al2Cl3 (catalyst) in the presence of 1 M AcOEt base.[1] The PCEVE segments of the synthesized block terpolymers were then used to react with living macroanions (PS-DPE-Li; poly styrene diphenyl ethylene lithium) to afford graft polymers. The quantitative desilylation of PSiDEGVE segments by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to graft co- and terpolymers in which the polyalcohol is the outer block. These co-/terpolymers were subsequently subjected to “grafting-from” reactions by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene to afford more complex macromolecular architectures. The base assisted living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers were also used to synthesize well-defined α-hydroxyl polyvinylether (PnBVE-OH). The resulting polymers were then modified into an ATRP macro-initiator for the synthesis of well-defined block copolymers (PnBVE-b-PS). Bifunctional PnBVE with terminal malonate groups was also synthesized and used as a precursor for more complex architectures such as H-shaped block copolymer by “grafting-from” or

  2. Control of Macromolecular Architectures for Renewable Polymers: Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuanbing

    The development of sustainable polymers from nature biomass is growing, but facing fierce competition from existing petrochemical-based counterparts. Controlling macromolecular architectures to maximize the properties of renewable polymers is a desirable approach to gain advantages. Given the complexity of biomass, there needs special consideration other than traditional design. In the presentation, I will talk about a few case studies on how macromolecular architectures could tune the properties of sustainable bioplastics and elastomers from renewable biomass such as resin acids (natural rosin) and plant oils.

  3. Macromolecular crystallography beamline X25 at the NSLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroux, Annie; Allaire, Marc; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matthew L; Dvorak, Joseph; Flaks, Leon; Lamarra, Steven; Myers, Stuart F; Orville, Allen M; Robinson, Howard H; Roessler, Christian G; Schneider, Dieter K; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Skinner, John M; Skinner, Michael; Soares, Alexei S; Sweet, Robert M; Berman, Lonny E

    2014-05-01

    Beamline X25 at the NSLS is one of the five beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography operated by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Macromolecular Crystallography Research Resource group. This mini-gap insertion-device beamline has seen constant upgrades for the last seven years in order to achieve mini-beam capability down to 20 µm × 20 µm. All major components beginning with the radiation source, and continuing along the beamline and its experimental hutch, have changed to produce a state-of-the-art facility for the scientific community.

  4. Macromolecular crystallography beamline X25 at the NSLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroux, Annie; Allaire, Marc; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matthew L.; Dvorak, Joseph; Flaks, Leon; LaMarra, Steven; Myers, Stuart F.; Orville, Allen M.; Robinson, Howard H.; Roessler, Christian G.; Schneider, Dieter K.; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael; Soares, Alexei S.; Sweet, Robert M.; Berman, Lonny E.

    2014-01-01

    Beamline X25 at the NSLS is one of the five beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography operated by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Macromolecular Crystallography Research Resource group. This mini-gap insertion-device beamline has seen constant upgrades for the last seven years in order to achieve mini-beam capability down to 20 µm × 20 µm. All major components beginning with the radiation source, and continuing along the beamline and its experimental hutch, have changed to produce a state-of-the-art facility for the scientific community. PMID:24763654

  5. Simultaneous mapping of membrane voltage and calcium in zebrafish heart in vivo reveals chamber-specific developmental transitions in ionic currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Hou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac action potential (AP and the consequent cytosolic Ca2+ transient are key indicators of cardiac function. Natural developmental processes, as well as many drugs and pathologies change the waveform, propagation, or variability (between cells or over time of these parameters. Here we apply a genetically encoded dual-function calcium and voltage reporter (CaViar to study the development of the zebrafish heart in vivo between 1.5 and 4 days post fertilization (dpf. We developed a high-sensitivity spinning disk confocal microscope and associated software for simultaneous three-dimensional optical mapping of voltage and calcium. We produced a transgenic zebrafish line expressing CaViar under control of the heart-specific cmlc2 promoter, and applied ion channel blockers at a series of developmental stages to map the maturation of the action potential in vivo. Early in development, the AP initiated via a calcium current through L-type calcium channels. Between 90 – 102 hours post fertilization (hpf, the ventricular AP switched to a sodium-driven upswing, while the atrial AP remained calcium driven. In the adult zebrafish heart, a sodium current drives the AP in both the atrium and ventricle. Simultaneous voltage and calcium imaging with genetically encoded reporters provides a new approach for monitoring cardiac development, and the effects of drugs on cardiac function.

  6. Mapping human cortical areas in vivo based on myelin content as revealed by T1- and T2-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Matthew F; Van Essen, David C

    2011-08-10

    Noninvasively mapping the layout of cortical areas in humans is a continuing challenge for neuroscience. We present a new method of mapping cortical areas based on myelin content as revealed by T1-weighted (T1w) and T2-weighted (T2w) MRI. The method is generalizable across different 3T scanners and pulse sequences. We use the ratio of T1w/T2w image intensities to eliminate the MR-related image intensity bias and enhance the contrast to noise ratio for myelin. Data from each subject were mapped to the cortical surface and aligned across individuals using surface-based registration. The spatial gradient of the group average myelin map provides an observer-independent measure of sharp transitions in myelin content across the surface--i.e., putative cortical areal borders. We found excellent agreement between the gradients of the myelin maps and the gradients of published probabilistic cytoarchitectonically defined cortical areas that were registered to the same surface-based atlas. For other cortical regions, we used published anatomical and functional information to make putative identifications of dozens of cortical areas or candidate areas. In general, primary and early unimodal association cortices are heavily myelinated and higher, multimodal, association cortices are more lightly myelinated, but there are notable exceptions in the literature that are confirmed by our results. The overall pattern in the myelin maps also has important correlations with the developmental onset of subcortical white matter myelination, evolutionary cortical areal expansion in humans compared with macaques, postnatal cortical expansion in humans, and maps of neuronal density in non-human primates.

  7. Resolving macromolecular structures from electron cryo-tomography data using subtomogram averaging in RELION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Scheres, Sjors H W

    2016-11-01

    Electron cryo-tomography (cryo-ET) is a technique that is used to produce 3D pictures (tomograms) of complex objects such as asymmetric viruses, cellular organelles or whole cells from a series of tilted electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) images. Averaging of macromolecular complexes found within tomograms is known as subtomogram averaging, and this technique allows structure determination of macromolecular complexes in situ. Subtomogram averaging is also gaining in popularity for the calculation of initial models for single-particle analysis. We describe herein a protocol for subtomogram averaging from cryo-ET data using the RELION software (http://www2.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/relion). RELION was originally developed for cryo-EM single-particle analysis, and the subtomogram averaging approach presented in this protocol has been implemented in the existing workflow for single-particle analysis so that users may conveniently tap into existing capabilities of the RELION software. We describe how to calculate 3D models for the contrast transfer function (CTF) that describe the transfer of information in the imaging process, and we illustrate the results of classification and subtomogram averaging refinement for cryo-ET data of purified hepatitis B capsid particles and Saccharomyces cerevisiae 80S ribosomes. Using the steps described in this protocol, along with the troubleshooting and optimization guidelines, high-resolution maps can be obtained in which secondary structure elements are resolved subtomogram.

  8. Plasticity in the macromolecular-scale causal networks of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, John G; Mamaghani, Mehrdad Jafari; Shafqat-Abbasi, Hamdah; Gong, Xiaowei; Tyrcha, Joanna; Strömblad, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous and dynamic single cell migration behaviours arise from a complex multi-scale signalling network comprising both molecular components and macromolecular modules, among which cell-matrix adhesions and F-actin directly mediate migration. To date, the global wiring architecture characterizing this network remains poorly defined. It is also unclear whether such a wiring pattern may be stable and generalizable to different conditions, or plastic and context dependent. Here, synchronous imaging-based quantification of migration system organization, represented by 87 morphological and dynamic macromolecular module features, and migration system behaviour, i.e., migration speed, facilitated Granger causality analysis. We thereby leveraged natural cellular heterogeneity to begin mapping the directionally specific causal wiring between organizational and behavioural features of the cell migration system. This represents an important advance on commonly used correlative analyses that do not resolve causal directionality. We identified organizational features such as adhesion stability and adhesion F-actin content that, as anticipated, causally influenced cell migration speed. Strikingly, we also found that cell speed can exert causal influence over organizational features, including cell shape and adhesion complex location, thus revealing causality in directions contradictory to previous expectations. Importantly, by comparing unperturbed and signalling-modulated cells, we provide proof-of-principle that causal interaction patterns are in fact plastic and context dependent, rather than stable and generalizable.

  9. Plasticity in the macromolecular-scale causal networks of cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Lock

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous and dynamic single cell migration behaviours arise from a complex multi-scale signalling network comprising both molecular components and macromolecular modules, among which cell-matrix adhesions and F-actin directly mediate migration. To date, the global wiring architecture characterizing this network remains poorly defined. It is also unclear whether such a wiring pattern may be stable and generalizable to different conditions, or plastic and context dependent. Here, synchronous imaging-based quantification of migration system organization, represented by 87 morphological and dynamic macromolecular module features, and migration system behaviour, i.e., migration speed, facilitated Granger causality analysis. We thereby leveraged natural cellular heterogeneity to begin mapping the directionally specific causal wiring between organizational and behavioural features of the cell migration system. This represents an important advance on commonly used correlative analyses that do not resolve causal directionality. We identified organizational features such as adhesion stability and adhesion F-actin content that, as anticipated, causally influenced cell migration speed. Strikingly, we also found that cell speed can exert causal influence over organizational features, including cell shape and adhesion complex location, thus revealing causality in directions contradictory to previous expectations. Importantly, by comparing unperturbed and signalling-modulated cells, we provide proof-of-principle that causal interaction patterns are in fact plastic and context dependent, rather than stable and generalizable.

  10. Non-invasive 3d magnetic resonance thermal mapping: determination of the lesion size during laser-therapy in ex vivo tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viard, R. [Lille 2 University, INSERM U703, EA 1049, Lille cedex (France); USTL, LAGIS CNRS UMR 8146, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Piron, B.; Rousseau, J. [Lille 2 University, INSERM U703, EA 1049, Lille cedex (France); Steiner, A. [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Lille (France); Wassmer, B. [Osyris SA, Hellemmes (France); Mordon, S. [Lille University Hospital, INSERM (French National Institute of Health and Medical Research) IFR 114, Lille (France)

    2008-04-15

    Developments in open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnets have made possible the use of reproducible thermosensitive sequences to determine temperature distribution inside biological tissue. This study aimed to compare MR thermal mapping during laser-induced interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) with macroscopically observed thermal lesions in order to estimate the 3D size of the coagulative necrosis. Laser irradiation was performed ex vivo with a 980-nm laser in pig liver in an open low-magnetic field (0.2 T) scanner. Laser light was transmitted through a 1,040/600 {mu}m (outer/core diameter) bare-tipped silica fiber. Laser energy was applied in a pulsed mode (10 s laser-on, 10 s laser-off) for 12 min, power 6 W, energy 2,160 J. Gradient-echo images acquired during laser irradiation were used for real-time temperature mapping by the MR-T1 method. The method was then validated by a comparison between calculated 60 C isotherm and macroscopic lesion size. Temperature accuracy was 2.2 C, temporal resolution was 20 s. and spatial resolution was 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 mm{sup 3} (0.8% of the mean volume of coagulative necrosis). The mean lesion volume was 1830 mm{sup 3} {+-} 189 (standard error), {sigma} (standard deviation) = 499 and range (min = 1281; max = 2591) mm{sup 3}. Volumes calculated from MRI isotherms were correlated (correlation coefficient r {sup 2} = 0.70) significantly (P = 0.08) to lesion size determined from macroscopic measurements. Using fast gradient-echo sequence, laser monitoring is achieved efficiently with fast temperature mapping. T1-weighted images appear promising in monitoring lesion size evolution in future low magnetic field in vivo studies. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of sedimentation equilibrium distributions reflecting nonideal macromolecular associations.

    OpenAIRE

    Wills, Peter R.; Jacobsen, Michael P.; Winzor, Donald J.

    2000-01-01

    A rigorous statistical-mechanical approach is adopted to derive general quantitative expressions that allow for the effects of thermodynamic nonideality in equilibrium measurements reflecting interaction between dissimilar macromolecular reactants. An analytical procedure based on these expressions is then formulated for obtaining global estimates of equilibrium constants and the corresponding reference thermodynamic activities of the free reactants in each of several sedimentation equilibriu...

  12. Optimization of macromolecular prodrugs of the antitumor antibiotic adriamycin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, C.J.T.; Potman, W.; Heeswijk, W.A.R.; Mud, J.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan; Feijen, Jan

    1985-01-01

    In our earlier work [10] on aminoribosyl-bound prodrugs of adriamycin (ADR) using poly(α-l-glutamic acid) (PGA) grafted in high yield (90–100 mol.%) with various peptide spacers as a plasma-soluble macromolecular carrier we observed rather low cytotoxic activities in L1210 leukemia and B16 melanoma

  13. Path Similarity Analysis: A Method for Quantifying Macromolecular Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyler, Sean L; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, M F; Beckstein, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Diverse classes of proteins function through large-scale conformational changes and various sophisticated computational algorithms have been proposed to enhance sampling of these macromolecular transition paths. Because such paths are curves in a high-dimensional space, it has been difficult to quantitatively compare multiple paths, a necessary prerequisite to, for instance, assess the quality of different algorithms. We introduce a method named Path Similarity Analysis (PSA) that enables us to quantify the similarity between two arbitrary paths and extract the atomic-scale determinants responsible for their differences. PSA utilizes the full information available in 3N-dimensional configuration space trajectories by employing the Hausdorff or Fréchet metrics (adopted from computational geometry) to quantify the degree of similarity between piecewise-linear curves. It thus completely avoids relying on projections into low dimensional spaces, as used in traditional approaches. To elucidate the principles of PSA, we quantified the effect of path roughness induced by thermal fluctuations using a toy model system. Using, as an example, the closed-to-open transitions of the enzyme adenylate kinase (AdK) in its substrate-free form, we compared a range of protein transition path-generating algorithms. Molecular dynamics-based dynamic importance sampling (DIMS) MD and targeted MD (TMD) and the purely geometric FRODA (Framework Rigidity Optimized Dynamics Algorithm) were tested along with seven other methods publicly available on servers, including several based on the popular elastic network model (ENM). PSA with clustering revealed that paths produced by a given method are more similar to each other than to those from another method and, for instance, that the ENM-based methods produced relatively similar paths. PSA applied to ensembles of DIMS MD and FRODA trajectories of the conformational transition of diphtheria toxin, a particularly challenging example, showed that

  14. Path Similarity Analysis: A Method for Quantifying Macromolecular Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean L Seyler

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diverse classes of proteins function through large-scale conformational changes and various sophisticated computational algorithms have been proposed to enhance sampling of these macromolecular transition paths. Because such paths are curves in a high-dimensional space, it has been difficult to quantitatively compare multiple paths, a necessary prerequisite to, for instance, assess the quality of different algorithms. We introduce a method named Path Similarity Analysis (PSA that enables us to quantify the similarity between two arbitrary paths and extract the atomic-scale determinants responsible for their differences. PSA utilizes the full information available in 3N-dimensional configuration space trajectories by employing the Hausdorff or Fréchet metrics (adopted from computational geometry to quantify the degree of similarity between piecewise-linear curves. It thus completely avoids relying on projections into low dimensional spaces, as used in traditional approaches. To elucidate the principles of PSA, we quantified the effect of path roughness induced by thermal fluctuations using a toy model system. Using, as an example, the closed-to-open transitions of the enzyme adenylate kinase (AdK in its substrate-free form, we compared a range of protein transition path-generating algorithms. Molecular dynamics-based dynamic importance sampling (DIMS MD and targeted MD (TMD and the purely geometric FRODA (Framework Rigidity Optimized Dynamics Algorithm were tested along with seven other methods publicly available on servers, including several based on the popular elastic network model (ENM. PSA with clustering revealed that paths produced by a given method are more similar to each other than to those from another method and, for instance, that the ENM-based methods produced relatively similar paths. PSA applied to ensembles of DIMS MD and FRODA trajectories of the conformational transition of diphtheria toxin, a particularly challenging example

  15. Fundamental analysis and ex vivo validation of thermal lesion mapping using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Y.; Luo, Jianwen; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Marquet, Fabrice; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-10-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on Amplitude-modulated (AM) - Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module, and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework in order to 1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and 2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25-Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6, and 9, the estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.65, 3.19, 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28, 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s, and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was also found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm2) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm2). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo.

  16. 7T Magnetization Transfer and Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MRI of Cortical Gray Matter: Can We Detect Neurochemical and Macromolecular Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    optic nerve , but also have disseminated these methods to collaborators outside of Vanderbilt for application to patients with brain tumors (see...Characterization of the Optic Nerve in vivo using High-resolution APT-CEST), and 1 abstract presented at the annual VUIIS retreat (Conrad B, Dethrage LM...for the quantification of macromolecular and metabolic indices reflective of demyelination and neurotransmitter /protein accumulation. All quantitative

  17. Construction of a 3D coronary map to assess geometrical information in-vivo from coronary patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciaro, M. E.; Craiem, D.; Graf, S.; Gurfinkel, E. P.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Traditional risk factors are involved in the development of coronary artery disease (CAD), but geometrical risk factors have also proved to be determinant. In this work we present a new method to construct a 3D map of the left coronary artery tree using CT image processing and skeletonization techniques. We computed cumulative length-volume functions through the coronary tree bifurcations and also the relationships between total tree volumes, total length, number of segments and bifurcations with respect to the presence and severity of atherosclerotic plaques. A total of 65 patients, 40 with and 20 without CAD were recruited. We found more vascular segments and bifurcations per patient in the CAD group. Accordingly, total cumulative length was longer in CAD patients (ppatients follow a compensatory mechanism, dilating the vessels to maintain a normal coronary flow. The 3D coronary map offers useful quantitative information of the coronary morphometry.

  18. Strategies for mapping synaptic inputs on dendrites in vivo by combining two-photon microscopy, sharp intracellular recording and pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eLevy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Uncovering the functional properties of individual synaptic inputs on single neurons is critical for understanding the computational role of synapses and dendrites. Previous studies combined whole-cell patch recording to load neurons with a fluorescent calcium indicator and two-photon imaging to map subcellular changes in fluorescence upon sensory stimulation. By hyperpolarizing the neuron below spike threshold, the patch electrode ensured that changes in fluorescence associated with synaptic events were isolated from those caused by back-propagating action potentials. This technique holds promise for determining whether the existence of unique cortical feature maps across different species may be associated with distinct wiring diagrams. However, the use of whole-cell patch for mapping inputs on dendrites is challenging in large mammals, due to brain pulsations and the accumulation of fluorescent dye in the extracellular milieu. Alternatively, sharp intracellular electrodes have been used to label neurons with fluorescent dyes, but the current passing capabilities of these high impedance electrodes may be insufficient to prevent spiking. In this study, we tested whether sharp electrode recording is suitable for mapping functional inputs on dendrites in the cat visual cortex. We compared three different strategies for suppressing visually evoked spikes: (1 hyperpolarization by intracellular current injection, (2 pharmacological blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels by intracellular QX-314, and (3 GABA iontophoresis from a perisomatic electrode glued to the intracellular electrode. We found that functional inputs on dendrites could be successfully imaged using all three strategies. However, the best method for preventing spikes was GABA iontophoresis with low currents (5 to 10 nA, which minimally affected the local circuit. Our methods advance the possibility of determining functional connectivity in preparations where whole-cell patch may be

  19. Quantitative in vivo MRI evaluation of lumbar facet joints and intervertebral discs using axial T2 mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelzeneder, David; Messner, Alina; Scheurecker, Georg; Goed, Sabine; Friedrich, Klaus M.; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, MR Centre-High Field MR, Vienna (Austria); Vlychou, Marianna [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, MR Centre-High Field MR, Vienna (Austria); University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Radiology, Larissa (Greece); Welsch, Goetz H. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, MR Centre-High Field MR, Vienna (Austria); University of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Pieber, Karin; Pflueger, Verena [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-11-15

    To assess the feasibility of T2 mapping of lumbar facet joints and intervertebral discs in a single imaging slab and to compare the findings with morphological grading. Sixty lumbar spine segments from 10 low back pain patients and 5 healthy volunteers were examined by axial T2 mapping and morphological MRI at 3.0 Tesla. Regions of interest were drawn on a single slice for the facet joints and the intervertebral discs (nucleus pulposus, anterior and posterior annulus fibrosus). The Weishaupt grading was used for facet joints and the Pfirrmann score was used for morphological disc grading (''normal'' vs. ''abnormal'' discs). The inter-rater agreement was excellent for the facet joint T2 evaluation (r = 0.85), but poor for the morphological Weishaupt grading (kappa = 0.15). The preliminary results show similar facet joint T2 values in segments with normal and abnormal Pfirrmann scores. There was no difference in mean T2 values between facet joints in different Weishaupt grading groups. Facet joint T2 values showed a weak correlation with T2 values of the posterior annulus (r = 0.32) This study demonstrates the feasibility of a combined T2 mapping approach for the facet joints and intervertebral discs using a single axial slab. (orig.)

  20. Biomolecular interactions modulate macromolecular structure and dynamics in atomistic model of a bacterial cytoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Isseki; Mori, Takaharu; Ando, Tadashi; Harada, Ryuhei; Jung, Jaewoon; Sugita, Yuji; Feig, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Biological macromolecules function in highly crowded cellular environments. The structure and dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids are well characterized in vitro, but in vivo crowding effects remain unclear. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a comprehensive atomistic model cytoplasm we found that protein-protein interactions may destabilize native protein structures, whereas metabolite interactions may induce more compact states due to electrostatic screening. Protein-protein interactions also resulted in significant variations in reduced macromolecular diffusion under crowded conditions, while metabolites exhibited significant two-dimensional surface diffusion and altered protein-ligand binding that may reduce the effective concentration of metabolites and ligands in vivo. Metabolic enzymes showed weak non-specific association in cellular environments attributed to solvation and entropic effects. These effects are expected to have broad implications for the in vivo functioning of biomolecules. This work is a first step towards physically realistic in silico whole-cell models that connect molecular with cellular biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19274.001 PMID:27801646

  1. DMS-Seq for In Vivo Genome-wide Mapping of Protein-DNA Interactions and Nucleosome Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Umeyama

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA interactions provide the basis for chromatin structure and gene regulation. Comprehensive identification of protein-occupied sites is thus vital to an in-depth understanding of genome function. Dimethyl sulfate (DMS is a chemical probe that has long been used to detect footprints of DNA-bound proteins in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe a genomic footprinting method, dimethyl sulfate sequencing (DMS-seq, which exploits the cell-permeable nature of DMS to obviate the need for nuclear isolation. This feature makes DMS-seq simple in practice and removes the potential risk of protein re-localization during nuclear isolation. DMS-seq successfully detects transcription factors bound to cis-regulatory elements and non-canonical chromatin particles in nucleosome-free regions. Furthermore, an unexpected preference of DMS confers on DMS-seq a unique potential to directly detect nucleosome centers without using genetic manipulation. We expect that DMS-seq will serve as a characteristic method for genome-wide interrogation of in vivo protein-DNA interactions.

  2. In Vivo Dual-Modality Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Lymph Node Mapping with Good Biocompatibility Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Zhan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctional manganese oxide nanoparticles (NPs with impressive enhanced T1 contrast ability show great promise in biomedical diagnosis. Herein, we developed a dual-modality imaging agent system based on polyethylene glycol (PEG-coated manganese oxide NPs conjugated with organic dye (Cy7.5, which functions as a fluorescence imaging (FI agent as well as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI imaging agent. The formed Mn3O4@PEG-Cy7.5 NPs with the size of ~10 nm exhibit good colloidal stability in different physiological media. Serial FI and MRI studies that non-invasively assessed the bio-distribution pattern and the feasibility for in vivo dual-modality imaging-guided lymph node mapping have been investigated. In addition, histological and biochemical analyses exhibited low toxicity even at a dose of 20 mg/kg in vivo. Since Mn3O4@PEG-Cy7.5 NPs exhibited desirable properties as imaging agents and good biocompatibility, this work offers a robust, safe, and accurate diagnostic platform based on manganese oxide NPs for tumor metastasis diagnosis.

  3. Mapping calcium phosphate activated gene networks as a strategy for targeted osteoinduction of human progenitors in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyckmans, J.; Roberts, S.J.; Bolander, J.; Schrooten, J.; Chen, C.S.; Luyten, F.P.

    2014-01-01

    Although calcium phosphate-containing biomaterials are promising scaffolds for bone regenerative strategies, the osteoinductive capacity of such materials is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous mechanisms of in vivo calcium phosphate-driven, ectopic bone formation could be identified and used to induce enhanced differentiation in vitro of the same progenitor population. To accomplish this, human periosteum derived cells (hPDCs) were seeded on hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffolds (calcium phosphate rich matrix or CPRM), or on decalcified scaffolds (calcium phosphate depleted matrix or CPDM), followed by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice to trigger ectopic bone formation. In this system, osteoblast differentiation occurred in CPRM scaffolds, but not in CPDM scaffolds. Gene expression was assessed by human full-genome microarray at 20 hours after seeding, and 2, 8 and 18 days after implantation. In both matrices, implantation of the cell constructs triggered a similar gene expression cascade, however, gene expression dynamics progressed faster in CPRM scaffolds than in CPDM scaffolds. The difference in gene expression dynamics was associated with differential activation of hub genes and molecular signaling pathways related to calcium signaling (CREB), inflammation (TNFα, NFkB, and IL6) and bone development (TGFβ, β-catenin, BMP, EGF, and ERK signaling). Starting from this set of pathways, a growth factor cocktail was developed that robustly enhanced osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that through the identification and subsequent stimulation of genes, proteins and signaling pathways associated with calcium phosphate mediated osteoinduction, a focused approach to develop targeted differentiation protocols in adult progenitor cells can be achieved. PMID:23537666

  4. Mapping current research trends on anterior cruciate ligament injury risk against the existing evidence: In vivo biomechanical risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharir, Raihana; Rafeeuddin, Radin; Staes, Filip; Dingenen, Bart; George, Keith; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Robinson, Mark A

    2016-08-01

    Whilst many studies measure large numbers of biomechanical parameters and associate these to anterior cruciate ligament injury risk, they cannot be considered as anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factors without evidence from prospective studies. A review was conducted to systematically assess the in vivo biomechanical literature to identify biomechanical risk factors for non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury during dynamic sports tasks; and to critically evaluate the research trends from retrospective and associative studies investigating non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk. An electronic literature search was undertaken on studies examining in vivo biomechanical risk factors associated with non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury. The relevant studies were assessed by classification; level 1 - a prospective cohort study, level 2 - a retrospective study or level 3 - an associative study. An initial search revealed 812 studies but this was reduced to 1 level 1 evidence study, 20 level 2 evidence studies and 175 level 3 evidence studies that met all inclusion criteria. Level 1 evidence showed that the knee abduction angle, knee abduction moment and ground reaction force were biomechanical risk factors. Nine level 2 studies and eighty-three level 3 studies used these to assess risk factors in their study. Inconsistencies in results and methods were observed in level 2 and 3 studies. There is a lack of high quality, prospective level 1 evidence related to biomechanical risk factors for non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury. More prospective cohort studies are required to determine risk factors and provide improved prognostic capability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Temperature-dependent macromolecular X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weik, Martin, E-mail: martin.weik@ibs.fr; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe [CEA, IBS, Laboratoire de Biophysique Moléculaire, F-38054 Grenoble (France); CNRS, UMR5075, F-38027 Grenoble (France); Université Joseph Fourier, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2010-04-01

    The dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. X-ray crystallography provides structural details of biological macromolecules. Whereas routine data are collected close to 100 K in order to mitigate radiation damage, more exotic temperature-controlled experiments in a broader temperature range from 15 K to room temperature can provide both dynamical and structural insights. Here, the dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. Experimental strategies of kinetic crystallography are discussed that have allowed the generation and trapping of macromolecular intermediate states by combining reaction initiation in the crystalline state with appropriate temperature profiles. A particular focus is on recruiting X-ray-induced changes for reaction initiation, thus unveiling useful aspects of radiation damage, which otherwise has to be minimized in macromolecular crystallography.

  6. Macromolecular metamorphosis via stimulus-induced transformations of polymer architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Kabb, Christopher P.; Dai, Yuqiong; Hill, Megan R.; Ghiviriga, Ion; Bapat, Abhijeet P.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2017-08-01

    Macromolecular architecture plays a pivotal role in determining the properties of polymers. When designing polymers for specific applications, it is not only the size of a macromolecule that must be considered, but also its shape. In most cases, the topology of a polymer is a static feature that is inalterable once synthesized. Using reversible-covalent chemistry to prompt the disconnection of chemical bonds and the formation of new linkages in situ, we report polymers that undergo dramatic topological transformations via a process we term macromolecular metamorphosis. Utilizing this technique, a linear amphiphilic block copolymer or hyperbranched polymer undergoes 'metamorphosis' into comb, star and hydrophobic block copolymer architectures. This approach was extended to include a macroscopic gel which transitioned from a densely and covalently crosslinked network to one with larger distances between the covalent crosslinks when heated. These architectural transformations present an entirely new approach to 'smart' materials.

  7. Refinement of macromolecular structures against neutron data with SHELXL2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruene, Tim; Hahn, Hinrich W; Luebben, Anna V; Meilleur, Flora; Sheldrick, George M

    2014-02-01

    Some of the improvements in SHELX2013 make SHELXL convenient to use for refinement of macromolecular structures against neutron data without the support of X-ray data. The new NEUT instruction adjusts the behaviour of the SFAC instruction as well as the default bond lengths of the AFIX instructions. This work presents a protocol on how to use SHELXL for refinement of protein structures against neutron data. It includes restraints extending the Engh & Huber [Acta Cryst. (1991), A47, 392-400] restraints to H atoms and discusses several of the features of SHELXL that make the program particularly useful for the investigation of H atoms with neutron diffraction. SHELXL2013 is already adequate for the refinement of small molecules against neutron data, but there is still room for improvement, like the introduction of chain IDs for the refinement of macromolecular structures.

  8. Macromolecular organization of chicken type X collagen in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The macromolecular structure of type X collagen in the matrices of primary cultures of chick hypertrophic chondrocytes was initially investigated using immunoelectron microscopy. Type X collagen was observed to assemble into a matlike structure with-in the matrix elaborated by hypertrophic chondrocytes. The process of self assembly was investigated at the molecular level using purified chick type X collagen and rotary-shadowing EM. It was shown that under neutral conditions at 34 degrees C, i...

  9. Celebrando la cristalografía macromolecular: una perspectiva personal

    OpenAIRE

    Abad-Zapatero, Celerino

    2015-01-01

    The twentieth century has seen an enormous advance in the knowledge of the atomic structures that surround us. The discovery of the first crystal structures of simple inorganic salts by the Braggs in 1914, using the diffraction of X-rays by crystals, provided the critical elements to unveil the atomic structure of matter. Subsequent developments in the field leading to macromolecular crystallography are presented with a personal perspective, related to the cultural milieu of Spain in the late...

  10. Stably engineered nanobubbles and ultrasound - An effective platform for enhanced macromolecular delivery to representative cells of the retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin S Thakur

    Full Text Available Herein we showcase the potential of ultrasound-responsive nanobubbles in enhancing macromolecular permeation through layers of the retina, ultimately leading to significant and direct intracellular delivery; this being effectively demonstrated across three relevant and distinct retinal cell lines. Stably engineered nanobubbles of a highly homogenous and echogenic nature were fully characterised using dynamic light scattering, B-scan ultrasound and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The nanobubbles appeared as spherical liposome-like structures under TEM, accompanied by an opaque luminal core and darkened corona around their periphery, with both features indicative of efficient gas entrapment and adsorption, respectively. A nanobubble +/- ultrasound sweeping study was conducted next, which determined the maximum tolerated dose for each cell line. Detection of underlying cellular stress was verified using the biomarker heat shock protein 70, measured before and after treatment with optimised ultrasound. Next, with safety to nanobubbles and optimised ultrasound demonstrated, each human or mouse-derived cell population was incubated with biotinylated rabbit-IgG in the presence and absence of ultrasound +/- nanobubbles. Intracellular delivery of antibody in each cell type was then quantified using Cy3-streptavidin. Nanobubbles and optimised ultrasound were found to be negligibly toxic across all cell lines tested. Macromolecular internalisation was achieved to significant, yet varying degrees in all three cell lines. The results of this study pave the way towards better understanding mechanisms underlying cellular responsiveness to ultrasound-triggered drug delivery in future ex vivo and in vivo models of the posterior eye.

  11. Cryo-Electron Tomography for Structural Characterization of Macromolecular Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Julia; Heumann, John; Hoenger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is an emerging 3-D reconstruction technology that combines the principles of tomographic 3-D reconstruction with the unmatched structural preservation of biological material embedded in vitreous ice. Cryo-ET is particularly suited to investigating cell-biological samples and large macromolecular structures that are too polymorphic to be reconstructed by classical averaging-based 3-D reconstruction procedures. This unit aims to make cryo-ET accessible to newcomers and discusses the specialized equipment required, as well as the relevant advantages and hurdles associated with sample preparation by vitrification and cryo-ET. Protocols describe specimen preparation, data recording and 3-D data reconstruction for cryo-ET, with a special focus on macromolecular complexes. A step-by-step procedure for specimen vitrification by plunge freezing is provided, followed by the general practicalities of tilt-series acquisition for cryo-ET, including advice on how to select an area appropriate for acquiring a tilt series. A brief introduction to the underlying computational reconstruction principles applied in tomography is described, along with instructions for reconstructing a tomogram from cryo-tilt series data. Finally, a method is detailed for extracting small subvolumes containing identical macromolecular structures from tomograms for alignment and averaging as a means to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminate missing wedge effects inherent in tomographic reconstructions. PMID:21842467

  12. What Macromolecular Crowding Can Do to a Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular environment represents an extremely crowded milieu, with a limited amount of free water and an almost complete lack of unoccupied space. Obviously, slightly salted aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of a biomolecule of interest are too simplistic to mimic the “real life” situation, where the biomolecule of interest scrambles and wades through the tightly packed crowd. In laboratory practice, such macromolecular crowding is typically mimicked by concentrated solutions of various polymers that serve as model “crowding agents”. Studies under these conditions revealed that macromolecular crowding might affect protein structure, folding, shape, conformational stability, binding of small molecules, enzymatic activity, protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions, and pathological aggregation. The goal of this review is to systematically analyze currently available experimental data on the variety of effects of macromolecular crowding on a protein molecule. The review covers more than 320 papers and therefore represents one of the most comprehensive compendia of the current knowledge in this exciting area. PMID:25514413

  13. Toward in vivo diagnosis of skin cancer using multimode imaging dermoscopy: (II) molecular mapping of highly pigmented lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nicholas; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a multimode imaging dermoscope that combines polarization and hyperspectral imaging with a computationally rapid analytical model. This approach employs specific spectral ranges of visible and near infrared wavelengths for mapping the distribution of specific skin bio-molecules. This corrects for the melanin-hemoglobin misestimation common to other systems, without resorting to complex and computationally intensive tissue optical models that are prone to inaccuracies due to over-modeling. Various human skin measurements including a melanocytic nevus, and venous occlusion conditions were investigated and compared with other ratiometric spectral imaging approaches. Access to the broad range of hyperspectral data in the visible and near-infrared range allows our algorithm to flexibly use different wavelength ranges for chromophore estimation while minimizing melanin-hemoglobin optical signature cross-talk.

  14. Mapping the longitudinal wall stiffness heterogeneities within intact canine aortas using Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmirzadi, Danial; Narayanan, Prathyush; Li, Ronny X; Qaqish, William W; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2013-07-26

    The aortic stiffness has been found to be a useful independent indicator of several cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and aneurysms. Existing methods to estimate the aortic stiffness are either invasive, e.g. catheterization, or yield average global measurements which could be inaccurate, e.g., tonometry. Alternatively, the aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been shown to be a reliable marker for estimating the wall stiffness based on the Moens-Korteweg (M-K) formulation. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is a relatively new, ultrasound-based imaging method for noninvasive and regional estimation of PWV. The present study aims at showing the application of PWI in obtaining localized wall mechanical properties by making PWV measurements on several adjacent locations along the ascending thoracic to the suprarenal abdominal aortic trunk in its intact vessel form. The PWV estimates were used to calculate the regional wall modulus based on the M-K relationship and were compared against conventional mechanical testing. The findings indicated that for the anisotropic aortic wall, the PWI estimates of the modulus are smaller than the circumferential modulus by an average of -32.22% and larger than the longitudinal modulus by an average of 25.83%. Ongoing work is focused on the in vivo applications of PWI in normal and pathological aortas with future implications in the clinical applications of the technique. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kant M; Lopes-Calcas, Ana; Honke, Michael L; O'Brien-Moran, Zoe; Buist, Richard; West, Michael; Martin, Melanie

    2017-07-01

    To advance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies further for in vivo tissue characterization with histopathologic validation, we investigated the feasibility of ex vivo tissue imaging of a surgically removed human brain tumor as a comprehensive approach for radiology-pathology correlation in histoanatomically identical fashion in a rare case of pigmented ganglioglioma with complex paramagnetic properties. Pieces of surgically removed ganglioglioma, containing melanin and hemosiderin pigments, were imaged with a small bore 7-T MRI scanner to obtain T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted image and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Corresponding histopathological slides were prepared for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain and special stains for melanin and iron/hemosiderin to correlate with MRI signal characteristics. Furthermore, mean diffusivity (MD) maps were generated from DTI data and correlated with cellularity using image analysis. While the presence of melanin was difficult to interpret in in vivo MRI with certainty due to concomitant hemosiderin pigments and calcium depositions, ex vivo tissue imaging clearly demonstrated pieces of tissue exhibiting the characteristic MR signal pattern for melanin with pathologic confirmation in a histoanatomically identical location. There was also concordant correlation between MD and cellularity. Although it is still in an initial phase of development, ex vivo tissue imaging is a promising approach, which offers radiology-pathology correlation in a straightforward and comprehensive manner.

  16. Mapping of electrophysiological response to transcranial infrared laser stimulation on the human brain in vivo measured by electroencephalography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinlong; Reddy, Divya Dhandapani; Gonzalez-Lima, F.; Liu, Hanli

    2017-02-01

    Transcranial infrared laser stimulation (TILS) is a non-destructive and non-thermal photobiomodulation therapy or process on the human brain; TILS uses infrared light from lasers or LEDs and has gained increased recognition for its beneficial effects on a variety of neurological and psychological conditions. While the mechanism of TILS has been assumed to stem from cytochrome-c-oxidase (CCO), which is the last enzyme in the electron transportation chain and is the primary photoacceptor, no literature is found to report electrophysiological response to TILS. In this study, a 64-channel electroencephalography (EEG) system was employed to monitor electrophysiological activities from 15 healthy human participants before, during and after TILS. A placebo experimental protocol was also applied for rigorous comparison. After recording a 3-minute baseline, we applied a 1064-nm laser with a power of 3.5W on the right forehead of each human participant for 8 minutes, followed by a 5-minute recovery period. In 64-channel EEG data analysis, we utilized several methods (root mean square, principal component analysis followed by independent component analysis, permutation conditional mutual information, and time-frequency wavelet analysis) to reveal differences in electrophysiological response to TILS between the stimulated versus placebo group. The analyzed results were further investigated using general linear model and paired t-test to reveal statistically meaningful responses induced by TILS. Moreover, this study will provide spatial mapping of human electrophysiological and possibly neural network responses to TILS for first time, indicating the potential of EEG to be an effective method for monitoring neurological improvement induced by TILS.

  17. Workshop on algorithms for macromolecular modeling. Final project report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leimkuhler, B.; Hermans, J.; Skeel, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    A workshop was held on algorithms and parallel implementations for macromolecular dynamics, protein folding, and structural refinement. This document contains abstracts and brief reports from that workshop.

  18. Thermodynamic signatures in macromolecular interactions involving conformational flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Anja; Neumann, Piotr; Schwieger, Christian; Stubbs, Milton T

    2014-07-01

    The energetics of macromolecular interactions are complex, particularly where protein flexibility is involved. Exploiting serendipitous differences in the plasticity of a series of closely related trypsin variants, we analyzed the enthalpic and entropic contributions accompanying interaction with L45K-eglin C. Binding of the four variants show significant differences in released heat, although the affinities vary little, in accordance with the principle of enthalpy-entropy compensation. Binding of the most disordered variant is almost entirely enthalpically driven, with practically no entropy change. As structures of the complexes reveal negligible differences in protein-inhibitor contacts, we conclude that solvent effects contribute significantly to binding affinities.

  19. Structural analysis of nanoparticulate carriers for encapsulation of macromolecular drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angelov, Borislav; Garamus, V.M.; Drechsler, M.; Angelova, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 235, Jun (2017), s. 83-89 ISSN 0167-7322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000447; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:OP VVV - ELIBIO(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_003/0000447; ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : self-assembled nanocarriers * liquid crystalline phase transitions * cationic lipids * macromolecular drugs Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.648, year: 2016

  20. PRIGo: a new multi-axis goniometer for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltersperger, Sandro; Olieric, Vincent; Pradervand, Claude; Glettig, Wayne; Salathe, Marco; Fuchs, Martin R; Curtin, Adrian; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Ebner, Simon; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Weinert, Tobias; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Wang, Meitian

    2015-07-01

    The Parallel Robotics Inspired Goniometer (PRIGo) is a novel compact and high-precision goniometer providing an alternative to (mini-)kappa, traditional three-circle goniometers and Eulerian cradles used for sample reorientation in macromolecular crystallography. Based on a combination of serial and parallel kinematics, PRIGo emulates an arc. It is mounted on an air-bearing stage for rotation around ω and consists of four linear positioners working synchronously to achieve x, y, z translations and χ rotation (0-90°), followed by a ϕ stage (0-360°) for rotation around the sample holder axis. Owing to the use of piezo linear positioners and active correction, PRIGo features spheres of confusion of <1 µm, <7 µm and <10 µm for ω, χ and ϕ, respectively, and is therefore very well suited for micro-crystallography. PRIGo enables optimal strategies for both native and experimental phasing crystallographic data collection. Herein, PRIGo hardware and software, its calibration, as well as applications in macromolecular crystallography are described.

  1. PRIGo: a new multi-axis goniometer for macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltersperger, Sandro; Olieric, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch; Pradervand, Claude [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Glettig, Wayne [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et Microtechnique SA, Neuchâtel 2002 (Switzerland); Salathe, Marco; Fuchs, Martin R.; Curtin, Adrian; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Ebner, Simon; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Weinert, Tobias [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schulze-Briese, Clemens [Dectris Ltd, Baden 5400 (Switzerland); Wang, Meitian, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-05-09

    The design and performance of the new multi-axis goniometer PRIGo developed at the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute is described. The Parallel Robotics Inspired Goniometer (PRIGo) is a novel compact and high-precision goniometer providing an alternative to (mini-)kappa, traditional three-circle goniometers and Eulerian cradles used for sample reorientation in macromolecular crystallography. Based on a combination of serial and parallel kinematics, PRIGo emulates an arc. It is mounted on an air-bearing stage for rotation around ω and consists of four linear positioners working synchronously to achieve x, y, z translations and χ rotation (0–90°), followed by a ϕ stage (0–360°) for rotation around the sample holder axis. Owing to the use of piezo linear positioners and active correction, PRIGo features spheres of confusion of <1 µm, <7 µm and <10 µm for ω, χ and ϕ, respectively, and is therefore very well suited for micro-crystallography. PRIGo enables optimal strategies for both native and experimental phasing crystallographic data collection. Herein, PRIGo hardware and software, its calibration, as well as applications in macromolecular crystallography are described.

  2. Conformational studies of common protein templates in macromolecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryscio, David R; Fleming, Michael Q; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2012-08-01

    Unlike the molecular imprinting of small molecule templates, molecularly imprinted polymers specific to large templates (>1,500 Da), have achieved limited success to date. Conformational stability of these labile macromolecules is one of the main factors that prevent the direct extension of successful procedures from the small molecule regime. We continue our systematic investigation of the effect of common components in macromolecular MIPs on the conformation of protein templates. Circular dichroism was used to show that frequently employed monomers and crosslinkers induce significant changes in the secondary structures of lysozyme and bovine hemoglobin. The extent to which this change occurs, at ligand concentrations far below what are typically used reported work, is cause for concern and provides as rational explanation for the lack of success in this arena. This is because a change in the template structure prior to polymerization would lead to the binding sites formed during polymerization to be specific to this alternate conformation. Subsequent studies with the macromolecule in its native state and the crosslinked network would not be successful. Using this information as a guide, we offer suggestions as to where work in macromolecular imprinted polymers should focus going forward in order for these antibody mimics to reach their vast potential as a new class of biomedical diagnostic devices.

  3. Branched Macromolecular Architectures for Degradable, Multifunctional Phosphorus-Based Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Helena; Brüggemann, Oliver; Teasdale, Ian

    2017-02-01

    This feature article briefly highlights some of the recent advances in polymers in which phosphorus is an integral part of the backbone, with a focus on the preparation of functional, highly branched, soluble polymers. A comparison is made between the related families of materials polyphosphazenes, phosphazene/phosphorus-based dendrimers and polyphosphoesters. The work described herein shows this to be a rich and burgeoning field, rapidly catching up with organic chemistry in terms of the macromolecular synthetic control and variety of available macromolecular architectures, whilst offering unique property combinations not available with carbon backbones, such as tunable degradation rates, high multi-valency and facile post-polymerization functionalization. As an example of their use in advanced applications, we highlight some investigations into their use as water-soluble drug carriers, whereby in particular the degradability in combination with multivalent nature has made them useful materials, as underlined by some of the recent studies in this area. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The Phenix software for automated determination of macromolecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Paul D; Afonine, Pavel V; Bunkóczi, Gábor; Chen, Vincent B; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J; Hung, Li-Wei; Jain, Swati; Kapral, Gary J; Grosse Kunstleve, Ralf W; McCoy, Airlie J; Moriarty, Nigel W; Oeffner, Robert D; Read, Randy J; Richardson, David C; Richardson, Jane S; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Zwart, Peter H

    2011-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is a critical tool in the study of biological systems. It is able to provide information that has been a prerequisite to understanding the fundamentals of life. It is also a method that is central to the development of new therapeutics for human disease. Significant time and effort are required to determine and optimize many macromolecular structures because of the need for manual interpretation of complex numerical data, often using many different software packages, and the repeated use of interactive three-dimensional graphics. The Phenix software package has been developed to provide a comprehensive system for macromolecular crystallographic structure solution with an emphasis on automation. This has required the development of new algorithms that minimize or eliminate subjective input in favor of built-in expert-systems knowledge, the automation of procedures that are traditionally performed by hand, and the development of a computational framework that allows a tight integration between the algorithms. The application of automated methods is particularly appropriate in the field of structural proteomics, where high throughput is desired. Features in Phenix for the automation of experimental phasing with subsequent model building, molecular replacement, structure refinement and validation are described and examples given of running Phenix from both the command line and graphical user interface. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Changes in the macromolecular structure of coals with pyrolysis temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndaji, F.E.; Butterfield, I.M.; Thomas, K.M. [University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Northern Carbon Research Labs., Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-01-01

    The macromolecular structure of coal is characterised by its cross-link density. This paper describes a study of the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the macromolecular structure of coal using solvent swelling techniques. Heat treatment initially dissociates the intermolecular interactions in the coal and cleaves some cross-links, leading to increase in the solvent swelling of the coal, which indicates a decrease in the cross-link density. The solvent swelling reaches a maximum before cross-linking reactions predominate, causing a progressive increase in cross-link density and a decrease in solvent swelling. For lower-rank coals there appears to be an overlap (near the temperature of minimum cross-link density) of the dissociation of intermolecular interactions and thermal decomposition. Appreciable decrease in the apparent cross-link density of high-rank coals as indicated by increase in solvent swelling was observed only after thermal decomposition had commenced. Major decomposition involves cross-linking reactions leading to the formation of chars. However, the solvent swelling characteristics continue to change above the resolidification temperature, eventually ceasing at {approximately}600{degree}C. The results are discussed in relation to measurements of thermoplastic properties and devolatilization characteristics. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Oxidative macromolecular alterations in the rat central nervous system in response to experimentally co-induced chlorpyrifos and cold stress: a comparative assessment in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, P Mahaboob; Poojary, Annappa

    2012-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species are generated as a result of a number of physiological and pathological processes which can promote multiple forms of oxidative damage including protein oxidation, and thereby influence the function of a diverse array of cellular processes. In our previous study we have reported that co-exposure to chlorpyrifos and cold stress in aging rats markedly influence the toxic outcome as a result of oxidative stress. In the present study, key neurochemical/enzymes were measured in order to evaluate the macromolecular alterations in response to experimentally co-induced chlorpyrifos and cold stress (15 and 20°C) either concurrently or individually in vivo for 48 h in discrete regions of brain and spinal cord of different age group rats. CPF and cold stress exposure either individually or in combination substantially increased the activity/levels of protein carbonyls, AST, ALT and decreased protein thiols, DNA, RNA and total proteins in discrete regions of CNS. Overall, the effects of co-exposure were appreciably different from either of the exposures. However, synergistic-action of CPF and cold stress at 15°C showed higher dyshomeostasis in comparison with CPF and cold stress alone and together at 20°C indicating the extent of oxidative macromolecular damage in discrete regions of brain and spinal cord. Furthermore, the present study demonstrates that macromolecular oxidative damage is highly pronounced in neonates and juveniles than the young adults.

  7. Intracardiac Vortex Dynamics by High-Frame-Rate Doppler Vortography-In Vivo Comparison With Vector Flow Mapping and 4-D Flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurie, Julia; Baudet, Mathilde; Assi, Kondo Claude; Auger, Dominique; Gilbert, Guillaume; Tournoux, Francois; Garcia, Damien

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that intracardiac vortex flow imaging could be of clinical interest to early diagnose the diastolic heart function. Doppler vortography has been introduced as a simple color Doppler method to detect and quantify intraventricular vortices. This method is able to locate a vortex core based on the recognition of an antisymmetric pattern in the Doppler velocity field. Because the heart is a fast-moving organ, high frame rates are needed to decipher the whole blood vortex dynamics during diastole. In this paper, we adapted the vortography method to high-frame-rate echocardiography using circular waves. Time-resolved Doppler vortography was first validated in vitro in an ideal forced vortex. We observed a strong correlation between the core vorticity determined by high-frame-rate vortography and the ground-truth vorticity. Vortography was also tested in vivo in ten healthy volunteers using high-frame-rate duplex ultrasonography. The main vortex that forms during left ventricular filling was tracked during two-three successive cardiac cycles, and its core vorticity was determined at a sampling rate up to 80 duplex images per heartbeat. Three echocardiographic apical views were evaluated. Vortography-derived vorticities were compared with those returned by the 2-D vector flow mapping approach. Comparison with 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging was also performed in four of the ten volunteers. Strong intermethod agreements were observed when determining the peak vorticity during early filling. It is concluded that high-frame-rate Doppler vortography can accurately investigate the diastolic vortex dynamics.

  8. A local-optimization refinement algorithm in single particle analysis for macromolecular complex with multiple rigid modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Shan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Single particle analysis, which can be regarded as an average of signals from thousands or even millions of particle projections, is an efficient method to study the three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules. An intrinsic assumption in single particle analysis is that all the analyzed particles must have identical composition and conformation. Thus specimen heterogeneity in either composition or conformation has raised great challenges for high-resolution analysis. For particles with multiple conformations, inaccurate alignments and orientation parameters will yield an averaged map with diminished resolution and smeared density. Besides extensive classification approaches, here based on the assumption that the macromolecular complex is made up of multiple rigid modules whose relative orientations and positions are in slight fluctuation around equilibriums, we propose a new method called as local optimization refinement to address this conformational heterogeneity for an improved resolution. The key idea is to optimize the orientation and shift parameters of each rigid module and then reconstruct their three-dimensional structures individually. Using simulated data of 80S/70S ribosomes with relative fluctuations between the large (60S/50S and the small (40S/30S subunits, we tested this algorithm and found that the resolutions of both subunits are significantly improved. Our method provides a proof-of-principle solution for high-resolution single particle analysis of macromolecular complexes with dynamic conformations.

  9. Implications of macromolecular crowding and reducing conditions for in vitro ribosome construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Brian R.; Jamil, Osman K.; Jewett, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro construction of Escherichia coli ribosomes could elucidate a deeper understanding of these complex molecular machines and make possible the production of synthetic variants with new functions. Toward this goal, we recently developed an integrated synthesis, assembly and translation (iSAT) system that allows for co-activation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription and ribosome assembly, mRNA transcription and protein translation without intact cells. Here, we discovered that macromolecular crowding and reducing agents increase overall iSAT protein synthesis; the combination of 6% w/v Ficoll 400 and 2 mM DTBA yielded approximately a five-fold increase in overall iSAT protein synthesis activity. By utilizing a fluorescent RNA aptamer, fluorescent reporter proteins and ribosome sedimentation analysis, we showed that crowding agents increase iSAT yields by enhancing translation while reducing agents increase rRNA transcription and ribosome assembly. Finally, we showed that iSAT ribosomes possess ∼70% of the protein synthesis activity of in vivo-assembled E. coli ribosomes. This work improves iSAT protein synthesis through the addition of crowding and reducing agents, provides a thorough understanding of the effect of these additives within the iSAT system and demonstrates how iSAT allows for manipulation and analysis of ribosome biogenesis in the context of an in vitro transcription-translation system. PMID:25897121

  10. The analysis of macromolecular interactions by sedimentation equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirlando, Rodolfo

    2011-05-01

    The study of macromolecular interactions by sedimentation equilibrium is a highly technical method that requires great care in both the experimental design and data analysis. The complexity of the interacting system that can be analyzed is only limited by the ability to deconvolute the exponential contributions of each of the species to the overall concentration gradient. This is achieved in part through the use of multi-signal data collection and the implementation of soft mass conservation. We illustrate the use of these constraints in SEDPHAT through the study of an A+B+B⇌AB+B⇌ABB system and highlight some of the technical challenges that arise. We show that both the multi-signal analysis and mass conservation result in a precise and robust data analysis and discuss improvements that can be obtained through the inclusion of data from other methods such as sedimentation velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Cryo-electron Microscopy Analysis of Structurally Heterogeneous Macromolecular Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonić, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has for a long time been a technique of choice for determining structure of large and flexible macromolecular complexes that were difficult to study by other experimental techniques such as X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance. However, a fast development of instruments and software for cryo-EM in the last decade has allowed that a large range of complexes can be studied by cryo-EM, and that their structures can be obtained at near-atomic resolution, including the structures of small complexes (e.g., membrane proteins) whose size was earlier an obstacle to cryo-EM. Image analysis to identify multiple coexisting structures in the same specimen (multiconformation reconstruction) is now routinely done both to solve structures at near-atomic resolution and to study conformational dynamics. Methods for multiconformation reconstruction and latest examples of their applications are the focus of this review.

  12. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Evolving Methods for Macromolecular Gystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Read, Randy J

    2007-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the pre-eminent technique for visualizing the structures of macromolecules at atomic resolution. These structures are central to understanding the detailed mechanisms of biological processes, and to discovering novel therapeutics using a structure-based approach. As yet, structures are known for only a small fraction of the proteins encoded by human and pathogenic genomes. To counter the myriad modern threats of disease, there is an urgent need to determine the structures of the thousands of proteins whose structure and function remain unknown. This volume draws on the expertise of leaders in the field of macromolecular crystallography to illuminate the dramatic developments that are accelerating progress in structural biology. Their contributions span the range of techniques from crystallization through data collection, structure solution and analysis, and show how modern high-throughput methods are contributing to a deeper understanding of medical problems.

  13. The analysis of macromolecular interactions by sedimentation equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirlando, Rodolfo

    2010-01-01

    The study of macromolecular interactions by sedimentation equilibrium is a highly technical method that requires great care in both the experimental design and data analysis. The complexity of the interacting system that can be analyzed is only limited by the ability to deconvolute the exponential contributions of each of the species to the overall concentration gradient. This is achieved in part through the use of multi-signal data collection and the implementation of soft mass conservation. We illustrate the use of these constraints in SEDPHAT through the study of an A + B + B ⇌ AB + B ⇌ ABB system and highlight some of the technical challenges that arise. We show that both the multi-signal analysis and mass conservation result in a precise and robust data analysis and discuss improvements that can be obtained through the inclusion of data from other methods such as sedimentation velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry. PMID:21167941

  14. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiniotis, Georgios; Southworth, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    Recent technological breakthroughs in image acquisition have enabled single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to achieve near-atomic resolution structural information for biological complexes. The improvements in image quality coupled with powerful computational methods for sorting distinct particle populations now also allow the determination of compositional and conformational ensembles, thereby providing key insights into macromolecular function. However, the inherent instability and dynamic nature of biological assemblies remain a tremendous challenge that often requires tailored approaches for successful implementation of the methodology. Here, we briefly describe the fundamentals of single-particle cryo-EM with an emphasis on covering the breadth of techniques and approaches, including low- and high-resolution methods, aiming to illustrate specific steps that are crucial for obtaining structural information by this method. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Cryo electron microscopy to determine the structure of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroni, Marta; Saibil, Helen R

    2016-02-15

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a structural molecular and cellular biology technique that has experienced major advances in recent years. Technological developments in image recording as well as in processing software make it possible to obtain three-dimensional reconstructions of macromolecular assemblies at near-atomic resolution that were formerly obtained only by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy. In parallel, cryo-electron tomography has also benefitted from these technological advances, so that visualization of irregular complexes, organelles or whole cells with their molecular machines in situ has reached subnanometre resolution. Cryo-EM can therefore address a broad range of biological questions. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of the principles and current state of the cryo-EM field. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Spontaneous and specific activation of chemical bonds in macromolecular fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Insun; Shirvanyants, David; Nese, Alper; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S

    2010-09-08

    Mechanical activation of chemical bonds typically involves the application of external forces, which implies a broad distribution of bond tensions. We demonstrate that controlling the flow profile of a macromolecular fluid generates and delineates mechanical force concentration, enabling a hierarchical activation of chemical bonds on different length scales from the macroscopic to the molecular. Bond tension is spontaneously generated within brushlike macromolecules as they spread on a solid substrate. The molecular architecture creates an uneven distribution of tension in the covalent bonds, leading to spatially controlled bond scission. By controlling the flow rate and the gradient of the film pressure, one can sever the flowing macromolecules with high precision. Specific chemical bonds are activated within distinct macromolecules located in a defined area of a thin film. Furthermore, the flow-controlled loading rate enables quantitative analysis of the bond activation parameters.

  17. Macromolecular and dendrimer-based magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumb, Ambika; Brechbiel, Martin W. (Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)), e-mail: pchoyke@mail.nih.gov; Choyke, Peter (Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that can provide an assessment of function or molecular expression in tandem with anatomic detail. Over the last 20-25 years, a number of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents have been developed to enhance signal by altering proton relaxation properties. This review explores a range of these agents from small molecule chelates, such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, to macromolecular structures composed of albumin, polylysine, polysaccharides (dextran, inulin, starch), poly(ethylene glycol), copolymers of cystamine and cystine with GD-DTPA, and various dendritic structures based on polyamidoamine and polylysine (Gadomers). The synthesis, structure, biodistribution, and targeting of dendrimer-based MR contrast agents are also discussed

  18. Associative Pattern Recognition Through Macro-molecular Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weishun; Schwab, David J.; Murugan, Arvind

    2017-05-01

    We show that macro-molecular self-assembly can recognize and classify high-dimensional patterns in the concentrations of N distinct molecular species. Similar to associative neural networks, the recognition here leverages dynamical attractors to recognize and reconstruct partially corrupted patterns. Traditional parameters of pattern recognition theory, such as sparsity, fidelity, and capacity are related to physical parameters, such as nucleation barriers, interaction range, and non-equilibrium assembly forces. Notably, we find that self-assembly bears greater similarity to continuous attractor neural networks, such as place cell networks that store spatial memories, rather than discrete memory networks. This relationship suggests that features and trade-offs seen here are not tied to details of self-assembly or neural network models but are instead intrinsic to associative pattern recognition carried out through short-ranged interactions.

  19. Detecting stoichiometry of macromolecular complexes in live cells using FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Yue, Daniel N.; Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    The stoichiometry of macromolecular interactions is fundamental to cellular signalling yet challenging to detect from living cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful phenomenon for characterizing close-range interactions whereby a donor fluorophore transfers energy to a closely juxtaposed acceptor. Recognizing that FRET measured from the acceptor's perspective reports a related but distinct quantity versus the donor, we utilize the ratiometric comparison of the two to obtain the stoichiometry of a complex. Applying this principle to the long-standing controversy of calmodulin binding to ion channels, we find a surprising Ca2+-induced switch in calmodulin stoichiometry with Ca2+ channels—one calmodulin binds at basal cytosolic Ca2+ levels while two calmodulins interact following Ca2+ elevation. This feature is curiously absent for the related Na channels, also potently regulated by calmodulin. Overall, our assay adds to a burgeoning toolkit to pursue quantitative biochemistry of dynamic signalling complexes in living cells. PMID:27922011

  20. Designing a synchrotron micro-focusing beamline for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochulski, Paweł; Cygler, Mirosław; Yates, Brian

    After a successful 10 years of operation, the Canadian Macromolecular Crystallography Facility 08ID-1 beamline will undergo an upgrade to establish micro-beam capability. This paper is mostly focussed on optics and computer simulations for ray tracing of the beamline. After completion, the focussed beam at the sample will have a much smaller size of 50 × 5 µm2 (H x V), allowing measurement of X-ray diffraction patterns from much smaller crystals than possible presently. The beamline will be equipped with a fast sample changer and an ultra-low noise photon counting detector, allowing shutter-less operation of the beamline. Additionally, it will be possible to perform in-situ room-temperature experiments.

  1. 129 Xe NMR Relaxation-Based Macromolecular Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Muller D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dao, Phuong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jeong, Keunhong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Slack, Clancy C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Vassiliou, Christophoros C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Finbloom, Joel A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Francis, Matthew B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Wemmer, David E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Biosciences Division; Pines, Alexander [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-07-29

    A 129Xe NMR relaxation-based sensing approach is reported on that exploits changes in the bulk xenon relaxation rate induced by slowed tumbling of a cryptophane-based sensor upon target binding. The amplification afforded by detection of the bulk dissolved xenon allows sensitive detection of targets. The sensor comprises a xenon-binding cryptophane cage, a target interaction element, and a metal chelating agent. Xenon associated with the target-bound cryptophane cage is rapidly relaxed and then detected after exchange with the bulk. Here we show that large macromolecular targets increase the rotational correlation time of xenon, increasing its relaxation rate. Upon binding of a biotin-containing sensor to avidin at 1.5 μM concentration, the free xenon T2 is reduced by a factor of 4.

  2. In-vacuum long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Armin; Duman, Ramona; Henderson, Keith; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy

    2016-03-01

    Structure solution based on the weak anomalous signal from native (protein and DNA) crystals is increasingly being attempted as part of synchrotron experiments. Maximizing the measurable anomalous signal by collecting diffraction data at longer wavelengths presents a series of technical challenges caused by the increased absorption of X-rays and larger diffraction angles. A new beamline at Diamond Light Source has been built specifically for collecting data at wavelengths beyond the capability of other synchrotron macromolecular crystallography beamlines. Here, the theoretical considerations in support of the long-wavelength beamline are outlined and the in-vacuum design of the endstation is discussed, as well as other hardware features aimed at enhancing the accuracy of the diffraction data. The first commissioning results, representing the first in-vacuum protein structure solution, demonstrate the promising potential of the beamline.

  3. Facilities for macromolecular crystallography at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Uwe, E-mail: umue@helmholtz-berlin.de; Darowski, Nora [Institute for Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Macromolecular Crystallography, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Fuchs, Martin R. [Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Förster, Ronald [Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Biologie, Chemie, Pharmazie, Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, AG Strukturbiochemie, Takustrasse 6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Hellmig, Michael; Paithankar, Karthik S. [Institute for Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Macromolecular Crystallography, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Pühringer, Sandra [Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Biologie, Chemie, Pharmazie, Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, AG Strukturbiochemie, Takustrasse 6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Steffien, Michael [Institute for Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Macromolecular Crystallography, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Zocher, Georg [Universität Tübingen, Interfakultäres Institut für Biochemie, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 4, D-72076 Tübingen (Germany); Weiss, Manfred S. [Institute for Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Macromolecular Crystallography, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    The three macromolecular crystallography beamlines BL14.1, BL14.2 and BL14.3 at the BESSY II storage ring at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin are described. Three macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamlines at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) are available for the regional, national and international structural biology user community. The state-of-the-art synchrotron beamlines for MX BL14.1, BL14.2 and BL14.3 are located within the low-β section of the BESSY II electron storage ring. All beamlines are fed from a superconducting 7 T wavelength-shifter insertion device. BL14.1 and BL14.2 are energy tunable in the range 5–16 keV, while BL14.3 is a fixed-energy side station operated at 13.8 keV. All three beamlines are equipped with CCD detectors. BL14.1 and BL14.2 are in regular user operation providing about 200 beam days per year and about 600 user shifts to approximately 50 research groups across Europe. BL14.3 has initially been used as a test facility and was brought into regular user mode operation during the year 2010. BL14.1 has recently been upgraded with a microdiffractometer including a mini-κ goniometer and an automated sample changer. Additional user facilities include office space adjacent to the beamlines, a sample preparation laboratory, a biology laboratory (safety level 1) and high-end computing resources. In this article the instrumentation of the beamlines is described, and a summary of the experimental possibilities of the beamlines and the provided ancillary equipment for the user community is given.

  4. Macromolecular structure analysis and effective liquefaction pretreatment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suuberg, E.M.; Yun, Y.; Lilly, W.D.; Leung, K.; Gates, T.; Otake, Y.; Deevi, S.C.

    1994-07-01

    This project was concerned with characterizing the changes in coal macromolecular structure, that are of significance for liquefaction pretreatments of coal. The macromolecular structure of the insoluble portion of coal is difficult to characterize. Techniques that do so indirectly (based upon, for example, NMR and FTIR characterizations of atomic linkages) are not particularly sensitive for this purpose. Techniques that characterize the elastic structure (such as solvent swelling) are much more sensitive to subtle changes in the network structure. It is for this reason that we focused upon these techniques. The overall objective involved identifying pretreatments that reduce the crosslinking (physical or chemical) of the network structure, and thus lead to materials that can be handled to a greater extent by traditional liquid-phase processing techniques. These techniques tend to be inherently more efficient at producing desirable products. This report is divided into seven chapters. Chapter II summarizes the main experimental approaches used throughout the project, and summarizes the main findings on the Argonne Premium coal samples. Chapter III considers synergistic effects of solvent pairs. It is divided into two subsections. The first is concerned with mixtures of CS{sub 2} with electron donor solvents. The second subsection is concerned with aromatic hydrocarbon - alcohol or hydrocarbon - alcohol mixtures, as might be of interest for preliquefaction delivery of catalysts into bituminous coals. Chapter IV deals with questions of how oxidation might influence the results that are obtained. Chapter V briefly details what conclusions may be drawn concerning the elastic behavior of coals, and the effects of thermal treatments on this behavior. Chapter VI is concerned with theories to describe the action of solvents that are capable of dissociating non-covalent crosslinks. Finally, Chapter VII discusses the practical implications of the study.

  5. Diffraction cartography: applying microbeams to macromolecular crystallography sample evaluation and data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Matthew W; Guijarro, Matias; Petitdemange, Sebastien; Baker, Isabel; Svensson, Olof; Burghammer, Manfred; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Gordon, Elspeth J; Flot, David; McSweeney, Sean M; Leonard, Gordon A

    2010-08-01

    Crystals of biological macromolecules often exhibit considerable inter-crystal and intra-crystal variation in diffraction quality. This requires the evaluation of many samples prior to data collection, a practice that is already widespread in macromolecular crystallography. As structural biologists move towards tackling ever more ambitious projects, new automated methods of sample evaluation will become crucial to the success of many projects, as will the availability of synchrotron-based facilities optimized for high-throughput evaluation of the diffraction characteristics of samples. Here, two examples of the types of advanced sample evaluation that will be required are presented: searching within a sample-containing loop for microcrystals using an X-ray beam of 5 microm diameter and selecting the most ordered regions of relatively large crystals using X-ray beams of 5-50 microm in diameter. A graphical user interface developed to assist with these screening methods is also presented. For the case in which the diffraction quality of a relatively large crystal is probed using a microbeam, the usefulness and implications of mapping diffraction-quality heterogeneity (diffraction cartography) are discussed. The implementation of these techniques in the context of planned upgrades to the ESRF's structural biology beamlines is also presented.

  6. Macromolecular composition of terrestrial and marine organic matter in sediments across the East Siberian Arctic Shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Sparkes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobilisation of terrestrial organic carbon (terrOC from permafrost environments in eastern Siberia has the potential to deliver significant amounts of carbon to the Arctic Ocean, via both fluvial and coastal erosion. Eroded terrOC can be degraded during offshore transport or deposited across the wide East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS. Most studies of terrOC on the ESAS have concentrated on solvent-extractable organic matter, but this represents only a small proportion of the total terrOC load. In this study we have used pyrolysis–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (py-GCMS to study all major groups of macromolecular components of the terrOC; this is the first time that this technique has been applied to the ESAS. This has shown that there is a strong offshore trend from terrestrial phenols, aromatics and cyclopentenones to marine pyridines. There is good agreement between proportion phenols measured using py-GCMS and independent quantification of lignin phenol concentrations (r2 = 0.67, p < 0.01, n = 24. Furfurals, thought to represent carbohydrates, show no offshore trend and are likely found in both marine and terrestrial organic matter. We have also collected new radiocarbon data for bulk OC (14COC which, when coupled with previous measurements, allows us to produce the most comprehensive 14COC map of the ESAS to date. Combining the 14COC and py-GCMS data suggests that the aromatics group of compounds is likely sourced from old, aged terrOC, in contrast to the phenols group, which is likely sourced from modern woody material. We propose that an index of the relative proportions of phenols and pyridines can be used as a novel terrestrial vs. marine proxy measurement for macromolecular organic matter. Principal component analysis found that various terrestrial vs. marine proxies show different patterns across the ESAS, and it shows that multiple river–ocean transects of surface sediments transition from river-dominated to

  7. IDPs in macromolecular complexes: the roles of multivalent interactions in diverse assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Birol, Melissa; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2018-01-04

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) have critical roles in a diverse array of cellular functions. Of relevance here is that they are components of macromolecular complexes, where their conformational flexibility helps mediate interactions with binding partners. IDPs often interact with their binding partners through short sequence motifs, commonly repeated within the disordered regions. As such, multivalent interactions are common for IDPs and their binding partners within macromolecular complexes. Here we discuss the importance of IDP multivalency in three very different macromolecular assemblies: biomolecular condensates, the nuclear pore, and the cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Is T1ρ Mapping an Alternative to Delayed Gadolinium-enhanced MR Imaging of Cartilage in the Assessment of Sulphated Glycosaminoglycan Content in Human Osteoarthritic Knees? An in Vivo Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tiel, Jasper; Kotek, Gyula; Reijman, Max; Bos, Pieter K; Bron, Esther E; Klein, Stefan; Nasserinejad, Kazem; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Verhaar, Jan A N; Krestin, Gabriel P; Weinans, Harrie; Oei, Edwin H G

    2016-05-01

    To determine if T1ρ mapping can be used as an alternative to delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the quantification of cartilage biochemical composition in vivo in human knees with osteoarthritis. This study was approved by the institutional review board. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Twelve patients with knee osteoarthritis underwent dGEMRIC and T1ρ mapping at 3.0 T before undergoing total knee replacement. Outcomes of dGEMRIC and T1ρ mapping were calculated in six cartilage regions of interest. Femoral and tibial cartilages were harvested during total knee replacement. Cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) and collagen content were assessed with dimethylmethylene blue and hydroxyproline assays, respectively. A four-dimensional multivariate mixed-effects model was used to simultaneously assess the correlation between outcomes of dGEMRIC and T1ρ mapping and the sGAG and collagen content of the articular cartilage. T1 relaxation times at dGEMRIC showed strong correlation with cartilage sGAG content (r = 0.73; 95% credibility interval [CI] = 0.60, 0.83) and weak correlation with cartilage collagen content (r = 0.40; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.58). T1ρ relaxation times did not correlate with cartilage sGAG content (r = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.21, 0.28) or collagen content (r = -0.05; 95% CI = -0.31, 0.20). dGEMRIC can help accurately measure cartilage sGAG content in vivo in patients with knee osteoarthritis, whereas T1ρ mapping does not appear suitable for this purpose. Although the technique is not completely sGAG specific and requires a contrast agent, dGEMRIC is a validated and robust method for quantifying cartilage sGAG content in human osteoarthritis subjects in clinical research. (©) RSNA, 2015.

  9. Gold detector: modular CCD area detector for macromolecular crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naday, Istvan; Ross, Stephan W.; Kanyo, Miklos; Westbrook, Mary L.; Westbrook, Edwin M.; Phillips, Walter C.; Stanton, Martin J.; O'Mara, Daniel M.

    1995-04-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a modular CCD area detector system for macromolecular crystallography at synchrotron x-ray sources, code-named the `gold' detector system. The sensitive area of the detector is 150 mm X 150 mm, with 3,072 X 3,072 pixel sampling, resulting in roughly a 50 micrometers pixel raster. The x-ray image formed on the face of the detector is converted to visible light by a thin phosphor layer. This image is transferred optically to nine CCD sensors by nine square fiberoptic tapers (one for each CCD), arranged in a 3 X 3 array. Each taper demagnifies the image by a factor of approximately 2. Each CCD has a 1,024 X 1,024 pixel raster and is read out through two independent data channels. After each x-ray exposure period the x-ray shutter is closed and the electronic image is digitized (16-bit) and read out in 1.8s. Alteratively, the image may be binned 2 X 2 during readout, resulting in a 1,536 X 1,536 raster of 100 micrometers pixels; this image can be read out in 0.4s. The CCD sensors are operated at -40 degree(s)C to reduce electronic noise. The detector is operated under full computer control: all operational parameters (readout rates, CCD temperature, etc.) can be adjusted from the console. The image data (18 MByte/image) are transferred via a fast VME system to a control processor and ultimately to disk storage. During April 1994 we carried out a complete set of measurements at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) for a full characterization of the gold detector. Characterization includes quantitative evaluation of the instrument's conversion gain (signal level/x-ray photon); detective quantum efficiency (DQE); point-spread function; sensitivity as a function of x-ray energy; geometrical distortion of images; spatial uniformity; read noise; and dark image and dark image noise. Characterization parameters derived from these measurements show that this detector will be extraordinarily valuable for macromolecular

  10. Macromolecular crowding for tailoring tissue-derived fibrillated matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, Valentina; Friedrichs, Jens; Weber, Heather M; Prewitz, Marina C; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Werner, Carsten

    2017-06-01

    Tissue-derived fibrillated matrices can be instrumental for the in vitro reconstitution of multiphasic extracellular microenvironments. However, despite of several advantages, the obtained scaffolds so far offer a rather narrow range of materials characteristics only. In this work, we demonstrate how macromolecular crowding (MMC) - the supplementation of matrix reconstitution media with synthetic or natural macromolecules in ways to create excluded volume effects (EVE) - can be employed for tailoring important structural and biophysical characteristics of kidney-derived fibrillated matrices. Porcine kidneys were decellularized, ground and the obtained extracellular matrix (ECM) preparations were reconstituted under varied MMC conditions. We show that MMC strongly influences the fibrillogenesis kinetics and impacts the architecture and the elastic modulus of the reconstituted matrices, with diameters and relative alignment of fibrils increasing at elevated concentrations of the crowding agent Ficoll400, a nonionic synthetic polymer of sucrose. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MMC modulates the distribution of key ECM molecules within the reconstituted matrix scaffolds. As a proof of concept, we compared different variants of kidney-derived fibrillated matrices in cell culture experiments referring to specific requirements of kidney tissue engineering approaches. The results revealed that MMC-tailored matrices support the morphogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) into capillary networks and of murine kidney stem cells (KSCs) into highly branched aggregates. The established methodology is concluded to provide generally applicable new options for tailoring tissue-specific multiphasic matrices in vitro. Tissue-derived fibrillated matrices can be instrumental for the in vitro reconstitution of multiphasic extracellular microenvironments. However, despite of several advantages, the obtained scaffolds so far offer a rather narrow range of materials

  11. Microwave Confocal Detection and Thermal Therapy for Breast Cancer: Adaptive Phased Array System for In-Vivo Mapping/Targeting Telomerase Activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    York, Robert

    2002-01-01

    .... The first area of research is developing biocompatible vectors with high microwave absorbing and scattering materials, enhancing in-vivo localization of target cells, where the activity of specific markers is present...

  12. Hypoxic tumor environments exhibit disrupted collagen I fibers and low macromolecular transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samata M Kakkad

    Full Text Available Hypoxic tumor microenvironments result in an aggressive phenotype and resistance to therapy that lead to tumor progression, recurrence, and metastasis. While poor vascularization and the resultant inadequate drug delivery are known to contribute to drug resistance, the effect of hypoxia on molecular transport through the interstitium, and the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM in mediating this transport are unexplored. The dense mesh of fibers present in the ECM can especially influence the movement of macromolecules. Collagen 1 (Col1 fibers form a key component of the ECM in breast cancers. Here we characterized the influence of hypoxia on macromolecular transport in tumors, and the role of Col1 fibers in mediating this transport using an MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model engineered to express red fluorescent protein under hypoxia. Magnetic resonance imaging of macromolecular transport was combined with second harmonic generation microscopy of Col1 fibers. Hypoxic tumor regions displayed significantly decreased Col1 fiber density and volume, as well as significantly lower macromolecular draining and pooling rates, than normoxic regions. Regions adjacent to severely hypoxic areas revealed higher deposition of Col1 fibers and increased macromolecular transport. These data suggest that Col1 fibers may facilitate macromolecular transport in tumors, and their reduction in hypoxic regions may reduce this transport. Decreased macromolecular transport in hypoxic regions may also contribute to poor drug delivery and tumor recurrence in hypoxic regions. High Col1 fiber density observed around hypoxic regions may facilitate the escape of aggressive cancer cells from hypoxic regions.

  13. Hypoxic tumor environments exhibit disrupted collagen I fibers and low macromolecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkad, Samata M; Penet, Marie-France; Akhbardeh, Alireza; Pathak, Arvind P; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Raman, Venu; Leibfritz, Dieter; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic tumor microenvironments result in an aggressive phenotype and resistance to therapy that lead to tumor progression, recurrence, and metastasis. While poor vascularization and the resultant inadequate drug delivery are known to contribute to drug resistance, the effect of hypoxia on molecular transport through the interstitium, and the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in mediating this transport are unexplored. The dense mesh of fibers present in the ECM can especially influence the movement of macromolecules. Collagen 1 (Col1) fibers form a key component of the ECM in breast cancers. Here we characterized the influence of hypoxia on macromolecular transport in tumors, and the role of Col1 fibers in mediating this transport using an MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model engineered to express red fluorescent protein under hypoxia. Magnetic resonance imaging of macromolecular transport was combined with second harmonic generation microscopy of Col1 fibers. Hypoxic tumor regions displayed significantly decreased Col1 fiber density and volume, as well as significantly lower macromolecular draining and pooling rates, than normoxic regions. Regions adjacent to severely hypoxic areas revealed higher deposition of Col1 fibers and increased macromolecular transport. These data suggest that Col1 fibers may facilitate macromolecular transport in tumors, and their reduction in hypoxic regions may reduce this transport. Decreased macromolecular transport in hypoxic regions may also contribute to poor drug delivery and tumor recurrence in hypoxic regions. High Col1 fiber density observed around hypoxic regions may facilitate the escape of aggressive cancer cells from hypoxic regions.

  14. Synchrotron radiation macromolecular crystallography: science and spin-offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Helliwell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A current overview of synchrotron radiation (SR in macromolecular crystallography (MX instrumentation, methods and applications is presented. Automation has been and remains a central development in the last decade, as have the rise of remote access and of industrial service provision. Results include a high number of Protein Data Bank depositions, with an increasing emphasis on the successful use of microcrystals. One future emphasis involves pushing the frontiers of using higher and lower photon energies. With the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, closely linked to SR developments, the use of ever smaller samples such as nanocrystals, nanoclusters and single molecules is anticipated, as well as the opening up of femtosecond time-resolved diffraction structural studies. At SR sources, a very high-throughput assessment for the best crystal samples and the ability to tackle just a few micron and sub-micron crystals will become widespread. With higher speeds and larger detectors, diffraction data volumes are becoming long-term storage and archiving issues; the implications for today and the future are discussed. Together with the rise of the storage ring to its current pre-eminence in MX data provision, the growing tendency of central facility sites to offer other centralized facilities complementary to crystallography, such as cryo-electron microscopy and NMR, is a welcome development.

  15. Synchrotron radiation macromolecular crystallography: science and spin-offs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, John R; Mitchell, Edward P

    2015-03-01

    A current overview of synchrotron radiation (SR) in macromolecular crystallography (MX) instrumentation, methods and applications is presented. Automation has been and remains a central development in the last decade, as have the rise of remote access and of industrial service provision. Results include a high number of Protein Data Bank depositions, with an increasing emphasis on the successful use of microcrystals. One future emphasis involves pushing the frontiers of using higher and lower photon energies. With the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, closely linked to SR developments, the use of ever smaller samples such as nanocrystals, nanoclusters and single molecules is anticipated, as well as the opening up of femtosecond time-resolved diffraction structural studies. At SR sources, a very high-throughput assessment for the best crystal samples and the ability to tackle just a few micron and sub-micron crystals will become widespread. With higher speeds and larger detectors, diffraction data volumes are becoming long-term storage and archiving issues; the implications for today and the future are discussed. Together with the rise of the storage ring to its current pre-eminence in MX data provision, the growing tendency of central facility sites to offer other centralized facilities complementary to crystallography, such as cryo-electron microscopy and NMR, is a welcome development.

  16. Macromolecular crystallography with a large format CMOS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nix, Jay C., E-mail: jcnix@lbl.gov [Molecular Biology Consortium 12003 S. Pulaski Rd. #166 Alsip, IL 60803 U.S.A (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Recent advances in CMOS technology have allowed the production of large surface area detectors suitable for macromolecular crystallography experiments [1]. The Molecular Biology Consortium (MBC) Beamline 4.2.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, has installed a 2952 x 2820 mm RDI CMOS-8M detector with funds from NIH grant S10OD012073. The detector has a 20nsec dead pixel time and performs well with shutterless data collection strategies. The sensor obtains sharp point response and minimal optical distortion by use of a thin fiber-optic plate between the phosphor and sensor module. Shutterless data collections produce high-quality redundant datasets that can be obtained in minutes. The fine-sliced data are suitable for processing in standard crystallographic software packages (XDS, HKL2000, D*TREK, MOSFLM). Faster collection times relative to the previous CCD detector have resulted in a record number of datasets collected in a calendar year and de novo phasing experiments have resulted in publications in both Science and Nature [2,3]. The faster collections are due to a combination of the decreased overhead requirements of shutterless collections combined with exposure times that have decreased by over a factor of 2 for images with comparable signal to noise of the NOIR-1 detector. The overall increased productivity has allowed the development of new beamline capabilities and data collection strategies.

  17. New concepts and applications in the macromolecular chemistry of fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Francesco; Martín, Nazario

    2010-10-08

    A new classification on the different types of fullerene-containing polymers is presented according to their different properties and applications they exhibit in a variety of fields. Because of their interest and novelty, water-soluble and biodegradable C(60)-polymers are discussed first, followed by polyfullerene-based membranes where unprecedented supramolecular structures are presented. Next are compounds that involve hybrid materials formed from fullerenes and other components such as silica, DNA, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) where the most recent advances have been achieved. A most relevant topic is still that of C(60)-based donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers. Since their application in photovoltaics D-A polymers are among the most realistic applications of fullerenes in the so-called molecular electronics. The most relevant aspects in these covalently connected fullerene/polymer hybrids as well as new concepts to improve energy conversion efficiencies are presented.The last topics disccused relate to supramolecular aspects that are in involved in C(60)-polymer systems and in the self-assembly of C(60)-macromolecular structures, which open a new scenario for organizing, by means of non-covalent interactions, new supramolecular structures at the nano- and micrometric scale, in which the combination of the hydrofobicity of fullerenes with the versatility of the noncovalent chemistry afford new and spectacular superstructures.

  18. Macromolecular gradients on material surfaces: Formation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzer, Jan

    2004-03-01

    In our presentation we will outline several novel multivariant methodologies that facilitate the formation of macromolecular assemblies grafted on flat solid substrates. We will introduce a method for generating polymer assemblies with a gradually increasing position-dependent polymer grafting density. We will document that such a set up can be utilized to probe the "mushroom"-to-"bush" conformational transition in both neutral polymer brushes as well as weak surface-anchored polyelectrolytes. We will also describe a technique leading to the generation of polymer assemblies with a gradually changing molecular weight of the grafted polymers. A simple extension of the latter approach will facilitate the generation of surface grafted block copolymers with gradually varying compositions. We will document that by combining the individual gradients, i.e. the grafting density and molecular weight, one can produce complex substrates in which two material properties change independently in two orthogonal directions. Finally, we will demonstrate that multivariant polymer brush assemblies represent universal soft material scaffolds that can be utilized in adjusting the spatial distribution of non-polymeric objects, such as nanoparticles and proteins.

  19. Early Diagnosis of Orthopedic Implant Failure Using Macromolecular Imaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ke; Dusad, Anand; Zhang, Yijia; Purdue, P. Edward; Fehringer, Edward V.; Garvin, Kevin L.; Goldring, Steven R.; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate diagnostic tools for early detection of wear particle-induced orthopaedic implant loosening. Methods N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer was tagged with an near infrared dye and used to detect the inflammation induced by polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles in a murine peri-implant osteolysis model. It was established by inserting implant into distal femur and with routine PMMA particles challenging. The osteolysis was evaluated by micro-CT and histological analysis at different time points. Results Significant peri-implant osteolysis was found three-month post PMMA particle challenge by micro-CT and histological analysis. At one-month time point, when there was no significant peri-implant bone loss, HPMA copolymer-near infrared dye conjugate was found to specifically target to the femur with PMMA particles deposition, but not the contralateral control femur with PBS infusion. Conclusion The results from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing the macromolecular diagnostic agent to report particle-induced peri-implant inflammation prior to the development of detectable osteolysis. Recognition of this early pathological event would provide the window of opportunity for prevention of peri-implant osteolysis and subsequent orthopaedic implant failure. PMID:24590878

  20. Structure of metaphase chromosomes: a role for effects of macromolecular crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    In metaphase chromosomes, chromatin is compacted to a concentration of several hundred mg/ml by mechanisms which remain elusive. Effects mediated by the ionic environment are considered most frequently because mono- and di-valent cations cause polynucleosome chains to form compact ~30-nm diameter fibres in vitro, but this conformation is not detected in chromosomes in situ. A further unconsidered factor is predicted to influence the compaction of chromosomes, namely the forces which arise from crowding by macromolecules in the surrounding cytoplasm whose measured concentration is 100-200 mg/ml. To mimic these conditions, chromosomes were released from mitotic CHO cells in solutions containing an inert volume-occupying macromolecule (8 kDa polyethylene glycol, 10.5 kDa dextran, or 70 kDa Ficoll) in 100 µM K-Hepes buffer, with contaminating cations at only low micromolar concentrations. Optical and electron microscopy showed that these chromosomes conserved their characteristic structure and compaction, and their volume varied inversely with the concentration of a crowding macromolecule. They showed a canonical nucleosomal structure and contained the characteristic proteins topoisomerase IIα and the condensin subunit SMC2. These observations, together with evidence that the cytoplasm is crowded in vivo, suggest that macromolecular crowding effects should be considered a significant and perhaps major factor in compacting chromosomes. This model may explain why ~30-nm fibres characteristic of cation-mediated compaction are not seen in chromosomes in situ. Considering that crowding by cytoplasmic macromolecules maintains the compaction of bacterial chromosomes and has been proposed to form the liquid crystalline chromosomes of dinoflagellates, a crowded environment may be an essential characteristic of all genomes.

  1. Macromolecular query language (MMQL): prototype data model and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindyalov, I N; Chang, W; Pu, C; Bourne, P E

    1994-11-01

    Macromolecular query language (MMQL) is an extensible interpretive language in which to pose questions concerning the experimental or derived features of the 3-D structure of biological macromolecules. MMQL portends to be intuitive with a simple syntax, so that from a user's perspective complex queries are easily written. A number of basic queries and a more complex query--determination of structures containing a five-strand Greek key motif--are presented to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the language. The predominant features of MMQL are a filter and pattern grammar which are combined to express a wide range of interesting biological queries. Filters permit the selection of object attributes, for example, compound name and resolution, whereas the patterns currently implemented query primary sequence, close contacts, hydrogen bonding, secondary structure, conformation and amino acid properties (volume, polarity, isoelectric point, hydrophobicity and different forms of exposure). MMQL queries are processed by MMQLlib; a C++ class library, to which new query methods and pattern types are easily added. The prototype implementation described uses PDBlib, another C(++)-based class library from representing the features of biological macromolecules at the level of detail parsable from a PDB file. Since PDBlib can represent data stored in relational and object-oriented databases, as well as PDB files, once these data are loaded they too can be queried by MMQL. Performance metrics are given for queries of PDB files for which all derived data are calculated at run time and compared to a preliminary version of OOPDB, a prototype object-oriented database with a schema based on a persistent version of PDBlib which offers more efficient data access and the potential to maintain derived information. MMQLlib, PDBlib and associated software are available via anonymous ftp from cuhhca.hhmi.columbia.edu.

  2. Crystal Structure of Bicc1 SAM Polymer and Mapping of Interactions between the Ciliopathy-Associated Proteins Bicc1, ANKS3, and ANKS6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothé, Benjamin; Leettola, Catherine N; Leal-Esteban, Lucia; Cascio, Duilio; Fortier, Simon; Isenschmid, Manuela; Bowie, James U; Constam, Daniel B

    2017-12-26

    Head-to-tail polymers of sterile alpha motifs (SAM) can scaffold large macromolecular complexes. Several SAM-domain proteins that bind each other are mutated in patients with cystic kidneys or laterality defects, including the Ankyrin (ANK) and SAM domain-containing proteins ANKS6 and ANKS3, and the RNA-binding protein Bicc1. To address how their interactions are regulated, we first determined a high-resolution crystal structure of a Bicc1-SAM polymer, revealing a canonical SAM polymer with a high degree of flexibility in the subunit interface orientations. We further mapped interactions between full-length and distinct domains of Bicc1, ANKS3, and ANKS6. Neither ANKS3 nor ANKS6 alone formed macroscopic homopolymers in vivo. However, ANKS3 recruited ANKS6 to Bicc1, and the three proteins together cooperatively generated giant macromolecular complexes. Thus, the giant assemblies are shaped by SAM domains, their flanking sequences, and SAM-independent protein-protein and protein-mRNA interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  4. A systematical analysis of in vivo contact forces on virtual catheter tip/tissue surface contact during cardiac mapping and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Yasuo; Johnson, Susan B; Bunch, T Jared; Henz, Benhur D; O'Brien, Christine J; Packer, Douglas L

    2008-06-01

    While catheter tip/tissue contact has been shown to be an important determinant of ablative lesions in in vitro studies, the impact of contact on the outcomes of mapping and ablation in the intact heart has not been evaluated. Twelve dogs underwent atrial ablation guided by the Senesitrade mark robotic catheter remote control system. After intracardiac ultrasound (ICE) validation of contact force measured by an in-line mechanical sensor, the relationship between contact force and individual lesion formation was established during irrigated-tipped ablation (flow 17 mL/sec) at 15 watts for 30 seconds. Minimal contact by ICE correlated with force of 4.7 +/- 5.8 grams, consistent contact 9.9 +/- 8.6 grams and tissue tenting produced 25.0 +/- 14.0 grams. Conversely, catheter tip/tissue contact by ICE was predicted by contact force. A contact force of 10-20 and > or =20 grams generated full-thickness, larger volume ablative lesions than that created with <10 grams (98 +/- 69 and 89 +/- 70 mm(3) vs 40 +/- 42 mm(3), P < 0.05). Moderate (10 grams) and marked contact (15-20 grams) application produced 1.5 X greater electroanatomic map volumes that were seen with minimal contact (5 grams) (26 +/- 3 cm(3) vs 33 +/- 6, 39 +/- 3 cm(3), P < 0.05). The electroanatomic map/CT merge process was also more distorted when mapping was generated at moderate to marked contact force. This study shows that mapping and ablation using a robotic sheath guidance system are critically dependent on generated force. These findings suggest that ablative lesion size is optimized by the application of 10-20 grams of contact force, although mapping requires lower-force application to avoid image distortions.

  5. Detection of Macromolecular Fractions in HCN Polymers Using Electrophoretic and Ultrafiltration Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Yaseli, Margarita R; Cid, Cristina; Yagüe, Ana I; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta

    2017-02-01

    Elucidating the origin of life involves synthetic as well as analytical challenges. Herein, for the first time, we describe the use of gel electrophoresis and ultrafiltration to fractionate HCN polymers. Since the first prebiotic synthesis of adenine by Oró, HCN polymers have gained much interest in studies on the origins of life due to the identification of biomonomers and related compounds within them. Here, we demonstrate that macromolecular fractions with electrophoretic mobility can also be detected within HCN polymers. The migration of polymers under the influence of an electric field depends not only on their sizes (one-dimensional electrophoresis) but also their different isoelectric points (two-dimensional electrophoresis, 2-DE). The same behaviour was observed for several macromolecular fractions detected in HCN polymers. Macromolecular fractions with apparent molecular weights as high as 250 kDa were detected by tricine-SDS gel electrophoresis. Cationic macromolecular fractions with apparent molecular weights as high as 140 kDa were also detected by 2-DE. The HCN polymers synthesized were fractionated by ultrafiltration. As a result, the molecular weight distributions of the macromolecular fractions detected in the HCN polymers directly depended on the synthetic conditions used to produce these polymers. The implications of these results for prebiotic chemistry will be discussed. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  6. PDBe: improved accessibility of macromolecular structure data from PDB and EMDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velankar, Sameer; van Ginkel, Glen; Alhroub, Younes; Battle, Gary M; Berrisford, John M; Conroy, Matthew J; Dana, Jose M; Gore, Swanand P; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Haslam, Pauline; Hendrickx, Pieter M S; Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Mir, Saqib; Fernandez Montecelo, Manuel A; Mukhopadhyay, Abhik; Oldfield, Thomas J; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Sen, Sanchayita; Slowley, Robert A; Wainwright, Michael E; Deshpande, Mandar S; Iudin, Andrii; Sahni, Gaurav; Salavert Torres, Jose; Hirshberg, Miriam; Mak, Lora; Nadzirin, Nurul; Armstrong, David R; Clark, Alice R; Smart, Oliver S; Korir, Paul K; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2016-01-04

    The Protein Data Bank in Europe (http://pdbe.org) accepts and annotates depositions of macromolecular structure data in the PDB and EMDB archives and enriches, integrates and disseminates structural information in a variety of ways. The PDBe website has been redesigned based on an analysis of user requirements, and now offers intuitive access to improved and value-added macromolecular structure information. Unique value-added information includes lists of reviews and research articles that cite or mention PDB entries as well as access to figures and legends from full-text open-access publications that describe PDB entries. A powerful new query system not only shows all the PDB entries that match a given query, but also shows the 'best structures' for a given macromolecule, ligand complex or sequence family using data-quality information from the wwPDB validation reports. A PDBe RESTful API has been developed to provide unified access to macromolecular structure data available in the PDB and EMDB archives as well as value-added annotations, e.g. regarding structure quality and up-to-date cross-reference information from the SIFTS resource. Taken together, these new developments facilitate unified access to macromolecular structure data in an intuitive way for non-expert users and support expert users in analysing macromolecular structure data. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Fifteen years of the Protein Crystallography Station: the coming of age of macromolecular neutron crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian C.-H. Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Protein Crystallography Station (PCS, located at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE, was the first macromolecular crystallography beamline to be built at a spallation neutron source. Following testing and commissioning, the PCS user program was funded by the Biology and Environmental Research program of the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-OBER for 13 years (2002–2014. The PCS remained the only dedicated macromolecular neutron crystallography station in North America until the construction and commissioning of the MaNDi and IMAGINE instruments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which started in 2012. The instrument produced a number of research and technical outcomes that have contributed to the field, clearly demonstrating the power of neutron crystallography in helping scientists to understand enzyme reaction mechanisms, hydrogen bonding and visualization of H-atom positions, which are critical to nearly all chemical reactions. During this period, neutron crystallography became a technique that increasingly gained traction, and became more integrated into macromolecular crystallography through software developments led by investigators at the PCS. This review highlights the contributions of the PCS to macromolecular neutron crystallography, and gives an overview of the history of neutron crystallography and the development of macromolecular neutron crystallography from the 1960s to the 1990s and onwards through the 2000s.

  8. High-resolution mapping of in vivo genomic transcription factor binding sites using in situ DNase I footprinting and ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumsakul, Onuma; Nakamura, Kensuke; Kurata, Tetsuya; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Hobman, Jon L; Ogasawara, Naotake; Oshima, Taku; Ishikawa, Shu

    2013-08-01

    Accurate identification of the DNA-binding sites of transcription factors and other DNA-binding proteins on the genome is crucial to understanding their molecular interactions with DNA. Here, we describe a new method: Genome Footprinting by high-throughput sequencing (GeF-seq), which combines in vivo DNase I digestion of genomic DNA with ChIP coupled with high-throughput sequencing. We have determined the in vivo binding sites of a Bacillus subtilis global regulator, AbrB, using GeF-seq. This method shows that exact DNA-binding sequences, which were protected from in vivo DNase I digestion, were resolved at a comparable resolution to that achieved by in vitro DNase I footprinting, and this was simply attained without the necessity of prediction by peak-calling programs. Moreover, DNase I digestion of the bacterial nucleoid resolved the closely positioned AbrB-binding sites, which had previously appeared as one peak in ChAP-chip and ChAP-seq experiments. The high-resolution determination of AbrB-binding sites using GeF-seq enabled us to identify bipartite TGGNA motifs in 96% of the AbrB-binding sites. Interestingly, in a thousand binding sites with very low-binding intensities, single TGGNA motifs were also identified. Thus, GeF-seq is a powerful method to elucidate the molecular mechanism of target protein binding to its cognate DNA sequences.

  9. In-vivo dynamic and static three-dimensional joint space distance maps for assessment of cartilage thickness in the radiocarpal joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foumani, M.; Strackee, S.D.; Van de Giessen, M.; Jonges, R.; Blankevoort, L.; Streekstra, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The assessment of the joint space thickness is an important clinical parameter for diagnosing osteoarthritis. The accuracy of joint space thickness evaluation from radiographs is limited due to anatomical complexity of the wrist. We propose using distance maps estimated from 3-dimensional

  10. In-vivo dynamic and static three-dimensional joint space distance maps for assessment of cartilage thickness in the radiocarpal joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foumani, M.; Strackee, S. D.; van de Giessen, M.; Jonges, R.; Blankevoort, L.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of the joint space thickness is an important clinical parameter for diagnosing osteoarthritis. The accuracy of joint space thickness evaluation from radiographs is limited due to anatomical complexity of the wrist. We propose using distance maps estimated from 3-dimensional and

  11. Towards a compact and precise sample holder for macromolecular crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Christopher; Janocha, Robert; Sorez, Clement; Astruc, Anthony; McCarthy, Andrew; Belrhali, Hassan; Cipriani, Florent

    2017-01-01

    Most of the sample holders currently used in macromolecular crystallography offer limited storage density and poor initial crystal-positioning precision upon mounting on a goniometer. This has now become a limiting factor at high-throughput beamlines, where data collection can be performed in a matter of seconds. Furthermore, this lack of precision limits the potential benefits emerging from automated harvesting systems that could provide crystal-position information which would further enhance alignment at beamlines. This situation provided the motivation for the development of a compact and precise sample holder with corresponding pucks, handling tools and robotic transfer protocols. The development process included four main phases: design, prototype manufacture, testing with a robotic sample changer and validation under real conditions on a beamline. Two sample-holder designs are proposed: NewPin and miniSPINE. They share the same robot gripper and allow the storage of 36 sample holders in uni-puck footprint-style pucks, which represents 252 samples in a dry-shipping dewar commonly used in the field. The pucks are identified with human- and machine-readable codes, as well as with radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. NewPin offers a crystal-repositioning precision of up to 10 µm but requires a specific goniometer socket. The storage density could reach 64 samples using a special puck designed for fully robotic handling. miniSPINE is less precise but uses a goniometer mount compatible with the current SPINE standard. miniSPINE is proposed for the first implementation of the new standard, since it is easier to integrate at beamlines. An upgraded version of the SPINE sample holder with a corresponding puck named SPINEplus is also proposed in order to offer a homogenous and interoperable system. The project involved several European synchrotrons and industrial companies in the fields of consumables and sample-changer robotics. Manual handling of mini

  12. Synthesis and characterization of macromolecular layers grafted to polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtovyy, Oleksandr

    The composition and behavior of surfaces and interfaces play a pivotal role in dictating the overall efficiency of the majority of polymeric materials and devices. Surface properties of the materials can be altered using surface modification techniques. It is necessary to highlight that successful methods of surface modification should affect only the upper layer of the polymer material without changing bulk properties. The processes must introduce new functionalities to the surface, optimize surface roughness, lubrication, hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity, adhesion, conductivity, and/or biocompatibility. Research presented in this dissertation is dedicated to the synthesis, characterization, and application of thin macromolecular layers anchored to polymer substrates. Specifically, attachment of functional polymers via a "grafting to" approach has been extensively studied using PET and nylon model substrates. First, poly(glycidyl methacrylate) was used to introduce permanent functionalities to the model substrates by anchoring it to model films. Then, three different functional polymers were grafted on top of the previous layer. As one part of this study, the temperature and time dependence of grafting functional layers were studied. The surface coverage by hydrophobic polymer was determined from experimental data and predicted by a model. In general, the model has a high degree of predictive capability. Next, surface modification of polymeric fibers and membranes is presented as an important application of the polymer thin layers targeted in the study. Specifically, the procedures developed for surface modification of model substrates was employed for modification of PET, nylon, and cotton fabrics as well as PET track-etched membranes. Since epoxy groups are highly reactive in various chemical reactions, the approach becomes virtually universal, allowing both various surfaces and end-functionalized macromolecules to be used in the grafted layer synthesis. PET

  13. Non-contact luminescence lifetime cryothermometry for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykhaylyk, V B; Wagner, A; Kraus, H

    2017-05-01

    Temperature is a very important parameter when aiming to minimize radiation damage to biological samples during experiments that utilize intense ionizing radiation. A novel technique for remote, non-contact, in situ monitoring of the protein crystal temperature has been developed for the new I23 beamline at the Diamond Light Source, a facility dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX) with long-wavelength X-rays. The temperature is derived from the temperature-dependent decay time constant of luminescence from a minuscule scintillation sensor (<0.05 mm 3 ) located in very close proximity to the sample under test. In this work the underlying principle of cryogenic luminescence lifetime thermometry is presented, the features of the detection method and the choice of temperature sensor are discussed, and it is demonstrated how the temperature monitoring system was integrated within the viewing system of the endstation used for the visualization of protein crystals. The thermometry system was characterized using a Bi 4 Ge 3 O 12 crystal scintillator that exhibits good responsivity of the decay time constant as a function of temperature over a wide range (8-270 K). The scintillation sensor was calibrated and the uncertainty of the temperature measurements over the primary operation temperature range of the beamline (30-150 K) was assessed to be ±1.6 K. It has been shown that the temperature of the sample holder, measured using the luminescence sensor, agrees well with the expected value. The technique was applied to characterize the thermal performance of different sample mounts that have been used in MX experiments at the I23 beamline. The thickness of the mount is shown to have the greatest impact upon the temperature distribution across the sample mount. Altogether, these tests and findings demonstrate the usefulness of the thermometry system in highlighting the challenges that remain to be addressed for the in-vacuum MX experiment to become a

  14. The use of a mini-κ goniometer head in macromolecular crystallography diffraction experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhauser, Sandor; Ravelli, Raimond B G; McCarthy, Andrew A

    2013-07-01

    Most macromolecular crystallography (MX) diffraction experiments at synchrotrons use a single-axis goniometer. This markedly contrasts with small-molecule crystallography, in which the majority of the diffraction data are collected using multi-axis goniometers. A novel miniaturized κ-goniometer head, the MK3, has been developed to allow macromolecular crystals to be aligned. It is available on the majority of the structural biology beamlines at the ESRF, as well as elsewhere. In addition, the Strategy for the Alignment of Crystals (STAC) software package has been developed to facilitate the use of the MK3 and other similar devices. Use of the MK3 and STAC is streamlined by their incorporation into online analysis tools such as EDNA. The current use of STAC and MK3 on the MX beamlines at the ESRF is discussed. It is shown that the alignment of macromolecular crystals can result in improved diffraction data quality compared with data obtained from randomly aligned crystals.

  15. Use of Site-Specifically Tethered Chemical Nucleases to Study Macromolecular Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Srabani

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During a complex macromolecular reaction multiple changes in molecular conformation and interactions with ligands may occur. X-ray crystallography may provide only a limited set of snapshots of these changes. Solution methods can augment such structural information to provide a more complete picture of a macromolecular reaction. We analyzed the changes in protein conformation and protein:nucleic acid interactions which occur during transcription initiation by using a chemical nuclease tethered to cysteines introduced site-specifically into the RNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7 (T7 RNAP. Changes in cleavage patterns as the polymerase steps through transcription reveal a series of structural transitions which mediate transcription initiation. Cleavage by tethered chemical nucleases is seen to be a powerful method for revealing the conformational dynamics of macromolecular reactions, and has certain advantages over cross-linking or energy transfer approaches.

  16. Feasibility of Using a Bone-Targeted, Macromolecular Delivery System Coupled with Prostaglandin E1 to Promote Bone Formation in Aged, Estrogen-Deficient Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. C.; Pan, H.; Wang, D.; Bowman, B. M.; Kopečková, P.; Kopeček, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Macromolecular delivery systems have therapeutic uses because of their ability to deliver and release drugs to specific tissues. The uptake and localization of HPMA copolymers using Asp8 as the bone-targeting moiety was determined in aged, ovariectomized (ovx) rats. PGE1 was attached via a cathepsin K-sensitive linkage to HPMA copolymer–Asp8 conjugate and was tested to determine if it could promote bone formation. Materials and Methods The uptake of FITC-labeled HPMA copolymer–Asp8 conjugate (P-Asp8-FITC) on bone surfaces was compared with the mineralization marker, tetracycline. Then a targeted PGE1-HPMA copolymer conjugate (P-Asp8-FITC-PGE1) was given as a single injection and its effects on bone formation were measured 4 weeks later. Results P-Asp8-FITC preferentially deposited on resorption surfaces, unlike tetracycline. A single injection of P-Asp8-FITC-PGE1 resulted in greater indices of bone formation in aged, ovx rats. Conclusions HPMA copolymers can be targeted to bone surfaces using Asp8, with preferential uptake on resorption surfaces. Additionally, PGE1 attached to the Asp8-targeted HPMA copolymers and given by a single injection resulted in greater bone formation measured 4 weeks later. This initial in vivo study suggests that macromolecular delivery systems targeted to bone may offer some therapeutic opportunities and advantages for the treatment of skeletal diseases. PMID:18758923

  17. Accounting for large amplitude protein deformation during in silico macromolecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastard, Karine; Saladin, Adrien; Prévost, Chantal

    2011-02-22

    Rapid progress of theoretical methods and computer calculation resources has turned in silico methods into a conceivable tool to predict the 3D structure of macromolecular assemblages, starting from the structure of their separate elements. Still, some classes of complexes represent a real challenge for macromolecular docking methods. In these complexes, protein parts like loops or domains undergo large amplitude deformations upon association, thus remodeling the surface accessible to the partner protein or DNA. We discuss the problems linked with managing such rearrangements in docking methods and we review strategies that are presently being explored, as well as their limitations and success.

  18. Accounting for Large Amplitude Protein Deformation during in Silico Macromolecular Docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Prévost

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid progress of theoretical methods and computer calculation resources has turned in silico methods into a conceivable tool to predict the 3D structure of macromolecular assemblages, starting from the structure of their separate elements. Still, some classes of complexes represent a real challenge for macromolecular docking methods. In these complexes, protein parts like loops or domains undergo large amplitude deformations upon association, thus remodeling the surface accessible to the partner protein or DNA.We discuss the problems linked with managing such rearrangements in docking methods and we review strategies that are presently being explored, as well as their limitations and success.

  19. An acoustic on-chip goniometer for room temperature macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, C G; Axford, D; Edwards, A M J; Gildea, R J; Morris, R H; Newton, M I; Orville, A M; Prince, M; Topham, P D; Docker, P T

    2017-11-10

    This paper describes the design, development and successful use of an on-chip goniometer for room-temperature macromolecular crystallography via acoustically induced rotations. We present for the first time a low cost, rate-tunable, acoustic actuator for gradual in-fluid sample reorientation about varying axes and its utilisation for protein structure determination on a synchrotron beamline. The device enables the efficient collection of diffraction data via a rotation method from a sample within a surface confined droplet. This method facilitates efficient macromolecular structural data acquisition in fluid environments for dynamical studies.

  20. Effect of intra-articular injection of intermediate-weight hyaluronic acid on hip and knee cartilage: in-vivo evaluation using T2 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Giulio; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Fiz, Francesco; Fabbro, Emanuele; Corazza, Angelo; Dettore, Daniele; Orlandi, Davide; Castellazzo, Carlo; Tornago, Stefano; Serafini, Giovanni

    2018-01-09

    We used T2 mapping to quantify the effect of intra-articular hyaluronic acid administration (IAHAA) on cartilage with correlation to clinical symptoms. One hundred two patients with clinical and MRI diagnosis of hip or knee grade I-III chondropathy were prospectively included. All patients received a standard MRI examination of the affected hip/knee (one joint/patient) and T2-mapping multiecho sequence for cartilage evaluation. T2 values of all slices were averaged and used for analysis. One month after MR evaluation 72 patients (38 males; mean age 51±10 years) underwent IAHAA. As a control group, 30 subjects (15 males; 51 ± 9 years) were not treated. MR and WOMAC evaluation was performed at baseline and after 3, 9, and 15 months in all patients. T2 mapping in hyaluronic acid (HA) patients showed a significant increase in T2 relaxation times from baseline to the first time point after therapy in knees (40.7 ± 9.8 ms vs. 45.8 ± 8.6 ms) and hips (40.9 ± 9.7 ms; 45.9 ± 9.5 ms) (p < 0.001). At the 9- and 15-month evaluations, T2 relaxation dropped to values similar to the baseline ones (p < 0.001 vs. 3 month). The correlation between T2 increase and pain reduction after IAHAA was statistically significant (r = 0.54, p < 0.01) in patients with grade III chondropathy. T2 mapping can be used to evaluate the effect over time of IAHAA in patients with hip and knee chondropathy. • T2 relaxation times change over time after hyaluronic acid intra-articular administration • T2 relaxation times of the medial femoral condyle correlate with WOMAC variation • T2 relaxation times are different between Outerbridge I and II-III.

  1. Carotenoids co-localize with hydroxyapatite, cholesterol, and other lipids in calcified stenotic aortic valves. Ex vivo Raman maps compared to histological patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bonetti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Unlike its application for atherosclerotic plaque analysis, Raman microspectroscopy was sporadically used to check the sole nature of bioapatite deposits in stenotic aortic valves, neglecting the involvement of accumulated lipids/lipoproteins in the calcific process. Here, Raman microspectroscopy was employed for examination of stenotic aortic valve leaflets to add information on nature and distribution of accumulated lipids and their correlation with mineralization in the light of its potential precocious diagnostic use. Cryosections from surgically explanted stenotic aortic valves (n=4 were studied matching Raman maps against specific histological patterns. Raman maps revealed the presence of phospholipids/triglycerides and cholesterol, which showed spatial overlapping with one another and Raman-identified hydroxyapatite. Moreover, the Raman patterns correlated with those displayed by both von-Kossa-calcium- and Nile-blue-stained serial cryosections. Raman analysis also provided the first identification of carotenoids, which co-localized with the identified lipid moieties. Additional fit concerned the distribution of collagen and elastin. The good correlation of Raman maps with high-affinity staining patterns proved that Raman microspectroscopy is a reliable tool in evaluating calcification degree, alteration/displacement of extracellular matrix components, and accumulation rate of different lipid forms in calcified heart valves. In addition, the novel identification of carotenoids supports the concept that valve stenosis is an atherosclerosis-like valve lesion, consistently with their previous Raman microspectroscopical identification inside atherosclerotic plaques.

  2. Syntheses and biological evaluation of {sup 18}F-labeled 3-(1-benzyl-piperidin-4-yl)-1-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)propan-1-ones for in vivo mapping of acetylcholinesterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Y.-S. E-mail: yschoe@samsung.co.kr; Oh, S.-J.; Shim, Insop; Naruto, Shunji; Chi, Dae Yoon; Kim, Sang Eun; Lee, Kyung-Han; Choi, Yong; Kim, B.-T

    2000-04-01

    We synthesized novel {sup 18}F-labeled acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, 3-[1-(3- and 4-[{sup 18}F]fluoromethylbenzyl)piperidin-4-yl]-1-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)propan- 1-ones ([{sup 18}F]1 and [{sup 18}F]2) and 3-[1-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl)piperidin-4-yl]-1-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)propan- 1-one ([{sup 18}F]3) in high yields (decay-corrected, 25%-40%) and with high effective specific activities (>37 GBq/{mu}mol). Tissue distribution studies of the [{sup 18}F]1 and the [{sup 18}F]3 in mice showed the nonspecific bindings in brain regions, with metabolic defluorination of the [{sup 18}F]1. The result suggests that these radioligands may not be suitable agents for in vivo mapping of AChE, despite their potent in vitro anti-AChE activities.

  3. New utilization of Polygonum multiflorum polysaccharide as macromolecular carrier of 5-fluorouracil for controlled release and immunoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Xu, Yi; Lv, Junjiang; Cheng, Mengxia; Wu, Ying; Cao, Kun; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Mou, Xiuni; Fan, Qi

    2018-02-10

    WPMP-2 is an acid polysaccharide isolated from Polygonum multiflorum, which demonstrated excellent immunomodulatory activity. In order to reduce immunosuppression of 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), WPMP-2 was utilized as a macromolecular carrier to conjugate the 5-Fu derivatives 5-fluorouracil-1-acetic acid (5-FUAC) through ester bond. The conjugate showed controlled drug release behaviour in vitro at 37°C in phosphate buffer (pH7.4), and only 5-FUAC was detected in the media. The cytotoxicity test in vitro showed that the conjugate exhibited different cytotoxicity to HepG-2 and HT-29 cells. In addition, immunization study in vivo illustrated that the conjugate displayed immunoprotective effect by mitigating inhibition and damage effects of 5-Fu on secretion of cytokines, proliferation of splenocytes, and phagocytosis of peritoneal macrophages. It was indicated that the conjugation of 5-Fu and WPMP-2 could be a potential double effective drug delivery system. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Improving the performance of a quadrupole time-of-flight instrument for macromolecular mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Duijn, van E.; Mazon, H.; Synowsky, S.A.; Lorenzen, K.; Versluis, C.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Langridge, D.; Oost, van der J.; Hoyes, J.; Heck, C.K.

    2006-01-01

    We modified and optimized a first generation quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) 1 to perform tandem mass spectrometry on macromolecular protein complexes. The modified instrument allows isolation and subsequent dissociation of high-mass protein complexes through collisions with argon molecules. The

  5. Isolation and chemical characterization of resistant macromolecular constituents in microalgae and marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelin, F.

    1996-01-01

    The recognition of novel, insoluble and non-hydrolysable macromolecular constituents in protective tissues of fresh-water algae and higher plants has had a major impact on our understanding of the origin and fate of sedimentary organic matter (OM) in terrestrial and lacustrine deposits. The

  6. Reliable and efficient solution of genome-scale models of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ding; Yang, Laurence; Fleming, Ronan M. T.

    2017-01-01

    Constraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) is currently the only methodology that permits integrated modeling of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression (ME) at genome-scale. Linear optimization computes steady-state flux solutions to ME models, but flux values are spread over many...

  7. MMTF-An efficient file format for the transmission, visualization, and analysis of macromolecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Anthony R; Rose, Alexander S; Pavelka, Antonín; Valasatava, Yana; Duarte, Jose M; Prlić, Andreas; Rose, Peter W

    2017-06-01

    Recent advances in experimental techniques have led to a rapid growth in complexity, size, and number of macromolecular structures that are made available through the Protein Data Bank. This creates a challenge for macromolecular visualization and analysis. Macromolecular structure files, such as PDB or PDBx/mmCIF files can be slow to transfer, parse, and hard to incorporate into third-party software tools. Here, we present a new binary and compressed data representation, the MacroMolecular Transmission Format, MMTF, as well as software implementations in several languages that have been developed around it, which address these issues. We describe the new format and its APIs and demonstrate that it is several times faster to parse, and about a quarter of the file size of the current standard format, PDBx/mmCIF. As a consequence of the new data representation, it is now possible to visualize structures with millions of atoms in a web browser, keep the whole PDB archive in memory or parse it within few minutes on average computers, which opens up a new way of thinking how to design and implement efficient algorithms in structural bioinformatics. The PDB archive is available in MMTF file format through web services and data that are updated on a weekly basis.

  8. Type IV kerogens as analogues for organic macromolecular materials in aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthewman, Richard; Martins, Zita; Sephton, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the processes involved in the evolution of organic matter in the early Solar System requires extensive experimental work. The scientifically valuable carbonaceous chondrites are principal targets for organic analyses, but these meteorites are rare. Meteoritic analog materials available in larger quantities, on which experiments can be performed, would be highly beneficial. The bulk of the organic inventory of carbonaceous chondrites is made up of solvent-insoluble macromolecular material. This high-molecular-weight entity provides a record of thermal and aqueous parent-body alteration of precursor organic structures present at the birth of the Solar System. To identify an effective analogue for this macromolecular material, we analyzed a series of terrestrial kerogens by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Type I and II kerogens are unsuitable analogues owing to their highly aliphatic nature. Type III kerogens show some similarities to meteoritic macromolecular materials but display a substantial biological heritage. Type IV kerogens, in this study derived from Mesozoic paleosols and produced by the reworking and oxidation of organic matter, represent an effective analogue. Some isomeric differences exist between meteoritic macromolecular materials and type IV kerogens, and stepped pyrolysis indicates variations in thermal stability. In addition to being a suitable material for novel experimentation, type IV kerogens also have the potential to aid in the optimization of instruments for deployment on Mars.

  9. Effect of macromolecular crowding on the rate of diffusion-limited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on percolation and diffusion in disordered systems to study the effect of macromolecular crowding on the enzymatic reaction rates. The model qualitatively explains some of the experimental observations. Keywords. Enzyme kinetics; Monte Carlo; percolation; random walk; obstacle. PACS Nos 02.50.Ey; 05.40.Jc; 05.60.Cd.

  10. A vibrating membrane bioreactor (VMBR): Macromolecular transmission-influence of extracellular polymeric substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2009-01-01

    The vibrating membrane bioreactor (VMBR) system facilitates the possibility of conducting a separation of macromolecules (BSA) from larger biological components (yeast cells) with a relatively high and stable macromolecular transmission at sub-critical flux. This is not possible to achieve...

  11. Modeling macromolecular degradation of corn starch in a twin screw extruder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einde, van den R.M.; Veen, van der M.E.; Bosman, H.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Macromolecular degradation of starch in a twin screw extruder was modeled. A shear cell having well-defined flow conditions described earlier was used to measure peak viscosity of corn starch melts at various moisture contents and temperatures. Shear rate and elongation rate distributions in the

  12. SPring-8 BL44XU, beamline designed for structure analysis of large biological macromolecular assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashiura, Akifumi, E-mail: hgsur-a@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp; Yamashita, Eiki [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Yoshimura, Masato [Taiwan NSRRC, Taiwan Beamline Office at SPring-8, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hasegawa, Kazuya; Furukawa, Yukito; Kumasaka, Takashi [JASRI/SPring-8, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ueno, Go; Yamamoto, Masaki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tsukihara, Tomitake [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Gradual School of Life Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Kouto, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Nakagawa, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    Beamline BL44XU at SPring-8 is operated by the Institute for Protein Research of Osaka University. The beamline is designed for X-ray crystallography of large biological macromolecular assemblies. Here we show its detailed performances, results, and the ongoing upgrade plans.

  13. Effect of macromolecular crowding on the rate of diffusion-limited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The enzymatic reaction rate has been shown to be affected by the presence of such macromolecules. A simple numerical model is proposed here based on percolation and diffusion in disordered systems to study the effect of macromolecular crowding on the enzymatic reaction rates. The model qualitatively explains some ...

  14. Interplay between the bacterial nucleoid protein H-NS and macromolecular crowding in compacting DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintraecken, C.H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

      In this dissertation we discuss H-NS and its connection to nucleoid compaction and organization. Nucleoid formation involves a dramatic reduction in coil volume of the genomic DNA. Four factors are thought to influence coil volume: supercoiling, DNA charge neutralization, macromolecular

  15. Synergy of DNA-bending nucleoid proteins and macromolecular crowd-condensing DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessa Ramos, E.; Wintraecken, C.H.J.M.; Geerling, A.C.M.; Vries, de R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Many prokaryotic nucleoid proteins bend DNA and form extended helical protein-DNA fibers rather than condensed structures. On the other hand, it is known that such proteins (such as bacterial HU) strongly promote DNA condensation by macromolecular crowding. Using theoretical arguments, we show that

  16. Anti-angiogenic activity of gecko aqueous extracts and its macromolecular components in CAM and HUVE-12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhen; Huang, Shu-Qiong; Liu, Jian-Ting; Jiang, Gui-Xiang; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Gecko is a kind of traditional Chinese medicine with remarkable antineoplastic activity. However, undefined mechanisms and ambiguity regarding active ingredients limit new drug development from gecko. This study was conducted to assess anti-angiogenic properties of the aqueous extracts of fresh gecko (AG) or macromolecular components separated from AG (M-AG). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) approach was applied to detect the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion of the tumor cells treated with AG or M-AG. The effect of AG or M-AG on vascular endothelial cell proliferation and migratory ability was analyzed by tetrazolium dye colorimetric method, transwell and wound-healing assays. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays were used to ensure the anti-angiogenic activity of M-AG in vivo. The results showed that AG or M-AG inhibited the VEGF secretion of tumor cells, the relative inhibition rates of AG and M-AG being 27.2% and 53.2% respectively at a concentration of 20 μL/mL. AG and M-AG inhibited the vascular endothelial (VE) cell proliferation with IC50 values of 11.5 ± 0.5 μL/mL and 12.9 ± 0.4 μL/mL respectively. The VE cell migration potential was inhibited significantly (p<0.01) by the AG (≥ 24 μL/mL) or M-AG (≥ 12 μL/ mL) treatment. In vivo, neovascularization of CAM treated with M-AG was inhibited significantly (p<0.05) at a concentration of 0.4 μL/mL. This study provided evidence that anti-angiogenesis is one of the anti-tumor mechanisms of AG and M-AG, with the latter as a promising active component.

  17. Three-dimensional Integrated Functional, Structural, and Computational Mapping to Define the Structural "Fingerprints" of Heart-Specific Atrial Fibrillation Drivers in Human Heart Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jichao; Hansen, Brian J; Wang, Yufeng; Csepe, Thomas A; Sul, Lidiya V; Tang, Alan; Yuan, Yiming; Li, Ning; Bratasz, Anna; Powell, Kimerly A; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul M L; Weiss, Raul; Simonetti, Orlando P; Hummel, John D; Fedorov, Vadim V

    2017-08-22

    Structural remodeling of human atria plays a key role in sustaining atrial fibrillation (AF), but insufficient quantitative analysis of human atrial structure impedes the treatment of AF. We aimed to develop a novel 3-dimensional (3D) structural and computational simulation analysis tool that could reveal the structural contributors to human reentrant AF drivers. High-resolution panoramic epicardial optical mapping of the coronary-perfused explanted intact human atria (63-year-old woman, chronic hypertension, heart weight 608 g) was conducted during sinus rhythm and sustained AF maintained by spatially stable reentrant AF drivers in the left and right atrium. The whole atria (107×61×85 mm 3 ) were then imaged with contrast-enhancement MRI (9.4 T, 180×180×360-μm 3 resolution). The entire 3D human atria were analyzed for wall thickness (0.4-11.7 mm), myofiber orientations, and transmural fibrosis (36.9% subendocardium; 14.2% midwall; 3.4% subepicardium). The 3D computational analysis revealed that a specific combination of wall thickness and fibrosis ranges were primarily present in the optically defined AF driver regions versus nondriver tissue. Finally, a 3D human heart-specific atrial computer model was developed by integrating 3D structural and functional mapping data to test AF induction, maintenance, and ablation strategies. This 3D model reproduced the optically defined reentrant AF drivers, which were uninducible when fibrosis and myofiber anisotropy were removed from the model. Our novel 3D computational high-resolution framework may be used to quantitatively analyze structural substrates, such as wall thickness, myofiber orientation, and fibrosis, underlying localized AF drivers, and aid the development of new patient-specific treatments. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  18. A comparison of multi-echo spin-echo and triple-echo steady-state T2 mapping for in vivo evaluation of articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Institute of Measurement Science, Department of Imaging Methods, Bratislava (Slovakia); Bohndorf, Klaus; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Hager, Benedikt; Zbyn, Stefan [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Heule, Rahel; Bieri, Oliver [University of Basel Hospital, Division of Radiological Physics, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    To assess the clinical relevance of T{sub 2} relaxation times, measured by 3D triple-echo steady-state (3D-TESS), in knee articular cartilage compared to conventional multi-echo spin-echo T{sub 2}-mapping. Thirteen volunteers and ten patients with focal cartilage lesions were included in this prospective study. All subjects underwent 3-Tesla MRI consisting of a multi-echo multi-slice spin-echo sequence (CPMG) as a reference method for T{sub 2} mapping, and 3D TESS with the same geometry settings, but variable acquisition times: standard (TESSs 4:35min) and quick (TESSq 2:05min). T{sub 2} values were compared in six different regions in the femoral and tibial cartilage using a Wilcoxon signed ranks test and the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). The local ethics committee approved this study, and all participants gave written informed consent. The mean quantitative T{sub 2} values measured by CPMG (mean: 46±9ms) in volunteers were significantly higher compared to those measured with TESS (mean: 31±5ms) in all regions. Both methods performed similarly in patients, but CPMG provided a slightly higher difference between lesions and native cartilage (CPMG: 90ms→61ms [31%],p=0.0125;TESS 32ms→24ms [24%],p=0.0839). 3D-TESS provides results similar to those of a conventional multi-echo spin-echo sequence with many benefits, such as shortening of total acquisition time and insensitivity to B{sub 1} and B{sub 0} changes. (orig.)

  19. Genome-wide mapping indicates that p73 and p63 co-occupy target sites and have similar dna-binding profiles in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Yang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The p53 homologs, p63 and p73, share approximately 85% amino acid identity in their DNA-binding domains, but they have distinct biological functions.Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-resolution tiling arrays covering the human genome, we identify p73 DNA binding sites on a genome-wide level in ME180 human cervical carcinoma cells. Strikingly, the p73 binding profile is indistinguishable from the previously described binding profile for p63 in the same cells. Moreover, the p73:p63 binding ratio is similar at all genomic loci tested, suggesting that there are few, if any, targets that are specific for one of these factors. As assayed by sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation, p63 and p73 co-occupy DNA target sites in vivo, suggesting that p63 and p73 bind primarily as heterotetrameric complexes in ME180 cells.The observation that p63 and p73 associate with the same genomic targets suggest that their distinct biological functions are due to cell-type specific expression and/or protein domains that involve functions other than DNA binding.

  20. Macromolecular Dynamics in Red Blood Cells Investigated Using Neutron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadler, Andreas Maximilian; Demmel, Franz; Artmann, Gerhard; 10.1098/rsif.2010.0306

    2011-01-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements on the dynamics of hemoglobin (Hb) in human red blood cells in vivo. Global and internal Hb dynamics were measured in the ps to ns time- and {\\AA} length-scale using quasielastic neutron backscattering spectroscopy. We observed the cross-over from global Hb short-time to long-time self-diffusion. Both short- and long-time diffusion coefficients agree quantitatively with predicted values from hydrodynamic theory of non-charged hard-sphere suspensions when a bound water fraction of around 0.23g H2O/ g Hb is taken into account. The higher amount of water in the cells facilitates internal protein fluctuations in the ps time-scale when compared to fully hydrated Hb powder. Slower internal dynamics of Hb in red blood cells in the ns time-range were found to be rather similar to results obtained with fully hydrated protein powders, solutions and E. coli cells.

  1. Flexibility damps macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding dynamics: Application to the murine prion protein (121-231)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2014-01-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the combined effects of protein flexibility and macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. It is found that the increase in stability and folding rate promoted by macromolecular crowding is damped for proteins with highly flexible native structures. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). It is found that the high flexibility of the native isoform of the murine prion protein (121-231) reduces the effects of macromolecular crowding on its folding dynamics. The relevance of these findings for the pathogenic mechanism are discussed.

  2. Mapping out Map Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferjan Ormeling

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Discussing the requirements for map data quality, map users and their library/archives environment, the paper focuses on the metadata the user would need for a correct and efficient interpretation of the map data. For such a correct interpretation, knowledge of the rules and guidelines according to which the topographers/cartographers work (such as the kind of data categories to be collected, and the degree to which these rules and guidelines were indeed followed are essential. This is not only valid for the old maps stored in our libraries and archives, but perhaps even more so for the new digital files as the format in which we now have to access our geospatial data. As this would be too much to ask from map librarians/curators, some sort of web 2.0 environment is sought where comments about data quality, completeness and up-to-dateness from knowledgeable map users regarding the specific maps or map series studied can be collected and tagged to scanned versions of these maps on the web. In order not to be subject to the same disadvantages as Wikipedia, where the ‘communis opinio’ rather than scholarship, seems to be decisive, some checking by map curators of this tagged map use information would still be needed. Cooperation between map curators and the International Cartographic Association ( ICA map and spatial data use commission to this end is suggested.

  3. Synthesis of [{sup 18}F]Ro41-0960, a potent COMT inhibitor, for use in vivo mapping with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y.S.; Sugano, Y.; Gatley, S.J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMPT; EC 2.1.1.6) is one of the two major enzymes which metabolize the catecholamine neurotransmitters. It is distributed throughout the body and brain and is elevated in breast cancer tissue when it plays a role in estrogen metabolism. It is also an important molecular target in the development of drugs to treat Parkinson`s disease (PD). Because COMT regulates the concentration of important neurotransmitter amines such as dopamine, there is speculation that abnormalities in its activity may be associated with neurological, and psychiatric disorders. Ro41-9060(3,4-dihydroxy-5-nitro-2{prime}-fluorobenzophenone) is a potent, fluorine containing COMT inhibitor which has been reported to cross the blood brain barrier. It is structurally similar to Ro40-7592 which is currently undergoing clinical trials in PD. We report the synthesis of [{sup 18}F]Ro41-0960, for investigation for mapping COMT and for studies of COMT drugs. [{sup 18}F]Ro41-0960 was synthesized by the nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction with NCA [{sup 18}F] fluoride on a protected precursor (prepared via a five-step synthesis) followed by hydrolysis with HBr (synthesis time of 100 min; radiochemical yield of 5-7% (EOB)). Though Ro41-0960 has been reported to cross the blood brain barrier, PET studies in baboon demonstrated that an almost complete absence of the drug from the brain both at tracer doses and with the addition of unlabeled drug (1.5 mg/kg) at all times through a 90 min experimental interval. The plasma to brain ratios of F-18 average about 40:1. However, high uptake was observed in the kidneys and in other organs which are known to have high COMT. Studies in mice showed that at 30 min after injection of tracer, F-18 in kidneys was largely as [{sup 18}F]Ro-41-0960 and that it could be displaced with unlabeled Ro41-0960. These studies provide the first example of a positron emitter labeled COMT radiotracer.

  4. High-Resolution Macromolecular Structure Determination by MicroED, a cryo-EM Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gonen, T.

    2017-01-01

    Microelectron diffraction (MicroED) is a new cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) method capable of determining macromolecular structures at atomic resolution from vanishingly small 3D crystals. MicroED promises to solve atomic resolution structures from even the tiniest of crystals, less than a few hundred nanometers thick. MicroED complements frontier advances in crystallography and represents part of the rebirth of cryo-EM that is making macromolecular structure determination more accessible for all. Here we review the concept and practice of MicroED, for both the electron microscopist and crystallographer. Where other reviews have addressed specific details of the technique (Hattne et al., 2015; Shi et al., 2016; Shi, Nannenga, Iadanza, & Gonen, 2013), we aim to provide context and highlight important features that should be considered when performing a MicroED experiment. PMID:27572734

  5. Clustering procedures for the optimal selection of data sets from multiple crystals in macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foadi, James [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Aller, Pierre [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Alguel, Yilmaz; Cameron, Alex [Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Armour, Wes [Oxford e-Research Centre (OeRC), Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3QG (United Kingdom); Waterman, David G. [Research Complex at Harwell (RCaH), Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Iwata, So [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    A systematic approach to the scaling and merging of data from multiple crystals in macromolecular crystallography is introduced and explained. The availability of intense microbeam macromolecular crystallography beamlines at third-generation synchrotron sources has enabled data collection and structure solution from microcrystals of <10 µm in size. The increased likelihood of severe radiation damage where microcrystals or particularly sensitive crystals are used forces crystallographers to acquire large numbers of data sets from many crystals of the same protein structure. The associated analysis and merging of multi-crystal data is currently a manual and time-consuming step. Here, a computer program, BLEND, that has been written to assist with and automate many of the steps in this process is described. It is demonstrated how BLEND has successfully been used in the solution of a novel membrane protein.

  6. PHENIX: a comprehensive Python-based system for macromolecular structure solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Paul D; Afonine, Pavel V; Bunkóczi, Gábor; Chen, Vincent B; Davis, Ian W; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J; Hung, Li-Wei; Kapral, Gary J; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; McCoy, Airlie J; Moriarty, Nigel W; Oeffner, Robert; Read, Randy J; Richardson, David C; Richardson, Jane S; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Zwart, Peter H

    2010-02-01

    Macromolecular X-ray crystallography is routinely applied to understand biological processes at a molecular level. However, significant time and effort are still required to solve and complete many of these structures because of the need for manual interpretation of complex numerical data using many software packages and the repeated use of interactive three-dimensional graphics. PHENIX has been developed to provide a comprehensive system for macromolecular crystallographic structure solution with an emphasis on the automation of all procedures. This has relied on the development of algorithms that minimize or eliminate subjective input, the development of algorithms that automate procedures that are traditionally performed by hand and, finally, the development of a framework that allows a tight integration between the algorithms.

  7. Beamline 08ID-1, the prime beamline of the Canadian Macromolecular Crystallography Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochulski, Pawel; Fodje, Michel N; Gorin, James; Labiuk, Shaunivan L; Berg, Russ

    2011-07-01

    Beamline 08ID-1 is the prime macromolecular crystallography beamline at the Canadian Light Source. Based on a small-gap in-vacuum undulator, it is designed for challenging projects like small crystals and crystals with large cell dimensions. Beamline 08ID-1, together with a second bending-magnet beamline, constitute the Canadian Macromolecular Crystallography Facility (CMCF). This paper presents an overall description of the 08ID-1 beamline, including its specifications, beamline software and recent scientific highlights. The end-station of the beamline is equipped with a CCD X-ray detector, on-axis crystal visualization system, a single-axis goniometer and a sample automounter allowing remote access to the beamline. The general user program is guaranteed up to 55% of the useful beam time and is run under a peer-review proposal system. The CMCF staff provide `Mail-in' crystallography service to the users with the highest-scored proposals.

  8. Macromolecular shape and interactions in layer-by-layer assemblies within cylindrical nanopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. Lazzara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Layer-by-layer (LbL deposition of polyelectrolytes and proteins within the cylindrical nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO membranes was studied by optical waveguide spectroscopy (OWS. AAO has aligned cylindrical, nonintersecting pores with a defined pore diameter d0 and functions as a planar optical waveguide so as to monitor, in situ, the LbL process by OWS. The LbL deposition of globular proteins, i.e., avidin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was compared with that of linear polyelectrolytes (linear-PEs, both species being of similar molecular weight. LbL deposition within the cylindrical AAO geometry for different pore diameters (d0 = 25–80 nm for the various macromolecular species, showed that the multilayer film growth was inhibited at different maximum numbers of LbL steps (nmax. The value of nmax was greatest for linear-PEs, while proteins had a lower value. The cylindrical pore geometry imposes a physical limit to LbL growth such that nmax is strongly dependent on the overall internal structure of the LbL film. For all macromolecular species, deposition was inhibited in native AAO, having pores of d0 = 25–30 nm. Both, OWS and scanning electron microscopy showed that LbL growth in larger AAO pores (d0 > 25–30 nm became inhibited when approaching a pore diameter of deff,n_max = 25–35 nm, a similar size to that of native AAO pores, with d0 = 25–30 nm. For a reasonable estimation of deff,n_max, the actual volume occupied by a macromolecular assembly must be taken into consideration. The results clearly show that electrostatic LbL allowed for compact macromolecular layers, whereas proteins formed loosely packed multilayers.

  9. Macromolecular coupling in seconds of triazolinedione end-functionalized polymers prepared by RAFT polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Vandewalle, Stef; Billiet, Stijn; Driessen, Frank; Du Prez, Filip

    2016-01-01

    The ultrafast and additive-free triazolinedione-click reaction with electron rich (di)enes is a powerful method for the ultrafast ligation of polymer segments. A versatile method is described for the introduction of dickable TAD end groups in various polymer segments, using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. These triazolinedione-functionalized prepolymers were subsequently used for macromolecular functionalization with a low molecular weight diene and block copo...

  10. Measurement and Interpretation of Diffuse Scattering in X-Ray Diffraction for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-16

    X-ray diffraction from macromolecular crystals includes both sharply peaked Bragg reflections and diffuse intensity between the peaks. The information in Bragg scattering reflects the mean electron density in the unit cells of the crystal. The diffuse scattering arises from correlations in the variations of electron density that may occur from one unit cell to another, and therefore contains information about collective motions in proteins.

  11. Folding dynamics of Trp-cage in the presence of chemical interference and macromolecular crowding. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiotakis, Antonios; Cheung, Margaret S

    2011-11-07

    Proteins fold and function in the crowded environment of the cell's interior. In the recent years it has been well established that the so-called "macromolecular crowding" effect enhances the folding stability of proteins by destabilizing their unfolded states for selected proteins. On the other hand, chemical and thermal denaturation is often used in experiments as a tool to destabilize a protein by populating the unfolded states when probing its folding landscape and thermodynamic properties. However, little is known about the complicated effects of these synergistic perturbations acting on the kinetic properties of proteins, particularly when large structural fluctuations, such as protein folding, have been involved. In this study, we have first investigated the folding mechanism of Trp-cage dependent on urea concentration by coarse-grained molecular simulations where the impact of urea is implemented into an energy function of the side chain and/or backbone interactions derived from the all-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with urea through a Boltzmann inversion method. In urea solution, the folding rates of a model miniprotein Trp-cage decrease and the folded state slightly swells due to a lack of contact formation between side chains at the terminal regions. In addition, the equilibrium m-values of Trp-cage from the computer simulations are in agreement with experimental measurements. We have further investigated the combined effects of urea denaturation and macromolecular crowding on Trp-cage's folding mechanism where crowding agents are modeled as hard-spheres. The enhancement of folding rates of Trp-cage is most pronounced by macromolecular crowding effect when the extended conformations of Trp-cast dominate at high urea concentration. Our study makes quantitatively testable predictions on protein folding dynamics in a complex environment involving both chemical denaturation and macromolecular crowding effects.

  12. Protein crystallography for aspiring crystallographers or how to avoid pitfalls and traps in macromolecular structure determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodawer, Alexander; Minor, Wladek; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank now approaches 100 000, with the vast majority of them determined by crystallographic methods. Thousands of papers describing such structures have been published in the scientific literature, and 20 Nobel Prizes in chemistry or medicine have been awarded for discoveries based on macromolecular crystallography. New hardware and software tools have made crystallography appear to be an almost routine (but still far from being analytical) technique and many structures are now being determined by scientists with very limited experience in the practical aspects of the field. However, this apparent ease is sometimes illusory and proper procedures need to be followed to maintain high standards of structure quality. In addition, many noncrystallographers may have problems with the critical evaluation and interpretation of structural results published in the scientific literature. The present review provides an outline of the technical aspects of crystallography for less experienced practitioners, as well as information that might be useful for users of macromolecular structures, aiming to show them how to interpret (but not overinterpret) the information present in the coordinate files and in their description. A discussion of the extent of information that can be gleaned from the atomic coordinates of structures solved at different resolution is provided, as well as problems and pitfalls encountered in structure determination and interpretation. PMID:24034303

  13. Development of next-generation macromolecular drugs based on the EPR effect: challenges and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hideaki; Fang, Jun; Jun, Fang; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A major problem with conventional antitumor therapeutics is nonselective delivery of cytotoxic drugs to normal vital organs and tissues but little delivery to tumor tissues. Here, the authors describe the tumor selective delivery of antitumor drugs by taking advantage of nano-sized drugs and the means to augment it further. Based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, the mechanism for more efficient universal tumor delivery using macromolecular drugs to cover wider tumor types than single molecular target is discussed. Unique properties of solid tumor vasculature in the tumor tissue are discussed, especially leakiness of the blood vessels and factors involved and impaired clearance of macromolecular drugs from the tumor interstitium via the lymphatic system. The criteria for such macromolecular drugs or nanomedicines for effective accumulation at tumor sites is commented on as well as the importance of long plasma retention time of such drugs and a need to release active principles from nanoparticles at target sites. Methods to augment the EPR effect and tumor delivery (2 - 3 times) and its application to photodynamic therapy are also discussed. Tumor selective delivery of antitumor drugs based on the EPR effect can be accomplished and augmented by modulating the tumor environment. This methodology is favorable not only for tumor therapy but also for tumor imaging.

  14. The use of a mini-κ goniometer head in macromolecular crystallography diffraction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockhauser, Sandor [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); UJF–EMBL–CNRS UMI 3265, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); Ravelli, Raimond B. G. [Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); McCarthy, Andrew A., E-mail: andrewmc@embl.fr [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); UJF–EMBL–CNRS UMI 3265, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2013-07-01

    Hardware and software solutions for MX data-collection strategies using the EMBL/ESRF miniaturized multi-axis goniometer head are presented. Most macromolecular crystallography (MX) diffraction experiments at synchrotrons use a single-axis goniometer. This markedly contrasts with small-molecule crystallography, in which the majority of the diffraction data are collected using multi-axis goniometers. A novel miniaturized κ-goniometer head, the MK3, has been developed to allow macromolecular crystals to be aligned. It is available on the majority of the structural biology beamlines at the ESRF, as well as elsewhere. In addition, the Strategy for the Alignment of Crystals (STAC) software package has been developed to facilitate the use of the MK3 and other similar devices. Use of the MK3 and STAC is streamlined by their incorporation into online analysis tools such as EDNA. The current use of STAC and MK3 on the MX beamlines at the ESRF is discussed. It is shown that the alignment of macromolecular crystals can result in improved diffraction data quality compared with data obtained from randomly aligned crystals.

  15. Creating 3D physical models to probe student understanding of macromolecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A Kat; Oliver-Hoyo, M T

    2017-11-01

    The high degree of complexity of macromolecular structure is extremely difficult for students to process. Students struggle to translate the simplified two-dimensional representations commonly used in biochemistry instruction to three-dimensional aspects crucial in understanding structure-property relationships. We designed four different physical models to address student understanding of electrostatics and noncovalent interactions and their relationship to macromolecular structure. In this study, we have tested these models in classroom settings to determine if these models are effective in engaging students at an appropriate level of difficulty and focusing student attention on the principles of electrostatic attractions. This article describes how to create these unique models for four targeted areas related to macromolecular structure: protein secondary structure, protein tertiary structure, membrane protein solubility, and DNA structure. We also provide evidence that merits their use in classroom settings based on the analysis of assembled models and a behavioral assessment of students enrolled in an introductory biochemistry course. By providing students with three-dimensional models that can be physically manipulated, barriers to understanding representations of these complex structures can be lowered and the focus shifted to addressing the foundational concepts behind these properties. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(6):491-500, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Homogenization Theory for the Prediction of Obstructed Solute Diffusivity in Macromolecular Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Preston; Chehreghanianzabi, Yasaman; Rathinam, Muruhan; Zustiak, Silviya Petrova

    2016-01-01

    The study of diffusion in macromolecular solutions is important in many biomedical applications such as separations, drug delivery, and cell encapsulation, and key for many biological processes such as protein assembly and interstitial transport. Not surprisingly, multiple models for the a-priori prediction of diffusion in macromolecular environments have been proposed. However, most models include parameters that are not readily measurable, are specific to the polymer-solute-solvent system, or are fitted and do not have a physical meaning. Here, for the first time, we develop a homogenization theory framework for the prediction of effective solute diffusivity in macromolecular environments based on physical parameters that are easily measurable and not specific to the macromolecule-solute-solvent system. Homogenization theory is useful for situations where knowledge of fine-scale parameters is used to predict bulk system behavior. As a first approximation, we focus on a model where the solute is subjected to obstructed diffusion via stationary spherical obstacles. We find that the homogenization theory results agree well with computationally more expensive Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, the homogenization theory agrees with effective diffusivities of a solute in dilute and semi-dilute polymer solutions measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Lastly, we provide a mathematical formula for the effective diffusivity in terms of a non-dimensional and easily measurable geometric system parameter.

  17. Poly(HEMA-Zidovudine) conjugate: a macromolecular pro-drug for improvement in the biopharmaceutical properties of the drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeraj, Agrawal; Chandrasekar, M J N; Sara, U V S; Rohini, A

    2011-05-01

    A macromolecular pro-drug of a known anti-viral agent Zidovudine (AZT) was synthesized and evaluated as a sustained drug delivery system. The pro-drug was synthesized by coupling the drug to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) through a succinic spacer to get a monomeric drug conjugate which was polymerized to obtain the polymeric pro-drug. The pro-drug was subjected for in-vitro drug release study in buffers of pH 1.2 and 7.4. The hydrolytic stability of the pro-drug to pepsin was assessed in simulated gastric fluid (SGF, pH 1.2) and to α-chymotrypsin in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF, pH 7.4). The results showed that the drug release from the polymeric backbone takes place in a sustained manner over a period of 24 h, and the amount of drug released was comparatively higher at pH 7.4. Plasmatic hydrolysis studies of succinylzidovudine showed nearly complete release of AZT. At all pH conditions in the presence and absence of α-chymotrypsin, AZT was released preferentially in comparison with the succinyl derivative. The in-vivo release studies in rabbits after oral administration of AZT conjugate demonstrated a sustained release of parent drug over a period of 24 h. The pro-drug provided a significant increase in the area under the plasma concentration time curve as compared to free drug and extended the plasma half-life from 1.06 h to 8.08 h. This study suggested that, after oral administration, the drug-polymer conjugate can release AZT for prolonged periods, thus improving the pharmacokinetics of AZT and decreasing the fluctuation in plasma drug levels that can lead to toxicity.

  18. The effect of macromolecular crowding on the structure of the protein complex superoxide dismutase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapaksha Mudalige, Ajith Rathnaweera

    Biological environments contain between 7 - 40% macromolecules by volume. This reduces the available volume for macromolecules and elevates the osmotic pressure relative to pure water. Consequently, biological macromolecules in their native environments tend to adopt more compact and dehydrated conformations than those in vitro. This effect is referred to as macromolecular crowding and constitutes an important physical difference between native biological environments and the simple solutions in which biomolecules are usually studied. We used small angle scattering (SAS) to measure the effects of macromolecular crowding on the size of a protein complex, superoxide dismutase (SOD). Crowding was induced using 400 MW polyethylene glycol (PEG), triethylene glycol (TEG), methyl-alpha-glucoside (alpha-MG) and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). Parallel small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) allowed us to unambiguously attribute apparent changes in radius of gyration to changes in the structure of SOD. For a 40% PEG solution, we find that the volume of SOD was reduced by 9%. SAS coupled with osmotic pressure measurements allowed us to estimate a compressibility modulus for SOD. We believe this to be the first time the osmotic compressibility of a protein complex was measured. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are widely used to obtain insights on biomolecular processes. However, it is not clear whether MD is capable of predicting subtle effects of macromolecular crowding. We used our experimentally observed compressibility of SOD to evaluate the ability of MD to predict macromolecular crowding. Effects of macromolecular crowding due to PEG on SOD were modeled using an all atom MD simulation with the CHARMM forcefield and the crystallographically resolved structures of SOD and PEG. Two parallel MD simulations were performed for SOD in water and SOD in 40% PEG for over 150~ns. Over the period of the simulation the SOD structure in 40

  19. Nucleotide's bilinear indices: novel bio-macromolecular descriptors for bioinformatics studies of nucleic acids. I. Prediction of paromomycin's affinity constant with HIV-1 Psi-RNA packaging region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Ortega-Broche, Sadiel E; Díaz, Yunaimy Echeverría; Alvarado, Ysaias J; Cubillan, Nestor; Cardoso, Gladys Casas; Torrens, Francisco; Pérez-Giménez, Facundo

    2009-07-21

    A new set of nucleotide-based bio-macromolecular descriptors are presented. This novel approach to bio-macromolecular design from a linear algebra point of view is relevant to nucleic acids quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies. These bio-macromolecular indices are based on the calculus of bilinear maps on Re(n)[b(mk)(x (m),y (m)):Re(n) x Re(n)-->Re] in canonical basis. Nucleic acid's bilinear indices are calculated from kth power of non-stochastic and stochastic nucleotide's graph-theoretic electronic-contact matrices, M(m)(k) and (s)M(m)(k), respectively. That is to say, the kth non-stochastic and stochastic nucleic acid's bilinear indices are calculated using M(m)(k) and (s)M(m)(k) as matrix operators of bilinear transformations. Moreover, biochemical information is codified by using different pair combinations of nucleotide-base properties as weightings (experimental molar absorption coefficient epsilon(260) at 260 nm and pH=7.0, first (Delta E(1)) and second (Delta E(2)) single excitation energies in eV, and first (f(1)) and second (f(2)) oscillator strength values (of the first singlet excitation energies) of the nucleotide DNA-RNA bases. As example of this approach, an interaction study of the antibiotic paromomycin with the packaging region of the HIV-1 Psi-RNA have been performed and it have been obtained several linear models in order to predict the interaction strength. The best linear model obtained by using non-stochastic bilinear indices explains about 91% of the variance of the experimental Log K (R=0.95 and s=0.08 x 10(-4)M(-1)) as long as the best stochastic bilinear indices-based equation account for 93% of the Log K variance (R=0.97 and s=0.07 x 10(-4)M(-1)). The leave-one-out (LOO) press statistics, evidenced high predictive ability of both models (q(2)=0.86 and s(cv)=0.09 x 10(-4)M(-1) for non-stochastic and q(2)=0.91 and s(cv)=0.08 x 10(-4)M(-1) for stochastic bilinear indices). The nucleic acid's bilinear indices

  20. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B; Bench, G; Keating III, G; Palmblad, M; Vogel, J; Grant, P G; Hillegonds, D

    2004-02-17

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS.

  1. Fast and sensitive rigid-body fitting into cryo-EM density maps with PowerFit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.p.van Zundert, Gydo; M.j.j. Bonvin, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Cryo-EM is a rapidly developing method to investigate the three dimensional structure of large macromolecular complexes. In spite of all the advances in the field, the resolution of most cryo-EM density maps is too low for de novo model building. Therefore, the data are often complemented by fitting

  2. A Web Resource for Standardized Benchmark Datasets, Metrics, and Rosetta Protocols for Macromolecular Modeling and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó Conchúir, Shane; Barlow, Kyle A; Pache, Roland A; Ollikainen, Noah; Kundert, Kale; O'Meara, Matthew J; Smith, Colin A; Kortemme, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    The development and validation of computational macromolecular modeling and design methods depend on suitable benchmark datasets and informative metrics for comparing protocols. In addition, if a method is intended to be adopted broadly in diverse biological applications, there needs to be information on appropriate parameters for each protocol, as well as metrics describing the expected accuracy compared to experimental data. In certain disciplines, there exist established benchmarks and public resources where experts in a particular methodology are encouraged to supply their most efficient implementation of each particular benchmark. We aim to provide such a resource for protocols in macromolecular modeling and design. We present a freely accessible web resource (https://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/benchmarks) to guide the development of protocols for protein modeling and design. The site provides benchmark datasets and metrics to compare the performance of a variety of modeling protocols using different computational sampling methods and energy functions, providing a "best practice" set of parameters for each method. Each benchmark has an associated downloadable benchmark capture archive containing the input files, analysis scripts, and tutorials for running the benchmark. The captures may be run with any suitable modeling method; we supply command lines for running the benchmarks using the Rosetta software suite. We have compiled initial benchmarks for the resource spanning three key areas: prediction of energetic effects of mutations, protein design, and protein structure prediction, each with associated state-of-the-art modeling protocols. With the help of the wider macromolecular modeling community, we hope to expand the variety of benchmarks included on the website and continue to evaluate new iterations of current methods as they become available.

  3. D3, the new diffractometer for the macromolecular crystallography beamlines of the Swiss Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Martin R., E-mail: mfuchs@bnl.gov [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Mail Stop 745, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Pradervand, Claude; Thominet, Vincent; Schneider, Roman; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Grunder, Marcel; Gabadinho, Jose; Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Tomizaki, Takashi; Schneider, Jörg; Mayer, Aline; Curtin, Adrian; Olieric, Vincent; Frommherz, Uli; Kotrle, Goran; Welte, Jörg; Wang, Xinyu; Maag, Stephan [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schulze-Briese, Clemens [DECTRIS Ltd, Neuenhoferstrasse 107, 5400 Baden (Switzerland); Wang, Meitian [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-02-04

    A new diffractometer for microcrystallography has been developed for the three macromolecular crystallography beamlines of the Swiss Light Source. A new diffractometer for microcrystallography has been developed for the three macromolecular crystallography beamlines of the Swiss Light Source. Building upon and critically extending previous developments realised for the high-resolution endstations of the two undulator beamlines X06SA and X10SA, as well as the super-bend dipole beamline X06DA, the new diffractometer was designed to the following core design goals. (i) Redesign of the goniometer to a sub-micrometer peak-to-peak cylinder of confusion for the horizontal single axis. Crystal sizes down to at least 5 µm and advanced sample-rastering and scanning modes are supported. In addition, it can accommodate the new multi-axis goniometer PRIGo (Parallel Robotics Inspired Goniometer). (ii) A rapid-change beam-shaping element system with aperture sizes down to a minimum of 10 µm for microcrystallography measurements. (iii) Integration of the on-axis microspectrophotometer MS3 for microscopic sample imaging with 1 µm image resolution. Its multi-mode optical spectroscopy module is always online and supports in situ UV/Vis absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. (iv) High stability of the sample environment by a mineral cast support construction and by close containment of the cryo-stream. Further features are the support for in situ crystallization plate screening and a minimal achievable detector distance of 120 mm for the Pilatus 6M, 2M and the macromolecular crystallography group’s planned future area detector Eiger 16M.

  4. A Web Resource for Standardized Benchmark Datasets, Metrics, and Rosetta Protocols for Macromolecular Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Ó Conchúir

    Full Text Available The development and validation of computational macromolecular modeling and design methods depend on suitable benchmark datasets and informative metrics for comparing protocols. In addition, if a method is intended to be adopted broadly in diverse biological applications, there needs to be information on appropriate parameters for each protocol, as well as metrics describing the expected accuracy compared to experimental data. In certain disciplines, there exist established benchmarks and public resources where experts in a particular methodology are encouraged to supply their most efficient implementation of each particular benchmark. We aim to provide such a resource for protocols in macromolecular modeling and design. We present a freely accessible web resource (https://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/benchmarks to guide the development of protocols for protein modeling and design. The site provides benchmark datasets and metrics to compare the performance of a variety of modeling protocols using different computational sampling methods and energy functions, providing a "best practice" set of parameters for each method. Each benchmark has an associated downloadable benchmark capture archive containing the input files, analysis scripts, and tutorials for running the benchmark. The captures may be run with any suitable modeling method; we supply command lines for running the benchmarks using the Rosetta software suite. We have compiled initial benchmarks for the resource spanning three key areas: prediction of energetic effects of mutations, protein design, and protein structure prediction, each with associated state-of-the-art modeling protocols. With the help of the wider macromolecular modeling community, we hope to expand the variety of benchmarks included on the website and continue to evaluate new iterations of current methods as they become available.

  5. Functionalization of polyoxometalates by carboxylato and azido ligands: macromolecular complexes and extended compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mialane, Pierre; Dolbecq, Anne; Sécheresse, Francis

    2006-09-07

    Polyoxometalate compounds continue to be widely studied due to their relevance in various fields such as catalysis or magnetochemistry. In this article, we will focus on two topics we recently developed, the functionalization of rare earth polyoxometalates by organic ligands, which has led to compounds ranging from magnetic macromolecular complexes to a 3D open-framework system, and the functionalization of first row transition metal substituted polyoxometalates by azido ligands, which has allowed the isolation of complexes exhibiting the largest ferromagnetic exchange couplings observed to date in polyoxometalate chemistry.

  6. Integrated software for macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beamlines II: revision, robots and a database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, John M; Cowan, Matt; Buono, Rick; Nolan, William; Bosshard, Heinz; Robinson, Howard H; Héroux, Annie; Soares, Alexei S; Schneider, Dieter K; Sweet, Robert M

    2006-11-01

    This manuscript chronicles the evolution of software used originally to control a diffractometer at a macromolecular crystallography beamline. The system has been augmented and rewritten. A modular and carefully organized suite of programs now handles the whole experimental environment from a single vantage point. It provides automatic logging of the experiment and communication with the user, all the way from an initial proposal to perform the work to the end of data collection. This has included construction of a relational database to organize all details of the experiment and incorporation of a robotic specimen changer to provide automation for high-throughput applications.

  7. A proteolytic effect of Oenococcus oeni on the nitrogenous macromolecular fraction of red wine

    OpenAIRE

    Manca de Nadra, M. C.; Farias, M.E.; Moreno-Arribas, M? Victoria; Pueyo, E.; Polo, María Carmen

    1999-01-01

    The proteolytic activity of Oenococcus oeni protease on the release of individual amino acids and peptides from a red wine macromolecular nitrogenous fraction was evaluated. 148.7 mg l(-1) of individual amino acids were released and a difference of 109.5 mg l(-1) with respect to the amino acids liberation from white wine was observed. Stimulatory amino acids for O. oeni growth, glutamic acid and proline, were the most important amino acids obtained by the protease activity. In the HPLC and sp...

  8. Phosphorus ionization in silicon doped by self-assembled macromolecular monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haigang; Li, Ke; Gao, Xuejiao; Dan, Yaping

    2017-10-01

    Individual dopant atoms can be potentially controlled at large scale by the self-assembly of macromolecular dopant carriers. However, low concentration phosphorus dopants often suffer from a low ionization rate due to defects and impurities introduced by the carrier molecules. In this work, we demonstrated a nitrogen-free macromolecule doping technique and investigated the phosphorus ionization process by low temperature Hall effect measurements. It was found that the phosphorus dopants diffused into the silicon bulk are in nearly full ionization. However, the electrons ionized from the phosphorus dopants are mostly trapped by deep level defects that are likely carbon interstitials.

  9. Dark surfaces of asteroids and comets - Evidence for macromolecular carbon compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of very low-albedo material on the surfaces of some classes of asteroids (C,P,D) and most comets appears to be related to macromolecular carbon compounds on these bodies. Preliminary detections of an organic spectral signature have been reported for some asteroids. The complex refractory organics that occur in some meteorites are probably the material that makes low-albedo asteroids dark. Comet surfaces and ejected dust particles are also very low albedo, apparently resulting from the radiation processing of organic ices.

  10. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, G.; Pastore, A.; Piazza, F.; Temussi, P. A.

    2013-08-01

    More than 60 years of biochemical and biophysical studies have accustomed us to think of proteins as highly purified entities that act in isolation, more or less freely diffusing until they find their cognate partner to bind to. While in vitro experiments that reproduce these conditions largely remain the only way to investigate the intrinsic properties of molecules, this approach ignores an important factor: in their natural milieu , proteins are surrounded by several other molecules of different chemical nature, and this crowded environment can considerably modify their behaviour. About 40% of the cellular volume on average is occupied by all sorts of molecules. Furthermore, biological macromolecules live and operate in an extremely structured and complex environment within the cell (endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, cytoskeletal structures, etc). Hence, to further complicate the picture, the interior of the cell is by no means a simply crowded medium, rather, a most crowded and confining one. In recent times, several approaches have been developed in the attempt to take into account important factors such as the ones mentioned above, at both theoretical and experimental levels, so that this field of research is now emerging as one of the most thriving in molecular and cell biology (see figure 1). Figure 1. Figure 1. Left: number of articles containing the word 'crowding' as a keyword limited to the biological and chemical science domains (source: ISI Web of Science). The arrow flags the 2003 'EMBO Workshop on Biological Implications of Macromolecular Crowding' (Embo, 2012). Right: number of citations to articles containing the word 'crowding' limited to the same domains (bars) and an exponential regression curve (source: Elsevier Scopus). To promote the importance of molecular crowding and confinement and provide researchers active in this field an interdisciplinary forum for meeting and exchanging ideas, we recently organized an international conference

  11. Automated segmentation of molecular subunits in electron cryomicroscopy density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew L; Yu, Zeyun; Chiu, Wah; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2006-12-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) is capable of imaging large macromolecular machines composed of multiple components. However, it is currently only possible to achieve moderate resolution at which it may be possible to computationally extract the individual components in the machine. In this work, we present application details of an automated method for detecting and segmenting the components of a large machine in an experimentally determined density map. This method is applicable to object with and without symmetry and takes advantage of global and local symmetry axes if present. We have applied this segmentation algorithm to several cryoEM data sets already deposited in EMDB with various complexities, symmetries and resolutions and validated the results using manually segmented density and available structures of the components in the PDB. As such, automated segmentation could become a useful tool for the analysis of the ever-increasing number of structures of macromolecular machines derived from cryoEM.

  12. In vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Bruce A; Lenning, Jacob; Khetarpal, Nikita; Tran, Catherine; Wu, Johnny Y; Berri, Ali M; Dernay, Kristin; Haacke, E Mark; Shafie-Khorassani, Fatema; Podolsky, Robert H; Gant, John C; Maimaiti, Shaniya; Thibault, Olivier; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Bennett, Brian M; Roberts, Robin

    2017-09-01

    Hippocampus oxidative stress is considered pathogenic in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), and in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Angelman syndrome (AS). Yet clinical benefits of antioxidant treatment for these diseases remain unclear because conventional imaging methods are unable to guide management of therapies in specific hippocampus subfields in vivo that underlie abnormal behavior. Excessive production of paramagnetic free radicals in nonhippocampus brain tissue can be measured in vivo as a greater-than-normal 1/ T 1 that is quenchable with antioxidant as measured by quench-assisted (Quest) MRI. Here, we further test this approach in phantoms, and we present proof-of-concept data in models of AD-like and AS hippocampus oxidative stress that also exhibit impaired spatial learning and memory. AD-like models showed an abnormal gradient along the CA1 dorsal-ventral axis of excessive free radical production as measured by Quest MRI, and redox-sensitive calcium dysregulation as measured by manganese-enhanced MRI and electrophysiology. In the AS model, abnormally high free radical levels were observed in dorsal and ventral CA1. Quest MRI is a promising in vivo paradigm for bridging brain subfield oxidative stress and behavior in animal models and in human patients to better manage antioxidant therapy in devastating neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases.-Berkowitz, B. A., Lenning, J., Khetarpal, N., Tran, C., Wu, J. Y., Berri, A. M., Dernay, K., Haacke, E. M., Shafie-Khorassani, F., Podolsky, R. H., Gant, J. C., Maimaiti, S., Thibault, O., Murphy, G. G., Bennett, B. M., Roberts, R. In vivo imaging of prodromal hippocampus CA1 subfield oxidative stress in models of Alzheimer disease and Angelman syndrome. © FASEB.

  13. Pulsatile Gating of Giant Vesicles Containing Macromolecular Crowding Agents Induced by Colligative Nonideality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wan-Chih; Gettel, Douglas L; Chabanon, Morgan; Rangamani, Padmini; Parikh, Atul N

    2018-01-17

    The ability of large macromolecules to exhibit nontrivial deviations in colligative properties of their aqueous solutions is well-appreciated in polymer physics. Here, we show that this colligative nonideality subjects giant lipid vesicles containing inert macromolecular crowding agents to osmotic pressure differentials when bathed in small-molecule osmolytes at comparable concentrations. The ensuing influx of water across the semipermeable membrane induces characteristic swell-burst cycles: here, cyclical and damped oscillations in size, tension, and membrane phase separation occur en route to equilibration. Mediated by synchronized formation of transient pores, these cycles orchestrate pulsewise ejection of macromolecules from the vesicular interior reducing the osmotic differential in a stepwise manner. These experimental findings are fully corroborated by a theoretical model derived by explicitly incorporating the contributions of the solution viscosity, solute diffusivity, and the colligative nonideality of the osmotic pressure in a previously reported continuum description. Simulations based on this model account for the differences in the details of the noncolligatively induced swell-burst cycles, including numbers and periods of the repeating cycles, as well as pore lifetimes. Taken together, our observations recapitulate behaviors of vesicles and red blood cells experiencing sudden osmotic shocks due to large (hundreds of osmolars) differences in the concentrations of small molecule osmolytes and link intravesicular macromolecular crowding with membrane remodeling. They further suggest that any tendency for spontaneous overcrowding in single giant vesicles is opposed by osmotic stresses and requires independent specific interactions, such as associative chemical interactions or those between the crowders and the membrane boundary.

  14. Macromolecular Crowding Studies of Amino Acids Using NMR Diffusion Measurements and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amninder S Virk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular crowding occurs when the total concentration of macromolecular species in a solution is so high that a considerable proportion of the volume is physically occupied and therefore not accessible to other molecules. This results in significant changes in the solution properties of the molecules in such systems. Macromolecular crowding is ubiquitous in biological systems due to the generally high intracellular protein concentrations. The major hindrance to understanding crowding is the lack of direct comparison of experimental data with theoretical or simulated data. Self-diffusion is sensitive to changes in the molecular weight and shape of the diffusing species, and the available diffusion space (i.e., diffusive obstruction. Consequently, diffusion measurements are a direct means for probing crowded systems including the self-association of molecules. In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of the self-diffusion of four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine and phenylalanine up to their solubility limit in water were compared directly with molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental data were then analyzed using various models of aggregation and obstruction. Both experimental and simulated data revealed that the diffusion of both water and the amino acids were sensitive to the amino acid concentration. The direct comparison of the simulated and experimental data afforded greater insights into the aggregation and obstruction properties of each amino acid.

  15. Macromolecular diffusion characteristics of ageing human Bruch's membrane: implications for age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, A A; Starita, C; Hodgetts, A; Marshall, J

    2010-06-01

    Macromolecular species such as retinal binding protein, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, etc., released by the fenestrated choroidal capillaries must diffuse across Bruch's membrane for interaction with the basal membranes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) for delivery of essential metabolites to the neural retina. The patency of this pathway through ageing Bruch's was examined by quantifying the diffusional flux of a 21.2 kDa fluorescein-isothiocyanate labelled dextran. Dextran flux measurements across Bruch's membrane from the macular region of the human fundus showed a highly significant decrease (p < 0.001) with ageing of donor such that diffusional transport in the ninth decade was about 6.5% of that in the first decade of life. Peripheral regions also showed a highly significant decline (p < 0.001) but ageing changes were considerably slowed in comparison to the macula with diffusional rates in the ninth decade being about 44% of that in the first decade. Peripheral samples from AMD donors displayed diffusional rates that were lower than the control population. The age-related decline in macromolecular diffusion across Bruch's membrane suggests that in the elderly, the patency of the conducting pathways may be compromised and in the more advanced ageing of Bruch's associated with AMD, the metabolic trafficking of carrier proteins may be severely impaired. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. ISPyB: an information management system for synchrotron macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagenière, Solange; Brenchereau, Patrice; Launer, Ludovic; Ashton, Alun W; Leal, Ricardo; Veyrier, Stéphanie; Gabadinho, José; Gordon, Elspeth J; Jones, Samuel D; Levik, Karl Erik; McSweeney, Seán M; Monaco, Stéphanie; Nanao, Max; Spruce, Darren; Svensson, Olof; Walsh, Martin A; Leonard, Gordon A

    2011-11-15

    Individual research groups now analyze thousands of samples per year at synchrotron macromolecular crystallography (MX) resources. The efficient management of experimental data is thus essential if the best possible experiments are to be performed and the best possible data used in downstream processes in structure determination pipelines. Information System for Protein crystallography Beamlines (ISPyB), a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with an underlying data model allowing for the integration of analyses down-stream of the data collection experiment was developed to facilitate such data management. ISPyB is now a multisite, generic LIMS for synchrotron-based MX experiments. Its initial functionality has been enhanced to include improved sample tracking and reporting of experimental protocols, the direct ranking of the diffraction characteristics of individual samples and the archiving of raw data and results from ancillary experiments and post-experiment data processing protocols. This latter feature paves the way for ISPyB to play a central role in future macromolecular structure solution pipelines and validates the application of the approach used in ISPyB to other experimental techniques, such as biological solution Small Angle X-ray Scattering and spectroscopy, which have similar sample tracking and data handling requirements.

  17. MxCuBE: a synchrotron beamline control environment customized for macromolecular crystallography experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabadinho, José; Beteva, Antonia; Guijarro, Matias; Rey-Bakaikoa, Vicente; Spruce, Darren; Bowler, Matthew W; Brockhauser, Sandor; Flot, David; Gordon, Elspeth J; Hall, David R; Lavault, Bernard; McCarthy, Andrew A; McCarthy, Joanne; Mitchell, Edward; Monaco, Stéphanie; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Nurizzo, Didier; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Thibault, Xavier; Walsh, Martin A; Leonard, Gordon A; McSweeney, Sean M

    2010-09-01

    The design and features of a beamline control software system for macromolecular crystallography (MX) experiments developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. This system, MxCuBE, allows users to easily and simply interact with beamline hardware components and provides automated routines for common tasks in the operation of a synchrotron beamline dedicated to experiments in MX. Additional functionality is provided through intuitive interfaces that enable the assessment of the diffraction characteristics of samples, experiment planning, automatic data collection and the on-line collection and analysis of X-ray emission spectra. The software can be run in a tandem client-server mode that allows for remote control and relevant experimental parameters and results are automatically logged in a relational database, ISPyB. MxCuBE is modular, flexible and extensible and is currently deployed on eight macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the ESRF. Additionally, the software is installed at MAX-lab beamline I911-3 and at BESSY beamline BL14.1.

  18. The MX2 macromolecular crystallography beamline: a wiggler X-ray source at the LNLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Beatriz G; Sanfelici, Lucas; Neuenschwander, Regis T; Rodrigues, Flávio; Grizolli, Walan C; Raulik, Marco A; Piton, James R; Meyer, Bernd C; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Polikarpov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory [Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP, Brazil] is the first commissioned synchrotron light source in the southern hemisphere. The first wiggler macromolecular crystallography beamline (MX2) at the LNLS has been recently constructed and brought into operation. Here the technical design, experimental set-up, parameters of the beamline and the first experimental results obtained at MX2 are described. The beamline operates on a 2.0 T hybrid 30-pole wiggler, and its optical layout includes collimating mirror, Si(111) double-crystal monochromator and toroidal bendable mirror. The measured flux density at the sample position at 8.7 eV reaches 4.8 x 10(11) photons s(-1) mm(-2) (100 mA)(-1). The beamline is equipped with a MarResearch Desktop Beamline Goniostat (MarDTB) and 3 x 3 MarMosaic225 CCD detector, and is controlled by a customized version of the Blu-Ice software. A description of the first X-ray diffraction data sets collected at the MX2 LNLS beamline and used for macromolecular crystal structure solution is also provided.

  19. Assessing physio-macromolecular effects of lactic acid on Zygosaccharomyces bailii cells during microaerobic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuanyshev, Nurzhan; Ami, Diletta; Signori, Lorenzo; Porro, Danilo; Morrissey, John P; Branduardi, Paola

    2016-08-01

    The ability of Zygosaccharomyces bailii to grow at low pH and in the presence of considerable amounts of weak organic acids, at lethal condition for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, increased the interest in the biotechnological potential of the yeast. To understand the mechanism of tolerance and growth effect of weak acids on Z. bailii, we evaluated the physiological and macromolecular changes of the yeast exposed to sub lethal concentrations of lactic acid. Lactic acid represents one of the important commodity chemical which can be produced by microbial fermentation. We assessed physiological effect of lactic acid by bioreactor fermentation using synthetic media at low pH in the presence of lactic acid. Samples collected from bioreactors were stained with propidium iodide (PI) which revealed that, despite lactic acid negatively influence the growth rate, the number of PI positive cells is similar to that of the control. Moreover, we have performed Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) microspectroscopy analysis on intact cells of the same samples. This technique has been never applied before to study Z. bailii under this condition. The analyses revealed lactic acid induced macromolecular changes in the overall cellular protein secondary structures, and alterations of cell wall and membrane physico-chemical properties. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Can visco-elastic phase separation, macromolecular crowding and colloidal physics explain nuclear organisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, Francisco J

    2007-04-12

    The cell nucleus is highly compartmentalized with well-defined domains, it is not well understood how this nuclear order is maintained. Many scientists are fascinated by the different set of structures observed in the nucleus to attribute functions to them. In order to distinguish functional compartments from non-functional aggregates, I believe is important to investigate the biophysical nature of nuclear organisation. The various nuclear compartments can be divided broadly as chromatin or protein and/or RNA based, and they have very different dynamic properties. The chromatin compartment displays a slow, constrained diffusional motion. On the other hand, the protein/RNA compartment is very dynamic. Physical systems with dynamical asymmetry go to viscoelastic phase separation. This phase separation phenomenon leads to the formation of a long-lived interaction network of slow components (chromatin) scattered within domains rich in fast components (protein/RNA). Moreover, the nucleus is packed with macromolecules in the order of 300 mg/ml. This high concentration of macromolecules produces volume exclusion effects that enhance attractive interactions between macromolecules, known as macromolecular crowding, which favours the formation of compartments. In this paper I hypothesise that nuclear compartmentalization can be explained by viscoelastic phase separation of the dynamically different nuclear components, in combination with macromolecular crowding and the properties of colloidal particles. I demonstrate that nuclear structure can satisfy the predictions of this hypothesis. I discuss the functional implications of this phenomenon.

  1. A new paradigm for macromolecular crystallography beamlines derived from high-pressure methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourme, Roger, E-mail: roger.fourme@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Girard, Eric [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France); Dhaussy, Anne-Claire [CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard du Maréchal Juin, 14000 Caen (France); Medjoubi, Kadda [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Prangé, Thierry [LCRB (UMR 8015 CNRS), Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Pharmacie, 4 avenue de l’Observatoire, 75270 Paris (France); Ascone, Isabella [ENSCP (UMR CNRS 7223), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mezouar, Mohamed [ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Kahn, Richard [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography at high pressure (HPMX) is a mature technique. Shorter X-ray wavelengths increase data collection efficiency on cryocooled crystals. Extending applications and exploiting spin-off of HPMX will require dedicated synchrotron radiation beamlines based on a new paradigm. Biological structures can now be investigated at high resolution by high-pressure X-ray macromolecular crystallography (HPMX). The number of HPMX studies is growing, with applications to polynucleotides, monomeric and multimeric proteins, complex assemblies and even a virus capsid. Investigations of the effects of pressure perturbation have encompassed elastic compression of the native state, study of proteins from extremophiles and trapping of higher-energy conformers that are often of biological interest; measurements of the compressibility of crystals and macromolecules were also performed. HPMX results were an incentive to investigate short and ultra-short wavelengths for standard biocrystallography. On cryocooled lysozyme crystals it was found that the data collection efficiency using 33 keV photons is increased with respect to 18 keV photons. This conclusion was extended from 33 keV down to 6.5 keV by exploiting previously published data. To be fully exploited, the potential of higher-energy photons requires detectors with a good efficiency. Accordingly, a new paradigm for MX beamlines was suggested, using conventional short and ultra-short wavelengths, aiming at the collection of very high accuracy data on crystals under standard conditions or under high pressure. The main elements of such beamlines are outlined.

  2. Long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography - First successful native SAD experiment close to the sulfur edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurelius, O; Duman, R; El Omari, K; Mykhaylyk, V; Wagner, A

    2017-11-15

    Phasing of novel macromolecular crystal structures has been challenging since the start of structural biology. Making use of anomalous diffraction of natively present elements, such as sulfur and phosphorus, for phasing has been possible for some systems, but hindered by the necessity to access longer X-ray wavelengths in order to make most use of the anomalous scattering contributions of these elements. Presented here are the results from a first successful experimental phasing study of a macromolecular crystal structure at a wavelength close to the sulfur K edge. This has been made possible by the in-vacuum setup and the long-wavelength optimised experimental setup at the I23 beamline at Diamond Light Source. In these early commissioning experiments only standard data collection and processing procedures have been applied, in particular no dedicated absorption correction has been used. Nevertheless the success of the experiment demonstrates that the capability to extract phase information can be even further improved once data collection protocols and data processing have been optimised.

  3. The neurobiologist's guide to structural biology: a primer on why macromolecular structure matters and how to evaluate structural data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Daniel L

    2007-05-24

    Structural biology now plays a prominent role in addressing questions central to understanding how excitable cells function. Although interest in the insights gained from the definition and dissection of macromolecular anatomy is high, many neurobiologists remain unfamiliar with the methods employed. This primer aims to help neurobiologists understand approaches for probing macromolecular structure and where the limits and challenges remain. Using examples of macromolecules with neurobiological importance, the review covers X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy (EM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and biophysical methods with which these approaches are often paired: isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), equilibrium analytical ultracentifugation, and molecular dynamics (MD).

  4. Assessment of the Role of MAP Kinase in Mediating Activity-Dependent Transcriptional Activation of the Immediate Early Gene "Arc/Arg3.1" in the Dentate Gyrus in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotiner, Jennifer K.; Nielson, Jessica; Farris, Shannon; Lewandowski, Gail; Huang, Fen; Banos, Karla; de Leon, Ray; Steward, Oswald

    2010-01-01

    Different physiological and behavioral events activate transcription of "Arc/Arg3.1" in neurons in vivo, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate induction in particular situations remain to be defined. Here, we explore the relationships between induction of "Arc/Arg3.1" transcription in dentate granule cells in vivo and activation of…

  5. Mapping the human translation elongation factor eEF1H complex using the yeast two-hybrid system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Friis, Irene; Jadidi, Mandana

    2002-01-01

    of in vitro experiments have been proposed for the macromolecular organization of the eEF1H complex. However, these models differ in various aspects. This might be due to the difficulties of handling, particularly the eEF1B beta and eEF1B gamma subunits in vitro. Here, the human eEF1H complex is for the first...... time mapped using the yeast two-hybrid system, which is a powerful in vivo technique for analysing protein-protein interactions. The following complexes were observed: eEF1A1:eEF1B alpha, eEF1A1:eEF1B beta, eEF1B beta:eEF1B beta, eEF1B alpha:eEF1B gamma, eEF1B beta:eEF1B gamma and eEF1B alpha:eEF1B...... gamma:eEF1B beta, where the last was observed using a three-hybrid approach. Surprisingly, eEF1A2 showed no or only little affinity for the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors. Truncated versions of the subunits of eEF1B were used to orientate these subunits within the resulting model. The model unit...

  6. Cognitive maps

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchin, Rob

    2001-01-01

    A cognitive map is a representative expression of an individual's cognitive map knowledge, where cognitive map knowledge is an individual's knowledge about the spatial and environmental relations of geographic space. For example, a sketch map drawn to show the route between two locations is a cognitive map — a representative expression of the drawer's knowledge of the route between the two locations. This map can be analyzed using classification schemes or quantitatively using spatial statist...

  7. An optimal strategy for X-ray data collection on macromolecular crystals with position-sensitive detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vicković, Ivan; Kalk, Kor H.; Drenth, Jan; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray data collection on macromolecular crystals is preferably done with minimum exposure time and high completeness. A Fortran procedure - DCS - has been written in the environment of the MADNES program to predict the completeness of data before the start of actual data collection. In addition, the

  8. Proceedings of a one-week course on exploiting anomalous scattering in macromolecular structure determination (EMBO'07)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, M.S.; Shepard, W.; Dauter, Z.; Leslie, A.; Diederichs, K.; Evans, G.; Svensson, O.; Schneider, T.; Bricogne, G.; Dauter, Z.; Flensburg, C.; Terwilliger, T.; Lamzin, V.; Leslie, A.; Kabsch, W.; Flensburg, C.; Terwilliger, T.; Lamzin, V.; Read, R.; Panjikar, S.; Pannu, N.S.; Dauter, Z.; Weiss, M.S.; McSweeney, S

    2007-07-01

    This course, which was directed to young scientists, illustrated both theoretical and practical aspects of macromolecular crystal structure solution using synchrotron radiation. Some software dedicated to data collection, processing and analysis were presented. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  9. Macromolecular bipill of gemcitabine and methotrexate facilitates tumor-specific dual drug therapy with higher benefit-to-risk ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Manasmita; Jain, Roopal; Agrawal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports the synthesis, characterization, and biological evaluation of a novel macromolecular bipill, synthesized by appending two different anticancer agents, viz., gemcitabine (GEM) and methotrexate (MTX), to the distal ends of a long-circulating poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG...

  10. Probing the Interplay of Size, Shape, and Solution Environment in Macromolecular Diffusion Using a Simple Refraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankidy, Bijith D.; Coutinho, Cecil A.; Gupta, Vinay K.

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of polymers is a critical parameter in biomedicine, catalysis, chemical separations, nanotechnology, and other industrial applications. Here, measurement of macromolecular diffusion in solutions is described using a visually instructive, undergraduate-level optical refraction experiment based on Weiner's method. To…

  11. Errors in macromolecular synthesis after stress : a study of the possible protective role of the small heat shock proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin Vinader, L.

    2006-01-01

    The general goal of this thesis was to gain insight in what small heat shock proteins (sHsps) do with respect to macromolecular synthesis during a stressful situation in the cell. It is known that after a non-lethal heat shock, cells are better protected against a subsequent more severe heat shock,

  12. COMPARISON OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPONENT DISTRIBUTIONS IN OSTEOARTHRITIC AND HEALTHY CARTILAGES BY FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANHUA YIN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI was used to examine the depth-dependent content variations of macromolecular components, collagen and proteoglycan (PG, in osteoarthritic and healthy cartilages. Dried 6 μm thick sections of canine knee cartilages were imaged at 6.25 μm pixel-size in FTIRI. By analyzing the infrared (IR images and spectra, the depth dependence of characteristic band (sugar intensity of PG show obvious difference between the cartilage sections of (OA and health. The result confirms that PG content decreases in the osteoarthritic cartilage. However, no clear change occurs to collagen, suggesting that the OA influences little on the collagen content at early stage of OA. This observation will be helpful to further understand PG loss associated with pathological conditions in OA, and demonstrates that FTIRI has the potential to become an important analytical tool to identify early clinical signs of tissue degradation, such as PG loss even collagen disruption.

  13. RosettaScripts: a scripting language interface to the Rosetta macromolecular modeling suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Sarel J; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Corn, Jacob E; Strauch, Eva-Maria; Khare, Sagar D; Koga, Nobuyasu; Ashworth, Justin; Murphy, Paul; Richter, Florian; Lemmon, Gordon; Meiler, Jens; Baker, David

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular modeling and design are increasingly useful in basic research, biotechnology, and teaching. However, the absence of a user-friendly modeling framework that provides access to a wide range of modeling capabilities is hampering the wider adoption of computational methods by non-experts. RosettaScripts is an XML-like language for specifying modeling tasks in the Rosetta framework. RosettaScripts provides access to protocol-level functionalities, such as rigid-body docking and sequence redesign, and allows fast testing and deployment of complex protocols without need for modifying or recompiling the underlying C++ code. We illustrate these capabilities with RosettaScripts protocols for the stabilization of proteins, the generation of computationally constrained libraries for experimental selection of higher-affinity binding proteins, loop remodeling, small-molecule ligand docking, design of ligand-binding proteins, and specificity redesign in DNA-binding proteins.

  14. Mix and Inject: Reaction Initiation by Diffusion for Time-Resolved Macromolecular Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography unifies structure determination with chemical kinetics, since the structures of transient states and chemical and kinetic mechanisms can be determined simultaneously from the same data. To start a reaction in an enzyme, typically, an initially inactive substrate present in the crystal is activated. This has particular disadvantages that are circumvented when active substrate is directly provided by diffusion. However, then it is prohibitive to use macroscopic crystals because diffusion times become too long. With small micro- and nanocrystals diffusion times are adequately short for most enzymes and the reaction can be swiftly initiated. We demonstrate here that a time-resolved crystallographic experiment becomes feasible by mixing substrate with enzyme nanocrystals which are subsequently injected into the X-ray beam of a pulsed X-ray source.

  15. Whole Cell Imprinting in Sol-Gel Thin Films for Bacterial Recognition in Liquids: Macromolecular Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Armon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of organically modified silica (ORMOSILS produced by a sol-gel method were imprinted with whole cells of a variety of microorganisms in order to develop an easy and specific probe to concentrate and specifically identify these microorganisms in liquids (e.g., water. Microorganisms with various morphology and outer surface components were imprinted into thin sol-gel films. Adsorption of target microorganism onto imprinted films was facilitated by these macromolecular fingerprints as revealed by various microscopical examinations (SEM, AFM, HSEM and CLSM. The imprinted films showed high selectivity toward each of test microorganisms with high adsorption affinity making them excellent candidates for rapid detection of microorganisms from liquids.

  16. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilca, Serban L; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M; Stuart, David I; Huiskonen, Juha T

    2015-11-04

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems.

  17. DA+ data acquisition and analysis software at the Swiss Light Source macromolecular crystallography beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Justyna Aleksandra; Kaminski, Jakub W; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Ebner, Simon; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Gabadinho, Jose; Wang, Meitian

    2018-01-01

    Data acquisition software is an essential component of modern macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamlines, enabling efficient use of beam time at synchrotron facilities. Developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, the DA+ data acquisition software is implemented at all three Swiss Light Source (SLS) MX beamlines. DA+ consists of distributed services and components written in Python and Java, which communicate via messaging and streaming technologies. The major components of DA+ are the user interface, acquisition engine, online processing and database. Immediate data quality feedback is achieved with distributed automatic data analysis routines. The software architecture enables exploration of the full potential of the latest instrumentation at the SLS MX beamlines, such as the SmarGon goniometer and the EIGER X 16M detector, and development of new data collection methods.

  18. Theory and applications of the generalized Born solvation model in macromolecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, V; Case, D A

    Generalized Born (GB) models provide an attractive way to include some thermodynamic aspects of aqueous solvation into simulations that do not explicitly model the solvent molecules. Here we discuss our recent experience with this model, presenting in detail the way it is implemented and parallelized in the AMBER molecular modeling code. We compare results using the GB model (or GB plus a surface-area based "hydrophobic" term) to explicit solvent simulations for a 10 base-pair DNA oligomer, and for the 108-residue protein thioredoxin. A slight modification of our earlier suggested parameters makes the GB results more like those found in explicit solvent, primarily by slightly increasing the strength of NH [bond] O and NH [bond] N internal hydrogen bonds. Timing and energy stability results are reported, with an eye toward using these model for simulations of larger macromolecular systems and longer time scales. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biopolymers (Nucleic Acid Sci) 56: 275-291, 2001

  19. Integration and global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data for studying macromolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Chad A; Zhao, Huaying; Vargas, Carolyn; Keller, Sandro; Schuck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful and widely used method to measure the energetics of macromolecular interactions by recording a thermogram of differential heating power during a titration. However, traditional ITC analysis is limited by stochastic thermogram noise and by the limited information content of a single titration experiment. Here we present a protocol for bias-free thermogram integration based on automated shape analysis of the injection peaks, followed by combination of isotherms from different calorimetric titration experiments into a global analysis, statistical analysis of binding parameters and graphical presentation of the results. This is performed using the integrated public-domain software packages NITPIC, SEDPHAT and GUSSI. The recently developed low-noise thermogram integration approach and global analysis allow for more precise parameter estimates and more reliable quantification of multisite and multicomponent cooperative and competitive interactions. Titration experiments typically take 1-2.5 h each, and global analysis usually takes 10-20 min.

  20. A novel approach for assesing macromolecular complexes combining soft-docking calculations with NMR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Xavier J.; Palma, P. Nuno; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Rigby, Alan C.

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel and efficient approach for assessing protein–protein complex formation, which combines ab initio docking calculations performed with the protein docking algorithm BiGGER and chemical shift perturbation data collected with heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) or TROSY nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This method, termed "restrained soft-docking," is validated for several known protein complexes. These data demonstrate that restrained soft-docking extends the size limitations of NMR spectroscopy and provides an alternative method for investigating macromolecular protein complexes that requires less experimental time, effort, and resources. The potential utility of this novel NMR and simulated docking approach in current structural genomic initiatives is discussed. PMID:11567104

  1. Functionalization of Planet-Satellite Nanostructures Revealed by Nanoscopic Localization of Distinct Macromolecular Species

    KAUST Repository

    Rossner, Christian

    2016-09-26

    The development of a straightforward method is reported to form hybrid polymer/gold planet-satellite nanostructures (PlSNs) with functional polymer. Polyacrylate type polymer with benzyl chloride in its backbone as a macromolecular tracer is synthesized to study its localization within PlSNs by analyzing the elemental distribution of chlorine. The functionalized nanohybrid structures are analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and spectrum imaging. The results show that the RAFT (reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer) polymers\\' sulfur containing end groups are colocalized at the gold cores, both within nanohybrids of simple core-shell morphology and within higher order PlSNs, providing microscopic evidence for the affinity of the RAFT group toward gold surfaces. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA., Weinheim.

  2. Phase behaviour of macromolecular liquid crystalline materials. Computational studies at the molecular level

    CERN Document Server

    Stimson, L M

    2003-01-01

    Molecular simulations provide an increasingly useful insight into the static and dynamic characteristics of materials. In this thesis molecular simulations of macro-molecular liquid crystalline materials are reported. The first liquid crystalline material that has been investigated is a side chain liquid crystal polymer (SCLCP). In this study semi-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted at a range of temperatures and an aligning potential has been applied to mimic the effect of a magnetic field. In cooling the SCLCP from an isotropic melt, microphase separation was observed yielding a domain structure. The application of a magnetic field to this structure aligns the domains producing a stable smectic mesophase. This is the first study in which mesophases have been observed using an off-lattice model of a SCLCP. The second material that has been investigated is a dendrimer with terminal mesogenic functionalization. Here, a multi-scale approach has been taken with Monte Carlo studies of a s...

  3. Phenix - a comprehensive python-based system for macromolecular structure solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hung, Li - Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adams, Paul D [UC BERKELEY; Afonine, Pavel V [UC BERKELEY; Bunkoczi, Gabor [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE; Chen, Vincent B [DUKE UNIV; Davis, Ian [DUKE UNIV; Echols, Nathaniel [LBNL; Headd, Jeffrey J [DUKE UNIV; Grosse Kunstleve, Ralf W [LBNL; Mccoy, Airlie J [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE; Moriarty, Nigel W [LBNL; Oeffner, Robert [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE; Read, Randy J [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE; Richardson, David C [DUKE UNIV; Richardson, Jane S [DUKE UNIV; Zwarta, Peter H [LBNL

    2009-01-01

    Macromolecular X-ray crystallography is routinely applied to understand biological processes at a molecular level. However, significant time and effort are still required to solve and complete many of these structures because of the need for manual interpretation of complex numerical data using many software packages, and the repeated use of interactive three-dimensional graphics. Phenix has been developed to provide a comprehensive system for crystallographic structure solution with an emphasis on automation of all procedures. This has relied on the development of algorithms that minimize or eliminate subjective input, the development of algorithms that automate procedures that are traditionally performed by hand, and finally the development of a framework that allows a tight integration between the algorithms.

  4. The macromolecular crystallography beamline I911-3 at the MAX IV laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursby, Thomas; Unge, Johan; Appio, Roberto; Logan, Derek T; Fredslund, Folmer; Svensson, Christer; Larsson, Krister; Labrador, Ana; Thunnissen, Marjolein M G M

    2013-07-01

    The macromolecular crystallography beamline I911-3, part of the Cassiopeia/I911 suite of beamlines, is based on a superconducting wiggler at the MAX II ring of the MAX IV Laboratory in Lund, Sweden. The beamline is energy-tunable within a range between 6 and 18 keV. I911-3 opened for users in 2005. In 2010-2011 the experimental station was completely rebuilt and refurbished such that it has become a state-of-the-art experimental station with better possibilities for rapid throughput, crystal screening and work with smaller samples. This paper describes the complete I911-3 beamline and how it is embedded in the Cassiopeia suite of beamlines.

  5. Improvements toward highly accurate diffraction experiments at the macromolecular micro-crystallography beamline BL-17A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Chavas, Leonard M G; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Hiraki, Masahiko; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Matsugaki, Naohiro

    2013-11-01

    BL-17A is a macromolecular crystallography beamline dedicated to diffraction experiments conducted using micro-crystals and structure determination studies using a lower energy X-ray beam. In these experiments, highly accurate diffraction intensity measurements are definitively important. Since this beamline was constructed, the beamline apparatus has been improved in several ways to enable the collection of accurate diffraction data. The stability of the beam intensities at the sample position was recently improved by modifying the monochromator. The diffractometer has also been improved. A new detector table was installed to prevent distortions in the diffractometer's base during the repositioning of the diffractometer detector. A new pinhole system and an on-axis viewing system were installed to improve the X-ray beam profile at the sample position and the centering of tiny crystal samples.

  6. The macromolecular crystallography beamline I911-3 at the MAX IV laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursby, Thomas; Unge, Johan; Appio, Roberto; Logan, Derek T.; Fredslund, Folmer; Svensson, Christer; Larsson, Krister; Labrador, Ana; Thunnissen, Marjolein M. G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The macromolecular crystallography beamline I911-3, part of the Cassiopeia/I911 suite of beamlines, is based on a superconducting wiggler at the MAX II ring of the MAX IV Laboratory in Lund, Sweden. The beamline is energy-tunable within a range between 6 and 18 keV. I911-3 opened for users in 2005. In 2010–2011 the experimental station was completely rebuilt and refurbished such that it has become a state-of-the-art experimental station with better possibilities for rapid throughput, crystal screening and work with smaller samples. This paper describes the complete I911-3 beamline and how it is embedded in the Cassiopeia suite of beamlines. PMID:23765310

  7. C1 Polymerization: a unique tool towards polyethylene-based complex macromolecular architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, De

    2017-05-09

    The recent developments in organoborane initiated C1 polymerization (chain grows by one atom at a time) of ylides opens unique horizons towards well-defined/perfectly linear polymethylenes (equivalent to polyethylenes, PE) and PE-based complex macromolecular architectures. The general mechanism of C1 polymerization (polyhomologation) involves the formation of a Lewis complex between a methylide (monomer) and a borane (initiator), followed by migration/insertion of a methylene into the initiator and after oxidation/hydrolysis to afford OH-terminated polyethylenes. This review summarizes efforts towards conventional and newly discovered borane-initiators and ylides (monomers), as well as a combination of polyhomologation with other polymerization methods. Initial efforts dealing with C3 polymerization and the synthesis of the first C1/C3 copolymers are also given. Finally, some thoughts for the future of these polymerizations are presented.

  8. Switchable enantioseparation based on macromolecular memory of a helical polyacetylene in the solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Kouhei; Ikai, Tomoyuki; Kanoh, Shigeyoshi; Yashima, Eiji; Maeda, Katsuhiro

    2014-05-01

    In the chromatographic separation of enantiomers the order of elution is determined by the strength of diasteromeric interactions between the components of the mixture and a chiral stationary phase. For analytical purposes, it is ideal to have the minor component elute first, whereas in the preparative mode a faster elution of the major component is desirable. Here we describe a stationary phase constructed from a polyacetylene that bears 2,2‧-bisphenol-derived side chains in which chirality can be switched in the solid state prior to use. Both the macromolecular helicity of the polymer backbone and the axial chirality of the side chains can be switched in the solid state by interaction with a chiral alcohol, but importantly are maintained after removal of the chiral alcohol because of a memory effect. The chiral stationary phase thus prepared was used to separate the enantiomers of trans-stilbene oxide with the enantiomer elution order determined by the preseparation treatment.

  9. Dynamic simulation of concentrated macromolecular solutions with screened long-range hydrodynamic interactions: algorithm and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tadashi; Chow, Edmond; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2013-09-28

    Hydrodynamic interactions exert a critical effect on the dynamics of macromolecules. As the concentration of macromolecules increases, by analogy to the behavior of semidilute polymer solutions or the flow in porous media, one might expect hydrodynamic screening to occur. Hydrodynamic screening would have implications both for the understanding of macromolecular dynamics as well as practical implications for the simulation of concentrated macromolecular solutions, e.g., in cells. Stokesian dynamics (SD) is one of the most accurate methods for simulating the motions of N particles suspended in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number, in that it considers both far-field and near-field hydrodynamic interactions. This algorithm traditionally involves an O(N(3)) operation to compute Brownian forces at each time step, although asymptotically faster but more complex SD methods are now available. Motivated by the idea of hydrodynamic screening, the far-field part of the hydrodynamic matrix in SD may be approximated by a diagonal matrix, which is equivalent to assuming that long range hydrodynamic interactions are completely screened. This approximation allows sparse matrix methods to be used, which can reduce the apparent computational scaling to O(N). Previously there were several simulation studies using this approximation for monodisperse suspensions. Here, we employ newly designed preconditioned iterative methods for both the computation of Brownian forces and the solution of linear systems, and consider the validity of this approximation in polydisperse suspensions. We evaluate the accuracy of the diagonal approximation method using an intracellular-like suspension. The diffusivities of particles obtained with this approximation are close to those with the original method. However, this approximation underestimates intermolecular correlated motions, which is a trade-off between accuracy and computing efficiency. The new method makes it possible to perform large

  10. Concept Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Explains concept mapping as a heuristic device that is helpful in visualizing the relationships between and among ideas. Highlights include how to begin a map; brainstorming; map applications, including document or information summaries and writing composition; and mind mapping to strengthen note-taking. (LRW)

  11. Concept Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Schwendimann, Beat Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A concept map is a node-link diagram showing the semantic relationships among concepts. The technique for constructing concept maps is called "concept mapping". A concept map consists of nodes, arrows as linking lines, and linking phrases that describe the relationship between nodes. Two nodes connected with a labeled arrow are called a proposition. Concept maps are versatile graphic organizers that can represent many different forms of relationships between concepts. The relationship between...

  12. Developmental broadening of inhibitory sensory maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Kathleen B; Ung, Kevin; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Huang, Longwen; Herman, Isabella; Addison, Angela P; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Cordiner, Keith; Saggau, Peter; Tolias, Andreas S; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2017-01-01

    Sensory maps are created by networks of neuronal responses that vary with their anatomical position, such that representations of the external world are systematically and topographically organized in the brain. Current understanding from studying excitatory maps is that maps are sculpted and refined throughout development and/or through sensory experience. Investigating the mouse olfactory bulb, where ongoing neurogenesis continually supplies new inhibitory granule cells into existing circuitry, we isolated the development of sensory maps formed by inhibitory networks. Using in vivo calcium imaging of odor responses, we compared functional responses of both maturing and established granule cells. We found that, in contrast to the refinement observed for excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps became broader with maturation. However, like excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps are sensitive to experience. These data describe the development of an inhibitory sensory map as a network, highlighting the differences from previously described excitatory maps. PMID:28024159

  13. Developmental broadening of inhibitory sensory maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Kathleen B; Ung, Kevin; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Huang, Longwen; Herman, Isabella; Addison, Angela P; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Cordiner, Keith; Saggau, Peter; Tolias, Andreas S; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2017-02-01

    Sensory maps are created by networks of neuronal responses that vary with their anatomical position, such that representations of the external world are systematically and topographically organized in the brain. Current understanding from studying excitatory maps is that maps are sculpted and refined throughout development and/or through sensory experience. Investigating the mouse olfactory bulb, where ongoing neurogenesis continually supplies new inhibitory granule cells into existing circuitry, we isolated the development of sensory maps formed by inhibitory networks. Using in vivo calcium imaging of odor responses, we compared functional responses of both maturing and established granule cells. We found that, in contrast to the refinement observed for excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps became broader with maturation. However, like excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps are sensitive to experience. These data describe the development of an inhibitory sensory map as a network, highlighting the differences from previously described excitatory maps.

  14. In vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenblum, Julia; Iglesias, José A; Hermann, Martin; Walsen, Tanja; Wilfinger, Armin; Meyer, Dirk; Kimmel, Robin A

    2018-02-08

    The three-dimensional architecture of the pancreatic islet is integral to beta cell function, but the process of islet formation remains poorly understood due to the difficulties of imaging internal organs with cellular resolution. Within transparent zebrafish larvae, the developing pancreas is relatively superficial and thus amenable to live imaging approaches. We performed in vivo time-lapse and longitudinal imaging studies to follow islet development, visualizing both naturally occurring islet cells and cells arising with an accelerated timecourse following an induction approach. These studies revealed previously unappreciated fine dynamic protrusions projecting between neighboring and distant endocrine cells. Using pharmacological compound and toxin interference approaches, and single-cell analysis of morphology and cell dynamics, we determined that endocrine cell motility is regulated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Linking cell dynamics to islet formation, perturbation of protrusion formation disrupted endocrine cell coalescence, and correlated with decreased islet cell differentiation. These studies identified novel cell behaviors contributing to islet morphogenesis, and suggest a model in which dynamic exploratory filopodia establish cell-cell contacts that subsequently promote cell clustering. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Melissa; Li, Jianli; Cline, Hollis T

    2017-01-01

    The neurovascular niche is a specialized microenvironment formed by the interactions between neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and the vasculature. While it is thought to regulate adult neurogenesis by signaling through vascular-derived soluble cues or contacted-mediated cues, less is known about the neurovascular niche during development. In Xenopus laevis tadpole brain, NPCs line the ventricle and extend radial processes tipped with endfeet to the vascularized pial surface. Using in vivo labeling and time-lapse imaging in tadpoles, we find that intracardial injection of fluorescent tracers rapidly labels Sox2/3-expressing NPCs and that vascular-circulating molecules are endocytosed by NPC endfeet. Confocal imaging indicates that about half of the endfeet appear to appose the vasculature, and time-lapse analysis of NPC proliferation and endfeet-vascular interactions suggest that proliferative activity does not correlate with stable vascular apposition. Together, these findings characterize the neurovascular niche in the developing brain and suggest that, while signaling to NPCs may occur through vascular-derived soluble cues, stable contact between NPC endfeet and the vasculature is not required for developmental neurogenesis.

  16. IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamila, Nargis; Khan, Naeem; Khan, Amir Atlas; Khan, Imran; Khan, Sadiq Noor; Zakaria, Zainal Amiruddin; Khairuddean, Melati; Osman, Hasnah; Kim, Kyong Su

    2017-01-01

    Garcinia hombroniana , known as "manggis hutan" (jungle mangosteen) in Malaysia, is distributed in tropical Asia, Borneo, Thailand, Andaman, Nicobar Islands, Vietnam and India. In Malaysia, its ripened crimson sour fruit rind is used as a seasoning agent in curries and culinary dishes. Its roots and leaves decoction is used against skin infections and after child birth. This study aimed to evaluate in vivo hepatoprotective and in vitro cytotoxic activities of 20% methanolic ethyl acetate (MEA) G. hombroniana bark extract. In hepatoprotective activity, liver damage was induced by treating rats with 1.0 mL carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 )/kg and MEA extract was administered at a dose of 50, 250 and 500 mg/kg 24 h before intoxication with CCl 4 . Cytotoxicity study was performed on MCF-7 (human breast cancer), DBTRG (human glioblastoma), PC-3 (human prostate cancer) and U2OS (human osteosarcoma) cell lines. 1 H, 13 C-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance), and IR (infrared) spectral analyses were also conducted for MEA extract. In hepatoprotective activity evaluation, MEA extract at a higher dose level of 500 mg/kg showed significant (pIR spectra exhibited bands, signals and J (coupling constant) values representing aromatic/phenolic constituents. From the results, it could be concluded that MEA extract has potency to inhibit hepatotoxicity and MCF-7 and DBTRG cancer cell lines which might be due to the phenolic compounds depicted from NMR and IR spectra.

  17. High-pressure jet injection of viscous solutions for endoscopic submucosal dissection: a study on ex vivo pig stomachs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioche, Mathieu; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Lépilliez, Vincent; Salmon, Damien; Mais, Laetitia; Guillaud, Olivier; Hervieu, Valérie; Petronio, Marco; Lienhart, Isabelle; Adriano, Jean-Luc; Lafon, Cyril; Ponchon, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Long-lasting lifting is a key factor during endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and can be obtained by water-jet injection of saline solution or by injection of viscous macromolecular solutions. Combination of the jet injection and the macromolecular viscous solutions has never been used yet. We assessed the ability of a new water-jet system to inject viscous solutions in direct viewing and in retroflexion. We compared jet injection of saline solution and hyaluronate 0.5 % to perform ESD on ex vivo pig stomachs in order to evaluate the benefits of macromolecular solutions when injected by a jet-injector system. This is a prospective comparative study in pig stomachs. Using the jet injector, four viscous solutions were tested: hydroxyethyl starch, glycerol mix, hyaluronate sodic (0.5 %), and poloxamer mix. Ten ESDs larger than 25 mm (five in direct viewing and five in retroflexion) and one larger than 10 cm were performed with each solution. ESD with hyaluronate jet injection was then compared with ESD with saline jet injection by performing 50 ESDs in each group. A single, minimally-experienced operator conducted all the procedures. All 145 resections were complete, including all marking points with two perforations. Eleven jet ESDs per solution were conducted without any injection issue. In the second part of the study, when compared with saline, significant benefit of hyaluronate was observed on dissection speed (0.80 vs. 1.08 cm(2)/min, p < 0.001). This is the first report on a jet-injector system allowing injection of macromolecular viscous solutions even with retroflexed endoscope. Jet injection of macromolecular solutions can speed up dissection in comparison with saline, and should now be tested on humans.

  18. High-quality binary interactome mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreze, Matija; Monachello, Dario; Lurin, Claire; Cusick, Michael E; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Braun, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Physical interactions mediated by proteins are critical for most cellular functions and altogether form a complex macromolecular "interactome" network. Systematic mapping of protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein-RNA, and protein-metabolite interactions at the scale of the whole proteome can advance understanding of interactome networks with applications ranging from single protein functional characterization to discoveries on local and global systems properties. Since the early efforts at mapping protein-protein interactome networks a decade ago, the field has progressed rapidly giving rise to a growing number of interactome maps produced using high-throughput implementations of either binary protein-protein interaction assays or co-complex protein association methods. Although high-throughput methods are often thought to necessarily produce lower quality information than low-throughput experiments, we have recently demonstrated that proteome-scale interactome datasets can be produced with equal or superior quality than that observed in literature-curated datasets derived from large numbers of small-scale experiments. In addition to performing all experimental steps thoroughly and including all necessary controls and quality standards, careful verification of all interacting pairs and validation tests using independent, orthogonal assays are crucial to ensure the release of interactome maps of the highest possible quality. This chapter describes a high-quality, high-throughput binary protein-protein interactome mapping pipeline that includes these features. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, G; Pastore, A; Piazza, F; Temussi, P A

    2013-08-02

    More than 60 years of biochemical and biophysical studies have accustomed us to think of proteins as highly purified entities that act in isolation, more or less freely diffusing until they find their cognate partner to bind to. While in vitro experiments that reproduce these conditions largely remain the only way to investigate the intrinsic properties of molecules, this approach ignores an important factor: in their natural milieu , proteins are surrounded by several other molecules of different chemical nature, and this crowded environment can considerably modify their behaviour. About 40% of the cellular volume on average is occupied by all sorts of molecules. Furthermore, biological macromolecules live and operate in an extremely structured and complex environment within the cell (endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, cytoskeletal structures, etc). Hence, to further complicate the picture, the interior of the cell is by no means a simply crowded medium, rather, a most crowded and confining one. In recent times, several approaches have been developed in the attempt to take into account important factors such as the ones mentioned above, at both theoretical and experimental levels, so that this field of research is now emerging as one of the most thriving in molecular and cell biology (see figure 1). [Formula: see text] Figure 1. Left: number of articles containing the word 'crowding' as a keyword limited to the biological and chemical science domains (source: ISI Web of Science). The arrow flags the 2003 'EMBO Workshop on Biological Implications of Macromolecular Crowding' (Embo, 2012). Right: number of citations to articles containing the word 'crowding' limited to the same domains (bars) and an exponential regression curve (source: Elsevier Scopus). To promote the importance of molecular crowding and confinement and provide researchers active in this field an interdisciplinary forum for meeting and exchanging ideas, we recently organized an international

  20. Organic sulphur in macromolecular sedimentary organic matter : I. Structure and origin of sulphur-containing moieties in kerogen, asphaltene and coal as revealed by flash pyrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Eglinton, T.I.; Leeuw, J.W. de; Schenk, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The distributions of sulphur-containing compounds generated by flash pyrolysis of macromolecular sedimentary organic matter (kerogen, coal, asphaltenes) were studied by gas chromatography in combination with S-selective flame photometric detection or mass spectrometry. The abundance of

  1. Beamline AR-NW12A: high-throughput beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the Photon Factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavas, L M G; Matsugaki, N; Yamada, Y; Hiraki, M; Igarashi, N; Suzuki, M; Wakatsuki, S

    2012-05-01

    AR-NW12A is an in-vacuum undulator beamline optimized for high-throughput macromolecular crystallography experiments as one of the five macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamlines at the Photon Factory. This report provides details of the beamline design, covering its optical specifications, hardware set-up, control software, and the latest developments for MX experiments. The experimental environment presents state-of-the-art instrumentation for high-throughput projects with a high-precision goniometer with an adaptable goniometer head, and a UV-light sample visualization system. Combined with an efficient automounting robot modified from the SSRL SAM system, a remote control system enables fully automated and remote-access X-ray diffraction experiments.

  2. Distribution and enzymatic activity of heterotrophic bacteria decomposing selected macromolecular compounds in a Baltic Sea sandy beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórska, B.; Mudryk, Z. J.

    2003-03-01

    The potential capability to decompose macromolecular compounds, and the level of extracellular enzyme activities were determined in heterotrophic bacteria isolated from a sandy beach in Sopot on the Southern Baltic Sea coast. Individual isolates were capable of hydrolysing a wide spectrum of organic macromolecular compounds. Lipids, gelatine, and DNA were hydrolyzed most efficiently. Only a very small percentage of strains were able to decompose cellulose, and no pectinolytic bacteria were found. Except for starch-hydrolysis, no significant differences in the intensity of organic compound decomposition were recorded between horizontal and vertical profiles of the studied beach. Of all the studied extracellular enzymes, alkaline phosphatase, esterase lipase, and leucine acrylaminidase were most active; in contrast, the activity α-fucosidase, α-galactosidase and β-glucouronidase was the weakest. The level of extracellular enzyme activity was similar in both sand layers.

  3. On the vibron dressing in the one-dimensional macromolecular chains caused by the interaction with acoustic phonon modes

    CERN Document Server

    Cevizovic, Dalibor; Galovic, Slobodanka; Ivic, Zoran

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the physical properties of the vibrational excitation in the one-dimensional macromolecular chains, caused by the interaction with acoustical phonon modes. The influence of the temperature and the basic system parameters on the vibron dressing has been analyzed by employing the simple mean--field approach based on the variational extension of the Lang--Firsov unitary transformation. Applied approach predicts a region in system parameter space where it is possible of the coexistence of the partially dressed (light and mobile) and fully dressed (immobile) vibron states. We found that the boundary of this region depends on system temperature and type of bond among structure elements in macromolecular chain.

  4. DISTURBANCE OF THE CARDIOMYOCYTE’S MACROMOLECULAR STRUCTURE IN HEART ALLOGRAFTS AS A SIGN OF CHRONIC REJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Kupriyanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic rejection, especially cardiac allograft vasculopathy, is a major limiting factor for long-term transplant survival. This process affects not only the blood vessels, but also cardiomyocytes. However, there are extremely few reports on the evaluation of their macromolecular structure state. The aim of the study was to evaluate the structural proteins of cardiomyocytes (actin, myosin, troponin I, titin, desmin, vinculin of heart allografts in different periods after the operation (from 6 days to 15 years. Major changes of macromolecular structure were revealed in late period after transplantation (6 months – 15 years. The contribution of humoral immune response in the process of chronic cardiac allograft rejection was observed: in eight of twelve recipients episodes of acute humoral rejection had been repeatedly registered; disorders of the expression of 5 proteins out of 6 characterized were found in recipients with recurrent and persistent antibody-mediated rejection. 

  5. Macromolecular pHPMA-based nanoparticles with cholesterol for solid tumor targeting: behavior in HSA protein environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, X.; Niebuur, B.-J.; Chytil, Petr; Etrych, Tomáš; Filippov, Sergey K.; Kikhney, A.; Wieland, D. C. F.; Svergun, D. I.; Papadakis, C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2018), s. 470-480 ISSN 1525-7797 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-10527J; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28594A; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polymer carriers * N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide * tumor targeting Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 5.246, year: 2016

  6. C,N-2-[(Dimethylamino)methyl]phenylplatinum Complexes Functionalized with C60 as Macromolecular Building Blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Meijer, M.D.; Wolf, E. de; Lutz, M.H.; Spek, A.L.; Klink, G.P.M. van

    2001-01-01

    The application of platinum(II) complexes based on the N,N-dimethylbenzylamine ligand (abbreviated as H-C,N) in macromolecular synthesis was demonstrated. Two cationic C,N-platinum moieties were linked with a 4,4'-bipyridine bridge, giving [{C6H4(CH2NMe2)-2-Pt(PPh3)}2(4,4'-bpy)](BF4)2 (2), the

  7. A facile metal-free "grafting-from" route from acrylamide-based substrate toward complex macromolecular combs

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Junpeng

    2013-01-01

    High-molecular-weight poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) was used as a model functional substrate to investigate phosphazene base (t-BuP 4)-promoted metal-free anionic graft polymerization utilizing primary amide moieties as initiating sites. The (co)polymerization of epoxides was proven to be effective, leading to macromolecular combs with side chains being single- or double-graft homopolymer, block copolymer and statistical copolymer. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. 08B1-1: an automated beamline for macromolecular crystallography experiments at the Canadian Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodje, Michel; Grochulski, Pawel; Janzen, Kathryn; Labiuk, Shaunivan; Gorin, James; Berg, Russ

    2014-05-01

    Beamline 08B1-1 is a recently commissioned bending-magnet beamline at the Canadian Light Source. The beamline is designed for automation and remote access. Together with the undulator-based beamline 08ID-1, they constitute the Canadian Macromolecular Crystallography Facility. This paper describes the design, specifications, hardware and software of beamline 08B1-1. A few scientific results using data obtained at the beamline will be highlighted.

  9. Refinement of Atomic Structures Against cryo-EM Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshudov, G N

    2016-01-01

    This review describes some of the methods for atomic structure refinement (fitting) against medium/high-resolution single-particle cryo-EM reconstructed maps. Some of the tools developed for macromolecular X-ray crystal structure analysis, especially those encapsulating prior chemical and structural information can be transferred directly for fitting into cryo-EM maps. However, despite the similarities, there are significant differences between data produced by these two techniques; therefore, different likelihood functions linking the data and model must be used in cryo-EM and crystallographic refinement. Although tools described in this review are mostly designed for medium/high-resolution maps, if maps have sufficiently good quality, then these tools can also be used at moderately low resolution, as shown in one example. In addition, the use of several popular crystallographic methods is strongly discouraged in cryo-EM refinement, such as 2Fo-Fc maps, solvent flattening, and feature-enhanced maps (FEMs) for visualization and model (re)building. Two problems in the cryo-EM field are overclaiming resolution and severe map oversharpening. Both of these should be avoided; if data of higher resolution than the signal are used, then overfitting of model parameters into the noise is unavoidable, and if maps are oversharpened, then at least parts of the maps might become very noisy and ultimately uninterpretable. Both of these may result in suboptimal and even misleading atomic models. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CEPH maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, H M

    1992-06-01

    There are CEPH genetic maps on each homologous human chromosome pair. Genotypes for these maps have been generated in 88 laboratories that receive DNA from a reference panel of large nuclear pedigrees/families supplied by the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain. These maps serve as useful tools for the localization of both disease genes and other genes of interest.

  11. Effect of minimizing amount of template by addition of macromolecular crowding agent on preparation of molecularly imprinted monolith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guang-Ying; Zhong, Dan-Dan; Li, Xiang-Jie; Luo, Yu-Qing; Ba, Hang; Liu, Zhao-Sheng; Aisa, Haji Akber

    2015-09-01

    One of the main challenges in the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) is the substantial initial amount of template needed because of the requirement of high load capacities for most applications. A new strategy of macromolecular crowding was suggested to solve this problem by reducing the amount of template in the polymerization recipe. In a ternary porogenic system of polystyrene (PS) (crowding agent), tetrahydrofuran, and toluene, an imprinted monolithic column with high porosity and good permeability was synthesized using a mixture of ellagic acid (template), acrylamide, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The effect of polymerization factors, including monomer-template molar ratio and the molecular weight and concentration of PS, on the imprinting effect of the resulting MIP monoliths was systematically investigated. At a high ratio of monomer-template (120:1), the greatest imprinting factor of 32.4 was obtained on the MIP monolith with the aid of macromolecular crowding agent. The PS-based imprinted monolith had imprinting even at the extremely high ratio of functional monomer to template of 1510:1. Furthermore, an off-line solid-phase extraction based on the ground MIP was conducted, and the purification recovery of ellagic acid from pomegranate-rind extract was up to 80 %. In conclusion, this approach based on macromolecular crowding is simple, and is especially valuable for those applications of MIP preparation for which a rare template is used.

  12. Single-Step Affinity Purification (ssAP) and Mass Spectrometry of Macromolecular Complexes in the Yeast S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trahan, Christian; Aguilar, Lisbeth-Carolina; Oeffinger, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Cellular functions are mostly defined by the dynamic interactions of proteins within macromolecular networks. Deciphering the composition of macromolecular complexes and their dynamic rearrangements is the key to getting a comprehensive picture of cellular behavior and to understanding biological systems. In the last decade, affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful tool to comprehensively study interaction networks and their assemblies. However, the study of these interactomes has been hampered by severe methodological limitations. In particular, the affinity purification of intact complexes from cell lysates suffers from protein and RNA degradation, loss of transient interactors, and poor overall yields. In this chapter, we describe a rapid single-step affinity purification method for the efficient isolation of dynamic macromolecular complexes. The technique employs cell lysis by cryo-milling, which ensures nondegraded starting material in the submicron range, and magnetic beads, which allow for dense antibody-conjugation and thus rapid complex isolation, while avoiding loss of transient interactions. The method is epitope tag-independent, and overcomes many of the previous limitations to produce large interactomes with almost no contamination. The protocol described here has been optimized for the yeast S. cerevisiae.

  13. Macromolecular crowding effects on reactions of TePixD (Tll0078).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyooka, Tsuguyoshi; Tanaka, Keisuke; Okajima, Koji; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Tokutomi, Satoru; Terazima, Masahide

    2011-01-01

    To reveal macromolecular crowding effects on a chemical reaction of a BLUF (sensors of blue light using FAD) protein (PixD from a thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 [TePixD, Tll0078]), the photoreaction was studied at various concentrations of the macromolecule Ficoll-70 by UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy and the pulsed laser-induced transient grating (TG) method. The absorption spectrum did not change with varying concentration of Ficoll-70. The crowding did not affect the quantum yield of the spectral red shift reaction, recovery rate of the product, rate constant of the volume change reaction and the magnitude of the volume change. However, the magnitude of the TG signal representing the diffusion-sensitive conformation change significantly increased on addition of Ficoll-70. This dependence was attributed to the crowding effect on the TePixD decamer-pentamer equilibrium in the solution. This result indicates that the TePixD reaction is more efficient in cellular than in in vitro conditions. © 2010 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2010 The American Society of Photobiology.

  14. Comparative study of CsI(Tl) screens for macromolecular crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipnis, Sameer V.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Miller, Stuart R.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy B.

    2001-12-01

    At RMD we have fabricated structured CsI(Tl) screens tailored for macromolecular x-ray crystallography applications. Diffraction patterns typically consist of several closely spaced Bragg peaks of varying sizes and intensities, and the detection of such features requires screens with high light output, high resolution, and excellent x-ray absorption. Properties of these screens, for example, light output or spatial resolution, were tailored by post deposition treatments to suit the specific needs of the application. Specifically, we have produced up to 45 micrometers thick CsI(Tl) screens with excellent resolution over the spatial frequency range of 0 to 20 lp/mm and very low noise. Imaging characteristics of these screens along with the commercial Gd2O2S (GOS) have been measured using a CCD detector with a fiberoptic taper. Performance of these screens in terms of point spread function (PSF(f)), light output, noise power spectrum (NPS(f)), and the modulation transfer function (MTF(f)) was measured. It is observed that the intrinsic properties of the structured CsI(Tl) screens are heavily influenced by the substrate on which the films are deposited and on the post deposition coatings, thus providing a latitude for modifying the screen properties to match the needs of the application.

  15. Macromolecular composition of a Cellulomonas sp. cultivated in continuous culture under glucose and zinc limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R J; Srinivasan, V R

    1979-01-01

    The mutant strain of Cellulomonas sp. (ATCC 21399) was cultivated under glucose and zinc limitation at a variety of growth rates in continuous culture. The growth characteristics and macromolecular composition of the population varied with the limitation imposed and the growth rate. Glucose- and zinc-limited cultures maintained a constant relative protein content. The relative ribonucleic acid content increased, whereas the carbohydrate and deoxyribonucleic acid contents decreased with an increase in the population growth rate in glucose-limited cultures. Free unbound lipid remained constant. The maximum population growth rate in zinc-limited cultures was directly proportional to the zinc concentration and demonstrated a traditional steady-state function. The nucleic acid content increased with increased growth rate; however, the relative nucleic acid content was significantly depressed when compared to glucose limited cells. This manner of cultivation may prove to be a useful tool for the production of single cell protein with lowered nucleic acid content and the elucidation of micronutrient involvement in growth-related processes. PMID:114114

  16. The use of workflows in the design and implementation of complex experiments in macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhauser, Sandor; Svensson, Olof; Bowler, Matthew W; Nanao, Max; Gordon, Elspeth; Leal, Ricardo M F; Popov, Alexander; Gerring, Matthew; McCarthy, Andrew A; Gotz, Andy

    2012-08-01

    The automation of beam delivery, sample handling and data analysis, together with increasing photon flux, diminishing focal spot size and the appearance of fast-readout detectors on synchrotron beamlines, have changed the way that many macromolecular crystallography experiments are planned and executed. Screening for the best diffracting crystal, or even the best diffracting part of a selected crystal, has been enabled by the development of microfocus beams, precise goniometers and fast-readout detectors that all require rapid feedback from the initial processing of images in order to be effective. All of these advances require the coupling of data feedback to the experimental control system and depend on immediate online data-analysis results during the experiment. To facilitate this, a Data Analysis WorkBench (DAWB) for the flexible creation of complex automated protocols has been developed. Here, example workflows designed and implemented using DAWB are presented for enhanced multi-step crystal characterizations, experiments involving crystal reorientation with kappa goniometers, crystal-burning experiments for empirically determining the radiation sensitivity of a crystal system and the application of mesh scans to find the best location of a crystal to obtain the highest diffraction quality. Beamline users interact with the prepared workflows through a specific brick within the beamline-control GUI MXCuBE.

  17. Chemical composition and structural features of the macromolecular components of plantation Acacia mangium wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Paula C; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Pascoal Neto, Carlos

    2005-10-05

    The wood of Acacia mangium, a prominent fast-growing plantation species used in the pulp-and-paper industry and, so far, poorly investigated for its chemical structure, was submitted to a detailed characterization of its main macromolecular components. Lignin (28% wood weight) isolated by mild acidolysis and characterized by permanganate oxidation, 1H and 13C NMR, and GPC, showed a very low content of syringylpropane-derived units (S:G:H of 48:49:3), a high degree of condensation, a low content of beta-O-4 ( approximately 0.40-0.43 per C6) structures, and a Mw of 2230. Glucuronoxylan (14% wood weight) isolated by alkaline (KOH) or by dimethyl sulfoxide extraction was characterized by methylation analysis, 1H NMR, and GPC. About 10% of the xylopyranose (Xylp) units constituting the linear backbone were substituted at O-2 with 4-O-methylglucuronic acid residues. Almost half of the Xylp units (45%) were O-2 (18%), O-3 (24%) or O-2,3 (3%) acetylated. X-ray diffraction analysis of cellulose (46% wood weight), isolated according to the Kürschner-Hoffer method, showed a degree of crystallinity of 67.6%.

  18. RoboDiff: combining a sample changer and goniometer for highly automated macromolecular crystallography experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurizzo, Didier; Bowler, Matthew W; Caserotto, Hugo; Dobias, Fabien; Giraud, Thierry; Surr, John; Guichard, Nicolas; Papp, Gergely; Guijarro, Matias; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Flot, David; McSweeney, Sean; Cipriani, Florent; Theveneau, Pascal; Leonard, Gordon A

    2016-08-01

    Automation of the mounting of cryocooled samples is now a feature of the majority of beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX). Robotic sample changers have been developed over many years, with the latest designs increasing capacity, reliability and speed. Here, the development of a new sample changer deployed at the ESRF beamline MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1), based on an industrial six-axis robot, is described. The device, named RoboDiff, includes a high-capacity dewar, acts as both a sample changer and a high-accuracy goniometer, and has been designed for completely unattended sample mounting and diffraction data collection. This aim has been achieved using a high level of diagnostics at all steps of the process from mounting and characterization to data collection. The RoboDiff has been in service on the fully automated endstation MASSIF-1 at the ESRF since September 2014 and, at the time of writing, has processed more than 20 000 samples completely automatically.

  19. Effects of sound exposure on the growth and intracellular macromolecular synthesis of E. coli k-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobin Gu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbes, as one of the primary producers of the biosphere, play an important role in ecosystems. Exploring the mechanism of adaptation and resistance of microbial population to various environmental factors has come into focus in the fields of modern microbial ecology and molecular ecology. However, facing the increasingly serious problem of acoustic pollution, very few efforts have been put forth into studying the relation of single cell organisms and sound field exposure. Herein, we studied the biological effects of sound exposure on the growth of E. coli K-12 with different acoustic parameters. The effects of sound exposure on the intracellular macromolecular synthesis and cellular morphology of E. coli K-12 were also analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that E. coli K-12 exposed to sound waves owned a higher biomass and a faster specific growth rate compared to the control group. Also, the average length of E. coli K-12 cells increased more than 27.26%. The maximum biomass and maximum specific growth rate of the stimulation group by 8000 Hz, 80dB sound wave was about 1.7 times and 2.5 times that of the control group, respectively. Moreover, it was observed that E. coli K-12 can respond rapidly to sound stress at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels by promoting the synthesis of intracellular RNA and total protein. Some potential mechanisms may be involved in the responses of bacterial cells to sound stress.

  20. Temperature sensitivity of soil microbial communities: An application of macromolecular rate theory to microbial respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, Charlotte J.; Koyama, Akihiro; Johnson, Nels G.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; von Fischer, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    There is compelling evidence that microbial communities vary widely in their temperature sensitivity and may adapt to warming through time. To date, this sensitivity has been largely characterized using a range of models relying on versions of the Arrhenius equation, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature. However, there is growing evidence from laboratory and field studies that observe nonmonotonic responses of reaction rates to variation in temperature, indicating that Arrhenius is not an appropriate model for quantitatively characterizing temperature sensitivity. Recently, Hobbs et al. (2013) developed macromolecular rate theory (MMRT), which incorporates thermodynamic temperature optima as arising from heat capacity differences between isoenzymes. We applied MMRT to measurements of respiration from soils incubated at different temperatures. These soils were collected from three grassland sites across the U.S. Great Plains and reciprocally transplanted, allowing us to isolate the effects of microbial community type from edaphic factors. We found that microbial community type explained roughly 30% of the variation in the CO2 production rate from the labile C pool but that temperature and soil type were most important in explaining variation in labile and recalcitrant C pool size. For six out of the nine soil × inoculum combinations, MMRT was superior to Arrhenius. The MMRT analysis revealed that microbial communities have distinct heat capacity values and temperature sensitivities sometimes independent of soil type. These results challenge the current paradigm for modeling temperature sensitivity of soil C pools and understanding of microbial enzyme dynamics.

  1. Hydrolysis of macromolecular components of primary and secondary wastewater sludge by thermal hydrolytic pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher A; Novak, John T

    2009-10-01

    A laboratory simulation of the thermal hydrolytic pretreatment (THP) process was performed on wastewater sludge, as well as key macromolecular components: proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides. Hydrolysis temperatures from 130 to 220 degrees C were investigated. The objectives of this study were to determine how and over which temperature range THP specifically affects sludge components, and whether hydrolysis temperature can be used to minimize the previously reported drawbacks of THP such as high total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) loads and the production of highly-colored recalcitrant organics. In addition, the applicability of THP to primary sludge (PS) was investigated. The breakdown of proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides was determined to be temperature dependent, and both waste activated sludge (WAS) and PS responded similarly to THP apart from intrinsic differences in lipid and protein content. Pure carbohydrate solutions were not largely converted to mono- or dimeric reducing sugar units at temperatures below 220 degrees C, however significant caramelization of starch and production of dextrose and maltose was observed to occur at 220 degrees C. Volatile fatty acid production during thermal hydrolysis was largely attributed to the breakdown of unsaturated lipids, and long-chain fatty acid production was not significant in terms of previous reports of methanogenic inhibition. Ammonia was produced from protein during thermal hydrolysis, however solids loading rather than thermal hydrolysis temperature appeared to be a more meaningful control for ammonia levels in downstream anaerobic digestion.

  2. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic Triblock Terpolymers with Complex Macromolecular Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Polymeropoulos, George

    2015-11-25

    Two star triblock terpolymers (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO)3 and one dendritic-like terpolymer [PS-b-P2VP-b-(PEO)2]3 of PS (polystyrene), P2VP (poly(2-vinylpyridine)), and PEO (poly(ethylene oxide)), never reported before, were synthesized by combining atom transfer radical and anionic polymerizations. The synthesis involves the transformation of the -Br groups of the previously reported Br-terminated 3-arm star diblock copolymers to one or two -OH groups, followed by anionic polymerization of ethylene oxide to afford the star or dendritic structure, respectively. The well-defined structure of the terpolymers was confirmed by static light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, and NMR spectroscopy. The self-assembly in solution and the morphology in bulk of the terpolymers, studied by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, respectively, reveal new insights in the phase separation of these materials with complex macromolecular architecture. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  3. Macromolecular scaffolding: the relationship between nanoscale architecture and function in multichromophoric arrays for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Vincenzo; Schwartz, Erik; Finlayson, Chris E; Liscio, Andrea; Otten, Matthijs B J; Trapani, Sara; Müllen, Klaus; Beljonne, David; Friend, Richard H; Nolte, Roeland J M; Rowan, Alan E; Samorì, Paolo

    2010-02-23

    The optimization of the electronic properties of molecular materials based on optically or electrically active organic building blocks requires a fine-tuning of their self-assembly properties at surfaces. Such a fine-tuning can be obtained on a scale up to 10 nm by mastering principles of supramolecular chemistry, i.e., by using suitably designed molecules interacting via pre-programmed noncovalent forces. The control and fine-tuning on a greater length scale is more difficult and challenging. This Research News highlights recent results we obtained on a new class of macromolecules that possess a very rigid backbone and side chains that point away from this backbone. Each side chain contains an organic semiconducting moiety, whose position and electronic interaction with neighboring moieties are dictated by the central macromolecular scaffold. A combined experimental and theoretical approach has made it possible to unravel the physical and chemical properties of this system across multiple length scales. The (opto)electronic properties of the new functional architectures have been explored by constructing prototypes of field-effect transistors and solar cells, thereby providing direct insight into the relationship between architecture and function.

  4. Influence of temperature and macromolecular mobility on sorption of TCE on humic acid coated mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Katherine Young; LeBoeuf, Eugene J

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates differences in sorptive capacity of volatile organic compound (VOC) trichloroethylene (TCE) onto natural organic matter (NOM) coated and uncoated mineral surfaces above and below the NOM glass transition temperature. TCE sorption isotherms for dry NOM-mineral systems below the NOM glass transition temperature (T(g)) demonstrated sorption behavior characteristic of micropore filling, with sorption capacities reduced relative to uncoated mineral matrices. Such differences were not entirely associated with differences in surface areas of the coated and uncoated mineral matrices, but were likely associated with either a blockage of pore space available to the VOC or a kinetic limitation that does not allow the VOC access to the internal porosity of the model soil within the time periods of the experiment. TCE sorption in dry NOM-mineral matrices above the T(g), however, was described in terms of sorption within a more fluid, macromolecular dissolution medium that does not hinder access to mineral surfaces. Such observations have potential important implications for modeling the fate and transport of VOCs in soils and sediment systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. SPring-8 BL41XU, a high-flux macromolecular crystallography beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuya; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Okumura, Hideo; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Baba, Seiki; Hirata, Kunio; Takeuchi, Tomoyuki; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    SPring-8 BL41XU is a high-flux macromolecular crystallography beamline using an in-vacuum undulator as a light source. The X-rays are monochromated by a liquid-nitrogen-cooling Si double-crystal monochromator, and focused by Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror optics. The focused beam size at the sample is 80 µm (H) × 22 µm (V) with a photon flux of 1.1 × 1013 photons s−1. A pinhole aperture is used to collimate the beam in the range 10–50 µm. This high-flux beam with variable size provides opportunities not only for micro-crystallography but also for data collection effectively making use of crystal volume. The beamline also provides high-energy X-rays covering 20.6–35.4 keV which allows ultra-high-resolution data to be obtained and anomalous diffraction using the K-edge of Xe and I. Upgrade of BL41XU for more rapid and accurate data collection is proceeding. Here, details of BL41XU are given and an outline of the upgrade project is documented. PMID:24121338

  6. Visualization of X-ray Beam Using CdWO4 Crystal for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz J. Gofron

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In synchrotron diffraction experiments, it is typically assumed that the X-ray beam at the sample position is uniform, stable and has dimensions that are controlled by the focus and slits settings. As might be expected, this process is much more complex. We present here an investigation of the properties of a synchrotron X-ray beam at the sample position. The X-ray beam is visualized with a single crystal scintillator that converts X-ray photons into visible light photons, which can be imaged using Structure Biology Center (SBC on-axis and off-axis microscope optics. The X-ray penetration is dependent on the composition of the scintillator (especially the effective Z, and X-ray energy. Several scintillators have been used to visualize X-ray beams. Here we compare CdWO4, PbWO4, Bi4Ge3O12, Y3Al5O12:Ce (YAG:Ce, and Gd2O2S:Tb (phosphor. We determined that scintillator crystals made of CdWO4 and similar high-Z materials are best suited for the energy range (7–20 keV and are most suitable for beam visualization for macromolecular crystallography applications. These scintillators show excellent absorption, optical, and mechanical properties.

  7. About Small Streams and Shiny Rocks: Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We are developing a novel technique with which we have grown diffraction quality protein crystals in very small volumes, utilizing chip-based, microfluidic ("LabChip") technology. With this technology volumes smaller than achievable with any laboratory pipette can be dispensed with high accuracy. We have performed a feasibility study in which we crystallized several proteins with the aid of a LabChip device. The protein crystals are of excellent quality as shown by X-ray diffraction. The advantages of this new technology include improved accuracy of dispensing for small volumes, complete mixing of solution constituents without bubble formation, highly repeatable recipe and growth condition replication, and easy automation of the method. We have designed a first LabChip device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode and can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents. We are currently testing this design. Upon completion additional crystallization techniques, such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility aboard the International Space Station.

  8. The Effect of Attractive Interactions and Macromolecular Crowding on Crystallins Association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiachen Wei

    Full Text Available In living systems proteins are typically found in crowded environments where their effective interactions strongly depend on the surrounding medium. Yet, their association and dissociation needs to be robustly controlled in order to enable biological function. Uncontrolled protein aggregation often causes disease. For instance, cataract is caused by the clustering of lens proteins, i.e., crystallins, resulting in enhanced light scattering and impaired vision or blindness. To investigate the molecular origins of cataract formation and to design efficient treatments, a better understanding of crystallin association in macromolecular crowded environment is needed. Here we present a theoretical study of simple coarse grained colloidal models to characterize the general features of how the association equilibrium of proteins depends on the magnitude of intermolecular attraction. By comparing the analytic results to the available experimental data on the osmotic pressure in crystallin solutions, we identify the effective parameters regimes applicable to crystallins. Moreover, the combination of two models allows us to predict that the number of binding sites on crystallin is small, i.e. one to three per protein, which is different from previous estimates. We further observe that the crowding factor is sensitive to the size asymmetry between the reactants and crowding agents, the shape of the protein clusters, and to small variations of intermolecular attraction. Our work may provide general guidelines on how to steer the protein interactions in order to control their association.

  9. Topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  10. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging and histology of vascular function in xenografts using macromolecular contrast agent hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-GdF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jennifer H E; McPhee, Kelly C; Moosvi, Firas; Saatchi, Katayoun; Häfeli, Urs O; Minchinton, Andrew I; Reinsberg, Stefan A

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents are in development as blood pool markers for MRI. HPG-GdF is a 583 kDa hyperbranched polyglycerol doubly tagged with Gd and Alexa 647 nm dye, making it both MR and histologically visible. In this study we examined the location of HPG-GdF in whole-tumor xenograft sections matched to in vivo DCE-MR images of both HPG-GdF and Gadovist. Despite its large size, we have shown that HPG-GdF extravasates from some tumor vessels and accumulates over time, but does not distribute beyond a few cell diameters from vessels. Fractional plasma volume (fPV) and apparent permeability-surface area product (aPS) parameters were derived from the MR concentration-time curves of HPG-GdF. Non-viable necrotic tumor tissue was excluded from the analysis by applying a novel bolus arrival time (BAT) algorithm to all voxels. aPS derived from HPG-GdF was the only MR parameter to identify a difference in vascular function between HCT116 and HT29 colorectal tumors. This study is the first to relate low and high molecular weight contrast agents with matched whole-tumor histological sections. These detailed comparisons identified tumor regions that appear distinct from each other using the HPG-GdF biomarkers related to perfusion and vessel leakiness, while Gadovist-imaged parameter measures in the same regions were unable to detect variation in vascular function. We have established HPG-GdF as a biocompatible multi-modal high molecular weight contrast agent with application for examining vascular function in both MR and histological modalities. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Protein linear indices of the 'macromolecular pseudograph alpha-carbon atom adjacency matrix' in bioinformatics. Part 1: prediction of protein stability effects of a complete set of alanine substitutions in Arc repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Medina-Marrero, Ricardo; Castillo-Garit, Juan A; Romero-Zaldivar, Vicente; Torrens, Francisco; Castro, Eduardo A

    2005-04-15

    A novel approach to bio-macromolecular design from a linear algebra point of view is introduced. A protein's total (whole protein) and local (one or more amino acid) linear indices are a new set of bio-macromolecular descriptors of relevance to protein QSAR/QSPR studies. These amino-acid level biochemical descriptors are based on the calculation of linear maps on Rn[f k(xmi):Rn-->Rn] in canonical basis. These bio-macromolecular indices are calculated from the kth power of the macromolecular pseudograph alpha-carbon atom adjacency matrix. Total linear indices are linear functional on Rn. That is, the kth total linear indices are linear maps from Rn to the scalar R[f k(xm):Rn-->R]. Thus, the kth total linear indices are calculated by summing the amino-acid linear indices of all amino acids in the protein molecule. A study of the protein stability effects for a complete set of alanine substitutions in the Arc repressor illustrates this approach. A quantitative model that discriminates near wild-type stability alanine mutants from the reduced-stability ones in a training series was obtained. This model permitted the correct classification of 97.56% (40/41) and 91.67% (11/12) of proteins in the training and test set, respectively. It shows a high Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC=0.952) for the training set and an MCC=0.837 for the external prediction set. Additionally, canonical regression analysis corroborated the statistical quality of the classification model (Rcanc=0.824). This analysis was also used to compute biological stability canonical scores for each Arc alanine mutant. On the other hand, the linear piecewise regression model compared favorably with respect to the linear regression one on predicting the melting temperature (tm) of the Arc alanine mutants. The linear model explains almost 81% of the variance of the experimental tm (R=0.90 and s=4.29) and the LOO press statistics evidenced its predictive ability (q2=0.72 and scv=4.79). Moreover, the

  12. Prospects for Simulating Macromolecular Surfactant Chemistry at the Ocean-Atmosphere Boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Deal, C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, Lynn M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties in the surfactant logic distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  13. Prospects for simulating macromolecular surfactant chemistry at the ocean-atmosphere boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, S. M.; Deal, C.; Liu, X.; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, L. M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  14. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, Charlotte J; Baas, Peter; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Johnson, Nels G; von Fischer, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these enzymes will provide fundamental insights for predicting nutrient dynamics belowground. In this study, we characterized how both microbial taxonomic variation as well as substrate type affects temperature sensitivity. We measured β-glucosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, and phosphatase activities at six temperatures: 4, 11, 25, 35, 45, and 60°C, for seven different soil microbial isolates. To calculate temperature sensitivity, we employed two models, Arrhenius, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature, and Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT), which predicts rate to peak and then decline as temperature increases. We found MMRT provided a more accurate fit and allowed for more nuanced interpretation of temperature sensitivity in all of the enzyme × isolate combinations tested. Our results revealed that both the enzyme type and soil isolate type explain variation in parameters associated with temperature sensitivity. Because we found temperature sensitivity to be an inherent and variable property of an enzyme, we argue that it can be incorporated as a microbial functional trait, but only when using the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity. We show that the Arrhenius metrics of temperature sensitivity are overly sensitive to test conditions, with activation energy changing depending on the temperature range it was calculated within. Thus, we propose the use of the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity for accurate interpretation of

  15. Assessing Exhaustiveness of Stochastic Sampling for Integrative Modeling of Macromolecular Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Shruthi; Chemmama, Ilan E; Cimermancic, Peter; Sali, Andrej

    2017-12-05

    Modeling of macromolecular structures involves structural sampling guided by a scoring function, resulting in an ensemble of good-scoring models. By necessity, the sampling is often stochastic, and must be exhaustive at a precision sufficient for accurate modeling and assessment of model uncertainty. Therefore, the very first step in analyzing the ensemble is an estimation of the highest precision at which the sampling is exhaustive. Here, we present an objective and automated method for this task. As a proxy for sampling exhaustiveness, we evaluate whether two independently and stochastically generated sets of models are sufficiently similar. The protocol includes testing 1) convergence of the model score, 2) whether model scores for the two samples were drawn from the same parent distribution, 3) whether each structural cluster includes models from each sample proportionally to its size, and 4) whether there is sufficient structural similarity between the two model samples in each cluster. The evaluation also provides the sampling precision, defined as the smallest clustering threshold that satisfies the third, most stringent test. We validate the protocol with the aid of enumerated good-scoring models for five illustrative cases of binary protein complexes. Passing the proposed four tests is necessary, but not sufficient for thorough sampling. The protocol is general in nature and can be applied to the stochastic sampling of any set of models, not just structural models. In addition, the tests can be used to stop stochastic sampling as soon as exhaustiveness at desired precision is reached, thereby improving sampling efficiency; they may also help in selecting a model representation that is sufficiently detailed to be informative, yet also sufficiently coarse for sampling to be exhaustive. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of large-area CCD-based x-ray detector for macromolecular crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokric, M.; Allinson, Nigel M.; Jorden, Anthony R.; Cox, Matthew P.; Marshall, Andrew R.; Long, P. G.; Moon, Kevin; Jerram, Paul; Pool, Peter J.; Nave, Colin; Derbyshire, Gareth E.; Helliwell, John R.

    1999-10-01

    The design and development of an area CCD-based X-ray detector system, using the first CCD imagers specially designed for macromolecular crystallography, is presented. The system is intended to produce the highest quality data for physically small crystals at synchrotron sources through the use of large CCDs--that is approaching wafer scale. This work is part of a large research and development program for advanced X-ray sensor technology, funded by industry and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council in the UK. The detector has been optimized by increasing its efficiency at low X-ray energies for conventional laboratory sources, and offers fast readout and high dynamic range needed for efficient measurements at synchrotron sources. The detector consists of CCDs optically coupled to a X-ray sensitive phosphor via skewed fiber-optic studs. The individual three- sides buttable CCD consists of 2048 X 1536 27 micrometers square pixels (55.3 X 41.5 mm). The pixel size has been optimized to match diffraction spot profiling needs and the high dynamic range required for such applications. The multiple amplifier outputs possess switched responsivity to maximize the trade-off between signal handling capabilities and linearity. The readout noise is 5 electrons rms at a 1 MHz pixel rate at the high responsivity setting. A prototype detector system comprising two close-butted cooled CCDs is being developed. This system employs a high-efficiency scintillator with very low point spread function, skewed optical-fiber studs (instead of the more usual demagnifying tapers) to maximize the system's detective quantum efficiency and minimize optical distortions. Full system specifications and a novel crystallographic data processing are presented.

  17. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Jean Alster

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these enzymes will provide fundamental insights for predicting nutrient dynamics belowground. In this study, we characterized how both microbial taxonomic variation as well as substrate type affects temperature sensitivity. We measured β-glucosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, and phosphatase activities at six temperatures: 4, 11, 25, 35, 45, and 60°C, for seven different soil microbial isolates. To calculate temperature sensitivity, we employed two models, Arrhenius, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature, and Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT, which predicts rate to peak and then decline as temperature increases. We found MMRT provided a more accurate fit and allowed for more nuanced interpretation of temperature sensitivity in all of the enzyme × isolate combinations tested. Our results revealed that both the enzyme type and soil isolate type explain variation in parameters associated with temperature sensitivity. Because we found temperature sensitivity to be an inherent and variable property of an enzyme, we argue that it can be incorporated as a microbial functional trait, but only when using the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity. We show that the Arrhenius metrics of temperature sensitivity are overly sensitive to test conditions, with activation energy changing depending on the temperature range it was calculated within. Thus, we propose the use of the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity for accurate

  18. The use of workflows in the design and implementation of complex experiments in macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockhauser, Sandor, E-mail: brockhauser@embl.fr [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble (France); UJF–EMBL–CNRS, UMI 3265, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Svensson, Olof; Bowler, Matthew W. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); Nanao, Max [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble (France); UJF–EMBL–CNRS, UMI 3265, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Gordon, Elspeth; Leal, Ricardo M. F.; Popov, Alexander; Gerring, Matthew [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); McCarthy, Andrew A. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble (France); UJF–EMBL–CNRS, UMI 3265, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Gotz, Andy [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2012-08-01

    A powerful and easy-to-use workflow environment has been developed at the ESRF for combining experiment control with online data analysis on synchrotron beamlines. This tool provides the possibility of automating complex experiments without the need for expertise in instrumentation control and programming, but rather by accessing defined beamline services. The automation of beam delivery, sample handling and data analysis, together with increasing photon flux, diminishing focal spot size and the appearance of fast-readout detectors on synchrotron beamlines, have changed the way that many macromolecular crystallography experiments are planned and executed. Screening for the best diffracting crystal, or even the best diffracting part of a selected crystal, has been enabled by the development of microfocus beams, precise goniometers and fast-readout detectors that all require rapid feedback from the initial processing of images in order to be effective. All of these advances require the coupling of data feedback to the experimental control system and depend on immediate online data-analysis results during the experiment. To facilitate this, a Data Analysis WorkBench (DAWB) for the flexible creation of complex automated protocols has been developed. Here, example workflows designed and implemented using DAWB are presented for enhanced multi-step crystal characterizations, experiments involving crystal reorientation with kappa goniometers, crystal-burning experiments for empirically determining the radiation sensitivity of a crystal system and the application of mesh scans to find the best location of a crystal to obtain the highest diffraction quality. Beamline users interact with the prepared workflows through a specific brick within the beamline-control GUI MXCuBE.

  19. Facilities for macromolecular crystallography at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Uwe [Inst. for Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Berlin (Germany); Darowski, Nora [Inst. for Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Berlin (Germany); Fuchs, Martin R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Swiss Light Source; Förster, Ronald [Freie Univ., Berlin (Germany); Hellmig, Michael [Inst. for Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Berlin (Germany); Paithankar, Karthik S. [Inst. for Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Berlin (Germany); Pühringer, Sandra [Freie Univ., Berlin (Germany); Steffien, Michael [Inst. for Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Berlin (Germany); Zocher, Georg [Univ. of Tubingen (Germany); Weiss, Manfred S. [Inst. for Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-20

    Three macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamlines at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) are available for the regional, national and international structural biology user community. The state-of-the-art synchrotron beamlines for MX BL14.1, BL14.2 and BL14.3 are located within the low-[beta] section of the BESSY II electron storage ring. All beamlines are fed from a superconducting 7 T wavelength-shifter insertion device. BL14.1 and BL14.2 are energy tunable in the range 5-16 keV, while BL14.3 is a fixed-energy side station operated at 13.8 keV. All beamlines are equipped with CCD detectors. BL14.1 and BL14.2 are in regular user operation providing about 200 beam days per year and about 600 user shifts to approximately 50 research groups across Europe. BL14.3 has initially been used as a test facility and was brought into regular user mode operation during the year 2010. BL14.1 has recently been upgraded with a microdiffractometer including a mini-[kappa] goniometer and an automated sample changer. Other user facilities include office space adjacent to the beamlines, a sample preparation laboratory, a biology laboratory (safety level 1) and high-end computing resources. In this article the instrumentation of the beamlines is described, and a summary of the experimental possibilities of the beamlines and the provided ancillary equipment for the user community is given.

  20. Novel use for polyvinylpyrrolidone as a macromolecular crowder for enhanced extracellular matrix deposition and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Rafi; Lim, Natalie Sheng Jie; Chee, Stella Min Ling; Png, Si Ning; Wohland, Thorsten; Raghunath, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Macromolecular crowding (MMC) is a biophysical effect that governs biochemical processes inside and outside of cells. Since standard cell culture media lack this effect, the physiological performance of differentiated and progenitor cells, including extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, is impaired in vitro. To bring back physiological crowdedness to in vitro systems, we have previously introduced carbohydrate-based macromolecules to culture media and have achieved marked improvements with mixed MMC in terms of ECM deposition and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We show here that although this system is successful, it is limited, due to viscosity, to only 33% of the fractional volume occupancy (FVO) of full serum, which we calculated to have an FVO of approximately 54% v/v. We show here that full-serum FVO can be achieved using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) 360 kDa. Under these conditions, ECM deposition in human fibroblasts and MSCs is on par, if not stronger than, with original MMC protocols using carbohydrates, but with a viscosity that is not significantly changed. In addition, we have found that the proliferation rate for bone marrow-derived MSCs and fibroblasts increases slightly in the presence of PVP360, similar to that observed with carbohydrate-based crowders. A palette of MMC compounds is now emerging that enables us to tune the crowdedness of culture media seamlessly from interstitial fluid (9% FVO), in which the majority of tissue cells might be based, to serum environments mimicking intravascular conditions. Despite identical FVO's, individual crowder size effects play a role and different cell types appear to have preferences in terms of FVO and the crowder that this is achieved with. However, in the quest of crowders that we have predicted to have a smoother regulatory approval path, PVP is a highly interesting compound, as it has been widely used in the medical and food industries and shows a novel promising use in cell culture and

  1. Question Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Josh

    2012-01-01

    After accepting the principal position at Farmersville (TX) Junior High, the author decided to increase instructional rigor through question mapping because of the success he saw using this instructional practice at his prior campus. Teachers are the number one influence on student achievement (Marzano, 2003), so question mapping provides a…

  2. Causal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2006-01-01

    The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method......The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method...

  3. Aging changes of macromolecular synthesis in the digestive organs of mice as revealed by microscopic radioautography and X-ray microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Tetsuji [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto (Japan). School of Medicine. Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology]. E-mail: nagatas@po.cnet.ne.jp

    2002-07-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the aging changes of macromolecular synthesis such as DNA, RNA, proteins, glycoproteins, glycides and lipids in various organ systems of experimental animals, we have studied the digestive organs of aging mice and rats as a series of systematic studies using light and electron microscopic radioautography after incorporations with macromolecular precursors. The experimental animals mainly used were ddY strain mice at various aging groups from embryo to postnatal days 1 and 3, weeks 1 and 2, months 1, 2, 6, 12 up to 2 year senescent stages as well as several groups of adult Wistar rats. The animals were injected with such macromolecular precursors as {sup 3}H - thymidine for DNA, {sup 3}H-uridine for RNA, {sup 3}H-leucine and {sup 3}H proline for proteins, {sup 35}SO{sub 4} for glycoproteins, {sup 3} H-glucosamine for glucides and {sup 3}H-glycerol for lipids. The results demonstrated that these precursors were incorporated into various cell types in the oral cavity, the salivary glands, the esophagus, the stomach, the small and large intestines, the liver and the pancreas at various ages from perinatal to juvenile, mature and senescent stages, showing specific patterns of macromolecular synthesis. It is concluded that these specific patterns of macromolecular synthesis in respective cell types demonstrated the organ specificity of aging of animals. (author)

  4. MX1: a bending-magnet crystallography beamline serving both chemical and macromolecular crystallography communities at the Australian Synchrotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowieson, Nathan Philip; Aragao, David; Clift, Mark; Ericsson, Daniel J; Gee, Christine; Harrop, Stephen J; Mudie, Nathan; Panjikar, Santosh; Price, Jason R; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Williamson, Rachel; Caradoc-Davies, Tom

    2015-01-01

    MX1 is a bending-magnet crystallography beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The beamline delivers hard X-rays in the energy range from 8 to 18 keV to a focal spot at the sample position of 120 µm FWHM. The beamline endstation and ancillary equipment facilitate local and remote access for both chemical and biological macromolecular crystallography. Here, the design of the beamline and endstation are discussed. The beamline has enjoyed a full user program for the last seven years and scientific highlights from the user program are also presented.

  5. Leaching of organic acids from macromolecular organic matter by non-supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, P.; Glombitza, C.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-04-01

    The storage of CO2 in underground reservoirs is discussed controversly in the scientific literature. The worldwide search for suitable storage formations also considers coal-bearing strata. CO2 is already injected into seams for enhanced recovery of coal bed methane. However, the effects of increased CO2 concentration, especially on organic matter rich formations, are rarely investigated. The injected CO2 will dissolve in the pore water, causing a decrease in pH and resulting in acidic formation waters. Huge amounts of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) are chemically bound to the macromolecular matrix of sedimentary organic matter and may be liberated by hydrolysis, which is enhanced by the acidic porewater. Recent investigations outlined the importance of LMWOAs as a feedstock for microbial life in the subsurface [1]. Therefore, injection of CO2 into coal formations may result in enhanced nutrient supply for subsurface microbes. To investigate the effect of high concentrations of dissolved CO2 on the release of LMWOAs from coal we developed an inexpensive high-pressure high temperature system that allows manipulating the partial pressure of dissolved gases at pressures and temperatures up to 60 MPa and 120° C, respectively. In a reservoir vessel, gases are added to saturate the extraction medium to the desired level. Inside the extraction vessel hangs a flexible and inert PVDF sleeve (polyvinylidene fluoride, almost impermeable for gases), holding the sample and separating it from the pressure fluid. The flexibility of the sleeve allows for subsampling without loss of pressure. Coal samples from the DEBITS-1 well, Waikato Basin, NZ (R0 = 0.29, TOC = 30%). were extracted at 90° C and 5 MPa, either with pure or CO2-saturated water. Subsamples were taken at different time points during the extraction. The extracted LMWOAs such as formate, acetate and oxalate were analysed by ion chromatography. Yields of LMWOAs were higher with pure water than with CO2

  6. Enhanced conjugation stability and blood circulation time of macromolecular gadolinium-DTPA contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenjob, Ratchapol [Department of New Drug Development, School of Medicine, Inha University, 2F A-dong, Jeongseok Bldg., Sinheung-dong 3-ga, Jung-gu, Incheon 400-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kun, Na [Department of Biotechnology, The Catholic University of Korea, 43 Jibong-ro, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si, Gyeonggi-do 420-743 (Korea, Republic of); Ghee, Jung Yeon [Utah-Inha DDS and Advanced Therapeutics, B-403 Meet-You-All Tower, SongdoTechnopark, 7–50, Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Xiaoxia [Division of Functional Materials and Nano-Devices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology & Engineering (NIMTE), Chinese Academy of Sciences, 519 Zhuangshi Street, Zhenhai District, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315201 (China); Cho, Steve K., E-mail: scho@gist.ac.kr [Division of Liberal Arts and Science, GIST College, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Don Haeng [Utah-Inha DDS and Advanced Therapeutics, B-403 Meet-You-All Tower, SongdoTechnopark, 7–50, Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Incheon 420-751 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Su-Geun, E-mail: Sugeun.Yang@Inha.ac.kr [Department of New Drug Development, School of Medicine, Inha University, 2F A-dong, Jeongseok Bldg., Sinheung-dong 3-ga, Jung-gu, Incheon 400-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we prepared macromolecular MR T1 contrast agent: pullulan-conjugated Gd diethylene triamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA-Pullulan) and estimated residual free Gd{sup 3+}, chelation stability in competition with metal ions, plasma and tissue pharmacokinetics, and abdominal MR contrast on rats. Residual free Gd{sup 3+} in Gd-DTPA-Pullulan was measured using colorimetric spectroscopy. The transmetalation of Gd{sup 3+} incubated with Ca{sup 2+} was performed by using a dialysis membrane (MWCO 100–500 Da) and investigated by ICP-OES. The plasma concentration profiles of Gd-DTPA-Pullulan were estimated after intravenous injection at a dose 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd. The coronal-plane abdominal images of normal rats were observed by MR imaging. The content of free Gd{sup 3+}, the toxic residual form, was less than 0.01%. Chelation stability of Gd-DTPA-Pullulan was estimated, and only 0.2% and 0.00045% of Gd{sup 3+} were released from Gd-DTPA-Pullulan after 2 h incubation with Ca{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}, respectively. Gd-DTPA-Pullulan displayed the extended plasma half-life (t{sub 1/2,α} = 0.43 h, t{sub 1/2,β} = 2.32 h), much longer than 0.11 h and 0.79 h of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Abdominal MR imaging showed Gd-DTPA-Pullulan maintained initial MR contrast for 30 min. The extended plasma half-life of Gd-DTPA-Pullulan probably allows the prolonged MR acquisition time in clinic with enhanced MR contrast. - Highlights: • Macromolecule (pullulan) conjugated Gd contrast agent (Gd-DTPA-Pullulan) showed the extended plasma half-life (t{sub 1/2,α} = 0.43 h, t{sub 1/2,β} = 2.32 h) in comparison with Gd-EOB-DTPA • Gd-DTPA-pullulan T1 contrast agent exhibited strong chelation stability against Gd. • The extended blood circulation attributed the enhanced and prolonged MR contrast on abdominal region of rats. • The extended blood circulation may provide prolonged MR acquisition time window in clinics.

  7. Gastrointestinal host defence: importance of gut closure in control of macromolecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, W A

    An important adaptation of the gastrointestinal tract to the extrauterine environment is its development of a mucosal barrier against the penetration of harmful substances (bacteria, toxins and antigens) present within the intestinal lumen. At birth, the newborn infant must be prepared to deal with bacterial colonization of the gut, with formation of toxic byproducts of bacteria and viruses (enterotoxins and endotoxins) and with the ingestion of antigens (milk proteins). These potentially noxious substances if allowed to penetrate the mucosal epithelial barrier under pathological conditions can cause inflammatory and allergic reactions which may result in gastrointestinal and systemic disease states. To combat the potential danger of invasion across the mucosal barrier the infant must develop an elaborate system of defence mechanisms within the lumen and on the luminal mucosal surface which act to control and maintain the epithelium as an impermeable barrier to uptake of macromolecular antigens. These defences include a unique immunological system adapted to function in the complicated milieu of the intestine as well as other non-immunological processes such as a gastric barrier, intestinal surface secretions, peristaltic movement and natural antibacterial substances (lysozyme, bile salts) which also help to provide maximum protection for the intestinal surface. Unfortunately, during the immediate postpartum period, particularly for premature and small-for-dates infants, this elaborate local defence system is incompletely developed. As a result of the delay in the maturation of the mucosal barrier newborn infants are particularly vulnerable to pathological penetration by harmful intraluminal substances. The consequences of altered defence are susceptibility to infection and the potential for hypersensitivity reactions and for formation of immune complexes. With these reactions comes the potential for developing life-threatening diseases such as necrotizing

  8. Photon-counting single-molecule spectroscopy for studying conformational dynamics and macromolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Ted Alfred [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Single-molecule methods have the potential to provide information about conformational dynamics and molecular interactions that cannot be obtained by other methods. Removal of ensemble averaging provides several benefits, including the ability to detect heterogeneous populations and the ability to observe asynchronous reactions. Single-molecule diffusion methodologies using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are developed to monitor conformational dynamics while minimizing perturbations introduced by interactions between molecules and surfaces. These methods are used to perform studies of the folding of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2, a small, single-domain protein, and of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers. Confocal microscopy is used in combination with sensitive detectors to detect bursts of photons from fluorescently labeled biomolecules as they diffuse through the focal volume. These bursts are analyzed to extract fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency. Advances in data acquisition and analysis techniques that are providing a more complete picture of the accessible molecular information are discussed. Photon Arrival-time Interval Distribution (PAID) analysis is a new method for monitoring macromolecular interactions by fluorescence detection with simultaneous determination of coincidence, brightness, diffusion time, and occupancy (proportional to concentration) of fluorescently-labeled molecules undergoing diffusion in a confocal detection volume. This method is based on recording the time of arrival of all detected photons, and then plotting the two-dimensional histogram of photon pairs, where one axis is the time interval between each pair of photons 1 and 2, and the second axis is the number of other photons detected in the time interval between photons 1 and 2. PAID is related to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) by a collapse of this histogram onto the time interval axis. PAID extends auto- and cross-correlation FCS

  9. Contribution of muscarinic receptors to in vitro and in vivo effects of Ruscus extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle; Heusler, Peter; Cussac, Didier; Lantoine-Adam, Frédérique; de Almeida Cyrino, Fatima Zely Garcia; Bouskela, Eliete

    2017-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate, in vitro and in vivo, the contribution of muscarinic receptors to the effects of Ruscus extract. Ruscus extract was tested in competition binding experiments at recombinant human muscarinic receptors, heterologous expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and in cellular assays measuring Ca2+ liberation and activator protein-1 (AP-1) reporter gene activation. The impact of muscarinic blockade on prolonged treatment outcome was evaluated using the hamster cheek pouch (HCP) microcirculation examining macromolecular permeability increase induced by histamine or ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), mean arteriolar and venular diameters, functional capillary density and I/R-induced leukocyte rolling and sticking. Ruscus extract exhibited affinities for muscarinic receptor subtypes at a range of 50-100μg/ml and behaved as partial agonist at human recombinant M1 and M3 receptors for Ca2+ liberation, confirmed in an AP-1 reporter gene assay. In the HCP model, topical application of atropine completely or partially blocked Ruscus extract-induced reductions of histamine- and I/R-induced increases of macromolecular permeability and leukocyte-endothelium interaction. Our results showed that Ruscus extract in vitro binds and activates different subtypes of muscarinic receptors and in vivo its anti-inflammatory effects are, at least partially, mediated via muscarinic receptors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Participatory Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    2016-01-01

    practice. In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human-made disasters has become one focal point for environmental knowledge production. This type of digital map has been highlighted as a processual turn in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism......, it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This article looks at computer-assisted cartography as part of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the data-journalism platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example...

  11. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Noe, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly-interconverting states. Here we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine...

  12. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghoon, E-mail: hsh860504@gmail.com; Kim, Sehui, E-mail: sehui0916@nate.com; Kim, Jeehyun, E-mail: jeehk@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Changho, E-mail: ch31037@postech.edu; Jeon, Mansik, E-mail: msjeon@postech.edu [Department of Creative IT Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulhong, E-mail: jeehk@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu [Department of Creative IT Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14221 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  13. Formation of macromolecular lignin in ginkgo xylem cell walls as observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Noritsugu; Awano, Tatsuya; Takabe, Keiji; Yoshida, Masato

    2004-01-01

    Formation of macromolecular lignin in ginkgo cell walls. In the lignifying process of xylem cell walls, macromolecular lignin is formed by polymerization of monolignols on the pectic substances, hemicellulose and cellulose microfibrils that have deposited prior to the start of lignification. Observation of lignifying secondary cell walls of ginkgo tracheids by field emission scanning electron microscopy suggested that lignin-hemicellulose complexes are formed as tubular bead-like modules surrounding the cellulose microfibrils (CMFs), and that the complexes finally fill up the space between CMFs. The size of one tubular bead-like module in the middle layer of the secondary wall (S2) was tentatively estimated to be about 16+/-2 nm in length, about 25+/-1 nm in outer diameter, with a wall thickness of 4+/-2 nm; the size of the modules in the outer layer of the secondary wall (S1) was larger and they were thicker-walled than that in the middle layer (S2). Aggregates of large globular modules were observed in the cell corner and compound middle lamella. It was suggested that the structure of non-cellulosic polysaccharides and mode of their association with CMFs may be important factors controlling the module formation and lignin concentration in the different morphological regions of the cell wall.

  14. Lung surface-active fraction as a model system for macromolecular ultrastructural studies with Crotalus atrox venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosolono, M F; Pawlowski, R; Charms, B L; Corbusier, C; Abrams, M; Jones, J

    1973-01-01

    The dog lung surface-active fraction and phosphatidylcholine constituents were subjected to hydrolysis by Crotalus atrox phospholipase A(2). Relative rates of hydrolysis were: dipalmitoyl glycerophosphorylcholine > phosphatidylcholine isolated from the surface-active fraction > phosphatidylcholine as an integral component of the intact surface-active macromolecular structure. Cholesterol markedly inhibited, whereas tripalmitin increased, the rate of hydrolysis with both pure phosphatidylcholine substrates. The effect of temperature on the velocity indicated the enzyme was most active when the substrates were in the gel state. These kinetic results, in conjunction with surface chemistry studies, can be interpreted to indicate that the phosphatidylcholine in the intact surface-active macromolecular particle is liquid crystalline due to molecular interactions with other constituents. Gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of the 2-lysophosphatidylcholines and fatty acids produced from the enzymatic hydrolysis of the intact surface-active fraction indicated that palmitoyl residues were more accessible to the enzyme, perhaps because they occupied positions near the surface of the particle.

  15. Effect of macromolecular impurities on lysozyme solubility and crystallizability: dynamic light scattering, phase diagram, and crystal growth studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouri, M.; Lorber, B.; Giegé, R.; Munch, J.-P.; Candau, J. S.

    1995-07-01

    The effects of macromolecular impurities on protein solubility and crystallizability were investigated by dynamic light scattering and crystal growth experiments using hen egg-white lysozyme as the model protein. In the presence of traces of protein impurities, representing no more than 2% (w/w) of the total protein, the average diffusion coefficients of the macromolecular particles found in undersaturated lysozyme solutions are significantly lower than those measured with purest lysozyme preparations. This fact is explained by the simultaneous existence of individual molecules and of large size aggregates in contaminated solutions, as indicated by the bimodal light scattering autocorrelation function. Controlled contamination experiments in which ovalbumin or conalbumin were added to purest lysozyme indicate that aggregates result from heterogeneous association of lysozyme molecules with the structurally unrelated proteins. These aggregates might become starting points for heterogeneous nucleation leading to the growth of ill-shaped microcrystals. Aggregates in under- or supersaturated lysozyme solutions containing NaCl can be eliminated by filtration over microporous membranes. As a result the number of ill-shaped crystals diminishes drastically; that of well-shaped tetragonal crystals decreases also but their size increases.

  16. Preclinical imaging and translational animal models of cancer for accelerated clinical implementation of nanotechnologies and macromolecular agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Raquel; Spence, Tara; Huang, Huang; Allen, Christine

    2015-12-10

    The majority of animal models of cancer have performed poorly in terms of predicting clinical performance of new therapeutics, which are most often first evaluated in patients with advanced, metastatic disease. The development and use of metastatic models of cancer may enhance clinical translatability of preclinical studies focused on the development of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems and macromolecular therapeutics, potentially accelerating their clinical implementation. It is recognized that the development and use of such models are not without challenge. Preclinical imaging tools offer a solution by allowing temporal and spatial characterization of metastatic lesions. This paper provides a review of imaging methods applicable for evaluation of novel therapeutics in clinically relevant models of advanced cancer. An overview of currently utilized models of oncology in small animals is followed by image-based development and characterization of visceral metastatic cancer models. Examples of imaging tools employed for metastatic lesion detection, evaluation of anti-tumor and anti-metastatic potential and biodistribution of novel therapies, as well as the co-development and/or use of imageable surrogates of response, are also discussed. While the focus is on development of macromolecular and nanotechnology-based therapeutics, examples with small molecules are included in some cases to illustrate concepts and approaches that can be applied in the assessment of nanotechnologies or macromolecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of knowledge-based restraints in phenix.refine to improve macromolecular refinement at low resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headd, Jeffrey J; Echols, Nathaniel; Afonine, Pavel V; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Chen, Vincent B; Moriarty, Nigel W; Richardson, David C; Richardson, Jane S; Adams, Paul D

    2012-04-01

    Traditional methods for macromolecular refinement often have limited success at low resolution (3.0-3.5 Å or worse), producing models that score poorly on crystallographic and geometric validation criteria. To improve low-resolution refinement, knowledge from macromolecular chemistry and homology was used to add three new coordinate-restraint functions to the refinement program phenix.refine. Firstly, a `reference-model' method uses an identical or homologous higher resolution model to add restraints on torsion angles to the geometric target function. Secondly, automatic restraints for common secondary-structure elements in proteins and nucleic acids were implemented that can help to preserve the secondary-structure geometry, which is often distorted at low resolution. Lastly, we have implemented Ramachandran-based restraints on the backbone torsion angles. In this method, a ϕ,ψ term is added to the geometric target function to minimize a modified Ramachandran landscape that smoothly combines favorable peaks identified from nonredundant high-quality data with unfavorable peaks calculated using a clash-based pseudo-energy function. All three methods show improved MolProbity validation statistics, typically complemented by a lowered R(free) and a decreased gap between R(work) and R(free).

  18. Improved metrics for comparing structures of macromolecular assemblies determined by 3D electron-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Patwardhan, Ardan; Topf, Maya; Winn, Martyn

    2017-07-01

    Recent developments in 3-dimensional electron microcopy (3D-EM) techniques and a concomitant drive to look at complex molecular structures, have led to a rapid increase in the amount of volume data available for biomolecules. This creates a demand for better methods to analyse the data, including improved scores for comparison, classification and integration of data at different resolutions. To this end, we developed and evaluated a set of scoring functions that compare 3D-EM volumes. To test our scores we used a benchmark set of volume alignments derived from the Electron Microscopy Data Bank. We find that the performance of different scores vary with the map-type, resolution and the extent of overlap between volumes. Importantly, adding the overlap information to the local scoring functions can significantly improve their precision and accuracy in a range of resolutions. A combined score involving the local mutual information and overlap (LMI_OV) performs best overall, irrespective of the map category, resolution or the extent of overlap, and we recommend this score for general use. The local mutual information score itself is found to be more discriminatory than cross-correlation coefficient for intermediate-to-low resolution maps or when the map size and density distribution differ significantly. For comparing map surfaces, we implemented two filters to detect the surface points, including one based on the 'extent of surface exposure'. We show that scores that compare surfaces are useful at low resolutions and for maps with evident surface features. All the scores discussed are implemented in TEMPy (http://tempy.ismb.lon.ac.uk/). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Liberation of microbial substrates from macromolecular organic matter by non-supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, P.; Glombitza, C.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    The worldwide search for suitable underground storage formations for CO2 also considers coal-bearing strata. CO2 is already injected into coal seams for enhanced recovery of coal bed methane. However, the geochemical and microbiological effects of increased CO2 concentrations on organic matter rich formations are rarely investigated. The injected CO2 will dissolve in the pore water, causing a decrease in pH and resulting in acidic formation waters. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) are chemically bound to the macromolecular matrix of sedimentary organic matter and may be liberated by hydrolysis, which is enhanced under acidic conditions. Recent investigations outlined the importance of LMWOAs as a feedstock for subsurface microbial life [1]. Therefore, injection of CO2 into coal formations may result in enhanced nutrient supply for subsurface microbes. To investigate the effects of highly CO2-saturated waters on the release of LMWOAs from coal, we developed an inexpensive high-pressure-high-temperature system that allows manipulating the concentration of dissolved gases up to 60 MPa and 120°C, respectively. The sample is placed in a flexible, gas-tight and inert PVDF sleeve, separating it from the pressure fluid and allowing for subsampling without loss of pressure. Lignite samples from the DEBITS-1 well, Waikato Basin, NZ and the Welzow-Süd open-cast mine, Niederlausitz, Germany, were extracted at 90° C and 5 MPa, with either pure water, CO2-saturated water, CO2/NO2 or CO2/SO2-saturated water. Subsamples were taken at different time points during the 72 hrs. long extraction. Extraction of LMWOAs from coal samples with our pressurised system resulted in yields that were up to four times higher than those reported for Soxhlet extraction [2]. These higher yields may be explained by the fact that during Soxhlet extraction the sample only gets into contact with freshly distilled water, whereas in our system the extraction fluid is circulated, resulting in

  20. High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy on macromolecular complexes and cell organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenger, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy techniques and computational 3-D reconstruction of macromolecular assemblies are tightly linked tools in modern structural biology. This symbiosis has produced vast amounts of detailed information on the structure and function of biological macromolecules. Typically, one of two fundamentally different strategies is used depending on the specimens and their environment. A: 3-D reconstruction based on repetitive and structurally identical unit cells that allow for averaging, and B: tomographic 3-D reconstructions where tilt-series between approximately ± 60 and ± 70° at small angular increments are collected from highly complex and flexible structures that are beyond averaging procedures, at least during the first round of 3-D reconstruction. Strategies of group A are averaging-based procedures and collect large number of 2-D projections at different angles that are computationally aligned, averaged together, and back-projected in 3-D space to reach a most complete 3-D dataset with high resolution, today often down to atomic detail. Evidently, success relies on structurally repetitive particles and an aligning procedure that unambiguously determines the angular relationship of all 2-D projections with respect to each other. The alignment procedure of small particles may rely on their packing into a regular array such as a 2-D crystal, an icosahedral (viral) particle, or a helical assembly. Critically important for cryo-methods, each particle will only be exposed once to the electron beam, making these procedures optimal for highest-resolution studies where beam-induced damage is a significant concern. In contrast, tomographic 3-D reconstruction procedures (group B) do not rely on averaging, but collect an entire dataset from the very same structure of interest. Data acquisition requires collecting a large series of tilted projections at angular increments of 1-2° or less and a tilt range of ± 60° or more. Accordingly, tomographic data

  1. SASSIE: A program to study intrinsically disordered biological molecules and macromolecular ensembles using experimental scattering restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Joseph E.; Raghunandan, Sindhu; Nanda, Hirsh; Krueger, Susan

    2012-02-01

    A program to construct ensembles of biomolecular structures that are consistent with experimental scattering data are described. Specifically, we generate an ensemble of biomolecular structures by varying sets of backbone dihedral angles that are then filtered using experimentally determined restraints to rapidly determine structures that have scattering profiles that are consistent with scattering data. We discuss an application of these tools to predict a set of structures for the HIV-1 Gag protein, an intrinsically disordered protein, that are consistent with small-angle neutron scattering experimental data. We have assembled these algorithms into a program called SASSIE for structure generation, visualization, and analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins and other macromolecular ensembles using neutron and X-ray scattering restraints. Program summaryProgram title: SASSIE Catalogue identifier: AEKL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 991 624 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 826 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python, C/C++, Fortran Computer: PC/Mac Operating system: 32- and 64-bit Linux (Ubuntu 10.04, Centos 5.6) and Mac OS X (10.6.6) RAM: 1 GB Classification: 3 External routines: Python 2.6.5, numpy 1.4.0, swig 1.3.40, scipy 0.8.0, Gnuplot-py-1.8, Tcl 8.5, Tk 8.5, Mac installation requires aquaterm 1.0 (or X window system) and Xcode 3 development tools. Nature of problem: Open source software to generate structures of disordered biological molecules that subsequently allow for the comparison of computational and experimental results is limiting the use of scattering resources. Solution method: Starting with an all atom model of a protein, for example, users can input

  2. Noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic images and iodine maps for the detection of venous thrombosis in second-generation dual-energy CT (DECT): an ex vivo phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongers, Malte N.; Schabel, Christoph; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Ketelsen, Dominik; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Thomas, Christoph [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Krauss, Bernhard [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be difficult to detect using CT due to poor and heterogeneous contrast. Dual-energy CT (DECT) allows iodine contrast optimization using noise-optimized monoenergetic extrapolations (MEIs) and iodine maps (IMs). Our aim was to assess whether MEI and IM could improve the delineation of thrombotic material within iodine-enhanced blood compared to single-energy CT (SECT). Six vessel phantoms, including human thrombus and contrast media-enhanced blood and one phantom without contrast, were placed in an attenuation phantom and scanned with DECT 100/140 kV and SECT 120 kV. IM, virtual non-contrast images (VNC), mixed images, and MEI were calculated. Attenuation of thrombi and blood were measured. Contrast and contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) were calculated and compared among IM, VNC, mixed images, MEI, and SECT using paired t tests. MEI40keV and IM showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV from high to intermediate iodine concentrations (contrast:pMEI40keV < 0.002,pIM < 0.005;CNR:pMEI40keV < 0.002,pIM < 0.004). At low iodine concentrations, MEI190keV and VNC images showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV with inverted contrasts (contrast:pMEI190keV < 0.008,pVNC < 0.002;CNR:pMEI190keV < 0.003,pVNC < 0.002). Noise-optimized MEI and IM provide significantly higher contrast and CNR in the delineation of thrombosis compared to SECT, which may facilitate the detection of DVT in difficult cases. circle Poor contrast makes it difficult to detect thrombosis in CT. (orig.)

  3. CALS Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Ib; Nielsen, Povl Holm; Larsen, Michael Holm

    1998-01-01

    To enhance the industrial applications of CALS, CALS Center Danmark has developed a cost efficient and transparent assessment, CALS Mapping, to uncover the potential of CALS - primarily dedicated to small and medium sized enterprises. The idea behind CALS Mapping is that the CALS State...... of the enterprise is compared with a Reference Enterprise Model (REM). The REM is a CALS idealised enterprise providing full product support throughout the extended enterprise and containing different manufacturing aspects, e.g. component industry, process industry, and one-piece production. This CALS idealised...... enterprise is, when applied in a given organisation modified with respect to the industry regarded, hence irrelevant measure parameters are eliminated to avoid redundancy. This assessment of CALS Mapping, quantify the CALS potential of an organisation with the purpose of providing decision support to the top...

  4. Cognitive maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minder, Bettina; Laursen, Linda Nhu; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2014-01-01

    . Conceptual clustering is used to analyse and order information according to concepts or variables from within the data. The cognitive maps identified are validated through the comments of some of the same experts. The study presents three cognitive maps and respective world-views explaining how the design...... and innovation field are related and under which dimensions they differ. The paper draws preliminary conclusions on the implications of the different world- views on the innovation process. With the growing importance of the design approach in innovation e.g. design thinking, a clear conception...

  5. Participatory maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    towards a new political ecology. This type of digital cartographies has been highlighted as the ‘processual turn’ in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This paper...... looks at computer-assisted cartography as part of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia...

  6. Metabolic growth rate control in Escherichia coli may be a consequence of subsaturation of the macromolecular biosynthetic apparatus with substrates and catalytic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Pedersen, Steen

    1990-01-01

    to a molecular sharing economy at a high level of competition inside the cell. Thus, the promoters compete with each other in the binding of a limited amount of free RNA polymerase and the ribosome binding sites on the mRNA chains compete with each other for the free ribosomes. The macromolecular chain...

  7. Tools for macromolecular model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Alan; Long, Fei; Nicholls, Robert A.; Toots, Jaan; Emsley, Paul; Murshudov, Garib, E-mail: garib@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    A description is given of new tools to facilitate model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions. The recent rapid development of single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) now allows structures to be solved by this method at resolutions close to 3 Å. Here, a number of tools to facilitate the interpretation of EM reconstructions with stereochemically reasonable all-atom models are described. The BALBES database has been repurposed as a tool for identifying protein folds from density maps. Modifications to Coot, including new Jiggle Fit and morphing tools and improved handling of nucleic acids, enhance its functionality for interpreting EM maps. REFMAC has been modified for optimal fitting of atomic models into EM maps. As external structural information can enhance the reliability of the derived atomic models, stabilize refinement and reduce overfitting, ProSMART has been extended to generate interatomic distance restraints from nucleic acid reference structures, and a new tool, LIBG, has been developed to generate nucleic acid base-pair and parallel-plane restraints. Furthermore, restraint generation has been integrated with visualization and editing in Coot, and these restraints have been applied to both real-space refinement in Coot and reciprocal-space refinement in REFMAC.

  8. Tools for macromolecular model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alan; Long, Fei; Nicholls, Robert A; Toots, Jaan; Emsley, Paul; Murshudov, Garib

    2015-01-01

    The recent rapid development of single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) now allows structures to be solved by this method at resolutions close to 3 Å. Here, a number of tools to facilitate the interpretation of EM reconstructions with stereochemically reasonable all-atom models are described. The BALBES database has been repurposed as a tool for identifying protein folds from density maps. Modifications to Coot, including new Jiggle Fit and morphing tools and improved handling of nucleic acids, enhance its functionality for interpreting EM maps. REFMAC has been modified for optimal fitting of atomic models into EM maps. As external structural information can enhance the reliability of the derived atomic models, stabilize refinement and reduce overfitting, ProSMART has been extended to generate interatomic distance restraints from nucleic acid reference structures, and a new tool, LIBG, has been developed to generate nucleic acid base-pair and parallel-plane restraints. Furthermore, restraint generation has been integrated with visualization and editing in Coot, and these restraints have been applied to both real-space refinement in Coot and reciprocal-space refinement in REFMAC.

  9. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being......, the innovation map can act as a medium in which policymakers, interest organization and companies can develop and coordinate future innovation activities....

  10. Meal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Kügler, Jens; Olsen, Nina Veflen

    2013-01-01

    probabilities are subjected to multiple correspondence analysis and mapped into low-dimensional space. In a third step, the principal coordinates representing meal centres and side components in the correspondence analysis solution are subjected to cluster analysis to identify distinct groups of compatible...

  11. Mapping filmmaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilje, Øystein; Frølunde, Lisbeth; Lindstrand, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    This chapter concerns mapping patterns in regards to how young filmmakers (age 15 – 20) in the Scandinavian countries learn about filmmaking. To uncover the patterns, we present portraits of four young filmmakers who participated in the Scandinavian research project Making a filmmaker. The focus...

  12. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    of digital cartographies has been highlighted as the ‘processual turn’ in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This paper looks at computer-assisted cartography as part...

  13. Recent advances in the analysis of macromolecular interactions using the matrix-free method of sedimentation in the analytical ultracentrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Stephen E; Gillis, Richard B; Almutairi, Fahad; Erten, Tayyibe; Kök, M Şamil; Adams, Gary G

    2015-03-06

    Sedimentation in the analytical ultracentrifuge is a matrix free solution technique with no immobilisation, columns, or membranes required and can be used to study self-association and complex or "hetero"-interactions, stoichiometry, reversibility and interaction strength of a wide variety of macromolecular types and across a very large dynamic range (dissociation constants from 10-12 M to 10-1 M). We extend an earlier review specifically highlighting advances in sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium in the analytical ultracentrifuge applied to protein interactions and mucoadhesion and to review recent applications in protein self-association (tetanus toxoid, agrin), protein-like carbohydrate association (aminocelluloses), carbohydrate-protein interactions (polysaccharide-gliadin), nucleic-acid protein (G-duplexes), nucleic acid-carbohydrate (DNA-chitosan) and finally carbohydrate-carbohydrate (xanthan-chitosan and a ternary polysaccharide complex) interactions.

  14. A fast band-Krylov eigensolver for macromolecular functional motion simulation on multicore architectures and graphics processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliaga, José I.; Alonso, Pedro; Badía, José M.; Chacón, Pablo; Davidović, Davor; López-Blanco, José R.; Quintana-Ortí, Enrique S.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a new iterative Krylov subspace-based eigensolver for the simulation of macromolecular motions on desktop multithreaded platforms equipped with multicore processors and, possibly, a graphics accelerator (GPU). The method consists of two stages, with the original problem first reduced into a simpler band-structured form by means of a high-performance compute-intensive procedure. This is followed by a memory-intensive but low-cost Krylov iteration, which is off-loaded to be computed on the GPU by means of an efficient data-parallel kernel. The experimental results reveal the performance of the new eigensolver. Concretely, when applied to the simulation of macromolecules with a few thousands degrees of freedom and the number of eigenpairs to be computed is small to moderate, the new solver outperforms other methods implemented as part of high-performance numerical linear algebra packages for multithreaded architectures.

  15. Recent Advances in the Analysis of Macromolecular Interactions Using the Matrix-Free Method of Sedimentation in the Analytical Ultracentrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Stephen E.; Gillis, Richard B.; Almutairi, Fahad; Erten, Tayyibe; Kök, M. Şamil; Adams, Gary G.

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentation in the analytical ultracentrifuge is a matrix free solution technique with no immobilisation, columns, or membranes required and can be used to study self-association and complex or “hetero”-interactions, stoichiometry, reversibility and interaction strength of a wide variety of macromolecular types and across a very large dynamic range (dissociation constants from 10−12 M to 10−1 M). We extend an earlier review specifically highlighting advances in sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium in the analytical ultracentrifuge applied to protein interactions and mucoadhesion and to review recent applications in protein self-association (tetanus toxoid, agrin), protein-like carbohydrate association (aminocelluloses), carbohydrate-protein interactions (polysaccharide-gliadin), nucleic-acid protein (G-duplexes), nucleic acid-carbohydrate (DNA-chitosan) and finally carbohydrate-carbohydrate (xanthan-chitosan and a ternary polysaccharide complex) interactions. PMID:25756246

  16. The effect of macromolecular crowding on mobility of biomolecules, association kinetics and gene expression in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaka, Marcin; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Hou, Sen; Hołyst, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We discuss a quantitative influence of macromolecular crowding on biological processes: motion, bimolecular reactions, and gene expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. We present scaling laws relating diffusion coefficient of an object moving in a cytoplasm of cells to a size of this object and degree of crowding. Such description leads to the notion of the length scale dependent viscosity characteristic for all living cells. We present an application of the length-scale dependent viscosity model to the description of motion in the cytoplasm of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic living cells. We compare the model with all recent data on diffusion of nanoscopic objects in HeLa, and E. coli cells. Additionally a description of the mobility of molecules in cell nucleus is presented. Finally we discuss the influence of crowding on the bimolecular association rates and gene expression in living cells.

  17. Recent Advances in the Analysis of Macromolecular Interactions Using the Matrix-Free Method of Sedimentation in the Analytical Ultracentrifuge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Harding

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentation in the analytical ultracentrifuge is a matrix free solution technique with no immobilisation, columns, or membranes required and can be used to study self-association and complex or “hetero”-interactions, stoichiometry, reversibility and interaction strength of a wide variety of macromolecular types and across a very large dynamic range (dissociation constants from 10−12 M to 10−1 M. We extend an earlier review specifically highlighting advances in sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium in the analytical ultracentrifuge applied to protein interactions and mucoadhesion and to review recent applications in protein self-association (tetanus toxoid, agrin, protein-like carbohydrate association (aminocelluloses, carbohydrate-protein interactions (polysaccharide-gliadin, nucleic-acid protein (G-duplexes, nucleic acid-carbohydrate (DNA-chitosan and finally carbohydrate-carbohydrate (xanthan-chitosan and a ternary polysaccharide complex interactions.

  18. A fast band–Krylov eigensolver for macromolecular functional motion simulation on multicore architectures and graphics processors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliaga, José I., E-mail: aliaga@uji.es [Depto. Ingeniería y Ciencia de Computadores, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain); Alonso, Pedro [Departamento de Sistemas Informáticos y Computación, Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain); Badía, José M. [Depto. Ingeniería y Ciencia de Computadores, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain); Chacón, Pablo [Dept. Biological Chemical Physics, Rocasolano Physics and Chemistry Institute, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Davidović, Davor [Rudjer Bošković Institute, Centar za Informatiku i Računarstvo – CIR, Zagreb (Croatia); López-Blanco, José R. [Dept. Biological Chemical Physics, Rocasolano Physics and Chemistry Institute, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Quintana-Ortí, Enrique S. [Depto. Ingeniería y Ciencia de Computadores, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    We introduce a new iterative Krylov subspace-based eigensolver for the simulation of macromolecular motions on desktop multithreaded platforms equipped with multicore processors and, possibly, a graphics accelerator (GPU). The method consists of two stages, with the original problem first reduced into a simpler band-structured form by means of a high-performance compute-intensive procedure. This is followed by a memory-intensive but low-cost Krylov iteration, which is off-loaded to be computed on the GPU by means of an efficient data-parallel kernel. The experimental results reveal the performance of the new eigensolver. Concretely, when applied to the simulation of macromolecules with a few thousands degrees of freedom and the number of eigenpairs to be computed is small to moderate, the new solver outperforms other methods implemented as part of high-performance numerical linear algebra packages for multithreaded architectures.

  19. Improved fitting of solution X-ray scattering data to macromolecular structures and structural ensembles by explicit water modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishaev, Alexander; Guo, Liang; Irving, Thomas; Bax, Ad

    2010-11-10

    A new procedure, AXES, is introduced for fitting small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data to macromolecular structures and ensembles of structures. By using explicit water models to account for the effect of solvent, and by restricting the adjustable fitting parameters to those that dominate experimental uncertainties, including sample/buffer rescaling, detector dark current, and, within a narrow range, hydration layer density, superior fits between experimental high resolution structures and SAXS data are obtained. AXES results are found to be more discriminating than standard Crysol fitting of SAXS data when evaluating poorly or incorrectly modeled protein structures. AXES results for ensembles of structures previously generated for ubiquitin show improved fits over fitting of the individual members of these ensembles, indicating these ensembles capture the dynamic behavior of proteins in solution.

  20. Sample preparation of biological macromolecular assemblies for the determination of high-resolution structures by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Holger; Chari, Ashwin

    2016-02-01

    Single particle cryo-EM has recently developed into a powerful tool to determine the 3D structure of macromolecular complexes at near-atomic resolution, which allows structural biologists to build atomic models of proteins. All technical aspects of cryo-EM technology have been considerably improved over the last two decades, including electron microscopic hardware, image processing software and the ever growing speed of computers. This leads to a more widespread use of the technique, and it can be anticipated that further automation of electron microscopes and image processing tools will soon fully shift the focus away from the technological aspects, onto biological questions that can be answered. In single particle cryo-EM, no crystals of a macromolecule are required. In contrast to X-ray crystallography, this significantly facilitates structure determination by cryo-EM. Nevertheless, a relatively high level of biochemical control is still essential to obtain high-resolution structures by cryo-EM, and it can be anticipated that the success of the cryo-EM technology goes hand in hand with further developments of sample purification and preparation techniques. This will allow routine high-resolution structure determination of the many macromolecular complexes of the cell that until now represent evasive targets for X-ray crystallographers. Here we discuss the various biochemical tools that are currently available and the existing sample purification and preparation techniques for cryo-EM grid preparation that are needed to obtain high-resolution images for structure determination. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Single-step antibody-based affinity cryo-electron microscopy for imaging and structural analysis of macromolecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guimei; Vago, Frank; Zhang, Dongsheng; Snyder, Jonathan E; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Ci; Benjamin, Christopher; Jiang, Xi; Kuhn, Richard J; Serwer, Philip; Thompson, David H; Jiang, Wen

    2014-07-01

    Single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is an emerging powerful tool for structural studies of macromolecular assemblies (i.e., protein complexes and viruses). Although single particle cryo-EM requires less concentrated and smaller amounts of samples than X-ray crystallography, it remains challenging to study specimens that are low-abundance, low-yield, or short-lived. The recent development of affinity grid techniques can potentially further extend single particle cryo-EM to these challenging samples by combining sample purification and cryo-EM grid preparation into a single step. Here we report a new design of affinity cryo-EM approach, cryo-SPIEM, that applies a traditional pathogen diagnosis tool Solid Phase Immune Electron Microscopy (SPIEM) to the single particle cryo-EM method. This approach provides an alternative, largely simplified and easier to use affinity grid that directly works with most native macromolecular complexes with established antibodies, and enables cryo-EM studies of native samples directly from cell cultures. In the present work, we extensively tested the feasibility of cryo-SPIEM with multiple samples including those of high or low molecular weight, macromolecules with low or high symmetry, His-tagged or native particles, and high- or low-yield macromolecules. Results for all these samples (non-purified His-tagged bacteriophage T7, His-tagged Escherichiacoli ribosomes, native Sindbis virus, and purified but low-concentration native Tulane virus) demonstrated the capability of cryo-SPIEM approach in specifically trapping and concentrating target particles on TEM grids with minimal view constraints for cryo-EM imaging and determination of 3D structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impaired macromolecular protein pools in fronto-striato-thalamic circuits in type 2 diabetes revealed by magnetization transfer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaolin; Ajilore, Olusola; Wu, Minjie; Lamar, Melissa; Kumar, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with white matter microstructural changes, cognitive impairment, and decreased resting-state functional connectivity and spontaneous brain activity. This study used magnetization transfer imaging to examine, for the first time, the integrity of macromolecular protein pools in fronto-striato-thalamic circuits and its clinical and cognitive correlates in patients with T2DM. T2DM patients without mood disorders (n = 20, aged 65.05 ± 11.95 years) and healthy control subjects (HCs; n = 26, aged 62.92 ± 12.71 years) were recruited. Nodes of fronto-striato-thalamic circuits-head of the caudate nucleus (hCaud), putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus-and four cortical regions-rostral and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and lateral orbitofrontal cortex-were examined. Compared with HCs, patients with T2DM had significantly lower magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in bilateral anterior cingulate and hCaud. Reduced MTRs in the above regions showed correlations with T2DM-related clinical measures, including hemoglobin A1c level and vascular risk factors, and neuropsychological task performance in the domains of learning and memory, executive function, and attention and information processing. The impaired biophysical integrity of brain macromolecular protein pools and their local microenvironments in T2DM patients may provide insights into the neurological pathophysiology underlying diabetes-associated clinical and cognitive deficits. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  3. Multiscale modeling of metabolism and macromolecular synthesis in E. coli and its application to the evolution of codon usage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Thiele

    Full Text Available Biological systems are inherently hierarchal and multiscale in time and space. A major challenge of systems biology is to describe biological systems as a computational model, which can be used to derive novel hypothesis and drive experiments leading to new knowledge. The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis approach has been successfully applied to metabolism and to the macromolecular synthesis machinery assembly. Here, we present the first integrated stoichiometric multiscale model of metabolism and macromolecular synthesis for Escherichia coli K12 MG1655, which describes the sequence-specific synthesis and function of almost 2000 gene products at molecular detail. We added linear constraints, which couple enzyme synthesis and catalysis reactions. Comparison with experimental data showed improvement of growth phenotype prediction with the multiscale model over E. coli's metabolic model alone. Many of the genes covered by this integrated model are well conserved across enterobacters and other, less related bacteria. We addressed the question of whether the bias in synonymous codon usage could affect the growth phenotype and environmental niches that an organism can occupy. We created two classes of in silico strains, one with more biased codon usage and one with more equilibrated codon usage than the wildtype. The reduced growth phenotype in biased strains was caused by tRNA supply shortage, indicating that expansion of tRNA gene content or tRNA codon recognition allow E. coli to respond to changes in codon usage bias. Our analysis suggests that in order to maximize growth and to adapt to new environmental niches, codon usage and tRNA content must co-evolve. These results provide further evidence for the mutation-selection-drift balance theory of codon usage bias. This integrated multiscale reconstruction successfully demonstrates that the constraint-based modeling approach is well suited to whole-cell modeling endeavors.

  4. Macromolecular Engineering: New Routes Towards the Synthesis of Well-??Defined Polyethers/Polyesters Co/Terpolymers with Different Architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Alamri, Haleema

    2016-05-18

    The primary objective of this research was to develop a new and efficient pathway for well-defined multicomponent homo/co/terpolymers of cyclic esters/ethers using an organocatalytic approach with an emphasis on the macromolecular engineering aspects of the overall synthesis. Macromolecular engineering (as discussed in the first chapter) of homo/copolymers refers to the specific tailoring of these materials for achieving an easy and reproducible synthesis that results in precise molecular characteristics, i.e. molecular weight and polydispersity, as well as specific structure and end?group choices. Precise control of these molecular characteristics will provide access to new materials that can be used for pre-targeted purposes such as biomedical applications. Among the most commonly used engineering materials are polyesters (biocompatible and biodegradable) and polyethers (biocompatible), either as homopolymers or when or copolymers with linear structures. The ability to create non-linear structures, for example stars, will open new horizons in the applications of these important polymeric materials. The second part of this thesis describes the synthesis of aliphatic polyesters, particularly polycaprolactone and polylactide, using a metal-free initiator/catalyst system. A phosphazene base (t?BuP2) was used as the catalyst for the ring-opening copolymerization of ?-aprolactone (??CL) and L,Lactide (LLA) at room temperature with a variety of protic initiators in different solvents. These studies provided important information for the design of a metal-free route toward the synthesis of polyester?based (bio) materials. The third part of the thesis describes a novel route for the one?pot synthesis of polyether-b polyester block copolymers with either a linear or a specific macromolecular architecture. Poly (styrene oxide)?b?poly(caprolactone)?b?poly(L,lactide) was prepared using this method with the goal of synthesizing poly(styrene oxide)-based materials since this

  5. Comparison of In Vivo and Ex Vivo MRI of the Human Hippocampal Formation in the Same Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisse, L E M; Adler, D H; Ittyerah, R; Pluta, J B; Robinson, J L; Schuck, T; Trojanowski, J Q; Grossman, M; Detre, J A; Elliott, M A; Toledo, J B; Liu, W; Pickup, S; Das, S R; Wolk, D A; Yushkevich, P A

    2017-11-01

    Multiple techniques for quantification of hippocampal subfields from in vivo MRI have been proposed. Linking in vivo MRI to the underlying histology can help validate and improve these techniques. High-resolution ex vivo MRI can provide an intermediate modality to map information between these very different imaging modalities. This article evaluates the ability to match information between in vivo and ex vivo MRI in the same subjects. We perform rigid and deformable registration on 10 pairs of in vivo (3 T, 0.4 × 0.4 × 2.6 mm3) and ex vivo (9.4 T, 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.2 mm3) scans, and describe differences in MRI appearance between these modalities qualitatively and quantitatively. The feasibility of using this dataset to validate in vivo segmentation is evaluated by applying an automatic hippocampal subfield segmentation technique (ASHS) to in vivo scans and comparing SRLM (stratum/radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare) surface to manual tracing on corresponding ex vivo scans (and in 2 cases, histology). Regional increases in thickness are detected in ex vivo scans adjacent to the ventricles and were not related to scanner, resolution differences, or susceptibility artefacts. Satisfactory in vivo/ex vivo registration and subvoxel accuracy of ASHS segmentation of hippocampal SRLM demonstrate the feasibility of using this dataset for validation, and potentially, improvement of in vivo segmentation methods. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. The analysis shows a multifaceted landscape of innovation around an existing regime, built around existing ways of working...... and developed over generations. The regime is challenged from various niches and the socio-technical landscape through trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation...... potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being between government and governance. Based on the concepts from SNM the paper introduces an innovation map in order to support the development of meta-governance policymaking. By mapping some...

  7. EM-Fold: De novo atomic-detail protein structure determination from medium resolution density maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindert, Steffen; Alexander, Nathan; Wötzel, Nils; Karakaş, Mert; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Meiler, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Electron density maps of membrane proteins or large macromolecular complexes are frequently only determined at medium resolution between 4 Å and 10 Å, either by cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) or X-ray crystallography. In these density maps the general arrangement of secondary structure elements is revealed while their directionality and connectivity remain elusive. We demonstrate that the topology of proteins with up to 250 amino acids can be determined from such density maps when combined with a computational protein folding protocol. Furthermore, we accurately reconstruct atomic detail in loop regions and amino acid side chains not visible in the experimental data. The EM-Fold algorithm assembles the secondary structure elements de novo before atomic detail is added using Rosetta. In a benchmark of 27 proteins the protocol consistently and reproducibly achieves models with RMSD values smaller than 3 Å. PMID:22405005

  8. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  9. Reasoning Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Falcão, Renato Pinto de Queiroz

    2003-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro Tecnológico. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia de Produção. Esta dissertação apresenta uma ferramenta de apoio à decisão, baseada na Metodologia Multicritérios de Apoio à Decisão - MCDA, através do desenvolvimento de um software denominado Reasoning Maps. O software permite, de maneira integrada, a construção de mapas cognitivos, suas diversas análises topológicas e o cadastramento e análise de alternativas. Abor...

  10. Projective mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlholm, Christian; Brockhoff, Per B.; Bredie, Wender Laurentius Petrus

    2012-01-01

    instructions and influence heavily the product placements and the descriptive vocabulary (Dehlholm et.al., 2012b). The type of assessors performing the method influences results with an extra aspect in Projective Mapping compared to more analytical tests, as the given spontaneous perceptions are much dependent...... the applied framework, semantic restrictions, the choice of type of assessors and the validation of product separations. The applied framework concerns the response surface as presented to the assessor in different shapes, e.g. rectangular, square or round. Semantic restrictions are a part of the assessor...

  11. Small molecular, macromolecular, and cellular chloramines react with thiocyanate to give the human defense factor hypothiocyanite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xulu, Bheki A; Ashby, Michael T

    2010-03-09

    Thiocyanate reacts noncatalytically with myeloperoxidase-derived HOCl to produce hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-)), thereby potentially limiting the propensity of HOCl to inflict host tissue damage that can lead to inflammatory diseases. However, the efficiency with which SCN(-) captures HOCl in vivo depends on the concentration of SCN(-) relative to other chemical targets. In blood plasma, where the concentration of SCN(-) is relatively low, proteins may be the principal initial targets of HOCl, and chloramines are a significant product. Chloramines eventually decompose to irreversibly damage proteins. In the present study, we demonstrate that SCN(-) reacts efficiently with chloramines in small molecules, in proteins, and in Escherichia coli cells to give OSCN(-) and the parent amine. Remarkably, OSCN(-) reacts faster than SCN(-) with chloramines. These reactions of SCN(-) and OSCN(-) with chloramines may repair some of the damage that is inflicted on protein amines by HOCl. Our observations are further evidence for the importance of secondary reactions during the redox cascades that are associated with oxidative stress by hypohalous acids.

  12. Mapping of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed M. Arafat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Land cover map of North Sinai was produced based on the FAO-Land Cover Classification System (LCCS of 2004. The standard FAO classification scheme provides a standardized system of classification that can be used to analyze spatial and temporal land cover variability in the study area. This approach also has the advantage of facilitating the integration of Sinai land cover mapping products to be included with the regional and global land cover datasets. The total study area is covering a total area of 20,310.4 km2 (203,104 hectare. The landscape classification was based on SPOT4 data acquired in 2011 using combined multispectral bands of 20 m spatial resolution. Geographic Information System (GIS was used to manipulate the attributed layers of classification in order to reach the maximum possible accuracy. GIS was also used to include all necessary information. The identified vegetative land cover classes of the study area are irrigated herbaceous crops, irrigated tree crops and rain fed tree crops. The non-vegetated land covers in the study area include bare rock, bare soils (stony, very stony and salt crusts, loose and shifting sands and sand dunes. The water bodies were classified as artificial perennial water bodies (fish ponds and irrigated canals and natural perennial water bodies as lakes (standing. The artificial surfaces include linear and non-linear features.

  13. Improving the Accuracy of Fitted Atomic Models in Cryo-EM Density Maps of Protein Assemblies Using Evolutionary Information from Aligned Homologous Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh, Ramachandran; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) has become an important technique to obtain structural insights into large macromolecular assemblies. However the resolution of the density maps do not allow for its interpretation at atomic level. Hence they are combined with high resolution structures along with information from other experimental or bioinformatics techniques to obtain pseudo-atomic models. Here, we describe the use of evolutionary conservation of residues as obtained from protein structures and alignments of homologous proteins to detect errors in the fitting of atomic structures as well as improve accuracy of the protein-protein interfacial regions in the cryo-EM density maps.

  14. Transcriptional mapping of rabies virus in vivo. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flamand, A. (Univ. Paris, Orsay, France); Delagneau, J.F.

    1978-11-01

    Synthesis of the proteins of rabies virus was studied in hamster cell infected with uv-irradiated virus. The uv target size of genes L, N, M/sub 1/, and M/sub 2/ was measured during primary transcription. Except for N, the target size of the remaining genes was considerably larger than that of their physical sizes. The data fit the hypothesis that four genes occupy a single transcriptional unit and that transcription of rabies virus proceeds in the order N, M/sub 1/, M/sub 2/, and L.

  15. Integrative Modeling of Macromolecular Assemblies from Low to Near-Atomic Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While conventional high-resolution techniques in structural biology are challenged by the size and flexibility of many biological assemblies, recent advances in low-resolution techniques such as cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS have opened up new avenues to define the structures of such assemblies. By systematically combining various sources of structural, biochemical and biophysical information, integrative modeling approaches aim to provide a unified structural description of such assemblies, starting from high-resolution structures of the individual components and integrating all available information from low-resolution experimental methods. In this review, we describe integrative modeling approaches, which use complementary data from either cryo-EM or SAXS. Specifically, we focus on the popular molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF method, which has been widely used for flexible fitting into cryo-EM maps. Second, we describe hybrid molecular dynamics, Rosetta Monte-Carlo and minimum ensemble search (MES methods that can be used to incorporate SAXS into pseudoatomic structural models. We present concise descriptions of the two methods and their most popular alternatives, along with select illustrative applications to protein/nucleic acid assemblies involved in DNA replication and repair.

  16. Mapping Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carruth, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Resilience theory is a growing discipline with great relevance for the discipline of planning, particularly in fields like energy planning that face great uncertainty and rapidly transforming contexts. Building on the work of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, this paper begins by outlining...... the relationship between resilience and energy planning, suggesting that planning in, and with, time is a core necessity in this domain. It then reviews four examples of graphically mapping with time, highlighting some of the key challenges, before tentatively proposing a graphical language to be employed...... by planners when aiming to construct resilient energy plans. It concludes that a graphical language has the potential to be a significant tool, flexibly facilitating cross-disciplinary communication and decision-making, while emphasising that its role is to support imaginative, resilient planning rather than...

  17. Near real-time skin deformation mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacenjar, Steve; Chen, Suzie; Jafri, Madiha; Wall, Brian; Pedersen, Richard; Bezozo, Richard

    2013-02-01

    A novel in vivo approach is described that provides large area mapping of the mechanical properties of the skin in human patients. Such information is important in the understanding of skin health, cosmetic surgery[1], aging, and impacts of sun exposure. Currently, several methods have been developed to estimate the local biomechanical properties of the skin, including the use of a physical biopsy of local areas of the skin (in vitro methods) [2, 3, and 4], and also the use of non-invasive methods (in vivo) [5, 6, and 7]. All such methods examine localized areas of the skin. Our approach examines the local elastic properties via the generation of field displacement maps of the skin created using time-sequence imaging [9] with 2D digital imaging correlation (DIC) [10]. In this approach, large areas of the skin are reviewed rapidly, and skin displacement maps are generated showing the contour maps of skin deformation. These maps are then used to precisely register skin images for purposes of diagnostic comparison. This paper reports on our mapping and registration approach, and demonstrates its ability to accurately measure the skin deformation through a described nulling interpolation process. The result of local translational DIC alignment is compared using this interpolation process. The effectiveness of the approach is reported in terms of residual RMS, image entropy measures, and differential segmented regional errors.

  18. A Review of Two Multiscale Methods for the Simulation of Macromolecular Assemblies: Multiscale Perturbation and Multiscale Factorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Pankavich

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many mesoscopic N-atom systems derive their structural and dynamical properties from processes coupled across multiple scales in space and time. That is, they simultaneously deform or display collective behaviors, while experiencing atomic scale vibrations and collisions. Due to the large number of atoms involved and the need to simulate over long time periods of biological interest, traditional computational tools, like molecular dynamics, are often infeasible for such systems. Hence, in the current review article, we present and discuss two recent multiscale methods, stemming from the N-atom formulation and an underlying scale separation, that can be used to study such systems in a friction-dominated regime: multiscale perturbation theory and multiscale factorization. These novel analytic foundations provide a self-consistent approach to yield accurate and feasible long-time simulations with atomic detail for a variety of multiscale phenomena, such as viral structural transitions and macromolecular self-assembly. As such, the accuracy and efficiency of the associated algorithms are demonstrated for a few representative biological systems, including satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV and lactoferrin.

  19. Innovative High-Throughput SAXS Methodologies Based on Photonic Lab-on-a-Chip Sensors: Application to Macromolecular Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Isaac; Radajewski, Dimitri; Charton, Sophie; Phamvan, Nhat; Brennich, Martha; Pernot, Petra; Bonneté, Françoise; Teychené, Sébastien

    2017-06-02

    The relevance of coupling droplet-based Photonic Lab-on-a-Chip (PhLoC) platforms and Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) technique is here highlighted for the performance of high throughput investigations, related to the study of protein macromolecular interactions. With this configuration, minute amounts of sample are required to obtain reliable statistical data. The PhLoC platforms presented in this work are designed to allow and control an effective mixing of precise amounts of proteins, crystallization reagents and buffer in nanoliter volumes, and the subsequent generation of nanodroplets by means of a two-phase flow. Spectrophotometric sensing permits a fine control on droplet generation frequency and stability as well as on concentration conditions, and finally the droplet flow is synchronized to perform synchrotron radiation SAXS measurements in individual droplets (each one acting as an isolated microreactor) to probe protein interactions. With this configuration, droplet physic-chemical conditions can be reproducibly and finely tuned, and monitored without cross-contamination, allowing for the screening of a substantial number of saturation conditions with a small amount of biological material. The setup was tested and validated using lysozyme as a model of study. By means of SAXS experiments, the proteins gyration radius and structure envelope were calculated as a function of protein concentration. The obtained values were found to be in good agreement with previously reported data, but with a dramatic reduction of sample volume requirements compared to studies reported in the literature.

  20. A Comparison of Arrhenius and Macromolecular Rate Theory for Predicting Temperature Responses of Soil CO2 Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, C. J.; Koyama, A.; Johnson, N. G.; von Fischer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Soil microbes catalyze many key ecosystem functions, including soil respiration, and are thus important for understanding global carbon cycles and other biogeochemical cycles. One important component in predicting rates of respiration is determining how microbial communities respond to temperature. A range of models have been developed for determining temperature sensitivity of soil biological activities, most of which are based on the Arrhenius equation. This equation predicts an exponential increase in rate with temperature, despite field and laboratory results suggesting a temperature optimum below the denaturation point. Recently, Schipper et al. (2014) developed a novel theory, Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT), which explains this trend due to heat capacity (CP) changes associated with enzymes. We applied MMRT to respiration data collected using a reciprocal transplant design with soils from three different sites across the U.S. Great Plains to isolate the effects of microbial community type from edaphic factors. We found that MMRT provided a better fit to the data than Arrhenius in 8 out of the 9 soil x inocula combinations. Our analysis revealed that the microbial communities have distinct CP values largely independent of soil type. These results have significant implications for fundamental understanding of microbial enzyme dynamics in soils as well as for ecosystem and global carbon modeling.

  1. Characterization of soluble macromolecular oxidatively reactive species (SMORS) from middle distillate diesel fuels: Their origin and role in instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, D.R.; Wechter, M.A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In diesel fuels which are oxidatively unstable and at least 6 months old, it has been shown that a solid phase can be isolated from the filtered fuels by methanol extraction followed by precipitation with hexane. The weight of this material is directly proportional to the amount of sludge which forms by both accelerated storage stability tests and by continued field aging of the fuels. We have suggested that the presence of this extraction induced precipitate (EIP) or fuel Soluble, Macromolecular, Oxidatively Reactive Species (SMORS) in these fuels thus accounts for the production of thermally induced precipitate (TIP) or insoluble sediment during oxidative aging of diesel fuels. In this paper the acronym EIP will be used in place of SMORS in most cases. This paper describes and summarizes the characterization studies performed to date on the EIP from representative fuels which are all greater than 6 months past production. The origin and apparent role of SMORS in sediment formation in diesel fuels is discussed.

  2. The surface modification of TiN nano-particles using macromolecular coupling agents, and their resulting dispersibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guojun; Qian, Jiasheng; Miao, Jibin; Yang, Bin; Xia, Ru; Chen, Peng

    2014-05-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) nano-particles were modified by the grafting of a random copolymerization functionalized macromolecular coupling agent (F-MCA) via a direct blending method. The hydroxyl groups on the surface of the nano-TiN particles interact with the silanol groups [SiOCH3] of the F-MCA to form an organic coating layer. The formation of covalent bonds [TiOSi] was verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. An X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the presence of the F-MCA inhibited the growth of the crystal plane but did not change the crystal structure of the TiN. Thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle measurement indicated that the F-MCA molecules were adsorbed or anchored to the surface of the nano-TiN particles, which hindered their aggregation. Pristine nano-TiN particles are poorly dispersed in ethyl acetate. Compared with the pristine TiN particles, the modified TiN particles show good dispersibility and form a stable colloidal dispersion in ethyl acetate. The surface hydrophobicity of the modified TiN increases, and the F-MCA molecules are anchored on the surface of the TiN particles. TiN particles modified by a F-MCA can be used in polymer blends, thermoplastic elastomers and polymer nanocomposites that have a better performance and longer life cycle.

  3. JBluIce-EPICS: a fast and flexible open-source beamline control system for macromolecular crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, S.; Hilgart, M.; Makarov, O.; Pothineni, S. B.; Yoder, D.; Ogata, C.; Sanishvili, R.; Venugopalan, N.; Becker, M.; Clift, M.; Smith, J. L.; Fischetti, R. F.

    2013-03-01

    This paper overviews recent advances in the JBluIce-EPICS open-source control system designed at the macromolecular crystallography beamlines of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and National Cancer Institute at the Advanced Photon Source (GM/CA@APS). We discuss some technical highlights of this system distinguishing it from the competition, such as reduction of software layers to only two, possibility to operate JBluIce in parallel with other beamline controls, plugin-enabled architecture where the plugins can be written in any programming language, and utilization of the whole power of the Java integrated development environment in the Graphical User Interface. Then, we demonstrate how these highlights help to make JBluIce fast, easily adaptable to new beamline developments, and intuitive for users. In particular, we discuss several recent additions to the system including a bridge between crystal rastering and data collection, automatic detection of raster polygons from optical crystal centering, background data processing, and a pathway to a fully automated pipeline from crystal screening to solving crystal structure.

  4. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  5. YUP.SCX: coaxing atomic models into medium resolution electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Robert K-Z; Devkota, Batsal; Harvey, Stephen C

    2008-08-01

    The structures of large macromolecular complexes in different functional states can be determined by cryo-electron microscopy, which yields electron density maps of low to intermediate resolutions. The maps can be combined with high-resolution atomic structures of components of the complex, to produce a model for the complex that is more accurate than the formal resolution of the map. To this end, methods have been developed to dock atomic models into density maps rigidly or flexibly, and to refine a docked model so as to optimize the fit of the atomic model into the map. We have developed a new refinement method called YUP.SCX. The electron density map is converted into a component of the potential energy function to which terms for stereochemical restraints and volume exclusion are added. The potential energy function is then minimized (using simulated annealing) to yield a stereochemically-restrained atomic structure that fits into the electron density map optimally. We used this procedure to construct an atomic model of the 70S ribosome in the pre-accommodation state. Although some atoms are displaced by as much as 33A, they divide themselves into nearly rigid fragments along natural boundaries with smooth transitions between the fragments.

  6. Mapping the Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-19

    Computer Mapping in Geoecology , The Harvard Library of Computer Graphics, 1979 Mapping Collection, Vol. 5, pp 11-27. 5. Robinson, A.H. (1974) A New Map...Use of Synagraphic Computer Mapping in Geoecology , The Harvard Library of Computer Graphics, 1979 Mapping Collection, Vol. 5, pp 11-27. 5. Robinson, A

  7. Human Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  8. Scaphoid kinematics in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moojen, Thybout M.; Snel, Jeroen G.; Ritt, Marco J. P. F.; Venema, Henk W.; Kauer, John M. G.; Bos, Kurt E.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify 3-dimensional (3-D) in vivo scaphoid kinematics during flexion-extension motion (FEM) and radial-ulnar deviation (RUD) of the hand. The right wrists of 11 healthy volunteers were imaged by spiral computed tomography during RUD and 5 of those wrists also

  9. Concept Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Laura K.; Brownson, Ross C.; Kelly, Cheryl; Ivey, Melissa K.; Leviton, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2003 to 2008, 25 cross-sector, multidisciplinary community partnerships funded through the Active Living by Design (ALbD) national program designed, planned, and implemented policy and environmental changes, with complementary programs and promotions. This paper describes the use of concept-mapping methods to gain insights into promising active living intervention strategies based on the collective experience of community representatives implementing ALbD initiatives. Methods Using Concept Systems software, community representatives (n=43) anonymously generated actions and changes in their communities to support active living (183 original statements, 79 condensed statements). Next, respondents (n=26, from 23 partnerships) sorted the 79 statements into self-created categories, or active living intervention approaches. Respondents then rated statements based on their perceptions of the most important strategies for creating community changes (n=25, from 22 partnerships) and increasing community rates of physical activity (n=23, from 20 partnerships). Cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling were used to describe data patterns. Results ALbD community partnerships identified three active living intervention approaches with the greatest perceived importance to create community change and increase population levels of physical activity: changes to the built and natural environment, partnership and collaboration efforts, and land-use and transportation policies. The relative importance of intervention approaches varied according to subgroups of partnerships working with different populations. Conclusions Decision makers, practitioners, and community residents can incorporate what has been learned from the 25 community partnerships to prioritize active living policy, physical project, promotional, and programmatic strategies for work in different populations and settings. PMID:23079266

  10. ShakeMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ShakeMap is a product of the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program in conjunction with the regional seismic networks. ShakeMaps provide near-real-time maps of ground...

  11. Lozi-like maps

    OpenAIRE

    Misiurewicz, Michal; Štimac, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    We define a broad class of piecewise smooth plane homeomorphisms which have properties similar to the properties of Lozi maps, including the existence of a hyperbolic attractor. We call those maps Lozi-like. For those maps one can apply our previous results on kneading theory for Lozi maps. We show a strong numerical evidence that there exist Lozi-like maps that have kneading sequences different than those of Lozi maps.

  12. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  13. Fast mapping of global protein folding states by multivariate NMR: a GPS for proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Underhaug, Jarl; Otzen, Daniel E

    2010-01-01

    that provides such an overview. GPS NMR exploits the unique ability of NMR to simultaneously record signals from individual hydrogen atoms in complex macromolecular systems and of multivariate analysis to describe spectral variations from these by a few variables for establishment of, and positioning in......, protein-folding state maps. The method is fast, sensitive, and robust, and it works without isotope-labelling. The unique capabilities of GPS NMR to identify different folding states and to compare different unfolding processes are demonstrated by mapping of the equilibrium folding space of bovine alpha......-lactalbumin in the presence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, and compare these with other surfactants, acid, denaturants and heat....

  14. FlexED8: the first member of a fast and flexible sample-changer family for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Gergely; Felisaz, Franck; Sorez, Clement; Lopez-Marrero, Marcos; Janocha, Robert; Manjasetty, Babu; Gobbo, Alexandre; Belrhali, Hassan; Bowler, Matthew W; Cipriani, Florent

    2017-10-01

    Automated sample changers are now standard equipment for modern macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beamlines. Nevertheless, most are only compatible with a single type of sample holder and puck. Recent work aimed at reducing sample-handling efforts and crystal-alignment times at beamlines has resulted in a new generation of compact and precise sample holders for cryocrystallography: miniSPINE and NewPin [see the companion paper by Papp et al. (2017, Acta Cryst., D73, 829-840)]. With full data collection now possible within seconds at most advanced beamlines, and future fourth-generation synchrotron sources promising to extract data in a few tens of milliseconds, the time taken to mount and centre a sample is rate-limiting. In this context, a versatile and fast sample changer, FlexED8, has been developed that is compatible with the highly successful SPINE sample holder and with the miniSPINE and NewPin sample holders. Based on a six-axis industrial robot, FlexED8 is equipped with a tool changer and includes a novel open sample-storage dewar with a built-in ice-filtering system. With seven versatile puck slots, it can hold up to 112 SPINE sample holders in uni-pucks, or 252 miniSPINE or NewPin sample holders, with 36 samples per puck. Additionally, a double gripper, compatible with the SPINE sample holders and uni-pucks, allows a reduction in the sample-exchange time from 40 s, the typical time with a standard single gripper, to less than 5 s. Computer vision-based sample-transfer monitoring, sophisticated error handling and automatic error-recovery procedures ensure high reliability. The FlexED8 sample changer has been successfully tested under real conditions on a beamline.

  15. Davisson-Germer Prize in Atomic or Surface Physics Lecture: Line 'Em All Up: Macromolecular Assembly at Liquid Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Geraldine

    2013-03-01

    Advances in our molecular level understanding of the ubiquitous fluid interface comprised of a hydrophobic fluid medium, and an aqueous solution of soluble ions and solutes has been slow until recently. This more recent upsurge in interest and progress comes from advances in both experimental and computational techniques as well as the increasingly important role that this interface is playing in such areas as green chemistry, nanoparticle synthesis, improved oil and mineral recovery and water purification. The presentation will focus on our most recent efforts in understanding (1) the molecular structure of the interface between two immiscible liquids, (2) the penetration of aqueous phase ions into the interfacial region and their effect on its properties, and (3) the structure and dynamics of the adsorption of surfactants, polymers and nanoparticles at this interface. To gain insights into these processes we use a combination of vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, surface tension measurements using the pendant drop method, and molecular dynamics simulations. The results demonstrate that weak interactions between interfacial oil and water molecules create an interface that exhibits a high degree of molecular structuring and ordering, and with properties quite different than what is observed at the air-water interface. As a consequence of these interfacial oil-water interactions, the interface provides a unique environment for the adsorption and assembly of ions, polymers and nanoparticles that are drawn to its inner-most regions. Examples of our studies that provide new insights into the unique nature of adsorption, adsorption dynamics and macromolecular assembly at this interface will be provided.

  16. Macromolecular Crystallography for Synthetic Abiological Molecules: Combining xMDFF and PHENIX for Structure Determination of Cyanostar Macrocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Liu, Yun; Mayne, Christopher G; Lee, Semin; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Zlotnick, Adam; Schulten, Klaus; Flood, Amar H

    2015-07-15

    Crystal structure determination has long provided insight into structure and bonding of small molecules. When those same small molecules are designed to come together in multimolecular assemblies, such as in coordination cages, supramolecular architectures and organic-based frameworks, their crystallographic characteristics closely resemble biological macromolecules. This resemblance suggests that biomacromolecular refinement approaches be used for structure determination of abiological molecular complexes that arise in an aggregate state. Following this suggestion we investigated the crystal structure of a pentagonal macrocycle, cyanostar, by means of biological structure analysis methods and compared results to traditional small molecule methods. Cyanostar presents difficulties seen in supramolecular crystallography including whole molecule disorder and highly flexible solvent molecules sitting in macrocyclic and intermolecule void spaces. We used the force-field assisted refinement method, molecular dynamics flexible fitting algorithm for X-ray crystallography (xMDFF), along with tools from the macromolecular structure determination suite PHENIX. We found that a standard implementation of PHENIX, namely one without xMDFF, either fails to produce a solution by molecular replacement alone or produces an inaccurate structure when using generic geometry restraints, even at a very high diffraction data resolution of 0.84 Å. The problems disappear when taking advantage of xMDFF, which applies an optimized force field to realign molecular models during phasing by providing accurate restraints. The structure determination for this model system shows excellent agreement with the small-molecule methods. Therefore, the joint xMDFF-PHENIX refinement protocol provides a new strategy that uses macromolecule methods for structure determination of small molecules and their assemblies.

  17. Developments in optics and performance at BL13-XALOC, the macromolecular crystallography beamline at the ALBA synchrotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanhuix, Jordi; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Cuní, Guifré; Colldelram, Carles; Nicolás, Josep; Lidón, Julio; Boter, Eva; Ruget, Claude; Ferrer, Salvador; Benach, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    BL13-XALOC is currently the only macromolecular crystallography beamline at the 3 GeV ALBA synchrotron near Barcelona, Spain. The optics design is based on an in-vacuum undulator, a Si(111) channel-cut crystal monochromator and a pair of KB mirrors. It allows three main operation modes: a focused configuration, where both mirrors can focus the beam at the sample position to 52 µm × 5.5 µm FWHM (H × V); a defocused configuration that can match the size of the beam to the dimensions of the crystals or to focus the beam at the detector; and an unfocused configuration, where one or both mirrors are removed from the photon beam path. To achieve a uniform defocused beam, the slope errors of the mirrors were reduced down to 55 nrad RMS by employing a novel method that has been developed at the ALBA high-accuracy metrology laboratory. Thorough commissioning with X-ray beam and user operation has demonstrated an excellent energy and spatial stability of the beamline. The end-station includes a high-accuracy single-axis diffractometer, a removable mini-kappa stage, an automated sample-mounting robot and a photon-counting detector that allows shutterless operation. The positioning tables of the diffractometer and the detector are based on a novel and highly stable design. This equipment, together with the operation flexibility of the beamline, allows a large variety of types of crystals to be tackled, from medium-sized crystals with large unit-cell parameters to microcrystals. Several examples of data collections measured during beamline commissioning are described. The beamline started user operation on 18 July 2012.

  18. New methodologies at PF AR-NW12A: the implementation of high-pressure macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavas, Leonard Michel Gabriel, E-mail: leonard.chavas@kek.jp [PF/IMSS/KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-0801 (Japan); Nagae, Tadayuki [Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Yamada, Hiroyuki [Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Watanabe, Nobuhisa [Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Nagoya University, Furo-cho Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Yamada, Yusuke; Hiraki, Masahiko; Matsugaki, Naohiro [PF/IMSS/KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-0801 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The evolution of AR-NW12A into a multi-purpose end-station with optional high-pressure crystallography is described. The macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamline AR-NW12A is evolving from its original design of high-throughput crystallography to a multi-purpose end-station. Among the various options to be implemented, great efforts were made in making available high-pressure MX (HPMX) at the beamline. High-pressure molecular biophysics is a developing field that attracts the interest of a constantly growing scientific community. A plethora of activities can benefit from high pressure, and investigations have been performed on its applicability to study multimeric complex assemblies, compressibility of proteins and their crystals, macromolecules originating from extremophiles, or even the trapping of higher-energy conformers for molecules of biological interest. Recent studies using HPMX showed structural hydrostatic-pressure-induced changes in proteins. The conformational modifications could explain the enzymatic mechanism differences between proteins of the same family, living at different environmental pressures, as well as the initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process that have been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. To facilitate further HPMX, while allowing access to various individualized set-ups and experiments, the AR-NW12A sample environment has been revisited. Altogether, the newly added implementations will bring a fresh breath of life to AR-NW12A and allow the MX community to experiment in a larger set of fields related to structural biology.

  19. Macromolecular Competition Titration Method: Accessing Thermodynamics of the Unmodified Macromolecule–Ligand Interactions Through Spectroscopic Titrations of Fluorescent Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamically rigorous binding isotherms provides fundamental information about the energetics of the ligand–macromolecule interactions and often an invaluable insight about the structure of the formed complexes. The Macromolecular Competition Titration (MCT) method enables one to quantitatively obtain interaction parameters of protein–nucleic acid interactions, which may not be available by other methods, particularly for the unmodified long polymer lattices and specific nucleic acid substrates, if the binding is not accompanied by adequate spectroscopic signal changes. The method can be applied using different fluorescent nucleic acids or fluorophores, although the etheno-derivatives of nucleic acid are especially suitable as they are relatively easy to prepare, have significant blue fluorescence, their excitation band lies far from the protein absorption spectrum, and the modification eliminates the possibility of base pairing with other nucleic acids. The MCT method is not limited to the specific size of the reference nucleic acid. Particularly, a simple analysis of the competition titration experiments is described in which the fluorescent, short fragment of nucleic acid, spanning the exact site-size of the protein–nucleic acid complex, and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. Although the MCT method is predominantly discussed as applied to studying protein–nucleic acid interactions, it can generally be applied to any ligand–macromolecule system by monitoring the association reaction using the spectroscopic signal originating from the reference macromolecule in the presence of the competing macromolecule, whose interaction parameters with the ligand are to be determined. PMID:21195223

  20. Metabolic growth rate control in Escherichia coli may be a consequence of subsaturation of the macromolecular biosynthetic apparatus with substrates and catalytic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, K F; Pedersen, S

    1990-06-01

    In this paper, the Escherichia coli cell is considered as a system designed for rapid growth, but limited by the medium. We propose that this very design causes the cell to become subsaturated with precursors and catalytic components at all levels of macromolecular biosynthesis and leads to a molecular sharing economy at a high level of competition inside the cell. Thus, the promoters compete with each other in the binding of a limited amount of free RNA polymerase and the ribosome binding sites on the mRNA chains compete with each other for the free ribosomes. The macromolecular chain elongation reactions sequester a considerable proportion of the total amount of RNA polymerase and ribosomes in the cells. We propose that the degree of subsaturation of the macromolecular biosynthetic apparatus renders a variable fraction of RNA polymerase and ribosomes unavailable for the initiation of new chain synthesis and that this, at least in part, determines the composition of the cell as a function of the growth rate. Thus, at rapid growth, the high speed of the elongation reactions enables the cell to increase the concentrations of free RNA polymerase and ribosomes for initiation purposes. Furthermore, it is proposed that the speed of RNA polymerase movement is adjusted to the performance speed of the ribosomes. Mechanistically, this adjustment of the coupling between transcription and translation involves transcriptional pause sites along the RNA chains, the adjustment of the saturation level of RNA polymerase with the nucleoside triphosphate substrates, and the concentration of ppGpp, which is known to inhibit RNA chain elongation. This model is able to explain the stringent response and the control of stable RNA and of ribosome synthesis in steady states and in shifts, as well as the rate of overall protein synthesis as a function of the growth rate.

  1. In-vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Timothy C; Kim, Michele M; Liang, Xing; Finlay, Jarod C; Busch, Theresa M

    2015-02-01

    Dosimetry of singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) is of particular interest because it is the major cytotoxic agent causing biological effects for type-II photosensitizers during photodynamic therapy (PDT). An in-vivo model to determine the singlet oxygen threshold dose, [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh , for PDT was developed. An in-vivo radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor mouse model was used to correlate the radius of necrosis to the calculation based on explicit PDT dosimetry of light fluence distribution, tissue optical properties, and photosensitizer concentrations. Inputs to the model include five photosensitizer-specific photochemical parameters along with [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh . Photosensitizer-specific model parameters were determined for benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) and compared with two other type-II photosensitizers, Photofrin ® and m-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC) from the literature. The mean values (standard deviation) of the in-vivo [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh are approximately 0.56 (0.26) and 0.72 (0.21) mM (or 3.6×10 7 and 4.6×10 7 singlet oxygen per cell to reduce the cell survival to 1/e) for Photofrin ® and BPD, respectively, assuming that the fraction of generated singlet oxygen that interacts with the cell is 1. While the values for the photochemical parameters (ξ, σ, g , β) used for BPD were preliminary and may need further refinement, there is reasonable confidence for the values of the singlet oxygen threshold doses. In comparison, the [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh value derived from in-vivo mouse study was reported to be 0.4 mM for mTHPC-PDT. However, the singlet oxygen required per cell is reported to be 9×10 8 per cell per 1/ e fractional kill in an in-vitro mTHPC-PDT study on a rat prostate cancer cell line (MLL cells) and is reported to be 7.9 mM for a multicell in-vitro EMT6/Ro spheroid model for mTHPC-PDT. A theoretical analysis is provided to relate the number of in-vitro singlet oxygen required per cell to reach cell killing of 1/ e to in-vivo singlet

  2. Mapping the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  3. Biomimetic polymers responsive to a biological signaling molecule: nitric oxide triggered reversible self-assembly of single macromolecular chains into nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinming; Whittaker, Michael R; Duong, Hien; Li, Yang; Boyer, Cyrille; Davis, Thomas P

    2014-07-21

    Novel nitric oxide (NO) responsive monomers (NAPMA and APUEMA) containing o-phenylenediamine functional groups have been polymerized to form NO-responsive macromolecular chains as truly biomimetic polymers. Upon exposure to NO--a ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule--the NAPMA- and APUEMA-labeled thermoresponsive copolymers exhibited substantial changes in solubility, clearly characterized by tuneable LCST behavior, thereby inducing self-assembly into nanoparticulate structures. Moreover, the NO-triggered self-assembly process in combination with environmentally sensitive fluorescence dyes could be employed to detect and image endogenous NO. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. USGS Map Indices Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Map Indices service from The National Map (TNM) consists of 1x1 Degree, 30x60 Minute (100K), 15 Minute (63K), 7.5 Minute (24K), and 3.75 Minute grid...

  5. Applicability of vulnerability maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.J.; Gosk, E. (Geological Survey of Denmark, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    A number of aspects to vulnerability maps are discussed: the vulnerability concept, mapping purposes, possible users, and applicability of vulnerability maps. Problems associated with general-type vulnerability mapping, including large-scale maps, universal pollutant, and universal pollution scenario are also discussed. An alternative approach to vulnerability assessment - specific vulnerability mapping for limited areas, specific pollutant, and predefined pollution scenario - is suggested. A simplification of the vulnerability concept is proposed in order to make vulnerability mapping more objective and by this means more comparable. An extension of the vulnerability concept to the rest of the hydrogeological cycle (lakes, rivers, and the sea) is proposed. Some recommendations regarding future activities are given.

  6. 7. Annex II: Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Aeberli, Annina

    2012-01-01

    Map 1: States of South Sudan UN OCHA (2012) Republic of South Sudan – States, as of 15 July 2012, Reliefweb http://reliefweb.int/map/south-sudan-republic/republic-south-sudan-states-15-july-2012-reference-map, accessed 31 July 2012. Map 2: Counties of South Sudan UN OCHA (2012) Republic of South Sudan – Counties, as of 16 July 2012, Reliefweb http://reliefweb.int/map/south-sudan-republic/republic-south-sudan-counties-16-july-2012-reference-map, accessed 31 July 2012. Map 3: Eastern Equato...

  7. Google Maps: You Are Here

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Librarians use online mapping services such as Google Maps, MapQuest, Yahoo Maps, and others to check traffic conditions, find local businesses, and provide directions. However, few libraries are using one of Google Maps most outstanding applications, My Maps, for the creation of enhanced and interactive multimedia maps. My Maps is a simple and…

  8. Macromolecular rate theory (MMRT) provides a thermodynamics rationale to underpin the convergent temperature response in plant leaf respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liyin L; Arcus, Vickery L; Heskel, Mary A; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Creek, Danielle; Egerton, John J G; Tjoelker, Mark G; Atkin, Owen K; Schipper, Louis A

    2017-10-14

    Temperature is a crucial factor in determining the rates of ecosystem processes, for example, leaf respiration (R) - the flux of plant respired CO2 from leaves to the atmosphere. Generally, R increases exponentially with temperature and formulations such as the Arrhenius equation are widely used in earth system models. However, experimental observations have shown a consequential and consistent departure from an exponential increase in R. What are the principles that underlie these observed patterns? Here, we demonstrate that macromolecular rate theory (MMRT), based on transition state theory (TST) for enzyme-catalyzed kinetics, provides a thermodynamic explanation for the observed departure and the convergent temperature response of R using a global database. Three meaningful parameters emerge from MMRT analysis: the temperature at which the rate of respiration would theoretically reach a maximum (the optimum temperature, Topt ), the temperature at which the respiration rate is most sensitive to changes in temperature (the inflection temperature, Tinf ) and the overall curvature of the log(rate) versus temperature plot (the change in heat capacity for the system, ΔCP‡). On average, the highest potential enzyme-catalyzed rates of respiratory enzymes for R are predicted to occur at 67.0 ± 1.2°C and the maximum temperature sensitivity at 41.4 ± 0.7°C from MMRT. The average curvature (average negative ΔCP‡) was -1.2 ± 0.1 kJ mol(-1)  K(-1) . Interestingly, Topt , Tinf and ΔCP‡ appear insignificantly different across biomes and plant functional types, suggesting that thermal response of respiratory enzymes in leaves could be conserved. The derived parameters from MMRT can serve as thermal traits for plant leaves that represent the collective temperature response of metabolic respiratory enzymes and could be useful to understand regulations of R under a warmer climate. MMRT extends the classic TST to enzyme-catalyzed reactions and provides an

  9. The surface modification of TiN nano-particles using macromolecular coupling agents, and their resulting dispersibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Guojun, E-mail: chengguojun0436@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan 232001 (China); Qian, Jiasheng, E-mail: qianjs@ahu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Miao, Jibin; Yang, Bin; Xia, Ru; Chen, Peng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: The hydroxyl groups on the surface of nano-TiN particles interacted with the silanol groups [-Si-OCH{sub 3}] of a F-MCA to form an organic coating layer that hindered the aggregation of the nano-TiN. The obvious agglomeration and homogeneous dispersion can be seen in TEM images. - Highlights: • The dispersible TiN nano-particles were prepared to increase its surface activity. • Surface hydrophobicity increased due to being modified by F-MCA. • TiN nano-particles modified with F-MCA shows good dispersion in anhydrous ethanol. • The coupling agents are tightly absorbed on the surface of particles by chemisorption. • Modified TiN nano-particles can be widely used in polymers with great compatibility. - Abstract: Titanium nitride (TiN) nano-particles were modified by the grafting of a random copolymerization functionalized macromolecular coupling agent (F-MCA) via a direct blending method. The hydroxyl groups on the surface of the nano-TiN particles interact with the silanol groups [-Si-OCH{sub 3}] of the F-MCA to form an organic coating layer. The formation of covalent bonds [Ti-O-Si] was verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. An X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the presence of the F-MCA inhibited the growth of the crystal plane but did not change the crystal structure of the TiN. Thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle measurement indicated that the F-MCA molecules were adsorbed or anchored to the surface of the nano-TiN particles, which hindered their aggregation. Pristine nano-TiN particles are poorly dispersed in ethyl acetate. Compared with the pristine TiN particles, the modified TiN particles show good dispersibility and form a stable colloidal dispersion in ethyl acetate. The surface hydrophobicity of the modified TiN increases, and the F-MCA molecules are anchored on the surface of the TiN particles. TiN particles modified by a F-MCA can be used in polymer blends, thermoplastic elastomers and polymer

  10. Development of a macromolecular prodrug for the treatment of inflammatory arthritis: mechanisms involved in arthrotropism and sustained therapeutic efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the present manuscript is to test the hypothesis that arthrotropic localization and synovial cell internalization account for the unique capacity of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-dexamethasone conjugate (P-Dex, a macromolecular prodrug of dexamethasone) to induce sustained amelioration of joint inflammation and inhibition of tissue damage in an animal model of inflammatory arthritis. Methods Rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) were treated with P-Dex, free dexamethasone, saline or HPMA homopolymer. To define the biodistribution of P-Dex, conjugates with different imaging labels were given to AA rats and analyzed. Isolated joint tissues were evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and immunohistochemical staining. Cellular uptake of P-Dex and its effects on apoptosis and production of proinflammatory cytokines were examined using human monocyte-macrophages and fibroblasts. Results A single systemic administration of P-Dex completely suppressed AA for >20 days. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated higher HPMA copolymer influx into the inflamed joints than the normal joints. Immunohistochemistry and FACS analyses of arthritic joints revealed extensive uptake of the polymer conjugate by synovial fibroblasts and myeloid lineage cells. The capacity of P-Dex to suppress inflammation was confirmed in monocyte-macrophage cultures in which P-Dex treatment resulted in suppression of lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-6 and TNFα release. Similarly, TNFα-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP1 and MMP3) in synovial fibroblasts from a rheumatoid arthritis patient was suppressed by P-Dex. P-Dex showed no detectable effect on monocyte apoptosis. Conclusions P-Dex provides superior and sustained amelioration of AA compared with an equivalent dose of free dexamethasone. The arthrotropism and local retention of P-Dex is attributed to the enhanced vascular permeability in arthritic joints and the

  11. Spatiotemporal monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy with passive acoustic mapping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jensen, Carl R; Ritchie, Robert W; Gyöngy, Miklós; Collin, James R T; Leslie, Tom; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate feasibility of monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment with passive acoustic mapping of broadband and harmonic emissions reconstructed from filtered-channel radiofrequency data in ex vivo bovine tissue...

  12. Population-averaged macaque brain atlas with high-resolution ex vivo DTI integrated into in vivo space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lei; Jeon, Tina; Yu, Qiaowen; Ouyang, Minhui; Peng, Qinmu; Mishra, Virendra; Pletikos, Mihovil; Sestan, Nenad; Miller, Michael I; Mori, Susumu; Hsiao, Steven; Liu, Shuwei; Huang, Hao

    2017-12-01

    Animal models of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), the most widely used nonhuman primate, have been irreplaceable in neurobiological studies. However, a population-averaged macaque brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) atlas, including comprehensive gray and white matter labeling as well as bony and facial landmarks guiding invasive experimental procedures, is not available. The macaque white matter tract pathways and microstructures have been rarely recorded. Here, we established a population-averaged macaque brain atlas with high-resolution ex vivo DTI integrated into in vivo space incorporating bony and facial landmarks, and delineated microstructures and three-dimensional pathways of major white matter tracts in vivo MRI/DTI and ex vivo (postmortem) DTI of ten rhesus macaque brains were acquired. Single-subject macaque brain DTI template was obtained by transforming the postmortem high-resolution DTI data into in vivo space. Ex vivo DTI of ten macaque brains was then averaged in the in vivo single-subject template space to generate population-averaged macaque brain DTI atlas. The white matter tracts were traced with DTI-based tractography. One hundred and eighteen neural structures including all cortical gyri, white matter tracts and subcortical nuclei, were labeled manually on population-averaged DTI-derived maps. The in vivo microstructural metrics of fractional anisotropy, axial, radial and mean diffusivity of the traced white matter tracts were measured. Population-averaged digital atlas integrated into in vivo space can be used to label the experimental macaque brain automatically. Bony and facial landmarks will be available for guiding invasive procedures. The DTI metric measurements offer unique insights into heterogeneous microstructural profiles of different white matter tracts.

  13. Macromolecular crystallographic estructure refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonine, Pavel V.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Model refinement is a key step in crystallographic structure determination that ensures final atomic structure of macromolecule represents measured diffraction data as good as possible. Several decades have been put into developing methods and computational tools to streamline this step. In this manuscript we provide a brief overview of major milestones of crystallographic computing and methods development pertinent to structure refinement.El refinamiento es un paso clave en el proceso de determinación de una estructura cristalográfica al garantizar que la estructura atómica de la macromolécula final represente de la mejor manera posible los datos de difracción. Han hecho falta varias décadas para poder desarrollar nuevos métodos y herramientas computacionales dirigidas a dinamizar esta etapa. En este artículo ofrecemos un breve resumen de los principales hitos en la computación cristalográfica y de los nuevos métodos relevantes para el refinamiento de estructuras.

  14. Expanding Thurston maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bonk, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the study of the dynamics of expanding Thurston maps under iteration. A Thurston map is a branched covering map on a two-dimensional topological sphere such that each critical point of the map has a finite orbit under iteration. It is called expanding if, roughly speaking, preimages of a fine open cover of the underlying sphere under iterates of the map become finer and finer as the order of the iterate increases. Every expanding Thurston map gives rise to a fractal space, called its visual sphere. Many dynamical properties of the map are encoded in the geometry of this visual sphere. For example, an expanding Thurston map is topologically conjugate to a rational map if and only if its visual sphere is quasisymmetrically equivalent to the Riemann sphere. This relation between dynamics and fractal geometry is the main focus for the investigations in this work.

  15. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Polyethylene-Based Macromolecular Architectures by Combining Polyhomologation with Powerful Linking Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Alkayal, Nazeeha

    2016-09-05

    Polyhomologation is a powerful method to prepare polyethylene-based materials with controlled molecular weight, topology and composition. This dissertation focuses on the discovery of new synthetic routes to prepare polyethylene-based macromolecular architectures by combining polyhomologation with highly orthogonal and efficient linking reactions such as Diels Alder, copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), and Glaser. Taking advantage of functionalized polyhomologation initiators, as well as of the efficient coupling chemistry, we were able to synthesize various types of polymethylene (polyethylene)-based materials with complex architectures including linear co/terpolymers, graft terpolymers, and tadpole copolymers. In the first project, a facile synthetic route towards well-defined polymethylene-based co/terpolymers, by combining the anthracene/maleimide Diels–Alder reaction with polyhomologation, is presented. For the synthesis of diblock copolymers the following approach was applied: (a) synthesis of α-anthracene-ω-hydroxy-polymethylene by polyhomologation using tri (9 anthracene-methyl propyl ether) borane as the initiator, (b) synthesis of furan-protected-maleimide-terminated poly(ε-caprolactone) or polyethylene glycol and (c) Diels–Alder reaction between anthracene and maleimide-terminated polymers. In the case of triblock terpolymers, the α-anthracene-ω-hydroxy polymethylene was used as a macroinitiator for the ring-opening polymerization of D, L-lactide to afford an anthracene-terminated PM-b-PLA copolymer, followed by the Diels–Alder reaction with furan-protected maleimide-terminated poly (ε-caprolactone) or polyethylene glycol to give the triblock terpolymers. The synthetic methodology is general and potentially applicable to a range of polymers. The coupling reaction applied in the second project of this dissertation was copper-catalyzed “click” cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC). Novel well-defined polyethylene

  16. Size-dependent studies of macromolecular crowding on the thermodynamic stability, structure and functional activity of proteins: in vitro and in silico approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Sumra; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan

    2017-02-01

    The environment inside cells in which proteins fold and function are quite different from that of the dilute buffer solutions often used during in vitro experiments. The presence of large amounts of macromolecules of varying shapes, sizes and compositions makes the intracellular milieu extremely crowded. The overall concentration of macromolecules ranges from 50 to 400gl-1, and they occupy 10-40% of the total cellular volume. These differences in solvent conditions and the level of crowdedness resulting in excluded volume effects can have significant consequences on proteins' biophysical properties. A question that arises is: how important is it to examine the roles of shape, size and composition of macromolecular crowders in altering the biological properties of proteins? This review article aims at focusing, gathering and summarizing all of the research investigations done by means of in vitro and in silico approaches taking into account the size-dependent influence of the crowders on proteins' properties. Altogether, the internal architecture of macromolecular crowding environment including size, shape and concentration of crowders, appears to be playing an extremely important role in causing changes in the biological processes. Most often the small sized crowders have been found more effective crowding agents. However, thermodynamic stability, structure and functional activity of proteins have been governed by volume exclusion as well as soft (chemical) interactions. The article provides an understanding of importance of internal architecture of the cellular environment in altering the biophysical properties of proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Accurate macromolecular crystallographic refinement: incorporation of the linear scaling, semiempirical quantum-mechanics program DivCon into the PHENIX refinement package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Plumley, Joshua A.; Martin, Roger I. [QuantumBio Inc., 2790 West College Avenue, State College, PA 16801 (United States); Merz, Kenneth M. Jr [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Westerhoff, Lance M., E-mail: lance@quantumbioinc.com [QuantumBio Inc., 2790 West College Avenue, State College, PA 16801 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Semiempirical quantum-chemical X-ray macromolecular refinement using the program DivCon integrated with PHENIX is described. Macromolecular crystallographic refinement relies on sometimes dubious stereochemical restraints and rudimentary energy functionals to ensure the correct geometry of the model of the macromolecule and any covalently bound ligand(s). The ligand stereochemical restraint file (CIF) requires a priori understanding of the ligand geometry within the active site, and creation of the CIF is often an error-prone process owing to the great variety of potential ligand chemistry and structure. Stereochemical restraints have been replaced with more robust functionals through the integration of the linear-scaling, semiempirical quantum-mechanics (SE-QM) program DivCon with the PHENIX X-ray refinement engine. The PHENIX/DivCon package has been thoroughly validated on a population of 50 protein–ligand Protein Data Bank (PDB) structures with a range of resolutions and chemistry. The PDB structures used for the validation were originally refined utilizing various refinement packages and were published within the past five years. PHENIX/DivCon does not utilize CIF(s), link restraints and other parameters for refinement and hence it does not make as many a priori assumptions about the model. Across the entire population, the method results in reasonable ligand geometries and low ligand strains, even when the original refinement exhibited difficulties, indicating that PHENIX/DivCon is applicable to both single-structure and high-throughput crystallography.

  18. Mapping in the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    This engaging text provides a solid introduction to mapmaking in the era of cloud computing. It takes students through both the concepts and technology of modern cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), and Web-based mapping. Conceptual chapters delve into the meaning of maps and how they are developed, covering such topics as map layers, GIS tools, mobile mapping, and map animation. Methods chapters take a learn-by-doing approach to help students master application programming interfaces and build other technical skills for creating maps and making them available on the Internet. Th

  19. Mapping with Drupal

    CERN Document Server

    Palazzolo, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Build beautiful interactive maps on your Drupal website, and tell engaging visual stories with your data. This concise guide shows you how to create custom geographical maps from top to bottom, using Drupal 7 tools and out-of-the-box modules. You'll learn how mapping works in Drupal, with examples on how to use intuitive interfaces to map local events, businesses, groups, and other custom data. Although building maps with Drupal can be tricky, this book helps you navigate the system's complexities for creating sophisticated maps that match your site design. Get the knowledge and tools you ne

  20. Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanoprobes for in Vivo Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai-Hoon Quek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Near-infrared (NIR fluorescent probes offer advantages of high photon penetration, reduced light scattering and minimal autofluorescence from living tissues, rendering them valuable for noninvasive mapping of molecular events, assessment of therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring of disease progression in animal models. This review provides an overview of the recent development of the design and optical property of the different classes of NIR fluorescent nanoprobes associated with in vivo imaging applications.

  1. Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanoprobes for in Vivo Optical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Chai-Hoon; Leong, Kam W.

    2012-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes offer advantages of high photon penetration, reduced light scattering and minimal autofluorescence from living tissues, rendering them valuable for noninvasive mapping of molecular events, assessment of therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring of disease progression in animal models. This review provides an overview of the recent development of the design and optical property of the different classes of NIR fluorescent nanoprobes associated with in vivo imaging applications. PMID:28348298

  2. The nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor antagonist UFP-101 reduces microvascular inflammation to lipopolysaccharide in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë L S Brookes

    Full Text Available Microvascular inflammation occurs during sepsis and the endogenous opioid-like peptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ is known to regulate inflammation. This study aimed to determine the inflammatory role of N/OFQ and its receptor NOP (ORL1 within the microcirculation, along with anti-inflammatory effects of the NOP antagonist UFP-101 (University of Ferrara Peptide-101 in an animal model of sepsis (endotoxemia. Male Wistar rats (220 to 300 g were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS for 24 h (-24 h, 1 mg kg(-1; -2 h, 1 mg kg(-1 i.v., tail vein. They were then either anesthetised for observation of the mesenteric microcirculation using fluorescent in vivo microscopy, or isolated arterioles (~200 µm were studied in vitro with pressure myography. 200 nM kg(-1 fluorescently labelled N/OFQ (FITC-N/OFQ, i.a., mesenteric artery bound to specific sites on the microvascular endothelium in vivo, indicating sparse distribution of NOP receptors. In vitro, arterioles (~200 µm dilated to intraluminal N/OFQ (10(-5M (32.6 + 8.4% and this response was exaggerated with LPS (62.0 +7.9%, p=0.031. In vivo, LPS induced macromolecular leak of FITC-BSA (0.02 g kg(-1 i.v. (LPS: 95.3 (86.7 to 97.9%, p=0.043 from post-capillary venules (<40 µm and increased leukocyte rolling as endotoxemia progressed (p=0.027, both being reduced by 150 nmol kg(-1 UFP-101 (i.v., jugular vein. Firstly, the rat mesenteric microcirculation expresses NOP receptors and secondly, NOP function (ability to induce dilation is enhanced with LPS. UFP-101 also reduced microvascular inflammation to endotoxemia in vivo. Hence inhibition of the microvascular N/OFQ-NOP pathway may have therapeutic potential during sepsis and warrants further investigation.

  3. NAIP Status Maps Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — NAIP Status Maps Gallery. These maps illustrate what aerial imagery collection is planned, whats been collected, when it is available and how it is available. These...

  4. Recovery Action Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Recovery Action Mapping Tool is a web map that allows users to visually interact with and query actions that were developed to recover species listed under the...

  5. Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Minority Health has designed an interactive map, the Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool, to identify areas of disparities between subgroups of...

  6. MapBook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Beginning with the systematic mapping of the lunar surface more than three decades ago, this database contains over 1600 maps of the planets and satellites of the...

  7. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  8. RadMap

    Science.gov (United States)

    RadMap is an interactive desktop tool featuring a nationwide geographic information systems (GIS) map of long-term radiation monitoring locations across the United States with access to key information about the monitor and the area surrounding it.

  9. NGS Survey Control Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Survey Control Map provides a map of the US which allows you to find and display geodetic survey control points stored in the database of the National...

  10. Obesity Prevalence Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Prevent Obesity Early Care and Education State Indicator Report Salad Bars to School Healthy Food Service ... Statistics Adult Obesity Facts Childhood Obesity Facts Data, Trends and Maps Adult Obesity Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & ...

  11. Active Fire Mapping Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active Fire Mapping Program Current Large Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS Data Fire Data in Google Earth ...

  12. Orthogonal spin labeling using click chemistry for in vitro and in vivo applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucher, Svetlana; Korneev, Sergei; Tyagi, Swati; Apfelbaum, Ronja; Grohmann, Dina; Lemke, Edward A.; Klare, Johann P.; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Klose, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Site-directed spin labeling for EPR- and NMR spectroscopy has mainly been achieved exploiting the specific reactivity of cysteines. For proteins with native cysteines or for in vivo applications, an alternative coupling strategy is required. In these cases click chemistry offers major benefits by providing a fast and highly selective, biocompatible reaction between azide and alkyne groups. Here, we establish click chemistry as a tool to target unnatural amino acids in vitro and in vivo using azide- and alkyne-functionalized spin labels. The approach is compatible with a variety of labels including reduction-sensitive nitroxides. Comparing spin labeling efficiencies from the copper-free with the strongly reducing copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne click reaction, we find that the faster kinetics for the catalyzed reaction outrun reduction of the labile nitroxide spin labels and allow quantitative labeling yields within short reaction times. Inter-spin distance measurements demonstrate that the novel side chain is suitable for paramagnetic NMR- or EPR-based conformational studies of macromolecular complexes.

  13. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1999-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...... set. Particular studies are made of branched polynomial covering maps arising from Riemann surfaces and from knots in the 3-sphere....

  14. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2002-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...... set. Particular studies are made of branched polynomial covering maps arising from Riemann surfaces and from knots in the 3-sphere. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. Using maps in genealogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Maps are one of many sources you may need to complete a family tree. In genealogical research, maps can provide clues to where our ancestors may have lived and where to look for written records about them. Beginners should master basic genealogical research techniques before starting to use topographic maps.

  16. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  17. On parabolic external maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomonaco, Luna; Petersen, Carsten Lunde; Shen, Weixiao

    2017-01-01

    We prove that any C1+BV degree d ≥ 2 circle covering h having all periodic orbits weakly expanding, is conjugate by a C1+BV diffeomorphism to a metrically expanding map. We use this to connect the space of parabolic external maps (coming from the theory of parabolic-like maps) to metrically...

  18. Mapping landscape corridors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Vogt; Kurt H. Riitters; Marcin Iwanowski; Christine Estreguil; Jacek Kozak; Pierre Soille

    2007-01-01

    Corridors are important geographic features for biological conservation and biodiversity assessment. The identification and mapping of corridors is usually based on visual interpretations of movement patterns (functional corridors) or habitat maps (structural corridors). We present a method for automated corridor mapping with morphological image processing, and...

  19. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  20. DREAM - A Novel Approach for Robust, Ultra-Fast, Multi-Slice B1 Mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nehrke, K.; Boernert, P.

    2012-01-01

    Fast and robust in vivo B1 mapping is an essential prerequisite forquantitative MRI or multi-element transmit applications like RF-shimming or accelerated multi-dimensional RF pulses. However, especially at higher field strength, the acquisition speed of current B1-mapping approaches is

  1. Geography Education Through Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Demiralp

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Geography studies the relationship between human and the earth and pay attention to space, place and environment. In its simplest definition, maps are language and communication tools in transferring knowledge of an area in the science of geography which studies the space. Thus teaching and teaching how to use maps is quite important. This is not valid just for all matters of geography education; they can be used at any point, level, age or grade in teaching. This is because map reading involves transferring a piece of information by coding it on a platform and the users to read and interpret the information by encoding it according to their needs. Thus, we can say that teaching maps and teaching how to use maps is the transformation or translation of a piece of knowledge from life, with the appropriate language. In order for this kind of teaching and learning to be accomplished it is a must that the map maker and the map user to know the common language of maps, which is map language, and for them to know qualities, types and limitations of maps. To gain this kind of knowledge, students must see every type of map from the simplest to the most complicated and study and analyse them, as well as get to know their different usages.

  2. Umsetzung des KDSF-Datenmodells in VIVO

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, Tatiana; Hauschke, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Im Rahmen des Projekts „Umsetzung Kerndatensatz Forschung in VIVO“ wird am Open Science Lab der Technischen Informationsbibliothek Hannover (TIB) der Versuch unternommen, den Kerndatensatz Forschung in das Forschungsinformationssystem VIVO zu integrieren. Entwurf KDSF-VIVO-Alignment und KDSF-VIVO-Extension: https://github.com/VIVO-DE/VIVO-KDSF-Integration

  3. Determining protein complex structures based on a Bayesian model of in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Massimiliano; Pellarin, Riccardo; Kim, Seung Joong; Russel, Daniel; Sundin, Bryan A; Riffle, Michael; Jaschob, Daniel; Ramsden, Richard; Davis, Trisha N; Muller, Eric G D; Sali, Andrej

    2014-11-01

    The use of in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data to determine the molecular architecture of a protein complex in living cells is challenging due to data sparseness, sample heterogeneity, signal contributions from multiple donors and acceptors, unequal fluorophore brightness, photobleaching, flexibility of the linker connecting the fluorophore to the tagged protein, and spectral cross-talk. We addressed these challenges by using a Bayesian approach that produces the posterior probability of a model, given the input data. The posterior probability is defined as a function of the dependence of our FRET metric FRETR on a structure (forward model), a model of noise in the data, as well as prior information about the structure, relative populations of distinct states in the sample, forward model parameters, and data noise. The forward model was validated against kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and in vivo experimental data collected on nine systems of known structure. In addition, our Bayesian approach was validated by a benchmark of 16 protein complexes of known structure. Given the structures of each subunit of the complexes, models were computed from synthetic FRETR data with a distance root-mean-squared deviation error of 14 to 17 Å. The approach is implemented in the open-source Integrative Modeling Platform, allowing us to determine macromolecular structures through a combination of in vivo FRETR data and data from other sources, such as electron microscopy and chemical cross-linking. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Mapping the amino acid properties of constituent nucleoporins onto the yeast nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Ashok; Krishnan, Narayanan H; Krishnan, Vv

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of molecular structures aids in the understanding of structural and functional roles of biological macromolecules. Macromolecular transport between the cell nucleus and cytoplasm is facilitated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The ring structure of the NPC is large and contains several distinct proteins (nucleoporins) which function as a selective gate for the passage of certain molecules into and out of the nucleus. In this note we demonstrate the utility of a python code that allows direct mapping of the physiochemical properties of the constituent nucleoporins on the scaffold of the yeast NPC׳s cytoplasmic view. We expect this tool to be useful for researchers to visualize the NPC based on their physiochemical properties and how it alters when specific mutations are introduced in one or more of the nucleoporins. The code developed using Python is available freely from the authors.

  5. $2^n-$rational maps

    OpenAIRE

    Kassotakis, Pavlos; Nieszporski, Maciej; Damianou, Pantelis

    2015-01-01

    We present a natural extension of the notion of nondegenerate rational maps (quadrirational maps) to arbitrary dimensions. We refer to these maps as $2^n-$rational maps. In this note we construct a rich family of $2^n-$rational maps. These maps by construction are involutions and highly symmetric in the sense that the maps and their companion maps have the same functional form.

  6. Automated system to acquire fluorescence, polarization and anisotropy maps within liquid flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintella, Cristina M; Gonçalves, Cristiane C; Pepe, Iuri; Lima, Angelo M V; Musse, Ana Paula S

    2002-01-01

    Maps of polarization and anisotropy can be helpful for flow analysis systems (FIA, CFA, etc.) with reactions dependent on the intermolecular alignment as well as for dispersion control. Maps can be acquired manually, but when a scan over a sample area is required, the acquisition becomes tiresome and has low precision. The paper describes an automatic flexible system for high-precision sample positioning with closed loop self control, remote data acquisition and storage controlled by a BASIC program. The system was developed to acquire maps up to 850 mm(2) of the sample (liquid flows, solids, interfaces, etc.), with up to 100 mum(2) precision. To evaluate the equipment, performance is presented as the scan of a thin liquid film of monoethylene glycol (MEG) flowing on borosilicate. Tests were performed with and without surfactantes at submicellar concentrations: two concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and one of polyethylene oxide (PEO). For pure MEG, the intermolecular alignment initially increased, then decreased. When SDS was added, both polarization and anisotropy only increased progressively with the flow. This might be explained by the surfactant decrease of interfacial interaction. When PEO was added, both polarization and anisotropy decreased pronouncedly over the entire map, which might be due to macromolecular aggregates within the bulk generating misaligned molecular domains. The system presented as sample positioning repeatability of 0.1% and a high polarization reproducibility (error margin < 6 in 1000).

  7. Accurate model annotation of a near-atomic resolution cryo-EM map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryc, Corey F; Chen, Dong-Hua; Afonine, Pavel V; Jakana, Joanita; Wang, Zhao; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; Jiang, Wen; Adams, Paul D; King, Jonathan A; Schmid, Michael F; Chiu, Wah

    2017-03-21

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) has been used to determine the atomic coordinates (models) from density maps of biological assemblies. These models can be assessed by their overall fit to the experimental data and stereochemical information. However, these models do not annotate the actual density values of the atoms nor their positional uncertainty. Here, we introduce a computational procedure to derive an atomic model from a cryo-EM map with annotated metadata. The accuracy of such a model is validated by a faithful replication of the experimental cryo-EM map computed using the coordinates and associated metadata. The functional interpretation of any structural features in the model and its utilization for future studies can be made in the context of its measure of uncertainty. We applied this protocol to the 3.3-Å map of the mature P22 bacteriophage capsid, a large and complex macromolecular assembly. With this protocol, we identify and annotate previously undescribed molecular interactions between capsid subunits that are crucial to maintain stability in the absence of cementing proteins or cross-linking, as occur in other bacteriophages.

  8. A Dual-Thermoresponsive Gemini-Type Supra-amphiphilic Macromolecular [3]Pseudorotaxane Based on Pillar[10]arene/Paraquat Cooperative Complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiaodong; Yu, Guocan; Shao, Li; Chen, Jianzhuang; Huang, Feihe

    2016-03-09

    Herein, first we report the preparation of a thermoresponsive [3]pseudorotaxane from cooperative complexation between a water-soluble pillar[10]arene and a paraquat derivative in water. Then we successfully construct the first pillararene-based gemini-type supra-amphiphilic [3]pseudorotaxane from the water-soluble pillar[10]arene and a paraquat-containing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) based on this new molecular recognition motif in water. This macromolecular [3]pseudorotaxane shows unique dual-thermoresponsiveness. Furthermore, it can self-assemble into polymeric vesicles at 37 °C in water. These vesicles can be further used in the controlled release of small molecules induced by cooling to 25 °C or heating to 60 °C.

  9. Cost-effective imprinting combining macromolecular crowding and a dummy template for the fast purification of punicalagin from pomegranate husk extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guang-Ying; Wang, Chao; Luo, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Yong-Xin; Yang, Jian; Liu, Zhao-Sheng; Aisa, Haji Akber

    2016-05-01

    The combination of molecular crowding and virtual imprinting was employed to develop a cost-effective method to prepare molecularly imprinted polymers. By using linear polymer polystyrene as a macromolecular crowding agent, an imprinted polymer recognizable to punicalagin had been successfully synthesized with punicalin as the dummy template. The resulting punicalin-imprinted polymer presented a remarkable selectivity to punicalagin with an imprinting factor of 3.17 even at extremely low consumption of the template (template/monomer ratio of 1:782). In contrast, the imprinted polymer synthesized without crowding agent, did not show any imprinting effect at so low template amount. The imprinted polymers made by combination of molecular crowding and virtual imprinting can be utilized for the fast separation of punicalagin from pomegranate husk extract after optimizing the protocol of solid-phase extraction with the recovery of 85.3 ± 1.2%. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Discovery of abundant cellulose microfibers encased in 250 Ma Permian halite: a macromolecular target in the search for life on other planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Jack D; Willcox, Smaranda; Powers, Dennis W; Nelson, Roger; Baxter, Bonnie K

    2008-04-01

    In this study, we utilized transmission electron microscopy to examine the contents of fluid inclusions in halite (NaCl) and solid halite crystals collected 650 m below the surface from the Late Permian Salado Formation in southeastern New Mexico (USA). The halite has been isolated from contaminating groundwater since deposition approximately 250 Ma ago. We show that abundant cellulose microfibers are present in the halite and appear remarkably intact. The cellulose is in the form of 5 nm microfibers as well as composite ropes and mats, and was identified by resistance to 0.5 N NaOH treatment and susceptibility to cellulase enzyme treatment. These cellulose microfibers represent the oldest native biological macromolecules to have been directly isolated, examined biochemically, and visualized (without growth or replication) to date. This discovery points to cellulose as an ideal macromolecular target in the search for life on other planets in our Solar System.

  11. A new on-axis micro-spectrophotometer for combining Raman, fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy with macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian S N; Thominet, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Fuchs, Martin R

    2013-09-01

    The combination of X-ray diffraction experiments with optical methods such as Raman, UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy greatly enhances and complements the specificity of the obtained information. The upgraded version of the in situ on-axis micro-spectrophotometer, MS2, at the macromolecular crystallography beamline X10SA of the Swiss Light Source is presented. The instrument newly supports Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, in addition to the previously available UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence modes. With the recent upgrades of the spectral bandwidth, instrument stability, detection efficiency and control software, the application range of the instrument and its ease of operation were greatly improved. Its on-axis geometry with collinear X-ray and optical axes to ensure optimal control of the overlap of sample volumes probed by each technique is still unique amongst comparable facilities worldwide and the instrument has now been in general user operation for over two years.

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a macromolecular MR contrast agent (P792): Evaluation of antivascular drug effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Sun [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Woo, Sung Min; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Il [Dept. of Radiology, Sheikh Khalifa Specialty Hospital, Ras Al Khaimah (United Arab Emirates); Choi, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent.

  13. Fractal-like kinetics of intracellular enzymatic reactions: a chemical framework of endotoxin tolerance and a possible non-specific contribution of macromolecular crowding to cross-tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilescu, Catalin; Olteanu, Mircea; Flondor, Paul; Calin, George A

    2013-09-14

    The response to endotoxin (LPS), and subsequent signal transduction lead to the production of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by innate immune cells. Cells or organisms pretreated with endotoxin enter into a transient state of hyporesponsiveness, referred to as endotoxin tolerance (ET) which represents a particular case of negative preconditioning. Despite recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of ET, there is no consensus yet on the primary mechanism responsible for ET and for the more complex cases of cross tolerance. In this study, we examined the consequences of the macromolecular crowding (MMC) and of fractal-like kinetics (FLK) of intracellular enzymatic reactions on the LPS signaling machinery. We hypothesized that this particular type of enzyme kinetics may explain the development of ET phenomenon. Our aim in the present study was to characterize the chemical kinetics framework in ET and determine whether fractal-like kinetics explains, at least in part, ET. We developed an ordinary differential equations (ODE) mathematical model that took into account the links between the MMC and the LPS signaling machinery leading to ET. We proposed that the intracellular fractal environment (MMC) contributes to ET and developed two mathematical models of enzyme kinetics: one based on Kopelman's fractal-like kinetics framework and the other based on Savageau's power law model. Kopelman's model provides a good image of the potential influence of a fractal intracellular environment (MMC) on ET. The Savageau power law model also partially explains ET. The computer simulations supported the hypothesis that MMC and FLK may play a role in ET. The model highlights the links between the organization of the intracellular environment, MMC and the LPS signaling machinery leading to ET. Our FLK-based model does not minimize the role of the numerous negative regulatory factors. It simply draws attention to the fact that macromolecular crowding can

  14. The effect of macromolecular crowding on the electrostatic component of barnase-barstar binding: a computational, implicit solvent-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena W Qi

    Full Text Available Macromolecular crowding within the cell can impact both protein folding and binding. Earlier models of cellular crowding focused on the excluded volume, entropic effect of crowding agents, which generally favors compact protein states. Recently, other effects of crowding have been explored, including enthalpically-related crowder-protein interactions and changes in solvation properties. In this work, we explore the effects of macromolecular crowding on the electrostatic desolvation and solvent-screened interaction components of protein-protein binding. Our simple model enables us to focus exclusively on the electrostatic effects of water depletion on protein binding due to crowding, providing us with the ability to systematically analyze and quantify these potentially intuitive effects. We use the barnase-barstar complex as a model system and randomly placed, uncharged spheres within implicit solvent to model crowding in an aqueous environment. On average, we find that the desolvation free energy penalties incurred by partners upon binding are lowered in a crowded environment and solvent-screened interactions are amplified. At a constant crowder density (fraction of total available volume occupied by crowders, this effect generally increases as the radius of model crowders decreases, but the strength and nature of this trend can depend on the water probe radius used to generate the molecular surface in the continuum model. In general, there is huge variation in desolvation penalties as a function of the random crowder positions. Results with explicit model crowders can be qualitatively similar to those using a lowered "effective" solvent dielectric to account for crowding, although the "best" effective dielectric constant will likely depend on multiple system properties. Taken together, this work systematically demonstrates, quantifies, and analyzes qualitative intuition-based insights into the effects of water depletion due to crowding on the

  15. HTLV-1 Tax Induces Formation of the Active Macromolecular IKK Complex by Generating Lys63- and Met1-Linked Hybrid Polyubiquitin Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yuri; Tokunaga, Fuminori; Goto, Eiji; Komatsu, Ginga; Gohda, Jin; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Inoue, Satoshi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Seya, Tsukasa; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    The Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is crucial for the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a highly malignant CD4+ T cell neoplasm. Among the multiple aberrant Tax-induced effects on cellular processes, persistent activation of transcription factor NF-κB, which is activated only transiently upon physiological stimulation, is essential for leukemogenesis. We and others have shown that Tax induces activation of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, which is a critical step in NF-κB activation, by generating Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. However, the molecular mechanism underlying Tax-induced IKK activation is controversial and not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Tax recruits linear (Met1-linked) ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) to the IKK complex and that Tax fails to induce IKK activation in cells that lack LUBAC activity. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that both Lys63-linked and Met1-linked polyubiquitin chains are associated with the IKK complex. Furthermore, treatment of the IKK-associated polyubiquitin chains with Met1-linked-chain-specific deubiquitinase (OTULIN) resulted in the reduction of high molecular weight polyubiquitin chains and the generation of short Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains, indicating that Tax can induce the generation of Lys63- and Met1-linked hybrid polyubiquitin chains. We also demonstrate that Tax induces formation of the active macromolecular IKK complex and that the blocking of Tax-induced polyubiquitin chain synthesis inhibited formation of the macromolecular complex. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a novel model in which the hybrid-chain-dependent oligomerization of the IKK complex triggered by Tax leads to trans-autophosphorylation-mediated IKK activation.

  16. On palaeogeographic map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Zhao Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The palaeogeographic map is a graphic representation of physical geographical characteristics in geological history periods and human history periods. It is the most important result of palaeogeographic study. The author, as the Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Palaeogeography, Chinese Edition and English Edition, aimed at the problems of the articles submitted to and published in the Journal of Palaeogeography in recent years and the relevant papers and books of others, and integrated with his practice of palaeogeographic study and mapping, wrote this paper. The content mainly includes the data of palaeogeographic mapping, the problems of palaeogeographic mapping method, the “Single factor analysis and multifactor comprehensive mapping method —— Methodology of quantitative lithofacies palaeogeography”, i.e., the “4 steps mapping method”, the nomenclature of each palaeogeographic unit in palaeogeographic map, the explanation of each palaeogeographic unit in palaeogeographic map, the explanation of significance of palaeogeographic map and palaeogeographic article, the evaluative standards of palaeogeographic map and palaeogeographic article, and the self-evaluation. Criticisms and corrections are welcome.

  17. Principles of Electroanatomic Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Bhakta

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiologic testing and radiofrequency ablation have evolved as curative measures for a variety of rhythm disturbances. As experience in this field has grown, ablation is progressively being used to address more complex rhythm disturbances. Paralleling this trend are technological advancements to facilitate these efforts, including electroanatomic mapping (EAM. At present, several different EAM systems utilizing various technologies are available to facilitate mapping and ablation. Use of these systems has been shown to reduce fluoroscopic exposure and radiation dose, with less significant effects on procedural duration and success rates. Among the data provided by EAM are chamber reconstruction, tagging of important anatomic landmarks and ablation lesions, display of diagnostic and mapping catheters without using fluoroscopy, activation mapping, and voltage (or scar mapping. Several EAM systems have specialized features, such as enhanced ability to map non-sustained or hemodynamically unstable arrhythmias, ability to display diagnostic as well as mapping catheter positions, and wide compatibility with a variety of catheters. Each EAM system has its strengths and weaknesses, and the system chosen must depend upon what data is required for procedural success (activation mapping, substrate mapping, cardiac geometry, the anticipated arrhythmia, the compatibility of the system with adjunctive tools (i.e. diagnostic and ablation catheters, and the operator's familiarity with the selected system. While EAM can offer significant assistance during an EP procedure, their incorrect or inappropriate application can substantially hamper mapping efforts and procedural success, and should not replace careful interpretation of data and strict adherence to electrophysiologic principles.

  18. MotifMap-RNA: a genome-wide map of RBP binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Sun, Sha; Bredy, Timothy; Wood, Marcelo; Spitale, Robert C; Baldi, Pierre

    2017-07-01

    RNA plays a critical role in gene expression and its regulation. RNA binding proteins (RBPs), in turn, are important regulators of RNA. Thanks to the availability of large scale data for RBP binding motifs and in vivo binding sites results in the form of eCLIP experiments, it is now possible to computationally predict RBP binding sites across the whole genome. We describe MotifMap-RNA, an extension of MotifMap which predicts binding sites for RBP motifs across human and mouse genomes and allows large scale querying of predicted binding sites. The data and corresponding web server are available from: http://motifmap-rna.ics.uci.edu/ as part of the MotifMap web portal. rspitale@uci.edu or pfbaldi@uci.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. A fragment based method for modeling of protein segments into cryo-EM density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismer, Jochen; Rose, Alexander S; Tiemann, Johanna K S; Hildebrand, Peter W

    2017-11-13

    Single-particle analysis of electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) is a key technology for elucidation of macromolecular structures. Recent technical advances in hardware and software developments significantly enhanced the resolution of cryo-EM density maps and broadened the applicability and the circle of users. To facilitate modeling of macromolecules into cryo-EM density maps, fast and easy to use methods for modeling are now demanded. Here we investigated and benchmarked the suitability of a classical and well established fragment-based approach for modeling of segments into cryo-EM density maps (termed FragFit). FragFit uses a hierarchical strategy to select fragments from a pre-calculated set of billions of fragments derived from structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank, based on sequence similarly, fit of stem atoms and fit to a cryo-EM density map. The user only has to specify the sequence of the segment and the number of the N- and C-terminal stem-residues in the protein. Using a representative data set of protein structures, we show that protein segments can be accurately modeled into cryo-EM density maps of different resolution by FragFit. Prediction quality depends on segment length, the type of secondary structure of the segment and local quality of the map. Fast and automated calculation of FragFit renders it applicable for implementation of interactive web-applications e.g. to model missing segments, flexible protein parts or hinge-regions into cryo-EM density maps.

  20. Of maps and myths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, J.E.; Mooneyhan, D.W. [Univ. Space Research Assoc, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-05-01

    For many areas of both the developed and developing world, the spatially accurate data required to effectively support environmental planning, resources management, and public policy decision making do not exist. There are a variety of reasons for this lack of map data. Mapping is neither easy nor cheap. Issues of both national security and national sovereignty are involved. There is a need to reinvigorate and expand our mapping programs to make them national in focus but global in scope. It is also essential that a civil agency be given a load role in global mapping. There is a need to work to break down the barriers that inhibit the open flow of map information that does exist, garner the resources required to fill in where there are gaps, and support efforts to increase funding for research in mapping and spatial analysis. All this must be done if we are to improve our understanding of our rapidly changing world. 20 refs.

  1. Map Projection Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedjeljko Frančula

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Map Projection Transitions is a very successful web application about map projections. The web page (http://www.jasondavies.com/maps/transition pre­sents a world map with graticule and country borders in the oblique Aitoff projection, with the South Pole. The map is not static, but animated. The South Pole moves toward the bottom and Earth rotates around its poles. The animation lasts five seconds, after which the projection changes and movement continues for five seconds, after which the projection changes again. Names of projections appear in a separate window. There are a total of 56 projections. The South Pole eventually becomes invisible and the North Pole appears at the top. Various parts of Earth appear in the center of the map by rotating around the poles.

  2. Advances in Reverberation Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Kaspi, Shai

    2007-01-01

    This contribution briefly reviews the reverberation mapping technique which leads to determination of black hole masses. I focus on the emerging relation between the broad-line region size and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, and on an overview of recent results of reverberation mapping studies which are starting to cover the full AGN luminosity range. Preliminary results and time lag determination from a reverberation mapping program of high-luminosity quasars are also presented.

  3. Classification of Lipschitz mappings

    CERN Document Server

    Piasecki, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    The Lipschitz Condition Nonlinear spectral radius Uniformly lipschitzian mappings Basic Facts on Banach Spaces Convexity The operator norm Dual spaces, reexivity, the weak, and weak* topologiesMean Lipschitz Condition Nonexpansive and mean nonexpansive mappings in Banach spaces General case On the Lipschitz Constants for Iterates of Mean Lipschitzian Mappings A bound for Lipschitz constants of iterates A bound for the constant k∞(T)Moving averages in Bana

  4. Similarity transformations of MAPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Allan T.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the notion of similar Markovian Arrival Processes (MAPs and show that the event stationary point processes related to two similar MAPs are stochastically equivalent. This holds true for the time stationary point processes too. We show that several well known stochastical equivalences as e.g. that between the H 2 renewal process and the Interrupted Poisson Process (IPP can be expressed by the similarity transformations of MAPs. In the appendix the valid region of similarity transformations for two-state MAPs is characterized.

  5. Multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swann, Andrew Francis; Madsen, Thomas Bruun

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a notion of moment map adapted to actions of Lie groups that preserve a closed three-form. We show existence of our multi-moment maps in many circumstances, including mild topological assumptions on the underlying manifold. Such maps are also shown to exist for all groups whose second...... and third Lie algebra Betti numbers are zero. We show that these form a special class of solvable Lie groups and provide a structural characterisation. We provide many examples of multi-moment maps for different geometries and use them to describe manifolds with holonomy contained in G(2) preserved by a two...

  6. In vivo contribution of amino acid sulfur to cartilage proteoglycan sulfation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecora, Fabio; Gualeni, Benedetta; Forlino, Antonella; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Tenni, Ruggero; Cetta, Giuseppe; Rossi, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic sulfate for sulfation reactions may be derived either from extracellular fluids or from catabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids and other thiols. In vitro studies have pointed out the potential relevance of sulfur-containing amino acids as sources for sulfation when extracellular sulfate concentration is low or when its transport is impaired such as in DTDST [DTD (diastrophic dysplasia) sulfate transporter] chondrodysplasias. In the present study, we have considered the contribution of cysteine and cysteine derivatives to in vivo macromolecular sulfation of cartilage by using the mouse model of DTD we have recently generated [Forlino, Piazza, Tiveron, Della Torre, Tatangelo, Bonafe, Gualeni, Romano, Pecora, Superti-Furga et al. (2005) Hum. Mol. Genet. 14, 859–871]. By intraperitoneal injection of [35S]cysteine in wild-type and mutant mice and determination of the specific activity of the chondroitin 4-sulfated disaccharide in cartilage, we demonstrated that the pathway by which sulfate is recruited from the intracellular oxidation of thiols is active in vivo. To check whether cysteine derivatives play a role, sulfation of cartilage proteoglycans was measured after treatment for 1 week of newborn mutant and wild-type mice with hypodermic NAC (N-acetyl-L-cysteine). The relative amount of sulfated disaccharides increased in mutant mice treated with NAC compared with the placebo group, indicating an increase in proteoglycan sulfation due to NAC catabolism, although pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the drug was rapidly removed from the bloodstream. In conclusion, cysteine contribution to cartilage proteoglycan sulfation in vivo is minimal under physiological conditions even if extracellular sulfate availability is low; however, the contribution of thiols to sulfation becomes significant by increasing their plasma concentration. PMID:16719839

  7. Inhibitors of unactivated p38 MAP kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullington, James; Argentieri, Dennis; Averill, Kristin; Carter, Demetrius; Cavender, Druie; Fahmy, Bohumila; Fan, Xiaodong; Hall, Daniel; Heintzelman, Geoffrey; Jackson, Paul; Leung, Wai-Ping; Li, Xun; Ling, Ping; Olini, Gilbert; Razler, Thomas; Reuman, Michael; Rupert, Kenneth; Russell, Ronald; Siekierka, John; Wadsworth, Scott; Wolff, Russell; Xiang, Bangping; Zhang, Yue-Mei

    2006-12-01

    Inhibition of the p38 map kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The first class of potent p38 kinase inhibitors was the pyridinylimidazole compounds from SKB. Since then several pyridinylimidazole-based compounds have been shown to inhibit activated p38 kinase in vitro and in vivo. We have developed a novel series of pyridinylimidazole-based compounds, which potently inhibit the p38 pathway by binding to unactivated p38 kinase and only weakly inhibiting activated p38 kinase activity in vitro.

  8. 3D phenotyping and quantitative trait locus mapping identify core regions of the rice genome controlling root architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christopher N. Topp; Anjali S. Iyer-Pascuzzi; Jill T. Anderson; Cheng-Ruei Lee; Paul R. Zurek; Olga Symonova; Ying Zheng; Alexander Bucksch; Yuriy Mileyko; Taras Galkovskyi; Brad T. Moore; John Harer; Herbert Edelsbrunner; Thomas Mitchell-Olds; Joshua S. Weitz; Philip N. Benfey

    2013-01-01

    .... We demonstrate the ability of a semiautomated 3D in vivo imaging and digital phenotyping pipeline to interrogate the quantitative genetic basis of root system growth in a rice biparental mapping population, Bala × Azucena. We phenotyped...

  9. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Yang, Yun Jung; Yang, Byeongseon; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2012-10-24

    In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa) and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate the use of functional MAPs in practical applications and

  10. Conventional frequency ultrasonic biomarkers of cancer treatment response in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Tadayyon, Hadi; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Tran, William; Papanicolau, Naum; Kolios, Michael C; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2013-06-01

    Conventional frequency quantitative ultrasound in conjunction with textural analysis techniques was investigated to monitor noninvasively the effects of cancer therapies in an in vivo preclinical model. Conventional low-frequency (∼7 MHz) and high-frequency (∼20 MHz) ultrasound was used with spectral analysis, coupled with textural analysis on spectral parametric maps, obtained from xenograft tumor-bearing animals (n = 20) treated with chemotherapy to extract noninvasive biomarkers of treatment response. Results indicated statistically significant differences in quantitative ultrasound-based biomarkers in both low- and high-frequency ranges between untreated and treated tumors 12 to 24 hours after treatment. Results of regression analysis indicated a high level of correlation between quantitative ultrasound-based biomarkers and tumor cell death estimates from histologic analysis. Applying textural characterization to the spectral parametric maps resulted in an even stronger correlation (r (2) = 0.97). The results obtained in this research demonstrate that quantitative ultrasound at a clinically relevant frequency can monitor tissue changes in vivo in response to cancer treatment administration. Using higher order textural information extracted from quantitative ultrasound spectral parametric maps provides more information at a high sensitivity related to tumor cell death.

  11. MAP OF NASCA GEOGLYPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hanzalová

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Czech Technical University in Prague in the cooperation with the University of Applied Sciences in Dresden (Germany work on the Nasca Project. The cooperation started in 2004 and much work has been done since then. All work is connected with Nasca lines in southern Peru. The Nasca project started in 1995 and its main target is documentation and conservation of the Nasca lines. Most of the project results are presented as WebGIS application via Internet. In the face of the impending destruction of the soil drawings, it is possible to preserve this world cultural heritage for the posterity at least in a digital form. Creating of Nasca lines map is very useful. The map is in a digital form and it is also available as a paper map. The map contains planimetric component of the map, map lettering and altimetry. Thematic folder in this map is a vector layer of the geoglyphs in Nasca/Peru. Basis for planimetry are georeferenced satellite images, altimetry is created from digital elevation model. This map was created in ArcGis software.

  12. Maps of metric spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Buliga, Marius

    2011-01-01

    This is a pedagogical introduction covering maps of metric spaces, Gromov-Hausdorff distance and its "physical" meaning, and dilation structures as a convenient simplification of an exhaustive database of maps of a metric space into another. See arXiv:1103.6007 for the context.

  13. Mapping Hrad Vallis, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Hamilton, C. W.

    2017-06-01

    Our 1:175K-scale geologic map is almost done! And we've found inflated lava flows and multiple episodes of aqueous discharge interspersed with volcanic eruptions. But we should also look beyond this area, as these units extend beyond the map area.

  14. Statistical air quality mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassteele, van de J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis handles statistical mapping of air quality data. Policy makers require more and more detailed air quality information to take measures to improve air quality. Besides, researchers need detailed air quality information to assess health effects. Accurate and spatially highly resolved maps

  15. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features, while...

  16. Sao Paulo Map Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, G. Robert

    1985-01-01

    Describes geographical, subject, and chronological aspects of 25 cartographic collections housed in university, public, special, state, and semi-state libraries in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Three size categories of map holdings (more than 10,000, 1,000-10,000, less than 1,000) are distinguished. A list of 27 Sao Paulo institutions housing map collections…

  17. Simplifying Massive Contour Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars; Deleuran, Lasse Kosetski; Mølhave, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours.......We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours....

  18. Water development projects map

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new map showing major water development projects across the United States has been published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The map shows the location, size, and ownership of approximately 2800 of the nation's major multipurpose and flood control dams and virtually all of the reservoir storage and flood control capacity of the country. Other features illustrated on the map include U.S. Bureau of Reclamation surface water irrigation projects; watershed protection projects of the U.S. Soil Conservation Service; hydroelectric power facilities, including both federal plants and nonfederal plants leased by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers navigation and flood damage reduction projects; and the federal systems of wild and scenic rivers. The map also delineates major rivers and the 21 USGS water resources region boundaries so that users of the map can locate development projects with respect to drainage basins.

  19. Geologic map of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Skinner, James A.; Dohm, James M.; Irwin, Rossman P.; Kolb, Eric J.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Platz, Thomas; Michael, Gregory G.; Hare, Trent M.

    2014-01-01

    This global geologic map of Mars, which records the distribution of geologic units and landforms on the planet's surface through time, is based on unprecedented variety, quality, and quantity of remotely sensed data acquired since the Viking Orbiters. These data have provided morphologic, topographic, spectral, thermophysical, radar sounding, and other observations for integration, analysis, and interpretation in support of geologic mapping. In particular, the precise topographic mapping now available has enabled consistent morphologic portrayal of the surface for global mapping (whereas previously used visual-range image bases were less effective, because they combined morphologic and albedo information and, locally, atmospheric haze). Also, thermal infrared image bases used for this map tended to be less affected by atmospheric haze and thus are reliable for analysis of surface morphology and texture at even higher resolution than the topographic products.

  20. Mapping Unknown Knowns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diogo de Andrade Silva, Elisa; Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon

    Mapping is often known as the entangled method of recognizing, representing and examining the existing physical conditions of a design site. Therefore, it becomes an evocative requirement to urban designers’ work in order to develop design proposals (Corner 1999). In this paper, we focus on mapping......, such as quantitative flows, materials, solid structures and others, offer themselves relatively easy to be analysed and mapped. But these transit infrastructures are an important part of people’s daily life for more that their efficient transport purposes. In these nodes and corridors, embodied mobile experiences...... representative dimensions of travellers’ embodied ‘dwelling-in-motion’ (Urry, 2007) and experiences. The paper foregrounds a ‘Mapping-in-Motion’ graphic example, an experimental urban design student assignment aiming to map some of the less representative dimensions of journeys between A and B in Berlin...

  1. The projective heat map

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Richard Evan

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces a simple dynamical model for a planar heat map that is invariant under projective transformations. The map is defined by iterating a polygon map, where one starts with a finite planar N-gon and produces a new N-gon by a prescribed geometric construction. One of the appeals of the topic of this book is the simplicity of the construction that yet leads to deep and far reaching mathematics. To construct the projective heat map, the author modifies the classical affine invariant midpoint map, which takes a polygon to a new polygon whose vertices are the midpoints of the original. The author provides useful background which makes this book accessible to a beginning graduate student or advanced undergraduate as well as researchers approaching this subject from other fields of specialty. The book includes many illustrations, and there is also a companion computer program.

  2. Bodily maps of emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K.

    2014-01-01

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions. PMID:24379370

  3. Ex vivo and in vivo coherent Raman imaging of the peripheral and central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Terry Brandon

    A hallmark of nervous system disorders is damage or degradation of the myelin sheath. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying myelin degeneration and repair represent one of the great challenges in medicine. This thesis work details the development and utilization of advanced optical imaging methods to gain insight into the structure and function of myelin in both healthy and diseased states in the in vivo environment. This first part of this thesis discusses ex vivo studies of the effects of high-frequency stimulation of spinal tissues on the structure of the node of Ranvier as investigated by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging (manuscript submitted to Journal of Neurosciece). Reversible paranodal myelin retraction at the nodes of Ranvier was observed during 200 Hz electrical stimulation, beginning minutes after the onset and continuing for up to 10 min after stimulation was ceased. A mechanistic study revealed a Ca2+ dependent pathway: high-frequency stimulation induced paranodal myelin retraction via pathologic calcium influx into axons, calpain activation, and cytoskeleton degradation through spectrin break-down. Also, the construction of dual-scanning CARS microscope for large area mapping of CNS tissues is detailed (Optics Express, 2008, 16:19396-193409). A confocal scanning head equipped with a rotating polygon mirror provides high speed, high resolution imaging and is coupled with a motorized sample stage to generate high-resolution large-area images of mouse brain coronal section and guinea pig spinal cord cross section. The polygon mirror decreases the mosaic acquisition time significantly without reducing the resolution of individual images. The ex vivo studies are then extended to in vivo imaging of mouse sciatic nerve tissue by CARS and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging (Journal of Microscopy, 2007, 225: 175-182). Following a minimally invasive surgery to open the skin, CARS imaging of myelinated axons and SHG imaging of the

  4. Mental Mapping: A Classroom Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Les

    1978-01-01

    Examines potential uses of mental maps in the classroom by reviewing research efforts, providing an example of the differences between mental maps of two student groups, and suggesting how to use mental maps in the geography curriculum. Mental mapping (or cognitive mapping) refers to individuals' processes of collecting, storing, and retrieving…

  5. nowCOAST's Map Service for Political Map Overlays

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST map service provides map overlays depicting the boundaries of U.S. states, territories, counties and townships/county subdivisions,...

  6. nowCOAST's Map Service for Transportation Map Overlays

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST map service provides maps depicting the locations of major world airport runways, major U.S. seaports, and latitude/longitude grid...

  7. In vivo measurement of the shape of the tissue-refractive-index correlation function and its application to detection of colorectal field carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Andrew J; Ruderman, Sarah; DelaCruz, Mart; Wali, Ramesh K; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2012-04-01

    Polarization-gated spectroscopy is an established method to depth-selectively interrogate the structural properties of biological tissue. We employ this method in vivo in the azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rat model to monitor the morphological changes that occur in the field of a tumor during early carcinogenesis. The results demonstrate a statistically significant change in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function for AOM-treated rats versus saline-treated controls. Since refractive index is linearly proportional to mass density, these refractive-index changes can be directly linked to alterations in the spatial distribution patterns of macromolecular density. Furthermore, we found that alterations in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function shape were an indicator of both present and future risk of tumor development. These results suggest that noninvasive measurement of the shape of the refractive-index correlation function could be a promising marker of early cancer development.

  8. Cognitive maps and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Oliver; Nadel, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive map theory suggested that exploring an environment and attending to a stimulus should lead to its integration into an allocentric environmental representation. We here report that directed attention in the form of exploration serves to gather information needed to determine an optimal spatial strategy, given task demands and characteristics of the environment. Attended environmental features may integrate into spatial representations if they meet the requirements of the optimal spatial strategy: when learning involves a cognitive mapping strategy, cues with high codability (e.g., concrete objects) will be incorporated into a map, but cues with low codability (e.g., abstract paintings) will not. However, instructions encouraging map learning can lead to the incorporation of cues with low codability. On the other hand, if spatial learning is not map-based, abstract cues can and will be used to encode locations. Since exploration appears to determine what strategy to apply and whether or not to encode a cue, recognition memory for environmental features is independent of whether or not a cue is part of a spatial representation. In fact, when abstract cues were used in a way that was not map-based, or when they were not used for spatial navigation at all, they were nevertheless recognized as familiar. Thus, the relation between exploratory activity on the one hand and spatial strategy and memory on the other appears more complex than initially suggested by cognitive map theory.

  9. Color on emergency mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lili; Qi, Qingwen; Zhang, An

    2007-06-01

    There are so many emergency issues in our daily life. Such as typhoons, tsunamis, earthquake, fires, floods, epidemics, etc. These emergencies made people lose their lives and their belongings. Every day, every hour, even every minute people probably face the emergency, so how to handle it and how to decrease its hurt are the matters people care most. If we can map it exactly before or after the emergencies; it will be helpful to the emergency researchers and people who live in the emergency place. So , through the emergency map, before emergency is occurring we can predict the situation, such as when and where the emergency will be happen; where people can refuge, etc. After disaster, we can also easily assess the lost, discuss the cause and make the lost less. The primary effect of mapping is offering information to the people who care about the emergency and the researcher who want to study it. Mapping allows the viewers to get a spatial sense of hazard. It can also provide the clues to study the relationship of the phenomenon in emergency. Color, as the basic element of the map, it can simplify and clarify the phenomenon. Color can also affects the general perceptibility of the map, and elicits subjective reactions to the map. It is to say, structure, readability, and the reader's psychological reactions can be affected by the use of color.

  10. Fractal-like kinetics of intracellular enzymatic reactions: a chemical framework of endotoxin tolerance and a possible non-specific contribution of macromolecular crowding to cross-tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The response to endotoxin (LPS), and subsequent signal transduction lead to the production of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by innate immune cells. Cells or organisms pretreated with endotoxin enter into a transient state of hyporesponsiveness, referred to as endotoxin tolerance (ET) which represents a particular case of negative preconditioning. Despite recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of ET, there is no consensus yet on the primary mechanism responsible for ET and for the more complex cases of cross tolerance. In this study, we examined the consequences of the macromolecular crowding (MMC) and of fractal-like kinetics (FLK) of intracellular enzymatic reactions on the LPS signaling machinery. We hypothesized that this particular type of enzyme kinetics may explain the development of ET phenomenon. Method Our aim in the present study was to characterize the chemical kinetics framework in ET and determine whether fractal-like kinetics explains, at least in part, ET. We developed an ordinary differential equations (ODE) mathematical model that took into account the links between the MMC and the LPS signaling machinery leading to ET. We proposed that the intracellular fractal environment (MMC) contributes to ET and developed two mathematical models of enzyme kinetics: one based on Kopelman’s fractal-like kinetics framework and the other based on Savageau’s power law model. Results Kopelman’s model provides a good image of the potential influence of a fractal intracellular environment (MMC) on ET. The Savageau power law model also partially explains ET. The computer simulations supported the hypothesis that MMC and FLK may play a role in ET. Conclusion The model highlights the links between the organization of the intracellular environment, MMC and the LPS signaling machinery leading to ET. Our FLK-based model does not minimize the role of the numerous negative regulatory factors. It simply draws attention to

  11. Electron Tomography of Cryo-Immobilized Plant Tissue: A Novel Approach to Studying 3D Macromolecular Architecture of Mature Plant Cell Walls In Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Yap, Edgar G.; Das, Jyotirmoy; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Cabal, Angelo; Neuhaus, Erica; Maji, Dolonchampa; Kumar, Shailabh; Joo, Michael; Yakovlev, Sergey; Csencsits, Roseann; Yu, Zeyun; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Downing, Kenneth H.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D) organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT) electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼2 nm), and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF), cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin) samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we characterized the

  12. Electron tomography of cryo-immobilized plant tissue: a novel approach to studying 3D macromolecular architecture of mature plant cell walls in situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purbasha Sarkar

    Full Text Available Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼ 2 nm, and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF, cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we

  13. Continuous mutual improvement of macromolecular structure models in the PDB and of X-ray crystallographic software: the dual role of deposited experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87507 (United States); Bricogne, Gerard, E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Global Phasing Ltd, Sheraton House, Castle Park, Cambridge CB3 0AX (United Kingdom); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87507 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Macromolecular structures deposited in the PDB can and should be continually reinterpreted and improved on the basis of their accompanying experimental X-ray data, exploiting the steady progress in methods and software that the deposition of such data into the PDB on a massive scale has made possible. Accurate crystal structures of macromolecules are of high importance in the biological and biomedical fields. Models of crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are in general of very high quality as deposited. However, methods for obtaining the best model of a macromolecular structure from a given set of experimental X-ray data continue to progress at a rapid pace, making it possible to improve most PDB entries after their deposition by re-analyzing the original deposited data with more recent software. This possibility represents a very significant departure from the situation that prevailed when the PDB was created, when it was envisioned as a cumulative repository of static contents. A radical paradigm shift for the PDB is therefore proposed, away from the static archive model towards a much more dynamic body of continuously improving results in symbiosis with continuously improving methods and software. These simultaneous improvements in methods and final results are made possible by the current deposition of processed crystallographic data (structure-factor amplitudes) and will be supported further by the deposition of raw data (diffraction images). It is argued that it is both desirable and feasible to carry out small-scale and large-scale efforts to make this paradigm shift a reality. Small-scale efforts would focus on optimizing structures that are of interest to specific investigators. Large-scale efforts would undertake a systematic re-optimization of all of the structures in the PDB, or alternatively the redetermination of groups of structures that are either related to or focused on specific questions. All of the resulting structures should be

  14. In vivo histamine optical nanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Kevin J; Clark, Heather A

    2012-01-01

    In this communication we discuss the development of ionophore based nanosensors for the detection and monitoring of histamine levels in vivo. This approach is based on the use of an amine-reactive, broad spectrum ionophore which is capable of recognizing and binding to histamine. We pair this ionophore with our already established nanosensor platform, and demonstrate in vitro and in vivo monitoring of histamine levels. This approach enables capturing rapid kinetics of histamine after injection, which are more difficult to measure with standard approaches such as blood sampling, especially on small research models. The coupling together of in vivo nanosensors with ionophores such as nonactin provide a way to generate nanosensors for novel targets without the difficult process of designing and synthesizing novel ionophores.

  15. Languages of Unimodal Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huimin

    The following sections are included: * Unimodal Maps * Definition and Terminology * Logistic Map and Tent Map * Simple Models with Complicated Dynamics * Symbolic Dynamics * A Brief History * Itinerary and Kneading Sequence * An Order Relation of Sequences * Conditions of being Itinerary * Definition of Languages * Admissible Sequences * The Languages ℒ(KS) * Each Word is "Real" * ℒ(KS) are Dynamical Languages * Some Facts of Strings for a Given Kneading Sequence * Prefix-Suffixes with respect to Kneading Sequence * Conditions for x ∈ ℒ(KS) * ℒ(KS) when KS contains c * Two Lemmas about Dual Strings * Periodic Sequences and Periodic Orbits * Periodic Sequences which are Itineraries * Complexity of Windows

  16. Crowdsourcing The National Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Elizabeth; Craun, Kari J.; Korris, Erin M.; Brostuen, David A.; Moore, Laurence R.

    2015-01-01

    Using crowdsourcing techniques, the US Geological Survey’s (USGS) Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) project known as “The National Map Corps (TNMCorps)” encourages citizen scientists to collect and edit data about man-made structures in an effort to provide accurate and authoritative map data for the USGS National Geospatial Program’s web-based The National Map. VGI is not new to the USGS, but past efforts have been hampered by available technologies. Building on lessons learned, TNMCorps volunteers are successfully editing 10 different structure types in all 50 states as well as Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

  17. DOT Official County Highway Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The County Highway Map theme is a scanned and rectified version of the original MnDOT County Highway Map Series. The cultural features on some of these maps may be...

  18. Tools for mapping ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Ignacio; Adamescu, Mihai; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Cazacu, Constantin; Klug, Hermann; Nedkov, Stoyan; Burkhard, Benjamin; Maes, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Mapping tools have evolved impressively in recent decades. From early computerised mapping techniques to current cloud-based mapping approaches, we have witnessed a technological evolution that has facilitated the democratisation of Geographic Information

  19. Northern Hemisphere Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Part I consists of plotted and analyzed daily maps of sea-level and 500-mb maps for 0300, 0400, 1200, 1230, 1300, and 1500...

  20. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy; In vivo magnetisk resonansspektroskopi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakken, Inger Johanne; Skjetne, Tore; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Kvistad, Kjell Arne

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic resonance tomography (MR) has become a highly useful tool for diagnostic imaging. The technology is in a process of rapid development with new and better methods emerging for the imaging of anatomic and pathologic aspects. With some additional equipment, the MR instrument may also be used for in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS provides biochemical information about metabolites in a given tissue volume. This type of biochemical information can be extracted from volumes the size of a sugar lump within a recording period of about five minutes. New technologies also allow extracting such information from several volumes during one recording in which the information is processed as metabolic pictures. The method has found clinical applications in several fields, including the evaluation of brain tumours and epilepsy. The use of in vivo MRS will probably increase in the years ahead, especially, perhaps, for the follow-up of various therapeutic regimens. All suppliers of MR equipment now provide in vivo MRS sets and routines for recording and data analysis have become very user-friendly. (author)