WorldWideScience

Sample records for vivo human skin

  1. In vivo human skin autofluorescence: color perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, Sergei R.; Knuschke, Peter; Mavlyutov, Albert H.; Pilipenko, Helena A.; Sinichkin, Yurii P.

    1996-12-01

    The most frequently used techniques in the human skin diagnostics are reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy. Technique of chromametry is based on color perception of the reflected from the skin white light. In CIE1976 (L*a*b*) color space the quantity estimation of color-difference between different states of the human skin have been defined by changes in parameters of brightness, hue and chroma of reflected light. This report focuses on the use of the perception of the color difference between autofluorescence of the human skin under different conditions for the purpose of skin diagnostics.

  2. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, Marc Arthur; van der Heide, Emile

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on

  3. In vivo study of human skin using pulsed terahertz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickwell, E [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Cole, B E [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Fitzgerald, A J [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Pepper, M [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Wallace, V P [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-07

    Studies in terahertz (THz) imaging have revealed a significant difference between skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma) and healthy tissue. Since water has strong absorptions at THz frequencies and tumours tend to have different water content from normal tissue, a likely contrast mechanism is variation in water content. Thus, we have previously devised a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) model which is able to closely simulate the interaction of THz radiation with water. In this work we investigate the interaction of THz radiation with normal human skin on the forearm and palm of the hand in vivo. We conduct the first ever systematic in vivo study of the response of THz radiation to normal skin. We take in vivo reflection measurements of normal skin on the forearm and palm of the hand of 20 volunteers. We compare individual examples of THz responses with the mean response for the areas of skin under investigation. Using the in vivo data, we demonstrate that the FDTD model can be applied to biological tissue. In particular, we successfully simulate the interaction of THz radiation with the volar forearm. Understanding the interaction of THz radiation with normal skin will form a step towards developing improved imaging algorithms for diagnostic detection of skin cancer and other tissue disorders using THz radiation.

  4. In-vivo spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Danny; Schulz, Benjamin; Ruebhausen, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Human skin can be described as a layered biological tissue. Knowledge of the behaviour of the optical properties of skin across the layers is limited. We describe an ellipsometric setup for spectrally resolved in-vivo measurements of human skin and show measurements of the complex refractive index N=n+ik of the finger of several volunteers over a range from 330 to 780 nm. A tapestripping study of human skin reveals the profile of the complex refractive index extracted from a simple bulk model over the stratum corneum. Fits of the evolution of n and k to an exponential function show that after approximately five strips a steady state is reached. A refined model applying an effective medium approximation accounting for surface roughness describes the development of the ellipsometric parameter Ψ in terms of the skin's increased water content with deeper depth of the measured layer.

  5. OCT monitoring of cosmetic creams in human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Hee; Yoon, Chang Han; Conroy, Leigh; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2012-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a tool currently used for noninvasive diagnosis of human disease as well as for monitoring treatment during or after therapy. In this study, OCT was used to examine penetration and accumulation of cosmetic creams on human hand skin. The samples varied in collagen content with one formulation containing soluble collagen as its primary active ingredient. Collagen is a major connective tissue protein that is essential in maintaining health vitality and strength of many organs. The penetration and localization of collagen in cosmetic creams is thought to be the main determinant of the efficacy of new collagen synthesis. Detection and quantification of collagen in cosmetic creams applied to skin may thus help predict the eventual efficacy of the product in skin collagen regeneration. We hypothesize that the topically applied collagen may be detectable by OCT through its modulation of skin scattering properties. To test this hypothesis, we used a FDML swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. A particular location on the skin of two male adult volunteers was used to investigate 4 different cosmetic creams. The duration of OCT monitoring of cosmetic penetration into skin ranged from 5 minutes to 2 hours following topical application. The results showed that OCT can discriminate between a cream with collagen and other collagen-free formulations. Thus it seems feasible that OCT intensity can monitor the in vivo effects of topical application of collagen contained in cosmetic formulations.

  6. In vivo human-skin electrical conduction and pain sensations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voegelin, M. R. [Florence, Univ. (Italy). Div. di Fisica Medica. Dipt. di Fisiopatologia; Paoli, G.; Zoppi, M. [Florence, Univ. (Italy). Istituto della I Clinica Medica

    1997-06-01

    In vivo human skin is stimulated by direct current the intensity of which ranges from 1 {mu}A to 1 mA. They have detected the voltage/current plot and the temporal trend of potential difference between two electrodes placed in a suitable cutaneous region of stimulation, in a group of healthy subjects. They have elaborated a non-linear functional equivalent model to describe the system behaviour. The electrical stimulation can induce painful sensation, over a critical value of the current intensity, and they believe that this sensation is due to thermal dissipation into the inner layers of the skin. In fact, subjects begin to feel pain when the electric power dissipated in the stimulated region for unit time is within the range of 235-260 mcal/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s, that corresponds to the thermal threshold required to evoke pain.

  7. In-Vivo Human Skin to Textiles Friction Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfarr, Lukas; Zagar, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    We report on a measurement system to determine highly reliable and accurate friction properties of textiles as needed for example as input to garment simulation software. Our investigations led to a set-up that allows to characterize not just textile to textile but also textile to in-vivo human skin tribological properties and thus to fundamental knowledge about genuine wearer interaction in garments. The method of test conveyed in this paper is measuring concurrently and in a highly time resolved manner the normal force as well as the resulting shear force caused by a friction subject intending to slide out of the static friction regime and into the dynamic regime on a test bench. Deeper analysis of various influences is enabled by extending the simple model following Coulomb's law for rigid body friction to include further essential parameters such as contact force, predominance in the yarn's orientation and also skin hydration. This easy-to-use system enables to measure reliably and reproducibly both static and dynamic friction for a variety of friction partners including human skin with all its variability there might be.

  8. In vivo optical coherence tomography of human skin microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Alexander M.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Pravdenko, Kirill I.; Shabanov, Dmitry V.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Pochinko, Vitaly; Zhegalov, V.; Dmitriev, G.; Vazina, I.; Petrova, Galina P.; Nikulin, Nikolai K.

    1994-12-01

    A compact effective optical coherence tomography (OCT) system is presented. It contains approximately equals 0.3 mW superluminescent diode with spectral width 30 nm FWHM (providing approximately equals 15 micrometers longitudinal resolution) and fiber interferometer with integrated longitudinal scanning. The dynamic range 60 dB allows to observe structure of human skin in vivo up to 1.5 mm in depth. A comparison of obtained tomographs with data of histologic analysis of the same samples of the skin have been carried out to identify the observed structures and determine their optical properties. This technique allows one to perform noncontact, noninvasive diagnostic of early stages of different pathological state of the skin, to measure the burn depth and to observe the process of the recovery. Unlike scanning confocal microscopy, OCT is more suitable for an endoscopic investigation of the mucous membranes of hollow organs. Possible diagnostic applications include dermatology, gastroenterology, gynecology, urology, oncology, othorinolaryngology, transplantology. The most promising features are the potential possibility of differential diagnosis of precancer and various types of cancer, estimation of the invasion depth, differential diagnosis of inflammation and dystrophic processes, control of radical operative treatment.

  9. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen

  10. Real-time trace gas sensing of ethylene, propanal and acetaldehyde from human skin in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moeskops, B.W.M.; Steeghs, M.M.L.; Swam, K. van; Cristescu, S.M.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Harren, F.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Trace gases emitted by human skin in vivo are monitored non-invasively and in real time using laser-based photoacoustic detection and proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry. A small quartz cuvette is placed on the skin to create a headspace from which a carrier gas transports the skin emissions

  11. Laser system for optical biopsy and in-vivo study of the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Ekaterina G.; Avramov, Lachezar A.

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a preliminary evaluation of the diagnostic potential of noninvasive laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy (LIAFS) for human skin in vivo. The autofluorescence characterization of tissue relies on different spectral properties of tissue. It was demonstrated a differentiation between normal skin and skin with vitaligo. In our experimental investigation of the autofluorescence spectrum of human skin in vivo a nitrogen laser with excitation wavelength 337 nm was used. Two fluorescence bands were observed at 440 and 490 nm, these were attributed to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and collagen. The intensity of the NADH emission band was markedly reduced in the skin with vitaligo compared with the normal skin, which could indicate different redox conditions in skin with vitaligo. The autofluorescence spectrum of human skin depends on the main internal absorbers, which are blood and melanin. In this study was described the effect caused by melanin content on the shape of the autofluorescence spectrum of human skin. Human skin fluorescence spectrum might provide dermatologists with important information and such investigations are successfully used now in skin disease diagnostics, in investigation of the environmental factor impact or for evaluation of treatment efficiency. The goal of this work is optimization of detection and diagnosis of hollow organs and skin.

  12. In vivo optical elastography: stress and strain imaging of human skin lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Gong, Peijun; Kennedy, Kelsey M.; Wijesinghe, Philip; Sampson, David D.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2015-03-01

    Probing the mechanical properties of skin at high resolution could aid in the assessment of skin pathologies by, for example, detecting the extent of cancerous skin lesions and assessing pathology in burn scars. Here, we present two elastography techniques based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to probe the local mechanical properties of skin. The first technique, optical palpation, is a high-resolution tactile imaging technique, which uses a complaint silicone layer positioned on the tissue surface to measure spatially-resolved stress imparted by compressive loading. We assess the performance of optical palpation, using a handheld imaging probe on a skin-mimicking phantom, and demonstrate its use on human skin. The second technique is a strain imaging technique, phase-sensitive compression OCE that maps depth-resolved mechanical variations within skin. We show preliminary results of in vivo phase-sensitive compression OCE on a human skin lesion.

  13. Using infrared and Raman microspectroscopies to compare ex vivo involved psoriatic skin with normal human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Marie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Pouliot, Roxane; Auger, Michèle; Laroche, Gaétan

    2015-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic dermatosis that affects around 3% of the world's population. The etiology of this autoimmune pathology is not completely understood. The barrier function of psoriatic skin is known to be strongly altered, but the structural modifications at the origin of this dysfunction are not clear. To develop strategies to reduce symptoms of psoriasis or adequate substitutes for modeling, a deep understanding of the organization of psoriatic skin at a molecular level is required. Infrared and Raman microspectroscopies have been used to obtain direct molecular-level information on psoriatic and healthy human skin biopsies. From the intensities and positions of specific vibrational bands, the lipid and protein distribution and the lipid order have been mapped in the different layers of the skin. Results showed a similar distribution of lipids and collagen for normal and psoriatic human skin. However, psoriatic skin is characterized by heterogeneity in lipid/protein composition at the micrometer scale, a reduction in the definition of skin layer boundaries and a decrease in lipid chain order in the stratum corneum as compared to normal skin. A global decrease of the structural organization is exhibited in psoriatic skin that is compatible with an alteration of its barrier properties.

  14. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, M. E.; Richter, H.; Zhu, Y. J.; Meinke, M. C.; Knorr, F.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Koenig, K.; Lademann, J.

    2014-07-01

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted.

  15. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvin, M E; Richter, H; Zhu, Y J; Meinke, M C; Knorr, F; Lademann, J [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology, Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Gonchukov, S A [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Russian Federation); Koenig, K [JenLab GmbH, Schillerstr. 1, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-31

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted. (laser biophotonics)

  16. Fatty acids penetration into human skin ex vivo: A TOF-SIMS analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čižinauskas, Vytis; Elie, Nicolas; Brunelle, Alain; Briedis, Vitalis

    2017-03-02

    Linoleic, oleic, palmitoleic, palmitic, and stearic fatty acids (FAs) are commonly used in dermatological formulations. They differ by their structure, presence in the skin, and mode of application in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics compounding. These FAs are also known as chemical penetration enhancers, but their mechanisms of penetration enhancement and effect on barrier characteristics of the skin require additional study. In this study, the authors conducted an ex vivo analysis of the distribution of lipid components in the epidermis and dermis of human skin after applying individual FAs. The goal was to elucidate possible mechanisms of penetration enhancement and FA effects on barrier characteristics of the skin. FA penetration studies were conducted ex vivo on human skin and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) bioimaging analysis was performed to visualize and analyze distribution of FAs in skin sections. The current study demonstrated that TOF-SIMS imaging was effective in visualizing the distribution of linoleic, oleic, palmitoleic, palmitic, and stearic acid in the human skin ex vivo after the skin penetration experiment of individual FAs. The integration of the obtained TOF-SIMS images allowed a semiquantitative comparison of the effects induced by individual FA applications on the human skin ex vivo. FAs showed varying abilities to penetrate the skin and disorder the FAs within the skin, based on their structures and physicochemical properties. Linoleic acid penetrated the skin and changed the distribution of all the analyzed FAs. Skin treatment with palmitoleic or oleic acid increased the amounts of singular FAs in the skin. Penetration of saturated FAs was low, but it increased the detected amounts of linoleic acid in both skin layers. The results indicate that application of FAs on the skin surface induce redistribution of native FAs not only in the stratum corneum layer of epidermis but also in the lipid content of full epidermis

  17. Cutaneous in vivo metabolism of topical lidocaine formulation in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolsted, K; Benfeldt, E; Kissmeyer, A-M

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the metabolising capacity of the human skin in relation to topically applied drugs and formulations. We chose lidocaine as a model compound since the metabolic pathways are well known from studies concerning hepatic metabolism following systemic drug administration. However......, the enzymes involved are also expressed in the skin. Hence, the aim of the current study was to investigate the extent of the cutaneous in vivo metabolism of topically applied lidocaine in human volunteers. A dose of 5 mg/cm(2) of Xylocaine(R) (5% lidocaine) ointment was applied onto the buttock skin...... of the volunteers. After 2 h, residual formulation was removed, and two 4-mm punch biopsies were taken from each volunteer. The quantity of lidocaine extracted from the skin samples (epidermis + dermis) was 109 +/- 43 ng/mm(2) skin. One metabolite (monoethylglycine xylidide, MEGX) was detected in skin from 7...

  18. Visualization studies of human skin in vitro/in vivo under the influence of an electrical field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatouros, N.E.; Groenink, H.W.M.; Graaff, de A.M.; Aelst, van A.C.; Koerten, H.K.; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the local changes in the ultrastructure of human skin after iontophoresis, using cryo-scanning, transmission and freeze fracture electron microscopy in human skin in vitro and in vivo. Human dermatomed skin was subjected to passive diffusion for 6 hours

  19. In vivo multimodality video microscopy of human skin in the vertical plane (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenguo; Tian, Yunxian; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are non-invasive methods of acquiring morphological images of the skin in vivo. Most research in this area focuses on instruments that are configured for two-dimensional imaging in a horizontal plane parallel to the skin surface. In contrast, conventional histopathologic evaluation of the skin is based on vertical tissue sections that show microscopic features and their interrelationships according to their depth within the skin. The ability to similarly depict the skin in the vertical plane during in vivo microscopic imaging poses several significant challenges with respect to imaging speed, resolution and extractable information. Aiming to address above challenges, we developed a laser scanning multimodal microscopy system which combines RCM and MPM, and has the ability to do fast xz scanning to achieve high resolution vertical "optical sectioning" of in vivo human skin at video rates. RCM and MPM images are obtained simultaneously and co-registered thereby providing complementary morphological information. To validate the performance of this system vertical section RCM and MPM microscopic images of normal human skin in vivo were obtained at half video rates (15 frames/s). Using our system it is possible to discern the following structures: all layers of the epidermis including the stratum lucidum, the dermal-epidermal junction, and the papillary dermis. Blood flow is also visible as evidenced by blood cell movement within vessels. The effective imaging depth is about 200 micrometers. This system provides a means of interrogating human skin noninvasively at an orientation analogous to conventional histological sectioning.

  20. An immunohistological study of anhydrous topical ascorbic acid compositions on ex vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, Geoffrey K; Markovic, Boban; Hayes, Amanda

    2006-06-01

    Ascorbic acid has numerous essential and beneficial functions in normal and photoaged skin. Ionisation of ascorbic acid in aqueous topical formulations leads to oxidative degradation. Ascorbic acid in an anhydrous vehicle would inherently have greater stability. The objective of this study was to observe the effects of two anhydrous formulations containing microfine particles of ascorbic acid on neocollagenesis and cytokeratin production in ex vivo human skin. Vitamin C preparations were applied topically onto the surface of freshly excised human abdominal skin. Following an exposure time of 48 h with appropriate controls, skin discs were cut into sections, placed on slides and assessed using immunohistochemical (antibodies: collagen type I, III, cytokeratin) staining. Analysis was performed using microscopy and descriptive rating. Both formulations resulted in increased production of collagen types I and III and cytokeratin. The application of anhydrous formulations containing microfine particles of ascorbic acid to ex vivo human skin in this study resulted in neocollagenesis and increased production of cytokeratin. This approach appears to enable biological effects of ascorbic acid in the skin using a vehicle which would provide it greater stability than an aqueous vehicle.

  1. In vivo measurements of human neck skin elasticity using MRI and finite element modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yunqiang; Ji, Changjin; Li, Yong; Wang, Jianxia; Zhang, Xinyue; Huang, Yaqi

    2017-04-01

    The assessment of mechanical properties of the human skin is very important in investigating the mechanism of obstructive sleep apnea, a common disorder characterized by repetitive collapse and obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. In this study, a unique method, combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and finite element modeling (FEM), was developed to obtain the value of the in vivo elastic modulus of the neck skin. A total of 22 subjects, 16 males and six females, were recruited to participate in the MRI studies. The changes in the airway and the neck size resulting from fluid shift from the lower body to the neck were measured based on the MR images. A two-dimensional plane strain FE model was built to simulate such changes in the neck cross-section for each subject. Solving an inverse problem using FEM by matching the measured data, we obtained the in vivo elastic modulus of the neck skin to be 1.78 ± 1.73 MPa. Results showed that the elastic modulus tended to increase with age and body mass index for these subjects. A sensitivity analysis of the muscle and fat mechanical parameters was also performed to test their effects on the predicted skin elasticity. The unique method developed in this study for measuring the in vivo elastic modulus of the neck skin is quite effective, and the skin elasticity value obtained using this method is credible. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Optical palpation in vivo: imaging human skin lesions using mechanical contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Kennedy, Kelsey M.; Gong, Peijun; Sampson, David D.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the first application of the recently proposed method of optical palpation to in vivo imaging of human skin. Optical palpation is a tactile imaging technique that probes the spatial variation of a sample's mechanical properties by producing an en face map of stress measured at the sample surface. This map is determined from the thickness of a translucent, compliant stress sensor placed between a loading element and the sample and is measured using optical coherence tomography. We assess the performance of optical palpation using a handheld imaging probe on skin-mimicking phantoms, and demonstrate its use on human skin lesions. Our results demonstrate the capacity of optical palpation to delineate the boundaries of lesions and to map the mechanical contrast between lesions and the surrounding normal skin.

  3. Impact of Humidity on In Vitro Human Skin Permeation Experiments for Predicting In Vivo Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Endo, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-12-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been commonly conducted to predict in vivo permeability for the development of transdermal therapeutic systems (TTSs). We clarified the impact of humidity on in vitro human skin permeation of two TTSs having different breathability and then elucidated the predictability of in vivo permeability based on in vitro experimental data. Nicotinell(®) TTS(®) 20 and Frandol(®) tape 40mg were used as model TTSs in this study. The in vitro human skin permeation experiments were conducted under humidity levels similar to those used in clinical trials (approximately 50%) as well as under higher humidity levels (approximately 95%). The skin permeability values of drugs at 95% humidity were higher than those at 50% humidity. The time profiles of the human plasma concentrations after TTS application fitted well with the clinical data when predicted based on the in vitro permeation parameters at 50% humidity. On the other hand, those profiles predicted based on the parameters at 95% humidity were overestimated. The impact of humidity was higher for the more breathable TTS; Frandol(®) tape 40mg. These results show that in vitro human skin permeation experiments should be investigated under realistic clinical humidity levels especially for breathable TTSs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  4. Effectiveness of hand washing on the removal of iron oxide nanoparticles from human skin ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Nastassja A; Berthet, Aurélie; Maurizi, Lionel; Eisenbeis, Antoine; Hopf, Nancy B

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of washing with soap and water in removing nanoparticles from exposed skin was investigated. Dry, nanoscale hematite (α-Fe2O3) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) powder, with primary particle diameters between 20-30 nm, were applied to two samples each of fresh and frozen ex vivo human skin in two independent experiments. The permeation of nanoparticles through skin, and the removal of nanoparticles after washing with soap and water were investigated. Bare iron oxide nanoparticles remained primarily on the surface of the skin, without penetrating beyond the stratum corneum. Skin exposed to iron oxide nanoparticles for 1 and 20 hr resulted in removal of 85% and 90%, respectively, of the original dose after washing. In the event of dermal exposure to chemicals, removal is essential to avoid potential local irritation or permeation across skin. Although manufactured at an industrial scale and used extensively in laboratory experiments, limited data are available on the removal of engineered nanoparticles after skin contact. Our finding raises questions about the potential consequences of nanoparticles remaining on the skin and whether alternative washing methods should be proposed. Further studies on skin decontamination beyond use of soap and water are needed to improve the understanding of the potential health consequences of dermal exposure to nanoparticles.

  5. A preclinical model for the analysis of genetically modified human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Serrano, Fernando; Meana, Alvaro; Muñoz, Marta; Garcia, Marta; Muñoz, Evangelina; Martin, Clara; Bernad, Antonio; Jorcano, José Luis

    2002-05-20

    Although skin is perhaps the most accessible of all somatic tissues for therapeutic gene transfer, it is a challenging site when attempting gene delivery. In addition to the transience of gene expression, important obstacles to cutaneous gene therapy have included the inability to sustain gene expression in a large proportion of keratinocytes within a given skin compartment. In this study, we have developed a novel experimental strategy that allows long-term regeneration of entirely genetically engineered human skin on the backs of NOD/SCID mice. Primary human keratinocytes were infected with a retroviral vector encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) produced by transient transfection of 293T cells. EGFP expression allowed cell-sorting selection of a polyclonal population of productively transduced keratinocytes that were assembled in a live fibroblast-containing fibrin dermal matrix and orthotopically grafted onto mice. Epifluorescent illumination of the transplanted zone allowed in vivo monitoring of the genetically modified graft. EGFP-positive human skin was present on mice for 22 weeks after grafting. In addition, frozen sections prepared from the grafts displayed consistently strong EGFP-based fluorescence in all epidermal strata at every time point examined. Persistence of transgene expression was further confirmed through EGFP protein immunodetection. Purified EGFP-positive keratinocytes grafted as part of the fibrin-based artificial skin were capable of generating multilayer human epidermis on mice, with well-developed granulosum and corneum strata, and clearly defined rete ridges. Finally, the large proportion of transduced keratinocytes in our grafts allowed us to study, for the first time, the long-term in vivo clonal reconstitution pattern of the regenerated skin. Analysis of the provirus insertion sites indicates that a discrete number of epidermal stem cell clones was responsible for the maintenance of human skin regenerated in NOD

  6. Influence of probe pressure on diffuse reflectance spectra of human skin measured in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Alexey P; Bykov, Alexander V; Meglinski, Igor V

    2017-11-01

    Mechanical pressure superficially applied on the human skin surface by a fiber-optic probe influences the spatial distribution of blood within the cutaneous tissues. Upon gradual load of weight on the probe, a stepwise increase in the skin reflectance spectra is observed. The decrease in the load follows the similar inverse staircase-like tendency. The observed stepwise reflectance spectra changes are due to, respectively, sequential extrusion of blood from the topical cutaneous vascular beds and their filling afterward. The obtained results are confirmed by Monte Carlo modeling. This implies that pressure-induced influence during the human skin diffuse reflectance spectra measurements in vivo should be taken into consideration, in particular, in the rapidly developing area of wearable gadgets for real-time monitoring of various human body parameters. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  7. Microdialysis of the interstitial water space in human skin in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, L J; Kristensen, J K; Bülow, J

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a microdialysis technique for measurement of substances in the interstitial water space in intact human skin. Glucose was selected to validate the method. The cutaneous glucose concentration was measured by microdialysis and compared...... of the dialysis probes was established by C-mode ultrasound scanning. The implantation trauma lasted 90-135 min as measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Each dialysis fiber was calibrated in vivo by perfusing it with four to five different glucose concentrations. The perfusion rate was 3 microliters...... that the microdialysis technique accurately and precisely can reflect biochemical events in the interstitial water space in human skin in vivo....

  8. Molecular basis of retinol anti-ageing properties in naturally aged human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Y; He, T; Fisher, G J; Voorhees, J J; Quan, T

    2017-02-01

    Retinoic acid has been shown to improve the aged-appearing skin. However, less is known about the anti-ageing effects of retinol (ROL, vitamin A), a precursor of retinoic acid, in aged human skin in vivo. This study aimed to investigate the molecular basis of ROL anti-ageing properties in naturally aged human skin in vivo. Sun-protected buttock skin (76 ± 6 years old, n = 12) was topically treated with 0.4% ROL and its vehicle for 7 days. The effects of topical ROL on skin epidermis and dermis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, Northern analysis, real-time RT-PCR and Western analysis. Collagen fibrils nanoscale structure and surface topology were analysed by atomic force microscopy. Topical ROL shows remarkable anti-ageing effects through three major types of skin cells: epidermal keratinocytes, dermal endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Topical ROL significantly increased epidermal thickness by stimulating keratinocytes proliferation and upregulation of c-Jun transcription factor. In addition to epidermal changes, topical ROL significantly improved dermal extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment; increasing dermal vascularity by stimulating endothelial cells proliferation and ECM production (type I collagen, fibronectin and elastin) by activating dermal fibroblasts. Topical ROL also stimulates TGF-β/CTGF pathway, the major regulator of ECM homeostasis, and thus enriched the deposition of ECM in aged human skin in vivo. 0.4% topical ROL achieved similar results as seen with topical retinoic acid, the biologically active form of ROL, without causing noticeable signs of retinoid side effects. 0.4% topical ROL shows remarkable anti-ageing effects through improvement of the homeostasis of epidermis and dermis by stimulating the proliferation of keratinocytes and endothelial cells, and activating dermal fibroblasts. These data provide evidence that 0.4% topical ROL is a promising and safe treatment to improve the naturally aged human skin

  9. Analysis of Human and Porcine Skin in vivo/ex vivo for Penetration of Selected Oils by Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, ChunSik; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2015-01-01

    The subject of oil penetration into the skin is controversially discussed in the scientific literature. Confocal Raman microscopy was used for analyzing oil penetration into the skin. The following methods were applied in the study: methods based on tracking specific peaks (method 1), the nonrestricted multiple least square fit (method 2), analyzing the lipid-to-keratin peak ratio using the perpendicular drop-down cutoff procedure (method 3), and the Gaussian function-based deconvolution procedure (method 4). The results obtained using methods 1, 2 and 4 show that the investigated oils do not penetrate deeper than 11 µm into human and porcine skin. Petrolatum has a prominent swelling effect on the stratum corneum (32% in vivo, 28% ex vivo), while the other oils exhibit no significant swelling effect. By using method 3, the penetration profile of oils, and especially of petrolatum, into the skin was interpreted incorrectly for various reasons that are addressed herein below. Predominantly remaining in the uppermost corneocyte layers of the stratum corneum, topically applied oils do not reach the viable cells of the stratum spinosum. To exclude any possible mistakes when using the lipid-keratin Raman peak (2,820-3,030 cm-1), the penetration analysis should be performed using the Gaussian function-based deconvolution procedure. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. In Vivo Human Skin Penetration Study of Sunscreens by Confocal Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippavajhala, Vamshi Krishna; de Oliveira Mendes, Thiago; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2017-10-05

    This research work mainly deals with the application of confocal Raman spectroscopic technique to study in vivo human skin penetration of sunscreen products, as there are a lot of controversies associated with their skin penetration. Healthy human volunteers were tested for penetration of two commercial sunscreen products into their volar forearm skin for a period of 2 h. Measurements were taken before and after application of these sunscreen products. All the confocal Raman spectra were pre-processed and then subjected to multivariate two-dimensional principal component analysis and classical least squares analysis to determine the skin penetration of these sunscreens in comparison to the "sunscreen product spectrum" which was considered as the control. Score plots of principal component analysis of confocal Raman spectra indicated clear separation between the spectra before and after application of sunscreen products. Loading plots showed the maximum differences in the spectral region from 1590 to 1626 cm(-1) where the characteristic peak of the pure sunscreen products was observed. Classical least squares analysis has shown a significant penetration to a depth of 10 μm in the volar forearm skin of healthy human volunteers for both these sunscreen products. The results confirm that the penetration of these tested sunscreen products was restricted to stratum corneum and also prove that confocal Raman spectroscopy is a simple, fast, nondestructive, and noninvasive semi-quantitative analytical technique for these studies.

  11. Detection of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on human skin by in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. A.; Pereira, L.; Ali, S. M.; Pizzol, C. D.; Tellez, C. A.; Favero, P. P.; Santos, L.; da Silva, V. V.; Praes, C. E. O.

    2016-03-01

    The aging process involves the reduction in the production of the major components of skin tissue. During intrinsic aging and photoaging processes, in dermis of human skin, fibroblasts become senescent and have decreased activity, which produce low levels of collagen. Moreover, there is accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs have incidence in the progression of age-related diseases, principally in diabetes mellitus and in Alzheimer's diseases. AGEs causes intracellular damage and/or apoptosis leading to an increase of the free radicals, generating a crosslink with skin proteins and oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to detect AGEs markers on human skin by in vivo Confocal Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were obtained by using a Rivers Diagnostic System, 785 nm laser excitation and a CCD detector from the skin surface down to 120 μm depth. We analyzed the confocal Raman spectra of the skin dermis of 30 women volunteers divided into 3 groups: 10 volunteers with diabetes mellitus type II, 65-80 years old (DEW); 10 young healthy women, 20-33 years old (HYW); and 10 elderly healthy women, 65-80 years old (HEW). Pentosidine and glucosepane were the principally identified AGEs in the hydroxyproline and proline Raman spectral region (1000-800 cm-1), in the 1.260-1.320 cm-1 region assignable to alpha-helical amide III modes, and in the Amide I region. Pentosidine and glucosepane calculated vibrational spectra were performed through Density Functional Theory using the B3LYP functional with 3-21G basis set. Difference between the Raman spectra of diabetic elderly women and healthy young women, and between healthy elderly women and healthy young women were also obtained with the purpose of identifying AGEs Raman bands markers. AGEs peaks and collagen changes have been identified and used to quantify the glycation process in human skin.

  12. Using a portable terahertz spectrometer to measure the optical properties of in vivo human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Grundt, Jessica A.; Tarango, Melissa; Ibey, Bennett L.; Tongue, Thomas; Liang, Min; Xin, Hao; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2013-12-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy systems permit the measurement of a tissue's hydration level. This feature makes THz spectrometers excellent tools for the noninvasive assessment of skin; however, current systems are large, heavy and not ideal for clinical settings. We previously demonstrated that a portable, compact THz spectrometer permitted measurement of porcine skin optical properties that were comparable to those collected with conventional systems. In order to move toward human use of this system, the goal for this study was to measure the absorption coefficient (μa) and index of refraction (n) of human subjects in vivo. Spectra were collected from 0.1 to 2 THz, and measurements were made from skin at three sites: the palm, ventral and dorsal forearm. Additionally, we used a multiprobe adapter system to measure each subject's skin hydration levels, transepidermal water loss, and melanin concentration. Our results suggest that the measured optical properties varied considerably for skin tissues that exhibited dissimilar hydration levels. These data provide a framework for using compact THz spectrometers for clinical applications.

  13. MALDI-MS imaging of lipids in ex vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Philippa J; Francese, Simona; Claude, Emmanuelle; Woodroofe, M Nicola; Clench, Malcolm R

    2011-07-01

    Lipidomics is a rapidly expanding area of scientific research and there are a number of analytical techniques that are employed to facilitate investigations. One such technique is matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Previous MALDI-MS studies involving lipidomic investigation have included the analysis of a number of different ex vivo tissues, most of which were obtained from animal models, with only a few being of human origin. In this study, we describe the use of MALDI-MS, MS/MS and MS imaging methods for analysing lipids within cross-sections of ex vivo human skin. It has been possible to tentatively identify lipid species via accurate mass measurement MALDI-MS and also to confirm the identity of a number of these species via MALDI-MS/MS, in experiments carried out directly on tissue. The main lipid species detected include glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. MALDI images have been generated at a spatial resolution of 150 and 30 μm, using a MALDI quadrupole time-of-flight Q-Star Pulsar-i (TM) (Applied Biosystems/MDS Sciex, Concord, ON, Canada) and a MALDI high-definition MS (HDMS) SYNAPT G2-HDMS(TM) system (Waters, Manchester, UK), respectively. These images show the normal distribution of lipids within human skin, which will provide the basis for assessing alterations in lipid profiles linked to specific skin conditions e.g. sensitisation, in future investigations.

  14. Tribological behaviour of skin equivalents and ex-vivo human skin against the material components of artificial turf in sliding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Hurtado, Marina; Peppelman, P.; Zeng, Xiangqiong; van Erp, P.E.J.; van der Heide, Emile

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to analyse the interaction of three artificial skin equivalents and human skin against the main material components of artificial turf. The tribological performance of Lorica, Silicone Skin L7350 and a recently developed Epidermal Skin Equivalent (ESE) were studied and compared to

  15. Multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy for in vivo determination of carotenoids in human skin and blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Magnussen, Björn; Lademann, Juergen; Köcher, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive measurement of carotenoid antioxidants in human skin is one of the important tasks to investigate the skin physiology in vivo. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy are the most frequently used non-invasive techniques in dermatology and skin physiology. In the present study, an improved method based on multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy (MSRRS) was introduced. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the ‘gold standard’ resonance Raman spectroscopy method and showed strong correlations for the total carotenoid concentration (R  =  0.83) as well as for lycopene (R  =  0.80). The measurement stability was confirmed to be better than 10% within the total temperature range from 5 °C to  +  30 °C and pressure contact between the skin and the MSRRS sensor from 800 Pa to 18 000 Pa. In addition, blood samples taken from the subjects were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations. The MSRRS sensor was calibrated on the blood carotenoid concentrations resulting in being able to predict with a correlation of R  =  0.79. On the basis of blood carotenoids it could be demonstrated that the MSRRS cutaneous measurements are not influenced by Fitzpatrick skin types I-VI. The MSRRS sensor is commercially available under the brand name biozoom.

  16. Release of rosmarinic acid from semisolid formulations and its penetration through human skin ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelmakienė Ada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of rosmarinic acid (RA from the experimental topical formulations with the Melissa officinalis L. extract and to evaluate its penetration through undamaged human skin ex vivo. The results of the in vitro release study showed that higher amounts of RA were released from the emulsion vehicle when lemon balm extract was added in its dry form. An inverse correlation was detected between the released amount of RA and the consistency index of the formulation. Different penetration of RA into the skin may be influenced by the characteristics of the vehicle as well as by the form of the extract. The results of penetration assessment showed that the intensity of RA penetration was influenced by its lipophilic properties: RA was accumulating in the epidermis, while the dermis served as a barrier, impeding its deeper penetration.

  17. Confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements of depth dependent hydration dynamics in human skin in-vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, P.; Hashemi, M.; Hoppe, S.; Wessel, S.; Hagens, R.; Jaspers, S.; Wenck, H.; Rübhausen, M.

    2017-11-01

    We present confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements applied to in-vivo studies to determine the depth dependent hydration profiles of human skin. The observed spectroscopic signal covers the spectral range from 810 nm to 2100 nm allowing to probe relevant absorption signals that can be associated with e.g. lipid and water-absorption bands. We employ a spectrally sensitive autofocus mechanism that allows an ultrafast focusing of the measurement spot on the skin and subsequently probes the evolution of the absorption bands as a function of depth. We determine the change of the water concentration in m%. The water concentration follows a sigmoidal behavior with an increase of the water content of about 70% within 5 μm in a depth of about 14 μm. We have applied our technique to study the hydration dynamics of skin before and after treatment with different concentrations of glycerol indicating that an increase of the glycerol concentration leads to an enhanced water concentration in the stratum corneum. Moreover, in contrast to traditional corneometry we have found that the application of Aluminium Chlorohydrate has no impact to the hydration of skin.

  18. Confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements of depth dependent hydration dynamics in human skin in-vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Behm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements applied to in-vivo studies to determine the depth dependent hydration profiles of human skin. The observed spectroscopic signal covers the spectral range from 810 nm to 2100 nm allowing to probe relevant absorption signals that can be associated with e.g. lipid and water-absorption bands. We employ a spectrally sensitive autofocus mechanism that allows an ultrafast focusing of the measurement spot on the skin and subsequently probes the evolution of the absorption bands as a function of depth. We determine the change of the water concentration in m%. The water concentration follows a sigmoidal behavior with an increase of the water content of about 70% within 5 μm in a depth of about 14 μm. We have applied our technique to study the hydration dynamics of skin before and after treatment with different concentrations of glycerol indicating that an increase of the glycerol concentration leads to an enhanced water concentration in the stratum corneum. Moreover, in contrast to traditional corneometry we have found that the application of Aluminium Chlorohydrate has no impact to the hydration of skin.

  19. In vivo multiphoton‐microscopy of picosecond‐laser‐induced optical breakdown in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentsch, Griffin; Korta, Dorota Z.; König, Karsten; Kelly, Kristen M.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Zachary, Christopher B.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Improvements in skin appearance resulting from treatment with fractionated picosecond‐lasers have been noted, but optimizing the treatment efficacy depends on a thorough understanding of the specific skin response. The development of non‐invasive laser imaging techniques in conjunction with laser therapy can potentially provide feedback for guidance and optimizing clinical outcome. Objective The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the capability of multiphoton microscopy (MPM), a high‐resolution, label‐free imaging technique, to characterize in vivo the skin response to a fractionated non‐ablative picosecond‐laser treatment. Design, Setting, and Participants Two areas on the arm of a volunteer were treated with a fractionated picosecond laser at the Dermatology Clinic, UC Irvine. The skin response to treatment was imaged in vivo with a clinical MPM‐based tomograph at 3 hours and 24 hours after treatment and seven additional time points over a 4‐week period. Main Outcomes and Measures MPM revealed micro‐injuries present in the epidermis. Pigmented cells were particularly damaged in the process, suggesting that melanin is likely the main absorber for laser induced optical breakdown. Results Damaged individual cells were distinguished as early as 3 hours post pico‐laser treatment with the 532 nm wavelength, and 24 hours post‐treatment with both 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths. At later time points, clusters of cellular necrotic debris were imaged across the treated epidermis. After 24 hours of treatment, inflammatory cells were imaged in the proximity of epidermal micro‐injuries. The epidermal injuries were exfoliated over a 4‐week period. Conclusions and Relevance This observational and descriptive pilot study demonstrates that in vivo MPM imaging can be used non‐invasively to provide label‐free contrast for describing changes in human skin following a fractionated non‐ablative laser treatment. The results presented in

  20. Volumetric cutaneous microangiography of human skin in vivo by VCSEL swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo June Choi; Wang, R K [University of Washington, Department of Bioengineering, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2014-08-31

    We demonstrate volumetric cutaneous microangiography of the human skin in vivo that utilises 1.3-μm high-speed sweptsource optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The swept source is based on a micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS)-tunable vertical cavity surface emission laser (VCSEL) that is advantageous in terms of long coherence length over 50 mm and 100 nm spectral bandwidth, which enables the visualisation of microstructures within a few mm from the skin surface. We show that the skin microvasculature can be delineated in 3D SS-OCT images using ultrahigh-sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) with a correlation mapping mask, providing a contrast enhanced blood perfusion map with capillary flow sensitivity. 3D microangiograms of a healthy human finger are shown with distinct cutaneous vessel architectures from different dermal layers and even within hypodermis. These findings suggest that the OCT microangiography could be a beneficial biomedical assay to assess cutaneous vascular functions in clinic. (laser biophotonics)

  1. In vivo assessment of aged human skin with a unilateral NMR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Elad; Sarda, Yifat; Ritz, Noa; Sabo, Edmond; Navon, Gil; Bergman, Reuven; Nevo, Uri

    2015-06-01

    Human skin undergoes morphological and biochemical changes as a result of chronological aging and exposure to solar ultraviolet irradiation (photoaging). Noninvasive detection of these changes may aid in the prevention and treatment of both types of aging. This article presents a noninvasive method for the evaluation of aging skin with a unilateral stray field NMR scanner. These portable and inexpensive scanners may be suitable for in-depth skin characterization. In vivo profiles of sun-protected and sun-exposed skin from the forearms of female subjects of different ages (n = 9) were measured. Skin biopsies for histopathological examination were used as reference. T2 analysis with a bi-exponential decay model was applied and the extracted parameters were examined as markers for dermal aging. In the upper reticular dermis, a significant increase in the fraction of the slow T2 component and in the T2 value itself was found to correlate with chronological aging. For most subjects, there was an additional increase in the values of the slow T2 component and the T2 values from the sun-exposed forearm, superimposed on that measured for the sun-protected forearm. These results are in agreement with the decline in collagen content and the increase in free water content with aging. The results suggest that such a technique can be used as a tool for the assessment of aging, and that bi-exponential fitting can produce sensitive fingerprint parameters for the dermal alterations that occur during aging. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Combined in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy and confocal microscopy of human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Caspers (Peter); G.W. Lucassen (Gerald); G.J. Puppels (Gerwin)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy is a noninvasive optical method to obtain detailed information about the molecular composition of the skin with high spatial resolution. In vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy is an imaging modality that provides optical sections

  3. Applying tattoo dye as a third-harmonic generation contrast agent for in vivo optical virtual biopsy of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Lin, Chen-Yu; Liao, Yi-Hua; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2013-02-01

    Third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy has been reported to provide intrinsic contrast in elastic fibers, cytoplasmic membrane, nucleus, actin filaments, lipid bodies, hemoglobin, and melanin in human skin. For advanced molecular imaging, exogenous contrast agents are developed for a higher structural or molecular specificity. We demonstrate the potential of the commonly adopted tattoo dye as a THG contrast agent for in vivo optical biopsy of human skin. Spectroscopy and microscopy experiments were performed on cultured cells with tattoo dyes, in tattooed mouse skin, and in tattooed human skin to demonstrate the THG enhancement effect. Compared with other absorbing dyes or nanoparticles used as exogenous THG contrast agents, tattoo dyes are widely adopted in human skin so that future clinical biocompatibility evaluation is relatively achievable. Combined with the demonstrated THG enhancement effect, tattoo dyes show their promise for future clinical imaging applications.

  4. In vivo reflectance-mode confocal microscopy assessments: impact of overweight on human skin microcirculation and histomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ahmet A.; Aust, Matthias C.; Krämer, Robert; Vogt, Peter M.; Altintas, Mehmet A.

    2016-03-01

    Reflectance-mode confocal microscopy (RCM) enables in vivo assessment of the human skin. Impact of overweight on both human skin microcirculation and histomorphology has not been investigated in vivo. The purpose of this study is to evaluate both microcirculation and histomorphology in vivo in overweight. In 10 normotensive overweight nondiabetic individuals (OW-group, BMI 29.1±2.7 kg/m2) and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy lean controls (CO-group, BMI 20.4±1.9 kg/m2) the following parameters were evaluated using RCM: dermal blood cell flow (DBCF), density of dermal capillaries (DDC), epidermal thickness (ET), and epidermal cell size (ECS). DBCF was counted at 63.11±4.14 cells/min in OW-group and at 51.06±3.84 cells/min in CO-group (Padiposity-related skin condition.

  5. Ethosomes for skin delivery of ammonium glycyrrhizinate: in vitro percutaneous permeation through human skin and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity on human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Donatella; Lucania, Giuseppe; Mardente, Domenico; Alhaique, Franco; Fresta, Massimo

    2005-08-18

    The aim of this work was the evaluation of various ethosomal suspensions made up of water, phospholipids and ethanol at various concentrations for their potential application in dermal administration of ammonium glycyrrhizinate, a useful drug for the treatment of various inflammatory-based skin diseases. Physicochemical characterization of ethosomes was carried out by photon correlation spectroscopy and freeze fracture electron microscopy. The percutaneous permeation of ammonium glycyrrhizinate/ethosomes was evaluated in vitro through human stratum corneum and epidermis membranes by using Franz's cells and compared with the permeation profiles of drug solutions either in water or in a water-ethanol mixture. Reflectance spectrophotometry was used as a non-invasive technique to evaluate the carrier toxicity, the drug permeation and the anti-inflammatory activity of ammonium glycyrrhizinate in a model of skin erythema in vivo on human volunteers. Ethosomal suspensions had mean sizes ranging from 350 nm to 100 nm as a function of ethanol and lecithin quantities, i.e., high amounts of ethanol and a low lecithin concentration provided ethosome suspensions with a mean size of approximately 100 nm and a narrow size distribution. In vitro and in vivo experiments were carried out by using an ethosome formulation made up of ethanol 45% (v/v) and lecithin 2% (w/v). The ethosome suspension showed a very good skin tolerability in human volunteers, also when applied for a long period (48 h). Ethosomes elicited an increase of the in vitro percutaneous permeation of both methylnicotinate and ammonium glycyrrhizinate. Ethosomes were able to significantly enhance the anti-inflammatory activity of ammonium glycyrrhizinate compared to the ethanolic or aqueous solutions of this drug. Some in vivo experiments also showed the ability of ethosome to ensure a skin accumulation and a sustained release of the ammonium glycyrrhizinate.

  6. A novel approach to measuring the frictional behaviour of human skin in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, Marc Arthur; van der Heide, Emile

    2012-01-01

    Friction involving human skin plays a key role in human life. The availability of a portable tribometer improves the accessibility to large number of both subjects and anatomical sites. This is the first mobile device suitable to measure skin friction with a controlled and variable normal load

  7. In vivo imaging of human and mouse skin with a handheld dual-axis confocal fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Hyejun; Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Emilio; Mandella, Michael J; Kino, Gordon S; Solgaard, Olav; Leake, Devin; Kaspar, Roger L; Oro, Anthony; Contag, Christopher H

    2011-05-01

    Advancing molecular therapies for the treatment of skin diseases will require the development of new tools that can reveal spatiotemporal changes in the microanatomy of the skin and associate these changes with the presence of the therapeutic agent. For this purpose, we evaluated a handheld dual-axis confocal (DAC) microscope that is capable of in vivo fluorescence imaging of skin, using both mouse models and human skin. Individual keratinocytes in the epidermis were observed in three-dimensional image stacks after topical administration of near-infrared (NIR) dyes as contrast agents. This suggested that the DAC microscope may have utility in assessing the clinical effects of a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based therapeutic (TD101) that targets the causative mutation in pachyonychia congenita (PC) patients. The data indicated that (1) formulated indocyanine green (ICG) readily penetrated hyperkeratotic PC skin and normal callused regions compared with nonaffected areas, and (2) TD101-treated PC skin revealed changes in tissue morphology, consistent with reversion to nonaffected skin compared with vehicle-treated skin. In addition, siRNA was conjugated to NIR dye and shown to penetrate through the stratum corneum barrier when topically applied to mouse skin. These results suggest that in vivo confocal microscopy may provide an informative clinical end point to evaluate the efficacy of experimental molecular therapeutics.

  8. In vivo stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence imaging of melanin in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; Abbas, Saleh; Lowe, Jared; Sierra, Heidy; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin because the activation and excitation can be a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser. Our previous work has demonstrated the melanin SMPAF images in sepia melanin, mouse hair, and mouse skin. In this study, we show the feasibility of using SMPAF to detect melanin in vivo. in vivo melanin SMPAF images of normal skin and benign nevus are demonstrated. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection than MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF is a promising technology to enable early detection of melanoma for dermatologists.

  9. Dermal uptake and percutaneous penetration of ten flame retardants in a human skin ex vivo model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Jensen, Niels Martin

    2016-01-01

    The dermal uptake and percutaneous penetration of ten organic flame retardants was measured using an ex vivo human skin model. The studied compounds were DBDPE, BTBPE, TBP-DBPE, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, α, β and γ-HBCDD as well as syn- and anti-DDC-CO. Little or none of the applied flame retardants...

  10. Polarimetry based partial least square classification of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma human skin tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ikram, Masroor

    2016-06-01

    Optical polarimetry was employed for assessment of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tissue samples from human skin. Polarimetric analyses revealed that depolarization and retardance for healthy tissue group were significantly higher (ppolarimetry together with PLS statistics hold promise for automated pathology classification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Haptic characterization of human skin in vivo in response to shower gels using a magnetic levitation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, R; Fan, A; Masters, J; Mascaro, S

    2016-02-01

    Skin products such as shower gels have a direct impact on skin health and wellness. Although qualitative haptic characterization through explicit, verbal measures in consumer studies are often sufficient for general comparison on consumer perceived skin feel, a quantitative approach is desired to characterize minute changes in skin condition in response to various skin products. Prior research has sought to characterize the haptic properties of human skin in vitro and in vivo, but very few studies have compared the haptic effects of commercial skin products having relatively similar formulations. In addition, related studies have typically utilized simple, low-precision devices and fixtures. The purpose of this study was to use a precision magnetic levitation haptic device to characterize the frictional properties of human skin in vivo before, during, and after treatment with commercially available shower gels, to capture the entire cycle of consumer experience on skin feel. A hybrid force-position control algorithm was used to control a precision magnetic levitation haptic device with silicone tactor to stroke the human skin (on the volar forearm) in vivo. Position and force data were collected from 32 human subjects using eight different commercially available shower gels, while stroking the skin before, during, and after treatment. The data were analyzed to produce coefficients of friction and viscous damping constant, which were used as metrics for comparing the effects of each shower gel type. Other factors investigated include skin test location, order, and subject age and gender. Results showed significant differences between the effects of eight various shower gels, especially after accounting for variance between subjects. Most notably, Shower Gel four with high level of petrolatum, along with Shower Gels five and six with low levels of castoryl maleate (a skin lipid analog), as well as Shower Gel two with high levels of vegetable oils yielded higher skin

  12. Quantitative characterization of mechanically indented in vivo human skin in adults and infants using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Pande, Paritosh; Shelton, Ryan L.; Joa, Frank; Moore, Dave; Gillman, Elisa; Kidd, Kimberly; Nolan, Ryan M.; Odio, Mauricio; Carr, Andrew; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2017-03-01

    Influenced by both the intrinsic viscoelasticity of the tissue constituents and the time-evolved redistribution of fluid within the tissue, the biomechanical response of skin can reflect not only localized pathology but also systemic physiology of an individual. While clinical diagnosis of skin pathologies typically relies on visual inspection and manual palpation, a more objective and quantitative approach for tissue characterization is highly desirable. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an interferometry-based imaging modality that enables in vivo assessment of cross-sectional tissue morphology with micron-scale resolution, which surpasses those of most standard clinical imaging tools, such as ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. This pilot study investigates the feasibility of characterizing the biomechanical response of in vivo human skin using OCT. OCT-based quantitative metrics were developed and demonstrated on the human subject data, where a significant difference between deformed and nondeformed skin was revealed. Additionally, the quantified postindentation recovery results revealed differences between aged (adult) and young (infant) skin. These suggest that OCT has the potential to quantitatively assess the mechanically perturbed skin as well as distinguish different physiological conditions of the skin, such as changes with age or disease.

  13. Histamine is not released in acute thermal injury in human skin in vivo: a microdialysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars J; Pedersen, Juri L; Skov, Per S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal models have shown histamine to be released from the skin during the acute phase of a burn injury. The role of histamine during the early phase of thermal injuries in humans remains unclear. PURPOSE: The objectives of this trial were to study histamine release in human skin during...... the acute phase of a standardized thermal injury in healthy volunteers. METHODS: Histamine concentrations in human skin were measured by skin microdialysis technique. Microdialysis fibers were inserted into the dermis in the lower leg in male healthy volunteers. A standardized superficial thermal injury...... was elicited by a heating thermode (49 degrees C) applied to the skin for 5 min. Histamine in dialysate was analyzed for up to 2 h after the injury using two different analytical methods. RESULTS: Spectrofluorometric assay of histamine showed no histamine release in separate studies using 2-min samples over 20...

  14. Myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers reinnervate tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal human skin analogs in an in vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, T; Klar, A S; Böttcher-Haberzeth, S; Reichmann, E; Meuli, M

    2016-12-01

    The clinical application of autologous tissue-engineered skin analogs is an important strategy to cover large skin defects. Investigating biological dynamics, such as reinnervation after transplantation, is essential to improve the quality of such skin analogs. Previously, we have examined that our skin substitutes are reinnervated by host peripheral nerve fibers as early as 8 weeks after transplantation. Here, we wanted to investigate the presence and possible differences regarding myelinated and unmyelinated host nerve fibers 15 weeks after the transplantation of light and dark human tissue-engineered skin analogs. Human epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes, and dermal fibroblasts were isolated from human light and dark skin biopsies. Keratinocytes and melanocytes were seeded on fibroblast-containing collagen type I hydrogels after expansion in culture. After additional culturing, the tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin analogs were transplanted onto full-thickness skin wounds created on the back of immuno-incompetent rats. Skin substitutes were excised and analyzed 15 weeks after transplantation. Histological sections were examined with regard to the ingrowth pattern of myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers into the skin analogs using markers, such as Substance P, NF200, and S100-Beta. We found myelinated and unmyelinated peripheral host nerve fibers 15 weeks after transplantation in the dermal part of our human skin substitutes. In particular, we identified large-diameter-myelinated Aβ- and Aδ-fibers, and small-diameter C-fibers. Furthermore, we observed myelinated nerves in close proximity to CD31-positive blood capillaries. In the long run, both types of ingrown host fibers showed an identical pattern in both light and dark skin analogs. Our data suggest that myelinated and unmyelinated peripheral nerves reinnervate human skin substitutes in a long-term in vivo transplantation assay. Our tissue-engineered skin analogs attract A- and C-fibers to

  15. Near-infrared autofluorescence imaging of cutaneous melanins and human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2009-03-01

    In recent years, near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence imaging has been explored as a novel technique for tissue evaluation and diagnosis. We present an NIR fluorescence imaging system optimized for the dermatologic clinical setting, with particular utility for the direct characterization of cutaneous melanins in vivo. A 785-nm diode laser is coupled into a ring light guide to uniformly illuminate the skin. A bandpass filter is used to purify the laser light for fluorescence excitation, while a long-pass filter is used to block the main laser wavelength but pass the spontaneous components for NIR reflectance imaging. A computer-controlled filter holder is used to switch these two filters to select between reflectance and fluorescence imaging modes. Both the reflectance and fluorescence photons are collected by an NIR-sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to form the respective images. Preliminary results show that cutaneous melanin in pigmented skin disorders emits higher NIR autofluorescence than surrounding normal tissue. This confirmed our previous findings from NIR fluorescence spectroscopy study of cutaneous melanins and provides a new approach to directly image the distributions of cutaneous melanins in the skin. In-vivo NIR autofluorescence images may be useful for clinical evaluation and diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions, including melanoma.

  16. Two-photon excited spectroscopies of ex vivo human skin endogenous species irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianxin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Luo, Tianshu; Zhao, Jingjun

    2006-10-01

    Two-photon excited spectroscopies from ex vivo human skin are investigated by using a femtosecond laser and a confocal microscope (Zeiss LSM 510 META). In the dermis, collagen is responsible for second harmonic generation (SHG); elastin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), melanin and porphyrin are the primary endogenous sources of two-photon excited autofluorescence. In the epidermis, keratin, NADH, melanin and porphyrins contribute to autofluorescence signals. The results also show that the SHG spectra have the ability to shift with the excitation wavelength and the autofluorescence spectra display a red shift of the spectral peaks when increasing the excitation wavelength. These results may have practical implications for diagnosis of skin diseases.

  17. Methacholine induces wheal-and-flare reactions in human skin but does not release histamine in vivo as assessed by the skin microdialysis technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, L J; Skov, P S

    1995-12-01

    A number of investigations have indicated that cholinergic agonists release histamine from isolated mast cells and suggested that cholinergic stimulation releases histamine in vivo. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the cutaneous wheal-and-flare reaction induced by methacholine challenge in human skin involves histamine release as measured by the skin microdialysis technique. Five hollow dialysis fibers were inserted intradermally in forearm skin in eight healthy subjects. Each fiber was perfused with Kreb's-Ringer bicarbonate at a rate of 3 microliters/min. Dialysates were collected in 2-min fractions before skin challenge and for 20 min after intradermal injection of methacholine 10(-3)-10(-1) M, the vehicle, and a positive control, codeine phosphate 0.3 mg/ml. Histamine was assayed spectrofluorometrically. Methacholine caused a statistically significant dose-related wheal-and-flare reaction, the flare reaction to methacholine 10(-1) M being comparable with that seen with codeine 0.3 mg/ml. No significant histamine release was observed with methacholine, cumulative histamine release of 16 +/- 8 nM by methacholine 10(-1) M being similar to vehicle responses of 15 +/- 9 nM. Histamine release by codeine was 2524 +/- 435 nM. In conclusion, methacholine-induced wheal-and-flare reactions in human skin appeared not to involve histamine release from skin mast cells.

  18. In vivo laser scanning microscopic investigation of the decontamination of hazardous substances from the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Schanzer, S.; Richter, H.; Gross, I.; Menting, K. H.; Frazier, L.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stimulation of the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin is a topic of intensive dermatological and pharmacological research. In this context, it was found that in addition to the intercellular penetration, the follicular penetration also represents an efficient penetration pathway. The hair follicles act as a long-term reservoir for topically applied substances. They are surrounded by all important target structures, such as blood capillaries, stem and dendritic cells. Therefore, the hair follicles, as well as the skin, need to be protected from hazardous substances. The traditional method of decontamination after respective accidental contacts consists of an intensive washing of the skin. However, during this mechanical procedure, the substances can be pushed even deeper into the hair follicles. In the present study, absorbent materials were applied to remove a fluorescent model substance from the skin without inducing mechanical stress. The results were compared to the decontamination effects obtained by intensive washing. Investigations were performed by means of in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The comparison revealed that decontamination with absorbent materials is more effective than decontamination with washing processes.

  19. A broad-spectrum sunscreen prevents UVA radiation-induced gene expression in reconstructed skin in vitro and in human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marionnet, Claire; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Seité, Sophie; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Lejeune, François; Bastien, Philippe; Rougier, André; Bernerd, Françoise; Krutmann, Jean

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of sunscreens to protect against ultraviolet (UV) A radiation is usually assessed by measuring erythema formation and pigmentation. The biological relevance of these endpoints for UVA-induced skin damage, however, is not known. We therefore carried out two complementary studies to determine UVA protection provided by a broad-spectrum sunscreen product at a molecular level by studying UVA radiation-induced gene expression. One study was performed on human reconstructed skin in vitro with a semi-global gene expression analysis of 227 genes in fibroblasts and 244 in keratinocytes. The second one was conducted in vivo in human volunteers and focused on genes involved in oxidative stress response and photo-ageing (haeme oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase-2, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, matrix metalloproteinase-1). In-vitro UVA radiation induced modulation of genes involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis, oxidative stress, heat shock responses, cell growth, inflammation and epidermal differentiation. Sunscreen pre-application abrogated or significantly reduced these effects, as underlined by unsupervised clustering analysis. The in vivo study confirmed that the sunscreen prevented UVA radiation-induced transcriptional expression of the five studied genes. These findings indicate the high efficacy of a broad-spectrum sunscreen in protecting human skin against UVA-induced gene responses and suggest that this approach is a biologically relevant complement to existing methods. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Thermal transport characteristics of human skin measured in vivo using ultrathin conformal arrays of thermal sensors and actuators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Chad Webb

    Full Text Available Measurements of the thermal transport properties of the skin can reveal changes in physical and chemical states of relevance to dermatological health, skin structure and activity, thermoregulation and other aspects of human physiology. Existing methods for in vivo evaluations demand complex systems for laser heating and infrared thermography, or they require rigid, invasive probes; neither can apply to arbitrary regions of the body, offers modes for rapid spatial mapping, or enables continuous monitoring outside of laboratory settings. Here we describe human clinical studies using mechanically soft arrays of thermal actuators and sensors that laminate onto the skin to provide rapid, quantitative in vivo determination of both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, in a completely non-invasive manner. Comprehensive analysis of measurements on six different body locations of each of twenty-five human subjects reveal systematic variations and directional anisotropies in the characteristics, with correlations to the thicknesses of the epidermis (EP and stratum corneum (SC determined by optical coherence tomography, and to the water content assessed by electrical impedance based measurements. Multivariate statistical analysis establishes four distinct locations across the body that exhibit different physical properties: heel, cheek, palm, and wrist/volar forearm/dorsal forearm. The data also demonstrate that thermal transport correlates negatively with SC and EP thickness and positively with water content, with a strength of correlation that varies from region to region, e.g., stronger in the palmar than in the follicular regions.

  1. Thermal transport characteristics of human skin measured in vivo using ultrathin conformal arrays of thermal sensors and actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, R Chad; Pielak, Rafal M; Bastien, Philippe; Ayers, Joshua; Niittynen, Juha; Kurniawan, Jonas; Manco, Megan; Lin, Athena; Cho, Nam Heon; Malyrchuk, Viktor; Balooch, Guive; Rogers, John A

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal transport properties of the skin can reveal changes in physical and chemical states of relevance to dermatological health, skin structure and activity, thermoregulation and other aspects of human physiology. Existing methods for in vivo evaluations demand complex systems for laser heating and infrared thermography, or they require rigid, invasive probes; neither can apply to arbitrary regions of the body, offers modes for rapid spatial mapping, or enables continuous monitoring outside of laboratory settings. Here we describe human clinical studies using mechanically soft arrays of thermal actuators and sensors that laminate onto the skin to provide rapid, quantitative in vivo determination of both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, in a completely non-invasive manner. Comprehensive analysis of measurements on six different body locations of each of twenty-five human subjects reveal systematic variations and directional anisotropies in the characteristics, with correlations to the thicknesses of the epidermis (EP) and stratum corneum (SC) determined by optical coherence tomography, and to the water content assessed by electrical impedance based measurements. Multivariate statistical analysis establishes four distinct locations across the body that exhibit different physical properties: heel, cheek, palm, and wrist/volar forearm/dorsal forearm. The data also demonstrate that thermal transport correlates negatively with SC and EP thickness and positively with water content, with a strength of correlation that varies from region to region, e.g., stronger in the palmar than in the follicular regions.

  2. In vivo confocal microscopy of human skin: a new design for cosmetology and dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcuff, P; Gonnord, G; Piérard, G E; Lévéque, J L

    1996-08-01

    In-depth exploration of cellular structures in living human skin in situ is possible with the tandem scanning microscope (TSM). However, the rigid design of the microscope limited observations to the arms, hands, and fingers. A mobile version allowing the investigation of any parts of the body has been designed. The head containing the Nipkow disk and the optical path were the only part saved from the original TSM. This prototype can be used to observe, in real time, the different skin structures down to a depth of 200 microns and to measure the thickness of the different layers with micron precision level. The hydration of the stratum corneum (SC) could be assessed. For example, lengthy immersion of the hand in water led to an increase in SC thickness without affecting that of the living epidermis. Occlusive patch tests also showed that water and, even more so. propylene glycol, led to transient swelling of the SC. In dermatology, the example of psoriasis illustrated the value of the TSM for describing, measuring, and assessing pathologic skin changes. The availability of this noninvasive method for observing changes with time in a given skin site should prove useful for monitoring treatment efficacy. This tool opens up new insight for the investigation of cutaneous pathophysiology.

  3. Microdialysis of the interstitial water space in human skin in vivo: quantitative measurement of cutaneous glucose concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, L J; Kristensen, J K; Bülow, J

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a microdialysis technique for measurement of substances in the interstitial water space in intact human skin. Glucose was selected to validate the method. The cutaneous glucose concentration was measured by microdialysis and compared to that in venous blood. Single dialysis fibers (length 20 mm, 2,000 Da molecular weight cutoff) were glued to nylon tubings and inserted in forearm skin by means of a fine needle. Dialysis fibers were inserted in duplicate. Seven subjects were investigated after an overnight fast. Intradermal position of the dialysis probes was established by C-mode ultrasound scanning. The implantation trauma lasted 90-135 min as measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Each dialysis fiber was calibrated in vivo by perfusing it with four to five different glucose concentrations. The perfusion rate was 3 microliters/min. Regression analysis of the calibration curves yielded the relative in vivo recovery of glucose. The skin glucose concentration was calculated as that particular perfusate glucose concentration that resulted in no net glucose transport across the dialysis membrane. Correlation coefficient of the regression lines was 0.93 +/- 0.03 (mean +/- SEM). After the injection trauma had vanished, recovery was 20.5 +/- 0.7%. Coefficient of variation (CV) on recovery was 10.9%. The cutaneous glucose concentration was 99.1 +/- 1.8% of the glucose concentration in venous plasma water (CV 4.1%). These findings suggest that the microdialysis technique accurately and precisely can reflect biochemical events in the interstitial water space in human skin in vivo.

  4. Modeling the Mechanical Response of In Vivo Human Skin Under a Rich Set of Deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Flynn, Cormac

    2011-03-11

    Determining the mechanical properties of an individual\\'s skin is important in the fields of pathology, biomedical device design, and plastic surgery. To address this need, we present a finite element model that simulates the skin of the anterior forearm and posterior upper arm under a rich set of three-dimensional deformations. We investigated the suitability of the Ogden and Tong and Fung strain energy functions along with a quasi-linear viscoelastic law. Using non-linear optimization techniques, we found material parameters and in vivo pre-stresses for different volunteers. The model simulated the experiments with errors-of-fit ranging from 13.7 to 21.5%. Pre-stresses ranging from 28 to 92 kPa were estimated. We show that using only in-plane experimental data in the parameter optimization results in a poor prediction of the out-of-plane response. The identifiability of the model parameters, which are evaluated using different determinability criteria, improves by increasing the number of deformation orientations in the experiments. © 2011 Biomedical Engineering Society.

  5. In-vivo multiphoton microscopy (MPM) of laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) in human skin (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Mihaela; Lentsch, Griffin; Korta, Dorota; Konig, Karsten; Kelly, Kristen M.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Zachary, Christopher B.

    2017-02-01

    We use a multiphoton microscopy (MPM)-based clinical microscope (MPTflex, JenLab, Germany) to describe changes in human skin following treatment with a fractional non-ablative laser (PicoWay, Candela). The treatment was based on a fractionated picosecond Nd:YAG laser (1064 and 532nm, 3mJ and 1.5mJ (no attenuation), respectively maximum energy/pulse, 100 microbeams/6mmx6mm). Improvements in skin appearance resulting from treatment with this laser have been noted but optimizing the efficacy depends on a thorough understanding of the specific skin response to treatment. MPM is a nonlinear laser scanning microscopy technique that features sub-cellular resolution and label-free molecular contrast. MPM contrast in skin is derived from second-harmonic generation of collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence of NADH/FAD+, elastin, keratin, melanin. In this pilot study, two areas on the arm of a volunteer (skin type II) were treated with the picoWay laser (1064nm, 3mJ; 532nm, 1.5mJ; 1pass). The skin response to treatment was imaged in-vivo at 8 time points over the following 4 weeks. MPM revealed micro-injuries present in epidermis. Damaged individual cells were distinguished after 3h and 24h from treatment with both wavelengths. Pigmented cells were particularly damaged in the process, suggesting that melanin is the main absorber and the primary target for laser induced optical breakdown. At later time points, clusters of cellular necrotic debris were imaged across the treated epidermis. These results represent the groundwork for future longitudinal studies on expanded number of subjects to understand the response to treatment in different skin types at different laser parameters, critical factors in optimizing treatment outcomes.

  6. Impact of Cosmetic Lotions on Nanoparticle Penetration through ex Vivo C57BL/6 Hairless Mouse and Human Skin: A Comparison Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samreen Jatana

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interactions of nanoparticles (NPs with skin is important from a consumer and occupational health and safety perspective, as well as for the design of effective NP-based transdermal therapeutics. Despite intense efforts to elucidate the conditions that permit NP penetration, there remains a lack of translatable results from animal models to human skin. The objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of common skin lotions on NP penetration and to quantify penetration differences of quantum dot (QD NPs between freshly excised human and mouse skin. QDs were mixed in seven different vehicles, including five commercial skin lotions. These were topically applied to skin using two exposure methods; a petri dish protocol and a Franz diffusion cell protocol. QD presence in the skin was quantified using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. Results show that the commercial vehicles can significantly impact QD penetration in both mouse and human skin. Lotions that contain alpha hydroxyl acids (AHA facilitated NP penetration. Lower QD signal was observed in skin studied using a Franz cell. Freshly excised human skin was also studied immediately after the sub-cutaneous fat removal process, then after 24 h rest ex vivo. Resting human skin 24 h prior to QD exposure significantly reduced epidermal presence. This study exemplifies how application vehicles, skin processing and the exposure protocol can affect QD penetration results and the conclusions that maybe drawn between skin models.

  7. Impact of Cosmetic Lotions on Nanoparticle Penetration through ex vivo C57BL/6 Hairless Mouse and Human Skin: A Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatana, Samreen; Callahan, Linda M.; Pentland, Alice P.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interactions of nanoparticles (NPs) with skin is important from a consumer and occupational health and safety perspective, as well as for the design of effective NP-based transdermal therapeutics. Despite intense efforts to elucidate the conditions that permit NP penetration, there remains a lack of translatable results from animal models to human skin. The objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of common skin lotions on NP penetration and to quantify penetration differences of quantum dot (QD) NPs between freshly excised human and mouse skin. QDs were mixed in 7 different vehicles, including 5 commercial skin lotions. These were topically applied to skin using two exposure methods; a petri dish protocol and a Franz diffusion cell protocol. QD presence in the skin was quantified using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. Results show that the commercial vehicles can significantly impact QD penetration in both mouse and human skin. Lotions that contain alpha hydroxyl acids (AHA) facilitated NP penetration. Lower QD signal was observed in skin studied using a Franz cell. Freshly excised human skin was also studied immediately after the sub-cutaneous fat removal process, then after 24 hours rest ex vivo. Resting human skin 24 hours prior to QD exposure significantly reduced epidermal presence. This study exemplifies how application vehicles, skin processing and the exposure protocol can affect QD penetration results and the conclusions that maybe drawn between skin models. PMID:27453793

  8. Impact of Cosmetic Lotions on Nanoparticle Penetration through ex vivo C57BL/6 Hairless Mouse and Human Skin: A Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatana, Samreen; Callahan, Linda M; Pentland, Alice P; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the interactions of nanoparticles (NPs) with skin is important from a consumer and occupational health and safety perspective, as well as for the design of effective NP-based transdermal therapeutics. Despite intense efforts to elucidate the conditions that permit NP penetration, there remains a lack of translatable results from animal models to human skin. The objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of common skin lotions on NP penetration and to quantify penetration differences of quantum dot (QD) NPs between freshly excised human and mouse skin. QDs were mixed in 7 different vehicles, including 5 commercial skin lotions. These were topically applied to skin using two exposure methods; a petri dish protocol and a Franz diffusion cell protocol. QD presence in the skin was quantified using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. Results show that the commercial vehicles can significantly impact QD penetration in both mouse and human skin. Lotions that contain alpha hydroxyl acids (AHA) facilitated NP penetration. Lower QD signal was observed in skin studied using a Franz cell. Freshly excised human skin was also studied immediately after the sub-cutaneous fat removal process, then after 24 hours rest ex vivo. Resting human skin 24 hours prior to QD exposure significantly reduced epidermal presence. This study exemplifies how application vehicles, skin processing and the exposure protocol can affect QD penetration results and the conclusions that maybe drawn between skin models.

  9. Lack of effect of selected sunscreens applied on ex vivo human skin for 5-methyl-aminolevulinic acid penetration and protoporphyrin IX photoactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman-Ponchet, Hanan; Sevin, Karine; Gaborit, Alexandre; Kouidhi, Magali; Hanaizi, Johanna; Comby, Pierre; Ruty, Bernard; Bouvier, Guy

    2017-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a successful treatment for non-melanoma skin cancers. Methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) is metabolized to protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) which accumulates in the skin lesion and which generates a painful photochemical toxic reaction upon red light exposure. PDT using daylight (DL) exposure is now used to reduce pain and subjects are advised to protect the areas with sunscreen. This work investigated the effect of sunscreen on MAL penetration and PpIX photoactivation in ex vivo human skin. To measure skin penetration of MAL, particle-free sunscreens were applied on ex vivo human skin samples mounted on diffusion cells before application of Metvix cream containing [14C]-MAL for 2.5h. To circumvent the absence of skin penetration of PpIX, skin samples were first treated with microneedles and mounted on diffusion cells before the application of PpIX solution for 1h followed by sunscreens. Skin samples were then exposed to solar simulator for 1h. Concentrations of [14C]-MAL or PpIX were measured in both total skin and receptor liquid. The results showed that the in vitro skin penetration of MAL and the PpIX photoactivation on ex vivo human skin samples are not modified by pretreatments of ex vivo human skin with sunscreens. This study demonstrates that neither in vitro skin penetration of MAL nor PpIX photoactivation were modified by pretreatments with Cetaphil SPF 30 Dermacontrol and Actinica® Lotion SPF 50+. This supports the efficacy and safety of MAL DL-PDT in the clinical situation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of vehicle on the uptake and elimination kinetics of capsaicinoids in human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershing, Lynn K; Reilly, Christopher A; Corlett, Judy L; Crouch, Dennis J

    2004-10-01

    While the physiologic and molecular effects of capsaicinoids have been extensively studied in various model systems by a variety of administration routes, little is known about the uptake and elimination kinetic profiles in human skin following topical exposure. The present study evaluated the uptake and elimination kinetics of capsaicinoids in human stratum corneum following a single topical exposure to 3% solutions containing 55% capsaicin, 35% dihydrocapsaicin, and 10% other analogues prepared in three vehicles: mineral oil (MO), propylene glycol (PG), and isopropyl alcohol (IPA). Capsaicinoid solutions were evaluated simultaneously in a random application pattern on the volar forearms of 12 subjects using a small, single 150-microg dose. Capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin were recovered from human skin using commercial adhesive discs to harvest stratum corneum from treated sites. Capsaicinoids were extracted from the stratum corneum-adhesive discs and quantified by liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (LC/MS). Both capsaicinoids were detected in stratum corneum 1 min after application with all vehicles and achieved a pseudo-steady state shortly thereafter. IPA delivered three times greater capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin into the human stratum corneum than PG or MO at all time points investigated. The Cmax of capsaicin in IPA, PG, and MO was 16.1, 6.2, and 6.5 microg, respectively. The dihydrocapsaicin content was 60% of capsaicin with all vehicles. The estimated T(half) of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin in the three vehicles was similar (24 h). Thus, maximal cutaneous capsaicinoid concentrations were achieved quickly in the human stratum corneum and were concentration and vehicle dependent. In contrast, capsaicinoid half-life was long and vehicle independent.

  11. In vivo characterization of structural and optical properties of human skin by combined photothermal radiometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdel, Nina; Marin, Ana; Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2017-02-01

    We have combined two optical techniques to enable simultaneous assessment of structure and composition of human skin in vivo: Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR), which involves measurements of transient dynamics in midinfrared emission from sample surface after exposure to a light pulse, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in visible part of the spectrum. Namely, while PPTR is highly sensitive to depth distribution of selected absorbers, DRS provides spectral information and thus enables differentiation between various chromophores. The accuracy and robustness of the inverse analysis is thus considerably improved compared to use of either technique on its own. Our analysis approach is simultaneous multi-dimensional fitting of the measured PPTR signals and DRS with predictions from a numerical model of light-tissue interaction (a.k.a. inverse Monte Carlo). By using a three-layer skin model (epidermis, dermis, and subcutis), we obtain a good match between the experimental and modeling data. However, dividing the dermis into two separate layers (i.e., papillary and reticular dermis) helps to bring all assessed parameter values within anatomically and physiologically plausible intervals. Both the quality of the fit and the assessed parameter values depend somewhat on the assumed scattering properties for skin, which vary in literature and likely depend on subject's age and gender, anatomical site, etc. In our preliminary experience, simultaneous fitting of the scattering properties is possible and leads to considerable improvement of the fit. The described approach may thus have a potential for simultaneous determination of absorption and scattering properties of human skin in vivo.

  12. U. V. -induced DNA damage and its repair in human skin in vivo studied by sensitive immunohistochemical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggset, G.; Volden, G.; Krokan, H.

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies specific for u.v.-induced DNA damage were raised in rabbits, and used to study damage and repair of nuclear DNA in nude mouse and human skin in vivo by immuno-fluorescence and immunoperoxidase techniques. Purification of the antibodies by affinity chromatography strongly reduced unspecific background staining. In situ denaturation of nuclear DNA with 70 mM NaOH in 70% ethanol increased the sensitivity of the assay approximately 10-fold. Absorption experiments indicated that the specificity of the antibodies was primarily directed against pyrimidine dimers in single stranded DNA. Immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase staining were essentially equally sensitive and positive responses using these techniques were already apparent in epidermal cell nuclei after 0.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of u.v. light. At higher doses, such as 2 MED, the staining was strong in all the epidermal layers and could also be observed in dermis. Even so, removal of antibody binding sites was well under way at 4-5 h post-irradiation and essentially complete after 24 h. Visible light increased the rate of repair, indicating the involvement of a photoreactivation enzyme in human skin in vivo.

  13. Intra- and inter-individual variability in the mechanical properties of the human skin from in vivo measurements on 20 volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, E; Chambert, J; Pauchot, J; Sandoz, P

    2017-11-01

    The mechanical properties and behavior of the human skin in vivo are of medical importance, particularly to surgeons who have to consider the skin extension capabilities in the preparation of surgical acts. Variable data can be found in literature that result from diverse kinds of tests (in vivo, ex vivo, and postmortem) performed with different instruments. This paper presents the results of in vivo measurements performed on a cohort of 20 healthy volunteers with an ultralight homemade uniaxial extensometer. Different anatomical zones were explored under different directions of solicitation in order to document inter- and intra-individual variability as well as skin anisotropy. The experimental data obtained are fitted with a phenomenological exponential model allowing the identification of three parameters characteristic of the tested skin behavior. These parameters can be related to the concept of skin extensibility used by surgeons. The inter- and intra-variability observed on that cohort confirms the need for a patient-specific approach based on the in vivo measurement of the mechanical behavior of the human skin of interest. Even the direction of higher skin stiffness is found to be individual-dependent. The capability of the extensometer used in this study to fulfill such measurement needs is also demonstrated. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Vehicle and enhancer effects on human skin penetration of aminophylline from cream formulations: evaluation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai-Hao; Wang, Chia-Chen; Kuo, Su-Ching

    2007-01-01

    The effects of four essential oils (rosemary, ylang, lilacin, and peppermint oils), and three plant oils (jojoba oil, corn germ oil, and olive oil) on the permeation of aminophylline were studied using human skin. The permeation effects of these oils were compared with those of three chemical penetration enhancers. Although all oils enhanced the permeation of aminophylline, their effects were less than that of ethanol. Jojoba oil was found to be the most active, causing about a 32% peak height decrease of N-H bending absorbances in comparison with the control, while peppermint, lilacin, rosemary, and ylang oils caused 28%, 24%, 18%, and 12% peak height decreases, respectively. Microemulsions containing 10% jojoba oil and 30% corn germ oil were found to be superior vehicles for the percutaneous absorption of aminophylline. Comparision with results obtained from high-performance liquid chromatography shows good agreement.

  15. Intravital multiphoton tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory disease of human skin. Its pathogenesis is still unknown; however, dysfunctions of the epidermal barrier and the immune response are regarded as key factors for the development of AD. In our study we applied intravital multiphoton tomography (5D-IVT), equipped with a spectral-FLIM module for in-vivo and ex-vivo analysis of human skin affected with AD. In addition to the morphologic skin analysis, FLIM technology gain access to the metabolic status of the epidermal cells referring to the NADH specific fluorescence lifetime. We evaluated a characteristic 5D-IVT skin pattern of AD in comparison to histological sections and detected a correlation with the disease activity measured by SCORAD. FLIM analysis revealed a shift of the mean fluorescence lifetime (taum) of NADH, indicating an altered metabolic activity. Within an ex-vivo approach we have investigated cryo-sections of human skin with or without barrier defects. Spectral-FLIM allows the detection of autofluorescent signals that reflect the pathophysiological conditions of the defect skin barrier. In our study the taum value was shown to be different between healthy and affected skin. Application of the 5D-IVT allows non-invasive in-vivo imaging of human skin with a penetration depth of 150 μm. We could show that affected skin could be distinguished from healthy skin by morphological criteria, by FLIM and by spectral-FLIM. Further studies will evaluate the application of the 5D-IVT technology as a diagnostic tool and to monitor the therapeutic efficacy.

  16. In vivo optical coherence tomography imaging of dissolution of hyaluronic acid microneedles in human skin (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seungri; Kim, Jung Dong; Bae, Jung-hyun; Chang, Sooho; Kim, Soocheol; Lee, Hyungsuk; Jeong, Dohyeon; Kim, Hong Kee; Joo, Chulmin

    2017-02-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) has been recently highlighted as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. Among many methods, drug delivery using a microneedle (MN) is one of the promising administration strategies due to its high skin permeability, mininal invasiveness, and ease of injection. In addition, microneedle-based TDD is explored for cosmetic and therapeutic purposes, rapidly developing market of microneedle industry for general population. To date, visualization of microneedles inserted into biological tissue has primarily been performed ex vivo. MRI, CT and ultrasound imaging do not provide sufficient spatial resolution, and optical microscopy is not suitable because of their limited imaging depth; structure of microneedles located in 0.2 1mm into the skin cannot be visulalized. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, cross-sectional optical imaging modality for biological tissue with high spatial resolution and acquisition speed. Compared with ultrasound imaging, it exhibits superior spatial resolution (1 10 um) and high sensitivity, while providing an imaging depth of biological tissue down to 1 2 mm. Here, we present in situ imaging and analysis of the penetration and dissolution characteristics of hyaluronic acid based MNs (HA-MN) with various needle heights in human skin in vivo. In contrast to other studies, we measured the actual penetration depths of the HA-MNs by considering the experimentally measured refractive index of HA in the solid state. For the dissolution dynamics of the HA-MNs, time-lapse structural alteration of the MNs could be clearly visualized, and the volumetric changes of the MNs were measured with an image analysis algorithm.

  17. In vivo classification of human skin burns using machine learning and quantitative features captured by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Neeru; Srivastava, Vishal; Singh Mehta, Dalip

    2018-02-01

    We report the first fully automated detection of human skin burn injuries in vivo, with the goal of automatic surgical margin assessment based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. Our proposed automated procedure entails building a machine-learning-based classifier by extracting quantitative features from normal and burn tissue images recorded by OCT. In this study, 56 samples (28 normal, 28 burned) were imaged by OCT and eight features were extracted. A linear model classifier was trained using 34 samples and 22 samples were used to test the model. Sensitivity of 91.6% and specificity of 90% were obtained. Our results demonstrate the capability of a computer-aided technique for accurately and automatically identifying burn tissue resection margins during surgical treatment.

  18. Non-invasive short-term assessment of retinoids effects on human skin in vivo using multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancrède-Bohin, E; Baldeweck, T; Decencière, E; Brizion, S; Victorin, S; Parent, N; Faugere, J; Souverain, L; Bagot, M; Pena, A-M

    2015-04-01

    The occlusive patch test developed for assessing topical retinoids activity in human skin has been extended as a short-term screening protocol for anti-ageing agents. In this model, biopsies are performed at the end of the occlusion period for morphological and immuno-histochemistry analysis. Multiphoton microscopy is a recent non-invasive imaging technique that combined with image processing tools allows the in vivo quantification of human skin modifications. To validate with gold standards of anti-ageing that are retinoids, the relevance of multiphoton microscopy for kinetic and quantitative assessment in this model. Twenty women, aged 50-65 years, were enrolled. Retinol 0.3% (RO) and Retinoic acid 0.025% (RA) were applied to the dorsal photo-damaged side of their forearm under occlusive patches for 12 days. A patch alone was applied to a third area as control. Evaluation was performed at day D0, D12 (end of treatment), D18 and D32 using multiphoton microscopy. Epidermal thickness, normalized area of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) and melanin density were estimated using 3D image processing tools. Main significant results are: Epidermal thickening at D12, D18 and D32 with RO and at D12, D18 with RA vs. baseline and vs. Increased DEJ undulation at D32 with RO and at D12 with RA vs. baseline and vs. Decreased melanin content with RO (at D12 and D18 vs. baseline and at D32 vs. baseline and vs. control) and with RA (at D12 vs. baseline). This study shows that multiphoton microscopy associated to specific 3D image processing tools allows cutaneous effects induced by topical retinoids in this in vivo model to be non-invasively detected, quantified and followed over time. This innovative approach could be applied to the evaluation of other active compounds. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  19. An unsupervised machine learning method for delineating stratum corneum in reflectance confocal microscopy stacks of human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Alican; Kose, Kivanc; Fox, Christi A.; Dy, Jennifer; Brooks, Dana H.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Study of the stratum corneum (SC) in human skin is important for research in barrier structure and function, drug delivery, and water permeability of skin. The optical sectioning and high resolution of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows visual examination of SC non-invasively. Here, we present an unsupervised segmentation algorithm that can automatically delineate thickness of the SC in RCM images of human skin in-vivo. We mimic clinicians visual process by applying complex wavelet transform over non-overlapping local regions of size 16 x 16 μm called tiles, and analyze the textural changes in between consecutive tiles in axial (depth) direction. We use dual-tree complex wavelet transform to represent textural structures in each tile. This transform is almost shift-invariant, and directionally selective, which makes it highly efficient in texture representation. Using DT-CWT, we decompose each tile into 6 directional sub-bands with orientations in +/-15, 45, and 75 degrees and a low-pass band, which is the decimated version of the input. We apply 3 scales of decomposition by recursively transforming the low-pass bands and obtain 18 bands of different directionality at different scales. We then calculate mean and variance of each band resulting in a feature vector of 36 entries. Feature vectors obtained for each stack of tiles in axial direction are then clustered using spectral clustering in order to detect the textural changes in depth direction. Testing on a set of 15 RCM stacks produced a mean error of 5.45+/-1.32 μm, compared to the "ground truth" segmentation provided by a clinical expert reader.

  20. Effect of elevating the skin temperature during topical ALA application on in vitro ALA penetration through mouse skin and in vivo PpIX production in human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker, Johanna T. H. M.; Boot, Kristian; Vernon, David I.; Brown, Stanley B.; Groenendijk, Laurens; van Rhoon, Gerard C.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.

    2004-01-01

    An approach to induce increased protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) production in aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) of skin lesions is to elevate the skin temperature during topical ALA application. Increased skin temperature may increase the ( depth of) penetration of ALA into the

  1. A comparison of levocetirizine and desloratadine in the histamine-induced wheal and flare response in human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, T A; Dumitrascu, D; Bachvarova, A; Bocsan, C; Dimitrov, V; Church, M K

    2006-06-01

    The histamine-induced wheal and flare response was used to compare quantitatively the antihistaminic potency of levocetirizine and desloratadine. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 24 healthy male non-atopic volunteers received weekly single doses of 1.25, 2.5 or 5 mg levocetirizine, 2.5, 5 or 10 mg desloratadine, or placebo. Four hours after dosing, histamine (100 mg/ml) skin prick tests were performed on the volar surface of both forearms. The diameters of the wheals and flares were measured 10 minutes later. Sedation was evaluated using a visual analogue scale and a motricity test. The effects of individual drug doses were compared using Student's t-test for paired data and the overall effects of the two drugs by ANOVA. All doses of levocetirizine significantly (P wheals and flares in a dose-related manner. Only the 10 mg dose of desloratadine achieved significant inhibition of response. ANOVA showed levocetirizine to be significantly (P wheal and flare responses to histamine in human skin in vivo, with 1.25 mg levocetirizine being more effective than 10 mg desloratadine.

  2. Human atopic dermatitis skin-derived T cells can induce a reaction in mouse keratinocytes in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Britta C; Blom, Lars; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    injection of the human AD skin-derived T cells resulted in migration of the human T cells from subcutis to the papillary dermis followed by development of erythema and edema in the mouse skin. Furthermore, the human T cells induced a transient proliferative response in the mouse keratinocytes shown......In atopic dermatitis (AD), the inflammatory response between skin infiltrating T cells and keratinocytes is fundamental to the development of chronic lesional eczema. The aim of this study was to investigate whether skin-derived T cells from AD patients could induce an inflammatory response in mice...... through keratinocyte activation and consequently cause development of eczematous lesions. Punch biopsies of lesional skin from AD patients were used to establish skin-derived T cell cultures and which were transferred into NOD.Cg-Prkd(scid) Il2rg(tm1Sug) /JicTac (NOG) mice. We found that subcutaneous...

  3. Development and characterisation of an in vitro photomicronucleus test using ex vivo human skin tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus, A.A.; Meeuwen, R.N.C. van; Vogel, N. de; Maas, W.J.M.; Krul, C.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Photosafety testing is of concern for the evaluation of personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Current regulatory guidance state that photosafety should be evaluated for compounds that absorb radiation between 290 and 700 nm with relevant exposure in the skin or eyes. However, oversensitivity

  4. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the effect of Laurus novocanariensis oil and essential oil in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viciolle, E; Castilho, P; Rosado, C

    2012-12-01

    Laurus novocanariensis is an endemic plant from the Madeira Island forest that derives a fatty oil, with a strong spicy odour, from its berries that has been used for centuries in traditional medicine to treat skin ailments. This work aimed to investigate the effect of the application of both the oil and its essential oil on normal skin, to assess their safety and potential benefits. Diffusion studies with Franz cells using human epidermal membranes were conducted. The steady-state fluxes of two model molecules through untreated skin were compared with those obtained after a 2-h pre-treatment with either the oil or the essential oil. Additionally, eleven volunteers participated in the in vivo study that was conducted on the forearm and involved daily application of the oil for 5 days. Measurements were performed every day in the treated site with bioengineering methods that measure erythema, irritation and loss of barrier function. Slightly higher steady-state fluxes were observed for both the lipophilic and the hydrophilic molecule when the epidermal membranes were pre-treated. Nevertheless, such differences had no statistical significance, which seems to confirm that neither the oil nor the essential oil impaired the epidermal barrier. Results collected with the Chromameter, the Laser Doppler Flowmeter and the visual scoring are in agreement with those established in the in vitro study. They indicate that the repeated application of the oil did not cause erythema, because the results observed in the first day of the study were maintained throughout the week. Application of the oil did not affect the skin barrier function, because the transepidermal water loss remained constant throughout the study. The stratum corneum hydration was slightly reduced on days 4 and 5. This work shows that both the oil and the essential oil were well tolerated by the skin and did not cause significant barrier impairment or irritation. © 2012 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the

  5. Ex vivo permeation of carprofen from nanoparticles: A comprehensive study through human, porcine and bovine skin as anti-inflammatory agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Alexander; Clares, Beatriz; Rosselló, Ana; Garduño-Ramírez, María L; Abrego, Guadalupe; García, María L; Calpena, Ana C

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this study was the development of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for the dermal delivery of carprofen (CP). The developed nanovehicle was then lyophilized using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) as cryoprotectant. The ex vivo permeation profiles were evaluated using Franz diffusion cells using three different types of skin membranes: human, porcine and bovine. Furthermore, biomechanical properties of skin (trans-epidermal water loss and skin hydration) were tested. Finally, the in vivo skin irritation and the anti-inflammatory efficacy were also assayed. Results demonstrated the achievement of NPs 187.32 nm sized with homogeneous distribution, negatively charged surface (-23.39 mV) and high CP entrapment efficiency (75.38%). Permeation studies showed similar diffusion values between human and porcine skins and higher for bovine. No signs of skin irritation were observed in rabbits. Topically applied NPs significantly decreased in vivo inflammation compared to the reference drug in a TPA-induced mouse ear edema model. Thus, it was concluded that NPs containing CP may be a useful tool for the dermal treatment of local inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. In vivo plasma concentration for lindane after 6 hour exposure in human skin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset is a time course description of lindane disappearance in blood plasma after dermal exposure in human volunteers. This dataset is associated with the...

  7. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C Thompson

    Full Text Available Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3 reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2 solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer.

  8. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2) solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer.

  9. Effects of a skin-massaging device on the ex-vivo expression of human dermis proteins and in-vivo facial wrinkles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caberlotto, Elisa; Ruiz, Laetitia; Miller, Zane; Poletti, Mickael; Tadlock, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical and geometrical cues influence cell behaviour. At the tissue level, almost all organs exhibit immediate mechanical responsiveness, in particular by increasing their stiffness in direct proportion to an applied mechanical stress. It was recently shown in cultured-cell models, in particular with fibroblasts, that the frequency of the applied stress is a fundamental stimulating parameter. However, the influence of the stimulus frequency at the tissue level has remained elusive. Using a device to deliver an oscillating torque that generates cyclic strain at different frequencies, we studied the effect(s) of mild skin massage in an ex vivo model and in vivo. Skin explants were maintained ex vivo for 10 days and massaged twice daily for one minute at various frequencies within the range of 65-85 Hz. Biopsies were analysed at D0, D5 and D10 and processed for immuno-histological staining specific to various dermal proteins. As compared to untreated skin explants, the massaging procedure clearly led to higher rates of expression, in particular for decorin, fibrillin, tropoelastin, and procollagen-1. The mechanical stimulus thus evoked an anti-aging response. Strikingly, the expression was found to depend on the stimulus frequency with maximum expression at 75Hz. We then tested whether this mechanical stimulus had an anti-aging effect in vivo. Twenty Caucasian women (aged 65-75y) applied a commercial anti-aging cream to the face and neck, followed by daily treatments using the anti-aging massage device for 8 weeks. A control group of twenty-two women, with similar ages to the first group, applied the cream alone. At W0, W4 and W8, a blinded evaluator assessed the global facial wrinkles, skin texture, lip area, cheek wrinkles, neck sagging and neck texture using a clinical grading scale. We found that combining the massaging device with a skin anti-aging formulation amplified the beneficial effects of the cream.

  10. Effects of a skin-massaging device on the ex-vivo expression of human dermis proteins and in-vivo facial wrinkles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Caberlotto

    Full Text Available Mechanical and geometrical cues influence cell behaviour. At the tissue level, almost all organs exhibit immediate mechanical responsiveness, in particular by increasing their stiffness in direct proportion to an applied mechanical stress. It was recently shown in cultured-cell models, in particular with fibroblasts, that the frequency of the applied stress is a fundamental stimulating parameter. However, the influence of the stimulus frequency at the tissue level has remained elusive. Using a device to deliver an oscillating torque that generates cyclic strain at different frequencies, we studied the effect(s of mild skin massage in an ex vivo model and in vivo. Skin explants were maintained ex vivo for 10 days and massaged twice daily for one minute at various frequencies within the range of 65-85 Hz. Biopsies were analysed at D0, D5 and D10 and processed for immuno-histological staining specific to various dermal proteins. As compared to untreated skin explants, the massaging procedure clearly led to higher rates of expression, in particular for decorin, fibrillin, tropoelastin, and procollagen-1. The mechanical stimulus thus evoked an anti-aging response. Strikingly, the expression was found to depend on the stimulus frequency with maximum expression at 75Hz. We then tested whether this mechanical stimulus had an anti-aging effect in vivo. Twenty Caucasian women (aged 65-75y applied a commercial anti-aging cream to the face and neck, followed by daily treatments using the anti-aging massage device for 8 weeks. A control group of twenty-two women, with similar ages to the first group, applied the cream alone. At W0, W4 and W8, a blinded evaluator assessed the global facial wrinkles, skin texture, lip area, cheek wrinkles, neck sagging and neck texture using a clinical grading scale. We found that combining the massaging device with a skin anti-aging formulation amplified the beneficial effects of the cream.

  11. In vivo MR imaging of the human skin at subnanoliter resolution using a superconducting surface coil at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laistler, Elmar; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Lambert, Simon A; Dubuisson, Rose-Marie; Girard, Olivier M; Moser, Ewald; Darrasse, Luc; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a highly sensitive superconducting surface coil for microscopic MRI of the human skin in vivo in a clinical 1.5 Tesla (T) scanner. A 12.4-mm high-temperature superconducting coil was used at 1.5T for phantom and in vivo skin imaging. Images were inspected to identify fine anatomical skin structures. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement by the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, as compared to a commercial MR microscopy coil was quantified from phantom imaging; the gain over a geometrically identical coil made from copper (cooled or not) was theoretically deduced. Noise sources were identified to evaluate the potential of HTS coils for future studies. In vivo skin images with isotropic 80 μm resolution were demonstrated revealing fine anatomical structures. The HTS coil improved SNR by a factor 32 over the reference coil in a nonloading phantom. For calf imaging, SNR gains of 380% and 30% can be expected over an identical copper coil at room temperature and 77 K, respectively. The high sensitivity of HTS coils allows for microscopic imaging of the skin at 1.5T and could serve as a tool for dermatology in a clinical setting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Bioactive reagents used in mesotherapy for skin rejuvenation in vivo induce diverse physiological processes in human skin fibroblasts in vitro- a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Claudia; Brenner, Christiane; Habicht, Jüri; Wallich, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    The promise of mesotherapy is maintenance and/or recovery of a youthful skin with a firm, bright and moisturized texture. Currently applied medications employ microinjections of hyaluronic acid, vitamins, minerals and amino acids into the superficial layer of the skin. However, the molecular and cellular processes underlying mesotherapy are still elusive. Here we analysed the effect of five distinct medication formulas on pivotal parameters involved in skin ageing, that is collagen expression, cell proliferation and morphological changes using normal human skin fibroblast cultures in vitro. Whereas in the presence of hyaluronic acid, NCTF135(®) and NCTF135HA(®) , cell proliferation was comparable to control cultures; however, with higher expression of collagen type-1, matrix metalloproteinase-1 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, addition of Soluvit(®) N and Meso-BK led to apoptosis and/or necrosis of human fibroblasts. The data indicate that bioactive reagents currently applied for skin rejuvenation elicit strikingly divergent physiological processes in human skin fibroblast in vitro. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Intravital multiphoton tomography as an appropriate tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Mess, Christian; Dimitrova, Valentina; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2011-03-01

    Increasing incidence of inflammatory skin diseases such as Atopic Dermatitis (AD) has been noted in the past years. According to recent estimations around 15% of newborn subjects are affected with a disease severity that requires medical treatment. Although its pathogenesis is multifactorial, recent reports indicate that an impaired physical skin barrier predispose for the development of AD. The major part of this barrier is formed by the stratum corneum (SC) wherein corneocytes are embedded in a complex matrix of proteins and lipids. Its components were synthesized in the stratum granulosum (SG) and secreted via lamellar bodies at the SC/SG interface. Within a clinical in vivo study we focused on the skin metabolism at the SC/SG interface in AD affected patients in comparison to healthy subjects. Measurement of fluorescence life-time of NADH provides access to the metabolic state of skin. Due to the application of a 5D intravital tomographic skin analysis we facilitate the non-invasive investigation of human epidermis in the longitudinal course of AD therapy. We could ascertain by blinded analysis of 40 skin areas of 20 patients in a three month follow-up that the metabolic status at the SC/SG interface was altered in AD compromised skin even in non-lesional, apparent healthy skin regions. This illustrates an impaired skin barrier formation even at non-affected skin of AD subjects appearing promotive for the development of acute skin inflammation. Therefore, our findings allow a deeper understanding of the individual disease development and the improved management of the therapeutic intervention in clinical application.

  14. Spectral Remittance and Transmittance of Visible and Infrared-A Radiation in Human Skin-Comparison Between in vivo Measurements and Model Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazena, Helmut; Meffert, Hans; Uebelhack, Ralf

    2017-05-04

    The aim of the study was to assess the interindividual variability of spectral remittance and spectral transmittance of visible and infrared-A radiations interacting with human skin and subcutaneous tissue, and direct measurements were taken in vivo using healthy persons of different skin color types. Up to wavelengths of about 900 nm, both spectral remittance and spectral transmittance depended significantly on the individual contents of melanin and hemoglobin in the skin, whereas the contents of water and lipids mainly determined spectral slopes of both characteristics of interaction for wavelengths above about 900 nm. In vivo measured data of spectral transmittance showed approximately similar decreases with tissue thickness between about 900 nm and 1100 nm as compared with model data which were calculated using spectral absorption and scattering coefficients of skin samples in vitro published by different authors. In addition, in vivo measured data and in vitro-based model calculations of spectral remittance were approximately comparable in this wavelength range. In contrast, systematic but individually varying differences between both methods were found for both spectral remittance and spectral transmittance at wavelengths below about 900 nm, where interaction of radiation was significantly affected by both melanin and hemoglobin. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  15. Skin tissue engineering--in vivo and in vitro applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeber, Florian; Holeiter, Monika; Hampel, Martina; Hinderer, Svenja; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2011-04-30

    Significant progress has been made over the years in the development of in vitro-engineered substitutes that mimic human skin, either to be used as grafts for the replacement of lost skin or for the establishment of human-based in vitro skin models. This review summarizes these advances in in vivo and in vitro applications of tissue-engineered skin. We further highlight novel efforts in the design of complex disease-in-a-dish models for studies ranging from disease etiology to drug development and screening. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro-in vivo correlation in skin permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, D; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2014-02-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been used extensively in the development and optimisation of delivery of actives in vivo. However, there are few reported correlations of such in vitro studies with in vivo data. The aim of this study was to investigate the skin permeation of a model active, niacinamide, both in vitro and in vivo. Conventional diffusion cell studies were conducted in human skin to determine niacinamide permeation from a range of vehicles which included dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML), N-methyl 2-pyrrolidone (NMP), Miglyol 812N® (MG), and mineral oil (MO). Single, binary or ternary systems were examined. The same vehicles were subsequently examined to investigate niacinamide delivery in vivo. For this proof-of-concept study one donor was used for the in vitro studies and one volunteer for the in vivo investigations to minimise biovariability. Analysis of in vitro samples was conducted using HPLC and in vivo uptake of niacinamide was evaluated using Confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS). The amount of niacinamide permeated through skin in vitro was linearly proportional to the intensity of the niacinamide signal determined in the stratum corneum in vivo. A good correlation was observed between the signal intensities of selected vehicles and niacinamide signal intensity. The findings provide further support for the use of CRS to monitor drug delivery into and across the skin. In addition, the results highlight the critical role of the vehicle and its disposition in skin for effective dermal delivery.

  17. Electrospun Zein/PCL Fibrous Matrices Release Tetracycline in a Controlled Manner, Killing Staphylococcus aureus Both in Biofilms and Ex Vivo on Pig Skin, and are Compatible with Human Skin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusein, Nour; Blagbrough, Ian S; Beeton, Michael L; Bolhuis, Albert; De Bank, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the destruction of clinically-relevant bacteria within biofilms via the sustained release of the antibiotic tetracycline from zein-based electrospun polymeric fibrous matrices and to demonstrate the compatibility of such wound dressing matrices with human skin cells. Zein/PCL triple layered fibrous dressings with entrapped tetracycline were electrospun. The successful entrapment of tetracycline in these dressings was validated. The successful release of bioactive tetracycline, the destruction of preformed biofilms, and the viability of fibroblast (FEK4) cells were investigated. The sustained release of tetracycline from these matrices led to the efficient destruction of preformed biofilms from Staphylococcus aureus MRSA252 in vitro, and of MRSA252 and ATCC 25923 bacteria in an ex vivo pig skin model using 1 × 1 cm square matrices containing tetracycline (30 μg). Human FEK4 cells grew normally in the presence of these matrices. The ability of the zein-based matrices to destroy bacteria within increasingly complex in vitro biofilm models was clearly established. An ex vivo pig skin assay showed that these matrices, with entrapped tetracycline, efficiently kill bacteria and this, combined with their compatibility with a human skin cell line suggest these matrices are well suited for applications in wound healing and infection control.

  18. In-vivo fluorescence dosimetry of aminolevulinate-based protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulation in human nonmelanoma skin cancers and precancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Christine B.; Lohser, Sara; Chang, Sung; Bailin, Philip A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2009-06-01

    PDT is clinically useful for precancers (actinic keratoses; AK) of the skin, but the optimal duration for 5-ALA application is still controversial. For basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), cure rates remain inferior to surgical excision. Lack of knowledge about regional levels of PpIX levels within target tissues clearly contribute to these suboptimal results. To investigate PpIX levels achievable in human skin neoplasias in-vivo, a clinical study to monitor PpIX accumulation in vivo was performed. PpIX-fluorescence in patients undergoing ALA-PDT for facial AK was monitored via real-time in-vivo fluorescence dosimetry, with measurements q20 min following application of 5-ALA (Levulan Kerastick). PpIX accumulation followed linear kinetics in nearly all cases. The slopes varied widely, and did not correlate with clinical outcome in all patients. Some patients with a low accumulation of PpIX fluorescence had a good response to therapy, whereas others with high PpIX accumulation required repeat treatment (although not necessarily of the same lesion). PpIX accumulation rates did correlate to a certain degree with the overall amount of erythema. We conclude that unknown factors besides PpIX levels must be critical for the response to treatment. To assess the relationship between PpIX levels in various skin cancers, patients undergoing routine Mohs surgery for BCC or SCC were measured by in-vivo dosimetry at 2 h after 5-ALA application. Overall, a progressive increase in PpIX signal during malignant progression was observed, in the following rank order: Normal skin < AK < SCC ~ BCC.

  19. Evaluating the Photoprotective Effects of Ochre on Human Skin by In Vivo SPF Assessment: Implications for Human Evolution, Adaptation and Dispersal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaan F Rifkin

    Full Text Available Archaeological indicators of cognitively modern behaviour become increasingly prevalent during the African Middle Stone Age (MSA. Although the exploitation of ochre is viewed as a key feature of the emergence of modern human behaviour, the uses to which ochre and ochre-based mixtures were put remain ambiguous. Here we present the results of an experimental study exploring the efficacy of ochre as a topical photoprotective compound. This is achieved through the in vivo calculation of the sun protection factor (SPF values of ochre samples obtained from Ovahimba women (Kunene Region, Northern Namibia and the Palaeozoic Bokkeveld Group deposits of the Cape Supergroup (Western Cape Province, South Africa. We employ visible spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF, X-ray diffraction (XRD and granulometric analyses to characterise ochre samples. The capacity of ochre to inhibit the susceptibility of humans to the harmful effects of exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR is confirmed and the mechanisms implicated in the efficacy of ochre as a sunscreen identified. It is posited that the habitual application of ochre may have represented a crucial innovation for MSA humans by limiting the adverse effects of ultraviolet exposure. This may have facilitated the colonisation of geographic regions largely unfavourable to the constitutive skin colour of newly arriving populations.

  20. Modified Corneosurfametry as a new accelerated high-throughput ex vivo methodology for predicting cleanser effects towards human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M; Mollica, L; Regan, J; Hawkins, S; McGuiness, H; Vetro, K; Garczarek, U; Shi, S; Vasudevan, V; Ananthapadmanabhan, K P

    2016-04-01

    Corneosurfametry (CSM) was originally developed as a tool to predict irritation potential of cleansers. In this method, surface skin stripped using cyanoacrylate is contacted with surfactants/products, rinsed and stained with toluidine blue and basic fuschin dyes. The intensity of staining increases with increases in irritation potential of surfactant. Our objective was to modify the CSM technique to achieve better control of the tape stripping process. Another objective was to correlate the modified CSM (MCSM) with a traditional in-vivo forearm controlled application test (FCAT) for mildness and to explore its utility to assess the state of corneum after a clinical test. Surface skin cells were tape stripped from forearms of volunteers with D-Squame Adhesive Discs. Discs were treated with a 10% solution of the product in a 96-plate well for 10 min, rinsed, dried and treated with basic fuschin-toluidine blue dye solution, rinsed and dried again. Forearm Controlled Application Test (FCAT) was based on a published protocol. Tape strips obtained after product treatment were also analyzed by the MCSM procedure without additional product treatment. Mildness/barrier damage assessed from in-vivo FCAT showed a similar ranking to the MCSM results. MCSM, TEWL and Erythema analysis of between-treatment differences showed a good correlation indicating that barrier damage seen in in-vivo studies can be predicted from ex-vivo MCSM studies. MCSM analysis of tape strips after the FCAT study showed that the damage decreased with increase in tape strip number. A moisturizing body wash (MBW) with mild surfactants showed the least damage in all layers. In contrast, harsh dish washing liquid showed significantly higher damage down to several layers. Another MBW with petrolatum in a harsher base showed damage almost similar to that of the harsh dish washing liquid in the surface layers. Thus, the MCSM was able to show underlying damage which would have been normally masked by the

  1. Measurement of the force–displacement response of in vivo human skin under a rich set of deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Flynn, Cormac

    2011-06-01

    The non-linear, anisotropic, and viscoelastic properties of human skin vary according to location on the body, age, and individual. The measurement of skin\\'s mechanical properties is important in several fields including medicine, cosmetics, and forensics. In this study, a novel force-sensitive micro-robot applied a rich set of three-dimensional deformations to the skin surface of different areas of the arms of 20 volunteers. The force-displacement response of each area in different directions was measured. All tested areas exhibited a non-linear, viscoelastic, and anisotropic force-displacement response. There was a wide quantitative variation in the stiffness of the response. For the right anterior forearm, the ratio of the maximum probe reaction force to maximum probe displacement ranged from 0.44Nmm-1 to 1.45Nmm-1. All volunteers exhibited similar qualitative anisotropic characteristics. For the anterior right forearm, the stiffest force-displacement response was when the probe displaced along the longitudinal axis of the forearm. The response of the anterior left forearm was stiffest in a direction 20° to the longitudinal axis of the forearm. The posterior upper arm was stiffest in a direction 90° to the longitudinal axis of the arm. The averaged posterior upper arm response was less stiff than the averaged anterior forearm response. The maximum probe force at 1.3mm probe displacement was 0.69N for the posterior upper arm and 1.1N for the right anterior forearm. The average energy loss during the loading-unloading cycle ranged from 11.9% to 34.2%. This data will be very useful for studying the non-linear, anisotropic, and viscoelastic behaviour of skin and also for generating material parameters for appropriate constitutive models. © 2011 IPEM.

  2. Influence of age and sun exposure on the biophysical properties of the human skin: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhoute, H; de Rigal, J; Marchand, J P; Privat, Y; Leveque, J L

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of the skin were measured by using noninvasive methods on 72 people displaying various levels of solar elastosis on the neck. The physical parameters measured were the skin extensibility, the elastic recovery, the skin colour, the skin thickness and the electrical conductance. The correlation between the above parameters, the clinical grades of elastosis and the chronological age of each subject were studied using two different statistical approaches. They both showed that elastotic skin is less elastic, dryer, darker, more erythematous and less yellowish than the nonexposed skin. The similarities and differences between the properties of elastotic skin and purely chronologically aged skin are discussed.

  3. Platelet-activating factor induces histamine release from human skin mast cells in vivo, which is reduced by local nerve blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, L J; Church, M K; Skov, P S

    1997-05-01

    Intradermal injection of platelet-activating factor (PAF) causes wheal and flare reactions, which are inhibited by antihistamines. However, PAF does not release histamine from human dispersed skin mast cells in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent and possible mechanisms of PAF-induced histamine release in human skin in vivo with the use of dermal microdialysis. Hollow dialysis fibers were inserted into the upper dermis in forearm skin and each fiber was perfused with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution at a rate of 3.0 microliters/min. PAF (4.5 to 36 mumol/L), lyso-PAF (36 mumol/L), vehicle (negative control), and codeine 750 or 250 mumol/L (positive control) were injected intradermally above separate fibers. Dialysate was collected in 2-minute fractions for 20 minutes and histamine analyzed spectrofluorometrically. PAF, but not lyso-PAF, caused statistically significant dose-related histamine release and wheal and flare reactions. Intradermal mepivacaine administration significantly abrogated flare reactions by PAF and codeine and inhibited histamine release and wheal reactions by PAF but not by codeine. Long-term topical capsaicin administration inhibited histamine release and wheal reactions by PAF but not by codeine. It inhibited flare reactions induced by both compounds. PAF did not release histamine from blood basophils. These data suggest that PAF induced histamine release from mast cells in intact human skin indirectly via neurogenic activation. Further, on the intradermal injection of PAF histamine release and the skin responses, the wheal and the flare, are differentially regulated by neurogenic components.

  4. Responsive corneosurfametry following in vivo skin preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhoda, E; Goffin, V; Pierard, G E

    2003-12-01

    Skin is subjected to many environmental threats, some of which altering the structure and function of the stratum corneum. Among them, surfactants are recognized factors that may influence irritant contact dermatitis. The present study was conducted to compare the variations in skin capacitance and corneosurfametry (CSM) reactivity before and after skin exposure to repeated subclinical injuries by 2 hand dishwashing liquids. A forearm immersion test was performed on 30 healthy volunteers. 2 daily soak sessions were performed for 5 days. At inclusion and the day following the last soak session, skin capacitance was measured and cyanoacrylate skin-surface strippings were harvested. The latter specimens were used for the ex vivo microwave CSM. Both types of assessments clearly differentiated the 2 hand dishwashing liquids. The forearm immersion test allowed the discriminant sensitivity of CSM to increase. Intact skin capacitance did not predict CSM data. By contrast, a significant correlation was found between the post-test conductance and the corresponding CSM data. In conclusion, a forearm immersion test under realistic conditions can discriminate the irritation potential between surfactant-based products by measuring skin conductance and performing CSM. In vivo skin preconditioning by surfactants increases CSM sensitivity to the same surfactants.

  5. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and ex vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2013-05-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) protects from ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced carcinogenesis in mice and from UV-induced immunosuppression in mice and humans. Recent double-blinded randomized controlled Phase 2 studies in heavily sun-damaged individuals have shown that oral nicotinamide significantly reduces premalignant actinic keratoses, and may reduce new non-melanoma skin cancers. Nicotinamide is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential coenzyme in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Previously, we showed that nicotinamide prevents UV-induced ATP decline in HaCaT keratinocytes. Energy-dependent DNA repair is a key determinant of cellular survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV radiation. Hence, in this study we investigated whether nicotinamide protection from cellular energy loss influences DNA repair. We treated HaCaT keratinocytes with nicotinamide and exposed them to low-dose solar-simulated UV (ssUV). Excision repair was quantified using an assay of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Nicotinamide increased both the proportion of cells undergoing excision repair and the repair rate in each cell. We then investigated ssUV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxoG) formation and repair by comet assay in keratinocytes and with immunohistochemistry in human skin. Nicotinamide reduced CPDs and 8oxoG in both models and the reduction appeared to be due to enhancement of DNA repair. These results show that nicotinamide enhances two different pathways for repair of UV-induced photolesions, supporting nicotinamide's potential as an inexpensive, convenient and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention.

  6. Dermal penetration and resorption of beta-naphthylamine and N-phenyl-beta-naphthylamine from lubricants in an ex vivo human skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Göen, Thomas; Zobel, Melanie; Boos, Anja M; Drexler, Hans; Kilo, Sonja

    2017-10-01

    Dermal Penetration of aromatic amines (AA's), often suspected or known to be carcinogenic, can play an important role in the overall human exposure. However, information on penetration of certain AA's is poor and inconsistent. Penetration of the former lubricant additive N-phenyl-beta-naphthylamine (PBNA) and its contaminant beta-naphthylamine (BNA) a known carcinogen was investigated and the influence of formulation and co-application characterized. Percutaneous penetration of BNA and PBNA through freshly excised human skin (n = 8; 48 h) was investigated using an ex vivo diffusion cell model. Both AA's were applied in a technical-conform lubricant or dissolved in hexane. The amount of BNA and PBNA applied to skin was 0.52 and 259 μg/0.64 cm(2). The analytical determination of AA's was performed by GC-MS. Both, BNA and PBNA penetrated through human skin (38 vs. 5% of applied dose). In contrast to BNA, the percutaneous penetration of PBNA continued beyond the end of exposure. Co-exposure of both AA's increased the intradermal uptake of BNA and PBNA (p penetration (2.9 and 1.9% of applied dose). The results clearly reveal that dermal penetration of both AA's depends strongly on the mode of application. Co-application and formulation alters the penetration of the AA's. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Combined multimodal photoacoustic tomography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT based angiography system for in vivo imaging of multiple skin disorders in human(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyang; Chen, Zhe; Sinz, Christoph; Rank, Elisabet; Zabihian, Behrooz; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Kittler, Harald; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    All optical photoacoustic tomography (PAT) using a planar Fabry-Perot interferometer polymer film sensor has been demonstrated for in vivo human palm imaging with an imaging penetration depth of 5 mm. The relatively larger vessels in the superficial plexus and the vessels in the dermal plexus are visible in PAT. However, due to both resolution and sensitivity limits, all optical PAT cannot reveal the smaller vessels such as capillary loops and venules. Melanin absorption also sometimes causes difficulties in PAT to resolve vessels. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) based angiography, on the other hand, has been proven suitable for microvasculature visualization in the first couple millimeters in human. In our work, we combine an all optical PAT system with an OCT system featuring a phase stable akinetic swept source. This multimodal PAT/OCT/OCT-angiography system provides us co-registered human skin vasculature information as well as the structural information of cutaneous. The scanning units of the sub-systems are assembled into one probe, which is then mounted onto a portable rack. The probe and rack design gives six degrees of freedom, allowing the multimodal optical imaging probe to access nearly all regions of human body. Utilizing this probe, we perform imaging on patients with various skin disorders as well as on healthy controls. Fused PAT/OCT-angiography volume shows the complete blood vessel network in human skin, which is further embedded in the morphology provided by OCT. A comparison between the results from the disordered regions and the normal regions demonstrates the clinical translational value of this multimodal optical imaging system in dermatology.

  8. In vivo evaluation of Fe in the human skin and swins mice skin through the X-rays fluorescence technique; Avaliacao in vivo de Fe na pele humana e de camundongos swins atraves da tecnica de fluorescencia de raios X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevam, Marcelo

    2005-07-01

    Recent technological improvements allow the method of in vivo XRF to supply useful sensibility for diagnostics or monitoring in biomedical applications. In cases of hereditary sanguine disorders as the {beta}-Thalassaemia or a genetic disorder like Haemochromatosis, there is a high concentration of elements as Fe, Zn and Cu in the skin and internal organs, due to the treatment of those abnormalities or due to the own dysfunction caused by the disease. The levels of Fe related to the patient bearers of the {beta}-Thalassaemia are determined, at the moment, measuring a protein in the sanguine current, called ferritin. The monitoring of the protein is ineffective in several situations, such as when the patient suffers any disturbance of health. Nowadays, the main forms of measuring the levels of those metals through hepatic storage are the biopsy of the liver, that is invasive and potentially dangerous, presenting a rate of mortality of 0,1%, and through magnetic susceptibilities that employs a quantum superconductor, which is highly expensive and there are only three main world medical centers with this equipment. This work investigates the use of a Si PIN-diode detector and a 238Pu source (13 and 17 keV; 13%; 95.2 mCi; 86y) for the measurement of Fe skin levels compatible with those associated to the disease {beta}-Thalassaemia. XRF spectra were analyzed using a set of AXIL-WinQXAS programs elaborated and disseminated by the IAEA. The determination coefficient of the calibration model (sensitivity curve) was 0.97. Measurements on skin phantoms containing concentrations of Fe in the range from 15 to 150 parts per million (ppm), indicate that we are able to detect Fe at levels of the order of 13 ppm, using monitoring periods of 50 seconds and skin entrance dose less than 10 mSv. The literature reports skin Fe levels from 15.0 to 60.0 ppm in normal persons and from 70 to 150 ppm in thalassaemic patients. So, the employed methodology allows the in vivo measurement of

  9. Automatic motion correction for in vivo human skin optical coherence tomography angiography through combined rigid and nonrigid registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, David Wei; Deegan, Anthony J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2017-06-01

    When using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA), the development of artifacts due to involuntary movements can severely compromise the visualization and subsequent quantitation of tissue microvasculatures. To correct such an occurrence, we propose a motion compensation method to eliminate artifacts from human skin OCTA by means of step-by-step rigid affine registration, rigid subpixel registration, and nonrigid B-spline registration. To accommodate this remedial process, OCTA is conducted using two matching all-depth volume scans. Affine transformation is first performed on the large vessels of the deep reticular dermis, and then the resulting affine parameters are applied to all-depth vasculatures with a further subpixel registration to refine the alignment between superficial smaller vessels. Finally, the coregistration of both volumes is carried out to result in the final artifact-free composite image via an algorithm based upon cubic B-spline free-form deformation. We demonstrate that the proposed method can provide a considerable improvement to the final en face OCTA images with substantial artifact removal. In addition, the correlation coefficients and peak signal-to-noise ratios of the corrected images are evaluated and compared with those of the original images, further validating the effectiveness of the proposed method. We expect that the proposed method can be useful in improving qualitative and quantitative assessment of the OCTA images of scanned tissue beds.

  10. In vivo multiphoton imaging of the eyelid skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; König, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton tomography (MPT) has become an important imaging method for non-invasive and high-resolution imaging of the skin in vivo. Due to the nonlinear excitation, by using near-infrared (NIR) light, 3D information is intrinsically provided. In combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), it is possible to obtain both structural and metabolic data. Human in vivo measurements are usually limited to easily accessible regions. However, often imaging of specific body parts such as the eyelid are of interest for cosmetic reasons. By using the clinically certified multiphoton imaging tomograph MPTflex this demand can be fulfilled. An articulated mirror arm and scan-detector head enable imaging at otherwise difficult-to-access areas. We show the characterization of the epidermal and upper dermal layers of the eyelid skin of human volunteers in vivo based on endogenous autofluorescence intensity, lifetime, and second-harmonic generation signals. Skin properties such as the epidermal thickness were also assessed. Furthermore, the influence of an anti-aging cream on the eyelid and forearm skin was investigated. Changes of the skin epidermis autofluorescence lifetime were observed after two-weeks long application of an anti-aging cream. The SHG-to-AF aging index of dermis (SAAID) increased during that time.

  11. Efficient in vivo gene transfer to xenotransplanted human skin by lentivirus-mediated, but not by AAV-directed, gene delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Maria Vad; Askou, Anne Louise; Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup

    Skin is an easily accessible organ, and therapeutic gene transfer to skin remains an attractive alternative for treatment of skin diseases. We compared the potential usefulness of various serotypes of recombinant AAV vectors and lentiviral vectors for gene transfer to human skin in a xenotranspla......Skin is an easily accessible organ, and therapeutic gene transfer to skin remains an attractive alternative for treatment of skin diseases. We compared the potential usefulness of various serotypes of recombinant AAV vectors and lentiviral vectors for gene transfer to human skin...... in a xenotransplanted mouse model. Vector constructs encoding firefly luciferase were packaged in AAV capsids of serotype 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, and 9 and separately administered by intradermal injection in human skin transplants. For all serotypes, live bioimaging demonstrated low levels of transgene expression in the human...... skin graft, and firefly luciferase expression was observed primarily in neighboring tissue beneath or surrounding the graft. In contrast, gene delivery by intradermally injected lentiviral vectors was efficient and led to extensive and persistent firefly luciferase expression within the human skin...

  12. The role of topically applied L-ascorbic acid in ex-vivo examination of burn-injured human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, Anna; Biniaś, Dorota; Bobiński, Rafał; Sarna, Ewa; Paluch, Jadwiga; Waksmańska, Wioletta

    2017-10-01

    Wound treatment and healing is complex and is comprised of an elaborate set of processes including cellular, spectroscopic and biochemical ones as well as the ;reaction; of local tissue to thermal injury. Vitamin C as L-ascorbic acid (LA) prevents injurious effects of oxidants because it reduces reactive oxygen species to stable molecules, it becomes oxidized to the short-lived ascorbyl radical. As a result, antioxidant treatment may contribute to minimizing injury in burn patients. The aim of this study is to assess changes in molecular structure of collagen extracted from human epidermis burn wound scab during incubation of the epidermis in L-ascorbic acid solution. The study will be performed using FTIR and FT Raman spectroscopies. During this research it was observed that the intensity of Raman peaks increased where healing was being modified by LA. The intensity of the amide III band at 1247 cm- 1 relative to the intensity at 1326 cm- 1 was used to test tissue repair degree at the incision site. FTIR spectra were recorded from frozen specimens of serum modified by LA; an analysis of shifts in the amide I band position was conducted. The appearance of a new band for frozen samples modified by LA was observed around 1149-1220 cm- 1. The above conclusions confirmed the creation of hydrogen bonds between Nsbnd H stretch and Cdbnd O. Samples being incubated in solutions of L-ascorbic acid demonstrated the absence of electrophoretic bands of albumin. Alterations in the surface of the skin incubated in L-ascorbic acid were investigated with the use of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). A decrease in external symptoms of burn injury was noted in the damaged epidermis incubated in L-ascorbic acid.

  13. Kinetics of carotenoid distribution in human skin in vivo after exogenous stress: disinfectant and wIRA-induced carotenoid depletion recovers from outside to inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluhr, Joachim W.; Caspers, Peter; van der Pol, J. Andre; Richter, Heike; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2011-03-01

    The human organism has developed a protection system against the destructive effect of free radicals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the extent of exogenous stress factors such as disinfectant and IR-A radiation on the skin, and their influence on the kinetics of carotenoids distribution during the recovery process. Ten healthy volunteers were assessed with resonance spectroscopy using an Argon-laser at 488 nm to excite the carotenoids in vivo. Additionally, Raman-confocal-micro-spectroscopy measurements were performed using a model 3510 Skin Composition Analyzer with spatially resolved measurements down to 30 μm. The measurements were performed at a baseline of 20, 40, 60, and 120 min after an external stressor consisting either of water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) with 150 mW/cm2 or 1 ml/cm2 of an alcoholic disinfectant. Both Raman methods were capable to detect the infrared-induced depletion of carotenoids. Only Raman-microspectroscopy could reveal the carotenoids decrease after topical disinfectant application. The carotenoid-depletion started at the surface. After 60 min, recovery starts at the surface while deeper parts were still depleted. The disinfectant- and wIRA-induced carotenoid depletion in the epidermis recovers from outside to inside and probably delivered by sweat and sebaceous glands. We could show that the Raman microscopic spectroscopy is suited to analyze the carotenoid kinetic of stress effects and recovery.

  14. The effect of formulation on the penetration of coated and uncoated zinc oxide nanoparticles into the viable epidermis of human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite-Silva, Vânia R; Le Lamer, Marina; Sanchez, Washington Y; Liu, David C; Sanchez, Washington H; Morrow, Isabel; Martin, Darren; Silva, Heron D T; Prow, Tarl W; Grice, Jeffrey E; Roberts, Michael S

    2013-06-01

    The use of nanoparticulate zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) in sunscreens and other cosmetic products has raised public health concerns. The two key issues are the extent of exposure to ZnO-NP and the likely hazard after the application of ZnO-NP in sunscreen and cosmetic products to humans in vivo. Our aims were to assess exposure by the extent of ZnO-NP penetration into the viable epidermis and hazard by changes in the viable epidermal redox state for a number of topical products. Of particular interest is the role of the particle coating, formulation used, and the presence of any enhancers. Multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (MPT-FLIM) was used to simultaneously observe ZnO-NP penetration and potential metabolic changes within the viable epidermis of human volunteers after topical application of various ZnO-NP products. Coated and uncoated ZnO-NP remained in the superficial layers of the SC and in the skin furrows. We observed limited penetration of coated ZnO-NP dispersed in a water-in-oil emulsion formulation, which was predominantly localized adjacent to the skin furrow. However, the presence of ZnO-NP in the viable epidermis did not alter the metabolic state or morphology of the cells. In summary, our data suggest that some limited penetration of coated and uncoated ZnO-NP may occur into viable stratum granulosum epidermis adjacent to furrows, but that the extent is not sufficient to affect the redox state of those viable cells. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Feasibility of measuring arsenic and selenium in human skin using in vivo x-ray fluorescence (XRF)--a comparison of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehab, H; Desouza, E D; O'Meara, J; Pejović-Milić, A; Chettle, D R; Fleming, D E B; McNeill, F E

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, in vivo measurement systems of arsenic in skin by K-shell x-ray fluorescence (XRF) have been developed, including one which was applied in a pilot study of human subjects. Improved tube-based approaches suggest the method can be further exploited for in vivo studies. Recently, it has been suggested that selenium deficiency is correlated with arsenic toxicity. A non-invasive measurement of both elements could therefore be of potential interest. The main aim of this current study was to evaluate and compare the performance of an upgraded portable XRF system and an advanced version of the benchtop XRF system for both selenium and arsenic. This evaluation was performed in terms of arsenic and selenium Kα detection limits for a 4W gold anode Olympus InnovX Delta portable analyzer (40 kVp) in polyester resin skin-mimicking phantoms. Unlike the polychromatic source earlier reported in the literature, the benchtop tube-based technique involves monochromatic excitation (25 W silver anode, manufactured by x-ray optics, XOS) and a higher throughput detector type. Use of a single exciting energy allows for a lower in vivo dose delivered and superior signal-noise ratio. For the portable XRF method, arsenic and selenium minimum detection limits (MDLs) of 0.59  ±  0.03 ppm and 0.75  ±  0.02 ppm respectively were found for 1 min measurement times. The MDLs for arsenic and selenium using the benchtop system were found to be 0.35  ±  0.01 ppm and 0.670  ±  0.004 ppm respectively for 30 min measurement times. In terms of a figure of merit (FOM), allowing for dose as well as MDL, the benchtop system was found to be superior for arsenic and the two systems were equivalent, within error, for selenium. We shall discuss the performance and possible improvements of each system, their ease of use and potential for field application.

  16. The isolated perfused human skin flap model: A missing link in skin penetration studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternullo, Selenia; de Weerd, Louis; Flaten, Gøril Eide; Holsæter, Ann Mari; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša

    2017-01-01

    Development of effective (trans)dermal drug delivery systems requires reliable skin models to evaluate skin drug penetration. The isolated perfused human skin flap remains metabolically active tissue for up to 6h during in vitro perfusion. We introduce the isolated perfused human skin flap as a close-to-in vivo skin penetration model. To validate the model's ability to evaluate skin drug penetration the solutions of a hydrophilic (calcein) and a lipophilic (rhodamine) fluorescence marker were applied. The skin flaps were perfused with modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer (pH7.4). Infrared technology was used to monitor perfusion and to select a well-perfused skin area for administration of the markers. Flap perfusion and physiological parameters were maintained constant during the 6h experiments and the amount of markers in the perfusate was determined. Calcein was detected in the perfusate, whereas rhodamine was not detectable. Confocal images of skin cross-sections shoved that calcein was uniformly distributed through the skin, whereas rhodamine accumulated in the stratum corneum. For comparison, the penetration of both markers was evaluated on ex vivo human skin, pig skin and cellophane membrane. The proposed perfused flap model enabled us to distinguish between the penetrations of the two markers and could be a promising close-to-in vivo tool in skin penetration studies and optimization of formulations destined for skin administration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Carotenoids in Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theognosia Vergou

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The human skin, as the boundary organ between the human body and the environment, is under the constant influence of free radicals (FR, both from the outside in and from the inside out. Carotenoids are known to be powerful antioxidant substances playing an essential role in the reactions of neutralization of FR (mainly reactive oxygen species ROS. Carotenoid molecules present in the tissue are capable of neutralizing several attacks of FR, especially ROS, and are then destroyed. Human skin contains carotenoids, such as α-, γ-, β-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and their isomers, which serve the living cells as a protection against oxidation. Recent studies have reported the possibility to investigate carotenoids in human skin quickly and non-invasively by spectroscopic means. Results obtained from in-vivo studies on human skin have shown that carotenoids are vital components of the antioxidative protective system of the human skin and could serve as marker substances for the overall antioxidative status. Reflecting the nutritional and stress situation of volunteers, carotenoids must be administered by means of antioxidant-rich products, e.g., in the form of fruit and vegetables. Carotenoids are degraded by stress factors of any type, inter alia, sun radiation, contact with environmental hazards, illness, etc. The kinetics of the accumulation and degradation of carotenoids in the skin have been investigated.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor-α-accelerated degradation of type I collagen in human skin is associated with elevated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Magnus S; Schnabel, Reinhild; Christensen, Lise H

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may disrupt skin integrity. We have investigated the effects and mechanisms of exogenous TNF-α on collagen degradation by incubating human skin explants in defined serum-free media with or without TNF-α (10ng/ml) in the a......Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may disrupt skin integrity. We have investigated the effects and mechanisms of exogenous TNF-α on collagen degradation by incubating human skin explants in defined serum-free media with or without TNF-α (10ng....../ml) in the absence or presence of the nonselective MMP inhibitor GM6001 for 8 days. The basal culture conditions promoted type I collagen catabolism that was accelerated by TNF-α (p... were associated with increased collagen degradation. TNF-α increased secretion of MMP-1 (p

  19. Reconstructing in-vivo reflectance spectrum of pigmented skin lesion by Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; He, Qingli; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2012-03-01

    In dermatology applications, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been extensively investigated as a promising tool for the noninvasive method to distinguish melanoma from benign pigmented skin lesion (nevus), which is concentrated with the skin chromophores like melanin and hemoglobin. We carried out a theoretical study to examine melanin distribution in human skin tissue and establish a practical optical model for further pigmented skin investigation. The theoretical simulation was using junctional nevus as an example. A multiple layer skin optical model was developed on established anatomy structures of skin, the published optical parameters of different skin layers, blood and melanin. Monte Carlo simulation was used to model the interaction between excitation light and skin tissue and rebuild the diffuse reflectance process from skin tissue. A testified methodology was adopted to determine melanin contents in human skin based on in vivo diffuse reflectance spectra. The rebuild diffuse reflectance spectra were investigated by adding melanin into different layers of the theoretical model. One of in vivo reflectance spectra from Junctional nevi and their surrounding normal skin was studied by compare the ratio between nevus and normal skin tissue in both the experimental and simulated diffuse reflectance spectra. The simulation result showed a good agreement with our clinical measurements, which indicated that our research method, including the spectral ratio method, skin optical model and modifying the melanin content in the model, could be applied in further theoretical simulation of pigmented skin lesions.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of near infrared autofluorescence measurements of in vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; He, Qingli; Zeng, Haishan

    2011-12-02

    The autofluorescence properties of normal human skin in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range were studied using Monte Carlo simulation. The light-tissue interactions including scattering, absorption and anisotropy propagation of the regenerated autofluorescence photons in the skin tissue were taken into account in the theoretical modeling. Skin was represented as a turbid seven-layered medium. To facilitate the simulation, ex vivo NIR autofluorescence spectra and images from different skin layers were measured from frozen skin vertical sections to define the intrinsic fluorescence properties. Monte Carlo simulation was then used to study how the intrinsic fluorescence spectra were distorted by the tissue reabsorption and scattering during in vivo measurements. We found that the reconstructed model skin spectra were in good agreement with the measured in vivo skin spectra from the same anatomical site as the ex vivo tissue sections, demonstrating the usefulness of this modeling. We also found that difference exists over the melanin fluorescent wavelength range (880-910 nm) between the simulated spectrum and the measured in vivo skin spectrum from a different anatomical site. This difference suggests that melanin contents may affect in vivo skin autofluorescence properties, which deserves further investigation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-invasive in vivo determination of the carotenoids beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations in the human skin using the Raman spectroscopic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvin, M E [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology (CCP), Department of Dermatology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Gersonde, I [Institute of Medical Physics and Laser Medicine, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Meinke, M [Institute of Medical Physics and Laser Medicine, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Sterry, W [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology (CCP), Department of Dermatology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Lademann, J [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology (CCP), Department of Dermatology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-08-07

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was used as a fast and non-invasive optical method of measuring the absolute concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene in living human skin. Beta-carotene and lycopene have different absorption values at 488 and 514.5 nm and, consequently, the Raman lines for beta-carotene and lycopene have different scattering efficiencies at 488 and 514.5 nm excitations. These differences were used for the determination of the concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene. Using multiline Ar{sup +} laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra can be obtained which are superimposed on a large fluorescence background. The Raman signals are characterized by two prominent Stokes lines at 1160 and 1525 cm{sup -1}, which have nearly identical relative intensities. Both substances were detected simultaneously. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 10 s, and the required laser light exposure level is well within safety standards. The disturbance of the measurements by non-homogeneous skin pigmentation was avoided by using a relatively large measuring area of 35 mm{sup 2}. It was shown that beta-carotene and lycopene distribution in human skin strongly depends upon the skin region studied and drastically changed inter-individually. Skin beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations are lower in smokers than in non-smokers and higher in the vegetarian group.

  2. The top skin-associated genes: a comparative analysis of human and mouse skin transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Homey, Bernhard; Zlotnik, Albert; Hevezi, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The mouse represents a key model system for the study of the physiology and biochemistry of skin. Comparison of skin between mouse and human is critical for interpretation and application of data from mouse experiments to human disease. Here, we review the current knowledge on structure and immunology of mouse and human skin. Moreover, we present a systematic comparison of human and mouse skin transcriptomes. To this end, we have recently used a genome-wide database of human gene expression to identify genes highly expressed in skin, with no, or limited expression elsewhere - human skin-associated genes (hSAGs). Analysis of our set of hSAGs allowed us to generate a comprehensive molecular characterization of healthy human skin. Here, we used a similar database to generate a list of mouse skin-associated genes (mSAGs). A comparative analysis between the top human (n=666) and mouse (n=873) skin-associated genes (SAGs) revealed a total of only 30.2% identity between the two lists. The majority of shared genes encode proteins that participate in structural and barrier functions. Analysis of the top functional annotation terms revealed an overlap for morphogenesis, cell adhesion, structure, and signal transduction. The results of this analysis, discussed in the context of published data, illustrate the diversity between the molecular make up of skin of both species and grants a probable explanation, why results generated in murine in vivo models often fail to translate into the human.

  3. Comparison of human and porcine skin for characterization of sunscreens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigmann, Hans-Jürgen; Schanzer, Sabine; Patzelt, Alexa; Bahaban, Virginie; Durat, Fabienne; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    The universal sun protection factor (USPF) characterizing sunscreen efficacy based on spectroscopically determined data, which were obtained using the tape stripping procedure. The USPF takes into account the complete ultraviolet (UV) spectral range in contrast to the classical sun protection factor (SPF). Until now, the USPF determination has been evaluated only in human skin. However, investigating new filters not yet licensed excludes in vivo investigation on human skin but requires the utilization of a suitable skin model. The penetration behavior and the protection efficacy of 10 commercial sunscreens characterized by USPF were investigated, comparing human and porcine skin. The penetration behavior found for typical UV filter substances is nearly identical for both skin types. The comparison of the USPF obtained for human and porcine skin results in a linear relation between both USPF values with a correlation factor R2=0.98. The results demonstrate the possibility for the use of porcine skin to determine the protection efficacy of sunscreens.

  4. Modelling and verification of melanin concentration on human skin type

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Karsten, AE

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available /or in vitro and elucidated the melanosomal differences between 5 the different skin types. Meinhardt et al (9) measured the absorption spectra of in vivo human 6 skin from the lighter skin types before and after exposure to natural UV radiation, while Wan 7... et al (10) measured the epidermal (including the Stratum corneum) transmittance of in vitro 8 light and dark coloured human skin over the UVA, UVB and visible wavelength ranges. 9 None of these studies however specifically determined epidermal...

  5. Characterization of Temperature Profiles in Skin and Transdermal Delivery System When Exposed to Temperature Gradients In Vivo and In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Murawsky, Michael; LaCount, Terri; Hao, Jinsong; Kasting, Gerald B; Newman, Bryan; Ghosh, Priyanka; Raney, Sam G; Li, S Kevin

    2017-07-01

    Performance of a transdermal delivery system (TDS) can be affected by exposure to elevated temperature, which can lead to unintended safety issues. This study investigated TDS and skin temperatures and their relationship in vivo, characterized the effective thermal resistance of skin, and identified the in vitro diffusion cell conditions that would correlate with in vivo observations. Experiments were performed in humans and in Franz diffusion cells with human cadaver skin to record skin and TDS temperatures at room temperature and with exposure to a heat flux. Skin temperatures were regulated with two methods: a heating lamp in vivo and in vitro, or thermostatic control of the receiver chamber in vitro. In vivo basal skin temperatures beneath TDS at different anatomical sites were not statistically different. The maximum tolerable skin surface temperature was approximately 42-43°C in vivo. The temperature difference between skin surface and TDS surface increased with increasing temperature, or with increasing TDS thermal resistance in vivo and in vitro. Based on the effective thermal resistance of skin in vivo and in vitro, the heating lamp method is an adequate in vitro method. However, the in vitro-in vivo correlation of temperature could be affected by the thermal boundary layer in the receiver chamber.

  6. Increased in vivo skin penetration of quantum dots with UVR and in vitro quantum dot cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Luke; Zheng, Hong; Faulknor, Renea; De Benedetto, Anna; Beck, Lisa; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2009-02-01

    The growing presence of quantum dots (QD) in a variety of biological, medical, and electronics applications means an increased risk of human exposure in manufacturing, research, and consumer use. However, very few studies have investigated the susceptibility of skin to penetration of QD - the most common exposure route- and the results of those that exist are conflicting. This suggests that a technique allowing determination of skin barrier status and prediction of skin permeability to QD would be of crucial interest as recent findings have provided evidence of in vitro cytotoxicity and long-term in vivo retention in the body for most QD surface chemistries. Our research focuses on barrier status of the skin (intact and with ultraviolet radiation induced barrier defect) and its impact on QD skin penetration. These model studies are particularly relevant to the common application condition of NP containing sunscreen and SPF cosmetics to UV exposed skin. Herein we present our initial efforts to develop an in vivo model of nanoparticle skin penetration using the SKH-1 hairless mouse with transepidermal water loss (TEWL) to evaluate skin barrier status and determine its ability to predict QD penetration. Our results show that ultraviolet radiation increases both TEWL and skin penetration of QD. Additionally, we demonstrate cytotoxic potential of QD to skin cells using a metastatic melanoma cell line. Our research suggests future work in specific targeting of nanoparticles, to prevent or enhance penetration. This knowledge will be used to develop powerful therapeutic agents, decreased penetration cosmetic nanoparticles, and precise skin cancer imaging modalities.

  7. Effect of Different Skin Penetration Promoters in Halobetasol Propionate Permeation and Retention in Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Carvajal-Vidal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Halobetasol propionate (HB is a potent synthetic corticosteroid used against inflammatory skin diseases, such as dermatitis, eczema, and psoriasis, among others. The aim of this study is to define how the presence of different skin penetration enhancers (nonane, menthone, limonene, azone, carene, decanol, linoleic acid and cetiol affects the penetration and retention in skin of HB. To determine drug penetration through skin, 5% of each promoter was used in an ex vivo system with human skin on Franz cells. The results showed that the highest permeation occurs in the presence of menthone, followed by nonane. Permeation parameters were determined. The in vivo test was assessed, and the formulation containing HB-menthone presented better anti-inflammatory efficacy. These results are useful to generate a specific treatment according to each patient’s needs, and the inflammatory characteristics of the disease.

  8. Effects of UV Rays and Thymol/Thymus vulgaris L. Extract in an ex vivo Human Skin Model: Morphological and Genotoxicological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaghi, Laura; Arnaboldi, Francesca; Calò, Rossella; Landoni, Federica; Baruffaldi Preis, William Franz; Marabini, Laura; Donetti, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the major environmental factor affecting functions of the skin. Compounds rich in polyphenols, such as Thymus vulgaris leaf extract and thymol, have been proposed for the prevention of UV-induced skin damage. We compared the acute effects induced by UVA and UVB rays on epidermal morphology and proliferation, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Normal human skin explants were obtained from young healthy women (n = 7) after informed consent and cultured at the air-liquid interface overnight. After 24 h, the samples were divided in 2 groups: the former exposed to UVA (16 or 24 J/cm2) and the latter irradiated with UVB (0.24 or 0.72 J/cm2). One hour after the end of irradiation, supernatants were collected for evaluation of the lactate dehydrogenase activity. Twenty-four hours after UVB exposure, biopsies were processed for light and transmission electron microscopy analysis, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity. UVB and UVA rays induced early inhibition of cell proliferation and DNA damage compared to controls. In particular, UVB rays were always more cytotoxic and genotoxic than UVA ones. For this reason, we evaluated the effect of either T. vulgaris L. extract (1.82 µg/ml) or thymol (1 µg/ml) on all samples treated for 1 h before UVB irradiation. While Thymus had a protective action for all of the endpoints evaluated, the action of the extract was less pronounced on epidermal proliferation and morphological features. The results presented in this study could be the basis for investigating the mechanism of thymol and T. vulgaris L. extract against the damage induced by UV radiation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Novel instrumentation to determine peel force in vivo and preliminary studies with adhesive skin barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Evan M; Cullum, Malford E; Nichols, Thom R; Taylor, Michael G; Sexton, William L; Murahata, Richard I

    2013-11-01

    Adhesive barriers secure medical devices to skin. Laboratory adhesion models are not predictive of in vivo performance. The objectives of these studies were to validate a novel peel force device, and to investigate relationships between barrier formulations, barrier width, subjective discomfort during barrier removal, and substrates. Three hydrocolloid barrier formulations in three widths were adhered to ethylene/methyl acrylate film (EMA), VITRO-SKIN(®) and human abdominal skin. Peel force was measured using a MTS Insight™ and a cyberDERM Inc. Mini Peel Tester (CMPT). Subjects reported their discomfort. Peel forces were highly correlated between devices and highly dependent on substrate. Data suggested a weak direct association between peel force in vivo and discomfort. The 0.5″-wide barriers had the most precise peel forces measurements in vivo. A weak negative relationship between normalized peel force and barrier width on human skin was found. There was a strong positive relationship between peel force in vivo and on EMA, whereas no correlation was observed with VITRO-SKIN(®). The CMPT correlates with a standard instrument and can advantageously investigate adhesion in vivo. Barrier width and substrate impact the reliability and predictability of peel force measurements. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Skin and the non-human human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösing, Lilian Munk

    2013-01-01

    ) article 'Visualizing the mind: Looking at Titian's Flaying of Marsyas', addressing features of the painting not commented on by Hart, and supplementing Hart's (Kleinian) theoretical frame by involving Didier Anzieu's 'skin ego', Slavoj Zizek's concept of the 'non-human', Giorgio Agamben's term...

  11. Investigation of in-vivo skin autofluorescence lifetimes under long-term cw optical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lihachev, A; Ferulova, I; Vasiljeva, K; Spigulis, J [Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia)

    2014-08-31

    The main results obtained during the last five years in the field of laser-excited in-vivo human skin photobleaching effects are presented. The main achievements and results obtained, as well as methods and experimental devices are briefly described. In addition, the impact of long-term 405-nm cw low-power laser excitation on the skin autofluorescence lifetime is experimentally investigated. (laser biophotonics)

  12. Immunoarchitectural characterization of a human skin model reconstructed in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Ricardo Martinhão Souto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Over the last few years, different models for human skin equivalent reconstructed in vitro (HSERIV have been reported for clinical usage and applications in research for the pharmaceutical industry. Before release for routine use as human skin replacements, HSERIV models need to be tested regarding their similarity with in vivo skin, using morphological (architectural and immunohistochemical (functional analyses. A model for HSERIV has been developed in our hospital, and our aim here was to further characterize its immunoarchitectural features by comparing them with human skin, before it can be tested for clinical use, e.g. for severe burns or wounds, whenever ancillary methods are not indicated. DESIGN AND SETTING: Experimental laboratory study, in the Skin Cell Culture Laboratory, School of Medical Sciences, Universidade Estadual de Campinas. METHODS: Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Masson's trichrome for collagen fibers, periodic acid-Schiff reagent for basement membrane and glycogen, Weigert-Van Gieson for elastic fibers and Fontana-Masson for melanocytes. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize cytokeratins (broad spectrum of molecular weight, AE1/AE3, high molecular weight cytokeratins (34βE12, low molecular weight cytokeratins (35βH11, cytokeratins 7 and 20, vimentin, S-100 protein (for melanocytic and dendritic cells, CD68 (KP1, histiocytes and CD34 (QBend, endothelium. RESULTS: Histology revealed satisfactory similarity between HSERIV and in vivo skin. Immunohistochemical analysis on HSERIV demonstrated that the marker pattern was similar to what is generally present in human skin in vivo. CONCLUSION: HSERIV is morphologically and functionally compatible with human skin observed in vivo.

  13. Combined Raman spectroscopy and autofluoresence imaging method for in vivo skin tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, V. P.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Khristoforova, Y. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    The fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy (RS) combined method of in vivo detection of malignant human skin cancer was demonstrated. The fluorescence analysis was used for detection of abnormalities during fast scanning of large tissue areas. In suspected cases of malignancy the Raman spectrum analysis of biological tissue was performed to determine the type of neoplasm. A special RS phase method was proposed for in vivo identification of skin tumor. Quadratic Discriminant Analysis was used for tumor type classification on phase planes. It was shown that the application of phase method provides a diagnosis of malignant melanoma with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 87%.

  14. The Effect of Polyhexanide, Octenidine Dihydrochloride, and Tea Tree Oil as Topical Antiseptic Agents on In Vivo Microcirculation of the Human Skin: A Noninvasive Quantitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, Jens; Krauss, Sabrina; Tschumi, Christian; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Held, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Antiseptics are indispensable for wound management and should focus not only on the efficacy in reducing the bacterial burden but also on how much they interfere in wound healing. In this study, the authors analyzed the direct effect of topical antiseptic agents on the microcirculation of intact human skin. The perfusion dynamics were assessed before, and 10 minutes after, the volunteers' fingers of the right hand (n = 20) were immersed in the following solutions - octenidine dihydrochloride, polyhexanide, tea tree oil, and saline solution. The authors used the Oxygen to See (LEA Medizintechnik GmbH, Giessen, Germany) diagnostic device for noninvasive determination of oxygen supply in microcirculation of blood perfused tissues, which combines a laser light to determine blood flow, as well as white light to determine hemoglobin oxygenation and the relative amount of hemoglobin. Tea tree oil (÷19.0%) (B. Braun Melsungen AG, Melsungen, Germany) and polyhexanide (÷12.4%) (Lavanid, Serag Wiessner GmbH, Naila, Germany) caused a significant increase in blood flow compared to the negative control (-25.6%). Octenidine (Octenisept, Schülke & Mayr GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany) showed a nonsignificant trend towards an increase in blood flow (÷7.2%). There were alterations in the values of hemoglobin oxygenation and the relative amount of hemoglobin, but these were not significant. Perfusion is an important factor for wound healing. Therefore, it might be advantageous if antiseptic agents would increase blood flow. Tea tree oil and polyhexanide have a positive effect on skin blood flow and can therefore be used especially in critically perfused wounds, provided the adverse reactions and the antimicrobial efficacy are comparable.

  15. The Microbiota of the Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egert, Markus; Simmering, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to sum up important progress in the field of human skin microbiota research that was achieved over the last years.The human skin is one of the largest and most versatile organs of the human body. Owing to its function as a protective interface between the largely sterile interior of the human body and the highly microbially contaminated outer environment, it is densely colonized with a diverse and active microbiota. This skin microbiota is of high importance for human health and well-being. It is implicated in several severe skin diseases and plays a major role in wound infections. Many less severe, but negatively perceived cosmetic skin phenomena are linked with skin microbes, too. In addition, skin microorganisms, in particular on the human hands, are crucial for the field of hygiene research. Notably, apart from being only a potential source of disease and contamination, the skin microbiota also contributes to the protective functions of the human skin in many ways. Finally, the analysis of structure and function of the human skin microbiota is interesting from a basic, evolutionary perspective on human microbe interactions.Key questions in the field of skin microbiota research deal with (a) a deeper understanding of the structure (species inventory) and function (physiology) of the healthy human skin microbiota in space and time, (b) the distinction of resident and transient skin microbiota members, (c) the distinction of beneficial skin microorganisms from microorganisms or communities with an adverse or sickening effect on their hosts, (d) factors shaping the skin microbiota and its functional role in health and disease, (e) strategies to manipulate the skin microbiota for therapeutic reasons.

  16. Human papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smola, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect squamous epithelia and can induce hyperproliferative lesions. More than 120 different HPV types have been characterized and classified into five different genera. While mucosal high-risk HPVs have a well-established causal role in anogenital carcinogenesis, the biology of cutaneous HPVs is less well understood. The clinical relevance of genus beta-PV infection has clearly been demonstrated in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease associated with ahigh rate of skin cancer. In the normal population genus beta-PV are suspected to have an etiologic role in skin carcinogenesis as well but this is still controversially discussed. Their oncogenic potency has been investigated in mouse models and in vitro. In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the genus beta HPV types 5 and 8 as "possible carcinogenic" biological agents (group 2B) in EV disease. This chapter will give an overview on the knowns and unknowns of infections with genus beta-PV and discuss their potential impact on skin carcinogenesis in the general population.

  17. Nicotinamide Enhances Repair of Arsenic and Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in HaCaT Keratinocytes and Ex Vivo Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Benjamin C.; Halliday, Gary M.; Damian, Diona L.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy ...

  18. Harmonics optical biopsy of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Shih-Peng; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Chu, Shi-Wei; Lee, Wen-Jeng; Liao, Yi-Hua; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2005-04-01

    Traditional biopsy requires the removal, fixation, and staining of tissues from the human body. Its procedure is invasive and painful. Therefore, a novel method of optical biopsy is desired which can perform in vivo examination and is noninvasive, highly penetrative, with no energy deposition and damage, without invasive pharmaceutical injection, and with three-dimensional (3D) imaging capability and sub-micron spatial resolution. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM) is previously applied for biopsy of skin due to its high lateral resolution, low out-of-focus damage, and intrinsic 3D section capability. However, for future clinical applications without surgery, current 700-850 nm based laser scanning technology still presents several limitations including low penetration depth, in-focus cell damages, multi-photon phototoxicity due to high optical intensity in the 800 nm wavelength region, and toxicity if exogenous fluorescence markers were required. Here we demonstrate a novel noninvasive optical biopsy method called harmonics optical biopsy (HOB), which combines both second harmonic generation imaging and third harmonic generation imaging. Due to virtual transition nature of harmonic generations and based on light sources with an optical wavelength located around the biological penetration window (~1300nm), our HOB can serve as a truly non-invasive biopsy tool with sub-micron three-dimensional spatial resolution without any energy deposition and exogenous contrast agents. From preliminary experiment result, our HOB can reconstruct 3D cellular and subcellular images from skin surface through dermis. Besides, by utilizing backward propagating detection geometry, we will show that this technique is ideal for non-invasive clinical biopsy of human skin diseases and even useful for the early diagnosis of skin cancer symptom such as the angiogenesis.

  19. Ex vivo skin absorption of terpenes from Vicks VapoRub ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, Krzysztof; Sopala, Monika

    2008-08-01

    The pharmaceutical market offers a wide range of inhalant drug products applied on the skin that contain essential oils and/or their isolated compounds, i.e. terpenes. Because there are few data concerning the skin penetration of terpenes, especially from complex carriers, the goal of this study was to determine the ex vivo skin absorption kinetics of chosen terpenes, namely eucalyptol, menthol, camphor, alpha-pinene, and beta-pinene, from the product Vicks VapoRub. Human cadaver skin was placed in a flow-through diffusion chamber and the product was applied for 15, 30, and 60 min. After the application time the skin was separated into layers using a tape-stripping technique: three fractions of stratum corneum and epidermis with dermis, and terpenes amounts in the samples were determined by gas-chromatography. The investigated terpenes showed different absorption characteristics related to their physicochemical properties and did not permeate through the skin into the acceptor fluid. Eucalyptol had the largest total accumulation in the stratum corneum and in the epidermis with dermis, while alpha-pinene penetrated into the skin in the smallest amount. The short time in which saturation of the stratum corneum with the terpenes occurred and the high accumulation of most of the investigated terpenes in the skin layers proved that these compounds easily penetrate and permeate the stratum corneum and that in vivo they may easily penetrate into the blood circulation.

  20. Human reconstructed skin xenografts on mice to model skin physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Giorgiana; Ng, Yi Zhen; Koh, Li Fang; Goh, Christabelle S M; Common, John E

    Xenograft models to study skin physiology have been popular for scientific use since the 1970s, with various developments and improvements to the techniques over the decades. Xenograft models are particularly useful and sought after due to the lack of clinically relevant animal models in predicting drug effectiveness in humans. Such predictions could in turn boost the process of drug discovery, since novel drug compounds have an estimated 8% chance of FDA approval despite years of rigorous preclinical testing and evaluation, albeit mostly in non-human models. In the case of skin research, the mouse persists as the most popular animal model of choice, despite its well-known anatomical differences with human skin. Differences in skin biology are especially evident when trying to dissect more complex skin conditions, such as psoriasis and eczema, where interactions between the immune system, epidermis and the environment likely occur. While the use of animal models are still considered the gold standard for systemic toxicity studies under controlled environments, there are now alternative models that have been approved for certain applications. To overcome the biological limitations of the mouse model, research efforts have also focused on "humanizing" the mice model to better recapitulate human skin physiology. In this review, we outline the different approaches undertaken thus far to study skin biology using human tissue xenografts in mice and the technical challenges involved. We also describe more recent developments to generate humanized multi-tissue compartment mice that carry both a functioning human immune system and skin xenografts. Such composite animal models provide promising opportunities to study drugs, disease and differentiation with greater clinical relevance. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In vivo skin elastography with high-definition optical videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Brodell, Robert T; Mostow, Eliot N; Vinyard, Christopher J; Marie, Hazel

    2009-08-01

    Continuous measurements of biomechanical properties of skin provide potentially valuable information to dermatologists for both clinical diagnosis and quantitative assessment of therapy. This paper presents an experimental study on in vivo imaging of skin elastic properties using high-definition optical videos. The objective is to (i) investigate whether skin property abnormalities can be detected in the computed strain elastograms, (ii) quantify property abnormalities with a Relative Strain Index (RSI), so that an objective rating system can be established, (iii) determine whether certain skin diseases are more amenable to optical elastography and (iv) identify factors that may have an adverse impact on the quality of strain elastograms. There are three steps in optical skin elastography: (i) skin deformations are recorded in a video sequence using a high-definition camcorder, (ii) a dense motion field between two adjacent video frames is obtained using a robust optical flow algorithm, with which a cumulative motion field between two frames of a larger interval is derived and (iii) a strain elastogram is computed by applying two weighted gradient filters to the cumulative motion data. Experiments were carried out using videos of 25 patients. In the three cases presented in this article (hypertrophic lichen planus, seborrheic keratosis and psoriasis vulgaris), abnormal tissues associated with the skin diseases were successfully identified in the elastograms. There exists a good correspondence between the shape of property abnormalities and the area of diseased skin. The computed RSI gives a quantitative measure of the magnitude of property abnormalities that is consistent with the skin stiffness observed on clinical examinations. Optical elastography is a promising imaging modality that is capable of capturing disease-induced property changes. Its main advantage is that an elastogram presents a continuous description of the spatial variation of skin properties on

  2. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model

    OpenAIRE

    Sidgwick, G. P.; McGeorge, D.; Bayat, A.

    2016-01-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be ...

  3. Life on human surfaces: skin metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Mathieu

    Full Text Available The human skin microbiome could provide another example, after the gut, of the strong positive or negative impact that human colonizing bacteria can have on health. Deciphering functional diversity and dynamics within human skin microbial communities is critical for understanding their involvement and for developing the appropriate substances for improving or correcting their action. We present a direct PCR-free high throughput sequencing approach to unravel the human skin microbiota specificities through metagenomic dataset analysis and inter-environmental comparison. The approach provided access to the functions carried out by dominant skin colonizing taxa, including Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus and Propionibacterium, revealing their specific capabilities to interact with and exploit compounds from the human skin. These functions, which clearly illustrate the unique life style of the skin microbial communities, stand as invaluable investigation targets for understanding and potentially modifying bacterial interactions with the human host with the objective of increasing health and well being.

  4. Confocal histopathology of irritant contact dermatitis in vivo and the impact of skin color (black vs white)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hicks, Shari P.; Swindells, Kirsty J.; Middelkamp-Hup, Maritza A.; Sifakis, Martine A.; González, Ernesto; González, Salvador

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of irritant contact dermatitis and its modulation according to skin color is not well understood. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) enables high-resolution, real-time, in-vivo imaging of human skin. OBJECTIVE: The goal of our study was to use RCM to determine whether

  5. Noninvasive in-vivo optical properties of skin tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Smith, Elizabeth B.; Zou, Jun; Duvic, Madeleine; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a study for in-vivo estimation of optical properties of pigmented skin tumor by oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The developed system has been tested in clinical conditions to compare the optical properties of melanomas, dysplastic nevi and common nevi. The spatio-spectral data are collected in the wavelength range of 455 to 765 nm from 96 pigmented skin lesions including 10 histopathologically diagnosed as melanoma, 67 as dysplastic nevi and 19 lesions as common nevi. The preliminary results indicate significantly larger average reduced scattering coefficient spectra for malignant and dysplastic lesions than for benign common nevi.

  6. UVA-1 exposure in vivo leads to an IL-6 surge within the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lars Alexander; Raizner, Katharina; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Brenneisen, Peter; Gethöffer, Kerstin; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2017-09-01

    UVA-1 is a known promotor of skin ageing. Cytokines like IL-1α, Il-1β or TNF-α, VEGF and IL-6 orchestrate UV effects, and IL-6 is furthermore an effector of UVA-induced photoageing. We investigated how fractionated UVA-1 doses influence the cytokine milieu and especially the IL-6 levels in the skin in vivo. In a study with 35 participants, we exposed previously unirradiated human skin to three UVA-1 irradiation regimes. Cytokine levels in interstitial skin fluid were measured up to 48 hours postexposure and compared to unirradiated control skin fluid. Our results show that IL-6 levels increased significantly after UVA-1 exposure at selected time points. The other candidates IL-1α, Il-1β or TNF-α and VEGF show no significant response after UVA-1 exposure in vivo. UVA-1 thus raises selectively IL-6 levels in vivo, a fact that underlines its role in photoageing and has potential implications for its modulatory effect on photoageing pathology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Neurogenic inflammation in human and rodent skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmelz, M; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2001-01-01

    The combination of vasodilation and protein extravasation following activation of nociceptors has been termed "neurogenic inflammation." In contrast to rodents, no neurogenic protein extravasation can be elicited in healthy human skin. Dermal microdialysis has considerably increased our knowledge...... about neurogenic inflammation in human skin, including the involvement of mast cells....

  8. In-vitro percutaneous absorption of losartan potassium in human skin and prediction of human skin permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petkar K.C.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the feasibility of transdermal controlled administration of Losartan potassium (LP across human cadaver skin. Study also defines the influence of capsaicin, sex and site of application on permeation characteristics and determined an appropriate animal model for human skin permeability. The permeation of LP of various formulations was studied using Keshary-Chein diffusion cell. Optimized controlled formulation (without capsaicin released 42.17% (±1.85 of LP in 12 hr whereas treatment formulation (with capsaicin 0.028 % w/v released 48.94% (±1.71 of LP with significant difference on null hypothesis. Influence of sex showed statistically significant difference for permeation of LP through male and female rats, as well as male and female mice across both the abdominal and dorsal sides of the skin (p<0.05. Similarly statistically significant differences were noted for permeation of LP across male and female mice abdomen-dorsal, but not for male rat abdomen-dorsal and female rat abdomen-dorsal. Furthermore, in-vitro permeation of LP across human skin was compared with the permeation across rat and mice skins. Male rat and male mice dorsal skin was found to have closer permeability characteristics to human than other skin membranes, but the Factor of Difference values were < 3 for all membranes which were used suggesting the membranes are good models for human skin permeability. In conclusion simple transdermal adhesive patches formulations incorporating high molecular weight of LP can deliver a dose in-vivo and proposed model skin membranes can be utilized for future pharmacokineic and toxicokinetic studies as well as metabolism studies of LP

  9. Photoprotection of human skin beyond ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Krutmann, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection of human skin by means of sunscreens or daily skin-care products is traditionally centered around the prevention of acute (e.g. sunburn) and chronic (e.g. skin cancer and photoaging) skin damage that may result from exposure to ultraviolet rays (UVB and UVA). Within the last decade, however, it has been appreciated that wavelengths beyond the ultraviolet spectrum, in particular visible light and infrared radiation, contribute to skin damage in general and photoaging of human skin in particular. As a consequence, attempts have been made to develop skin care/sunscreen products that not only protect against UVB or UVA radiation but provide photoprotection against visible light and infrared radiation as well. In this article, we will briefly review the current knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for visible light/infrared radiation-induced skin damage and then, based on this information, discuss strategies that have been successfully used or may be employed in the future to achieve photoprotection of human skin beyond ultraviolet radiation. In this regard we will particularly focus on the use of topical antioxidants and the challenges that result from the task of showing their efficacy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Water vapour loss measurements on human skin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Petrus Gerardus Maria van der

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of a series of investigations into the barrier function of human skin are presented. In these investigations, the barrier function was assessed by water vapour loss measurements of the skin using a method based on gradient estimation.... Zie: Summary and conclusions

  11. Deposition of contaminant aerosol on human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Roed, Jørn; Byrne, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Over recent years, it has been established that deposition of various types of pollutant aerosols (e.g., radioactive) on human skin can have serious deleterious effects on health. However. only few investigations in the past have been devoted to measurement of deposition velocities on skin...

  12. Black and white human skin differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Maibach, H I

    1979-01-01

    This review of black and white human skin differences emphasizes the alleged importance of factors other than the obvious, i.e., skin color. Physicochemical differences and differences in susceptibility to irritants and allergens suggest a more resistant black than white skin. Differences appear...... to exist in the frequency of which several skin diseases occur among blacks and whites. A striking feature in this literature is the disagreement between authors. Common for much of this information is difficulty of interpretation, because of socioeconomic influences and other environmental factors....

  13. In vivo terahertz pulsed spectroscopy of dysplastic and non-dysplastic skin nevi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Chernomyrdin, Nikita V.; Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Gavdush, Arseniy A.; Nosov, Pavel A.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.; Reshetov, Igor V.

    2016-08-01

    The results of the in vivo terahertz (THz) pulsed spectroscopy (TPS) of pigmentary skin nevi are reported. Observed THz dielectric permittivity of healthy skin and dysplastic and non-dysplastic skin nevi exhibits significant contrast in THz frequency range. Dysplastic skin nevus is a precursor of melanoma, which is reportedly the most dangerous cancer of the skin. Therefore, the THz dielectric spectroscopy is potentially an effective tool for non-invasive early diagnosis of melanomas of the skin.

  14. Fiber optic microneedles for transdermal light delivery: ex vivo porcine skin penetration experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosoglu, Mehmet A; Hood, Robert L; Chen, Ye; Xu, Yong; Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Rylander, Christopher G

    2010-09-01

    Shallow light penetration in tissue has been a technical barrier to the development of light-based methods for in vivo diagnosis and treatment of epithelial carcinomas. This problem can potentially be solved by utilizing minimally invasive probes to deliver light directly to target areas. To develop this solution, fiber optic microneedles capable of delivering light for either imaging or therapy were manufactured by tapering step-index silica-based optical fibers employing a melt-drawing process. Some of the microneedles were manufactured to have sharper tips by changing the heat source during the melt-drawing process. All of the microneedles were individually inserted into ex vivo pig skin samples to demonstrate the feasibility of their application in human tissues. The force on each microneedle was measured during insertion in order to determine the effects of sharper tips on the peak force and the steadiness of the increase in force. Skin penetration experiments showed that sharp fiber optic microneedles that are 3 mm long penetrate through 2 mm of ex vivo pig skin specimens. These sharp microneedles had a minimum average diameter of 73 mum and a maximum tip diameter of 8 mum. Flat microneedles, which had larger tip diameters, required a minimum average diameter of 125 mum in order to penetrate through pig skin samples. Force versus displacement plots showed that a sharp tip on a fiber optic microneedle decreased the skin's resistance during insertion. Also, the force acting on a sharp microneedle increased more steadily compared with a microneedle with a flat tip. However, many of the sharp microneedles sustained damage during skin penetration. Two designs that did not accrue damage were identified and will provide a basis of more robust microneedles. Developing resilient microneedles with smaller diameters will lead to transformative, novel modes of transdermal imaging and treatment that are less invasive and less painful for the patient.

  15. Stratum corneum damage and ex vivo porcine skin water absorption - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch Lynggaard, C; Bang Knudsen, D; Jemec, G B E

    2009-01-01

    A simple ex vivo screening technique would be of interest for mass screening of substances for potential barrier disruptive qualities. Ex vivo water absorption as a marker of skin barrier integrity was studied on pig ear skin. Skin water absorption was quantified by weighing and weight changes were...... found to reflect prehydration barrier damage. It is suggested that this simple model may be elaborated to provide a rapid, economical screening tool for potential skin irritants....

  16. Non-lipophilic mycobiota of human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Talaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The human skin is inhabited by many species of bacteria and fungi, which are its natural microbiota. Fungi colonizing the skin, including those causing disease, characterized by great variety and variability, can be influenced by various factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the composition of the non-lipid-dependent fungal microbiota of skin, including the presence of species potentially pathogenic for humans. Fifty-six volunteers of both sexes aged 22–78 were subjected to the study. Swabs were taken from the face, chest, back and interdigital spaces of hands. Mycobiota isolated proved to vary both in terms of the location of occurrence and gender of patients. Interdigital spaces of hands, dominated by yeasts, constitute a location on human skin most contaminated with fungi. Molds were more often isolated from the face and chest. The back was the least contaminated location. There was no difference in fungal incidence in relation to sex.

  17. In vivo skin characterization by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Caspers (Peter)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Various areas of skin research depend on detailed knowledge of the molecular composition of skin and molecular structure of skin constituents. On a microscopic scale the skin is a highly heterogeneous tissue. Molecular composition and structure vary

  18. The relationship between skin aging and steady state ultraweak photon emission as an indicator of skin oxidative stress in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabe, Y; Osanai, O; Takema, Y

    2014-08-01

    Ultraweak photon emission (UPE) is one potential method to evaluate the oxidative status of the skin in vivo. However, little is known about how the daily oxidative stress of the skin is related to skin aging-related alterations in vivo. We characterized the steady state UPE and performed a skin survey. We evaluated the skin oxidative status by UPE, skin elasticity, epidermal thickness and skin color on the inner upper arm, the outer forearm, and the buttock of 70 Japanese volunteers. The steady state UPE at the three skin sites increased with age. Correlation analysis revealed that the steady state UPE only from the buttock was related to skin elasticity, which showed age-dependent changes. Moreover, analysis by age group indicated that b* values of the inner upper arm of subjects in their 20s were inversely correlated with UPE as occurred in buttock skin. In contrast, photoaged skin did not show a clear relationship with steady state UPE because the accumulation of sun-exposure might influence the sensitivity to oxidative stress. These results suggest that steady state UPE reflects not only intrinsic skin aging and cutaneous color but also the current oxidative status independent of skin aging. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2016-07-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be quantified in an optimised whole tissue biopsy culture model. Topical formulations containing green tea catechins (GTC) were investigated in a skin biopsy culture model (n = 11). Punch biopsies were harvested at 3, 7 and 10 days, and analysed using qRT-PCR, histology and HPLC to determine gene and protein expression, and transdermal delivery of compounds of interest. Reduced gene expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, mast cell tryptase, mast cell chymase, TGF-β1, CTGF and PAI-1 was observed after 7 and 10 days compared with treated controls (p animal models in this context, prior to study in a clinical trial environment.

  20. Three-Dimensional In Vitro Skin and Skin Cancer Models Based on Human Fibroblast-Derived Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berning, Manuel; Prätzel-Wunder, Silke; Bickenbach, Jackie R; Boukamp, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro skin and skin cancer models help to dissect epidermal-dermal and tumor-stroma interactions. In the model presented here, normal human dermal fibroblasts isolated from adult skin self-assembled into dermal equivalents with their specific fibroblast-derived matrix (fdmDE) over 4 weeks. The fdmDE represented a complex human extracellular matrix that was stabilized by its own heterogeneous collagen fiber meshwork, largely resembling a human dermal in vivo architecture. Complemented with normal human epidermal keratinocytes, the skin equivalent (fdmSE) thereof favored the establishment of a well-stratified and differentiated epidermis and importantly allowed epidermal regeneration in vitro for at least 24 weeks. Moreover, the fdmDE could be used to study the features of cutaneous skin cancer. Complementing fdmDE with HaCaT cells in different stages of malignancy or tumor-derived cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, the resulting skin cancer equivalents (fdmSCEs) recapitulated the respective degree of tumorigenicity. In addition, the fdmSCE invasion phenotypes correlated with their individual degree of tissue organization, disturbance in basement membrane organization, and presence of matrix metalloproteinases. Together, fdmDE-based models are well suited for long-term regeneration of normal human epidermis and, as they recapitulate tumor-specific growth, differentiation, and invasion profiles of cutaneous skin cancer cells, also provide an excellent human in vitro skin cancer model.

  1. Elucidation of xenobiotic metabolism pathways in human skin and human skin models by proteomic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven van Eijl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skin has the capacity to metabolise foreign chemicals (xenobiotics, but knowledge of the various enzymes involved is incomplete. A broad-based unbiased proteomics approach was used to describe the profile of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes present in human skin and hence indicate principal routes of metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Several in vitro models of human skin have been developed for the purpose of safety assessment of chemicals. The suitability of these epidermal models for studies involving biotransformation was assessed by comparing their profiles of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes with those of human skin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Label-free proteomic analysis of whole human skin (10 donors was applied and analysed using custom-built PROTSIFT software. The results showed the presence of enzymes with a capacity for the metabolism of alcohols through dehydrogenation, aldehydes through dehydrogenation and oxidation, amines through oxidation, carbonyls through reduction, epoxides and carboxylesters through hydrolysis and, of many compounds, by conjugation to glutathione. Whereas protein levels of these enzymes in skin were mostly just 4-10 fold lower than those in liver and sufficient to support metabolism, the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes were at least 300-fold lower indicating they play no significant role. Four epidermal models of human skin had profiles very similar to one another and these overlapped substantially with that of whole skin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proteomics profiling approach was successful in producing a comprehensive analysis of the biotransformation characteristics of whole human skin and various in vitro skin models. The results show that skin contains a range of defined enzymes capable of metabolising different classes of chemicals. The degree of similarity of the profiles of the in vitro models indicates their suitability for epidermal toxicity testing. Overall, these

  2. Forensic human identification using skin microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedes, Sarah E; Woerner, August E; Budowle, Bruce

    2017-09-08

    The human microbiome contributes significantly to the genetic content of the human body. Genetic and environmental factors help shape the microbiome, and as such, the microbiome can be unique to an individual. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential to use microbiome profiling for forensic applications, however a method has yet to identify stable features of skin microbiomes that produce high classification accuracies for samples collected over reasonably long time intervals. A novel approach is described to classify skin microbiomes to their donors by comparing two features types, Propionibacterium acnes pangenome presence/absence features and nucleotide diversities of stable clade-specific markers. Supervised learning was used to attribute skin microbiomes from 14 skin body sites from 12 healthy individuals sampled at three time points over a >2.5 year period with accuracies up to 100% for three body sites. Feature selection identified a reduced subset of markers from each body site that are highly individualizing, identifying 187 markers from 12 clades. Classification accuracies were compared in a formal model testing framework, and the results of this indicate that learners trained on nucleotide diversity perform significantly better than those trained on presence/absence encodings. This study used supervised learning to identify individuals with high accuracy and associated stable features from skin microbiomes over a period of up to almost 3 years. These selected features provide a preliminary marker panel for future development of a robust and reproducible method for skin microbiome profiling for forensic human identification.Importance A novel approach is described to attribute skin microbiomes, collected over a period of >2.5 years, to their individual hosts with a high degree of accuracy. Nucleotide diversities of stable clade-specific markers with supervised learning was used to classify skin microbiomes from a particular individual with up to

  3. Raman measurement of carotenoid composition in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    The carotenoids lycopene and beta-carotene are powerful antioxidants in skin and are thought to act as scavengers for free radicals and singlet oxygen. The role of carotenoid species in skin health is of strong current interest. We demonstrate the possibility to use Resonance Raman spectroscopy for fast, non-invasive, highly specific, and quantitative detection of beta-carotene and lycopene in human skin. Analyzing Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue and green laser excitation, we were able to characterize quantitatively the relative concentrations of each carotenoid species in-vivo. In the selective detection, we take advantage of different Raman cross-section spectral profiles for beta-carotene and lycopene molecules, and obtain a quantitative assessment of individual long-chain carotenoid species in the skin rather than their cumulative levels. Preliminary dual-wavelength Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different subjects. The technique holds promise for rapid screening of carotenoid compositions in human skin in large populations and may be suitable in clinical studies for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  4. Preparation of Artificial Skin that Mimics Human Skin Surface and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Rana; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2017-12-14

    We have developed an artificial skin that mimics the morphological and mechanical properties of human skin. The artificial skin comprises a polyurethane block possessing a microscopically rough surface. We evaluated the tactile sensations when skin-care cream was applied to the artificial skin. Many subjects perceived smooth, moist, and soft feels during the application process. Cluster analysis showed that these characteristic tactile feels are similar to those when skin-care cream is applied to real human skin. Contact angle analysis showed that an oil droplet spread smoothly on the artificial skin surface, which occurred because there were many grooves several hundred micrometers in width on the skin surface. In addition, when the skin-care cream was applied, the change in frictional force during the dynamic friction process increased. These wetting and frictional properties are important factors controlling the similarity of artificial skin to real human skin.

  5. Non-Invasive Assessment of Skin Barrier Properties: Investigating Emerging Tools for In Vitro and In Vivo Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emer Duffy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the development of non-invasive tools for studying the properties of skin, due to the potential for non-destructive sampling, reduced ethical concerns and the potential comparability of results in vivo and in vitro. The present research focuses on the use of a range of non-invasive approaches for studying skin and skin barrier properties in human skin and human skin equivalents (HSE. Analytical methods used include pH measurements, electrical sensing of the epidermis and detection of volatile metabolic skin products. Standard probe based measurements of pH and the tissue dielectric constant (TDC are used. Two other more novel approaches that utilise wearable platforms are also demonstrated here that can assess the electrical properties of skin and to profile skin volatile species. The potential utility of these wearable tools that permit repeatability of testing and comparability of results is considered through application of our recently reported impedance-based tattoo sensors and volatile samplers on both human participants and HSEs. The HSE exhibited a higher pH (6.5 and TDC (56 than human skin (pH 4.9–5.6, TDC 29–36, and the tattoo sensor revealed a lower impedance signal for HSEs, suggesting the model could maintain homeostasis, but in a different manner to human skin, which demonstrated a more highly resistive barrier. Characterisation of volatiles showed a variety of compound classes emanating from skin, with 16 and 27 compounds identified in HSEs and participants respectively. The continuing development of these tools offers potential for improved quality and relevance of data, and potential for detection of changes that are undetectable in traditional palpable and visual assessments, permitting early detection of irritant reactions.

  6. Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocke, David M. [University of California Davis

    2013-09-09

    During course of this project, we have worked in several areas relevant to low-dose ionizing radiation. Using gene expression to measure biological response, we have examined the response of human skin exposed in-vivo to radation, human skin exposed ex-vivo to radiation, and a human-skin model exposed to radiation. We have learned a great deal about the biological response of human skin to low-dose ionizing radiation.

  7. Sarcoptes scabiei mites modulate gene expression in human skin equivalents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie S Morgan

    Full Text Available The ectoparasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei that burrows in the epidermis of mammalian skin has a long co-evolution with its hosts. Phenotypic studies show that the mites have the ability to modulate cytokine secretion and expression of cell adhesion molecules in cells of the skin and other cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems that may assist the mites to survive in the skin. The purpose of this study was to identify genes in keratinocytes and fibroblasts in human skin equivalents (HSEs that changed expression in response to the burrowing of live scabies mites. Overall, of the more than 25,800 genes measured, 189 genes were up-regulated >2-fold in response to scabies mite burrowing while 152 genes were down-regulated to the same degree. HSEs differentially expressed large numbers of genes that were related to host protective responses including those involved in immune response, defense response, cytokine activity, taxis, response to other organisms, and cell adhesion. Genes for the expression of interleukin-1α (IL-1α precursor, IL-1β, granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF precursor, and G-CSF precursor were up-regulated 2.8- to 7.4-fold, paralleling cytokine secretion profiles. A large number of genes involved in epithelium development and keratinization were also differentially expressed in response to live scabies mites. Thus, these skin cells are directly responding as expected in an inflammatory response to products of the mites and the disruption of the skin's protective barrier caused by burrowing. This suggests that in vivo the interplay among these skin cells and other cell types, including Langerhans cells, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells, is responsible for depressing the host's protective response allowing these mites to survive in the skin.

  8. Lensless high-resolution photoacoustic imaging scanner for in vivo skin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Taiichiro; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Omuro, Toshiyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi

    2017-10-01

    We previously launched a high-resolution photoacoustic (PA) imaging scanner based on a unique lensless design for in vivo skin imaging. The design, imaging algorithm and characteristics of the system are described in this paper. Neither an optical lens nor an acoustic lens is used in the system. In the imaging head, four sensor elements are arranged quadrilaterally, and by checking the phase differences for PA waves detected with these four sensors, a set of PA signals only originating from a chromophore located on the sensor center axis is extracted for constructing an image. A phantom study using a carbon fiber showed a depth-independent horizontal resolution of 84.0 ± 3.5 µm, and the scan direction-dependent variation of PA signals was about ± 20%. We then performed imaging of vasculature phantoms: patterns of red ink lines with widths of 100 or 200 μm formed in an acrylic block co-polymer. The patterns were visualized with high contrast, showing the capability for imaging arterioles and venues in the skin. Vasculatures in rat burn models and healthy human skin were also clearly visualized in vivo.

  9. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH promotes wound re-epithelialisation in frog and human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia T Meier

    Full Text Available There remains a critical need for new therapeutics that promote wound healing in patients suffering from chronic skin wounds. This is, in part, due to a shortage of simple, physiologically and clinically relevant test systems for investigating candidate agents. The skin of amphibians possesses a remarkable regenerative capacity, which remains insufficiently explored for clinical purposes. Combining comparative biology with a translational medicine approach, we report the development and application of a simple ex vivo frog (Xenopus tropicalis skin organ culture system that permits exploration of the effects of amphibian skin-derived agents on re-epithelialisation in both frog and human skin. Using this amphibian model, we identify thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH as a novel stimulant of epidermal regeneration. Moving to a complementary human ex vivo wounded skin assay, we demonstrate that the effects of TRH are conserved across the amphibian-mammalian divide: TRH stimulates wound closure and formation of neo-epidermis in organ-cultured human skin, accompanied by increased keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing-associated differentiation (cytokeratin 6 expression. Thus, TRH represents a novel, clinically relevant neuroendocrine wound repair promoter that deserves further exploration. These complementary frog and human skin ex vivo assays encourage a comparative biology approach in future wound healing research so as to facilitate the rapid identification and preclinical testing of novel, evolutionarily conserved, and clinically relevant wound healing promoters.

  10. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) promotes wound re-epithelialisation in frog and human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Natalia T; Haslam, Iain S; Pattwell, David M; Zhang, Guo-You; Emelianov, Vladimir; Paredes, Roberto; Debus, Sebastian; Augustin, Matthias; Funk, Wolfgang; Amaya, Enrique; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Hardman, Matthew J; Paus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    There remains a critical need for new therapeutics that promote wound healing in patients suffering from chronic skin wounds. This is, in part, due to a shortage of simple, physiologically and clinically relevant test systems for investigating candidate agents. The skin of amphibians possesses a remarkable regenerative capacity, which remains insufficiently explored for clinical purposes. Combining comparative biology with a translational medicine approach, we report the development and application of a simple ex vivo frog (Xenopus tropicalis) skin organ culture system that permits exploration of the effects of amphibian skin-derived agents on re-epithelialisation in both frog and human skin. Using this amphibian model, we identify thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) as a novel stimulant of epidermal regeneration. Moving to a complementary human ex vivo wounded skin assay, we demonstrate that the effects of TRH are conserved across the amphibian-mammalian divide: TRH stimulates wound closure and formation of neo-epidermis in organ-cultured human skin, accompanied by increased keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing-associated differentiation (cytokeratin 6 expression). Thus, TRH represents a novel, clinically relevant neuroendocrine wound repair promoter that deserves further exploration. These complementary frog and human skin ex vivo assays encourage a comparative biology approach in future wound healing research so as to facilitate the rapid identification and preclinical testing of novel, evolutionarily conserved, and clinically relevant wound healing promoters.

  11. RNA Aptamer Delivery through Intact Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenn, Jon D; Neil, Jessica; Donahue, Christine; Demock, Kellie; Tibbetts, Caitlin Vestal; Cote-Sierra, Javier; Smith, Susan H; Rubenstein, David; Therrien, Jean-Philippe; Pendergrast, P Shannon; Killough, Jason; Brown, Marc B; Williams, Adrian C

    2018-02-01

    It is generally recognized that only relatively small molecular weight (typically aptamer, highly specific to the human IL-23 cytokine, with picomolar activity. Results demonstrate penetration of the aptamer into freshly excised human skin using two different fluorescent labels. A dual hybridization assay quantified aptamer from the epidermis and dermis, giving levels far exceeding the cellular half maximal inhibitory concentration values (>100,000-fold), and aptamer integrity was confirmed using an oligonucleotide precipitation assay. A T helper 17 response was stimulated in freshly excised human skin resulting in significantly upregulated IL-17f, and IL-22; topical application of the IL-23 aptamer decreased both IL-17f and IL-22 by approximately 45% but did not result in significant changes to IL-23 mRNA levels, confirming that the aptamer did not globally suppress mRNA levels. This study demonstrates that very-large-molecular-weight RNA aptamers can permeate across the intact human skin barrier to therapeutically relevant levels into both the epidermis and dermis and that the skin-penetrating aptamer retains its biologically active conformational structure capable of binding to endogenous IL-23. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Human age and skin physiology shape diversity and abundance of Archaea on skin

    OpenAIRE

    Moissl-Eichinger, C; Probst, AJ; Birarda, G; Auerbach, A; Koskinen, K; Wolf, P; Holman, HYN

    2017-01-01

    © The Author(s) 2017. The human skin microbiome acts as an important barrier protecting our body from pathogens and other environmental influences. Recent investigations have provided evidence that Archaea are a constant but highly variable component of the human skin microbiome, yet factors that determine their abundance changes are unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the abundance of archaea on human skin is influenced by human age and skin physiology by quantitative PCR of 51 diff...

  13. Comparative histology and immunohistochemistry of porcine versus human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeer, Sabine; Le Luduec, Jean-Benoît; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Laurent, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-François; Dubois, Bertrand; Kanitakis, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Porcine skin is increasingly being employed as a model of human skin in various research fields, including pharmacology, toxicology and immunology, with particular interest in percutaneous permeation and organ transplantation. Porcine skin shows several anatomical and physiological similarities, but also some differences, with human skin, but few in depth comparative studies are so far available. To study the immunohistochemical properties of normal porcine skin in comparison with human skin. We performed a histological and immunohistochemical study on frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded skin biopsies from domestic swine and normal human skin, using a panel of 93 monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies recognizing various human and porcine skin cell types or structures. We found that several antibodies used to detect normal human skin cells showed equivalent immunoreactivity on normal porcine skin. However, some antibodies commonly used to detect human skin antigens remained unreactive on porcine skin. Our findings highlight the main immunohistochemical properties of porcine skin in comparison with those of human skin and provide a morphological and immunohistochemical basis useful to researchers using porcine skin.

  14. Probe pressure effects on human skin diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Tunnell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are popular research techniques for noninvasive disease diagnostics. Most systems include an optical fiber probe that transmits and collects optical spectra in contact with the suspected lesion. The purpose of this study is to investigate probe pressure effects on human skin spectroscopic measurements. We conduct an in-vivo experiment on human skin tissue to study the short-term (30 s) effects of probe pressure on diffuse reflectance and fluor...

  15. In vivo characterization of hair and skin derived carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as long-term bioprobes in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-Hui Zhang; Aping Niu; Jing Li; Jian-Wei Fu; Qun Xu; De-Sheng Pei

    2016-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CDs) were widely investigated because of their tunable fluorescence properties and low toxicity. However, so far there have been no reports on in vivo functional studies of hair and skin derived CDs. Here, hair derived CDs (HCDs) and skin derived CDs (SCDs) were produced by using human hair and pig skin as precursors. The quantum yields (QYs) of HCDs and SCDs were quite high, compared to citric acid derived CDs (CCDs). HCDs and SCDs possess optimal photostability, hypotox...

  16. Human In-Vivo Bioassay for the Tissue-Specific Measurement of Nociceptive and Inflammatory Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Angst, Martin S; Tingle, Martha; Schmelz, Martin; Carvalho, Brendan; Yeomans, David C

    2008-01-01

    This in-vivo human bioassay can be used to study human volunteers and patients. Samples are collected from pertinent tissue sites such as the skin via aseptically inserted microdialysis catheters (Dermal Dialysis, Erlangen, Germany). Illustrated in this example is the collection of interstitial fluid from experimentally inflamed skin in human volunteers. Sample collection can be combined with other experimental tests. For example, the simultaneous assessment of locally released biochemicals a...

  17. Proof of concept testing of a positive reference material for in vivo and in vitro skin irritation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Lee, Michelle; Fukui, Chie; Watanabe, Kayo; Olsen, Daniel; Turley, Audrey; Morishita, Yuki; Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Yuba, Toshiyasu; Fujimaki, Hideo; Inoue, Kaoru; Yoshida, Midori; Ogawa, Kumiko; Haishima, Yuji

    2017-12-11

    In vivo and in vitro irritation testing is important for evaluating the biological safety of medical devices. Here, the performance of positive reference materials for skin irritation testing was evaluated. Four reference standards, referred to as Y-series materials, were analyzed: a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) sheet spiked with 0 (Y-1), 1.0 (Y-2), 1.5 (Y-3), or 10 (Y-4) parts of Genapol X-080 per 100 parts of PVC by weight. Y-1, Y-2, and Y-3 did not induce skin irritation responses in an in vitro reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) tissue model, as measured by tissue viability or interleukin-1α release, or in an in vivo intracutaneous response test using rabbits. In contrast, Y-4 extracts prepared with saline or sesame oil at 37°C and 50°C clearly elicited positive irritation responses, including reduced viability (< 50%) and significantly higher interleukin-1α release compared with the solvent alone group, in the RhE tissue model and an intracutaneous response test, where substantial necrosis was observed by histopathology. The positive skin irritation responses induced in vitro under various extraction conditions, as well as those elicited in vivo, indicate that Y-4 is an effective extractable positive control material for in vivo and in vitro skin irritation tests of medical devices. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The in vivo rat skin photomicronucleus assay: Phototoxicity and photogenotoxicity evaluation of six fluoroquinolones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus, A.A.; Usta, M.; Kenny, J.D.; Clements, P.J.; Pruimboom-Brees, I.; Aylott, M.; Lynch, A.M.; Krul, C.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    An in vivo photomicronucleus test (MNT) using rat skin, the target organ for photoirritancy and carcinogenicity, was recently described. The assay was evaluated using fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics with varying degrees of phototoxic potency (i.e. sparflocacin [SPFX], lomefloxacin [LOFX],

  19. Measurement of interstitial cetirizine concentrations in human skin: correlation of drug levels with inhibition of histamine-induced skin responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, L J; Church, M K; Rihoux, J P; Skov, P S

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure the concentrations of cetirizine in the extracellular water compartment in intact human skin and assess simultaneously inhibition of histamine-induced wheal and flare reactions. Skin cetirizine levels were collected by the microdialysis technique and analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection. Skin levels in 20 subjects were compared to plasma levels for 4 h after a single oral dose of 10 or 20 mg of cetirizine. Skin prick tests were performed with histamine 100 mg/ml. Plasma cetirizine levels increased within 30 min to reach peak values of 315+/-10 and 786+/-45 ng/ml 90-120 min after administration of 10 and 20 mg of cetirizine. This was followed by a slow decline. In the skin, dialysate cetirizine levels (non-protein-bound fraction only) peaked at 1.6+/-0.1 and 2.4+/-0.3 ng/ml at 120-180 min. In vivo recovery of cetirizine was 14.4+/-4.3%. It was estimated that the non-protein-bound concentration of cetirizine in the skin was 50-70% of corresponding plasma values. Both 10- and 20-mg doses of cetirizine inhibited wheal and flare reactions over 240 min. The time vs concentration profile of cetirizine in skin dialysate paralleled the inhibition of skin reactions, but no significant correlations were found between individual cetirizine levels in skin or plasma with wheal and flare reactions. Cetirizine concentrations in the skin could be monitored by the microdialysis technique. The results indicate no simple linear correlation between cetirizine skin levels and inhibition of skin reactions.

  20. Terahertz pulse imaging in reflection geometry of human skin cancer and skin tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, Ruth M [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cole, Bryan E [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wallace, Vincent P [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pye, Richard J [Department of Dermatology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Arnone, Donald D [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Linfield, Edmund H [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pepper, Michael [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2002-11-07

    We demonstrate the application of terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) in reflection geometry for the study of skin tissue and related cancers both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of terahertz radiation to polar molecules, such as water, makes TPI suitable for studying the hydration levels in the skin and the determination of the lateral spread of skin cancer pre-operatively. By studying the terahertz pulse shape in the time domain we have been able to differentiate between diseased and normal tissue for the study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Basal cell carcinoma has shown a positive terahertz contrast, and inflammation and scar tissue a negative terahertz contrast compared to normal tissue. In vivo measurements on the stratum corneum have enabled visualization of the stratum corneum-epidermis interface and the study of skin hydration levels. These results demonstrate the potential of terahertz pulse imaging for the study of skin tissue and its related disorders, both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Novel 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 inhibitors reduce cortisol levels in keratinocytes and improve dermal collagen content in human ex vivo skin after exposure to cortisone and UV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie M Boudon

    Full Text Available Activity and selectivity assessment of new bi-aryl amide 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1 inhibitors, prepared in a modular manner via Suzuki cross-coupling, are described. Several compounds inhibiting 11β-HSD1 at nanomolar concentrations were identified. Compounds 2b, 3e, 7b and 12e were shown to selectively inhibit 11β-HSD1 over 11β-HSD2, 17β-HSD1 and 17β-HSD2. These inhibitors also potently inhibited 11β-HSD1 activity in intact HEK-293 cells expressing the recombinant enzyme and in intact primary human keratinocytes expressing endogenous 11β-HSD1. Moreover, compounds 2b, 3e and 12e were tested for their activity in human skin biopsies. They were able to prevent, at least in part, both the cortisone- and the UV-mediated decreases in collagen content. Thus, inhibition of 11β-HSD1 by these compounds can be further investigated to delay or prevent UV-mediated skin damage and skin aging.

  2. In vivo measurements of skin barrier: comparison of different methods and advantages of laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the skin is to provide a protective barrier at the interface between external environment and the organism. For skin barrier measurement, a multiplicity of methods is available. As standard methods, the determination of the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as well as the measurement of the stratum corneum hydration, are widely accepted, although they offer some obvious disadvantages such as increased interference liability. Recently, new optical and spectroscopic methods have been introduced to investigate skin barrier properties in vivo. Especially, laser scanning microscopy has been shown to represent an excellent tool to study skin barrier integrity in many areas of relevance such as cosmetology, occupation, diseased skin, and wound healing.

  3. Study of the vitamins A, E and C esters penetration into the skin by confocal Raman spectroscopy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogilevych, Borys; Isensee, Debora; Rangel, Joao L.; Dal Pizzol, Carine; Martinello, Valeska C. A.; Dieamant, Gustavo C.; Martin, Airton A.

    2015-06-01

    Vitamins A, E and C play important role in skin homeostasis and protection. Hence, they are extensively used in many cosmetic and cosmeceutic products. However, their molecules are unstable, and do not easily penetrate into the skin, which drastically decreases its efficiency in topical formulations. Liposoluble derivative of the vitamin A - retinyl palmitate, vitamin E - tocopheryl acetate, and vitamin C - tetraisopalmitoyl ascorbic acid, are more stable, and are frequently used as an active ingredient in cosmetic products. Moreover, increased hydrophobicity of these molecules could lead to a higher skin penetration. The aim of this work is to track and compare the absorption of the liposoluble derivatives of the vitamins and their encapsulated form, into the healthy human skin in vivo. We used Confocal Raman Spectroscopy (CRS) that is proven to be helpful in label-free non-destructive investigation of the biochemical composition and molecular conformational analysis of the biological samples. The measurements were performed in the volar forearm of the 10 healthy volunteers. Skin was treated with both products, and Raman spectra were obtained after 15 min, 3 hours, and 6 hours after applying the formulation. 3510 Skin Composition Analyzer (River Diagnostics, The Netherlands) with 785 nm laser excitation was used to acquire information in the fingerprint region. Significant difference in permeation of the products was observed. Whereas only free form of retinyl palmitate penetrate the skin within first 15 minutes, all three vitamin derivatives were present under the skin surface in case of nanoparticulated form.

  4. In vivo skin capacitive imaging analysis by using grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Xiang; Pan, Wei; Xiao, Perry

    2014-01-02

    We present our latest work on in vivo skin capacitive imaging analysis by using grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The in vivo skin capacitive images were taken by a capacitance based fingerprint sensor, the skin capacitive images were then analysed by GLCM. Four different GLCM feature vectors, angular second moment (ASM), entropy (ENT), contrast (CON) and correlation (COR), are selected to describe the skin texture. The results show that angular second moment increases as age increases, and entropy decreases as age increases. The results also suggest that the angular second moment values and the entropy values reflect more about the skin texture, whilst the contrast values and the correlation values reflect more about the topically applied solvents. The overall results shows that the GLCM is an effective way to extract and analyse the skin texture information, which can potentially be a valuable reference for evaluating effects of medical and cosmetic treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo confocal Raman microspectroscopy of the skin: Noninvasive determination of molecular concentration profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Caspers (Peter); G.W. Lucassen (Gerald); E.A. Carter (Elizabeth); H.A. Bruining (Hajo); G.J. Puppels (Gerwin)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractConfocal Raman spectroscopy is introduced as a noninvasive in vivo optical method to measure molecular concentration profiles in the skin. It is shown how it can be applied to determine the water concentration in the stratum corneum as a function of distance to the skin surface, with a

  6. In vivo skin dose measurement in breast conformal radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Accurate skin dose assessment is necessary during breast radiotherapy to assure that the skin dose is below the tolerance level and is sufficient to prevent tumour recurrence. The aim of the current study is to measure the skin dose and to evaluate the geometrical/anatomical parameters that affect it. Material and methods : Forty patients were simulated by TIGRT treatment planning system and treated with two tangential fields of 6 MV photon beam. Wedge filters were used to homogenise dose distribution for 11 patients. Skin dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100 and the effects of beam incident angle, thickness of irradiated region, and beam entry separation on the skin dose were analysed. Results : Average skin dose in treatment course of 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV was 36.65 Gy. The corresponding dose values for patients who were treated with and without wedge filter were 35.65 and 37.20 Gy, respectively. It was determined that the beam angle affected the average skin dose while the thickness of the irradiated region and the beam entry separation did not affect dose. Since the skin dose measured in this study was lower than the amount required to prevent tumour recurrence, application of bolus material in part of the treatment course is suggested for post-mastectomy advanced breast radiotherapy. It is more important when wedge filters are applied to homogenize dose distribution.

  7. Surfactant-induced dermatitis: comparison of corneosurfametry with predictive testing on human and reconstructed skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard, G E; Goffin, V; Hermanns-Lê, T; Arrese, J E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    1995-09-01

    Surfactants elicit alterations in the stratum corneum. Predictive tests that avoid animal experimentation are needed. This study compares three methods of rating and predicting shampoo-induced irritation. Corneosurfametry entails collection of stratum corneum followed by brief contact with diluted surfactants and measurement of variations in staining of samples. Corneosurfametry appears to correlate well with in vivo testing in volunteers with sensitive skin. However, corneosurfametry presents less interindividual variability than in vivo testing and allows better discrimination among mild products. Morphologic information about surfactant-induced loosening of corneocytes may be increased by testing surfactants on human skin equivalent. Results are similar to those provided by specimens used for corneosurfametry. The corneosurfametric prediction of surfactant irritancy correlates with in vivo testing and with in vitro evaluation on human skin equivalent.

  8. Non-invasive measurement of micro-area skin impedance in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dachao; Liang, Wenshuai; Liu, Tongkun; Yu, Haixia; Xu, Kexin

    2011-12-01

    Volume measurement of interstitial fluid transdermally extracted is important in continuous glucose monitoring instrument. The volume of transdermally extracted interstitial fluid could be determined by a skin permeability coefficient. If the skin impedance which is the indicator of skin permeability coefficient can be accurately measured, the volume of interstitial fluid can be calculated based on the relationship between the indicator and the skin permeability coefficient. The possibility of using the skin impedance to indicate the skin permeability coefficient is investigated. A correlation model between the skin impedance and the skin permeability coefficient is developed. A novel non-invasive method for in vivo, real-time, and accurate measurement of skin impedance within a micro skin area is brought forward. The proposed measurement method is based on the theory that organisms saliva and interstitial fluid are equipotential. An electrode is put on the surface of a micro skin area and another one is put in the mouth to be fully contacted with saliva of an animal in the experiments. The electrode in mouth is used to replace the implantable subcutaneous electrode for non-invasive measurement of skin impedance in vivo. A biologically compatible AC current with amplitude of 100mv and frequency of 10Hz is applied to stimulate the micro skin area by the two electrodes. And then the voltage and current between the two electrodes are measured to calculate the skin impedance within a micro skin area. The measurement results by electrode in mouth are compared with the results by subcutaneous electrode in animal experiments and they are consistent so the proposed measurement method is verified well. The effect of moisture and pressure for the measurement is also studied in the paper.

  9. Characterization of porcine skin as a model for human skin studies using infrared spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Rong; Bhargava, Rohit

    2011-06-07

    Porcine skin is often considered a substitute for human skin based on morphological and functional data, for example, for transdermal drug diffusion studies. A chemical, structural and temporal characterization of porcine skin in comparison to human skin is not available but will likely improve our understanding of this porcine skin model. Here, we employ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to holistically measure chemical species as well as spatial structure as a function of time to characterize porcine skin as a model for human skin. Porcine skin was found to resemble human skin spectroscopically and differences are elucidated. Cryo-prepared fresh porcine skin samples for spectroscopic imaging were found to be stable over time and small variations are observed. Hence, we extended characterization to the use of this model for dynamic processes. In particular, the capacity and stability of this model in transdermal diffusion is examined. The results indicate that porcine skin is likely to be an attractive tool for studying diffusion dynamics of materials in human skin.

  10. In vitro and in vivo percutaneous absorption of retinol from cosmetic formulations: significance of the skin reservoir and prediction of systemic absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yourick, Jeffrey J; Jung, Connie T; Bronaugh, Robert L

    2008-08-15

    The percutaneous absorption of retinol (Vitamin A) from cosmetic formulations was studied to predict systemic absorption and to understand the significance of the skin reservoir in in vitro absorption studies. Viable skin from fuzzy rat or human subjects was assembled in flow-through diffusion cells for in vitro absorption studies. In vivo absorption studies using fuzzy rats were performed in glass metabolism cages for collection of urine, feces, and body content. Retinol (0.3%) formulations (hydroalcoholic gel and oil-in-water emulsion) containing (3)H-retinol were applied and absorption was measured at 24 or 72 h. All percentages reported are % of applied dose. In vitro studies using human skin and the gel and emulsion vehicles found 0.3 and 1.3% retinol, respectively, in receptor fluid at 24 h. Levels of absorption in the receptor fluid increased over 72 h with the gel and emulsion vehicles. Using the gel vehicle, in vitro rat skin studies found 23% in skin and 6% in receptor fluid at 24 h, while 72-h studies found 18% in skin and 13% in receptor fluid. Thus, significant amounts of retinol remained in rat skin at 24 h and decreased over 72 h, with proportional increases in receptor fluid. In vivo rat studies with the gel found 4% systemic absorption of retinol after 24 h and systemic absorption did not increase at 72 h. Retinol remaining in rat skin after in vivo application was 18% and 13% of the applied dermal dose after 24 and 72 h, respectively. Similar observations were made with the oil-in water emulsion vehicle in the rat. Retinol formed a reservoir in rat skin both in vivo and in vitro. Little additional retinol was bioavailable after 24 h. Comparison of these in vitro and in vivo results for absorption through rat skin indicates that the 24-h in vitro receptor fluid value accurately estimated 24-h in vivo systemic absorption. Therefore, the best single estimate of retinol systemic absorption from in vitro human skin studies is the 24-h receptor fluid

  11. Relating friction on the human skin to the hydration and temperature of the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, E. van der

    2013-01-01

    The human skin is constantly in interaction with materials and products. Therefore, skin friction is relevant to all people. In the literature, the frictional properties of the skin have been linked to a large variety of variables, like age, gender and hydration. The present study compares the data

  12. In vitro Percutaneous Absorption of Niacinamide and Phytosterols and in vivo Evaluation of their Effect on Skin Barrier Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerta, Alessia; Bonina, Francesco; Gasparri, Franco; Zanardi, Andrea; Micicche, Lucia; Puglia, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated different strategies to optimize the percutaneous absorption of niacinamide (NA) and soy phytosterols (FITO) by making use of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and penetration enhancers, such as the hydrogenated lecithin. The evaluation of the skin permeation of NA and FITO has been effected in vitro using excised human skin (i.e., stratum corneum-epidermis or SCE). Furthermore, we evaluated the in vivo effect that NA and FITO has on skin barrier recovery after the topical application; using the extent of methyl nicotinate (MN)-induced erythema in damaged skin as a parameter to determine the rate of stratum corneum recovery. Results pointed out the importance of these strategies as valid tools for NA and FITO topical delivery. In fact, soy lecithin based formulations were able to increase the percutaneous absorption of the two active ingredients, while SLN guaranteed an interesting delayed and sustained release of FITO. In vivo evaluation showed clearly that the formulation containing both the actives (NA and FITO) is able to recover about 95% of skin barrier integrity eight days after tape stripping. This effect is probably due to the "synergistic effect" of NA and FITO.

  13. In vivo evaluation of wound bed reaction and graft performance after cold skin graft storage: new targets for skin tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Alicia; Kornmann, Kai; Kerl, Katrin; Calcagni, Maurizio; Schmidt, Christian A; Vollmar, Brigitte; Giovanoli, Pietro; Lindenblatt, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Surplus harvested skin grafts are routinely stored at 4 to 6°C in saline for several days in plastic surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of storage on human skin graft performance in an in vivo intravital microscopic setting after transplantation. Freshly harvested human full-thickness skin grafts and split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs) after storage of 0, 3, or 7 days in moist saline at 4 to 6°C were transplanted into the modified dorsal skinfold chamber, and intravital microscopy was performed to evaluate vessel morphology and angiogenic change of the wound bed. The chamber tissue was harvested 10 days after transplantation for evaluation of tissue integrity and inflammation (hematoxylin and eosin) as well as for immunohistochemistry (human CD31, murine CD31, Ki67, Tdt-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labelling). Intravital microscopy results showed no differences in the host angiogenic response between fresh and preserved grafts. However, STSGs and full-thickness skin grafts exhibited a trend toward different timing and strength in capillary widening and capillary bud formation. Preservation had no influence on graft quality before transplantation, but fresh STSGs showed better quality 10 days after transplantation than 7-day preserved grafts. Proliferation and apoptosis as well as host capillary in-growth and graft capillary degeneration were equal in all groups. These results indicate that cells may activate protective mechanisms under cold conditions, allowing them to maintain function and morphology. However, rewarming may disclose underlying tissue damage. These findings could be translated to a new approach for the design of full-thickness skin substitutes.

  14. Fermentation of Propionibacterium acnes, a commensal bacterium in the human skin microbiome, as skin probiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muya Shu

    Full Text Available Bacterial interference creates an ecological competition between commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Through fermentation of milk with gut-friendly bacteria, yogurt is an excellent aid to balance the bacteriological ecosystem in the human intestine. Here, we demonstrate that fermentation of glycerol with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes, a skin commensal bacterium, can function as a skin probiotic for in vitro and in vivo growth suppression of USA300, the most prevalent community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA. We also promote the notion that inappropriate use of antibiotics may eliminate the skin commensals, making it more difficult to fight pathogen infection. This study warrants further investigation to better understand the role of fermentation of skin commensals in infectious disease and the importance of the human skin microbiome in skin health.

  15. In vivo measurement of breast skin elasticity and breast skin thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Alok; Miller, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    The mechanical properties of the breast skin play an important role in explaining the changes associated with radiotherapy, tissue expansion, and breast reconstruction surgery. Quantitative measurement of mechanical properties of breast skin is essential for surgical preplanning and outcome prediction. We have measured the skin elasticity properties and skin thickness of the breast using noninvasive methods. The DermaLab suction cup and the DermaScanC ultrasound were used to measure the modulus of elasticity and the skin thickness, respectively. Measurements were taken in 16 different locations on the breast in 23 female patients, also with patients in supine and upright position. Different analytical models (plate, membrane, large deformation) that can represent the experiment were studied to extract the elasticity modulus. The average modulus of breast skin elasticity found was 344 ± 88 kPa (Mean ± SD) with 95% confidence interval being 306-382 kPa. The range of the modulus was 195-480 kPa. The average thickness of breast skin was 1.55 ± 0.25 mm with a range of 0.83-2.4 mm. Regional variations of breast skin elasticity properties and breast skin thickness were observed. No direct correlations of biomechanical properties with age or breast thickness were observed. No significant difference was observed in the elasticity modulus between the supine and upright patient positions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Dermal absorption behavior of fluorescent molecules in nanoparticles on human and porcine skin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debotton, Nir; Badihi, Amit; Robinpour, Mano; Enk, Claes D; Benita, Simon

    2017-05-30

    The percutaneous passage of poorly skin absorbed molecules can be improved using nanocarriers, particularly biodegradable polymeric nanospheres (NSs) or nanocapsules (NCs). However, penetration of the encapsulated molecules may be affected by other factors than the nanocarrier properties. To gain insight information on the skin absorption of two fluorescent cargos, DiIC18(5) and coumarin-6 were incorporated in NSs or NCs and topically applied on various human and porcine skin samples. 3D imaging techniques suggest that NSs and NCs enhanced deep dermal penetration of both probes similarly, when applied on excised human skin irrespective of the nature of the cargo. However, when ex vivo pig skin was utilized, the cutaneous absorption of DiIC18(5) was more pronounced by means of PLGA NCs than NSs. In contrast, PLGA NSs noticeably improved the porcine skin penetration of coumarin-6, as compared to the NCs. Furthermore, the porcine skin results were reproducible when triplicated whereas from various human skin samples, as expected, the results were not sufficiently reproducible and large deviations were observed. The overall findings from this comprehensive comparison emphasize the potential of PLGA NCs or NSs to promote cutaneous bioavailability of encapsulated drugs, exhibiting different physicochemical properties but depending on the nature of the skin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Polarization speckle imaging as a potential technique for in vivo skin cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Lui, Harvey; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I; Lee, Tim K

    2013-06-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the Western world. In order to accurately detect the disease, especially malignant melanoma-the most fatal form of skin cancer-at an early stage when the prognosis is excellent, there is an urgent need to develop noninvasive early detection methods. We believe that polarization speckle patterns, defined as a spatial distribution of depolarization ratio of traditional speckle patterns, can be an important tool for skin cancer detection. To demonstrate our technique, we conduct a large in vivo clinical study of 214 skin lesions, and show that statistical moments of the polarization speckle pattern could differentiate different types of skin lesions, including three common types of skin cancers, malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and two benign lesions, melanocytic nevus and seborrheic keratoses. In particular, the fourth order moment achieves better or similar sensitivity and specificity than many well-known and accepted optical techniques used to differentiate melanoma and seborrheic keratosis.

  18. Polarization speckle imaging as a potential technique for in vivo skin cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Lui, Harvey; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lee, Tim K.

    2013-06-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the Western world. In order to accurately detect the disease, especially malignant melanoma-the most fatal form of skin cancer-at an early stage when the prognosis is excellent, there is an urgent need to develop noninvasive early detection methods. We believe that polarization speckle patterns, defined as a spatial distribution of depolarization ratio of traditional speckle patterns, can be an important tool for skin cancer detection. To demonstrate our technique, we conduct a large in vivo clinical study of 214 skin lesions, and show that statistical moments of the polarization speckle pattern could differentiate different types of skin lesions, including three common types of skin cancers, malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and two benign lesions, melanocytic nevus and seborrheic keratoses. In particular, the fourth order moment achieves better or similar sensitivity and specificity than many well-known and accepted optical techniques used to differentiate melanoma and seborrheic keratosis.

  19. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Human Skin Using a Commercial Fiber Optic Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atencio, J. A. Delgado; Rodríguez, M. Cunill; Montiel, S. Vázquez y.; Gutiérrez, J. L.; Martínez, F.; Gutiérrez, B.; Orozco, E.; Castro, Jorge; Rodríguez, A. Cornejo

    2008-08-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a reliable and easy to implement technique in human tissue characterization. In this work we evaluate the performance of the commercial USB4000 miniature fiber optic spectrometer in the in-vivo measurement of the diffuse reflectance spectra of different healthy skin sites and lesions in a population of 54 volunteers. Results show, that this spectrometer reproduces well the typical signatures of skin spectra over the 400-1000 nm region. Remarkable spectral differences exist between lesions and normal surrounding skin. A diffusion-based model was used to simulate reflectance spectra collected by the optical probe of the system.

  20. Human skin equivalent as an alternative to animal testing

    OpenAIRE

    Mertsching, Heike; Weimer, Michaela; Kersen, Silke; Brunner, Herwig

    2008-01-01

    The 3-D skin equivalent can be viewed as physiologically comparable to the natural skin and therefore is a suitable alternative for animal testing. This highly differentiated in vitro human skin equivalent is used to assess the efficacy and mode of action of novel agents. This model is generated from primary human keratinocytes on a collagen substrate containing human dermal fibroblasts. It is grown at the air-liquid interface which allows full epidermal stratification and epidermal-dermal in...

  1. Chemical ecology of interactions between human skin microbiota and mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, N.O.; Takken, W.; Dicke, M.; Schraa, G.; Smallegange, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Microbiota on the human skin plays a major role in body odour production. The human microbial and chemical signature displays a qualitative and quantitative correlation. Genes may influence the chemical signature by shaping the composition of the microbiota. Recent studies on human skin microbiota,

  2. Ex vivo multiscale quantitation of skin biomechanics in wild-type and genetically-modified mice using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Lynch, Barbara; Bonod-Bidaud, Christelle; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Dokládal, Petr; Allain, Jean-Marc; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Ruggiero, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Soft connective tissues such as skin, tendon or cornea are made of about 90% of extracellular matrix proteins, fibrillar collagens being the major components. Decreased or aberrant collagen synthesis generally results in defective tissue mechanical properties as the classic form of Elhers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS). This connective tissue disorder is caused by mutations in collagen V genes and is mainly characterized by skin hyperextensibility. To investigate the relationship between the microstructure of normal and diseased skins and their macroscopic mechanical properties, we imaged and quantified the microstructure of dermis of ex vivo murine skin biopsies during uniaxial mechanical assay using multiphoton microscopy. We used two genetically-modified mouse lines for collagen V: a mouse model for cEDS harboring a Col5a2 deletion (a.k.a. pN allele) and the transgenic K14-COL5A1 mice which overexpress the human COL5A1 gene in skin. We showed that in normal skin, the collagen fibers continuously align with stretch, generating the observed increase in mechanical stress. Moreover, dermis from both transgenic lines exhibited altered collagen reorganization upon traction, which could be linked to microstructural modifications. These findings show that our multiscale approach provides new crucial information on the biomechanics of dermis that can be extended to all collagen-rich soft tissues.

  3. A custom tailored model to investigate skin penetration in porcine skin and its comparison with human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Michael E; Houdek, Pia; Gorissen, Sascha; Zorn-Kruppa, Michaela; Wladykowski, Ewa; Volksdorf, Thomas; Grzybowski, Stephan; Kolios, Georgios; Willers, Christoph; Mallwitz, Henning; Moll, Ingrid; Brandner, Johanna M

    2015-09-01

    Reliable models for the determination of skin penetration and permeation are important for the development of new drugs and formulations. The intention of our study was to develop a skin penetration model which (1) is viable and well supplied with nutrients during the period of the experiment (2) is mimicking human skin as far as possible, but still is independent from the problems of supply and heterogeneity, (3) can give information about the penetration into different compartments of the skin and (4) considers specific inter-individual differences in skin thickness. In addition, it should be quick and inexpensive (5) and without ethical implications (6). Using a chemically divers set of four topically approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), namely diclofenac, metronidazole, tazarotene, and terbinafine, we demonstrated that the model allows reliable determination of drug concentrations in different layers of the viable epidermis and dermis. For APIs susceptible for skin metabolism, the extent of metabolic transformation in epidermis and dermis can be monitored. Furthermore, a high degree of accordance in the ability for discrimination of skin concentrations of the substances in different layers was found in models derived from porcine and human skin. Viability, proliferation, differentiation and markers for skin barrier function were surveyed in the model. This model, which we call 'Hamburg model of skin penetration' is particularly suited to support a rational ranking and selection of dermatological formulations within drug development projects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of Reparative Activity of Platelet Lysate: Effect on Cell Monolayer Recovery In Vitro and Skin Wound Healing In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeeva, N S; Shanskii, Ya D; Sviridova, I K; Karalkin, P A; Kirsanova, V A; Akhmedova, S A; Kaprin, A D

    2016-11-01

    Platelet lysate prepared from donor platelet concentrate and pooled according to a developed technique stimulates migration of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells of the human adipose tissue and promotes healing of the monolayer defect in cultures of human fibroblasts and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro in concentrations close those of fetal calf serum (5-10%). Lysate of platelets from platelet-rich rat blood plasma stimulated healing of the skin defect by promoting epithelialization and granulation tissue formation. The regenerative properties of platelet lysate in vivo increased with increasing its concentration.

  5. Cationic membrane-active peptides - anticancer and antifungal activity as well as penetration into human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nhung; Weindl, Günther; Grohmann, Lisa; Salwiczek, Mario; Koksch, Beate; Korting, Hans Christian; Schäfer-Korting, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient natural broad-spectrum antibiotics, and several compounds also exhibit anticancer activity. However, most applications pertain to bacterial infections, and treatment for skin cancer is less frequently considered. The cytotoxicity of melittin, cecropin A, protegrin-1 and histatin 5 against squamous skin cancer cell lines and normal human keratinocytes was evaluated and compared to established drugs. The results show that melittin clearly outperforms 5-fluorouracil regarding antitumor activity. Importantly, combined melittin and 5-fluorouracil enhanced cytotoxic effects on cancer cells and reduced toxicity on normal keratinocytes. Additionally, minimum inhibitory concentrations indicate that melittin also shows superior activity against clinical and laboratory strains of Candida albicans compared to amphotericin B. To evaluate its potential for topical applications, human skin penetration of melittin was investigated ex vivo and compared to two non-toxic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), low molecular weight protamine (LMWP) and penetratin. The stratum corneum prevents penetration into viable epidermis over 6 h; however, the peptides gain access to the viable skin after 24 h. Inhibition of digestive enzymes during skin penetration significantly enhances the availability of intact peptide. In conclusion, melittin may represent an innovative agent for non-melanoma skin cancer and infectious skin diseases. In order to develop a drug candidate, skin absorption and proteolytic digestion by skin enzymes need to be addressed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. In Vivo SILAC-Based Proteomics Reveals Phosphoproteome Changes during Mouse Skin Carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanivan, Sara; Meves, Alexander; Behrendt, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    SILAC technology in combination with high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) can be successfully used to measure phosphoproteomes in vivo. Here, Zanivan, Mann, and colleagues have applied SILAC-based MS to investigate phosphoproteomic changes during skin carcinogenesis, using the DMBA/TPA two-stag......-stage mouse model. Using this approach, the authors have revealed the phosphoproteomic dynamics that accompany skin cancer progression and predict specific kinase activities associated with tumor malignancy....

  7. Effect of terbutaline and bambuterol on immediate-type allergic skin responses and mediator release in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, L J; Skov, P S

    2003-09-01

    Beta-2 agonists are potent inhibitors of mast cell degranulation in vitro. Intradermally injected they also inhibit mast cell activation in human skin in vivo. To what extent orally administered beta(2)-agonists inhibit mast cell degranulation and allergic skin responses in vivo in daily recommended doses remains unclear. The main purpose was to study the effects of oral administered terbutaline and bambuterol on allergen- and codeine-induced histamine release and skin responses in intact human skin in vivo. In addition, control studies were carried out with intradermally injected terbutaline. Ten allergic subjects were randomized to receive bambuterol (10 mg tablets twice daily), terbutaline (7.5 mg controlled release tablets twice daily) and corresponding placebo for 5 days with a washout phase of 3 days between treatments in a double-blind, double-dummy, cross-over trial. The patients were studied at the fifth day of each regimen, i.e. at day 5, 13, and 21. Allergen- and codeine-induced histamine release was measured by microdialysis technique. Wheal and flare reactions to allergen, codeine, and histamine were measured planimetrically. Measurements were performed in the morning on day 5 on each regimen before medication and for additional 5 h after administration of the morning dose. In a separate series of experiments in another 10 allergic patients, 1-1,000 nM (0.05-50 pmoles) of terbutaline was injected intradermally for measurement of histamine release, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) synthesis and skin responses. Neither orally administered terbutaline nor bambuterol significantly reduced allergen- or codeine-induced histamine release. Flare reactions to allergen, codeine and histamine remained unaffected which was also the case for the majority of the wheal reactions. In comparison, intradermally injected terbutaline significantly reduced allergen-induced histamine release, PGD(2) synthesis, and skin reactions. Codeine-induced histamine release remained unaffected

  8. [The clinical use of cryopreserved human skin allografts for transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Francisco; Chacón-Gómez, María; Madinaveitia-Villanueva, Juan Antonio; Barrera-Lopez, Araceli; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Querevalu-Murillo, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The biological recovery of human skin allografts is the gold standard for preservation in Skin Banks. However, there is no worldwide consensus about specific allocation criteria for preserved human skin allografts with living cells. A report is presented on the results of 5 years of experience of using human skin allografts in burned patient in the Skin and Tissue Bank at the "Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" The human skin allografts were obtained from multi-organ donors. processed and preserved at -80 °C for 12 months. Allocation criteria were performed according to blood type match, clinical history, and burned body surface. Up to now, the Skin and Tissue Bank at 'Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" has processed and recovered 125,000 cm(2) of human skin allografts. It has performed 34 surgical implants on 21 burned patients. The average of burn body surface was 59.2%. More than two-thirds (67.7%) of recipients of skin allografts were matched of the same to type blood of the donor, and 66.6% survived after 126 days hospital stay. It is proposed to consider recipient's blood group as allocation criteria to assign tissue; and use human skin allografts on patiens affected with burns over 30% of body surface (according the "rule of the 9"). Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced in vitro and in vivo skin deposition of apigenin delivered using ethosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-Na; Zhang, Yong-Tai; Wang, Qin; Xu, Ling; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-01-02

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel topical delivery system for apigenin by using ethosomes. An optimal apigenin-loaded ethosome formulation was identified by means of uniform design experiments. Skin deposition and transdermal flux of apigenin loaded in ethosomes, liposomes, and deformable liposomes were compared in vitro and in vivo. The efficiency of apigenin encapsulation increased with an increase in the amount of phospholipids in ethosome formulations. Moreover, skin deposition and transdermal flux of apigenin improved with an increase in the levels of phospholipids (Lipoid S 75) and short-chain alcohols (propylene glycol and ethanol), but decreased with an increase in the ratio of propylene glycol to ethanol. Profiles of skin deposition versus time for ethosomes varied markedly between in vivo and in vitro studies compared with those of liposomes or deformable liposomes. Optimized ethosomes showed superior skin targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, they had the strongest effect on reduction of cyclooxygenase-2 levels in mouse skin inflammation induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) light. Therefore, apigenin-loaded ethosomes represent a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of UVB-induced skin inflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The moisturizing effects of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Sogabe, Atsushi; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants, such as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced by different yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma and have been attracting much attention as new cosmetic ingredients owing to their unique liquid-crystal-forming and moisturizing properties. In this study, the effects of different MEL derivatives on the skin were evaluated in detail using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model and an in vivo human study. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were evaluated on the basis of cell viability. Most MEL derivatives efficiently recovered the viability of the cells and showed high recovery rates (over 80%) comparable with that of natural ceramide. It is interesting that the recovery rate with MEL-A prepared from olive oil was significantly higher than that of MEL-A prepared from soybean oil. The water retention properties of MEL-B were further investigated on human forearm skin in a preliminary study. Compared with the control, the aqueous solution of MEL-B (5 wt%) was estimated to considerably increase the stratum corneum water content in the skin. Moreover, perspiration on the skin surface was clearly suppressed by treatment with the MEL-B solution. These results suggest that MELs are likely to exhibit a high moisturizing action, by assisting the barrier function of the skin. Accordingly, the yeast glycolipids have a strong potential as a new ingredient for skin care products.

  11. Setup for investigating gold nanoparticle penetration through reconstructed skin and comparison to published human skin data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouta, Hagar I.; Thude, Sibylle; Schneider, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Owing to the limited source of human skin (HS) and the ethical restrictions of using animals in experiments, in vitro skin equivalents are a possible alternative for conducting particle penetration experiments. The conditions for conducting penetration experiments with model particles, 15-nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP), through nonsealed skin equivalents are described for the first time. These conditions include experimental setup, sterility conditions, effective applied dose determination, skin sectioning, and skin integrity check. Penetration at different exposure times (two and 24 h) and after tissue fixation (fixed versus unfixed skin) are examined to establish a benchmark in comparison to HS in an attempt to get similar results to HS experiments presented earlier. Multiphoton microscopy is used to detect gold luminescence in skin sections. λex=800 nm is used for excitation of AuNP and skin samples, allowing us to determine a relative index for particle penetration. Despite the observed overpredictability of penetration into skin equivalents, they could serve as a first fast screen for testing the behavior of nanoparticles and extrapolate their penetration behavior into HS. Further investigations are required to test a wide range of particles of different physicochemical properties to validate the skin equivalent-human skin particle penetration relationship.

  12. Cold Plasma Welding System for Surgical Skin Closure: In Vivo Porcine Feasibility Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harats, Moti; Lam, Amnon; Maller, Michael; Kornhaber, Rachel; Haik, Josef

    2016-09-29

    Cold plasma skin welding is a novel technology that bonds skin edges through soldering without the use of synthetic materials or conventional wound approximation methods such as sutures, staples, or skin adhesives. The cold plasma welding system uses a biological solder applied to the edges of a skin incision, followed by the application of cold plasma energy. The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of a cold plasma welding system in approximating and fixating skin incisions compared with conventional methods and to evaluate and define optimal plasma welding parameters and histopathological tissue response in a porcine model. The cold plasma welding system (BioWeld1 System, IonMed Ltd, Yokneam, Israel) was used on porcine skin incisions using variable energy parameters. Wound healing was compared macroscopically and histologically to incisions approximated with sutures. When compared to sutured skin closure, cold plasma welding in specific system parameters demonstrated comparable and favorable wound healing results histopathologically as well as macroscopically. No evidence of epidermal damage, thermal or otherwise, was encountered in the specified parameters. Notably, bleeding, infection, and wound dehiscence were not detected at incision sites. Skin incisions welded at extreme energy parameters presented second-degree burns. Implementation of cold plasma welding has been shown to be feasible for skin closure. Initial in vivo results suggest cold plasma welding might provide equal, if not better, healing results than traditional methods of closure.

  13. Human age and skin physiology shape diversity and abundance of Archaea on skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Probst, Alexander J; Birarda, Giovanni; Auerbach, Anna; Koskinen, Kaisa; Wolf, Peter; Holman, Hoi-Ying N

    2017-06-22

    The human skin microbiome acts as an important barrier protecting our body from pathogens and other environmental influences. Recent investigations have provided evidence that Archaea are a constant but highly variable component of the human skin microbiome, yet factors that determine their abundance changes are unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the abundance of archaea on human skin is influenced by human age and skin physiology by quantitative PCR of 51 different skin samples taken from human subjects of various age. Our results reveal that archaea are more abundant in human subjects either older than 60 years or younger than 12 years as compared to middle-aged human subjects. These results, together with results obtained from spectroscopy analysis, allowed us gain first insights into a potential link of lower sebum levels and lipid content and thus reduced skin moisture with an increase in archaeal signatures. Amplicon sequencing of selected samples revealed the prevalence of specific eury- and mainly thaumarchaeal taxa, represented by a core archaeome of the human skin.

  14. Biogeography and individuality shape function in the human skin metagenome

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Julia; Byrd, Allyson L.; Deming, Clay; Conlan, Sean; Kong, Heidi H.; Segre, Julia A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The varied topography of human skin offers a unique opportunity to study how the body?s microenvironments influence the functional and taxonomic composition of microbial communities. Phylogenetic marker gene-based studies have identified many bacteria and fungi that colonize distinct skin niches. Here, metagenomic analyses of diverse body sites in healthy humans demonstrate that local biogeography and strong individuality define the skin microbiome. We developed a relational analysis ...

  15. In vitro and human testing strategies for skin irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M K; Osborne, R; Perkins, M A

    2000-01-01

    Prior to the manufacture, transport, and marketing of chemicals or products, it is critical to assess their potential for skin toxicity (corrosion or irritation), thereby protecting the worker and consumer from adverse skin effects due to intended or accidental skin exposure. Traditionally, animal testing procedures have provided the data needed to assess the more severe forms of skin toxicity, and current regulations may require animal test data before permission can be obtained to manufacture, transport, or market chemicals or the products that contain them. In recent years, the use of animals to assess skin safety has been opposed by some as inhumane and unnecessary. The conflicting needs of the industrial toxicologist to (1) protect human safety, (2) comply with regulations, and (3) reduce animal testing have led to major efforts to develop alternative, yet predictive, test methods. A variety of in vitro skin corrosion test methods have been developed and several have successfully passed initial international validation. These have included skin or epidermal equivalent assays that have been shown to distinguish corrosive from noncorrosive chemicals. These skin/epidermal equivalent assays have also been modified and used to assess skin irritation potential relative to existing human exposure test data. The data show a good correlation between in vitro assay data and different types of human skin irritation data for both chemicals and consumer products. The effort to eliminate animal tests has also led to the development of a novel human patch test for assessment of acute skin irritation potential. A case study shows the benefits of in vitro and human skin irritation tests compared to the animal tests they seek to replace, and strategies now exist to adequately assess human skin irritation potential without the need to rely on animal test methods.

  16. Molecular cartography of the human skin surface in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouslimani, Amina; Porto, Carla; Rath, Christopher M.; Wang, Mingxun; Guo, Yurong; Gonzalez, Antonio; Berg-Lyon, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Moeller Christensen, Gitte Julie; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Zhang, Lingjuan; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Meehan, Michael J.; Dorrestein, Kathleen; Gallo, Richard L.; Bandeira, Nuno; Knight, Rob; Alexandrov, Theodore; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-01-01

    The human skin is an organ with a surface area of 1.5–2 m2 that provides our interface with the environment. The molecular composition of this organ is derived from host cells, microbiota, and external molecules. The chemical makeup of the skin surface is largely undefined. Here we advance the technologies needed to explore the topographical distribution of skin molecules, using 3D mapping of mass spectrometry data and microbial 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. Our 3D maps reveal that the molecular composition of skin has diverse distributions and that the composition is defined not only by skin cells and microbes but also by our daily routines, including the application of hygiene products. The technological development of these maps lays a foundation for studying the spatial relationships of human skin with hygiene, the microbiota, and environment, with potential for developing predictive models of skin phenotypes tailored to individual health. PMID:25825778

  17. Molecular cartography of the human skin surface in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouslimani, Amina; Porto, Carla; Rath, Christopher M; Wang, Mingxun; Guo, Yurong; Gonzalez, Antonio; Berg-Lyon, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Moeller Christensen, Gitte Julie; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Zhang, Lingjuan; Borkowski, Andrew W; Meehan, Michael J; Dorrestein, Kathleen; Gallo, Richard L; Bandeira, Nuno; Knight, Rob; Alexandrov, Theodore; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2015-04-28

    The human skin is an organ with a surface area of 1.5-2 m(2) that provides our interface with the environment. The molecular composition of this organ is derived from host cells, microbiota, and external molecules. The chemical makeup of the skin surface is largely undefined. Here we advance the technologies needed to explore the topographical distribution of skin molecules, using 3D mapping of mass spectrometry data and microbial 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. Our 3D maps reveal that the molecular composition of skin has diverse distributions and that the composition is defined not only by skin cells and microbes but also by our daily routines, including the application of hygiene products. The technological development of these maps lays a foundation for studying the spatial relationships of human skin with hygiene, the microbiota, and environment, with potential for developing predictive models of skin phenotypes tailored to individual health.

  18. N-acetyltransferase in human skin and keratinocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, Tanja; Bonifas, Jutta; Wiegman, Marjon; Pas, Hendrikus; Blömeke, Brunhilde; Coenraads, Pieter Jan; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise

    Background: N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) mediated Nacetylation in human skin and keratinocytes is an important detoxification pathway for aromatic amines including the strong sensitizer para-phenylenediamine (PPD), an important component of oxidative hair dyes. Objectives: Human skin and

  19. Imaging mitochondrial dynamics in human skin reveals depth-dependent hypoxia and malignant potential for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouli, Dimitra; Balu, Mihaela; Alonzo, Carlo A; Liu, Zhiyi; Quinn, Kyle P; Rius-Diaz, Francisca; Harris, Ronald M; Kelly, Kristen M; Tromberg, Bruce J; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-11-30

    Active changes in mitochondrial structure and organization facilitate cellular homeostasis. Because aberrant mitochondrial dynamics are implicated in a variety of human diseases, their assessment is potentially useful for diagnosis, therapy, and disease monitoring. Because current techniques for evaluating mitochondrial morphology are invasive or necessitate mitochondria-specific dyes, their clinical translation is limited. We report that mitochondrial dynamics can be monitored in vivo, within intact human skin by relying entirely on endogenous two-photon-excited fluorescence from the reduced metabolic coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). We established the sensitivity of this approach with in vivo, fast temporal studies of arterial occlusion-reperfusion, which revealed acute changes in the mitochondrial metabolism and dynamics of the lower human epidermal layers. In vitro hypoxic-reperfusion studies validated that the in vivo outcomes were a result of NADH fluorescence changes. To demonstrate the diagnostic potential of this approach, we evaluated healthy and cancerous human skin epithelia. Healthy tissues displayed consistent, depth-dependent morphological and mitochondrial organization patterns that varied with histological stratification and intraepithelial mitochondrial protein expression. In contrast, these consistent patterns were absent in cancerous skin lesions. We exploited these differences to successfully differentiate healthy from cancerous tissues using a predictive classification approach. Collectively, these results demonstrate that our label-free, automated, near real-time assessments of mitochondrial organization-relying solely on endogenous contrast-could be useful for accurate, noninvasive in vivo diagnosis. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Histamine suppresses epidermal keratinocyte differentiation and impairs skin barrier function in a human skin model

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwandtner, M; Mildner, M.; Mlitz, V; Gruber, F; Eckhart, L; Werfel, T.; Gutzmer, R.; Elias, P M; Tschachler, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Defects in keratinocyte differentiation and skin barrier are important features of inflammatory skin diseases like atopic dermatitis. Mast cells and their main mediator histamine are abundant in inflamed skin and thus may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methods Human primary keratinocytes were cultured under differentiation-promoting conditions in the presence and absence of histamine, histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. The expression of differentiation-associated gen...

  1. In-vivo fluorescence detection and imaging of porphyrin-producing bacteria in the human skin and in the oral cavity for diagnosis of acne vulgaris, caries, and squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Hemmer, Joerg; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-05-01

    Certain bacteria are able to synthesize metal-free fluorescent porphyrins and can therefore be detected by sensitive autofluorescence measurements in the red spectral region. The porphyrin-producing bacterium Propionibacterium acnes, which is involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris, was localized in human skin. Spectrally resolved fluorescence images of bacteria distribution in the face were obtained by a slow-scan CCD camera combined with a tunable liquid crystal filter. The structured autofluorescence of dental caries and dental plaque in the red is caused by oral bacteria, like Bacteroides or Actinomyces odontolyticus. `Caries images' were created by time-gated imaging in the ns-region after ultrashort laser excitation. Time-gated measurements allow the suppression of backscattered light and non-porphyrin autofluorescence. Biopsies of oral squamous cell carcinoma exhibited red autofluorescence in necrotic regions and high concentrations of the porphyrin-producing bacterium Pseudomonas aerigunosa. These studies suggest that the temporal and spectral characteristics of bacterial autofluorescence can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases.

  2. Characterization of pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes in a long-term in vivo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Biedermann, Thomas; Klar, Agnieszka S; Widmer, Daniel S; Neuhaus, Kathrin; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    In our laboratory, we have been using human pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes for short-term experiments since several years. Little is known, however, about the long-term biology of such constructs after transplantation. We constructed human, melanocyte-containing dermo-epidermal skin substitutes of different (light and dark) pigmentation types and studied them in a long-term animal experiment. Developmental and maturational stages of the epidermal and dermal compartment as well as signs of homoeostasis were analysed 15 weeks after transplantation. Keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts from human skin biopsies were isolated and assembled into dermo-epidermal skin substitutes. These were transplanted onto immuno-incompetent rats and investigated 15 weeks after transplantation. Chromameter evaluation showed a consistent skin colour between 3 and 4 months after transplantation. Melanocytes resided in the epidermal basal layer in physiological numbers and melanin accumulated in keratinocytes in a supranuclear position. Skin substitutes showed a mature epidermis in a homoeostatic state and the presence of dermal components such as Fibrillin and Tropoelastin suggested advanced maturation. Overall, pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes show a promising development towards achieving near-normal skin characteristics and epidermal and dermal tissue homoeostasis. In particular, melanocytes function correctly over several months whilst remaining in a physiological, epidermal position and yield a pigmentation resembling original donor skin colour. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Antioxidant capacity of 3D human skin EpiDerm model: effects of skin moisturizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazul-Bilska, A T; Bilski, J J; Redmer, D A; Reynolds, L P; Abdullah, K M; Abdullah, A

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of skin moisturizers on total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of human skin using EpiDerm model. Three different skin moisturizers containing antioxidant ingredients (samples 1-3) or aloe vera extract were topically applied to EpiDerm units and incubated for 2 and 24 h to determine acute and longer-term effects of applied samples on TAC and glutathione peroxidase activity in medium and/or homogenized skin tissues. Total antioxidant capacity in medium and skin homogenates was enhanced (P affect TAC. Glutathione peroxidase activity was enhanced (P < 0.0001) in medium and skin homogenates by sample 2 but not by any other sample. These data demonstrate high potential of gel and cream (samples 2 and 3) containing antioxidant ingredients in enhancing antioxidant capacity of EpiDerm which will likely contribute to overall skin health. Results of this experiment will help to better understand mechanisms of effects of skin moisturizers containing antioxidant ingredients on skin function at the tissue level and to establish effective strategies for skin protection and clinical treatments of skin disorders and possibly healing wounds.

  4. Human in vitro skin organ culture as a model system for evaluating DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hannah; Tuchinda, Papapit; Fishelevich, Rita; Harberts, Erin; Gaspari, Anthony A

    2014-06-01

    UV-exposures result in accumulation of genetic lesions that facilitate the development of skin cancer. Numerous pharmacologic agents are currently under development to both inhibit formation of DNA lesions and enhance repair. Drugs must be evaluated in vitro, currently performed in cell culture systems, before being tested on humans. Current systems do not account for the architecture and diverse cellularity of intact human skin. To establish a novel, functionally viable, and reproducible in vitro skin organ culture system for studying the effects of various pharmacologic agents on DNA repair. Human skin was obtained from neonatal foreskins. Intact skin punches derived from foreskins were cultured in vitro prior to exposure to UV-irradiation, and evaluated for DNA-damage using a DNA dot blot. Serial skin biopsies were obtained from patients with actinic keratoses treated with topical imiquimod. Expression of immune-stimulating and DNA repair genes was evaluated in ex vivo and in vitro samples. DNA dot blots revealed active repair of UV induced lesions in our in vitro skin organ culture. The photo-protective effect of sunscreen was detected, while imiquimod treatment did not enhance DNA repair in vitro. The DNA repair molecules XPA and XPF were up-regulated in the skin of imiquimod treated patients with actinic keratoses and imiquimod treated bone marrow-derived cell lines, but not keratinocytes. Our in vitro human skin organ culture model detected repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, and may be easily adapted to investigate various photo-protective drugs intended to prevent or treat skin cancer. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. NOTE: Multilayer Gafchromic film detectors for breast skin dose determination in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Tsang; Butson, Martin J.; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2002-01-01

    Assessment of skin dose delivered to patients from radiotherapy x-ray beams should be performed both inside and outside the prescribed treatment fields. A multilayer Gafchromic film detector which has high sensitivity for detection of radiation can be used to measure skin dose in a two-dimensional map over the skin surface if required. This is an advantage over other detectors, which only provide point dose estimates. A study of 25 patients undergoing breast irradiation was performed to analyse the ability of the multilayer detector to analyse skin dose and to assess both in-field and out-of-field radiation doses delivered during tangent field breast irradiation. Results show that the main contributor to total skin dose within the treatment field was delivered by exit dose. However, outside the field, most dose was delivered by entry beams. Patients with smaller breast separations where found, in general, to receive a higher total skin dose from entry and exiting beams at the central axis. Results also showed that a significant skin dose was delivered outside the treatment field and the main cause of this dose was from electron contamination from entry beams. The multilayer Gafchromic film detector provided adequate skin dose assessment within one fraction of treatment for in vivo results.

  6. Multiphoton STED and FRET in human skin: Resolving the skin barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonescu, Irina; Dreier, Jes; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    excited STED and Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) microscopy to probe the structure of human skin. Super resolution optical microscopy enables resolving structures in the skin below to 60 nm allowing visualization of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid matrix and individual proteins...

  7. In-vivo pilot study on physical absorption enhancement of active skin whitening ingredients by heat and ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheja, M.M.; Wang, X.; Ma, P.

    2012-01-01

    In Q3 of 2011, Philips Research received a brief from the Skin Carecategory of the Philips Consumer Lifestyle sector to explore the feasibility of heat and ultrasound to increase skin uptake of active skin whitening ingredients from cosmetics. Philips Research Asia-Shanghai performed an in-vivo

  8. Adaptation of human skin color in various populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lian; Xu, Shuhua

    2018-01-01

    Skin color is a well-recognized adaptive trait and has been studied extensively in humans. Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation of skin color in various populations has many implications in human evolution and medicine. Impressive progress has been made recently to identify genes associated with skin color variation in a wide range of geographical and temporal populations. In this review, we discuss what is currently known about the genetics of skin color variation. We enumerated several cases of skin color adaptation in global modern humans and archaic hominins, and illustrated why, when, and how skin color adaptation occurred in different populations. Finally, we provided a summary of the candidate loci associated with pigmentation, which could be a valuable reference for further evolutionary and medical studies. Previous studies generally indicated a complex genetic mechanism underlying the skin color variation, expanding our understanding of the role of population demographic history and natural selection in shaping genetic and phenotypic diversity in humans. Future work is needed to dissect the genetic architecture of skin color adaptation in numerous ethnic minority groups around the world, which remains relatively obscure compared with that of major continental groups, and to unravel the exact genetic basis of skin color adaptation.

  9. Influence of different cosmetic formulations on the human skin barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, K; Heinrich, U; Tronnier, H

    2014-01-01

    The human skin barrier is an important part of the skin's intactness and its functionality is a precondition for healthy skin. Ingredients in cosmetic formulations, especially penetration enhancers, can influence this barrier function as they transport active agents into deeper skin layers. In this study different cosmetic formulations were tested by 60 healthy female volunteers over a period of 4 weeks. The skin hydration and barrier function before and during the application were measured. Significant changes in both parameters were determined. A negative influence on the barrier function by penetration enhancers could be observed, but it was also found that lamellar lipid structures (DermaMembranSysteme®, DMS®) are able to enhance the skin barrier. Both penetration enhancers as well as DMS can increase skin hydration. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Penetration and decontamination of americium-241 ex vivo using fresh and frozen pig skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazrart, A; Bolzinger, M A; Moureau, A; Molina, T; Coudert, S; Angulo, J F; Briancon, S; Griffiths, N M

    2017-04-01

    Skin contamination is one of the most probable risks following major nuclear or radiological incidents. However, accidents involving skin contamination with radionuclides may occur in the nuclear industry, in research laboratories and in nuclear medicine departments. This work aims to measure the penetration of the radiological contaminant Americium ( 241 Am) in fresh and frozen skin and to evaluate the distribution of the contamination in the skin. Decontamination tests were performed using water, Fuller's earth and diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), which is the recommended treatment in case of skin contamination with actinides such as plutonium or americium. To assess these parameters, we used the Franz cell diffusion system with full-thickness skin obtained from pigs' ears, representative of human skin. Solutions of 241 Am were deposited on the skin samples. The radioactivity content in each compartment and skin layers was measured after 24 h by liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrophotometry. The Am cutaneous penetration to the receiver compartment is almost negligible in fresh and frozen skin. Multiple washings with water and DTPA recovered about 90% of the initial activity. The rest remains fixed mainly in the stratum corneum. Traces of activity were detected within the epidermis and dermis which is fixed and not accessible to the decontamination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ex-vivo complexation, skin permeation, interaction and cytodermal toxicity studies of p-tertbutylcalix[4]arene nanoemulsion for radiation decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Navneet; Ojha, Himanshu; Pathak, Dharam Pal; Goel, Rajeev; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    p-tertbutylcalix[4]arene loaded nanoemulsion has been designed, characterized and evaluated for skin decontamination of radionuclides of interest in nuclear and radiological emergencies. Further, nanoemulsion was evaluated for Ex-vivo complexation, skin permeation, interaction and cytodermal toxicity. Ex-vivo skin complexation studies were conducted using High-resolution sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (HR-SF-ICPMS). Skin studies at dermal and cyto-dermal level have been carried out using techniques such as florescence microscopy, Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Flow cytometry, Confocal microscopy, Prestoblue and Comet assay. HR-SF-ICPMS study confirmed >95% complexation of surrogate nuclides of thallium and Iodine applied on excised rat skin mounted over Franz diffusion cell. Temporal analysis of aliquots obtained from Franz diffusion cell using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy indicated that only 3.37% of formulation permeates through the skin. Skin penetration study of rhodamine 123 nanoemulsion carried out using florescence microscopy confirmed that formulation remains localised in epidermis of rat skin. DSC data confirmed skin compatibility of nanoemulsion, as no lipid extraction was observed from skin. In-vitro cell viability and cellular uptake assays performed on human skin fibroblasts prove no cellular uptake and cytotoxic effects. Comet assay, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis-inducing mechanistic studies prove that prepared nanoemulsion is safe at cellular level. Taken together, data indicate that p-tertbutylcalix[4]arene nanoemulsion is both effective and safe formulation to use on skin for radio-decontamination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The immunology of the porcine skin and its value as a model for human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Artur; Meurens, François; Ricklin, Meret E

    2015-07-01

    The porcine skin has striking similarities to the human skin in terms of general structure, thickness, hair follicle content, pigmentation, collagen and lipid composition. This has been the basis for numerous studies using the pig as a model for wound healing, transdermal delivery, dermal toxicology, radiation and UVB effects. Considering that the skin also represents an immune organ of utmost importance for health, immune cells present in the skin of the pig will be reviewed. The focus of this review is on dendritic cells, which play a central role in the skin immune system as they serve as sentinels in the skin, which offers a large surface area exposed to the environment. Based on a literature review and original data we propose a classification of porcine dendritic cell subsets in the skin corresponding to the subsets described in the human skin. The equivalent of the human CD141(+) DC subset is CD1a(-)CD4(-)CD172a(-)CADM1(high), that of the CD1c(+) subset is CD1a(+)CD4(-)CD172a(+)CADM1(+/low), and porcine plasmacytoid dendritic cells are CD1a(-)CD4(+)CD172a(+)CADM1(-). CD209 and CD14 could represent markers of inflammatory monocyte-derived cells, either dendritic cells or macrophages. Future studies for example using transriptomic analysis of sorted populations are required to confirm the identity of these cells. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Tactile-direction-sensitive and stretchable electronic skins based on human-skin-inspired interlocked microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonghwa; Lee, Youngoh; Hong, Jaehyung; Lee, Youngsu; Ha, Minjeong; Jung, Youngdo; Lim, Hyuneui; Kim, Sung Youb; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2014-12-23

    Stretchable electronic skins with multidirectional force-sensing capabilities are of great importance in robotics, prosthetics, and rehabilitation devices. Inspired by the interlocked microstructures found in epidermal-dermal ridges in human skin, piezoresistive interlocked microdome arrays are employed for stress-direction-sensitive, stretchable electronic skins. Here we show that these arrays possess highly sensitive detection capability of various mechanical stimuli including normal, shear, stretching, bending, and twisting forces. Furthermore, the unique geometry of interlocked microdome arrays enables the differentiation of various mechanical stimuli because the arrays exhibit different levels of deformation depending on the direction of applied forces, thus providing different sensory output patterns. In addition, we show that the electronic skins attached on human skin in the arm and wrist areas are able to distinguish various mechanical stimuli applied in different directions and can selectively monitor different intensities and directions of air flows and vibrations.

  14. Topical drug delivery by a polymeric nanosphere gel: Formulation optimization and in vitro and in vivo skin distribution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batheja, Priya; Sheihet, Larisa; Kohn, Joachim; Singer, Adam J; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena

    2011-01-20

    Tyrosine-derived nanospheres have demonstrated potential as effective carriers for the topical delivery of lipophilic molecules. In this investigation, a gel formulation containing nanospheres was developed for effective skin application and enhanced permeation. Carbopol and HPMC hydrophilic gels were evaluated for dispersion of these nanospheres. Sparingly water soluble diclofenac sodium (DS) and lipophilic Nile Red were used as model compounds. DS was used to determine the optimum polymer type, viscosity and release properties of the gel while fluorescent Nile Red was used in in vitro and in vivo skin distribution studies. In addition, the effect of a penetration enhancer, Azone, on the skin delivery was investigated. Dispersion of Nile Red-loaded nanospheres in 1% w/v HPMC gel produced a uniform and stable dispersion with suitable rheological properties for topical application, without any short-term cellular toxicity or tissue irritation. In vitro permeation studies using human cadaver skin revealed that the deposition of Nile Red via the nanosphere gel in the upper and lower dermis was 1.4 and 1.8 fold higher, respectively, than the amount of Nile Red deposited via an aqueous nanosphere formulation. In vivo, the HPMC gel containing Nile Red-loaded nanospheres significantly enhanced (1.4 fold) the permeation of Nile Red to the porcine stratum corneum/epidermis compared to the aqueous Nile Red-loaded nanospheres. An additional increase (1.4 fold) of Nile Red deposition in porcine stratum corneum/epidermis was achieved by incorporation of Azone (0.2M) into the nanosphere gel formulation. Therefore, tyrosine-derived nanospheres dispersed in gels offer promise for the topical delivery of lipophilic drugs and personal care agents to skin for treatment of cancers, psoriasis, eczema, and microbial infections. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Relevance of in vivo models in melanoma skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    A discussion of possible wavelength dependence of induction of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is provided. Strengths and weaknesses of various experimental approaches to better understanding of the prevalence of CMM in different human populations including latitude effects are compared. Further the advantages and limitations of the use of the laboratory opossum (Monodelphis domestic), transgenic mice containing SV40 ongogene sequences under tyrosinase promoter control, and a backcross hybrid fish of the genus Xenophorus are contrasted.

  16. Determination of the thickness and structure of the skin barrier by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Astner, S.; Patzelt, A.; Knorr, F.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, Ch

    2008-04-01

    Normal skin barrier function is an essential aspect of skin homeostasis and regeneration. Dynamic inflammatory, proliferative and neoplastic skin processes such as wound healing, psoriasis and contact dermatitis are associated with a significant disruption of the skin barrier. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in evaluating cosmetic and pharmacologic products for their ability to restore these protective properties. The gold standard for characterization of barrier function has been the measurement of the transepidermal water loss, however the disadvantage of this method is its interference with several endogenous and exogenous factors such as hydration, perspiration and topically applied substances. This study was aimed to test the clinical applicability of a fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM) for a systematic morphologic analysis of the structure, integrity and thickness of the stratum corneum in 10 otherwise healthy volunteers. The influence of skin treatment with commercial moisturizing cream on skin barrier function was evaluated in serial non-invasive examinations. Our findings showed that in vivo LSM may represent a simple and efficient method for the characterization of skin barrier properties, such as the thickness and hydration of the stratum corneum.

  17. The occlusion effects in capacitive contact imaging for in vivo skin damage assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, W; Zhang, X; Lane, M; Xiao, P

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occlusion effects in capacitive contact imaging, and to develop a new quantitative methodology for in vivo skin assessments using capacitive contact imaging and condenser-TEWL (transepidermal water loss) method. Two measurement technologies were used in this study, i.e., capacitive contact imaging and condenser-TEWL method. Three types of skin damages were studied, intensive washes, tape stripping and sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) irritation. The test skin sites were chosen on the volar forearms of healthy volunteers (aged 25-45); the measurements were taken both before and periodically after the damages. The results show that the time-dependent occlusion curves of the capacitive contact imaging can reflect the types of damages, and by analysing the shapes of the curves, we can get information about the skin surface water content level and stratum corneum thickness. The results also show that the combination of capacitive contact imaging and condenser-TEWL method gives extra information about the skin damages, such as the types of the damages and status of the damages. We have developed a potential new quantitative methodology for skin damage assessments using capacitive contact imaging and condenser-TEWL method. The combination of the two technologies can provide useful information for skin damage assessments. We have also developed a mathematical model for analysing the occlusion curves. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  18. In vivo investigations on the penetration of various oils and their influence on the skin barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, A; Lademann, J; Richter, H; Darvin, M E; Schanzer, S; Thiede, G; Sterry, W; Vergou, T; Hauser, M

    2012-08-01

    The skin represents a potent barrier to the environment, which can be enhanced by the topical application of skin care products, such as oil and oil-based formulations by moisturizing the skin. The aim of this study was the investigation of the penetration behaviour of four vegetable oils and of paraffin oil into the stratum corneum by laser scanning microscopy. In addition, the occlusion capacity of these substances was assessed by transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements. Petrolatum served as a positive control for skin occlusion. The study was conducted in vivo and included six healthy volunteers. Paraffin oil, as well as the vegetable oils, penetrated only into the first upper layers of the stratum corneum. TEWL measurements indicated that the application of the vegetable oils (except jojoba oil) as well as paraffin oil, led to a similar occlusion of the skin surface. The most effective occlusion was found for petrolatum. For the investigated oils, a deeper penetration than into the first upper layers of the stratum corneum could be excluded. The decreased TEWL values indicate that the application of the oils leads to a semi-occlusion of the skin surface as it is intended by the use of oils to retain moisture in skin. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Influence of two different IR radiators on the antioxidative potential of the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, M. E.; Patzelt, A.; Meinke, M.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2009-03-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was used for the fast in vivo detection of the concentration of carotenoid antioxidant substances such as beta-carotene and lycopene in human skin and for the measurement of their degradation dynamics, subsequent to infrared (IR) irradiation emitted by two different IR radiators applied at the same power density. One of the radiators was equipped with a water filter in front of the radiation source (WIRA) and the other was a usual broadband system without a water filter (standard IR radiator - SIR). It was found that the SIR exerted a higher influence on the degradation of carotenoids in the skin than the WIRA. Furthermore, all twelve volunteers who participated in the study felt that the irradiation with the SIR was disagreeably warmer on the skin surface compared to the WIRA, in spite of the same power density values for both radiators on the skin surface. The average degradation magnitude of the carotenoids in the skin of all volunteers after an IR irradiation was determined at 23% for WIRA and 33% for the SIR. A correlation (R2 ~ 0.6) was found between the individual level of carotenoids in the skin of the volunteers and the magnitude of degradation of the carotenoids for both IR radiators. Taking the previous investigations into consideration, which clearly showed production of free radicals in the skin subsequent to IR irradiation, it can be concluded that during the application of WIRA irradiation on the skin, fewer radicals are produced in comparison to the SIR.

  20. Formation of a protection film on the human skin by microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Schanzer, S.; Richter, H.; Antoniou, C.; Knorr, F.; Sterry, W.; Patzelt, A.

    2008-09-01

    Laser scanning microscopy and tape stripping, in combination with optical methods, were used to analyze the distribution and penetration of a barrier cream into the horny layer (stratum corneum) of the human skin under in vivo conditions. The barrier cream contained microparticles of 10 - 100 μm loaded with antioxidant substances. The cream was designed for protection of the skin surface against the destructive action of free radicals, produced by systemically applied chemotherapeutic agents reaching the skin surface via the sweat. Both methods were able to demonstrate that the barrier cream was distributed homogeneously on the skin surface forming a protection film. A penetration into deeper parts of the stratum corneum (SC) was not observed.

  1. Advances in the in Vivo Raman Spectroscopy of Malignant Skin Tumors Using Portable Instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Kourkoumelis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for real-time clinical diagnosis of malignant skin tumors offering a number of potential advantages: it is non-intrusive, it requires no sample preparation, and it features high chemical specificity with minimal water interference. However, in vivo tissue evaluation and accurate histopathological classification remain a challenging task for the successful transition from laboratory prototypes to clinical devices. In the literature, there are numerous reports on the applications of Raman spectroscopy to biomedical research and cancer diagnostics. Nevertheless, cases where real-time, portable instrumentations have been employed for the in vivo evaluation of skin lesions are scarce, despite their advantages in use as medical devices in the clinical setting. This paper reviews the advances in real-time Raman spectroscopy for the in vivo characterization of common skin lesions. The translational momentum of Raman spectroscopy towards the clinical practice is revealed by (i assembling the technical specifications of portable systems and (ii analyzing the spectral characteristics of in vivo measurements.

  2. Human skeletal muscle releases leptin in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Grøndahl, Thomas Sahl; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2012-01-01

    Leptin is considered an adipokine, however, cultured myocytes have also been found to release leptin. Therefore, as proof-of-concept we investigated if human skeletal muscle synthesized leptin by measuring leptin in skeletal muscle biopsies. Following this, we quantified human skeletal muscle...... and adipose tissue leptin release in vivo. We recruited 16 healthy male human participants. Catheters were inserted into the femoral artery and vein draining skeletal muscle, as well as an epigastric vein draining the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. By combining the veno-arterial differences in plasma...... leptin with measurements of blood flow, leptin release from both tissues was quantified. To induce changes in leptin, the participants were infused with either saline or adrenaline in normo-physiological concentrations. The presence of leptin in skeletal muscle was confirmed by western blotting. Leptin...

  3. Comparative study of skin autofluorescence expression in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis: A prospective in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, J H; Jeong, K H; Shin, M K

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis requires their differentiation from other eczematoid dermatitis and a determination of disease severity. However, both can be clinically difficult and the findings subjectively interpreted. We investigated the utility of in vivo autofluorescence (AF) measurements for diagnosis of both diseases, and determination of severity. Thirty patients with AD and 30 with psoriasis were recruited, together with sex- and age-matched patients with healthy skin. AF intensity was measured using the EcoSkin® fluorescence video dermatoscope. In AD and psoriasis patients, AF in non-sun-exposed lesional and non-lesional skin was measured. To identify the locations that reflect characteristics of AD, AF was also measured at the other sites in the patients with AD. AD was associated with lower AF and psoriasis with higher AF intensity peaking around 620 nm. In addition, skin AF intensity of each disease was associated with severity of lesion. Non-invasive measurement of skin AF in vivo can aid in diagnosis of AD and psoriasis as well as in treatment monitoring. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. In vitro and in vivo germ line potential of stem cells derived from newborn mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W Dyce

    Full Text Available We previously reported that fetal porcine skin-derived stem cells were capable of differentiation into oocyte-like cells (OLCs. Here we report that newborn mice skin-derived stem cells are also capable of differentiating into early OLCs. Using stem cells from mice that are transgenic for Oct4 germline distal enhancer-GFP, germ cells resulting from their differentiation are expected to be GFP(+. After differentiation, some GFP(+ OLCs reached 40-45 µM and expressed oocyte markers. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that ∼ 0.3% of the freshly isolated skin cells were GFP(+. The GFP-positive cells increased to ∼ 7% after differentiation, suggesting that the GFP(+ cells could be of in vivo origin, but are more likely induced upon being cultured in vitro. To study the in vivo germ cell potential of skin-derived cells, they were aggregated with newborn ovarian cells, and transplanted under the kidney capsule of ovariectomized mice. GFP(+ oocytes were identified within a subpopulation of follicles in the resulting growth. Our finding that early oocytes can be differentiated from mice skin-derived cells in defined medium may offer a new in vitro model to study germ cell formation and oogenesis.

  5. Measurement of interstitial cetirizine concentrations in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Church, M K; Rihoux, J P

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to measure the concentrations of cetirizine in the extracellular water compartment in intact human skin and assess simultaneously inhibition of histamine-induced wheal and flare reactions. METHODS: Skin cetirizine levels were collected by the micro...

  6. Comparison of the Skin Penetration of 3 Metabolically Stable Chemicals Using Fresh and Frozen Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques-Jamin, Carine; Duplan, Hélène; Rothe, Helga; Vaillant, Ophelie; Eilstein, Joan; Grégoire, Sebastien; Cubberley, Richard; Lange, Daniela; Ellison, Corie; Klaric, Martina; Hewitt, Nicola; Schepky, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The Cosmetics Europe ADME Task Force is developing in vitro and in silico tools for predicting skin and systemic concentrations after topical application of cosmetic ingredients. There are conflicting reports as to whether the freezing process affects the penetration of chemicals; therefore, we evaluated whether the storage of human skin used in our studies (8-12 weeks at -20°C) affected the penetration of model chemicals. Finite doses of trans-cinnamic acid (TCA), benzoic acid (BA), and 6-methylcoumarin (6MC) (non-volatile, non-protein reactive and metabolically stable in skin) were applied to fresh and thawed frozen skin from the same donors. The amounts of chemicals in different skin compartments were analysed after 24 h. Although there were some statistical differences in some parameters for 1 or 2 donors, the penetration of TCA, BA, and 6MC was essentially the same in fresh and frozen skin, i.e., there were no biologically relevant differences in penetration values. Statistical differences that were evident indicated that penetration was marginally lower in frozen than in fresh skin, indicating that the barrier function of the skin was not lost. The penetration of the 3 chemicals was essentially unaffected by freezing the skin at -20°C for up to 12 weeks. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Expression of filaggrin and its degradation products in human skin following erythemal doses of ultraviolet B irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Stine; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal filaggrin level is affected by ultraviolet B irradiation in animal and experimental models. This study examined the effect of ultraviolet B irradiation on epidermal filaggrin and natural moisturizing factors in vivo in healthy adults (n = 22). Participants were irradiated with 2 minimal...... erythema doses of ultraviolet B on the skin. Biopsies and tape strips were collected from skin irradiated 24 and 72 h earlier and from nonirradiated skin (control). Real-time quantitative PCR on skin biopsies showed significantly reduced profilaggrin mRNA expression 24 h after irradiation (mean relative m...... moisturizing factor levels after irradiation, but mean trans-urocanic acid was significantly reduced, as expected (n = 8). In conclusion, erythemal doses of ultraviolet B exert acute effects on profilaggrin mRNA and filaggrin protein in human skin in vivo....

  8. Reproducible pattern of microRNA in normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Line; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Gniadecki, Robert

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis via specific targeting of messenger RNA (mRNA). Aberrant mRNA expression contributes to pathological processes such as carcinogenesis. To take advantage of miRNA profiling in skin disease it is essential to investigate miRNA...... expression pattern in normal human skin. Here we investigated miRNA expression profiles from skin biopsies of 8 healthy volunteers taken from sun protected and mildly photo damaged skin using the modified protocol for miRNA extraction. We were able to show a constant pattern of miRNA expression between...... different individuals. We did not find any significant differences in miRNA expression between sun protected and mildly photodamaged skin. These results may be valuable for future design of studies on miRNA expression in skin disease....

  9. Sensory responses of human skin to synthetic histamine analogues and histamine.

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, M.G.; Greaves, M W

    1980-01-01

    The potential for itch production in human skin of the synthetic analogues of histamine, 2-methyl histamine (an H1-receptor agonist) and 4-methyl histamine and dimaprit (H2-receptor agonists) has been studied in vivo and compared with histamine. Itch thresholds for 2-methyl histamine were consistently much higher than for histamine (P < 0.001). The H1-receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine raised the itch thresholds to 2-methyl histamine and histamine significantly (P < 0.001). Pruritus was not...

  10. Preliminary characterization of human skin microbiome in healthy Egyptian individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, M; Solyman, S; Taha, M; Hanora, A

    2016-07-31

    Human skin is a large, complex ecosystem that harbors diverse microbial communities. The rapid advances in molecular techniques facilitate the exploration of skin associated bacterial populations. The objective of this study was to perform a preliminary characterization of skin associated bacterial populations in Egyptian individuals. Samples were collected from five healthy subjects from two skin sites; Antecubital Fossa (AF) and Popliteal Fossa (PF). Genomic DNA was extracted and used to amplify bacterial 16S rRNA genes which were sequenced on Illumina MiSeq platform. The two sites showed distinct diversity where PF was more diverse than AF. Taxonomic analysis of sequences revealed four main phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Deinococcus-Thermus, with Proteobacteria presenting the highest diversity. Klebsiella, Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Escherichia were the most predominant genera. Our data suggest that environmental factors can shape the composition of the skin microbiome in certain geographical regions. This study presents a new insight for subsequent analyses of human microbiome in Egypt.

  11. Vehicle effects on human stratum corneum absorption and skin penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Alissa; Jung, Eui-Chang; Zhu, Hanjiang; Zou, Ying; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of three vehicles-ethanol (EtOH), isopropyl alcohol (IPA), and isopropyl myristate (IPM)-on stratum corneum (SC) absorption and diffusion of the [(14)C]-model compounds benzoic acid and butenafine hydrochloride to better understand the transport pathways of chemicals passing through and resident in SC. Following application of topical formulations to human dermatomed skin for 30 min, penetration flux was observed for 24 h post dosing, using an in vitro flow-through skin diffusion system. Skin absorption and penetration was compared to the chemical-SC (intact, delipidized, or SC lipid film) binding levels. A significant vehicle effect was observed for chemical skin penetration and SC absorption. IPA resulted in the greatest levels of intact SC/SC lipid absorption, skin penetration, and total skin absorption/penetration of benzoic acid, followed by IPM and EtOH, respectively. For intact SC absorption and total skin absorption/penetration of butenafine, the vehicle that demonstrated the highest level of sorption/penetration was EtOH, followed by IPA and IPM, respectively. The percent doses of butenafine that were absorbed in SC lipid film and penetrated through skin in 24 h were greatest for IPA, followed by EtOH and IPM, respectively. The vehicle effect was consistent between intact SC absorption and total chemical skin absorption and penetration, as well as SC lipid absorption and chemical penetration through skin, suggesting intercellular transport as a main pathway of skin penetration for model chemicals. These results suggest the potential to predict vehicle effects on skin permeability with simple SC absorption assays. As decontamination was applied 30 min after chemical exposure, significant vehicle effects on chemical SC partitioning and percutaneous penetration also suggest that skin decontamination efficiency is vehicle dependent, and an effective decontamination method should act on chemical solutes in the lipid domain.

  12. Histamine suppresses epidermal keratinocyte differentiation and impairs skin barrier function in a human skin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwandtner, M; Mildner, M; Mlitz, V; Gruber, F; Eckhart, L; Werfel, T; Gutzmer, R; Elias, P M; Tschachler, E

    2013-01-01

    Background Defects in keratinocyte differentiation and skin barrier are important features of inflammatory skin diseases like atopic dermatitis. Mast cells and their main mediator histamine are abundant in inflamed skin and thus may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methods Human primary keratinocytes were cultured under differentiation-promoting conditions in the presence and absence of histamine, histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. The expression of differentiation-associated genes and epidermal junction proteins was quantified by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling. The barrier function of human skin models was tested by the application of biotin as tracer molecule. Results The addition of histamine to human keratinocyte cultures and organotypic skin models reduced the expression of the differentiation-associated proteins keratin 1/10, filaggrin, and loricrin by 80–95%. Moreover, the addition of histamine to skin models resulted in the loss of the granular layer and thinning of the epidermis and stratum corneum by 50%. The histamine receptor H1R agonist, 2-pyridylethylamine, suppressed keratinocyte differentiation to the same extent as did histamine. Correspondingly, cetirizine, an antagonist of H1R, virtually abrogated the effect of histamine. The expression of tight junction proteins zona occludens-1, occludin, claudin-1, and claudin-4, as well as that of desmosomal junction proteins corneodesmosin and desmoglein-1, was down-regulated by histamine. The tracer molecule biotin readily penetrated the tight junction barrier of skin cultures grown in the presence of histamine, while their diffusion was completely blocked in nontreated controls. Conclusions Our findings suggest a new mechanism by which mast cell activation and histamine release contribute to skin barrier defects in inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:23157658

  13. Polarization-Sensitive Hyperspectral Imaging in vivo: A Multimode Dermoscope for Skin Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nicholas; Saager, Rolf B.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Chave, Robert; Lindsley, Erik H.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2014-05-01

    Attempts to understand the changes in the structure and physiology of human skin abnormalities by non-invasive optical imaging are aided by spectroscopic methods that quantify, at the molecular level, variations in tissue oxygenation and melanin distribution. However, current commercial and research systems to map hemoglobin and melanin do not correlate well with pathology for pigmented lesions or darker skin. We developed a multimode dermoscope that combines polarization and hyperspectral imaging with an efficient analytical model to map the distribution of specific skin bio-molecules. This corrects for the melanin-hemoglobin misestimation common to other systems, without resorting to complex and computationally intensive tissue optical models. For this system's proof of concept, human skin measurements on melanocytic nevus, vitiligo, and venous occlusion conditions were performed in volunteers. The resulting molecular distribution maps matched physiological and anatomical expectations, confirming a technologic approach that can be applied to next generation dermoscopes and having biological plausibility that is likely to appeal to dermatologists.

  14. Histological study of subcutaneous fat at NIR laser treatment of the rat skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanina, I. Y.; Svenskaya, Yu. I.; Navolokin, N. A.; Matveeva, O. V.; Bucharskaya, A. B.; Maslyakova, G. N.; Gorin, D. A.; Sukhorukov, G. B.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this work is to quantify impact of in vivo photochemical treatment using indocyanine green (ICG) or encapsulated ICG and NIR laser irradiation through skin of rat with obesity by the follow up tissue sampling and histochemistry. After 1 hour elapsed since 1-min light exposure samples of rat skin with subcutaneous tissue of thickness of 1.5-2.5 mm were taken by surgery from rats within marked 4-zones of the skin site. For hematoxylin-eosin histological examination of excised tissue samples, fixation was carried out by 10%-formaldehyde solution. For ICG and encapsulated ICG subcutaneous injection and subsequent 1-min diode laser irradiation with power density of 8 W/cm2, different necrotic regions with lipolysis of subcutaneous fat were observed. The obtained data can be used for safe layer-by-layer laser treatment of obesity and cellulite.

  15. Coverage error of commercial skin pigments as compared to human facial skin tones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, Elizabeth; Beatty, Mark W; Marx, David B; Simetich, Bobby; Wee, Alvin G

    2013-11-01

    It is unknown if present-day pigments used for intrinsic colouration of maxillofacial prostheses are representative of human facial skin tones. This study's purpose was to measure L*a*b* values of pigmented elastomers coloured by eleven skin tone pigments and determine coverage error (CE) when the pigments were compared to human facial lip and nose colour data. 11 skin tone pigments were combined at 0.1%, 1% and 10% by weight with A-2186 elastomer (n=3). L*a*b* values were measured with a spectrophotometer and group means were used to calculate ΔE* colour differences with each L*a*b* value obtained for human nose and lip. Pigmented elastomer CEs were calculated for nose and lip. Results were compared to CEs for proposed shade guide colours obtained from clustering analyses of facial skin colours. L* values of pigmented elastomers generally were higher than those measured for nose and lip, whereas a* values were lower. CEs for pigmented elastomers were higher than those obtained from the proposed shade guide obtained from clustered skin measurements. Overall, the current commercial elastomers appeared to be too white and not red enough to adequately match the skin tones of the subject population. Adjustments must be made to the existing pigmenting system in order to adequately match the skin colours of the study population. The creation of a shade guide and a collection of intrinsic pigments representing the realm of human facial skin colours would greatly decrease the time a patient must sit while the clinician is obtaining an acceptable colour match for the silicone to be used for processing the final prosthesis, thereby increasing both patient satisfaction and clinician productivity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The application of a compact multispectral imaging system with integrated excitation source to in vivo monitoring of fluorescence during topical photodynamic therapy of superficial skin cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, J; Nadeau, V; Ferguson, J; Moseley, H; Ibbotson, S; Allen, J W; Sibbett, W; Padgett, M

    2001-03-01

    A novel, compact and low-cost multispectral fluorescence imaging system with an integrated excitation light source is described. Data are presented demonstrating the application of this method to in vivo monitoring of fluorescence before, during and after topical 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy of superficial skin cancers. The excitation source comprised a fluorescent tube with the phosphor selected to emit broadband violet light centered at 394 nm. The camera system simultaneously captured spectrally specific images of the fluorescence of the photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX, the illumination profile and the skin autofluorescence. Real-time processing enabled images to be manipulated to create a composite image of high contrast. The application and validation of this method will allow further detailed studies of the characteristics and time-course of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence, during topical photodynamic therapy in human skin in vivo.

  17. Human Skin Permeation Studies with PPARγ Agonist to Improve Its Permeability and Efficacy in Inflammatory Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Silva-Abreu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rosacea is the most common inflammatory skin disease. It is characterized by erythema, inflammatory papules and pustules, visible blood vessels, and telangiectasia. The current treatment has limitations and unsatisfactory results. Pioglitazone (PGZ is an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, a nuclear receptor that regulates important cellular functions, including inflammatory responses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the permeation of PGZ with a selection of penetration enhancers and to analyze its effectiveness for treating rosacea. The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was validated for the quantitative determination of PGZ. Ex vivo permeation experiments were realized in Franz diffusion cells using human skin, in which PGZ with different penetration enhancers were assayed. The results showed that the limonene was the most effective penetration enhancer that promotes the permeation of PGZ through the skin. The cytotoxicity studies and the Draize test detected cell viability and the absence of skin irritation, respectively. The determination of the skin color using a skin colorimetric probe and the results of histopathological studies confirmed the ability of PGZ-limonene to reduce erythema and vasodilation. This study suggests new pharmacological indications of PGZ and its possible application in the treatment of skin diseases, namely rosacea.

  18. From frog integument to human skin: dermatological perspectives from frog skin biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Iain S; Roubos, Eric W; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Vaudry, Hubert; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Pattwell, David M; Maderson, Paul F A; Paus, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    For over a century, frogs have been studied across various scientific fields, including physiology, embryology, neuroscience, (neuro)endocrinology, ecology, genetics, behavioural science, evolution, drug development, and conservation biology. In some cases, frog skin has proven very successful as a research model, for example aiding in the study of ion transport through tight epithelia, where it has served as a model for the vertebrate distal renal tubule and mammalian epithelia. However, it has rarely been considered in comparative studies involving human skin. Yet, despite certain notable adaptations that have enabled frogs to survive in both aquatic and terrestrial environments, frog skin has many features in common with human skin. Here we present a comprehensive overview of frog (and toad) skin ontogeny, anatomy, cytology, neuroendocrinology and immunology, with special attention to its unique adaptations as well as to its similarities with the mammalian integument, including human skin. We hope to provide a valuable reference point and a source of inspiration for both amphibian investigators and mammalian researchers studying the structural and functional properties of the largest organ of the vertebrate body. © 2013 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2013 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  19. Essential role of RAB27A in determining constitutive human skin color.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Yoshida-Amano

    Full Text Available Human skin color is predominantly determined by melanin produced in melanosomes within melanocytes and subsequently distributed to keratinocytes. There are many studies that have proposed mechanisms underlying ethnic skin color variations, whereas the processes involved from melanin synthesis in melanocytes to the transfer of melanosomes to keratinocytes are common among humans. Apart from the activities in the melanogenic rate-limiting enzyme, tyrosinase, in melanocytes and the amounts and distribution patterns of melanosomes in keratinocytes, the abilities of the actin-associated factors in charge of melanosome transport within melanocytes also regulate pigmentation. Mutations in genes encoding melanosome transport-related molecules, such as MYO5A, RAB27A and SLAC-2A, have been reported to cause a human pigmentary disease known as Griscelli syndrome, which is associated with diluted skin and hair color. Thus we hypothesized that process might play a role in modulating skin color variations. To address that hypothesis, the correlations of expression of RAB27A and its specific effector, SLAC2-A, to melanogenic ability were evaluated in comparison with tyrosinase, using human melanocytes derived from 19 individuals of varying skin types. Following the finding of the highest correlation in RAB27A expression to the melanogenic ability, darkly-pigmented melanocytes with significantly higher RAB27A expression were found to transfer significantly more melanosomes to keratinocytes than lightly-pigmented melanocytes in co-culture and in human skin substitutes (HSSs in vivo, resulting in darker skin color in concert with the difference observed in African-descent and Caucasian skins. Additionally, RAB27A knockdown by a lentivirus-derived shRNA in melanocytes concomitantly demonstrated a significantly reduced number of transferred melanosomes to keratinocytes in co-culture and a significantly diminished epidermal melanin content skin color intensity (

  20. Essential role of RAB27A in determining constitutive human skin color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida-Amano, Yasuko; Hachiya, Akira; Ohuchi, Atsushi; Kobinger, Gary P; Kitahara, Takashi; Takema, Yoshinori; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2012-01-01

    Human skin color is predominantly determined by melanin produced in melanosomes within melanocytes and subsequently distributed to keratinocytes. There are many studies that have proposed mechanisms underlying ethnic skin color variations, whereas the processes involved from melanin synthesis in melanocytes to the transfer of melanosomes to keratinocytes are common among humans. Apart from the activities in the melanogenic rate-limiting enzyme, tyrosinase, in melanocytes and the amounts and distribution patterns of melanosomes in keratinocytes, the abilities of the actin-associated factors in charge of melanosome transport within melanocytes also regulate pigmentation. Mutations in genes encoding melanosome transport-related molecules, such as MYO5A, RAB27A and SLAC-2A, have been reported to cause a human pigmentary disease known as Griscelli syndrome, which is associated with diluted skin and hair color. Thus we hypothesized that process might play a role in modulating skin color variations. To address that hypothesis, the correlations of expression of RAB27A and its specific effector, SLAC2-A, to melanogenic ability were evaluated in comparison with tyrosinase, using human melanocytes derived from 19 individuals of varying skin types. Following the finding of the highest correlation in RAB27A expression to the melanogenic ability, darkly-pigmented melanocytes with significantly higher RAB27A expression were found to transfer significantly more melanosomes to keratinocytes than lightly-pigmented melanocytes in co-culture and in human skin substitutes (HSSs) in vivo, resulting in darker skin color in concert with the difference observed in African-descent and Caucasian skins. Additionally, RAB27A knockdown by a lentivirus-derived shRNA in melanocytes concomitantly demonstrated a significantly reduced number of transferred melanosomes to keratinocytes in co-culture and a significantly diminished epidermal melanin content skin color intensity (ΔL* = 4.4) in the

  1. Quantitative Imaging In Vivo of Functioning Lymphatic Vessels Around Human Melanoma and Benign Nevi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhras, Victoria; Ramakrishnan, Rathi; Stanton, Anthony W B; Levick, John R; Cook, Martin G; Chong, Heung; Mortimer, Peter S

    2015-08-01

    The density of functioning human lymphatics in vivo and of immunohistochemically defined lymphatics was quantified around melanomas, benign nevi, and matched normal skin, to assess the current lymphangiogenesis paradigm. We investigated whether histological and functioning density increased around melanomas compared with benign nevi or matched skin; whether functioning and histological density increased similarly; and whether larger increases occurred around metastatic melanomas. Functioning density was quantified in vivo as the total amount of human dermal microlymphatics taking up fluorescent marker injected at the lesion margin. After tissue excision, perilesion histological density was quantified using podoplanin marker D2-40. Histological density was raised similarly around metastasising and non-metastasising melanomas compared with normal skin (+71%, p benign nevi (+17%, p = 0.03, n = 20). In contrast, functioning lymphatic density was substantially reduced around the margins of melanomas (both metastasising and non-metastasising) compared with benign nevi (by 65%, p = 0.02) or normal skin (by 53%, p = 0.0014). Raised perilesion histological lymphatic density is not unique to melanoma but occurs also around benign nevi. The findings indicated that the number of functioning lateral lymphatics around human melanomas in vivo but not benign nevi is reduced, despite histologically increased numbers of lymphatics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [Study of skin retraction applied to the treatment of skin tumors. Mapping of the human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, P; Benatar, M; Cardot-Leccia, N; Lebreton, E; Chignon-Sicard, B

    2012-04-01

    Skin, the main organ of the human body, is equipped with own biomechanical characteristics, highly variable depending on intra-individual factors (location, weight status, dermatological diseases…) and interindividual (age, sex…). Despite some recent cutometric studies, our review of the literature shows that there is no currently reliable analytical model representing the biomechanical behavior of the skin. Yet, this is a central issue in dermatology surgery, especially in the treatment of skin tumors, for the proper observance of surgical margins. We studied prospectively on 75 resection specimens (about 71 patient(s)), for the treatment of skin lesions tumor suspicious or known malignant or benign. Room dimensions were measured before and 5 minutes after excision, leading us to calculate a ratio of retraction of the skin surface. This retraction was correlated with age, gender, tumor type, and anatomic location of the site of excision. The power of retraction of the skin varies significantly by region of the body. It is maximum in the upper limb (hand excluded) and in the cervical region. At the cephalic region, skin of the ear and periorbital skin have capacities of important early retraction. Unlike the lower limb (foot excluded), the back skin of the nose and face appear to be a minimum of shrinkage. Age also seems to change on that capacity shrinkage, sex would have no influence. Our study confirms the variations in the ability of skin retraction based on a number of factors. In dermato-oncology, that power retraction could cause significant differences between clinical surgical margins and final pathologist margins. We believe it must be taken into account by the couple surgeon-pathologist, especially in the context of invasive and/or recurrent tumors. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  3. Effects of hypobaric pressure on human skin: implications for cryogen spray cooling (part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Guillermo; Franco, Walfre; Liu, Jie; Svaasand, Lars O; Nelson, J Stuart

    2005-02-01

    Clinical results have demonstrated that dark purple port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks respond favorably to laser induced photothermolysis after the first three to five treatments. Nevertheless, complete blanching is rarely achieved and the lesions stabilize at a red-pink color. In a feasibility study (Part I), we showed that local hypobaric pressure on PWS human skin prior to laser irradiation induced significant lesion blanching. The objective of the present study (Part II) is to investigate the effects of hypobaric pressures on the efficiency of cryogen spray cooling (CSC), a technique that assists laser therapy of PWS and other dermatoses. Experiments were carried out within a suction cup and vacuum chamber to study the effect of hypobaric pressure on the: (1) interaction of cryogen sprays with human skin; (2) spray atomization; and (3) thermal response of a model skin phantom. A high-speed camera was used to acquire digital images of spray impingement on in vivo human skin and spray cones generated at different hypobaric pressures. Subsequently, liquid cryogen was sprayed onto a skin phantom at atmospheric and 17, 34, 51, and 68 kPa (5, 10, 15, and 20 in Hg) hypobaric pressures. A fast-response temperature sensor measured sub-surface phantom temperature as a function of time. Measurements were used to solve an inverse heat conduction problem to calculate surface temperatures, heat flux, and overall heat extraction at the skin phantom surface. Under hypobaric pressures, cryogen spurts did not produce skin indentation and only minimal frost formation. Sprays also showed shorter jet lengths and better atomization. Lower minimum surface temperatures and higher overall heat extraction from skin phantoms were reached. The combined effects of hypobaric pressure result in more efficient cryogen evaporation that enhances heat extraction and, therefore, improves the epidermal protection provided by CSC. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. In vivo characterization of hair and skin derived carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as long-term bioprobes in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Hui; Niu, Aping; Li, Jing; Fu, Jian-Wei; Xu, Qun; Pei, De-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CDs) were widely investigated because of their tunable fluorescence properties and low toxicity. However, so far there have been no reports on in vivo functional studies of hair and skin derived CDs. Here, hair derived CDs (HCDs) and skin derived CDs (SCDs) were produced by using human hair and pig skin as precursors. The quantum yields (QYs) of HCDs and SCDs were quite high, compared to citric acid derived CDs (CCDs). HCDs and SCDs possess optimal photostability, hypotoxicity and biocompatibility in zebrafish, indicating that HCDs and SCDs possess the capacity of being used as fluorescence probes for in vivo biological imaging. The long-time observation for fluorescence alternation of CDs in zebrafish and the quenching assay of CDs by ATP, NADH and Fe3+ ions demonstrated that the decaying process of CDs in vivo might be induced by the synergistic effect of the metabolism process. All results indicated that large batches and high QYs of CDs can be acquired by employing natural and nontoxic hair and skin as precursors. To our knowledge, this is the first time to report SCDs, in vivo comparative studies of HCDs, SCDs and CCDs as bioprobes, and explore their mechanism of photostability in zebrafish.

  5. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for skin: ex vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J-H; Lim, S-D; Oh, S H; Lee, J H; Yeo, U C

    2017-08-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used for skin tightening. However, there is a rising concern of irreversible adverse effects. Our aim was to evaluate the depth of thermal injury zone after HIFU energy passes through different condition. To analyze the consistency of the HIFU device, phantom tests were performed. Simulations were performed on ex vivo porcine tissues to estimate the area of the thermal coagulation point (TCP) according to the applied energy and skin condition. The experiment was designed in three orientations: normal direction (from epidermis to fascia), reverse direction (from fascia to epidermis), and normal direction without epidermis. The TCP was larger and wider depending on the applied fluence and handpieces (HPs). When we measured TCP in different directions, the measured area in the normal direction was more superficially located than that in the reverse direction. The depth of the TCP in the porcine skin without epidermis was detected at 130% deeper than in skin with an intact epidermis. The affected area by HIFU is dependent on the skin condition and the characteristics of the HP and applied fluence. Considerations of these factors may be the key to minimize the unwanted adverse effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Human Skin 3D Bioprinting Using Scaffold-Free Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourchet, Léa J; Thepot, Amélie; Albouy, Marion; Courtial, Edwin J; Boher, Aurélie; Blum, Loïc J; Marquette, Christophe A

    2017-02-01

    Organ in vitro synthesis is one of the last bottlenecks between tissue engineering and transplantation of synthetic organs. Bioprinting has proven its capacity to produce 3D objects composed of living cells but highly organized tissues such as full thickness skin (dermis + epidermis) are rarely attained. The focus of the present study is to demonstrate the capability of a newly developed ink formulation and the use of an open source printer, for the production of a really complete skin model. Proofs are given through immunostaining and electronic microscopy that the bioprinted skin presents all characteristics of human skin, both at the molecular and macromolecular level. Finally, the printability of large skin objects is demonstrated with the printing of an adult-size ear. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Oxidative Stress in Aging Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bischof, Johannes; Streubel, Maria Karolin; Trost, Andrea; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in skin plays a major role in the aging process. This is true for intrinsic aging and even more for extrinsic aging. Although the results are quite different in dermis and epidermis, extrinsic aging is driven to a large extent by oxidative stress caused by UV irradiation. In this review the overall effects of oxidative stress are discussed as well as the sources of ROS including the mitochondrial ETC, peroxisomal and ER localized proteins, the Fenton reaction, and such enzymes as cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, xanthine oxidases, and NADPH oxidases. Furthermore, the defense mechanisms against oxidative stress ranging from enzymes like superoxide dismutases, catalases, peroxiredoxins, and GSH peroxidases to organic compounds such as L-ascorbate, α-tocopherol, beta-carotene, uric acid, CoQ10, and glutathione are described in more detail. In addition the oxidative stress induced modifications caused to proteins, lipids and DNA are discussed. Finally age-related changes of the skin are also a topic of this review. They include a disruption of the epidermal calcium gradient in old skin with an accompanying change in the composition of the cornified envelope. This modified cornified envelope also leads to an altered anti-oxidative capacity and a reduced barrier function of the epidermis. PMID:25906193

  8. Oxidative Stress in Aging Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Rinnerthaler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress in skin plays a major role in the aging process. This is true for intrinsic aging and even more for extrinsic aging. Although the results are quite different in dermis and epidermis, extrinsic aging is driven to a large extent by oxidative stress caused by UV irradiation. In this review the overall effects of oxidative stress are discussed as well as the sources of ROS including the mitochondrial ETC, peroxisomal and ER localized proteins, the Fenton reaction, and such enzymes as cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, xanthine oxidases, and NADPH oxidases. Furthermore, the defense mechanisms against oxidative stress ranging from enzymes like superoxide dismutases, catalases, peroxiredoxins, and GSH peroxidases to organic compounds such as L-ascorbate, α-tocopherol, beta-carotene, uric acid, CoQ10, and glutathione are described in more detail. In addition the oxidative stress induced modifications caused to proteins, lipids and DNA are discussed. Finally age-related changes of the skin are also a topic of this review. They include a disruption of the epidermal calcium gradient in old skin with an accompanying change in the composition of the cornified envelope. This modified cornified envelope also leads to an altered anti-oxidative capacity and a reduced barrier function of the epidermis.

  9. In vivo determination of optical properties and fluorophore characteristics of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Narasimhan; Kovacic, Dianne; Migden, Michael F.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Nguyen, Tri H.; Tunnell, James W.

    2009-02-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques have widely been used as noninvasive tools for early cancer detection in several organs including the cervix, oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Using a combined DOS/LIF approach, one can simultaneously measure the morphology and biochemical composition of tissue and use these features to diagnose malignancy. We report for the first time to our knowledge both the optical properties and native fluorophore characteristics of non-melanoma skin cancer in the UV-visible range. We collected in vivo diffuse reflectance and intrinsic fluorescence measurements from 44 skin lesions on 37 patients. The skin sites were further categorized into three groups of non-melanoma skin cancer according to histopathology: 1) pre-cancerous actinic keratosis 2) malignant squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 3) basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We used a custom-built probe-based clinical system that collects both white light reflectance and laser-induced fluorescence in the wavelength range of 350-700 nm. We extracted the blood volume fraction, oxygen saturation, blood vessel size, tissue microarchitecture and melanin content from diffuse reflectance measurements. In addition, we determined the native fluorophore contributions of NADH, collagen and FAD from laser-induced fluorescence for all groups. The scattering from tissue decreased with progression from clinically normal to precancerous actinic keratosis to malignant SCC. A similar trend was observed for clinically normal skin and malignant BCC. Statistically significant differences were observed in the collagen contributions, which were lower in malignant SCC and BCC as compared to normal skin. Our data demonstrates that the mean optical properties and fluorophore contributions of normal, benign and malignant nonmelanoma cancers are significantly different from each other and can potentially be used as biomarkers for the early detection of skin cancer.

  10. In vivo near-infrared autofluorescence imaging of pigmented skin lesions: methods, technical improvements and preliminary clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; He, Qingli; Zeng, Haishan

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence emission from in vivo cutaneous melanin was recently detected under near-infrared (NIR) excitation by our group. We then built a prototype NIR autofluorescence imaging system to observe and characterize the melanin distribution in human skin. In this article, we reported a new setup of NIR fluorescence imaging system and calibration methods to optimize the system for better clinical feasibility and clearer image. The imaging system was designed to perform both fluorescence and reflectance imaging with a 785-nm fiber-coupled laser source. The illumination light was purified by a 785-nm bandpass filter for fluorescence excitation; while the spontaneous components were selected by a longpass filter for NIR reflectance imaging. A hand-controlled filter wheel was used to switch these two filters for different imaging modes. A dichroic filter was used to guide the illuminating light onto the skin surface for excitation. Reflectance and fluorescence signals were collected sequentially by a NIR optimized CCD camera. The captured images were calibrated by the reflectance images of a standard reflectance disk for non-uniform illuminations and light collection efficiencies. The clinical results demonstrated that NIR fluorescence intensities and distribution patterns vary among lesion types. It was also confirmed that pigmented skin lesions emitted higher NIR fluorescence than the surrounding normal skin due to the presentation of higher concentrations of cutaneous melanin within the lesions. NIR autofluorescence imaging system could be utilized as a powerful tool for visualizing melanin distribution in pigmented skin lesions and as a potential method for aiding melanoma detection. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Tattooing of skin results in transportation and light-induced decomposition of tattoo pigments--a first quantification in vivo using a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Eva; Vasold, Rudolf; Santarelli, Francesco; Maisch, Tim; Gopee, Neera V; Howard, Paul C; Landthaler, Michael; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Millions of people are tattooed with inks that contain azo pigments. The pigments contained in tattoo inks are manufactured for other uses with no established history of safe use in humans and are injected into the skin at high densities (2.5 mg/cm(2)). Tattoo pigments disseminate after tattooing throughout the human body and although some may photodecompose at the injection site by solar or laser light exposure, the extent of transport or photodecomposition under in vivo conditions remains currently unknown. We investigated the transport and photodecomposition of the widely used tattoo Pigment Red 22 (PR 22) following tattooing into SKH-1 mice. The pigment was extracted quantitatively at different times after tattooing. One day after tattooing, the pigment concentration was 186 microg/cm(2) skin. After 42 days, the amount of PR 22 in the skin has decreased by about 32% of the initial value. Exposure of the tattooed skin, 42 days after tattooing, to laser light reduced the amount of PR 22 by about 51% as compared to skin not exposed to laser light. A part of this reduction is as a result of photodecomposition of PR 22 as shown by the detection of corresponding hazardous aromatic amines. Irradiation with solar radiation simulator for 32 days caused a pigment reduction of about 60% and we again assume pigment decomposition in the skin. This study is the first quantitative estimate of the amount of tattoo pigments transported from the skin into the body or decomposed by solar or laser radiation.

  12. The effect of skin aging on the percutaneous penetration of chemicals through human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskos, K.V.

    1989-01-01

    Despite much research into the mechanisms of cutaneous aging and the identification of significant age-associated biological and biophysical changes within the skin, the question how does aging affect percutaneous absorption (PA) in vivo remains unanswered. The author has made in vivo measurements of PA in young (18-40 years) and old (> 65 years) subjects. Standard radiotracer methodology was employed and PA was quantified from the urinary excretion profiles of {sup 14}C radiolabel (corrected for incomplete renal elimination). Testosterone (TST), estradiol (EST), hydrocortisone (HC), benzoic acid (BA), acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and caffeine (CAFF) have been studied. Penetration of HC, BA, ASA, and CAFF were significantly lower in aged subjects whereas TST and EST absorption were not distinguishable from the young controls. Thus it appears that aging can affect PA in vivo and that relatively hydrophilic compounds may be most sensitive. Work was done to elucidate whether the observations were related to documented skin aging changes. Cutaneous microcirculation efficiency suspected to decline with increasing age, could not be correlated with the observed penetration changes. However, in vivo infrared spectroscopic studies of aged stratum corneum (SC) reveal a decreased amount of epidermal lipid. The diminished lipid content implies a diminished dissolution medium for compounds administered to the skin surface. They hypothesize that the compounds most affected by a loss of SC lipids would be those compounds whose overall solubility is lowest (compounds with lower octanol-water partition coefficients, eg., HC, BA, ASA and CAFF). Conversely, a diminished lipid content may not affect dissolution into the SC of highly lipophilic compounds (e.g., TST and EST).

  13. Corneocyte quantification by NIR densitometry and UV/Vis spectroscopy for human and porcine skin and the role of skin cleaning procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, J C; Klang, V; Hoppel, M; Wolzt, M; Valenta, C

    2012-01-01

    Optical methods of corneocyte quantification during tape stripping experiments on the skin are useful tools for the rapid evaluation of the skin penetration potential of dermally applied substances. However, a comparative investigation of the different methods proposed for this task, namely NIR densitometry and UV/Vis spectroscopy, is still missing. Thus, the aim of the present work was to employ these two techniques in comparative tape stripping experiments both in vivo on human forearm skin and in vitro on porcine ear skin. Standard tape stripping experiments were performed in the absence and presence of a marketed formulation containing flufenamic acid as a model drug. In the context of these methodological investigations, different methods of skin cleaning prior to the tape stripping procedure were evaluated to identify the most appropriate working protocol among the approaches proposed in the respective literature. The results showed that the investigated methods of NIR densitometry and UV/Vis spectroscopy deliver highly comparable results. Both optical methods are suitable to determine the skin penetration profiles of active substances during in vivo and in vitro tape stripping, especially if a simple working protocol without any cleaning procedures is maintained. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Comparison of skin decontamination efficacy of commercial decontamination products following exposure to VX on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thors, L; Koch, M; Wigenstam, E; Koch, B; Hägglund, L; Bucht, A

    2017-08-01

    The decontamination efficacy of four commercially available skin decontamination products following exposure to the nerve agent VX was evaluated in vitro utilizing a diffusion cell and dermatomed human skin. The products included were Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), the Swedish decontamination powder 104 (PS104), the absorbent Fuller's Earth and the aqueous solution alldecontMED. In addition, various decontamination procedures were assessed to further investigate important mechanisms involved in the specific products, e.g. decontamination removal from skin, physical removal by sponge swabbing and activation of degradation mechanisms. The efficacy of each decontamination product was evaluated 5 or 30 min after dermal application of VX (neat or diluted to 20% in water). The RSDL-lotion was superior in reducing the penetration of VX through human skin, both when exposed as neat agent and when diluted to 20% in water. Swabbing with the RSDL-sponge during 2 min revealed decreased efficacy compared to applying the RSDL-lotion directly on the skin for 30 min. Decontamination with Fuller's Earth and alldecontMED significantly reduced the penetration of neat concentration of VX through human skin. PS104-powder was insufficient for decontamination of VX at both time-points, independently of the skin contact time of PS104. The PS104-slurry (a mixture of PS104-powder and water), slightly improved the decontamination efficacy. Comparing the time-points for initiated decontamination revealed less penetrated VX for RSDL and Fuller's Earth when decontamination was initiated after 5 min compared to 30 min post-exposure, while alldecontMED displayed similar efficacy at both time-points. Decontamination by washing with water only resulted in a significant reduction of penetrated VX when washing was performed 5 min after exposure, but not when decontamination was delayed to 30 min post-exposure of neat VX. In conclusion, early initiated decontamination with the

  15. Microneedle enhanced delivery of cosmeceutically relevant peptides in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuf H Mohammed

    Full Text Available Peptides and proteins play an important role in skin health and well-being. They are also found to contribute to skin aging and melanogenesis. Microneedles have been shown to substantially enhance skin penetration and may offer an effective means of peptide delivery enhancement. The aim of this investigation was to assess the influence of microneedles on the skin penetration of peptides using fluorescence imaging to determine skin distribution. In particular the effect of peptide chain length (3, 4, 5 amino acid chain length on passive and MN facilitated skin penetration was investigated. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to image fluorescence intensity and the area of penetration of fluorescently tagged peptides. Penetration studies were conducted on excised full thickness human skin in Franz type diffusion cells for 1 and 24 hours. A 2 to 22 fold signal improvement in microneedle enhanced delivery of melanostatin, rigin and pal-KTTKS was observed. To our knowledge this is the first description of microneedle enhanced skin permeation studies on these peptides.

  16. Developing a predictive model of human skin coloring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Symon; Claridge, Ela

    1996-04-01

    A model of color formation within human skin has been developed to aid the characterization of pigmented skin lesions from their digitized color images. The model is based on the Kublenka-Munk theory of scattering and absorption within inhomogeneous materials and the physics pertaining to their color properties. By considering the skin to be a layered construction of such materials, the stratum corneum, epidermis, papillary dermis and reticular dermis, and by exploiting the physics related to the optical interface between these layers, the model generates all possible colors occurring within normal human skin. In particular, the model predicts that all skin colors have to lie on a simple curved surface patch within a three- dimensional color space bounded by two physiologically meaningful axes, one corresponding to the amount of melanin within the epidermis and the other to the amount of blood within the dermis. These predictions were verified by comparing the CIE LMS coordinates of a representative, cross-racial sample of fifty skin images with the LMS coordinates predicted by the model. The results show that, within the predicted error bounds, the coordinates for normal skin colors do indeed lie on the curved surface generated by the model. Several possible applications of this representation are outlined, including images representing the melanin and blood components separately, as well as the possibility of measuring the Breslow thickness of melanocytic invasion within malignant melanoma.

  17. Human in vivo and in vitro hydroquinone topical bioavailability, metabolism, and disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, R C; Melendres, J; Hui, X; Cox, R; Serranzana, S; Zhai, H; Quan, D; Maibach, H I

    1998-06-26

    Hydroquinone is a ubiquitous chemical readily available as monographed in cosmetic and nonprescription forms for skin lightening, and is an important industrial chemical. The in vivo bioavailability for 24-h application in humans was 45.3+/-11.2% of dose from a 2% cream formulation containing [14C]hydroquinone, with the majority of radioactivity excreted in the first 24 h. Timed skin wash and skin tape-stripping sequences showed a rapid and continuous movement of hydroquinone into the stratum corneum of human volunteers. Plasma levels taken both ipsilateral and contralateral to the topical dosing site contained radioactivity at the first 0.5-h sampling time. Peak plasma radioactivity was at 4 h in the 8-h blood sampling period. In vitro percutaneous absorption with fresh viable human skin gave a bioavailability of 43.3% of dose, and flux was calculated at 2.85 microg/cm2/h. In vitro, some of the skin samples were pretreated with the metabolic inhibitor sodium azide, which had no effect on percutaneous absorption. Receptor fluid accumulations and 24-h skin samples were extracted and the extracts subjected to thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Control [14C]hydroquinone extraction and TLC had one radioactivity peak, hydroquinone. Receptor fluid and skin extraction had a second peak with the same Rf as benzoquinone, which was decreased with azide treatment. No other peaks were found. Ethyl acetate extraction of urine from the in vivo study showed all radioactivity to be only water-soluble, free hydroquinone released following glucuronidase treatment. Risk assessment should not only involve the bioavailability of intact topical hydroquinone, but also consider phase I and phase II metabolism in both humans and any animal for which toxicity potential was assessed.

  18. Skin Blood Perfusion and Oxygenation Colour Affect Perceived Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Ian D.; Coetzee, Vinet; Law Smith, Miriam; Perrett, David I.

    2009-01-01

    Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation depends upon cardiovascular, hormonal and circulatory health in humans and provides socio-sexual signals of underlying physiology, dominance and reproductive status in some primates. We allowed participants to manipulate colour calibrated facial photographs along empirically-measured oxygenated and deoxygenated blood colour axes both separately and simultaneously, to optimise healthy appearance. Participants increased skin blood colour, particularly oxygenated, above basal levels to optimise healthy appearance. We show, therefore, that skin blood perfusion and oxygenation influence perceived health in a way that may be important to mate choice. PMID:19337378

  19. Ex-vivo MR Volumetry of Human Brain Hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Bennett, David A.; Schneider, Julie A.; Dawe, Robert J.; Golak, Tom; Leurgans, Sue E.; Yu, Lei; Arfanakis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this work were to: a) develop an approach for ex-vivo MR volumetry of human brain hemispheres that does not contaminate the results of histopathological examination, b) longitudinally assess regional brain volumes postmortem, and c) investigate the relationship between MR volumetric measurements performed in-vivo and ex-vivo. Methods An approach for ex-vivo MR volumetry of human brain hemispheres was developed. Five hemispheres from elderly subjects were imaged ex-vivo longitudinally. All datasets were segmented. The longitudinal behavior of volumes measured ex-vivo was assessed. The relationship between in-vivo and ex-vivo volumetric measurements was investigated in seven elderly subjects imaged both ante-mortem and postmortem. Results The presented approach for ex-vivo MR volumetry did not contaminate the results of histopathological examination. For a period of 6 months postmortem, within-subject volume variation across time points was substantially smaller than inter-subject volume variation. A close linear correspondence was detected between in-vivo and ex-vivo volumetric measurements. Conclusion Regional brain volumes measured with the presented approach for ex-vivo MR volumetry remain relatively unchanged for a period of 6 months postmortem. Furthermore, the linear relationship between in-vivo and ex-vivo MR volumetric measurements suggests that the presented approach captures information linked to ante-mortem macrostructural brain characteristics. PMID:23440751

  20. In vivo determination of local skin optical properties and photon path length by use of spatially resolved diffuse reflectance with applications in laser Doppler flowmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Marcus; Nilsson, Henrik; Strömberg, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    Methods for local photon path length and optical properties estimation, based on measured and simulated diffuse reflectance within 2 mm from the light source, are proposed and evaluated in vivo on Caucasian human skin. The accuracy of the methods was good (2%-7%) for path length and reduced scattering but poor for absorption estimation. Reduced scattering and absorption were systematically lower in the fingertip than in the forearm skin (633 nm). A maximum intrasite and interindividual variation of approximately 35% in an average photon path length was found. The methodology was applied in laser Doppler flowmetry, where path-length normalization of the estimated perfusion removed the optical property dependency.

  1. Assessment Of Suspected Skin Lesion Depth By Multispectral Digital Dermatoscopy: In-Vivo Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, L.; Munaretto, R.; Serresi, S.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the possibility to assess the depth of suspected skin lesion in-vivo, using multispectral digital dermatoscopy (MDD); being malignant lesion depth an important factor related to survival rate. The system realised in this work is based on a special multi-wavelength LED illuminator (700 nm, 940 nm and 950 nm) and an high quality CCD camera which allows to acquire a detailed image of the suspected skin lesion. A statistically significant correlation between contrast of the area of the lesion at single wavelength and the depth of the lesions in vivo (as determined by histopathology survey) has been found using 39 samples. Interesting results, have been especially obtained using illuminating wavelength at 940 nm and 950 nm. Using a linear fitting of our data the maximum depth of melanoma has been overestimation of 0.43 ± 0.26 mm. The present study shows a possible use of our MDD system as in the assessment of maximum depth of suspected skin lesions.

  2. Human skin wetness perception: psychophysical and neurophysiological bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filingeri, Davide; Havenith, George

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perceive thermal changes in the surrounding environment is critical for survival. However, sensing temperature is not the only factor among the cutaneous sensations to contribute to thermoregulatory responses in humans. Sensing skin wetness (i.e. hygrosensation) is also critical both for behavioral and autonomic adaptations. Although much has been done to define the biophysical role of skin wetness in contributing to thermal homeostasis, little is known on the neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning the ability to sense skin wetness. Humans are not provided with skin humidity receptors (i.e., hygroreceptors) and psychophysical studies have identified potential sensory cues (i.e. thermal and mechanosensory) which could contribute to sensing wetness. Recently, a neurophysiological model of human wetness sensitivity has been developed. In helping clarifying the peripheral and central neural mechanisms involved in sensing skin wetness, this model has provided evidence for the existence of a specific human hygrosensation strategy, which is underpinned by perceptual learning via sensory experience. Remarkably, this strategy seems to be shared by other hygroreceptor-lacking animals. However, questions remain on whether these sensory mechanisms are underpinned by specific neuromolecular pathways in humans. Although the first study on human wetness perception dates back to more than 100 years, it is surprising that the neurophysiological bases of such an important sensory feature have only recently started to be unveiled. Hence, to provide an overview of the current knowledge on human hygrosensation, along with potential directions for future research, this review will examine the psychophysical and neurophysiological bases of human skin wetness perception. PMID:27227008

  3. Human skin hypoxia modulates cerebrovascular and autonomic functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Pucci

    Full Text Available Because the skin is an oxygen sensor in amphibians and mice, we thought to confirm this function also in humans. The human upright posture, however, introduces additional functional demands for the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in which cerebral blood flow and autonomic nervous system (ANS function may also be involved. We examined nine males and three females. While subjects were breathing ambient air, at sea level, we changed gases in a plastic body-bag during two conditions of the experiment such as to induce skin hypoxia (with pure nitrogen or skin normoxia (with air. The subjects performed a test of hypoxic ventilatory drive during each condition of the experiment. We found no differences in the hypoxic ventilatory drive tests. However, ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities were modulated by skin hypoxia and the effect was significantly greater on the left than right middle cerebral arteries. We conclude that skin hypoxia modulates ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities and this might impact life styles and tolerance to ambient hypoxia at altitude. Thus the skin in normal humans, in addition to its numerous other functions, is also an oxygen sensor.

  4. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  5. In vivo interstitial glucose characterization and monitoring in the skin by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrebova Eikje, Natalja

    2011-03-01

    Successful development of real-time non-invasive glucose monitoring would represent a major advancement not only in the treatment and management of patients with diabetes mellitus and carbohydrate metabolism disorders, but also for understanding in those biochemical, metabolic and (patho-)physiological processes of glucose at the molecular level in vivo. Here, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy technique has been challenged not only for in vivo measurement of interstitial glucose levels, but also for their non-invasive molecular qualitative and quantitative comparative characterization in the skin tissue. The results, based on calculated mean values of determined 5 glucose-specific peaks in the glucose-related 1000-1160 cm-1 region, showed intra- and inter-subject differences in interstitial glucose activity levels with their changes at different times and doses of OGTT, while raising questions about the relationships between interstitial and blood glucose levels. In conclusion, the introduction of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy technique has opened up an access to the interstitial fluid space in the skin tissue for interstitial glucose characterization and monitoring in vivo. Though interstitial versus blood glucose monitoring has different characteristics, it can be argued that accurate and precise measurements of interstitial glucose levels may be more important clinically.

  6. Mobile phone radiation might alter protein expression in human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nylund Reetta

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Earlier we have shown that the mobile phone radiation (radiofrequency modulated electromagnetic fields; RF-EMF alters protein expression in human endothelial cell line. This does not mean that similar response will take place in human body exposed to this radiation. Therefore, in this pilot human volunteer study, using proteomics approach, we have examined whether a local exposure of human skin to RF-EMF will cause changes in protein expression in living people. Results Small area of forearm's skin in 10 female volunteers was exposed to RF-EMF (specific absorption rate SAR = 1.3 W/kg and punch biopsies were collected from exposed and non-exposed areas of skin. Proteins extracted from biopsies were separated using 2-DE and protein expression changes were analyzed using PDQuest software. Analysis has identified 8 proteins that were statistically significantly affected (Anova and Wilcoxon tests. Two of the proteins were present in all 10 volunteers. This suggests that protein expression in human skin might be affected by the exposure to RF-EMF. The number of affected proteins was similar to the number of affected proteins observed in our earlier in vitro studies. Conclusion This is the first study showing that molecular level changes might take place in human volunteers in response to exposure to RF-EMF. Our study confirms that proteomics screening approach can identify protein targets of RF-EMF in human volunteers.

  7. Clinical study of noninvasive in vivo melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers using multimodal spectral diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Migden, Michael R.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Markey, Mia K.; Ross, Merrick I.; Tunnell, James W.

    2014-11-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the diagnostic capability of a multimodal spectral diagnosis (SD) for in vivo noninvasive disease diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. We acquired reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectra from 137 lesions in 76 patients using custom-built optical fiber-based clinical systems. Biopsies of lesions were classified using standard histopathology as malignant melanoma (MM), nonmelanoma pigmented lesion (PL), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), actinic keratosis (AK), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Spectral data were analyzed using principal component analysis. Using multiple diagnostically relevant principal components, we built leave-one-out logistic regression classifiers. Classification results were compared with histopathology of the lesion. Sensitivity/specificity for classifying MM versus PL (12 versus 17 lesions) was 100%;/100%;, for SCC and BCC versus AK (57 versus 14 lesions) was 95%;/71%, and for AK and SCC and BCC versus normal skin (71 versus 71 lesions) was 90%/85%. The best classification for nonmelanoma skin cancers required multiple modalities; however, the best melanoma classification occurred with Raman spectroscopy alone. The high diagnostic accuracy for classifying both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer lesions demonstrates the potential for SD as a clinical diagnostic device.

  8. Topical Formulation Containing Beeswax-Based Nanoparticles Improved In Vivo Skin Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Carla; de Freitas, Luis Alexandre Pedro; Maia Campos, Patrícia Maria Berardo Gonçalves

    2017-10-01

    Lipid nanoparticles have shown many advantages for treatment/prevention of skin disorders with damaged skin barrier function. Beeswax is a favorable candidate for the development of nanosystems in the cosmetic and dermatological fields because of its advantages for the development of products for topical application. In the present study, beeswax-based nanoparticles (BNs) were prepared using the hot melt microemulsion technique and incorporated to a gel-cream formulation. The formulation was subsequently evaluated for its rheological stability and effect on stratum corneum water content (SCWC) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) using in vivo biophysical techniques. BNs resulted in mean particle size of 95.72 ± 9.63 nm and zeta potential of -9.85 ± 0.57 mV. BN-loaded formulation showed shear thinning behavior, well adjusted by the Herschel-Bulkley model, and a small thixotropy index that were stable for 28 days at different temperatures. BN-loaded formulation was also able to simultaneously decrease the TEWL and increase the SCWC values 28 days after treatment. In conclusion, the novel beeswax-based nanoparticles showed potential for barrier recovery and open the perspective for its commercial use as a novel natural active as yet unexplored in the field of dermatology and cosmetics for treatment of skin diseases with damaged skin barrier function.

  9. Multimodal fluorescence molecular imaging for in vivo characterization of skin cancer using endogenous and exogenous fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica P.; Habimana-Griffin, LeMoyne; Edwards, Tracy S.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Similarity of skin cancer with many benign skin pathologies requires reliable methods to detect and differentiate the different types of these lesions. Previous studies have explored the use of disparate optical techniques to identify and estimate the invasive nature of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma with varying outcomes. Here, we used a concerted approach that provides complementary information for rapid screening and characterization of tumors, focusing on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Assessment of in vivo autofluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging of endogenous fluorophores that are excitable at longer wavelengths (480 nm) than conventional NADH and FAD revealed a decrease in the short FLT component for SCC compared to normal skin, with mean values of 0.57±0.026 ns and 0.61±0.021 ns, respectively (p=0.004). Subsequent systemic administration of a near-infrared fluorescent molecular probe in SCC bearing mice, followed by the implementation of image processing methods on data acquired from two-dimensional and three-dimensional fluorescence molecular imaging, allowed us to estimate the tumor volume and depth, as well as quantify the fluorescent probe in the tumor. The result suggests the involvement of lipofuscin-like lipopigments and riboflavin in SCC metabolism and serves as a model for staging SCC.

  10. Influence of massage and occlusion on the ex vivo skin penetration of rigid liposomes and invasomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trauer, S.; Richter, H.; Kuntsche, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes are frequently described as drug delivery systems for dermal and transdermal applications. Recently, it has been shown that particulate substances penetrate effectively into hair follicles and that the follicular penetration depth can be increased by massaging the skin, which simulates...... the in vivo movement of hairs in the hair follicles. In the present study, massage was applied to skin mounted to Franz diffusion cells. By means of confocal laser scanning microscopy, the influence of massage and occlusion on the follicular penetration depths of rigid and flexible liposomes loaded...... with a hydrophilic and lipophilic dye was investigated. The application of massage increased follicular penetration significantly. Occlusion resulted in an increased follicular penetration depth only for rigid liposomes, whereas invasomes did not penetrate more effectively if occlusion was applied. The results...

  11. Composition of human skin microbiota affects attractiveness to malaria mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels O Verhulst

    Full Text Available The African malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto continues to play an important role in malaria transmission, which is aggravated by its high degree of anthropophily, making it among the foremost vectors of this disease. In the current study we set out to unravel the strong association between this mosquito species and human beings, as it is determined by odorant cues derived from the human skin. Microbial communities on the skin play key roles in the production of human body odour. We demonstrate that the composition of the skin microbiota affects the degree of attractiveness of human beings to this mosquito species. Bacterial plate counts and 16S rRNA sequencing revealed that individuals that are highly attractive to An. gambiae s.s. have a significantly higher abundance, but lower diversity of bacteria on their skin than individuals that are poorly attractive. Bacterial genera that are correlated with the relative degree of attractiveness to mosquitoes were identified. The discovery of the connection between skin microbial populations and attractiveness to mosquitoes may lead to the development of new mosquito attractants and personalized methods for protection against vectors of malaria and other infectious diseases.

  12. Biogeography and individuality shape function in the human skin metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Julia; Byrd, Allyson L; Deming, Clay; Conlan, Sean; Kong, Heidi H; Segre, Julia A

    2014-10-02

    The varied topography of human skin offers a unique opportunity to study how the body's microenvironments influence the functional and taxonomic composition of microbial communities. Phylogenetic marker gene-based studies have identified many bacteria and fungi that colonize distinct skin niches. Here metagenomic analyses of diverse body sites in healthy humans demonstrate that local biogeography and strong individuality define the skin microbiome. We developed a relational analysis of bacterial, fungal and viral communities, which showed not only site specificity but also individual signatures. We further identified strain-level variation of dominant species as heterogeneous and multiphyletic. Reference-free analyses captured the uncharacterized metagenome through the development of a multi-kingdom gene catalogue, which was used to uncover genetic signatures of species lacking reference genomes. This work is foundational for human disease studies investigating inter-kingdom interactions, metabolic changes and strain tracking, and defines the dual influence of biogeography and individuality on microbial composition and function.

  13. Cortisol extraction through human skin by reverse iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Stephanie A; Heikenfeld, Jason; Brooks, Tiffany; Esfandiari, Leyla; Boyce, Steven; Park, Yoonjee; Kasting, Gerald B

    2017-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of cortisol at the surface of the skin would advance the diagnosis and treatment of cortisol-related diseases, or of elevated cortisol levels related to stress in otherwise healthy populations. Reliable and accurate detection of cortisol at the skin surface remains a limiting factor in real-time monitoring of cortisol. To address this limitation, cortisol extraction through excised human skin by reverse iontophoresis was studied in vitro in side-by-side diffusion cells using a radiolabeled probe. The skin was subjected to four direct current regimens (0, 28, 56, 113μAcm -2 ) with the anode in the donor chamber and the cumulative cortisol concentrations recorded in the receiver chamber. The 56 and 113μAcm -2 regimens significantly increased transport of 3 H-cortisol through the skin, and current density correlated directly with transcutaneous transport of 3 H-cortisol. The threshold of detection of electroosmotic versus passive diffusion of cortisol through the skin was between 28 and 56μAcm -2 . The results of this study are significant in examining how lipophilic analytes found in the bloodstream respond to reverse iontophoresis across the skin. In addition, a device integration technique is presented which illustrates how continuous cortisol extraction and sensing could potentially be achieved in a conventional wearable format. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel image processing workflow for the in vivo quantification of skin microvasculature using dynamic optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugaj, D; Chenet, A; Petit, L; Vaglio, J; Pascual, T; Piketty, C; Bourdes, V

    2018-02-04

    Currently, imaging technologies that can accurately assess or provide surrogate markers of the human cutaneous microvessel network are limited. Dynamic optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) allows the detection of blood flow in vivo and visualization of the skin microvasculature. However, image processing is necessary to correct images, filter artifacts, and exclude irrelevant signals. The objective of this study was to develop a novel image processing workflow to enhance the technical capabilities of D-OCT. Single-center, vehicle-controlled study including healthy volunteers aged 18-50 years. A capsaicin solution was applied topically on the subject's forearm to induce local inflammation. Measurements of capsaicin-induced increase in dermal blood flow, within the region of interest, were performed by laser Doppler imaging (LDI) (reference method) and D-OCT. Sixteen subjects were enrolled. A good correlation was shown between D-OCT and LDI, using the image processing workflow. Therefore, D-OCT offers an easy-to-use alternative to LDI, with good repeatability, new robust morphological features (dermal-epidermal junction localization), and quantification of the distribution of vessel size and changes in this distribution induced by capsaicin. The visualization of the vessel network was improved through bloc filtering and artifact removal. Moreover, the assessment of vessel size distribution allows a fine analysis of the vascular patterns. The newly developed image processing workflow enhances the technical capabilities of D-OCT for the accurate detection and characterization of microcirculation in the skin. A direct clinical application of this image processing workflow is the quantification of the effect of topical treatment on skin vascularization. © 2018 The Authors. Skin Research and Technology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Humanized In Vivo Model for Streptococcal Impetigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzzino, Dominick A.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Bessen, Debra E.

    2000-01-01

    An in vivo model for group A streptococcal (GAS) impetigo was developed, whereby human neonatal foreskin engrafted onto SCID mice was superficially damaged and bacteria were topically applied. Severe infection, indicated by a purulent exudate, could be induced with as few as 1,000 CFU of a virulent strain. Early findings (48 h) showed a loss of stratum corneum and adherence of short chains of gram-positive cocci to the external surface of granular keratinocytes. This was followed by an increasing infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) of mouse origin, until a thick layer of pus covered an intact epidermis, with massive clumps of cocci accumulated at the outer rim of the pus layer. By 7 days postinoculation, the epidermis was heavily eroded; in some instances, the dermis contained pockets (ulcers) filled with cocci, similar to that observed for ecthyma. Importantly, virulent GAS underwent reproduction, resulting in a net increase in CFU of 20- to 14,000-fold. The majority of emm pattern D strains had a higher gross pathology score than emm pattern A, B, or C (A–C) strains, consistent with epidemiological findings that pattern D strains have a strong tendency to cause impetigo, whereas pattern A–C strains are more likely to cause pharyngitis. PMID:10768985

  16. In vivo human buccal permeability of nicotine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Charlotte L; Olin, Helle B D; Dalhoff, Kim

    2006-01-01

    -smokers using a buccal perfusion cell. The disappearance of nicotine from perfusion solutions with pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1 was studied for 3h. The apparent permeability of nicotine (P(app)) was determined at each pH value. Parotid saliva was collected in an attempt to assess systemic levels of nicotine......(app) values and non-ionised nicotine, which indicates that the nicotine transfer occurred by means of passive diffusion. P(app) values of 0.60 x 10(-4) and 6.18 x 10(-4)cms(-1) were obtained for the mono-protonated and non-ionised species of nicotine, respectively. The analysis of the parotid saliva samples...... indicated that these samples might be useful in the assessment of systemic absorption of nicotine. Previous buccal in vitro models underestimated the in vivo human permeability of nicotine. However, the in vitro models were capable of predicting the effect of pH on the nicotine permeability....

  17. Human skin color clustering for face detection

    OpenAIRE

    Kovač, Jure; Peer, Peter; Solina, Franc

    2003-01-01

    Computer vision is one out of many areas that wants to understand the process of human functionality and copy that process with intention to complement human life with intelligent machines. For better human–computer interaction it is necessary for the machine to see people. This can be achieved by employing face detection algorithms, like the one used in the installation “15 Seconds of Fame”. Mentioned installation unites the areas of modern art and technology. Its algorithm...

  18. Human skin colour clustering for face detection

    OpenAIRE

    Solina, Franc; Peer, Peter; Kovač, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Computer vision is one out of many areas that wants to understand the process of human functionality and copy that process with intention to complement human life with intelligent machines. For better human–computer interaction it is necessary for the machine to see people. This can be achieved by employing face detection algorithms, like the one used in the installation “15 Seconds of Fame”. Mentioned installation unites the areas of modern art and technology. Its algorithm...

  19. An in vitro model for detecting skin irritants: methyl green-pyronine staining of human skin explant cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J. J. L.; Lehé, C.; Cammans, K. D. A.; Das, P. K.; Elliott, G. R.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the potential of human organotypic skin explant cultures (hOSECs) for screening skin irritants. Test chemicals were applied to the epidermis of the skin explants which were incubated for 4, 24 or 48 h in tissue culture medium. A decrease in epidermal RNA staining, visualised in frozen

  20. Ethosomal Hydrogel of Raloxifene HCl: Statistical Optimization & Ex Vivo Permeability Evaluation Across Microporated Pig Ear Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Hetal P; Savsani, Hitesh; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    The oral bioavailability of Raloxifene hydrochloride, an FDA approved selective estrogen receptor modulator, is severely limited due to its poor aqueous solubility and extensive first pass metabolism. The Present work focuses on the development of ethosomal hydrogel for transdermal delivery of Raloxifene HCl as an alternate way to solve aforementioned problem. The physical breaching of stratum corneum, the principal barrier, by microneedle treatment was also employed to potentiate its transdermal permeation. The influence of lipid and ethanol concentration on vesicle size and entrapment efficiency was extensively investigated using response surface methodology based on central composite design. The software based optimization was done and validated using check point analysis. Optimized batch was extensively evaluated for its safety, efficacy and stability. The optimized ethosomal batch possessed 403 nm size and 74.25% drug entrapment. Its zeta potential and in vitro drug release were also found favorable for transdermal permeation. The ex vivo skin permeation study revealed a transdermal flux of 4.621 μg/cm2/h through the intact pig ear skin which was further enhanced through the microporated skin (transdermal flux, 6.194 μg/cm2/h) with a 3.87 fold rise when compared to drug permeation from plain solution applied over intact skin (transdermal flux, 1.6 μg/cm2/h). Histopathological skin sections showed the non-irritant nature of the ethosomal hydrogel and microneedle treatment. The formulation was found stable under both refrigeration and room temperature conditions for 6 weeks. In a nutshell, the developed system was found efficient, safe and stable and seems promising for transdermal use.

  1. Determination of the optical properties of melanin-pigmented human skin equivalents using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Peralta, Xomalin G.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2013-02-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) methods have been utilized in previous studies in order to characterize the optical properties of skin and its primary constituents (i.e., water, collagen, and keratin). However, similar experiments have not yet been performed to investigate whether melanocytes and the melanin pigment that they synthesize contribute to skin's optical properties. In this study, we used THz-TDS methods operating in transmission geometry to measure the optical properties of in vitro human skin equivalents with or without normal human melanocytes. Skin equivalents were cultured for three weeks to promote gradual melanogenesis, and THz time domain data were collected at various time intervals. Frequency-domain analysis techniques were performed to determine the index of refraction (n) and absorption coefficient (μa) for each skin sample over the frequency range of 0.1-2.0 THz. We found that for all samples as frequency increased, n decreased exponentially and the μa increased linearly. Additionally, we observed that skin samples with higher levels of melanin exhibited greater n and μa values than the non-pigmented samples. Our results indicate that melanocytes and the degree of melanin pigmentation contribute in an appreciable manner to the skin's optical properties. Future studies will be performed to examine whether these contributions are observed in human skin in vivo.

  2. The vasorelaxant effect of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide and amylin in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Eskesen, Karen; Lind, Peter Henrik

    2006-01-01

    In this study we aimed to assess in vivo, the vasodilator effects of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) and amylin in human skin vasculature and compare the responses to the effects mediated by the endogenous neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP......) and substance P and to examine the mRNA expression of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL-R) and receptor-activity modifying proteins, RAMP1, RAMP 2 and RAMP3 in human subcutaneous arteries. Changes in skin blood flow of the forearm were measured using a Laser Doppler Imager after intradermal injection...... to the transient response induced by substance P. PAMP (10(-6)-10(-5) M) caused distinct itch sensation and local erythema. This effect could be abolished when combining the histamine H1-receptor antagonist mepyramin and PAMP. Real-time PCR data showed a higher level of mRNA for RAMP2 than CL-R, RAMP1 and RAMP3...

  3. Hydrogen sulphide and phosphine interactions with human skin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Sharyn; Heath, Linda; Pisaniello, Dino; Evans, Richard; Edwards, John W; Logan, Michael; Baxter, Christina

    2017-04-01

    Accidental or intentional releases of toxic gases can have significant public health consequences and emergency resource demands. Management of exposed individuals during hazardous material incidents should be risk and evidence based, but there are knowledge gaps in relation to dermal absorption of gases and management advice for potentially exposed individuals. Using a modified Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in vitro toxicology protocol with human donor skin, this article reports on two common and odorous chemicals, hydrogen sulphide and phosphine. Results show that undamaged human skin provides a good barrier to hydrogen sulphide (up to 800 ppm) and phosphine (up to 1000 ppm) penetration for up to 30 min exposures, with little variability in the presence of clothing or in elevated temperature and humidity conditions. A practical guideline template for skin decontamination has been developed, and implications of the research for first responders are outlined.

  4. Real-time, High-resolution, In Vivo Characterization of Superficial Skin With Microscopy Using Ultraviolet Surface Excitation (MUSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Derek; Fereidouni, Farzad; Levenson, Richard M; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-11-01

    Skin care products make up the largest part (36%) of the cosmetic market globally, of which the United States plays the largest role. In 2015, approximately 115 billion USD was spent globally on skin care products. Skin care products, in contradistinction to pharmaceuticals, are not strictly regulated by the FDA. A key factor for evaluation of a skin care product or topical drug is skin barrier function and effect on super cial skin. Thus, it is critical to have quantitative and qualitative methods to study the effects of skin care products on skin barrier and the super cial skin. Currently, no imaging method exists that can evaluate and track super cial skin changes visually in real-time. To report using a novel imaging modality, Microscopy using Ultraviolet Surface Excitation (MUSE), to provide real-time, high- resolution, in vivo characterization of super cial skin and moisturizing properties of topical moisturizer, and to highlight key bene ts of using MUSE to visualize the super cial skin and serve as an excellent complementary tool to current quantitative methods. The methodology of MUSE is based upon two main principles inherent to ultraviolet (UV) light and uorescent staining agents. In this study, the author's (JJ) index ngertip was imaged using the MUSE instrument without and with moisturizer. Dermatoglyphics of the fingertip consists of ridges (cristae super ciales) and grooves (sulci super ciales) proved to be straightforward to visualize at high resolution. Desquamation of superficial corneocytes and opening of an acrosyringium (the most superficial portion of eccrine ducts) were visualized in high-resolution. Post-application of a moisturizer, a uniform layer of moisturizer could be seen superficial to the corneocytes along the ridges and CONCLUSIONS: Real-time, high-resolution, in vivo characterization of super cial skin and moisturizing properties of moisturizer using MUSE is feasible. Its utility can be enhanced with downstream quantification using

  5. Technical note: comparing von Luschan skin color tiles and modern spectrophotometry for measuring human skin pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatoniowski, Anna K; Quillen, Ellen E; Shriver, Mark D; Jablonski, Nina G

    2013-06-01

    Prior to the introduction of reflectance spectrophotometry into anthropological field research during the 1950s, human skin color was most commonly classified by visual skin color matching using the von Luschan tiles, a set of 36 standardized, opaque glass tiles arranged in a chromatic scale. Our goal was to establish a conversion formula between the tile-based color matching method and modern reflectance spectrophotometry to make historical and contemporary data comparable. Skin pigmentation measurements were taken on the forehead, inner upper arms, and backs of the hands using both the tiles and a spectrophotometer on 246 participants showing a broad range of skin pigmentation. From these data, a second-order polynomial conversion formula was derived by jackknife analysis to estimate melanin index (M-index) based on tile values. This conversion formula provides a means for comparing modern data to von Luschan tile measurements recorded in historical reports. This is particularly important for populations now extinct, extirpated, or admixed for which tile-based measures of skin pigmentation are the only data available. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. In vivo Raman Confocal Spectroscopy in the Investigation of the Skin Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal barrier, predominantly attributed to the stratum corneum (SC), is the outermost part of our body that comprises multiple defensive functions against exogenous attacks and the loss of body substances, e.g. water. A novel investigative method, in vivo Raman confocal spectroscopy (RCS), is employed to study the composition of the epidermal barrier and compounds penetrating the epidermis both in a space-resolved manner. By using this method, a semiquantitative analysis of skin barrier constituents can be evaluated, namely SC lipids, natural moisturizing factor components and sweat constituents. The technique enables to examine epidermal barrier impairment in experimental settings as well as the penetration of exogenous substances into the epidermis, e.g. retinol. RCS can reveal microcompositional changes in the skin barrier as a function of age. We also review the use of RCS in studying antioxidant defense components. This chapter discusses the application of in vivo RCS in the investigation of the epidermal barrier. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Influence of massage and occlusion on the ex vivo skin penetration of rigid liposomes and invasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauer, Sindy; Richter, Heike; Kuntsche, Judith; Büttemeyer, Rolf; Liebsch, Manfred; Linscheid, Michael; Fahr, Alfred; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Lademann, Jürgen; Patzelt, Alexa

    2014-02-01

    Liposomes are frequently described as drug delivery systems for dermal and transdermal applications. Recently, it has been shown that particulate substances penetrate effectively into hair follicles and that the follicular penetration depth can be increased by massaging the skin, which simulates the in vivo movement of hairs in the hair follicles. In the present study, massage was applied to skin mounted to Franz diffusion cells. By means of confocal laser scanning microscopy, the influence of massage and occlusion on the follicular penetration depths of rigid and flexible liposomes loaded with a hydrophilic and lipophilic dye was investigated. The application of massage increased follicular penetration significantly. Occlusion resulted in an increased follicular penetration depth only for rigid liposomes, whereas invasomes did not penetrate more effectively if occlusion was applied. The results confirm that massage is an important tool for increasing follicular penetration in ex vivo studies using Franz diffusion cells. Occlusion may reduce the efficacy of follicular penetration depending on the specific liposomal preparation. Rigidity in particular appears to be a relevant parameter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multi-spectral mapping of in vivo skin hemoglobin and melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Spigulis, Janis; Saknite, Inga

    2010-04-01

    The multi-spectral imaging technique has been used for distant mapping of in-vivo skin chromophores by analyzing spectral data at each reflected image pixel and constructing 2-D maps of the relative concentrations of oxy-/deoxyhemoglobin and melanin. Instead of using a broad visible-NIR spectral range, this study focuses on narrowed spectral band 500-700 nm, so speeding-up the signal processing procedure. Regression analysis confirmed that superposition of three Gaussians is optimal analytic approximation for the oxy-hemoglobin absorption tabular spectrum in this spectral band, while superposition of two Gaussians fits well for deoxy-hemoglobin absorption and exponential function - for melanin absorption. The proposed approach was clinically tested for three types of in-vivo skin provocations - ultraviolet irradiance, chemical reaction with vinegar essence and finger arterial occlusion. Spectral range 500-700 nm provided better sensitivity to oxy-hemoglobin changes and higher response stability to melanin than two reduced ranges 500-600 nm and 530-620 nm.

  9. Anticancer effect of realgar nanoparticles on mouse melanoma skin cancer in vivo via transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi-Hong; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Yun; Wang, Hui-Li; Shen, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Wen-Jun; Wen, Long-Ping

    2010-06-01

    Realgar has been used successfully to treat diseases for thousands of years, but its poor water solubility and high toxicity hampered its further medical uses. Here, we first applied transdermal drug delivery system to deliver realgar nanoparticles to investigate its anticancer effect and toxicity in vivo. In this study, MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that realgar significantly suppressed the proliferation and induced apoptosis of B16 melanoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Transdermal penetration studies in vitro showed realgar nanoparticles could be delivered efficiently through skin. Tests on tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice displayed that realgar could decrease the tumor volume markedly via transdermal drug delivery compared with the intraperitoneal administration and the control. Hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining revealed that it could inhibit angiogenesis. The monitoring of the hepatic injury, body weight, feeding behavior, motor activity, and skin irritation of each animal indicated little toxicity of realgar to mice. The results demonstrated that realgar nanoparticles can be dermally delivered to achieve high efficacy against menaloma in vivo with low toxicity.

  10. Further development of the EpiDerm 3D reconstructed human skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Greg C; Aardema, Marilyn J; Hu, Ting; Barnett, Brenda; Kaluzhny, Yulia; Klausner, Mitchell; Karetsky, Viktor; Dahl, Erica L; Curren, Rodger D

    2009-03-17

    The upcoming ban on testing of cosmetics in animals by the European Union's 7th Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive will require genotoxicity safety assessments of cosmetics ingredients and final formulations to be based primarily on in vitro genotoxicity tests. The current in vitro test battery produces an unacceptably high rate of false positives, and used by itself would effectively prevent the use and development of many ingredients that are actually safe for human use. To address the need for an in vitro test that is more predictive of genotoxicity in vivo, we have developed an in vitro micronucleus assay using a three-dimensional human reconstructed skin model (EpiDerm) that more closely mimics the normal dermal exposure route of chemicals. We have refined this model and assessed its ability to predict genotoxicity of a battery of chemicals that have been previously classified as genotoxins or non-genotoxins based on in vivo rodent skin tests. Our reconstructed skin micronucleus assay correctly identified 7 genotoxins and 5 non-genotoxins, demonstrating its potential to have a higher predictive value than currently available in vitro genotoxicity tests, and its utility as part of a comprehensive in vitro genotoxicity testing strategy.

  11. Neurotrophin-3 is increased in skin in human diabetic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, A; Wellmer, A; Facer, P; Saldanha, G; Kopelman, P; Lindsay, R; Anand, P

    1998-01-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), a member of the neurotrophin family, has been shown to be necessary for the development of muscle spindle and Merkel cell afferent nerve fibres in animal models.The presence of NT-3 in the suprabasal epidermis, where many unmyelinated sensory fibres terminate, has been shown for the first time. As these fibres are affected in early diabetic neuropathy and a clinical trial of recombinant human NT-3 in diabetic neuropathy is in progress, the concentrations of endogenous NT-3 in skin of 24 patients at different stages of diabetic polyneuropathy have been investigated. NT-3 concentrations, measured with a specific immunoassay, were significantly higher in affected skin biopsies from patients with diabetic neuropathy than matched control skin (diabetic skin 6.32(1.18) pg/mg v control skin 1.28 (0.05) (mean (SEM)); p<0.004, Mann-Whitney U test), particularly in the later stages. The optical density of NT-3-immunostaining was also significantly greater in the epidermis in diabetic patients (diabetic epidermis 0.30(0.06) v controls 0.24 (0.01); p<0.02). No correlation was found between individual quantitative sensory tests and the increase of NT-3 concentration. The increase of NT-3 seems to reflect the degree of skin denervation in diabetic neuropathy, and may represent a compensatory mechanism. The concentrations of NT-3 in other peripheral targets deserve study in diabetic neuropathy.

 PMID:9728960

  12. In vivo imaging of human burn injuries with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hean; Pierce, Mark C.; Maguluri, Gopi; Park, B. Hyle; Yoon, Sang June; Lydon, Martha; Sheridan, Robert; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2012-06-01

    The accurate determination of burn depth is critical in the clinical management of burn wounds. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been proposed as a potentially non-invasive method for determining burn depth by measuring thermally induced changes in the structure and birefringence of skin, and has been investigated in pre-clinical burn studies with animal models and ex vivo human skin. In this study, we applied PS-OCT to the in-vivo imaging of two pediatric burn patients. Deep and superficial burned skins along with contralateral controls were imaged in 3D. The imaging size was 8 mm×6 mm×2 mm in width, length, and depth in the air respectively, and the imaging time was approximately 6 s per volume. Superficially burned skins exhibited the same layered structure as the contralateral controls, but more visible vasculature and reduced birefringence compared to the contralateral controls. In contrast, a deeply burned skin showed loss of the layered structure, almost absent vasculature, and smaller birefringence compared to superficial burns. This study suggested the vasculature and birefringence as parameters for characterizing burn wounds.

  13. Resveratrol-Loaded Lipid Nanocarriers: Correlation between In Vitro Occlusion Factor and In Vivo Skin Hydrating Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Montenegro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipid nanocarriers show occlusive properties that may be related to their ability to improve skin hydration. The aim of this work was to evaluate the relationship between in vitro occlusion factor and in vivo skin hydration for three types of lipid nanocarriers: nanoemulsions (NEs, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs. These lipid nanocarriers were loaded with trans-resveratrol (RSV and incorporated in gel vehicles. In vitro occlusion factor was in the order SLNs > NLCs > NEs. Gels containing unloaded or RSV loaded lipid nanocarriers were applied on the back of a hand of 12 healthy volunteers twice a day for one week, recording skin hydration changes using the instrument Soft Plus. An increase of skin hydration was observed for all lipid nanocarriers (SLNs > NLCs > NEs. RSV loading into these nanocarriers did not affect in vitro and in vivo lipid nanocarriers effects. A linear relationship (r2 = 0.969 was observed between occlusion factor and in vivo increase of skin hydration. Therefore, the results of this study showed the feasibility of using the occlusion factor to predict in vivo skin hydration resulting from topical application of different lipid nanocarriers loading an active ingredient with no inherent hydrating activity.

  14. Enhancement of Human Cheek Skin Texture by Acacia Nilotica Bark ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of a topical application of a cream formulation containing extract of Acacia nilotica bark extract on human cheek skin texture. Methods: A cream containing 3 % concentrated extract of Acacia nilotica bark was developed by entrapping the extract in the internal aqueous phase of the cream having strong antioxidant activity.

  15. Human skin Langerhans cells are targets of dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, SJL; Grouard-Vogel, G; Mascola, [No Value; Brachtel, E; Putvatana, R; Louder, MK; Filgueira, L; Marovich, MA; Wong, HK; Blauvelt, A; Murphy, GS; Robb, ML; Innes, BL; Birx, DL; Hayes, CG; Frankel, SS

    Dengue virus (DV), an arthropod-borne flavivirus, causes a febrile illness for which there is no antiviral treatment and no vaccine(1,2). Macrophages are important in dengue pathogenesis; however, the initial target cell for DV infection remains unknown. As DV is introduced into human skin by

  16. Tumor angiogenic factor and human skin tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, J E; Hubler, W R

    1975-03-01

    A transparent acrylic hamster cheek-pouch chamber was used to investigate the elaboration of a tumor angiogenic factor (TAF) by human cutaneous neoplasms; direct tumor implantations, transfilter diffusion, and soluble tumor extracts were used in the study. A diffusible and filterable TAF was extracted from cutaneous tumors and produced distinctive patterns of sequential vasodilatation, tortuosity, and neovascular proliferation in the cheek-pouch membrane. Malignant human neoplasms (eg, melanoma, basal cell epithelioma, squamous cell carcinoma, lymphoma) produced striking neovascularization; vascular tumors (eg, Kaposi sarcoma, pyogenic granuloma, vascular histiocytoma) stimulated dramatic hyperemia and ectasia. Angiogenesis was conspicuously absent after implantation of control materials and nevoid or normal cutaneous components (with the exception of epidermis). Tumor angiogenic factor appears to induce direct stimulation of endothelial cell mitosis and may be essential for survival of nutritionally ravenous neoplastic tissues. The interference with TAF has therapeutic implications.

  17. Characterization of a MOSkin detector for in vivo skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, M. J.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H., E-mail: ngkh@um.edu.my [Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia and University of Malaya Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Jong, W. L. [Clinical Oncology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Cutajar, D. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The MOSkin is a MOSFET detector designed especially for skin dose measurements. This detector has been characterized for various factors affecting its response for megavoltage photon beams and has been used for patient dose measurements during radiotherapy procedures. However, the characteristics of this detector in kilovoltage photon beams and low dose ranges have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to characterize the MOSkin detector to determine its suitability for in vivo entrance skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures. Methods: The calibration and reproducibility of the MOSkin detector and its dependency on different radiation beam qualities were carried out using RQR standard radiation qualities in free-in-air geometry. Studies of the other characterization parameters, such as the dose linearity and dependency on exposure angle, field size, frame rate, depth-dose, and source-to-surface distance (SSD), were carried out using a solid water phantom under a clinical x-ray unit. Results: The MOSkin detector showed good reproducibility (94%) and dose linearity (99%) for the dose range of 2 to 213 cGy. The sensitivity did not significantly change with the variation of SSD (±1%), field size (±1%), frame rate (±3%), or beam energy (±5%). The detector angular dependence was within ±5% over 360° and the dose recorded by the MOSkin detector in different depths of a solid water phantom was in good agreement with the Markus parallel plate ionization chamber to within ±3%. Conclusions: The MOSkin detector proved to be reliable when exposed to different field sizes, SSDs, depths in solid water, dose rates, frame rates, and radiation incident angles within a clinical x-ray beam. The MOSkin detector with water equivalent depth equal to 0.07 mm is a suitable detector for in vivo skin dosimetry during interventional radiology procedures.

  18. The electromagnetic response of human skin in the millimetre and submillimetre wave range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Yuri; Puzenko, Alexander; Ben Ishai, Paul; Caduff, Andreas; Davidovich, Issak; Sakran, Fadi; Agranat, Aharon J

    2009-06-07

    Recent studies of the minute morphology of the skin by optical coherence tomography revealed that the sweat ducts in human skin are helically shaped tubes, filled with a conductive aqueous solution. This, together with the fact that the dielectric permittivity of the dermis is higher than that of the epidermis, brings forward the supposition that as electromagnetic entities, the sweat ducts could be regarded as low Q helical antennas. The implications of this statement were further investigated by electromagnetic simulation and experiment of the in vivo reflectivity of the skin of subjects under varying physiological conditions (Feldman et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 128102). The simulation and experimental results are in a good agreement and both demonstrate that sweat ducts in the skin could indeed behave as low Q antennas. Thus, the skin spectral response in the sub-Terahertz region is governed by the level of activity of the perspiration system and shows the minimum of reflectivity at some frequencies in the frequency band of 75-110 GHz. It is also correlated to physiological stress as manifested by the pulse rate and the systolic blood pressure. As such, it has the potential to become the underlying principle for remote sensing of the physiological parameters and the mental state of the examined subject.

  19. The electromagnetic response of human skin in the millimetre and submillimetre wave range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Yuri; Puzenko, Alexander; Ben Ishai, Paul; Caduff, Andreas; Davidovich, Issak; Sakran, Fadi; Agranat, Aharon J.

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies of the minute morphology of the skin by optical coherence tomography revealed that the sweat ducts in human skin are helically shaped tubes, filled with a conductive aqueous solution. This, together with the fact that the dielectric permittivity of the dermis is higher than that of the epidermis, brings forward the supposition that as electromagnetic entities, the sweat ducts could be regarded as low Q helical antennas. The implications of this statement were further investigated by electromagnetic simulation and experiment of the in vivo reflectivity of the skin of subjects under varying physiological conditions (Feldman et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 128102). The simulation and experimental results are in a good agreement and both demonstrate that sweat ducts in the skin could indeed behave as low Q antennas. Thus, the skin spectral response in the sub-Terahertz region is governed by the level of activity of the perspiration system and shows the minimum of reflectivity at some frequencies in the frequency band of 75-110 GHz. It is also correlated to physiological stress as manifested by the pulse rate and the systolic blood pressure. As such, it has the potential to become the underlying principle for remote sensing of the physiological parameters and the mental state of the examined subject.

  20. Epigenetic modulations in early endothelial cells and DNA hypermethylation in human skin after sulfur mustard exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Simons, Thilo; Striepling, Enno; Bölck, Birgit; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-02-26

    Victims that were exposed to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) suffer from chronic dermal and ocular lesions, severe pulmonary problems and cancer development. It has been proposed that epigenetic perturbations might be involved in that process but this has not been investigated so far. In this study, we investigated epigenetic modulations in vitro using early endothelial cells (EEC) that were exposed to different SM concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 23.5 and 50μM). A comprehensive analysis of 78 genes related to epigenetic pathways (i.e., DNA-methylation and post-translational histone modifications) was performed. Moreover, we analyzed global DNA methylation in vitro in EEC after SM exposure as a maker for epigenetic modulations and in vivo using human skin samples that were obtained from a patient 1 year after an accidently exposure to pure SM. SM exposure resulted in a complex regulation pattern of epigenetic modulators which was accompanied by a global increase of DNA methylation in vitro. Examination of the SM exposed human skin samples also revealed a significant increase of global DNA methylation in vivo, underlining the biological relevance of our findings. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that SM affects epigenetic pathways and causes epigenetic modulations both in vivo and in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnosis of malignant melanoma and basal cell carcinoma by in vivo NIR-FT Raman spectroscopy is independent of skin pigmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, P A; Knudsen, L; Gniadecka, M

    2013-01-01

    in a higher spectral background caused by fluorescence, which could be removed by background correction. After background correction, we found only a negligible effect of pigmentation on the major spectral bands, and the comparison of the intensity of these bands allowed us to differentiate between normal......There is a general need for methods to obtain fast in vivo diagnosis of skin tumours. Raman spectroscopy measures molecular structure and may thus have potential as a tool for skin tumour diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate how skin pigmentation influenced the Raman spectra...... and skin tumour diagnostics in vivo. We obtained Raman spectra in vivo from the normal skin of 55 healthy persons with different skin pigmentation (Fitzpatrick skin type I-VI) and in vivo from 25 basal cell carcinomas, 41 pigmented nevi and 15 malignant melanomas. Increased skin pigmentation resulted...

  2. Microsphaeropsis olivacea as an etiological agent of human skin infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarro, J; Mayayo, E; Tapiol, J; Aguilar, C; Cano, J

    1999-04-01

    Microsphaeropsis olivacea is reported as the agent of a case of human skin infection in an otherwise healthy woman. This fungus has not been reported previously as causing disease in humans. It was identified on the basis of its production of pycnidia and conidial structures typical of the Coelomycetes, and by its light brown, ellipsoid to cylindrical and thick walled conidia. The in vitro inhibitory activity of amphotericin B, fluconazole, flucytosine, itraconazole, ketoconazole and miconazole was determined.

  3. In vitro-in vivo correlations for nicotine transdermal delivery systems evaluated by both in vitro skin permeation (IVPT) and in vivo serum pharmacokinetics under the influence of transient heat application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Soo Hyeon; Thomas, Sherin; Raney, Sam G; Ghosh, Priyanka; Hammell, Dana C; El-Kamary, Samer S; Chen, Wilbur H; Billington, M Melissa; Hassan, Hazem E; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2018-01-28

    The in vitro permeation test (IVPT) has been widely used to characterize the bioavailability (BA) of compounds applied on the skin. In this study, we performed IVPT studies using excised human skin (in vitro) and harmonized in vivo human serum pharmacokinetic (PK) studies to evaluate the potential in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) of nicotine BA from two, matrix-type, nicotine transdermal delivery systems (TDS). The study designs used for both in vitro and in vivo studies included 1h of transient heat (42±2°C) application during early or late time periods post-dosing. The goal was to evaluate whether any IVIVC observed would be evident even under conditions of heat exposure, in order to investigate further whether IVPT may have the potential to serve as a possible surrogate method to evaluate the in vivo effects of heat on the bioavailability of a drug delivered from a TDS. The study results have demonstrated that the BA of nicotine characterized by the IVPT studies correlated with and was predictive of the in vivo BA of nicotine from the respective TDS, evaluated under the matched study designs and conditions. The comparisons of single parameters such as steady-state concentration, heat-induced increase in partial AUCs and post-treatment residual content of nicotine in TDS from the in vitro and in vivo data sets showed no significant differences (p≥0.05). In addition, a good point-to-point IVIVC (Level A correlation) for the entire study duration was achieved by predicting in vivo concentrations of nicotine using two approaches: Approach I requiring only an in vitro data set and Approach II involving deconvolution and convolution steps. The results of our work suggest that a well designed IVPT study with adequate controls can be a useful tool to evaluate the relative effects of heat on the BA of nicotine from TDS with different formulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human in-vivo bioassay for the tissue-specific measurement of nociceptive and inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Martin S; Tingle, Martha; Schmelz, Martin; Carvalho, Brendan; Yeomans, David C

    2008-12-01

    This in-vivo human bioassay can be used to study human volunteers and patients. Samples are collected from pertinent tissue sites such as the skin via aseptically inserted microdialysis catheters (Dermal Dialysis, Erlangen, Germany). Illustrated in this example is the collection of interstitial fluid from experimentally inflamed skin in human volunteers. Sample collection can be combined with other experimental tests. For example, the simultaneous assessment of locally released biochemicals and subjective sensitivity to painful stimuli in experimentally inflamed skin provides the critical biochemical-behavioral link to identify biomarkers of pain and inflammation. Presented assay in the living human organism allows for mechanistic insight into tissue-specific processes underlying pain and/or inflammation. The method is also well suited to examine the effectiveness of existing or novel interventions--such as new drug candidates - targeting the treatment of painful and/or inflammatory conditions. This article will provide a detailed description on the use of microdialysis techniques for collecting interstitial fluid from experimentally inflamed skin lesion of human study subjects. Interstitial fluid samples are typically processed with aid of multiplex bead array immunoassays allowing assaying up to 100 analytes in samples as small in volume as 50 microliters.

  5. Biological evaluation of human hair keratin scaffolds for skin wound repair and regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Songmei; Sang, Lin [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhang, Yaping [Engineering Research Center of Biomass Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Wang, Xiaoliang [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Li, Xudong, E-mail: xli20004@yahoo.com [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2013-03-01

    The cytocompatibility, in vivo biodegradation and wound healing of keratin biomaterials were investigated. For the purposes, three groups of keratin scaffolds were fabricated by freeze-drying reduced solutions at 2 wt.%, 4 wt.% and 8 wt.% keratins extracted from human hairs. These scaffolds exhibited evenly distributed high porous structures with pore size of 120-220 {mu}m and the porosity > 90%. NIH3T3 cells proliferated well on these scaffolds in culture lasting up to 22 days. Confocal micrographs stained with AO visually revealed cell attachment and infiltration as well as scaffold architectural stability. In vivo animal experiments were conducted with 4 wt.% keratin scaffolds. Early degradation of subcutaneously implanted scaffolds occurred at 3 weeks in the outermost surface, in concomitant with inflammatory response. At 5 weeks, the overall porous structure of scaffolds severely deteriorated while the early inflammatory response in the outermost surface obviously subsided. A faster keratin biodegradation was observed in repairing full-thickness skin defects. Compared with the blank control, keratin scaffolds gave rise to more blood vessels at 2 weeks and better complete wound repair at 3 weeks with a thicker epidermis, less contraction and newly formed hair follicles. These preliminary results suggest that human hair keratin scaffolds are promising dermal substitutes for skin regeneration. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preparation of highly-interconnected human hair keratin scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-term cell culturing and in vivo animal experiments with keratin scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biodegradation is dependent on implantation site and function Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early vascularization and better repair in treating full-thickness skin wounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A thicker epidermis, less contraction and newly formed hair follicles are observed.

  6. The in vivo developmental potential of porcine skin-derived progenitors and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming-Tao; Yang, Xiaoyu; Lee, Kiho; Mao, Jiude; Teson, Jennifer M; Whitworth, Kristin M; Samuel, Melissa S; Spate, Lee D; Murphy, Clifton N; Prather, Randall S

    2012-09-20

    Multipotent skin-derived progenitors (SKPs) can be traced back to embryonic neural crest cells and are able to differentiate into both neural and mesodermal progeny in vitro. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are capable of self-renewing and can contribute to neuron and glia in the nervous system. Recently, we derived porcine SKPs and NSCs from the same enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgenic fetuses and demonstrated that SKPs could contribute to neural and mesodermal lineages in vivo. However, it remains unclear whether porcine SKPs and NSCs can generate ectoderm and mesoderm lineages or other germ layers in vivo. Embryonic chimeras are a well-established tool for investigating cell lineage determination and cell potency through normal embryonic development. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo developmental potential of porcine SKPs and fetal brain-derived NSCs by chimera production. Porcine SKPs, NSCs, and fibroblasts were injected into precompact in vitro fertilized embryos (IVF) and then transferred into corresponding surrogates 24 h postinjection. We found that porcine SKPs could incorporate into the early embryos and contribute to various somatic tissues of the 3 germ layers in postnatal chimera, and especially have an endodermal potency. However, this developmental potential is compromised when they differentiate into fibroblasts. In addition, porcine NSCs fail to incorporate into host embryos and contribute to chimeric piglets. Therefore, neural crest-derived SKPs may represent a more primitive state than their counterpart neural stem cells in terms of their contributions to multiple cell lineages.

  7. Towards label-free evaluation of oxidative stress in human skin exposed to sun filters (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseiran, Sam; Wang, Hequn; Suita, Yusuke; Roider, Elisabeth; Fisher, David E.; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-02-01

    Skin cancer, including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma, is the most common form of cancer in North America. Paradoxically, skin cancer incidence is steadily on the rise even despite the growing use of sunscreens over the past decades. One potential explanation for this discrepancy involves the sun filters in sunscreen, which are responsible for blocking harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is proposed that these agents may produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the site of application, thereby generating oxidative stress in skin that gives rise to genetic mutations, which may explain the rising incidence of skin cancer. To test this hypothesis, ex vivo human skin was treated with five common chemical sun filters (avobenzone, octocrylene, homosalate, octisalate, and oxybenzone) as well as two physical sun filters (zinc oxide compounds), both with and without UV irradiation. To non-invasively evaluate oxidative stress, two-photon excitation fluorescence (2PEF) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of the skin samples were used to monitor levels of NADH and FAD, two key cofactors in cellular redox metabolism. The relative redox state of the skin was assessed based on the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of these endogenous cofactors. While the sun filters were indeed shown to have a protective effect from UV radiation, it was observed that they also generate oxidative stress in skin, even in the absence of UV light. These results suggest that sun filter induced ROS production requires more careful study, especially in how these reactive species impact the rise of skin cancer.

  8. Selective susceptibility of human skin antigen presenting cells to productive dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cerny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a growing global concern with 390 million people infected each year. Dengue virus (DENV is transmitted by mosquitoes, thus host cells in the skin are the first point of contact with the virus. Human skin contains several populations of antigen-presenting cells which could drive the immune response to DENV in vivo: epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs, three populations of dermal dendritic cells (DCs, and macrophages. Using samples of normal human skin we detected productive infection of CD14(+ and CD1c(+ DCs, LCs and dermal macrophages, which was independent of DC-SIGN expression. LCs produced the highest viral titers and were less sensitive to IFN-β. Nanostring gene expression data showed significant up-regulation of IFN-β, STAT-1 and CCL5 upon viral exposure in susceptible DC populations. In mice infected intra-dermally with DENV we detected parallel populations of infected DCs originating from the dermis and migrating to the skin-draining lymph nodes. Therefore dermal DCs may simultaneously facilitate systemic spread of DENV and initiate the adaptive anti-viral immune response.

  9. Optical clearing of human skin for the enhancement of optical imaging of proximal interphalangeal joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, Ekaterina A.; Kolesnikov, Aleksandr S.; Zabarylo, Urszula; Minet, Olaf; Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2014-01-01

    We are proposing a new method for enhancement of optical imaging of proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints in humans at skin using optical clearing technique. A set of illuminating laser diodes with the wavelengths 670, 820, and 904 nm were used as a light source. The laser diodes, monochromatic digital CCD camera and specific software allowed for detection of the finger joint image in a transillumination mode. The experiments were carried out in vivo with human fingers. Dehydrated glycerol and hand cream with urea (5%) were used as optical clearing agents (OCAs). The contrast of the obtained images was analyzed to determine the effect of the OCA. It was found that glycerol application to the human skin during 60 min caused the decrease of contrast in 1.4 folds for 670 nm and the increase of contrast in 1.5 and 1.7 folds for 820 nm and 904 nm, respectively. At the same time, the hand cream application to the human skin during 60 min caused the decrease of contrast in 1.1 folds for 670 nm and the increase of contrast in 1.3 and 1.1 folds for 820 nm and 904 nm, respectively. The results have shown that glycerol and the hand cream with 5% urea allow for obtaining of more distinct image of finger joint in the NIR. Obtained data can be used for development of optical diagnostic methods of rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. NEW BIOKERATOPROSTHETIC COMPLEX BASED ON MODIFIED ALLOGENIC DONOR CORNEAS AND CULTURED POSTNATAL HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Borzenok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to develop biokeratoprosthetic complex based on cross-linking modified allogenic donor corneas and cultured postnatal human skin fibroblasts. Cross-linking enhances corneal strength and tole- rance to proteolytic enzymes. Fibroblasts’ proliferation and migration in the intrastromal pocket stimulates fiber syncytium formation and collagen microcarriers integration into the corneal stroma, as well as intercellular ma- trix formation around the prosthetic metallic plate as early as the cocultivation stage. A new biokeratoprosthetic complex has been successfully developed for further in vivo studies. 

  11. Mechanical properties of the human Achilles tendon, in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Nielsen, C H; Hegnsvad, S

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography has been widely applied for in vivo measurements of tendon mechanical properties. Assessments of human Achilles tendon mechanical properties have received great interest. Achilles tendon injuries predominantly occur in the tendon region between the Achilles-soleus myotendinous...... Achilles tendon in vivo by the use of ultrasonography and 2) assess the between-day reproducibility of these measurements....

  12. Antibacterial Evaluation of Synthetic Thiazole Compounds In Vitro and In Vivo in a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Skin Infection Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Haroon; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including strains resistant to current antibiotics, has contributed to an increase in the number of skin infections reported in humans in recent years. New therapeutic options are needed to counter this public health challenge. The aim of the present study was to examine the potential of thiazole compounds synthesized by our research group to be used topically to treat MRSA skin and wound infections. The broth microdilution method confirmed that the lead thiazole compound and four analogues are capable of inhibiting MRSA growth at concentrations as low as 1.3 μg/mL. Additionally, three compounds exhibited a synergistic relationship when combined with the topical antibiotic mupirocin against MRSA in vitro via the checkerboard assay. Thus the thiazole compounds have potential to be used alone or in combination with mupirocin against MRSA. When tested against human keratinocytes, four derivatives of the lead compound demonstrated an improved toxicity profile (were found to be non-toxic up to a concentration of 20 μg/mL). Utilizing a murine skin infection model, we confirmed that the lead compound and three analogues exhibited potent antimicrobial activity in vivo, with similar capability as the antibiotic mupirocin, as they reduced the burden of MRSA present in skin wounds by more than 90%. Taken altogether, the present study provides important evidence that these thiazole compounds warrant further investigation for development as novel topical antimicrobials to treat MRSA skin infections. PMID:26536129

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity of Punica granatum L. (Pomegranate) rind extracts applied topically to ex vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, David M J; Bugert, Joachim; Denyer, Stephen P; Heard, Charles M

    2017-03-01

    Coadministered pomegranate rind extract (PRE) and zinc (II) produces a potent virucidal activity against Herpes simplex virus (HSV); however, HSV infections are also associated with localised inflammation and pain. Here, the objective was to determine the anti-inflammatory activity and relative depth penetration of PRE, total pomegranate tannins (TPT) and zinc (II) in skin, ex vivo. PRE, TPT and ZnSO 4 were dosed onto freshly excised ex vivo porcine skin mounted in Franz diffusion cells and analysed for COX-2, as a marker for modulation of the arachidonic acid inflammation pathway, by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Tape stripping was carried out to construct relative depth profiles. Topical application of PRE to ex vivo skin downregulated expression of COX-2, which was significant after just 6h, and maintained for up to 24h. This was achieved with intact stratum corneum, proving that punicalagin penetrated skin, further supported by the depth profiling data. When PRE and ZnSO 4 were applied together, statistically equal downregulation of COX-2 was observed when compared to the application of PRE alone; no effect followed the application of ZnSO 4 alone. TPT downregulated COX-2 less than PRE, indicating that tannins alone may not be entirely responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of PRE. Punicalagin was found throughout the skin, in particular the lower regions, indicating appendageal delivery as a significant route to the viable epidermis. Topical application of TPT and PRE had significant anti-inflammatory effects in ex vivo skin, confirming that PRE penetrates the skin and modulates COX-2 regulation in the viable epidermis. Pomegranates have potential as a novel approach in ameliorating the inflammation and pain associated with a range of skin conditions, including cold sores and herpetic stromal keratitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a combined OCT-Raman probe for the prospective in vivo clinical melanoma skin cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurenka, M.; Behrendt, L.; Meinhardt-Wollweber, M.; Morgner, U.; Roth, B.

    2017-10-01

    A combined optical coherence tomography (OCT)-Raman probe was designed and built into a spectral domain OCT head, and its performance was evaluated and compared to the most common Raman probe setups, based on a fiber bundle and confocal free space optics. Due to the use of the full field of view of an OCT scanning lens, the combined probe has a superior performance within maximum permissible exposure limits, compared to the other two probes. Skin Raman spectra, recorded in vivo, further prove the feasibility of the OCT-Raman probe for the future in vivo clinical applications in skin cancer screening.

  15. Development of a combined OCT-Raman probe for the prospective in vivo clinical melanoma skin cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurenka, M; Behrendt, L; Meinhardt-Wollweber, M; Morgner, U; Roth, B

    2017-10-01

    A combined optical coherence tomography (OCT)-Raman probe was designed and built into a spectral domain OCT head, and its performance was evaluated and compared to the most common Raman probe setups, based on a fiber bundle and confocal free space optics. Due to the use of the full field of view of an OCT scanning lens, the combined probe has a superior performance within maximum permissible exposure limits, compared to the other two probes. Skin Raman spectra, recorded in vivo, further prove the feasibility of the OCT-Raman probe for the future in vivo clinical applications in skin cancer screening.

  16. Visible skin condition and perception of human facial appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, N; Fink, B; Matts, P J

    2010-06-01

    Evolutionary psychology suggests that certain human beauty standards have evolved to provide reliable cues of fertility and health. Hence, preferences for some physical characteristics of the face and body are thought to reflect adaptations for the promotion of mate choice. Studies that have investigated facial attractiveness have concentrated mainly on features such as symmetry, averageness and sex-typical traits, which are developed under the influence of sex steroids. Few studies, however, have addressed the effect of human skin condition on perception of facial appearance in this context, and possible implications for sexual selection. There is now accumulating evidence that skin pigmentation and skin surface topography cues, particularly in women, have a significant influence on attractiveness judgements, as they seem primarily to signal aspects of age and health. This article (i) reviews briefly some of the main determinants of visible skin condition, (ii) presents recent evidence on its signalling value in face perception and (iii) suggests areas for future research with reference to an evolutionary psychology framework.

  17. Clinical studies of pigmented lesions in human skin by using a multiphoton tomograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Mihaela; Kelly, Kristen M.; Zachary, Christopher B.; Harris, Ronald M.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; König, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-02-01

    In vivo imaging of pigmented lesions in human skin was performed with a clinical multiphoton microscopy (MPM)-based tomograph (MPTflex, JenLab, Germany). Two-photon excited fluorescence was used for visualizing endogenous fluorophores such as NADH/FAD, keratin, melanin in the epidermal cells and elastin fibers in the dermis. Collagen fibers were imaged by second harmonic generation. Our study involved in vivo imaging of benign melanocytic nevi, atypical nevi and melanoma. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify in vivo the characteristic features and their frequency in pigmented lesions at different stages (benign, atypical and malignant) and to evaluate the ability of in vivo MPM to distinguish atypical nevi from melanoma. Comparison with histopathology was performed for the biopsied lesions. Benign melanocytic nevi were characterized by the presence of nevus cell nests at the epidermal-dermal junction. In atypical nevi, features such as lentiginous hyperplasia, acanthosis and architectural disorder were imaged. Cytological atypia was present in all the melanoma lesions imaged, showing the strongest correlation with malignancy. The MPM images demonstrated very good correlation with corresponding histological images, suggesting that MPM could be a promising tool for in vivo non-invasive pigmented lesion diagnosis, particularly distinguishing atypical nevi from melanoma.

  18. A novel ATX-S10(Na) photodynamic therapy for human skin tumors and benign hyperproliferative skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Susumu; Sakata, Isao; Iizuka, Hajime

    2004-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment for various skin tumors and other skin diseases. We investigated the potential therapeutic effects of PDT using ATX-S10(Na) ointment and a diode laser in mouse skin models of experimental skin tumors as well as transplanted human samples of superficial skin tumors and lesional psoriatic skin. ATX-S10(Na) ointment (1% w/v) was introduced into tape-stripped mouse skin, transplanted squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) samples and human skin diseases after topical application, then PDT was performed. ATX-S10(Na) ointment (1% w/v) was introduced effectively into tape-stripped mouse skin and transplanted SCC samples after topical application, but was not detected after 48 h, as assessed by fluorescence microscopy. PDT, using 1% ATX-S10(Na) ointment and diode laser (50 J/cm(2)), was found to decrease epidermal thickness in 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-treated mouse skin by 6 days. PDT with 1% ATX-S10(Na) ointment and diode laser (150 J/cm(2)) was also effective for transplanted SCC, and tumors were eliminated by 6 weeks. PDT against Bowen disease, basal-cell carcinoma, and psoriasis xenografts onto SCID mice also showed marked suppression of tumor growth and cell proliferation, respectively. Our results indicate that ATX-S10(Na)-PDT is an effective treatment for various skin tumors and psoriasis in experimental mouse models.

  19. Inhibition of skin carcinogenesis in vivo by caffeine and other agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdela, F; Latarjet, R

    1978-12-01

    The induction of skin cancer in mice of the Swiss (Carshalton) strain, by repeated irradiation with UV-light, was strikingly reduced by the local application of caffeine prior to each exposure. Theophylline displayed the same activity. These two substances have been selected as probable inhibitors of error-prone, postreplicative DNA repair. Conversely, reductone and chloroquine, which are considered as inhibitors of the error-free, prereplicative excision repair, did not modify the incidence of the tumors. Special emphasis has been given to the histologic behavior of radiolabeled caffeine in the normal and UV-irradiated epidermis of the mouse in vivo and to the ability of mouse epidermal cells in vitro to repair DNA after UV irradiation.

  20. On skin expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Djenane C; Velloso, Raquel Q; Radwanski, Henrique N

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses skin expansion without considering cellular growth of the skin. An in vivo analysis was carried out that involved expansion at three different sites on one patient, allowing for the observation of the relaxation process. Those measurements were used to characterize the human skin of the thorax during the surgical process of skin expansion. A comparison between the in vivo results and the numerical finite elements model of the expansion was used to identify the material elastic parameters of the skin of the thorax of that patient. Delfino's constitutive equation was chosen to model the in vivo results. The skin is considered to be an isotropic, homogeneous, hyperelastic, and incompressible membrane. When the skin is extended, such as with expanders, the collagen fibers are also extended and cause stiffening in the skin, which results in increasing resistance to expansion or further stretching. We observed this phenomenon as an increase in the parameters as subsequent expansions continued. The number and shape of the skin expanders used in expansions were also studied, both mathematically and experimentally. The choice of the site where the expansion should be performed is discussed to enlighten problems that can lead to frustrated skin expansions. These results are very encouraging and provide insight into our understanding of the behavior of stretched skin by expansion. To our knowledge, this study has provided results that considerably improve our understanding of the behavior of human skin under expansion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Microemulsion system for topical delivery of thai mango seed kernel extract: development, physicochemical characterisation and ex vivo skin permeation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanpolchareanchai, Jiraporn; Padois, Karine; Falson, Françoise; Bavovada, Rapepol; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan

    2014-10-24

    A microemulsion system containing Thai mango seed kernel extract (MSKE, cultivar "Fahlun") was developed and characterised for the purpose of topical skin delivery. The MSKE-loaded microemulsions were prepared by using the spontaneous emulsification method. Isopropyl myristate (IPM) was selected as the oil phase. A polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate and sorbitan monododecanoate (1:1, w/w) system was used as the surfactant phase; an aqueous mixture of different cosurfactants (absolute ethanol, 96.3% v/v ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol or 1,2-propanediol) at a weight ratio of 1:1 was used as the aqueous phase. Among the cosurfactants studied, the 1-propanol aqueous mixture had the largest microemulsion region (48.93%) in the pseudo-ternary phase diagram. Microemulsions containing 1% MSKE demonstrated good physicochemical stability during a six-month study period at 25 ± 2 °C/60% ± 5% RH. The ex vivo skin permeation study demonstrated that the microemulsions exhibited a potent skin enhancement effect allowing MSKE to penetrate skin layers up to 60-fold higher compared with the control. Neither skin irritation nor skin corrosion was observed in ex vivo studies. The present study revealed that IPM-based microemulsion systems may be promising carriers to enhance skin penetration and delivering MSKE for topical treatment.

  2. Microemulsion System for Topical Delivery of Thai Mango Seed Kernel Extract: Development, Physicochemical Characterisation and Ex Vivo Skin Permeation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiraporn Leanpolchareanchai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A microemulsion system containing Thai mango seed kernel extract (MSKE, cultivar “Fahlun” was developed and characterised for the purpose of topical skin delivery. The MSKE-loaded microemulsions were prepared by using the spontaneous emulsification method. Isopropyl myristate (IPM was selected as the oil phase. A polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate and sorbitan monododecanoate (1:1, w/w system was used as the surfactant phase; an aqueous mixture of different cosurfactants (absolute ethanol, 96.3% v/v ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol or 1,2-propanediol at a weight ratio of 1:1 was used as the aqueous phase. Among the cosurfactants studied, the 1-propanol aqueous mixture had the largest microemulsion region (48.93% in the pseudo-ternary phase diagram. Microemulsions containing 1% MSKE demonstrated good physicochemical stability during a six-month study period at 25 ± 2 °C/60% ± 5% RH. The ex vivo skin permeation study demonstrated that the microemulsions exhibited a potent skin enhancement effect allowing MSKE to penetrate skin layers up to 60-fold higher compared with the control. Neither skin irritation nor skin corrosion was observed in ex vivo studies. The present study revealed that IPM-based microemulsion systems may be promising carriers to enhance skin penetration and delivering MSKE for topical treatment.

  3. Electrode-Skin contact impedance: In vivo measurements on an ovine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Kosobrodov, R.; Barry, M. A.; Chik, W.; Jin, C.; Oh, T. I.; Thiagalingam, A.; McEwan, A.

    2013-04-01

    The problem of electrical impedance between the skin and the electrode is an on-going challenge in bio-electronics. This is particularly true in the case of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), which uses a large number of skin-contact electrodes and is very sensitive to noise. In the present article, contact impedance is measured and compared for a range of electrodes placed on the thorax of an ovine model. The study has been approved by the Westmead Hospital Animal Ethics Committee. The electrode models that were employed in the research are Ag/AgCl electrodes (E1), commonly used for ECG and EIT measurements in both humans and animal models, stainless steel crocodile clips (E2), typically used on animal models, and novel multi-point dry electrodes in two modifications: bronze plated (E3) and nickel plated (E4). Further, since the contact impedance is mostly attributed to the acellular outer layer of the skin, in our experiment, we attempted to study the effect of this layer by comparing the results when the skin is intact and when electrodes are introduced underneath the skin through small cuts. This boundary effect was assessed by comparison of measurements obtained during E2 skin surface contact, and sub-cutaneous contact (E5). Twelve gauge intradermal needles were also tested as an electrode (E6). The full impedance spectrum, from 500 Hz to 300 kHz, was recorded, analysed and compared. As expected, the contact impedance in the more invasive cases, i.e the electrodes under the skin, is significantly lower than in the non-invasive cases. At the frequency of 50 kHz which is commonly used in lung EIT acquisition, electrodes E3, E4 and E6 demonstrated contact impedance of less than 200 Ω, compared to more than 400 Ω measured for electrodes E1, E2 and E5. In conclusion, the novel multipoint electrodes proved to be best suited for EIT purposes, because they are non-invasive and have lower contact impedance than Ag/AgCl and crocodile clips, in both invasive and

  4. Study of the epidermis ablation effect on the efficiency of optical clearing of skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genina, E. A.; Ksenofontova, N. S.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Terentyuk, G. S.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2017-06-01

    We present the results of a comparative analysis of optical immersion clearing of skin in laboratory animals in vivo with and without preliminary ablation of epidermis. Laser ablation is implemented using a setup based on a pulsed erbium laser (λ = 2940 nm). The size of the damaged region amounted to 6 × 6 mm, the depth being smaller than 50 μm. As an optical clearing agent (OCA), use is made of polyethylene glycol (PEG-300). Based on optical coherence tomography, we use the single scattering model to estimate the scattering coefficient in the process of optical clearing in 2 regions at depths of 50-170 μm and 150-400 μm. The results show that skin surface ablation leads to the local oedema of the affected region that increases the scattering coefficient. However, the intense evaporation of water from the ablation zone facilitates the optical clearing at the expense of tissue dehydration, particularly in the upper layers. The assessment of the optical clearing efficiency shows that the efficiency exceeding 30% can be achieved at a depth from 50 to 170 μm in 120 min after ablation, as well as after the same ablation with subsequent application of PEG-300, which increases the efficiency of the immersion method by almost 1.8 times. At a depth from 150 to 400 μm, dehydration of upper layers cannot completely compensate for an increase in light scattering by dermis after epidermis ablation. The additional effect of OCA enhances the optical clearing of skin at the expense of improving the refractive index matching between dermis components, but the maximal efficiency of optical clearing in 120 min does not exceed 6%.

  5. Extracellular depolymerization of hyaluronic acid in cultured human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T.; Takagaki, K.; Kubo, K.; Morikawa, A.; Tamura, S.; Endo, M. (Hirosaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-10-15

    The chain length of ({sup 3}H)hyaluronic acid synthesized by cultivating human skin fibroblasts in the presence of ({sup 3}H)glucosamine was investigated. ({sup 3}H)Hyaluronic acid obtained from the matrix fraction was excluded from a Sepharose CL-2B column irrespective of the incubation period, whereas that from the medium was depolymerized into a constant chain length (Mr = 40,000). The reducing and non-reducing terminals of the depolymerized hyaluronic acid were N-acetylglucosamine and glucuronic acid, respectively. Prolonged incubation produced no oligosaccharides as shown by examination of hyaluronidase digests, suggesting the presence of a novel endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

  6. Hair follicle reformation induced by dermal papilla cells from human scalp skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Tang-You; Lu, Yuan-Gang; Liu, Rong-Qing; Mai, Yue; Cheng, Bo; Lu, Zhong-Fa; Zhong, Bai-Yu; Tang, Shu-Qian

    2006-09-01

    To investigate the possibility of hair follicle reformation induced by dermal papilla cells in vivo and in vitro. Dermal papilla cells, dermal sheath cells obtained from human scalp skin by enzyme digestion were mixed with collagen to form mesenchymal cell-populated collagen gels. Superior and inferior epithelial cells and bulb matrical cells were then cultured on these gels by organotypic culture to recombine bilayer artificial skins. Dermal papilla cells and outer root sheath keratinocytes were mingled together and transplanted under subcutaneous tissue of the dorsal skin of nude mice. The results of histologic examination was observed with HE stain. These recombinants by organotypic culture all reformed bilayer structure like nature skin. Hair follicle-like structure reformation was found in dermal sheath cell-populated collagen gel when combined with superior or inferior epithelial cells. Dermal papilla cells also induced superior and inferior epithelial cells to form hair follicle on nude mice. Low passage dermal papilla cells mixed with hair follicle epithelial cells reformed many typical hair follicle structures and produced hair fibres after transplantation on nude mice. The dermal part of hair follicle, such as dermal papilla cells and dermal sheath cells, has the ability to induce hair follicle formation by interaction with the epithelial cells of hair follicle.

  7. Nanocomposite-strengthened dissolving microneedles for improved transdermal delivery to human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Raphael, Anthony P; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Wang, Beilei; Chen, Wei; Tang, Tao; Deng, Yan; Sant, Himanshu J; Zhu, Guangyu; Choy, Kwong Wai; Gale, Bruce K; Prow, Tarl W; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-04-01

    Delivery of drugs and biomolecules into skin has significant advantages. To achieve this, herein, a nanomaterial-strengthened dissolving microneedle patch for transdermal delivery is reported. The patch comprises thousands of microneedles, which are composed of dissolving polymers, nanomaterials, and drug/biomolecules in their interior. With the addition of nanomaterials, the mechanical property of generally weak dissolving polymers can be dramatically improved without sacrificing dissolution rate within skin. In this experiments, layered double hydroxides (LDH) nanoparticles are incorporated into sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to form a nanocomposite. The results show that, by adding 5 wt% of LDH nanoparticles into CMC, the mechanical strength significantly increased. Small and densely packed CMC-LDH microneedles penetrate human and pig skin more reliably than pure CMC ones and attractively the nanocomposite-strengthened microneedles dissolve in skin and release payload within only 1 min. Finally, the application of using the nanocomposite-strengthened microneedle arrays is tested for in vivo vaccine delivery and the results show that significantly stronger antibody response could be induced when compared with subcutaneous injection. These data suggest that nanomaterials could be useful for fabricating densely packed and small polymer microneedles that have robust mechanical properties and rapid dissolution rates and therefore potential use in clinical applications. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. In silico vs. in vivo human intestinal permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, N M; Najib, N

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research is to calculate human intestinal permeability in silico and correlate results with those measured in vivo. Optimized human intestinal permeability values were calculated for 16 drugs by de-convolution of human plasma profiles using Parameter Estimation module of SimCYP program V13. Results showed high in silico-in vivo correlation coefficient of 0.89 for drugs with high/low permeability values. In silico permeability, if properly optimized, can be used as surrogate for in vivo permeability for BCS class I drugs and hence is suggested that such methodology could be employed as a support for waiver of in vivo studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Safety aspects of atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet operation on skin: In vivo study on mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Spela; Blagus, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Filipic, Gregor; Sersa, Gregor; Cvelbar, Uros

    2017-01-01

    Biomedical applications of plasma require its efficacy for specific purposes and equally importantly its safety. Herein the safety aspects of cold plasma created with simple atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced with helium gas and electrode discharge are evaluated in skin damage on mouse, at different duration of exposure and gas flow rates. The extent of skin damage and treatments are systematically evaluated using stereomicroscope, labelling with fluorescent dyes, histology, infrared imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. The analyses reveal early and late skin damages as a consequence of plasma treatment, and are attributed to direct and indirect effects of plasma. The results indicate that direct skin damage progresses with longer treatment time and increasing gas flow rates which reflect changes in plasma properties. With increasing flow rates, the temperature on treated skin grows and the RONS formation rises. The direct effects were plasma treatment dependent, whereas the disclosed late-secondary effects were more independent on discharge parameters and related to diffusion of RONS species. Thermal effects and skin heating are related to plasma-coupling properties and are separated from the effects of other RONS. It is demonstrated that cumulative topical treatment with helium plasma jet could lead to skin damage. How these damages can be mitigated is discussed in order to provide guidance, when using atmospheric pressure plasma jets for skin treatments.

  10. Differential susceptibility of primary cultured human skin cells to hypericin PDT in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, A; Wiggins, T; Davids, L M

    2015-08-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence rate in South Africa is increasing. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective treatment modality, through topical administration, for treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers. Our group investigates hypericin-induced PDT (HYP-PDT) for the treatment of both non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. However, a prerequisite for effective cancer treatments is efficient and selective targeting of the tumoral cells with minimal collateral damage to the surrounding normal cells, as it is well established that cancer therapies have bystander effects on normal cells in the body, often causing undesirable side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular and molecular effects of HYP-PDT on normal primary human keratinocytes (Kc), melanocytes (Mc) and fibroblasts (Fb) in an in vitro tissue culture model which represented both the epidermal and dermal cellular compartments of human skin. Cell viability analysis revealed a differential cytotoxic response to a range of HYP-PDT doses in all the human skin cell types, showing that Fb (LD50=1.75μM) were the most susceptible to HYP-PDT, followed by Mc (LD50=3.5μM) and Kc (LD50>4μM HYP-PDT) These results correlated with the morphological analysis which displayed distinct morphological changes in Fb and Mc, 24h post treatment with non-lethal (1μM) and lethal (3μM) doses of HYP-PDT, but the highest HYP-PDT doses had no effect on Kc morphology. Fluorescent microscopy displayed cytoplasmic localization of HYP in all the 3 skin cell types and additionally, HYP was excluded from the nuclei in all the cell types. Intracellular ROS levels measured in Fb at 3μM HYP-PDT, displayed a significant 3.8 fold (pPDT. These results depict a differential response to HYP-PDT by different human skin cells thus highlighting the efficacy and indeed, the potential bystander effect of if administered in vivo. This study contributes toward our knowledge

  11. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capelle, Lisa [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc [Division of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Amanie, John [Division of Statistics and Epidemiology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Abdulkarim, Bassam, E-mail: bassam.abdulkarim@mcgill.ca [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin{sub V50} (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin{sub V40} and skin{sub V30} (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients

  12. A micromechanical comparison of human and porcine skin before and after preservation by freezing for medical device development

    OpenAIRE

    Ranamukhaarachchi, S. A.; Lehnert, S.; Ranamukhaarachchi, S. L.; Sprenger, L.; Schneider, T.; Mansoor, I.; Rai, K.; H?feli, U. O.; Stoeber, B.

    2016-01-01

    Collecting human skin samples for medical research, including developing microneedle-based medical devices, is challenging and time-consuming. Researchers rely on human skin substitutes and skin preservation techniques, such as freezing, to overcome the lack of skin availability. Porcine skin is considered the best substitute to human skin, but their mechanical resemblance has not been fully validated. We provide a direct mechanical comparison between human and porcine skin samples using a co...

  13. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of topical formulations containing physiological lipid mixture for replacement of skin barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, C; Parra, J L; Coderch, L; Semenzato, A

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to describe a new in vivo and in vitro approach of the efficacy evaluation of cosmetic emollients to better understand the link between the formulation and the activity of cosmetic products. Two long term in vivo studies were carried out on nine healthy Caucasian volunteers mean age 40±12 years to evaluate the protecting and repairing effects of the two different barrier repair cosmetic formulations. The application of the formulations was repeated once a day during 7 days and biophysical parameters (TEWL and Skin Hydration) were measured before and after Sodium laureth sulphate exposure The in vitro study was carried out by freeze substitution transmission electron microscopy (FSTEM) on stratum corneum samples obtained by sections of fresh skin from young pigs, depleted with a solvent mixture and treated with the two products The in vivo results demonstrated that daily product application provided a reinforcement of the skin barrier with protecting and repairing effects from chemical injuries the extent of which was dependent on the formulation features (product A>product B) The role of the technical form on the lipid availability was confirmed by the in vitro evaluation tests. The results point out that a daily application of physiological lipid mixture containing emulsion can protect healthy skin and promote the reparing effect on unpaired barrier skin, reducing TEWL and maintaining hydration of the stratum corneum. The efficacy degree is higher when the cosmetic form promotes the availability of active ingredients increasing the product performance.

  14. A bioactive peptide analogue for myxoma virus protein with a targeted cytotoxicity for human skin cancer in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansour, Nahlah M; Pirogova, Elena; Coloe, Peter J; Cosic, Irena; Istivan, Taghrid S

    2012-07-17

    Cancer is an international health problem, and the search for effective treatments is still in progress. Peptide therapy is focused on the development of short peptides with strong tumoricidal activity and low toxicity. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a myxoma virus peptide analogue (RRM-MV) as a candidate for skin cancer therapy. RRM-MV was designed using the Resonant Recognition Model (RRM) and its effect was examined on human skin cancer and normal human skin cells in vitro. Cell cultures were treated with various concentrations of the peptides at different incubation intervals. Cellular morphological changes (apoptosis and necrosis) were evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The cytotoxic effects of RRM-MV on human skin cancer and normal human skin cells were quantitatively determined by cytotoxicity and cell viability assays. The effect on human erythrocytes was also determined using quantitative hemolysis assay. DNA fragmentation assay was performed to detect early apoptotic events in treated cancer cells. Furthermore, to investigate the possible cell signalling pathway targeted by the peptides treatment, the levels of p-Akt expression in skin cancer and normal cells were detected by immunoblotting. Our results indicate that RRM-MV has a dose-dependent toxic effect on cancer cells only up to 18 h. The immunoblotting results indicated that the RRM-MV slightly increased p-Akt expression in melanoma and carcinoma cells, but did not seem to affect p-Akt expression in normal skin cells. RRM-MV targets and lethally harms cancer cells and leaves normal cells unharmed. It is able to reduce the cancer cell viability, disrupting the LDH activity in cancer cells and can significantly affect cancer progression. Further investigation into other cell signalling pathways is needed in the process leading to the in vivo testing of this peptide to prove its safety as a possible effective treatment for skin cancer.

  15. A bioactive peptide analogue for myxoma virus protein with a targeted cytotoxicity for human skin cancer in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almansour Nahlah M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is an international health problem, and the search for effective treatments is still in progress. Peptide therapy is focused on the development of short peptides with strong tumoricidal activity and low toxicity. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a myxoma virus peptide analogue (RRM-MV as a candidate for skin cancer therapy. RRM-MV was designed using the Resonant Recognition Model (RRM and its effect was examined on human skin cancer and normal human skin cells in vitro. Methods Cell cultures were treated with various concentrations of the peptides at different incubation intervals. Cellular morphological changes (apoptosis and necrosis were evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The cytotoxic effects of RRM-MV on human skin cancer and normal human skin cells were quantitatively determined by cytotoxicity and cell viability assays. The effect on human erythrocytes was also determined using quantitative hemolysis assay. DNA fragmentation assay was performed to detect early apoptotic events in treated cancer cells. Furthermore, to investigate the possible cell signalling pathway targeted by the peptides treatment, the levels of p-Akt expression in skin cancer and normal cells were detected by immunoblotting. Results Our results indicate that RRM-MV has a dose-dependent toxic effect on cancer cells only up to 18 h. The immunoblotting results indicated that the RRM-MV slightly increased p-Akt expression in melanoma and carcinoma cells, but did not seem to affect p-Akt expression in normal skin cells. Conclusions RRM-MV targets and lethally harms cancer cells and leaves normal cells unharmed. It is able to reduce the cancer cell viability, disrupting the LDH activity in cancer cells and can significantly affect cancer progression. Further investigation into other cell signalling pathways is needed in the process leading to the in vivo testing of this peptide to prove its safety as a possible

  16. New Enlightenment of Skin Cancer Chemoprevention through Phytochemicals: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies and the Underlying Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhulika; Suman, Shankar; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Skin overexposure to ultraviolet irradiations, chemicals, and several viruses has a capability to cause severe skin-related disorders including immunosuppression and skin cancer. These factors act in sequence at various steps of skin carcinogenesis via initiation, promotion, and/or progression. These days cancer chemoprevention is recognized as the most hopeful and novel approach to prevent, inhibit, or reverse the processes of carcinogenesis by intervention with natural products. Phytochemicals have antioxidant, antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic, and carcinogen detoxification capabilities thereby considered as efficient chemopreventive agents. Considerable efforts have been done to identify the phytochemicals which may possibly act on one or several molecular targets that modulate cellular processes such as inflammation, immunity, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Till date several phytochemicals in the light of chemoprevention have been studied by using suitable skin carcinogenic in vitro and in vivo models and proven as beneficial for prevention of skin cancer. This revision presents a comprehensive knowledge and the main molecular mechanisms of actions of various phytochemicals in the chemoprevention of skin cancer.

  17. New Enlightenment of Skin Cancer Chemoprevention through Phytochemicals: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies and the Underlying Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhulika; Suman, Shankar; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Skin overexposure to ultraviolet irradiations, chemicals, and several viruses has a capability to cause severe skin-related disorders including immunosuppression and skin cancer. These factors act in sequence at various steps of skin carcinogenesis via initiation, promotion, and/or progression. These days cancer chemoprevention is recognized as the most hopeful and novel approach to prevent, inhibit, or reverse the processes of carcinogenesis by intervention with natural products. Phytochemicals have antioxidant, antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic, and carcinogen detoxification capabilities thereby considered as efficient chemopreventive agents. Considerable efforts have been done to identify the phytochemicals which may possibly act on one or several molecular targets that modulate cellular processes such as inflammation, immunity, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Till date several phytochemicals in the light of chemoprevention have been studied by using suitable skin carcinogenic in vitro and in vivo models and proven as beneficial for prevention of skin cancer. This revision presents a comprehensive knowledge and the main molecular mechanisms of actions of various phytochemicals in the chemoprevention of skin cancer. PMID:24757666

  18. New Enlightenment of Skin Cancer Chemoprevention through Phytochemicals: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies and the Underlying Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhulika Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Skin overexposure to ultraviolet irradiations, chemicals, and several viruses has a capability to cause severe skin-related disorders including immunosuppression and skin cancer. These factors act in sequence at various steps of skin carcinogenesis via initiation, promotion, and/or progression. These days cancer chemoprevention is recognized as the most hopeful and novel approach to prevent, inhibit, or reverse the processes of carcinogenesis by intervention with natural products. Phytochemicals have antioxidant, antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic, and carcinogen detoxification capabilities thereby considered as efficient chemopreventive agents. Considerable efforts have been done to identify the phytochemicals which may possibly act on one or several molecular targets that modulate cellular processes such as inflammation, immunity, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Till date several phytochemicals in the light of chemoprevention have been studied by using suitable skin carcinogenic in vitro and in vivo models and proven as beneficial for prevention of skin cancer. This revision presents a comprehensive knowledge and the main molecular mechanisms of actions of various phytochemicals in the chemoprevention of skin cancer.

  19. Enhanced barrier functions and anti-inflammatory effect of cultured coconut extract on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soomin; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jihee; Lee, Young In; Lee, Dong Won; Song, Seung Yong; Lee, Ju Hee

    2017-08-01

    Natural plant oils have been used as a translational alternative to modern medicine. Particularly, virgin coconut oil (VCO) has gained popularity because of its potential benefits in pharmaceutical, nutritional, and cosmetic applications. Cultured coconut extract (CCE) is an alternative end product of VCO, which undergoes a further bacterial fermentation process. This study aimed to investigate the effects of CCE on human skin. We analyzed the expression of skin barrier molecules and collagens after applying CCE on human explanted skin. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of CCE, the expression of inflammatory markers was analyzed after ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. The CCE-treated group showed increased expression of cornified cell envelope components, which contribute to protective barrier functions of the stratum corneum. Further, the expression of inflammatory markers was lower in the CCE-treated group after exposure to UVB radiation. These results suggest an anti-inflammatory effect of CCE against UVB irradiation-induced inflammation. Additionally, the CCE-treated group showed increased collagen and hyaluronan synthase-3 expression. In our study, CCE showed a barrier-enhancing effect and anti-inflammatory properties against ex vivo UVB irradiation-induced inflammation. The promising effect of CCE may be attributed to its high levels of polyphenols and fatty acid components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Scutellaria radix Extract as a Natural UV Protectant for Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Jin Kyung; Kwak, Jun Yup; Choi, Go Woon; An, Sang Mi; Kwak, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Hyeong-Ho; Suh, Hwa-Jin; Boo, Yong Chool

    2016-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces oxidative injury and inflammation in human skin. Scutellaria radix (SR, the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi) contains flavonoids with high UV absorptivity and antioxidant properties. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential use of SR extract as an additive in cosmetic products for UV protection. SR extract and its butanol (BuOH) fraction strongly absorbed UV radiation and displayed free radical scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radials and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radicals. They also attenuated the UV-induced death of HaCaT cells. Sunscreen creams, with or without supplementation of SR extract BuOH fraction, were tested in vivo in human trials to evaluate potential skin irritation and determine the sun protection factor (SPF). Both sunscreen creams induced no skin irritation. A sunscreen cream containing 24% ZnO showed an SPF value of 17.8, and it increased to 22.7 when supplemented with 5% SR extract BuOH fraction. This study suggests that SR-derived materials are useful as safe cosmetic additives that provide UV protection. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The safety of donor skin preserved with glycerol - Evaluating the Euro Skin Bank preservation procedures of human donor skin against the prEN 12442 standard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertsma RE; Wassenaar C; LGM

    2000-01-01

    The procedures for preservation of human donor skin with glycerol, as applied by the Euro Skin Bank (ESB), were evaluated against the prEN 12442 standard: animal tissues and their derivatives used in the manufacture of medical devices. The focus chosen for this review is on risks related to the

  2. In vivo photoacoustic microscopy of human cutaneous microvasculature and a nevus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher P.; Jassim, Omar; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    In several human volunteers, photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has been utilized for noninvasive cutaneous imaging of the skin microvasculature and a melanocytic nevus. Microvascular networks in both acral and nonacral skin were imaged, and multiple features within the skin have been identified, including the stratum corneum, epidermal-dermal junction, and subpapillary vascular plexus. Several vascular and structural differences between acral and nonacral skin were also observed in the photoacoustic images. In addition, a nevus was photoacoustically imaged, excised, and histologically analyzed. The photoacoustic images allowed for in vivo measurement of tumor thickness, depth, and microvasculature-values confirmed by histologic examination. The presented images demonstrate the potential of PAM to aid in the study and evaluation of cutaneous microcirculation and analysis of pigmented lesions. Through its ability to three-dimensionally image the structure and function of the microvasculature and pigmented lesions, PAM can have a clinical impact in diagnosis and assessment of systemic diseases that affect the microvasculature such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, cutaneous malignancies such as melanoma, and potentially other skin disorders.

  3. Hyperspectral imaging for detection of cholesterol in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanič, Matija; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Larsson, Marcus; Marraccini, Paolo; Strömberg, Tomas; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2015-03-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is characterized by high levels of cholesterol in the blood and is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Early detection of hypercholesterolemia is necessary to prevent onset and progress of cardiovascular disease. Optical imaging techniques might have a potential for early diagnosis and monitoring of hypercholesterolemia. In this study, hyperspectral imaging was investigated for this application. The main aim of the study was to identify spectral and spatial characteristics that can aid identification of hypercholesterolemia in facial skin. The first part of the study involved a numerical simulation of human skin affected by hypercholesterolemia. A literature survey was performed to identify characteristic morphological and physiological parameters. Realistic models were prepared and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain hyperspectral images. Based on the simulations optimal wavelength regions for differentiation between normal and cholesterol rich skin were identified. Minimum Noise Fraction transformation (MNF) was used for analysis. In the second part of the study, the simulations were verified by a clinical study involving volunteers with elevated and normal levels of cholesterol. The faces of the volunteers were scanned by a hyperspectral camera covering the spectral range between 400 nm and 720 nm, and characteristic spectral features of the affected skin were identified. Processing of the images was done after conversion to reflectance and masking of the images. The identified features were compared to the known cholesterol levels of the subjects. The results of this study demonstrate that hyperspectral imaging of facial skin can be a promising, rapid modality for detection of hypercholesterolemia.

  4. Changes of human skin in subepidermal wound healing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugata, Keiichi; Kitahara, Takashi; Takema, Yoshinori

    2008-11-01

    The wound healing process involves unexplained mechanisms. An aberration in this process is known to cause dermal disorders such as keloid or hypertrophic scars, but the mechanism by which these scars are formed remains to be elucidated. Here we examined the usefulness of a non-invasive optical imaging device to clarify mechanisms of wound healing and of scar formation. An 8 mm experimental wound was made in the forearms of six subjects by a suction blister method. To observe chronological changes associated with wound healing, horizontal cross-sectional images were non-invasively obtained of the wounded area from the skin surface down to 129 microm below at 21.5 microm intervals using in vivo laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM). The wounds were covered with a new epidermis by week 2, at which time the dermal papilla count decreased while the thickness from the skin surface to the apex of the dermal papilla increased. The count and the thickness returned to the initial levels when the wound was healed. In two out of six subjects, fibrous tissues were observed in the upper dermis, whereas in one other subject, melanocyte-like dendritic cells were observed in the epidermis-dermis border in later phases of wound healing. This non-invasive method using in vivo LCSM revealed chronological changes in the dermis and epidermis during wound healing. In addition, although a scar was not formed in any of study subjects, this microscopy revealed aspects similar to the fibrous tissue overgrowth or to melanocyte migration, both of which may relate to wound healing. These results indicate the usefulness of this non-invasive method in studies of wound healing and of scar formation.

  5. Collagen synthesis in human musculoskeletal tissues and skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babraj, J A; Cuthbertson, D J R; Smith, K

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a direct method for the measurement of human musculoskeletal collagen synthesis on the basis of the incorporation of stable isotope-labeled proline or leucine into protein and have used it to measure the rate of synthesis of collagen in tendon, ligament, muscle, and skin....... In postabsorptive, healthy young men (28 +/- 6 yr) synthetic rates for tendon, ligament, muscle, and skin collagen were 0.046 +/- 0.005, 0.040 +/- 0.006, 0.016 +/- 0.002, and 0.037 +/- 0.003%/h, respectively (means +/- SD). In postabsorptive, healthy elderly men (70 +/- 6 yr) the rate of skeletal muscle collagen...... synthesis is greater than in the young (0.023 +/- 0.002%/h, P collagen are similar to those of mixed skeletal muscle protein in the postabsorptive state, whereas the rate for muscle collagen synthesis is much lower in both young and elderly men...

  6. Dynamic longitudinal investigation of individual nerve endings in the skin of anesthetized mice using in vivo two-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuryev, Mikhail; Khiroug, Leonard

    2012-04-01

    Visualization of individual cutaneous nerve endings has previously relied on laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light or electron microscopy. We present a method for non-invasive, longitudinal two-photon microscopy of single nerve endings within the skin of anesthetized transgenic mice. Besides excellent signal-to-background ratio and nanometer-scale spatial resolution, this method offers time-lapse ``movies'' of pathophysiological changes in nerve fine structure over minutes, hours, days or weeks. Structure of keratinocytes and dermal matrix is visualized simultaneously with nerve endings, providing clear landmarks for longitudinal analysis. We further demonstrate feasibility of dissecting individual nerve fibers with infra-red laser and monitoring their degradation and regeneration. In summary, our excision-free optical biopsy technique is ideal for longitudinal microscopic analysis of animal skin and skin innervations in vivo and can be applied widely in preclinical models of chronic pain, allergies, skin cancers and a variety of dermatological disorders.

  7. In Vivo Assessment of Clobetasol Propionate-Loaded Lecithin-Chitosan Nanoparticles for Skin Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Şenyiğit

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to assess in vivo the anti-inflammatory efficacy and tolerability of clobetasol propionate (CP loaded lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles incorporated into chitosan gel for topical application (CP 0.005%. As a comparison, a commercial cream (CP 0.05% w/w, and a sodium deoxycholate gel (CP 0.05% w/w were also evaluated. Lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by self-assembling of the components obtained by direct injection of soybean lecithin alcoholic solution containing CP into chitosan aqueous solution. Nanoparticles obtained had a particle size around 250 nm, narrow distribution (polydispersity index below 0.2 and positive surface charge, provided by a superficial layer of the cationic polymer. The nanoparticle suspension was then loaded into a chitosan gel, to obtain a final CP concentration of 0.005%. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan-induced hind paw edema test on Wistar rats, the effect of formulations on the barrier property of the stratum corneum were determined using transepidermal water loss measurements (TEWL and histological analysis was performed to evaluate the possible presence of morphological changes. The results obtained indicate that nanoparticle-in-gel formulation produced significantly higher edema inhibition compared to other formulations tested, although it contained ten times less CP. TEWL measurements also revealed that all formulations have no significant disturbance on the barrier function of skin. Furthermore, histological analysis of rat abdominal skin did not show morphological tissue changes nor cell infiltration signs after application of the formulations. Taken together, the present data show that the use of lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles in chitosan gel as a drug carrier significantly improves the risk-benefit ratio as compared with sodium-deoxycholate gel and commercial cream formulations of CP.

  8. Paracrine interactions between primary human macrophages and human fibroblasts enhance murine mammary gland humanization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jodie M; Miller, Tyler C; Kidacki, Michal; Ginsburg, Erika; Stuelten, Christina H; Stewart, Delisha A; Troester, Melissa A; Vonderhaar, Barbara K

    2012-06-25

    Macrophages comprise an essential component of the mammary microenvironment necessary for normal gland development. However, there is no viable in vivo model to study their role in normal human breast function. We hypothesized that adding primary human macrophages to the murine mammary gland would enhance and provide a novel approach to examine immune-stromal cell interactions during the humanization process. Primary human macrophages, in the presence or absence of ectopic estrogen stimulation, were used to humanize mouse mammary glands. Mechanisms of enhanced humanization were identified by cytokine/chemokine ELISAs, zymography, western analysis, invasion and proliferation assays; results were confirmed with immunohistological analysis. The combined treatment of macrophages and estrogen stimulation significantly enhanced the percentage of the total gland humanized and the engraftment/outgrowth success rate. Timecourse analysis revealed the disappearance of the human macrophages by two weeks post-injection, suggesting that the improved overall growth and invasiveness of the fibroblasts provided a larger stromal bed for epithelial cell proliferation and structure formation. Confirming their promotion of fibroblasts humanization, estrogen-stimulated macrophages significantly enhanced fibroblast proliferation and invasion in vitro, as well as significantly increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive cells in humanized glands. Cytokine/chemokine ELISAs, zymography and western analyses identified TNFα and MMP9 as potential mechanisms by which estrogen-stimulated macrophages enhanced humanization. Specific inhibitors to TNFα and MMP9 validated the effects of these molecules on fibroblast behavior in vitro, as well as by immunohistochemical analysis of humanized glands for human-specific MMP9 expression. Lastly, glands humanized with macrophages had enhanced engraftment and tumor growth compared to glands humanized with fibroblasts alone. Herein, we

  9. Human skin equivalents for atopic dermatitis : investigating the role of filaggrin in the skin barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen, Vincent van

    2014-01-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is a frequent occurring inflammatory skin disease causing physical discomfort, social embarrassment and stress. This skin disease is characterized by decreased skin barrier function and various other epidermal changes, as well as immunological changes. A decreased skin barrier

  10. Biology of Zika Virus Infection in Human Skin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Rodolphe; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Neyret, Aymeric; Luplertlop, Natthanej; Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Surasombatpattana, Pornapat; Talignani, Loïc; Thomas, Frédéric; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Choumet, Valérie; Briant, Laurence; Desprès, Philippe; Amara, Ali; Yssel, Hans; Missé, Dorothée

    2015-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family, which includes dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, that causes a mosquito-borne disease transmitted by the Aedes genus, with recent outbreaks in the South Pacific. Here we examine the importance of human skin in the entry of ZIKV and its contribution to the induction of antiviral immune responses. We show that human dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and immature dendritic cells are permissive to the most recent ZIKV isolate, responsible for the epidemic in French Polynesia. Several entry and/or adhesion factors, including DC-SIGN, AXL, Tyro3, and, to a lesser extent, TIM-1, permitted ZIKV entry, with a major role for the TAM receptor AXL. The ZIKV permissiveness of human skin fibroblasts was confirmed by the use of a neutralizing antibody and specific RNA silencing. ZIKV induced the transcription of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), RIG-I, and MDA5, as well as several interferon-stimulated genes, including OAS2, ISG15, and MX1, characterized by strongly enhanced beta interferon gene expression. ZIKV was found to be sensitive to the antiviral effects of both type I and type II interferons. Finally, infection of skin fibroblasts resulted in the formation of autophagosomes, whose presence was associated with enhanced viral replication, as shown by the use of Torin 1, a chemical inducer of autophagy, and the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The results presented herein permit us to gain further insight into the biology of ZIKV and to devise strategies aiming to interfere with the pathology caused by this emerging flavivirus. Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to the Flaviviridae family. Vector-mediated transmission of ZIKV is initiated when a blood-feeding female Aedes mosquito injects the virus into the skin of its mammalian host, followed by infection of permissive cells via specific receptors. Indeed, skin immune cells, including dermal

  11. Clinical Nonlinear Laser Imaging of Human Skin: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Cicchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential of being used in vivo as a noninvasive imaging modality for both epidermal and dermal imaging. This paper reviews the capabilities of nonlinear microscopy as a noninvasive high-resolution tool for clinical skin inspection. In particular, we show that two-photon fluorescence microscopy can be used as a diagnostic tool for characterizing epidermal layers by means of a morphological examination. Additional functional information on the metabolic state of cells can be provided by measuring the fluorescence decay of NADH. This approach allows differentiating epidermal layers having different structural and cytological features and has the potential of diagnosing pathologies in a very early stage. Regarding therapy follow-up, we demonstrate that nonlinear microscopy could be successfully used for monitoring the effect of a treatment. In particular, combined two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy were used in vivo for monitoring collagen remodeling after microablative fractional laser resurfacing and for quantitatively monitoring psoriasis on the basis of the morphology of epidermal cells and dermal papillae. We believe that the described microscopic modalities could find in the near future a stable place in a clinical dermatological setting for quantitative diagnostic purposes and as a monitoring method for various treatments.

  12. In vivo experimental model of human gingival mucosa using immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukinoki, K; Miyoshi, Y; Aoki, T; Karakida, K; Ohta, Y; Kaneko, A; Ueyama, Y; Watanabe, Y

    2007-08-01

    To establish an in vivo experimental model for examining human periodontal tissue, the present study examined several transplant techniques that maintain the structure and characteristics of human gingival mucosa. Human oral mucosal tissue samples were collected from the gingiva (n = 11), palate (n = 1), and tongue (n = 3). These mucosal grafts were transplanted onto BALB/c nu/scid mice with double-mutant immunodeficiency. Murine skin, twice the size of the graft, was cut open in an ' square superset'-shape. Next, the connective tissue side of the graft was placed onto the murine connective tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis was also performed, using polyclonal rabbit antibody to involucrin, monoclonal antibody to vimentin, monoclonal antibody to CD34, and monoclonal antibody to Ki-67, to determine whether the characteristics of human oral mucosa were maintained. When the connective tissue side of the graft was placed on the murine fascial membrane, the histological structure of the graft was maintained for 60 d. These grafts were examined for human characteristics using human-specific antibodies. Immunohistochemically, the expression patterns of involucrin, vimentin, and Ki-67 indicated that transplanted mucosa revealed normal human characteristics, including differentiation and proliferation up to 80 d. CD34 was not detected in the graft endothelial cells. The present study revealed that the novel technique of transplantation of human gingival mucosa in nu/scid mice may serve as an in vivo experimental model of periodontal disease.

  13. Standardization of skin cleansing in vivo: part I. Development of an Automated Cleansing Device (ACiD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonsmann, F K; Strunk, M; Gediga, K; John, C; Schliemann, S; Seyfarth, F; Elsner, P; Diepgen, T L; Kutz, G; John, S M

    2014-05-01

    To date, there are no legally binding requirements concerning product testing in cosmetics. This leads to various manufacturer-specific test methods and absent transparent information on skin cleansing products. A standardized in vivo test procedure for assessment of cleansing efficacy and corresponding barrier impairment by the cleaning process is needed, especially in the occupational context where repeated hand washing procedures may be performed at short intervals. For the standardization of the cleansing procedure, an Automated Cleansing Device (ACiD) was designed and evaluated. Different smooth washing surfaces of the equipment for ACiD (incl. goat hair, felt, felt covered with nitrile caps) were evaluated regarding their skin compatibility. ACiD allows an automated, fully standardized skin washing procedure. Felt covered with nitrile as washing surface of the rotating washing units leads to a homogenous cleansing result and does not cause detectable skin irritation, neither clinically nor as assessed by skin bioengineering methods (transepidermal water loss, chromametry). Automated Cleansing Device may be useful for standardized evaluation of the cleansing effectiveness and parallel assessment of the corresponding irritancy potential of industrial skin cleansers. This will allow objectifying efficacy and safety of industrial skin cleansers, thus enabling market transparency and facilitating rational choice of products. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. In vivo and in situ imaging of controlled-release dissolving silk microneedles into the skin by optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Zhang, Mingtian; Jin, Cuiyun

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, transdermal drug delivery has become a hot topic with regard to delivery. Also, the percutaneous microneedle patch made of water-soluble material makes this technique one step closer to clinical application. The process of the microneedle patch penetrates and dissolves in the animal skin can directly reflect the efficiency of drug delivery. Hence, it is important to reflect the situation of microneedles dissolution and drug release by in vivo and in situ imaging in real time. This paper's purpose is to use the means of OCT (optical coherence tomography) to realize assessment of dissolving microneedles delivery efficiency in vivo and in situ imaging. This is the first study to utilize OCT to observe the dissolving process of silk microneedles (SFM) in different carriers. Dissolving process es of silk fibroin microneedles in different carriers were captured by the OCT system. The solution rate of silk fibroin microneedles in water is rapid. It also has good solution in the skin of mouse in vivo. OCT is a noncontact, noninvasive imaging technique with high resolution, the detecting depth of which is generally 1-3 mm under the skin. OCT has great potential to observe the solution process of dissolving microneedles in the skin. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Human skin penetration and local effects of topical nano zinc oxide after occlusion and barrier impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite-Silva, V R; Sanchez, W Y; Studier, H; Liu, D C; Mohammed, Y H; Holmes, A M; Ryan, E M; Haridass, I N; Chandrasekaran, N C; Becker, W; Grice, J E; Benson, H A E; Roberts, M S

    2016-07-01

    Public health concerns continue to exist over the safety of zinc oxide nanoparticles that are commonly used in sunscreen formulations. In this work, we assessed the effects of two conditions which may be encountered in everyday sunscreen use, occlusion and a compromised skin barrier, on the penetration and local toxicity of two topically applied zinc oxide nanoparticle products. Caprylic/capric triglyceride (CCT) suspensions of commercially used zinc oxide nanoparticles, either uncoated or with a silane coating, were applied to intact and barrier impaired skin of volunteers, without and with occlusion for a period of six hours. The exposure time was chosen to simulate normal in-use conditions. Multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging was used to noninvasively assess zinc oxide penetration and cellular metabolic changes that could be indicative of toxicity. We found that zinc oxide nanoparticles did not penetrate into the viable epidermis of intact or barrier impaired skin of volunteers, without or with occlusion. We also observed no apparent toxicity in the viable epidermis below the application sites. These findings were validated by ex vivo human skin studies in which zinc penetration was assessed by multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging as well as Zinpyr-1 staining and toxicity was assessed by MTS assays in zinc oxide treated skin cryosections. In conclusion, applications of zinc oxide nanoparticles under occlusive in-use conditions to volunteers are not associated with any measurable zinc oxide penetration into, or local toxicity in the viable epidermis below the application site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Recovery of latent fingerprints and DNA on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färber, Doris; Seul, Andrea; Weisser, Hans-Joachim; Bohnert, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The project "Latent Fingerprints and DNA on Human Skin" was the first systematic research in Europe dealing with detection of fingerprints and DNA left by offenders on the skin of corpses. One thousand samples gave results that allow general statements on the materials and methods used. The tests were carried out according to a uniform trial structure. Fingerprints were deposited by natural donors on corpses. The latent fingerprints were treated with magnetic powder or black fingerprint powder. Afterward, they were lifted with silicone casting material (Isomark(®)) or gelatine foil. All lifts were swabbed to recover DNA. It was possible to visualize comparable and identifiable fingerprints on the skin of corpses (16%). In the same categories, magnetic powder (18.4%) yielded better results than black fingerprint powder (13.6%). The number of comparable and identifiable fingerprints decreased on the lifts (12.7%). Isomark(®) (14.9%) was the better lifting material in comparison with gelatine foil (10.1%). In one-third of the samples, DNA could be extracted from the powdered and lifted latents. Black fingerprint powder delivered the better result with a rate of 2.2% for full DNA profiles and profiles useful for exclusion in comparison with 1.8% for the magnetic powder traces. Isomark(®) (3.1%) yielded better results than gelatine foil (0.6%). © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Electrical characteristics of female and male human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalauzi A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS is a popular method for characterizing the electrical properties of biological tissues. In this study, BIS measurement data of female and male human skin were analyzed and compared. The electrical characteristics of tissue were followed according to four-parameters of the Cole-Cole model: low frequency resistance R0; high frequency resistance R∞; relaxation time t and parameter a. Individual electrical characteristics of human skin were determined for 30 women and 30 men. The distribution and one-way analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA of the Cole-Cole parameters R0, R∞, t, a within the human population indicated their different dependence on gender. Parameter a, which is higher in the female subjects (a =0.83±0.03 than in the male subjects (a=0.7±0.05, is strongly dependent on gender (p=0. Parameter R∞ also significantly depends on gender (p=0.002, while t and R0 seem to be slightly related to gender (p>0.05. [Acknowledgments - This work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Serbia (41006.

  18. Expression of Filaggrin and its Degradation Products in Human Skin Following Erythemal Doses of Ultraviolet B Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Stine; Thyssen, Jacob P; Heegaard, Steffen; Kezic, Sanja; Skov, Lone

    2017-07-06

    Epidermal filaggrin level is affected by ultraviolet B irradiation in animal and experimental models. This study examined the effect of ultraviolet B irradiation on epidermal filaggrin and natural moisturizing factors in vivo in healthy adults (n = 22). Participants were irradiated with 2 minimal erythema doses of ultraviolet B on the skin. Biopsies and tape strips were collected from skin irradiated 24 and 72 h earlier and from non-irradiated skin (control). Real-time quantitative PCR on skin biopsies showed significantly reduced profilaggrin mRNA expression 24 h after irradiation (mean relative mRNA expression ± standard deviation: control, 3.86 ± 2.06 vs. 24 h, 1.52 ± 0.640; p = 0.02; n = 8). Immunohistochemistry showed aberrant spatial distribution of filaggrin protein 72 h after irradiation (n = 3). High-pressure liquid chromatography of tape extracts showed no change in mean total natural moisturizing factor levels after irradiation, but mean trans-urocanic acid was significantly reduced, as expected (n = 8). In conclusion, erythemal doses of ultraviolet B exert acute effects on profilaggrin mRNA and filaggrin protein in human skin in vivo.

  19. Steroid synthesis by primary human keratinocytes; implications for skin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannen, Rosalind F., E-mail: r.f.hannen@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Michael, Anthony E. [Centre for Developmental and Endocrine Signalling, Academic Section of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Clinical Developmental Sciences, 3rd Floor, Lanesborough Wing, St. George' s, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, Tooting, London SW17 0RE (United Kingdom); Jaulim, Adil [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Bhogal, Ranjit [Life Science, Unilever R and D Colworth House, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Burrin, Jacky M. [Centre for Endocrinology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Philpott, Michael P. [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Primary keratinocytes express the steroid enzymes required for cortisol synthesis. {yields} Normal primary human keratinocytes can synthesise cortisol. {yields} Steroidogenic regulators, StAR and MLN64, are expressed in normal epidermis. {yields} StAR expression is down regulated in eczema and psoriatic epidermis. -- Abstract: Cortisol-based therapy is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory treatments available for skin conditions including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have investigated the steroidogenic capabilities of keratinocytes, though none have demonstrated that these skin cells, which form up to 90% of the epidermis are able to synthesise cortisol. Here we demonstrate that primary human keratinocytes (PHK) express all the elements required for cortisol steroidogenesis and metabolise pregnenolone through each intermediate steroid to cortisol. We show that normal epidermis and cultured PHK express each of the enzymes (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3{beta}HSD1, CYP21 and CYP11B1) that are required for cortisol synthesis. These enzymes were shown to be metabolically active for cortisol synthesis since radiometric conversion assays traced the metabolism of [7-{sup 3}H]-pregnenolone through each steroid intermediate to [7-{sup 3}H]-cortisol in cultured PHK. Trilostane (a 3{beta}HSD1 inhibitor) and ketoconazole (a CYP17A1 inhibitor) blocked the metabolism of both pregnenolone and progesterone. Finally, we show that normal skin expresses two cholesterol transporters, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), regarded as the rate-determining protein for steroid synthesis, and metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) whose function has been linked to cholesterol transport in steroidogenesis. The expression of StAR and MLN64 was aberrant in two skin disorders, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, that are commonly treated with cortisol, suggesting dysregulation of epidermal steroid synthesis in these patients. Collectively these data

  20. In vivo cleansing efficacy of biodegradable exfoliating beads assessed by skin bioengineering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsongsermthon, J; Duangweang, K; Kreepoke, J; Tansirikongkol, A

    2017-11-01

    The plastic microbeads, used in many cleansers, will be banned in cosmetic and personal care products within 2017 since they are non-degradable and can disturb the living organisms in water reservoirs. Various choices of biodegradable beads are commercially available, but their efficacy has not been proven yet. This study aimed to compare the cleansing efficacy in dirt and sebum removal aspects of three types of exfoliating beads. The gel scrubs with polyethylene (PE) beads, mannan beads or wax beads, were formulated and evaluated for their stability. The in vivo evaluation was done in 38 healthy volunteers and the skin irritation, efficacy for dirt and sebum removal were measured by Mexameter® , Colorimeter® , and Sebumeter® , respectively. The selected gel scrubs did not cause an irritation in any volunteers. The differences in dirt residues between before and after scrubbing were not statistically significant among three gel scrubs and the similar result was also reported in the sebum removal study. All gel scrubs demonstrated the comparable cleansing efficacy in term of dirt and sebum removal. Thus, mannan beads and wax beads may be replaced non-biodegradable PE beads to achieve the similar cleansing effect. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. In vivo assessment of human burn scars through automated quantification of vascularity using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Yih Miin; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Gong, Peijun; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.

    2013-06-01

    In scars arising from burns, objective assessment of vascularity is important in the early identification of pathological scarring, and in the assessment of progression and treatment response. We demonstrate the first clinical assessment and automated quantification of vascularity in cutaneous burn scars of human patients in vivo that uses optical coherence tomography (OCT). Scar microvasculature was delineated in three-dimensional OCT images using speckle decorrelation. The diameter and area density of blood vessels were automatically quantified. A substantial increase was observed in the measured density of vasculature in hypertrophic scar tissues (38%) when compared against normal, unscarred skin (22%). A proliferation of larger vessels (diameter≥100 μm) was revealed in hypertrophic scarring, which was absent from normal scars and normal skin over the investigated physical depth range of 600 μm. This study establishes the feasibility of this methodology as a means of clinical monitoring of scar progression.

  2. 2016 Arte Poster Competition First Place Winner: Circadian Rhythm and UV-Induced Skin Damage: An In Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Linna; Suggs, Amanda; Ahsanuddin, Sayeeda; Tarrillion, Madeline; Selph, Jacqueline; Lam, Minh; Baron, Elma

    2016-09-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes many detrimental effects through mechanisms related to oxidative stress and DNA damage. Excessive oxidative stress can cause apoptosis and cellular dysfunction of epidermal cells leading to cellular senescence and connective tissue degradation. Direct and indirect damage to DNA predisposes the skin to cancer formation. Chronic UV exposure also leads to skin aging manifested as wrinkling, loss of skin tone, and decreased resilience. Fortunately, human skin has several natural mechanisms for combating UV-induced damage. The mechanisms operate on a diurnal rhythm, a cycle that repeats approximately every 24 hours. It is known that the circadian rhythm is involved in many skin physiologic processes, including water regulation and epidermal stem cell function. This study evaluated whether UV damage and the skin's natural mechanisms of inflammation and repair are also affected by circadian rhythm. We looked at UV-induced erythema on seven human subjects irradiated with simulated solar radiation in the morning (at 08:00 h) versus in the afternoon (at 16:00 h). Our data suggest that the same dose of UV radiation induces significantly more inflammation in the morning than in the afternoon. Changes in protein expression relevant to DNA damage, such as xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA), and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) from skin biopsies correlated with our clinical results. Both XPA and CPD levels were higher after the morning UV exposure compared with the afternoon exposure. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(9):1124-1130.

  3. Fat tissue histological study at indocyanine green-mediated photothermal/photodynamic treatment of the skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanina, Irina Yu.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Navolokin, Nikita A.; Matveeva, Olga V.; Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Altshuler, Gregory B.

    2012-05-01

    Histological slices of skin samples with the subcutaneous adipose tissue after photothermal/photodynamic treatment are analyzed. In the case of subcutaneous indocyanine green injection and 808-nm diode laser exposure of the rat skin site in vivo, the greatest changes in tissue condition were observed. Processes were characterized by dystrophy, necrosis, and desquamation of the epithelial cells, swelling and necrosis of the connective tissue, and widespread necrosis of the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The obtained data are useful for safe layer-by-layer dosimetry of laser illumination of ICG-stained adipose tissue for treatment of obesity and cellulite.

  4. Detection of human papillomavirus in nonmelanoma skin cancer lesions and healthy perilesional skin in kidney transplant recipients and immunocompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat-García, J; Morales Suárez-Varela, M; Vilata-Corell, J J; Marquina-Vila, A

    2014-04-01

    The influence of human papillomavirus (HPV) on the development of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is a topic of debate. HPV types from the beta genus (HPV-β) have been most frequently associated with the development of skin cancer. To analyze the prevalence and range of HPV types in NMSC lesions and healthy perilesional skin in immunodepressed and immunocompetent patients and to evaluate the influence of various clinical factors on the prevalence of HPV in skin cancer. Nested polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used to detect HPV in 120 NMSC samples obtained by biopsy from 30 kidney transplant recipients and 30 immunocompetent patients. In all cases, a sample was taken from the tumor site and the surrounding healthy skin. Potential confounders were assessed and the data analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. HPV DNA was detected in 44 (73.3%) of the 60 samples from immunodepressed patients and in 32 (53.3%) of the 60 samples from immunocompetent patients (adjusted odds ratio, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.2-9.6). In both groups of patients, HPV was more common in healthy perilesional skin than in lesional skin. HPV-β was the most common type isolated. We found a wide range of HPV types (mostly HPV-β) in the skin of kidney transplant recipients and immunocompetent patients with skin cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  5. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Jadoon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed.

  6. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadoon, Saima; Karim, Sabiha; Bin Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Khan, Abida Kalsoom; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed.

  7. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Sabiha; Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan Bin; Kalsoom Khan, Abida; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed. PMID:26448818

  8. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images of human skin by a spatial diversity method - art. no. 66270P

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Thrane, Lars; Mogensen, M.

    2007-01-01

    the scheme with a mobile fiber-based time-domain real-time OCT system. Essential enhancement was obtained in image contrast when performing in vivo imaging of normal skin and lesions. Resulting images show improved delineation of structure in correspondence with the observed improvements in contrast...... system. Here, we consider a method that in principle can be fitted to most OCT systems without major modifications. Specifically, we address a spatial diversity technique for suppressing speckle noise in OCT images of human skin. The method is a variant of changing the position of the sample relative...... to the measuring probe. Instead of physically moving the sample, which is often not feasible for in vivo imaging, the position of the focal plane of the probe beam is shifted. If the numerical aperture is sufficiently high this spatial diversity scheme incorporates a variant of angular compounding. We have tested...

  9. Comparative analysis of the effects of CO2 fractional laser and sonophoresis on human skin penetration with 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J H; Shin, E J; Jeong, K H; Shin, M K

    2017-11-01

    Successful delivery of a photosensitizer into the skin is an important factor for effective photodynamic therapy (PDT). The effective method to increase drug penetration within short incubation time overcoming skin barrier have been investigated. This study was performed to analyze and compare the effectiveness of ablative fractional laser (FXL) pretreatment and/or sonophoresis for enhancing the penetration of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) into human skin in vivo. Twenty-four identical 1 × 1 cm(2) treatment areas were mapped on the backs of ten healthy male subjects. Each area received FXL pretreatment and/or sonophoresis with different energy settings and ALA incubation times. After treatments, porphyrin fluorescence reflecting the ALA penetration were measured. Application of ablative CO2 FXL pretreatment resulted to higher fluorescence intensities than the non-treatment group. Incubation times were positively correlated with the increments of ALA penetration. However, increasing pulse energy or combining with sonophoresis did not show additional positive effects on ALA penetration. Ablative CO2 FXL pretreatment effectively facilitated ALA penetration in human skin in vivo. Ablative CO2 FXL alone without sonophoresis setting pulse energy of 10 and 20 mJ with more than 60 min of ALA incubation time could be an ideal setting for ALA penetration.

  10. Defining human mesenchymal stem cell efficacy in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennon Donald P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs can suppress graft versus host disease (GvHD and have profound anti-inflammatory and regenerative capacity in stroke, infarct, spinal cord injury, meniscus regeneration, tendinitis, acute renal failure, and heart disease in human and animal models of disease. There is significant clinical hMSC variability in efficacy and the ultimate response in vivo. The challenge in hMSC based therapy is defining the efficacy of hMSC in vivo. Models which may provide insight into hMSC bioactivity in vivo would provide a means to distinguish hMSCs for clinical utility. hMSC function has been described as both regenerative and trophic through the production of bioactive factors. The regenerative component involves the multi-potentiality of hMSC progenitor differentiation. The secreted factors generated by the hMSCs are milieu and injury specific providing unique niches for responses in vivo. These bioactive factors are anti-scarring, angiogenic, anti-apoptotic as well as regenerative. Further, from an immunological standpoint, hMSC's can avoid host immune response, providing xenographic applications. To study the in vivo immuno-regulatory effectiveness of hMSCs, we used the ovalbumin challenge model of acute asthma. This is a quick 3 week in vivo pulmonary inflammation model with readily accessible ways of measuring effectiveness of hMSCs. Our data show that there is a direct correlation between the traditional ceramic cube score to hMSCs attenuation of cellular recruitment due to ovalbumin challenge. The results from these studies verify the in vivo immuno-modulator effectiveness of hMSCs and support the potential use of the ovalbumin model as an in vivo model of hMSC potency and efficacy. Our data also support future directions toward exploring hMSCs as an alternative therapeutic for the treatment of airway inflammation associated with asthma.

  11. 'Nosing Around' the human skin: what information is concealed in skin odour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Havlíček, Jan; Bernd, August; Thaçi, Diamant; Kaufmann, Roland; Meissner, Markus

    2012-09-01

    In today's world, natural body odour is mostly considered as being unpleasant and combated by intensive cleansing, deodorants and perfumes. However, there is evidence that volatile body compounds provide the recipient with important information. Here, we present the chemical identity of odorous compounds derived from odourless precursors within sweat and sebum. Moreover, distinct volatile markers may be relevant for the clinical diagnosis of disease. Interestingly, ageing seems to correlate with the appearance of specific compounds that convey the so-called old man smell. Finally, it is discussed if human skin odour has the quality to act as pheromone transmitting information between individuals in terms of major histocompatibility complex type or reproductive status. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Fractional Calculus Model of Electrical Impedance Applied to Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosika, Zoran B.; Lazovic, Goran M.; Misevic, Gradimir N.; Simic-Krstic, Jovana B.

    2013-01-01

    Fractional calculus is a mathematical approach dealing with derivatives and integrals of arbitrary and complex orders. Therefore, it adds a new dimension to understand and describe basic nature and behavior of complex systems in an improved way. Here we use the fractional calculus for modeling electrical properties of biological systems. We derived a new class of generalized models for electrical impedance and applied them to human skin by experimental data fitting. The primary model introduces new generalizations of: 1) Weyl fractional derivative operator, 2) Cole equation, and 3) Constant Phase Element (CPE). These generalizations were described by the novel equation which presented parameter related to remnant memory and corrected four essential parameters We further generalized single generalized element by introducing specific partial sum of Maclaurin series determined by parameters We defined individual primary model elements and their serial combination models by the appropriate equations and electrical schemes. Cole equation is a special case of our generalized class of models for Previous bioimpedance data analyses of living systems using basic Cole and serial Cole models show significant imprecisions. Our new class of models considerably improves the quality of fitting, evaluated by mean square errors, for bioimpedance data obtained from human skin. Our models with new parameters presented in specific partial sum of Maclaurin series also extend representation, understanding and description of complex systems electrical properties in terms of remnant memory effects. PMID:23577065

  13. Using human epithelial amnion cells in human de-epidermized dermis for skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei-Wei; Chen, Hongduo; Lu, Hongguang

    2016-01-01

    Human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) is a desirable reserve of stem cells. Human de-epidermized dermis (DED) retains basic tissue structure and parts of the basement membrane (BM) components at the acelluIar dermal surface, and provides a potential tool for skin regeneration. To evaluate the potential role of hAECs in skin regeneration, we used DED to perform organotypic culture of hAECs to develop organotypic skin. HAECs were isolated and cultured. Biological characteristics of hAECs were determined by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. To prepare DED, the epidermis was removed and then repeated freeze-thaw cycles. HAECs and fibroblast were seeded onto DED to perform the submerged culture for 3 days and then to be maintained at the air-liquid interface for 14 days to form organotypic culture. To identify whether the obtained DED retain the BM structure and components, the histological characteristics of DED and the BM were detected by immunohistochemistry. To evaluate whether the organotypic skin has similar histological characteristics with normal human skin, the marks of epidermal proliferation and differentiation and basement membrane component were detected by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, cell ultrastructure, cell-cell contact and ultrastructure of BM were examined under the transmission electron microscopy. HAECs has stem-cell characteristics with strong pluripotent Oct-4 and embryonic marker SSEA-4 expression. DED has effectively cleansed the cell components and continuous distributions of laminin and collagen IV. The histological appearance of tissue-engineered skin in vitro has 4 to 9 continuous layers of stratified epithelium and is similar to normal human skin in morphology. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that proliferation and differentiation markers such as Ki67, CK19, CK14, CK10, filaggrin but not CK18 expressed similar pattern characteristics to normal human epidermis. In addition, Periodic acid-Schiff stain showed that a uniform red

  14. Mechanical properties, skin permeation and in vivo evaluations of dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel for topical delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Son, Mi Woon; Jang, Sun Woo; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the gel properties, skin permeation and in vivo drug efficacy of a novel dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel for topical delivery. In this study, the dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel and ibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel were prepared with isopropanol, Tween 80, propylene glycol, isopropyl myristate and carbopol. Their mechanical properties such as hardness and adhesiveness were assessed. Moreover, their skin permeation, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive efficacy were evaluated using Franz diffusion cell with the hairless mouse skin, the carrageenan-induced paw oedema test and paw pressure test in rat's hind paws compared with the commercial hydrogel, respectively. The dexibuprofen emulsion gel and ibuprofen emulsion gel provided significantly higher hardness and adhesiveness than the commercial hydrogel. The dexibuprofen emulsion gel enhanced skin permeability by about twofold and 3.5-fold without lag time compared to the ibuprofen emulsion gel and the commercial hydrogel, respectively, suggesting its faster skin permeation. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory efficacy and alleviation in carrageenan-induced inflammation was in the order of dexibuprofen emulsion gel > commercial hydrogel > ibuprofen emulsion gel. The dexibuprofen emulsion gel furnished significantly higher nociceptive thresholds than the ibuprofen emulsion gel and the commercial hydrogel, leading to the most improved anti-nociceptive efficacy. Thus, this dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel with good mechanical property, rapid skin permeation and excellent anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive efficacy would be a strong candidate for the topical delivery of anti-inflammatory dexibuprofen.

  15. Depth-dependent autofluorescence photobleaching using 325, 473, 633, and 785 nm of porcine ear skin ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleusener, Johannes; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2017-09-01

    Autofluorescence photobleaching describes the decrease of fluorescence intensity of endogenous fluorophores in biological tissue upon light irradiation. The origin of autofluorescence photobleaching is not fully understood. In the skin, the spatial distribution of various endogenous fluorophores varies within the skin layers. Most endogenous fluorophores are excited in the ultraviolet and short visible wavelength range, and only a few, such as porphyrins (red) and melanin (near-infrared), are excited at longer wavelengths. The excitation wavelength- and depth-dependent irradiation of skin will therefore excite different fluorophores, which will likely influence the photobleaching characteristics. The autofluorescence photobleaching of porcine ear skin has been measured ex vivo using 325, 473, 633, and 785 nm excitation at different skin depths from the surface to the dermis at 150 ? ? m . Confocal Raman microscopes were used to achieve sufficient spatial resolution of the measurements. The autofluorescence area under the curve was measured for 21 consecutive acquisitions of 15 s. In all cases, the photobleaching follows a two-exponential decay function approximated by nonlinear regression. The results show that photobleaching can be applied to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in Raman spectroscopy for all of the applied excitation wavelengths and skin depths.

  16. Depth-dependent autofluorescence photobleaching using 325, 473, 633, and 785 nm of porcine ear skin ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleusener, Johannes; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2017-09-01

    Autofluorescence photobleaching describes the decrease of fluorescence intensity of endogenous fluorophores in biological tissue upon light irradiation. The origin of autofluorescence photobleaching is not fully understood. In the skin, the spatial distribution of various endogenous fluorophores varies within the skin layers. Most endogenous fluorophores are excited in the ultraviolet and short visible wavelength range, and only a few, such as porphyrins (red) and melanin (near-infrared), are excited at longer wavelengths. The excitation wavelength- and depth-dependent irradiation of skin will therefore excite different fluorophores, which will likely influence the photobleaching characteristics. The autofluorescence photobleaching of porcine ear skin has been measured ex vivo using 325, 473, 633, and 785 nm excitation at different skin depths from the surface to the dermis at 150 μm. Confocal Raman microscopes were used to achieve sufficient spatial resolution of the measurements. The autofluorescence area under the curve was measured for 21 consecutive acquisitions of 15 s. In all cases, the photobleaching follows a two-exponential decay function approximated by nonlinear regression. The results show that photobleaching can be applied to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in Raman spectroscopy for all of the applied excitation wavelengths and skin depths.

  17. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  18. In vivo Prevention of Transplant Arteriosclerosis by ex vivo Expanded Human Regulatory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Satish N.; Więckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C.; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P.; Wood, Kathryn J.

    2010-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term [1,2]. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts [2]. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent TA [3,4]. Therefore, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (Treg cells) expanded ex vivo could prevent TA. Here we show the comparative capacity of Treg cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent TA in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of TA in human arteries was prevented with the treatment of ex vivo expanded human Treg cells. Additionally, we show that Treg cells sorted based on the low expression of CD127 (IL-7Rα) provide a more potent therapy to conventional Treg cells. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that human Treg cells can inhibit TA by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting TA in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy [5]. PMID:20473306

  19. Human Umbilical Cord Wharton Jelly-Derived Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells, in Biohybrid Scaffolds, for Experimental Skin Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanucci, Pia; di Pasquali, Camilla; Ferri, Ivana; Sidoni, Angelo; Cervelli, Valerio

    2017-01-01

    The ultimate goal for skin tissue engineering is to regenerate skin lesions to allow the full restoration of morphological and functional properties as what they were before injury. To this end, we have assembled a new prototype of a biomimetic human umbilical cord adult mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMS)/fibrin-based scaffold. We have fully characterized the proposed dermal equivalent (DE) in vitro, to assess morphological, functional, and biological properties of the encased cells. We transplanted DE subcutaneously into immunocompetent rodents, to verify its full biocompatibility. Finally, we studied DE graft effects on full-thickness wounds, in immunocompetent mice to demonstrate its capability to drive the healing process in the absence of significant scarring tissue. The excellent outcome of these in vivo studies fuels hope that this new approach, based on a biohybrid DE, may be applied to the operative treatment of skin lesions (i.e., diabetic foot ulcers and burns) in man. PMID:29456556

  20. Human Umbilical Cord Wharton Jelly-Derived Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells, in Biohybrid Scaffolds, for Experimental Skin Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Montanucci

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal for skin tissue engineering is to regenerate skin lesions to allow the full restoration of morphological and functional properties as what they were before injury. To this end, we have assembled a new prototype of a biomimetic human umbilical cord adult mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMS/fibrin-based scaffold. We have fully characterized the proposed dermal equivalent (DE in vitro, to assess morphological, functional, and biological properties of the encased cells. We transplanted DE subcutaneously into immunocompetent rodents, to verify its full biocompatibility. Finally, we studied DE graft effects on full-thickness wounds, in immunocompetent mice to demonstrate its capability to drive the healing process in the absence of significant scarring tissue. The excellent outcome of these in vivo studies fuels hope that this new approach, based on a biohybrid DE, may be applied to the operative treatment of skin lesions (i.e., diabetic foot ulcers and burns in man.

  1. In vivo visualization of dermal collagen fiber in skin burn by collagen-sensitive second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Ryosuke; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Sasaki, Kunihiko; Tanaka, Yuji; Murota, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Optical assessment of skin burns is possible with second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy due to its high sensitivity to thermal denaturation of collagen molecules. In contrast to previous studies that were performed using excised tissue specimens ex vivo, in vivo observation of dermal collagen fibers in living rat burn models with SHG microscopy is demonstrated. Changes in signal vanishing patterns in the SHG images are confirmed to be dependent on the burn degree. Comparison of the SHG images with Masson's trichrome-stained images indicated that the observed patterns were caused by the coexistence of molten and fibrous structures of dermal collagen fibers. Furthermore, a quantitative parameter for burn assessment based on the depth profile of the mean SHG intensity across the entire SHG image is proposed. These results and discussions imply a potential of SHG microscopy as a minimally invasive, highly quantitative tool for skin burn assessment.

  2. Study on radiation transfer in human skin for cosmetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Jun; Kawamura, Ayumu; Miura, Yoshimasa; Takata, Sadaki; Ogawa, Katsuki

    2005-06-01

    In order to design cosmetics producing the optical properties that are required for a beautiful skin, the radiation transfer in the skin has been numerically investigated by the Monte Carlo method and the effects of skin texture and cosmetics on the radiation transfer have been empirically investigated using an artificial skin. The numerical analysis showed that the total internal reflection suppresses large portion of radiation going out through the skin surface Additionally, the experimental study revealed that skin texture and cosmetics not only diffusely reflect the incoming radiation, but also lead the internally reflected radiation to the outside of the skin.

  3. International guidelines for the in vivo assessment of skin properties in non-clinical settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    du Plessis, Johan; Stefaniak, Aleksandr; Eloff, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    There is an emerging perspective that it is not sufficient to just assess skin exposure to physical and chemical stressors in workplaces, but that it is also important to assess the condition, i.e. skin barrier function of the exposed skin at the time of exposure. The workplace environment, repre...

  4. Healing and evaluating guinea pig skin incision after surgical suture and laser tissue by welding using in vivo Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimova, A.; Sriramoju, V.; Chakraverty, R.; Muthukattil, R.; Alfano, R. R.

    2010-02-01

    Changes in collagen in the wound during the healing process of guinea pig skin following surgical incisions and LTW was evaluated using in vivo, using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy provided information regarding the internal structure of the proteins. After the incisions were closed either by suturing or by LTW the ratio of the Raman peaks of the amide III (1247 cm-1) band to a peak at 1326 cm-1 used to evaluate the progression of collagen deposition. Histopathology was used as the gold standard. LTW skin demonstrated better healing than sutured skin, exhibiting minimal hyperkeratosis, minimal collagen deposition, near-normal surface contour, and minimal loss of dermal appendages. This work is important to plastic surgery.

  5. Combined Raman and autofluorescence ex vivo diagnostics of skin cancer in near-infrared and visible regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Artemyev, Dmitry N.; Myakinin, Oleg O.; Khristoforova, Yulia A.; Moryatov, Alexander A.; Kozlov, Sergey V.; Zakharov, Valery P.

    2017-02-01

    The differentiation of skin melanomas and basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) was demonstrated based on combined analysis of Raman and autofluorescence spectra stimulated by visible and NIR lasers. It was ex vivo tested on 39 melanomas and 40 BCCs. Six spectroscopic criteria utilizing information about alteration of melanin, porphyrins, flavins, lipids, and collagen content in tumor with a comparison to healthy skin were proposed. The measured correlation between the proposed criteria makes it possible to define weakly correlated criteria groups for discriminant analysis and principal components analysis application. It was shown that the accuracy of cancerous tissues classification reaches 97.3% for a combined 6-criteria multimodal algorithm, while the accuracy determined separately for each modality does not exceed 79%. The combined 6-D method is a rapid and reliable tool for malignant skin detection and classification.

  6. Validation of Dynamic optical coherence tomography for non-invasive, in vivo microcirculation imaging of the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Themstrup, L.; Welzel, Julia; Ciardo, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Dynamic optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) is an angiographic variation of OCT that non-invasively provides images of the in vivo microvasculature of the skin by combining conventional OCT images with flow data. The objective of this study was to investigate and report on the D......-OCT technique for imaging of the vascular networks in skin as well as to validate the method by comparing the results against already accepted blood flow measuring tools. Methods: 35 healthy subjects were recruited for the multicentre study, consisting of three experiments set up to examine the vascular blood...... perfusion during different induced physiologic changes in the blood flow. In order to validate the D-OCT images against existing techniques for blood flow measuring we performed consecutive D-OCT, chromametry and laser speckle contrast imager (LSCI) measurements on identical skin sites in all...

  7. In-vivo characterization of optical properties of pigmented skin lesions including melanoma using oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Smith, Elizabeth B.; Zou, Jun; Duvic, Madeleine; Prieto, Victor; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-02-01

    In this letter, we report the first use of oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry to conduct in-vivo measurements of optical properties of three different types of pigmented skin lesions, including melanoma, dysplastic, and common nevi. Both absorption and reduced scattering coefficient spectra were estimated from the spatially resolved diffuse reflectance within the wavelength range of 455-765 nm for 144 pigmented skin lesions including 16 melanomas. The absorption and reduced scattering spectra were found to change with the malignancy of the skin lesions, which were generally higher for the malignant cases than the benign ones. Based on the measurement results, the physiological origin leading to the change of the absorption and scattering properties is also discussed.

  8. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayce, Jonathan M; Wells, Jonathon D; Malphrus, Jonathan D; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B; Konrad, Peter E; Jansen, E Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients ([Formula: see text]) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and [Formula: see text]. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at [Formula: see text] and a [Formula: see text] safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans.

  9. Correlations between in vivo (1)H MRS and ex vivo (1)H HRMAS metabolite measurements in adult human gliomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opstad, K.S.; Wright, A.J.; Bell, B.A.; Griffiths, J.R.; Howe, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess how accurately ex vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) from small biopsy tissues relate to in vivo (1)H MRS (from larger tumor volumes) in human astrocytomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In vivo (PRESS, TE = 30 msec) and ex

  10. In vivo study for the discrimination of cancerous and normal skin using fibre probe-based Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleusener, Johannes; Gluszczynska, Patrycja; Reble, Carina; Gersonde, Ingo; Helfmann, Jürgen; Fluhr, Joachim W; Lademann, Jürgen; Röwert-Huber, Joachim; Patzelt, Alexa; Meinke, Martina C

    2015-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proved its capability as an objective, non-invasive tool for the detection of various melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) in a number of studies. Most publications are based on a Raman microspectroscopic ex vivo approach. In this in vivo clinical evaluation, we apply Raman spectroscopy using a fibre-coupled probe that allows access to a multitude of affected body sites. The probe design is optimized for epithelial sensitivity, whereby a large part of the detected signal originates from within the epidermal layer's depth down to the basal membrane where early stages of skin cancer develop. Data analysis was performed on measurements of 104 subjects scheduled for excision of lesions suspected of being malignant melanoma (MM) (n = 36), basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (n = 39) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (n = 29). NMSC were discriminated from normal skin with a balanced accuracy of 73% (BCC) and 85% (SCC) using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Discriminating MM and pigmented nevi (PN) resulted in a balanced accuracy of 91%. These results lie within the range of comparable in vivo studies and the accuracies achieved by trained dermatologists using dermoscopy. Discrimination proved to be unsuccessful between cancerous lesions and suspicious lesions that had been histopathologically verified as benign by dermoscopy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Skin mechanics measured in vivo using torsion: a new and accurate model more sensitive to age, sex and moisturizing treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, D C; McArthur, H C; Crosse, J E; Dickens, A D

    1993-10-01

    Summary Measurements of skin mechanics are required to understand better cracking and flaking of the epidermis and loss of 'elasticity'with age in the dermis. Improvements in torsional testing are described here. The resulting data was fitted to algebraic models, the parameters of which can serve both as a concise description of the responses and as a means of relating them to skin structure and physiology. This investigation looks into the suitability of seven such algebraic models. Five of the models examined here appear to be new. Using the commercially available Dia-Stron DTM Torque Meter with our own software, model parameters were studied as indicators of the effects of age and sex in 41 people, and of skin moisturizing treatments in a further 10 people. The two models in the literature were both found to be substantially less accurate and sensitive representations of experimental data than one of the new models proposed here based on the Weibull distribution. This 'WB model'was consistently the one best able to distinguish differences and detect changes which were statistically significant. The WB model appears to be the most powerful and efficient available. Use of this model makes it possible to demonstrate in vivo a statistically significant mechanical difference between male and pre-menopausal female skin using only one parameter (p= 0.0163, with 18 males and 19 females) and to demonstrate a statistically significant mechanical difference between successive decades of age in female skin using only one parameter (p= 0.0124, n= 24). The two parameters of the model most sensitive to skin structure, function and treatment have been combined to form the axes of a 'Skin condition chart'. Any person can be located on this chart at a point indicating their overall skin condition in mechanical terms and any changes in that condition can be clearly demonstrated by movement across the plot.

  12. Genetic deletion of amphiregulin restores the normal skin phenotype in a mouse model of the human skin disease tylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Hosur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In humans, gain-of-function (GOF mutations in RHBDF2 cause the skin disease tylosis. We generated a mouse model of human tylosis and show that GOF mutations in RHBDF2 cause tylosis by enhancing the amount of amphiregulin (AREG secretion. Furthermore, we show that genetic disruption of AREG ameliorates skin pathology in mice carrying the human tylosis disease mutation. Collectively, our data suggest that RHBDF2 plays a critical role in regulating EGFR signaling and its downstream events, including development of tylosis, by facilitating enhanced secretion of AREG. Thus, targeting AREG could have therapeutic benefit in the treatment of tylosis.

  13. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D-epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: phase II enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Ruwiedel, Karsten; Hübenthal, Ulrike; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Abel, Josef; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals in cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity. Therefore, skin in vitro models have to replace chemical testing in vivo. However, the metabolic competence neither of human skin nor of alternative in vitro models has so far been fully characterized, although skin is the first-pass organ for accidentally or purposely (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals) applied chemicals. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic-metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities to models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and N-acetyltransferase in ex vivo human skin, the 3D epidermal model EpiDerm 200 (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines (HaCaT and NCTC 2544) and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. We show that all three phase II enzymes are present and highly active in skin as compared to phase I. Human skin, therefore, represents a more detoxifying than activating organ. This work systematically compares the activities of three important phase II enzymes in four different in vitro models directly to human skin. We conclude from our studies that 3D epidermal models, like the EPI-200 employed here, are superior over monolayer cultures in mimicking human skin xenobiotic metabolism and thus better suited for dermatotoxicity testing. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Ethosomes for skin delivery of ropivacaine: preparation, characterization and ex vivo penetration properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yingjie; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yi; Liu, Jiyong; Wang, Zimin; Zhai, Guangxi

    2015-01-01

    Ropivacaine, a novel long-acting local anesthetic, has been proved to own superior advantage. However, Naropin® Injection, the applied form in clinic, can cause patient non-convenience. The purpose of this study was to formulate ropivacaine (RPV) in ethosomes and evaluate the potential of ethosome formulation in delivering RPV transdermally. The RPV-loaded ethosomes were prepared with thin-film dispersion technique and the formulation was characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. The results showed that the optimized RPV-ethosomes displayed a typical lipid bilayer structure with a narrow size distribution of 73.86 ± 2.40 nm and drug loading of 8.27 ± 0.37%, EE of 68.92 ± 0.29%. The results of DSC and XRD study indicated that RPV was in amorphous state when encapsulated into ethosomes. Furthermore, the results of ex vivo permeation study proved that RPV-ethosomes could promote the permeability in a high-efficient, rapid way (349.0 ± 11.5 μg cm(-2) at 12 h and 178.8 ± 7.1 μg cm(-2) at 0.5 h). The outcomes of histopathology study forecasted that the interaction between ethosomes and skin could loosen the tight conjugation of corneocyte layers and weaken the permeation barrier. In conclusion, RPV-ethosomes could be a promising delivery system to encapsulate RPV and deliver RPV for transdermal administration.

  15. Enhancement of human skin facial revitalization by moringa leaf extract cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Atif; Akhtar, Naveed; Chowdhary, Farzana

    2014-05-01

    Solar ultraviolet exposure is the main cause of skin damage by initiation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to skin collagen imperfection and eventually skin roughness. This can be reduced by proper revitalization of skin enhancing younger and healthier appearance. To evaluate the skin facial revitalization effect of a cream formulation containing the Moringa oleifera leaf extract on humans. Active cream containing 3% of the concentrated extract of moringa leaves was developed by entrapping in the inner aqueous phase of cream. Base contained no extract. Skin revitalizing parameters, i.e. surface, volume, texture parameters and surface evaluation of the living skin (SELS) were assessed comparatively after application of the base and active cream on human face using Visioscan(®) VC 98 for a period of 3 months. Surface values were increased by the base and decreased by the active cream. Effects produced for the base and active cream were significant and insignificant, respectively, as observed in the case of surface. Unlike the base, the active cream showed significant effects on skin volume, texture parameters (energy, variance and contrast) and SELS, SEr (skin roughness), SEsc (skin scaliness), SEsm (skin smoothness), and SEw (skin wrinkles) parameters. The results suggested that moringa cream enhances skin revitalization effect and supports anti-aging skin effects.

  16. Porphyrin Metabolisms in Human Skin Commensal Propionibacterium acnes Bacteria: Potential Application to Monitor Human Radiation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, M.; Kuo, S.; Wang, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Liu, Y.-T.; Gallo, R.L.; Huang, C.-M.

    2013-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, is a commensal organism in human skin. Like human cells, the bacteria produce porphyrins, which exhibit fluorescence properties and make bacteria visible with a Wood’s lamp. In this review, we compare the porphyrin biosynthesis in humans and P. acnes. Also, since P. acnes living on the surface of skin receive the same radiation exposure as humans, we envision that the changes in porphyrin profiles (the absorption spectra and/or metabolism) of P. acnes by radiation may mirror the response of human cells to radiation. The porphyrin profiles of P. acnes may be a more accurate reflection of radiation risk to the patient than other biodosimeters/biomarkers such as gene up-/down-regulation, which may be non-specific due to patient related factors such as autoimmune diseases. Lastly, we discuss the challenges and possible solutions for using the P. acnes response to predict the radiation risk. PMID:23231351

  17. Probe pressure effects on human skin diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Tunnell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are popular research techniques for noninvasive disease diagnostics. Most systems include an optical fiber probe that transmits and collects optical spectra in contact with the suspected lesion. The purpose of this study is to investigate probe pressure effects on human skin spectroscopic measurements. We conduct an in-vivo experiment on human skin tissue to study the short-term (30 s) effects of probe pressure on diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements. Short-term light probe pressure (P0 physiological properties extracted from diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements, and less than 0 +/- 5% for diagnostically significant physiological properties. Absorption decreases with site-specific variations due to blood being compressed out of the sampled volume. Reduced scattering coefficient variation is site specific. Intrinsic fluorescence shows a large standard error, although no specific pressure-related trend is observed. Differences in tissue structure and morphology contribute to site-specific probe pressure effects. Therefore, the effects of pressure can be minimized when the pressure is small and applied for a short amount of time; however, long-term and large pressures induce significant distortions in measured spectra.

  18. THz time-domain spectroscopy of human skin tissue for in-body nanonetworks

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra, Nishtha; Yang, Ke; Qammer H. Abbasi; Qaraqe, Khalid A.; Philpott, Mike; Alomainy, Akram

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents experimental study of real human skin material parameter extraction based on terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy in the band 0.1-2.5 THz. Results in this paper show that electromagnetic properties of the human skin distinctively affect the path loss and noise temperature parameters of the communication link, which are vital for channel modeling of in-body nanonetworks. Refractive index and absorption coefficient values are evaluated for dermis layer of the human skin....

  19. Color reproduction of human skin by spectral reflectance using RGB images and the Wiener estimation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiyomi; Miyazawa, Shota; Funamizu, Hideki; Yuasa, Tomonori; Nishidate, Izumi; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2017-04-01

    Skin measurements based on spectral reflectance are widely studied in the fields of medical care and cosmetics. It has the advantage that several skin properties can be estimated in the non-invasive and non-contacting manner. In this study, we demonstrate the color reproduction of human skin by spectral reflectance using RGB images and the Wiener estimation method.

  20. Contact modelling of human skin: what value to use for the modulus of elasticity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kuilenburg, Julien; Masen, Marc Arthur; van der Heide, Emile

    2012-01-01

    In modelling and understanding the contact and friction behaviour of human skin, the elastic modulus of the skin is an important input parameter. For the development of design rules for the engineering of surfaces in contact with the skin an expression that describes the relation between the elastic

  1. In situ depletion of CD4(+) T cells in human skin by Zanolimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, L.S.; Skov, L.; Dam, T.N.

    2007-01-01

    -driving T cells in situ may therefore be a useful approach in the treatment of inflammatory and malignant skin diseases. Depletion of CD4(+) T cells in intact inflamed human skin tissue by Zanolimumab, a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody (IgG1, kappa) against CD4, was studied in a human psoriasis...

  2. Ex Vivo Expanded Human NK Cells Survive and Proliferate in Humanized Mice with Autologous Human Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Fatemeh; Nham, Tina; Poznanski, Sophie M; Chew, Marianne V; Shenouda, Mira M; Lee, Dean; Ashkar, Ali A

    2017-09-21

    Adoptive immune cell therapy is emerging as a promising immunotherapy for cancer. Particularly, the adoptive transfer of NK cells has garnered attention due to their natural cytotoxicity against tumor cells and safety upon adoptive transfer to patients. Although strategies exist to efficiently generate large quantities of expanded NK cells ex vivo, it remains unknown whether these expanded NK cells can persist and/or proliferate in vivo in the absence of exogenous human cytokines. Here, we have examined the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human cord blood-derived NK cells into humanized mice reconstituted with autologous human cord blood immune cells. We report that ex vivo expanded NK cells are able to survive and possibly proliferate in vivo in humanized mice without exogenous cytokine administration, but not in control mice that lack human immune cells. These findings demonstrate that the presence of autologous human immune cells supports the in vivo survival of ex vivo expanded human NK cells. These results support the application of ex vivo expanded NK cells in cancer immunotherapy and provide a translational humanized mouse model to test the lifespan, safety, and functionality of adoptively transferred cells in the presence of autologous human immune cells prior to clinical use.

  3. Mechanical properties of the human Achilles tendon, in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Nielsen, C H; Hegnsvad, S

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography has been widely applied for in vivo measurements of tendon mechanical properties. Assessments of human Achilles tendon mechanical properties have received great interest. Achilles tendon injuries predominantly occur in the tendon region between the Achilles-soleus myotendinous...... junction and Achilles-calcaneus osteotendinous junction i.e. in the free Achilles tendon. However, there has been no adequate ultrasound based method for quantifying the mechanical properties of the free human Achilles tendon. This study aimed to: 1) examine the mechanical properties of the free human...

  4. Demonstration of tyrosinase in the vitiligo skin of human beings by a sensitive fluorometric method as well as by 14C(U)-L-tyrosine incorporation into melanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, I.; Vijayan, E.; Ramaiah, A.; Pasricha, J.S.; Madan, N.C.

    1982-03-01

    Tyrosinase activity (Monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine: oxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.14.18.1) in vitiligo and normal epidermal homogenates of skin from human beings was measured by estimating beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) by a highly sensitive fluorometric method described in this paper. The tyrosine activity in the vitiligo skin was about 4 to 37% of corresponding normal skin. The activity of tyrosinase in normal human skin from different individuals and from different regions of the body was in the range of 4 to 140 picomoles of beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine formed per min/mg protein of epidermal homogenate. The enzyme from vitiligo and normal skin was severely inhibited by substance(s) of low molecular weight. The enzyme exhibits a lag of about 4 hr in the absence of added beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 1 hr in presence of 5 microM dopa. Tyrosinase from the normal and vitiligo skin was inhibited by excess concentration of tyrosine. The homogenates from vitiligo skin could synthesize melanin from C14(U)-L-Tyrosine. The rate of tyrosine incorporation into melanin by the epidermal homogenates is increased by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) disproportionate to its effect on tyrosinase activity. Based on the data presented in this paper it is concluded that melanocytes are present in the vitiligo skin. A tentative hypothesis is put forward to explain the lack of melanin synthesis by the vitiligo skin under in vivo conditions, although melanocytes are present.

  5. Heat Transfer in Human Skin Exposed to Radiation from Forest Fire Taking Into Account Moisture Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poptsov Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation is one of the damaging factors of forest fire. As a result of exposure to radiant heat flow, thermal damage of the human skin is possible. A layer of skin is considered with effective thermophysical characteristics. Thin layer of sweat excretion situated on top of the skin. A mathematical model of heat transfer in the system of “skin-excretion” is developed taking into account evaporation of moisture. Typical simulation results are presented.

  6. Stress-induced responses of human skin fibroblasts in vitro reflect human longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Pim; Maier, Andrea B.; van Heemst, Diana; de Koning-Treurniet, Corine; Blom, Joke; Dirks, Roeland W.; Tanke, Hans J.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Unlike various model organisms, cellular responses to stress have not been related to human longevity. We investigated cellular responses to stress in skin fibroblasts that were isolated from young and very old subjects, and from offspring of nonagenarian siblings and their partners, representatives

  7. Characterizing human skin blood flow regulation in response to different local skin temperature perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Nieuwenhoff, M D; Huygen, F J P M; van der Helm, F C T; Niehof, S; Schouten, A C

    2017-05-01

    Small nerve fibers regulate local skin blood flow in response to local thermal perturbations. Small nerve fiber function is difficult to assess with classical neurophysiological tests. In this study, a vasomotor response model in combination with a heating protocol was developed to quantitatively characterize the control mechanism of small nerve fibers in regulating skin blood flow in response to local thermal perturbation. The skin of healthy subjects' hand dorsum (n=8) was heated to 42°C with an infrared lamp, and then naturally cooled down. The distance between the lamp and the hand was set to three different levels in order to change the irradiation intensity on the skin and implement three different skin temperature rise rates (0.03°C/s, 0.02°C/s and 0.01°C/s). A laser Doppler imager (LDI) and a thermographic video camera recorded the temporal profile of the skin blood flow and the skin temperature, respectively. The relationship between the skin blood flow and the skin temperature was characterized by a vasomotor response model. The model fitted the skin blood flow response well with a variance accounted for (VAF) between 78% and 99%. The model parameters suggested a similar mechanism for the skin blood flow regulation with the thermal perturbations at 0.03°C/s and 0.02°C/s. But there was an accelerated skin vasoconstriction after a slow heating (0.01°C/s) (p-valueskin vasodilation was also observed in four out of the seven subjects during the slow heating (0.01°C/s). Our method provides a promising way to quantitatively assess the function of small nerve fibers non-invasively and non-contact. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Optical clearing assisted confocal microscopy of ex vivo transgenic mouse skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eunjoo; Ahn, YoonJoon; Ahn, Jinhyo; Ahn, Soyeon; Kim, Changhwan; Choi, Sanghoon; Boutilier, Richard Martin; Lee, Yongjoong; Kim, Pilhan; Lee, Ho

    2015-10-01

    We examined the optical clearing assisted confocal microscopy of the transgenic mouse skin. The pinna and dorsal skin were imaged with a confocal microscope after the application of glycerol and FocusClear. In case of the glycerol-treated pinna, the clearing was minimal due to the inefficient permeability. However, the imaging depth was improved when the pinna was treated with FocusClear. In case of dorsal skin, we were able to image deeply to the subcutaneous connective tissue with both agents. Various skin structures such as the vessel, epithelium cells, cartilage, dermal cells, and hair follicles were clearly imaged.

  9. An in vivo mouse model of metastatic human thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisa; Gaskins, Kelli; Yu, Zhiya; Xiong, Yin; Merino, Maria J; Kebebew, Electron

    2014-04-01

    Mouse models of metastatic human cancers are important tools in preclinical studies for testing new systematic therapies and studying effectors of cancer metastasis. The major drawbacks of current mouse models for metastatic thyroid cancer are that they have low metastasis rates and do not allow in vivo tumor detection. Here, we report and characterize an in vivo detectable metastasis mouse model of human thyroid cancer using multiple thyroid cancer cell lines. Human anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines 8505C, C-643, SW-1736, and THJ-16T; follicular thyroid cancer cell lines FTC-133, FTC-236, and FTC-238; and Hürthle cell carcinoma cell line XTC-1 were transfected with a linearized pGL4.51[luc2/CMV/Neo] vector or transduced with lentivirus containing Luc2-eGFP reporter genes. The stably transfected cells were injected intravenously into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. Tumors were detected with an in vivo imaging system-Xenogen IVIS. Vemurafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, was used to treat lung metastases generated from 8505C-Luc2 cells with a BRAF(V600E) mutation to test the accuracy of the model to evaluate response to therapy. Intravenous injection of as few as 30,000 8505C-Luc2 cells produced lung metastases in 100% of the injected mice, and many of these mice also developed bone metastases at a later stage of the disease. Similarly, metastatic tumors also developed in all mice injected with C-643-Luc2, THJ-16T-Luc2, FTC-133-Luc2, FTC-236-Luc2, FTC-238-Luc2, and XTC-1-Luc2 cells. The metastases were easily detectable in vivo, and tumor progression could be dynamically and accurately followed and correlated with the actual tumor burden. Furthermore, disease progression could be easily controlled by adjusting the number of injected cells. The in vivo treatment of 8505C xenograft lung metastases with vemurafenib dramatically reduced the growth and signal intensity with good correlation with actual tumor burden. Herein we report an in vivo detectable mouse model

  10. Instrumentation for the measurement of autofluorescence in the human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, R; Meerwaldt, R; Lutgers, HL; Baptist, R; de Jong, ED; Zijp, [No Value; Links, TP; Smit, AJ; Rakhorst, G; VoDinh, T; Grundfest, WS; Benaron, DA; Cohn, GE

    2005-01-01

    A setup to measure skin autofluorescence was developed to assess accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) in patients noninvasively. The method applies direct blacklight tube illumination of the skin of the lower arm, and spectrometry. The setup displays skin autofluorescence (AF) as a

  11. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...... barrier function of the skin. The amount of chromium found in all skin layers after application of chromium chloride decreased with increasing pH due to lower solubility of the salt. The % of chromium found in the recipient phase as chromium(VI) increased with increasing total chromium concentration...

  12. Intermuscular force transmission between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Schwartz, Sidse

    2010-01-01

    The exact mechanical function of synergist muscles within a human limb in vivo is not well described. Recent studies indicate the existence of a mechanical interaction between muscle actuators that may have functional significance and further play a role for injury mechanisms. The purpose...... of the present study was to investigate if intermuscular force transmission occurs within and between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo. Seven subjects performed four types of either active contractile tasks or passive joint manipulations: passive knee extension, voluntary isometric plantarflexion, voluntary...... task-induced tissue displacement (which is assumed to represent loading) for the plantarflexor muscles [MG, soleus (SOL), and flexor hallucis longus (FHL)]. Selective MG stimulation and passive knee extension resulted in displacement of both the MG and SOL muscles. Minimal displacement of the triceps...

  13. Constructing Human Skin Equivalents on Porcine Acellular Peritoneum Extracellular Matrix for In Vitro Irritation Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Chin; Zhang, Zheng; Florek, Charles; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B

    2016-01-01

    The irritancy of topical products has to be investigated to ensure the safety and compliance. Although several reconstructed human epidermal models have been adopted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to replace in vivo animal irritation testing, these models are based on a single cell type and lack dermal components, which may be insufficient to reflect all of the components of irritation. In our study, we investigated the use of acellular porcine peritoneum extracellular matrix as a substrate to construct full-thickness human skin equivalents (HSEs) for use as irritation screening tool. The acellular peritoneum matrix (APM) exhibited excellent skin cell attachment (>80%) and proliferation for human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). APM-HSEs based on coculture of HDF and HaCaT were prepared. Increased HDF seeding density up to 5 × 10(4)/cm(2) resulted in APM-HSEs with a thicker and more organized epidermis. The epidermis of APM-HSEs expressed keratin 15, a keratinocyte proliferation marker, and involucrin, a differentiation marker, respectively. To assess the use of APM-HSEs for irritation testing, six proficiency chemicals, including three nonirritants (phosphate-buffered saline, polyethylene glycol 400, and isopropanol) and three irritants (1-bromohexane, heptanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate) were applied. The APM-HSEs were able to discriminate nonirritants from irritants based on the viability. Levels of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1α, IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-8, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) in these treatment groups further assisted the irritancy ranking. In conclusion, we have developed partially differentiated full-thickness APM-HSEs based on acellular porcine peritoneum matrix, and these APM-HSEs demonstrated utility as an in vitro irritation screening tool.

  14. Efficacy of glutathione in ameliorating sulfur mustard analog-induced toxicity in cultured skin epidermal cells and in SKH-1 mouse skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Chapla; Huang, Jie; Day, Brian J; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2011-02-01

    Exposure to chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD) is reported to cause GSH depletion, which plays an important role in HD-linked oxidative stress and skin injury. Using the HD analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), we evaluated the role of GSH and its efficacy in ameliorating CEES-caused skin injury. Using mouse JB6 and human HaCaT epidermal keratinocytes, we observed both protective and therapeutic effects of exogenous GSH (1 or 10 mM) in attenuating a CEES-caused decrease in cell viability and DNA synthesis, as well as S and G(2)M phase arrest in cell cycle progression. However, the protective effect of GSH was stronger than its ability to reverse CEES-induced cytotoxic effect. The observed effect of GSH could be associated with an increase in intracellular GSH levels after its treatment before or after CEES exposure, which strongly depleted cellular GSH levels. N-Acetyl cysteine, a GSH precursor, also showed both protective and therapeutic effects against CEES-caused cytotoxicity. Buthionine sulfoximine, which reduces cellular GSH levels, caused an increased CEES cytotoxicity in both JB6 and HaCaT cells. In further studies translating GSH effects in cell culture, pretreatment of mice with 300 mg/kg GSH via oral gavage 1 h before topical application of CEES resulted in significant protection against CEES-caused increase in skin bifold and epidermal thickness, apoptotic cell death, and myeloperoxidase activity, which could be associated with increased skin GSH levels. Together, these results highlight GSH efficacy in ameliorating CEES-caused skin injury and further support the need for effective antioxidant countermeasures against skin injury by HD exposure.

  15. International guidelines for the in vivo assessment of skin properties in non-clinical settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Plessis, Johan du; John, Swen M

    2013-01-01

    position, skin health, time of day), exogenous (hand washing, barrier creams, soaps and detergents, occlusion), environmental (seasonality), and measurement (atmospheric conditions) factors; (ii) report pH measurements results as a difference or percent change (not absolute values) using a measure......BACKGROUND: Skin surface pH is known to influence the dissolution and partitioning of chemicals and may influence exposures that lead to skin diseases. Non-clinical environments (e.g. workplaces) are highly variable, thereby presenting unique measurement challenges that are not typically...... encountered in clinical settings. Hence, guidelines are needed for consistent measurement of skin surface pH in environments that are difficult to control. METHODS: An expert workshop was convened at the 5th International Conference on Occupational and Environmental Exposure of Skin to Chemicals to review...

  16. Myelin water fraction in human cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yijing; Alexander, Andrew L; Fleming, John O; Duncan, Ian D; Field, Aaron S

    2006-01-01

    The noninvasive discrimination of myelin disease from axonal loss and other pathologic confounds remains an unsolved problem in multiple sclerosis but may be possible through magnetic resonance quantitation of the intramyelinic water compartment. Technical challenges have limited the study of this approach in the spinal cord, a common site of involvement in multiple sclerosis. This technical note reports the test-retest reproducibility of a short T2-based estimate of myelin content in human spinal cord in vivo.

  17. Susceptibility of anthocyanins to ex vivo degradation in human saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Kamonpatana, Kom; Giusti, M. Mónica; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; MorenoCruz, Maria; Riedl, Ken M.; Kumar, Purnima; Failla, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Some fruits and their anthocyanin-rich extracts have been reported to exhibit chemopreventive activity in the oral cavity. Insights regarding oral metabolism of anthocyanins remain limited. Anthocyanin-rich extracts from blueberry, chokeberry, black raspberry, red grape, and strawberry were incubated ex vivo with human saliva from 14 healthy subjects. All anthocyanins were partially degraded in saliva. Degradation of chokeberry anthocyanins in saliva was temperature dependent and decreased by...

  18. Singlet molecular oxygen quenching by the antioxidant dimethylmethoxy chromanol in solution and in ex vivo porcine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonell, S; García-Díaz, M; Viladot, J L; Delgado, R

    2013-06-01

    Singlet-oxygen is a non-radical reactive oxygen species believed to play a major role in many photooxidation processes in connection with diverse photo-biological processes such as skin ageing or photocarcinogenesis. Dimethylmethoxy chromanol (3,4-dihydro-6-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-7-methoxy-1(2H)-benzopyran) is a potent antioxidant used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations. We have assessed the singlet oxygen quenching ability of dimethylmethoxy chromanol, by monitoring the near-IR phosphorescence of singlet-oxygen in solution and in ex vivo porcine skin samples. Dimethylmethoxy chromanol quenches singlet oxygen with a rate constant of (1.3 ± 0.1) × 10⁸ M⁻¹ s⁻¹ in solution. Consistent with this, a clear reduction in the singlet oxygen lifetime and emission intensity was observed when ex vivo porcine skin samples were treated with dimethylmethoxy chromanol. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  19. The skin-depigmenting potential of Paeonia lactiflora root extract and paeoniflorin: in vitro evaluation using reconstructed pigmented human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, J; Chen, M; Liu, J; Huang, X; Chen, J; Zhou, L; Ma, J; Sextius, P; Pena, A-M; Cai, Z; Jeulin, S

    2016-10-01

    The roots of the herb Paeonia lactiflora ('White Peony') are used in association with other herbs in traditional clinical cosmetic practice in China as oral treatment for skin pigmentary disorders, such as brown or dark pigmentary spots. However, the skin-depigmenting potential of Paeonia lactiflora root extract and its main ingredient paeoniflorin has been scarcely investigated by topical application. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Paeonia lactiflora root extract and paeoniflorin as skin whitening agent in cosmetic application. Paeonia lactiflora root extract (containing 53.25% of paeoniflorin) and paeoniflorin (97% purity) were applied topically on reconstructed pigmented human epidermis model, a three-dimensional (3D) human skin equivalent, showing morphological and functional characteristics similar to those of in vivo human skin. Two specific methods were used for quantifying melanin inside the reconstructed pigmented epidermis: Fontana-Masson staining (2D quantification) and multiphoton microscopy (3D quantification). Compared to vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide DMSO), a significant decrease in 2D and 3D melanin content was observed after topical application on reconstructed pigmented epidermis of Paeonia lactiflora extract at 300 μg mL(-1) (-28% and -27%, respectively) and paeoniflorin at 120 μg mL(-1) /250 μM (-30% and -23%, respectively), which is in the same order of magnitude as the positive reference 4-n-butylresorcinol at 83 μg mL(-1) /500 μM (-26% and -40%, respectively). These results demonstrate, for the first time, the depigmenting potential of paeoniflorin and thus the potential interest of using Paeonia lactiflora root extracts containing paeoniflorin in cosmetic or dermatological applications for reducing the severity of some hyperpigmented skin disorders. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  20. Identification of a novel pro-inflammatory human skin-homing Vγ9Vδ2 T cell subset with a potential role in psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAGGNER, Ute; DI MEGLIO, Paola; PERERA, Gayathri K.; HUNDHAUSEN, Christian; LACY, Katie E.; ALI, Niwa; SMITH, Catherine H.; HAYDAY, Adrian C.; NICKOLOFF, Brian J.; NESTLE, Frank O.

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells mediate rapid tissue responses in murine skin and participate in cutaneous immune regulation including protection against cancer. The role of human γδ cells in cutaneous homeostasis and pathology is poorly characterized. In this study we show in vivo evidence that human blood contains a distinct subset of pro-inflammatory cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA) and C-C chemokine receptor (CCR) 6 positive Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, which is rapidly recruited into perturbed human skin. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells produced an array of pro-inflammatory mediators including IL-17A and activated keratinocytes in a TNF-α and IFN-γ dependent manner. Examination of the common inflammatory skin disease psoriasis revealed a striking reduction of circulating Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in psoriasis patients compared to healthy controls and atopic dermatitis patients. Decreased numbers of circulating Vγ9Vδ2 T cells normalized after successful treatment with psoriasis-targeted therapy. Together with the increased presence of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in psoriatic skin, this data indicates redistribution of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells from the blood to the skin compartment in psoriasis. In summary, we report a novel human pro-inflammatory γδ T cell involved in skin immune surveillance with immediate response characteristics and with potential clinical relevance in inflammatory skin disease. PMID:21813772

  1. In vivo skin fluorescence imaging in young Caucasian adults with early malignant melanomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piérard GE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gérald E Piérard,1 Trinh Hermanns-Lê,2 Sébastien L Piérard,3 Lucas Dewalque,4 Corinne Charlier,4 Claudine Piérard-Franchimont,2 Philippe Delvenne2 1Laboratory of Skin Bioengineering and Imaging (LABIC, Department of Clinical Sciences, Liège University, 2Department of Dermatopathology, Unilab Lg, University Hospital of Liège, 3INTELSIG Laboratory, Montefiore Institute, University of Liège, 4Department of Clinical, Forensic and Environmental Toxicology, University Hospital of Liège, Liège, Belgium Background: Human cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM is an aggressive cancer showing a dramatic worldwide increase in incidence over the past few decades. The most prominent relative epidemiological increase has been disclosed in young women. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of chronic sun exposures in order to rate the extend of melanocytic stimulations in the vicinity of CMM. Methods: The study was designed to evaluate the melanin distribution and density using ultraviolet light illumination. The present study was performed on surgical excision specimens of thin CMM lesion removed from the upper limbs of 55 Caucasian adults (37 women and 18 men. Two control groups comprised 23 men and 21 women of similar ages who had medium-size congenital melanocytic nevi, also present on the upper limbs. The peritumoral skin was scrutinized using a Visioscan® VC98 device, revealing the faint mosaic melanoderma (FMM pattern that grossly indicates early signs of chronic photodamage in epidermal melanin units. Results: The median extent of relative FMM was significantly higher in the CMM male group. By contrast, the CMM female group showed a reverse bimodal distribution in FMM size. Only 12/37 (32.5% of the CMM female group had an increased FMM size, whereas 25/37 (67.5% of females with CMM had a global FMM extent in the normal range, relative to the controls. Conclusion: Thin CMM supervening in young women appear unrelated to repeat

  2. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Lei [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Xiao, Yongsheng [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Wang, Yinsheng, E-mail: yinsheng.wang@ucr.edu [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  3. Barrier function in reconstructed epidermis and its resemblance to native human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponec, M.; Gibbs, S.; Pilgram, G.; Boelsma, E.; Koerten, H.; Bouwstra, J.; Mommaas, M.

    2001-01-01

    One of the prerequisites for the use of human skin equivalents for scientific and screening purposes is that their barrier function is similar to that of native skin. Using human epidermis reconstructed on de-epidermized dermis we demonstrated that the formation of the stratum corneum (SC) barrier

  4. Barrier Ëunction in Reconstructed Epidermis and Its Resembiance to Native Human Skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponec, M.; Gibbs, S.; GPilgram, G.; BoeIsma, E.; Koerten, H.; Bouwstra, J.; Mommaas, M.

    2001-01-01

    One of the prerequisitesforthe use of human skin equivalents for scientific and screening purposes is that their barrierfunction is similar to that of native skin. Using human epidermis reconstructed en de-epidermized dermis we demonstrated that the formation of the stratum corneum (SC) barrier in

  5. Insight into the immunobiology of human skin and functional specialization of skin dendritic cell subsets to innovate intradermal vaccination design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, M B M; Haniffa, M; Collin, M P

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the key initiators and regulators of any immune response which determine the outcome of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses. Multiple distinct DC subsets can be distinguished by location, phenotype, and function in the homeostatic and inflamed human skin. The function of steady-state cutaneous DCs or recruited inflammatory DCs is influenced by the surrounding cellular and extracellular skin microenvironment. The skin is an attractive site for vaccination given the extended local network of DCs and the easy access to the skin-draining lymph nodes to generate effector T cells and immunoglobulin-producing B cells for long-term protective immunity. In the context of intradermal vaccination we describe in this review the skin-associated immune system, the characteristics of the different skin DC subsets, the mechanism of antigen uptake and presentation, and how the properties of DCs can be manipulated. This knowledge is critical for the development of intradermal vaccine strategies and supports the concept of intradermal vaccination as a superior route to the conventional intramuscular or subcutaneous methods.

  6. Under Persistent Assault: Understanding the Factors that Deteriorate Human Skin and Clinical Efficacy of Topical Antioxidants in Treating Aging Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia K. Farris

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies contend that the skin is subject to far more damage than just ultraviolet (UV light, with infrared radiation and pollution now clearly demonstrated to degrade cutaneous tissue. While consumers continue to strive for new ways to augment the aesthetic appeal and improve the health of their skin, awareness regarding environmental insults and effective ways to protect the skin remains low. New advances in dermatologic science have exponentially increased the available information on the underlying mechanism of cutaneous damage and potential of topical antioxidants to treat aging skin. Combining antioxidants that can work through multiple pathways holds great potential for a cumulative and synergistic way to treat aging skin. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive review on environmental factors that damage human skin, discuss scientifically proven benefits of topical antioxidants, understand challenges of formulating and administering topical antioxidants, evaluate novel mechanisms of antioxidant activity, and suggest practical ways of integrating topical antioxidants with aesthetic procedures to complement clinical outcomes.

  7. Determination of the Antioxidant Status of the Skin by In Vivo-Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Barbara Lohan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Organisms produce free radicals which are essential for various metabolic processes (enzymatic oxidation, cellular respiration, signaling. Antioxidants are important chemical compounds that specifically prevent the oxidation of substances by scavenging radicals, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS. Made up of one or two unpaired electrons, ROS are free radicals that are highly reactive and can attack other metabolites. By using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy, it is possible to measure paramagnetic substances such as free radicals. Therefore the dermal antioxidant activity can be determined by applying semi-stable radicals onto the skin and measuring the antioxidant-induced radical scavenging activity in the skin. In recent years, EPR has been developed as a spectroscopic method for determining the antioxidant status in vivo. Several studies have shown that an additional uptake of dietary supplements, such as carotenoids or vitamin C in physiological concentrations, provide a protective effect against free radicals. Using the EPR technique it could be demonstrated that the radical production in stress situations, such as irradiation with infrared and visible light, was reduced with time. However, not only the oral uptake of antioxidants, but also the topical application of antioxidants, e.g., a hyperforin-rich cream, is very useful against the development of oxidative stress. Regular application of a hyperforin-rich cream reduced radical formation. The skin lipids, which are very important for the barrier function of the skin, were also stabilized.

  8. A topical antioxidant solution containing vitamins C and E stabilized by ferulic acid provides protection for human skin against damage caused by ultraviolet irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John C; Burch, James A; Streilein, Robert D; Iannacchione, Mary Ann; Hall, Russell P; Pinnell, Sheldon R

    2008-09-01

    Skin cancer and photoaging changes result from ultraviolet (UV)-induced oxidative stress. Topical antioxidants may protect skin from these effects. We sought to determine whether a stable topical formulation of 15% L-ascorbic acid, 1% alpha-tocopherol, and 0.5% ferulic acid (CEFer) could protect human skin in vivo from substantial amounts of solar-simulated UV radiation. CEFer and its vehicle were applied to separate patches of normal-appearing human skin for 4 days. Each patch was irradiated with solar-simulated UV, 2 to 10 minimal erythema doses, at 2-minimal erythema dose intervals. One day later, skin was evaluated for erythema and sunburn cells, and immunohistochemically for thymine dimers and p53. UV-induced cytokine formation, including interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. CEFer provided significant and meaningful photoprotection for skin by all methods of evaluation. The number of patients evaluated was relatively small. CEFer provided substantial UV photoprotection for skin. It is particularly effective for reducing thymine dimer mutations known to be associated with skin cancer. Its mechanism of action is different from sunscreens and would be expected to supplement the sun protection provided by sunscreens.

  9. Elastic wave induced by friction as a signature of human skin ageing and gender effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaghloul, M; Morizot, F; Zahouani, H

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we propose an innovative approach based on a rotary tribometer coupled with laser velocimetry for measuring the elastic wave propagation on the skin. The method is based on a dynamic contact with the control of the normal force (Fn ), the contact length and speed. During the test a quantification of the friction force is produced. The elastic wave generated by friction is measured at the surface of the skin 35 mm from the source of friction exciter. In order to quantify the spectral range and the energy property of the wave generated, we have used laser velocimetry whose spot laser diameter is 120 μm, which samples the elastic wave propagation at a frequency which may reach 100 kHz. In this configuration, the speaker is the friction exciter and the listener the laser velocimetry. In order to perform non-invasive friction tests, the normal stress has been set to 0.3 N and the rotary velocity to 3 revolutions per second, which involves a sliding velocity of 63 mm/s. This newly developed innovative tribometer has been used for the analysis of the elastic wave propagation induced by friction on human skin during chronological ageing and gender effect. Measurements in vivo have been made on 60 healthy men and women volunteers, aged from 25 to 70. The results concerning the energy of the elastic wave signature induced by friction show a clear difference between the younger and older groups in the range of a low band of frequencies (0-200 Hz). The gender effect was marked by a 20% decrease in the energy of elastic wave propagation in the female group. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The release of leukotriene B4 from human skin in response to substance P: evidence for the functional heterogeneity of human skin mast cells among individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, T; Hide, M; Koro, O; Nimi, N; Yamamoto, S

    2001-01-01

    Substance P is located in cutaneous nerve fibres and induces wheal and flare responses, accompanied by granulocyte infiltration, upon intradermal injection. Studies with animal skin and rat peritoneal mast cells have suggested that substance P induces the release of histamine and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a potent chemoattractant for granulocytes, from skin mast cells. However, the release of LTB4 has not been detected from mast cells enzymatically isolated from human skin. In order to investigate the mechanism of granulocyte infiltration induced by substance P in human skin, we studied the release of LTB4 and histamine in response to substance P, and the effect of dexamethasone using human skin obtained from 22 nonallergic individuals. Histamine was released from all skin tissue samples in a dose-dependent manner. However, the amount of LTB4 release, both constitutive and inducible, was variable among skin preparations. Substance P induced a large release of LTB4 from the skin of eight donors (twice to six times that of the spontaneous release), but no or only negligible release from the skin of 14 donors. The amount of constitutive release of LTB4 correlated with the amount of tissue histamine. Dexamethasone selectively abolished the inducible release of LTB4, without an effect on histamine release and the constitutive release of LTB4. These results suggest that substance P induces the release of LTB4 in a certain population of human individuals by a glucocorticosteroid-dependent mechanism, and plays an important role in neurogenic inflammation with granulocyte infiltration. PMID:11359454

  11. Human skin-derived stem cells migrate throughout forebrain and differentiate into astrocytes after injection into adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belicchi, Marzia; Pisati, Federica; Lopa, Raffaella; Porretti, Laura; Fortunato, Francesco; Sironi, Manuela; Scalamogna, Mario; Parati, Eugenio A; Bresolin, Nereo; Torrente, Yvan

    2004-08-15

    Recent evidence indicates that neural stem cell properties can be found among a mammalian skin-derived multipotent population. A major barrier in the further characterization of the human skin-derived neural progenitors is the inability to isolate this population based on expression of cell surface markers. Our work has been devoted to purified human skin-derived stem cells that are capable of neural differentiation, based on the presence or absence of the AC133 cell surface marker. The enriched skin-derived AC133(+) cells express the CD34 and Thy-1 antigens. These cells cultured in a growth medium containing epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) proliferate, forming spheres, and differentiate in vitro into neurons, astrocytes, and rarely into oligodendrocytes. Single cells from sphere cultures initiated from human purified AC133(+) cells were replated as single cells and were able to generate new spheres, demonstrating the self-renewing ability of these stem cell populations. Brain engraftment of cells obtained from human purified AC133(+)-derived spheres generated different neural phenotypes: immature neurons and a most abundant population of well differentiated astrocytes. The AC133-derived astrocytes assumed perivascular locations in the frontal cortex. No donor-derived oligodendrocytes were found in the transplanted mouse brains. Several donor small, rounded cells that expressed endothelial markers were found close to the host vessel and near the subventricular zone. Thus, mammalian skin AC133-derived cells behave as a multipotent population with the capacity to differentiate into neural lineages in vitro and, prevalently, endothelium and astrocytes in vivo, demonstrating the great plasticity of these cells and suggesting potential clinical application. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Human gingival fibroblasts display a non-fibrotic phenotype distinct from skin fibroblasts in three-dimensional cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Mah

    Full Text Available Scar formation following skin injury can be a major psychosocial and physiological problem. However, the mechanisms of scar formation are still not completely understood. Previous studies have shown that wound healing in oral mucosa is faster, associates with a reduced inflammatory response and results to significantly reduced scar formation compared with skin wounds. In the present study, we hypothesized that oral mucosal fibroblasts from human gingiva are inherently distinct from fibroblasts from breast and abdominal skin, two areas prone to excessive scar formation, which may contribute to the preferential wound healing outcome in gingiva. To this end, we compared the phenotype of human gingival and skin fibroblasts cultured in in vivo-like three-dimensional (3D cultures that mimic the cells' natural extracellular matrix (ECM niche. To establish 3D cultures, five parallel fibroblast lines from human gingiva (GFBLs and breast skin (SFBLs were seeded in high density, and cultured for up to 21 days in serum and ascorbic acid containing medium to induce expression of wound-healing transcriptome and ECM deposition. Cell proliferation, morphology, phenotype and expression of wound healing and scar related genes were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemical methods. The expression of a set of genes was also studied in three parallel lines of human abdominal SFBLs. Findings showed that GFBLs displayed morphologically distinct organization of the 3D cultures and proliferated faster than SFBLs. GFBLs expressed elevated levels of molecules involved in regulation of inflammation and ECM remodeling (MMPs while SFBLs showed significantly higher expression of TGF-β signaling, ECM and myofibroblast and cell contractility-related genes. Thus, GFBLs display an inherent phenotype conducive for fast resolution of inflammation and ECM remodeling, characteristic for scar-free wound healing, while SFBLs have a profibrotic, scar

  13. Investigation of in vivo potential of scorpion venom against skin tumorigenesis in mice via targeting markers associated with cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Asmari AK

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdulrahman K Al Asmari, Abdul Quaiyoom Khan Research Centre, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world in spite of the advances made in its management. In this study, we investigated the in vivo antitumorigenic potential of the venom obtained from a medically important scorpion species Leiurus quinquestriatus on chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Animals were divided into five groups, with 13 animals in each group. All the treatments were given topically on the shaved dorsal surface of the skin. Animals in Group 1 received vehicle only (0.2 mL acetone. Moreover, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 400 nmol per mouse was applied to all the animals in the remaining four groups. After 1 week, different concentrations of venom (17.5 µg, 35 µg, and 52.5 µg per animal were applied to each animal in the Groups III–V. Thirty minutes after the application of venom, croton oil was applied on the same position where venom was administered to the animals of Groups III–V. Animals in Group II were treated as the positive control (without venom and received croton oil as in Groups III–V. The findings of this study revealed that venom extract of L. quinquestriatus inhibits DMBA + croton oil-induced mouse skin tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity. Venom treatment also decreased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry results showed a downregulation of the expression of molecular markers such as Ki-67, nuclear factor kappa-B, cyclooxygenase-2, B-cell lymphoma-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in venom-treated animals. Our findings suggest that the venom of L. quinquestriatus possesses in vivo anticancer potential and may be used in the development of anticancer molecules. Keywords: Leiurus quinquestriatus, skin cancer, apoptosis, immunosuppression

  14. Fat tissue histological study at NIR laser treatment of the skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanina, Irina Y.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Navolokin, Nikita A.; Matveeva, Olga V.; Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Maslyakova, Galina N.

    2011-07-01

    Histological slices of skin samples with the subcutaneous adipose tissue after laser irradiation at different doses are analyzed. These data may be used at carrying out of the analysis of histological slices of skin samples with the subcutaneous adipose tissue after photodynamic therapy. The obtained data are important for safe layer-by-layer dosimetry of laser irradiation used in the treatment of obesity and cellulite.

  15. Raman spectroscopic investigation of the effects of cosmetic formulations on the constituents and properties of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosato, Maira G; Alves, Rani S; Dos Santos, Edson A P; Raniero, Leandro; Menezes, Priscila F C; Belletti, Klésia M S; Praes, Carlos Eduardo O; Martin, Airton A

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the biochemical alterations in hydration and skin proteins, which are associated with the skin aging process, caused by cosmetic use. Many techniques have been used to assess the effectiveness of cosmetics' hydrating and anti-aging effects on skin. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has been shown to be a powerful, noninvasive tool that can monitor changes in the biomolecules of the skin in real time. Were analyzed human skin in vivo at the beginning of the experiment (T0) and after 30 (T30) and 60 (T60) days of continuous use of a cosmetic product. Fourier-transform and dispersive Raman spectroscopy were the used to examine the periorbicular right lateral eye region of 16 female Brazilian volunteers, aged 60-75 years. Multivariate statistical analysis of principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis were performed on all Raman spectra. Using the cosmetic product for 30 days increased the intensity of the Raman bands for collagen, amide III (1250-1350 cm(-1)) for proteins, and the water (OH) stretching mode at 3250 cm(-1), suggesting that the treatment was effective. The changes observed at T30 were not sustained at the same intensity for 60 days. Intensity variations in other bands may be related to changes in the organization of the epidermis at the dermal matrix. The application of cosmetics with active moisturizing and anti-aging properties helps to maintain the skin's protective barrier and to slow the intrinsic and extrinsic aging processes of the skin.

  16. Identification of Biomarkers of Human Skin Ageing in Both Genders. Wnt Signalling - A Label of Skin Ageing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampeli, Vasiliki; Elewa, Rana Mohsen; Mlody, Barbara; Hossini, Amir M.; Hermes, Bjoern; Krause, Ulf; Knolle, Juergen; Abdallah, Marwa; Adjaye, James; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of our work has been to investigate the mechanisms of gender-independent human skin ageing and examine the hypothesis of skin being an adequate model of global ageing. For this purpose, whole genome gene profiling was employed in sun-protected skin obtained from European Caucasian young and elderly females (mean age 26.7±4 years [n1 = 7] and 70.75±3.3 years [n2 = 4], respectively) and males (mean age 25.8±5.2 years [n3 = 6] and 76±3.8 years [n4 = 7], respectively) using the Illumina array platform. Confirmation of gene regulation was performed by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. 523 genes were significantly regulated in female skin and 401 genes in male skin for the chosen criteria. Of these, 183 genes exhibited increased and 340 decreased expression in females whereas 210 genes showed increased and 191 decreased expression in males with age. In total, 39 genes were common in the target lists of significant regulated genes in males and females. 35 of these genes showed increased (16) or decreased (19) expression independent of gender. Only 4 overlapping genes (OR52N2, F6FR1OP2, TUBAL3 and STK40) showed differential regulation with age. Interestingly, Wnt signalling pathway showed to be significantly downregulated in aged skin with decreased gene and protein expression for males and females, accordingly. In addition, several genes involved in central nervous system (CNS) ageing (f.i. APP, TAU) showed to be expressed in human skin and were significanlty regulated with age. In conclusion, our study provides biomarkers of endogenous human skin ageing in both genders and highlight the role of Wnt signalling in this process. Furthermore, our data give evidence that skin could be used as a good alternative to understand ageing of different tissues such as CNS. PMID:23226273