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Sample records for vivo intestinal permeability

  1. In silico vs. in vivo human intestinal permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, N M; Najib, N

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research is to calculate human intestinal permeability in silico and correlate results with those measured in vivo. Optimized human intestinal permeability values were calculated for 16 drugs by de-convolution of human plasma profiles using Parameter Estimation module of SimCYP program V13. Results showed high in silico-in vivo correlation coefficient of 0.89 for drugs with high/low permeability values. In silico permeability, if properly optimized, can be used as surrogate for in vivo permeability for BCS class I drugs and hence is suggested that such methodology could be employed as a support for waiver of in vivo studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Human in vivo regional intestinal permeability: importance for pharmaceutical drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennernäs, Hans

    2014-01-06

    Both the development and regulation of pharmaceutical dosage forms have undergone significant improvements and development over the past 25 years, due primarily to the extensive application of the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS). The Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System, which was published in 2005, has also been a useful resource for predicting the influence of transporters in several pharmacokinetic processes. However, there remains a need for the pharmaceutical industry to develop reliable in vitro/in vivo correlations and in silico methods for predicting the rate and extent of complex gastrointestinal (GI) absorption, the bioavailability, and the plasma concentration-time curves for orally administered drug products. Accordingly, a more rational approach is required, one in which high quality in vitro or in silico characterizations of active pharmaceutical ingredients and formulations are integrated into physiologically based in silico biopharmaceutics models to capture the full complexity of GI drug absorption. The need for better understanding of the in vivo GI process has recently become evident after an unsuccessful attempt to predict the GI absorption of BCS class II and IV drugs. Reliable data on the in vivo permeability of the human intestine (Peff) from various intestinal regions is recognized as one of the key biopharmaceutical requirements when developing in silico GI biopharmaceutics models with improved predictive accuracy. The Peff values for human jejunum and ileum, based on historical open, single-pass, perfusion studies are presented in this review. The main objective of this review is to summarize and discuss the relevance and current status of these human in vivo regional intestinal permeability values.

  3. Bacterial translocation and in vivo assessment of intestinal barrier permeability in Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with and without soyabean meal-induced inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosberian Tanha, Peyman; Overland, M.; Landsverk, Thor; Reveco, Felipe E.; Schrama, J.W.; Roem, A.J.; Agger, Jane W.; Midland, Liv T.

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this experiment was to evaluate the intestinal barrier permeability in vivo in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed increasing levels of soyabean meal (SBM). The relationship between SBM-induced enteritis (SBMIE) and the permeability markers was also investigated. Our results

  4. Intestinal permeability in patients with atopic eczema.

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    Bjarnason, I; Goolamali, S K; Levi, A J; Peters, T J

    1985-03-01

    Intestinal permeability was investigated in adult patients with atopic eczema by in vivo and in vitro techniques. Patients with symptoms of 'immediate' food allergy were specifically excluded. A 51Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetate absorption test was carried out in eighteen patients. Their mean (+/- s.d.) 24-hour urine excretion following oral administration of the test substance (2.1 +/- 0.9%) did not differ significantly from that of thirty-four normal controls (1.9 +/- 0.5%). Small bowel permeability was estimated directly in jejunal mucosal samples in ten patients with three permeability probes of differing molecular weight. Mucosal permeability did not differ significantly from that of fifteen control patients for any of the test substances. Two patients had abnormal results by both tests and in one this was due to coeliac disease. These results suggest that altered intestinal permeability is not important in the pathogenesis of eczema. Patients demonstrating increased intestinal permeability should undergo jejunal biopsy to exclude significant small bowel disease.

  5. Enhanced oral bioavailability of piperine by self-emulsifying drug delivery systems: in vitro, in vivo and in situ intestinal permeability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Bing; Cui, Chao; Ji, Hongyu; Tang, Jingling; Wang, Zhiyong; Liu, Hongmei; Qin, Mengnan; Li, Xin; Wu, Linhua

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate a self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) of piperine to enhance its solubility and bioavailability. The formulation was optimized by solubility test and ternary phase diagrams. Then physiochemical properties and in vitro release of SEDDS were characterized. In vivo pharmacokinetics study and in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion were performed to investigate the effects of SEDDS on the bioavailability and intestinal absorption of piperine. The optimized formulation was composed of ethyl oleate, Tween 80 and Transcutol P (3:5.5:1.5, w/w), with the level of the piperine reached 2.5% (w/w). The in vitro dissolution rates of piperine SEDDS were significantly higher than the self-prepared capsules. In vivo pharmacokinetic study showed Cmax1, Cmax2 and area under the curve of piperine after oral administration of SEDDS in rats were 3.8-, 7.2- and 5.2-fold higher than the self-prepared capsules, respectively, and the relative bioavailability of SEDDS was 625.74%. The in situ intestinal absorption study revealed that the effective permeability and the effective absorption rate values of piperine for SEDDS were significantly improved comparing to solutions (p piperine effectively.

  6. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANELBURG, RM; UIL, JJ; DEMONCHY, JGR; HEYMANS, HSA

    1992-01-01

    The role of the physiologic barrier function of the small bowel and its possible role in health and disease has attracted much attention over the past decade. The intestinal mucosal barrier for luminal macromolecules and microorganism is the result of non-immunologic and immunologic defense

  7. Small intestinal permeability in dermatological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, I; Fairris, G M; Rothwell, J; Cunliffe, W J; Dixon, M F; Axon, A T

    1985-09-01

    Passive small intestinal permeability was investigated in 62 patients with atopic eczema, 29 with psoriasis and 18 with dermatitis herpetiformis, using the cellobiose/mannitol differential sugar absorption test. Urinary recovery of cellobiose and mannitol in patients with both psoriasis and eczema were similar to values in a control population, and were not affected by the extent or activity of skin disease. The cellobiose/mannitol recovery ratio was abnormally high in seven patients with eczema, six of whom underwent jejunal biopsy. Jejunal mucosal morphology was normal in five, and one patient was found to have coeliac disease. Cellobiose/mannitol recovery ratio was also abnormal in seven patients with psoriasis, and in 11 with dermatitis herpetiformis, seven of whom had a normal jejunal biopsy. These findings demonstrate that the passive permeability of the small intestine is normal in the majority of patients with atopic eczema and psoriasis. Increased absorption of macromolecules from the gut lumen cannot be ascribed to defective intestinal integrity, and is unlikely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of eczema. Abnormal intestinal permeability may be a more sensitive manifestation of gluten-sensitive enteropathy than jejunal biopsy in dermatitis herpetiformis.

  8. Hepatic Injury in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Contributes to Altered Intestinal PermeabilitySummary

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    Jay Luther

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Emerging data suggest that changes in intestinal permeability and increased gut microbial translocation contribute to the inflammatory pathway involved in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH development. Numerous studies have investigated the association between increased intestinal permeability and NASH. Our meta-analysis of this association investigates the underlying mechanism. Methods: A meta-analysis was performed to compare the rates of increased intestinal permeability in patients with NASH and healthy controls. To further address the underlying mechanism of action, we studied changes in intestinal permeability in a diet-induced (methionine-and-choline-deficient; MCD murine model of NASH. In vitro studies were also performed to investigate the effect of MCD culture medium at the cellular level on hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, and intestinal epithelial cells. Results: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD patients, and in particular those with NASH, are more likely to have increased intestinal permeability compared with healthy controls. We correlate this clinical observation with in vivo data showing mice fed an MCD diet develop intestinal permeability changes after an initial phase of liver injury and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα induction. In vitro studies reveal that MCD medium induces hepatic injury and TNFα production yet has no direct effect on intestinal epithelial cells. Although these data suggest a role for hepatic TNFα in altering intestinal permeability, we found that mice genetically resistant to TNFα-myosin light chain kinase (MLCK–induced intestinal permeability changes fed an MCD diet still develop increased permeability and liver injury. Conclusions: Our clinical and experimental results strengthen the association between intestinal permeability increases and NASH and also suggest that an early phase of hepatic injury and inflammation contributes to altered intestinal

  9. The role of CB1 in intestinal permeability and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwad, Mustafa A; Couch, Daniel G; Theophilidou, Elena; Sarmad, Sarir; Barrett, David A; Larvin, Michael; Wright, Karen L; Lund, Jonathan N; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2017-08-01

    The endocannabinoid system has previously been shown to play a role in the permeability and inflammatory response of the human gut. The goal of our study was to determine the effects of endogenous anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) on the permeability and inflammatory response of intestinal epithelium under normal, inflammatory, and hypoxic conditions. Human intestinal mucosa was modeled using Caco-2 cells. Human tissue was collected from planned colorectal resections. Accumulation of AEA and 2-AG was achieved by inhibiting their metabolizing enzymes URB597 (a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor) and JZL184 (a monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor). Inflammation and ischemia were simulated with TNF-α and IFN-γ and oxygen deprivation. Permeability changes were measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. The role of the CB1 receptor was explored using CB1-knockdown (CB1Kd) intestinal epithelial cells. Endocannabinoid levels were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Cytokine secretion was measured using multiplex and ELISA. URB597 and JZL184 caused a concentration-dependent increase in permeability via CB1 (P permeability via CB1 (P permeability caused by inflammation and hypoxia (P permeability response to inflammation (P permeability and in inflammatory and hypoxic conditions.-Karwad, M. A., Couch, D. G., Theophilidou, E., Sarmad, S., Barrett, D. A., Larvin, M., Wright, K. L., Lund, J. N., O'Sullivan, S. E. The role of CB1 in intestinal permeability and inflammation. © FASEB.

  10. Intestinal permeability - a new target for disease prevention and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, S.C.; Barbara, G.; Buurman, W.; Ockhuizen, T.; Schulzke, J.D.; Serino, M.; Tilg, H.; Watson, A.; Wells, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Data are accumulating that emphasize the important role of the intestinal barrier and intestinal permeability for health and disease. However, these terms are poorly defined, their assessment is a matter of debate, and their clinical significance is not clearly established. In the present review,

  11. Bovine Colostrum Supplementation During Running Training Increases Intestinal Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant D. Brinkworth

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise training can increase intestinal permeability which may contribute to the development of gastrointestinal symptoms in some athletes. Bovine colostrum (BC supplementation reduces intestinal permeability induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This study aimed to determine whether BC could also reduce intestinal permeability induced by endurance exercise. Thirty healthy adult males (25.0 ± 4.7 yr; mean ± SD completed eight weeks of running three times per week for 45 minutes at their lactate threshold while consuming 60 g/day of BC, whey protein (WP or control (CON. Intestinal permeability was assessed at baseline and after eight weeks by measuring the ratio of urinary lactulose (L and rhamnose (R excretion. After eight weeks the L/R ratio increased significantly more in volunteers consuming BC (251 ± 140% compared with WP (21 ± 35%, P < 0.05 and CON (−7 ± 13%, P < 0.02. The increase in intestinal permeability with BC may have been due to BC inducing greater leakiness of tight junctions between enterocytes or by increasing macromolecular transport as it does in neonatal gut. Further research should investigate the potential for BC to increase intestinal macromolecular transport in adults.

  12. The biopharmaceutics of successful controlled release drug product: Segmental-dependent permeability of glipizide vs. metoprolol throughout the intestinal tract.

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    Zur, Moran; Cohen, Noa; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to study the challenges and prospects of regional-dependent absorption in a controlled-release scenario, through the oral biopharmaceutics of the sulfonylurea antidiabetic drug glipizide. The BCS solubility class of glipizide was determined, and its physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability were thoroughly investigated, both in-vitro (PAMPA and Caco-2) and in-vivo in rats. Metoprolol was used as the low/high permeability class boundary marker. Glipizide was found to be a low-solubility compound. All intestinal permeability experimental methods revealed similar trend; a mirror image small intestinal permeability with opposite regional/pH-dependency was obtained, a downward trend for glipizide, and an upward trend for metoprolol. Yet the lowest permeability of glipizide (terminal Ileum) was comparable to the lowest permeability of metoprolol (proximal jejunum). At the colon, similar permeability was evident for glipizide and metoprolol, that was higher than metoprolol's jejunal permeability. We present an analysis that identifies metoprolol's jejunal permeability as the low/high permeability class benchmark anywhere throughout the intestinal tract; we show that the permeability of both glipizide and metoprolol matches/exceeds this threshold throughout the entire intestinal tract, accounting for their success as controlled-release dosage form. This represents a key biopharmaceutical characteristic for a successful controlled-release dosage form. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomimetic PVPA in vitro model for estimation of the intestinal drug permeability using fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids.

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    Naderkhani, Elenaz; Vasskog, Terje; Flaten, Gøril Eide

    2015-06-20

    A prerequisite for successful oral drug therapy is the drug's ability to cross the gastrointestinal barrier. Considering the increasing number of new chemical entities in modern drug discovery, reliable and fast in vitro models are required for early and efficient prediction of intestinal permeability. To mimic the intestinal environment, use of biorelevant media may provide valuable information on in vivo drug permeation. The present study aims at improving the novel biomimetic phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay's (PVPAbiomimetic) biorelevance by investigating the applicability of the biorelevant media; fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) and fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FeSSIF). The FaSSIF and FeSSIF's influence on the permeability of the model drugs acyclovir, indomethacin, griseofulvin and nadolol was then assessed. The barriers' robustness in terms of storage stability was also evaluated. The barriers were found to maintain their integrity in presence of FaSSIF and FeSSIF. The model drugs showed changes in permeability in presence of the different simulated intestinal fluids that were in agreement with previous reports. Moreover, the barrier showed improved storage stability by maintaining its integrity for 6months. Altogether, this study moves the PVPAbiomimetic an important step towards a better in vitro permeability model for use in drug development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Alterations in Intestinal Permeability After Thermal Injury,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Permeability After Burns-LeVoyer et al R wthe Arrihtv.of Su~gy8 4• u’y 1992, Voue 127 Copright 1992. Akn • Med/kaf Awoctahbn Patlenbs Controls 4. (n-=1...may have a role in the tinal tract is enteral nutrition . I was wondering if by any chance development of increased permeability, then we can evaluate

  15. Luminal leptin inhibits intestinal sugar absorption in vivo.

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    Iñigo, C; Patel, N; Kellett, G L; Barber, A; Lostao, M P

    2007-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that leptin inhibits galactose absorption in rat intestinal everted rings and that leptin receptors are present in the apical membrane of the enterocytes. This adipocyte-derived hormone is also secreted by gastric mucosal cells and is able to reach the intestinal lumen. The goal of the present study was to prove whether luminal leptin acts on intestinal sugar absorption in vivo both at low (basal state) and high sugar concentration (post-prandial state). In vivo intestinal sugar absorption in rat was measured with recirculating and single-pass perfusion systems. Sugar disappearance in the perfusate was measured by radioactivity and biochemical methods. Luminal leptin effect on intestinal absorption mediated by sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) as well as intestinal permeability (mannitol absorption) was determined. Luminal leptin inhibited intestinal sugar absorption at low galactose concentrations, which indicates that leptin regulates SGLT1 activity in vivo. The inhibition was reversed in the absence of hormone in the intestinal lumen, suggesting that it was produced by post-translational regulation processes. At high luminal glucose concentrations, leptin also inhibited the phloretin-insensitive component of sugar absorption mediated by SGLT1. There was no significant effect on the apical GLUT2 component of absorption. Leptin did not modify in vivo intestinal permeability determined with (14)C-mannitol. These observations support the view that gastric leptin exerts a regulatory role on intestinal sugar absorption in the postprandial state by modifying the active component of absorption.

  16. (13) C mannitol as a novel biomarker for measurement of intestinal permeability.

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    Grover, M; Camilleri, M; Hines, J; Burton, D; Ryks, M; Wadhwa, A; Sundt, W; Dyer, R; Singh, R J

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI disorders are associated with altered intestinal permeability, which can be measured in vivo by urinary excretion after oral lactulose and mannitol ingestion. Inadvertent dietary consumption of (12) Carbon ((12) C, regular) mannitol in food or from other sources may interfere with the test's interpretation. (13) Carbon ((13) C) constitutes 1% of carbon in nature and (13) C mannitol is a stable isotope. Our aim was to determine the performance of (13) C mannitol for measurement of intestinal permeability. Ten healthy volunteers underwent intestinal permeability assay using coadministered (12) C mannitol, (13) C mannitol and lactulose, followed by timed urine collections. Urinary sugar concentrations were measured using tandem high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that (13) C mannitol can be distinguishable from (12) C mannitol on tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, (13) C mannitol had ~20-fold lower baseline contamination compared to (12) C mannitol. We describe here the (13) C mannitol assay method for the measurement of intestinal permeability. In conclusion, (13) C mannitol is superior to (12) C mannitol for measurement of intestinal permeability. It avoids issues with baseline contamination and erratic excretions during the testing period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Amorphous azithromycin with improved aqueous solubility and intestinal membrane permeability.

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    Aucamp, Marique; Odendaal, Roelf; Liebenberg, Wilna; Hamman, Josias

    2015-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) is a poorly soluble macrolide antibacterial agent. Its low solubility is considered as the major contributing factor to its relatively low oral bioavailability. The aim of this study was to improve the solubility of this active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) by preparing an amorphous form by quench cooling of the melt and to study the influence of the improved solubility on membrane permeability. The amorphous azithromycin (AZM-A) exhibited a significant increase in water solubility when compared to the crystalline azithromycin dihydrate (AZM-DH). The influence that the improved solubility could have on membrane permeability was also studied. The apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) values of AZM-A were statistically significantly higher (p solubility of AZM in the amorphous form also produced improved permeability across excised intestinal tissue at physiological pH values found in the small intestine.

  18. Regulation of intestinal permeability: The role of proteases.

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    Van Spaendonk, Hanne; Ceuleers, Hannah; Witters, Leonie; Patteet, Eveline; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; De Meester, Ingrid; De Man, Joris G; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2017-03-28

    The gastrointestinal barrier is - with approximately 400 m 2 - the human body's largest surface separating the external environment from the internal milieu. This barrier serves a dual function: permitting the absorption of nutrients, water and electrolytes on the one hand, while limiting host contact with noxious luminal antigens on the other hand. To maintain this selective barrier, junction protein complexes seal the intercellular space between adjacent epithelial cells and regulate the paracellular transport. Increased intestinal permeability is associated with and suggested as a player in the pathophysiology of various gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gastrointestinal tract is exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous proteases, both in the lumen and in the mucosa. There is increasing evidence to suggest that a dysregulation of the protease/antiprotease balance in the gut contributes to epithelial damage and increased permeability. Excessive proteolysis leads to direct cleavage of intercellular junction proteins, or to opening of the junction proteins via activation of protease activated receptors. In addition, proteases regulate the activity and availability of cytokines and growth factors, which are also known modulators of intestinal permeability. This review aims at outlining the mechanisms by which proteases alter the intestinal permeability. More knowledge on the role of proteases in mucosal homeostasis and gastrointestinal barrier function will definitely contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets for permeability-related diseases.

  19. In vivo human buccal permeability of nicotine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Charlotte L; Olin, Helle B D; Dalhoff, Kim

    2006-01-01

    -smokers using a buccal perfusion cell. The disappearance of nicotine from perfusion solutions with pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1 was studied for 3h. The apparent permeability of nicotine (P(app)) was determined at each pH value. Parotid saliva was collected in an attempt to assess systemic levels of nicotine......(app) values and non-ionised nicotine, which indicates that the nicotine transfer occurred by means of passive diffusion. P(app) values of 0.60 x 10(-4) and 6.18 x 10(-4)cms(-1) were obtained for the mono-protonated and non-ionised species of nicotine, respectively. The analysis of the parotid saliva samples...... indicated that these samples might be useful in the assessment of systemic absorption of nicotine. Previous buccal in vitro models underestimated the in vivo human permeability of nicotine. However, the in vitro models were capable of predicting the effect of pH on the nicotine permeability....

  20. Developmental changes in distribution of the mucous gel layer and intestinal permeability in rat small intestine.

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    Iiboshi, Y; Nezu, R; Khan, J; Chen, K; Cui, L; Yoshida, H; Wasa, M; Fukuzawa, M; Kamata, S; Takagi, Y; Okada, A

    1996-01-01

    From the developmental aspects, the distribution of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran 70,000 (FTTC-dextran) and mucous gel across the lumen of small intestine was observed as an investigation into the role of mucous gel on intestinal permeability. Furthermore, the effect of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a mucolytic agent, on intestinal permeability was examined. In suckling and weaned rats, FTTC-dextran (750 mg/kg body wt) was gavage-fed. After 3 hours, blood samples were taken by cardiac puncture to analyze plasma FTTC-dextran by fluorescence spectrometry. Samples of small intestine with luminal contents were frozen and sectioned in a cryostat for fluorescence microscopy; the same sections were placed in a 0.2% celloidin solution to preserve mucous gel and were stained by periodic acid-Schiff reaction for light microscopy. In weaned rats, intestinal permeability was examined with different concentrations of intraluminally instilled NAC. The plasma level of FTTC-dextran showed a significant increase (p mucus but filled with FTTC-dextran in suckling rats, whereas the spaces were filled with mucus and not filled with FTTC-dextran in weaned rats. Intestinal permeability in groups with NAC were significantly higher (p NAC. These results suggest that an increase in the mucous gel layer that coats the epithelial lining according to the maturation of the gastrointestinal tract is one of the most important factors for a restriction in intestinal permeability.

  1. Intestinal permeability, atopic eczema and oral disodium cromoglycate.

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    Ventura, A; Rinaldi, S; Florean, P; Agosti, E

    1991-01-01

    A dual sugar (lactulose-mannitol) absorption test was performed in 19 patients with atopic eczema before and after a 21 day elimination-diet. Moreover L/M test was carried out in 20 controls. The mean value of lactulose-mannitol urinary ratio (L/M) was 0.015 (+/- 0.018 SD) in the group of patients and 0.012 (+/- 0.011 SD) in the control group (p = 0.49). The mean clinical score improved significantly after elimination diet (41,6 +/- 12.9 SD before the diet, 21.7 +/- 10.4 SD after the diet, p less than 0.001) but no significant modification of intestinal permeability was recorded (L/M = 0.015 +/- 0.018 SD before the diet and 0.21 +/- 0.022 SD after the diet, p = 0.38). Using a double blind approach we were not able to demonstrate any significant effect of disodium cromoglycate on the clinical score and intestinal permeability. The connections between food allergy, intestinal permeability and atopic dermatitis have not been understood, but disodium cromoglycate doesn't seem to play a significant role in the treatment of atopic dermatitis nor in the modification of intestinal permeability.

  2. Effect of anionic macromolecules on intestinal permeability of furosemide.

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    Valizadeh, Hadi; Fahimfar, Hadi; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Islambulchilar, Ziba; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2015-02-01

    Furosemide is an anionic molecule and has very low absorption in gastro intestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of anionic macromolecules on the intestinal permeability of Furosemide. The intestinal permeability of Furosemide was determined using single-pass intestinal perfusion technique in rats. Briefly a jejunal segment of ∼10 cm was isolated and cannulated in both ends for inlet and outlet solution. The perfusate was collected every 10 min and samples were analyzed using the RP-HPLC method. Test samples containing furosemide and two anionic macromolecules, sodium carboxy methyl cellulose and sodium alginate, at different concentrations were used. The obtained data showed that existence of Sodium carboxy methyl cellulose significantly increased the Peff values in all three investigated concentrations (p < 0.05) but sodium alginate only in concentrations <0.1% increased drug permeability. It is concluded that the anionic macromolecules at specific concentrations could alter the permeability of anionic drugs across the biological membranes. Donnan phenomenon and chelating property of macromolecules could be attributed to the observed effect.

  3. Cannabinoids mediate opposing effects on inflammation-induced intestinal permeability

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    Alhamoruni, A; Wright, KL; Larvin, M; O'Sullivan, SE

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Activation of cannabinoid receptors decreases emesis, inflammation, gastric acid secretion and intestinal motility. The ability to modulate intestinal permeability in inflammation may be important in therapy aimed at maintaining epithelial barrier integrity. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cannabinoids modulate the increased permeability associated with inflammation in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Confluent Caco-2 cell monolayers were treated for 24 h with IFNγ and TNFα (10 ng·mL−1). Monolayer permeability was measured using transepithelial electrical resistance and flux measurements. Cannabinoids were applied either apically or basolaterally after inflammation was established. Potential mechanisms of action were investigated using antagonists for CB1, CB2, TRPV1, PPARγ and PPARα. A role for the endocannabinoid system was established using inhibitors of the synthesis and degradation of endocannabinoids. KEY RESULTS Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol accelerated the recovery from cytokine-induced increased permeability; an effect sensitive to CB1 receptor antagonism. Anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol further increased permeability in the presence of cytokines; this effect was also sensitive to CB1 antagonism. No role for the CB2 receptor was identified in these studies. Co-application of THC, cannabidiol or a CB1 antagonist with the cytokines ameliorated their effect on permeability. Inhibiting the breakdown of endocannabinoids worsened, whereas inhibiting the synthesis of endocannabinoids attenuated, the increased permeability associated with inflammation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings suggest that locally produced endocannabinoids, acting via CB1 receptors play a role in mediating changes in permeability with inflammation, and that phytocannabinoids have therapeutic potential for reversing the disordered intestinal permeability associated with inflammation. LINKED ARTICLES This

  4. Small intestinal permeability to sugars in patients with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukabam, S O; Mann, R J; Cooper, B T

    1984-06-01

    Absorption of lactulose and mannitol was measured in eleven patients with atopic eczema and lactulose/mannitol excretion ratios were calculated. Mean lactulose absorption was increased in the patients with exzema and their excretion ratios were higher than those of controls. There was no correlation between either eczema extent or severity and the excretion ratio. We conclude that small intestinal passive permeability is increased in some patients with atopic eczema.

  5. Determination of Regional Intestinal Permeability of Diclofenac and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The calibration curves were linear for all compounds (r > 0.999) with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.005, 0.1, 0.075 μg/mL, and limit of quantification of 0.1, 0.3, 0.2 μg/mL for ... Keywords: Biopharmaceutics classification system, Diclofenac, Metoprolol tartrate, Segmental permeability, Intestinal absorption, Validation ...

  6. Epithelial Cell Damage Activates Bactericidal/Permeability Increasing-Protein (BPI Expression in Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Balakrishnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As the first line of defense against invading pathogen, intestinal epithelium produces various antimicrobial proteins (AMP that help in clearance of pathogen. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI is a 55 kDa AMP that is expressed in intestinal epithelium. Dysregulation of BPI in intestinal epithelium is associated with various inflammatory diseases like Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative colitis, and Infectious enteritis’s. In this paper, we report a direct correlation between intestinal damage and BPI expression. In Caco-2 cells, we see a significant increase in BPI levels upon membrane damage mediated by S. aureus infection and pore-forming toxins (Streptolysin and Listeriolysin. Cells detect changes in potassium level as a Danger-associated molecular pattern associated with cell damage and induce BPI expression in a p38 dependent manner. These results are further supported by in vivo findings that the BPI expression in murine intestinal epithelium is induced upon infection with bacteria which cause intestinal damage (Salmonella Typhimurium and Shigella flexneri whereas mutants that do not cause intestinal damage (STM ΔfliC and STM ΔinvC did not induce BPI expression. Our results suggest that epithelial damage associated with infection act as a signal to induce BPI expression.

  7. Gliadin induces an increase in intestinal permeability and zonulin release by binding to the chemokine receptor CXCR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Karen M; Lu, Ruliang; Brownley, Julie; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Craig; Thomas, Karen; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Tamiz, Amir; Alkan, Sefik; Netzel-Arnett, Sarah; Antalis, Toni; Vogel, Stefanie N; Fasano, Alessio

    2008-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gliadin, a component of the grain protein gluten. Gliadin induces an MyD88-dependent zonulin release that leads to increased intestinal permeability, a postulated early element in the pathogenesis of celiac disease. We aimed to establish the molecular basis of gliadin interaction with intestinal mucosa leading to intestinal barrier impairment. Alpha-gliadin affinity column was loaded with intestinal mucosal membrane lysates to identify the putative gliadin-binding moiety. In vitro experiments with chemokine receptor CXCR3 transfectants were performed to confirm binding of gliadin and/or 26 overlapping 20mer alpha-gliadin synthetic peptides to the receptor. CXCR3 protein and gene expression were studied in intestinal epithelial cell lines and human biopsy specimens. Gliadin-CXCR3 interaction was further analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy, laser capture microscopy, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunoprecipitation/Western blot analysis. Ex vivo experiments were performed using C57BL/6 wild-type and CXCR3(-/-) mouse small intestines to measure intestinal permeability and zonulin release. Affinity column and colocalization experiments showed that gliadin binds to CXCR3 and that at least 2 alpha-gliadin 20mer synthetic peptides are involved in this binding. CXCR3 is expressed in mouse and human intestinal epithelia and lamina propria. Mucosal CXCR3 expression was elevated in active celiac disease but returned to baseline levels following implementation of a gluten-free diet. Gliadin induced physical association between CXCR3 and MyD88 in enterocytes. Gliadin increased zonulin release and intestinal permeability in wild-type but not CXCR3(-/-) mouse small intestine. Gliadin binds to CXCR3 and leads to MyD88-dependent zonulin release and increased intestinal permeability.

  8. Intestinal permeability and nutritional status in developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Nilian Carla Silva; Mendonca, Jacqueline Nakau; Portari, Guilherme Vannucchi; Jordao Junior, Alceu Afonso; Marchini, Julio Sergio; Chiarello, Paula Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a developmental disorder with a possible connection between dietary components and triggering or worsening of symptoms. An altered intestinal permeability might allow absorption of incompletely digested peptides (gluten and casein) that could produce opioid-like activity on the brain, causing significant changes in behavior. To assess the intestinal permeability and nutritional status of participants with developmental disorders to determine if changes in the intestinal mucosal barrier and/or injury to the intercellular junctions have occurred that might justify application of further dietary modifications. To assess intestinal permeability, the research team analyzed participants urine under fasting conditions, using gas chromatography to determine chromatographic peaks. To assess nutritional status, the team determined participants heights and weights and performed a bioelectric bioimpedance examination at least 4 hours after their most recent meal. In addition, the team determined food intake using three diet diaries. They asked participants and caregivers to register each food consumed during 2 nonconsecutive weekdays and 1 weekend day. The study occurred at the Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo University. Seven participants aged 9 to 23 years with developmental disorders (the developmental group, DG) completed the study. The research team recruited them through the Association of Friends of the Autistic Persons of Ribeirao Preto in Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. The control group (CG) consisted of nonsmoking healthy volunteers in the general population who were similar in age to the experimental group and did not suffer from diseases that potentially could influence nutritional status and intestinal function. To assess intestinal permeability, participants ingested 150 mL of an isosmolar solution of the sugars mannitol (2 g) and lactulose (7.5 g) under fasting conditions and the researchers collected all voided urine over a period of 5 hours

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant ameliorates acute alcohol-induced intestinal permeability and liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhua; Liu, Yanlong; Sidhu, Anju; Ma, Zhenhua; McClain, Craig; Feng, Wenke

    2012-07-01

    Endotoxemia is a contributing cofactor to alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and alcohol-induced increased intestinal permeability is one of the mechanisms of endotoxin absorption. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to promote intestinal epithelial integrity and protect barrier function in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and in ALD. Although it is highly possible that some common molecules secreted by probiotics contribute to this action in IBD, the effect of probiotic culture supernatant has not yet been studied in ALD. We examined the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant (LGG-s) on the acute alcohol-induced intestinal integrity and liver injury in a mouse model. Mice on standard chow diet were supplemented with supernatant from LGG culture (10(9) colony-forming unit/mouse) for 5 days, and one dose of alcohol at 6 g/kg body wt was administered via gavage. Intestinal permeability was measured by FITC-FD-4 ex vivo. Alcohol-induced liver injury was examined by measuring the activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in plasma, and liver steatosis was evaluated by triglyceride content and Oil Red O staining of the liver sections. LGG-s pretreatment restored alcohol-induced reduction in ileum mRNA levels of claudin-1, intestine trefoil factor (ITF), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP), which play important roles on intestinal barrier integrity. As a result, LGG-s pretreatment significantly inhibited the alcohol-induced intestinal permeability, endotoxemia and subsequently liver injury. Interestingly, LGG-s pretreatment increased ileum mRNA expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α, an important transcription factor of ITF, P-gp, and CRAMP. These results suggest that LGG-s ameliorates the acute alcohol-induced liver injury by promoting HIF signaling, leading to the suppression of alcohol-induced increased intestinal permeability and endotoxemia. The use of bacteria-free LGG culture supernatant provides a

  10. Potato glycoalkaloids adversely affect intestinal permeability and aggravate inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bijal; Schutte, Robert; Sporns, Peter; Doyle, Jason; Jewel, Lawrence; Fedorak, Richard N

    2002-09-01

    Disruption of epithelial barrier integrity is important in the initiation and cause of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Glycoalkaloids, solanine (S), and chaconine (C) are naturally present in potatoes, can permeabilize cholesterol-containing membranes, and lead to disruption of epithelial barrier integrity. Frying potatoes concentrates glycoalkaloids. Interestingly, the prevalence of IBD is highest in countries where fried potatoes consumption is highest. To further understand the role of potato glycoalkaloids on intestinal barrier integrity, we examined the effect of varying concentrations of solanine and chaconine on intestinal permeability and function. Solanine (0-50 microM), chaconine (0-20 microM), or a 1:1 mixture (0-20 microM) were exposed to T84 cultured epithelial monolayers for varying periods of time to determine concentration response effect on epithelial permeability. Next, a 1:1 mixture (5 microM) of solanine-to-chaconine (C:S) was exposed to sheets of normal murine small intestine, mounted in Ussing chambers, from control and interleukin-10 gene-deficient mice to determine whether glycoalkaloids affected intestine from mice with a genetic predisposition for IBD greater than controls. Finally, the effects of glycoalkaloids on colonic histologic injury were examined in mice orally fed amounts of glycoalkaloids that would normally be consumed in a human diet. Glycoalkaloids embedded and permeabilized the T84 monolayer epithelial membrane bilayer in a concentration-dependent fashion, with C:S > C > S. In vitro Ussing chamber experiments also illustrated a concentration-dependent disruption of intestinal barrier integrity in animals with a genetic predisposition to develop IBD, but not in control animals. Similarly, in vivo oral feeding experiments demonstrated that C:S ingestion, at physiologic concentrations, aggravated histologic colonic injury in mice genetically predisposed to developing IBD. Concentrations of glycoalkaloids normally available

  11. Intestinal Permeability before and after Ibuprofen in Families of Children with Crohn’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A Zamora

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Members of a subset of first-degree relatives of adults with Crohn’s disease have been shown to have an increased baseline intestinal permeability and/or an exaggerated increase in intestinal permeability after the administration of acetylsalicylic acid.

  12. Intestinal mucosa permeability following oral insulin delivery using core shell corona nanolipoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuying; Guo, Shiyan; Zhu, Chunliu; Zhu, Quanlei; Gan, Yong; Rantanen, Jukka; Rahbek, Ulrik Lytt; Hovgaard, Lars; Yang, Mingshi

    2013-12-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles (NC) have excellent capacity for protein entrapment, favorable epithelial permeability, and are regarded as promising nanocarriers for oral protein delivery. Herein, we designed and evaluated a class of core shell corona nanolipoparticles (CSC) to further improve the absorption through enhanced intestinal mucus penetration. CSC contains chitosan nanoparticles as a core component and pluronic F127-lipid vesicles as a shell with hydrophilic chain and polyethylene oxide PEO as a corona. These particles were developed by hydration of a dry pluronic F127-lipid film with NC suspensions followed by extrusion. Insulin nested inside CSC was well protected from enzymatic degradation. Compared with NC, CSC exhibited significantly higher efficiency of mucosal penetration and, consequently, higher cellular internalization of insulin in mucus secreting E12 cells. The cellular level of insulin after CSC treatment was 36-fold higher compared to treatment with free insulin, and 10-fold higher compared to NC. CSC significantly facilitated the permeation of insulin across the ileum epithelia, as demonstrated in an ex vivo study and an in vivo absorption study. CSC pharmacological studies in diabetic rats showed that the hypoglycemic effects of orally administrated CSC were 2.5-fold higher compared to NC. In conclusion, CSC is a promising oral protein delivery system to enhance the stability, intestinal mucosal permeability, and oral absorption of insulin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase 9-induced increase in intestinal epithelial tight junction permeability contributes to the severity of experimental DSS colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nighot, Prashant; Al-Sadi, Rana; Guo, Shuhong; Watterson, D. Martin; Ma, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated a pathogenic role for matrix metalloproteinases 9 (MMP-9) in inflammatory bowel disease. Although loss of epithelial barrier function has been shown to be a key pathogenic factor for the development of intestinal inflammation, the role of MMP-9 in intestinal barrier function remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of MMP-9 in intestinal barrier function and intestinal inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and MMP-9−/− mice were subjected to experimental dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis by administration of 3% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. The mouse colonic permeability was measured in vivo by recycling perfusion of the entire colon using fluorescently labeled dextran. The DSS-induced increase in the colonic permeability was accompanied by an increase in intestinal epithelial cell MMP-9 expression in WT mice. The DSS-induced increase in intestinal permeability and the severity of DSS colitis was found to be attenuated in MMP-9−/− mice. The colonic protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and phospho-MLC was found to be significantly increased after DSS administration in WT mice but not in MMP-9−/− mice. The DSS-induced increase in colonic permeability and colonic inflammation was attenuated in MLCK−/− mice and MLCK inhibitor ML-7-treated WT mice. The DSS-induced increase in colonic surface epithelial cell MLCK mRNA was abolished in MMP-9−/− mice. Lastly, increased MMP-9 protein expression was detected within the colonic surface epithelial cells in ulcerative colitis cases. These data suggest a role of MMP-9 in modulation of colonic epithelial permeability and inflammation via MLCK. PMID:26514773

  14. Interactions Between Diet and the Intestinal Microbiota Alter Intestinal Permeability and Colitis Severity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Sean R; Britton, Graham J; Contijoch, Eduardo J; Vennaro, Olivia H; Mortha, Arthur; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Grinspan, Ari; Clemente, Jose C; Merad, Miriam; Faith, Jeremiah J

    2017-11-23

    It is not clear how the complex interactions between diet and the intestinal microbiota affect development of mucosal inflammation or inflammatory bowel disease. We investigated interactions between dietary ingredients, nutrients, and the microbiota in specific pathogen-free (SPF) and germ-free (GF) mice given more than 40 unique diets; we quantified individual and synergistic effects of dietary macronutrients and the microbiota on intestinal health and development of colitis. C56BL/6J SPF and GF mice were placed on custom diets containing different concentrations and sources of protein, fat, digestible carbohydrates, and indigestible carbohydrates (fiber). After 1 week, SPF and GF mice were given dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to induce colitis. Disease severity was determined based on the percent weight change from baseline, and modeled as a function of the concentration of each macronutrient in the diet. In unchallenged mice, we measured intestinal permeability by feeding mice labeled dextran and measuring levels in blood. Feces were collected and microbiota were analyzed by 16S rDNA sequencing. We collected colons from mice and performed transcriptome analyses. Fecal microbiota varied with diet; the concentration of protein and fiber had the strongest effect on colitis development. Among 9 fiber sources tested, psyllium, pectin, and cellulose fiber reduced the severity of colitis in SPF mice, whereas methylcellulose increased severity. Increasing dietary protein increased the density of the fecal microbiota and the severity of colitis in SPF mice, but not in GF mice or mice given antibiotics. Psyllium fiber reduced the severity of colitis through microbiota-dependent and microbiota-independent mechanisms. Combinatorial perturbations to dietary casein protein and psyllium fiber in parallel accounted for most variation in gut microbial density and intestinal permeability in unchallenged mice, as well as the severity of DSS-induced colitis; changes in 1 ingredient

  15. Regulation of Tight Junction Permeability by Intestinal Bacteria and Dietary Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulluwishewa, D.; Anderson, R.C.; McNabb, W.C.; Moughan, P.J.; Wells, J.; Roy, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium is formed by a single layer of epithelial cells that separates the intestinal lumen from the underlying lamina propria. The space between these cells is sealed by tight junctions (TJ), which regulate the permeability of the intestinal barrier. TJ are complex protein

  16. Changes in intestinal microbiota composition and metabolism coincide with increased intestinal permeability in young adults under prolonged physiological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, J Philip; Margolis, Lee M; Madslien, Elisabeth H; Murphy, Nancy E; Castellani, John W; Gundersen, Yngvar; Hoke, Allison V; Levangie, Michael W; Kumar, Raina; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Gautam, Aarti; Hammamieh, Rasha; Martini, Svein; Montain, Scott J; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2017-06-01

    The magnitude, temporal dynamics, and physiological effects of intestinal microbiome responses to physiological stress are poorly characterized. This study used a systems biology approach and a multiple-stressor military training environment to determine the effects of physiological stress on intestinal microbiota composition and metabolic activity, as well as intestinal permeability (IP). Soldiers ( n = 73) were provided three rations per day with or without protein- or carbohydrate-based supplements during a 4-day cross-country ski-march (STRESS). IP was measured before and during STRESS. Blood and stool samples were collected before and after STRESS to measure inflammation, stool microbiota, and stool and plasma global metabolite profiles. IP increased 62 ± 57% (mean ± SD, P microbiota responses were characterized by increased α-diversity and changes in the relative abundance of >50% of identified genera, including increased abundance of less dominant taxa at the expense of more dominant taxa such as Bacteroides Changes in intestinal microbiota composition were linked to 23% of metabolites that were significantly altered in stool after STRESS. Together, pre-STRESS Actinobacteria relative abundance and changes in serum IL-6 and stool cysteine concentrations accounted for 84% of the variability in the change in IP. Findings demonstrate that a multiple-stressor military training environment induced increases in IP that were associated with alterations in markers of inflammation and with intestinal microbiota composition and metabolism. Associations between IP, the pre-STRESS microbiota, and microbiota metabolites suggest that targeting the intestinal microbiota could provide novel strategies for preserving IP during physiological stress. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Military training, a unique model for studying temporal dynamics of intestinal barrier and intestinal microbiota responses to stress, resulted in increased intestinal permeability concomitant with changes in

  17. Combined LDI/SAT test to evaluate intestinal lactose digestion and mucosa permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, H. A.; Klaassen, D.; van der Molen, A. R. H.; Elzinga, H.; Bijsterveld, K.; Boverhof, R.; Stellaard, F.

    2006-01-01

    Background Intestinal mucosal damage causes impaired digestive capacity and increased mucosal permeability. Quantification of damage can be used to improve treatment options. Currently, the Lactose Digestion Index (LDI) and the Sugar Absorption Test (SAT) are used for evaluation. The investigation

  18. Intestinal and gastric permeability in children with eosinophilic esophagitis and reflux esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Aldrich J T; Persad, Sujata; Slae, Mordechai; Abdelradi, Amr; Kluthe, Cheryl; Shirton, Leanne; Danchuk, Ronda; Persad, Rabin; Meddings, Jon; Huynh, Hien Q

    2015-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic and immune-mediated entity that leads to a characteristic inflammation of esophageal mucosa. Patients complain of dysphagia and reflux-like symptoms. As many as 80% of patients with EoE may also have a history of atopy, and patients with asthma and eczema have previously been shown to have increased intestinal permeability. This study was designed to assess small intestinal and gastric permeability in patients with EoE and to see whether it differed from healthy individuals and patients with reflux esophagitis (RE). Gastric and small intestinal permeability was measured using sugar probe tests containing lactulose, mannitol, and sucrose. Lactulose-to-mannitol (L/M) ratios in the patient's urine were a measure for intestinal permeability, and total sucrose was a measure for gastric permeability. We analyzed samples from 23 patients with EoE, 20 RE, 14 normal upper endoscopy with gastrointestinal symptoms, and 26 healthy controls. All of the 4 groups had L/M ratios less than the upper limit of normal (<0.025). There was no statistically significant difference in gastric permeability between the 4 groups (L/M P = 0.26, sucrose P = 0.46). Our data suggest that an alteration in gastric and intestinal permeability does not play a role in EoE or RE pathogenesis.

  19. Intestinal permeability and glucagon-like peptide-2 in children with autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Marli A; Sigalet, David L; Holst, Jens Juul

    2008-01-01

    We measured small intestinal permeability using a lactulose:mannitol sugar permeability test in a group of children with autism, with current or previous gastrointestinal complaints. Secondly, we examined whether children with autism had an abnormal glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) response...

  20. Oral Supplementation with Bovine Colostrum Decreases Intestinal Permeability and Stool Concentrations of Zonulin in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Hałasa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased intestinal permeability has been implicated in various pathologies, has various causes, and can develop during vigorous athletic training. Colostrum bovinum is a natural supplement with a wide range of supposed positive health effects, including reduction of intestine permeability. We assessed influence of colostrum supplementation on intestinal permeability related parameters in a group of 16 athletes during peak training for competition. This double-blind placebo-controlled study compared supplementation for 20 days with 500 mg of colostrum bovinum or placebo (whey. Gut permeability status was assayed by differential absorption of lactulose and mannitol (L/M test and stool zonulin concentration. Baseline L/M tests found that six of the participants (75% in the colostrum group had increased intestinal permeability. After supplementation, the test values were within the normal range and were significantly lower than at baseline. The colostrum group Δ values produced by comparing the post-intervention and baseline results were also significantly lower than the placebo group Δ values. The differences in stool zonulin concentration were smaller than those in the L/M test, but were significant when the Δ values due to intervention were compared between the colostrum group and the placebo group. Colostrum bovinum supplementation was safe and effective in decreasing of intestinal permeability in this series of athletes at increased risk of its elevation.

  1. Artificial neural network models for prediction of intestinal permeability of oligopeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Min-Kook

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral delivery is a highly desirable property for candidate drugs under development. Computational modeling could provide a quick and inexpensive way to assess the intestinal permeability of a molecule. Although there have been several studies aimed at predicting the intestinal absorption of chemical compounds, there have been no attempts to predict intestinal permeability on the basis of peptide sequence information. To develop models for predicting the intestinal permeability of peptides, we adopted an artificial neural network as a machine-learning algorithm. The positive control data consisted of intestinal barrier-permeable peptides obtained by the peroral phage display technique, and the negative control data were prepared from random sequences. Results The capacity of our models to make appropriate predictions was validated by statistical indicators including sensitivity, specificity, enrichment curve, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (the ROC score. The training and test set statistics indicated that our models were of strikingly good quality and could discriminate between permeable and random sequences with a high level of confidence. Conclusion We developed artificial neural network models to predict the intestinal permeabilities of oligopeptides on the basis of peptide sequence information. Both binary and VHSE (principal components score Vectors of Hydrophobic, Steric and Electronic properties descriptors produced statistically significant training models; the models with simple neural network architectures showed slightly greater predictive power than those with complex ones. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the selection of intestinal barrier-permeable peptides for generating peptide drugs or peptidomimetics.

  2. Bioaccessibility, Intestinal Permeability and Plasma Stability of Isorhamnetin Glycosides from Opuntia ficus-indica (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes-Ricardo, Marilena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, César; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Cepeda-Cañedo, Eduardo; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio O

    2017-08-22

    Isorhamnetin glycosides are representative compounds of Opuntia ficus-indica that possess different biological activities. There is slight information about the changes in bioaccessibility induced by the glycosylation pattern of flavonoids, particularly for isorhamnetin. In this study, the bioaccessibility and permeability of isorhamnetin glycosides extracted from O. ficus-indica were contrasted with an isorhamnetin standard. Also, the plasma stability of these isorhamnetin glycosides after intravenous administration in rats was evaluated. Recoveries of isorhamnetin after oral and gastric digestion were lower than that observed for its glycosides. After intestinal digestion, isorhamnetin glycosides recoveries were reduced to less than 81.0%. The apparent permeability coefficient from apical (AP) to basolateral (BL) direction (Papp(AP-BL)) of isorhamnetin was 2.6 to 4.6-fold higher than those obtained for its glycosides. Isorhamnetin diglycosides showed higher Papp(AP-BL) values than triglycosides. Sugar substituents affected the Papp(AP-BL) of the triglycosides. Isorhamnetin glycosides were better retained in the circulatory system than the aglycone. After intravenous dose of the isorhamnetin standard, the elimination half-life was 0.64 h but increased to 1.08 h when the O. ficus-indica extract was administered. These results suggest that isorhamnetin glycosides naturally found in O. ficus-indica could be a controlled delivery system to maintain a constant plasmatic concentration of this important flavonoid to exert its biological effects in vivo.

  3. Comparison of Mass Transfer Models for Determination of the Intestinal Permeability

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    P Zakeri-Milani

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: In determination of the permeability of the intestinal wall by external perfusion techniques, several models have been proposed. In the present study three models were used for experimental results that differ in their convection and diffusion assumptions. Material and Methods: Permeability coefficients for 13 compounds (metoprolol, propranolol, naproxen, ketoprofen, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, cimetidine, ranitidine, atenolol, piroxicam, antipyrine, ibuprofen and carbamazepine with known human intestinal permeability values were determined in anaesthetized rats by different mass transfer models and plotted versus the observed human intestinal permeabilities. Results: The calculated dimensionless wall permeability values were in the range of 0.37 - 4.85, 0.38-6.54 and 0.41-16.59 for complete radial mixing, mixing tank and laminar flow models respectively. The results indicated that all of the models work relatively well for our data despite fundamentally different assumptions. The wall permeabilities were in the order laminar flow > mixing tank > complete radial mixing. Conclusion: Although laminar flow model provides the most direct measure of the intrinsic wall permeability, it has limitations for highly permeable drugs such as ibuprofen. The normal physiological hydrodynamics is more complex and more investigation is required to find out the real hydrodynamics.

  4. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Justin; Leonard Puppa, Elaine; Greenwald, Bruce; Goldberg, Eric; Guerrerio, Anthony; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD), celiac patients in remission (RCD), non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS) and non-celiac controls (NC). Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6), RCD (n = 6), GS (n = 6), and NC (n = 5)) demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity. PMID:25734566

  5. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Hollon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD, celiac patients in remission (RCD, non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS and non-celiac controls (NC. Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6, RCD (n = 6, GS (n = 6, and NC (n = 5 demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity.

  6. In vivo and In vitro Evaluations of Intestinal Gabapentin Absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malte Selch; Frølund, Sidsel; Nøhr, Martha Kampp

    2015-01-01

    cells. The effect of co-application of the LAT-inhibitor, BCH, and the b(0,+)-substrate, L-lysine, on intestinal transport of gabapentin was evaluated in vivo and in vitro. RESULTS: Gabapentin showed dose-dependent oral absorption kinetics and dose-independent disposition kinetics. Co-application of BCH...... inhibited intestinal absorption in vivo and apical uptake in vitro, whereas no effect was observed following co-application of L-lysine. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows for the first time that BCH was capable of inhibiting intestinal absorption of gabapentin in vivo. Furthermore, in Caco-2 cell...

  7. Design of vancomycin RS-100 nanoparticles in order to increase the intestinal permeability

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    Hadi Valizadeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this work was to preparation of vancomycin (VCM biodegradable nanoparticles to improve the intestinal permeability, using water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W multiple emulsion method. Methods: The vancomycin-loaded nanoparticles were created using double-emulsion solvent evaporation method. Using Eudragit RS100 as a coating material. The prepared nanoparticles were identifyed for their micromeritic and crystallographic properties, drug loading, particle size, drug release, Zeta potential, effective permeability (Peff and oral fractional absorption. Intestinal permeability of VCM nanoparticles was figured out, in different concentrations using SPIP technique in rats. Results: Particle sizes were between 362 and 499 nm for different compositions of VCM-RS-100 nanoparticles. Entrapment efficiency expansed between 63%-94.76%. The highest entrapment efficiency 94.76% was obtained when the ratio of drug to polymer was 1:3. The in vitro release studies were accomplished in pH 7.4. The results showed that physicochemical properties were impressed by drug to polymer ratio. The FT-IR, XRPD and DSC results ruled out any chemical interaction betweenthe drug and RS-100. Effective intestinal permeability values of VCM nanoparticles in concentrations of 200, 300 and 400 µg/ml were higher than that of solutions at the same concentrations. Oral fractional absorption was achieved between 0.419-0.767. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that RS-100 nanoparticles could provide a delivery system for VCM, with enhanced intestinal permeability.

  8. Biopharmaceutical classification of drugs using intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) and rat intestinal permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Azimi, Mandana; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2009-09-01

    The solubility and dissolution rate of active ingredients are of major importance in preformulation studies of pharmaceutical dosage forms. In the present study, passively absorbed drugs are classified based on their intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) and their intestinal permeabilities. IDR was determined by measuring the dissolution of a non-disintegrating disk of drug, and effective intestinal permeability of tested drugs in rat jejunum was determined using single perfusion technique. The obtained intrinsic dissolution rate values were in the range of 0.035-56.8 mg/min/cm(2) for tested drugs. The minimum and maximum intestinal permeabilities in rat intestine were determined to be 1.6 x 10(-5) and 2 x 10(-4)cm/s, respectively. Four classes of drugs were defined: Category I: P(eff,rat)>5 x 10(-5) (cm/s) or P(eff,human)>4.7 x 10(-5) (cm/s), IDR>1(mg/min/cm(2)), Category II: P(eff,rat)>5 x 10(-5) (cm/s) or P(eff,human)>4.7 x 10(-5) (cm/s), IDR1 (mg/min/cm(2)) and Category IV: P(eff,rat)drugs, it is concluded that drugs could be categorized correctly based on their IDR and intestinal permeability values.

  9. Determination of Regional Intestinal Permeability of Diclofenac and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    characteristics of diclofenac sodium in the gastrointestinal tract. Prior to permeability studies, in order to save time and reduce solvent consumption, a simple, sensitive and unique. HPLC method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of diclofenac sodium, metoprolol tartarate and phenol red from.

  10. TNF-α Modulation of Intestinal Tight Junction Permeability Is Mediated by NIK/IKK-α Axis Activation of the Canonical NF-κB Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sadi, Rana; Guo, Shuhong; Ye, Dongmei; Rawat, Manmeet; Ma, Thomas Y.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a key mediator of intestinal inflammation, causes an increase in intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) permeability by activating myosin light chain kinase (MLCK; official name MYLK3) gene. However, the precise signaling cascades that mediate the TNF-α–induced activation of MLCK gene and increase in TJ permeability remain unclear. Our aims were to delineate the upstream signaling mechanisms that regulate the TNF-α modulation of intestinal TJ barrier function with the use of in vitro and in vivo intestinal epithelial model systems. TNF-α caused a rapid activation of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathway. NF-κB–inducing kinase (NIK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1 (MEKK-1) were activated in response to TNF-α. NIK mediated the TNF-α activation of inhibitory κB kinase (IKK)-α, and MEKK1 mediated the activation of IKK complex, including IKK-β. NIK/IKK-α axis regulated the activation of both NF-κB p50/p65 and RelB/p52 pathways. Surprisingly, the siRNA induced knockdown of NIK, but not MEKK-1, prevented the TNF-α activation of both NF-κB p50/p65 and RelB/p52 and the increase in intestinal TJ permeability. Moreover, NIK/IKK-α/NF-κB p50/p65 axis mediated the TNF-α–induced MLCK gene activation and the subsequent MLCK increase in intestinal TJ permeability. In conclusion, our data show that NIK/IKK-α/regulates the activation of NF-κB p50/p65 and plays an integral role in the TNF-α–induced activation of MLCK gene and increase in intestinal TJ permeability. PMID:26948423

  11. Bile enhances glucose uptake, reduces permeability, and modulates effects of lectins, trypsin inhibitors and saponins on intestinal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Anne Marie; Chikwati, Elvis M; Venold, Fredrik F; Sahlmann, Christian; Holm, Halvor; Penn, Michael H; Oropeza-Moe, Marianne; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2014-02-01

    Antinutritional factors (ANFs) can disrupt digestive and other intestinal functions. ANFs in soybean meal (SBM) are implicated in proliferative and inflammatory responses in the intestine of various (functionally) monogastric animals, including Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). The goal of the current study was to investigate the effect of ex vivo exposure of mid and distal intestinal tissue of salmon to soybean saponins (SAP), lectin (LEC) and Kunitz' trypsin inhibitor (KTI), singly and in combination, on epithelial function, as assessed by measuring in vitro glucose uptake pathways along a glucose concentration gradient. As solubilization of SAP in the calcium-containing Ringer's solution was problematic but resolved with the addition of a physiological concentration of bile collected from the gall bladder of salmon, an evaluation of bile effects became an added element. Results indicated that bile increased baseline glucose absorption and possibly transport, and also had a protective effect on the epithelial barrier, at least partially due to taurocholate. Compared to controls, tissues exposed to LEC+bile, KTI+bile and LEC+KTI+bile exhibited increased glucose uptake at the higher glucose concentrations, apparently due to markedly increased tissue permeability. Addition of SAP, however, attenuated the response, possibly by binding bile components. SAP+bile, also in combination with LEC and/or KTI, as well as LEC, KTI and LEC+KTI without bile often reduced transcellular glucose uptake pathways, while maintaining low tissue permeability. SAP+LEC+KTI+bile, LEC and KTI caused the most marked reductions. The distal intestine was more affected, reflecting the restriction of in vivo SBM-induced inflammatory changes to this region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Permeability and modulation of the intestinal epithelial barrier in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duizer, E.

    1999-01-01

    The bioavailability of all ingested compounds is to a great extend determined by the ability of these compounds to pass the intestinal epithelium. A high bioavailability is guaranteed for most nutrients and electrolytes since they are actively absorbed by the epithelium. The same

  13. Primary enamel permeability: a SEM evaluation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchese, A; Bertacci, A; Chersoni, S; Portelli, M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the occurrence of outward fluid flow on primary tooth sound enamel surface. Sixty primary upper canines from preadolescent patients (mean age 8.0±1.9) and 24 retained primary upper canines from adult subjects (mean age 35.0±1.8) were analysed. The enamel surface was gently polished and air dried for 10 s. An impression was immediately obtained by vinyl polyxiloxane. Replicas were then obtained by polyether impression material, gold coated and inspected under SEM. The hydrophobic vinyl polyxiloxane material enabled to obtain in situ a morphological image of the presence of droplets, most likely resulting from outward fluids flow through outer enamel. For each sample three different representative areas of 5μ² in the cervical, medium and incisal third were examined and droplets presence values was recorded. All data were analysed by by Fisher's exact test. Primary enamel showed a substantial permeability expressed as droplets discharge on its surface. Droplets distribution covered, without any specific localisation, the entire enamel surface in all the samples. No signs of post-eruptive maturation with changes in droplets distribution were observed in samples from adult subjects. No statistically significant differences (P = 0.955) were noted in the percentage distribution of enamel area covered with droplets among the two group studied. SEM evaluation of droplets distribution on enamel surface indicated a substantial enamel permeability in primary teeth, accordingly with histological features, without changes during aging. A relationship between enamel permeability, caries susceptibility and bonding procedures effectiveness could be hypothesised.

  14. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE AND RELATIVES OF PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, R. M.; Uil, J. J.; Mulder, C. J.; Heymans, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    The functional integrity of the small bowel is impaired in coeliac disease. Intestinal permeability, as measured by the sugar absorption test probably reflects this phenomenon. In the sugar absorption test a solution of lactulose and mannitol was given to the fasting patient and the

  15. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE AND RELATIVES OF PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANELBURG, RM; UIL, JJ; MULDER, CJJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    The functional integrity of the small bowel is impaired in coeliac disease. Intestinal permeability, as measured by the sugar absorption test probably reflects this phenomenon. In the sugar absorption test a solution of lactulose and mannitol was given to the fasting patient and the

  16. Effect of polyethylene glycol 400 on the intestinal permeability of carbamazepine in the rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riad, L.E.; Sawchuk, R.J. (College of Pharmacy, Minneapolis, MN (USA))

    1991-04-01

    Because of the limited solubility of carbamazepine, aqueous solutions are usually prepared using glycols as cosolvents. This research focuses on the effect of varying the composition of polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG-400) in aqueous solutions in rabbit intestinal permeability of carbamazepine in the duodenojejunum and the ascending colon using an in situ perfusion technique. In both segments the intestinal permeability varied inversely with the percentage of PEG-400, when the concentration of carbamazepine in the perfusing solution was maintained constant. The decreased permeability may be explained by a reduction in the thermodynamic activity of carbamazepine with increased concentrations of PEG-400, as well as by reverse solvent drag because of the hyperosmolarity of the perfusing solutions.

  17. cis-Peptide Bonds: A Key for Intestinal Permeability of Peptides? .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Ovadia, Oded; Frank, Andreas Oliver; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Gilon, Chaim; Hoffman, Amnon; Kessler, Horst

    2015-10-19

    Recent structural studies on libraries of cyclic hexapeptides led to the identification of common backbone conformations that may be instrumental to the oral availability of peptides. Furthermore, the observation of differential Caco-2 permeabilities of enantiomeric pairs of some of these peptides strongly supports the concept of conformational specificity driven uptake and also suggests a pivotal role of carrier-mediated pathways for peptide transport, especially for scaffolds of polar nature. This work presents investigations on the Caco-2 and PAMPA permeability profiles of 13 selected N-methylated cyclic pentaalanine peptides derived from the basic cyclo(-D-Ala-Ala4 -) template. These molecules generally showed moderate to low transport in intestinal epithelia with a few of them exhibiting a Caco-2 permeability equal to or slightly higher than that of mannitol, a marker for paracellular permeability. We identified that the majority of the permeable cyclic penta- and hexapeptides possess an N-methylated cis-peptide bond, a structural feature that is also present in the orally available peptides cyclosporine A and the tri-N-methylated analogue of the Veber-Hirschmann peptide. Based on these observations it appears that the presence of N-methylated cis-peptide bonds at certain locations may promote the intestinal permeability of peptides through a suitable conformational preorganization. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Intestinal Barrier Permeability and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Weaned Piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Zhang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was developed to provide further information on the intestinal barrier permeability and the tight junction protein expression in weaned piglets fed with different levels of soybean agglutinin (SBA. Twenty-five weaned crossbred barrows (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire were selected and randomly allotted to five groups, each group with five replicates. The piglets in the control group were not fed with leguminous products. 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2% SBA was added to the control diet to form four experimental diets, respectively. After the experimental period of 7 days (for each group, all the piglets were anesthetized with excess procaine and slaughtered. The D-lactic acid in plasma and the Ileal mucosa diamine oxidase (DAO was analyzed to observe the change in the intestinal permeability. The tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in the jejunum tissue distribution and relative expression were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. The results illustrated that a high dose of SBA (0.1–0.2% could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet had no significant affects. The contents of DAO, D-lactic acid, occludin or ZO-1, had a linear relationship with the SBA levels (0–0.2% in diets. The high dose SBA (0.1–0.2% could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet had no affects.

  19. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein and gut permeability responses to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Daniel S; Marchbank, Tania; Playford, Raymond J; Jones, Arwel W; Thatcher, Rhys; Davison, Glen

    2017-05-01

    Intestinal cell damage due to physiological stressors (e.g. heat, oxidative, hypoperfusion/ischaemic) may contribute to increased intestinal permeability. The aim of this study was to assess changes in plasma intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) in response to exercise (with bovine colostrum supplementation, Col, positive control) and compare this to intestinal barrier integrity/permeability (5 h urinary lactulose/rhamnose ratio, L/R). In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design, 18 males completed two experimental arms (14 days of 20 g/day supplementation with Col or placebo, Plac). For each arm participants performed two baseline (resting) intestinal permeability assessments (L/R) pre-supplementation and one post-exercise following supplementation. Blood samples were collected pre- and post-exercise to determine I-FABP concentration. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed an arm × time interaction for L/R and I-FABP (P exercise in Plac (273% of pre, P exercise values significantly lower with Col (P exercise in Plac (191% of pre-exercise, P = 0.002) but not in the Col arm (107%, P = 0.862) with post-exercise values significantly lower with Col (P = 0.013). Correlations between the increase in I-FABP and L/R were evident for visit one (P = 0.044) but not visit two (P = 0.200) although overall plots/patterns do appear similar for each. These findings suggest that exercise-induced intestinal cellular damage/injury is partly implicated in changes in permeability but other factors must also contribute.

  20. Increased intestinal permeability correlates with sigmoid mucosa alpha-synuclein staining and endotoxin exposure markers in early Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Forsyth

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder of aging. The pathological hallmark of PD is neuronal inclusions termed Lewy bodies whose main component is alpha-synuclein protein. The finding of these Lewy bodies in the intestinal enteric nerves led to the hypothesis that the intestine might be an early site of PD disease in response to an environmental toxin or pathogen. One potential mechanism for environmental toxin(s and proinflammatory luminal products to gain access to mucosal neuronal tissue and promote oxidative stress is compromised intestinal barrier integrity. However, the role of intestinal permeability in PD has never been tested. We hypothesized that PD subjects might exhibit increased intestinal permeability to proinflammatory bacterial products in the intestine. To test our hypothesis we evaluated intestinal permeability in subjects newly diagnosed with PD and compared their values to healthy subjects. In addition, we obtained intestinal biopsies from both groups and used immunohistochemistry to assess bacterial translocation, nitrotyrosine (oxidative stress, and alpha-synuclein. We also evaluated serum markers of endotoxin exposure including LPS binding protein (LBP. Our data show that our PD subjects exhibit significantly greater intestinal permeability (gut leakiness than controls. In addition, this intestinal hyperpermeability significantly correlated with increased intestinal mucosa staining for E. coli bacteria, nitrotyrosine, and alpha-synuclein as well as serum LBP levels in PD subjects. These data represent not only the first demonstration of abnormal intestinal permeability in PD subjects but also the first correlation of increased intestinal permeability in PD with intestinal alpha-synuclein (the hallmark of PD, as well as staining for gram negative bacteria and tissue oxidative stress. Our study may thus shed new light on PD pathogenesis as well as provide a new method for earlier

  1. Modeling gastrointestinal drug absorption requires more in vivo biopharmaceutical data: experience from in vivo dissolution and permeability studies in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennernäs, Hans

    2007-10-01

    The majority (84%) of the 50 most-sold pharmaceutical products in the US and European markets are given orally. The dominating role of this route in drug therapy is a consequence of it being safe, efficient and easily accessible with minimal discomfort to the patient in comparison with other routes of drug administration. A successful drug discovery and development of oral pharmaceutical products require an in-depth understanding of multiple biochemical and physiological processes that determine the dissolution rate, intestinal permeability, gastrointestinal transit, first-pass extraction and systemic exposure-time profiles of drugs. It is crucial to realize that these basic biopharmaceutic and pharmacokinetic properties are crucial to focus on to allow successful drug development. Identification of the rate-limiting step(s) in order to overcome these barriers and understanding of the sources of variability are important in the selection of suitable candidate molecules in drug development. Several reports based on in vitro investigations in various cell models have suggested that carrier-mediated intestinal efflux may be a major reason for incomplete absorption and variable bioavailability of drugs, as well being a site for drug-drug and specific food-drug interactions. However, many drugs which were initially suggested to undergo significant efflux in vitro were later shown to be completely absorbed in vivo. This apparent discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo results may be due to several factors that will be discussed in this review. Novel data on solubility and dissolution in human gastrointestinal derived fluids will be reviewed. The effect of food intake on solubility and dissolution rate of a range of drugs including felodipine, danazol, griseofulvin, cyclosporine, probucol and ubiquinone in simulated and real intestinal fluids is discussed. The biopharmaceutic and physicochemical data discussed here can potentially be used as a benchmark set for

  2. Enterococcus faecalis Gelatinase Mediates Intestinal Permeability via Protease-Activated Receptor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharshak, Nitsan; Huh, Eun Young; Paiboonrungruang, Chorlada; Shanahan, Michael; Thurlow, Lance; Herzog, Jeremy; Djukic, Zorka; Orlando, Roy; Pawlinski, Rafal; Ellermann, Melissa; Borst, Luke; Patel, Siten; Dotan, Iris; Sartor, Ryan B.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial protease-mediated disruption of the intestinal epithelium is a potential mechanism whereby a dysbiotic enteric microbiota can lead to disease. This mechanism was investigated using the colitogenic, protease-secreting enteric microbe Enterococcus faecalis. Caco-2 and T-84 epithelial cell monolayers and the mouse colonic epithelium were exposed to concentrated conditioned media (CCM) from E. faecalis V583 and E. faecalis lacking the gelatinase gene (gelE). The flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran across monolayers or the mouse epithelium following exposure to CCM from parental or mutant E. faecalis strains indicated paracellular permeability. A protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist and PAR2-deficient (PAR2−/−) mice were used to investigate the role of this receptor in E. faecalis-induced permeability. Gelatinase (GelE) purified from E. faecalis V583 was used to confirm the ability of this protease to induce epithelial cell permeability and activate PAR2. The protease-mediated permeability of colonic epithelia from wild-type (WT) and PAR2−/− mice by fecal supernatants from ulcerative colitis patients was assessed. Secreted E. faecalis proteins induced permeability in epithelial cell monolayers, which was reduced in the absence of gelE or by blocking PAR2 activity. Secreted E. faecalis proteins induced permeability in the colonic epithelia of WT mice that was absent in tissues from PAR2−/− mice. Purified GelE confirmed the ability of this protease to induce epithelial cell permeability via PAR2 activation. Fecal supernatants from ulcerative colitis patients induced permeability in the colonic epithelia of WT mice that was reduced in tissues from PAR2−/− mice. Our investigations demonstrate that GelE from E. faecalis can regulate enteric epithelial permeability via PAR2. PMID:25916983

  3. Prediction of the Passive Intestinal Absorption of Medicinal Plant Extract Constituents with the Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay (PAMPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Charlotte; Bujard, Alban; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Cretton, Sylvian; Houriet, Joëlle; Christen, Philippe; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2016-03-01

    -throughput, cost-effective, and early evaluation of passive intestinal absorption of active principles in medicinal plants. In phytochemical studies, obtaining effective passive permeability values of pharmacologically active natural products is important to predict if natural products showing interesting activities in vitro may have a chance to reach their target in vivo. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Estimate of the digestibility, assimilability and intestinal permeability of butyltins occurring in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azenha, M A; Evangelista, R; Martel, F; Vasconcelos, M T

    2008-02-01

    An estimate of the digestibility and assimilability of butyltins occurring in contaminated wines (Port, red and white) was obtained by means of in vitro studies of gastrointestinal digestion. The influence of the wine matrix on the intestinal permeability was explored by studying the accumulation of butyltins in Caco-2 monolayers either when these species are dissolved in buffer only or in the dialysates of digested wines. Some important information about the fate of the butyltin compounds ingested from contaminated wines could be achieved. Only a very small fraction of the ingested DBT and TBT, the two most toxic forms, appear to be able to reach the epithelium as judged by the small dialyzable fraction found (contaminants, since the influence of the involved enzymes appear to be dominant, especially for DBT and TBT. Additionally, the intestinal permeability of the three butyltins was also very low, the wine matrix possibly having a hindrance effect in a few cases.

  5. [Alteration of intestinal permeability: the missing link between gut microbiota modifications and inflammation in obesity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genser, Laurent; Poitou, Christine; Brot-Laroche, Édith; Rousset, Monique; Vaillant, Jean-Christophe; Clément, Karine; Thenet, Sophie; Leturque, Armelle

    2016-05-01

    The increasing incidence of obesity and associated metabolic complications is a worldwide public health issue. The role of the gut in the pathophysiology of obesity, with an important part for microbiota, is becoming obvious. In rodent models of diet-induced obesity, the modifications of gut microbiota are associated with an alteration of the intestinal permeability increasing the passage of food or bacterial antigens, which contribute to low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. In human obesity, intestinal permeability modification, and its role in the crosstalk between gut microbiota changes and inflammation at systemic and tissular levels, are still poorly documented. Hence, further characterization of the triggering mechanisms of such inflammatory responses in obese subjects could enable the development of personalized intervention strategies that will help to reduce the risk of obesity-associated diseases. © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  6. Evaluation of physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability of six dietary polyphenols in human intestinal colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Himanshu; Jana, Snehasis

    2016-02-01

    Phenolic compounds are common ingredients in many dietary supplements and functional foods. However, data concerning physicochemical properties and permeability of polyphenols on the intestinal epithelial cells are scarce. The aims of this study were to determine the experimental partition coefficient (Log P), and parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA), to characterize the bi-directional transport of six phenolic compounds viz. caffeic acid, chrysin, gallic acid, quercetin, resveratrol and rutin in Caco-2 cells. The experimental Log P values of six polyphenols were correlated (R (2) = 0.92) well with the calculated Log P values. The apparent permeability (P app) range of all polyphenols in PAMPA for the apical (AP) to basolateral (BL) was 1.18 ± 0.05 × 10(-6) to 5.90 ± 0.16 × 10(-6) cm/s. The apparent Caco-2 permeability (P app) range for the AP-BL was 0.96 ± 0.03 × 10(-6) to 3.80 ± 0.45 × 10(-6) cm/s. The efflux ratio of P app (BL → AP) to P app (AP → BL) for all phenolics was Caco-2 cell monolayer permeation data. Dietary six polyphenols were poorly absorbed through PAMPA and Caco-2 cells, and their transepithelial transports were mainly by passive diffusion.

  7. Assessment of Passive Intestinal Permeability Using an Artificial Membrane Insert System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berben, Philippe; Brouwers, Joachim; Augustijns, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Despite reasonable predictive power of current cell-based and cell-free absorption models for the assessment of intestinal drug permeability, high costs and lengthy preparation steps hamper their use. The use of a simple artificial membrane (without any lipids present) as intestinal barrier substitute would overcome these hurdles. In the present study, a set of 14 poorly water-soluble drugs, dissolved in 2 different media (fasted state simulated/human intestinal fluids [FaSSIF/FaHIF]), were applied to the donor compartment of an artificial membrane insert system (AMI-system) containing a regenerated cellulose membrane. Furthermore, to investigate the predictive capacity of the AMI-system as substitute for the well-established Caco-2 system to assess intestinal permeability, the same set of 14 drugs dissolved in FaHIF were applied to the donor compartment of a Caco-2 system. For 14 drugs, covering a broad range of physicochemical parameters, a reasonable correlation between both absorption systems was observed, characterized by a Pearson correlation coefficient r of 0.95 (FaHIF). Using the AMI-system, an excellent predictive capacity of FaSSIF as surrogate medium for FaHIF was demonstrated (r = 0.96). Based on the acquired data, the AMI-system appears to be a time- and cost-effective tool for the early-stage estimation of passive intestinal permeability for poorly water-soluble drugs. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. (51Cr)EDTA intestinal permeability in children with cow's milk intolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrander, J.J.; Unsalan-Hooyen, R.W.; Forget, P.P.; Jansen, J. (Academic Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands))

    1990-02-01

    Making use of ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA as a permeability marker, we measured intestinal permeability in a group of 20 children with proven cow's milk intolerance (CMI), a group of 17 children with similar complaints where CMI was excluded (sick controls), and a group of 12 control children. ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test results (mean +/- SD) were 6.85 +/- 3.64%, 3.42 +/- 0.94%, and 2.61 +/- 0.67% in the group with CMI, the sick control, and the control group, respectively. When compared to both control groups, patients with cow's milk intolerance (CMI) showed a significantly increased small bowel permeability. We conclude that the ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test can be helpful for the diagnosis of cow's milk intolerance.

  9. Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John R.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Cryan, John F.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Clarke, Gerard; Hyland, Niall P.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a “leaky gut” may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signaling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function. PMID:26528128

  10. Maintenance of superior mesenteric arterial perfusion prevents increased intestinal mucosal permeability in endotoxic pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, M.P.; Kaups, K.L.; Wang, H.L.; Rothschild, H.R. (Department of Surgery, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide increases intestinal mucosal permeability to hydrophilic compounds such as chromium 51-labeled edetate (51Cr-EDTA). The authors sought to determine whether this phenomenon is partly mediated by lipopolysaccharide-induced mesenteric hypoperfusion. They assessed permeability in an isolated segment of ileum by measuring plasma-to-lumen clearances (C) for two probes, 51Cr-EDTA and urea, and expressing the results as a ratio (CEDTA/CUREA). In control pigs (n = 6) resuscitated with Ringer's lactate (RL), mucosal permeability was unchanged during the 210-minute period of observation. In pigs (n = 7) infused with lipopolysaccharide (50 micrograms/kg) and similarly resuscitated with RL, mesenteric perfusion (Qsma) decreased significantly and permeability increased progressively and significantly. When endotoxic pigs (n = 6) were resuscitated with a regimen (RL plus hetastarch plus dobutamine) that preserved normal Qsma, lipopolysaccharide-induced mucosal hyperpermeability was prevented. Resuscitation of endotoxic pigs (n = 6) with RL plus hetastarch provided intermediate protection against both mesenteric hypoperfusion and increased permeability. These data suggest that diminished Qsma contributes to impaired ileal mucosal barrier function in experimental endotoxicosis.

  11. Commensal microbiota-induced microRNA modulates intestinal epithelial permeability through the small GTPase ARF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Kazuaki; Sugi, Yutaka; Narabayashi, Hikari; Kobayakawa, Tetsuro; Nakanishi, Yusuke; Tsuda, Masato; Hosono, Akira; Kaminogawa, Shuichi; Hanazawa, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2017-09-15

    The intestinal tract contains many commensal bacteria that modulate various physiological host functions. Dysbiosis of commensal bacteria triggers dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier, leading to the induction or aggravation of intestinal inflammation. To elucidate whether microRNA plays a role in commensal microbiome-dependent intestinal epithelial barrier regulation, we compared transcripts in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from conventional and germ-free mice and found that commensal bacteria induced the expression of miR-21-5p in IECs. miR-21-5p increased intestinal epithelial permeability and up-regulated ADP ribosylation factor 4 (ARF4), a small GTPase, in the IEC line Caco-2. We also found that ARF4 expression was up-regulated upon suppression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), which are known miR-21-5p targets, by RNAi. Furthermore, ARF4 expression in epithelial cells of the large intestine was higher in conventional mice than in germ-free mice. ARF4 suppression in the IEC line increased the expression of tight junction proteins and decreased intestinal epithelial permeability. These results indicate that commensal microbiome-dependent miR-21-5p expression in IECs regulates intestinal epithelial permeability via ARF4, which may therefore represent a target for preventing or managing dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. In vitro evaluation of inorganic mercury and methylmercury effects on the intestinal epithelium permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, M; Vélez, D; Devesa, V

    2014-12-01

    The mercurial forms [inorganic divalent mercury, Hg(II) and methylmercury, CH3Hg] produce neurological and immune effects as well as hematological and renal alterations. The main route of exposure is through the diet. Consequently, the gastrointestinal mucosa is exposed to these mercurial forms, though the potential toxic effects upon the mucosa are not clear. The present study evaluates the toxicity of Hg(II) and CH3Hg (0.1-2 mg/L) in an intestinal epithelium model using the differentiated and undifferentiated human Caco-2 cell line.The experiments made show the mercurial forms generate reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species and a significant decrease in glutathione contents. This redox imbalance could be the cause of the lipid peroxidation observed after short exposure times. Such conditions of stress lead to a modulation of stress proteins, intercellular junction proteins and tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression and to a redistribution of F-actin and ZO1 protein in the intestinal monolayer. The abovementioned effects may be the cause of the increase in permeability in the differentiated cells observed at concentrations similar to those found in food products (0.5-1 mg/L). The increase in permeability could produce an impairment of the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium.

  13. Intestinal permeability is increased in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and correlates with liver disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgio, Valentina; Miele, Luca; Principessa, Luigi; Ferretti, Francesca; Villa, Maria Pia; Negro, Valentina; Grieco, Antonio; Alisi, Anna; Nobili, Valerio

    2014-06-01

    Increased intestinal permeability seems to play a major role in non-alcoholic liver disease development and progression. To investigate the prevalence of altered intestinal permeability in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and to study its potential association with the stage of liver disease. We performed a case-control study examining intestinal permeability in children using the lactulose-mannitol bowel permeability test. Overall, 39 consecutive patients (30 males, median age 12 years) and 21 controls (14 males, median age 11.8 years) were included. The lactulose/mannitol ratio resulted impaired in 12/39 patients (31%) and none of the controls. Intestinal permeability was higher in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (lactulose/mannitol ratios: 0.038±0.037 vs. 0.008±0.007, pnon-alcoholic fatty liver disease group, intestinal permeability was increased in children with steatohepatitis compared to those with steatosis only (0.05±0.04 vs. 0.03 vs. 0.03, psteatohepatitis (2.27±0.68 vs. 2.80±0.35, pnon-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and correlates with the severity of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ischemic small intestine-in vivo versus ex vivo bioimpedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand-Amundsen, Runar J; Reims, Henrik M; Tronstad, Christian; Kalvøy, Håvard; Martinsen, Ørjan G; Høgetveit, Jan O; Ruud, Tom E; Tønnessen, Tor I

    2017-05-01

    Bioimpedance has been used to investigate changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The small intestine is a multi-layered structure, with several distinct tissue types, and ischemia related changes occur at different times in the different intestinal layers. When investigating how the electrical properties in the small intestine is affected by ischemia, some researchers have used ex vivo models while others have used in vivo models. In this study, we compare ischemic time development of electrical parameters in ischemic in vivo versus ex vivo small intestine. Measurements were performed using a two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. Electrodes were placed on the surface of ischemic pig jejunum, applying a voltage and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. In each pig, 4 segments of the jejunum were made ischemic by clamping the mesenteric arteries and veins, resulting in a 30 cm central zone of warm ischemia and edema. The in vivo part of the experiment lasted 10 h, after which 3 pieces of perfused small intestine were resected, stored in Ringer-acetat at 38 °C, and measured during a 10 h ex vivo experiment. Main results and significance: We found significant differences (p  vivo and ex vivo measurements as a function of ischemic time development. We also observed some similarities in the trends. In vivo, we measured an overall decrease in impedance during the duration of the experiment, probably as a result from the formation of edema. Ex vivo, the low frequency impedance increased initially for approximately 3 h before starting to decrease.

  15. Racecadotril demonstrates intestinal antisecretory activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primi, M P; Bueno, L; Baumer, P; Berard, H; Lecomte, J M

    1999-12-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan), a potent enkephalinase inhibitor, protects endogenous enkephalins from degradation. Racecadotril exhibits experimental and clinical antidiarrhoeal activity without any effect on intestinal motility, suggesting selective antisecretory activity. The antisecretory effect of racecadotril was directly assessed in the present study. A 1 m, jejunal, Thiry-Vella loop was created in six mongrel dogs, and water and ionic fluxes were evaluated during infusion (2 mL/min) of Tyrode solution labelled with 14C-polyethylene glycol. Fluxes were determined both in the basal state and 5-6 h after commencement of a 2-h infusion of cholera toxin (0.4 microgram/mL). Racecadotril (10 mg/kg) or vehicle was given orally with and without prior intravenous administration of naloxone (0.1 mg/kg) or phentolamine (0.2 mg/kg). Basal absorption remained unchanged following racecadotril administration; however, racecadotril significantly decreased (P = 0.01) cholera toxin-induced water, sodium, and potassium hypersecretion, from 0.73 +/- 0.15 to 0.37 +/- 0.13 mL/min; from 125.0 +/- 16.1 to 14.7 +/- 9.5 microMol/min; and from 3.41 +/- 0.66 to 1.66 +/- 0.61 microMol/min, respectively. This antisecretory activity of racecadotril was suppressed by naloxone but not by phentolamine. This study directly demonstrates the antisecretory activity of racecadotril in relation to the protection of endogenous enkephalins.

  16. Botulinum Toxin Complex Increases Paracellular Permeability in Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIYASHITA, Shin-ichiro; SAGANE, Yoshimasa; INUI, Ken; HAYASHI, Shintaro; MIYATA, Keita; SUZUKI, Tomonori; OHYAMA, Tohru; WATANABE, Toshihiro; NIWA, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium botulinum produces a large toxin complex (L-TC) that increases paracellular permeability in intestinal epithelial cells by a mechanism that remains unclear. Here, we show that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in this permeability increase. Paracellular permeability was measured by FITC-dextran flux through a monolayer of rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells, and MAPK activation was estimated from western blots. L-TC of C. botulinum serotype D strain 4947 increased paracellular dextran flux and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in IEC-6 cells. The permeability increase induced by L-TC was abrogated by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These results indicate that L-TC increases paracellular permeability by activating p38, but not JNK and ERK. PMID:23884081

  17. Antibiotic Treatment Affects Intestinal Permeability and Gut Microbial Composition in Wistar Rats Dependent on Antibiotic Class.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Vera-Lise Tulstrup

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are frequently administered orally to treat bacterial infections not necessarily related to the gastrointestinal system. This has adverse effects on the commensal gut microbial community, as it disrupts the intricate balance between specific bacterial groups within this ecosystem, potentially leading to dysbiosis. We hypothesized that modulation of community composition and function induced by antibiotics affects intestinal integrity depending on the antibiotic administered. To address this a total of 60 Wistar rats (housed in pairs with 6 cages per group were dosed by oral gavage with either amoxicillin (AMX, cefotaxime (CTX, vancomycin (VAN, metronidazole (MTZ, or water (CON daily for 10-11 days. Bacterial composition, alpha diversity and caecum short chain fatty acid levels were significantly affected by AMX, CTX and VAN, and varied among antibiotic treatments. A general decrease in diversity and an increase in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria was observed for all three antibiotics. Additionally, the relative abundance of Bifidobacteriaceae was increased in the CTX group and both Lactobacillaceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae were increased in the VAN group compared to the CON group. No changes in microbiota composition or function were observed following MTZ treatment. Intestinal permeability to 4 kDa FITC-dextran decreased after CTX and VAN treatment and increased following MTZ treatment. Plasma haptoglobin levels were increased by both AMX and CTX but no changes in expression of host tight junction genes were found in any treatment group. A strong correlation between the level of caecal succinate, the relative abundance of Clostridiaceae 1 family in the caecum, and the level of acute phase protein haptoglobin in blood plasma was observed. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced changes in microbiota may be linked to alterations in intestinal permeability, although the specific interactions remain to be elucidated as changes in

  18. Effects of pharmaceutical excipients on membrane permeability in rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Yusuke; Kishimoto, Hisanao; Nakagawa, Minami; Sakamoto, Nasa; Tobe, Yoshifusa; Furuya, Takahito; Tomita, Mikio; Hayashi, Masahiro

    2013-09-10

    Pharmaceutical excipients should not disturb the effects of drug therapy. In recent years, however, it has been reported that excipients induce some changes to the tight junction (TJ) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which can affect drug disposition. In this study, we examined the effects of 20 common pharmaceutical excipients from different classes on mucosal membrane and the differences of such effects among regions of the small intestine. We used the in vitro sac method in rat jejunum and ileum to study the effects of excipients on the membrane permeation of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (5-CF). 5-CF was used as a model of water-soluble compounds. In some dosage conditions of methyl-β-cyclodextrin, the membrane permeability of 5-CF was significantly increased in the jejunum, but such change was not observed in the ileum. Similarly, in the cases of sodium carboxymethyl starch, low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose and croscarmellose sodium, the membrane permeability of 5-CF was significantly increased in the jejunum, but no change was observed in the ileum. On the other hand, in both the jejunum and the ileum, the membrane permeation of 5-CF was decreased with 0.02% (w/v) hydroxypropyl cellulose, but significantly increased with it at 0.20% (w/v). It was shown that excipients affected the membrane permeability of water-soluble compounds via the paracellular route, and these effects on absorption differed among regions of the small intestine. Moreover, in the case of 20 excipients, not only an increase in membrane permeability but also a decrease was observed. Therefore, it was suggested that a more effective formulation could be designed by changing the combination of excipients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Chitosan-modified porous silicon microparticles for enhanced permeability of insulin across intestinal cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Neha; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Araújo, Francisca; Zhang, Hongbo; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Kauppila, Jussi; Sarmento, Bruno; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-08-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) based particulate systems are emerging as an important drug delivery system due to its advantageous properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability and ability to tailor the particles' physicochemical properties. Here, annealed thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (AnnTHCPSi) and undecylenic acid modified AnnTHCPSi (AnnUnTHCPSi) microparticles were developed as a PSi-based platform for oral delivery of insulin. Chitosan (CS) was used to modify the AnnUnTHCPSi microparticles to enhance the intestinal permeation of insulin. Surface modification with CS led to significant increase in the interaction of PSi microparticles with Caco-2/HT-29 cell co-culture monolayers. Compared to pure insulin, the CS-conjugated microparticles significantly improved the permeation of insulin across the Caco-2/HT-29 cell monolayers, with ca. 20-fold increase in the amount of insulin permeated and ca. 7-fold increase in the apparent permeability (P(app)) value. Moreover, among all the investigated particles, the CS-conjugated microparticles also showed the highest amount of insulin associated with the mucus layer and the intestinal Caco-2 cells and mucus secreting HT-29 cells. Our results demonstrate that CS-conjugated AnnUnTHCPSi microparticles can efficiently enhance the insulin absorption across intestinal cells, and thus, they are promising microsystems for the oral delivery of proteins and peptides across the intestinal cell membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Effect of multicomponent environment on intestinal permeability of puerarin in biopharmaceutics classification system of Chinese materia medica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Gang; Dong, Ling; Tang, Ming-Min; Zhu, Mei-Ling; Dong, Hong-Huant; Hou, Cheng-Bo

    2014-12-01

    The evaluation of permeability in biopharmaceutics classification system of Chinese materia medica (CMMBCS) requires multicomponent as a whole in order to conduct research, even in the study of a specific component, should also be put in the multicomponent environment. Based on this principle, the high content components in Gegen Qinlian decoction were used as multicomponent environmental impact factors in the experiment, and the relevant parameters of intestinal permeability about puerarin were measured with using in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion model, to investigate and evaluate the intestinal permeability of puerarin with other high content components. The experimental results showed that different proportions of baicalin, glycyrrhizic acid and berberine had certain influence on intestinal permeability of puerarin, and glycyrrhizic acid could significantly inhibit the intestinal absorption of puerarin, moreover, high concentration of berberine could promote the absorption of puerarin. The research results indicated that the important research ideas of permeability evaluation in biopharmaceutics classification system of Chinese materia medica with fully considering the effects of other ingredients in multicomponent environment.

  1. Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 inhibits adipose tissue inflammation and intestinal permeability in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Michio; Miyoshi, Masaya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Sakai, Fumihiko; Kadooka, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 (LG2055) has anti-obesity effects. Obesity is closely correlated with inflammation in adipose tissue, and maintaining adipose tissue in a less-inflamed state requires intestinal integrity or a barrier function to protect the intestine from the disruption that can be caused by a high-fat diet (HFD). Here, we examined the anti-inflammatory and intestinal barrier-protecting effects of LG2055 in C57BL/6 mice fed a normal-fat diet (NFD), HFD, or the HFD containing LG2055 (HFD-LG) for 21 weeks. HFD-LG intake significantly prevented HFD-induced increases in body weight, visceral fat mass, and the ratio of inflammatory-type macrophages to anti-inflammatory ones in adipose tissue. Mice fed the HFD showed higher intestinal permeability to a fluorescent dextran administered by oral administration and an elevated concentration of antibodies specific to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the blood compared with those fed the NFD, suggesting an increased penetration of the gut contents into the systemic circulation. These elevations of intestinal permeability and anti-LPS antibody levels were significantly suppressed in mice fed the HFD-LG. Moreover, treatment with LG2055 cells suppressed an increase in the cytokine-induced permeability of Caco-2 cell monolayers. These results suggest that LG2055 improves the intestinal integrity, reducing the entry of inflammatory substances like LPS from the intestine, which may lead to decreased inflammation in adipose tissue.

  2. Intestinal permeability and P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux transport of ticagrelor in Caco-2 monolayer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsousi, Niloufar; Doffey-Lazeyras, Fabienne; Rudaz, Serge; Desmeules, Jules A; Daali, Youssef

    2016-12-01

    Ticagrelor is the unique reversible oral antiplatelet drug commercialized today. During this study, the intestinal permeability of ticagrelor and its potential P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated active transport were assessed. To this end, bidirectional transport of ticagrelor was performed across Caco-2 (human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma) monolayer model in the presence and absence of potent P-gp inhibitor valspodar. Ticagrelor presented an apical-basolateral apparent permeability coefficient (Papp ) of 6.0 × 10(-6) cm/s. On the other hand, mean efflux ratio (ER) of 2.71 was observed for ticagrelor describing a higher efflux permeability compared to the influx component. Valspodar showed a significant inhibitory effect on the efflux of ticagrelor suggesting involvement of P-gp in its oral disposition. Co-incubation of the P-gp inhibitor decreased the efflux Papp of ticagrelor from 1.60 × 10(-5) to 1.13 × 10(-5) cm/s and decreased its ER by 70%. Results suggest a modest active transport of ticagrelor by P-gp across the Caco-2 cell monolayer. The co-administration of ticagrelor with a P-gp inhibitor seems altogether unlikely to have an extended impact on pharmacokinetics of ticagrelor and cause bleeding events in patients. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  3. Effects of Piperine on the Intestinal Permeability and Pharmacokinetics of Linarin in Rats

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    Xinchi Feng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although linarin possesses diverse pharmacological activities, its poor oral bioavailability has been a concern for further development. The present study aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of improving the oral absorption of linarin in rats with a bioenhancer‒piperine. First, the intestinal permeability of linarin in the presence and absence of verapamil or piperine was investigated using an in situ single-pass rat intestinal perfusion method. A significant increase in the Peff when co-perfused with verapamil or piperine indicated that piperine effectively inhibited P-glycoprotein mediated efflux of linarin. Then, the pharmacokinetic profiles of linarin in rats after oral administration of linarin (50 mg/kg alone and in combination with piperine (20 mg/kg were determined using a validated LC–MS/MS method. The results showed that piperine increased the plasma exposure (AUC of linarin by 381% along with an increase in the Cmax by 346% and the Tmax from 0.05 h to 0.2 h. The present study revealed that piperine significantly enhanced the oral absorption of linarin in rats by inhibiting P-glycoprotein mediated cellular efflux during the intestinal absorption and likely simultaneously by inhibiting the metabolism of linarin.

  4. Increased intestinal permeability in endotoxic pigs. Mesenteric hypoperfusion as an etiologic factor

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    Fink, M.P.; Antonsson, J.B.; Wang, H.L.; Rothschild, H.R. (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Infusing pigs with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) decreases superior mesenteric artery blood flow (Qsma), suggesting that mesenteric hypoperfusion may be responsible for LPS-induced alterations in gut mucosal permeability. To test this hypothesis, we studied four groups of anesthetized swine. Group 1 animals (N = 6) were infused with LPS (250 micrograms/kg over 1 hour beginning at 60 minutes) and continuously resuscitated with Ringer's lactate (48 mL/kg per hour). In group 2 (N = 5), Qsma was decreased by 50% by means of a mechanical occluder to mimic the LPS-induced alterations in Qsma observed in group I. Group 3 (N = 5) was included to document our ability to detect ischemia/reperfusion-induced alterations in mucosal permeability; in these pigs, Qsma was decreased in steps to zero flow (at 150 to 210 minutes) and then perfusion was restored (at 210 to 270 minutes). Pigs in group 4 (N = 6) served as normal controls; these animals were resuscitated with Ringer's lactate at the same rate as in group 1 but were not infused with LPS. To assess mucosal permeability, we measured plasma-to-lumen clearances for two markers, chromium 51-labeled edetic acid monohydrate (EDTA) and urea. Loading and maintenance infusions of the markers were given intravenously, and a 20-cm isolated segment of small intestine was continuously perfused at 2 mL/min with Ringer's lactate at 37 degrees C. Results were expressed as the ratio of the clearances for the two probes (CEDTA/CUREA). In group 3, CEDTA/CUREA was 999% +/- 355% of baseline at 270 minutes. In group 1, CEDTA/CUREA was 572% +/- 235% of baseline at 270 minutes. In groups 2 and 4, however, CEDTA/CUREA did not change significantly from the baseline value over the duration of the study. These data suggest that increased mucosal permeability after LPS is due to factors other than (or in addition to) mesenteric hypoperfusion.

  5. In vivo studies of biotin absorption in distal rat intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have extended their previous studies of biotin absorption in rat proximal jejunum (PJ) to examine biotin absorptive capacity of rat ileum (I) and proximal colon (PC) using in vivo intestinal loop technique. Intestinal loops (2.5 cm) were filled with 0.3 ml of solution containing (/sup 3/H)-biotin and (/sup 14/C)-inulin in phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Biotin absorption was determined on the basis of luminal biotin disappearance after correction for inulin recovery and averaged (pmol/loop-10 min; X +/- SEM). In related experiments, 5-cm loops of PJ, distal I (DI), or PC were filled with 0.5 ml of solution of similar composition (1.0 ..mu..M biotin). The abdominal cavity was closed and the rats were allowed to recover from anesthesia, then sacrificed 3 hr after injection. Biotin absorption averaged 96.2% (PJ), 93.2% (DI), and 25.8% (PC) of the dose administered. These differences were reflected in the radioactive biotin content of plasma and intestinal loop, kidney, and liver. These data demonstrate significant biotin absorption in rat DI and PC, as required if the intestinal microflora are to be considered as a source of biotin for the host.

  6. Study of the Biotransformation of Tongmai Formula by Human Intestinal Flora and Its Intestinal Permeability across the Caco-2 Cell Monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuai; Xu, Wei; Wang, Fu-Rong; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2015-10-15

    Tongmai formula (TMF) is a well-known Chinese medicinal preparation that contains isoflavones as its major bioactive constituents. As traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) are usually used by oral administration, their fate inside the intestinal lumen, including their biotransformation by human intestinal flora (HIF) and intestinal absorption deserves study. In this work TMF extract was incubated with human intestinal bacteria under anaerobic conditions and the changes in the twelve main constituents of TMF were then investigated. Their intestinal permeabilities, i.e., the transport capability across the intestinal brush border were investigated with a human colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2) cell monolayer model to predict the absorption mechanism. Meanwhile, rapid HPLC-DAD methods were established for the assay. According to the biotransformation curves of the twelve constituents and the permeability coefficients, the intestinal absorption capacity of the typical compounds was elevated from the levels of 10(-7) cm/s to 10(-5) cm/s from those of the original compounds in TMF. Among them the main isoflavone glycosides puerarin (4), mirificin (6) and daidzin (7) were transformed into the same aglycone, daidzein (10). Therefore it was predicted that the aglycone compounds might be the real active ingredients in TMF. The models used can represent a novel path for the TCM studies.

  7. In vitro solubility, dissolution and permeability studies combined with semi-mechanistic modeling to investigate the intestinal absorption of desvenlafaxine from an immediate- and extended release formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, F; Jarlfors, A; Larsen, F.

    2015-01-01

    (ERF). Semi-mechanistic models of desvenlafaxine were built (using SimCyp®) by combining in vitro data on dissolution and permeation (mechanistic part of model) with clinical data (obtained from literature) on distribution and clearance (non-mechanistic part of model). The model predictions...... for desvenlafaxine absorption (i.e. intestinal dissolution or permeation) is not fully clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dissolution and/or intestinal permeability rate-limit desvenlafaxine absorption from an immediate-release formulation (IRF) and Pristiq®, an extended release formulation...... of desvenlafaxine pharmacokinetics after IRF and ERF administration were compared with published clinical data from 14 trials. Desvenlafaxine in vivo dissolution from the IRF and ERF was predicted from in vitro solubility studies and biorelevant dissolution studies (using the USP3 dissolution apparatus...

  8. Intestinal permeability in Hymenolepis nana as reflected by non invasive lactulose/mannitol dual permeability test and its impaction on nutritional parameters of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mahmoud A; Hegazi, Mai A

    2007-12-01

    Assessment of Hymenolepis nana infection among 102 children and adults of both sexes (5-16 years) residing 2 Welfare Institutes (Giza and Cairo) showed a prevalence of 22.33%. The effect of H. nana on intestinal permeability and on nutritional parameters of patients was studied. A total of 46 subjects were divided into 2 groups: GI (20 H. nana patients) and GII (26 parasite-free control). Both groups were subjected to lactulose/mannitol dual permeability test, anthropometric study, estimation of vitamin B12 and folate levels in plasma and estimation of haemoglobin (HB)%, RBCs and WBCs counts and haematocrite value (HCT%) for anaemia. The H. nana patients showed significant higher percent (P = 0.04) of altered intestinal permeability versus controls denoting intestinal leakage, significant means lower levels of vitamin B12 (P = 0.01) and folate (P nana patients and control denoting anaemia liability. The percent of stunting (HAZ nana patients versus controls but without significant difference (P = 0.19 & P = 0.47 respectively).

  9. Antibiotic treatment affects intestinal permeability and gut microbial composition in Wistar rats dependent on antibiotic class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulstrup, Monica Vera-Lise; Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Carvalho, Vera

    2015-01-01

    in microbiota composition or function were observed following MTZ treatment. Permeability to 4 kDa FITC-dextran was decreased after CTX and VAN treatment and increased following MTZ treatment. Plasma haptoglobin levels were increased by both AMX and CTX but no changes in expression of host tight junction genes......Antibiotics are frequently administered orally to treat bacterial infections not necessarily related to the gastrointestinal system. This has adverse effects on the commensal gut microbial community, by disrupting the intricate balance between specific bacterial groups within this ecosystem...... potentially leading to dysbiosis. We hypothesized that modulation of community composition and function induced by antibiotics affects intestinal integrity depending on the antibiotic administered. To address this a total of 60 Wistar rats (n=12 per group) were dosed by oral gavage with either amoxicillin...

  10. Expressions of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin-1 are under the circadian control in the mouse large intestine: implications in intestinal permeability and susceptibility to colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoko, Oh-oka; Kono, Hiroshi; Ishimaru, Kayoko; Miyake, Kunio; Kubota, Takeo; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Shibata, Shigenobu; Nakao, Atsuhito

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock drives daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. A recent study suggests that intestinal permeability is also under control of the circadian clock. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Because intestinal permeability depends on tight junction (TJ) that regulates the epithelial paracellular pathway, this study investigated whether the circadian clock regulates the expression levels of TJ proteins in the intestine. The expression levels of TJ proteins in the large intestinal epithelium and colonic permeability were analyzed every 4, 6, or 12 hours between wild-type mice and mice with a mutation of a key clock gene Period2 (Per2; mPer2(m/m). In addition, the susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis was compared between wild-type mice and mPer2(m/m) mice. The mRNA and protein expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 exhibited daily variations in the colonic epithelium in wild-type mice, whereas they were constitutively high in mPer2(m/m) mice. Colonic permeability in wild-type mice exhibited daily variations, which was inversely associated with the expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 proteins, whereas it was constitutively low in mPer2(m/m) mice. mPer2(m/m) mice were more resistant to the colonic injury induced by DSS than wild-type mice. Occludin and Claudin-1 expressions in the large intestine are under the circadian control, which is associated with temporal regulation of colonic permeability and also susceptibility to colitis.

  11. Expressions of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin-1 are under the circadian control in the mouse large intestine: implications in intestinal permeability and susceptibility to colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh-oka Kyoko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The circadian clock drives daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. A recent study suggests that intestinal permeability is also under control of the circadian clock. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Because intestinal permeability depends on tight junction (TJ that regulates the epithelial paracellular pathway, this study investigated whether the circadian clock regulates the expression levels of TJ proteins in the intestine. METHODS: The expression levels of TJ proteins in the large intestinal epithelium and colonic permeability were analyzed every 4, 6, or 12 hours between wild-type mice and mice with a mutation of a key clock gene Period2 (Per2; mPer2(m/m. In addition, the susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis was compared between wild-type mice and mPer2(m/m mice. RESULTS: The mRNA and protein expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 exhibited daily variations in the colonic epithelium in wild-type mice, whereas they were constitutively high in mPer2(m/m mice. Colonic permeability in wild-type mice exhibited daily variations, which was inversely associated with the expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 proteins, whereas it was constitutively low in mPer2(m/m mice. mPer2(m/m mice were more resistant to the colonic injury induced by DSS than wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Occludin and Claudin-1 expressions in the large intestine are under the circadian control, which is associated with temporal regulation of colonic permeability and also susceptibility to colitis.

  12. Ascorbic Acid may Exacerbate Aspirin-Induced Increase in Intestinal Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Ivana R; Kruger, Marlena C; Hurst, Roger D; Lentle, Roger G

    2015-09-01

    Ascorbic acid in combination with aspirin has been used to prevent aspirin-induced oxidative GI damage. We aimed to determine whether ascorbic acid reduces or prevents aspirin-induced changes in intestinal permeability over a 6-hr period using saccharidic probes mannitol and lactulose. The effects of administration of 600 mg aspirin alone, 500 mg ascorbic acid alone and simultaneous dosage of both agents were compared in a cross-over study in 28 healthy female volunteers. These effects were also compared with that of a placebo. The ability of ascorbic acid to mitigate the effects of aspirin when administered either half an hour before or after dosage with aspirin was also assessed in 19 healthy female volunteers. The excretion of lactulose over the 6-hr period was augmented after consumption of either aspirin or ascorbic acid compared with that after consumption of placebo. Dosage with ascorbic acid alone augmented the excretion of lactulose more than did aspirin alone. Simultaneous dosage with both agents augmented the excretion of lactulose in an additive manner. The timing of dosage with ascorbic acid in relation to that with aspirin had no significant effect on the excretion of the two sugars. These findings indicate that ascorbic acid does not prevent aspirin-induced increase in gut permeability rather that both agents augment it to a similar extent. The additive effect on simultaneous dosage with both agents in augmenting the absorption of lactulose suggests that each influences paracellular permeability by different pathways. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  13. Zonulin Regulates Intestinal Permeability and Facilitates Enteric Bacteria Permeation in Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanwei; Gao, Min; Zhang, Wen; Chen, Caiyu; Zhou, Faying; Hu, Zhangxu; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-06-29

    Several studies have reported an association between enteric bacteria and atherosclerosis. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene belong to Enterobacteriaceae have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques. How intestinal bacteria go into blood is not known. Zonulin reversibly modulate intestinal permeability (IP), the circulating zonulin levels were increased in diabetes, obesity, all of which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. It is unclear whether the circulating zonulin levels were changed in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and modulate IP. The 16S rRNA gene of bacteria in blood sample was checked by 454 pyrosequencing. The zonulin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The distribution of zonulin was detected by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Bacteria and Caco-2 cell surface micro-structure were checked by transmission electron microscopy. A high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA gene can be detected in samples from CAD patients, most of them (99.4%) belong to Enterobacteriaceaes, eg. Rahnella. The plasma zonulin levels were significantly higher in CAD patients. Pseudomonas fluorescens exposure significantly increased zonulin expression and decreased IP in a time dependent manner. The elevated zonulin increase IP and may facilitate enteric translocation by disassembling the tight junctions, which might explain the observed high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in blood samples.

  14. Lactic Acid Bacteria Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Toxicity of Graphene Oxide by Maintaining Normal Intestinal Permeability under different Genetic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Xiaoming; Jia, Ruhan; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is safe and useful for food and feed fermentation. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible beneficial effect of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus) pretreatment against toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and the underlying mechanisms. LAB prevented GO toxicity on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in wild-type nematodes. LAB blocked translocation of GO into secondary targeted organs through intestinal barrier by maintaining normal intestinal permeability in wild-type nematodes. Moreover, LAB prevented GO damage on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in exposed nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes (sod-2, sod-3, gas-1, and aak-2) to GO toxicity by sustaining normal intestinal permeability. LAB also sustained the normal defecation behavior in both wild-type nematodes and nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes. Therefore, the beneficial role of LAB against GO toxicity under different genetic backgrounds may be due to the combinational effects on intestinal permeability and defecation behavior. Moreover, the beneficial effects of LAB against GO toxicity was dependent on the function of ACS-22, homologous to mammalian FATP4 to mammalian FATP4. Our study provides highlight on establishment of pharmacological strategy to protect intestinal barrier from toxicity of GO.

  15. FROG INTESTINAL PERFUSION TO EVALUATE DRUG PERMEABILITY: APPLICATION TO P-gp AND CYP3A4 SUBSTRATES

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    Neelima eYerasi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTo evaluate the reliability of using in situ frog intestinal perfusion technique for permeability assessment of carrier transported drugs which are also substrates for CYP enzymes. Single Pass Intestinal Perfusion (SPIP studies were performed in frogs of the species Rana tigrina using established method for rats with some modifications after inducing anesthesia. Effective permeability coefficient (Peff of losartan and midazolam was calculated in the presence and absence of inhibitors using the parallel-tube model. Peff of losartan when perfused alone was found to be 0.427 ± 0.27×10-4cm/s and when it was co-perfused with inhibitors, significant change in Peff was observed. Peff of midazolam when perfused alone was found to be 2.03 ± 0.07 × 10-4cm/s and when it was co-perfused with inhibitors, no significant change in Peff was observed. Comparison of Peff calculated in frog with that of other available models and also humans suggested that the Peff values are comparable and reflected well with human intestinal permeability. It is possible to determine the Peff value for compounds which are dual substrates of P-gp and CYP3A4 using in situ frog intestinal perfusion technique. The calculated Peff values correlated well with reported Peff values of probe drugs. comparison of the Peff value of losartan obtained with that of reported human’s Peff and Caco 2 cell data, and comparison of the Peff value of midazolam with that of reported rat’s Peff, we could conclude that SPIP from model can be reliably used in preclinical studies for permeability estimation. This model may represent a valuable alternative to the low speed and high cost of conventional animal models (typically rodents for the assessment of intestinal permeability.

  16. Synbiotics reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and inflammation by improving intestinal permeability and microbiota in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Wan-Chun; Huang, Ya-Li; Chen, Ya-Ling; Peng, Hsiang-Chi; Liao, Wei-Hsiang; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Chen, Jiun-Rong; Yang, Suh-Ching

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and animal experiments indicated that gut-derived endotoxin and imbalanced intestinal microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In this study, we investigated whether synbiotic supplementation could improve ALD in rats by altering the intestinal microbial composition and improving the intestinal integrity. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups according to plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities and subjected to either a normal liquid diet (C), a normal liquid diet with synbiotic supplementation (C + S), an ethanol liquid diet (E), or an ethanol liquid diet with synbiotic supplementation (E + S) for 12 weeks. Results revealed that the ethanol-fed group showed increases in plasma AST and ALT activities, the endotoxin level, the hepatic triglyceride (TG) level, and hepatic tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 levels, and a decrease in the hepatic IL-10 level. Ethanol-feeding also contributed to increased intestinal permeability and decreased fecal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli amounts. However, synbiotic supplementation effectively attenuated the plasma endotoxin, hepatic TG and TNF-α levels, and increased the hepatic IL-10 level. Furthermore, synbiotic supplementation protected the rats against ethanol-induced hyperpermeability of the intestine, and significantly increased amounts of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the feces. This study demonstrated that synbiotics possess a novel hepatoprotective function by improving the intestinal permeability and microbiota in rats with ethanol-induced liver injury.

  17. Dietary management of acute diarrhoea in children: effect of fermented and amylase-digested weaning foods on intestinal permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willumsen, J F; Darling, J C; Kitundu, J A; Kingamkono, R R; Msengi, A E; Mduma, B; Sullivan, K R; Tomkins, A M

    1997-03-01

    There is a strong relationship between diarrhoea, malnutrition, and intestinal integrity. To investigate the effect of different dietary-treatment on intestinal permeability during acute diarrhoea, 87 Tanzanian children aged 6-25 months were recruited to this study when admitted to hospital. Children with acute diarrhoea were rehydrated and then randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatment groups: a conventional low-energy density porridge, a high-energy density amylase digested porridge (AMD), or a high-energy density amylase digested and then fermented porridge (FAD). Lactulose/mannitol permeability tests were performed on admission, at 3 days, and at follow-up 2 and 4 weeks after discharge. The lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratios were compared between dietary treatment groups and to a group of age-matched, healthy control subjects. Children with diarrhoea had higher L/M ratios (geometric mean 0.85, 95% CI 0.68-1.05) compared with control subjects (0.14, 0.12-0.17) on admission. There was a significant difference in the change in L/M ratio between admission and 3 days between dietary treatment groups in favour of the FAD group (p FAD porridge seems to be more effective in the treatment of intestinal permeability than AMD or conventional porridge. Urinary lactose concentrations in spot urine samples taken prior to the permeability test were also measured. There was a significant correlation with the L/M ratio (correlation coefficient = 0.62, p < 0.001).

  18. Ex Vivo Correlation of the Permeability of Metoprolol Across Human and Porcine Buccal Mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng-Lund, Emil; Marxen, Eva; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2014-01-01

    The pH partition theory proposes a correlation between fraction of unionized drug substance and permeability. The aim of this study was to compare the permeability of metoprolol and mannitol in ex vivo human and porcine buccal mucosa models at varying pH to validate whether the porcine permeability...... model is predictive for human buccal absorption. Human (n = 9-10) and porcine (n = 6-7) buccal mucosa were mounted in a modified Ussing chamber, and the kinetics of metoprolol and mannitol transport was assessed for a period of 5.5 h with the pH values of donor medium set at 7.4, 8.5, and 9...

  19. Fecal lactoferrin and intestinal permeability are effective non-invasive markers in the diagnostic work-up of chronic diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccaro, Roberta; D'Incà, Renata; Martinato, Matteo; Pont, Elisabetta Dal; Pathak, Surajit; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo

    2014-10-01

    Non-invasive markers able to identify patients with chronic diarrhea at risk of organic disease are missing. Aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic ability of intestinal permeability (IP) test and fecal lactoferrin (FL) in distinguishing functional from organic disease in patients with chronic diarrhea. We retrospectively enrolled patients referring to the gastroenterology outpatient clinic for chronic diarrhea. Among the 103 patients included, 40 % had an organic disease, with IP and FL levels significantly higher compared to those with a functional disorder (p chronic diarrhea patients. Together these tests could recognize both the presence of intestinal damage and its site.

  20. Intestinal permeability to glucose after experimental traumatic brain injury: effect of gadopentetate dimeglumine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Alejandro; Gonçalves, Pedro; Araújo, João R; Martel, Fátima

    2008-09-01

    Traumatic injuries are the leading cause of mortality in individuals aged 1-44 years, and brain injury significantly contributes to the outcome in nearly one half of all deaths from trauma. At the intestinal level, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces profound effects, including gastrointestinal mucosa ischaemia and motility dysfunction. However, nothing is known concerning the effect of TBI on the intestinal absorption of glucose. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TBI on the intestinal absorption of glucose by investigating the effect of TBI on the jejunal mucosal-to-serosal apparent permeability (AP-to-BL P(app)) to two glucose model substrates, (3)H-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((3)H-DG) and (3)H-3-O-methyl-D-glucose ((3)H-OMG), and to (14)C-sorbitol. Additionally, we tested if gadopentetate dimeglumine administration could prevent any of the changes observed after TBI. Traumatic brain injury induced an increase in the AP-to-BL P(app) to (3)H-DG. After a 100-min. perfusion of the jejunum, the AP-to-BL P(app) to (3)H-DG in TBI rats was almost 70% higher than in the control rats. There was no change, however, in the AP-to-BL P(app) to neither (3)H-OMG nor (14)C-sorbitol. Interestingly enough, gadopentetate dimeglumine was able to prevent the increase in the AP-to-BL P(app) to (3)H-DG observed after TBI. Given the differences in transport characteristics between (3)H-DG and (3)H-OMG, our results point to the possibility of the Na(+)-independent glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) being activated by TBI (as the P(app) to (3)H-DG, a GLUT2 substrate, was increased) and the Na(+)-dependent glucose co-transporter (SGLT1) being inhibited by TBI (as the P(app) to (3)H-OMG, a GLUT2 and SGLT1 substrate, remained unchanged). Moreover, gadopentetate dimeglumine prevented these changes associated with TBI.

  1. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for analysis of intestinal permeability of loperamide in physiological buffer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam S Rubelt

    Full Text Available Analysis of in vitro samples with high salt concentrations represents a major challenge for fast and specific quantification with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. To investigate the intestinal permeability of opioids in vitro employing the Ussing chamber technique, we developed and validated a fast, sensitive and selective method based on LC-MS/MS for the determination of loperamide in HEPES-buffered Ringer's solution. Chromatographic separation was achieved with an Atlantis dC18 column, 2.1 mm×20 mm, 3 µm particle size and a gradient consisting of methanol/0.1% formic acid and ammonium acetate. The flow rate was 0.7 ml/min, and the total run time was 3 min. For quantification, two mass transitions for loperamide and a deuterated internal standard (methadone-d(3 were used. The lower limit of loperamide quantification was 0.2 ng/ml. This new LC-MS/MS method can be used for the detection of loperamide in any experimental setup using HEPES-buffered Ringer's solution as a matrix compound.

  2. Real-time visualization and quantitation of vascular permeability in vivo: implications for drug delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond B S Pink

    Full Text Available The leaky, heterogeneous vasculature of human tumors prevents the even distribution of systemic drugs within cancer tissues. However, techniques for studying vascular delivery systems in vivo often require complex mammalian models and time-consuming, surgical protocols. The developing chicken embryo is a well-established model for human cancer that is easily accessible for tumor imaging. To assess this model for the in vivo analysis of tumor permeability, human tumors were grown on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM, a thin vascular membrane which overlays the growing chick embryo. The real-time movement of small fluorescent dextrans through the tumor vasculature and surrounding tissues were used to measure vascular leak within tumor xenografts. Dextran extravasation within tumor sites was selectively enhanced an interleukin-2 (IL-2 peptide fragment or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. VEGF treatment increased vascular leak in the tumor core relative to surrounding normal tissue and increased doxorubicin uptake in human tumor xenografts. This new system easily visualizes vascular permeability changes in vivo and suggests that vascular permeability may be manipulated to improve chemotherapeutic targeting to tumors.

  3. Effect of acute, slightly increased intra-abdominal pressure on intestinal permeability and oxidative stress in a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Leng

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH is known as a common, serious complication in critically ill patients. Bacterial translocation and permeability changes are considered the pathophysiological bases for IAH-induced enterogenic endotoxemia and subsequent multiorgan failure. Nevertheless, the effects of slightly elevated intra-abdominal pressures (IAPs on the intestinal mucosa and the associated mechanisms remain unclear. METHODS: To investigate the acute effects of different nitrogen pneumoperitoneum grades on colonic mucosa, male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to six groups with different IAPs (0 [control], 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 mmHg, n = 6/group. During 90 min of exposure, we dynamically monitored the heart rate and noninvasive hemodynamic parameters. After gradual decompression, arterial blood gas analyses were conducted. Thereafter, structural injuries to the colonic mucosa were identified using light microscopy. Colon permeability was determined using the expression of tight junction proteins, combined with fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FD-4 absorption. The pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance was determined based on the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and antioxidant enzymes. RESULTS: IAH significantly affected the histological scores of the colonic mucosa, tight junction protein expression, mucosal permeability, and pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance. Interestingly, elevations of IAP that were lower than the threshold for IAH also showed a similar, undesirable effect. In the 8 mmHg group, mild hyponatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypoxemia occurred, accompanied by reduced blood and abdominal perfusion pressures. Mild microscopic inflammatory infiltration and increased MDA levels were also detected. Moreover, an 8-mm Hg IAP markedly inhibited the expression of tight junction proteins, although no significant differences in FD-4 permeability were observed between the 0- and 8-mmHg groups. CONCLUSIONS: Acute exposure to slightly

  4. Bovine colostrum increases pore-forming claudin-2 protein expression but paradoxically not ion permeability possibly by a change of the intestinal cytokine milieu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Bodammer

    Full Text Available An impaired intestinal barrier function is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Several nutritional factors are supposed to be effective in IBD treatment but scientific data about the effects on the intestinal integrity remain scarce. Bovine colostrum was shown to exert beneficial effects in DSS-induced murine colitis, and the present study was undertaken to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. Western blot revealed increased claudin-2 expression in the distal ileum of healthy mice after feeding with colostrum for 14 days, whereas other tight junction proteins (claudin-3, 4, 10, 15 remained unchanged. The colostrum-induced claudin-2 induction was confirmed in differentiated Caco-2 cells after culture with colostrum for 48 h. Paradoxically, the elevation of claudin-2, which forms a cation-selective pore, was neither accompanied by increased ion permeability nor impaired barrier function. In an in situ perfusion model, 1 h exposure of the colonic mucosa to colostrum induced significantly increased mRNA levels of barrier-strengthening cytokine transforming growth factor-β, while interleukine-2, interleukine-6, interleukine-10, interleukine-13, and tumor-necrosis factor-α remained unchanged. Thus, modulation of the intestinal transforming growth factor-β expression might have compensated the claudin-2 increase and contributed to the observed barrier strengthening effects of colostrum in vivo and in vitro.

  5. Role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on intestinal permeability and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzeri, Erika; Usai, Paolo

    2017-06-14

    The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is widespread worldwide thanks to their analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects. However, even more attention is placed upon the recurrence of digestive system complications in the course of their use. Recent data suggests that the complications of the lower gastro-intestinal tract may be as frequent and severe as those of the upper tract. NSAIDs enteropathy is due to enterohepatic recycling of the drugs resulting in a prolonged and repeated exposure of the intestinal mucosa to the compound and its metabolites. Thus leading to so-called topical effects, which, in turn, lead to an impairment of the intestinal barrier. This process determines bacterial translocation and toxic substances of intestinal origin in the portal circulation, leading to an endotoxaemia. This condition could determine a liver inflammatory response and might promote the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, mostly in patients with risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and a high fat diet, which may induce a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and dysbiosis. This alteration of gut microbiota may contribute to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its related disorders in two ways: firstly causing a malfunction of the tight junctions that play a critical role in the increase of intestinal permeability, and then secondly leading to the development of insulin resistance, body weight gain, lipogenesis, fibrogenesis and hepatic oxidative stress.

  6. Dai-Huang-Fu-Zi-Tang Alleviates Intestinal Injury Associated with Severe Acute Pancreatitis by Regulating Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore of Intestinal Mucosa Epithelial Cells

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    Xin Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the present study was to examine whether Dai-Huang-Fu-Zi-Tang (DHFZT could regulate mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP of intestinal mucosa epithelial cells for alleviating intestinal injury associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. Methods. A total of 72 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (sham group, SAP group, and DHFZT group, n=24 per group. The rats in each group were divided into 4 subgroups (n=6 per subgroup accordingly at 1, 3, 6, and 12 h after the operation. The contents of serum amylase, D-lactic acid, diamine oxidase activity, and degree of MPTP were measured by dry chemical method and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The change of mitochondria of intestinal epithelial cells was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Results. The present study showed that DHFZT inhibited the openness of MPTP at 3, 6, and 12 h after the operation. Meanwhile, it reduced the contents of serum D-lactic acid and activity of diamine oxidase activity and also drastically relieved histopathological manifestations and epithelial cells injury of intestine. Conclusion. DHFZT alleviates intestinal injury associated SAP via reducing the openness of MPTP. In addition, DHFZT could also decrease the content of serum diamine oxidase activity and D-lactic acid after SAP.

  7. Impact of Humidity on In Vitro Human Skin Permeation Experiments for Predicting In Vivo Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Endo, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-12-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been commonly conducted to predict in vivo permeability for the development of transdermal therapeutic systems (TTSs). We clarified the impact of humidity on in vitro human skin permeation of two TTSs having different breathability and then elucidated the predictability of in vivo permeability based on in vitro experimental data. Nicotinell(®) TTS(®) 20 and Frandol(®) tape 40mg were used as model TTSs in this study. The in vitro human skin permeation experiments were conducted under humidity levels similar to those used in clinical trials (approximately 50%) as well as under higher humidity levels (approximately 95%). The skin permeability values of drugs at 95% humidity were higher than those at 50% humidity. The time profiles of the human plasma concentrations after TTS application fitted well with the clinical data when predicted based on the in vitro permeation parameters at 50% humidity. On the other hand, those profiles predicted based on the parameters at 95% humidity were overestimated. The impact of humidity was higher for the more breathable TTS; Frandol(®) tape 40mg. These results show that in vitro human skin permeation experiments should be investigated under realistic clinical humidity levels especially for breathable TTSs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  8. Water absorption enhances the uptake of mannitol and decreases Cr-EDTA/mannitol permeability ratios in cat small intestine in situ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, P. B.; Fihn, B. M.; Sjöqvist, A.; Groot, J. A.; Taminiau, J. A. J. M.; Jodal, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Recently, we hypothesized that mannitol absorption in human intestinal permeability tests is a reflection of small intestinal water absorption and is dependent mainly on the efficiency of the countercurrent multiplier in the villi. This may affect the outcome of clinical double-sugar

  9. Intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with Crohn's disease and celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turck, D.; Ythier, H.; Maquet, E.; Deveaux, M.; Marchandise, X.; Farriaux, J.P.; Fontaine, G.

    1987-07-01

    (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was used as a probe molecule to assess intestinal permeability in 7 healthy control adults, 11 control children, 17 children with Crohn's disease, and 6 children with untreated celiac disease. After subjects fasted overnight, 75 kBq/kg (= 2 microCi/kg) /sup 51/Cr-labeled EDTA was given by mouth; 24-h urinary excretion of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the total oral dose. Mean and SD were as follows: control adults 1.47 +/- 0.62, control children 1.59 +/- 0.55, and patients with Crohn's disease or celiac disease 5.35 +/- 1.94. The difference between control children and patients was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). These results show that intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA is increased among children with active or inactive Crohn's disease affecting small bowel only or small bowel and colon, and with untreated celiac disease. The (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA permeability test could facilitate the decision to perform more extensive investigations in children suspected of small bowel disease who have atypical or poor clinical and biological symptomatology.

  10. Surfactants enhance the tight-junction permeability of food allergens in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Yoshinori; Zhang, Jie Wie

    2003-02-01

    Food additives are responsible for certain allergic types of symptoms. Here Caco-2 cell monolayers were used as a model of the intestinal epithelium for the study of the effect of a food grade surfactant. We determined whether or not the presence of a surfactant enhances the transportation of food allergens across human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. This study investigated sucrose monoester fatty acids, which are a food grade surfactant. As an in vitro model of human epithelial cells, Caco-2 cells were grown in monolayers and exposed to different doses of the surfactant in conjunction with ovomucoid, a major egg white allergen. The integrity of the monolayer was assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). The permeability of tight junctions and transport of the antigen were studied. TEER correlated with the permeability of tight junctions. TEER significantly decreased upon exposure to a surfactant, indicating an increase in ovomucoid permeability without degradation. The surfactant induced shortening in microvilli, actin disbandment and structural separation of tight junctions. The results indicate that food grade surfactants can increase the paracellular uptake of food allergens. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. /sup 51/Cr-EDTA//sup 14/C-mannitol intestinal permeability test. Clinical use in screening for coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotherby, K.J.; Wraight, E.P.; Neale, G.

    1988-01-01

    An intestinal permeability test with a combination of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA and /sup 14/C-mannitol was performed under routine conditions on 176 occasions in 161 adult patients. Of these patients, 116 were under investigation for possible coeliac disease, 33 were known to have coeliac disease, and 12 had inflammatory bowel disease. Small-bowel biopsies were performed in 61 patients. Expressing the results as the ratio of the 6-h urinary recoveries of the two probes was as sensitive as 95%, but more specific for histological mucosal abnormality (62% versus 46%) than measuring the urinary recovery of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA alone. All but two of the patients with active inflammatory bowel disease, whether Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, had an abnormal ratio. The /sup 51/Cr-EDTA//sup 14/C-mannitol intestinal permeablity test with a 6-h urine collection is a rapid and simple test of small-intestinal function suitable for routine use. 19 refs.

  12. Increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules and endotoxemia in patients with chronic alcohol abuse in different stages of alcohol-induced liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schäfer, C.; Schütz, Tanja

    2000-01-01

    and mild to more advanced stages of liver disease, and to measure the concentration of endotoxins in the plasma, as these compounds derive from the intestinal flora and are suspected to contribute to the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). METHODS: The permeability to polyethylene glycol Mr 400......BACKGROUND/AIMS: No information is yet available about the influence of alcohol abuse on the translocation of larger molecules (Mr>1200) through the intestinal mucosa in man. The present study aimed to determine the intestinal permeability to macromolecules in patients with chronic alcohol abuse...... with alcoholic liver disease (20/54, pintestinal barrier, which might enhance...

  13. Fermented Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae alleviates high fat diet-induced obesity in association with regulation of intestinal permeability and microbiota in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Hua; Bose, Shambhunath; Kim, Hyung-Gu; Han, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hojun

    2015-02-16

    Accumulating evidence suggests the anti-inflammatory and anti-obesity activities of Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (RAM). Here, we evaluated the anti-obesity impact of unfermented (URAM) versus fermented RAM (FRAM) using both in vitro and in vivo models. Both URAM and FRAM exhibited marked anti-inflammatory, anti-adipogenic, and anti-obesity activities, and modulation of the gut microbial distribution. However, FRAM, compared to URAM, resulted in more efficient suppression of NO production and normalization of transepithelial electrical resistance in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 and HCT 116 cells, respectively. Compared to URAM, FRAM more effectively reduced the adipose tissue weight; ameliorated the serum triglyceride and aspartate transaminase levels; restored the serum HDL level and intestinal epithelial barrier function in the LPS control group. The relative abundance of Bifidobacterium and Akkermansia as well as Bacteriodetes/Firmicutes ratio in the gut of the LPS control group was significantly enhanced by both URAM and FRAM. However, FRAM, but not URAM, resulted in a significant increase in the distribution of Bacteriodetes and Lactobacillus in the gut of the HFD + LPS group. Our results suggest that FRAM with probiotics can exert a greater anti-obesity effect than URAM, which is probably mediated at least in part via regulation of the intestinal microbiota and gut permeability.

  14. Effects of casein glycomacropeptide supplementation on growth performance, intestinal morphology, intestinal barrier permeability and inflammatory responses in Escherichia coli K88 challenged piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Rong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP is a bioactive peptide derived from milk with multiple functions. This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of CGMP as a potential feed additive on growth performance, intestinal morphology, intestinal barrier permeability and inflammatory responses of Escherichia coli K88 (E. coli K88 challenged piglets. Eighteen weaning piglets were randomly assigned to three groups. Control group and K88 challenged group received a basal diet, and CGMP treated group received the basal diet supplemented with 1% of CGMP powder. The trail lasted for 12 days, K88 was orally administered to the piglets of K88 challenged group and CGMP treated group on days 8–10. The results showed that the diet containing 1% CGMP significantly alleviated the decrease in average daily gain (P  0.05 and barrier permeability damage (P < 0.05, and acute inflammatory response (P < 0.05 induced by E. coli K88 infection. In conclusion, CGMP supplementation in the diet protected the weaning piglets against E. coli K88 infection.

  15. Permeabilities of rebamipide via rat intestinal membranes and its colon specific delivery using chitosan capsule as a carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bei-Bei; Li, Guo-Feng; Luo, Jing-Hui; Duan, Lian; Nobuaki, Kishimoto; Akira, Yamamoto

    2008-08-21

    To investigate the permeability characteristics of rebamipide across intestinal mucosa, and examine the effects of some absorption enhancers on the permeability across the colonic tissue. Another purpose is to demonstrate the colon-specific delivery of rebamipide with or without absorption enhancers using chitosan capsule as a carrier. The permeability of rebamipide was evaluated using an in vitro diffusion chamber system, and the effects of some absorption enhancers on the permeability via colon were further investigated. The release of rebamipide from chitosan or gelatin capsule was studied by Japan Pharmacopoeia rotating basket method. The colonic and plasma concentrations were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to evaluate colon-targeting action after oral administration of various dosage forms, and rebamipide with absorption enhancers in chitosan dosage forms. The permeability of rebamipide across the jejunal or ileal membranes was higher than the colonic membranes. Both sodium laurate (C12) and labrasol significantly increased permeability across the colon membranes. On the other hand, the release of rebamipide from chitosan capsule was less than 10% totally within 6 h. The area under concentration-time profile of drug in the colon mucosa using chitosan capsules (AUCLI, 16011.2 ng x h/g) was 2.5 times and 4.4 times greater than using gelatin capsules and CMC suspension, respectively. Meanwhile, the area under concentration-time profile of drug in the plasma (AUCPL) was 1016.0 ng x h/mL for chitosan capsule, 1887.9 ng x h/mL for CMC suspension p and 2163.5 ng x h/mL for gelatin capsule. Overall, both AUCLI and AUCPL were increased when C12 was co-administrated, but the increase of AUCLI was much greater; the drug delivery index (DDI) was more than 1 compared with simple chitosan capsule group. There was a regional difference in the permeability of Rabamipide across the jejunum, ileum and the colon, and passive diffusion seems to be one

  16. Propylene glycol-linked amino acid/dipeptide diester prodrugs of oleanolic acid for PepT1-mediated transport: synthesis, intestinal permeability, and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feng; Gao, Yahan; Wang, Meng; Fang, Lei; Ping, Qineng

    2013-04-01

    In our previous studies, ethylene glycol-linked amino acid diester prodrugs of oleanolic acid (OA), a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class IV drug, designed to target peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) have been synthesized and evaluated. Unlike ethylene glycol, propylene glycol is of very low toxicity in vivo. In this study, propylene glycol was used as a linker to further compare the effect of the type of linker on the stability, permeability, affinity, and bioavailability of the prodrugs of OA. Seven diester prodrugs with amino acid/dipeptide promoieties containing L-Val ester (7a), L-Phe ester (7b), L-Ile ester (7c), D-Val-L-Val ester (9a), L-Val-L-Val ester (9b), L-Ala-L-Val ester (9c), and L-Ala-L-Ile ester (9d) were designed and successfully synthesized. In situ rat single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) model was performed to screen the effective permeability (P(eff)) of the prodrugs. P(eff) of 7a, 7b, 7c, 9a, 9b, 9c, and 9d (6.7-fold, 2.4-fold, 1.24-fold, 1.22-fold, 4.15-fold, 2.2-fold, and 1.4-fold, respectively) in 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid buffer (MES) with pH 6.0 showed significant increase compared to that of OA (p propylene glycol-linked amino acid/dipeptide diester prodrugs showed better stability, permeability, affinity, and bioavailability. In conclusion, propylene glycol-linked amino acid/dipeptide diester prodrugs of OA may be suitable for PepT1-targeted prodrugs of OA to improve the oral bioavailability of OA.

  17. Burn Injury Alters the Intestinal Microbiome and Increases Gut Permeability and Bacterial Translocation.

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    Zachary M Earley

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains one of the leading causes of death in burn patients who survive the initial insult of injury. Disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier has been shown after burn injury; this can lead to the translocation of bacteria or their products (e.g., endotoxin from the intestinal lumen to the circulation, thereby increasing the risk for sepsis in immunocompromised individuals. Since the maintenance of the epithelial barrier is largely dependent on the intestinal microbiota, we examined the diversity of the intestinal microbiome of severely burned patients and a controlled mouse model of burn injury. We show that burn injury induces a dramatic dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome of both humans and mice and allows for similar overgrowths of Gram-negative aerobic bacteria. Furthermore, we show that the bacteria increasing in abundance have the potential to translocate to extra-intestinal sites. This study provides an insight into how the diversity of the intestinal microbiome changes after burn injury and some of the consequences these gut bacteria can have in the host.

  18. On Blastocystis secreted cysteine proteases: a legumain-activated cathepsin B increases paracellular permeability of intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourrisson, C; Wawrzyniak, I; Cian, A; Livrelli, V; Viscogliosi, E; Delbac, F; Poirier, P

    2016-11-01

    Blastocystis spp. pathogenic potential remains unclear as these anaerobic parasitic protozoa are frequently isolated from stools of both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. In silico analysis of the whole genome sequence of Blastocystis subtype 7 revealed the presence of numerous proteolytic enzymes including cysteine proteases predicted to be secreted. To assess the potential impact of proteases on intestinal cells and gut function, we focused our study on two cysteine proteases, a legumain and a cathepsin B, which were previously identified in Blastocystis subtype 7 culture supernatants. Both cysteine proteases were produced as active recombinant proteins. Activation of the recombinant legumain was shown to be autocatalytic and triggered by acidic pH, whereas proteolytic activity of the recombinant cathepsin B was only recorded after co-incubation with the legumain. We then measured the diffusion of 4-kDa FITC-labelled dextran across Caco-2 cell monolayers following exposition to either Blastocystis culture supernatants or each recombinant protease. Both Blastocystis culture supernatants and recombinant activated cathepsin B induced an increase of Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability, and this effect was significantly inhibited by E-64, a specific cysteine protease inhibitor. Our results suggest that cathepsin B might play a role in pathogenesis of Blastocystis by increasing intestinal cell permeability.

  19. Dietary fat and bile juice, but not obesity, are responsible for the increase in small intestinal permeability induced through the suppression of tight junction protein expression in LETO and OLETF rats

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    Suzuki Takuya

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increase in the intestinal permeability is considered to be associated with the inflammatory tone and development in the obesity and diabetes, however, the pathogenesis of the increase in the intestinal permeability is poorly understood. The present study was performed to determine the influence of obesity itself as well as dietary fat on the increase in intestinal permeability. Methods An obese rat strain, Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF, and the lean counter strain, Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO, were fed standard or high fat diets for 16 weeks. Glucose tolerance, intestinal permeability, intestinal tight junction (TJ proteins expression, plasma bile acids concentration were evaluated. In addition, the effects of rat bile juice and dietary fat, possible mediators of the increase in the intestinal permeability in the obesity, on TJ permeability were explored in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Results The OLETF rats showed higher glucose intolerance than did the LETO rats, which became more marked with the prolonged feeding of the high fat diet. Intestinal permeability in the OLETF rats evaluated by the urinary excretion of intestinal permeability markers (Cr-EDTA and phenolsulfonphthalein was comparable to that in the LETO rats. Feeding the high fat diet increased intestinal permeability in both the OLETF and LETO rats, and the increases correlated with decreases in TJ proteins (claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule-1 expression in the small, but not in the large intestine (cecum or colon. The plasma bile acids concentration was higher in rats fed the high fat diet. Exposure to bile juice and the fat emulsion increased TJ permeability with concomitant reductions in TJ protein expression (claudin-1, claudin-3, and junctional adhesion molecule-1 in the Caco-2 cell monolayers. Conclusion Excessive dietary fat and/or increased levels of luminal bile juice, but not genetic obesity, are

  20. Conjugated primary bile salts reduce permeability of endotoxin through intestinal epithelial cells and synergize with phosphatidylcholine in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schaeckeler, S.; Moser, L.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endotoxemia was shown to be integral in the pathophysiology of obstructive jaundice. In the current study, the role of conjugated primary bile salts (CPBS) and phosphatidylcholine on the permeability of endotoxin through a layer of intestinal epithelial cells and the consequent......: The effect of CPBS (0.5 mM and 1.5 mM), phosphatidylcholine (0.38 mM), and human bile (0.5% vol/vol) on the barrier function was assessed by the measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance, by endotoxin permeability through the intestinal epithelial cell layer, and by basolateral cytokine enzyme...... of CPBS suppressed the permeability of endotoxins through the intestinal epithelial cell layer significantly. In parallel, apical supplementation of CPBS dose-dependently reduced the basolateral production of all cytokines measured. Apical phosphatidylcholine supplementation enhanced this effect...

  1. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche Insights Gathered from Both In Vivo and Novel In Vitro Models

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    Nikolce Gjorevski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal stem cells are located at the base of the crypts and are surrounded by a complex structure called niche. This environment is composed mainly of epithelial cells and stroma which provides signals that govern cell maintenance, proliferation, and differentiation. Understanding how the niche regulates stem cell fate by controlling developmental signaling pathways will help us to define how stem cells choose between self-renewal and differentiation and how they maintain their undifferentiated state. Tractable in vitro assay systems, which reflect the complexity of the in vivo situation but provide higher level of control, would likely be crucial in identifying new players and mechanisms controlling stem cell function. Knowledge of the intestinal stem cell niche gathered from both in vivo and novel in vitro models may help us improve therapies for tumorigenesis and intestinal damage and make autologous intestinal transplants a feasible clinical practice.

  2. The effects of a multispecies probiotic on migraine and markers of intestinal permeability-results of a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roos, N M; van Hemert, S; Rovers, J M P; Smits, M G; Witteman, B J M

    2017-12-01

    Migraine, associated with several gastrointestinal disorders, may result from increased intestinal permeability, allowing endotoxins to enter the bloodstream. We tested whether probiotics could reduce migraine through an effect on intestinal permeability and inflammation. In total, 63 patients were randomly allocated to the probiotic (n=31) or the placebo group (n=32). Participants ingested a multispecies probiotic (5x109 colony-forming units) or placebo daily for 12 weeks. Migraine was assessed with the Migraine Disability Assessment Scale (MIDAS), the Headache Disability Inventory (HDI) and headache diaries. At baseline and 12 weeks, intestinal permeability was measured with the urinary lactulose/mannitol test and fecal and serum zonulin; inflammation was measured from interleukin (IL) -6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α and C-reactive protein in serum. The MIDAS migraine intensity score significantly decreased in both groups (Pmigraine days in the first month, 4 in the second month (P=0.002) and 5 in the last month, which was not significantly different from the 5, 4, and 4 days in the placebo group. A ⩾2day reduction in migraine days was seen in 12/31 patients in the probiotics group versus 7/29 in the placebo group (ns). Probiotic use did not significantly affect medication use, intestinal permeability or inflammation compared to placebo. In this study, we could not confirm significant benefit from a multispecies probiotic compared to a placebo on the outcome parameters of migraine and intestinal integrity.

  3. Association between intestinal permeability and faecal microbiota composition in Italian children with beta cell autoimmunity at risk for type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeis, Claudio; Martina, Alessia; Corradi, Massimiliano; Quarella, Sara; Nori, Nicole; Torriani, Sandra; Plebani, Mario; Contreas, Giovanna; Felis, Giovanna E

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatic organ-specific autoimmunity in subjects at risk for type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with increased intestinal permeability and an aberrant gut microbiota, but these factors have not yet been simultaneously investigated in the same subjects. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess both intestinal permeability and gut microbiota composition in an Italian sample of children at risk for T1D. Ten Italian children with beta cell autoimmunity at risk for T1D and 10 healthy children were involved in a case-control study. The lactulose/mannitol test was used to assess intestinal permeability. Analysis of microbiota composition was performed using polymerase chain reaction followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, based on the 16S rRNA gene. Intestinal permeability was significantly higher in children at risk for T1D than in healthy controls. Moreover, the gut microbiota of the former differed from that of the latter group: Three microorganisms were detected - Dialister invisus, Gemella sanguinis and Bifidobacterium longum - in association with the pre-pathologic state. The results of this study validated the hypothesis that increased intestinal permeability together with differences in microbiota composition are contemporaneously associated with the pre-pathological condition of T1D in a sample of Italian children. Further studies are necessary to confirm the microbial markers identified in this sample of children as well as to clarify the involvement of microbiota modifications in the mechanisms leading to increased permeability and the autoimmune mechanisms that promote diabetes onset. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Intestinal Permeability and Cellular Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from Mango (Mangifera indica cv. Ataulfo Peels

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    Ramón Pacheco-Ordaz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mango (Mangifera indica cv. Ataulfo peel contains bound phenolics that may be released by alkaline or acid hydrolysis and may be converted into less complex molecules. Free phenolics from mango cv. Ataulfo peel were obtained using a methanolic extraction, and their cellular antioxidant activity (CAA and permeability were compared to those obtained for bound phenolics released by alkaline or acid hydrolysis. Gallic acid was found as a simple phenolic acid after alkaline hydrolysis along with mangiferin isomers and quercetin as aglycone and glycosides. Only gallic acid, ethyl gallate, mangiferin, and quercetin were identified in the acid fraction. The acid and alkaline fractions showed the highest CAA (60.5% and 51.5% when tested at 125 µg/mL. The value of the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp across the Caco-2/HT-29 monolayer of gallic acid from the alkaline fraction was higher (2.61 × 10−6 cm/s than in the other fractions and similar to that obtained when tested pure (2.48 × 10−6 cm/s. In conclusion, mango peels contain bound phenolic compounds that, after their release, have permeability similar to pure compounds and exert an important CAA. This finding can be applied in the development of nutraceuticals using this important by-product from the mango processing industry.

  5. Gut Microbiota Richness and Composition and Dietary Intake of Overweight Pregnant Women Are Related to Serum Zonulin Concentration, a Marker for Intestinal Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkala, Kati; Röytiö, Henna; Munukka, Eveliina; Pietilä, Sami; Ekblad, Ulla; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Eerola, Erkki; Laiho, Asta; Laitinen, Kirsi

    2016-09-01

    Increased intestinal permeability may precede adverse metabolic conditions. The extent to which the composition of the gut microbiota and diet contribute to intestinal permeability during pregnancy is unknown. The aim was to investigate whether the gut microbiota and diet differ according to serum zonulin concentration, a marker of intestinal permeability, in overweight pregnant women. This cross-sectional study included 100 overweight women [mean age: 29 y; median body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 30] in early pregnancy (microbiota by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, and dietary intake of macro- and micronutrients from 3-d food diaries. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for pairwise comparisons and linear regression and Spearman's nonparametric correlations for relations between serum zonulin and other outcome variables. Women were divided into "low" (microbiota (Chao 1, observed species and phylogenetic diversity) was higher in the low zonulin group than in the high zonulin group (P = 0.01). The abundances of Bacteroidaceae and Veillonellaceae, Bacteroides and Blautia, and Blautia sp. were lower and of Faecalibacterium and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii higher (P composition of the gut microbiota and the intake of n-3 PUFAs, fiber, and a range of vitamins and minerals in overweight pregnant women are associated with serum zonulin concentration. Modification of the gut microbiota and diet may beneficially affect intestinal permeability, leading to improved metabolic health of both the mother and fetus. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01922791. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Conjugated primary bile salts reduce permeability of endotoxin through bacteria-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells and synergize with lecithin in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schaeckeler, Simone; Moser, Lydia

    2007-01-01

    : The effect of CPBS (0.5 mM and 1.5 mM), phosphatidylcholine(0.38 mM), and human bile (0.5% vol/vol) on the barrier function was assessed by the measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance, by endotoxin permeability through the intestinal epithelial cell layer, and by basolateral cytokine enzyme...

  7. Increased intestinal permeability to (51 Cr) EDTA is correlated with IgA immune complex-plasma levels in children with IgA-associated nephropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davin, J. C.; Forget, P.; Mahieu, P. R.

    1988-01-01

    Intestinal permeability was investigated in 10 normal young adults, in 11 control children and in 9 children presenting with either Berger disease (4 cases) or Henoch-Schönlein nephritis (5 cases), making use of (51 Cr) EDTA as a probe molecule. All subjects exhibited a normal creatinine clearance

  8. IMPROVEMENT OF INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY WITH ALANYL-GLUTAMINE IN HIV PATIENTS: a randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial

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    Roberio Dias LEITE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Glutamine is the main source of energy of the enterocyte and diarrhea and weight loss are frequent in HIV infected patients. Objective To determine the effect of alanyl-glutamine supplementation on intestinal permeability and absorption in these patients. Methods Randomized double-blinded, placebo-controlled study using isonitrogenous doses of alanyl-glutamine (24 g/day and placebo (glycine, 25 g/day during 10 days. Before and after this nutritional supplementation lactulose and mannitol urinary excretion were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Results Forty six patients with HIV/AIDS, 36 of whom were male, with 37.28 ± 3 (mean ± standard error years were enrolled. Twenty two and 24 subjects were treated with alanyl-glutamine and with glycine respectively. In nine patients among all in the study protocol that reported diarrhea in the 14 days preceding the beginning of the study, mannitol urinary excretion was significantly lower than patients who did not report this symptom [median (range: 10.51 (3.01–19.75 vs. 15.37 (3.93–46.73; P = 0.0281] and lactulose/mannitol ratio was significantly higher [median (range: 0.04 (0.00–2.89 vs. 0.02 (0.00–0.19; P = 0.0317]. There was also a significant increase in mannitol urinary excretion in the group treated with alanyl-glutamine [median (range: 14.38 (8.25–23.98 before vs 21.24 (6.27–32.99 after treatment; n = 14, P = 0.0382]. Conclusion Our results suggest that the integrity and intestinal absorption are more intensely affected in patients with HIV/AIDS who recently have had diarrhea. Additionally, nutritional supplementation with alanyl-glutamine was associated with an improvement in intestinal absorption.

  9. Sialic acids regulate microvessel permeability, revealed by novel in vivo studies of endothelial glycocalyx structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betteridge, Kai B.; Arkill, Kenton P.; Neal, Christopher R.; Harper, Steven J.; Foster, Rebecca R.; Satchell, Simon C.; Bates, David O.

    2017-01-01

    Key points We have developed novel techniques for paired, direct, real‐time in vivo quantification of endothelial glycocalyx structure and associated microvessel permeability.Commonly used imaging and analysis techniques yield measurements of endothelial glycocalyx depth that vary by over an order of magnitude within the same vessel.The anatomical distance between maximal glycocalyx label and maximal endothelial cell plasma membrane label provides the most sensitive and reliable measure of endothelial glycocalyx depth.Sialic acid residues of the endothelial glycocalyx regulate glycocalyx structure and microvessel permeability to both water and albumin. Abstract The endothelial glycocalyx forms a continuous coat over the luminal surface of all vessels, and regulates multiple vascular functions. The contribution of individual components of the endothelial glycocalyx to one critical vascular function, microvascular permeability, remains unclear. We developed novel, real‐time, paired methodologies to study the contribution of sialic acids within the endothelial glycocalyx to the structural and functional permeability properties of the same microvessel in vivo. Single perfused rat mesenteric microvessels were perfused with fluorescent endothelial cell membrane and glycocalyx labels, and imaged with confocal microscopy. A broad range of glycocalyx depth measurements (0.17–3.02 μm) were obtained with different labels, imaging techniques and analysis methods. The distance between peak cell membrane and peak glycocalyx label provided the most reliable measure of endothelial glycocalyx anatomy, correlating with paired, numerically smaller values of endothelial glycocalyx depth (0.078 ± 0.016 μm) from electron micrographs of the same portion of the same vessel. Disruption of sialic acid residues within the endothelial glycocalyx using neuraminidase perfusion decreased endothelial glycocalyx depth and increased apparent solute permeability to albumin in the same

  10. Acylation of salmon calcitonin modulates in vitro intestinal peptide flux through membrane permeability enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation, as well as increasing enzymatic stability and interactions with lipid cell membranes. Thus, acylation offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we...... hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the therapeutic peptide salmon calcitonin (sCT), which lowers blood calcium, by systematically increasing acyl chain length at two positions, in order to elucidate...... is due to a solubilization of the cell membrane, similar to transcellular oral permeation enhancers. The effect is dependent on pH, with larger effect at lower pH, and is impacted by acylation chain length and position. Compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, N-terminal acylation with a short chain...

  11. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition causes acute increases in glomerular permeability in vivo, dependent upon reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinina, Julia; Sverrisson, Kristinn; Rippe, Anna; Öberg, Carl M; Rippe, Bengt

    2016-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that the permeability of the glomerular filtration barrier (GFB) is partly regulated by a balance between the bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) and that of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been postulated that normal or moderately elevated NO levels protect the GFB from permeability increases, whereas ROS, through reducing the bioavailability of NO, have the opposite effect. We tested the tentative antagonism between NO and ROS on glomerular permeability in anaesthetized Wistar rats, in which the left ureter was cannulated for urine collection while simultaneously blood access was achieved. Rats were systemically infused with either l-NAME or l-NAME together with the superoxide scavenger Tempol, or together with l-arginine or the NO-donor DEA-NONOate, or the cGMP agonist 8-bromo-cGMP. To measure glomerular sieving coefficients (theta, θ) to Ficoll, rats were infused with FITC-Ficoll 70/400 (mol/radius 10-80 Å). Plasma and urine samples were analyzed by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) for determination of θ for Ficoll repeatedly during up to 2 h. l-NAME increased θ for Ficoll70Å from 2.27 ± 1.30 × 10(-5) to 8.46 ± 2.06 × 10(-5) (n = 6, P permeability and an inhibition was also observed with l-arginine and with 8-bromo-cGMP. In conclusion, acute NO synthase inhibition in vivo by l-NAME caused rapid increases in glomerular permeability, which could be reversed by either an ROS antagonist or by activating the guanylyl cyclase-cGMP pathway. The data strongly suggest a protective effect of NO in maintaining normal glomerular permeability in vivo. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. A tunable Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-culture model mimicking variable permeabilities of the human intestine obtained by an original seeding procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béduneau, Arnaud; Tempesta, Camille; Fimbel, Stéphane; Pellequer, Yann; Jannin, Vincent; Demarne, Frédéric; Lamprecht, Alf

    2014-07-01

    Standard monoculture models utilizing Caco-2 monolayers were extensively used to mimic the permeability of the human intestinal barrier. However, they exhibit numerous limitations such as the lack of mucus layer, an overestimation of the P-gp-mediated efflux and a low paracellular permeability. Here, we suggest a new procedure to set up an in vitro model of intestinal barrier to adjust gradually the properties of the absorption barrier. Mucin-secreting HT29-MTX cells were added to Caco-2 absorptive cells in a Transwell® at different time intervals. Effects of seeding day of HT29-MTX on the paracellular permeability of lucifer yellow (LY) and on the P-gp-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123 were investigated. Apparent permeability of the rhodamine 123 in the secretory direction was highly dependent on the seeding day of goblet cells. Transepithelial electrical resistance values and LY transport across the co-cultures in the apical-to-basolateral direction were intermediary between single Caco-2 and HT29-MTX models. Early seeding days of HT29-MTX allowed increasing the fraction of goblet cells in the co-culture. Co-culture permeability was unchanged between 21 and 30 days after Caco-2 seeding, corresponding to the period of use for Caco-2-based cell models. Thus, the HT29-MTX seeding day was a key factor to set up an in vitro intestinal model with tailor-made barrier properties in terms of P-gp expression and paracellular permeability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The utility of in vitro trials that use Caco-2 cell systems as a replacement for animal intestinal permeability and human bioequivalence measurements in drug development

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    Margarida Estudante

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Caco-2 cells have been widely used for in vitro intestinal permeability screening of new molecules in drug development but with some pitfalls. Limiting the application of Caco-2 permeability screening to passive compounds is difficult as the majority of approved drugs include both passive diffusion and active transport. The aim of this study was to evaluate Caco-2 cells utility in assessing effects of P-gp mediated efflux. For that purpose the study design included the highly soluble, highly permeable (class 1, verapamil and diltiazem, the highly soluble and poorly permeable drug (class 3 digoxin and the P-gp inhibitor GG918. The apparent permeability and efflux ratio (ER were calculated. Digoxin, a positive control for P-gp, presented an ER of 4, which decreased to around 1 by GG918 addition, consistent with a P-gp effect in Caco-2 cells. ER for verapamil and diltiazem was nearly 1 and the presence of GG918 resulted in no ERs changes. These results suggest that P-gp apparently plays a minimal role in transport of class 1 drugs across Caco-2 cells while class 3 drugs should be significantly affected by P-gp. It is suggested that Caco-2 cells may be useful to determine whether P-gp plays a relevant role in intestinal absorption.

  14. A simple method for the analysis of urinary sucralose for use in tests of intestinal permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A D G; Poon, P; Greenway, G M; MacFie, J

    2005-05-01

    Sucralose is a unique disaccharide probe which is stable in the colon and can be used to assess permeability over the whole gut. Additional information can be gained when sucralose is administered in combination with lactulose and a monosaccharide such as L-rhamnose in the form of a 'triple sugar test.' We describe a simple assay for urinary sucralose by HPLC with refractive index detection (HPLC-RI). Phenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (internal standard) was added to 10 mL of urine, which was then passed through a 0.45 microm syringe filter. Elution was with 30% methanol (1 mL/min) on a reverse-phase C18 column. Detection was by refractive index, and integration based upon peak areas. Sixty standards of sucralose in human urine were analysed in order to quantify analytical variation. The standard curve for urinary sucralose was linear from 25 to 500 mg/L (r>0.99). The limit of detection was 11 mg/L. Analytical recovery of sucralose at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 mg/L was 101.5% (CV 7.59%), 102.9% (CV 5.82%) and 105.0% (CV 4.26%), respectively. The technique described represents a simple assay for urinary sucralose which performed with acceptable accuracy and precision and should facilitate the use of the triple sugar test in clinical research.

  15. Bile acid malabsorption or disturbed intestinal permeability in patients treated with enzyme substitution for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is not caused by bacterial overgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Graff, Jesper; Philipsen, Else Kirstine

    2003-01-01

    permeability was assessed from urine excretion of ingested 14C-mannitol and 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA), and these data were compared with results for 10 age-matched healthy men. RESULTS: No patients had abnormal breath hydrogen or methane concentrations after glucose intake....... Abdominal retention of 75Se-HCAT was reduced in three of the patients. The patients had lower urine excretion of 14C-mannitol than the control subjects, whereas no difference was revealed in urine excretion of 99mTc-DTPA. CONCLUSION: Bile acid absorption and small intestinal permeability might be affected...

  16. The Microbiome Activates CD4 T-cell–mediated Immunity to Compensate for Increased Intestinal PermeabilitySummary

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    Karen L. Edelblum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Despite a prominent association, chronic intestinal barrier loss is insufficient to induce disease in human subjects or experimental animals. We hypothesized that compensatory mucosal immune activation might protect individuals with increased intestinal permeability from disease. We used a model in which intestinal barrier loss is triggered by intestinal epithelial-specific expression of constitutively active myosin light chain kinase (CA-MLCK. Here we asked whether constitutive tight junction barrier loss impacts susceptibility to enteric pathogens. Methods: Acute or chronic Toxoplasma gondii or Salmonella typhimurium infection was assessed in CA-MLCK transgenic or wild-type mice. Germ-free mice or those lacking specific immune cell populations were used to investigate the effect of microbial-activated immunity on pathogen translocation in the context of increased intestinal permeability. Results: Acute T gondii and S typhimurium translocation across the epithelial barrier was reduced in CA-MLCK mice. This protection was due to enhanced mucosal immune activation that required CD4+ T cells and interleukin 17A but not immunoglobulin A. The protective mucosal immune activation in CA-MLCK mice depended on segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB, because protection against early S typhimurium invasion was lost in germ-free CA-MLCK mice but could be restored by conventionalization with SFB-containing, not SFB-deficient, microbiota. In contrast, chronic S typhimurium infection was more severe in CA-MLCK mice, suggesting that despite activation of protective mucosal immunity, barrier defects ultimately result in enhanced disease progression. Conclusions: Increased epithelial tight junction permeability synergizes with commensal bacteria to promote intestinal CD4+ T-cell expansion and interleukin 17A production that limits enteric pathogen invasion. Keywords: Barrier Function, Tight Junction, Microbiota, CD4 T Cell, Mucosal Immunity

  17. Impact of ceftibuten on intestinal microflora: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gismondo, M R; Drago, L; Lombardi, A; Fassina, C

    1994-01-01

    The present study examines the possible interference of ceftibuten on intestinal microflora. In 60 germ-free mice, an intestinal microflora similar to the human one was implanted. The mice were then treated with a single dose and twice the therapeutic dose of ceftibuten. In another experiment, ten human volunteers were given ceftibuten in doses equivalent to 400 mg/day for 7 days in order to evaluate the ceftibuten faecal concentration, the possible interference on microflora and the quantity of indacan (as a measure of the bacterial metabolism in the gut) excreted in one day. The results obtained in vivo and in vitro have shown that ceftibuten in therapeutic doses does not alter the equilibrium of normal intestinal microflora.

  18. IL-36R signalling activates intestinal epithelial cells and fibroblasts and promotes mucosal healing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Kristina; Backert, Ingo; Wirtz, Stefan; Hueber, Axel; Schett, Georg; Vieth, Michael; Probst, Hans Christian; Bopp, Tobias; Neurath, Markus F; Neufert, Clemens

    2017-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-36R signalling plays a proinflammatory role in different organs including the skin, but the expression of IL-36R ligands and their molecular function in intestinal inflammation are largely unknown. We studied the characteristics of IL-36R ligand expression in IBDs and experimental colitis. The functional role of IL-36R signalling in the intestine was addressed in experimental colitis and wound healing models in vivo by using mice with defective IL-36R signalling (IL-36R-/-) or Myd88, neutralising anti-IL-36R antibodies, recombinant IL-36R ligands and RNA-seq genome expression analysis. Expression of IL-36α and IL-36γ was significantly elevated in active human IBD and experimental colitis. While IL-36γ was predominantly detected in nuclei of the intestinal epithelium, IL-36α was mainly found in the cytoplasm of CD14+ inflammatory macrophages. Functional studies showed that defective IL-36R signalling causes high susceptibility to acute dextran sodium sulfate colitis and impairs wound healing. Mechanistically, IL-36R ligands released upon mucosal damage activated IL-36R+ colonic fibroblasts via Myd88 thereby inducing expression of chemokines, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-6. Moreover, they induced proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and expression of the antimicrobial protein lipocalin 2. Finally, treatment of experimental intestinal wounds with IL-36R ligands significantly accelerated mucosal healing in vivo. IL-36R signalling is activated upon intestinal damage, stimulates IECs and fibroblasts and drives mucosal healing. Modulation of the IL-36R pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic strategy for induction of mucosal healing in IBD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Effective in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer to intestinal mucosa by VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasahara Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer to the gastrointestinal (GI mucosa is a therapeutic strategy which could prove particularly advantageous for treatment of various hereditary and acquired intestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, GI infections, and cancer. Methods We evaluated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein envelope (VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV for efficacy of gene transfer to both murine rectosigmoid colon in vivo and human colon explants ex vivo. LV encoding beta-galactosidase (LV-β-Gal or firefly-luciferase (LV-fLuc reporter genes were administered by intrarectal instillation in mice, or applied topically for ex vivo transduction of human colorectal explant tissues from normal individuals. Macroscopic and histological evaluations were performed to assess any tissue damage or inflammation. Transduction efficiency and systemic biodistribution were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR. LV-fLuc expression was evaluated by ex vivo bioluminescence imaging. LV-β-Gal expression and identity of transduced cell types were examined by histochemical and immunofluorescence staining. Results Imaging studies showed positive fLuc signals in murine distal colon; β-Gal-positive cells were found in both murine and human intestinal tissue. In the murine model, β-Gal-positive epithelial and lamina propria cells were found to express cytokeratin, CD45, and CD4. LV-transduced β-Gal-positive cells were also seen in human colorectal explants, consisting mainly of CD45, CD4, and CD11c-positive cells confined to the LP. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of LV-mediated gene transfer into colonic mucosa. We also identified differential patterns of mucosal gene transfer dependent on whether murine or human tissue was used. Within the limitations of the study, the LV did not appear to induce mucosal damage and were not distributed beyond the distal colon.

  20. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging for the Study of Intestinal Colonization by Escherichia coli in Mice▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, M.-L.; Thomas, L.; Goussard, S.; Branchini, B. R.; Grillot-Courvalin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is emerging as a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of infections in living animals. However, since luciferases are oxygenases, it has been suggested that the requirement for oxygen may limit the use of BLI in anaerobic environments, such as the lumen of the gut. Strains of Escherichia coli harboring the genes for either the bacterial luciferase from Photorhabdus luminescens or the PpyRE-TS and PpyGR-TS firefly luciferase mutants of Photinus pyralis (red and green thermostable P. pyralis luciferase mutants, respectively) have been engineered and used to monitor intestinal colonization in the streptomycin-treated mouse model. There was excellent correlation between the bioluminescence signal measured in the feces (R2 = 0.98) or transcutaneously in the abdominal region of whole animals (R2 = 0.99) and the CFU counts in the feces of bacteria harboring the luxABCDE operon. Stability in vivo of the bioluminescence signal was achieved by constructing plasmid pAT881(pGB2ΩPamiluxABCDE), which allowed long-term monitoring of intestinal colonization without the need for antibiotic selection for plasmid maintenance. Levels of intestinal colonization by various strains of E. coli could be compared directly by simple recording of the bioluminescence signal in living animals. The difference in spectra of light emission of the PpyRE-TS and PpyGR-TS firefly luciferase mutants and dual bioluminescence detection allowed direct in vitro and in vivo quantification of two bacterial populations by measurement of red and green emitted signals and thus monitoring of the two populations simultaneously. This system offers a simple and direct method to study in vitro and in vivo competition between mutants and the parental strain. BLI is a useful tool to study intestinal colonization. PMID:19880653

  1. In vivo bioluminescence imaging for the study of intestinal colonization by Escherichia coli in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, M-L; Thomas, L; Goussard, S; Branchini, B R; Grillot-Courvalin, C

    2010-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is emerging as a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of infections in living animals. However, since luciferases are oxygenases, it has been suggested that the requirement for oxygen may limit the use of BLI in anaerobic environments, such as the lumen of the gut. Strains of Escherichia coli harboring the genes for either the bacterial luciferase from Photorhabdus luminescens or the PpyRE-TS and PpyGR-TS firefly luciferase mutants of Photinus pyralis (red and green thermostable P. pyralis luciferase mutants, respectively) have been engineered and used to monitor intestinal colonization in the streptomycin-treated mouse model. There was excellent correlation between the bioluminescence signal measured in the feces (R2=0.98) or transcutaneously in the abdominal region of whole animals (R2=0.99) and the CFU counts in the feces of bacteria harboring the luxABCDE operon. Stability in vivo of the bioluminescence signal was achieved by constructing plasmid pAT881(pGB2OmegaPamiluxABCDE), which allowed long-term monitoring of intestinal colonization without the need for antibiotic selection for plasmid maintenance. Levels of intestinal colonization by various strains of E. coli could be compared directly by simple recording of the bioluminescence signal in living animals. The difference in spectra of light emission of the PpyRE-TS and PpyGR-TS firefly luciferase mutants and dual bioluminescence detection allowed direct in vitro and in vivo quantification of two bacterial populations by measurement of red and green emitted signals and thus monitoring of the two populations simultaneously. This system offers a simple and direct method to study in vitro and in vivo competition between mutants and the parental strain. BLI is a useful tool to study intestinal colonization.

  2. Human uremic plasma increases microvascular permeability to water and proteins in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Steven J; Tomson, Charles R V; Bates, David O

    2002-04-01

    The risk of cardiovascular disease is significantly higher in patients with long-term uremia than in otherwise healthy adults. This is true even before patients proceed to dialysis, but the reason why cardiovascular risk is increased is unknown. Transvascular transport of lipids and other macromolecules in both large vessels and the microcirculation has been implicated in generation of cardiovascular disease. To determine whether patients with long-term uremia have circulating factors that promote increased vascular permeability, we measured the effect of perfusing microvessels with uremic plasma in a non-mammalian model of vascular permeability measurement. Perfusion of frog mesenteric microvessels with dialyzed normal plasma did not result in an increase in either hydraulic conductivity (Lp, permeability of the vessel wall to water) or oncotic reflection coefficient (sigma, permeability to macromolecules, particularly proteins). Perfusion with dialyzed uremic plasma resulted in a very significant increase in vascular permeability to both water (Lp increased 8.8-fold from 4.1 to 36.4 x 10(-7) cm x s(-1) cm H2O(-1)) and proteins (sigma reduced from 0.93 to 0.53). These results suggest that one or more circulating macromolecules in uremic plasma are able to increase transvascular solute and fluid flux, and may underlie the increased cardiovascular risk found in these patients.

  3. A sustained release formulation of novel quininib-hyaluronan microneedles inhibits angiogenesis and retinal vascular permeability in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Orla; Srivastava, Akshay; Carroll, Oliver; Kulkarni, Rajiv; Dykes, Steve; Vickers, Steven; Dickinson, Keith; Reynolds, Alison L; Kilty, Claire; Redmond, Gareth; Jones, Rob; Cheetham, Sharon; Pandit, Abhay; Kennedy, Breandán N

    2016-07-10

    Pathologic neovascularisation and ocular permeability are hallmarks of proliferative diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Current pharmacologic interventions targeting VEGF are effective in only 30-60% of patients and require multiple intraocular injections associated with iatrogenic infection. Thus, our goal is to develop novel small molecule drugs that are VEGF-independent are amenable to sustained ocular-release, and which reduce retinal angiogenesis and retinal vascular permeability. Here, the anti-angiogenic drug quininib was formulated into hyaluronan (HA) microneedles whose safety and efficacy was evaluated in vivo. Quininib-HA microneedles were formulated via desolvation from quininib-HA solution and subsequent cross-linking with 4-arm-PEG-amine prior to freeze-drying. Scanning electron microscopy revealed hollow needle-shaped particle ultrastructure, with a zeta potential of -35.5mV determined by electrophoretic light scattering. The incorporation efficiency and pharmacokinetic profile of quininib released in vitro from the microneedles was quantified by HPLC. Quininib incorporation into these microneedles was 90%. In vitro, 20% quininib was released over 4months; or in the presence of increasing concentrations of hyaluronidase, 60% incorporated quininib was released over 4months. Zebrafish hyaloid vasculature assays demonstrated quininib released from these microneedles significantly (pmicroneedles allow for sustained release of quininib; are safe in vivo and quininib released from these microneedles effectively inhibits angiogenesis and RVP in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of intestinal strictures: microscopic and macroscopic assessment in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Lei, Hao; Johnson, Laura A.; Moons, David S.; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Qifa; Rice, Michael D.; Ni, Jun; Wang, Xueding; Higgins, Peter D. R.

    2017-03-01

    The pathology of Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by obstructing intestinal strictures because of inflammation (with high levels of hemoglobin), fibrosis (high levels of collagen), or a combination of both. Inflammatory strictures are medically treated. Fibrotic strictures have to be removed surgically. The accurate characterization of the strictures is therefore critical for the management of CD. Currently the comprehensive assessment of a stricture is difficult, as the standard diagnostic procedure, endoscopic biopsy, is superficial and with limited locations as well as depth. In our previous studies, photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recovered the layered architectures and the relative content of the molecular components in human and animal tissues ex vivo. This study will investigate the capability of multispectral PAI in resolving the architecture and the molecular components of intestinal strictures in rats in vivo. PA images at 532, 1210 and 1310 nm targeting the strong optical absorption of hemoglobin, lipid and collagen were acquired using two approaches. A compact linear array, CL15-7, was used to transcutaneously acquire PA signals generated by the a fiber optics diffuser positioned within the inner lumen of the strictures. Another approach was to use an endoscopic capsule probe for acoustic resolution PA microscopy. The capsule probe is designed for human and therefore cannot fit into rat colon. The inner surface of the intestinal stricture was exposed and the probe was attached to the diseased location for imaging. The findings in PA images were confirmed by histology results.

  5. Lubiprostone improves intestinal permeability in humans, a novel therapy for the leaky gut: A prospective randomized pilot study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takayuki; Honda, Yasushi; Kurita, Yusuke; Iwasaki, Akito; Sato, Takamitsu; Kessoku, Takaomi; Uchiyama, Shiori; Ogawa, Yuji; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Higurashi, Takuma; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Usuda, Haruki; Wada, Koichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    The barrier function of the small intestinal mucosa prevents the introduction of undesired pathogens into the body. Breakdown of this barrier function increases intestinal permeability. This has been proposed to induce not only gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, but also various other diseases, including allergies, diabetes mellitus, liver diseases, and collagen diseases, which are associated with this so called "leaky gut syndrome." As such, a method to prevent leaky gut syndrome would have substantial clinical value. However, no drugs have been demonstrated to improve disturbed intestinal permeability in humans to date. Therefore, we investigated whether a drug used to treat chronic constipation, lubiprostone, was effective for this purpose. Healthy male volunteers were treated with lubiprostone (24 μg/day) for 28 days. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by measuring the lactulose-mannitol ratio (LMR) after administration of diclofenac and compared with an untreated group. The examination was conducted three times in total, i.e., at baseline before diclofenac administration and after 14 and 28 days of lubiprostone treatment. Blood endotoxin activity was also evaluated at the same time points. The final analysis was conducted on 28 subjects (14 in the lubiprostone group and 14 in the untreated group). The LMR after 28 days of treatment was significantly lower in the lubiprostone group than that in the untreated group (0.017 vs. 0.028, respectively; 95% confidence interval, -0.022--0.0001; p = 0.049). Blood endotoxin activity exhibited almost no change over time in the lubiprostone and untreated groups and displayed no significant differences at any time point of examination. This study is the first to report an improvement in leaky gut using an available drug in humans. The result suggests that lubiprostone may prevent and ameliorate "leaky gut syndrome". However, a pivotal trial is needed to confirm

  6. Lubiprostone improves intestinal permeability in humans, a novel therapy for the leaky gut: A prospective randomized pilot study in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Kato

    Full Text Available The barrier function of the small intestinal mucosa prevents the introduction of undesired pathogens into the body. Breakdown of this barrier function increases intestinal permeability. This has been proposed to induce not only gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, but also various other diseases, including allergies, diabetes mellitus, liver diseases, and collagen diseases, which are associated with this so called "leaky gut syndrome." As such, a method to prevent leaky gut syndrome would have substantial clinical value. However, no drugs have been demonstrated to improve disturbed intestinal permeability in humans to date. Therefore, we investigated whether a drug used to treat chronic constipation, lubiprostone, was effective for this purpose.Healthy male volunteers were treated with lubiprostone (24 μg/day for 28 days. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by measuring the lactulose-mannitol ratio (LMR after administration of diclofenac and compared with an untreated group. The examination was conducted three times in total, i.e., at baseline before diclofenac administration and after 14 and 28 days of lubiprostone treatment. Blood endotoxin activity was also evaluated at the same time points.The final analysis was conducted on 28 subjects (14 in the lubiprostone group and 14 in the untreated group. The LMR after 28 days of treatment was significantly lower in the lubiprostone group than that in the untreated group (0.017 vs. 0.028, respectively; 95% confidence interval, -0.022--0.0001; p = 0.049. Blood endotoxin activity exhibited almost no change over time in the lubiprostone and untreated groups and displayed no significant differences at any time point of examination.This study is the first to report an improvement in leaky gut using an available drug in humans. The result suggests that lubiprostone may prevent and ameliorate "leaky gut syndrome". However, a pivotal trial is needed

  7. In vitro and in vivo activation of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore using triiodothyronine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Endlicher, R.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Červinková, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 2 (2016), s. 321-331 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : rat liver mitochondria * membrane permeability transition pore * thyroid hormones Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  8. Effect of Layer-by-Layer (LbL) Encapsulation of Nano-Emulsified Fish Oil on Their Digestibility Ex Vivo and Skin Permeability In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eun Young; Hong, Ki Bae; Son, Heung Soo; Suh, Hyung Joo; Park, Yooheon

    2016-06-01

    Omega-3 rich fish oils are extremely labile, thus requiring control of oxidation and off flavor development. A recently proposed emulsification method, layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition, was found to be a plausible method to enhance the characteristics of bioactive ingredients, especially lipids. The present work was designed to test the possibility of enhancing the uptake and utilization of omega-3 fatty acids present in fish oil. The bioavailability of nano-emulsified fish oil was monitored in terms of intestinal absorption as well as skin permeability by using the everted intestinal sac model and Franz cell model. The skin permeability and intestinal absorption characteristics was significantly improved by LbL emulsification with lecithin/chitosan/low methoxypectin. Multilayer encapsulation along with nano-emulsification can be a useful method to deliver biologically active lipids and related components, such as fish oil. The protective effect of this tool from lipid oxidation still needs to be verified.

  9. Modeling placental transport: correlation of in vitro BeWo cell permeability and ex vivo human placental perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Marie Sønnegaard; Rytting, Erik; Mose, Tina

    2009-01-01

    . Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system. J. Toxicol. Environ. Health, Part A 71, 984-991]. In this work, the transport of these same three compounds, plus the reference compound antipyrine, was investigated using BeWo (b30) cell monolayers. Transport......The placental passage of three compounds with different physicochemical properties was recently investigated in ex vivo human placental perfusion experiments (caffeine, benzoic acid, and glyphosate) [Mose, T., Kjaerstad, M.B., Mathiesen, L., Nielsen, J.B., Edelfors, S., Knudsen, L.E., 2008...... across the BeWo cells was observed in the rank order of caffeine>antipyrine>benzoic acid>glyphosate in terms of both the apparent permeability coefficient and the initial slope, defined as the linear rate of substance transferred to the fetal compartment as percent per time, a parameter used to compare...

  10. VEGF increases the permeability of sheep pleura ex vivo through VEGFR2 stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, Vasiliki I; Arsenopoulou, Zoi V; Zarogiannis, Sotirios G; Deligiorgi, Triantafyllia; Jagirdar, Rajesh; Makantasis, Ioannis; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Molyvdas, Paschalis-Adam; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Hatzoglou, Chrissi

    2014-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a cytokine that increases vascular permeability to water and proteins and induces angiogenesis, has been implicated in the development of pleural effusions. Inflammatory and malignant pleural effusions are rich in VEGF content while mesothelial cells produce and excrete VEGF. In this report we aimed at investigating by means of electrophysiology the direct effects of VEGF on the parietal and visceral sheep pleura as well as the type of receptors that mediate this effect. Our findings show that VEGF has a direct effect on the pleural mesothelium rendering it more permeable and this effect is mediated through the stimulation of VEGF receptor 2. Our findings shed more light to the role of VEGF in the pathogenesis of pleural effusions and provide functional evidence for a role of VEGFR2 on the pleural mesothelium that has never been studied before. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a vivo rabbit ligated intestinal Loop Model for HCMV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jin; Wu, Qiaoxing; Tang, Xinming; Shi, Ruihan; Suo, Jingxia; Huang, Guangping; An, Junqing; Wang, Jingyuan; Yang, Jinling; Hao, Wenzhuo; She, Ruiping; Suo, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections can be found throughout the body, especially in epithelial tissue. Animal model was established by inoculation of HCMV (strain AD-169) or coinoculation with Hepatitis E virus (HEV) into the ligated sacculus rotundus and vermiform appendix in living rabbits. The specimens were collected from animals sacrificed 1 and a half hours after infection. The virus was found to be capable of reproducing in these specimens through RT-PCR and Western-blot. Severe inflammation damage was found in HCMV-infected tissue. The viral protein could be detected in high amounts in the mucosal epithelium and lamina propria by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescense. Moreover, there are strong positive signals in lymphocytes, macrophages, and lymphoid follicles. Quantitative statistics indicate that lymphocytes among epithlium cells increased significantly in viral infection groups. The results showed that HCMV or HEV + HCMV can efficiently infect in rabbits by vivo ligated intestine loop inoculation. The present study successfully developed an infective model in vivo rabbit ligated intestinal Loop for HCMV pathogenesis study. This rabbit model can be helpful for understanding modulation of the gut immune system with HCMV infection.

  12. Vitamin A1 intestinal absorption in vivo: influence of luminal factors on transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, D; Muralidhara, K S

    1977-05-01

    Intestinal absorption of [3H]retinol was studied in the unanesthetized rat. Luminal perfusate was recirculated through isolated intestinal segments with intact vascular and lymphatic circulation. Apparent saturation kinetics were found in physiological concentrations of retinol, whereas a linear relationship between the concentration and absorption rate was found at pharmacological concentrations of retinol in the perfusate. In physiological concentrations, retinol uptake in vitro by everted gut sacs was unaffected by anoxia or metabolic inhibitors and uncouplers. In vivo retinol absorption rate was decreased when sodium taurocholate concentration was raised above 5 mM, or when 2.5 mM linoleic or linolenic acids were added to the perfusate. Absorption increased markedly as the thickness of the unstirred water layer was diminished. Variations in perfusate pH from 4.5 to 8.6 did not change the retinol absorption rate. In vivo absorption of retinol in physiological concentrations is mediated by a saturable, carrier-mediated passive absorption mechanism modified by the presence of fatty acids of varying chain length.

  13. Extensive intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene in vivo in pigs and impact for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thörn, Helena Anna; Yasin, Mohammed; Dickinson, Paul Alfred; Lennernäs, Hans

    2012-09-01

    In this study an advanced multisampling site pig model, with simultaneous venous blood sampling pre- and post liver, was applied to quantify the role of the intestine in relation to the liver in first-pass glucuronidation of raloxifene in vivo. The pharmacokinetic of raloxifene (a BCS/BDDCS class II compound) in humans is characterized by extensive metabolism (>90%) and the major metabolite is the 4'-β-glucuronide (R-4-G). Following intra-jejunal (i.j.) single dose administration in pigs raloxifene was metabolized in the gut (E(G)) during first-pass to more than 70% and a high concentration (AUC(0-6 h) ratio R-4-G/raloxifene >100) of R-4-G was reached in the portal vein. The hepatic extraction (E(H)) of raloxifene was ~50% and as in humans the bioavailability become low (~7%) in pigs. Interestingly the E(H) of raloxifene and R-4-G was time-dependent after i.j. administration. It is clear that the gut was the dominating organ in first-pass extraction of raloxifene in vivo in pigs. The quantification in this study support earlier human data and emphasize that intestinal glucuronidation should be considered early in the pharmaceutical development.

  14. Evaluation of superporous hydrogel (SPH) and SPH composite in porcine intestine ex-vivo: assessment of drug transport, morphology effect, and mechanical fixation to intestinal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorkoosh, Farid A; Borchard, Gerrit; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza; Verhoef, J Coos; Junginger, Hans E

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of superporous hydrogel (SPH) and SPH composite (SPHC) polymers to enhance the transport of N-alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine ethylester (BAEE) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4400 (FD4) across porcine intestinal epithelium ex-vivo, and to study any possible morphological damage to the epithelium by applying these polymers. In addition, the ability of these polymers to attach to the gut wall by mechanical pressure was examined by using a specifically designed centrifuge model. The transport of BAEE and FD4 across the intestinal mucosa was enhanced 2- to 3-fold by applying SPHC polymer in comparison to negative control. No significant morphological damage was observed by applying these polymers inside the intestinal lumen. Moreover, the SPH and SPHC polymers were able to attach mechanically to the intestinal wall by swelling and did not move in the intestinal lumen even when a horizontal force of 13 gms(-2) was applied. In conclusion, these polymers are appropriate vehicles for enhancing the intestinal absorption of peptide and protein drugs.

  15. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Stecca, Laura; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO2) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO2 NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO2 NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO2 NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm2 levels of TiO2 NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO2 NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  16. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.maranghi@iss.it [Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Stecca, Laura [European Commission-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection Chemical assessment and Testing Unit, Via E. Fermi, 2749I-21027 Ispra (Italy)

    2015-06-23

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO{sub 2} NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO{sub 2} NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO{sub 2} NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm{sup 2} levels of TiO{sub 2} NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO{sub 2} NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  17. Transcranial direct current stimulation transiently increases the blood-brain barrier solute permeability in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Da Wi; Khadka, Niranjan; Fan, Jie; Bikson, Marom; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-03-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive electrical stimulation technique investigated for a broad range of medical and performance indications. Whereas prior studies have focused exclusively on direct neuron polarization, our hypothesis is that tDCS directly modulates endothelial cells leading to transient changes in blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability (P) that are highly meaningful for neuronal activity. For this, we developed state-of-the-art imaging and animal models to quantify P to various sized solutes after tDCS treatment. tDCS was administered using a constant current stimulator to deliver a 1mA current to the right frontal cortex of rat (approximately 2 mm posterior to bregma and 2 mm right to sagittal suture) to obtain similar physiological outcome as that in the human tDCS application studies. Sodium fluorescein (MW=376), or FITC-dextrans (20K and 70K), in 1% BSA mammalian Ringer was injected into the rat (SD, 250-300g) cerebral circulation via the ipsilateral carotid artery by a syringe pump at a constant rate of ~3 ml/min. To determine P, multiphoton microscopy with 800-850 nm wavelength laser was applied to take the images from the region of interest (ROI) with proper microvessels, which are 100-200 micron below the pia mater. It shows that the relative increase in P is about 8-fold for small solute, sodium fluorescein, ~35-fold for both intermediate sized (Dex-20k) and large (Dex-70k) solutes, 10 min after 20 min tDCS pretreatment. All of the increased permeability returns to the control after 20 min post treatment. The results confirmed our hypothesis.

  18. Variants of β-casofensin, a bioactive milk peptide, differently modulate the intestinal barrier: In vivo and ex vivo studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Jérémie; Nicolas, Aurélie; Pesenti, Sandra; Schwarz, Jessica; Simon, Jean-Luc; Léonil, Joëlle; Plaisancié, Pascale

    2017-05-01

    β-Casofensin is a bioactive milk peptide that modulates the intestinal barrier, particularly through its action on goblet cells. β-Casofensin corresponds to fragment (f) 94-123 of the bovine β-casein (β-CN) A2 variant. Fifteen genetic variants of bovine β-CN (A1-3, B-G, H1-2, I-L) are known, of which the A2, A1, and B forms are the most common. These variants differ from each other by the substitution of one or more amino acids, some of which are localized in f94 to 123. The aim of our study was to compare the intestinal effects of β-casofensin A2 and its 3 main variants: A1, A3, and B. For this purpose, a solution (0.1 µM; 10 μL/g of body weight, postnatal d 10-20) containing β-casofensin A2, one of its variants (A1, A3, or B), or drinking water (control; CT) was administered to rat pups orally. After euthanasia (postnatal d 20), intestinal segments were collected for biochemical and histochemical analysis and also used to determine paracellular permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled 4-kDa dextran in an Ussing chamber. We also studied the direct effects of β-casofensin A2 and its A1 variant on the paracellular permeability of jejunum segments of adult rats. β-Casofensin A2 and its B variant significantly increased the population of goblet cells compared with the CT, A1, and A3 groups. The mucin 2 mRNA level was significantly higher in the β-casofensin A2 group than in the CT, A3, and B groups. Our results also revealed that the protein expression of zonula occludens-1 and occludin was reduced in the jejunum of rats in the A1, A3, and B groups compared with the CT group. However, the A1 variant was the only peptide to decrease jejunal permeability compared with the CT group. This variant, tested directly in the apical compartment of an Ussing chamber at a concentration of 0.1 nM, also reduced jejunal permeability. In conclusion, the substitution of a single amino acid alters the effect of β-CN sequence f94 to 123 on goblet cells and on

  19. Validation and Optimization of an Ex Vivo Assay of Intestinal Mucosal Biopsies in Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadstrup, Kasper; Galsgaard, Elisabeth Douglas; Gerwien, Jens

    2016-01-01

    are non-responders. This study demonstrates this version of an ex vivo culture as a valid and robust assay to assess inflammation in mucosal biopsies and test of the efficacy of novel drug candidates and current treatments on individual patients-potentially for a personalized medicine approach....... human explant method to test drug candidates and pathophysiological conditions in CD intestinal biopsies. Mucosal biopsies from 27 CD patients and 6 healthy individuals were collected to validate an explant assay test where the polarized tissue was cultured on a novel metal mesh disk, slightly immersed......Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic illness demanding better therapeutics. The marketed biologics only benefit some patients or elicit diminishing effect over time. To complement the known methods in drug development and to obtain patient specific drug responses, we optimized and validated a known...

  20. Vitamin K1 intestinal absorption in vivo: influence of luminal contents on transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, D; Rim, E; Muralidhara, K S

    1977-01-01

    Intestinal absorption of [3H]phylloquinone was investigated in the unanesthetized rat by the use of a technique of recirculating perfused isolated intestinal segments. Apparent saturation kinetics were found as the concentration of the vitamin in the perfusate was increased in a stepwise fashion from 15 nM to 300 muM. Alkalinization of the perfusate or the addition of 2.5 mM linoleic acid to the perfusate caused a significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in the absorption rate of phylloquinone. Modifications in the perfusate concentration of sodium taurocholate, the substitution of a nonionic detergent (Pluronic F-68) for sodium taurocholate, the addition of medium- and long-chain saturated fatty acids, or the addition of vitamins K2 and K3 to the perfusate did not alter the absorption rate of the vitamin. Decreasing the thickness of the unstirred water layer by increasing the perfusion rate caused a significant increase in phylloquinone absorption rate. In vivo absorption of vitamin K1 appears to be mediated by an energy requiring saturable transport mechanism. The composition of the perfusate, its pH, and its rate of flow are all important determinants of vitamin K1 absorption rate.

  1. Cell-permeable peptides improve cellular uptake and therapeutic gene delivery of replication-deficient viruses in cells and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Jean-Philippe; Yu, Jun; Griffith, Jason W; Babbitt, Roger W; Scotland, Ramona S; Hickey, Reed; Giordano, Frank J; Sessa, William C

    2003-03-01

    Small polybasic peptides derived from the transduction domains of certain proteins, such as the third alpha-helix of the Antennapedia (Antp) homeodomain, can cross the cell membrane through a receptor-independent mechanism. These cell-permeable molecules have been used as 'Trojan horses' to introduce biologically active cargo molecules such as DNA, peptides or proteins into cells. Using these cell-permeable peptides, we have developed an efficient and simple method to increase virally mediated gene delivery and protein expression in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that cell-permeable peptides increase viral cell entry, improve gene expression at reduced titers of virus and improve efficacy of therapeutically relevant genes in vivo.

  2. Sorbitol increases muscle glucose uptake ex vivo and inhibits intestinal glucose absorption ex vivo and in normal and type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that sorbitol, a known polyol sweetener, possesses glycemic control potentials. However, the effect of sorbitol on intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake still remains elusive. The present study investigated the effects of sorbitol on intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake as possible anti-hyperglycemic or glycemic control potentials using ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. Sorbitol (2.5% to 20%) inhibited glucose absorption in isolated rat jejuna (IC50 = 14.6% ± 4.6%) and increased glucose uptake in isolated rat psoas muscle with (GU50 = 3.5% ± 1.6%) or without insulin (GU50 = 7.0% ± 0.5%) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, sorbitol significantly delayed gastric emptying, accelerated digesta transit, inhibited intestinal glucose absorption, and reduced blood glucose increase in both normoglycemic and type 2 diabetic rats after 1 h of coingestion with glucose. Data of this study suggest that sorbitol exhibited anti-hyperglycemic potentials, possibly via increasing muscle glucose uptake ex vivo and reducing intestinal glucose absorption in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. Hence, sorbitol may be further investigated as a possible anti-hyperglycemic sweetener.

  3. Study on the small intestine absorptive kinetics characters of tanshinol and protocatechualdehyde of Salvia miltiorrhiza extracts in rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kai; Zhai, Shuiting; Zhang, Zhidong; Wang, Guoquan; Fu, Xiaoyang; Li, Tianxiao

    2016-07-01

    In order to provide scientific basis for clinical selection of drugs, to compare and analyze the effective constitutes and the intestinal absorption in vivo in rats of the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills (taken as the representatives). Determine the contents of tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid B and tanshinone II A, cryptotanshinone, ginseng saponin Rg1 and Rb1 in the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The intestinal absorption condition of the tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid B of the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills in rats were detected by intestinal perfusion experiment. Only the intake of protocatechuic aldehyde in the compound salvia tablets was higher than in the compound dropping pills, the intake of the other 6 effective constitutes were all lower than in the compound dropping pills. The intestinal absorption of protocatechuic aldehyde was rather complete, while the intestinal absorption of tanshinol and salvianolic acid B were not significant. The duodenum was the main absorption region of these three components. The absorption of protocatechuic aldehyde was different in different regions of the intestines. Each intake of the effective constitutes in the tablets and dropping pills were significantly different, and the rat intestinal absorption of part of the components were different.

  4. Evaluation of the intestinal permeability of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extract polyphenols and terpenoids in Caco-2 cell monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arráez-Román, David; González-Álvarez, Isabel; Ibáñez, Elena; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Bermejo, Marival; Micol, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is grown throughout the world and is widely used as a medicinal herb and to season and preserve food. Rosemary polyphenols and terpenoids have attracted great interest due to their potential health benefits. However, complete information regarding their absorption and bioavailability in Caco-2 cell model is scarce. The permeation properties of the bioactive compounds (flavonoids, diterpenes, triterpenes and phenylpropanoids) of a rosemary extract (RE), obtained by supercritical fluid extraction, was studied in Caco-2 cell monolayer model, both in a free form or liposomed. Compounds were identified and quantitated by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS), and the apparent permeability values (Papp) were determined, for the first time in the extract, for 24 compounds in both directions across cell monolayer. For some compounds, such as triterpenoids and some flavonoids, Papp values found were reported for the first time in Caco-2 cells.Our results indicate that most compounds are scarcely absorbed, and passive diffusion is suggested to be the primary mechanism of absorption. The use of liposomes to vehiculize the extract resulted in reduced permeability for most compounds. Finally, the biopharmaceutical classification (BCS) of all the compounds was achieved according to their permeability and solubility data for bioequivalence purposes. BCS study reveal that most of the RE compounds could be classified as classes III and IV (low permeability); therefore, RE itself should also be classified into this category. PMID:28234919

  5. Evaluation of the intestinal permeability of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extract polyphenols and terpenoids in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, Almudena; Borrás-Linares, Isabel; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Arráez-Román, David; González-Álvarez, Isabel; Ibáñez, Elena; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Bermejo, Marival; Micol, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is grown throughout the world and is widely used as a medicinal herb and to season and preserve food. Rosemary polyphenols and terpenoids have attracted great interest due to their potential health benefits. However, complete information regarding their absorption and bioavailability in Caco-2 cell model is scarce. The permeation properties of the bioactive compounds (flavonoids, diterpenes, triterpenes and phenylpropanoids) of a rosemary extract (RE), obtained by supercritical fluid extraction, was studied in Caco-2 cell monolayer model, both in a free form or liposomed. Compounds were identified and quantitated by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS), and the apparent permeability values (Papp) were determined, for the first time in the extract, for 24 compounds in both directions across cell monolayer. For some compounds, such as triterpenoids and some flavonoids, Papp values found were reported for the first time in Caco-2 cells.Our results indicate that most compounds are scarcely absorbed, and passive diffusion is suggested to be the primary mechanism of absorption. The use of liposomes to vehiculize the extract resulted in reduced permeability for most compounds. Finally, the biopharmaceutical classification (BCS) of all the compounds was achieved according to their permeability and solubility data for bioequivalence purposes. BCS study reveal that most of the RE compounds could be classified as classes III and IV (low permeability); therefore, RE itself should also be classified into this category.

  6. Evaluation of the intestinal permeability of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract polyphenols and terpenoids in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Pérez-Sánchez

    Full Text Available Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis is grown throughout the world and is widely used as a medicinal herb and to season and preserve food. Rosemary polyphenols and terpenoids have attracted great interest due to their potential health benefits. However, complete information regarding their absorption and bioavailability in Caco-2 cell model is scarce. The permeation properties of the bioactive compounds (flavonoids, diterpenes, triterpenes and phenylpropanoids of a rosemary extract (RE, obtained by supercritical fluid extraction, was studied in Caco-2 cell monolayer model, both in a free form or liposomed. Compounds were identified and quantitated by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS, and the apparent permeability values (Papp were determined, for the first time in the extract, for 24 compounds in both directions across cell monolayer. For some compounds, such as triterpenoids and some flavonoids, Papp values found were reported for the first time in Caco-2 cells.Our results indicate that most compounds are scarcely absorbed, and passive diffusion is suggested to be the primary mechanism of absorption. The use of liposomes to vehiculize the extract resulted in reduced permeability for most compounds. Finally, the biopharmaceutical classification (BCS of all the compounds was achieved according to their permeability and solubility data for bioequivalence purposes. BCS study reveal that most of the RE compounds could be classified as classes III and IV (low permeability; therefore, RE itself should also be classified into this category.

  7. Endothelial permeability in vitro and in vivo: protective actions of ANP and omapatrilat in experimental atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiki, Tomoko; Izumi, Ririko; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Larsen, Amy M; Sandberg, Sharon M; Burnett, John C

    2013-10-01

    Increased arterial endothelial cell permeability (ECP) is considered an initial step in atherosclerosis. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) which is rapidly degraded by neprilysin (NEP) may reduce injury-induced endothelial cell leakiness. Omapatrilat represents a first in class of pharmacological agents which inhibits both NEP and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). We hypothesized that ANP prevents thrombin-induced increases of ECP in human aortic ECs (HAECs) and that omapatrilat would reduce aortic leakiness and atherogenesis and enhance ANP mediated vasorelaxation of isolated aortas. Thrombin induced ECP determined by I(125) albumin flux was assessed in HAECs with and without ANP pretreatment. Next we examined the effects of chronic oral administration of omapatrilat (12 mg/kg/day, n=13) or placebo (n=13) for 8 weeks on aortic leakiness, atherogenesis and ANP-mediated vasorelaxation in isolated aortas in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis produced by high cholesterol diet. In HAECs, thrombin-induced increases in ECP were prevented by ANP. Omapatrilat reduced the area of increased aortic leakiness determined by Evans-blue dye and area of atheroma formation assessed by Oil-Red staining compared to placebo. In isolated arterial rings, omapatrilat enhanced vasorelaxation to ANP compared to placebo with and without the endothelium. ANP prevents thrombin-induced increases in ECP in HAECs. Chronic oral administration of omapatrilat reduces aortic leakiness and atheroma formation with enhanced endothelial independent vasorelaxation to ANP. These studies support the therapeutic potential of dual inhibition of NEP and ACE in the prevention of increased arterial ECP and atherogenesis which may be linked to the ANP/cGMP system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ethosomal Hydrogel of Raloxifene HCl: Statistical Optimization & Ex Vivo Permeability Evaluation Across Microporated Pig Ear Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Hetal P; Savsani, Hitesh; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    The oral bioavailability of Raloxifene hydrochloride, an FDA approved selective estrogen receptor modulator, is severely limited due to its poor aqueous solubility and extensive first pass metabolism. The Present work focuses on the development of ethosomal hydrogel for transdermal delivery of Raloxifene HCl as an alternate way to solve aforementioned problem. The physical breaching of stratum corneum, the principal barrier, by microneedle treatment was also employed to potentiate its transdermal permeation. The influence of lipid and ethanol concentration on vesicle size and entrapment efficiency was extensively investigated using response surface methodology based on central composite design. The software based optimization was done and validated using check point analysis. Optimized batch was extensively evaluated for its safety, efficacy and stability. The optimized ethosomal batch possessed 403 nm size and 74.25% drug entrapment. Its zeta potential and in vitro drug release were also found favorable for transdermal permeation. The ex vivo skin permeation study revealed a transdermal flux of 4.621 μg/cm2/h through the intact pig ear skin which was further enhanced through the microporated skin (transdermal flux, 6.194 μg/cm2/h) with a 3.87 fold rise when compared to drug permeation from plain solution applied over intact skin (transdermal flux, 1.6 μg/cm2/h). Histopathological skin sections showed the non-irritant nature of the ethosomal hydrogel and microneedle treatment. The formulation was found stable under both refrigeration and room temperature conditions for 6 weeks. In a nutshell, the developed system was found efficient, safe and stable and seems promising for transdermal use.

  9. Intestinal permeability assessed by 51Cr-EDTA in rats with CCl4 - induced cirrhosis Permeabilidade intestinal ao 51-Cr-EDTA em ratos com cirrose induzida por CCl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Regina L. Ramos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The straight relationship between cirrhosis and impaired intestinal barrier has not been elucidated yet. OBJECTIVES: To verify 51Cr-EDTA-intestinal permeability in rats with CCl4-induced cirrhosis and controls. METHOD: Fifty male Wistar rats weighing 150-180 g were separated in three groups: 25 animals received CCl4 0.25 mL/kg with olive oil by gavage with 12 g/rat/day food restriction for 10 weeks (CCl4-induced cirrhosis; 12 received the same food restriction for 10 weeks (CCl4-non exposed. Other 13 rats received indomethacin 15 mg/kg by gavage as positive control of intestinal inflammation. RESULTS: The median (25-75 interquartile range 51Cr-EDTA-IP values of cirrhotic and CCl4-non exposed rats were 0.90% (0.63-1.79 and 0.90% (0.60-1.52 respectively, without significant difference (P = 0.65. Animals from indomethacin group showed 51Cr-EDTA-IP, median 7.3% (5.1-14.7, significantly higher than cirrhotic and CCl4-non exposed rats (PCONTEXTO: A relação direta entre cirrose e alterações na barreira intestinal ainda não foi devidamente esclarecida. OBJETIVO: Verificar a permeabilidade intestinal ao 51Cr-EDTA em ratos com cirrose induzida por tetracloreto de carbono (CCl4 e controles. MÉTODO: Cinquenta ratos Wistar machos pesando 150-180 g foram separados em três grupos: 25 animais receberam CCl4 0,25 mL/kg diluído em óleo de oliva por gavagem com restrição dietética de 12 g/rato/dia por 10 semanas (grupo cirrose induzida por CCl4; 12 receberam a mesma restrição dietética por 10 semanas (grupo não exposto ao CCl4. Outros 13 ratos receberam indometacina 15 mg/kg por gavagem como controle positivo de inflamação intestinal. RESULTADOS: A mediana (intervalo interquartil 25-75 dos valores de permeabilidade intestinal ao 51Cr-EDTA dos grupos cirrose induzida por CCl4 e não exposto ao CCl4 foram 0,90% (0,63-1,79 e 0,90% (0,60-1,52, respectivamente, sem significância estatística (P = 0,65. Os animais do grupo indometacina

  10. Human and rodent ex vivo model for intestinal fibrosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, B.T.; Van Haaften, T.; Oosterhuis, D.; De Graaf, I.A.M.; Olinga, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: One of the major complications in IBD is intestinal fibrosis (IF). It is the result of the chronic inflammation of intestinal tissue. IF causes narrowing of the intestinal lumen and potential stricture formation. For the study of the cellular and molecular mechanism of IF in IBD adequate

  11. Cryosectioning the intestinal crypt-villus axis: An ex vivo method to study the dynamics of epigenetic modifications from stem cells to differentiated cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Audrey; Kazmierczak, Catherine; Duchêne, Belinda; Jonckheere, Nicolas; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Seuningen, Isabelle Van

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a particularly attractive biological adult model to study epigenetic mechanisms driving adult stem cell renewal and cell differentiation. Since epigenetic modifications are dynamic, we have developed an original ex vivo approach to study the expression and epigenetic profiles of key genes associated with either intestinal cell pluripotency or differentiation by isolating cryosections of the intestinal crypt-villus axis. Gene expression, DNA methylation and histone...

  12. In vitro and ex vivo intestinal tissue models to measure mucoadhesion of poly (methacrylate) and N-trimethylated chitosan polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keely, Simon; Rullay, Atvinder; Wilson, Carolyn; Carmichael, Adrian; Carrington, Steve; Corfield, Anthony; Haddleton, David M; Brayden, David J

    2005-01-01

    The adhesion of a range of polymers based on poly(2-(dimethylamino-ethyl) methacrylate (pDMAEMA) was assessed using human mucus-secreting and non mucus-secreting intestinal cell monolayers, HT29-MTX-E12 (E12) and HT29 monolayers, as well as excised non-everted intestinal sacs from rats. Differentiation of mucoadhesion from bioadhesion was achieved by pre-treatment with the mucolytic agent, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Adherence of pDMAEMA polymers was compared to that obtained with the mucoadhesive, N-trimethylated chitosan (TMC). The quantity of adherent coumarin 343-conjugated polymers to HT29, E12, and intestinal sacs was measured by fluorescence. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), light microscopy, and fluorescent microscopy were used to provide direct evidence. Measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), permeability to FITC-dextran 4000 (FD-4), and the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were used to assess potential cytotoxicity of polymers. Adherence of unquaternized and of 10%, 24%, and 32% methyl iodide-quaternized pDMAEMA polymers was measured in E12, HT29, and sacs. All pDMAEMA polymers showed significantly higher levels of adhesion to mucus (mucoadhesion) than to epithelium (bioadhesion). Colocalization of pDMAEMA with mucus was confirmed in E12 by microscopy. TMC showed equally high levels of mucoadhesion as unquaternized and 24% quaternized pDMAEMA, but displayed higher levels of bioadhesion. pDMAEMA-based polymers demonstrated lower levels of adherence to E12 and rat sacs in the presence of NAC, whereas adherence of TMC was unchanged. pDMAEMA significantly decreased the permeability of FD-4 across E12 monolayers and sacs and was less cytotoxic in E12 than in HT29. In contrast, TMC increased the permeability of FD-4 across E12 and sacs and was less cytotoxic in E12 than in HT29. Human mucus-producing E12 monolayers can be used to assess polymer mucoadhesion and give similar data to isolated rat intestinal sacs. p

  13. Usefulness of Caco-2/HT29-MTX and Caco-2/HT29-MTX/Raji B Coculture Models To Predict Intestinal and Colonic Permeability Compared to Caco-2 Monoculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; Araújo, Francisca; González-Álvarez, Isabel; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; González-Álvarez, Marta; Bermejo, Marival; Sarmento, Bruno

    2017-04-03

    The Caco-2 cellular monolayer is a widely accepted in vitro model to predict human permeability but suffering from several and critical limitations. Therefore, some alternative cell cultures to mimic the human intestinal epithelium, as closely as possible, have been developed to achieve more physiological conditions, as the Caco-2/HT29-MTX coculture and the triple Caco-2/HT29-MTX/Raji B models. In this work the permeability of 12 model drugs of different Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) characteristics, in the coculture and triple coculture models was assessed. Additionally, the utility of both models to classify compounds according to the BCS criteria was scrutinized. The obtained results suggested that the coculture of Caco-2/HT29-MTX and the triple coculture of Caco-2/HT29-MTX/Raji B were useful models to predict intestinal permeability and to classify the drugs in high or low permeability according to BCS. Moreover, to study thoroughly the transport mechanism of a specific drug, using a more complex model than Caco-2 monocultures is more suitable because coculture and triple coculture are more physiological models, so the results obtained with them will be closer to those obtained in the human intestine.

  14. Effects of unidirectional permeability in asymmetric poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) conduits on peripheral nerve regeneration: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chen-Jung; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Yen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Han; Hsu, Shih-Kuang

    2007-10-01

    The high outflow permeability of the nerve conduit used to emit the drained waste generated from the traumatized host nerve stump is critical in peripheral nerve regeneration. Our earlier studies have established that asymmetric conduits fulfill the basic requirements for use as nerve guide conduits. In this study, the inflow characteristics of optimal nerve conduits were further examined using in vivo and in vitro trials. Various asymmetric poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) conduits were controlled by modifying precipitation baths using 0, 20, and 95% isopropyl alcohol, with high-porosity (permeability), medium-porosity (high outflow and low inflow), and low-porosity (permeability), respectively. In the in vitro trial, the Schwann cells and fibroblasts were seeded on either side of the asymmetric PLGA films in a newly designed coculture system that simulated the repaired nerve conduit environment. The results of the directional permeable films indicated the statistically significant proliferation of Schwann cells and the inhibition of the division of fibroblasts in lactate dehydrogenase release and inhibition of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction, compared with the other films. In the in vivo trial, the PLGA conduits seeded with Schwann cells were implanted into 10 mm right sciatic nerve defects in rats. After 6 weeks, implanted conduits were harvested. Histological examination verified that directional permeable conduits had markedly more A-type and B-type myelin fibers in the midconduit and distal nerve. In this work, the directional transport characteristics were established as an extremely important factor to the design and development of optimal nerve guide conduits in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  15. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra Bansal

    Full Text Available Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5, which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus and mucus degradation, respectively were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion.

  16. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 is a survival factor for radiation-exposed intestinal epithelial stem cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Satoshi; Martin, Kareen; Booth, Catherine; Potten, Christopher S.; de Murcia, Gilbert; Bürkle, Alexander; Kirkwood, Thomas B. L.

    2003-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a key enzyme mediating the cellular response to DNA strand breaks. It plays a critical role in genomic stability and survival of proliferating cells in culture undergoing DNA damage. Intestinal epithelium is the most proliferative tissue in the mammalian body and its stem cells show extreme sensitivity to low-level genotoxic stress. We investigated the role of PARP-1 in the in vivo damage response of intestinal stem cells in crypts of PARP-1–/– and control mice following whole-body γ-irradiation (1 Gy). In the PARP-1–/– mice there was a significant delay during the first 6 h in the transient p53 accumulation in stem cells whereas an increased number of cells were positive for p21CIP1/WAF1. Either no or only marginal differences were noted in MDM2 expression, apoptosis, induction of or recovery from mitotic blockage, or inhibition of DNA synthesis. We further observed a dose-dependent reduction in crypt survival measured at 4 days post-irradiation in control mice, and this crypt-killing effect was significantly potentiated in PARP-1–/– mice. Our results thus establish that PARP-1 acts as a survival factor for intestinal stem cells in vivo and suggest a functional link with early p53 and p21CIP1/WAF1 responses. PMID:14576306

  17. Retrospectively gated MRI for in vivo assessment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and endothelial permeability in murine models of endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Anna; Skórka, Tomasz; Jasiński, Krzysztof; Sternak, Magdalena; Bartel, Żaneta; Tyrankiewicz, Urszula; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is linked to impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and permeability changes. Here, we quantify both of these phenomena associated with endothelial dysfunction by MRI in vivo in mice. Endothelial function was evaluated in the brachiocephalic artery (BCA) and left carotid artery (LCA) in ApoE/LDLR(-/-) and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice as compared with control mice (C57BL/6J). The 3D IntraGate® FLASH sequence was used for evaluation of changes in vessels' cross-sectional area (CSA) and volume following acetylcholine (Ach) administration. Evaluation of endothelial permeability after administration of contrast agent (Galbumin, BioPAL) was based on the variable flip angle method for the assessment of parameters based on the relaxation time (T1 ) value. In order to confirm the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in response to Ach, L-NAME-treated mice were also analyzed. To confirm that endothelial permeability changes accompany the impairment of Ach-dependent vasodilatation, permeability changes were analyzed in isolated, perfused carotid artery. In C57BL/6J mice, Ach-induced vasodilatation led to an approximately 25% increase in CSA in both vessels, which was temporarily dissociated from the effect of Ach on heart rate. In ApoE/LDLR(-/-) or HFD-fed mice Ach induced a paradoxical vasoconstriction that amounted to approximately 30% and 50% decreases in CSA of BCA and LCA respectively. In ApoE/LDLR(-/-) and HFD-fed mice endothelial permeability in BCA was also increased (fall in T1 by about 25%). In L-NAME-treated mice Ach-induced vasodilatation in BCA was lost. In isolated, perfused artery from ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice endothelial permeability was increased. MRI-based assessment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation induced by Ach and endothelial permeability using a retrospectively self-gated 3D gradient-echo sequence (IntraGate® FLASH) enables the reliable detection of systemic endothelial dysfunction in mice and provides an important tool

  18. Ion pairing with bile salts modulates intestinal permeability and contributes to food-drug interaction of BCS class III compound trospium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Christian A; Reuss, Stefan; Amidon, Gordon L; Langguth, Peter

    2013-11-04

    In the current study the involvement of ion pair formation between bile salts and trospium chloride (TC), a positively charged Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) class III substance, showing a decrease in bioavailability upon coadministration with food (negative food effect) was investigated. Isothermal titration calorimetry provided evidence of a reaction between TC and bile acids. An effect of ion pair formation on the apparent partition coefficient (APC) was examined using (3)H-trospium. The addition of bovine bile and bile extract porcine led to a significant increase of the APC. In vitro permeability studies of trospium were performed across Caco-2-monolayers and excised segments of rat jejunum in a modified Ussing chamber. The addition of bile acids led to an increase of trospium permeation across Caco-2-monolayers and rat excised segments by approximately a factor of 1.5. The addition of glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC) was less effective than taurodeoxycholate (TDOC). In the presence of an olive oil emulsion, a complete extinction of the permeation increasing effects of bile salts was observed. Thus, although there are more bile acids in the intestine in the fed state compared to the fasted state, these are not able to form ion pairs with trospium in fed state, because they are involved in the emulsification of dietary fats. In conclusion, the formation of ion pairs between trospium and bile acids can partially explain its negative food effect. Our results are presumably transferable to other organic cations showing a negative food effect.

  19. Effects of Achyrocline satureioides Inflorescence Extracts against Pathogenic Intestinal Bacteria: Chemical Characterization, In Vitro Tests, and In Vivo Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Suzana Moresco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Three Achyrocline satureioides (AS inflorescences extracts were characterized: (i a freeze-dried extract prepared from the aqueous extractive solution and (ii a freeze-dried and (iii a spray-dried extract prepared from hydroethanol extractive solution (80% ethanol. The chemical profile, antioxidant potential, and antimicrobial activity against intestinal pathogenic bacteria of AS extracts were evaluated. In vitro antioxidant activity was determined by the total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP assay. In vivo analysis and characterization of intestinal microbiota were performed in male Wistar rats (saline versus treated animals with AS dried extracts by high-throughput sequencing analysis: metabarcoding. Antimicrobial activity was tested in vitro by the disc diffusion tests. Moisture content of the extracts ranged from 10 to 15% and 5.7 to 17 mg kg−1 of fluorine. AS exhibited antioxidant activity, especially in its freeze-dried form which also exhibited a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity against intestinal pathogenic bacteria greater than those observed by the antibiotic, amoxicillin, when tested against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of AS extracts seemed to be positively correlated with the present amount of flavonoids. These findings suggest a potential use of AS as a coadjuvant agent for treating bacterial-induced intestinal diseases with high rates of antibiotic resistance.

  20. alpha2HS-glycoprotein, an antagonist of transforming growth factor beta in vivo, inhibits intestinal tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, Carol J; Partridge, Emily A; Macmillan, Jennifer C; Tajirian, Tania; DiGuglielmo, Gianni M; Hay, Kazy; Szweras, Melanie; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Wrana, Jeff L; Redston, Mark; Gallinger, Steven; Dennis, James W

    2004-09-15

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is associated with tumor progression and resistance to chemotherapy in established cancers, as well as host immune suppression. Here, we show that the serum glycoprotein alpha2-HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) blocks TGF-beta1 binding to cell surface receptors, suppresses TGF-beta signal transduction, and inhibits TGF-beta-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, suggesting that AHSG may play a role in tumor progression. In 66 consecutive sporadic human colorectal cancer specimens, we observed a 3-fold depletion of ASHG in tumor compared with normal tissue, whereas levels of other abundant plasma proteins, albumin and transferrin, were equivalent. Using the Multiple intestinal neoplasia/+ (Min/+) mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis, we found twice as many intestinal polyps overall, twice as many large polyps (>3 mm diameter), and more progression to invasive adenocarcinoma in Min/+ Ahsg-/- mice than in littermates expressing Ahsg. Phosphorylated Smad2 was more abundant in the intestinal mucosa and tumors of Min/+ mice lacking Ahsg, demonstrating increased TGF-beta signaling in vivo. Furthermore, TGF-beta-mediated suppression of immune cell function was exaggerated in Ahsg-/- animals, as shown by inhibition of macrophage activation and reduction in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-induced cutaneous inflammation. Reconstitution of Ahsg-/- mice with bovine Ahsg suppressed endogenous TGF-beta-dependent signaling to wild-type levels, suggesting that therapeutic enhancement of AHSG levels may benefit patients whose tumors are driven by TGF-beta.

  1. Intestinal absorption of the antiepileptic drug substance vigabatrin is altered by infant formula in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2014-01-01

    in Caco-2 cells. Oral coadministration of vigabatrin and infant formula significantly reduced Cmax and prolonged tmax of vigabatrin absorption. Ligands for the proton-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, sarcosine, and proline/l-tryptophan had similar effects on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin....... The infant formula decreased the rate of gastric emptying. Here we provide experimental evidence for an in vivo role of PAT1 in the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The effect of infant formula on the oral absorption of vigabatrin was found to be due to delayed gastric emptying, however, it seems...... reasonable that infant formula may also directly affect the intestinal absorption rate of vigabatrin possibly via PAT1....

  2. In vivo and in vitro studies on the absorption characteristics of β-cryptoxanthin in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaishi, Naoki; Satsu, Hideo; Takayanagi, Katsuhiko; Mukai, Katsuyuki; Shimizu, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    β-Cryptoxanthin (β-CRX) is a carotenoid abundantly present in the Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.), one of the most popular fruits in Japan, and it is reported to have several health benefits. Although it is thought to have higher bioavailability than other carotenoids, the usual daily intake is small, and a good method to improve its bioavailability is needed. Hence we studied the effect of emulsification on the absorption characteristics of β-CRX in the intestine. Human trials showed that its serum transfer efficiency was statistically higher in the emulsified formulation than in fresh Satsuma mandarin juice. Caco-2 permeability studies indicated that emulsifiers preferentially accelerate the absorption of the non-esterified form of β-CRX, suggesting that emulsification is more effective for free β-CRX. This information might be useful to improve the efficiency of β-CRX serum transfer, as well as to increase the health benefits of β-CRX.

  3. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CS21 pilus contributes to adhesion to intestinal cells and to pathogenesis under in vivo conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, C. P.; Luiz, W. B.; Sierra, A.; Cruz, C.; Qadri, F.; Kaushik, R. S.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Colonization surface antigens (CSs) represent key virulence-associated factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains. They are required for gut colonization, the first step of the diarrhoeal disease process induced by these bacteria. One of the most prevalent CSs is CS21, or longus, a type IV pili associated with bacterial self-aggregation, protection against environmental stresses, biofilm formation and adherence to epithelial cell lines. The objectives of this study were to assess the role of CS21 in adherence to primary intestinal epithelial cells and to determine if CS21 contributes to the pathogenesis of ETEC infection in vivo. We evaluated adherence of a CS21-expressing wild-type ETEC strain and an isogenic CS21-mutant strain to pig-derived intestinal cell lines. To determine the role of CS21 in pathogenesis we used the above ETEC strains in a neonatal mice challenge infection model to assess mortality. Quantitative adherence assays confirmed that ETEC adheres to primary intestinal epithelial cells lines in a CS21-dependent manner. In addition, the CS21-mediated ETEC adherence to cells was specific as purified LngA protein, the CS21 major subunit, competed for binding with the CS21-expressing ETEC while specific anti-LngA antibodies blocked adhesion to intestinal cells. Neonatal DBA/2 mice died after intra-stomach administration of CS21-expressing strains while lack of CS21 expression drastically reduced the virulence of the wild-type ETEC strain in this animal model. Collectively these results further support the role of CS21 during ETEC infection and add new evidence on its in vivo relevance in pathogenesis. PMID:23760820

  4. Intestinal Specific Gene Regulation by Transcription Factors Gata4 and Hnfla in Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Bosse (Tjalling)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe mammalian small intestine is responsible for the terminal digestion and absorption of nutrients, water homeostasis, and the elimination of waste products, which in turn, are essential processes for life. These processes however, are easily disrupted by infection,

  5. In vivo confocal microscopy: increased conjunctival or episcleral leukocyte adhesion in patients who wear contact lenses with lower oxygen permeability (Dk) values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy H; Dudek, Lara T; Krisciunas, Tammie C; Matiaco, Paul; Planck, Stephen R; Mathers, William D; Rosenbaum, James T

    2004-10-01

    Contact lens wear is known to threaten the health of the ocular surface. In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) to visualize leukocyte rolling and extravasation in inflammation was recently described. We tested the hypothesis that contact lens wear is associated with measurable inflammation in superficial vessels. Leukocyte rolling and sticking (hallmarks of the inflammatory process) were recorded by IVCM. IVCM was performed on conjunctival or episcleral blood vessels bilaterally on 55 contact lens wearers (15 male, 40 female) and 22 non-contact lens wearers (8 male, 14 female). Data were analyzed in 2 ways. Considering each vessel as an independent variable resulted in 132 analyzable vessel segments (13 daily disposable contact lenses, 67 traditional contact lenses, 14 rigid gas-permeable lenses, and 38 controls). Considering each subject as an independent variable resulted in analyzable data for 47 subjects (5 daily disposable contact lens wearers, 22 traditional contact lens wearers, 5 rigid contact lens wearers, and 15 control patients). Free-flowing, sticking, and rolling cells were counted in the vessels. Multiple parameters including mean flow velocity, shear rate, rolling cells/mm/min, and sticking cells/mm were calculated. We found no significant difference in leukocyte adhesion between control patients and patients wearing daily disposable, traditional disposable, or rigid gas-permeable lenses in both types of statistical analyses. However, the data regarding vessel segments as an independent variable show that there were more rolling cells in patients who wore contact lenses with oxygen permeability values (Dk) less than 10 as compared to those who wore contact lenses with oxygen permeability values greater than 16 (P oxygen permeability.

  6. Generation of in vivo activating factors in the ischemic intestine by pancreatic enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Kistler, Erik B.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2000-02-01

    One of the early events in physiological shock is the generation of activators for leukocytes, endothelial cells, and other cells in the cardiovascular system. The mechanism by which these activators are produced has remained unresolved. We examine here the hypothesis that pancreatic digestive enzymes in the ischemic intestine may be involved in the generation of activators during intestinal ischemia. The lumen of the small intestine of rats was continuously perfused with saline containing a broadly acting pancreatic enzyme inhibitor (6-amidino-2-naphthyl p-guanidinobenzoate dimethanesulfate, 0.37 mM) before and during ischemia of the small intestine by splanchnic artery occlusion. This procedure inhibited activation of circulating leukocytes during occlusion and reperfusion. It also prevented the appearance of activators in portal venous and systemic artery plasma and attenuated initiating symptoms of multiple organ injury in shock. Intestinal tissue produces only low levels of activators in the absence of pancreatic enzymes, whereas in the presence of enzymes, activators are produced in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The results indicate that pancreatic digestive enzymes in the ischemic intestine serve as an important source for cell activation and inflammation, as well as multiple organ failure.

  7. In vivo assessment of the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and blood-retinal barrier to fluorescent indoline derivatives in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Kohei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful delivery of compounds to the brain and retina is a challenge in the development of therapeutic drugs and imaging agents. This challenge arises because internalization of compounds into the brain and retina is restricted by the blood–brain barrier (BBB and blood-retinal barrier (BRB, respectively. Simple and reliable in vivo assays are necessary to identify compounds that can easily cross the BBB and BRB. Methods We developed six fluorescent indoline derivatives (IDs and examined their ability to cross the BBB and BRB in zebrafish by in vivo fluorescence imaging. These fluorescent IDs were administered to live zebrafish by immersing the zebrafish larvae at 7-8 days post fertilization in medium containing the ID, or by intracardiac injection. We also examined the effect of multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs on the permeability of the BBB and BRB to the ID using MK571, a selective inhibitor of MRPs. Results The permeability of these barriers to fluorescent IDs administered by simple immersion was comparable to when administered by intracardiac injection. Thus, this finding supports the validity of drug administration by simple immersion for the assessment of BBB and BRB permeability to fluorescent IDs. Using this zebrafish model, we demonstrated that the length of the methylene chain in these fluorescent IDs significantly affected their ability to cross the BBB and BRB via MRPs. Conclusions We demonstrated that in vivo assessment of the permeability of the BBB and BRB to fluorescent IDs could be simply and reliably performed using zebrafish. The structure of fluorescent IDs can be flexibly modified and, thus, the permeability of the BBB and BRB to a large number of IDs can be assessed using this zebrafish-based assay. The large amount of data acquired might be useful for in silico analysis to elucidate the precise mechanisms underlying the interactions between chemical structure and the efflux transporters at the

  8. The low/high BCS permeability class boundary: physicochemical comparison of metoprolol and labetalol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Moran; Gasparini, Marisa; Wolk, Omri; Amidon, Gordon L; Dahan, Arik

    2014-05-05

    Although recognized as overly conservative, metoprolol is currently the common low/high BCS permeability class boundary reference compound, while labetalol was suggested as a potential alternative. The purpose of this study was to identify the various characteristics that the optimal marker should exhibit, and to investigate the suitability of labetalol as the permeability class reference drug. Labetalol's BCS solubility class was determined, and its physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability were thoroughly investigated, both in vitro and in vivo in rats, considering the complexity of the whole of the small intestine. Labetalol was found to be unequivocally a high-solubility compound. In the pH range throughout the small intestine (6.5-7.5), labetalol exhibited pH-dependent permeability, with higher permeability at higher pH values. While in vitro octanol-buffer partitioning (Log D) values of labetalol were significantly higher than those of metoprolol, the opposite was evident in the in vitro PAMPA permeability assay. The results of the in vivo perfusion studies in rats lay between the two contradictory in vitro studies; metoprolol was shown to have moderately higher rat intestinal permeability than labetalol. Theoretical distribution of the ionic species of the drugs was in corroboration with the experimental in vitro and the in vivo data. We propose three characteristics that the optimal permeability class reference drug should exhibit: (1) fraction dose absorbed in the range of 90%; (2) the optimal marker drug should be absorbed largely via passive transcellular permeability, with no/negligible carrier-mediated active intestinal transport (influx or efflux); and (3) the optimal marker drug should preferably be nonionizable. The data presented in this paper demonstrate that neither metoprolol nor labetalol can be regarded as optimal low/high-permeability class boundary standard. While metoprolol is too conservative due to its complete absorption

  9. Alginate Microencapsulation for Oral Immunisation of Finfish: Release Characteristics, Ex Vivo Intestinal Uptake and In Vivo Administration in Atlantic Salmon, Salmo salar L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Bikramjit; Nowak, Barbara F; Bridle, Andrew R

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the feasibility of alginate microcapsules manufactured using a low-impact technology and reagents to protect orally delivered immunogens for use as immunoprophylactics for fish. Physical characteristics and protein release kinetics of the microcapsules were examined at different pH and temperature levels using a microencapsulated model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Impact of the microencapsulation process on contents was determined by analysing change in bioactivity of microencapsulated lysozyme. Feasibility of the method for oral immunoprophylaxis of finfish was assessed using FITC-labelled microcapsules. These were applied to distal intestinal explants of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to investigate uptake ex vivo. Systemic distribution of microcapsules was investigated by oral administration of FITC-labelled microcapsules to Atlantic salmon fry by incorporating into feed. The microcapsules produced were structurally robust and retained surface integrity, with a modal size distribution of 250-750 nm and a tendency to aggregate. Entrapment efficiency of microencapsulation was 51.2 % for BSA and 43.2 % in the case of lysozyme. Microcapsules demonstrated controlled release of protein, which increased with increasing pH or temperature, and the process had no significant negative effect on bioactivity of lysozyme. Uptake of fluorescent-labelled microcapsules was clearly demonstrated by intestinal explants over a 24-h period. Evidence of microcapsules was found in the intestine, spleen, kidney and liver of fry following oral administration. Amenability of the microcapsules to intestinal uptake and distribution reinforced the strong potential for use of this microencapsulation method in oral immunoprophylaxis of finfish using sensitive immunogenic substances.

  10. In vivo EPR pharmacokinetic evaluation of the redox status and the blood brain barrier permeability in the SOD1(G93A) ALS rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenković, Stefan; Pavićević, Aleksandra; Mojović, Miloš; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Selaković, Vesna; Andjus, Pavle; Bačić, Goran

    2017-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting the motor pathways of the central nervous system. Although a number of pathophysiological mechanisms have been described in the disease, post mortem and animal model studies indicate blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and elevated production of reactive oxygen species as major contributors to disease pathology. In this study, the BBB permeability and the brain tissue redox status of the SOD1(G93A) ALS rat model in the presymptomatic (preALS) and symptomatic (ALS) stages of the disease were investigated by in vivo EPR spectroscopy using three aminoxyl radicals with different cell membrane and BBB permeabilities, Tempol, 3-carbamoyl proxyl (3CP), and 3-carboxy proxyl (3CxP). Additionally, the redox status of the two brain regions previously implicated in disease pathology, brainstem and hippocampus, was investigated by spectrophotometric biochemical assays. The EPR results indicated that among the three spin probes, 3CP is the most suitable for reporting the intracellular redox status changes, as Tempol was reduced in vivo within minutes (t1/2 =2.0±0.5min), thus preventing reliable kinetic modeling, whereas 3CxP reduction kinetics gave divergent conclusions, most probably due to its membrane impermeability. It was observed that the reduction kinetics of 3CP in vivo, in the head of preALS and ALS SOD1(G93A) rats was altered compared to the controls. Pharmacokinetic modeling of 3CP reduction in vivo, revealed elevated tissue distribution and tissue reduction rate constants indicating an altered brain tissue redox status, and possibly BBB disruption in these animals. The preALS and ALS brain tissue homogenates also showed increased nitrilation, superoxide production, lipid peroxidation and manganese superoxide dismutase activity, and a decreased copper-zinc superoxide dismutase activity. The present study highlights in vivo EPR spectroscopy as a reliable tool for the investigation of

  11. Metabolism of myricetin and related compounds in the rat. Metabolite formation in vivo and by the intestinal microflora in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, L A; Smith, G E

    1972-11-01

    1. The metabolism of a group of polyphenols related in structure to myricetin (3,5,7,3',4',5'-hexahydroxyflavone), including myricetin, myricitrin, 3,4,5-trihydroxyphenylacetic acid, delphinidin, robinetin, tricetin, tricin, malvin and 5,7-dihydroxy-3',4',5'-trimethoxyflavone, has been studied both in vivo after oral administration to the rat and in vitro in cultures of micro-organisms derived from the intestine of the rat. 2. It was shown that the rat intestinal microflora are able to degrade compounds of this group to the ring-fission products observed in urine after oral administration of the specific flavonoid. 3. All flavones and flavonols possessing free 5- and 7-hydroxyl groups in the A ring and a free 4'-hydroxyl group in the B ring gave rise to ring-fission products that included 3',5'-dihydroxyphenylacyl derivatives. 4. The metabolites 3,5-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3,5-dihydroxyphenylpropionic acid and 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid were isolated and identified by chromatographic and spectral methods. 5. On anaerobic incubation in a thioglycollate medium it was shown that intestinal micro-organisms can effect cleavage of glycosidic bonds, ring fission of certain flavonoid molecules showing 3',4',5'-trihydroxyphenyl substitution and dehydroxylation of certain flavonoid metabolites. 6. The urinary excretion of the metabolites 3,5-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid was completely abolished when neomycin-treated rats were used.

  12. Alternative Functional In Vitro Models of Human Intestinal Epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Kauffman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically relevant sources of absorptive intestinal epithelial cells are crucial for human drug transport studies. Human adenocarcinoma-derived intestinal cell lines, such as Caco-2, offer conveniences of easy culture maintenance and scalability, but do not fully recapitulate in vivo intestinal phenotypes. Additional sources of renewable physiologically relevant human intestinal cells would provide a much needed tool for drug discovery and intestinal physiology. We sought to evaluate and compare two alternative sources of human intestinal cells, commercially available primary human intestinal epithelial cells (hInEpCs and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived intestinal cells to Caco-2, for use in in vitro transwell monolayer intestinal transport assays. To achieve this for iPSC-derived cells, our previously described 3-dimensional intestinal organogenesis method was adapted to transwell differentiation. Intestinal cells were assessed by marker expression through immunocytochemical and mRNA expression analyses, monolayer integrity through Transepithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER measurements and molecule permeability, and functionality by taking advantage the well-characterized intestinal transport mechanisms. In most cases, marker expression for primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells appeared to be as good as or better than Caco-2. Furthermore, transwell monolayers exhibited high TEER with low permeability. Primary hInEpCs showed molecule efflux indicative of P-glycoprotein transport. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells also showed neonatal Fc receptor-dependent binding of immunoglobulin G variants. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived intestinal cells exhibit expected marker expression and demonstrate basic functional monolayer formation, similar to or better than Caco-2. These cells could offer an alternative source of human intestinal cells for understanding normal intestinal epithelial physiology and drug transport.

  13. Excess soluble CD40L contributes to blood brain barrier permeability in vivo: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna C Davidson

    Full Text Available Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND, indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1 positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking.

  14. Assessment of the Effect of Intestinal Permeability Probes (Lactulose And Mannitol) and Other Liquids on Digesta Residence Times in Various Segments of the Gut Determined by Wireless Motility Capsule: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Ivana R; Lentle, Roger G; Kruger, Marlena C; Hurst, Roger D

    2015-01-01

    Whilst the use of the mannitol/lactulose test for intestinal permeability has been long established it is not known whether the doses of these sugars modify transit time Similarly it is not known whether substances such as aspirin that are known to increase intestinal permeability to lactulose and mannitol and those such as ascorbic acid which are stated to be beneficial to gastrointestinal health also influence intestinal transit time. Gastric and intestinal transit times were determined with a SmartPill following consumption of either a lactulose mannitol solution, a solution containing 600 mg aspirin, a solution containing 500 mg of ascorbic acid or an extract of blackcurrant, and compared by doubly repeated measures ANOVA with those following consumption of the same volume of a control in a cross-over study in six healthy female volunteers. The dominant frequencies of cyclic variations in gastric pressure recorded by the Smartpill were determined by fast Fourier transforms. The gastric transit times of lactulose mannitol solutions, of aspirin solutions and of blackcurrant juice did not differ from those of the control. The gastric transit times of the ascorbic acid solutions were significantly shorter than those of the other solutions. There were no significant differences between the various solutions either in the total small intestinal or colonic transit times. The intraluminal pHs during the initial quartiles of the small intestinal transit times were lower than those in the succeeding quartiles. This pattern did not vary with the solution that was consumed. The power of the frequencies of cyclic variation in intragastric pressure recorded by the Smartpill declined exponentially with increase in frequency and did not peak at the reported physiological frequencies of gastric contractile activity. Whilst the segmental residence times were broadly similar to those using other methods, the high degree of variation between subjects generally precluded the

  15. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro and in vivo investigation of chitosan-coated poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for intestinal delivery of exendin-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengshu; Zhang, Yong; Feng, Jiao; Gu, Tiejun; Dong, Qingguang; Yang, Xu; Sun, Yanan; Wu, Yongge; Chen, Yan; Kong, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Exendin-4 is an incretin mimetic agent approved for type 2 diabetes treatment. However, the required frequent injections restrict its clinical application. Here, the potential use of chitosan-coated poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (CS-PLGA) nanoparticles was investigated for intestinal delivery of exendin-4. Methods and results Nanoparticles were prepared using a modified water–oil–water (w/o/w) emulsion solvent-evaporation method, followed by coating with chitosan. The physical properties, particle size, and cell toxicity of the nanoparticles were examined. The cellular uptake mechanism and transmembrane permeability were performed in Madin-Darby canine kidney-cell monolayers. Furthermore, in vivo intraduodenal administration of exendin-4-loaded nanoparticles was carried out in rats. The PLGA nanoparticle coating with chitosan led to a significant change in zeta potential, from negative to positive, accompanied by an increase in particle size of ~30 nm. Increases in both the molecular weight and degree of deacetylation of chitosan resulted in an observable increase in zeta potential but no apparent change in the particle size of ~300 nm. Both unmodified PLGA and chitosan-coated nanoparticles showed only slight cytotoxicity. Use of different temperatures and energy depletion suggested that the cellular uptake of both types of nanoparticles was energy-dependent. Further investigation revealed that the uptake of PLGA nanoparticles occurred via caveolin-mediated endocytosis and that of CS-PLGA nanoparticles involved both macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, as evidenced by using endocytic inhibitors. However, under all conditions, CS-PLGA nanoparticles showed a greater potential to be transported into cells, as shown by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Transmembrane permeability analysis showed that unmodified and modified PLGA nanoparticles could improve the transport of exendin-4 by up to 8.9- and 16.5-fold, respectively

  16. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon. However, some patients with CC present with accompanying pathologic small-bowel manifestations such as coeliac disease, defects in bile acid absorption and histopathologic changes in small-intestinal biopsies......, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal permeability....

  17. Effects of patulin and ascladiol on porcine intestinal mucosa: An ex vivo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidana, Leila; Gerez, Juliana R; El Khoury, Rhoda; Pinho, Felipe; Puel, Olivier; Oswald, Isabelle P; Bracarense, Ana Paula F R L

    2016-12-01

    Patulin (PAT) is a secondary metabolite mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium that is frequently found contaminating apples and rotten fruits. Patulin can be transformed in potencially less toxic compounds such as ascladiol (ASC). Toxic effects of patulin were described in rats and in in vitro models, however concerning ascladiol, data are restricted to metabolic pathways. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of PAT (10 μM, 30 μM, 100 μM) and ASC (30 μM, 100 μM) on intestinal tissue using the jejunal explant model. Explants from pigs were exposed for 4 h to PAT and ASC and after this period were processed for histological, morphometrical and immunohistochemical analysis. Mild histological changes were observed in jejunal explants exposed to PAT and ASC, however no significant difference in the lesional score or villi height was observed between the PAT/ASC-groups and the control. Also, explants exposed to 100 μM of PAT showed a significant decrease in goblet cells density and a significant increase in cell apoptosis. These results indicate that high levels of patulin can induce mild toxic effects on intestinal mucosa whereas ascladiol apparently is non-toxic to intestinal tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Myocardial capillary permeability after regional ischemia and reperfusion in the in vivo canine heart. Effect of superoxide dismutase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Bjerrum, P J; Haunsø, S

    1991-01-01

    This study assesses the effect of the superoxide anion scavenger superoxide dismutase on myocardial capillary permeability-surface area (PS) products for small hydrophilic molecules after ischemia and reperfusion. Open-chest dogs underwent a 20-minute occlusion of the left anterior descending...... the start of reperfusion. In 13 dogs, no scavenger treatment was given (nonprotected control group), whereas eight dogs were treated systemically with 15,000 units/kg superoxide dismutase during 1 hour, starting 20 minutes before ischemia. In the control group, three dogs developed reperfusion ventricular...

  19. EX VIVO MODEL OF RABBIT INTESTINAL EPITHELIUM APPLIED TO THE STUDY OF COLONIZATION BY ENTEROAGGREGATIVE ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Luís Lopes BRAGA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND The diarrheal syndrome is considered a serious public health problem all over the world and is considered a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The high incidence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in diarrheal syndromes classified as an emerging pathogen of gastrointestinal infections. After decades of study, your pathogenesis remains uncertain and has been investigated mainly using in vitro models of adhesion in cellular lines. OBJECTIVE The present study investigated the interaction of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strains isolated from childhood diarrhea with rabbit ileal and colonic mucosa ex vivo, using the in vitro organ culture model. METHODS The in vitro adhesion assays using cultured tissue were performed with the strains co-incubated with intestinal fragments of ileum and colon over a period of 6 hours. Each strain was tested with three intestinal fragments for each region. The fragments were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS Through scanning electron microscopy we observed that all strains adhered to rabbit ileal and colonic mucosa, with the typical aggregative adherence pattern of “stacked bricks” on the epithelium. However, the highest degree of adherence was observed on colonic mucosa. Threadlike structures were found in greater numbers in the ileum compared to the colon. CONCLUSION These data showed that enteroaggregative Escherichia coli may have a high tropism for the human colon, which was ratified by the higher degree of adherence on the rabbit colonic mucosa. Finally, data indicated that in vitro organ culture of intestinal mucosa from rabbit may be used to elucidate the enteroaggregative Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

  20. Multiple-unit tablet of probiotic bacteria for improved storage stability, acid tolerability, and in vivo intestinal protective effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park HJ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hee Jun Park,1 Ga Hyeon Lee,1 Joonho Jun,1 Miwon Son,1 Myung Joo Kang2 1Dong-A Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Yongin, Gyeonggi, 2College of Pharmacy, Dankook University, Cheonan, Chungnam, Korea Abstract: The aim of this study was to formulate probiotics-loaded pellets in a tablet form to improve storage stability, acid tolerability, and in vivo intestinal protective effect. Bacteria-loaded pellets primarily prepared with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate were compressed into tablets with highly compressible excipients and optimized for flow properties, hardness, and disintegration time. The optimized probiotic tablet consisted of enteric-coated pellets (335 mg, microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH102, 37.5 mg, and porous calcium silicate (25 mg and allowed whole survival of living bacteria during the compaction process with sufficient tablet hardness (13 kp and disintegration time (14 minutes. The multiple-unit tablet showed remarkably higher storage stability under ambient conditions (25°C/60% relative humidity over 6 months and resistance to acidic medium compared to uncoated strains or pellets. Repeated intake of this multiple-unit tablet significantly lowered plasma level of endotoxin, a pathogenic material, compared to repeated intake of bare probiotics or marketed products in rats. These results, therefore, suggest that the multiple-unit tablet is advantageous to better bacterial viability and gain the beneficial effects on the gut flora, including the improvement of intestinal barrier function. Keywords: probiotics, multiple-unit tablet, bacterial viability, acid resistance, intestinal barrier function

  1. In vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of Murraya koenigii against gastro-intestinal nematodes of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Sabir Hossen; Bandyopadhyay, Probir Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present study have been conducted to evaluate the anthelmintic activity of crude aqueous and crude methanolic leaf extracts of Murraya koenigii. Infection of ruminants with gastro-intestinal (GI) parasite has become a worldwide problem. The parasite causes economic losses in a variety of ways. Previously sheep producers relied heavily on anti-parasitic drugs to control gastro-intestinal parasites of the flocks. But due to misuse of these drugs the parasites become resistant to drugs. Thus created interest in studying medicinal plants as an alternative source of controlling the GI parasites. Adult motility assay (AMA) and egg hatch assay (EHA) have been done for in vitro study, and faecal egg count reduction (FECR) assay have been done for in vivo study. The in vitro study revealed anthelmintic effects of M. koenigii on Haemonchus contortus as evident from their paralytic condition and/or death at eight hour post exposure in different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50 mg/ml) of aqueous and methanolic extracts which exhibit to be dose-dependent. Aqueous and methanolic extracts of M. koenigii were found to have low percent inhibitory effect on egg hatching. It may be concluded that M. koenigii showed significant anthelmintic activity.

  2. Transepithelial Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers Across Isolated Human Intestinal Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Dallin; Enda, Michael; Bond, Tanner; Moghaddam, Seyyed Pouya Hadipour; Conarton, Josh; Scaife, Courtney; Volckmann, Eric; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-11-02

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown transepithelial transport across intestinal epithelial barrier in rats and across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Caco-2 models innately lack mucous barriers, and rat isolated intestinal tissue has been shown to overestimate human permeability. This study is the first report of transport of PAMAM dendrimers across isolated human intestinal epithelium. It was observed that FITC labeled G4-NH2 and G3.5-COOH PAMAM dendrimers at 1 mM concentration do not have a statistically higher permeability compared to free FITC controls in isolated human jejunum and colonic tissues. Mannitol permeability was increased at 10 mM concentrations of G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 dendrimers. Significant histological changes in human colonic and jejunal tissues were observed at G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 concentrations of 10 mM implying that dose limiting toxicity may occur at similar concentrations in vivo. The permeability through human isolated intestinal tissue in this study was compared to previous rat and Caco-2 permeability data. This study implicates that PAMAM dendrimer oral drug delivery may be feasible, but it may be limited to highly potent drugs.

  3. Dietary emulsifiers directly alter human microbiota composition and gene expression ex vivo potentiating intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Benoit; Van de Wiele, Tom; De Bodt, Jana; Marzorati, Massimo; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2017-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays a central role in the development of many chronic inflammatory diseases including IBD and metabolic syndrome. Administration of substances that alter microbiota composition, including the synthetic dietary emulsifiers polysorbate 80 (P80) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), can promote such inflammatory disorders. However, that inflammation itself impacts microbiota composition has obfuscated defining the extent to which these compounds or other substances act directly upon the microbiota versus acting on host parameters that promote inflammation, which subsequently reshapes the microbiota. We examined the direct impact of CMC and P80 on the microbiota using the mucosal simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (M-SHIME) model that maintains a complex stable human microbiota in the absence of a live host. This approach revealed that both P80 and CMC acted directly upon human microbiota to increase its proinflammatory potential, as revealed by increased levels of bioactive flagellin. The CMC-induced increase in flagellin was rapid (1 day) and driven by altered microbiota gene expression. In contrast, the P80-induced flagellin increase occurred more slowly and was closely associated with altered species composition. Transfer of both emulsifier-treated M-SHIME microbiotas to germ-free recipient mice recapitulated many of the host and microbial alterations observed in mice directly treated with emulsifiers. These results demonstrate a novel paradigm of deconstructing host-microbiota interactions and indicate that the microbiota can be directly impacted by these commonly used food additives, in a manner that subsequently drives intestinal inflammation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Visualization of probiotic-mediated Ca2+ signaling in intestinal epithelial cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Adachi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics, such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB and Bacillus subtilis var. natto, have been shown to modulate immune responses. It is important to understand how probiotic bacteria impact intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, because IECs are the first line of defense at the mucosal surface barrier and their activities substantially affect the gut microenvironment and immunity. However, to date, their precise mechanism remains unknown due to a lack of analytical systems available for live animal models. Recently, we generated a conditional Ca2+ biosensor Yellow Cameleon (YC3.60 transgenic mouse line and established 5D (x, y, z, time, and Ca2+ intravital imaging systems of lymphoid tissues including those in Peyer’s patches and bone marrow. In the present study, we further advance our intravital imaging system for intestinal tracts to visualize IEC responses against orally administrated food compounds in real time. Using this system, heat-killed Bacillus subtilis natto, a probiotic TTCC012 strain, is shown to directly induce Ca2+ signaling in IECs in mice housed under specific pathogen-free conditions. In contrast, this activation is not observed in the Lactococcus lactis strain C60; however, when we generate germ-free YC3.60 mice and observe the LAB stimulation of IECs in the absence of gut microbiota, C60 is capable of inducing Ca2+ signaling. This is the first study to successfully visualize the direct effect of probiotics on IECs in live animals. These data strongly suggest that probiotic strains stimulate IECs under physiological conditions, and that their activity is affected by the microenvironment of the small intestine, such as commensal bacteria.

  5. The effect of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on intestinal permeability in very-low-birth-weight infants: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; Fetter, Willem P. F.; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Vegt, Ina M.; van der Molen, Hilda R. A.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants are susceptible to glutamine depletion. Glutamine depletion has negative effects on intestinal integrity. The lower infection rate in VLBW infants receiving glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition may originate from improved intestinal integrity, as

  6. Innovative Disease Model: Zebrafish as an In Vivo Platform for Intestinal Disorder and Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Wei Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world’s most common cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths, causing more than 50,000 estimated deaths each year. Several risk factors are highly associated with CRC, including being overweight, eating a diet high in red meat and over-processed meat, having a history of inflammatory bowel disease, and smoking. Previous zebrafish studies have demonstrated that multiple oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes can be regulated through genetic or epigenetic alterations. Zebrafish research has also revealed that the activation of carcinogenesis-associated signal pathways plays an important role in CRC. The biology of cancer, intestinal disorders caused by carcinogens, and the morphological patterns of tumors have been found to be highly similar between zebrafish and humans. Therefore, the zebrafish has become an important animal model for translational medical research. Several zebrafish models have been developed to elucidate the characteristics of gastrointestinal diseases. This review article focuses on zebrafish models that have been used to study human intestinal disorders and tumors, including models involving mutant and transgenic fish. We also report on xenograft models and chemically-induced enterocolitis. This review demonstrates that excellent zebrafish models can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases and help facilitate the evaluation of novel anti-tumor drugs.

  7. Selected Tea and Tea Pomace Extracts Inhibit Intestinal α-Glucosidase Activity in Vitro and Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungbae Oh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a metabolic disorder characterized by postprandial hyperglycemia, which is an early defect of T2DM and thus a primary target for anti-diabetic drugs. A therapeutic approach is to inhibit intestinal α-glucosidase, the key enzyme for dietary carbohydrate digestion, resulting in delayed rate of glucose absorption. Although tea extracts have been reported to have anti-diabetic effects, the potential bioactivity of tea pomace, the main bio waste of tea beverage processing, is largely unknown. We evaluated the anti-diabetic effects of three selected tea water extracts (TWE and tea pomace extracts (TPE by determining the relative potency of extracts on rat intestinal α-glucosidase activity in vitro as well as hypoglycemic effects in vivo. Green, oolong, and black tea bags were extracted in hot water and the remaining tea pomace were dried and further extracted in 70% ethanol. The extracts were determined for intestinal rat α-glucosidases activity, radical scavenging activity, and total phenolic content. The postprandial glucose-lowering effects of TWE and TPE of green and black tea were assessed in male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats and compared to acarbose, a known pharmacological α-glucosidase inhibitor. The IC50 values of all three tea extracts against mammalian α-glucosidase were lower or similar in TPE groups than those of TWE groups. TWE and TPE of green tea exhibited the highest inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase activity with the IC50 of 2.04 ± 0.31 and 1.95 ± 0.37 mg/mL respectively. Among the specific enzymes tested, the IC50 values for TWE (0.16 ± 0.01 mg/mL and TPE (0.13 ± 0.01 mg/mL of green tea against sucrase activity were the lowest compared to those on maltase and glucoamylase activities. In the animal study, the blood glucose level at 30 min after oral intake (0.5 g/kg body wt of TPE and TWE of both green and black tea was significantly reduced compared to the control in sucrose-loaded SD

  8. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Collagenous colitis (CC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon. However, some patients with CC present with accompanying pathologic small-bowel manifestations such as coeliac disease, defects in bile acid absorption and histopathologic changes in small...... permeability. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients with CC and chronic diarrhoea participated in the study. Coeliac disease was excluded by small-bowel biopsy and/or serology. Intestinal permeability was assessed as urinary excretion (ratios) 2, 4 and 6 h after ingestion of 14C-labelled mannitol (14C......-intestinal biopsies, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal...

  9. "Green" synthesized and coated nanaosilver alters the membrance permeability of barrier (intestinal, brain, endothelial) cells and stimulates oxidative stress pathways in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanosilver's (nanoAg) use in medical applications and consumer products is increasing. Because of this, its "green" synthesis and surface modification with beneficial coatings are desirable. Given nanoAg's potential exposure routes (e.g., dermal, intestin...

  10. Effects of saponins and glycoalkaloids on the permeability and viability of mammalian intestinal cells and on the integrity of tissue preparations in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gee, J.M.; Wortley, G.M.; Johnson, I.T.; Price, K.R.; Rutten, A.A.J.J.L.; Houben, G.F.; Penninks, A.H.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of potato and tomato glycoalkaloids and a saponin mixture from Gypsophila were investigated in cytotoxicity studies (neutral red uptake, mitochondrial MTT reduction and release of lactate dehydrogenase), using cultured cell lines of rat and human intestinal mucosal epithelium.

  11. Supplemental calcium attenuates the colitis-related increase in diarrhea, intestinal permeability, and extracellular matrix breakdown in HLA-B27 transgenic rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepens, M.A.; Schonewille, A.J.; Vink, C.; Schothorst, E.M. van; Kramer, E.; Hendriks, T.; Brummer, R.J.; Keijer, J.; Meer, R. van der; Bovee-Oudenhoven, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    We have shown in several controlled rat and human infection studies that dietary calcium improves intestinal resistance and strengthens the mucosal barrier. Reinforcement of gut barrier function may alleviate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, we investigated the effect of supplemental

  12. Supplemental calcium attenuates the Colitis-Related increase in Diarrhea, intestinal Permeability, and Extracellular Matrix Breakdown in HLA-B27 Transgenic Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepens, M.A.A.; Schonewille, A.J.; Vink, C.; Schothorst, van E.M.; Kramer, E.H.M.; Hendriks, T.; Brummer, R.J.; Keijer, J.; Meer, van der R.; Bovee - Oudenhoven, I.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    We have shown in several controlled rat and human infection studies that dietary calcium improves intestinal resistance and strengthens the mucosal barrier. Reinforcement of gut barrier function may alleviate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, we investigated the effect of supplemental

  13. Cryosectioning the intestinal crypt-villus axis: an ex vivo method to study the dynamics of epigenetic modifications from stem cells to differentiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Audrey; Kazmierczak, Catherine; Duchêne, Belinda; Jonckheere, Nicolas; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a particularly attractive biological adult model to study epigenetic mechanisms driving adult stem cell renewal and cell differentiation. Since epigenetic modifications are dynamic, we have developed an original ex vivo approach to study the expression and epigenetic profiles of key genes associated with either intestinal cell pluripotency or differentiation by isolating cryosections of the intestinal crypt-villus axis. Gene expression, DNA methylation and histone modifications were studied by qRT-PCR, methylation-specific PCR and micro-chromatin immunoprecipitation, respectively. Using this approach, it was possible to identify segment-specific methylation and chromatin profiles. We show that (i) expression of intestinal stem cell markers (Lgr5, Ascl2) exclusively in the crypt is associated with active histone marks, (ii) promoters of all pluripotency genes studied and transcription factors involved in intestinal cell fate (Cdx2) harbour a bivalent chromatin pattern in the crypts and (iii) expression of differentiation markers (Muc2, Sox9) along the crypt-villus axis is associated with DNA methylation. Hence, using an original model of cryosectioning along the crypt-villus axis that allows in situ detection of dynamic epigenetic modifications, we demonstrate that regulation of pluripotency and differentiation markers in healthy intestinal mucosa involves different and specific epigenetic mechanisms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Cryosectioning the intestinal crypt-villus axis: An ex vivo method to study the dynamics of epigenetic modifications from stem cells to differentiated cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium is a particularly attractive biological adult model to study epigenetic mechanisms driving adult stem cell renewal and cell differentiation. Since epigenetic modifications are dynamic, we have developed an original ex vivo approach to study the expression and epigenetic profiles of key genes associated with either intestinal cell pluripotency or differentiation by isolating cryosections of the intestinal crypt-villus axis. Gene expression, DNA methylation and histone modifications were studied by qRT-PCR, methylation-specific PCR and micro-chromatin immunoprecipitation, respectively. Using this approach, it was possible to identify segment-specific methylation and chromatin profiles. We show that (i expression of intestinal stem cell markers (Lgr5, Ascl2 exclusively in the crypt is associated with active histone marks, (ii promoters of all pluripotency genes studied and transcription factors involved in intestinal cell fate (Cdx2 harbour a bivalent chromatin pattern in the crypts and (iii expression of differentiation markers (Muc2, Sox9 along the crypt-villus axis is associated with DNA methylation. Hence, using an original model of cryosectioning along the crypt-villus axis that allows in situ detection of dynamic epigenetic modifications, we demonstrate that regulation of pluripotency and differentiation markers in healthy intestinal mucosa involves different and specific epigenetic mechanisms.

  15. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase inhibits the translocation of bacteria of gut-origin in mice with peritonitis: mechanism of action

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Shan-Wen; Zhu, Jing; Zuo, Shuai; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Zi-Yi; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Chen, Guo-Wei; Liu, Yu-Cun; Wang, Peng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), an enzyme produced endogenously at the brush edge of the intestinal mucosa, may mitigate the increase in aberrant intestinal permeability increased during sepsis...

  16. An in vivo and in vitro comparison of CYP induction in rat liver and intestine using slices and quantitative RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignoni, Marcella; de Kanter, Ruben; Grossi, Pietro; Mahnke, Axel; Saturno, Grazia; Monshouwer, Mario

    2004-12-30

    Xenobiotics, including drugs, can influence cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity by upregulating the transcription of CYP genes. To minimize potential drug interactions, it is important to ascertain whether a compound will be an inducer of CYP enzymes early in the development of new therapeutic agents. In vivo and in vitro studies are reported that demonstrate the use of liver and intestinal slices as an in vitro model to predict potential CYP induction in vivo. Rat liver slices and intestinal slices were incubated, for 24 h and 6 h, respectively, with beta-naphthoflavone (betaNF), phenobarbital (PB) or dexamethasone (DEX). In an in vivo study, rats were treated with the same compounds for 3 days. In vivo and in vitro CYP mRNA levels were measured by using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, CYP enzyme activities were determined in rat liver slices after 48 h incubation. In both rat liver and intestinal slices, betaNF significantly induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP2B1 mRNA levels. PB significantly induced CYP2B1. In liver slices a minor induction of CYP1A1 and CYP3A1 by PB was observed, whereas DEX significantly induced CYP3A1, CYP2B1 and CYP1A2 mRNA levels. The induction profiles (qualitative and quantitative) observed in vivo and in vitro are quite similar. All together, these data demonstrate that liver and intestinal slices are a useful and predictive tool to study CYP induction.

  17. Analysis of the intestinal absorption of essential fatty acids in vivo in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punchard, N A; Green, A T; Mullins, J G; Thompson, R P

    2000-01-01

    The absorption and competition kinetics of the essential fatty acids (EFAs), linoleic acid (LA), alpha-linolenic acid (alphaLnA) and arachidonic acid (AA) in vivo were studied in the perfused rat jejunum. Uptake of each EFA on its own followed saturable kinetics at low luminal concentrations, suggesting a facilitative transport process, the affinity of which increased with chain length and degree of unsaturation. Absorption of one EFA was enhanced by low, whilst competitively inhibited by high, concentrations of a second EFA. Whereas LA and alphaLnA each interfered with the absorption of one another, both had little effect on AA. There was a strong inverse correlation between the relative unsaturation of an EFA and the change in Km of its absorption observed upon inhibition with another EFA. Overall, the results indicated a specific absorptive mechanism, probably involving a transport protein, the affinity of which increased with the degree of unsaturation of the EFA.

  18. Bile acid malabsorption or disturbed intestinal permeability in patients treated with enzyme substitution for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is not caused by bacterial overgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Graff, Jesper; Philipsen, Else Kirstine

    2003-01-01

    permeability was assessed from urine excretion of ingested 14C-mannitol and 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA), and these data were compared with results for 10 age-matched healthy men. RESULTS: No patients had abnormal breath hydrogen or methane concentrations after glucose intake...

  19. TLR2/TLR4 activation induces Tregs and suppresses intestinal inflammation caused by Fusobacterium nucleatum in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Ping Jia

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs 2 and 4 play critical roles in intestinal inflammation caused by Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum infection, but the role of TLR2/TLR4 in regulation of proinflammatory cytokines remains unknown. In this study, through microarray analysis and qRT-PCR, we showed that TLR2/TLR4 are involved in the F. nucleatum-induced inflammatory signaling pathway in Caco-2 cells, C57BL/6 mice and human clinical specimens. In TLR2-/- and TLR4-/- mice, F. nucleatum infection resulted in increased colonization of the bacteria and production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α. In addition, the ratio of Foxp3+ CD4+ T cells in the total CD4+ T cells in TLR2-/- and TLR4-/- mice was less than that in wild-type mice, and the ratio in hybrid mice was more than that in knockout mice, which suggested that TLR2/TLR4 mediated the number of Tregs. Furthermore, it was observed that inflammatory cytokine levels were reduced in TLR2-/- mice after Treg transfer. Thus, these data indicate that TLR2/TLR4 regulate F. nucleatum-induced inflammatory cytokines through Tregs in vivo.

  20. Mutation of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Core LPS Biosynthesis Enzyme RfaD Confers Hypersusceptibility to Host Intestinal Innate Immunity In vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chen, Jenn-Wei; Chiu, Hao-Chieh; Teng, Ching-Hao; Hsu, Tai-I; Lu, Pei-Jung; Syu, Wan-Jr; Wang, Sin-Tian; Chou, Ting-Chen; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is an important foodborne pathogen causing severe diseases in humans worldwide. Currently, there is no specific treatment available for EHEC infection and the use of conventional antibiotics is contraindicated. Therefore, identification of potential therapeutic targets and development of effective measures to control and treat EHEC infection are needed. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are surface glycolipids found on the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, including EHEC, and LPS biosynthesis has long been considered as potential anti-bacterial target. Here, we demonstrated that the EHEC rfaD gene that functions in the biosynthesis of the LPS inner core is required for the intestinal colonization and pathogenesis of EHEC in vivo. Disruption of the EHEC rfaD confers attenuated toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans and less bacterial colonization in the intestine of C. elegans and mouse. Moreover, rfaD is also involved in the control of susceptibility of EHEC to antimicrobial peptides and host intestinal immunity. It is worth noting that rfaD mutation did not interfere with the growth kinetics when compared to the wild-type EHEC cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that mutations of the EHEC rfaD confer hypersusceptibility to host intestinal innate immunity in vivo, and suggested that targeting the RfaD or the core LPS synthesis pathway may provide alternative therapeutic regimens for EHEC infection.

  1. Noble gases without anesthetic properties protect myocardium against infarction by activating prosurvival signaling kinases and inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Paul S; Krolikowski, John G; Shim, Yon Hee; Venkatapuram, Suneetha; Kersten, Judy R; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Warltier, David C; Pratt, Phillip F

    2007-09-01

    The anesthetic noble gas, xenon, produces cardioprotection. We hypothesized that other noble gases without anesthetic properties [helium (He), neon (Ne), argon (Ar)] also produce cardioprotection, and further hypothesized that this beneficial effect is mediated by activation of prosurvival signaling kinases [including phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and 70-kDa ribosomal protein s6 kinase] and inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in vivo. Rabbits (n = 98) instrumented for hemodynamic measurement and subjected to a 30-min left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) occlusion and 3 h reperfusion received 0.9% saline (control), three cycles of 70% He-, Ne-, or Ar-30% O2 administered for 5 min interspersed with 5 min of 70% N2-30% O2 before LAD occlusion, or three cycles of brief (5 min) ischemia interspersed with 5 min reperfusion before prolonged LAD occlusion and reperfusion (ischemic preconditioning). Additional groups of rabbits received selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (wortmannin; 0.6 mg/kg), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (PD 098059; 2 mg/kg), or 70-kDa ribosomal protein s6 kinase (rapamycin; 0.25 mg/kg) or mPTP opener atractyloside (5 mg/kg) in the absence or presence of He pretreatment. He, Ne, Ar, and ischemic preconditioning significantly (P noble gases without anesthetic properties produce cardioprotection by activating prosurvival signaling kinases and inhibiting mPTP opening in rabbits.

  2. Assessment of penetrant and vehicle mixture properties on transdermal permeability using a mixed effect pharmacokinetic model of ex vivo porcine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittenden, Jason T; Riviere, Jim E

    2016-10-01

    The accurate prediction of the rate and extent of transdermal absorption from topical exposure to chemical mixtures would be beneficial in risk assessment and drug delivery applications. The isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF) has been used as an ex vivo model for assessing transdermal absorption from topical exposures. A mixed effect, pharmacokinetic tissue model was used to model finite dose, transdermal, absorption data from IPPSF experiments for 12 penetrants dosed in up to 10 different vehicles. The model was able to identify permeability constant, while accounting for between and within unit variability, across the entire data set. This approach provides a platform for exploring the relationship between covariates (chemical descriptors and functions thereof) and the model parameters. Successive models were employed that reduced the overall variability in the parameter estimate by modeling the parameters as functions of the covariates. Log kp was initially modeled as a function of LogP and MW of the pure penetrant (adjusted r2  = 0.48). The addition of mixture factors to account for the different dosing vehicles further improved the relationship: to r2  = 0.56 with Connolly molecular area (CMA) and r2  = 0.78 with the further addition of total polar surface area difference (TPSAd). The pharmacokinetic model and quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) developed for the IPPSF may be relevant to clinical transdermal formulation development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Crustal permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Permeability is the primary control on fluid flow in the Earth’s crust and is key to a surprisingly wide range of geological processes, because it controls the advection of heat and solutes and the generation of anomalous pore pressures.  The practical importance of permeability – and the potential for large, dynamic changes in permeability – is highlighted by ongoing issues associated with hydraulic fracturing for hydrocarbon production (“fracking”), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration.  Although there are thousands of research papers on crustal permeability, this is the first book-length treatment.  This book bridges the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic perspective of permeability as a static material property and the perspective of other Earth scientists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. 

  4. Validation and Optimization of an Ex Vivo Assay of Intestinal Mucosal Biopsies in Crohn's Disease: Reflects Inflammation and Drug Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadstrup, Kasper; Galsgaard, Elisabeth Douglas; Gerwien, Jens; Vester-Andersen, Marianne Kajbæk; Pedersen, Julie Steen; Rasmussen, Julie; Neermark, Søren; Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Jensen, Teis; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic illness demanding better therapeutics. The marketed biologics only benefit some patients or elicit diminishing effect over time. To complement the known methods in drug development and to obtain patient specific drug responses, we optimized and validated a known human explant method to test drug candidates and pathophysiological conditions in CD intestinal biopsies. Mucosal biopsies from 27 CD patients and 6 healthy individuals were collected to validate an explant assay test where the polarized tissue was cultured on a novel metal mesh disk, slightly immersed in medium imitating an air-liquid interphase. After culture in high oxygen for 24 hours with or without biological treatment in the medium, biopsy integrity and penetration of antibodies was measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nine cytokines were quantified in the conditioned medium as a read-out for degree of inflammation in individual biopsies and used to evaluate treatment efficacy. The biopsies were well-preserved, showing few structural changes. IHC revealed tissue penetration of antibodies demonstrating ability to test therapeutic antibodies. The cytokine release to the medium showed that the assay can distinguish between inflammation states and then validate the known effect of two treatment biologics confirmed by a detection panel of five specific cytokines. Our data also suggest that the assay would be able to indicate which patients are responders to anti-TNF-α therapeutics, and which are non-responders. This study demonstrates this version of an ex vivo culture as a valid and robust assay to assess inflammation in mucosal biopsies and test of the efficacy of novel drug candidates and current treatments on individual patients-potentially for a personalized medicine approach.

  5. Notional Permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, R.; Van den Bos, J.P.; Maertens, J.; Verhagen, H.J.; Van der Meer, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Different layer design of a rock slope and under layers has a large effect on the strengths on the rock slope itself. In the stability formula developed of VAN DER MEER [1988] this effect is represented by the term Notional Permeability with symbol P. A more open, or permeable, structure underneath

  6. Biostable glucose permeable polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A new biostable glucose permeable polymer has been developed which is useful, for example, in implantable glucose sensors. This biostable glucose permeable polymer has a number of advantageous characteristics and, for example, does not undergo hydrolytic cleavage and degradation, thereby providing...... a composition that facilitates long term sensor stability in vivo. The versatile characteristics of this polymer allow it to be used in a variety of contexts, for example to form the body of an implantable glucose sensor. The invention includes the polymer composition, sensor systems formed from this polymer...

  7. Hydrotropic solubilization of lipophilic drugs for oral delivery: The effects of urea and nicotinamide on carbamazepine solubility-permeability interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Beig

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrotropy refers to increasing the water solubility of otherwise poorly soluble compound by the presence of small organic molecules. While it can certainly increase the apparent solubility of a lipophilic drug, the effect of hydrotropy on the drugs' permeation through the intestinal membrane has not been studied. The purpose of this work was to investigate the solubility-permeability interplay when using hydrotropic drug solubilization. The concentration-dependent effects of the commonly used hydrotropes urea and nicotinamide, on the solubility and the permeability of the lipophilic antiepileptic drug carbamazepine were studied. Then, the solubility-permeability interplay was mathematically modeled, and was compared to the experimental data. Both hydrotropes allowed significant concentration-dependent carbamazepine solubility increase (up to ~30-fold. A concomitant permeability decrease was evident both in-vitro and in-vivo (~17-fold for nicotinamide and ~9-fold for urea, revealing a solubility-permeability tradeoff when using hydrotropic drug solubilization. A relatively simplified simulation approach based on proportional opposite correlation between the solubility increase and the permeability decrease at a given hydrotrope concentration allowed excellent prediction of the overall solubility-permeability tradeoff. In conclusion, when using hydrotropic drug solubilization it is prudent to not focus solely on solubility, but to account for the permeability as well; achieving optimal solubility-permeability balance may promote the overall goal of the formulation to maximize oral drug exposure.

  8. Hydrotropic Solubilization of Lipophilic Drugs for Oral Delivery: The Effects of Urea and Nicotinamide on Carbamazepine Solubility–Permeability Interplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beig, Avital; Lindley, David; Miller, Jonathan M.; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2016-01-01

    Hydrotropy refers to increasing the water solubility of otherwise poorly soluble compound by the presence of small organic molecules. While it can certainly increase the apparent solubility of a lipophilic drug, the effect of hydrotropy on the drugs’ permeation through the intestinal membrane has not been studied. The purpose of this work was to investigate the solubility–permeability interplay when using hydrotropic drug solubilization. The concentration-dependent effects of the commonly used hydrotropes urea and nicotinamide, on the solubility and the permeability of the lipophilic antiepileptic drug carbamazepine were studied. Then, the solubility–permeability interplay was mathematically modeled, and was compared to the experimental data. Both hydrotropes allowed significant concentration-dependent carbamazepine solubility increase (up to ∼30-fold). A concomitant permeability decrease was evident both in vitro and in vivo (∼17-fold for nicotinamide and ∼9-fold for urea), revealing a solubility–permeability tradeoff when using hydrotropic drug solubilization. A relatively simplified simulation approach based on proportional opposite correlation between the solubility increase and the permeability decrease at a given hydrotrope concentration allowed excellent prediction of the overall solubility–permeability tradeoff. In conclusion, when using hydrotropic drug solubilization it is prudent to not focus solely on solubility, but to account for the permeability as well; achieving optimal solubility–permeability balance may promote the overall goal of the formulation to maximize oral drug exposure. PMID:27826241

  9. Degranulation of mast cells due to compound 48/80 induces concentration-dependent intestinal contraction in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum) ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manera, M; Giammarino, A; Borreca, C; Giari, L; Dezfuli, B S

    2011-10-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) intestinal strips (n = 10) were mounted in an isolated organ bath and the effect of incremental doses of compound 48/80 was recorded. Compound 48/80 induced concentration-related contraction in all the examined strips following a sigmoidal dose-response curve fit. Values for maximal contraction (E(max) , g cm(-2)), negative logarithm of the EC(50) (pD(2)), and hill slope were, respectively (mean±standard error), 12.88 ± 0.51, 1.88 ± 0.05, 1.49 ± 0.27. The histological modification induced on mast cells (MCs) due to compound 48/80 was characterized by mean of gray-levels and texture analysis. Significant differences were observed between gray-levels values (Linear mixed model, Pcompound 48/80-treated strips compared with MCs from untreated strips. Moreover, maximal intestinal contraction (due to compound 48/80) correlates positively and significantly (Pearson and Spearman correlations, Pcompound 48/80 induces the degranulation of trout intestinal MCs ex vivo, and that the aforementioned degranulation promotes a concentration-dependent intestinal contraction. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  10. Effects of steroids and sex reversal on intestinal absorption of L-(/sup 14/C)leucine in vivo, in rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habibi, H.R.; Ince, B.W.

    1983-12-01

    The effects of steroids (17 alpha-methyltestosterone (MT), 17 beta-oestradiol (E2)), and of sex reversal (XX male) on intestinal absorption and accumulation of L-(/sup 14/C)leucine (5 mM), were investigated in unanaesthetized rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), using an in vivo gut perfusion technique. Each steroid was luminally perfused through the gut at a concentration of 50 micrograms/ml perfusate, during five separate perfusions carried out on the same fish at 30-min intervals (perfusion periods 1 to 5), for a total of 120 min at 14 degrees. Experiments were also conducted on masculinized, genetically female trout (XX male) with steroid-free perfusate. MT treatment significantly increased the intestinal absorption of radioleucine during periods 1 and 2, whilst E2 was without effect. Neither MT nor E2 influenced intestinal accumulation (mid- and hindgut) of radioleucine, and accumulation of /sup 14/C-solutes in skeletal muscle. Sex reversal, however, whilst having no effect on leucine absorption, nevertheless significantly increased intestinal accumulation of radioleucine, and accumulation of /sup 14/C-solutes in skeletal muscle. The effects observed in the present study are in agreement with previous work in trout using everted gut sac preparations. It is suggested that the growth-promoting effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids in fish may be partly explained by their action on gastrointestinal function.

  11. Nano-sized water-in-oil-in-water emulsion enhances intestinal absorption of calcein, a high solubility and low permeability compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Kenjiro; Takarada, Nobuo; Takada, Kanji

    2010-02-01

    Our goal was to develop safe and stable multilayer emulsions capable of enhancing intestinal absorption of biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class III drugs. First, w/o emulsions were prepared using calcein as a model BCS class III compound and condensed ricinoleic acid tetraglycerin ester as a hydrophobic emulsifier. Then water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsions were prepared with shirasu porous glass (SPG) membranes. Particle size analyses and calcein leakage from oil droplets in w/o/w emulsions led us to select stearic acid hexaglycerin esters (HS-11) and Gelucire 44/14 as hydrophilic emulsifiers. Analyses of the absorption-enhancing effects of w/o/w emulsions on intestinal calcein absorption in rats showed that calcein bioavailability after intraduodenal (i.d.) administration of HS-11 or Gelucire 44/14+polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) w/o/w emulsions prepared with 0.1-microm pore-sized SPGs was significantly higher than that of the calcein control. However, serum calcein concentration vs. time profiles after i.d. administration of w/o/w emulsions prepared with 1.1-microm and 30-microm pore-sized SPGs and an emulsion prepared with a calcein-containing outer water phase were comparable to control profiles. These results suggested that HS-11 or Gelucire 44/14+PVA are safe outer water phase additives and that 0.1-microm pore-sized SPGs are important for preparing w/o/w emulsions that enhanced intestinal calcein absorption. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mucin dispersions as a model for the oromucosal mucus layer in in vitro and ex vivo buccal permeability studies of small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marxen, Eva; Mosgaard, Mette Dalskov; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2017-01-01

    , mannitol, propranolol, caffeine) showed decreased permeability across mucin dispersions, compared to controls, and a greater effect was seen with HFDS than with PGM. Permeability of propranolol and caffeine across filter-grown TR146 cells was decreased by the presence of mucin, whereas no effect was found...

  13. P-glycoprotein is responsible for the poor intestinal absorption and low toxicity of oral aconitine: In vitro, in situ, in vivo and in silico studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Cuiping, E-mail: yangsophia76@hotmail.com; Zhang, Tianhong, E-mail: wdzth@sina.com; Li, Zheng, E-mail: lizh2524@126.com; Xu, Liang, E-mail: wj24998@163.com; Liu, Fei, E-mail: liufeipharm@163.com; Ruan, Jinxiu, E-mail: ruanjx1936@yahoo.com.cn; Liu, Keliang, E-mail: keliangliu55@126.com; Zhang, Zhenqing, E-mail: zhangzhenqingpharm@163.com

    2013-12-15

    Aconitine (AC) is a highly toxic alkaloid from bioactive plants of the genus Aconitum, some of which have been widely used as medicinal herbs for thousands of years. In this study, we systematically evaluated the potential role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the mechanisms underlying the low and variable bioavailability of oral AC. First, the bidirectional transport of AC across Caco-2 and MDCKII-MDR1 cells was investigated. The efflux of AC across monolayers of these two cell lines was greater than its influx. Additionally, the P-gp inhibitors, verapamil and cyclosporin A, significantly decreased the efflux of AC. An in situ intestinal perfusion study in rats showed that verapamil co-perfusion caused a significant increase in the intestinal permeability of AC, from 0.22 × 10{sup −5} to 2.85 × 10{sup −5} cm/s. Then, the pharmacokinetic profile of orally administered AC with or without pre-treatment with verapamil was determined in rats. With pre-treatment of verapamil, the maximum plasma concentration (C{sub max}) of AC increased sharply, from 39.43 to 1490.7 ng/ml. Accordingly, a 6.7-fold increase in the area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC{sub 0–12} {sub h}) of AC was observed when co-administered with verapamil. In silico docking analyses suggested that AC and verapamil possess similar P-gp recognition mechanisms. This work demonstrated that P-gp is involved in limiting the intestinal absorption of AC and attenuating its toxicity to humans. Our data indicate that potential P-gp-mediated drug–drug interactions should be considered carefully in the clinical application of aconite and formulations containing AC. - Highlights: • Verapamil and cyclosporin A decreased the efflux of aconitine across Caco-2 cells. • Both inhibitors decreased the efflux of aconitine across MDCKII-MDR1 cells. • Co-perfusion with verapamil increased the intestinal permeability of aconitine. • Co-administration with verapamil sharply increased the C{sub max

  14. Increase in Campylobacter jejuni invasion of intestinal epithelial cells under low-oxygen coculture conditions that reflect the in vivo environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Dominic C; Gundogdu, Ozan; Elmi, Abdi; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Taylor, Peter W; Wren, Brendan W; Dorrell, Nick

    2012-05-01

    Campylobacter jejuni infection often results in bloody, inflammatory diarrhea, indicating bacterial disruption and invasion of the intestinal epithelium. While C. jejuni infection can be reproduced in vitro using intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lines, low numbers of bacteria invading IECs do not reflect these clinical symptoms. Performing in vitro assays under atmospheric oxygen conditions neither is optimal for microaerophilic C. jejuni nor reflects the low-oxygen environment of the intestinal lumen. A vertical diffusion chamber (VDC) model system creates microaerobic conditions at the apical surface and aerobic conditions at the basolateral surface of cultured IECs, producing an in vitro system that closely mimics in vivo conditions in the human intestine. Ninefold increases in interacting and 80-fold increases in intracellular C. jejuni 11168H wild-type strain bacteria were observed after 24-h coculture with Caco-2 IECs in VDCs under microaerobic conditions at the apical surface, compared to results under aerobic conditions. Increased bacterial interaction was matched by an enhanced and directional host innate immune response, particularly an increased basolateral secretion of the proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8). Analysis of the invasive ability of a nonmotile C. jejuni 11168H rpoN mutant in the VDC model system indicates that motility is an important factor in the early stages of bacterial invasion. The first report of the use of a VDC model system for studying the interactions of an invasive bacterial pathogen with IECs demonstrates the importance of performing such experiments under conditions that represent the in vivo situation and will allow novel insights into C. jejuni pathogenic mechanisms.

  15. Giardia duodenalis infection reduces granulocyte infiltration in an in vivo model of bacterial toxin-induced colitis and attenuates inflammation in human intestinal tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Cotton

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the development of diarrheal disease and fever. Conversely, separate observations have indicated Giardia infections may enhance the severity of diarrheal disease from a co-infecting pathogen. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils (PMNs are granulocytic, innate immune cells characteristic of acute intestinal inflammatory responses against bacterial pathogens that contribute to the development of diarrheal disease following recruitment into intestinal tissues. Giardia cathepsin B cysteine proteases have been shown to attenuate PMN chemotaxis towards IL-8/CXCL8, suggesting Giardia targets PMN accumulation. However, the ability of Giardia infections to attenuate PMN accumulation in vivo and how in turn this effect may alter the host inflammatory response in the intestine has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we report that Giardia infection attenuates granulocyte tissue infiltration induced by intra-rectal instillation of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in an isolate-dependent manner. This attenuation of granulocyte infiltration into colonic tissues paralled decreased expression of several cytokines associated with the recruitment of PMNs. Giardia trophozoite isolates that attenuated granulocyte infiltration in vivo also decreased protein expression of cytokines released from inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues collected from patients with active Crohn's disease, including several cytokines associated with PMN recruitment. These results demonstrate for the first time

  16. Giardia duodenalis Infection Reduces Granulocyte Infiltration in an In Vivo Model of Bacterial Toxin-Induced Colitis and Attenuates Inflammation in Human Intestinal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, James A.; Motta, Jean-Paul; Schenck, L. Patrick; Hirota, Simon A.; Beck, Paul L.; Buret, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the development of diarrheal disease and fever. Conversely, separate observations have indicated Giardia infections may enhance the severity of diarrheal disease from a co-infecting pathogen. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils (PMNs) are granulocytic, innate immune cells characteristic of acute intestinal inflammatory responses against bacterial pathogens that contribute to the development of diarrheal disease following recruitment into intestinal tissues. Giardia cathepsin B cysteine proteases have been shown to attenuate PMN chemotaxis towards IL-8/CXCL8, suggesting Giardia targets PMN accumulation. However, the ability of Giardia infections to attenuate PMN accumulation in vivo and how in turn this effect may alter the host inflammatory response in the intestine has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we report that Giardia infection attenuates granulocyte tissue infiltration induced by intra-rectal instillation of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in an isolate-dependent manner. This attenuation of granulocyte infiltration into colonic tissues paralled decreased expression of several cytokines associated with the recruitment of PMNs. Giardia trophozoite isolates that attenuated granulocyte infiltration in vivo also decreased protein expression of cytokines released from inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues collected from patients with active Crohn’s disease, including several cytokines associated with PMN recruitment. These results demonstrate for the first time that certain

  17. Giardia duodenalis infection reduces granulocyte infiltration in an in vivo model of bacterial toxin-induced colitis and attenuates inflammation in human intestinal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, James A; Motta, Jean-Paul; Schenck, L Patrick; Hirota, Simon A; Beck, Paul L; Buret, Andre G

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the development of diarrheal disease and fever. Conversely, separate observations have indicated Giardia infections may enhance the severity of diarrheal disease from a co-infecting pathogen. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils (PMNs) are granulocytic, innate immune cells characteristic of acute intestinal inflammatory responses against bacterial pathogens that contribute to the development of diarrheal disease following recruitment into intestinal tissues. Giardia cathepsin B cysteine proteases have been shown to attenuate PMN chemotaxis towards IL-8/CXCL8, suggesting Giardia targets PMN accumulation. However, the ability of Giardia infections to attenuate PMN accumulation in vivo and how in turn this effect may alter the host inflammatory response in the intestine has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we report that Giardia infection attenuates granulocyte tissue infiltration induced by intra-rectal instillation of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in an isolate-dependent manner. This attenuation of granulocyte infiltration into colonic tissues paralled decreased expression of several cytokines associated with the recruitment of PMNs. Giardia trophozoite isolates that attenuated granulocyte infiltration in vivo also decreased protein expression of cytokines released from inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues collected from patients with active Crohn's disease, including several cytokines associated with PMN recruitment. These results demonstrate for the first time that certain

  18. Enrichment of in vivo transcription data from dietary intervention studies with in vitro data provides improved insight into gene regulation mechanisms in the intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulst, Marcel; Jansman, Alfons; Wijers, Ilonka; Hoekman, Arjan; Vastenhouw, Stéphanie; van Krimpen, Marinus; Smits, Mari; Schokker, Dirkjan

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of intestinal mucosa of chickens and pigs fed over long-term periods (days/weeks) with a diet rich in rye and a diet supplemented with zinc, respectively, or of chickens after a one-day amoxicillin treatment of chickens, were recorded recently. Such dietary interventions are frequently used to modulate animal performance or therapeutically for monogastric livestock. In this study, changes in gene expression induced by these three interventions in cultured "Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells" (IPEC-J2) recorded after a short-term period of 2 and 6 hours, were compared to the in vivo gene expression profiles in order to evaluate the capability of this in vitro bioassay in predicting in vivo responses. Lists of response genes were analysed with bioinformatics programs to identify common biological pathways induced in vivo as well as in vitro. Furthermore, overlapping genes and pathways were evaluated for possible involvement in the biological processes induced in vivo by datamining and consulting literature. For all three interventions, only a limited number of identical genes and a few common biological processes/pathways were found to be affected by the respective interventions. However, several enterocyte-specific regulatory and secreted effector proteins that responded in vitro could be related to processes regulated in vivo, i.e. processes related to mineral absorption, (epithelial) cell adherence and tight junction formation for zinc, microtubule and cytoskeleton integrity for amoxicillin, and cell-cycle progression and mucus production for rye. Short-term gene expression responses to dietary interventions as measured in the in vitro bioassay have a low predictability for long-term responses as measured in the intestinal mucosa in vivo. The short-term responses of a set regulatory and effector genes, as measured in this bioassay, however, provided additional insight into how specific processes in piglets and broilers may be modulated by

  19. The effect of E. coli STa enterotoxin on the absorption of weakly dissociable anti-malarial drugs from rat intestine in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Rawlings, J M; Lynch, J; Lucas, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of E. coli heat stable (STa) enterotoxin on the absorption of radiolabelled anti-malarial weak bases and their appearance in peripheral blood was assessed in vivo by a recirculation procedure in rat intestinal loops. 2. Enterotoxin increased the jejunal disappearance of quinine (P less than 0.05), trimethoprim (P less than 0.05), proguanil (P less than 0.05) and chloroquine (P less than 0.001) and left pyrimethamine disappearance unaltered. Peripheral blood levels of trimethopri...

  20. Crosstalk between Inflammation and ROCK/MLCK Signaling Pathways in Gastrointestinal Disorders with Intestinal Hyperpermeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The barrier function of the intestine is essential for maintaining the normal homeostasis of the gut and mucosal immune system. Abnormalities in intestinal barrier function expressed by increased intestinal permeability have long been observed in various gastrointestinal disorders such as Crohn’s disease (CD, ulcerative colitis (UC, celiac disease, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. Imbalance of metabolizing junction proteins and mucosal inflammation contributes to intestinal hyperpermeability. Emerging studies exploring in vitro and in vivo model system demonstrate that Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase- (ROCK- and myosin light chain kinase- (MLCK- mediated pathways are involved in the regulation of intestinal permeability. With this perspective, we aim to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the role of inflammation and ROCK-/MLCK-mediated pathways leading to intestinal hyperpermeability in gastrointestinal disorders. In the near future, it may be possible to specifically target these specific pathways to develop novel therapies for gastrointestinal disorders associated with increased gut permeability.

  1. Myosin light chain kinase mediates intestinal barrier disruption following burn injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanli Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe burn injury results in the loss of intestinal barrier function, however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Myosin light chain (MLC phosphorylation mediated by MLC kinase (MLCK is critical to the pathophysiological regulation of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesized that the MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates the regulation of intestinal barrier function following burn injury, and that MLCK inhibition attenuates the burn-induced intestinal barrier disfunction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male balb/c mice were assigned randomly to either sham burn (control or 30% total body surface area (TBSA full thickness burn without or with intraperitoneal injection of ML-9 (2 mg/kg, an MLCK inhibitor. In vivo intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-dextran was measured. Intestinal mucosa injury was assessed histologically. Tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin and claudin-1 was analyzed by immunofluorescent assay. Expression of MLCK and phosphorylated MLC in ileal mucosa was assessed by Western blot. Intestinal permeability was increased significantly after burn injury, which was accompanied by mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and increase of both MLCK and MLC phosphorylation. Treatment with ML-9 attenuated the burn-caused increase of intestinal permeability, mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and decreased MLC phosphorylation, but not MLCK expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction after severe burn injury. It is suggested that MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation may be a critical target for the therapeutic treatment of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption after severe burn injury.

  2. An In Vivo and In Vitro Evaluation of the Mutual Interactions between the Lung and the Large Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei-Miao Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important theories of the traditional Chinese medicine is the exterior-interior relationship between the lung and the large intestine; so far, little direct experimental evidence has been reported to support such relationship. Here we for the first time investigated the mutual interactions between the lung and the large intestine by examining the relevancies between the pulmonary functions and the rectal resting pressure in the rat models of asthma and constipation. We also evaluated the effects of the lung homogenate and the large intestine homogenate on the isolated large intestine muscle strip and the isolated tracheal spiral, respectively. Our results showed that the pulmonary resistance and pulmonary compliance were closely related to the rectal resting pressure in the asthmatic rat model, while the rectal resting pressure was much correlated with the pulmonary resistance in the rat model of constipation. Moreover, it was shown that the lung homogenate could specifically contract the isolated large intestine muscle strip. Overall, this study provided new lines of evidence for the theory and highlighted the potential application in the treatment of the corresponding diseases.

  3. Nivalenol Has a Greater Impact than Deoxynivalenol on Pig Jejunum Mucosa in Vitro on Explants and in Vivo on Intestinal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheat, Sophal; Gerez, Juliana R.; Cognié, Juliette; Alassane-Kpembi, Imourana; Bracarense, Ana Paula F. L.; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Oswald, Isabelle P.; Kolf-Clauw, Martine

    2015-01-01

    The mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV), worldwide cereal contaminants, raise concerns for animal and human gut health, following contaminated food or feed ingestion. The impact of DON and NIV on intestinal mucosa was investigated after acute exposure, in vitro and in vivo. The histological changes induced by DON and NIV were analyzed after four-hour exposure on pig jejunum explants and loops, two alternative models. On explants, dose-dependent increases in the histological changes were induced by DON and NIV, with a two-fold increase in lesion severity at 10 µM NIV. On loops, NIV had a greater impact on the mucosa than DON. The overall proliferative cells showed 30% and 13% decrease after NIV and DON exposure, respectively, and NIV increased the proliferative index of crypt enterocytes. NIV also increased apoptosis at the top of villi and reduced by almost half the proliferative/apoptotic cell ratio. Lamina propria cells (mainly immune cells) were more sensitive than enterocytes (epithelial cells) to apoptosis induced by NIV. Our results demonstrate a greater impact of NIV than DON on the intestinal mucosa, both in vitro and in vivo, and highlight the need of a specific hazard characterization for NIV risk assessment. PMID:26035490

  4. Nivalenol Has a Greater Impact than Deoxynivalenol on Pig Jejunum Mucosa in Vitro on Explants and in Vivo on Intestinal Loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophal Cheat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON and nivalenol (NIV, worldwide cereal contaminants, raise concerns for animal and human gut health, following contaminated food or feed ingestion. The impact of DON and NIV on intestinal mucosa was investigated after acute exposure, in vitro and in vivo. The histological changes induced by DON and NIV were analyzed after four-hour exposure on pig jejunum explants and loops, two alternative models. On explants, dose-dependent increases in the histological changes were induced by DON and NIV, with a two-fold increase in lesion severity at 10 µM NIV. On loops, NIV had a greater impact on the mucosa than DON. The overall proliferative cells showed 30% and 13% decrease after NIV and DON exposure, respectively, and NIV increased the proliferative index of crypt enterocytes. NIV also increased apoptosis at the top of villi and reduced by almost half the proliferative/apoptotic cell ratio. Lamina propria cells (mainly immune cells were more sensitive than enterocytes (epithelial cells to apoptosis induced by NIV. Our results demonstrate a greater impact of NIV than DON on the intestinal mucosa, both in vitro and in vivo, and highlight the need of a specific hazard characterization for NIV risk assessment.

  5. In vivo detection and quantification of tetracycline by use of a whole-cell biosensor in the rat intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Licht, Tine Rask

    2004-01-01

    was observed. Reintroduction of the E. coli MC4100/pTGFP2 strain into animals already colonized by the plasmid-free E. coli strain the day before euthanasia made it possible to extract and analyze the biosensors from intestinal samples. The induction of GFP in the biosensor cells extracted from the animals...

  6. Adhesive mucous gel layer and mucus release as intestinal barrier in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiboshi, Y; Nezu, R; Cui, L; Chen, K; Khan, J; Yoshida, H; Sando, K; Kamata, S; Takagi, Y; Okada, A

    1996-01-01

    Although it has been reported that total parenteral nutrition induces an increased intestinal permeability and a decreased mucous gel layer covering the intestinal epithelium, the role of mucous gel on intestinal permeability has not been well understood. We examined the in vivo effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) as mucolytic agent and colchicine as suppressant of the mucus production on the intestinal transmission of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran 70,000 (FITC-dextran). Rats were divided into four groups. In each group, FITC-dextran (750 mg/kg) with or without NAC (3000 mg/kg) was injected into the small intestinal lumen 3 hours after intraperitoneal injection of saline or colchicine (Col, 10 mg/kg). Thirty minutes after injection of FITC-dextran, blood samples were taken from portal vein to analyze plasma fluorescein concentration by fluorescence spectrometry. Samples of small intestine were sectioned in a cryostat for fluorescence microscopy, and the identical sections were stained by periodic acid-Schiff reaction. Plasma FITC-dextran level in NAC group was higher than that in control group (p NAC group was higher than that in Col group (p NAC group was higher than that in NAC group (p NAC and Col + NAC groups. FITC-dextran and mucous gel showed complementary distribution in all rats. The villous interstitial edema was recognized in NAC group and the villi were disrupted in Col + NAC group. These results suggest that intestinal permeability is possibly affected not only by the mucous gel covering the intestinal epithelium but also by mucus release from goblet cells of the small intestine.

  7. Quantitative prediction of intestinal metabolism in humans from a simplified intestinal availability model and empirical scaling factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadono, Keitaro; Akabane, Takafumi; Tabata, Kenji; Gato, Katsuhiko; Terashita, Shigeyuki; Teramura, Toshio

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to establish a practical and convenient method of predicting intestinal availability (F(g)) in humans for highly permeable compounds at the drug discovery stage, with a focus on CYP3A4-mediated metabolism. We constructed a "simplified F(g) model," described using only metabolic parameters, assuming that passive diffusion is dominant when permeability is high and that the effect of transporters in epithelial cells is negligible. Five substrates for CYP3A4 (alprazolam, amlodipine, clonazepam, midazolam, and nifedipine) and four for both CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (nicardipine, quinidine, tacrolimus, and verapamil) were used as model compounds. Observed fraction of drug absorbed (F(a)F(g)) values for these compounds were calculated from in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters, whereas in vitro intestinal intrinsic clearance (CL(int,intestine)) was determined using human intestinal microsomes. The CL(int,intestine) for the model compounds corrected with that of midazolam was defined as CL(m,index) and incorporated into a simplified F(g) model with empirical scaling factor. Regardless of whether the compound was a P-gp substrate, the F(a)F(g) could be reasonably fitted by the simplified F(g) model, and the value of the empirical scaling factor was well estimated. These results suggest that the effects of P-gp on F(a) and F(g) are substantially minor, at least in the case of highly permeable compounds. Furthermore, liver intrinsic clearance (CL(int,liver)) can be used as a surrogate index of intestinal metabolism based on the relationship between CL(int,liver) and CL(m,index). F(g) can be easily predicted using a simplified F(g) model with the empirical scaling factor, enabling more confident selection of drug candidates with desirable PK profiles in humans.

  8. Influence of intestinal bacteria, sex of the animal, and position of the nitro group on the hepatic genotoxicity of nitrotoluene isomers in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, D J; Sherrill, J M; Butterworth, B E

    1983-06-01

    The nitrotoluenes failed to induce unscheduled DNA synthesis in in vitro cultures of rat hepatocytes. Because intestinal bacteria are known to be involved in the metabolic activation of other nitroaromatic compounds, the genotoxicity of the nitrotoluenes was evaluated using an in vivo-in vitro hepatocyte DNA repair assay. 2-Nitrotoluene (2NT), 3-nitrotoluene, or 4-nitrotoluene was administered by gavage to male F344 rats. At selected times after treatment, primary hepatocyte cultures were prepared and incubated with [3H]thymidine, and unscheduled DNA synthesis was assessed by quantitative autoradiography. Corn oil controls ranged from -6 to -3 net grains/nucleus (NG). Only 2NT at 12 hr after treatment induced DNA repair (200 mg/kg: 15.4 NG). Twenty-four hr following treatment with 2NT, a 50-fold increase in the number of hepatocytes in S phase was observed and indicated that 2NT induces cell division in addition to DNA repair. To examine the influence of intestinal bacteria on the hepatic genotoxicity of 2NT, germ-free rats and germ-free rats inoculated with Charles River Altered Schaedler Flora were gavaged with 2NT. The cecal bacterial status was confirmed at sacrifice. 2NT did not induce DNA repair in germ-free animals (200 mg/kg: -3.8 NG), whereas DNA repair was induced in Charles River Altered Schaedler Flora-associated animals (200 mg/kg: 5.4 NG). When F344 females with conventional intestinal microflora were gavaged with 2NT and primary hepatocyte cultures were prepared, no unscheduled DNA synthesis was observed (200 mg/kg: -2.6 NG). Male and female F344 rats were shown to have similar populations of intestinal bacteria. These results demonstrate that the mononitrotoluenes display marked isomeric differences in their genotoxic potential, indicate the obligatory role of intestinal bacteria in the metabolic activation of 2NT, and show that the genotoxic potential of 2NT is dependent upon the sex of the animal under study.

  9. Gastrointestinal absorption and metabolism of apple polyphenols ex vivo by the pig intestinal mucosa in the Ussing chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusser, Hannah; Rogoll, Dorothee; Scheppach, Wolfgang; Volk, Antje; Melcher, Ralph; Richling, Elke

    2013-03-01

    Polyphenols contained in food have various positive effects on human health. The absorption and metabolism of polyphenols in the intestinal tract needs to be studied to estimate these effects. The Ussing chamber technique was used to investigate the transport behavior of apple polyphenols through pig small intestinal mucosa, which served as a model for human gastrointestinal mucosa. The identities and concentrations of polyphenols and their metabolites in the half-chambers (luminal and basolateral) within an incubation period of 4 h were determined by HPLC-MS/MS and HPLC-DAD (DAD = diode-array detection). Flux values were also measured. It was found that 5-caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid were absorbed and translocated to the basolateral side (1.9 and 3.7%, respectively), but other compounds, including glycosides of phloretin and quercetin, were observed without translocation. A Ussing chamber utilizing pig small intestinal mucosa is a suitable model for assessing the effect of apple polyphenols on mucosal integrity and nutrition absorption across porcine mucosa. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Intestinal Lymphatic Delivery of Praziquantel by Solid Lipid Nanoparticles: Formulation Design, In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to design and develop Praziquantal (PZQ loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (PZQ-SLN to improve the oral bioavailability by targeting intestinal lymphatic system. PZQ is practically insoluble in water and exhibits extensive hepatic first-pass metabolism. PZQ SLN were composed of triglycerides, lecithin and various aqueous surfactants; were optimized using hot homogenization followed by ultrasonication method. The optimized SLN had particle size of 123±3.41 nm, EE of 86.6±5.72%. The drug release of PZQ-SLN showed initial burst release followed by the sustained release. Inspite of zeta potential being around −10 mV, the optimized SLN were stable at storage conditions (5±3°C and 25±2°C/60±5% RH for six months. TEM study confirmed the almost spherical shape similar to the control formulations. Solid state characterization using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD analysis confirmed the homogeneous distribution of PZQ within the lipid matrix. The 5.81-fold increase in AUC0→∞, after intraduodenal administration of PZQ-SLN in rats treated with saline in comparison to rats treated with cycloheximide (a blocker of intestinal lymphatic pathway, confirmed its intestinal lymphatic delivery. The experimental results indicate that SLN may offer a promising strategy for improving the therapeutic efficacy and reducing the dose.

  11. Inhibition of ERK1/2 worsens intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kechen Ban

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK in intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury has not been well investigated. The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of inhibition of the ERK pathway in an in vitro and in vivo model of intestinal I/R injury. METHODS: ERK1/2 activity was inhibited using the specific inhibitor, U0126, in intestinal epithelial cells under hypoxia/reoxygenation conditions and in mice subjected to 1 hour of intestinal ischemia followed by 6 hours reperfusion. In vitro, cell proliferation was assessed by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, apoptosis by DNA fragmentation, and migration using an in vitro model of intestinal wound healing. Cells were also transfected with a p70S6K plasmid and the effects of overexpression similarly analyzed. In vivo, the effects of U0126 on intestinal cell proliferation and apoptosis, intestinal permeability, lung and intestinal neutrophil infiltration and injury, and plasma cytokine levels were measured. Survival was also assessed after U0126. Activity of p70S6 kinase (p70S6K was measured by Western blot. RESULTS: In vitro, inhibition of ERK1/2 by U0126 significantly decreased cell proliferation and migration but enhanced cell apoptosis. Overexpression of p70S6K promoted cell proliferation and decreased cell apoptosis. In vivo, U0126 significantly increased cell apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation in the intestine, increased intestinal permeability, intestinal and lung neutrophil infiltration, and injury, as well as systemic pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. Mortality was also significantly increased by U0126. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by U0126 also abolished activity of p70S6K both in vitro and in vivo models. CONCLUSION: Pharmacologic inhibition of ERK1/2 by U0126 worsens intestinal IR injury. The detrimental effects are mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of p70S6K, the major

  12. Prediction of total hepatic clearance by combining metabolism, transport, and permeability data in the in vitro-in vivo extrapolation methods: emphasis on an apparent fraction unbound in liver for drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Poulin and coworkers recently proposed in three manuscripts (2012. J Pharm Sci 101:838-851; 2012. J Pharm Sci 101:4308-4326; and 2013. J Pharm Sci 102:in press) a novel in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) method for clearance (CL) involving estimation of apparent fraction unbound in liver (fu(liver)) based on albumin-facilitated hepatic uptake and correction of unbound drug according to the ionization fraction either side of the plasma membrane. This novel IVIVE method has improved the prediction accuracy, and, hence, reduced the bias in predicting hepatic metabolic CL referring to plasma kinetics of several acidic/neutral drugs in preclinical species and humans either based on microsomal or hepatocyte data. So far, the prediction performance of this novel IVIVE method has been assessed for metabolic CL only. Because CL might also be governed by transporters effect and/or permeation limitation in addition to metabolism, an extension of the proposed IVIVE method from metabolic data to transport and permeability data was necessary. Therefore, it was assumed that the concept should also work for multiple CL processes predictions because it is applicable as long as the drug gets to the hepatocyte cell surface. In this study, the proposed IVIVE method was assessed using a large database of predictions of total hepatic CL in rats and humans by combining in vitro hepatocyte data on metabolism, transport, and permeability. The proposed IVIVE method is similarly effective in minimizing average prediction bias and improves accuracy unlike other IVIVE methods. Overall, the present study confirms the utility of the novel IVIVE method for predicting total hepatic CL of drugs under in vivo conditions either by considering metabolism data only or combining metabolism with transporter and permeability data. This study will facilitate the predictions of total hepatic CL in physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The kiwi fruit peptide kissper displays anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects in in-vitro and ex-vivo human intestinal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciacci, C; Russo, I; Bucci, C; Iovino, P; Pellegrini, L; Giangrieco, I; Tamburrini, M; Ciardiello, M A

    2014-03-01

    Literature reports describe kiwi fruit as a food with significant effects on human health, including anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Fresh fruit or raw kiwi fruit extracts have been used so far to investigate these effects, but the molecule(s) responsible for these health-promoting activities have not yet been identified. Kissper is a kiwi fruit peptide displaying pore-forming activity in synthetic lipid bilayers, the composition of which is similar to that found in intestinal cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the kissper influence on intestinal inflammation using cultured cells and ex-vivo tissues from healthy subjects and Crohn's disease (CD) patients. The anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of kissper were tested on Caco-2 cells and on the colonic mucosa from 23 patients with CD, by challenging with the lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli (EC-LPS) and monitoring the appropriate markers by Western blot and immunofluorescence. EC-LPS challenge determined an increase in the intracellular concentration of calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The peptide kissper was highly effective in preventing the increase of LPS-induced ROS levels in both the Caco-2 cells and CD colonic mucosa. Moreover, it controls the calcium increase, p65-nuclear factor (NF)-kB induction and transglutaminase 2 (TG2) activation inflammatory response in Caco-2 cells and CD colonic mucosa. Kissper efficiently counteracts the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in valuable model systems consisting of intestinal cells and CD colonic mucosa. This study reports the first evidence supporting a possible correlation between some beneficial effects of kiwi fruit and a specific protein molecule rather than generic nutrients. © 2013 British Society for Immunology.

  14. RUMINAL AND INTESTINAL DIGESTION OF MAIZE (Zea mays AND SORGHUM (Sorghum bicolor L. MOENCH USING DIFFERENT DIGESTIBILITY TECHNIQUES (IN VIVO, IN VITRO AND IN SACCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises A Gonzalez Garcia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the digestibility of the food is basic to establish its nutritive value and bioavailability of the nutrients. Numerous laboratory tests have been used to estimate the ruminal and intestinal digestion of the food such as in vitro (Gas and Daisy production and in sacco, to be compared with the in vivo method. Sorghum presented the highest (P 0.05 were found between grains. With regard to the digestibility methods, the DMD was lower (P 0.01 for the in sacco and in vitro methods (Daisy. The production of VFA's was similar for both cereals. In situ and in vitro techniques (DaisyII® allow the determination of digestibility quick and easy compared to conventional methods. Sorghum grinding improves its nutritional value by increasing its digestibility, which represents an alternative to maize for feeding calves for fattening.

  15. Hydrolytic Fate of 3/15-Acetyldeoxynivalenol in Humans: Specific Deacetylation by the Small Intestine and Liver Revealed Using in Vitro and ex Vivo Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hassan Ajandouz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In addition to deoxynivalenol (DON, acetylated derivatives, i.e., 3-acetyl and 15-acetyldexynivalenol (or 3/15ADON, are present in cereals leading to exposure to these mycotoxins. Animal and human studies suggest that 3/15ADON are converted into DON after their ingestion through hydrolysis of the acetyl moiety, the site(s of such deacetylation being still uncharacterized. We used in vitro and ex vivo approaches to study the deacetylation of 3/15ADON by enzymes and cells/tissues present on their way from the food matrix to the blood in humans. We found that luminal deacetylation by digestive enzymes and bacteria is limited. Using human cells, tissues and S9 fractions, we were able to demonstrate that small intestine and liver possess strong deacetylation capacity compared to colon and kidneys. Interestingly, in most cases, deacetylation was more efficient for 3ADON than 15ADON. Although we initially thought that carboxylesterases (CES could be responsible for the deacetylation of 3/15ADON, the use of pure human CES1/2 and of CES inhibitor demonstrated that CES are not involved. Taken together, our original model system allowed us to identify the small intestine and the liver as the main site of deacetylation of ingested 3/15ADON in humans.

  16. Prions efficiently cross the intestinal barrier after oral administration: Study of the bioavailability, and cellular and tissue distribution in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urayama, Akihiko; Concha-Marambio, Luis; Khan, Uffaf; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Kharat, Vineetkumar; Soto, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Natural forms of prion diseases frequently originate by oral (p.o.) infection. However, quantitative information on the gastro-intestinal (GI) absorption of prions (i.e. the bioavailability and subsequent biodistribution) is mostly unknown. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the fate of prions after oral administration, using highly purified radiolabeled PrPSc. The results showed a bi-phasic reduction of PrPSc with time in the GI, except for the ileum and colon which showed sustained increases peaking at 3–6 hr, respectively. Plasma and whole blood 125I-PrPSc reached maximal levels by 30 min and 3 hr, respectively, and blood levels were constantly higher than plasma. Upon crossing the GI-tract 125I-PrPSc became associated to blood cells, suggesting that binding to cells decreased the biological clearance of the agent. Size-exclusion chromatography revealed that oligomeric 125I-PrPSc were transported from the intestinal tract, and protein misfolding cyclic amplification showed that PrPSc in organs and blood retained the typical prion self-replicating ability. Pharmacokinetic analysis found the oral bioavailability of 125I-PrPSc to be 33.6%. Interestingly, 125I-PrPSc reached the brain in a quantity equivalent to the minimum amount needed to initiate prion disease. Our findings provide a comprehensive and quantitative study of the fate of prions upon oral infection. PMID:27573341

  17. Assessing the permeability of the rat sciatic nerve epineural sheath against compounds with local anesthetic activity: an ex vivo electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagiava, Alexia; Theophilidis, George

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Studies have shown that the sciatic nerve epineural sheath acts as a barrier and has a delaying effect on the diffusion of local anesthetics into the nerve fibers and endoneurium. The purpose of this work is to assess and to quantify the permeability of the epineural sheath. For this purpose, we isolated the rat sciatic nerve in a three-chamber recording bath that allowed us to monitor the constant in amplitude evoked nerve compound action potential (nCAP) for over 24 h. For nerves exposed to the compounds under investigation, we estimated the IT50 the time required to inhibit the nCAP to 50% of its initial value. For desheathed nerves, the half-vitality time was denoted as IT50(-) and for the ensheath normal nerves as IT50(+). There was no significant difference between the IT50 of desheathed and ensheathed nerves exposed to normal saline. The IT50(-) for nerves exposed to 40 mM lidocaine was 12.1 ± 0.95 s (n=14) and the IT50(+) was 341.4 ± 2.49 s (n=6). The permeability (P) coefficient of the epineural sheath was defined as the ratio IT50(+)/IT50(-). The P coefficient for 40 mM lidocaine and linalool was 28.2 and 3.48, correspondingly, and for 30 mM 2-heptanone was 4.87. This is an indication that the epineural sheath provided a stronger barrier against lidocaine, compared to natural local anesthetics, linalool and 2-heptanone. The methodology presented here is a useful tool for studying epineural sheath permeability to compounds with local anesthetic properties.

  18. Effect of pheromone induction on transfer of the Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pCF10 in intestinal mucus ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Tine Rask; Hammerum, Anette Marie; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2001-01-01

    The effect of synthetic sex pheromone on pheromone-inducible conjugation between the isogenic Enterococcus faecalis strains OG1RF and OG1SS was investigated in (i) Todd-Hewitt broth medium and (ii) intestinal mucus isolated from germ-free rats. In broth, the presence of synthetic pheromone cCF10...... had no detectable effect on the transfer kinetics observed for the tetracycline resistance encoding plasmid pCF10. In MUCUS, presence of the same pheromone significantly increased the transfer efficiency observed during the first 2 h of conjugation, while the effect was less pronounced later...... in the experiment. We suggest that due to differences in diffusion rates and medium-binding of the pheromones, the effect of the synthetic cCF10 was immediately dominated by the effect of pheromones produced by the recipient E. faecalis strain in broth, while this happened later in mucus....

  19. Evaluation of anthelmintic potential of the Ethiopian medicinal plant Embelia schimperi Vatke in vivo and in vitro against some intestinal parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debebe, Yared; Tefera, Mesfin; Mekonnen, Walelign; Abebe, Dawit; Woldekidan, Samuel; Abebe, Abiy; Belete, Yehualashet; Menberu, Temesgen; Belayneh, Bethelhem; Tesfaye, Berhanu; Nasir, Ibrahim; Yirsaw, Kidist; Basha, Hirut; Dawit, Asrat; Debella, Asfaw

    2015-06-18

    Embelia schimperi has been used for the treatment of intestinal parasites especially tapeworm infestations for centuries in Ethiopia. However, there is lack of scientific based evidences regarding the efficacy, safety and phytochemical analysis of this plant despite its frequent use as an anthelmintic. This study has therefore evaluated the efficacy and acute toxicity of E. schimperi thereby generating relevant preclinical information. The anthelmintic activities of the crude hydroalcoholic extract of E. schimperi and the isolated compound, embelin, were conducted using in vivo and in vitro models against the dwarf tapeworm, Hymenolepis nana, and the hookworm, Necator americanus, respectively. LD50 of the crude hydroalcoholic extract was determined using Swiss albino mice following the OECD guidelines. Chemical characterization of the isolated embelin was conducted using UV-spectroscopy, HPLC and NMR. In the acute toxicity study no prominent signs of toxicity and mortality were recorded among the experimental animals at the highest administered dose. Hence the LD50 of the plant was found to be higher than 5000 mg/kg. In vivo cestocidal activity of the crude hydroalcoholic extract of E. schimperi showed 100% parasite clearance at 1000 mg/kg, while the diammonium salt of embelin showed 85.3% parasite clearance at 750 mg/kg. The in vitro anthelminthic activity study revealed that the LC50 value of the crude extract and albendazole were 228.7 and 51.33 μg/mL, respectively. The results clearly indicated that the hydroalcoholic extract of E. schimperi and the diammonium salt of the isolated compound embelin had anthelmintic activity against hookworm larva in vitro and H. nana in vivo. Hence the findings of this study showed Embelia schimperi appears to possess some anthelmintic activity that may support the usage of these plants by local traditional healers to treat helminthic infestations.

  20. Ammonia and urea permeability of mammalian aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Søgaard, Rikke; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The human aquaporins,AQP3,AQP7, AQP8,AQP9, and possibly AQP10, are permeable to ammonia, and AQP7, AQP9, and possibly AQP3, are permeable to urea. In humans, these aquaporins supplement the ammonia transport of the Rhesus (Rh) proteins and the urea transporters (UTs). The mechanism by which...... and 9 are found together with Rh proteins in cells exposed to portal blood coming from the intestine. In the kidney, AQP3 might participate in the excretion of NH(4) (+) in the collecting duct. The interplay between the ammonia-permeable aquaporins and the other types of ammonia- and urea...

  1. Ultrasound shear wave elastography helps discriminate low-grade from high-grade bowel wall fibrosis in ex vivo human intestinal specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Stidham, Ryan W; Higgins, Peter D R; Moons, David S; Johnson, Laura A; Keshavarzi, Nahid R; Rubin, Jonathan M

    2014-12-01

    To determine whether bowel wall fibrosis can be detected in freshly resected human intestinal specimens based on ultrasound-derived shear wave speed. Seventeen intact (>3-cm) bowel segments (15 small and 2 large intestine) from 12 patients with known or suspected inflammatory bowel disease were procured immediately after surgical resection. Ultrasound shear wave elastography of the bowel wall was performed by two methods (Virtual Touch Quantification [VTQ] and Virtual Touch-IQ [VT-IQ]; Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc, Mountain View, CA). Eighteen short-axis shear wave speed measurements were acquired from each specimen: 3 from the 9-, 12-, and 3-o'clock locations for each method. Imaging was performed in two areas for specimens greater than 10 cm in length (separated by ≥5 cm). A gastrointestinal pathologist scored correlative histologic slides for inflammation and fibrosis. Differences in mean shear wave speed between bowel segments with low and high inflammation/fibrosis scores were assessed by a Student t test. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed. High-fibrosis score (n = 11) bowel segments had a significantly greater mean shear wave speed than low-fibrosis score (n = 6) bowel segments (mean ± SD: VTQ, 1.59 ± 0.37 versus 1.18 ± 0.08 m/s; P= .004; VT-IQ, 1.87 ± 0.44 versus 1.50 ± 0.26 m/s; P= .049). There was no significant difference in mean shear wave speed between high-and low-inflammation score bowel segments (P > .05 for both VTQ and VT-IQ). Receiver operating characteristic curves showed areas under the curve of 0.91 (95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.99) for VTQ and 0.77 (95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.94) for VT-IQ in distinguishing low-from high-fibrosis score bowel segments. Ex vivo bowel wall shear wave speed measurements increase when transmural intestinal fibrosis is present. © 2013 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  2. Cinnamon reduces inflammatory response in intestinal fibroblasts in vitro and in colitis in vivo leading to decreased fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenlocher, Yvonne; Satzinger, Sabrina; Civelek, Mehtap; Feilhauer, Katharina; Köninger, Jörg; Bischoff, Stephan C; Lorentz, Axel

    2017-09-01

    Intestinal fibrosis, a complication of inflammatory bowel disease, is currently being addressed by surgery alone, with no adequate alternative therapy available for patients. We propose that anti-inflammatory plant substances like cinnamon extract (CE) or its main compound cinnamaldeyde (CA) could aid in therapy. We recently found CE reducing inflammation in murine colitis. Here, we analyzed effects of CE on fibrosis in IL-10-/- colitis. IL-10-/- and wild-type (WT) mice were orally treated with/without vehicle or CE. Colonic tissue was analyzed for collagen deposition and expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Influence of CE or CA on expression and release of cytokines, and phosphorylation of IκB in LPS-activated fibroblasts was assessed. Fibrosis score and mRNA expression of MMPs were down-regulated in colonic tissue of CE-treated IL-10-/- mice. Fibroblasts treated with CE or CA showed reduced expression and release of IL-6, KC/C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL) 8, and C-C motif ligand (CCL) 2 in response to LPS-treatment. CE and CA appear to act via reducing phosphorylation of IκB. Cinnamon decreases fibrotic symptoms and markers in murine colitis, and expression of inflammatory and fibrotic markers in hiFB. Thus, CE and CA could be potential anti-fibrotic agents in chronic colitis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. In vivo measurements of blood-brain barrier permeability using micro-dialysis: radiobiological application; Etude in vivo des effets de l'irradiation gamma sur la permeabilite de la barriere hemato-encephalique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agin, A.; Diserbo, M.; Mauris, J.; Martin, C

    1998-07-01

    The effects of total-body irradiation on the permeability of striatal blood-brain barrier (BBB) to [{sup 3}H] amino-isobutyric acid (AIBA) and [{sup 14}C] sucrose were investigated. Six weeks, three and five months after gamma exposure at the dose of 4.5 Gy, no modification of the transport of AIB or of the diffusion of sucrose from blood to brain was observed. (authors)

  4. Altered membrane permeability in multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Key words: Outer membrane proteins, porins, Escherichia coli, multidrug resistance, extra-intestinal, extended spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL). INTRODUCTION. Membrane permeability is the first step involved in resis- tance of bacteria to an antibiotic. The outer membrane proteins that constitute porins play ...

  5. Gastrointestinal permeability in patients with irritable bowel syndrome assessed using a four probe permeability solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Pinero, Arseima Y.; Van Deventer, Hendrick E.; Fourie, Nicolaas H.; Martino, Angela C.; Patel, Nayan S.; Remaley, Alan T.; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Abnormal gastrointestinal permeability has been linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The lactulose-to-mannitol ratio is traditionally used to assess small intestine permeability while sucralose and sucrose are used to assess colonic and gastric permeability respectively. We used a single 4-probe test solution to assess permeability throughout the gastrointestinal tract in IBS patients and healthy controls by measuring the recovery of the probes in urine after ingestion using a modified liquid chromatography mass spectrometry protocol. Methods Fasting participants (N = 59) drank a permeability test solution (100 ml: sucralose, sucrose, mannitol, and lactulose). Urine was collected over a 5-h period and kept frozen until analysis. Urinary sugar concentrations were measured using an liquid chromatography/triple quadruple mass spectrometer. Results Colonic permeability was significantly lower in IBS patients when compared to healthy controls (p = 0.011). Gastric and small intestinal permeability did not significantly differ between the groups. Conclusions The study demonstrates the clinical potential of this non-invasive method for assessing alterations in gastrointestinal permeability in patients with IBS. PMID:23328210

  6. Administration of different Lactobacillus strains in fermented oatmeal soup: in vivo colonization of human intestinal mucosa and effect on the indigenous flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M L; Molin, G; Jeppsson, B; Nobaek, S; Ahrné, S; Bengmark, S

    1993-01-01

    In vivo colonization by different Lactobacillus strains on human intestinal mucosa of healthy volunteers was studied together with the effect of Lactobacillus administration on different groups of indigenous bacteria. A total of 19 test strains were administered in fermented oatmeal soup containing 5 x 10(6) CFU of each strain per ml by using a dose of 100 ml of soup per day for 10 days. Biopsies were taken from both the upper jejunum and the rectum 1 day before administration was started and 1 and 11 days after administration was terminated. The administration significantly increased the Lactobacillus counts on the jejunum mucosa, and high levels remained 11 days after administration was terminated. The levels of streptococci increased by 10- to 100-fold in two persons, and the levels of sulfite-reducing clostridia in the jejunum decreased by 10- to 100-fold in three of the volunteers 1 day after administration was terminated. In recta, the anaerobic bacterium counts and the gram-negative anaerobic bacterium counts decreased significantly by the end of administration. Furthermore, a decrease in the number of members of the Enterobacteriaceae by 1,000-fold was observed on the rectal mucosa of two persons. Randomly picked Lactobacillus isolates were identified phenotypically by API 50CH tests and genotypically by the plasmid profiles of strains and by restriction endonuclease analysis of chromosomal DNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. The use of captisol (SBE7-β-CD) in oral solubility-enabling formulations: Comparison to HPβCD and the solubility-permeability interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beig, Avital; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2015-09-18

    The aim of this research was to study the interaction of sulfobutyl ether7 β-cyclodextrin (captisol) and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) with the poorly soluble antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone, and to investigate the consequent solubility-permeability interplay. Phase-solubility studies of amiodarone with the two cyclodextrins, followed by PAMPA and rat intestinal permeability experiments, were carried out, and the solubility-permeability interplay was then illustrated as a function of increasing cyclodextrin content. Equimolar levels of captisol allowed ∼10-fold higher amiodarone solubility than HPβCD, as well as binding constant. With both captisol and HPβCD, decreased in vitro and in vivo amiodarone apparent permeability was evident with increasing CD levels and increased apparent solubility. A theoretical model assuming direct proportionality between the apparent solubility increase allowed by the CD and permeability decrease was able to accurately predict the solubility-permeability tradeoff as a function of CD levels. In conclusion, the addition of ionic interactions (e.g. amiodarone-captisol) to hydrophobic interactions of the inclusion complex formation may result in synergic effect on solubilization; however, it is not merely the solubility that should be examined when formulating an oral poorly soluble compound, but the solubility-permeability balance, in order to maximize the overall drug exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of Monepantel (AAD 1566 against laboratory models of human intestinal nematode infections.

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    Lucienne Tritten

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few effective drugs are available for soil-transmitted helminthiases and drug resistance is of concern. In the present work, we tested the efficacy of the veterinary drug monepantel, a potential drug development candidate compared to standard drugs in vitro and in parasite-rodent models of relevance to human soil-transmitted helminthiases. METHODOLOGY: A motility assay was used to assess the efficacy of monepantel, albendazole, levamisole, and pyrantel pamoate in vitro on third-stage larvae (L3 and adult worms of Ancylostoma ceylanicum, Necator americanus and Trichuris muris. Ancylostoma ceylanicum- or N. americanus-infected hamsters, T. muris- or Ascaris suum-infected mice, and Strongyloides ratti-infected rats were treated with single oral doses of monepantel or with one of the reference drugs. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monepantel showed excellent activity on A. ceylanicum adults (IC(50 = 1.7 µg/ml, a moderate effect on T. muris L3 (IC(50 = 78.7 µg/ml, whereas no effect was observed on A. ceylanicum L3, T. muris adults, and both stages of N. americanus. Of the standard drugs, levamisole showed the highest potency in vitro (IC(50 = 1.6 and 33.1 µg/ml on A. ceylanicum and T. muris L3, respectively. Complete elimination of worms was observed with monepantel (10 mg/kg and albendazole (2.5 mg/kg in A. ceylanicum-infected hamsters. In the N. americanus hamster model single 10 mg/kg oral doses of monepantel and albendazole resulted in worm burden reductions of 58.3% and 100%, respectively. Trichuris muris, S. ratti and A. suum were not affected by treatment with monepantel in vivo (following doses of 600 mg/kg, 32 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg, respectively. In contrast, worm burden reductions of 95.9% and 76.6% were observed following treatment of T. muris- and A. suum infected mice with levamisole (200 mg/kg and albendazole (600 mg/kg, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Monepantel reveals low or no activities against N. americanus

  9. Ex vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship of valnemulin against Clostridium perfringens in plasma, the small intestinal and caecal contents of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Feng; Yu, Yang; Sun, Jian; Tao, Meng-Ting; Zhou, Wen-Jie; Li, Xiao; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) and ex vivo pharmacodynamic (PD) of valnemulin against Clostridium perfringens were investigated in plasma, the small intestinal and caecal contents of rabbits following intravenous (IV) or oral administration at 3 mg/kg bodyweight (BW). The postantibiotic effect (PAE) and postantibiotic sub-MIC effect (PA-SME) of valnemulin against C. perfringens ATCC13124 were also determined. The time-kill curves were established in vitro and ex vivo to evaluate the antibacterial activity of valnemulin against C. perfringens. The elimination half-lives (T1/2λz) of valnemulin in the jejunal fluids (7.82 h) or caecal contents (14.8 h) of rabbits was significantly longer than that in plasma (2.94 h). The MIC values of valnemulin against C. perfringens ATCC13124 were both 0.063 μg/mL in the artificial medium and jejunal fluids. The PAEs of valnemulin against C. perfringens were 2.9 h (1 × MIC) and 5.03 h (4 × MIC), and the PA-SMEs ranged from 7.9 h to 11.1 h. Valnemulin exhibited rapid, time-dependent killing feature, and the ex vivo dose-response profile was closely fitted to sigmoid Emax model (r(2) = 0.9985). The surrogate index of AUC24 h/MIC ratios required to achieve the bactericidal and virtual bacterial elimination effects were 57.5 and 90.1 h, respectively. Accordingly, the calculated daily dosage regimens of valnemulin for the bactericidal activity (1.96 mg/kg) and bacterial elimination (3.08 mg/kg) would be therapeutically effective in rabbits against C. perfringens with MIC ≤0.5 μg/mL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Clostridium perfringens iota toxin in the small intestine of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Leandro M; Redondo, Enzo A; Dailoff, Gabriela C; Leiva, Carlos L; Díaz-Carrasco, Juan M; Bruzzone, Octavio A; Cangelosi, Adriana; Geoghegan, Patricia; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2017-12-01

    Iota toxin is a binary toxin solely produced by Clostridium perfringens type E strains, and is structurally related to CDT from C. difficile and CST from C. spiroforme. As type E causes hemorrhagic enteritis in cattle, it is usually assumed that associated diseases are mediated by iota toxin, although evidence in this regard has not been provided. In the present report, iota toxin intestinal effects were evaluated in vivo using a mouse model. Histological damage was observed in ileal loops treated with purified iota toxin after 4 h of incubation. Luminal iota toxin induced fluid accumulation in the small intestine in a dose dependent manner, as determined by the enteropooling and the intestinal loop assays. None of these changes were observed in the large intestine. These results suggest that C. perfringens iota toxin alters intestinal permeability, predominantly by inducing necrosis and degenerative changes in the mucosal epithelium of the small intestine, as well as changes in intestinal motility. The obtained results suggest a central role for iota toxin in the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type E hemorrhagic enteritis, and contribute to remark the importance of clostridial binary toxins in digestive diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Ex vivo-growth response of porcine small intestinal bacterial communities to pharmacological doses of dietary zinc oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo C Starke

    Full Text Available Piglets were fed diets containing 57 (low or 2425 (high mg zinc from analytical grade zinc oxide (ZnO ·kg(-1 feed. Digesta samples from the stomach and jejuna of 32, 39, 46 and 53 d old animals (n = 6 per group were incubated in media containing 80, 40, 20 and 0 µg·mL(-1 soluble zinc from ZnO. Turbidity was recorded for 16 h and growth parameters were calculated. Additionally, DNA extracts of selected samples were analyzed via qPCR for different bacterial groups. Samples from animals fed the low dietary zinc concentration always showed highest rate of growth and lowest lag times in media without added zinc. However, media supplemented with zinc displayed highest growth rates and lowest lag time in the high dietary zinc group. Specific growth rates and lag time showed significant differences on day 32 and 39 of age, but rarely on days 46 and 53 of age. Bacterial growth in digesta samples from the high dietary zinc group was less influenced by zinc and recovered growth more rapidly than in the low dietary zinc group. Specific growth rates and bacterial cell numbers from qPCR results showed that lactobacilli were most susceptible to zinc, while bifidobacteria, enterobacteria and enterococci exhibited increased growth rates in samples of animals from the high dietary zinc treatment. No treatment related differences were observed for clostridial cluster IV and the Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas cluster. The diversity of enterobacteria after incubation was always higher in the high dietary zinc treatment or in medium supplemented with 80 µg·mL(-1 soluble ZnO. This study has shown that a pharmacological dosage of ZnO leads to a reduced ex vivo-bacterial growth rate of bacteria from the stomach and jejunum of weaned piglets. In view of the rapid bacterial adaptation to dietary zinc, the administration of ZnO in feeds for weaned piglets might only be beneficial in a short period after weaning.

  12. Cellobiose/mannitol sugar permeability test complements biopsy histopathology in clinical investigation of the jejunum.

    OpenAIRE

    Strobel, S; Brydon, W G; Ferguson, A

    1984-01-01

    Intestinal permeability to probe molecules has been shown to correlate closely with the presence or absence of villous atrophy in a jejunal biopsy. The purpose of this study was to establish if there exist groups of patients with functional derangement of intestinal permeability but normal histopathology of the small bowel mucosa. In 135 patients a cellobiose/mannitol permeability test was performed at the same time as jejunal biopsy. Diagnosis included coeliac disease, Crohn's disease, irrit...

  13. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy.

  14. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik BW; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  15. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  16. Mechanisms of adhesion and subsequent actions of a haematopoietic stem cell line, HPC-7, in the injured murine intestinal microcirculation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean P J Kavanagh

    Full Text Available Although haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs migrate to injured gut, therapeutic success clinically remains poor. This has been partially attributed to limited local HSC recruitment following systemic injection. Identifying site specific adhesive mechanisms underpinning HSC-endothelial interactions may provide important information on how to enhance their recruitment and thus potentially improve therapeutic efficacy. This study determined (i the integrins and inflammatory cyto/chemokines governing HSC adhesion to injured gut and muscle (ii whether pre-treating HSCs with these cyto/chemokines enhanced their adhesion and (iii whether the degree of HSC adhesion influenced their ability to modulate leukocyte recruitment.Adhesion of HPC-7, a murine HSC line, to ischaemia-reperfused (IR injured mouse gut or cremaster muscle was monitored intravitally. Critical adhesion molecules were identified by pre-treating HPC-7 with blocking antibodies to CD18 and CD49d. To identify cyto/chemokines capable of recruiting HPC-7, adhesion was monitored following tissue exposure to TNF-α, IL-1β or CXCL12. The effects of pre-treating HPC-7 with these cyto/chemokines on surface integrin expression/clustering, adhesion to ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and recruitment in vivo was also investigated. Endogenous leukocyte adhesion following HPC-7 injection was again determined intravitally.IR injury increased HPC-7 adhesion in vivo, with intestinal adhesion dependent upon CD18 and muscle adhesion predominantly relying on CD49d. Only CXCL12 pre-treatment enhanced HPC-7 adhesion within injured gut, likely by increasing CD18 binding to ICAM-1 and/or CD18 surface clustering on HPC-7. Leukocyte adhesion was reduced at 4 hours post-reperfusion, but only when local HPC-7 adhesion was enhanced using CXCL12.This data provides evidence that site-specific molecular mechanisms govern HPC-7 adhesion to injured tissue. Importantly, we show that HPC-7 adhesion is a modulatable event in IR injury and

  17. Labetalol Prevents Intestinal Dysfunction Induced by Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Yuhuang; Fu, Fengming; Sun, Dalong; Xi, Chenhui; Chen, Fengyuan

    2015-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic blockade has been hypothesized to have a protective effect on intestinal dysfunction and increased intestinal permeability associated with the epinephrine surge after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wister rats were subjected to either a weight drop TBI, and intraperitoneally injected or not with labetalol, or a sham procedure (18 rats per group). After 3, 6, or 12h (6 rats per subgroup), intestinal permeability to 4.4 kDa FITC-Dextran and plasma epinephrine levels were measured as was intestinal tight junction protein ZO-1 expression at 12h. Terminal ileum was harvested to measure levels of intestinal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and to evaluate histopathology. In TBI group vs. sham group, intestinal permeability (Plabetalol group, 1) intestinal permeability was significantly lower at 6 and 12h (94.31±7.64 vs. 102.16±6.40 μg/mL; 110.21±7.52 vs. 118.95±7.11 μg/mL, respectively); 2) levels of plasma epinephrine and intestinal TNF-α were significantly lower at 3, 6 and 12h; and 3) intestinal ZO-1 expression was higher at 3, 6 and 12h (p=0.018). Histopathological evaluation showed that labetalol use preserved intestinal architecture throughout. In a rat model of TBI, labetalol reduced TBI-induced sympathetic hyperactivity, and prevented histopathological intestinal injury accompanied by changes in gut permeability and gut TNF-α expression.

  18. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course...

  19. Erlotinib promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated injury in the intestinal epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Lu; Hu, Lingna; Yang, Baofang; Fang, Xianying; Gao, Zhe; Li, Wanshuai; Sun, Yang; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xuefeng [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Shu, Yongqian [Department of Clinical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 140 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Gu, Yanhong, E-mail: guluer@163.com [Department of Clinical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 140 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wu, Xudong, E-mail: xudongwu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu, Qiang, E-mail: molpharm@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Erlotinib, a popular drug for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), causes diarrhea in approximately 55% of patients receiving this drug. In the present study, we found that erlotinib induced barrier dysfunction in rat small intestine epithelial cells (IEC-6) by increasing epithelial permeability and down-regulating E-cadherin. The mRNA levels of various pro-inflammatory cytokines (Il-6, Il-25 and Il-17f) were increased after erlotinib treatment in IEC-6 cells. Erlotinib concentration- and time-dependently induced apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in both IEC-6 and human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoN). Intestinal epithelial injury was also observed in male C57BL/6J mice administrated with erlotinib. Knockdown of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) with small interference RNA partially reversed erlotinib-induced apoptosis, production of IL-6 and down-regulation of E-cadherin in cultured intestinal epithelial cells. In conclusion, erlotinib caused ER stress-mediated injury in the intestinal epithelium, contributing to its side effects of diarrhea in patients. - Highlights: • Erlotinib destroyed barrier integrity both in vitro and in vivo. • Erlotinib induced inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. • Erlotinib induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. • ER stress contributed to erlotinib-induced barrier dysfunction.

  20. Human Milk Oligosaccharides and Synthetic Galactosyloligosaccharides Contain 3′-, 4-, and 6′-Galactosyllactose and Attenuate Inflammation in Human T84, NCM-460, and H4 Cells and Intestinal Tissue Ex Vivo12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae Sung; Leone, Serena; Nanthakumar, N Nanda

    2016-01-01

    Background: The immature intestinal mucosa responds excessively to inflammatory insult, but human milk protects infants from intestinal inflammation. The ability of galactosyllactoses [galactosyloligosaccharides (GOS)], newly found in human milk oligosaccharides (HMOS), to suppress inflammation was not known. Objective: The objective was to test whether GOS can directly attenuate inflammation and to explore the components of immune signaling modulated by GOS. Methods: Galactosyllactose composition was measured in sequential human milk samples from days 1 through 21 of lactation and in random colostrum samples from 38 mothers. Immature [human normal fetal intestinal epithelial cell (H4)] and mature [human metastatic colonic epithelial cell (T84) and human normal colon mucosal epithelial cell (NCM-460)] enterocyte cell lines were treated with the pro-inflammatory molecules tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or infected with Salmonella or Listeria. The inflammatory response was measured as induction of IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), or macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α) protein by ELISA and mRNA by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The ability of HMOS or synthetic GOS to attenuate this inflammation was tested in vitro and in immature human intestinal tissue ex vivo. Results: The 3 galactosyllactoses (3′-GL, 4-GL, and 6′-GL) expressed in colostrum rapidly declined over early lactation (P milk, contributing to innate immune modulation. The potential clinical utility of galactosyllactose warrants investigation. PMID:26701795

  1. Human Milk Oligosaccharides and Synthetic Galactosyloligosaccharides Contain 3'-, 4-, and 6'-Galactosyllactose and Attenuate Inflammation in Human T84, NCM-460, and H4 Cells and Intestinal Tissue Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, David S; Ko, Jae Sung; Leone, Serena; Nanthakumar, N Nanda

    2016-02-01

    The immature intestinal mucosa responds excessively to inflammatory insult, but human milk protects infants from intestinal inflammation. The ability of galactosyllactoses [galactosyloligosaccharides (GOS)], newly found in human milk oligosaccharides (HMOS), to suppress inflammation was not known. The objective was to test whether GOS can directly attenuate inflammation and to explore the components of immune signaling modulated by GOS. Galactosyllactose composition was measured in sequential human milk samples from days 1 through 21 of lactation and in random colostrum samples from 38 mothers. Immature [human normal fetal intestinal epithelial cell (H4)] and mature [human metastatic colonic epithelial cell (T84) and human normal colon mucosal epithelial cell (NCM-460)] enterocyte cell lines were treated with the pro-inflammatory molecules tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or infected with Salmonella or Listeria. The inflammatory response was measured as induction of IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), or macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α) protein by ELISA and mRNA by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The ability of HMOS or synthetic GOS to attenuate this inflammation was tested in vitro and in immature human intestinal tissue ex vivo. The 3 galactosyllactoses (3'-GL, 4-GL, and 6'-GL) expressed in colostrum rapidly declined over early lactation (P milk, contributing to innate immune modulation. The potential clinical utility of galactosyllactose warrants investigation. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase inhibits the translocation of bacteria of gut-origin in mice with peritonitis: mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Shan-Wen; Zhu, Jing; Zuo, Shuai; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Zi-Yi; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Chen, Guo-Wei; Liu, Yu-Cun; Wang, Peng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), an enzyme produced endogenously at the brush edge of the intestinal mucosa, may mitigate the increase in aberrant intestinal permeability increased during sepsis. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of the inhibitory effect of IAP on acute intestinal inflammation and to study the molecular mechanisms underlying IAP in ameliorating intestinal permeability. We used an in vivo imaging method to evaluate disease status and the curative effect of IAP. Two Escherichia coli (E.coli) B21 strains, carrying EGFP labeled enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and RFP labeled red fluorescent protein (RFP), were constructed as tracer bacteria and were administered orally to C57/B6N mice to generate an injection peritonitis (IP) model. The IP model was established by injecting inflammatory lavage fluid. C57/B6N mice bearing the tracer bacteria were subsequently treated with (IP+IAP group), or without IAP (IP group). IAP was administered to the mice via tail vein injections. The amount of tracer bacteria in the blood, liver, and lungs at 24 h post-injection was analyzed via flow cytometry (FCM), in vivo imaging, and Western blotting. Intestinal barrier function was measured using a flux assay with the macro-molecule fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran, molecular weight 40kD, (FD40). To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of IAP, we examined the levels of ERK phosphorylation, and the expression levels of proteins in the ERK-SP1-VEGF and ERK-Cdx-2-Claudin-2 pathways. We observed that IAP inhibited the expression of Claudin-2, a type of cation channel-forming protein, and VEGF, a cytokine that may increase intestinal permeability by reducing the levels of dephosphorylated ERK. In conclusion, exogenous IAP shows a therapeutic effect in an injection peritonitis model. This including inhibition of bacterial translocation. Moreover, we have established an imaging methodology for live-animals can

  3. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase inhibits the translocation of bacteria of gut-origin in mice with peritonitis: mechanism of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available Exogenous intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP, an enzyme produced endogenously at the brush edge of the intestinal mucosa, may mitigate the increase in aberrant intestinal permeability increased during sepsis. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of the inhibitory effect of IAP on acute intestinal inflammation and to study the molecular mechanisms underlying IAP in ameliorating intestinal permeability. We used an in vivo imaging method to evaluate disease status and the curative effect of IAP. Two Escherichia coli (E.coli B21 strains, carrying EGFP labeled enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP and RFP labeled red fluorescent protein (RFP, were constructed as tracer bacteria and were administered orally to C57/B6N mice to generate an injection peritonitis (IP model. The IP model was established by injecting inflammatory lavage fluid. C57/B6N mice bearing the tracer bacteria were subsequently treated with (IP+IAP group, or without IAP (IP group. IAP was administered to the mice via tail vein injections. The amount of tracer bacteria in the blood, liver, and lungs at 24 h post-injection was analyzed via flow cytometry (FCM, in vivo imaging, and Western blotting. Intestinal barrier function was measured using a flux assay with the macro-molecule fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran, molecular weight 40kD, (FD40. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of IAP, we examined the levels of ERK phosphorylation, and the expression levels of proteins in the ERK-SP1-VEGF and ERK-Cdx-2-Claudin-2 pathways. We observed that IAP inhibited the expression of Claudin-2, a type of cation channel-forming protein, and VEGF, a cytokine that may increase intestinal permeability by reducing the levels of dephosphorylated ERK. In conclusion, exogenous IAP shows a therapeutic effect in an injection peritonitis model. This including inhibition of bacterial translocation. Moreover, we have established an imaging methodology for live

  4. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Inhibits the Translocation of Bacteria of Gut-Origin in Mice with Peritonitis: Mechanism of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Shan-Wen; Zhu, Jing; Zuo, Shuai; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Zi-Yi; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Chen, Guo-Wei; Liu, Yu-Cun; Wang, Peng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), an enzyme produced endogenously at the brush edge of the intestinal mucosa, may mitigate the increase in aberrant intestinal permeability increased during sepsis. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of the inhibitory effect of IAP on acute intestinal inflammation and to study the molecular mechanisms underlying IAP in ameliorating intestinal permeability. We used an in vivo imaging method to evaluate disease status and the curative effect of IAP. Two Escherichia coli (E.coli) B21 strains, carrying EGFP labeled enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and RFP labeled red fluorescent protein (RFP), were constructed as tracer bacteria and were administered orally to C57/B6N mice to generate an injection peritonitis (IP) model. The IP model was established by injecting inflammatory lavage fluid. C57/B6N mice bearing the tracer bacteria were subsequently treated with (IP+IAP group), or without IAP (IP group). IAP was administered to the mice via tail vein injections. The amount of tracer bacteria in the blood, liver, and lungs at 24 h post-injection was analyzed via flow cytometry (FCM), in vivo imaging, and Western blotting. Intestinal barrier function was measured using a flux assay with the macro-molecule fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran, molecular weight 40kD, (FD40). To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of IAP, we examined the levels of ERK phosphorylation, and the expression levels of proteins in the ERK-SP1-VEGF and ERK-Cdx-2-Claudin-2 pathways. We observed that IAP inhibited the expression of Claudin-2, a type of cation channel-forming protein, and VEGF, a cytokine that may increase intestinal permeability by reducing the levels of dephosphorylated ERK. In conclusion, exogenous IAP shows a therapeutic effect in an injection peritonitis model. This including inhibition of bacterial translocation. Moreover, we have established an imaging methodology for live-animals can

  5. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Inhibits the Translocation of Bacteria of Gut-Origin in Mice with Peritonitis: Mechanism of Action: e0124835

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wei Wang; Shan-Wen Chen; Jing Zhu; Shuai Zuo; Yuan-Yuan Ma; Zi-Yi Chen; Jun-Ling Zhang; Guo-Wei Chen; Yu-Cun Liu; Peng-Yuan Wang

    2015-01-01

      Exogenous intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), an enzyme produced endogenously at the brush edge of the intestinal mucosa, may mitigate the increase in aberrant intestinal permeability increased during sepsis...

  6. Commensal and probiotic bacteria influence intestinal barrier function and susceptibility to colitis in Nod1-/-; Nod2-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natividad, Jane M M; Petit, Valerie; Huang, Xianxi; de Palma, Giada; Jury, Jennifer; Sanz, Yolanda; Philpott, Dana; Garcia Rodenas, Clara L; McCoy, Kathy D; Verdu, Elena F

    2012-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota regulates key host functions. It is unknown whether modulation of the microbiota can affect a genetically determined host phenotype. Polymorphisms in the Nucleotide oligomerization domain (Nod)-like receptor family confer genetic risk for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We investigated whether the intestinal microbiota and the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium breve NCC2950 affect intestinal barrier function and responses to intestinal injury in Nod1(-/-); Nod2(-/-) mice. Specific pathogen-free (SPF) Nod1(-/-); Nod2(-/-) mice and mice gnotobiotically derived with altered Schaedler flora (ASF) biota were used. SPF Nod1(+/-); Nod2(+/-) littermates (generated by crossing SPF Nod1(-/-); Nod2(-/-) and germ-free C57BL/6 mice) and ASF Nod1(+/-); Nod2(+/-) mice were used as controls. SPF mice were gavaged daily with 10(9) -CFU B. breve for 14 days before colitis induction. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to assess microbiota composition. Intestinal permeability was assessed by in vitro and in vivo techniques. Expressions of epithelial apical junction proteins, mucin, and antimicrobial proteins were assessed by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunofluorescence. Responses to intestinal injury were investigated using an acute experimental model of colitis. Under SPF conditions, Nod1(-/-); Nod2(-/-) mice had increased paracellular permeability, decreased E-cadherin, and lower colonic antimicrobial RegIII-γ expression compared to Nod1(+/-); Nod2(+/-) littermate controls. These changes were associated with increased susceptibility to colitis. ASF colonization or B. breve supplementation normalized RegIII-γ expression and decreased susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis in Nod1(-/-); Nod2(-/-) mice. The intestinal microbiota influences colitis severity in Nod1(-/-); Nod2(-/-) mice. The results suggest that colonization strategies with defined

  7. Insights into intermediate phases of human intestinal fluids visualized by atomic force microscopy and cryo-transmission electron microscopy ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllertz, Anette; Fatouros, Dimitrios G; Smith, James R; Vertzoni, Maria; Reppas, Christos

    2012-02-06

    The current work aims to study at the ultrastructural level the morphological development of colloidal intermediate phases of human intestinal fluids (HIFs) produced during lipid digestion. HIFs were aspirated near the ligament of Treitz early (30 min), Aspirate(early), and 1 h, Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp), after the administration of a heterogeneous liquid meal into the antrum. The composition of the sample aspirated 1 h after meal administration was similar to the average lumenal composition 1 h after meal administration (Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp)). The colloidal structures of individual aspirates and supernatants of aspirates after ultracentrifugation (micellar phase) were characterized by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). AFM revealed domain-like structures in Aspirate(early) and both vesicles and large aggregates Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp). Rough surfaces and domains varying in size were frequently present in the micellar phase of both Aspirate(early) and Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp). Cryo-TEM revealed an abundance of spherical micelles and occasionally presented worm-like micelles coexisting with faceted and less defined vesicles in Aspirate(early) and Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp). In Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp) oil droplets were visualized with bilayers closely located to their surface suggesting lipolytic product phases accumulated on the surface of the oil droplet. In the micellar phase of Aspirate(early), Cryo-TEM revealed the presence of spherical micelles, small vesicles, membrane fragments, oil droplets and plate-like structures. In the micellar phase of Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp) the only difference was the absence of oil droplets. Visualization studies previously performed with biorelevant media revealed structural features with many similarities as presented in the current investigation. The impression of the complexity and diversion of these phases has been reinforced with the excessive variation of structural

  8. Human intestinal microbiota composition is associated with local and systemic inflammation in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdam, F.J.; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Jonge, de C.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Erbil, R.; Greve, J.W.; Buurman, W.A.; Vos, de W.M.; Rensen, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Intestinal microbiota have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity, but the mechanism remains elusive. The relationship between microbiota composition, intestinal permeability, and inflammation in nonobese and obese subjects was investigated. DESIGN AND METHODS: Fecal

  9. Dietary non-digestible carbohydrates and the resistance to intestinal infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggencate, ten S.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords: Non-digestible carbohydrates, prebiotics, inulin, FOS, calcium, microflora, short-chain fatty acids, mucin, intestinal permeability, salmonella, infection, rat, humanDietary non-digestible carbohydrates and the resistance to intestinal infectionsNon-digestible carbohydrates (NDC) stimulate

  10. Permeability prediction in chalks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Prasad, Manika

    2011-01-01

    prediction, so we have investigated the use of velocity data to predict permeability. The compressional velocity fromwireline logs and core plugs of the chalk reservoir in the South Arne field, North Sea, has been used for this study. We compared various methods of permeability prediction from velocities......-permeability relationships were replaced by relationships between velocity of elastic waves and permeability using laboratory data, and the relationships were then applied to well-log data. We found that the permeability prediction in chalk and possibly other sediments with large surface areas could be improved...

  11. Film Permeability Determination Using Static Permeability Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The permeability of tarps to soil fumigant pesticides varies depending on the active ingredient chemical: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methyl bromide, chloropicrin, or other. The diffusion rate can be represented by the mass transfer coefficient (MTC).

  12. Estimation of soil permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr F. Elhakim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soils are permeable materials because of the existence of interconnected voids that allow the flow of fluids when a difference in energy head exists. A good knowledge of soil permeability is needed for estimating the quantity of seepage under dams and dewatering to facilitate underground construction. Soil permeability, also termed hydraulic conductivity, is measured using several methods that include constant and falling head laboratory tests on intact or reconstituted specimens. Alternatively, permeability may be measured in the field using insitu borehole permeability testing (e.g. [2], and field pumping tests. A less attractive method is to empirically deduce the coefficient of permeability from the results of simple laboratory tests such as the grain size distribution. Otherwise, soil permeability has been assessed from the cone/piezocone penetration tests (e.g. [13,14]. In this paper, the coefficient of permeability was measured using field falling head at different depths. Furthermore, the field coefficient of permeability was measured using pumping tests at the same site. The measured permeability values are compared to the values empirically deduced from the cone penetration test for the same location. Likewise, the coefficients of permeability are empirically obtained using correlations based on the index soil properties of the tested sand for comparison with the measured values.

  13. Zonulin transgenic mice show altered gut permeability and increased morbidity/mortality in the DSS colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Craig; Lan, Jinggang; Fasano, Alessio

    2017-06-01

    Increased small intestinal permeability (IP) has been proposed to be an integral element, along with genetic makeup and environmental triggers, in the pathogenies of chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs). We identified zonulin as a master regular of intercellular tight junctions linked to the development of several CIDs. We aim to study the role of zonulin-mediated IP in the pathogenesis of CIDs. Zonulin transgenic Hp2 mice (Ztm) were subjected to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) treatment for 7 days, followed by 4-7 days' recovery and compared to C57Bl/6 (wild-type (WT)) mice. IP was measured in vivo and ex vivo, and weight, histology, and survival were monitored. To mechanistically link zonulin-dependent impairment of small intestinal barrier function with clinical outcome, Ztm were treated with the zonulin inhibitor AT1001 added to drinking water in addition to DSS. We observed increased morbidity (more pronounced weight loss and colitis) and mortality (40-70% compared with 0% in WT) at 11 days post-DSS treatment in Ztm compared with WT mice. Both in vivo and ex vivo measurements showed an increased IP at baseline in Ztm compared to WT mice, which was exacerbated by DSS treatment and was associated with upregulation of zonulin gene expression (fourfold in the duodenum, sixfold in the jejunum). Treatment with AT1001 prevented the DSS-induced increased IP both in vivo and ex vivo without changing zonulin gene expression and completely reverted morbidity and mortality in Ztm. Our data show that zonulin-dependent small intestinal barrier impairment is an early step leading to the break of tolerance with subsequent development of CIDs. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Milk with and without lactoferrin can influence intestinal damage in a pig model of malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garas, Lydia C; Feltrin, Cristiano; Hamilton, M Kristina; Hagey, Jill V; Murray, James D; Bertolini, Luciana R; Bertolini, Marcelo; Raybould, Helen E; Maga, Elizabeth A

    2016-02-01

    Malnutrition remains a leading contributor to the morbidity and mortality of children under the age of five worldwide. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood necessitating an appropriate animal model to answer fundamental questions and conduct translational research into optimal interventions. One potential intervention is milk from livestock that more closely mimics human milk by increased levels of bioactive components that can promote a healthy intestinal epithelium. We tested the ability of cow milk and milk from transgenic cows expressing human lactoferrin at levels found in human milk (hLF milk) to mitigate the effects of malnutrition at the level of the intestine in a pig model of malnutrition. Weaned pigs (3 weeks old) were fed a protein and calorie restricted diet for five weeks, receiving cow, hLF or no milk supplementation daily from weeks 3-5. After three weeks, the restricted diet induced changes in growth, blood chemistry and intestinal structure including villous atrophy, increased ex vivo permeability and decreased expression of tight junction proteins. Addition of both cow and hLF milk to the diet increased growth rate and calcium and glucose levels while promoting growth of the intestinal epithelium. In the jejunum hLF milk restored intestinal morphology, reduced permeability and increased expression of anti-inflammatory IL-10. Overall, this pig model of malnutrition mimics salient aspects of the human condition and demonstrates that cow milk can stimulate the repair of damage to the intestinal epithelium caused by protein and calorie restriction with hLF milk improving this recovery to a greater extent.

  15. Pathogenic mechanisms in Blastocystis spp. - Interpreting results from in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajjampur, Sitara S R; Tan, Kevin S W

    2016-12-01

    Blastocystis spp. are commonly reported intestinal protists but whose clinical significance remains controversial. Infections have ranged from asymptomatic carriage to non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms and have also been linked to irritable bowel syndrome and urticaria in some patient populations. In vitro studies showed that both parasite and parasite lysates have damaging effects on intestinal epithelial cells causing apoptosis and degradation of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO1, resulting in increased intestinal permeability. Adhesion of trophic forms to the intestinal epithelium and release of cysteine proteases appear to be the major triggers leading to pathogenesis. Two putative virulence factors identified are cysteine proteases legumain and cathepsin B. Blastocystis spp. also have immuno-modulatory effects including degradation of IgA, inhibition of iNOS and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, IL8 and GM-CSF in intestinal epithelial cells and IL1β, IL6 and TNFα in murine macrophages. Blastocystis spp. have also been reported to dampen response to LPS in intestinal epithelial cells and monocytes. Studies in rodent models and naturally infected pigs have shown that the parasite localizes to the lumen and mucosal surface of the large intestine mostly in the caecum and colon. The parasite has been found to cause mucosal sloughing, increase in goblet cell mucin, increased intestinal permeability and to induce a pro-inflammatory cytokine response with upregulation of TNFα, IFNγ and IL12. In this review, we summarize findings from in vitro and in vivo studies that demonstrate pathogenic potential but also show considerable inter and intra subtype variation, which provides a plausible explanation on the conflicting reports on clinical significance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Precision-cut rat, mouse, and human intestinal slices as novel models for the early-onset of intestinal fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, Bao Tung; van Haaften, Wouter Tobias; Oosterhuis, Dorenda; Nieken, Judith; de Graaf, Inge Anne Maria; Olinga, Peter

    Intestinal fibrosis (IF) is a major complication of inflammatory bowel disease. IF research is limited by the lack of relevant in vitro and in vivo models. We evaluated precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) prepared from human, rat, and mouse intestine as ex vivo models mimicking the early-onset of

  17. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James; Nimmo, Michael

    2011-02-15

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia in the adult may be characterized as a disorder with dilated intestinal lacteals causing loss of lymph into the lumen of the small intestine and resultant hypoproteinemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia and reduced number of circulating lymphocytes or lymphopenia. Most often, intestinal lymphangiectasia has been recorded in children, often in neonates, usually with other congenital abnormalities but initial definition in adults including the elderly has become increasingly more common. Shared clinical features with the pediatric population such as bilateral lower limb edema, sometimes with lymphedema, pleural effusion and chylous ascites may occur but these reflect the severe end of the clinical spectrum. In some, diarrhea occurs with steatorrhea along with increased fecal loss of protein, reflected in increased fecal alpha-1-antitrypsin levels, while others may present with iron deficiency anemia, sometimes associated with occult small intestinal bleeding. Most lymphangiectasia in adults detected in recent years, however, appears to have few or no clinical features of malabsorption. Diagnosis remains dependent on endoscopic changes confirmed by small bowel biopsy showing histological evidence of intestinal lymphangiectasia. In some, video capsule endoscopy and enteroscopy have revealed more extensive changes along the length of the small intestine. A critical diagnostic element in adults with lymphangiectasia is the exclusion of entities (e.g. malignancies including lymphoma) that might lead to obstruction of the lymphatic system and "secondary" changes in the small bowel biopsy. In addition, occult infectious (e.g. Whipple's disease from Tropheryma whipplei) or inflammatory disorders (e.g. Crohn's disease) may also present with profound changes in intestinal permeability and protein-losing enteropathy that also require exclusion. Conversely, rare B-cell type lymphomas have also been described even decades following initial

  18. Probiotic Mixture Golden Bifido Prevents Neonatal Escherichia coli K1 Translocation via Enhancing Intestinal Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zeng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli K1 sepsis and meningitis is a severe infection characterized by high mortality in neonates. Successful colonization and translocation across the intestinal mucosa have been regarded as the critical steps for E. coli K1 sepsis and meningitis. We recently reported that the probiotic mixture, Golden Bifido (containing live Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium, and Streptococcus thermophilus, LBS has a preventive role against neonatal E. coli K1 bacteremia and meningitis. However, the interaction between the neonatal gut barrier, probiotics and E. coli K1 is still not elucidated. The present study aims to investigate how LBS exerts its protective effects on neonatal gut barrier during E. coli K1 infection. The beneficial effects of LBS were explored in vitro and in vivo using human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and rat model of neonatal E. coli K1 infection, respectively. Our results showed that stimulation with E. coli K1 was able to cause intestinal barrier dysfunction, which were reflected by E. coli K1-induced intestinal damage and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, reduction of mucin, immunoglobulin A (IgA and tight junction proteins expression, as well as increase in intestinal permeability, all these changes facilitate E. coli K1 intestinal translocation. However, these changes were alleviated when HT-29 cells were treated with LBS before E. coli K1 infection. Furthermore, we found that LBS-treated neonatal rats (without E. coli K1 infection have showed higher production of mucin, ZO-1, IgA, Ki67 in intestinal mucosa as well as lower intestinal permeability than that of non-treated rats, indicating that LBS could accelerate the development of neonatal intestinal defense. Taken together, our results suggest that enhancement of the neonatal intestinal defense to fight against E. coli K1 translocation could be the potential mechanism to elucidate how LBS confers a protective effect against neonatal E

  19. Probiotic Mixture Golden Bifido Prevents Neonatal Escherichia coli K1 Translocation via Enhancing Intestinal Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qing; He, Xiaolong; Puthiyakunnon, Santhosh; Xiao, Hansen; Gong, Zelong; Boddu, Swapna; Chen, Lecheng; Tian, Huiwen; Huang, Sheng-He; Cao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) K1 sepsis and meningitis is a severe infection characterized by high mortality in neonates. Successful colonization and translocation across the intestinal mucosa have been regarded as the critical steps for E. coli K1 sepsis and meningitis. We recently reported that the probiotic mixture, Golden Bifido (containing live Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium, and Streptococcus thermophilus, LBS) has a preventive role against neonatal E. coli K1 bacteremia and meningitis. However, the interaction between the neonatal gut barrier, probiotics and E. coli K1 is still not elucidated. The present study aims to investigate how LBS exerts its protective effects on neonatal gut barrier during E. coli K1 infection. The beneficial effects of LBS were explored in vitro and in vivo using human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and rat model of neonatal E. coli K1 infection, respectively. Our results showed that stimulation with E. coli K1 was able to cause intestinal barrier dysfunction, which were reflected by E. coli K1-induced intestinal damage and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, reduction of mucin, immunoglobulin A (IgA) and tight junction proteins expression, as well as increase in intestinal permeability, all these changes facilitate E. coli K1 intestinal translocation. However, these changes were alleviated when HT-29 cells were treated with LBS before E. coli K1 infection. Furthermore, we found that LBS-treated neonatal rats (without E. coli K1 infection) have showed higher production of mucin, ZO-1, IgA, Ki67 in intestinal mucosa as well as lower intestinal permeability than that of non-treated rats, indicating that LBS could accelerate the development of neonatal intestinal defense. Taken together, our results suggest that enhancement of the neonatal intestinal defense to fight against E. coli K1 translocation could be the potential mechanism to elucidate how LBS confers a protective effect against neonatal E. coli K1 bacteremia

  20. Glutamine supplementation improves intestinal barrier function in a weaned piglet model of Escherichia coli infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewaschuk, Julia B; Murdoch, Gordon K; Johnson, Ian R; Madsen, Karen L; Field, Catherine J

    2011-09-01

    The weaning period is associated with an increased prevalence of gastrointestinal infection in many species. Glutamine (Gln) has been shown to improve intestinal barrier function and immune function in both in vivo and in vitro models. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of dietary Gln supplementation on intestinal barrier function and intestinal cytokines in a model of Escherichia coli infection. We randomised 21-d-old piglets (n 20) to nutritionally complete isonitrogenous diets with or without Gln (4·4 %, w/w) for 2 weeks. Intestinal loops were isolated from anaesthetised pigs and inoculated with either saline or one of the two E. coli (K88AC or K88 wild-type)-containing solutions. Intestinal tissue was studied for permeability, cytokine expression, fluid secretion and tight-junction protein expression. Animals receiving Gln supplementation had decreased potential difference (PD) and short-circuit current (I(sc)) in E. coli-inoculated intestinal loops (PD 0·628 (SEM 0·151) mV; I(sc) 13·0 (SEM 3·07) μA/cm(2)) compared with control-fed animals (PD 1·36 (SEM 0·227) mV; I(sc) 22·4 (SEM 2·24) μA/cm(2)). Intestinal tissue from control, but not from Gln-supplemented, animals responded to E. coli with a significant increase in mucosal cytokine mRNA (IL-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor-β and IL-10). Tight-junction protein expression (claudin-1 and occludin) was reduced with exposure to E. coli in control-fed animals and was not influenced in Gln-supplemented piglets. Gln supplementation may be useful in reducing the severity of weaning-related gastrointestinal infections, by reducing the mucosal cytokine response and altering intestinal barrier function.

  1. CRF induces intestinal epithelial barrier injury via the release of mast cell proteases and TNF-α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L Overman

    Full Text Available Psychological stress is a predisposing factor in the onset and exacerbation of important gastrointestinal diseases including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. The pathophysiology of stress-induced intestinal disturbances is known to be mediated by corticotropin releasing factor (CRF but the precise signaling pathways remain poorly understood. Utilizing a porcine ex vivo intestinal model, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which CRF mediates intestinal epithelial barrier disturbances.Ileum was harvested from 6-8 week-old pigs, mounted on Ussing Chambers, and exposed to CRF in the presence or absence of various pharmacologic inhibitors of CRF-mediated signaling pathways. Mucosal-to-serosal flux of 4 kDa-FITC dextran (FD4 and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER were recorded as indices of intestinal epithelial barrier function.Exposure of porcine ileum to 0.05-0.5 µM CRF increased (p<0.05 paracellular flux compared with vehicle controls. CRF treatment had no deleterious effects on ileal TER. The effects of CRF on FD4 flux were inhibited with pre-treatment of tissue with the non-selective CRF(1/2 receptor antagonist Astressin B and the mast cell stabilizer sodium cromolyn (10(-4 M. Furthermore, anti-TNF-α neutralizing antibody (p<0.01, protease inhibitors (p<0.01 and the neural blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX inhibited CRF-mediated intestinal barrier dysfunction.These data demonstrate that CRF triggers increases in intestinal paracellular permeability via mast cell dependent release of TNF-α and proteases. Furthermore, CRF-mast cell signaling pathways and increases in intestinal permeability require critical input from the enteric nervous system. Therefore, blocking the deleterious effects of CRF may address the enteric signaling of mast cell degranulation, TNFα release, and protease secretion, hallmarks of IBS and IBD.

  2. Engineered human pluripotent-stem-cell-derived intestinal tissues with a functional enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Michael J; Mahe, Maxime M; Trisno, Stephen; Poling, Holly M; Watson, Carey L; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Chang, Ching-Fang; Schiesser, Jacqueline; Aubert, Philippe; Stanley, Edouard G; Elefanty, Andrew G; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Mandegar, Mohammad A; Conklin, Bruce R; Neunlist, Michel; Brugmann, Samantha A; Helmrath, Michael A; Wells, James M

    2017-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) of the gastrointestinal tract controls many diverse functions, including motility and epithelial permeability. Perturbations in ENS development or function are common, yet there is no human model for studying ENS-intestinal biology and disease. We used a tissue-engineering approach with embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to generate human intestinal tissue containing a functional ENS. We recapitulated normal intestinal ENS development by combining human-PSC-derived neural crest cells (NCCs) and developing human intestinal organoids (HIOs). NCCs recombined with HIOs in vitro migrated into the mesenchyme, differentiated into neurons and glial cells and showed neuronal activity, as measured by rhythmic waves of calcium transients. ENS-containing HIOs grown in vivo formed neuroglial structures similar to a myenteric and submucosal plexus, had functional interstitial cells of Cajal and had an electromechanical coupling that regulated waves of propagating contraction. Finally, we used this system to investigate the cellular and molecular basis for Hirschsprung's disease caused by a mutation in the gene PHOX2B. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of human-PSC-derived intestinal tissue with a functional ENS and how this system can be used to study motility disorders of the human gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Dietary l-arginine inhibits intestinal Clostridium perfringens colonisation and attenuates intestinal mucosal injury in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beibei; Lv, Zengpeng; Li, Huixian; Guo, Shuangshuang; Liu, Dan; Guo, Yuming

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary l-arginine level and feeding duration on the intestinal damage of broilers induced by Clostridium perfringens (CP) in vivo, and the antimicrobial effect of its metabolite nitric oxide (NO) in vitro. The in vivo experiment was designed as a factorial arrangement of three dietary treatments×two challenge statuses. Broilers were fed a basal diet (CON) or a high-arginine diet (ARG) containing 1·87 % l-arginine, or CON for the first 8 d and ARG from days 9 to 28 (CON/ARG). Birds were co-infected with or without Eimeria and CP (EM/CP). EM/CP challenge led to intestinal injury, as evidenced by lower plasma d-xylose concentration (P<0·01), higher paracellular permeability in the ileum (P<0·05) and higher numbers of Escherichia coli (P<0·05) and CP (P<0·001) in caecal digesta; however, this situation could be alleviated by l-arginine supplementation (P<0·05). The intestinal claudin-1 and occludin mRNA expression levels were decreased (P<0·05) following EM/CP challenge; this was reversed by l-arginine supplementation (P<0·05). Moreover, EM/CP challenge up-regulated (P<0·05) claudin-2, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), toll-like receptor 2 and nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain 1 (NOD1) mRNA expression, and l-arginine supplementation elevated (P<0·05) IFN-γ, IL-10 and NOD1 mRNA expression. In vitro study showed that NO had bacteriostatic activity against CP (P<0·001). In conclusion, l-arginine supplementation could inhibit CP overgrowth and alleviate intestinal mucosal injury by modulating innate immune responses, enhancing barrier function and producing NO.

  4. Vascular permeability alterations induced by arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chieh; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Wang, Hsiu-Jen; Yu, Hsin-Su; Chang, Louis W

    2004-01-01

    The impact of arsenic on the integrity of blood vessels in vivo via in situ exposure (local injection) of arsenic was investigated. Vascular permeability changes were evaluated by means of the Evans blue assay and the India ink tracer techniques. Rats were intravenously injected with Evans blue followed by intradermal injections of various doses of sodium arsenite on the back skins of the animals. Evans blue at different time points was extracted and assayed as indices of vascular leakage. Skin at various time point injection sites was sampled for arsenic measurement via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. Our time course study with Evans blue technique demonstrated a biphasic pattern of vascular permeability change: an early phase of permeability reduction and a later phase of permeability promotion at all dose levels tested. The India ink tracer technique also demonstrated a time-correlated increase in vascular labelling in the tissues examined, signifying an increase in vascular leakage with time. Moreover, we found that despite an early increase in tissue arsenic content at time of injection, tissue arsenic declined rapidly and returned to near control levels after 30-60 min. Thus, an inverse correlation between tissue arsenic content and the extent of vascular permeability was apparent. This study provides the first demonstration that in situ exposure to arsenic will produce vascular dysfunction (vascular leakage) in vivo.

  5. A new approach to predict human intestinal absorption using porcine intestinal tissue and biorelevant matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Steeg, E. van de; Grossouw, D.; Zeijdner, E.E.; Krul, C.A.M.; Verwei, M.; Wortelboer, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A reliable prediction of the oral bioavailability in humans is crucial and of high interest for pharmaceutical and food industry. The predictive value of currently used in silico methods, in vitro cell lines, ex vivo intestinal tissue and/or in vivo animal studies for human intestinal absorption,

  6. Design, Characterization, and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Tacrolimus Proliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekkanti, Vijaykumar; Rueda, Javier; Wang, Zhijun; Betageri, Guru V

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop proliposomal formulation for a poorly bioavailable drug, tacrolimus. Proliposomes were prepared by thin film hydration method using different lipids such as hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine (HEPC), soy phosphatidylcholine (SPC), distearyl phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol sodium (DMPG) and cholesterol in various ratios. Proliposomes were evaluated for particle size, zeta potential, in vitro drug release, in vitro permeability, and in vivo pharmacokinetics. In vitro drug release was carried out in purified water using USP type II dissolution apparatus. In vitro drug permeation was studied using parallel artificial membrane permeation assay (PAMPA) and everted rat intestinal perfusion techniques. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Among the different formulations, proliposomes with drug/DSPC/cholesterol in the ratio of 1:2:0.5 demonstrated the desired particle size and zeta potential. Enhanced drug release was observed with proliposomes compared to pure tacrolimus in purified water after 1 h. Tacrolimus permeability across PAMPA and everted rat intestinal perfusion models was significantly higher with proliposomes. The optimized formulation of proliposomes indicated a significant improvement in the rate and absorption of tacrolimus. Following a single oral administration, a relative bioavailability of 193.33% was achieved compared to pure tacrolimus suspension.

  7. Enhancement of HIV-1 infection and intestinal CD4+ T cell depletion ex vivo by gut microbes altered during chronic HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Stephanie M; Lee, Eric J; Donovan, Andrew M; Guo, Kejun; Harper, Michael S; Frank, Daniel N; McCarter, Martin D; Santiago, Mario L; Wilson, Cara C

    2016-01-14

    Early HIV-1 infection is characterized by high levels of HIV-1 replication and substantial CD4 T cell depletion in the intestinal mucosa, intestinal epithelial barrier breakdown, and microbial translocation. HIV-1-induced disruption of intestinal homeostasis has also been associated with changes in the intestinal microbiome that are linked to mucosal and systemic immune activation. In this study, we investigated the impact of representative bacterial species that were altered in the colonic mucosa of viremic HIV-1 infected individuals (HIV-altered mucosal bacteria; HAMB) on intestinal CD4 T cell function, infection by HIV-1, and survival in vitro. Lamina propria (LP) mononuclear cells were infected with CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL or mock infected, exposed to high (3 gram-negative) or low (2 gram-positive) abundance HAMB or control gram-negative Escherichia coli and levels of productive HIV-1 infection and CD4 T cell depletion assessed. HAMB-associated changes in LP CD4 T cell activation, proliferation and HIV-1 co-receptor expression were also evaluated. The majority of HAMB increased HIV-1 infection and depletion of LP CD4 T cells, but gram-negative HAMB enhanced CD4 T cell infection to a greater degree than gram-positive HAMB. Most gram-negative HAMB enhanced T cell infection to levels similar to that induced by gram-negative E. coli despite lower induction of T cell activation and proliferation by HAMB. Both gram-negative HAMB and E. coli significantly increased expression of HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5 on LP CD4 T cells. Lipopolysaccharide, a gram-negative bacteria cell wall component, up-regulated CCR5 expression on LP CD4 T cells whereas gram-positive cell wall lipoteichoic acid did not. Upregulation of CCR5 by gram-negative HAMB was largely abrogated in CD4 T cell-enriched cultures suggesting an indirect mode of stimulation. Gram-negative commensal bacteria that are altered in abundance in the colonic mucosa of HIV-1 infected individuals have the capacity to enhance

  8. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2004-01-01

    /or prodrugs to these carriers in order to increasing oral bioavailability and distribution. A number of absorptive intestinal transporters are described in terms of gene and protein classification, driving forces, substrate specificities and cellular localization. When targeting absorptive large capacity...... membrane transporters in the small intestine in order to increase oral bioavailabilities of drug or prodrug, the major influence on in vivo pharmacokinetics is suggested to be dose-dependent increase in bioavailability as well as prolonged blood circulation due to large capacity facilitated absorption......, and renal re-absorption, respectively. In contrast, when targeting low-capacity transporters such as vitamin transporters, dose independent saturable absorption kinetics are suggested. We thus believe that targeting drug substrates for absorptive intestinal membrane transporters could be a feasible strategy...

  9. Intestinal flora, probiotics, and cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero Hernández, Ignacio; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Vargas Vorackova, Florencia; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal microflora constitutes a symbiotic ecosystem in permanent equilibrium, composed mainly of anaerobic bacteria. However, such equilibrium may be altered by daily conditions as drug use or pathologies interfering with intestinal physiology, generating an unfavorable environment for the organism. Besides, there are factors which may cause alterations in the intestinal wall, creating the conditions for translocation or permeation of substances or bacteria. In cirrhotic patients, there are many conditions that combine to alter the amount and populations of intestinal bacteria, as well as the functional capacity of the intestinal wall to prevent the permeation of substances and bacteria. Nowadays, numerous complications associated with cirrhosis have been identified, where such mechanisms could play an important role. There is evidence that some probiotic microorganisms could restore the microbiologic and immunologic equilibrium in the intestinal wall in cirrhotic patients and help in the treatment of complications due to cirrhosis. This article has the objective to review the interactions between intestinal flora, gut permeability, and the actual role of probiotics in the field of cirrhotic patients.

  10. The effect of endurance exercise on intestinal integrity in well-trained healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen Duijghuijsen, Lonneke; Mensink, Marco; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Fiedorowicz, Ewa; Dartel, van Dorien A.M.; Mes, Jurriaan J.; Luiking, Yvette C.; Keijer, Jaap; Wichers, Harry J.; Witkamp, Renger F.; Norren, van Klaske

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is one of the external factors associated with impairment of intestinal integrity, possibly leading to increased permeability and altered absorption. Here, we aimed to examine to what extent endurance exercise in the glycogen-depleted state can affect intestinal permeability toward small

  11. Labetalol Prevents Intestinal Dysfunction Induced by Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhuang Lang

    Full Text Available Beta-adrenergic blockade has been hypothesized to have a protective effect on intestinal dysfunction and increased intestinal permeability associated with the epinephrine surge after traumatic brain injury (TBI.Wister rats were subjected to either a weight drop TBI, and intraperitoneally injected or not with labetalol, or a sham procedure (18 rats per group. After 3, 6, or 12h (6 rats per subgroup, intestinal permeability to 4.4 kDa FITC-Dextran and plasma epinephrine levels were measured as was intestinal tight junction protein ZO-1 expression at 12h. Terminal ileum was harvested to measure levels of intestinal tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and to evaluate histopathology.In TBI group vs. sham group, intestinal permeability (P<0.01 was significantly higher at all time-points, and intestinal ZO-1 expression was lower at 12h. In TBI with vs. without labetalol group, 1 intestinal permeability was significantly lower at 6 and 12h (94.31±7.64 vs. 102.16±6.40 μg/mL; 110.21±7.52 vs. 118.95±7.11 μg/mL, respectively; 2 levels of plasma epinephrine and intestinal TNF-α were significantly lower at 3, 6 and 12h; and 3 intestinal ZO-1 expression was higher at 3, 6 and 12h (p=0.018. Histopathological evaluation showed that labetalol use preserved intestinal architecture throughout.In a rat model of TBI, labetalol reduced TBI-induced sympathetic hyperactivity, and prevented histopathological intestinal injury accompanied by changes in gut permeability and gut TNF-α expression.

  12. Evaluation of anthelmintic potential of the Ethiopian medicinal plant Embelia schimperi Vatke in vivo and in vitro against some intestinal parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Debebe, Yared; Tefera, Mesfin; Mekonnen, Walelign; Abebe, Dawit; Woldekidan, Samuel; Abebe, Abiy; Belete, Yehualashet; Menberu, Temesgen; Belayneh, Bethelhem; Tesfaye, Berhanu; Nasir, Ibrahim; Yirsaw, Kidist; Basha, Hirut; Dawit, Asrat; Debella, Asfaw

    2015-01-01

    Background Embelia schimperi has been used for the treatment of intestinal parasites especially tapeworm infestations for centuries in Ethiopia. However, there is lack of scientific based evidences regarding the efficacy, safety and phytochemical analysis of this plant despite its frequent use as an anthelmintic. This study has therefore evaluated the efficacy and acute toxicity of E. schimperi thereby generating relevant preclinical information. Methods The anthelmintic activities of the cru...

  13. Effects of intestinal bacteria-derived p-cresyl sulfate on Th1-type immune response in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Takahiro, E-mail: takahiro-shiba@yakult.co.jp; Kawakami, Koji; Sasaki, Takashi; Makino, Ikuyo; Kato, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Uchida, Kazumi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki

    2014-01-15

    Protein fermentation by intestinal bacteria generates various compounds that are not synthesized by their hosts. An example is p-cresol, which is produced from tyrosine. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) accumulate high concentrations of intestinal bacteria-derived p-cresyl sulfate (pCS), which is the major metabolite of p-cresol, in their blood, and this accumulation contributes to certain CKD-associated disorders. Immune dysfunction is a CKD-associated disorder that frequently contributes to infectious diseases among CKD patients. Although some studies imply pCS as an etiological factor, the relation between pCS and immune systems is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the immunological effects of pCS derived from intestinal bacteria in mice. For this purpose, we fed mice a tyrosine-rich diet that causes the accumulation of pCS in their blood. The mice were shown to exhibit decreased Th1-driven 2, 4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced contact hypersensitivity response. The concentration of pCS in blood was negatively correlated with the degree of the contact hypersensitivity response. In contrast, the T cell-dependent antibody response was not influenced by the accumulated pCS. We also examined the in vitro cytokine responses by T cells in the presence of pCS. The production of IFN-γ was suppressed by pCS. Further, pCS decreased the percentage of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells. Our results suggest that intestinal bacteria-derived pCS suppressesTh1-type cellular immune responses. - Highlights: • Mice fed a tyrosine-rich diet accumulated p-cresyl sulfate in their blood. • p-Cresyl sulfate negatively correlated with contact hypersensitivity response. • The in vitro production of IFN-γ was suppressed by p-cresyl sulfate. • p-Cresyl sulfate decreased the percentage of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells in vitro.

  14. Decision trees to characterise the roles of permeability and solubility on the prediction of oral absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Danielle; Freitas, Alex A; Ghafourian, Taravat

    2015-01-27

    Oral absorption of compounds depends on many physiological, physiochemical and formulation factors. Two important properties that govern oral absorption are in vitro permeability and solubility, which are commonly used as indicators of human intestinal absorption. Despite this, the nature and exact characteristics of the relationship between these parameters are not well understood. In this study a large dataset of human intestinal absorption was collated along with in vitro permeability, aqueous solubility, melting point, and maximum dose for the same compounds. The dataset allowed a permeability threshold to be established objectively to predict high or low intestinal absorption. Using this permeability threshold, classification decision trees incorporating a solubility-related parameter such as experimental or predicted solubility, or the melting point based absorption potential (MPbAP), along with structural molecular descriptors were developed and validated to predict oral absorption class. The decision trees were able to determine the individual roles of permeability and solubility in oral absorption process. Poorly permeable compounds with high solubility show low intestinal absorption, whereas poorly water soluble compounds with high or low permeability may have high intestinal absorption provided that they have certain molecular characteristics such as a small polar surface or specific topology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  16. Zidovudine-cyclodextrin inclusion complex and its permeability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The permeability of zidovudine in zidovudine-cyclodextrin inclusion complex across stomach and intestinal compartments of rat was investigated spectrophotometrically. The absorption maximum ( ) for zidovudine in HCl max buffer (pH 1.2) and in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) were 267 and 268 nm respectively. The inclusion ...

  17. Intestinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, André; Anderson, David E

    2016-11-01

    A wide variety of disorders affecting the intestinal tract in cattle may require surgery. Among those disorders the more common are: intestinal volvulus, jejunal hemorrhage syndrome and more recently the duodenal sigmoid flexure volvulus. Although general principles of intestinal surgery can be applied, cattle has anatomical and behavior particularities that must be known before invading the abdomen. This article focuses on surgical techniques used to optimize outcomes and discusses specific disorders of small intestine. Diagnoses and surgical techniques presented can be applied in field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Optimizing Fluorescein Isothiocyanate Dextran Measurement As a Biomarker in a 24-h Feed Restriction Model to Induce Gut Permeability in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Tellez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d is a 3–5 kDa marker used to measure tight junction permeability. We have previously shown that intestinal barrier function can be adversely affected by stress, poorly digested diets, or feed restriction (FR, resulting in increased intestinal inflammation-associated permeability. However, further optimization adjustments of the current FITC-d methodology are possible to enhance precision and efficacy of results in future. The objective of the present study was to optimize our current model to obtain a larger difference between control and treated groups, by optimizing the FITC-d measurement as a biomarker in a 24-h FR model to induce gut permeability in broiler chickens. One in vitro and four in vivo independent experiments were conducted. The results of the present study suggest that by increasing the dose of FITC-d (8.32 versus 4.16 mg/kg; shortening the collection time of blood samples (1 versus 2.5 h; using a pool of non-FITC-d serum as a blank, compared to previously used PBS; adding a standard curve to set a limit of detection and modifying the software’s optimal sensitivity value, it was possible to obtain more consistent and reliable results.

  19. Permeable pavement study (Edison)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types...

  20. Permeability of displaced fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Christian; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido

    2017-04-01

    Flow along fractures or in fissured systems becomes increasingly important in the context of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), shale gas recovery or nuclear waste deposit. Commonly, the permeability of fractures is approximated using the Hagen-Poiseuille solution of Navier Stokes equation. Furthermore, the flow in fractures is assumed to be laminar flow between two parallel plates and the cubic law for calculating the velocity field is applied. It is a well-known fact, that fracture flow is strongly influenced by the fracture surface roughness and the shear displacement along the fracture plane. Therefore, a numerical approach was developed which calculates the flow pattern within a fracture-matrix system. The flow in the fracture is described by a free fluid flow and the flow in the matrix is assumed to be laminar and therefore validates Darcy's law. The presented approach can be applied for artificially generated fractures or real fractures measured by surface scanning. Artificial fracture surfaces are generated using the power spectral density of the surface height random process with a spectral exponent to define roughness. For calculating the permeability of such fracture-matrix systems the mean fracture aperture, the shear displacement and the surface roughness are considered by use of a 3D numerical simulator. By use of this approach correlation between shear displacement and mean aperture, shear displacement and permeability, as well as surface roughness and permeability can be obtained. Furthermore, the intrinsic measured permeability presents a combination of matrix and fracture permeability. The presented approach allows the separation and quantification of the absolute magnitudes of the matrix and the fracture permeability and the permeability of displaced fractures can be calculated. The numerical approach which is a 3D numerical simulation of the fracture-matrix system can be applied for artificial as well as real systems.

  1. Probiotic Mixture Golden Bifido Prevents NeonatalEscherichia coliK1 Translocation via Enhancing Intestinal Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qing; He, Xiaolong; Puthiyakunnon, Santhosh; Xiao, Hansen; Gong, Zelong; Boddu, Swapna; Chen, Lecheng; Tian, Huiwen; Huang, Sheng-He; Cao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) K1 sepsis and meningitis is a severe infection characterized by high mortality in neonates. Successful colonization and translocation across the intestinal mucosa have been regarded as the critical steps for E. coli K1 sepsis and meningitis. We recently reported that the probiotic mixture, Golden Bifido (containing live Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium , and Streptococcus thermophilus , LBS) has a preventive role against neonatal E. coli K1 bacteremia and meningitis. However, the interaction between the neonatal gut barrier, probiotics and E. coli K1 is still not elucidated. The present study aims to investigate how LBS exerts its protective effects on neonatal gut barrier during E. coli K1 infection. The beneficial effects of LBS were explored in vitro and in vivo using human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and rat model of neonatal E. coli K1 infection, respectively. Our results showed that stimulation with E. coli K1 was able to cause intestinal barrier dysfunction, which were reflected by E. coli K1-induced intestinal damage and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, reduction of mucin, immunoglobulin A (IgA) and tight junction proteins expression, as well as increase in intestinal permeability, all these changes facilitate E. coli K1 intestinal translocation. However, these changes were alleviated when HT-29 cells were treated with LBS before E. coli K1 infection. Furthermore, we found that LBS-treated neonatal rats (without E. coli K1 infection) have showed higher production of mucin, ZO-1, IgA, Ki67 in intestinal mucosa as well as lower intestinal permeability than that of non-treated rats, indicating that LBS could accelerate the development of neonatal intestinal defense. Taken together, our results suggest that enhancement of the neonatal intestinal defense to fight against E. coli K1 translocation could be the potential mechanism to elucidate how LBS confers a protective effect against neonatal E. coli K1

  2. Fundametal Study On Permeability Pavement

    OpenAIRE

    川口, 基広; 建部, 英博

    1997-01-01

    This study aimed at the thing which develops a water permeability pavement which improved a drainage pavement. Then it examined possibility of the permeability pavement which can secure water permeability and strength, which it uses water granulated iron-blast-furnace slag in subgrade roadbed and it makes an asphalt mixture mix a stainless steel fiber, to solve a problem of permeability pavement

  3. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  4. Primary mouse small intestinal epithelial cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sato, T.; Clevers, H.

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in adult mammals. We have recently shown that Lgr5 (Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor) is expressed in intestinal stem cells by an in vivo genetic lineage tracing strategy. In the past, extensive efforts have

  5. Ruminal and Intestinal Digestibility of Leucaena Foliage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pramote

    2013-12-30

    Dec 30, 2013 ... both Madras thorn and moringa fodders were significantly higher than that for leucaena fodder. Potential ... The in vivo measurement of nutrient digestion in the rumen and intestine requires that the animal be surgically prepared ... Various in vitro laboratory techniques have been used to predict intestinal.

  6. The Contributions of Human Mini-Intestines to the Study of Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huimin; Hasan, Nesrin M; In, Julie G; Estes, Mary K; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-02-10

    The lack of accessibility to normal and diseased human intestine and the inability to separate the different functional compartments of the intestine even when tissue could be obtained have held back the understanding of human intestinal physiology. Clevers and his associates identified intestinal stem cells and established conditions to grow "mini-intestines" ex vivo in differentiated and undifferentiated conditions. This pioneering work has made a new model of the human intestine available and has begun making contributions to the understanding of human intestinal transport in normal physiologic conditions and the pathophysiology of intestinal diseases. However, this model is reductionist and lacks many of the complexities of normal intestine. Consequently, it is not yet possible to predict how great the advances using this model will be for understanding human physiology and pathophysiology, nor how the model will be modified to include multiple other intestinal cell types and physical forces necessary to more closely approximate normal intestine. This review describes recent studies using mini-intestines, which have readdressed previously established models of normal intestinal transport physiology and newly examined intestinal pathophysiology. The emphasis is on studies with human enteroids grown either as three-dimensional spheroids or two-dimensional monolayers. In addition, comments are provided on mouse studies in cases when human studies have not yet been described.

  7. Cellobiose/mannitol sugar permeability test complements biopsy histopathology in clinical investigation of the jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, S; Brydon, W G; Ferguson, A

    1984-11-01

    Intestinal permeability to probe molecules has been shown to correlate closely with the presence or absence of villous atrophy in a jejunal biopsy. The purpose of this study was to establish if there exist groups of patients with functional derangement of intestinal permeability but normal histopathology of the small bowel mucosa. In 135 patients a cellobiose/mannitol permeability test was performed at the same time as jejunal biopsy. Diagnosis included coeliac disease, Crohn's disease, irritable bowel syndrome, idiopathic diarrhoea, self diagnosed food allergy, atopic eczema and postinfectious malabsorption. The value of the cellobiose/mannitol test in identifying patients with abnormal jejunal biopsy histopathology was confirmed. The permeability test was abnormal in all 28 patients with partial or subtotal villous atrophy, and also in all 10 in whom there was a high intraepithelial lymphocyte count despite normal villi and crypts. Functional abnormality of the small intestine has not previously been reported in patients with this jejunal biopsy abnormality. Abnormalities of permeability were also found in patients with idiopathic diarrhoea, folate deficiency, postinfectious or traveller's diarrhoea, small bowel Crohn's disease, and atopic eczema. These results show that sugar permeability tests have more potential in clinical investigation than merely serving as screening tests before jejunal biopsy. There are groups of patients without morphological changes in the small bowel in whom intestinal permeability is abnormal.

  8. Permeable pavement study (Edison)

    Science.gov (United States)

    While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types have on nutrient concentrations present in stormwater runoff are limited. In 2009, the U.S. EPA constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, New Jersey, that incorporated permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). Each permeable pavement type has four, 54.9-m2, lined sections that direct all infiltrate into 5.7-m3 tanks enabling complete volume collection and sampling. This paper highlights the results from a 12-month period when samples were collected from 13 rainfall/runoff events and analyzed for nitrogen species, orthophosphate, and organic carbon. Differences in infiltrate concentrations among the three permeable pavement types were assessed and compared with concentrations in rainwater samples and impervious asphalt runoff samples, which were collected as controls. Contrary to expectations based on the literature, the PA infiltrate had significantly larger total nitrogen (TN) concentrations than runoff and infiltrate from the other two permeable pavement types, indicating that nitrogen leached from materials in the PA strata. There was no significant difference in TN concentration between runoff and infiltrate from either PICP or PC, but TN in runoff was significantly larger than in the rainwater, suggesting meaningful inter-event dry de

  9. Development, Hatching, and Intestinal Establishment of Trichuris suis, - in vivo and in vitro Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejzagic, Nermina

    Trichuris suis, the pig whipworm is a nematode parasite located in the large intestine of pigs. Embryonated eggs of T. suis (T. suis ova = TSO) constitute the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in a new medicinal product, which is currently tested in human clinical trials as a potential...... treatment against several immune-mediated disease. In order to ensure that TSO can induce the immunomodulatory effect (pharmaceutical potency) and ultimately the treatment effect, the contained eggs need to be biologically potent. Biological potency refers to the ability of eggs to hatch (measurement......, and accurate measure to test the establishment of T. suis larvae (Manuscript 1), where both male and female pigs (3-4 months old) can be used in the assessment of TSO’s biological potency (Manuscript 4). For large-scale, in-process testing of TSO batches where a test result is needed in matter of ho rs...

  10. Plasmodium berghei ANKA causes intestinal malaria associated with dysbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Miyauchi, Eiji; Nakamura, Shota; Hirai, Makoto; Suzue, Kazutomo; Imai, Takashi; Nomura, Takahiro; Handa, Tadashi; Okada, Hiroko; Shimokawa, Chikako; Onishi, Risa; Olia, Alex; Hirata, Jun; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Horii, Toshihiro; Hisaeda, Hajime

    2015-10-27

    Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, are frequently observed in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the correlation between malaria intestinal pathology and intestinal microbiota has not been investigated. In the present study, infection of C57BL/6 mice with P. berghei ANKA (PbA) caused intestinal pathological changes, such as detachment of epithelia in the small intestines and increased intestinal permeability, which correlated with development with experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Notably, an apparent dysbiosis occurred, characterized by a reduction of Firmicutes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Furthermore, some genera of microbiota correlated with parasite growth and/or ECM development. By contrast, BALB/c mice are resistant to ECM and exhibit milder intestinal pathology and dysbiosis. These results indicate that the severity of cerebral and intestinal pathology coincides with the degree of alteration in microbiota. This is the first report demonstrating that malaria affects intestinal microbiota and causes dysbiosis.

  11. Oral peptide specific egg antibody to intestinal sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter-2b is effective at altering phosphate transport in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobeck, Elizabeth A; Hellestad, Erica M; Sand, Jordan M; Piccione, Michelle L; Bishop, Jeff W; Helvig, Christian; Petkovich, Martin; Cook, Mark E

    2015-06-01

    Hyperimmunized hens are an effective means of generating large quantities of antigen specific egg antibodies that have use as oral supplements. In this study, we attempted to create a peptide specific antibody that produced outcomes similar to those of the human pharmaceutical, sevelamer HCl, used in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia (a sequela of chronic renal disease). Egg antibodies were generated against 8 different human intestinal sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter 2b (NaPi2b) peptides, and hNaPi2b peptide egg antibodies were screened for their ability to inhibit phosphate transport in human intestinal Caco-2 cell line. Antibody produced against human peptide sequence TSPSLCWT (anti-h16) was specific for its peptide sequence, and significantly reduced phosphate transport in human Caco-2 cells to 25.3±11.5% of control nonspecific antibody, when compared to nicotinamide, a known inhibitor of phosphate transport (P≤0.05). Antibody was then produced against the mouse-specific peptide h16 counterpart (mouse sequence TSPSYCWT, anti-m16) for further analysis in a murine model. When anti-m16 was fed to mice (1% of diet as dried egg yolk powder), egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) was detected using immunohistochemical staining in mouse ileum, and egg anti-m16 IgY colocalized with a commercial goat anti-NaPi2b antibody. The effectiveness of anti-m16 egg antibody in reducing serum phosphate, when compared to sevelamer HCl, was determined in a mouse feeding study. Serum phosphate was reduced 18% (Pantibodies are useful and easy to prepare reagents for the study and possible treatment of select diseases. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  12. p38 MAPK-SKN-1/Nrf signaling cascade is required for intestinal barrier against graphene oxide toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunli; Zhi, Lingtong; Wu, Qiuli; Yu, Yonglin; Sun, Qiqing; Wang, Dayong

    2016-12-01

    Biological barrier plays a crucial role for organisms against the possible toxicity from engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Graphene oxide (GO) has been proven to cause potential toxicity on organisms. However, the molecular mechanisms for intestinal barrier of animals against GO toxicity are largely unclear. Using in vivo assay system of Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that mutation of genes encoding core p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway caused susceptible property to GO toxicity and enhanced translocation of GO into the body of nematodes. Genetic assays indicated that SKN-1/Nrf functioned downstream of p38 MAPK signaling pathway to regulate GO toxicity and translocation. Transcription factor of SKN-1 could regulate GO toxicity and translocation at least through function of its targeted gene of gst-4 encoding one of phase II detoxification proteins. Moreover, intestine-specific RNA interference (RNAi) assay demonstrated that the p38 MAPK-SKN-1/Nrf signaling cascade could function in intestine to regulate GO toxicity and intestinal permeability in GO exposed nematodes. Therefore, p38 MAPK-SKN-1/Nrf signaling cascade may act as an important molecular basis for intestinal barrier against GO toxicity in organisms. Exposure to GO induced significantly increased expression of genes encoding p38 MAPK-SKN-1/Nrf signaling cascade, which further implies that the identified p38 MAPK-SKN-1/Nrf signaling cascade may encode a protection mechanism for nematodes in intestine to be against GO toxicity.

  13. Intestinal Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weight loss Intestinal ischemia Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  14. The mycotoxin patulin increases colonic epithelial permeability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, H M; Collins, D; Maher, S; Walsh, E G; Winter, D C; O'Brien, P J; Brayden, D J; Baird, A W

    2012-11-01

    The gastrointestinal lumen is directly exposed to dietary contaminants, including patulin, a mycotoxin produced by moulds. Patulin is known to increase permeability across intestinal Caco-2 monolayers. This study aimed to determine the effect of patulin on permeability, ion transport and morphology in isolated rat colonic mucosae. Mucosal sheets were mounted in Ussing chambers and voltage clamped. Apical addition of patulin (100-500 μM) rapidly reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increased permeability to [(14)C] mannitol (2.9-fold). Patulin also inhibited carbachol-induced electrogenic chloride secretion and histological evidence of mucosal damage was observed. To examine potential mechanisms of action of patulin on colonic epithelial cells, high-content analysis of Caco-2 cells was performed and this novel, quantitative fluorescence-based approach confirmed its cytotoxic effects. With regard to time course, the cytotoxicity determined by high content analysis took longer than the almost immediate reduction of electrical resistance in isolated mucosal sheets. These data indicate patulin is not only cytotoxic to enterocytes but also has the capacity to directly alter permeability and ion transport in intact intestinal mucosae. These data corroborate and extend findings in intestinal cell culture monolayers, and further suggest that safety limits on consumption of patulin may be warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. In vitro permeability and metabolic stability of bile pigments and the effects of hydrophilic and lipophilic modification of biliverdin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulmer, Andrew C; Blanchfield, Joanne T; Coombes, Jeff S; Toth, Istvan

    2008-04-01

    Bile pigments, including bilirubin and biliverdin are tetrapyrrolic, dicarboxylic acids capable of forming conjugates at their propionic acid groups via ester or amide bonds. They possess substantial antioxidant and anti-mutagenic activities and therefore their intestinal absorption might influence the development of cardiovascular disease and cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether altering the physico-chemical properties of bile pigments would improve their permeability in an in vitro assay of absorption. Native and synthetically modified bile pigments were tested for gastrointestinal permeability and metabolic stability using the Caco-2 cell line. In addition, a gross measure of their toxic effects was tested in a red blood cell co-incubation assay. The apparent permeability of unconjugated bilirubin (1), bilirubin ditaurate (2) and biliverdin (3) through Caco-2 cell monolayers was determined to be 10.4+/-1.2x10(-7), 35.2+/-3.4x10(-7) and 37.0+/-1.6x10(-7) cm/s (mean+/-SD), respectively, while biliverdin diglucosamine (4), and biliverdin dioctylamine (5) were impermeable. Unconjugated bilirubin, biliverdin, bilirubin ditaurate and biliverdin diglucosamine did not decompose when incubated in Caco-2 cell homogenates, whereas biliverdin dioctylamine decomposed over time. Only unconjugated bilirubin showed toxicity towards red blood cells (> or = 1000 microM), an effect that was abolished by the addition of 40 g/L serum albumin. The data presented here suggest that bile pigments are absorbed across the Caco-2 cell monolayer and that conjugation of biliverdin to hydrophilic or lipophilic moieties decreases their absorption and can reduce their metabolic stability. In summary, exogenous bilirubin and biliverdin supplements could be absorbed across the intestinal epithelium in vivo and potentially increase circulating concentrations of these antioxidant compounds.

  16. Cranberry extract inhibits in vitro adhesion of F4 and F18+Escherichia coli to pig intestinal epithelium and reduces in vivo excretion of pigs orally challenged with F18+verotoxigenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddens, Annelies; Loos, Michaela; Vanrompay, Daisy; Remon, Jean Paul; Cox, Eric

    2017-04-01

    F4 + E. coli and F18 + E. coli infections are an important threat for pig industry worldwide. Antibiotics are commonly used to treat infected piglets, but the emerging development of resistance against antibiotics raises major concerns. Hence, alternative therapies to prevent pigs from F4 + E. coli and F18 + E. coli infections need to be developed. Since cranberry previously showed anti-adhesive activity against uropathogenic E. coli, we aimed to investigate whether cranberry extract could also inhibit binding of F4 + E. coli and F18 + E. coli to pig intestinal epithelium. Using the in vitro villus adhesion assay, we found that low concentrations of cranberry extract (20μg or 100μg/ml) have strong inhibitory activity on F4 + E. coli (75.3%, S.D.=9.31 or 95.8%, S.D.=2.56, respectively) and F18 + E. coli adherence (100% inhibition). This effect was not due to antimicrobial activity. Moreover, cranberry extract (10mg or 100mg) could also abolish in vivo binding of F4 and F18 fimbriae to the pig intestinal epithelium in ligated loop experiments. Finally, two challenge experiments with F18 + E. coli were performed to address the efficacy of in-feed or water supplemented cranberry extract. No effect could be observed in piglets that received cranberry extract only in feed (1g/kg or 10g/kg). However, supplementation of feed (10g/kg) and drinking water (1g/L) significantly decreased excretion and diarrhea. The decreased infection resulted in a decreased serum antibody response indicating reduced exposure to F18 + E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Biopharmaceutics permeability classification of lorcaserin, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C agonist: method suitability and permeability class membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Ma, Michael G; Fullenwider, Cody L; Chen, Weichao G; Sadeque, Abu J M

    2013-12-02

    The objectives of the study were (1) to demonstrate that a Caco-2 cell-based permeability assay, developed in our laboratory, is suitable to identify the permeability classification according to the US Food and Drug Administration Biopharmaceutics Classification System guidance, and (2) to use the validated Caco-2 method to determine permeability class membership of lorcaserin. Lorcaserin, marketed in United States as Belviq, is a selective human 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C agonist used for weight management. First, the permeability of twenty commercially available drugs was determined in the apical-to-basolateral direction at a final concentration of 10 μM, with the pH of transporter buffer in the apical and basolateral compartments being 6.8 and 7.4, respectively. A rank-order relationship between in vitro permeability results and the extent of human intestinal absorption for the drugs tested was observed. Second, the apparent permeability coefficient values of lorcaserin at 2, 20, and 200 μM and apical pH values of 6.8 and 7.4 in the apical-to-basolateral direction were determined using the validated method and found to be comparable to those of the high-permeability internal standard metoprolol. Lorcaserin permeability across Caco-2 cell monolayers was not dependent on the variation of apical pH. Furthermore, lorcaserin was not a substrate for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein. In conclusion, using the validated Caco-2 permeability assay, it was shown that lorcaserin is a highly permeable compound.

  18. Cannabinoids in intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Angelo A; Camilleri, Michael

    2009-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cannabinoids may exert beneficial effects in intestinal inflammation and cancer. Adaptive changes of the endocannabinoid system have been observed in intestinal biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. Studies on epithelial cells have shown that cannabinoids exert antiproliferative, antimetastatic and apoptotic effects as well as reducing cytokine release and promoting wound healing. In vivo, cannabinoids - via direct or indirect activation of CB(1) and/or CB(2) receptors - exert protective effects in well-established models of intestinal inflammation and colon cancer. Pharmacological elevation of endocannabinoid levels may be a promising strategy to counteract intestinal inflammation and colon cancer.

  19. Preparation, Characterization, and In Vivo Pharmacoscintigraphy Evaluation of an Intestinal Release Delivery System of Prussian Blue for Decorporation of Cesium and Thallium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Sandal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prussian blue (PB, ferric hexacyanoferrate is approved by US-FDA for internal decorporation of Cesium-137 (137Cs and Thallium-201 (201Tl. Aim. Since PB is a costly drug, pH-dependent oral delivery system of PB was developed using calcium alginate matrix system. Methods. Alginate (Alg beads containing PB were optimized by gelation of sodium alginate with calcium ions and effect of varying polymer concentration on encapsulation efficiency and release profile was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was carried out to study surface morphology. Adsorption efficacy of Alg-PB beads for 201Tl was evaluated and compared with native PB. In vivo pH-dependent release of the formulation was studied in humans using gamma scintigraphy. Results. Encapsulation efficiencies of Alg-PB beads with 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0% polymer solution were 99.9, 91, 92, and 93%, respectively. SEM and particle size analysis revealed differences between formulations in their appearance and size distribution. No drug release was seen in acidic media (pH of 1-2 while complete release was observed at pH of 6.8. Dissolution data was fitted to various mathematical models and beads were found to follow Hixson-Crowell mechanism of release. The pH-dependent release of beads was confirmed in vivo by pharmacoscintigraphy in humans.

  20. Mango Polyphenolics Reduce Inflammation in Intestinal Colitis—Involvement of the miR-126/PI3K/AKT/mTOR Axis In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyemee; Banerjee, Nivedita; Barnes, Ryan C.; Pfent, Catherine M.; Talcott, Stephen T.; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effect of mango (Mangifera Indica L.) polyphenolics containing gallic acid and gallotanins, and the role of the miR-126/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling axis in vitro and in vivo. Polyphenolics extracted from mango (var. Keitt) were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated CCD-18Co cells. Rats received either a beverage with mango polyphenolics or a control beverage, and were exposed to three cycles of 3% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) followed by a 2-wk recovery period. The mango extract (10 mg GAE/L) suppressed the protein expression of NF-κB, p-NF-κB, PI3K (p85β), HIF-1α, p70S6K1, and RPS6 in LPS-treated CCD-18Co cells. LPS reduced miR-126 expression, whereas, the mango extract induced miR-126 expression in a dose-dependent manner. The relationship between miR-126 and its target, PI3K (p85β), was confirmed by treating cells with miR-126 antagomiR where mango polyphenols reversed the effects of the antagomiR. In vivo, mango beverage protected against DSS-induced colonic inflammation (47%, P = 0.05) and decreased the Ki-67 labeling index in the central and basal regions compared to the control. Mango beverage significantly attenuated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and iNOS at the mRNA and protein level. Moreover, the expression of PI3K, AKT, and mTOR was reduced, whereas, miR-126 was upregulated by the mango treatment. These results suggest that mango polyphenols attenuated inflammatory response by modulating the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway at least in part through upregulation of miRNA-126 expression both in vitro and in vivo; thus, mango polyphenolics might be relevant as preventive agents in ulcerative colitis. PMID:27061150

  1. Mango polyphenolics reduce inflammation in intestinal colitis-involvement of the miR-126/PI3K/AKT/mTOR axis in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyemee; Banerjee, Nivedita; Barnes, Ryan C; Pfent, Catherine M; Talcott, Stephen T; Dashwood, Roderick H; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effect of mango (Mangifera Indica L.) polyphenolics containing gallic acid and gallotanins, and the role of the miR-126/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling axis in vitro and in vivo. Polyphenolics extracted from mango (var. Keitt) were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated CCD-18Co cells. Rats received either a beverage with mango polyphenolics or a control beverage, and were exposed to three cycles of 3% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) followed by a 2-wk recovery period. The mango extract (10 mg GAE/L) suppressed the protein expression of NF-κB, p-NF-κB, PI3K (p85β), HIF-1α, p70S6K1, and RPS6 in LPS-treated CCD-18Co cells. LPS reduced miR-126 expression, whereas, the mango extract induced miR-126 expression in a dose-dependent manner. The relationship between miR-126 and its target, PI3K (p85β), was confirmed by treating cells with miR-126 antagomiR where mango polyphenols reversed the effects of the antagomiR. In vivo, mango beverage protected against DSS-induced colonic inflammation (47%, P = 0.05) and decreased the Ki-67 labeling index in the central and basal regions compared to the control. Mango beverage significantly attenuated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and iNOS at the mRNA and protein level. Moreover, the expression of PI3K, AKT, and mTOR was reduced, whereas, miR-126 was upregulated by the mango treatment. These results suggest that mango polyphenols attenuated inflammatory response by modulating the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway at least in part through upregulation of miRNA-126 expression both in vitro and in vivo; thus, mango polyphenolics might be relevant as preventive agents in ulcerative colitis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Tissue engineering the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Ryan G; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2013-04-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) results from the loss of a highly specialized organ, the small intestine. SBS and its current treatments are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Production of tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) from the patient's own cells could restore normal intestinal function via autologous transplantation. Improved understanding of intestinal stem cells and their niche have been coupled with advances in tissue engineering techniques. Originally described by Vacanti et al of Massachusetts General Hospital, TESI has been produced by in vivo implantation of organoid units. Organoid units are multicellular clusters of epithelium and mesenchyme that may be harvested from native intestine. These clusters are loaded onto a scaffold and implanted into the host omentum. The scaffold provides physical support that permits angiogenesis and vasculogenesis of the developing tissue. After a period of 4 weeks, histologic analyses confirm the similarity of TESI to native intestine. TESI contains a differentiated epithelium, mesenchyme, blood vessels, muscle, and nerve components. To date, similar experiments have proved successful in rat, mouse, and pig models. Additional experiments have shown clinical improvement and rescue of SBS rats after implantation of TESI. In comparison with the group that underwent massive enterectomy alone, rats that had surgical anastomosis of TESI to their shortened intestine showed improvement in postoperative weight gain and serum B12 values. Recently, organoid units have been harvested from human intestinal samples and successfully grown into TESI by using an immunodeficient mouse host. Current TESI production yields approximately 3 times the number of cells initially implanted, but improvements in the scaffold and blood supply are being developed in efforts to increase TESI size. Exciting new techniques in stem cell biology and directed cellular differentiation may generate additional sources of autologous intestinal

  3. Espiroquetosis intestinal

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Sempere, Francisco José

    2017-01-01

    El término “espiroquetosis intestinal” fue introducido por Harland y Lee en 1967 -en una breve comunicación publicada en el British Medical Journal- para describir una infección intestinal que morfológicamente se manifiesta en la biopsia de colon/recto por la presencia de una banda de microorganismos, adheridos a la superficie del epitelio de la mucosa intestinal y que fueron identificados al microscopio electrónico como espiroquetas. La definición por lo tanto de este pr...

  4. Simulating kinetic parameters in transporter mediated permeability across Caco-2 cells. A case study on estrange-3-sulphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolsted, Kamilla; Rapin, Nicolas; Steffansen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    Substances that compete for the same saturable intestinal transporters may when dosed together lead to altered permeability and hence influence bioavailability. The aim was to simulate kinetic parameters, i.e. K(m) and J(max), for transporter mediated E(1)S permeability across Caco-2 cells...

  5. Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Blutt, Sarah E; de Jonge, Hugo R; Estes, Mary K; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-02-19

    Identification of Lgr5 as the intestinal stem cell marker as well as the growth factors necessary to replicate adult intestinal stem cell division has led to the establishment of the methods to generate "indefinite" ex vivo primary intestinal epithelial cultures, termed "mini-intestines." Primary cultures developed from isolated intestinal crypts or stem cells (termed enteroids/colonoids) and from inducible pluripotent stem cells (termed intestinal organoids) are being applied to study human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology with great expectations for translational applications, including regenerative medicine. Here we discuss the physiologic properties of these cultures, their current use in understanding diarrhea-causing host-pathogen interactions, and potential future applications. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Dysbiosis-induced intestinal inflammation activates TNFRI and mediates alcoholic liver disease in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Stärkel, Peter; Turner, Jerrold R.; Ho, Samuel B.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction is an important contributor to alcoholic liver disease. Translocated microbial products trigger an inflammatory response in the liver and contribute to steatohepatitis. Our aim was to investigate mechanisms of barrier disruption following chronic alcohol feeding. A Lieber-DeCarli model was used to induce intestinal dysbiosis, increased intestinal permeability and liver disease in mice. Alcohol feeding for 8 weeks induced intestinal inflammation in the jejunum, which is characterized by an increased number of TNFα producing monocytes and macrophages. These findings were confirmed in duodenal biopsies from patients with chronic alcohol abuse. Intestinal decontamination with non-absorbable antibiotics restored eubiosis, decreased intestinal inflammation and permeability, and reduced alcoholic liver disease in mice. TNF-receptor I (TNFRI) mutant mice were protected from intestinal barrier dysfunction and alcoholic liver disease. To investigate whether TNFRI on intestinal epithelial cells mediates intestinal barrier dysfunction and alcoholic liver disease, we used TNFRI mutant mice carrying a conditional gain-of-function allele for this receptor. Reactivation of TNFRI on intestinal epithelial cells resulted in increased intestinal permeability and liver disease that is similar to wild type mice after alcohol feeding, suggesting that enteric TNFRI promotes intestinal barrier dysfunction. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is a downstream target of TNFα and was phosphorylated in intestinal epithelial cells following alcohol administration. Using MLCK deficient mice, we further demonstrate a partial contribution of MLCK to intestinal barrier dysfunction and liver disease following chronic alcohol feeding. In conclusion, dysbiosis-induced intestinal inflammation and TNFRI signaling on intestinal epithelial cells are mediating a disruption of the intestinal barrier. Therefore, intestinal TNFRI is a crucial mediator of alcoholic liver disease

  7. Intestinal Oxygenotherapy of Critical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Mazurok

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The latent or mist diagnosed dysfunction of the small intestine is a common disorder in critically ill patients. Intestinal oxygenotherapy is one of the alternative ways to normalize the coordinated activity of the smooth muscles of the digestive tract.Purpose of the study. To determine the effect of intestinal oxygenotherapy in patients with enteropathies of critical conditions on the dynamics of biomarkers of the intestinal wall permeability and ischemia.Materials and methods. An open prospective descriptive study of 12 critically ill patients (7 adults, 5 children with multiple organ failure and evident or saspected dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract. Pediatric patients included children with congenital heart disease who underwent open-heart surgery for the purpose of radical or palliative correction.Results. Complications related to the intestinal oxygenotherapy were not observed. On the contrary, its use in children coincided with the positive clinical dynamics: elimination of intestinal paresis, normalization of digestion of enteral nutrition. However, it is difficult to interpret the results unambiguously. Serum citrulline concentration in children is an objective marker of the functional state of the gastrointestinal tract: in the vast majority of the control points its level was <20 μmol/l; it means a very severe intestinal damage. Serum I-FABP concentration was<100 pg/ml in a significant number of control points, which, by contrast, does not allow to talk about the intestinal wall severe ischemic disturbances. In adults, the initial serum citrulline concentration was <20 μmol/l in the vast majority of control points; but by days 5—6 after the onset of intestinal oxygenation, in the majority of patients the citrulline levels exceeded >20 μmol/l (up to 80 μmol/l. No correlation between serum citrulline and I-FABP concentrations in adults was found.Conclusion. Intestinal oxygenotherapy is a promising therapeutic technique for

  8. The role of CDX2 in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    a causal role in a large number of diseases and developmental disorders. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a chronically inflamed mucosa caused by dysregulation of the intestinal immune homeostasis. The aetiology of IBD is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors......, including luminal bacteria. The Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) is critical in early intestinal differentiation and has been implicated as a master regulator of the intestinal homeostasis and permeability in adults. When expressed, CDX2 modulates a diverse set of processes including...... of the intestinal homeostasis and further to reveal its potential role in inflammation....

  9. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Eiichi [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Hosokawa, Masaya [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Faculty of Human Sciences, Tezukayama Gakuin University, Osaka (Japan); Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Geriatric Medicine, Akita University School of Medicine, Akita (Japan); Seino, Yutaka [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Kansai Electric Power Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Inagaki, Nobuya, E-mail: inagaki@metab.kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); CREST of Japan Science and Technology Cooperation (JST), Kyoto (Japan)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  10. Human intestinal microbiota and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi

    2013-10-01

    The role of intestinal microbiota in immune-mediated diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, has deservedly received a lot of attention. Evidently, changes in the intestinal microbiota are associated with type 1 diabetes as demonstrated by recent studies. Children with beta-cell autoimmunity have shown low abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and increase in the abundance of members of the Bacteroidetes phylum in fecal microbiota. These alterations could explain increased gut permeability, subclinical small intestinal inflammation, and dysregulation of oral tolerance in type 1 diabetes. However, these studies do not provide evidence of the causative role of the gut microbiota in the development of beta-cell autoimmunity, yet. In animal models, the composition of gut microbiota modulates the function of both innate and adaptive immunity, and intestinal bacteria are regulators of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, prevention of type 1 diabetes could, in the future, be based on the interventions targeted to the gut microbiota.

  11. Determination of Site of Absorption of Propranolol in Rat Gut Using In Situ Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagare, N.; Damre, Anagha; Singh, K. S.; Mallurwar, S. R.; Iyer, Seethalakshmi; Naik, A.; Chintamaneni, Meena

    2010-01-01

    Previously, permeability and site of intestinal absorption of propranolol have been reported using the Ussing chamber. In the present study, the utility of Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion to study permeability and site of intestinal absorption of propranolol was evaluated in rats. Drug permeability in different regions of rat intestine viz. duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon was measured. Propranolol (30 μg/ml) solution was perfused in situ in each intestinal segment of rats. Effective permeability (Peff) of propranolol in each segment was calculated and site of absorption was determined. The Peff of propranolol in rat duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon was calculated to be 0.3316×10-4 cm/s, 0.4035×10-4cm/s, 0.5092×10-4 cm/s and 0.7167×10-4 cm/s, respectively. The above results suggest that permeability of propranolol was highest through colon compared to other intestinal sites, which is in close agreement to that reported previously. In conclusion, in situ single pass intestinal perfusion can be used effectively to study intestinal permeability as well as site of intestinal absorption of compounds in rats. PMID:21694996

  12. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant enhance neonatal resistance to systemic Escherichia coli K1 infection by accelerating development of intestinal defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaolong; Zeng, Qing; Puthiyakunnon, Santhosh; Zeng, Zhijie; Yang, Weijun; Qiu, Jiawen; Du, Lei; Boddu, Swapna; Wu, Tongwei; Cai, Danxian; Huang, Sheng-He; Cao, Hong

    2017-03-06

    The objective of this study was to determine whether Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant (LCS) has a preventive effect against gut-derived systemic neonatal Escherichia coli (E. coli) K1 infection. The preventive effects were evaluated in human colonic carcinoma cell line Caco-2 and neonatal rat models. Our in vitro results showed that LCS could block adhesion, invasion and translocation of E. coli K1 to Caco-2 monolayer via up-regulating mucin production and maintaining intestinal integrity. In vivo experiments revealed that pre-treatment with LCS significantly decrease susceptibility of neonatal rats to oral E. coli K1 infection as reflected by reduced bacterial intestinal colonization, translocation, dissemination and systemic infections. Further, we found that LCS treated neonatal rats have higher intestinal expressions of Ki67, MUC2, ZO-1, IgA, mucin and lower barrier permeability than those in untreated rats. These results indicated that LCS could enhance neonatal resistance to systemic E. coli K1 infection via promoting maturation of neonatal intestinal defense. In conclusions, our findings suggested that LCS has a prophylactic effect against systemic E. coli K1 infection in neonates. Future studies aimed at identifying the specific active ingredients in LCS will be helpful in developing effective pharmacological strategies for preventing neonatal E. coli K1 infection.

  13. Drug Transporters in the Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    and exemplify their roles in drug absorption/exsorption and in drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Although focus in the present Chapter is on DTs that are mentioned in American and European regulatory guidances, the intestinal transporters for nutrients and endogens (endogenous compounds) are also briefly...... that may impact drug absorption. Thus absorptive transporters may facilitate BA of APIs that are substrates/victims for the transporters and have permeability-limited absorption, i.e. those that are classified in the biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) Class 3 and 4. On the other hand, exsorptive...... transporters may restrict BA of APIs that are victims for these efflux transporters, especially those APIs classified to have solubility-limited absorption, i.e. compounds in BCS Class 2 and 4. The aim of the present Chapter is to review drug transporters (DTs) present within the intestine and to discuss...

  14. The mechanisms responsible for garlic - drug interactions and their in vivo relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berginc, Katja; Kristl, Albin

    2013-01-01

    Garlic phytochemicals and garlic supplements influence the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior of concomitantly ingested drugs. In this paper we have summarized the mechanisms responsible for first-pass intestinal pharmacokinetic interactions by investigating the intestinal permeability of some cardiovascular, antiviral drugs, their transport with hepatic transporters and CYP3A4 metabolism. Transporter-enzyme interplay was studied with several in vitro models of varying complexity: rat small intestine and Caco-2 cell monolayers were used in studies of intestinal processes, and hepatic pharmacokinetics was monitored in HepG2 cells, isolated rat hepatocytes and rat liver slices. Garlic phytochemicals from aged garlic extract modified the activities of secretory and absorptive transporters in both intestine and liver and competitively inhibited CYP3A4 enzyme. The increased activities of the most important intestinal efflux (P-glycoprotein - Pgp, Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein 2 - MRP-2, Breast Cancer Resistance Protein - BCRP) and uptake (MonoCarboxylate Transporter 1 - MCT1, Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide - OATP, Peptide transporter 1 - PepT1) transporters were caused by changes in electrophysiological membrane properties and by allosteric modifications. Because clinical studies investigating interactions between garlic and human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors saquinavir and ritonavir have already been performed, we used these in vivo data to evaluate the in vitro results and the reliability of the models employed as screening tools for forecasting the potential of first-pass intestinal metabolism changes. We also assessed the probability of pharmacokinetic interactions with garlic of the novel drug darunavir and other cardiovascular drugs. Finally, selected garlic phytochemicals were tested for their ability to influence P-glycoprotein and CYP3A4 activities.

  15. Enterohemorrhagic E. coli alters murine intestinal epithelial tight junction protein expression and barrier function in Shiga toxin independent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxas, Jennifer Lising; Koutsouris, Athanasia; Bellmeyer, Amy; Tesfay, Samuel; Royan, Sandhya; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; Harris, Antoneicka; Cheng, Hao; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Hecht, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is implicated in the development of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome, but early symptoms of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infection such as non-bloody diarrhea may be Stx-independent. In this study, we defined the effects of EHEC, in the absence of Stx, on the intestinal epithelium using a murine model. EHEC colonization of intestines from two groups of antibiotic-free and streptomycin-treated C57Bl/6J mice were characterized and compared. EHEC colonized the cecum and colon more efficiently than the ileum in both groups; however, greater amounts of tissue-associated EHEC were detected in streptomycin-pretreated mice. Imaging of intestinal tissues of mice infected with bioluminescent EHEC further confirmed tight association of the bacteria to the cecum and colon. Greater numbers of EHEC were also cultured from stool of streptomycin-pretreated mice, as compared to those that received no antibiotic. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that EHEC infection leads to microvillous effacement of mouse colonocytes. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of colonic tissues of infected mice revealed a slight increase in the number of lamina propria polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Transmucosal electrical resistance, a measure of epithelial barrier function, was reduced in colonic tissues of infected animals. Increased mucosal permeability to 4KDa FITC-Dextran was also observed in colonic tissues of infected mice. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that EHEC infection resulted in redistribution of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-3 and increased expression of claudin-2 while ZO-1 localization remained unaltered. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that EHEC altered mRNA transcription of Ocln, Cldn2 and Cldn3. Most notably, claudin-2 expression was significantly increased and correlated with increased intestinal permeability. Our data indicate that C57Bl/6J mice serve as an in vivo model to study the physiological

  16. Enterohemorrhagic E. coli alters murine intestinal epithelial tight junction protein expression and barrier function in a Shiga toxin independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxas, Jennifer L; Koutsouris, Athanasia; Bellmeyer, Amy; Tesfay, Samuel; Royan, Sandhya; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; Harris, Antoneicka; Cheng, Hao; Rhee, Ki Jong; Hecht, Gail

    2010-08-01

    in vivo model to study the physiological effects of EHEC infection on the intestinal epithelium and suggest that altered transcription of TJ proteins has a role in the increase in intestinal permeability.

  17. Myosin light chain kinase mediates intestinal barrier dysfunction via occludin endocytosis during anoxia/reoxygenation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Younggeon; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2016-12-01

    Intestinal anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) injury induces loss of barrier function followed by epithelial repair. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has been shown to alter barrier function via regulation of interepithelial tight junctions, but has not been studied in intestinal A/R injury. We hypothesized that A/R injury would disrupt tight junction barrier function via MLCK activation and myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. Caco-2BBe1 monolayers were subjected to anoxia for 2 h followed by reoxygenation in 21% O 2 , after which barrier function was determined by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran flux. Tight junction proteins and MLCK signaling were assessed by Western blotting, real-time PCR, or immunofluorescence microscopy. The role of MLCK was further investigated with select inhibitors (ML-7 and peptide 18) by using in vitro and ex vivo models. Following A/R injury, there was a significant increase in paracellular permeability compared with control cells, as determined by TER and dextran fluxes (P endocytosis caused by A/R injury. Application of MLCK inhibitors to ischemia-injured porcine ileal mucosa induced significant increases in TER and reduced mucosal-to-serosal fluxes of 3 H-labeled mannitol. These data suggest that MLCK-induced occludin endocytosis mediates intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction during A/R injury. Our results also indicate that MLCK-dependent occludin regulation may be a target for the therapeutic treatment of ischemia/reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Relative permeability through fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  19. Acamprosate permeability across Caco-2 cell monolayer is predominantly paracellular

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonescu, Irina-Elena; Steffansen, Bente

    /MS-MS. For the neutral paracellular marker [14C]-mannitol, which has a very similar molecular radius compared to acamprosate, the Papp, exp was measured in parallel. The experimental value for acamprosate was then compared to a mechanistically modelled Caco-2 apparent permeability, Papp, calc. Papp, calc...... effective permeability of acamprosate, which is fully ionized in vivo (pKa 1.83; molecular weight 181.2 g/mol), is predominantly paracellular (Ppara) or is transcellularly mediated by solute carriers (Ptrans). Aim. The overall aim was to get a better insight on the contribution of Ppara and Ptrans...... to the overall acamprosate apparent permeability. Methods. Acamprosate apparent permeability (Papp, exp) was determined across Caco-2 monolayers in the apical-to-basolateral transport direction using a buffer pH of 7.4 and several cell passages (N). Acamprosate concentrations were quantified by LC...

  20. Ultrathin Alumina Membranes as Scaffold for Epithelial Cell Culture from the Intestine of Rainbow Trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieschner, Carolin; Minghetti, Matteo; Wu, Songmei; Renaud, Philippe; Schirmer, Kristin

    2017-03-22

    Permeable membranes are indispensable for in vitro epithelial barrier models. However, currently available polymer-based membranes are low in porosity and relatively thick, resulting in a limited permeability and unrealistic culture conditions. In this study, we developed an ultrathin, nanoporous alumina membrane as novel cell culture interface for vertebrate cells, with focus on the rainbow trout (Onchorynchus mykiss) intestinal cell line RTgutGC. The new type of membrane is framed in a silicon chip for physical support and has a thickness of only 1 μm, with a porosity of 15% and homogeneous nanopores (Ø = 73 ± 21 nm). Permeability rates for small molecules, namely lucifer yellow, dextran 40, and bovine serum albumin, exceeded those of standard polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes by up to 27 fold. With the final goal to establish a representative model of the fish intestine for environmental toxicology, we engineered a simple culture setup, capable of testing the cellular response toward chemical exposure. Herein, cells were cultured in a monolayer on the alumina membranes and formed a polarized epithelium with apical expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 within 14 days. Impedance spectroscopy, a noninvasive and real time electrical measurement, was used to determine cellular resistance during epithelial layer formation and chemical exposure to evaluate barrier functionality. Resistance values during epithelial development revealed different stages of epithelial maturity and were comparable with the in vivo situation. During chemical exposure, cellular resistance changed immediately when barrier tightness or cell viability was affected. Thus, our study demonstrates nanoporous alumina membranes as promising novel interface for alternative in vitro approaches, capable of allowing cell culture in a physiologically realistic manner and enabling high quality microscopy and sensitive measurement of cellular resistance.

  1. Permeability measuremens of brazilian Eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Rogério da Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The permeability of Brazilian Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora wood was measured in a custom build gas analysis chamber in order to determine which species could be successfully treated with preservatives. Liquid permeability was tested using an emulsion of Neen oil and a control of distillated water. Air was used to test the gas phase permeability. For both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora, the longitudinal permeability of gas was shown to be about twice as great as the liquid phase permeability. No radial permeability was observed for either wood. The permeability of air and water through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was greater than that through the sapwood of Eucalyptus citriodora. The permeability of neen oil preservative through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was also greater than through the sapwood of E. Citradora, but the difference was not statistically significant. Scanning Electron Microscopy images showed that the distribution and obstruction in the vessels could be correlated with observed permeability properties. Irrespective of the causes of differences in permeability between the species, the fluid phase flux through the sapwood of both species was significant, indicating that both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora could be successfully treated with wood preservative.

  2. pH-induced proton permeability changes of plasma membrane vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H; Prins, HBA; Staal, H.

    In vivo studies with leaf cells of aquatic plant species such as Elodea nuttallii revealed the proton permeability and conductance of the plasma membrane to be strongly pH dependent. The question was posed if similar pH dependent permeability changes also occur in isolated plasma membrane vesicles.

  3. Acute gastrointestinal permeability responses to different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smecuol, E; Bai, J; Sugai, E; Vazquez, H; Niveloni, S; Pedreira, S; Maurino, E; Meddings, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause gastrointestinal damage both in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. New anti-inflammatory drugs have been developed in an attempt to improve their gastrointestinal side effect profile. Our objective was to compare the effect on gastrointestinal permeability of acute equieffective doses of four different NSAIDs; three were designed to reduce gastrointestinal mucosal injury.
MATERIALS—Healthy volunteers underwent sugar tests in a randomised fashion, 15 days apart, at: (1) baseline; (2) after two days of 75 mg slow release (microspheres) indomethacin; (3) after two days of 7.5 mg oral meloxicam which preferentially inhibits cyclooxygenase 2; and (4) after two days of 750 mg naproxen. A subgroup of subjects was tested after two days of 200 mg celecoxib. In each test, subjects ingested a solution containing sucrose, lactulose, and mannitol and sucralose, to evaluate gastroduodenal, intestinal, and colonic permeability, respectively.
RESULTS—Gastric permeability was significantly affected by naproxen (psucralose, was not significantly increased by any of the four drugs.
CONCLUSION—Our study provides evidence that the newly developed NSAIDs reduce gastric mucosal permeability significantly. However, most produced significant alteration of small intestinal permeability. In contrast, our results suggest that celecoxib seems to exhibit the most desirable gastrointestinal side effect profile.


Keywords: permeability; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; celecoxib; meloxican; small intestine; gastric injury PMID:11600467

  4. Low Permeability Polyimide Insulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Resodyn Technologies proposes a new technology that enables the application of polyimide based cryogenic insulation with low hydrogen permeability. This effort...

  5. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N. D.; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement.

  6. Transcriptome changes during intestinal cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadjali, Mehrdad; Seidelin, Jakob B; Olsen, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    by a general down-regulation of genes in the low abundance class. Similar results were found using mouse small intestinal crypt and villus cells, suggesting that the phenomenon also occurs in the intestine in vivo. The expression data were subsequently used in a search for markers for subsets of epithelial...... cells by performing reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction on RNA extracted from laser dissected intestinal crypt and villi. In a screen of eight transcripts one - SART3 - was identified as a marker for human colonic crypts....

  7. Autophagy and tight junction proteins in the intestine and intestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-An A. Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium (IE forms an indispensible barrier and interface between the intestinal interstitium and the luminal environment. The IE regulates water, ion and nutrient transport while providing a barrier against toxins, pathogens (bacteria, fungi and virus and antigens. The apical intercellular tight junctions (TJ are responsible for the paracellular barrier function and regulate trans-epithelial flux of ions and solutes between adjacent cells. Increased intestinal permeability caused by defects in the IE TJ barrier is considered an important pathogenic factor for the development of intestinal inflammation, diarrhea and malnutrition in humans and animals. In fact, defects in the IE TJ barrier allow increased antigenic penetration, resulting in an amplified inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, necrotizing enterocolitis and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Conversely, the beneficial enhancement of the intestinal TJ barrier has been shown to resolve intestinal inflammation and apoptosis in both animal models of IBD and human IBD. Autophagy (self-eating mechanism is an intracellular lysosome-dependent degradation and recycling pathway essential for cell survival and homeostasis. Dysregulated autophagy has been shown to be directly associated with many pathological processes, including IBD. Importantly, the crosstalk between IE TJ and autophagy has been revealed recently. We showed that autophagy enhanced IE TJ barrier function by increasing transepithelial resistance and reducing the paracellular permeability of small solutes and ions, which is, in part, by targeting claudin-2, a cation-selective, pore-forming, transmembrane TJ protein, for lysosome (autophagy-mediated degradation. Interestingly, previous studies have shown that the inflamed intestinal mucosa in patients with active IBD has increased claudin-2 expression. In addition, inflammatory cytokines (for example, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6

  8. Intestinal myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U S Udgaonkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intestinal myiasis is a condition when the fly larvae inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are passed out in faeces. This type of infestation results when eggs or larvae of the fly, deposited on food are inadvertently taken by man. They survive the unfavourable conditions within the gastrointestinal tract and produce disturbances, which may vary from mild to severe. The condition is not uncommon and is often misdiagnosed as pinworm infestation. Correct diagnosis by the clinical microbiologist is important to avoid unnecessary treatment. Materials and Methods: We had 7 cases of intestinal myiasis. In 2 cases the larvae were reared to adult fly in modified meat and sand medium (developed by Udgaonkar. This medium is simple and can be easily prepared in the laboratory. Results: Of the 7 larvae, 5 were Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, 1 Megaselia species and 1 was identified as Muscina stabulans. Conclusions: S. haemorrhoidalis was the commonest maggot involved. A high index of suspicion is required for clinical diagnosis when the patient complains of passing wriggling worms in faeces for a long period without any response to antihelminthics. The reason for long duration of illness and recurrence of infestation is baffling. The nearest to cure was colonic wash. We feel prevention is of utmost importance, which is to avoid eating food articles with easy access to flies.

  9. Transverse permeability of woven fabrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Akkerman, Remko; Loendersloot, Richard; van den Berg, S.

    2008-01-01

    The transverse permeability is an essential input in describing the consolidation process of CETEX® laminates. A two-dimensional, finite difference based, Stokes flow solver has been developed to determine the mesoscopic permeability of arbitrary fabric structures. The use of a multigrid solver

  10. Intestinal surfactant permeation enhancers and their interaction with enterocyte cell membranes in a mucosal explant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal permeation enhancers (PEs) are agents aimed to improve oral delivery of therapeutic drugs with poor bioavailability. The main permeability barrier for oral delivery is the intestinal epithelium, and PEs act to increase the paracellular and/or transcellular passage of drugs. Transcellular...

  11. Lactulose as a marker of intestinal barrier function in pigs after weaning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijtten, P.J.A.; Verstijnen, J.J.; Kempen, van T.A.T.G.; Perdok, H.B.; Gort, G.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function in pigs after weaning is almost exclusively determined in terminal experiments with Ussing chambers. Alternatively, the recovery in urine of orally administered lactulose can be used to assess intestinal permeability in living animals. This experiment was designed to

  12. Effects of Supernatants from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii on Intestinal Epithelial Cells and a Rat Model of 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanru; Jatmiko, Yoga D; Bastian, Susan E P; Mashtoub, Suzanne; Howarth, Gordon S

    2017-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (Fp) and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) are probiotics, which have been reported to ameliorate certain gastrointestinal disorders. We evaluated the effects of supernatants (SN) derived from Fp and EcN on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-treated intestinal cells and in a rat model of mucositis. In vitro: IEC-6, Caco-2, and T-84 cells were analyzed for viability and monolayer permeability. In vivo: Female dark agouti rats were gavaged with Fp or EcN SN and injected intraperitoneally with saline (control) or 5-FU to induce mucositis. Rats were euthanized and intestinal tissues collected for myeloperoxidase assay and histological analyses. In vitro: Caco-2 cell viability was further reduced when treated with Fp SN + 5-FU compared to 5-FU controls. In both Caco-2 and T-84 cells, Fp SN partially prevented the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) caused by 5-FU administration. In vivo: 5-FU-injected rats administered Fp SN or EcN SN partly prevented body weight loss and normalized water intake compared to 5-FU controls. These results suggest a growth inhibitory mechanism of Fp SN action on transformed epithelial cells that could be mediated by effects on tight junctions. Factors derived from Fp SN and EcN SN could have a role in reducing the severity of intestinal mucositis.

  13. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  14. In vitro methods to study intestinal drug metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Kerkhof, Esther G.; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2007-01-01

    Although the liver has long been thought to play the major role in drug metabolism, also the metabolic capacity of the intestine is more and more recognized. In vivo studies eventually pointed out not only the significance of first-pass metabolism by the intestinal wall for the bioavailability of

  15. A functional CFTR assay using primary cystic fibrosis intestinal organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, J.F.; Wiegerinck, C.L.; de Jonge, H.R.; Bronsveld, I.; Janssens, H.M.; de Winter-de Groot, K.M.; Brandsma, A.M.; de Jong, N.W.; Bijvelds, M.J.; Scholte, B.J.; Nieuwenhuis, E.E.; van den Brink, S.; Clevers, H.; van der Ent, C.K.; Middendorp, S.; Beekman, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    We recently established conditions allowing for long-term expansion of epithelial organoids from intestine, recapitulating essential features of the in vivo tissue architecture. Here we apply this technology to study primary intestinal organoids of people suffering from cystic fibrosis, a disease

  16. Intestinal cell barrier function in vitro is severely compromised by keratin 8 and 18 mutations identified in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Tina; Stojan, Jure; Lane, Ellen Birgitte; Komel, Radovan; Bedina-Zavec, Apolonija; Liovic, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    Keratin 8 and 18 (K8/K18) mutations have been implicated in the aetiology of certain pathogenic processes of the liver and pancreas. While some K8 mutations (K8 G62C, K8 K464N) are also presumed susceptibility factors for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the only K18 mutation (K18 S230T) discovered so far in an IBD patient is thought to be a polymorphism. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that these mutations might also directly affect intestinal cell barrier function. Cell monolayers of genetically engineered human colonocytes expressing these mutations were tested for permeability, growth rate and resistance to heat-stress. We also calculated the change in dissociation constant (Kd, measure of affinity) each of these mutations introduces into the keratin protein, and present the first model of a keratin dimer L12 region with in silico clues to how the K18 S230T mutation may affect keratin function. Physiologically, these mutations cause up to 30% increase in paracellular permeability in vitro. Heat-stress induces little keratin clumping but instead cell monolayers peel off the surface suggesting a problem with cell junctions. K18 S230T has pronounced pathological effects in vitro marked by high Kd, low growth rate and increased permeability. The latter may be due to the altered distribution of tight junction components claudin-4 and ZO-1. This is the first time intestinal cells have been suggested also functionally impaired by K8/K18 mutations. Although an in vitro colonocyte model system does not completely mimic the epithelial lining of the intestine, nevertheless the data suggest that K8/K18 mutations may be also able to produce a phenotype in vivo.

  17. Intestinal cell barrier function in vitro is severely compromised by keratin 8 and 18 mutations identified in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Zupancic

    Full Text Available Keratin 8 and 18 (K8/K18 mutations have been implicated in the aetiology of certain pathogenic processes of the liver and pancreas. While some K8 mutations (K8 G62C, K8 K464N are also presumed susceptibility factors for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, the only K18 mutation (K18 S230T discovered so far in an IBD patient is thought to be a polymorphism. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that these mutations might also directly affect intestinal cell barrier function. Cell monolayers of genetically engineered human colonocytes expressing these mutations were tested for permeability, growth rate and resistance to heat-stress. We also calculated the change in dissociation constant (Kd, measure of affinity each of these mutations introduces into the keratin protein, and present the first model of a keratin dimer L12 region with in silico clues to how the K18 S230T mutation may affect keratin function. Physiologically, these mutations cause up to 30% increase in paracellular permeability in vitro. Heat-stress induces little keratin clumping but instead cell monolayers peel off the surface suggesting a problem with cell junctions. K18 S230T has pronounced pathological effects in vitro marked by high Kd, low growth rate and increased permeability. The latter may be due to the altered distribution of tight junction components claudin-4 and ZO-1. This is the first time intestinal cells have been suggested also functionally impaired by K8/K18 mutations. Although an in vitro colonocyte model system does not completely mimic the epithelial lining of the intestine, nevertheless the data suggest that K8/K18 mutations may be also able to produce a phenotype in vivo.

  18. Larazotide acetate regulates epithelial tight junctions in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Shobha; Durai, Malarvizhi; Kitchens, Kelly; Tamiz, Amir P; Somerville, Robert; Ginski, Mark; Paterson, Blake M; Murray, Joseph A; Verdu, Elena F; Alkan, Sefik S; Pandey, Niranjan B

    2012-05-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) control paracellular permeability and apical-basolateral polarity of epithelial cells, and can be regulated by exogenous and endogenous stimuli. Dysregulated permeability is associated with pathological conditions, such as celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Herein we studied the mechanism by which larazotide acetate, an 8-mer peptide and TJ regulator, inhibits the cellular changes elicited by gliadin fragments, AT-1002, and cytokines. Previously, we demonstrated that AT-1002, a 6-mer peptide derived from the Vibrio cholerae zonula occludens toxin ZOT, caused several biochemical changes in IEC6 and Caco-2 cells resulting in decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increased TJ permeability. In this study, larazotide acetate inhibited the redistribution and rearrangement of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and actin caused by AT-1002 and gliadin fragments in Caco-2 and IEC6 cells. Functionally, larazotide acetate inhibited the AT-1002-induced TEER reduction and TJ opening in Caco-2 cells. Additionally, larazotide acetate inhibited the translocation of a gliadin 13-mer peptide, which has been implicated in celiac disease, across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Further, apically applied larazotide acetate inhibited the increase in TJ permeability elicited by basolaterally applied cytokines. Finally, when tested in vivo in gliadin-sensitized HLA-HCD4/DQ8 double transgenic mice, larazotide acetate inhibited gliadin-induced macrophage accumulation in the intestine and preserved normal TJ structure. Taken together, our data suggest that larazotide acetate inhibits changes elicited by AT-1002, gliadin, and cytokines in epithelial cells and preserves TJ structure and function in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment system for dioxin absorption in the small intestine and prevention of its absorption by food factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Yayoi; Satsu, Hideo; Kitamura, Kazushige; Okamoto, Naoto; Shimizu, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that 90% of the amount of dioxin in the whole body is absorbed orally with food. However, a concise and simple system to assess dioxin absorption in the small intestine has not yet been established. The present study reports a new in vitro assessment system for this purpose. A stable dioxin-responsive cell line was established by introducing a plasmid that incorporates a xenobiotic-responsive element upstream of the luciferase gene into human hepatic HepG2 genomic DNA. Dioxin was added to the apical side of differentiated human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell monolayers that had been cultured on a semipermeable membrane, and the basal medium was recovered after an appropriate incubation time. To the recovered medium was added dioxin-responsive HepG2, and a luciferase assay was performed. The established stable cell line clearly showed dose-and time-dependent response to dioxin. When a food factor such as chlorophyll, which has been reported to increase dioxin excretion in in vivo studies, was added with dioxin, a significant decrease in dioxin permeability to the Caco-2 monolayer was observed. This assessment system would be useful to search for those food factors that could prevent dioxin absorption in the small intestine.

  20. Pneumatose intestinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Veloso

    Full Text Available Pneumatosis Intestinalis (PI is the presence of gas-filled cysts within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT. It is a clinical and/or radiological sign associated with a wide spectrum of diseases, so that it has a variable clinical significance. Probably, its prevalence is increasing. The nature of the diseases causing PI is been modifying in last decades. Peptic ulcers were its main cause in the past. Nowadays, probably, immunosuppressive conditions and states of increased permeability of the GIT mucosa (AIDS, transplanted patients or in chemotherapy, etc are more common causes. PI can be shown on simple abdominal roentgenograms and computed tomographic scans obtained with lung windows. Its diagnosis include definition of the cause in addition to its presence. The treatment should be directed to the cause of the PI, fluctuating from expectant to emergency laparotomy. The present report is a contribution to the limited literature experience in this topic and calls attention to the importance of recognizing PI and its clinical significance in order to define the right conduct.

  1. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  2. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase deficiency leads to dysbiosis and bacterial translocation in the newborn intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawley, Jason; Koehler, Shannon; Cabrera, Susan; Lam, Vy; Fredrich, Katherine; Hessner, Martin; Salzman, Nita; Gourlay, David

    2017-10-01

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) has been shown to help maintain intestinal homeostasis. Decreased expression of IAP has been linked with pediatric intestinal diseases associated with bacterial overgrowth and subsequent inflammation. We hypothesize that the absence of IAP leads to dysbiosis, with increased inflammation and permeability of the newborn intestine. Sprague-Dawley heterozygote IAP cross-matches were bred. Pups were dam fed ad lib and euthanized at weaning. The microbiotas of terminal ileum (TI) and colon was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) of subphylum-specific bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA. RT-PCR was performed on TI for inflammatory cytokines. Intestinal permeability was quantified by fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran permeability and bacterial translocation by qRT-PCR for bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA in mesenteric lymph nodes. Statistical analysis was done by chi-square analysis. All three genotypes had similar concentrations of bacteria in the TI and colon. However, IAP knockout (IAP-KO) had significantly decreased diversity of bacterial species in their colonic stool compared with heterozygous and wild-type (WT). IAP-KO pups had a nonstatistically significant 3.9-fold increased inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA expression compared with WT (IAP-KO, 3.92 ± 1.36; WT, 1.0 ± 0.27; P = 0.03). IAP-KO also had significantly increased bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes occurred in IAP-KO (IAP-KO, 7625 RFU/g ± 3469; WT, 4957 RFU/g ± 1552; P = 0.04). Furthermore, IAP-KO had increased permeability (IAP-KO, 0.297 mg/mL ± 0.2; WT, 0.189 mg/mL ± 0.15 P = 0.07), but was not statistically significant. Deficiency of IAP in the newborn intestine is associated with dysbiosis and increased inflammation, permeability, and bacterial translocation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  4. Artemisinin permeability via Caco-2 cells increases after simulated digestion of Artemisia annua leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Matthew R; Weathers, Pamela J

    2018-01-10

    Artemisia annua has been used for > 2000yrs to treat fever and is more recently known for producing the important antimalarial drug, artemisinin. Artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) are effective for treating malaria, but are often unavailable to those in need. Dried leaves of A. annua (DLA) have recently been studied as a cost effective alternative to traditional ACTs. DLA was shown to dramatically increase oral bioavailability compared to pure artemisinin, so more investigation into the mechanisms causing this increased bioavailability is needed. In this study, we used a simulated digestion system coupled with Caco-2 cell permeability assays to investigate the intestinal permeability of DLA compared to pure artemisinin. We also determined the effects of different phytochemicals (7 flavonoids, 3 monoterpenes, 2 phenolic acids, scopoletin and inulin) and the cytochrome P450 isoform CYP3A4 on artemisinin intestinal permeability. Artemisinin permeability, when delivered as digested DLA, significantly increased by 37% (Papp = 8.03 × 10-5cms-1) compared to pure artemisinin (Papp = 5.03 × 10-5cms-1). However, none of the phytochemicals tested or CYP3A4 had any significant effect on the intestinal permeability of artemisinin. We also showed that essential oil derived from A. annua negatively affected the intestinal permeability of artemisinin, but only after simulated digestion. Finally, we showed that A. annua essential oil reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 monolayers, but only in the presence of bile. Although also reduced by essential oils, artemisinin Papp subsequently recovered in the presence of plant matrix. These results shed light on the mechanisms by which DLA enhances the oral bioavailability of artemisinin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Intestinal microbiota].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Horacio Joaquín; Menezes, Maria Elisabeth; d'Acâmpora, Armando José

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulative evidence on the multiple functions of the intestinal microflora in relation to the homeostasis of the host. At first considered as a simple mutualism, today this relationship proves to be essential to the health and to pathologic processes, particularly metabolic (eg, obesity) and gastrointestinal (eg, inflammatory bowel disease and functional disorders). The first studies were conducted on the microbiota from fecal material cultured anaerobically. With the advent of molecular biology, it has become possible to determine qualitative and quantitatively the dominant, subdominant and transients species. In recent years, there were advances in the understanding of the relationship betwen the microbiota and the host, as well as among the microorganisms in their respective niches. These advances result from translational integration of microbiology with specialities such as molecular biology, cell phisiology, immunology and ecology. There are few studies on the spatial distribution of the microflora in the gut. Unravelling the topography of the microflora in mammals is a way to validate new animal models for the study of microflora.

  6. Permeability theory and Palace Athena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamps, Arthur E

    2013-06-01

    Permeability theory suggests that safety in environments depends on how far and how easily one can perceive or move through environments. Parts of environments that limit perception or retard locomotion elicit impressions of being enclosed, so properties of environments that influence perceived enclosure are important in permeability theory. One prediction of permeability theory is that the more permeable the boundary, the less enclosed the region within that boundary will seem to be. Another prediction is that boundary depth will have little influence on perceived enclosure. These predictions were tested in the venue of Greek temples. 30 participants were tested (14 men, 16 women; M age = 40 yr.), who rated perceived enclosure for 18 stimuli. The stimuli were constructed using a virtual scene from the Tholos in Delphi with the positions of the columns forming the boundaries. The boundaries were designed to have different levels of permeability and depth. Data were analyzed in terms of effect sizes and focused comparisons. Results indicated that perceived enclosure was most strongly influenced by the visual permeability of the boundary, while depth of boundary had a much smaller effect on perceived enclosure.

  7. Differential expression and novel permeability properties of three aquaporin 8 paralogs from seawater-challenged Atlantic salmon smolts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Morten Buch; Chauvigné, François; Christensen, Birgitte Mønster

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins may facilitate transepithelial water absorption in the intestine of seawater (SW) acclimated fish. Here we have characterized three full-length aqp8 paralogs from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Bayesian inference revealed that each paralog is a representative of the three major classes...... of aqp8aa, aqp8ab and aqp8b genes found in other teleosts. The permeability properties were studied by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and the expression levels examined by qPCR, immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy, and immunoblotting of membrane fractions from intestines...... of SW challenged smolts. All three Aqp8 paralogs were permeable to water and urea, whereas Aqp8ab and -8b were, surprisingly, also permeable to glycerol. The mRNA tissue distribution of each paralog was distinct although some tissues, such as the intestine showed redundant expression of more than one...

  8. Effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction integrity: in vitro study in a three dimensional intestinal epithelial cell culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhaseen Elamin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal barrier dysfunction and translocation of endotoxins are involved in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Exposure to ethanol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde at relatively high concentrations have been shown to disrupt intestinal epithelial tight junctions in the conventional two dimensional cell culture models. The present study investigated quantitatively and qualitatively the effects of ethanol at concentrations detected in the blood after moderate ethanol consumption, of its metabolite acetaldehyde and of the combination of both compounds on intestinal barrier function in a three-dimensional cell culture model. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Caco-2 cells were grown in a basement membrane matrix (Matrigel™ to induce spheroid formation and were then exposed to the compounds at the basolateral side. Morphological differentiation of the spheroids was assessed by immunocytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. The barrier function was assessed by the flux of FITC-labeled dextran from the basal side into the spheroids' luminal compartment using confocal microscopy. Caco-2 cells grown on Matrigel assembled into fully differentiated and polarized spheroids with a central lumen, closely resembling enterocytes in vivo and provide an excellent model to study epithelial barrier functionality. Exposure to ethanol (10-40 mM or acetaldehyde (25-200 µM for 3 h, dose-dependently and additively increased the paracellular permeability and induced redistribution of ZO-1 and occludin without affecting cell viability or tight junction-encoding gene expression. Furthermore, ethanol and acetaldehyde induced lysine residue and microtubules hyperacetylation. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that ethanol at concentrations found in the blood after moderate drinking and acetaldehyde, alone and in combination, can increase the intestinal epithelial permeability. The data also point to the involvement of protein hyperacetylation in

  9. Rapamycin-induced autophagy restricts porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infectivity in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seongyeol; Gu, Min Jeong; Kim, Cheol Gyun; Kye, Yoon Chul; Lim, Younggap; Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Byung-Chul; Chu, Hyuk; Han, Seung Hyun; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2017-10-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) invades porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and causes diarrhea and dehydration in pigs. In the present study, we showed a suppression of PEDV infection in porcine jejunum intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) by an increase in autophagy. Autophagy was activated by rapamycin at a dose that does not affect cell viability and tight junction permeability. The induction of autophagy was examined by LC3I/LC3II conversion. To confirm the autophagic-flux (entire autophagy pathway), autophagolysosomes were examined by an immunofluorescence assay. Pre-treatment with rapamycin significantly restricted not only a 1 h infection but also a longer infection (24 h) with PEDV, while this effect disappeared when autophagy was blocked. Co-localization of PEDV and autophagosomes suggests that PEDV could be a target of autophagy. Moreover, alleviation of PEDV-induced cell death in IPEC-J2 cells pretreated with rapamycin demonstrates a protective effect of rapamycin against PEDV-induced epithelial cell death. Collectively, the present study suggests an early prevention against PEDV infection in IPEC-J2 cells via autophagy that might be an effective strategy for the restriction of PEDV, and opens up the possibility of the use of rapamycin in vivo as an effective prophylactic and prevention treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Proliposome powders for enhanced intestinal absorption and bioavailability of raloxifene hydrochloride: effect of surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpula, Ashok; Jukanti, Raju; Janga, Karthik Yadav; Sunkavalli, Sharath; Bandari, Suresh; Kandadi, Prabhakar; Veerareddy, Prabhakar Reddy

    2013-12-01

    The primary goal of the present study was to investigate the combined prospective of proliposomes and surface charge for the improved oral delivery of raloxifene hydrochloride (RXH). Keeping this objective, the present systematic study was focused to formulate proliposomes by varying the ratio of hydrogenated soyphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. Furthermore, to assess the role of surface charge on improved absorption of RXH, anionic and cationic vesicles were prepared using dicetyl phosphate and stearylamine, respectively. The formulations were characterized for size, zeta potential and entrapment efficiency. The improved dissolution characteristics assessed from dissolution efficiency, mean dissolution rate were higher for proliposome formulations. The solid state characterization studies indicate the transformation of native crystalline form of the drug to amorphous and/or molecular state. The higher effective permeability coefficient and fraction absorbed in humans extrapolated from in situ single-pass intestinal absorption study data in rats provide an insight on the potential of proliposomes and cationic surface charge for augment in absorption across gastro intestinal barrier. To draw the conclusions, in vivo pharmacokinetic study carried out in rats indicate a threefold enhancement in the rate and extent of absorption of RXH from cationic proliposome formulation which unfurl the potential of proliposomes and role of cationic charge for improved oral delivery of RXH.

  11. The permeability of heterogeneous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Darcy's original concept of permeability is largely associated with estimation of the hydraulic conductivity characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous porous media where the fluid flow characteristics can be estimated by appeal to a single scalar measure. Naturally occurring geomaterials are heterogeneous and the estimation of the effective permeability characteristics of such geomaterials presents a challenge not only in terms of the experimental procedures that should be used to ensure flow through the porous medium but also in the correct use of the theoretical concepts needed to accurately interpret the data. Relatively widely referred to rocks such as Indiana Limestone can exhibit spatial heterogeneity in the permeability characteristics even though the visual appearance can suggest the absence of such spatial and directional attributes (Selvadurai and Selvadurai, 2010). Argillaceous rocks such as the Cobourg Limestone found in southern Ontario, Canada can display hydraulic heterogeneity that is attributed to the presence of dolomitic and calcite nodular regions separated by calcite rock partings that contain an argillaceous component (Figure 1). Also, these rocks have extremely low permeability that requires the use of transient hydraulic pulse tests for the estimation of permeability. The performance of such pulse tests will be influenced by the bulk compressibility and bulk porosity of the porous skeleton consisting of the identifiable phases and their spatial distributions. The concepts of effective compressibilities and porosities therefore needs to be introduced if convenient procedures are to be developed for the accurate interpretation of even bench scale experiments (Selvadurai and Gɫowacki, 2017). The paper will describe both experimental and theoretical approaches for interpreting the effective Darcy permeability of the heterogeneous rocks using both experimental and computational approaches. In particular, the applicability of the "Geometric

  12. Acute high-intensity interval running increases markers of gastrointestinal damage and permeability but not gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Jamie N; Impey, Samuel G; Doran, Dominic A; Fleming, Simon C; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of high-intensity interval running on markers of gastrointestinal (GI) damage and permeability alongside subjective symptoms of GI discomfort. Eleven male runners completed an acute bout of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) (eighteen 400-m runs at 120% maximal oxygen uptake) where markers of GI permeability, intestinal damage, and GI discomfort symptoms were assessed and compared with resting conditions. Compared with rest, HIIT significantly increased serum lactulose/rhamnose ratio (0.051 ± 0.016 vs. 0.031 ± 0.021, p = 0.0047; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.006 to 0.036) and sucrose concentrations (0.388 ± 0.217 vs. 0.137 ± 0.148 mg·L -1 ; p HIIT and resting conditions. Plasma intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) was significantly increased (p HIIT whereas no changes were observed during rest. Mild symptoms of GI discomfort were reported immediately and at 24 h post-HIIT, although these symptoms did not correlate to GI permeability or I-FABP. In conclusion, acute HIIT increased GI permeability and intestinal I-FABP release, although these do not correlate with symptoms of GI discomfort. Furthermore, by using serum sampling, we provide data showing that it is possible to detect changes in intestinal permeability that is not observed using urinary sampling over a shorter time-period.

  13. Effects of Digested Onion Extracts on Intestinal Gene Expression: An Interspecies Comparison Using Different Intestine Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Nicole J W; Hulst, Marcel; Govers, Coen; van der Meulen, Jan; van Hoef, Angeline; Stoopen, Geert; Hamers, Astrid; Hoekman, Arjan; de Vos, Ric; Bovee, Toine F H; Smits, Mari; Mes, Jurriaan J; Hendriksen, Peter J M

    2016-01-01

    Human intestinal tissue samples are barely accessible to study potential health benefits of nutritional compounds. Numbers of animals used in animal trials, however, need to be minimalized. Therefore, we explored the applicability of in vitro (human Caco-2 cells) and ex vivo intestine models (rat precision cut intestine slices and the pig in-situ small intestinal segment perfusion (SISP) technique) to study the effect of food compounds. In vitro digested yellow (YOd) and white onion extracts (WOd) were used as model food compounds and transcriptomics was applied to obtain more insight into which extent mode of actions depend on the model. The three intestine models shared 9,140 genes which were used to compare the responses to digested onions between the models. Unsupervised clustering analysis showed that genes up- or down-regulated by WOd in human Caco-2 cells and rat intestine slices were similarly regulated by YOd, indicating comparable modes of action for the two onion species. Highly variable responses to onion were found in the pig SISP model. By focussing only on genes with significant differential expression, in combination with a fold change > 1.5, 15 genes showed similar onion-induced expression in human Caco-2 cells and rat intestine slices and 2 overlapping genes were found between the human Caco-2 and pig SISP model. Pathway analyses revealed that mainly processes related to oxidative stress, and especially the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway, were affected by onions in all three models. Our data fit with previous in vivo studies showing that the beneficial effects of onions are mostly linked to their antioxidant properties. Taken together, our data indicate that each of the in vitro and ex vivo intestine models used in this study, taking into account their limitations, can be used to determine modes of action of nutritional compounds and can thereby reduce the number of animals used in conventional nutritional intervention studies.

  14. Bentonite Permeability at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Daniels

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Repository designs frequently favour geological disposal of radioactive waste with a backfill material occupying void space around the waste. The backfill material must tolerate the high temperatures produced by decaying radioactive waste to prevent its failure or degradation, leading to increased hydraulic conductivity and reduced sealing performance. The results of four experiments investigating the effect of temperature on the permeability of a bentonite backfill are presented. Bentonite is a clay commonly proposed as the backfill in repository designs because of its high swelling capacity and very low permeability. The experiments were conducted in two sets of purpose-built, temperature controlled apparatus, designed to simulate isotropic pressure and constant volume conditions within the testing range of 4–6 MPa average effective stress. The response of bentonite during thermal loading at temperatures up to 200 °C was investigated, extending the previously considered temperature range. The results provide details of bentonite’s intrinsic permeability, total stress, swelling pressure and porewater pressure during thermal cycles. We find that bentonite’s hydraulic properties are sensitive to thermal loading and the type of imposed boundary condition. However, the permeability change is not large and can mostly be accounted for by water viscosity changes. Thus, under 150 °C, temperature has a minimal impact on bentonite’s hydraulic permeability.

  15. Probiotic Bacteria Induce Maturation of Intestinal Claudin 3 Expression and Barrier Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ravi M.; Myers, Loren S.; Kurundkar, Ashish R.; Maheshwari, Akhil; Nusrat, Asma; Lin, Patricia W.

    2012-01-01

    An immature intestinal epithelial barrier may predispose infants and children to many intestinal inflammatory diseases, such as infectious enteritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield insight into strategies to prevent these intestinal diseases. The claudin family of tight junction proteins plays an important role in regulating epithelial paracellular permeability. Previous reports demonstrate that rodent intestinal barrier function matures during the first 3 weeks of life. We show that murine paracellular permeability markedly decreases during postnatal maturation, with the most significant change occurring between 2 and 3 weeks. Here we report for the first time that commensal bacterial colonization induces intestinal barrier function maturation by promoting claudin 3 expression. Neonatal mice raised on antibiotics or lacking the toll-like receptor adaptor protein MyD88 exhibit impaired barrier function and decreased claudin 3 expression. Furthermore, enteral administration of either live or heat-killed preparations of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG accelerates intestinal barrier maturation and induces claudin 3 expression. However, live Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increases mortality. Taken together, these results support a vital role for intestinal flora in the maturation of intestinal barrier function. Probiotics may prevent intestinal inflammatory diseases by regulating intestinal tight junction protein expression and barrier function. The use of heat-killed probiotics may provide therapeutic benefit while minimizing adverse effects. PMID:22155109

  16. Intestinal lineage commitment of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li; Gibson, Jason D; Miyamoto, Shingo; Sail, Vibhavari; Verma, Rajeev; Rosenberg, Daniel W; Nelson, Craig E; Giardina, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Generating lineage-committed intestinal stem cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could provide a tractable experimental system for understanding intestinal differentiation pathways and may ultimately provide cells for regenerating damaged intestinal tissue. We tested a two-step differentiation procedure in which ESCs were first cultured with activin A to favor formation of definitive endoderm, and then treated with fibroblast-conditioned medium with or without Wnt3A. The definitive endoderm expressed a number of genes associated with gut-tube development through mouse embryonic day 8.5 (Sox17, Foxa2, and Gata4 expressed and Id2 silent). The intestinal stem cell marker Lgr5 gene was also activated in the endodermal cells, whereas the Msi1, Ephb2, and Dcamkl1 intestinal stem cell markers were not. Exposure of the endoderm to fibroblast-conditioned medium with Wnt3A resulted in the activation of Id2, the remaining intestinal stem cell markers and the later gut markers Cdx2, Fabp2, and Muc2. Interestingly, genes associated with distal gut-associated mesoderm (Foxf2, Hlx, and Hoxd8) were also simulated by Wnt3A. The two-step differentiation protocol generated gut bodies with crypt-like structures that included regions of Lgr5-expressing proliferating cells and regions of cell differentiation. These gut bodies also had a smooth muscle component and some underwent peristaltic movement. The ability of the definitive endoderm to differentiate into intestinal epithelium was supported by the vivo engraftment of these cells into mouse colonic mucosa. These findings demonstrate that definitive endoderm derived from ESCs can carry out intestinal cell differentiation pathways and may provide cells to restore damaged intestinal tissue. Copyright © 2010 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Critical role of P-selectin-dependent leukocyte recruitment in endotoxin-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Mangell, Peter; Röme, Andrada; Wang, Yusheng; Schramm, R; Jeppsson, Bengt; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To define the importance of leukocyte recruitment in endotoxin-induced gut permeability. Materials and methods: 31 male C57BL/6 mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Ileal permeability was measured in Ussing chambers and leukocyte-endothelium interactions studied with intravital fluorescence microscopy after 18 h. Results: LPS caused a clear-cut increase in leukocyte accumulation and intestinal permeability. Immunoneutralisation of P-selectin not only reduced leukocyt...

  18. Polyunsaturated fatty acids support epithelial barrier integrity and reduce IL-4 mediated permeability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Linette E M; Koetsier, Marleen A; Balvers, Martin; Beermann, Christopher; Stahl, Bernd; van Tol, Eric A F

    2008-06-01

    The intestinal mucosa functions as a barrier against harmful dietary and microbial antigens. An intact gut barrier forms a prerequisite for protection against infection and allergy. Both allergic and inflammatory mediators (e.g. IL-4, IFN-gamma) are known to compromise the epithelial barrier integrity by enhancing permeability. Breast milk provides protection against infection and allergy and contains polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Although PUFA are commonly used in infant formulas their effect on intestinal barrier is still poorly understood. Therefore the effects of distinct PUFA (n-6: LA, GLA, DGLA, AA; n-3: ALA, EPA, DHA) and a fat blend with PUFA composition similar to that of the human breast milk fat fraction, on barrier integrity were investigated. Human intestinal epithelial cells (T84) were pre-incubated with individual PUFA or a lipase treated fat blend, with or without subsequent IL-4 exposure. Barrier integrity was evaluated by measuring transepithelial resistance and permeability. Membrane phospholipid composition was determined by capillary gas chromatography. DGLA, AA, EPA, DHA and to a lesser extend GLA enhanced basal TER and strongly reduced IL-4 mediated permeability, while LA and ALA were ineffective. Furthermore, the lipase treated fat blend effectively supported barrier function. PUFA were incorporated in the membrane phospholipid fraction of T84 cells. Long chain PUFA DGLA, AA, EPA and DHA were particularly effective in supporting barrier integrity by improving resistance and reducing IL-4 mediated permeability. Fat blends that release specific PUFA upon digestion in the gastrointestinal tract may support natural resistance.

  19. Intestinal microbiome landscaping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Lahti, Leo; Smidt, Hauke; Vos, de Willem M.

    2017-01-01

    High individuality, large complexity and limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying human intestinal microbiome function remain the major challenges for designing beneficial modulation strategies. Exemplified by the analysis of intestinal bacteria in a thousand Western adults, we discuss

  20. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  1. Intestinal ischemia and infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/001151.htm Small intestinal ischemia and infarction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intestinal ischemia and infarction occurs when there is a narrowing or blockage ...

  2. PERMEABILITY OF BACTERIAL SPORES I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, S. H.; Gerhardt, Philipp

    1961-01-01

    Black, S. H. (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) and Philipp Gerhardt. Permeability of bacterial spores. I. Characterization of glucose uptake. J. Bacteriol. 82:743–749. 1961.—The total uptake of glucose by masses of clean, dormant spores was measured to assess their permeability. After correction for intercellular space, packed spores of Bacillus cereus strain terminalis were found in 87 determinations to be permeated by glucose to 40% of their weight. The glucose uptake was relatively independent of environmental variables, and thus was concluded to occur principally through a process of passive diffusion. PMID:13869665

  3. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh James; Nimmo, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia in the adult may be characterized as a disorder with dilated intestinal lacteals causing loss of lymph into the lumen of the small intestine and resultant hypoproteinemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia and reduced number of circulating lymphocytes or lymphopenia. Most often, intestinal lymphangiectasia has been recorded in children, often in neonates, usually with other congenital abnormalities but initial definition in adults including the elderly has bec...

  4. Factoring the intestinal microbiome into the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Albert J

    2016-11-14

    The intestinal microbiome is a reservoir of microbial antigens and activated immune cells. The aims of this review were to describe the role of the intestinal microbiome in generating innate and adaptive immune responses, indicate how these responses contribute to the development of systemic immune-mediated diseases, and encourage investigations that improve the understanding and management of autoimmune hepatitis. Alterations in the composition of the intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) can disrupt intestinal and systemic immune tolerances for commensal bacteria. Toll-like receptors within the intestine can recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns and shape subsets of T helper lymphocytes that may cross-react with host antigens (molecular mimicry). Activated gut-derived lymphocytes can migrate to lymph nodes, and gut-derived microbial antigens can translocate to extra-intestinal sites. Inflammasomes can form within hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells, and they can drive the pro-inflammatory, immune-mediated, and fibrotic responses. Diet, designer probiotics, vitamin supplements, re-colonization methods, antibiotics, drugs that decrease intestinal permeability, and molecular interventions that block signaling pathways may emerge as adjunctive regimens that complement conventional immunosuppressive management. In conclusion, investigations of the intestinal microbiome are warranted in autoimmune hepatitis and promise to clarify pathogenic mechanisms and suggest alternative management strategies.

  5. Antibiotics Suppress Activation of Intestinal Mucosal Mast Cells and Reduce Dietary Lipid Absorption in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hirokazu; Zhang, Linda S; Martinez, Kristina; Chang, Eugene B; Yang, Qing; Wang, Fei; Howles, Philip N; Hokari, Ryota; Miura, Soichiro; Tso, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    The gut microbiota affects intestinal permeability and mucosal mast cells (MMCs) responses. Activation of MMCs has been associated with absorption of dietary fat. We investigated whether the gut microbiota contributes to the fat-induced activation of MMCs in rats, and how antibiotics might affect this process. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were given streptomycin and penicillin for 4 days (n = 6-8) to reduce the abundance of their gut flora, or normal drinking water (controls, n = 6-8). They underwent lymph fistula surgery and after an overnight recovery were given an intraduodenal bolus of intralipid. We collected intestinal tissues and lymph fluid and assessed activation of MMCs, intestinal permeability, and fat transport parameters. Compared with controls, intestinal lymph from rats given antibiotics had reduced levels of mucosal mast cell protease II (produced by MMCs) and decreased activity of diamine oxidase (produced by enterocytes) (P antibiotics had reduced intestinal permeability in response to dietary lipid compared with controls (P antibiotics also reduced lymphatic transport of triacylglycerol and phospholipid (P antibiotics and controls. These effects were not seen with an acute dose of antibiotics or 4 weeks after the antibiotic regimen ended. The intestinal microbiota appears to activate MMCs after the ingestion of fat in rats; this contributes to fat-induced intestinal permeability. We found that the gut microbiome promotes absorption of lipid, probably by intestinal production of apolipoproteins and secretion of chylomicrons. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Is intestinal inflammation linking dysbiosis to gut barrier dysfunction during liver disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the intestinal microbiota composition contribute to the pathogenesis of many disorders including gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Recent studies have broadened our understanding of the “gut-liver” axis. Dietary changes, other environmental and genetic factors can lead to alterations in the microbiota. Dysbiosis can further disrupt the integrity of the intestinal barrier leading to pathological bacterial translocation and the initiation of an inflammatory response in the liver. In this article, the authors dissect the different steps involved in disease pathogenesis to further refine approaches for the medical management of liver diseases. The authors will specifically discuss the role of dysbiosis in inducing intestinal inflammation and increasing intestinal permeability. PMID:26088524

  7. Core–shell hybrid nanocapsules for oral delivery of camptothecin: formulation development, in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ünal, Hale, E-mail: unalhale@gmail.com [Hacettepe University, Division of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Institute of Pure and Applied Science (Turkey); D’Angelo, Ivana [Second University of Napoli, Di.S.T.A.Bi.F. (Italy); Pagano, Ester; Borrelli, Francesca; Izzo, Angelo; Ungaro, Francesca; Quaglia, Fabiana [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Pharmacy (Italy); Bilensoy, Erem [Hacettepe University, Division of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Institute of Pure and Applied Science (Turkey)

    2015-01-15

    The objective of this study was to design and in vitro–in vivo evaluate oral nanocapsules prepared from amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CDs) or poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) for the effective oral delivery of an anticancer agent, camptothecin (CPT). CPT-loaded anionic and Chitosan (CS)-coated cationic nanocapsules were prepared and characterized in vitro. Morphological analysis was performed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). CPT release profile was evaluated using dialysis method under sink conditions. To determine the protective effect and drug stability provided by nanocapsules, all the formulations were incubated in simulated gastrointestinal media. Measurement of mucoadhesive tendency of CPT-loaded nanocapsules was realized by turbidimetric method. Penetration of nanocapsules was performed through an artificial mucus model. The permeability of CPT in solution form and bound to nanocapsule formulations were demonstrated across Caco-2 cell line. Finally, the intestinal uptake of nanocapsules was evaluated in vivo, in a mouse model. Both anionic and cationic formulations were in the range of 180–220 nm with a narrow size distribution and desired zeta potential values. CPT-loaded nanocapsules were found to be stable in simulated gastrointestinal media. Turbidimetric measurements confirmed the interaction between nanoparticles and mucin. Penetration of CPT through an artificial mucus gel layer was higher with CS-coated nanocapsules in accordance with the results obtained from permeability studies across Caco-2 cell line. In vivo animal studies confirmed that the intestinal uptake of nanocapsules was significantly higher with cationic nanocapsules. CPT-loaded positively charged CD nanocapsules might be an attractive and promising treatment for oral chemotherapy.

  8. Methods to Study Epithelial Transport Protein Function and Expression in Native Intestine and Caco-2 Cells Grown in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anabazhagan, Arivarasu N; Chatterjee, Ishita; Priyamvada, Shubha; Kumar, Anoop; Tyagi, Sangeeta; Saksena, Seema; Alrefai, Waddah A; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Gill, Ravinder K

    2017-03-16

    The intestinal epithelium has important transport and barrier functions that play key roles in normal physiological functions of the body while providing a barrier to foreign particles. Impaired epithelial transport (ion, nutrient, or drugs) has been associated with many diseases and can have consequences that extend beyond the normal physiological functions of the transporters, such as by influencing epithelial integrity and the gut microbiome. Understanding the function and regulation of transport proteins is critical for the development of improved therapeutic interventions. The biggest challenge in the study of epithelial transport is developing a suitable model system that recapitulates important features of the native intestinal epithelial cells. Several in vitro cell culture models, such as Caco-2, T-84, and HT-29-Cl.19A cells are typically used in epithelial transport research. These cell lines represent a reductionist approach to modeling the epithelium and have been used in many mechanistic studies, including their examination of epithelial-microbial interactions. However, cell monolayers do not accurately reflect cell-cell interactions and the in vivo microenvironment. Cells grown in 3D have shown to be promising models for drug permeability studies. We show that Caco-2 cells in 3D can be used to study epithelial transporters. It is also important that studies in Caco-2 cells are complemented with other models to rule out cell specific effects and to take into account the complexity of the native intestine. Several methods have been previously used to assess the functionality of transporters, such as everted sac and uptake in isolated epithelial cells or in isolated plasma membrane vesicles. Taking into consideration the challenges in the field with respect to models and the measurement of transport function, we demonstrate here a protocol to grow Caco-2 cells in 3D and describe the use of an Ussing chamber as an effective approach to measure serotonin

  9. The permeability of oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánóczy, Jolán; Squier, Christopher A; Kremer, Mary; Wertz, Philip W; Kövesi, György; Szende, Béla; Dombi, Csaba

    2003-08-01

    The significant increase in oral cancer mortality necessitates further research on the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. It was the aim of this study to compare the permeability, lipid composition and histopathological characteristics of oral leukoplakia with non-lesional specimens of the same region in 30 cases as well as 11 specimens originating from healthy control buccal mucosa. The permeability (Kp) of tissue biopsies to tritiated nitrosonornicotine was determined in a continuous through-flow perfusion system, lipids were extracted and identified by thin-layer chromatography, and thickness of epithelium and keratin layer assessed by histopathological methods. Results of the measurements showed that the permeability to the tobacco carcinogen, nitrosonornicotine for leukoplakic tissue was higher than for normal control buccal specimens. Non-lesional areas of buccal mucosa, adjacent to leukoplakias, showed hyperplasia and significantly higher permeability values than both leukoplakic and normal buccal control mucosa. The lipid content of the non-lesional sites was intermediate between the increased values of the leukoplakic lesion and of normal control mucosa. The data strongly suggest that the presence of tobacco in the oral cavity may bring about generalized changes even in regions that do not show leukoplakia.

  10. Claudins, dietary milk proteins, and intestinal barrier regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Belinda M; Kerstetter, Jane E; Insogna, Karl L

    2013-01-01

    The family of claudin proteins plays an important role in regulating the intestinal barrier by modulating the permeability of tight junctions. The impact of dietary protein on claudin biology has not been studied extensively. Whey proteins have been reported to improve intestinal barrier function, but their mechanism of action is not clear. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated increased intestinal claudin expression in response to milk protein components. Reviewed here are new findings suggesting that whey-protein-derived transforming growth factor β transcriptionally upregulates claudin-4 expression via a Smad-4-dependent pathway. These and other data, including limited clinical studies, are summarized below and, in the aggregate, suggest a therapeutic role for whey protein in diseases of intestinal barrier dysfunction, perhaps, in part, by regulating claudin expression. © 2013 International Life Sciences Institute.

  11. Intestinal, segmented, filamentous bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, H L; Koopman, J P; Poelma, F G; Beynen, A C

    1992-06-01

    Segmented, filamentous bacteria (SFBs) are autochthonous, apathogenic bacteria, occurring in the ileum of mice and rats. Although the application of formal taxonomic criteria is impossible due to the lack of an in vitro technique to culture SFBs, microbes with a similar morphology, found in the intestine of a wide range of vertebrate and invertebrate host species, are considered to be related. SFBs are firmly attached to the epithelial cells of the distal ileal mucosa, their preferential ecological niche being the epithelium covering the Peyer's patches. Electron microscopic studies have demonstrated a considerable morphological diversity of SFBs, which may relate to different stages of a life cycle. Determinants of SFB colonization in vivo are host species, genotypical and phenotypical characteristics of the host, diet composition, environmental stress and antimicrobial drugs. SFBs can survive in vitro incubation, but do not multiply. On the basis of their apathogenic character and intimate relationship with the host, it is suggested that SFBs contribute to development and/or maintenance of host resistance to enteropathogens.

  12. Silver nanoparticles alter the permeability of sheep pleura and of sheep and human pleural mesothelial cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenopoulou, Zoi V; Taitzoglou, Ioannis A; Molyvdas, Paschalis-Adam; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Hatzoglou, Chrissi; Zarogiannis, Sotirios G

    2017-03-01

    Nanoparticles have been implicated in the development of pleural effusions in exposed factory workers while in experimental animal studies it has been shown that they induce inflammation, fibrosis and carcinogenesis in the pleura. The scope of this study was to investigate the direct effects of silver nanoparticles exposure on the membrane permeability of sheep parietal pleura, of primary sheep pleural cell monolayers and on a human mesothelial cell line. Our findings suggest that acute (30min) exposure increases the pleural permeability ex vivo, while longer (24h) exposure in vivo leads to late decrease of the pleural cell monolayers permeability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Host responses to intestinal microbial antigens in gluten-sensitive mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M Natividad

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Excessive uptake of commensal bacterial antigens through a permeable intestinal barrier may influence host responses to specific antigen in a genetically predisposed host. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intestinal barrier dysfunction induced by indomethacin treatment affects the host response to intestinal microbiota in gluten-sensitized HLA-DQ8/HCD4 mice.HLA-DQ8/HCD4 mice were sensitized with gluten, and gavaged with indomethacin plus gluten. Intestinal permeability was assessed by Ussing chamber; epithelial cell (EC ultra-structure by electron microscopy; RNA expression of genes coding for junctional proteins by Q-real-time PCR; immune response by in-vitro antigen-specific T-cell proliferation and cytokine analysis by cytometric bead array; intestinal microbiota by fluorescence in situ hybridization and analysis of systemic antibodies against intestinal microbiota by surface staining of live bacteria with serum followed by FACS analysis. Indomethacin led to a more pronounced increase in intestinal permeability in gluten-sensitized mice. These changes were accompanied by severe EC damage, decreased E-cadherin RNA level, elevated IFN-gamma in splenocyte culture supernatant, and production of significant IgM antibody against intestinal microbiota.Indomethacin potentiates barrier dysfunction and EC injury induced by gluten, affects systemic IFN-gamma production and the host response to intestinal microbiota antigens in HLA-DQ8/HCD4 mice. The results suggest that environmental factors that alter the intestinal barrier may predispose individuals to an increased susceptibility to gluten through a bystander immune activation to intestinal microbiota.

  14. Comprehensive characterization of the in vitro and in vivo metabolites of ziyuglycoside I in rat microsome, intestinal flora, excretion specimen and fresh tissues based on LC-Q-TOF/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangji; Fu, Hanxu; Ye, Wei; Zheng, Xiao; Xiao, Jingcheng; Kang, Dian; Rao, Tai; Shao, Yuhao; Xie, Lin; Liang, Yan

    2016-09-05

    Ziyuglycoside I is one of the major active ingredients in Sanguisorba officinalis, a popular medicinal plant in China. In the present study, the metabolites of ziyuglycoside I in rat liver microsome and intestinal flora were identified and structurally characterized, and the metabolic rules were summed based on the LC-Q-TOF/MS system. Then, the metabolites in rat excreta samples were rapidly screened and identified according to the in vitro metabolic rules. Finally, ziyuglycoside I was incubated with fresh liver/lung/kidney/stomach homogenates to further explore the source of the metabolites and reveal the possible metabolic organs involved. Four metabolites in liver microsome were identified as M0-Glu, M0-CH2OH, M0-Glu+CH3, M0-Glu-Ara+CH3. In intestinal flora incubation system, 6 degradation products including M0-Glu-Ara+O, M0-Ara, M0-Glu-COOH, M0-Glu, M0-Glu-Ara+O and M0-Ara+H2O were tentatively identified by interpretation of their accurate MS(1) and MS(2) data. Fifteen metabolites in rat urine and feces were identified, and most of the metabolites were attributed to the transformation in liver microsome and intestinal flora. Specifically, more than a dozen of new metabolites were identified in rat fresh tissues, and ziyuglycoside II was confirmed as the major metabolite in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes in intestinal barrier function and gut microbiota in high-fat diet-fed rats are dynamic and region dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, M Kristina; Boudry, Gaëlle; Lemay, Danielle G; Raybould, Helen E

    2015-05-15

    A causal relationship between the pathophysiological changes in the gut epithelium and altered gut microbiota with the onset of obesity have been suggested but not defined. The aim of this study was to determine the temporal relationship between impaired intestinal barrier function and microbial dysbiosis in the small and large intestine in rodent high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity. Rats were fed HF diet (45% fat) or normal chow (C, 10% fat) for 1, 3, or 6 wk; food intake, body weight, and adiposity were measured. Barrier function ex vivo using FITC-labeled dextran (4,000 Da, FD-4) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) probes in Ussing chambers, gene expression, and gut microbial communities was assessed. After 1 wk, there was an immediate but reversible increase in paracellular permeability, decrease in IL-10 expression, and decrease in abundance of genera within the class Clostridia in the ileum. In the large intestine, HRP flux and abundance of genera within the order Bacteroidales increased with time on the HF diet and correlated with the onset of increased body weight and adiposity. The data show immediate insults in the ileum in response to ingestion of a HF diet, which were rapidly restored and preceded increased passage of large molecules across the large intestinal epithelium. This study provides an understanding of microbiota dysbiosis and gut pathophysiology in diet-induced obesity and has identified IL-10 and Oscillospira in the ileum and transcellular flux in the large intestine as potential early impairments in the gut that might lead to obesity and metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-11-28

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations.

  17. Loss of guanylyl cyclase C (GCC signaling leads to dysfunctional intestinal barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Han

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Guanylyl Cyclase C (GCC signaling via uroguanylin (UGN and guanylin activation is a critical mediator of intestinal fluid homeostasis, intestinal cell proliferation/apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. As a mechanism for some of these effects, we hypothesized that GCC signaling mediates regulation of intestinal barrier function.Paracellular permeability of intestinal segments was assessed in wild type (WT and GCC deficient (GCC-/- mice with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge, as well as in UGN deficient (UGN-/- mice. IFNγ and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK levels were determined by real time PCR. Expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs, phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC, and STAT1 activation were examined in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs and intestinal mucosa. The permeability of Caco-2 and HT-29 IEC monolayers, grown on Transwell filters was determined in the absence and presence of GCC RNA interference (RNAi. We found that intestinal permeability was increased in GCC-/- and UGN-/- mice compared to WT, accompanied by increased IFNγ levels, MLCK and STAT1 activation in IECs. LPS challenge promotes greater IFNγ and STAT1 activation in IECs of GCC-/- mice compared to WT mice. Claudin-2 and JAM-A expression were reduced in GCC deficient intestine; the level of phosphorylated MLC in IECs was significantly increased in GCC-/- and UGN-/- mice compared to WT. GCC knockdown induced MLC phosphorylation, increased permeability in IEC monolayers under basal conditions, and enhanced TNFα and IFNγ-induced monolayer hyperpermeability.GCC signaling plays a protective role in the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier by regulating MLCK activation and TJ disassembly. GCC signaling activation may therefore represent a novel mechanism in maintaining the small bowel barrier in response to injury.

  18. Intestinal barrier function in response to abundant or depleted mucosal glutathione in Salmonella-infected rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vink Carolien

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione, the main antioxidant of intestinal epithelial cells, is suggested to play an important role in gut barrier function and prevention of inflammation-related oxidative damage as induced by acute bacterial infection. Most studies on intestinal glutathione focus on oxidative stress reduction without considering functional disease outcome. Our aim was to determine whether depletion or maintenance of intestinal glutathione changes susceptibility of rats to Salmonella infection and associated inflammation. Rats were fed a control diet or the same diet supplemented with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO; glutathione depletion or cystine (glutathione maintenance. Inert chromium ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (CrEDTA was added to the diets to quantify intestinal permeability. At day 4 after oral gavage with Salmonella enteritidis (or saline for non-infected controls, Salmonella translocation was determined by culturing extra-intestinal organs. Liver and ileal mucosa were collected for analyses of glutathione, inflammation markers and oxidative damage. Faeces was collected to quantify diarrhoea. Results Glutathione depletion aggravated ileal inflammation after infection as indicated by increased levels of mucosal myeloperoxidase and interleukin-1β. Remarkably, intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation were not increased. Cystine supplementation maintained glutathione in the intestinal mucosa but inflammation and oxidative damage were not diminished. Nevertheless, cystine reduced intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation. Conclusion Despite increased infection-induced mucosal inflammation upon glutathione depletion, this tripeptide does not play a role in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and diarrhoea. On the other hand, cystine enhances gut barrier function by a mechanism unlikely to be related to glutathione.

  19. Nanoformulations for dimethyl fumarate: Physicochemical characterization and in vitro/in vivo behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Elisabetta; Cortesi, Rita; Drechsler, Markus; Fan, Jie; Fu, Bingmei M; Calderan, Laura; Mannucci, Silvia; Boschi, Federico; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2017-06-01

    Dimethyl fumarate has been demonstrated useful in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis treatment (Tecfidera®). Nevertheless, since Tecfidera® capsules induce flushing, gastro-intestinal events and other more serious drawbacks, in this investigation a nanoparticle based system to be administered by an alternative way is proposed. In particular this study describes the preparation and characterization of dimethyl fumarate-containing solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). Namely SLN based on tristearin, tristearin SLN treated with polysorbate 80 and cationic SLN constituted of tristearin in mixture with dimethyldioctadecylammonium chloride were investigated. The effect of the presence of dimethyl fumarate, functionalization by polysorbate 80 and dimethyldioctadecylammonium chloride was studied on morphology and dimensional distribution of SLN, by photon correlation spectroscopy and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. Dimethyl fumarate release from SLN, studied by Franz cell, evidenced a Fickian dissolutive type kinetic in the case of SLN treated by polysorbate 80. Moreover fluorescent SLN were produced and characterized in order to investigate their in vitro permeability and in vivo biodistribution in mice. An in vitro study of fluorescent SLN permeability performed through a model of mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells, indicated that cationic SLN displayed higher permeability values with respect to neutral SLN and SLN treated by polysorbate 80. Biodistribution of polysorbate 80 treated SLN was studied by fluorescent imaging after intraperitoneal or intranasal administration in mice. The in vivo images indicate that polysorbate 80 treated SLN were able to reach the brain, even if they prevalently accumulated in liver and spleen, especially by intraperitoneal route. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In Situ Perfusion Model in Rat Colon for Drug Absorption Studies: Comparison with Small Intestine and Caco-2 Cell Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to develop and to validate the in situ closed loop perfusion method in rat colon and to compare with small intestine and Caco-2 cell models. Correlations with human oral fraction absorbed (Fa) and human colon fraction absorbed (Fa_colon) were developed to check the applicability of the rat colon model for controlled release (CR) drug screening. Sixteen model drugs were selected and their permeabilities assessed in rat small intestine and colon, and in Caco-2 monolayers. Correlations between colon/intestine/Caco-2 permeabilities versus human Fa and human Fa_colon have been explored to check model predictability and to apply a BCS approach in order to propose a cut off value for CR screening. Rat intestine perfusion with Doluisio's method and single-pass technique provided a similar range of permeabilities demonstrating the possibility of combining data from different laboratories. Rat colon permeability was well correlated with Caco-2 cell-4 days model reflecting a higher paracellular permeability. Rat colon permeabilities were also higher than human colon ones. In spite of the magnitude differences, a good sigmoidal relationship has been shown between rat colon permeabilities and human colon fractions absorbed, indicating that rat colon perfusion can be used for compound classification and screening of CR candidates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  2. The kinetics of denitrification in permeable sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evrard, Victor; Glud, Ronnie N.; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Permeable sediments comprise the majority of shelf sediments, yet the rates of denitrification remain highly uncertain in these environments. Computational models are increasingly being used to understand the dynamics of denitrification in permeable sediments, which are complex environments to st...

  3. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  4. Enhancement and inhibition effects on the corneal permeability of timolol maleate: Polymers, cyclodextrins and chelating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Isabel; Vázquez, José Antonio; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V

    2017-08-30

    This study investigates how both bioadhesive polymers (chitosan, hyaluronic acid and alginate) and permeability enhancers (ethylene glycol- bis(2-aminoethylether)- N, N, N', N'- tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin) influence the permeability of the anti-glaucoma drug timolol maleate through ex vivo bovine corneas. Our results showed that only the permeability enhancers alone were able to increase drug permeability, whereas the polymers significantly reduced drug permeation, and however, they increased the pre-corneal residence of timolol. Ternary systems (polymer-enhancer-drug) showed a reduced drug permeability compared to the polymers alone. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of the epithelium surface confirmed there was no evidence of epithelial disruption caused by these formulations, suggesting that polymer-enhancer interactions reduce drug solubilization and counteract the disruptive effect of the permeability enhancers on the surface of the cornea. Further mucoadhesive tests, revealed a stable interaction of chitosan and hyaluronic acid with the epithelium, while alginate showed poor mucoadhesive properties. The differences in mucoadhesion correlated with the permeability of timolol maleate observed, i.e. formulations containing mucoadhesive polymers showed lower drug permeabilities. The results of the present study indicate polymers acting as an additional barrier towards drug permeability which is even more evident in the presence of permeability enhancers like EGTA and hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin. Then, this study highlights the need to adequately select additives intended for ocular applications since interactions between them can have opposite results to what expected in terms of drug permeability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mast Cell Tryptase Reduces Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Implications for the Mechanisms of Barrier Dysfunction in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilcz-Villega, Ewa M

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how mast cell tryptase may influence intestinal permeability and tight junction (TJ) proteins in vitro and explore translation to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  6. Advanced Glycation End-Product Accumulation Reduces Vitreous Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, On-Tat; Good, Samuel D.; Lamy, Ricardo; Kudisch, Max; Stewart, Jay M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of nonenzymatic cross-linking (glycation) upon the permeability of the vitreous to small- and large-solute diffusion. Methods. Vitreous from freshly excised porcine eyes was treated for 30 minutes with control or 0.01%, 0.1%, or 1% methylglyoxal (MG) solution. The efficacy of the glycation regimen was verified by measuring nonenzymatic cross-link density by fluorescence in the vitreous samples. Resistance to collagenase digestion as well as Nε-(carboxyethyl) lysine (CEL) content were also measured. The permeability coefficient for fluorescein and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-IgG diffusion through 3 mL of the vitreous samples was determined by using a custom permeability tester. Results. Vitreous cross-linking with MG treatment was confirmed by increased fluorescence, increased CEL concentration, and increased resistance to collagenase digestion. Vitreous glycation resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the permeability coefficient for fluorescein diffusion when either 0.1% or 1% MG solution was used (5.36 ± 5.24 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.04; and 4.03 ± 2.1 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.001; respectively, compared with control, 9.77 ± 5.45 × 10−5 cm s−1). The permeability coefficient for diffusion of FITC-IgG between control (9.9 ± 6.37 × 10−5 cm s−1) and treatment groups was statistically significant at all MG concentrations (0.01% MG: 3.95 ± 3.44 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.003; 0.1% MG: 4.27 ± 1.32 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.004; and 0.1% MG: 3.72 ± 2.49 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.001). Conclusions. Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) accumulation reduces vitreous permeability when glycation is performed in ex vivo porcine vitreous. The permeability change was more pronounced for the larger solute, suggesting a lower threshold for AGE-induced permeability changes to impact the movement of proteins through the vitreous when compared with smaller molecules. PMID:26024075

  7. Entamoeba histolytica EhCP112 Dislocates and Degrades Claudin-1 and Claudin-2 at Tight Junctions of the Intestinal Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Patricia; Hernández-Nava, Elizabeth; García-Rivera, Guillermina; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Schnoor, Michael; Betanzos, Abigail; Orozco, Esther

    2017-01-01

    During intestinal invasion, Entamoeba histolytica opens tight junctions (TJs) reflected by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) dropping. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying this, we studied in vitro and in vivo the damage produced by the recombinant E. histolytica cysteine protease (rEhCP112) on TJ functions and proteins. rEhCP112 reduced TEER in Caco-2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner; and EhCP112-overexpressing trophozoites provoked major epithelial injury compared to control trophozoites. rEhCP112 penetrated through the intercellular space, and consequently the ion flux increased and the TJs fence function was disturbed. However, macromolecular flux was not altered. Functional in vitro assays revealed specific association of rEhCP112 with claudin-1 and claudin-2, that are both involved in regulating ion flux and fence function. Of note, rEhCP112 did not interact with occludin that is responsible for regulating macromolecular flux. Moreover, rEhCP112 degraded and delocalized claudin-1, thus affecting interepithelial adhesion. Concomitantly, expression of the leaky claudin-2 at TJ, first increased and then it was degraded. In vivo, rEhCP112 increased intestinal epithelial permeability in the mouse colon, likely due to apical erosion and claudin-1 and claudin-2 degradation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that EhCP112 causes epithelial dysfunction by specifically altering claudins at TJ. Thus, EhCP112 could be a potential target for therapeutic approaches against amoebiasis.

  8. Variability of permeability with diameter of conduit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... creating a permeability profile similar to the velocity profile. An equation was obtained to establish this. We also found that peak values of permeability increase with increasing porosity, and therefore entry length increases with increasing porosity with all other parameters kept constant. A plot of peak permeability versus ...

  9. [Design and analyze mathematical algorithms of intestinal absorption and metabolism of multicomponent drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ling; Xiang, Jia-Mei; Wang, Yun; Wu, Rui-Guang; Tang, Ming-Min; Sun, Mo-Han

    2014-12-01

    Evaluation of the permeability mainly focuses on intestinal absorption in biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS). It is more complicated that the absorption and metabolism under multicomponent environment in biopharmaceutics classification system of Chinese materia medica (CMMBCS) compared with single component environment, which needs suitable mathematical models to be described. Therefore, with full consideration of existing single component mathematical algorithm combining with the characteristics of intestinal absorption and metabolism, we explored and designed a new mathematical algorithm of intestinal absorption and metabolism of multicomponent drug. Then we put forward a new coefficient, P (influence), the relative change rate of the single component's intestinal absorption and metabolism under multicomponent environment compared with single component environment, which described the influences of intestinal absorption and metabolism of the component under multicomponent environment. Moreover, P (influence) highlights the distinctive characteristics of multicomponent drug's intestinal absorption and metabolism, and lays the foundation for the construction of CMMBCS.

  10. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M.

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse...

  11. Common intestinal parasites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kucik, Corry Jeb; Martin, Gary L; Sortor, Brett V

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal parasites cause significant morbidity and mortality. Diseases caused by Enterobius vermicularis, Giardia lamblia, Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, and Entamoeba histolytica occur in the United States. E...

  12. Intestinal parasites and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alauro, F; Lee, R V; Pao-In, K; Khairallah, M

    1985-11-01

    Intestinal parasites and pregnancy commonly coexist. Environmental, nutritional, and immunologic factors influence the clinical manifestations and determine the need for treatment of intestinal parasitism during pregnancy. No serious medical or obstetric problems attributable to intestinal parasites developed among 147 parasitized pregnant refugees living and delivering in a refugee camp in Southeast Thailand. These patients received adequate nutrition, careful prenatal monitoring, and no antiparasitic drug therapy. During pregnancy chemotherapy for intestinal parasites should not be used unless required for appropriate clinical and public health reasons.

  13. Intestinal parasites and tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Alonso Cedeño-Burbano

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The available evidence was insufficient to affirm that intestinal parasites predispose to developing tuberculous. The studies carried out so far have found statistically insignificant results.

  14. Can lipid nanoparticles improve intestinal absorption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, M; Soares, H T; Arnaut, L G; Sousa, J J; Pais, A A C C; Vitorino, C

    2016-12-30

    Lipid nanoparticles and their multiple designs have been considered appealing nanocarrier systems. Bringing the benefits of these nanosystems together with conventional coating technology clearly results in product differentiation. This work aimed at developing an innovative solid dosage form for oral administration based on tableting nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), coated with conventional polymer agents. NLC dispersions co-encapsulating olanzapine and simvastatin (Combo-NLC) were produced by high pressure homogenization, and evaluated in terms of scalability, drying procedure, tableting and performance from in vitro release, cytotoxicity and intestinal permeability stand points. Factorial design indicated that the scaling-up of the NLC production is clearly feasible. Spray-drying was the method selected to obtain dry particles, not only because it consists of a single step procedure, but also because it facilitates the coating process of NLC with different polymers. Modified NLC formulations with the polymers allowed obtaining distinct release mechanisms, comprising immediate, delayed and prolonged release. Sureteric:Combo-NLC provided a low cytotoxicity profile, along with a ca. 12-fold OL/3-fold SV higher intestinal permeability, compared to those obtained with commercial tablets. Such findings can be ascribed to drug protection and control over release promoted by NLC, supporting them as a versatile platform able to be modified according to the intended needs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The occurrence of aminopeptidase N and desquamated cell proteins in intestinal perfusate of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, V; Hansen, Gert Helge; Sjöström, H

    1988-01-01

    The in vivo release of a microvillar enzyme, aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2), and a cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27), into the intestinal lumen was measured to gain information on the fraction of desquamated cell protein in intestinal juice and on the mechanism of release...... of intestinal microvillar enzymes. 1.6% and 2.9% of the mucosal activities of aminopeptidase N and lactate dehydrogenase were released to the intestinal lumen per hour, respectively. The ratios between aminopeptidase N and lactate dehydrogenase in intestinal perfusates and mucosal homogenates were similar...

  16. Oral Delivery of Lipophilic Drugs: The Tradeoff between Solubility Increase and Permeability Decrease When Using Cyclodextrin-Based Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beig, Avital; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of oral cyclodextrin-based formulation on both the apparent solubility and intestinal permeability of lipophilic drugs. The apparent solubility of the lipophilic drug dexamethasone was measured in the presence of various HPβCD levels. The drug’s permeability was measured in the absence vs. presence of HPβCD in the rat intestinal perfusion model, and across Caco-2 cell monolayers. The role of the unstirred water layer (UWL) in dexamethasone’s absorption was studied, and a simplified mass-transport analysis was developed to describe the solubility-permeability interplay. The PAMPA permeability of dexamethasone was measured in the presence of various HPβCD levels, and the correlation with the theoretical predictions was evaluated. While the solubility of dexamethasone was greatly enhanced by the presence of HPβCD (K1∶1 = 2311 M−1), all experimental models showed that the drug’s permeability was significantly reduced following the cyclodextrin complexation. The UWL was found to have no impact on the absorption of dexamethasone. A mass transport analysis was employed to describe the solubility-permeability interplay. The model enabled excellent quantitative prediction of dexamethasone’s permeability as a function of the HPβCD level. This work demonstrates that when using cyclodextrins in solubility-enabling formulations, a tradeoff exists between solubility increase and permeability decrease that must not be overlooked. This tradeoff was found to be independent of the unstirred water layer. The transport model presented here can aid in striking the appropriate solubility-permeability balance in order to achieve optimal overall absorption. PMID:23874557

  17. Practical permeability-based hepatic clearance classification system (HepCCS) in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Peter W; Song, Yang; Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M; Cheong, Jonathan; Plise, Emile G; Khojasteh, S Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    The use of liver microsomes and hepatocytes to predict total in vivo clearance is standard practice in the pharmaceutical industry; however, metabolic stability data alone cannot always predict in vivo clearance accurately. Apparent permeability generated from Mardin-Darby canine kidney cells and rat hepatocyte uptake for 33 discovery compounds were obtained. When there is underprediction of in vivo clearance, compounds with low apparent permeability (less than 3 × 10(-6) cm/s) all exhibited hepatic uptake. A systematic approach in the form of a classification system (hepatic clearance classification system) and decision tree that will help drug discovery scientists understand in vitro-in vivo clearance prediction disconnect early is proposed.

  18. Effect of aggregate grain size distribution on properties of permeable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) ratio on the mechanical properties of permeable concrete is investigated. The aim of this study is to prepare permeable concrete mixture with optimum properties in terms of strength and permeability. For this purpose, five different permeable ...

  19. On the permeability of fractal tube bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Zinovik, I

    2011-01-01

    The permeability of a porous medium is strongly affected by its local geometry and connectivity, the size distribution of the solid inclusions and the pores available for flow. Since direct measurements of the permeability are time consuming and require experiments that are not always possible, the reliable theoretical assessment of the permeability based on the medium structural characteristics alone is of importance. When the porosity approaches unity, the permeability-porosity relationships represented by the Kozeny-Carman equations and Archie's law predict that permeability tends to infinity and thus they yield unrealistic results if specific area of the porous media does not tend to zero. The goal of this paper is an evaluation of the relationships between porosity and permeability for a set of fractal models with porosity approaching unity and a finite permeability. It is shown that the two-dimensional foams generated by finite iterations of the corresponding geometric fractals can be used to model poro...

  20. Gastrointestinal permeability in ovarian cancer and breast cancer patients treated with paclitaxel and platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tichá Alena

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combination of platinum derivatives with paclitaxel is currently the standard front line regimen for patients with epithelial ovarian carcinoma, and represents also an active regimen in patients with metastatic breast or unknown primary carcinomas. Measurement of intestinal permeability represents one of the potential methods of noninvasive laboratory assessment of gastrointestinal mucositis induced by chemotherapy, but little is known about intestinal permeability in patients treated with paclitaxel or platinum. Methods Intestinal permeability was assessed in 36 breast and ovarian cancer patients treated with paclitaxel/platinum combination by measuring, using capillary gas chromatography, urinary sucrose, lactulose, xylose and mannitol after oral challenge. The significance of differences during the therapy compared to pre-treatment values was studied by Wilcoxon paired test. The differences between groups of patient were studied by Mann-Whitney U test. Fisher exact test was used to compare the frequency in different subgroups. Results After administration of the first dose, a significant (p Conclusion A transient significant increase in lactulose/monosaccharide and sucrose/monosaccharide ratios was observed in ovarian and breast cancer patients treated with paclitaxel and platinum. Increased lactulose absorption, lactulose/mannitol, sucrose/mannitol and lactulose/xylose ratios were evident in patients with grade 3 or 4 toxicity, and increased baseline lactulose/mannitol ratio predicted serious toxicity.

  1. The Biopharmaceutics Classification System: Subclasses for in vivo predictive dissolution (IPD) methodology and IVIVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Mudie, Deanna M.; Langguth, Peter; Amidon, Greg E.; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2014-01-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) has found widespread utility in drug discovery, product development and drug product regulatory sciences. The classification scheme captures the two most significant factors influencing oral drug absorption; solubility and intestinal permeability and it has proven to be a very useful and a widely accepted starting point for drug product development and drug product regulation. The mechanistic base of the BCS approach has, no doubt, contributed to its wide spread acceptance and utility. Nevertheless, underneath the simplicity of BCS are many detailed complexities, both in vitro and in vivo which must be evaluated and investigated for any given drug and drug product. In this manuscript we propose a simple extension of the BCS classes to include subspecification of acid (a), base (b) and neutral (c) for classes II and IV. Sub-classification for Classes I and III (high solubility drugs as currently defined) is generally not needed except perhaps in border line solubility cases. It is well known that the , pKa physical property of a drug (API) has a significant impact on the aqueous solubility dissolution of drug from the drug product both in vitro and in vivo for BCS Class II and IV acids and bases, and is the basis, we propose for a sub-classification extension of the original BCS classification. This BCS sub-classification is particularly important for in vivo predictive dissolution methodology development due to the complex and variable in vivo environment in the gastrointestinal tract, with its changing pH, buffer capacity, luminal volume, surfactant luminal conditions, permeability profile along the gastrointestinal tract and variable transit and fasted and fed states. We believe this sub-classification is a step toward developing a more science-based mechanistic in vivo predictive dissolution (IPD) methodology. Such a dissolution methodology can be used by development scientists to assess the likelihood of a

  2. Vascular permeability and iron deposition biomarkers in longitudinal follow-up of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Romuald; Fam, Maged D; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Tan, Huan; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Shi, Changbin; Jesselson, Michael; Shenkar, Robert; Wu, Meijing; Cao, Ying; Hobson, Nicholas; Larsson, Henrik B W; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Vascular permeability and iron leakage are central features of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) pathogenesis. The authors aimed to correlate prospective clinical behavior of CCM lesions with longitudinal changes in biomarkers of dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative permeability (DCEQP) and quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) assessed by MRI. METHODS Forty-six patients with CCMs underwent 2 or more permeability and/or susceptibility studies in conjunction with baseline and follow-up imaging and clinical surveillance during a mean 12.05 months of follow-up (range 2.4-31.27 months). Based on clinical and imaging features, cases/lesions were classified as stable, unstable, or recovering. Associated and predictive changes in quantitative permeability and susceptibility were investigated. RESULTS Lesional mean permeability and QSM values were not significantly different in stable versus unstable lesions at baseline. Mean lesional permeability in unstable CCMs with lesional bleeding or growth increased significantly (+85.9% change; p = 0.005), while mean permeability in stable and recovering lesions did not significantly change. Mean lesional QSM values significantly increased in unstable lesions (+44.1% change; p = 0.01), decreased slightly with statistical significance in stable lesions (-3.2% change; p = 0.003), and did not significantly change in recovering lesions. Familial cases developing new lesions during the follow-up period showed a higher background brain permeability at baseline (p = 0.001), as well as higher regional permeability (p = 0.003) in the area that would later develop a new lesion as compared with the homologous contralateral brain region. CONCLUSIONS In vivo assessment of vascular permeability and iron deposition on MRI can serve as objective and quantifiable biomarkers of disease activity in CCMs. This may be applied in natural history studies and may help calibrate clinical trials. The 2 techniques are likely applicable in

  3. Association of Permeability and Lipid Content of Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashara, Kalpesh C; Shah, Ketan V

    2017-06-01

    Rat skin and goat cul de sac are mostly used in optimization of formulations as the model of human skin and cul de sac. To explore the correlation between lipid content of rat skin and goat cul de sac and permeability. Find out wavelength maximum for Sapat plus malam®, Ciplox eye ointment® and chloramphenicol eye caps and the standard curve was also derived. In vitro studies using Cellophane® membrane and ex vivo studies using rat skin or goat cul de sac of the formulations. Permeability coefficient, % dislodgeable dose, lag time, diffusion parameter, and partition coefficient were found for both studies after six and a half hours of penetration studies. Student's unpaired t-test with equal variance was used to find any statistically significant difference in the ex vivo and in vitro diffusion transport studies at 95% level of confidence. Permeability coefficient of Sapat plus malam®, Ciplox eye ointment® and chloramphenicol eye caps were 0.000316 ± 0.0000625, 0.00416 ± 0.0001, 0.0034 ± 0.00004 for Cellophane® membrane and 0.0001 ± 0.000001, 0.002254 ± 0.0002, 0.00303 ± 0.0001 for ex vivo membrane in cm2/min, respectively. For all three formulations, there were calculated t values which were higher than tabulated t values at 95% of confidence level (P<0.05). Cellophane® membrane shows a better diffusion than rat skin or goat cul de sac. In the optimization of formulation, only Cellophane® membrane is advisable to use.

  4. Human intestinal microbiota composition is associated with local and systemic inflammation in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdam, Froukje J; Fuentes, Susana; de Jonge, Charlotte; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Erbil, Runi; Greve, Jan Willem; Buurman, Wim A; de Vos, Willem M; Rensen, Sander S

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal microbiota have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity, but the mechanism remains elusive. The relationship between microbiota composition, intestinal permeability, and inflammation in nonobese and obese subjects was investigated. Fecal microbiota composition of 28 subjects (BMI 18.6-60.3 kg m(-2) ) was analyzed by a phylogenetic profiling microarray. Fecal calprotectin and plasma C-reactive protein levels were determined to evaluate intestinal and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HbA1c , and plasma levels of transaminases and lipids were analyzed. Gastroduodenal, small intestinal, and colonic permeability were assessed by a multisaccharide test. Based on microbiota composition, the study population segregated into two clusters with predominantly obese (15/19) or exclusively nonobese (9/9) subjects. Whereas intestinal permeability did not differ between clusters, the obese cluster showed reduced bacterial diversity, a decreased Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio, and an increased abundance of potential proinflammatory Proteobacteria. Interestingly, fecal calprotectin was only detectable in subjects within the obese microbiota cluster (n = 8/19, P = 0.02). Plasma C-reactive protein was also increased in these subjects (P = 0.0005), and correlated with the Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio (rs = -0.41, P = 0.03). Intestinal microbiota alterations in obese subjects are associated with local and systemic inflammation, suggesting that the obesity-related microbiota composition has a proinflammatory effect. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  5. Dopamine enhances duodenal epithelial permeability via the dopamine D5 receptor in rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X-Y; Zhang, D-N; Wang, Y-A; Fan, R-F; Hong, F; Zhang, Y; Li, Y; Zhu, J-X

    2017-05-01

    The intestinal barrier is made up of epithelial cells and intercellular junctional complexes to regulate epithelial ion transport and permeability. Dopamine (DA) is able to promote duodenal epithelial ion transport through D1-like receptors, which includes subtypes of D1 (D1 R) and D5 (D5 R), but whether D1-like receptors influence the duodenal permeability is unclear. FITC-dextran permeability, short-circuit current (ISC ), Western blot, immunohistochemistry and ELISA were used in human D5 R transgenic mice and hyperendogenous enteric DA (HEnD) rats in this study. Dopamine induced a downward deflection in ISC and an increase in FITC-dextran permeability of control rat duodenum, which were inhibited by the D1-like receptor antagonist, SCH-23390. However, DA decreased duodenal transepithelial resistance (TER), an effect also reversed by SCH-23390. A strong immunofluorescence signal for D5 R, but not D1 R, was observed in the duodenum of control rat. In human D5 R knock-in transgenic mice, duodenal mucosa displayed an increased basal ISC with high FITC-dextran permeability and decreased TER with a lowered expression of tight junction proteins, suggesting attenuated duodenal barrier function in these transgenic mice. D5 R knock-down transgenic mice manifested a decreased basal ISC with lowered FITC-dextran permeability. Moreover, an increased FITC-dextran permeability combined with decreased TER and tight junction protein expression in duodenal mucosa were also observed in HEnD rats. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that DA enhances duodenal permeability of control rat via D5 R, which provides new experimental and theoretical evidence for the influence of DA on duodenal epithelial barrier function. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. adhesive intestinal obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... ABSTRACT. Background: Adhesions after abdominal and pelvic surgery are a major cause of intestinal obstruction in the western world and the pathology is steadily gaining prominence in our practice. Objective: To determine the magnitude of adhesive intestinal obstruction; to determine the types.

  7. Neuromodulation of intestinal inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costes, L.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between the central nervous system and the immune system have been shown to exert a crucial role in the tight regulation of the immune response in the intestine. In particular, the vagus nerve was recently unraveled as an important player in this neuromodulation of intestinal

  8. Mango-bagasse functional-confectionery: vehicle for enhancing bioaccessibility and permeability of phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Cazares, Luz Abril; Hernández-Navarro, Fátima; Ramírez-Jiménez, Aurea K; Campos-Vega, Rocío; Reyes-Vega, María de la Luz; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Morales-Sánchez, Eduardo; Wall-Medrano, Abraham; Gaytán-Martínez, Marcela

    2017-11-15

    Functional confectionery can be exploited as a vehicle for the protection of phenolic compounds (PCs) and for enhancing absorption during the gastrointestinal (GI) process. In this study, a confection containing 20% of mango bagasse (MB), gelatin and pectin was formulated. The PC profile, antioxidant capacity, in vitro bioaccessibility and apparent permeability (Papp) during mouth-stomach-intestine digestion (15, 30, 60, 120 min) and in vitro colonic fermentation (6, 12, 24 h) were evaluated for MB and the mango bagasse confection (MBC). HPLC-DAD analysis showed that mangiferin (830.69 μg g -1 ) was the most abundant compound in MBC. Total PCs (4.14 mg g -1 ), quercetin (244.83 μg g -1 ), and gallic acid (GA) (285.43 μg g -1 ) were highly bioaccessible mainly at the intestine at 60-120 min of digestion. GA was the most bioaccessible compound. Total flavonoids (TFs) and condensed tannins (CTs) had the maximum bioaccessibility in the mouth and stomach, respectively. For the permeability studies, PCs showed efflux rather than uptake in the intestine. Those compounds that exhibited intestinal absorption were mangiferin > GA > total PCs > TFs, whereas quercetin and CT absorption was negligible. The antioxidant capacity remained unchanged along the GI, mangiferin and quercetin being the most likely compounds to exert this activity. Overall results indicate that MBC has higher bioaccessibility, absorption and antioxidant capacity than MB, suggesting an effective protective role of gelatin and pectin, giving insight into the potential of MBC as a functional food.

  9. Bioengineering of functional human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Kentaro; Schwartz, Dana M; Zhou, Haiyang; Gilpin, Sarah E; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Ren, Xi; Sommer, Cesar A; Capilla, Amalia V; Mathisen, Douglas J; Goldstein, Allan M; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ott, Harald C

    2017-10-10

    Patients with short bowel syndrome lack sufficient functional intestine to sustain themselves with enteral intake alone. Transplantable vascularized bioengineered intestine could restore nutrient absorption. Here we report the engineering of humanized intestinal grafts by repopulating decellularized rat intestinal matrix with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal epithelium and human endothelium. After 28 days of in vitro culture, hiPSC-derived progenitor cells differentiate into a monolayer of polarized intestinal epithelium. Human endothelial cells seeded via native vasculature restore perfusability. Ex vivo isolated perfusion testing confirms transfer of glucose and medium-chain fatty acids from lumen to venous effluent. Four weeks after transplantation to RNU rats, grafts show survival and maturation of regenerated epithelium. Systemic venous sampling and positron emission tomography confirm uptake of glucose and fatty acids in vivo. Bioengineering intestine on vascularized native scaffolds could bridge the gap between cell/tissue-scale regeneration and whole organ-scale technology needed to treat intestinal failure patients.There is a need for humanised grafts to treat patients with intestinal failure. Here, the authors generate intestinal grafts by recellularizing native intestinal matrix with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived epithelium and human endothelium, and show nutrient absorption after transplantation in rats.

  10. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dušan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. Case report. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and suportive therapy. Conclusion. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  11. A pilot study examining the relationship among Crohn disease activity, glucagon-like peptide-2 signalling and intestinal function in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigalet, David L; Kravarusic, Dragan; Butzner, Decker

    2013-01-01

      BACKGROUND⁄/OBJECTIVES: The relationship between the enteroendocrine hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) and intestinal inflammation is unclear. GLP-2 promotes mucosal growth, decreases permeability and reduces inflammation in the intestine; physiological stimulation of GLP-2 release...

  12. Steam-water relative permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  13. Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Oh Young

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder without any structural or metabolic abnormalities that sufficiently explain the symptoms, which include abdominal pain and discomfort, and bowel habit changes such as diarrhea and constipation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial: visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, psychosocial factors, genetic or environmental factors, dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, and altered intestinal microbiota have all been proposed as possible causes. The human intestinal microbiota are composed of more than 1000 different bacterial species and 1014 cells, and are essential for the development, function, and homeostasis of the intestine, and for individual health. The putative mechanisms that explain the role of microbiota in the development of IBS include altered composition or metabolic activity of the microbiota, mucosal immune activation and inflammation, increased intestinal permeability and impaired mucosal barrier function, sensory-motor disturbances provoked by the microbiota, and a disturbed gut-microbiota-brain axis. Therefore, modulation of the intestinal microbiota through dietary changes, and use of antibiotics, probiotics, and anti-inflammatory agents has been suggested as strategies for managing IBS symptoms. This review summarizes and discusses the accumulating evidence that intestinal microbiota play a role in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. PMID:25083061

  14. Regulation of the Intestinal Barrier Function by Host Defense Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kelsy; Deng, Zhuo; Hou, Yongqing; Zhang, Guolong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function is achieved primarily through regulating the synthesis of mucins and tight junction (TJ) proteins, which are critical for maintaining optimal gut health and animal performance. An aberrant expression of TJ proteins results in increased paracellular permeability, leading to intestinal and systemic disorders. As an essential component of innate immunity, host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in mucosal defense. Besides broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, HDPs promotes inflammation resolution, endotoxin neutralization, wound healing, and the development of adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence has also indicated an emerging role of HDPs in barrier function and intestinal homeostasis. HDP deficiency in the intestinal tract is associated with barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis. Several HDPs were recently shown to enhance mucosal barrier function by directly inducing the expression of multiple mucins and TJ proteins. Consistently, dietary supplementation of HDPs often leads to an improvement in intestinal morphology, production performance, and feed efficiency in livestock animals. This review summarizes current advances on the regulation of epithelial integrity and homeostasis by HDPs. Major signaling pathways mediating HDP-induced mucin and TJ protein synthesis are also discussed. As an alternative strategy to antibiotics, supplementation of exogenous HDPs or modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis may have potential to improve intestinal barrier function and animal health and productivity.

  15. Regulation of the intestinal barrier function by host defense peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsy eRobinson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal barrier function is achieved primarily through regulating the synthesis of mucins and tight junction proteins, which are critical for maintaining optimal gut health and animal performance. An aberrant expression of tight junction proteins results in increased paracellular permeability, leading to intestinal and systemic disorders. As an essential component of innate immunity, host defense peptides (HDPs play a critical role in mucosal defense. Besides broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, HDPs promotes inflammation resolution, endotoxin neutralization, wound healing, and the development of adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence has also indicated an emerging role of HDPs in barrier function and intestinal homeostasis. HDP deficiency in the intestinal tract is associated with barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis. Several HDPs were recently shown to enhance mucosal barrier function by directly inducing the expression of multiple mucins and tight junction proteins. Consistently, dietary supplementation of HDPs often leads to an improvement in intestinal morphology, production performance, and feed efficiency in livestock animals. This review summarizes current advances on the regulation of epithelial integrity and homeostasis by HDPs. Major signaling pathways mediating HDP-induced mucin and tight junction protein synthesis are also discussed. As an alternative strategy to antibiotics, supplementation of exogenous HDPs or modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis may have potential to improve intestinal barrier function and animal health and productivity.

  16. Increased gut permeability and bacterial translocation after chronic chlorpyrifos exposure in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Joly Condette

    Full Text Available The epithelium's barrier function is crucial for maintaining homeostasis and preventing the passage of food antigens and luminal bacteria. This function is essentially subserved by tight junctions (TJs, multiprotein complexes located in the most apical part of the lateral membrane. Some gastrointestinal disease states are associated with elevated intestinal permeability to macromolecules. In a study on rats, we determined the influence of chronic, daily ingestion of chlorpyrifos (CPF, a pesticide that crosses the placental barrier during pre- and postnatal periods on intestinal permeability and TJ characteristics in the pups. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-dextran was used as a marker of paracellular transport and mucosal barrier dysfunction. Pups were gavaged with FITC-dextran solution and blood samples were collected every 30 min for 400 min and analyzed spectrofluorimetrically. At sacrifice, different intestinal segments were resected and prepared for analysis of the transcripts (qPCR and localization (using immunofluorescence of ZO-1, occludin and claudins (scaffolding proteins that have a role in the constitution of TJs. In rats that had been exposed to CPF in utero and after birth, we observed a progressive increase in FITC-dextran passage across the epithelial barrier from 210 to 325 min at day 21 after birth (weaning but not at day 60 (adulthood. At both ages, there were significant changes in intestinal TJ gene expression, with downregulation of ZO-1 and occludin and upregulation of claudins 1 and 4. In some intestinal segments, there were changes in the cellular localization of ZO-1 and claudin 4 immunostaining. Lastly, bacterial translocation to the spleen was also observed. The presence of CPF residues in food may disturb epithelial homeostasis in rats. Changes in TJ protein expression and localization may be involved in gut barrier dysfunction in this model. Uncontrolled passage of macromolecules and bacteria across the intestinal

  17. Stress modulates intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael eCampos-Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a response of the central nervous system to environmental stimuli perceived as a threat to homeostasis. The stress response triggers the generation of neurotransmitters and hormones from the hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic axis and brain gut axis, and in this way modulates the intestinal immune system. The effects of psychological stress on intestinal immunity have been investigated mostly with the restraint/immobilization rodent model, resulting in an up or down modulation of SIgA levels depending on the intensity and time of exposure to stress. SIgA is a protein complex formed by dimeric (dIgA or polymeric IgA (pIgA and the secretory component (SC, a peptide derived from the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR. The latter receptor is a transmembrane protein expressed on the basolateral side of gut epithelial cells, where it uptakes dIgA or pIgA released by plasma cells in the lamina propria. As a result, the IgA-pIgR complex is formed and transported by vesicles to the apical side of epithelial cells. pIgR is then cleaved to release SIgA into the luminal secretions of gut. Down modulation of SIgA associated with stress can have negative repercussions on intestinal function and integrity. This can take the form of increased adhesion of pathogenic agents to the intestinal epithelium and/or an altered balance of inflammation leading to greater intestinal permeability. Most studies on the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in the stress response have focused on systemic immunity. The present review analyzes the impact of stress (mostly by restraint/immobilization, but also with mention of other models on the generation of SIgA, pIgR and other humoral and cellular components involved in the intestinal immune response. Insights into these mechanisms could lead to better therapies for protecting against pathogenic agents and avoiding epithelial tissue damage by modulating intestinal inflammation.

  18. Osmosignaling and volume regulation in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Christina H; Bot, Alice G M; de Jonge, Hugo R; Tilly, Ben C

    2007-01-01

    Most cells have to perform their physiological functions under a variable osmotic stress, which, because of the relatively high permeability of the plasma membrane for water, may result in frequent alterations in cell size. Intestinal epithelial cells are especially prone to changes in cell volume because of their high capacity of salt and water transport and the high membrane expression of various nutrient transporters. Therefore, to avoid excessive shrinkage or swelling, enterocytes, like most cell types, have developed efficient mechanisms to maintain osmotic balance. This chapter reviews selected model systems that can be use