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Sample records for vivo gas exchange

  1. In vivo MR imaging of pulmonary perfusion and gas exchange in rats via continuous extracorporeal infusion of hyperpolarized 129Xe.

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    Zackary I Cleveland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperpolarized (HP (129Xe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI permits high resolution, regional visualization of pulmonary ventilation. Additionally, its reasonably high solubility (>10% and large chemical shift range (>200 ppm in tissues allow HP (129Xe to serve as a regional probe of pulmonary perfusion and gas transport, when introduced directly into the vasculature. In earlier work, vascular delivery was accomplished in rats by first dissolving HP (129Xe in a biologically compatible carrier solution, injecting the solution into the vasculature, and then detecting HP (129Xe as it emerged into the alveolar airspaces. Although easily implemented, this approach was constrained by the tolerable injection volume and the duration of the HP (129Xe signal. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we overcome the volume and temporal constraints imposed by injection, by using hydrophobic, microporous, gas-exchange membranes to directly and continuously infuse (129Xe into the arterial blood of live rats with an extracorporeal (EC circuit. The resulting gas-phase (129Xe signal is sufficient to generate diffusive gas exchange- and pulmonary perfusion-dependent, 3D MR images with a nominal resolution of 2×2×2 mm(3. We also show that the (129Xe signal dynamics during EC infusion are well described by an analytical model that incorporates both mass transport into the blood and longitudinal relaxation. CONCLUSIONS: Extracorporeal infusion of HP (129Xe enables rapid, 3D MR imaging of rat lungs and, when combined with ventilation imaging, will permit spatially resolved studies of the ventilation-perfusion ratio in small animals. Moreover, EC infusion should allow (129Xe to be delivered elsewhere in the body and make possible functional and molecular imaging approaches that are currently not feasible using inhaled HP (129Xe.

  2. In vivo effects of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae DC-1 aphantoxins on gas exchange and ion equilibrium in the zebrafish gill

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    Zhang, Delu, E-mail: deluzh@163.com [Department of Lifescience and Biotechnology, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life Sciences, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Liu, Siyi [Department of Lifescience and Biotechnology, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life Sciences, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhang, Jing [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhang, Jian Kong [Department of Lifescience and Biotechnology, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life Sciences, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Hu, Chunxiang, E-mail: deluzh@ihb.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Algal Biology, Institute of Hydrobiology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu, Yongding [Key Laboratory of Algal Biology, Institute of Hydrobiology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Aphantoxins induce respiratory dysfunction in zebrafish gills. • Changes in LDH and cellular ultrastructure indicate gill damage. • Decreased NKA and CA reflect abnormal ion transport and gas exchange. • Increased ROS and decreased T-AOC suggest oxidative stress in the gills. - Abstract: Aphantoxins, neurotoxins or paralytic shellfish poisons (PSPs) generated by Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, are a threat to environmental safety and human health in eutrophic waters worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of neurotoxin function have been studied; however, the effects of these neurotoxins on oxidative stress, ion transport, gas exchange, and branchial ultrastructure in fish gills are not fully understood. Aphantoxins extracted from A. flos-aquae DC-1 were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. The major ingredients were gonyautoxins 1 and 5 and neosaxitoxin, which comprised 34.04%, 21.28%, and 12.77% of the total, respectively. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were administered A. flos-aquae DC-1 aphantoxins at 5.3 or 7.61 μg saxitoxin equivalents (eq)/kg (low and high doses, respectively) by intraperitoneal injection. The activities of Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase (NKA), carbonic anhydrase (CA), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), ultrastructural alterations in chloride and epithelial cells, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) were investigated in the gills during the first 24 h after exposure. Aphantoxins significantly increased the level of ROS and decreased the T-AOC in zebrafish gills from 3 to 12 h post-exposure, suggesting an induction of oxidative stress and inhibition of antioxidant capacity. Reduced activities of NKA and CA demonstrated abnormal ion transport and gas exchange in the gills of aphantoxin-treated fish. Toxin administration also resulted in increased LDH activity and ultrastructural alterations in chloride and epithelial cells, suggesting a disruption of function and structure in zebrafish

  3. History of respiratory gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B

    2011-07-01

    As early as the 6th century B.C. the Greeks speculated on a substance pneuma that meant breath or soul, and they argued that this was essential for life. An important figure in the 2nd century A.D. was Galen whose school developed an elaborate cardiopulmonary system that influenced scientific thinking for 1400 years. A key concept was that blood was mixed with pneuma from the lung in the left ventricle thus forming vital spirit. It was also believed that blood flowed from the right to the left ventricle of the heart through pores in the interventricular septum but this view was challenged first by the Arab physician Ibn al-Nafis in the 13th century and later by Michael Servetus in the 16th century. The 17th century saw an enormous burgeoning of knowledge about the respiratory gases. First Torricelli explained the origin of atmospheric pressure, and then a group of physiologists in Oxford clarified the properties of inspired gas that were necessary for life. This culminated in the work of Lavoisier who first clearly elucidated the nature of the respiratory gases, oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen. At that time it was thought that oxygen was consumed in the lung itself, and the fact that the actual metabolism took place in peripheral tissues proved to be a very elusive concept. It was not until the late 19th century that the issue was finally settled by Pflüger. In the early 20th century there was a colorful controversy about whether oxygen was secreted by the lung. During and shortly after World War II, momentous strides were made on the understanding of pulmonary gas exchange, particularly the role of ventilation-perfusion inequality. A critical development in the 1960s was the introduction of blood gas electrodes, and these have transformed the management of patients with severe lung disease. © 2011 American Physiological Society.

  4. The sites of respiratory gas exchange in the planktonic crustacean daphnia magna: an in vivo study employing blood haemoglobin as an internal oxygen probe

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    Pirow; Wollinger; Paul

    1999-11-01

    Recent studies on Daphnia magna have revealed that the feeding current is important for uptake of oxygen from the ambient medium. Respiratory gas exchange should therefore mainly occur within the filtering chamber, whose boundaries are formed by the trunk and the extended carapace shell valves. The precise site of gas exchange in the genus Daphnia is, however, a matter of conjecture. We have developed a method of imaging the haemoglobin oxygen-saturation in the circulatory system of transparent animals, which provides an opportunity to localize oxygen uptake from the environment and oxygen release to the tissues. Experiments were carried out at 20 degrees C on 2.8-3.0 mm long parthenogenetic females maintained in hypoxic culturing conditions, which had resulted in an increased haemoglobin content in the haemolymph. In lateral views of D. magna, the highest values of haemoglobin oxygen-saturation occurred near the posterior margin of the carapace and, surprisingly, in the rostral part of the head. The ambient oxygen partial pressures at which haemoglobin was half-oxygenated were 15 mmHg (2.0 kPa) for the posterior carapace region and 6 mmHg (0.8 kPa) for the rostrum. Although not all parts of the circulatory system could be analyzed using this technique, the data obtained from the accessible regions suggest that the inner wall of the carapace is a major site of respiratory gas exchange. Taking the circulatory pattern and the flow pattern of the medium in the filtering chamber into consideration, it becomes clear that the haemolymph, after passing from the limbs to the carapace lacuna, becomes oxygenated while flowing through the ventral part of the double-walled carapace in a posterior direction. The laterally flattened rostral region, where sensory and central nervous system structures are located, seems to have direct diffusive access to ambient oxygen, which could be especially advantageous during severe hypoxia when the convective transport systems fail to

  5. Improving respiration measurements with gas exchange analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, R; Ribas-Carbó, M; Del Saz, N F; El Aou-Ouad, H; Berry, J A; Flexas, J; Bota, J

    2016-12-01

    Dark respiration measurements with open-flow gas exchange analyzers are often questioned for their low accuracy as their low values often reach the precision limit of the instrument. Respiration was measured in five species, two hypostomatous (Vitis Vinifera L. and Acanthus mollis) and three amphistomatous, one with similar amount of stomata in both sides (Eucalyptus citriodora) and two with different stomata density (Brassica oleracea and Vicia faba). CO2 differential (ΔCO2) increased two-fold with no change in apparent Rd, when the two leaves with higher stomatal density faced outside. These results showed a clear effect of the position of stomata on ΔCO2. Therefore, it can be concluded that leaf position is important to guarantee the improvement of respiration measurements increasing ΔCO2 without affecting the respiration results by leaf or mass units. This method will help to increase the accuracy of leaf respiration measurements using gas exchange analyzers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Trace Gas Exchange of Biofuel Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Li, R.; Eller, A. S.; Gray, C.; Fierer, N.; Fall, R.; Harley, P. C.; Roberts, J. M.; Yuan, B.; Qian, Y.; Westra, P.; Fryrear, C.; Collins, M.; Whitman, K.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2010 leaf level gas exchange and VOC fluxes from switchgrass and corn grown at the CSU horticultural farm in Ft Collins (CO) were measured using a PTR-MS coupled to a modified Li6400 cuvette system. Both species are C4 plants with corn currently being the dominant biofuel crop in the USA whilst switchgrass being a promising candidate for cellulosic fuel ethanol production. Amongst the strongest VOC emissions from both plants were methanol, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, acetone and toluene. The switchgrass VOC emissions compare reasonably well with the only published data measured from potted plants in a whole plant enclosure (Eller et al. 2011). VOC emission studies on corn are almost as scarce as those of switchgrass. Considering the acreage of corn grown in the USA every year, VOC flux measurements of this plant species are largely under-represented in the literature. The emission rates that do exist in the literature do not compare well with the numbers found in this study (e.g. Das et al. 2003; 35μg methanol per hour per gram biomass). To investigate the biosphere atmosphere exchange of corn fields in more detail the field campaign BioCORN 2011 was initiated. In summer 2011 an eddy covariance system was set up in a corn field at ARDEC (CSU, Ft Collins, CO) to investigate the energy flux and the trace gas exchange of the US' dominant biofuel crop. Besides energy flux, evapotranspiration and CO2 flux a comprehensive suite of volatile organic compounds and inorganic species (O3, NO, NO2, CO) are measured for virtual disjunct eddy covariance (vDEC) analysis and true eddy covariance (EC) fluxes, respectively. VOCs are monitored by PTR-MS and, for the first time, fluxes of formic acid are measured utilizing NI-CIMS data for vDEC analysis. Besides the EC approach leaf level flux measurements and soil flux measurements are performed using a GC-MS system (TACOH) coupled to a modified Li6400 system and to soil chambers, respectively. Ethanol and methanol are amongst the

  7. Analysis of factors affecting gas exchange in intravascular blood gas exchanger.

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    Niranjan, S C; Clark, J W; San, K Y; Zwischenberger, J B; Bidani, A

    1994-10-01

    A mathematical model of an intravascular hollow-fiber gas-exchange device, called IVOX, has been developed using a Krogh cylinder-like approach with a repeating unit structure comprised of a single fiber with gas flowing through its lumen surrounded by a coaxial cylinder of blood flowing in the opposite direction. Species mass balances on O2 and CO2 result in a nonlinear coupled set of convective-diffusion parabolic partial differential equations that are solved numerically using an alternating-direction implicit finite-difference method. Computed results indicated the presence of a large resistance to gas transport on the external (blood) side of the hollow-fiber exchanger. Increasing gas flow through the device favored CO2 removal from but not O2 addition to blood. Increasing blood flow over the device favored both CO2 removal as well as O2 addition. The rate of CO2 removal increased linearly with the transmural PCO2 gradient imposed across the device. The effect of fiber crimping on blood phase mass transfer resistance was evaluated indirectly by varying species blood diffusivity. Computed results indicated that CO2 excretion by IVOX can be significantly enhanced with improved bulk mixing of vena caval blood around the IVOX fibers.

  8. Integrated Heat Exchange For Recuperation In Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTEGRATED HEAT EXCHANGE FOR RECUPERATION IN GAS TURBINE ENGINES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR...ship gas turbines is difficult due the size and weight of the heat exchanger components required. An alternate approach would be to embed a heat ... exchange system within the engine using existing blade surfaces to extract and insert heat . Due to the highly turbulent and transient flow, heat

  9. LES of Gas Exchange in IC Engines

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    Mittal V.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available As engine technologies become increasingly complex and engines are driven to new operating points, understanding transient phenomena is important to ensure reliable engine operation. Unlike Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS studies that only provide cycle-averaged information, Large Eddy Simulation (LES studies are capable of simulating cycle-to-cycle dynamics. In this work, a finite difference based structured methodology for LES of IC engines is presented. This structured approach allows for an efficient mesh generation process and provides potential for higher order numerical accuracy. An efficient parallel scalable block decomposition is done to overcome the challenges associated with the low ratio of fluid elements to overall mesh elements. The motion of the valves and piston is handled using a dynamic cell blanking approach and the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE method, respectively. Modified three-dimensional Navier-Stokes Characteristic Boundary Conditions (NSCBC are used in the simulation to prescribe conditions in the manifolds. The accuracy of the simulation framework is validated using various canonical configurations. Flow bench simulations of an axisymmetric configuration and an actual engine geometry are done with the LES methodology. Simulations of the gas exchange in an engine under motored conditions are also performed. Overall, good agreement is obtained with experiments for all the cases. Therefore, this framework can be used for LES of engine simulations. In the future, reactive LES simulations will be performed using this framework.

  10. [Gas exchange in acute respiratory distress syndrome].

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    Raimondi, Guillermo A

    2003-01-01

    The hypoxemia of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) depends chiefly upon shunt and ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) inequality produced by fluid located in the interstitial space, alveolar collapse and flooding. Variables other tham inspired oxygen fraction and the underlying physiological abnormality can influence arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2). Changes in cardiac output, hemoglobin concentration, oxygen consumption and alcalosis can cause changes in PaO2 through their influence on mixed venous PO2. Gas exchange (GE) in ARDS may be studied using the inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) which enables to define the distribution of ventilation and perfusion without necessarily altering the FIO2 differentiating shunt from lung units with low VA/Q ratios and dead space from lung units with high VA/Q ratios. Different ventilatory strategies that increase mean airway pressure (positive end-expiratory pressure, high tidal volumes, inverse inspiratory-expiratory ratio, etc) improve PaO2 through increasing lung volume by recruiting new open alveoli and spreading the intra-alveolar fluid over a large surface area. Also prone-position ventilation would result in a marked improvement in GE enhancing dorsal lung ventilation by the effects on the gravitional distribution of pleural pressure and the reduction in the positive pleural pressure that develops in dorsal regions in ARDS. Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to increase PaO2 in ARDS patients by inducing vasodilation predominantly in ventilated areas redistributing pulmonary blood flow away from nonventilated toward ventilated areas of the lung thus resulting in a shunt reduction. On the same way inhaled prostaglandins (PGI2 or PGE1) causes selective pulmonary vasodilation improving pulmonary GE. Intravenous almitrine, a selective pulmonary vasoconstrictor, has been shown to increase PaO2 by increasing hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. A synergistic effect was found between inhaled NO and almitrine

  11. Gas Turbine Engine with Air/Fuel Heat Exchanger

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    Karam, Michael Abraham (Inventor); Donovan, Eric Sean (Inventor); Krautheim, Michael Stephen (Inventor); Vetters, Daniel Kent (Inventor); Chouinard, Donald G. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique aircraft propulsion gas turbine engine. Another embodiment is a unique gas turbine engine. Another embodiment is a unique gas turbine engine. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for gas turbine engines with heat exchange systems. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  12. Gas exchange and morpho-physiological response of soybean to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gas exchange and morpho-physiological response of soybean to straw mulching under drought conditions. Lan-lan Xue, Long-chang Wang, Shakeel Ahmad Anjum, Muhammad Farrukh Saleem, Ming-chen Bao, Asif Saeed, Muhammad Faisal Bilal ...

  13. BOREAS TE-04 Gas Exchange Data from Boreal Tree Species

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Contains TE-04 data on gas exchange studies of photosynthesis, respiration and stomatal conductance of boreal forest species using the MPH-1000 system.

  14. BOREAS TE-04 Gas Exchange Data from Boreal Tree Species

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Contains TE-04 data on gas exchange studies of photosynthesis, respiration and stomatal conductance of boreal forest species using the MPH-1000 system.

  15. Gas exchanges in annonaceae species under different crop protections

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    Daniel Baron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the gas exchanges of different species of Annonaceae due to environmental variations provided by different types of crop protection. 'Araticum-de-terra-fria', 'araticum-mirim', 'biribá' and atemoya seedlings were cultived in three different crop protections: nursery, greenhouse and warm house. Gas exchanges were obtained in six plants, from 9:00 am to 11:00 am, with IRGA, LI-6400, at 180 Days After Transplanting. The different types of crop protection had a direct influence on gas exchanges of these species. Thus, nursery provided suitable conditions for 'araticum-de-terra-fria', 'araticum-mirim' and 'biribá', increasing their gas exchanges. To atemoya the best crop protection was the greenhouse.

  16. Influence of Anticholinesterase on Distribution of Ventilation and Gas Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    the observed pressure profile measured at the catheter tip. Following catheter placement, mechanical ventilation with a tidal volume of 15 ml/kg was...OTEC FILE COPY USAFSAM-TR-90-30 AD-A229 341 INFLUENCE OF ANTICHOLINESTERASE ON DISTRIBUTION OF VENTILATION AND GAS EXCHANGE Harold I. Modell, Ph.D...Distribution of Ventilation and Gas Exchange 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Modell, Harold I. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year

  17. Minimum gas speed in heat exchangers to avoid particulate fouling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abd-Elhady, M.S.; Rindt, C.C.M.; Wijers, J.G.; van Steenhoven, A.A.; Bramer, Eduard A.; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2004-01-01

    The minimum gas speed for a heat exchanger (HE) at which particulate fouling is avoided is investigated. Fouling experiments have been done with particles of different sizes and different materials running under different gas speeds. It is found that the smallest particles in the flow deposit first

  18. Leaf gas exchange of mature bottomland oak trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico M. Gazal; Mark E. Kubiske; Kristina F. Connor

    2009-01-01

    We determined how changes in environmental moisture affected leaf gas exchange in Nuttall (Quercus texana Buckley), overcup (Q. lyrata Walt.), and dominant and codominant swamp chestnut (Q. michauxii Nutt.) oak trees in Mississippi and Louisiana. We used canopy access towers to measure leaf level gas...

  19. [Methods of interpreting pulmonary gas exchange].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffartzik, W

    1993-01-01

    When arterial and mixed venous blood gas tensions, inspired and expired O2 and expired CO2 concentrations are known, it is possible to calculate the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference, intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt and dead space ventilation. However, because arterial hypoxemia is caused by ventilation/perfusion mismatching in most cases, a method allowing analysis of ventilation/perfusion ratios is needed. The "multiple inert gas elimination technique" (MIGET) is a powerful method that is useful for this purpose. This technique is based on measurements of arterial, venous and expired levels of inert gases spanning a wide range of solubility and analysis of the lung for the ventilation/perfusion ratios from true shunt to dead space ventilation. True shunt, with ventilation/perfusion ratios of 0, can be differentiated from ventilation/perfusion ratios of 0.005, and dead space ventilation can be distinguished from ventilation/perfusion ratios over 10 and under 100. Ventilation/perfusion ratios between these extremes can also be differentiated. It is not unusual for results yielded by MIGET to differ from those obtained with O2-dependent methods: O2 shunt generally exceeds MIGET shunt, for example, because O2 shunt includes low ventilation/perfusion units.

  20. Comparative field performance of three different gas exchange systems

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    G. F. Midgley

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available We compared portable and continuously monitoring gas exchange systems under field conditions, using Protea glabra Thunb. as a test species. The aim was to determine if the same patterns of gas exchange and ancillary parameters could be obtained with rather different measurement systems, and whether the same interpretation and conclusions about environmental control of gas exchange could be drawn. The following systems were compared: 1, a ‘closed’ portable 1RGA manufactured by Ll-Cor (LI-6200; 2, an ‘open’ portable porometer manufactured by Walz; and 3, a continuously monitoring minicuvette system with temperature control facility, also manufactured by Walz. All three systems yielded similar diurnal curves for CO2  uptake, although absolute flux values for the minicuvette system were lower than those obtained for the portable systems. This was likely due to stem respiration and self-shading of leaves on the shoot enclosed in the minicuvette. Differences in sampling technique between the two portable systems, primarily with regard to changes in leaf orientation, resulted in some differences in absolute values of gas fluxes and ancillary parameters such as leaf temperature and leaf to air vapour pressure difference. However, data from all three systems allowed similar interpretations to be made about the environmental dependencies of gas exchange patterns. It appears that each system has certain drawbacks associated with widely varying field conditions. A combination of portable and continuous monitoring techniques would seem to be the most powerful approach to investigating the gas exchange patterns of terrestrial plants in their natural environment.

  1. Gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters of ornamental bromeliads

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    Karina Gonçalves da Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence are widely used in physiological and ecological studies; however, few studies have used these techniques with ornamental plants. This study tested the potential contribution of gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence to evaluate the water and nutrients uptake by the tank and root system of epiphyte bromeliad Guzmania lingulata. For this purpose, we conducted an experiment with different water regime and another with different concentrations of nitrogen. The experiments were: 1 - Watering: Control (application of water into Tank and Root, Tank (watering into Tank, Root (watering Root and Drought (water suspension during the 90 days of experimentation and 2 - Nitrogen: Plants fertilized with Hoagland and Arnon nutrient solution exclusively into Tank or Root with nitrogen concentrations of control and 2.62 or 5.34 mM N applied as urea. The Fv /Fm ratio allowed comparing the treatments between experiments, demonstrating that Root and Tank both have the capacity to maintain G. lingulata photosynthetic activity and growth, while Drought treatment (water suspension was the limiting factor for energy conversion efficiency of PSII. However, gas exchange was more permissive as a parameter for comparing treatments in the nitrogen experiment, providing important information about the general aspects of the photosynthetic process in the watering experiment. Both gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence can support the evaluation of G. lingulata physiological status and can be useful tools in ornamental horticultural studies.

  2. Effect of exogenous methyl jasmonate on growth, gas exchange and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    plants subjected to water stress. The soybean plants were grown under normal water supply conditions till blooming and were then subjected to moisture stress by withholding water followed by foliar application of MJ at the rate of 50 μM. Drought stress severely hampered the growth, leaf gas-exchange attributes as well as ...

  3. Low light availability affects leaf gas exchange, growth and survival ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The values of dark respiration rate (Rd) and photosynthetic compensation irradiance (Ic) were sufficiently low for a positive carbon balance. Notwithstanding, the interpretation of results of microclimate variables together with leaf gas exchange and growth variables indicated that seedlings at all sites were in a suboptimal ...

  4. The performance of a new gas to gas heat exchanger with strip fin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Hirs, Gerard; Rollmann, P.

    1999-01-01

    A compact gas to gas heat exchanger needs large heat transfer areas on both fluid sides. This can be realised by adding secondary surfaces. The secondary surfaces are plate fin, strip fin, and louvered fin, etc. The fins extend the heat transfer surfaces and promote turbulence. This paper presents a

  5. A continuum model for metabolic gas exchange in pear fruit.

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    Q Tri Ho

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Exchange of O(2 and CO(2 of plants with their environment is essential for metabolic processes such as photosynthesis and respiration. In some fruits such as pears, which are typically stored under a controlled atmosphere with reduced O(2 and increased CO(2 levels to extend their commercial storage life, anoxia may occur, eventually leading to physiological disorders. In this manuscript we have developed a mathematical model to predict the internal gas concentrations, including permeation, diffusion, and respiration and fermentation kinetics. Pear fruit has been selected as a case study. The model has been used to perform in silico experiments to evaluate the effect of, for example, fruit size or ambient gas concentration on internal O(2 and CO(2 levels. The model incorporates the actual shape of the fruit and was solved using fluid dynamics software. Environmental conditions such as temperature and gas composition have a large effect on the internal distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide in fruit. Also, the fruit size has a considerable effect on local metabolic gas concentrations; hence, depending on the size, local anaerobic conditions may result, which eventually may lead to physiological disorders. The model developed in this manuscript is to our knowledge the most comprehensive model to date to simulate gas exchange in plant tissue. It can be used to evaluate the effect of environmental stresses on fruit via in silico experiments and may lead to commercial applications involving long-term storage of fruit under controlled atmospheres.

  6. Reactive oxygen species production and discontinuous gas exchange in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S; Hetz, Stefan K; Marais, Elrike; Chown, Steven L

    2012-03-07

    While biochemical mechanisms are typically used by animals to reduce oxidative damage, insects are suspected to employ a higher organizational level, discontinuous gas exchange mechanism to do so. Using a combination of real-time, flow-through respirometry and live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that spiracular control associated with the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) in Samia cynthia pupae is related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hyperoxia fails to increase mean ROS production, although minima are elevated above normoxic levels. Furthermore, a negative relationship between mean and mean ROS production indicates that higher ROS production is generally associated with lower . Our results, therefore, suggest a possible signalling role for ROS in DGC, rather than supporting the idea that DGC acts to reduce oxidative damage by regulating ROS production.

  7. Pulmonary gas exchange and acid-base balance during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickland, Michael K; Lindinger, Michael I; Olfert, I Mark; Heigenhauser, George J F; Hopkins, Susan R

    2013-04-01

    As the first step in the oxygen-transport chain, the lung has a critical task: optimizing the exchange of respiratory gases to maintain delivery of oxygen and the elimination of carbon dioxide. In healthy subjects, gas exchange, as evaluated by the alveolar-to-arterial PO2 difference (A-aDO2), worsens with incremental exercise, and typically reaches an A-aDO2 of approximately 25 mmHg at peak exercise. While there is great individual variability, A-aDO2 is generally largest at peak exercise in subjects with the highest peak oxygen consumption. Inert gas data has shown that the increase in A-aDO2 is explained by decreased ventilation-perfusion matching, and the development of a diffusion limitation for oxygen. Gas exchange data does not indicate the presence of right-to-left intrapulmonary shunt developing with exercise, despite recent data suggesting that large-diameter arteriovenous shunt vessels may be recruited with exercise. At the same time, multisystem mechanisms regulate systemic acid-base balance in integrative processes that involve gas exchange between tissues and the environment and simultaneous net changes in the concentrations of strong and weak ions within, and transfer between, extracellular and intracellular fluids. The physicochemical approach to acid-base balance is used to understand the contributions from independent acid-base variables to measured acid-base disturbances within contracting skeletal muscle, erythrocytes and noncontracting tissues. In muscle, the magnitude of the disturbance is proportional to the concentrations of dissociated weak acids, the rate at which acid equivalents (strong acid) accumulate and the rate at which strong base cations are added to or removed from muscle.

  8. Risk Based Inspection of Gas-Cooling Heat Exchanger

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    Dwi Priyanta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available On October 2013, Pertamina Hulu Energi Offshore North West Java (PHE – ONWJ platform personnel found 93 leaking tubes locations in the finfan coolers/ gas-cooling heat exchanger. After analysis had been performed, the crack in the tube strongly indicate that stress corrosion cracking was occurred by chloride. Chloride stress corrosion cracking (CLSCC is the cracking occurred by the combined influence of tensile stress and a corrosive environment. CLSCC is the one of the most common reasons why austenitic stainless steel pipework or tube and vessels deteriorate in the chemical processing, petrochemical industries and maritime industries. In this thesis purpose to determine the appropriate inspection planning for two main items (tubes and header box in the gas-cooling heat exchanger using risk based inspection (RBI method. The result, inspection of the tubes must be performed on July 6, 2024 and for the header box inspection must be performed on July 6, 2025. In the end, RBI method can be applicated to gas-cooling heat exchanger. Because, risk on the tubes can be reduced from 4.537 m2/year to 0.453 m2/year. And inspection planning for header box can be reduced from 4.528 m2/year to 0.563 m2/year.

  9. Regulation of cellular gas exchange, oxygen sensing, and metabolic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanton, T L; Hogan, M C; Gladden, L B

    2013-07-01

    Cells must continuously monitor and couple their metabolic requirements for ATP utilization with their ability to take up O2 for mitochondrial respiration. When O2 uptake and delivery move out of homeostasis, cells have elaborate and diverse sensing and response systems to compensate. In this review, we explore the biophysics of O2 and gas diffusion in the cell, how intracellular O2 is regulated, how intracellular O2 levels are sensed and how sensing systems impact mitochondrial respiration and shifts in metabolic pathways. Particular attention is paid to how O2 affects the redox state of the cell, as well as the NO, H2S, and CO concentrations. We also explore how these agents can affect various aspects of gas exchange and activate acute signaling pathways that promote survival. Two kinds of challenges to gas exchange are also discussed in detail: when insufficient O2 is available for respiration (hypoxia) and when metabolic requirements test the limits of gas exchange (exercising skeletal muscle). This review also focuses on responses to acute hypoxia in the context of the original "unifying theory of hypoxia tolerance" as expressed by Hochachka and colleagues. It includes discourse on the regulation of mitochondrial electron transport, metabolic suppression, shifts in metabolic pathways, and recruitment of cell survival pathways preventing collapse of membrane potential and nuclear apoptosis. Regarding exercise, the issues discussed relate to the O2 sensitivity of metabolic rate, O2 kinetics in exercise, and influences of available O2 on glycolysis and lactate production. © 2013 American Physiological Society.

  10. A new method for noninvasive measurement of pulmonary gas exchange using expired gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B; Prisk, G Kim

    2017-09-29

    Measurement of the gas exchange efficiency of the lung is often required in the practice of pulmonary medicine and in other settings. The traditional standard is the values of the PO2, PCO2, and pH of arterial blood. However arterial puncture requires technical expertise, is invasive, uncomfortable for the patient, and expensive. Here we describe how the composition of expired gas can be used in conjunction with pulse oximetry to obtain useful measures of gas exchange efficiency. The new procedure is noninvasive, well tolerated by the patient, and takes only a few minutes. It could be particularly useful when repeated measurements of pulmonary gas exchange are required. One product of the procedure is the difference between the PO2 of end-tidal alveolar gas and the calculated PO2 of arterial blood. This measurement is related to the classical alveolar-arterial PO2 difference based on ideal alveolar gas. However that traditional index is heavily influenced by lung units with low ventilation-perfusion ratios, whereas the new index has a broader physiological basis because it includes contributions from the whole lung. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel technique for highly accurate gas exchange measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkenings, R. K.; Jähne, B. J.

    2003-04-01

    The Heidelberg Aeolotron is a circular wind-wave facility for investigating air-sea gas exchange. In this contribution a novel technique for measuring highly accurate transfer velocities k of mass transfer will be presented. Traditionally, in mass balance techniques the constant of decay for gas concentrations over time is measured. The major drawback of this concept is the long time constant. At low wind speeds and a water height greater than 1 m the period of observation has to be several days. In a gas-tight facility such as the Aeolotron, the transfer velocity k can be computed from the concentration in the water body and the change of concentration in the gas space. Owing to this fact, transfer velocities are gained while greatly reducing the measuring times to less than one hour. The transfer velocity k of a tracer can be parameterized as k=1/β \\cdot u_* \\cdot Sc^n, with the Schmidt Number Sc, shear velocity u_* and the dimensionless transfer resistance β. The Schmidt Number exponent n can be derived from simultaneous measurements of different tracers. Since these tracers are of different Schmidt number, the shear velocity is not needed. To allow for Schmidt numbers spanning a hole decade, in our experiments He, H_2, N_2O and F12 are used. The relative accuracy of measuring the transfer velocity was improved to less than 2%. In 9 consecutive experiments conducted at a wind speed of 6.2 m/s, the deviation of the Schmidt number exponent was found to be just under 0.02. This high accuracy will allow precisely determining the transition of the Schmidt number exponent from n=2/3 to n=0.5 from a flat to wavy water surface. In order to quantify gas exchange not only the wind speed is important. Surfactants have a pronounced effect on the wave field and lead to a drastic reduction in the transfer velocity. In the Aeolotron measurements were conducted with a variety of measuring devices, ranging from an imaging slope gauge (ISG) to thermal techniques with IR

  12. Atmosphere-ocean gas exchange based on radiocarbon data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byalko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    In recent decades, the intensity of global atmospheric convection has accelerated faster than climate warming; it is possible to judge this process from indirect data. Increasing ocean salinity contrasts provide evidence that evaporation has intensified [1]; sea surface wind velocities and wave heights have increased [2]. The CO2 gas exchange between the atmosphere and ocean must also simultaneously increase. Monthly measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration have been published since 1958 [3], but directly measuring its fluxes from the atmosphere to the ocean and back is hardly possible. We show they can be reconstructed from 14C isotope concentration data. In the past century, two processes influenced the atmospheric 14C concentration in opposite directions: burning fossil fuels and testing nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. We compare the gas exchange theory with measurements of radiocarbon content in the atmosphere [4—6], which allows assessing the gas exchange quantitatively for the ocean to atmosphere and atmosphere to ocean fluxes separately for period 1960—2010 [7]. References 1. Durack P. J. and Wijffels S. E., J. Climate 23, 4342 (2010). 2. Young I. R., Sieger S., and Babanin A.V., Science 332, 451 (2011). 3. NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Data: ftp://ftp.cmdl.noaa.gov/ccg/co2/trends/co2_mm_mlo.txt. 4. Nydal R., Lövseth K. // J. Geophys. Res. 1983. V. 88. P. 3579. 5. Levin I., Kromer B. // Radiocarbon. 1997. V. 39. P. 205. 6. Miller J.B., Lehman S.J., Montzka S.A., et al. // J. Geophys. Res. 2012. V. 117. D08302. 7. Byalko A.V. Doklady Physics, 2013. V. 58, 267-271.

  13. Gas exchange indices--how valid are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, A; Swanevelder, J; van der Spuy, G; Jansen, J

    1995-11-01

    This study examined the arterial-alveolar oxygen tension difference (AaDO2), arterial oxygen tension to inspired oxygen fraction ratio (PaO2/FiO2) and alveolar to arterial oxygen tension ratio (PAO2/PaO2) with regard to: (i) their correlation with the calculated pulmonary shunt in critically ill patients; and (ii) the influence of the inspired oxygen fraction on these indices before, during and after general anaesthesia. This study comprised two sections: (i) retrospective analyses of blood gas data retrieved from the intensive care computerised database; and (ii) analyses of arterial blood gases before, during and after abdominal and orthopaedic surgery in patients subjected to various inspired fractions of oxygen. The study was conducted at an academic hospital. The first section of the study was a retrospective analysis of blood gases retrieved from a computerised database from the surgical and respiratory intensive care units. Blood gases which indicated hypoxaemia (arterial haemoglobin saturation less than 90%) were collected from patients who suffered from adult respiratory distress syndrome. The calculated pulmonary shunt was correlated with the AaDO2, PaO2/FiO2 and PAO2/PaO2. In the second section of this study, 15 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists status 1, scheduled to undergo peripheral orthopaedic and intra-abdominal surgery, were exposed to various concentrations of inspired oxygen before, during and after general anaesthesia. At the end of a 15-minute period of exposure to a particular level of inspired oxygen (which was varied at random), arterial blood gases were analysed. A correlation was attempted between the inspired oxygen fraction and the various indices of pulmonary gas exchange. Patients were subjected to the various inspired fractions of oxygen before, during and after general anaesthesia. A radial artery cannula, inserted under local anaesthesia, allowed the researchers to collect arterial blood gas analysis. The

  14. PREDICTION OF TOTAL DISSOLVED GAS EXCHANGE AT HYDROPOWER DAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    2012-07-01

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in waters released at hydropower dams can cause gas bubble trauma in fisheries resulting in physical injuries and eyeball protrusion that can lead to mortality. Elevated TDG pressures in hydropower releases are generally caused by the entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin. The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. These dam operations are constrained by state and federal water quality standards for TDG saturation which balance the benefits of spillway operations designed for Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed fisheries versus the degradation to water quality as defined by TDG saturation. In the 1970s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), under the federal Clean Water Act (Section 303(d)), established a criterion not to exceed the TDG saturation level of 110% in order to protect freshwater and marine aquatic life. The states of Washington and Oregon have adopted special water quality standards for TDG saturation in the tailrace and forebays of hydropower facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers where spillway operations support fish passage objectives. The physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been studied throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and routine water quality monitoring programs. These data have been used to quantify the relationship between project operations, structural properties, and TDG exchange. These data have also been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange to support real-time TDG management decisions. These empirically based predictive models have been developed for specific projects and account for both the fate of spillway and

  15. Leaf gas exchange and yield of three upland rice cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Félix Alvarez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies of physiological parameters associated with crop performance and growth in different groups of upland rice (Oryza sativa L. may support plant breeding programs. We evaluated the role of gas exchange rates and dry matter accumulation (DMA as traits responsible for yields in a traditional (cv. ‘Caiapó’, intermediate (cv. ‘Primavera’ and modern (cv. ‘Maravilha’ upland rice cultivars. Leaf gas exchange rates, DMA, leaf area index (LAI, harvest indexes (HI and yield components were measured on these genotypes in the field, under sprinkler irrigation. Panicles per m2 and DMA at flowering (FL and heading, as well as CO2 assimilation rates (A were similar across these cultivars. The highest yield was found in ‘Primavera’, which may be explained by (i a two-fold higher HI compared to the other cultivars, (ii greater rates of DMA during spikelet formation and grain-filling, as well as (iii a slow natural decrease of A in this cultivar, at the end of the season (between FL and maturation.

  16. A microprocessor-based system for measurement of gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, M B; Frick, G; Wilson, D; Johnston, M; Reid, H; Foster, S; Norton, A C

    1984-10-01

    The basic physical measurements for determining gas exchange are difficult to make accurately even in a well-equipped, human-performance laboratory with experienced personnel. A fully automated system has been developed to achieve the accuracy of standard laboratory measurements. The application of this instrument extends from critical care to stress-testing. Real-time, multitasking software integrates the data collected from several transducers and analyzers and calculates up to several dozen physiological variables, which are range-checked for reasonableness. The operator is provided with user-friendly means to tailor the data-reporting and- collection functions of the system to his own needs and requirements. Because the instrument is controlled by software, the functions of calibration, measurement, timing, reporting, plotting, and data quality assurance are highly cost-effective. Extensive use of formal test procedures permits verifying all systems and data reliability; it also assures meeting the desired specifications. The ease of operation and high-quality results inherent in this system make it unsurpassed in gas-exchange measurements.

  17. High Temperature Gas-to-Gas Heat Exchanger Based on a Solid Intermediate Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Amirante

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the design of an innovative high temperature gas-to-gas heat exchanger based on solid particles as intermediate medium, with application in medium and large scale externally fired combined power plants fed by alternative and dirty fuels, such as biomass and coal. An optimization procedure, performed by means of a genetic algorithm combined with computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis, is employed for the design of the heat exchanger: the goal is the minimization of its size for an assigned heat exchanger efficiency. Two cases, corresponding to efficiencies equal to 80% and 90%, are considered. The scientific and technical difficulties for the realization of the heat exchanger are also faced up; in particular, this work focuses on the development both of a pressurization device, which is needed to move the solid particles within the heat exchanger, and of a pneumatic conveyor, which is required to deliver back the particles from the bottom to the top of the plant in order to realize a continuous operation mode. An analytical approach and a thorough experimental campaign are proposed to analyze the proposed systems and to evaluate the associated energy losses.

  18. Gas transport during in vitro and in vivo preclinical testing of inert gas therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Katz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New gas therapies using inert gases such as xenon and argon are being studied, which require in vitro and in vivo preclinical experiments. Examples of the kinetics of gas transport during such experiments are analyzed in this paper. Using analytical and numerical models, we analyze an in vitro experiment for gas transport to a 96 cell well plate and an in vivo delivery to a small animal chamber, where the key processes considered are the wash-in of test gas into an apparatus dead volume, the diffusion of test gas through the liquid media in a well of a cell test plate, and the pharmacokinetics in a rat. In the case of small animals in a chamber, the key variable controlling the kinetics is the chamber wash-in time constant that is a function of the chamber volume and the gas flow rate. For cells covered by a liquid media the diffusion of gas through the liquid media is the dominant mechanism, such that liquid depth and the gas diffusion constant are the key parameters. The key message from these analyses is that the transport of gas during preclinical experiments can be important in determining the true dose as experienced at the site of action in an animal or to a cell.

  19. Gas exchange and energy expenditure in chicken embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chwalibog, André; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Ali, Abdalla

    to evaluate amount of oxidized fat during embryonic development and to compare daily fat oxidation with changes in the fat content of eggs. The experiment comprised 48 embryos from a modern, fast growing line, Ross 308 (RO) and 48 from a slow growing line, Labresse (LA) of White Plymouth Rock. The O2...... fat contributing with nearly 100 % to the total EE. Since oxidised fat was the main energy fuel the content of fat in eggs decreased with 2.0 (RO) and 1.6 g (LA) during the incubation period. It can be concluded that the pattern of gas exchange and thereby the pattern of energy expenditure...... is independent of genetic origin of embryos. However, the embryos from the slow growing broiler line had a lower metabolic rate and oxidised less fat than the modern, fast growing line. The reduced utilization of yolk fat might be a tool for saving fat reserves for the immediate post-hatching period...

  20. An automated gas exchange tank for determining gas transfer velocities in natural seawater samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schneider-Zapp

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to advance understanding of the role of seawater surfactants in the air–sea exchange of climatically active trace gases via suppression of the gas transfer velocity (kw, we constructed a fully automated, closed air–water gas exchange tank and coupled analytical system. The system allows water-side turbulence in the tank to be precisely controlled with an electronically operated baffle. Two coupled gas chromatographs and an integral equilibrator, connected to the tank in a continuous gas-tight system, allow temporal changes in the partial pressures of SF6, CH4 and N2O to be measured simultaneously in the tank water and headspace at multiple turbulence settings, during a typical experimental run of 3.25 h. PC software developed by the authors controls all operations and data acquisition, enabling the optimisation of experimental conditions with high reproducibility. The use of three gases allows three independent estimates of kw for each turbulence setting; these values are subsequently normalised to a constant Schmidt number for direct comparison. The normalised kw estimates show close agreement. Repeated experiments with Milli-Q water demonstrate a typical measurement accuracy of 4% for kw. Experiments with natural seawater show that the system clearly resolves the effects on kw of spatial and temporal trends in natural surfactant activity. The system is an effective tool with which to probe the relationships between kw, surfactant activity and biogeochemical indices of primary productivity, and should assist in providing valuable new insights into the air–sea gas exchange process.

  1. A novel, simplified ex vivo method for measuring water exchange performance of heat and moisture exchangers for tracheostomy application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boer, Cindy; Muller, Sara H; Vincent, Andrew D; Züchner, Klaus; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2013-09-01

    Breathing through a tracheostomy results in insufficient warming and humidification of inspired air. This loss of air-conditioning can be partially compensated for with the application of a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) over the tracheostomy. In vitro (International Organization for Standardization [ISO] standard 9360-2:2001) and in vivo measurements of the effects of an HME are complex and technically challenging. The aim of this study was to develop a simple method to measure the ex vivo HME performance comparable with previous in vitro and in vivo results. HMEs were weighed at the end of inspiration and at the end of expiration at different breathing volumes. Four HMEs (Atos Medical, Hörby, Sweden) with known in vivo humidity and in vitro water loss values were tested. The associations between weight change, volume, and absolute humidity were determined using both linear and non-linear mixed effects models. The rating between the 4 HMEs by weighing correlated with previous intra-tracheal measurements (R(2) = 0.98), and the ISO standard (R(2) = 0.77). Assessment of the weight change between end of inhalation and end of exhalation is a valid and simple method of measuring the water exchange performance of an HME.

  2. Human Regional Pulmonary Gas Exchange with Xenon Polarization Transfer (XTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradian, Iga; Butler, James; Hrovat, Mirko; Topulos, George; Hersman, Elizabeth; Ruset, Iulian; Covrig, Silviu; Frederick, Eric; Ketel, Stephen; Hersman, F. W.; Patz, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Xenon Transfer Contrast (XTC) is an existing imaging method (Ruppert et al, Magn Reson Med, 51:676-687, 2004) that measures the fraction F of ^129Xe magnetization that diffuses from alveolar gas spaces to septal parenchymal tissue in lungs in a specified exchange time. As previously implemented, XTC is a 2-breath method and has been demonstrated in anesthetized animals. To use XTC in humans and to avoid issues associated with obtaining identical gas volumes on subsequent breath-hold experiments as well as precise image registration in post-processing, a single breath XTC method was developed that acquires three consecutive gradient echo images in an 8s acquisition. We report here initial measurements of the mean and variance of F for 5 normal healthy subjects as well as 7 asymptomatic smokers. The experiments were performed at two lung volumes (˜45 and 65% of TLC). We found that both the mean and variance of F increased with smoking history. In comparison, standard pulmonary function tests such as DLCO FEV1 showed no correlation with smoking history.

  3. Determination of natural in vivo noble-gas concentrations in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yama Tomonaga

    Full Text Available Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry.

  4. Pulmonary and Cutaneous O[subscript 2] Gas Exchange: A Student Laboratory Exercise in the Frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Glenn J.; Currie, Suzanne; LeBlanc, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas exchange in animals is ultimately diffusion based, generally occurring across dedicated respiratory organs. In many aquatic amphibians, however, multiple modes of gas exchange exist, allowing for the partitioning of O[subscript 2] uptake and CO[subscript 2] excretion between respiratory organs with different efficiencies. For example, due to…

  5. Ex vivo assessment and validation of water exchange performance of 23 heat and moisture exchangers for laryngectomized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boer, Cindy; Muller, Sara H; Vincent, Andrew D; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2014-08-01

    Breathing through a tracheostoma results in insufficient warming and humidification of the inspired air. This loss of air conditioning, especially humidification, can be partially restored with the application of a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) over the tracheostoma. For medical professionals, it is not easy to judge differences in water exchange performance of various HMEs owing to the lack of universal outcome measures. This study has three aims: assessment of the water exchange performance of commercially available HMEs for laryngectomized patients, validation of these results with absolute humidity outcomes, and assessment of the role of hygroscopic salt present in some of the tested HMEs. Measurements of weight and absolute humidity at end inspiration and end expiration at different breathing volumes of a healthy volunteer were performed using a microbalance and humidity sensor. Twenty-three HMEs from 6 different manufacturers were tested. Associations were determined between core weight, weight change, breathing volume, and absolute humidity, using both linear and nonlinear mixed effects models. Water exchange of the 23 HMEs at a breathing volume of 0.5 L varies between 0.5 and 3.6 mg. Both water exchange and wet core weight correlate strongly with the end-inspiratory absolute humidity values (r2 =0.89/0.87). Hygroscopic salt increases core weight. The 23 tested HMEs for laryngectomized patients show wide variation in water exchange performance. Water exchange correlates well with the end-inspiratory absolute humidity outcome, which validates the ex vivo weight change method. Wet core weight is a predictor of HME performance. Hygroscopic salt increases the weight of the core material. The results of this study can help medical professionals to obtain a more founded opinion about the performance of available HMEs for pulmonary rehabilitation in laryngectomized patients, and allow them to make an informed decision about which HME type to use.

  6. Observations on gas exchange and element recycle within a gas-closed algal-mouse system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smernoff, D. T.; Wharton, R. A., Jr.; Averner, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    Life support systems based on bioregeneration rely on the control and manipulation of organisms. Algae are potentially useful for a variety of Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) functions including the revitalization of atmospheres, production of food and for nitrogen fixation. The results of experiments conducted with a gas-closed algal-mouse system designed to investigate gas exchange phenomena under varying algal environmental conditions, and the ability of algae to utilize oxidized mouse solid waste are reported. Inherent instabilities exist between the uptake and release of carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxygen (O2) by the mouse and algae in a gas-closed system. Variations in light intensity and cell density alter the photosynthetic rate of the algae and enable short-term steady-state concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O2. Different nitrogen sources (urea and nitrate) result in different algal assimilatory quotients (AQ). Combinations of photosynthetic rate and AQ ratio manipulations were examined for their potential in stabilizing atmospheric gas concentrations in the gas-closed algal-mouse system.

  7. Risk factors for transient dysfunction of gas exchange after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Delgado Alves Rodrigues

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A retrospective cohort study was preformed aiming to verify the presence of transient dysfunction of gas exchange in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and determine if this disorder is linked to cardiorespiratory events. Methods: We included 942 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery and cardiac procedures who were referred to the Intensive Care Unit between June 2007 and November 2011. Results: Fifteen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (2%, 199 (27.75% had mild transient dysfunction of gas exchange, 402 (56.1% had moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange, and 39 (5.4% had severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange. Hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the emergence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange postoperatively (P=0.02 and P=0.019, respectively and were risk factors for this dysfunction (P=0.0023 and P=0.0017, respectively. Diabetes mellitus was also a risk factor for transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.03. Pneumonia was present in 8.9% of cases and correlated with the presence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.001. Severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange was associated with patients who had renal replacement therapy (P=0.0005, hemotherapy (P=0.0001, enteral nutrition (P=0.0012, or cardiac arrhythmia (P=0.0451. Conclusion: Preoperative hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the occurrence of postoperative transient dysfunction of gas exchange. The preoperative risk factors included hypertension, cardiogenic shock, and diabetes. Postoperatively, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, renal replacement therapy, hemotherapy, and cardiac arrhythmia were associated with the appearance of some degree of transient dysfunction of gas exchange, which was a risk factor for reintubation, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and renal replacement therapy in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and

  8. Differentiation at necropsy between in vivo gas embolism and putrefaction using a gas score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Saavedra, Pedro; Møllerløkken, Andreas; Brubakk, Alf O; Jørgensen, Arve; González-Díaz, Oscar; Martín-Barrasa, Jose L; Fernández, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Gas bubble lesions consistent with decompression sickness in marine mammals were described for the first time in beaked whales stranded in temporal and spatial association with military exercises. Putrefaction gas is a post-mortem artifact, which hinders the interpretation of gas found at necropsy. Gas analyses have been proven to help differentiating putrefaction gases from gases formed after hyperbaric exposures. Unfortunately, chemical analysis cannot always be performed. Post-mortem computed tomography is used to study gas collections, but many different logistical obstacles and obvious challenges, like the size of the animal or the transport of the animal from the stranding location to the scanner, limit its use in stranded marine mammals. In this study, we tested the diagnostic value of an index-based method for characterizing the amount and topography of gas found grossly during necropsies. For this purpose, putrefaction gases, intravenously infused atmospheric air, and gases produced by decompression were evaluated at necropsy with increased post-mortem time in New Zealand White Rabbits using a gas score index. Statistical differences (P<0.001) were found between the three experimental models immediately after death. Differences in gas score between in vivo gas embolism and putrefaction gases were found significant (P<0.05) throughout the 67h post-mortem. The gas score-index is a new and simple method that can be used by all stranding networks, which has been shown through this study to be a valid diagnostic tool to distinguish between fatal decompression, iatrogenic air embolism and putrefaction gases at autopsies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. On factors influencing air-water gas exchange in emergent wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David T.; Engel, Victor C.; Ferron, Sara; Hickman, Benjamin; Choi, Jay; Harvey, Judson W.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of gas exchange in wetlands is important in order to determine fluxes of climatically and biogeochemically important trace gases and to conduct mass balances for metabolism studies. Very few studies have been conducted to quantify gas transfer velocities in wetlands, and many wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations used in oceanographic or limnological settings are inappropriate under conditions found in wetlands. Here six measurements of gas transfer velocities are made with SF6 tracer release experiments in three different years in the Everglades, a subtropical peatland with surface water flowing through emergent vegetation. The experiments were conducted under different flow conditions and with different amounts of emergent vegetation to determine the influence of wind, rain, water flow, waterside thermal convection, and vegetation on air-water gas exchange in wetlands. Measured gas transfer velocities under the different conditions ranged from 1.1 cm h−1 during baseline conditions to 3.2 cm h−1 when rain and water flow rates were high. Commonly used wind speed/gas exchange relationships would overestimate the gas transfer velocity by a factor of 1.2 to 6.8. Gas exchange due to thermal convection was relatively constant and accounted for 14 to 51% of the total measured gas exchange. Differences in rain and water flow among the different years were responsible for the variability in gas exchange, with flow accounting for 37 to 77% of the gas exchange, and rain responsible for up to 40%.

  10. mRNA secondary structures fold sequentially but exchange rapidly in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth M Mahen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available RNAs adopt defined structures to perform biological activities, and conformational transitions among alternative structures are critical to virtually all RNA-mediated processes ranging from metabolite-activation of bacterial riboswitches to pre-mRNA splicing and viral replication in eukaryotes. Mechanistic analysis of an RNA folding reaction in a biological context is challenging because many steps usually intervene between assembly of a functional RNA structure and execution of a biological function. We developed a system to probe mechanisms of secondary structure folding and exchange directly in vivo using self-cleavage to monitor competition between mutually exclusive structures that promote or inhibit ribozyme assembly. In previous work, upstream structures were more effective than downstream structures in blocking ribozyme assembly during transcription in vitro, consistent with a sequential folding mechanism. However, upstream and downstream structures blocked ribozyme assembly equally well in vivo, suggesting that intracellular folding outcomes reflect thermodynamic equilibration or that annealing of contiguous sequences is favored kinetically. We have extended these studies to learn when, if ever, thermodynamic stability becomes an impediment to rapid equilibration among alternative RNA structures in vivo. We find that a narrow thermodynamic threshold determines whether kinetics or thermodynamics govern RNA folding outcomes in vivo. mRNA secondary structures fold sequentially in vivo, but exchange between adjacent secondary structures is much faster in vivo than it is in vitro. Previous work showed that simple base-paired RNA helices dissociate at similar rates in vivo and in vitro so exchange between adjacent structures must occur through a different mechanism, one that likely involves facilitation of branch migration by proteins associated with nascent transcripts.

  11. Differentiation at autopsy between in vivo gas embolism and putrefaction using gas composition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; González-Díaz, Oscar; Møllerløkken, Andreas; Brubakk, Alf O; Hjelde, Astrid; Saavedra, Pedro; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Gas embolism can arise from different causes (iatrogenic accidents, criminal interventions, or diving related accidents). Gas analyses have been shown to be a valid technique to differentiate between putrefaction gases and gas embolism. In this study, we performed systematic necropsies at different postmortem times in three experimental New Zealand White Rabbits models: control or putrefaction, infused air embolism, and compression/decompression. The purpose of this study was to look for qualitative and quantitative differences among groups and to observe how putrefaction gases mask in vivo gas embolism. We found that the infused air embolism and compression/decompression models had a similar gas composition prior to 27-h postmortem, being typically composed of around 70-80 % of N(2) and 20-30 % of CO(2), although unexpected higher CO(2) concentrations were found in some decompressed animals, putting in question the role of CO(2) in decompression. All these samples were statistically and significantly different from more decomposed samples. Gas composition of samples from more decomposed animals and from the putrefaction model presented hydrogen, which was therefore considered as a putrefaction marker.

  12. Leaf gas exchange in the frankincense tree (Boswellia papyrifera) of African dry woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengistu, Tefera; Sterck, Frank J; Fetene, Masresha; Tadesse, Wubalem; Bongers, Frans

    2011-07-01

    A conceptual model was tested for explaining environmental and physiological effects on leaf gas exchange in the deciduous dry tropical woodland tree Boswellia papyrifera (Del.) Hochst. For this species we aimed at (i) understanding diurnal patterns in leaf gas exchange, (ii) exploring cause-effect relationships among external environment, internal physiology and leaf gas exchange, and (iii) exploring site differences in leaf gas exchange in response to environmental variables. Diurnal courses in gas exchange, underlying physiological traits and environmental variables were measured for 90 trees on consecutive days at two contrasting areas, one at high and the other at low altitude. Assimilation was highest in the morning and slightly decreased during the day. In contrast, transpiration increased from early morning to midday, mainly in response to an increasing vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and gradual stomatal closure. The leaf water potential varied relatively little and did not influence gas exchange during the measurement period. Our results suggest that the same cause-effect relationships function at contrasting areas. However, leaves at the higher altitude had higher photosynthetic capacity, reflecting acclimation to higher light levels. Trees at both areas nevertheless achieved similar leaf assimilation rates since assimilation was down-regulated by stomatal closure due to the higher VPD at the higher altitude, while it became more light limited at the lower altitude. Gas exchange was thus limited by a high VPD or low light levels during the wet season, despite the ability of the species to acclimate to different conditions.

  13. In vivo cation exchange in quantum dots for tumor-specific imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyou; Braun, Gary B; Qin, Mingde; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Sugahara, Kazuki N

    2017-08-24

    In vivo tumor imaging with nanoprobes suffers from poor tumor specificity. Here, we introduce a nanosystem, which allows selective background quenching to gain exceptionally tumor-specific signals. The system uses near-infrared quantum dots and a membrane-impermeable etchant, which serves as a cation donor. The etchant rapidly quenches the quantum dots through cation exchange (ionic etching), and facilitates renal clearance of metal ions released from the quantum dots. The quantum dots are intravenously delivered into orthotopic breast and pancreas tumors in mice by using the tumor-penetrating iRGD peptide. Subsequent etching quenches excess quantum dots, leaving a highly tumor-specific signal provided by the intact quantum dots remaining in the extravascular tumor cells and fibroblasts. No toxicity is noted. The system also facilitates the detection of peritoneal tumors with high specificity upon intraperitoneal tumor targeting and selective etching of excess untargeted quantum dots. In vivo cation exchange may be a promising strategy to enhance specificity of tumor imaging.The imaging of tumors in vivo using nanoprobes has been challenging due to the lack of sufficient tumor specificity. Here, the authors develop a tumor-specific quantum dot system that permits in vivo cation exchange to achieve selective background quenching and high tumor-specific imaging.

  14. Greenhouse Gas Exchange and Biogeochemistry of Fertilized Canadian Plantation Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiliko, N.; Grayston, S. J.; Roy, R.; Mohn, W. W.; Yolova, V.; Prescott, C.

    2005-12-01

    Canada's ratification of the Kyoto Protocol in 2002 has raised questions of the role of ecosystem management as a tool to temporarily reduce the net greenhouse gas burden of the forestry industry and potentially generate emission offset credits. We examined growing season methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, soil nutrient chemistry, and microbial biomass and CH4-oxidizing bacterial communities in 20-year-old sub-boreal lodgepole pine and maritime hemlock plantations under control conditions and simulated operational fertilization with N (200kg urea-N per ha, applied twice) and N, P, K, and micronutrients. CH4 uptake was significantly greater in the lodgepole pine site than in the hemlock site (152-221 and 57-81 micrograms CH4 consumed per square meter per hour), and there were no significant differences among treatments at either site. Among sites, treatments, and sampling times, CH4 uptake correlated positively with NH4 concentrations and negatively with extractable organic N:P quotients, indicating that this process may potentially be limited by nutrient availability to the CH4-oxidizing bacteria. N2O efflux was measured sporadically at a few flux collars, but was not significantly different from zero at any site, treatment, or time. Soil respiration (CO2 efflux) rates were faster in the hemlock than lodgepole pine site (243-409 and 100-266 milligrams CO2 per square meter per hour), and significant treatment differences were observed at individual times, though with fertilized plots exhibiting both faster and slower rates than controls. Soil respiration correlated significantly with microbial biomass C and N and NO3. Within each site, soil respiration, but not CH4 uptake, was positively correlated with soil temperature. New experiments examining the short-term effects of fertilization on greenhouse gas exchanges are underway, and both short and long-term effects will be evaluated in relation to changes in C storage in plant biomass

  15. Prototype Vent Gas Heat Exchanger for Exploration EVA - Performance and Manufacturing Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory J.; Strange, Jeremy; Jennings, Mallory

    2013-01-01

    NASA is developing new portable life support system (PLSS) technologies, which it is demonstrating in an unmanned ground based prototype unit called PLSS 2.0. One set of technologies within the PLSS provides suitable ventilation to an astronaut while on an EVA. A new component within the ventilation gas loop is a liquid-to-gas heat exchanger to transfer excess heat from the gas to the thermal control system s liquid coolant loop. A unique bench top prototype heat exchanger was built and tested for use in PLSS 2.0. The heat exchanger was designed as a counter-flow, compact plate fin type using stainless steel. Its design was based on previous compact heat exchangers manufactured by United Technologies Aerospace Systems (UTAS), but was half the size of any previous heat exchanger model and one third the size of previous liquid-to-gas heat exchangers. The prototype heat exchanger was less than 40 cubic inches and weighed 2.57 lb. Performance of the heat exchanger met the requirements and the model predictions. The water side and gas side pressure drops were less 0.8 psid and 0.5 inches of water, respectively, and an effectiveness of 94% was measured at the nominal air side pressure of 4.1 psia.

  16. A dynamic leaf gas-exchange strategy is conserved in woody ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising atmospheric [CO2], ca, is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have reported that stomata regulate leaf gas-exchange around “set points” that include a constant leaf internal [CO2], ci, a constant drawdown in CO2 (ca - ci), and a constant ci/ca. Because these set points can result in drastically different consequences for leaf gas-exchange, it will be essential for the accuracy of Earth systems models that generalizable patterns in leaf gas-exchange responses to ca be identified if any do exist. We hypothesized that the concept of optimal stomatal behavior, exemplified by woody plants shifting along a continuum of these set point strategies, would provide a unifying framework for understanding leaf gas-exchange responses to ca. We analyzed studies reporting C stable isotope ratio (δ13C) or photosynthetic discrimination (∆13C) from woody plant taxa that grew across ca spanning at least 100 ppm for each species investigated. From these data we calculated ci, and in combination with known or estimated ca, leaf gas-exchange regulation strategies were assessed. Overall, our analyses does not support the hypothesis that trees are canalized towards any of the proposed set points, particularly so for a constant ci. Rather, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that stomatal optimization regulates leaf gas

  17. Pulmonary and cutaneous O₂gas exchange: a student laboratory exercise in the frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Glenn J; Currie, Suzanne; LeBlanc, Danielle M

    2013-03-01

    Gas exchange in animals is ultimately diffusion based, generally occurring across dedicated respiratory organs. In many aquatic amphibians, however, multiple modes of gas exchange exist, allowing for the partitioning of O2 uptake and CO2 excretion between respiratory organs with different efficiencies. For example, due to the physical properties of O2 being vastly different between air and water phases, the lung and skin play disproportionately important roles in O2 uptake. Many aquatic frogs are renowned for their cutaneous gas exchange capacity, where often the majority of CO2 is excreted across the skin. Furthermore, the roles of these gas exchange organs change with the animal's behavior. Under diving conditions, most of the frog's gas exchange needs must be met by the skin. In this article, we describe an interactive undergraduate laboratory that allows a class of students to share equipment while assessing pulmonary and cutaneous respiration in frogs provided with an air/water choice and under enforced dive conditions. Concepts explored in this laboratory exercise include animal energetics, diving reflex, pulmonary and cutaneous gas exchange processes, diffusion-based gas flux, and O2 debt.

  18. Leaf gas exchange characteristics of three neotropical mangrove species in response to varying hydroperiod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken W. Krauss; Robert R. Twilley; Thomas w. Doyle; Emile S. Gardiner

    2006-01-01

    We determined how different hydroperiods affected leaf gas exchange characteristics of greenhouse-grown seedlings (2002) and saplings (2003) of the mangrove species Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn., Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn. f., and Rhizophora mangle L. Hydroperiod treatments included...

  19. Mechanisms of gas exchange response to lung volume reduction surgery in severe emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    Cremona, George; Barbara, Joan A.; Melgosa, Teresa; Appendini, Lorenzo; Roca, Josep; Casadio, Caterina; Donner, Claudio F.; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Wagner, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves lung function, respiratory symptoms, and exercise tolerance in selected patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who have heterogeneous emphysema. However, the reported effects of LVRS on gas exchange are variable, even when lung function is improved. To clarify how LVRS affects gas exchange in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 23 patients were studied before LVRS, 14 of whom were again studied afterwards. We performed measurement...

  20. Impaired gas exchange: accuracy of defining characteristics in children with acute respiratory infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pascoal, Lívia Maia; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Chaves, Daniel Bruno Resende; Beltrão, Beatriz Amorim; Silva, Viviane Martins da; Monteiro, Flávia Paula Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the accuracy of the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange nursing diagnosis in children with acute respiratory infection.METHOD: open prospective cohort study conducted with 136 children monitored for a consecutive period of at least six days and not more than ten days. An instrument based on the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis and on literature addressing pulmonary assessment was used to collect data. The accuracy means of...

  1. Gas exchange patterns and water loss rates in the Table Mountain cockroach, Aptera fusca (Blattodea: Blaberidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewald, Berlizé; Bazelet, Corinna S; Potter, C Paige; Terblanche, John S

    2013-10-15

    The importance of metabolic rate and/or spiracle modulation for saving respiratory water is contentious. One major explanation for gas exchange pattern variation in terrestrial insects is to effect a respiratory water loss (RWL) saving. To test this, we measured the rates of CO2 and H2O release ( and , respectively) in a previously unstudied, mesic cockroach, Aptera fusca, and compared gas exchange and water loss parameters among the major gas exchange patterns (continuous, cyclic, discontinuous gas exchange) at a range of temperatures. Mean , and per unit did not differ among the gas exchange patterns at all temperatures (P>0.09). There was no significant association between temperature and gas exchange pattern type (P=0.63). Percentage of RWL (relative to total water loss) was typically low (9.79±1.84%) and did not differ significantly among gas exchange patterns at 15°C (P=0.26). The method of estimation had a large impact on the percentage of RWL, and of the three techniques investigated (traditional, regression and hyperoxic switch), the traditional method generally performed best. In many respects, A. fusca has typical gas exchange for what might be expected from other insects studied to date (e.g. , , RWL and cuticular water loss). However, we found for A. fusca that expressed as a function of metabolic rate was significantly higher than the expected consensus relationship for insects, suggesting it is under considerable pressure to save water. Despite this, we found no consistent evidence supporting the conclusion that transitions in pattern type yield reductions in RWL in this mesic cockroach.

  2. The mechanisms underlying the production of discontinuous gas exchange cycles in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Philip G D

    2017-08-17

    This review examines the control of gas exchange in insects, specifically examining what mechanisms could explain the emergence of discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs). DGCs are gas exchange patterns consisting of alternating breath-hold periods and bouts of gas exchange. While all insects are capable of displaying a continuous pattern of gas exchange, this episodic pattern is known to occur within only some groups of insects and then only sporadically or during certain phases of their life cycle. Investigations into DGCs have tended to emphasise the role of chemosensory thresholds in triggering spiracle opening as critical for producing these gas exchange patterns. However, a chemosensory basis for episodic breathing also requires an as-of-yet unidentified hysteresis between internal respiratory stimuli, chemoreceptors, and the spiracles. What has been less appreciated is the role that the insect's central nervous system (CNS) might play in generating episodic patterns of ventilation. The active ventilation displayed by many insects during DGCs suggests that this pattern could be the product of directed control by the CNS rather than arising passively as a result of self-sustaining oscillations in internal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels. This paper attempts to summarise what is currently known about insect gas exchange regulation, examining the location and control of ventilatory pattern generators in the CNS, the influence of chemoreceptor feedback in the form of O2 and CO2/pH fluctuations in the haemolymph, and the role of state-dependent changes in CNS activity on ventilatory control. This information is placed in the context of what is currently known regarding the production of discontinuous gas exchange patterns.

  3. The influence of gas-to-particle conversion on measurements of ammonia exchange over forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oss, R. van; Duyzer, J.; Wyers, P.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of vertical gradients of ammonium nitrate aerosol and NH3 are used together with HNO3 concentrations to study the influence of gas-to-particle conversion (gtpc) on surface exchange processes above a forest. A numerical model of surface exchange, in which a description of gtpc was

  4. The Usefulness of Submaximal Exercise Gas Exchange in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Woods

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Submaximal exercise gas exchange may be a useful tool to track responses to therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH patients. Methods Three patients diagnosed with idiopathic PAH, on differing therapies, were included. Standard clinical tests (echocardiography; 6 minute walk were performed pre and 3-5 months after treatment. Gas exchange was measured during 3 minutes of step exercise at both time points. Results Gas exchange variables, end tidal CO 2 (P ET CO 2 and the ratio of ventilation to CO 2 production (V E /VCO 2 , during submaximal exercise were able to track patient responses to therapy over a 3-5 month period. Two patients demonstrated positive improvements, with an increased P ET CO 2 and decreased V E /VCO 2 during light exercise, in response to an altered therapeutic regime. The third patient had a worsening of gas exchange (decreased P ET CO 2 and increased V E /VCO 2 following no changes in the medical regime from the baseline visit. Conclusion Gas exchange variables measured during light submaximal exercise, such as P ET CO 2 and V E /VCO 2 , may be able to better detect small changes in functional status following treatment and could, therefore, be a useful tool to track disease severity in PAH patients. Further study is required to determine the clinical usefulness of these gas exchange variables.

  5. Influence of heat exchange of reservoir with rocks on hot gas injection via a single well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Vladimir E.; Ivanov, Gavril I.

    2017-11-01

    In the computational experiment the influence of heat exchange through top and bottom of the gas-bearing reservoir on the dynamics of temperature and pressure fields during hot gas injection via a single well is investigated. The experiment was carried out within the framework of modified mathematical model of non-isothermal real gas filtration, obtained from the energy and mass conservation laws and the Darcy law. The physical and caloric equations of state together with the Newton-Riemann law of heat exchange of gas reservoir with surrounding rocks, are used as closing relations. It is shown that the influence of the heat exchange with environment on temperature field of the gas-bearing reservoir is localized in a narrow zone near its top and bottom, though the size of this zone is increased with time.

  6. Investigation and optimization of the depth of flue gas heat recovery in surface heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalov, V. V.; Bespalov, V. I.; Melnikov, D. V.

    2017-09-01

    Economic issues associated with designing deep flue gas heat recovery units for natural gas-fired boilers are examined. The governing parameter affecting the performance and cost of surface-type condensing heat recovery heat exchangers is the heat transfer surface area. When firing natural gas, the heat recovery depth depends on the flue gas temperature at the condenser outlet and determines the amount of condensed water vapor. The effect of the outlet flue gas temperature in a heat recovery heat exchanger on the additionally recovered heat power is studied. A correlation has been derived enabling one to determine the best heat recovery depth (or the final cooling temperature) maximizing the anticipated reduced annual profit of a power enterprise from implementation of energy-saving measures. Results of optimization are presented for a surface-type condensing gas-air plate heat recovery heat exchanger for the climatic conditions and the economic situation in Tomsk. The predictions demonstrate that it is economically feasible to design similar heat recovery heat exchangers for a flue gas outlet temperature of 10°C. In this case, the payback period for the investment in the heat recovery heat exchanger will be 1.5 years. The effect of various factors on the optimal outlet flue gas temperature was analyzed. Most climatic, economical, or technological factors have a minor effect on the best outlet temperature, which remains between 5 and 20°C when varying the affecting factors. The derived correlation enables us to preliminary estimate the outlet (final) flue gas temperature that should be used in designing the heat transfer surface of a heat recovery heat exchanger for a gas-fired boiler as applied to the specific climatic conditions.

  7. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E.; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R.; Brown, Jeffery M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra.

  8. Dynamics of heat, water, and soluble gas exchange in the human airways: 1. A model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsu, M E; Babb, A L; Ralph, D D; Hlastala, M P

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide a means for analysis of heat, water, and soluble gas exchange with the airways during tidal ventilation, a one dimensional theoretical model describing heat and water exchange in the respiratory airways has been extended to include soluble gas exchange with the airway mucosa and water exchange with the mucous layer lining the airways. Not only do heat, water, and gas exchange occur simultaneously, but they also interact. Heating and cooling of the airway surface and mucous lining affects both evaporative water and soluble gas exchange. Water evaporation provides a major source of heat exchange. The model-predicted mean airway temperature profiles agree well with literature data for both oral and nasal breathing validating that part of the model. With model parameters giving the best fit to experimental data, the model shows: (a) substantial heat recovery in the upper airways, (b) minimal respiratory heat and water loss, and (c) low average mucous temperatures and maximal increases in mucous thickness. For resting breathing of room air, heat and water conservation appear to be more important than conditioning efficiency. End-tidal expired partial pressures of very soluble gases eliminated by the lungs are predicted to be lower than the alveolar partial pressures due to the absorption of the expired gases by the airway mucosa. The model may be usable for design of experiments to examine mechanisms associated with the local hydration and dehydration dynamics of the mucosal surface, control of bronchial perfusion, triggering of asthma, mucociliary clearance and deposition of inhaled pollutant gases.

  9. Respiratory dynamics of discontinuous gas exchange in the tracheal system of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewald, Berlizé; Hetz, Stefan K; Chown, Steven L; Terblanche, John S

    2012-07-01

    Gas exchange dynamics in insects is of fundamental importance to understanding evolved variation in breathing patterns, such as discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs). Most insects do not rely solely on diffusion for the exchange of respiratory gases but may also make use of respiratory movements (active ventilation) to supplement gas exchange at rest. However, their temporal dynamics have not been widely investigated. Here, intratracheal pressure, V(CO2) and body movements of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria were measured simultaneously during the DGC and revealed several important aspects of gas exchange dynamics. First, S. gregaria employs two different ventilatory strategies, one involving dorso-ventral contractions and the other longitudinal telescoping movements. Second, although a true spiracular closed (C)-phase of the DGC could be identified by means of subatmospheric intratracheal pressure recordings, some CO(2) continued to be released. Third, strong pumping actions do not necessarily lead to CO(2) release and could be used to ensure mixing of gases in the closed tracheal system, or enhance water vapour reabsorption into the haemolymph from fluid-filled tracheole tips by increasing the hydrostatic pressure or forcing fluid into the haemocoel. Finally, this work showed that the C-phase of the DGC can occur at any pressure. These results provide further insights into the mechanistic basis of insect gas exchange.

  10. Teaching Pulmonary Gas Exchange Physiology Using Computer Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitan, Kent S.

    2008-01-01

    Students often have difficulty understanding the relationship of O[subscript 2] consumption, CO[subscript 2] production, cardiac output, and distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratios in the lung to the final arterial blood gas composition. To overcome this difficulty, I have developed an interactive computer simulation of pulmonary gas exchange…

  11. High effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger for space power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Mattick, A. T.

    1983-01-01

    A high-effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger (LDHX) concept for thermal management in space is described. Heat is transferred by direct contact between fine droplets (approximately 100-300 microns in diameter) of a suitable low vapor pressure liquid and an inert working gas. Complete separation of the droplet and gas media in the zero-g environment is accomplished by configuring the LDHX as a vortex chamber.The large heat transfer area presented by the small droplets permits heat exchanger effectiveness of 0.9-0.95 in a compact, lightweight geometry which avoids many of the limitations of conventional plate and fin or tube and shell heat exchangers, such as their tendency toward single point failure. The application of the LDHX in a high temperature Brayton cycle is discussed to illustrate the performance and operational characteristics of this new heat exchanger concept.

  12. Gas exchange in the ice zone: the role of small waves and big animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loose, B.; Takahashi, A.; Bigdeli, A.

    2016-12-01

    The balance of air-sea gas exchange and net biological carbon fixation determine the transport and transformation of carbon dioxide and methane in the ocean. Air-sea gas exchange is mostly driven by upper ocean physics, but biology can also play a role. In the open ocean, gas exchange increases proportionate to the square of wind speed. When sea ice is present, this dependence breaks down in part because breaking waves and air bubble entrainment are damped out by interactions between sea ice and the wave field. At the same time, sea ice motions, formation, melt, and even sea ice-associated organisms can act to introduce turbulence and air bubbles into the upper ocean, thereby enhancing air-sea gas exchange. We take advantage of the knowledge advances of upper ocean physics including bubble dynamics to formulate a model for air-sea gas exchange in the sea ice zone. Here, we use the model to examine the role of small-scale waves and diving animals that trap air for insulation, including penguins, seals and polar bears. We compare these processes to existing parameterizations of wave and bubble dynamics in the open ocean, to observe how sea ice both mitigates and locally enhances air-sea gas transfer.

  13. Comparative ex vivo study on humidifying function of three speaking valves with integrated heat and moisture exchanger for tracheotomised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boer, C.; Lansaat, L.; Muller, S.H.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Assessment of humidifying function of tracheotomy speaking valves with integrated heat and moisture exchanger. Design Ex vivo measurement of water exchange and storage capacity of three tracheotomy speaking valves: Humidiphon Plus, Spiro and ProTrach DualCare (with two different heat and

  14. Gas Transport and Exchange through Wetland Plant Aerenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorrell, Brian Keith; Brix, Hans

    2013-01-01

    such as stirring of solutions. In some species, pressurized gas flows develop in shoots and rhizomes, and their contribution to gas fluxes can be assessed with pressure transducers and flow meters. Other gases produced in wetlands (e.g., CO2, CH4, and N2O) are also transported in aerenchyma. Their fluxes......-space dimensions accurately describe both O2 and CH4 fluxes in many species at a range of scales from individual roots to the entire vegetation....

  15. Evaluation of fiber bundle rotation for enhancing gas exchange in a respiratory assist catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eash, Heide J; Mihelc, Kevin M; Frankowski, Brian J; Hattler, Brack G; Federspiel, William J

    2007-01-01

    Supplemental oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal through an intravenous respiratory assist catheter can be used as a means of treating patients with acute respiratory failure. We are beginning development efforts toward a new respiratory assist catheter with an insertional size mixing and enhanced gas exchange in intravenous respiratory assist catheters. Using a simple test apparatus of a rotating densely packed bundle of hollow fiber membranes, water and blood gas exchange levels were evaluated at various rotation speeds in a mock vena cava. At 12,000 RPM, maximum CO2 gas exchange rates were 449 and 523 mL/min per m2, water and blood, respectively, but the rate of increase with increasing rotation rate diminished beyond 7500 RPM. These levels of gas exchange efficiency are two- to threefold greater than achieved in our previous respiratory catheters using balloon pulsation for active mixing. In preliminary hemolysis tests, which monitored plasma-free hemoglobin levels in vitro over a period of 6 hours, we established that the rotating fiber bundle per se did not cause significant blood hemolysis compared with an intra-aortic balloon pump. Accordingly, fiber bundle rotation appears to be a potential mechanism for increasing gas exchange and reducing insertional size in respiratory catheters.

  16. Continuous measurement of air-water gas exchange by underwater eddy covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Peter; Pace, Michael L.

    2017-12-01

    Exchange of gases, such as O2, CO2, and CH4, over the air-water interface is an important component in aquatic ecosystem studies, but exchange rates are typically measured or estimated with substantial uncertainties. This diminishes the precision of common ecosystem assessments associated with gas exchanges such as primary production, respiration, and greenhouse gas emission. Here, we used the aquatic eddy covariance technique - originally developed for benthic O2 flux measurements - right below the air-water interface (˜ 4 cm) to determine gas exchange rates and coefficients. Using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter and a fast-responding dual O2-temperature sensor mounted on a floating platform the 3-D water velocity, O2 concentration, and temperature were measured at high-speed (64 Hz). By combining these data, concurrent vertical fluxes of O2 and heat across the air-water interface were derived, and gas exchange coefficients were calculated from the former. Proof-of-concept deployments at different river sites gave standard gas exchange coefficients (k600) in the range of published values. A 40 h long deployment revealed a distinct diurnal pattern in air-water exchange of O2 that was controlled largely by physical processes (e.g., diurnal variations in air temperature and associated air-water heat fluxes) and not by biological activity (primary production and respiration). This physical control of gas exchange can be prevalent in lotic systems and adds uncertainty to assessments of biological activity that are based on measured water column O2 concentration changes. For example, in the 40 h deployment, there was near-constant river flow and insignificant winds - two main drivers of lotic gas exchange - but we found gas exchange coefficients that varied by several fold. This was presumably caused by the formation and erosion of vertical temperature-density gradients in the surface water driven by the heat flux into or out of the river that affected the turbulent

  17. Continuous measurement of air–water gas exchange by underwater eddy covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Berg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Exchange of gases, such as O2, CO2, and CH4, over the air–water interface is an important component in aquatic ecosystem studies, but exchange rates are typically measured or estimated with substantial uncertainties. This diminishes the precision of common ecosystem assessments associated with gas exchanges such as primary production, respiration, and greenhouse gas emission. Here, we used the aquatic eddy covariance technique – originally developed for benthic O2 flux measurements – right below the air–water interface (∼ 4 cm to determine gas exchange rates and coefficients. Using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter and a fast-responding dual O2–temperature sensor mounted on a floating platform the 3-D water velocity, O2 concentration, and temperature were measured at high-speed (64 Hz. By combining these data, concurrent vertical fluxes of O2 and heat across the air–water interface were derived, and gas exchange coefficients were calculated from the former. Proof-of-concept deployments at different river sites gave standard gas exchange coefficients (k600 in the range of published values. A 40 h long deployment revealed a distinct diurnal pattern in air–water exchange of O2 that was controlled largely by physical processes (e.g., diurnal variations in air temperature and associated air–water heat fluxes and not by biological activity (primary production and respiration. This physical control of gas exchange can be prevalent in lotic systems and adds uncertainty to assessments of biological activity that are based on measured water column O2 concentration changes. For example, in the 40 h deployment, there was near-constant river flow and insignificant winds – two main drivers of lotic gas exchange – but we found gas exchange coefficients that varied by several fold. This was presumably caused by the formation and erosion of vertical temperature–density gradients in the surface water driven by the heat flux into or

  18. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  19. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  20. The Precise Mechanisms of a High-Speed Ultrasound Gas Sensor and Detecting Human-Specific Lung Gas Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Toda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose and develop a new real-time human respiration process analysis method using a high-time-sampling gas concentration sensor based on ultrasound. A unique point about our proposed gas concentration sensor is its 1 kHz gas concentration sampling speed. This figure could not have been attained by previously proposed gas concentration measurement methods such as InfraRed, semiconductor gas sensors, or GC-MS, because the gas analysis speeds were a maximum of a few hundred milliseconds. First, we describe the proposed new ultrasound sound speed measurement method and the signal processing, and present the measurement circuit diagram. Next, we analyse the human respiration gas variation patterns of five healthy subjects using a newly developed gas-mask-type respiration sensor. This reveals that the rapid gas exchange from H2O to CO2 contains air specific to the human being. In addition, we also measured medical symptoms in subjects suffering from asthma, hyperventilation and bronchial asthma. The millisecond level high-speed analysis of the human respiration process will be useful for the next generation of healthcare, rehabilitation and sports science technology.

  1. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed.

  2. Evidence for surface organic matter modulation of air-sea CO2 gas exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Agustí

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Air-sea CO2 exchange depends on the air-sea CO2 gradient and the gas transfer velocity (k, computed as a function of wind speed. Large discrepancies among relationships predicting k from wind suggest that other processes also contribute significantly to modulate CO2 exchange. Here we report, on the basis of the relationship between the measured gas transfer velocity and the organic carbon concentration at the ocean surface, a significant role of surface organic matter in suppressing air-sea gas exchange, at low and intermediate winds, in the open ocean, confirming previous observations. The potential role of total surface organic matter concentration (TOC on gas transfer velocity (k was evaluated by direct measurements of air-sea CO2 fluxes at different wind speeds and locations in the open ocean. According to the results obtained, high surface organic matter contents may lead to lower air-sea CO2 fluxes, for a given air-sea CO2 partial pressure gradient and wind speed below 5 m s−1, compared to that observed at low organic matter contents. We found the bias in calculated gas fluxes resulting from neglecting TOC to co-vary geographically and seasonally with marine productivity. These results support previous evidences that consideration of the role of organic matter in modulating air-sea CO2 exchange may improve flux estimates and help avoid possible bias associated to variability in surface organic concentration across the ocean.

  3. Diode laser absorption spectroscopy for studies of gas exchange in fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, L.; Gao, H.; Sjöholm, M.; Svanberg, S.

    2006-07-01

    Gas exchange in fruits, in particular oxygen transport in apples, was studied non-intrusively using wavelength modulation diode laser absorption spectroscopy at about 761 nm, applied to the strongly scattering intact fruit structure. The applicability of the technique was demonstrated by studies of the influence of the skin to regulate the internal oxygen balance and of cling film in modifying it by observing the response of the signal from the internal oxygen gas to a transient change in the ambient gas concentration. Applications within controlled atmosphere fruit storage and modified atmosphere packaging are discussed. The results suggest that the technique could be applied to studies of a large number of problems concerning gas exchange in foods and in food packaging.

  4. Reduction of molecular gas diffusion through gaskets in leaf gas exchange cuvettes by leaf‐mediated pores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard, Kristine Stove; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro‐Poulsen, Helge

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate on how to correct leaf gas exchange measurements for the unavoidable diffusion leakage that occurs when measurements are done in non‐ambient CO2 concentrations. In this study, we present a theory on how the CO2 diffusion gradient over the gasket is affected by leaf......‐mediated pores (LMP) and how LMP reduce diffusive exchange across the gaskets. Recent discussions have so far neglected the processes in the quasi‐laminar boundary layer around the gasket. Counter intuitively, LMP reduce the leakage through gaskets, which can be explained by assuming that the boundary layer...

  5. Effects of stomata clustering on leaf gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2015-09-01

    A general theoretical framework for quantifying the stomatal clustering effects on leaf gaseous diffusive conductance was developed and tested. The theory accounts for stomatal spacing and interactions among 'gaseous concentration shells'. The theory was tested using the unique measurements of Dow et al. (2014) that have shown lower leaf diffusive conductance for a genotype of Arabidopsis thaliana with clustered stomata relative to uniformly distributed stomata of similar size and density. The model accounts for gaseous diffusion: through stomatal pores; via concentration shells forming at pore apertures that vary with stomata spacing and are thus altered by clustering; and across the adjacent air boundary layer. Analytical approximations were derived and validated using a numerical model for 3D diffusion equation. Stomata clustering increases the interactions among concentration shells resulting in larger diffusive resistance that may reduce fluxes by 5-15%. A similar reduction in conductance was found for clusters formed by networks of veins. The study resolves ambiguities found in the literature concerning stomata end-corrections and stomatal shape, and provides a new stomata density threshold for diffusive interactions of overlapping vapor shells. The predicted reduction in gaseous exchange due to clustering, suggests that guard cell function is impaired, limiting stomatal aperture opening. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Aluminum toxicity in tomato. Part 2.Leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll content, and invertase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. Simon; M. Kieger; Shi-Jean S. Sung; T.J. Smalley

    1994-01-01

    The effect of aluminum (Al) toxicity on leaf gas exchange, leaf chlorophyll content, and sucrose metabolizing enzyme activity of two tomato cultivars (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. 'Mountain Pride' and 'Floramerica') was studied to determine the mechanism of growth reduction observed in a related study (Simon et al., 1994, Part 1).Plants were grown...

  7. Flooding tolerance of Carex species. II. Root gas-exchange capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moog, PR; Bruggemann, W

    1998-01-01

    Root CO2 and O-2 gas exchange were measured in young Carer extensa Good. (flooding sensitive), C. remota L. and C. pseudocyperus L. (both flooding tolerant) plants, precultured either aerobically or anaerobically. Temperature changes form 21 to II degrees C had small effects on root CO2 release from

  8. Metabolic gas exchange in critically ill surgical patients : physical, methodological, therapeutic and prognostic aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.B. van Lanschot (Jan)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe aims of these studies are: - To design and to validate an automatic instrument for the measurement of oxygen consumption (Vo,), carbon dioxide production (Vco,) and respiratory quotient (R.Q.) (Appendix I). - - To assess the influence of artifacts in metabolic gas-exchange

  9. Analyzing transient closed chamber effects on canopy gas exchange for optimizing flux calculation timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langensiepen, M.; Kupisch, M.; Wijk, van M.T.; Ewert, F.

    2012-01-01

    Transient type canopy chambers are still the only currently available practical solution for rapid screening of gas-exchange in agricultural fields. The technique has been criticized for its effect on canopy microclimate during measurement which affects the transport regime and regulation of plant

  10. Unilateral lung edema: effects on pulmonary gas exchange, hemodynamics, and pulmonary perfusion distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama, K; Gesch, M; Böck, J C; Pietschmann, S M; Schaffartzik, W; Pison, U

    2000-10-01

    Two types of unilateral lung edema in sheep were characterized regarding their effects on pulmonary gas exchange, hemodynamics, and distribution of pulmonary perfusion. One edema type was induced with aerosolized HCl (0.15 M, pH 1.0) and the other with NaCl (0.15 M, pH 7.4). Both aerosols were nebulized continuously for 4 h into left lungs. In HCl-treated animals, pulmonary gas exchange deteriorated [from a partial arterial O(2) pressure-to-inspired O(2) fraction ratio (Pa(O(2))/FI(O(2))) of 254 at baseline to 187 after 4 h HCl]. In addition, pulmonary artery pressure and total pulmonary vascular resistance increased (from 16 to 19 mmHg and from 133 to 154 dyn. s. cm(-5), respectively). In NaCl-treated animals, only the central venous pressure significantly increased (from 7 to 9 mmHg). Distribution of pulmonary perfusion (measured with fluorescent microspheres) changed differently in both groups. After HCl application, 6% more blood flow was directed to the treated lung, whereas, after NaCl, 5% more blood flow was directed to the untreated lung. HCl and NaCl treatment both induce an equivalent lung edema, but only HCl treatment is associated with gas exchange alteration and tissue damage. Redistribution of pulmonary perfusion maintains gas exchange during NaCl treatment and decreases it during HCl inhalation.

  11. Leaf gas exchange traits of domestic and exotic tree species in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Tateishi, M.; Kumagai, T.; Otsuki, K.

    2009-12-01

    In forests under the management by community villagers, exotic tree species with rapid growth rate are introduced in wide range of Cambodia. To evaluate the influence of the introduction on the forest gas exchange and water budget, we investigated the leaf gas exchange traits of two domestic (Dipterocarpus obtusifolius and Shorea roxburghii) and exotic tree species (Acasia auriculiformis and Eucalyptus camadilansis). We sampled shoots of each species and measured the leaf gas exchange traits (photosynthetic rates under different CO2 concentrations, transpiration rate and stomatal conductance) (6 leaves x 3 trees x 4 species). We carried out this measurement at 2 months intervals for a year from the beginning of rainy season and compared the obtained traits among species. Light saturated rate of net photosynthesis was higher in E. camadilansis but did not differ among other species both in rainy and dry seasons. Seasonal patter in photosynthetic traits was not obvious. Each species changed stomatal conductance in response to changes in environmental conditions. The response was more sensitive than reported values. In this presentation, we show details about the basic information about the leaf-level gas exchange traits, which are required to run soil- vegetation - atmosphere transfer model.

  12. Emphysema following vitrectomy with fluid–gas exchange: description of a rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damasceno EF

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo F Damasceno,1 Nadyr Damasceno,2 Soraya Horowitz,2 Marcio Mortera Rodrigues3 1Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Brazil; 2Hospital Naval Marcílio Dias, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 3Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Purpose: To report a case of subcutaneous emphysema involving the orbit, mediastinum, and face after pars plana vitrectomy with fluid–gas exchange. Methods: Case report of a 55-year-old man who presented with bilateral eyelid and face edema and dysphagia in the immediate postoperative period after pars plana vitrectomy. Orbital and chest computed tomographies were performed, revealing emphysema of the orbit and soft tissue of the face, extending from the neck to the upper chest. Results: The patient with a retinal detachment in the right eye underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy surgery with fluid–gas exchange and an implantation of silicone oil. The patient had a previous history of facial trauma for more than 20 years with an orbital fracture. After surgery, the patient developed emphysema of the orbit, soft tissue of the face and upper chest. Systemic prophylactic antibiotics associated with antibiotics and steroid drops performed a satisfactory evolution. Conclusion: The fluid–gas exchange during pars plana vitrectomy in patients with orbital fracture can lead to emphysema of the face, chest, and soft tissue. Keywords: vitrectomy complications, fluid–gas exchange, orbital emphysema, mediastinal emphysema, face emphysema, orbit fracture

  13. Acclimation of a terrestrial plant to submergence facilitates gas exchange under water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommer, L.; Pedersen, O.; Visser, E.J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Flooding imposes stress upon terrestrial plants since it severely hampers gas exchange rates between the shoot and the environment. The resulting oxygen deficiency is considered to be the major problem for submerged plants. Oxygen microelectrode studies have, however, shown that aquatic plants

  14. Changes in gas exchange, tissue respiration and glycolysis in rats during hypokinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorya, L. V.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an experiment which studied changes in oxygen balance under conditions of hypokinesia in rats is presented. The effect of the stress during hypokinesia is expressed most clearly in the changes of general gas exchange, and in the intensity of liver and myocardial tissue respiration.

  15. Impaired gas exchange: accuracy of defining characteristics in children with acute respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Maia Pascoal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the accuracy of the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange nursing diagnosis in children with acute respiratory infection.METHOD: open prospective cohort study conducted with 136 children monitored for a consecutive period of at least six days and not more than ten days. An instrument based on the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis and on literature addressing pulmonary assessment was used to collect data. The accuracy means of all the defining characteristics under study were computed.RESULTS: the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis was present in 42.6% of the children in the first assessment. Hypoxemia was the characteristic that presented the best measures of accuracy. Abnormal breathing presented high sensitivity, while restlessness, cyanosis, and abnormal skin color showed high specificity. All the characteristics presented negative predictive values of 70% and cyanosis stood out by its high positive predictive value.CONCLUSION: hypoxemia was the defining characteristic that presented the best predictive ability to determine Impaired gas exchange. Studies of this nature enable nurses to minimize variability in clinical situations presented by the patient and to identify more precisely the nursing diagnosis that represents the patient's true clinical condition.

  16. Effects of moisture and nitrogen stress on gas exchange and nutrient resorption in Quercus rubra seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Francis Salifu; Douglass F. Jacobs

    2008-01-01

    The effects of simulated soil fertility at three levels (poor, medium, and rich soils) and moisture stress at two levels (well watered versus moisture stressed) on gas exchange and foliar nutrient resorption in 1+0 bareroot northern red oak (Quercus rubra) seedlings were evaluated. Current nitrogen (N) uptake was labeled with the stable isotope

  17. Improved gas exchange performance of the intravascular oxygenator by active blood mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W; Schroeder, T; Bidani, A; Cardenas, V J; Nguyen, P D; Bradford, D W; Traber, D L; Zwischenberger, J B

    1994-01-01

    The intravascular oxygenator and carbon dioxide removal device (IVOX; CardioPulmonics, Salt Lake City, UT) has been shown to perform 30% of the gas exchange in animals and patients with acute respiratory failure. Among the factors that limit gas exchange is the mass transfer resistance in the blood phase. To determine if a reduction in mass transfer resistance by mixing venous blood can enhance the O2 transfer and CO2 removal by IVOX, a right atrium-pulmonary artery venovenous bypass circuit was used in sheep to model the adult vena cava. A size 9 IVOX (894 fibers with 0.41 m2 surface area, n = 5) was incorporated in the bypass circuit and the blood flow controlled by a roller pump ranging from 1 to 4 l/min. An intra-aortic balloon was placed near the shaft of the IVOX and pulsated at the rate adjusted to best improve CO2 removal (100-120 bpm). O2 transfer and CO2 removal were measured with balloon pulsation on and off at different flow rates. Results showed that blood mixing by pulsation of the balloon caused a 25-49% increase in O2 transfer by IVOX, and this increase remained relatively constant throughout the full flow range. CO2 removal was also increased by up to 35%, but at flows between 3.5 and 4 l/min, the effect of mixing was diminished. It is concluded that reduction in the mass transfer resistance by blood mixing improves gas exchange. Because O2 is more diffusion limited, it is more dependent upon mixing of blood for gas exchange than CO2. More design improvements to incorporate active mixing may further enhance the gas exchange performance of IVOX.

  18. Analysis of effect of the solubility on gas exchange in nonhomogeneous lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, W. E., Jr.; Evans, J. W.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison is made of the gas exchange in nonhomogeneous lung models and in homogeneous lung models with the same total blood flow and ventilation. It is shown that the ratio of the rate of gas transfer of the inhomogeneous lung model over the rate of gas transfer of the homogeneous lung model as a function of gas solubility always has the qualitative features for gases with linear dissociation curves. This ratio is 1 for a gas with zero solubility and decreases to a single minimum. It subsequently rises to approach 1 as the solubility tends to infinity. The early portion of the graph of this function is convex, then after a single inflection point it is concave.

  19. Gas exchange in fruits related to skin condition and fruit ripening studied with diode laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Lin, Huiying; Li, Tianqi; Mei, Liang; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune

    2016-12-01

    The concentration of the biologically active molecular oxygen gas is of crucial importance for fruits in the metabolic respiration, maturation, and ripening processes. In our study, oxygen content and oxygen transport in fruits, exemplified by apples and guavas, were studied noninvasively by gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy. The technique is based on the fact that free gases typically have 10,000 times narrower absorption features than the bulk material. The technique was demonstrated in studies of the influence of the fruit skin in regulating the internal oxygen balance, by observing the signal response of the internal oxygen gas to a transient change in the ambient gas concentration on peeled and unpeeled fruits. In addition, the gas exchange rate at different ripening stages was also studied in intact guavas.

  20. Combined Effects of Wind and Rain on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, S.; Harrison, E.; Ho, D. T.; Veron, F.

    2010-12-01

    In constraining local and global carbon cycle budgets, it is important to know the air-water gas transfer velocity (k). Historically, k has been parameterized by wind speed or rain rate separately, and pilot experiments in the laboratory with wind and rain suggested that these parameterizations may be linearly additive (Ho et al., 2007). Here we present results from a series of experiments completed at the University of Delaware’s Air-Sea Interaction Laboratory (ASIL) that aim to study the combined effect of wind and rain on air-water gas exchange. Experimental conditions included 11 wind speeds and 6 rain rates, where gas transfer velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, and bubble size and density were measured. Our results indicate that these effects are not linearly additive, particularly at higher wind speeds (approximately 19 m/s). At these higher wind speeds wind contributes significantly more to the total kinetic energy flux than the rain. These results corroborate findings at the ASIL from 2008 (Harrison et al., in prep). Here, we further examine changes in turbulence due to wind and rain and bubble production due to rain at the air-water interface to elucidate the nonlinear effects of wind and rain on air-water gas exchange. References Harrison, E., et al. (in prep), The combined effect of rain and wind on air-water gas exchange. Ho, D. T., et al. (2007), The combined effect of rain and wind on air-water gas exchange: A feasibility study, Journal of Marine Systems, 66(1-4), 150-160.

  1. A Three-Dimensional Multiscale Model for Gas Exchange in Fruit1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Quang Tri; Verboven, Pieter; Verlinden, Bert E.; Herremans, Els; Wevers, Martine; Carmeliet, Jan; Nicolaï, Bart M.

    2011-01-01

    Respiration of bulky plant organs such as roots, tubers, stems, seeds, and fruit depends very much on oxygen (O2) availability and often follows a Michaelis-Menten-like response. A multiscale model is presented to calculate gas exchange in plants using the microscale geometry of the tissue, or vice versa, local concentrations in the cells from macroscopic gas concentration profiles. This approach provides a computationally feasible and accurate analysis of cell metabolism in any plant organ during hypoxia and anoxia. The predicted O2 and carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressure profiles compared very well with experimental data, thereby validating the multiscale model. The important microscale geometrical features are the shape, size, and three-dimensional connectivity of cells and air spaces. It was demonstrated that the gas-exchange properties of the cell wall and cell membrane have little effect on the cellular gas exchange of apple (Malus × domestica) parenchyma tissue. The analysis clearly confirmed that cells are an additional route for CO2 transport, while for O2 the intercellular spaces are the main diffusion route. The simulation results also showed that the local gas concentration gradients were steeper in the cells than in the surrounding air spaces. Therefore, to analyze the cellular metabolism under hypoxic and anoxic conditions, the microscale model is required to calculate the correct intracellular concentrations. Understanding the O2 response of plants and plant organs thus not only requires knowledge of external conditions, dimensions, gas-exchange properties of the tissues, and cellular respiration kinetics but also of microstructure. PMID:21224337

  2. A three-dimensional multiscale model for gas exchange in fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Quang Tri; Verboven, Pieter; Verlinden, Bert E; Herremans, Els; Wevers, Martine; Carmeliet, Jan; Nicolaï, Bart M

    2011-03-01

    Respiration of bulky plant organs such as roots, tubers, stems, seeds, and fruit depends very much on oxygen (O2) availability and often follows a Michaelis-Menten-like response. A multiscale model is presented to calculate gas exchange in plants using the microscale geometry of the tissue, or vice versa, local concentrations in the cells from macroscopic gas concentration profiles. This approach provides a computationally feasible and accurate analysis of cell metabolism in any plant organ during hypoxia and anoxia. The predicted O2 and carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressure profiles compared very well with experimental data, thereby validating the multiscale model. The important microscale geometrical features are the shape, size, and three-dimensional connectivity of cells and air spaces. It was demonstrated that the gas-exchange properties of the cell wall and cell membrane have little effect on the cellular gas exchange of apple (Malus×domestica) parenchyma tissue. The analysis clearly confirmed that cells are an additional route for CO2 transport, while for O2 the intercellular spaces are the main diffusion route. The simulation results also showed that the local gas concentration gradients were steeper in the cells than in the surrounding air spaces. Therefore, to analyze the cellular metabolism under hypoxic and anoxic conditions, the microscale model is required to calculate the correct intracellular concentrations. Understanding the O2 response of plants and plant organs thus not only requires knowledge of external conditions, dimensions, gas-exchange properties of the tissues, and cellular respiration kinetics but also of microstructure.

  3. Currents and convection cause enhanced gas exchange in the ice–water boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice Loose

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of sea ice acts as a physical barrier for air–sea exchange. On the other hand it creates additional turbulence due to current shear and convection during ice formation. We present results from a laboratory study that demonstrate how shear and convection in the ice–ocean boundary layer can lead to significant gas exchange. In the absence of wind, water currents beneath the ice of 0.23 m s−1 produced a gas transfer velocity (k of 2.8 m d−1, equivalent to k produced by a wind speed of 7 m s−1 over the open ocean. Convection caused by air–sea heat exchange also increased k of as much as 131 % compared to k produced by current shear alone. When wind and currents were combined, k increased, up to 7.6 m d−1, greater than k produced by wind or currents alone, but gas exchange forcing by wind produced mixed results in these experiments. As an aggregate, these experiments indicate that using a wind speed parametrisation to estimate k in the sea ice zone may underestimate k by ca. 50 % for wind speeds <8 m s−1.

  4. Investigating the effects of random balloon pulsation on gas exchange in a respiratory assist catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eash, Heide J; Budilarto, Stephanus G; Hattler, Brack G; Federspiel, William J

    2006-01-01

    We are developing an intravenous respiratory assist catheter, which uses hollow-fiber membranes wrapped around a pulsating balloon that increases oxygenation and CO2 removal with increased balloon pulsation. Our current pulsation system operates with a constant rate of pulsation and delivered balloon volume. This study examined the hypothesis that random balloon pulsation would disrupt fluid entrainment within the fiber bundle and increase our overall gas exchange. We implemented two different modes for random (rates and delivered volume) versus constant pulsation. The impact on gas exchange was measured in a 3 l/min water flow loop at 37 degrees C. CO2 gas exchange for randomized beat rate mode was comparable to its corresponding average constant pulsation (e.g., constant 286 beats/min versus randomized 200-400 beats/min was 299.5+/-0.9 and 302.2+/-1.4 ml/min/m, respectively). Random volume mode CO2 exchange was also comparable to constant delivered balloon volume (100% inflation and deflation) (e.g., 294.3+/-0.6 and 301.1+/-1.7 ml/min/m, random 50-100% inflation and constant, respectively). Greater active mixing was seen with constant pulsation as compared with randomly changing the parameters of balloon pulsation.

  5. Optical methods to study the gas exchange processes in large diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gros, S.; Hattar, C. [Wartsila Diesel International Oy, Vaasa (Finland); Hernberg, R.; Vattulainen, J. [Tampere Univ. of Technology, Tampere (Finland). Plasma Technology Lab.

    1996-12-01

    To be able to study the gas exchange processes in realistic conditions for a single cylinder of a large production-line-type diesel engine, a fast optical absorption spectroscopic method was developed. With this method line-of-sight UV-absorption of SO{sub 2} contained in the exhaust gas was measured as a function of time in the exhaust port area in a continuously fired medium speed diesel engine type Waertsilae 6L20. SO{sub 2} formed during the combustion from the fuel contained sulphur was used as a tracer to study the gas exchange as a function of time in the exhaust channel. In this case of a 4-stroke diesel engine by assuming a known concentration of SO{sub 2} in the exhaust gas after exhaust valve opening and before inlet and exhaust valve overlap period, the measured optical absorption was used to determine the gas density and further the instantaneous exhaust gas temperature during the exhaust cycle. (author)

  6. Surviving floods: leaf gas films improve O2 and CO2 exchange, root aeration, and growth of completely submerged rice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Rich, Sarah Meghan; Colmer, Timothy David

    2009-01-01

    that the improved gas exchange was not caused by differences in diffusive boundary layers adjacent to submerged leaves with or without gas films; instead, reduced resistance to gas exchange was probably due to the enlarged water–gas interface (cf. aquatic insects). When gas films were removed artificially......When completely submerged, the leaves of some species retain a surface gas film. Leaf gas films on submerged plants have recently been termed 'plant plastrons', analogous with the plastrons of aquatic insects. In aquatic insects, surface gas layers (i.e. plastrons) enlarge the gas–water interface...... to promote O2 uptake when under water; however, the function of leaf gas films has rarely been considered. The present study demonstrates that gas films on leaves of completely submerged rice facilitate entry of O2 from floodwaters when in darkness and CO2 entry when in light. O2 microprofiles showed...

  7. Exchange between the stagnant and flowing zone in gas-flowing solids-fixed bed contactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSANDAR P. DUDUKOVIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In countercurrent gas – flowing solids – fixed bed contactors, a fraction of the flowing solids is in motion (dynamic holdup, while the other fraction is resting on the fixed bed elements. In this study it was experimentally proved that the stagnant zone should not be considered as a dead part of the column, but that there is a dynamic exchange between these two portions of flowing solids particles. Combining a mathematical model with tracer experiments, the rate of exchange was determined and it was shown that only a small part (ca. 20 % of the stagnant region should be considered as a dead one.

  8. Mechanisms of gas exchange response to lung volume reduction surgery in severe emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremona, George; Barberà, Joan A; Barbara, Joan A; Melgosa, Teresa; Appendini, Lorenzo; Roca, Josep; Casadio, Caterina; Donner, Claudio F; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Wagner, Peter D

    2011-04-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves lung function, respiratory symptoms, and exercise tolerance in selected patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who have heterogeneous emphysema. However, the reported effects of LVRS on gas exchange are variable, even when lung function is improved. To clarify how LVRS affects gas exchange in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 23 patients were studied before LVRS, 14 of whom were again studied afterwards. We performed measurements of lung mechanics, pulmonary hemodynamics, and ventilation-perfusion (Va/Q) inequality using the multiple inert-gas elimination technique. LVRS improved arterial Po₂ (Pa(O₂)) by a mean of 6 Torr (P = 0.04), with no significant effect on arterial Pco₂ (Pa(CO₂)), but with great variability in both. Lung mechanical properties improved considerably more than did gas exchange. Post-LVRS Pa(O₂) depended mostly on its pre-LVRS value, whereas improvement in Pa(O(2)) was explained mostly by improved Va/Q inequality, with lesser contributions from both increased ventilation and higher mixed venous Po(2). However, no index of lung mechanical properties correlated with Pa(O₂). Conversely, post-LVRS Pa(CO₂) bore no relationship to its pre-LVRS value, whereas changes in Pa(CO₂) were tightly related (r² = 0.96) to variables, reflecting decrease in static lung hyperinflation (intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure and residual volume/total lung capacity) and increase in airflow potential (tidal volume and maximal inspiratory pressure), but not to Va/Q distribution changes. Individual gas exchange responses to LVRS vary greatly, but can be explained by changes in combinations of determining variables that are different for oxygen and carbon dioxide.

  9. Numerical Study of Compact Plate-Fin Heat Exchanger for Rotary-Vane Gas Refrigeration Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Trandafilov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Plate-fin heat exchangers are widely used in refrigeration technique. They are popular because of their compactness and excellent heat transfer performance. Here we present a numerical model for the development, research and optimization of a plate-fin heat exchanger for a rotary-vane gas refrigeration machine. The method of analysis by graphic method of plate - fin heat exchanger is proposed. The model describes the effects of secondary parameters such as axial thermal conductivity through a metal matrix of the heat exchanger. The influence of geometric parameters and heat transfer coefficient is studied. Graphs of dependences of length, efficiency of a fin and pressure drop in a heat exchanger on the thickness of the fin and the number of fins per meter are obtained. To analyze the results of numerical simulation, the heat exchanger was designed in the Aspen HYSYS program. The simulation results show that the total deviation from the proposed numerical model is not more than 15%. 

  10. Heat Exchange and Fouling Analysis on a Set of Hydrogen Sulphide Gas Coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Adrian Sánchez-Escalona

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The sulphide acid coolers are tube and shell jacketed heat exchangers designed to cool down the produced gas from 416,15 K to 310,15 K in addition to separate the sulphur carried over by the outlet gas from the reactor tower. The investigation was carried out by applying the passive experimentation process in an online cooler set in order to determine the heat transfer rates and fouling based on heat resistance. It was corroborated that the operation of this equipment outside design parameters increases outlet gas temperature and liquid sulphur carryovers. Efficiency loss is caused by fouling elements in the fluid, which results in changes in the overall heat transfer rate. The linear tendency of the fouling heat resistance based on time for three gas flowrates.

  11. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h−1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m−2 d−1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  12. Gas exchange and heart rate in the harbour porpoise, Phocoena phocoena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reed, J.Z.; Chambers, C.; Hunter, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    The respiratory physiology, heart rates and metabolic rates of two captive juvenile male harbour porpoises (both 28 kg) were measured using a rapid-response respiratory gas analysis system in the laboratory. Breath-hold durations in the laboratory (12 +/- 0.3 s, mean +/- SEM) were shorter than...... a comparatively high minute rate of gas exchange. Oxygen consumption under these experimental conditions (247 +/- 13.8 ml O-2. min(-1)) was 1.9- fold higher than predicted by standard scaling relations. These data together with an estimate of the total oxygen stores predicted an aerobic dive limit of 5.4 min...

  13. Is pulmonary gas exchange during exercise in hypoxia impaired with the increase of cardiac output?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J.A.; Robach, P.; Lundby, C.

    2008-01-01

    that the main mechanism limiting pulmonary gas exchange is diffusion limitation. It is presumed that an elevation of cardiac output during exercise in acute hypoxia should increase the (A-a)DO(2). However, no studies have examined how variations in cardiac output independently affect pulmonary diffusion......-a)DO(2) is accentuated. Using the multiple inert gas elimination technique it has been shown that during exercise in acute hypoxia the contribution of ventilation-perfusion inequality to (A-a)DO(2) is rather small and in the absence of pulmonary edema intrapulmonary shunts can be ruled out. This implies...

  14. Experimental results with a natural gas cogeneration system using a polymer exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, Mihai; Lottin, Olivier; Feidt, Michel; Lombard, Christophe; Noc, David Le; Doze, Stéphane Le

    This paper reports experimental results of an investigation of five identical CHP (combined heat and power) units using PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) and running on natural gas. The natural gas is reformed locally to produce hydrogen. The net electric power is 4.5 kWe and the installations are designed for low temperature heat recovery (6 kW at 60 °C). The performances of the CHP units are analyzed in terms of electrical, thermal and total efficiencies. The electrical efficiency is low and it is shown that this is due mostly to the reforming process and to electric losses, while fuel cell performances are fully satisfying.

  15. A gas-exchange system for assessing plant performance in response to environmental stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G.E. Jr; Tingey, D.T.

    1979-10-01

    Anthropogenic stresses are increasingly common as environmental factors affecting the performance of plants in both natural and agro-ecosystems. There is a need to determine how these stresses may influence vital physiological processes in plants. This report documents the design, construction and performance of a whole-plant, gas-exchange system that can accurately monitor gas flux (e.g., carbon dioxide, water vapor, pollutants) between plants and the atmospheric environment. From these data, rates of key physiological processes--photosynthesis, transpiration, gaseous uptake and emission--can be assessed. Example studies are reported on the uptake of sulfur dioxide by plants and emissions of monoterpenes from plants.

  16. GROWTH, GAS EXCHANGE AND YIELD OF CORN WHEN FERTIGATED WITH BOVINE BIOFERTILIZER

    OpenAIRE

    THALES VINÍCIUS DE ARAÚJO VIANA; JOÃO GUILHERME ARAÚJO LIMA; GEOCLEBER GOMES DE SOUSA; LUIS GONZAGA PINHEIRO NETO; BENITO MOREIRA DE AZEVEDO

    2014-01-01

    The bovine biofertilizer applied through irrigation water in the soil (bio fertigation), can be a viable organic source to maintain fertility levels in agricultural production systems. So, this work was aimed at evaluating the effects of different concentrations of bovine biofertilizer applied by fertigation on corn growth, gas exchange and yield. The experiment was conducted under full sun exposure, in Fortaleza, Ceara, in 100 liter (100 L) vessels. The experimental design was that of random...

  17. Inorganic nitrogen fertilizers induce changes in ammonium assimilation and gas exchange in Camellia sinensis L.

    OpenAIRE

    DU, Xu Hua; PENG, Fang Ren; JIANG, Jiang; TAN, Peng Peng; WU, Zhi Zhuang; LIANG, You Wang; ZHONG, Zhe Ke

    2015-01-01

    Camellia sinensis L. is one of the most economically important crops in the world today. The leaves of this plant are harvested for tea production on a massive scale through a process that requires a large amount of inorganic nitrogen (N). However, knowledge of how inorganic nitrogen regulates the growth physiology of C. sinensis L. remains limited. In order to investigate its effects on gas exchange, N assimilation, and the efficiency of N use in C. sinensis L., we carried out experiments wi...

  18. Linking stomata geometries and densities to leaf gas exchange - new opportunities and old pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus; Singer, Thomas; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    Historical trends in stomatal sizes and numbers are believed to be directly related to trends in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, where lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations selected for larger leaf conductance to achieve adequate CO2 assimilation rates. In addition to affecting maximum stomatal conductance, stomatal size is considered to affect transition time between full opening and full closure with smaller stomata responding faster. Stomatal sizes and numbers are often deduced by direct microscopy of leaf surfaces (fresh or fossil), or from nail polish imprints obtained from leaf epidermis. The maximum stomatal conductance is then calculated for fully open stomata of assumed aperture shape based on gas diffusion from within the leaf across a leaf boundary layer. Direct microscopic observations of leaves in specialised gas exchange chambers or snap-frozen leaves right after removal from a gas exchange chamber enabled correlation of actual stomatal apertures with directly measured bulk stomatal conductance. We combined systematic analyses of stomatal conductance and response times with laser scanning microscopy of epidermis imprints using fast setting dental imprint that preserve highly resolved stomatal apertures after removal from a gas exchange chamber. The simplicity of data collection relative to previous approaches enables data collection across a range of species with different stomatal sizes and numbers. The dataset was used to evaluate the adequacy of different physically-based stomatal conductance formulas based on geometrical attributes relative to measured conductance for a range of external CO2 concentrations. We also investigated the link between stomata size and response time to environmental perturbation. Results point to uncertainties in inferred geometrical attributes and suggest highly patchy stomatal opening that complicates links between stomata aperture and density for estimation of actual stomatal conductance. Additionally, we identified

  19. Exchange bias and magnetic behaviour of iron nanoclusters prepared by the gas aggregation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Marcos, J., E-mail: sanchej@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Laguna-Marco, M.A.; Martinez-Morillas, R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez-Villacorta, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); SpLine Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, ESRF-BP 220-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Cespedes, E. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Menendez, N. [Dep. Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Prieto, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gas aggregation phase technique allows obtaining {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have reported exchange bias up to 3250 Oe at 2 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exchange bias may be tuned by different stoichiometry of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. - Abstract: Iron nanoclusters have been deposited by the gas-phase aggregation technique to form multilayered structures with outstanding exchange-bias (H{sub E}) values up to H{sub E} = 3300 Oe at low temperatures. In order to explain the observed magnetic properties, composition and crystallographic phase have been determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A metal-oxide core-shell arrangement has to be discarded to explain the large obtained values of H{sub E} since structural results show nanoclusters formed by the antiferromagnetic {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide. Moreover, nanoparticles of few nanometers formed by substoichiometric {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} explain the observed weak ferromagnetism and let to understand the origin of large exchange bias by the interaction between different spin sublattice configurations provided by the low iron coordination at surface.

  20. The effects of temperature on the gas exchange cycle in Agathemera crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienel, Mariana; Canals, Mauricio; Bozinovic, Francisco; Veloso, Claudio

    2015-05-01

    Insects exhibit three patterns of gas exchange: continuous (CoGE), cyclic (CGE) and discontinuous (DGE). In this work, we present the first record of a DGE in Phasmatodea and its transition to CGE and to CoGE through a thermal gradient. The rate of CO2 production (VCO2) at 10, 20 and 30°C was examined in adults of Agathemera crassa, a high-Andean phasmid of central Chile. Carbon dioxide release was recorded during 24 h with L:D cycle of 12:12 h in order to record both rest and activity periods. At rest, A. crassa showed three patterns of gas exchange, highlighting the use of DGE preferably at 10°C. As the temperature increased, the CoGE pattern was more frequent being the only pattern observed in all individuals at 30°C. During activity, patterns changed to CoGE with a significant increase in VCO2. Our results support the idea that gas exchange patterns in insects are not distinct but correspond to a continuum of responses addressed by metabolic demand and where DGE can be expressed only under an absolute state of rest. Our results support the idea that the presence of the DGE may be underestimated in other insect taxa because they may have been measured under conditions where this pattern not necessarily can be expressed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. GAS EXCHANGE AND CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE OF CITRUS ROOTSTOCK VARIETIES UNDER SALT STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCOS ERIC BARBOSA BRITO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT High salt concentration in water are common in Brazilian semirad region, being important to research alternatives for use this waters on crop, like use of tolerant genotypes to salinity. Thus, in order to evaluate the saline stress perception of citrus rootstocks varieties crop from gas exchange and fluorescence analysis, an experiment was realized in greenhouse at the Center for Science and Technology Agrifood, CCTA, of Federal University of Campina Grande, UFCG, Pombal, PB, Brazil. It was studied in a randomized block design with factorial scheme (2x4, two salinity levels (0.3 and 4.0 dSm-1 and four varieties of citrus rootstocks [1 -common Sunki mandarin (TSKC, 2 - Florida Rough lemon (LRF, 3 -Santa Cruz Rangpur lime (LCRSTC and 4-Volkamer lemon (LVK], with three replications. The citrus rootstocks varieties grown on hydroponic system and at 90 days after sowing the plants were evaluated by gas exchange and PSII fluorescence at 0, 24 and 48 hours after application of treatments to determine the times for the physiological establishment of salt stress. The first 48h under saline conditions promoted changes in gas exchange and PSII fluorescence in varieties TSKC, LRF and LCRSTC indicating the begin of physiological stress; the common ‘Sunki’ mandarin and the ‘Florida Rough’ lemon are the more sensitive genotypes to saline stress, in order hand the ‘Santa Cruz Rangpur’ lime and ‘Volkamer’ lemon are the genotypes more tolerant.

  2. Real-time trace gas sensing of ethylene, propanal and acetaldehyde from human skin in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moeskops, B.W.M.; Steeghs, M.M.L.; Swam, K. van; Cristescu, S.M.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Harren, F.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Trace gases emitted by human skin in vivo are monitored non-invasively and in real time using laser-based photoacoustic detection and proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry. A small quartz cuvette is placed on the skin to create a headspace from which a carrier gas transports the skin emissions

  3. Sister chromatid exchanges and sperm abnormalities produced by antidepressant drug fluoxetine in mouse treated in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, H A S

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the capacity of serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant drug fluoxetine (FLX) to induce genotoxic damage in somatic and germ cells. For this study, sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow cells and sperm abnormalities assays in male mice were used. The animals were organized in four groups constituted by five mice. They were orally administered with the test substance as follows: a negative control group; three groups treated with FLX (2.6, 7.8 and 13.0 mg/kg b.wt.) for 5 consecutive days. Animals were sacrificed 24h after the last treatment for analysis SCE's and left for 35 days from the first treatment for analysis sperm-shape abnormalities. The results showed that the drug was SCE and sperm abnormalities inducer. The response of this compound was dose-dependent, and showed that the highest tested dose increased about two times SCE and four times the sperm abnormalities control level. The cellular proliferation kinetics was not affected by the chemical, and the mitotic indexes were slightly diminished with the highest dose. The percentage of sperm count and sperm motility decreased (p < 0.01) with increased the dose of treatment. These results indicate an in vivo genotoxic potential for the antidepressant drug FLX.

  4. Stomatal design principles for gas exchange in synthetic and real leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kaare H.; Haaning, Katrine; Boyce, C. Kevin; Zwieniecki, Maciej

    2016-11-01

    Stomata are portals in plant leaves that control gas exchange for photosynthesis, a process fundamental to life on Earth. Gas fluxes and plant productivity depend on external factors such as light, water, and CO2 availability and on geometric properties of the stomata pores. The link between stomata geometry and environmental factors have informed a wide range of scientific fields - from agriculture to climate science, where observed variations in stomata size and density is used to infer prehistoric atmospheric CO2 content. However, the physical mechanisms and design principles responsible for major trends in stomatal patterning, are not well understood. Here we use a combination of biomimetic experiments and theory to rationalize the observed changes in stomatal geometry. We show that the observed correlations between stomatal size and density are consistent with the hypothesis that plants favor efficient use of space and maximum control of dynamic gas conductivity, and - surprisingly - that the capacity for gas exchange in plants has remained constant over at least the last 325 million years. Our analysis provides a new measure to gauge the relative performance of species based on their stomatal characteristics. Supported by the Carlsberg Foundation (2013-01-0449), VILLUM FONDEN (13166) and the National Science Foundation (EAR-1024041).

  5. Dynamics of Exchange at Gas-Zeolite Interfaces 1: Pure Component n-Butane and Isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHANDROSS,MICHAEL E.; WEBB III,EDMUND B.; GREST,GARY S.; MARTIN,MARCUS G.; THOMPSON,AIDAN P.; ROTH,M.W.

    2000-07-13

    The authors present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of n-butane and isobutane in silicalite. They begin with a comparison of the bulk adsorption and diffusion properties for two different parameterizations of the interaction potential between the hydrocarbon species, both of which have been shown to reproduce experimental gas-liquid coexistence curves. They examine diffusion as a function of the loading of the zeolite, as well as the temperature dependence of the diffusion constant at loading and for infinite dilution. They continue with simulations in which interfaces are formed between single component gases and the zeolite. After reaching equilibrium, they examine the dynamics of exchange between the bulk gas and the zeolite. Finally, they calculate the permeability of the zeolite for n-butane and isobutane as a function of pressure. Their simulations are performed for a number of different gas temperatures and pressures, covering a wide range of state points.

  6. The charge-exchange induced coupling between plasma-gas counterflows in the heliosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Many hydrodynamic models have been presented which give similar views of the interaction of the solar wind plasma bubble with the counterstreaming partially ionized interstellar medium. In the more recent of these models it is taken into account that the solar and interstellar hydrodynamic flows of neutral atoms and protons are coupled by mass-, momentum-, and energy-exchange terms due to charge exchange processes. We shall reinvestigate the theoretical basis of this coupling here by use of a simplified description of the heliospheric interface and describe the main physics of the H-atom penetration through the more or less standing well-known plasma wall ahead of the heliopause. Thereby we can show that the type of charge exchange coupling terms used in up-to-now hydrodynamic treatments unavoidably leads to an O-type critical point at the sonic point of the H-atom flow, thus not allowing for a continuation of the integration of the hydrodynamic set of differential equations. The remedy for this problem is given by a more accurate formulation of the momentum exchange term for quasi-and sub-sonic H-atom flows. With a refined momentum exchange term derived from basic kinetic Boltzmann principles, we instead arrive at a characteristic equation with an X-type critical point, allowing for a continuous solution from supersonic to subsonic flow conditions. This necessitates that the often treated problem of the propagation of inter-stellar H-atoms through the heliosheath has to be solved using these newly derived, differently effective plasma – gas friction forces. Substantially different results are to be expected from this context for the filtration efficiency of the heliospheric interface.Key words. Interplanetary physics (heliopause and solar wind termination; interstellar gas – Ionosphere (plasma temperature and density

  7. The charge-exchange induced coupling between plasma-gas counterflows in the heliosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    Full Text Available Many hydrodynamic models have been presented which give similar views of the interaction of the solar wind plasma bubble with the counterstreaming partially ionized interstellar medium. In the more recent of these models it is taken into account that the solar and interstellar hydrodynamic flows of neutral atoms and protons are coupled by mass-, momentum-, and energy-exchange terms due to charge exchange processes. We shall reinvestigate the theoretical basis of this coupling here by use of a simplified description of the heliospheric interface and describe the main physics of the H-atom penetration through the more or less standing well-known plasma wall ahead of the heliopause. Thereby we can show that the type of charge exchange coupling terms used in up-to-now hydrodynamic treatments unavoidably leads to an O-type critical point at the sonic point of the H-atom flow, thus not allowing for a continuation of the integration of the hydrodynamic set of differential equations. The remedy for this problem is given by a more accurate formulation of the momentum exchange term for quasi-and sub-sonic H-atom flows. With a refined momentum exchange term derived from basic kinetic Boltzmann principles, we instead arrive at a characteristic equation with an X-type critical point, allowing for a continuous solution from supersonic to subsonic flow conditions. This necessitates that the often treated problem of the propagation of inter-stellar H-atoms through the heliosheath has to be solved using these newly derived, differently effective plasma – gas friction forces. Substantially different results are to be expected from this context for the filtration efficiency of the heliospheric interface.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (heliopause and solar wind termination; interstellar gas – Ionosphere (plasma temperature and density

  8. The Multifunctional Fish Gill: Dominant Site of Gas Exchange, Osmoregulation, Acid-Base Regulation, and Excretion of Nitrogenous Waste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David H. Evans; Peter M. Piermarini; Keith P. Choe

    2005-01-01

    The fish gill is a multipurpose organ that, in addition to providing for aquatic gas exchange, plays dominant roles in osmotic and ionic regulation, acid-base regulation, and excretion of nitrogenous wastes...

  9. Surfactant control of air-sea gas exchange across contrasting biogeochemical regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ryan; Schneider-Zapp, Klaus; Upstill-Goddard, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Air-sea gas exchange is important to the global partitioning of CO2.Exchange fluxes are products of an air-sea gas concentration difference, ΔC, and a gas transfer velocity, kw. The latter is controlled by the rate of turbulent diffusion at the air-sea interface but it cannot be directly measured and has a high uncertainty that is now considered one of the greatest challenges to quantifying net global air-sea CO2 exchange ...(Takahashi et al., 2009). One important control on kw is exerted by sea surface surfactants that arise both naturally from biological processes and through anthropogenic activity. They influence gas exchange in two fundamental ways: as a monolayer physical barrier and through modifying sea surface hydrodynamics and hence turbulent energy transfer. These effects have been demonstrated in the laboratory with artificial surfactants ...(Bock et al., 1999; Goldman et al., 1988) and through purposeful surfactant releases in coastal waters .(.).........().(Brockmann et al., 1982) and in the open ocean (Salter et al., 2011). Suppression of kwin these field experiments was ~5-55%. While changes in both total surfactant concentration and the composition of the natural surfactant pool might be expected to impact kw, the required in-situ studies are lacking. New data collected from the coastal North Sea in 2012-2013 shows significant spatio-temporal variability in the surfactant activity of organic matter within the sea surface microlayer that ranges from 0.07-0.94 mg/L T-X-100 (AC voltammetry). The surfactant activities show a strong winter/summer seasonal bias and general decrease in concentration with increasing distance from the coastline possibly associated with changing terrestrial vs. phytoplankton sources. Gas exchange experiments of this seawater using a novel laboratory tank and gas tracers (CH4 and SF6) demonstrate a 12-45% reduction in kw compared to surfactant-free water. Seasonally there is higher gas exchange suppression in the summer

  10. Gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Kohei; Utani, Keisuke; Gunther, Detlef; Ohata, Masaki

    2014-10-21

    A novel gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for the direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was proposed and demonstrated in the present study. The technique is based on a transfer of gas into particle, which can be directly analyzed by ICPMS. Particles from metal carbonyl gases such as Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6 are formed by reaction with ozone (O3) and ammonium (NH3) gases within a newly developed gas to particle conversion device (GPD). The reaction mechanism of the gas to particle conversion is based on either oxidation of metal carbonyl gas by O3 or agglomeration of metal oxide with ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) which is generated by the reaction of O3 and NH3. To separate the reaction gases (remaining O3 and NH3) from the formed particles, a previously reported gas exchange device (GED) was used and the in argon stabilized analyte particles were directly introduced and measured by ICPMS. This new technique provided limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 pL L(-1) (0.32 ng m(-3)), 0.02 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)), and 0.01 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)) for Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6, respectively, which were 4-5 orders of magnitude lower than those conventional applied for detecting these gases, e.g., gas chromatography with electron captured detector (GC-ECD) as well as Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The achieved LODs were also similar or slightly better than those for ICPMS coupled to GC. Since the gas to particle conversion technique can achieve the direct measurement of metal carbonyl gases as well as the removal of reaction and ambient gases from metal carbonyl gases, the technique is considered to be well suited to monitor gas quality in semiconductor industry, engine exhaust gases, and or waste incineration products.

  11. Apneic oxygenation combined with extracorporeal arteriovenous carbon dioxide removal provides sufficient gas exchange in experimental lung injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Koefoed-Nielsen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that apneic oxygenation, using an open lung approach, combined with extracorporeal CO2 removal, would provide adequate gas exchange in acute lung injury. We tested this hypothesis in nine anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs (85-95 kg), in which surfactant was depleted from....../min. Thus, the method provided adequate gas exchange in this experimental model, suggesting that it might have potential as an alternative treatment modality in acute lung injury....

  12. The impact of lower sea-ice extent on Arctic greenhouse-gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Frans-Jan W.; Christensen, Torben R.; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Rysgaard, Søren; McGuire, A. David; Miller, Paul A.; Walker, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    In September 2012, Arctic sea-ice extent plummeted to a new record low: two times lower than the 1979–2000 average. Often, record lows in sea-ice cover are hailed as an example of climate change impacts in the Arctic. Less apparent, however, are the implications of reduced sea-ice cover in the Arctic Ocean for marine–atmosphere CO2 exchange. Sea-ice decline has been connected to increasing air temperatures at high latitudes. Temperature is a key controlling factor in the terrestrial exchange of CO2 and methane, and therefore the greenhouse-gas balance of the Arctic. Despite the large potential for feedbacks, many studies do not connect the diminishing sea-ice extent with changes in the interaction of the marine and terrestrial Arctic with the atmosphere. In this Review, we assess how current understanding of the Arctic Ocean and high-latitude ecosystems can be used to predict the impact of a lower sea-ice cover on Arctic greenhouse-gas exchange.

  13. Effects of ultrafiltration, dialysis, and temperature on gas exchange during hemodiafiltration: a laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, J; Novak, I; Rokyta, R; Matejovic, M; Hadravsky, M; Nalos, M; Sramek, V

    2001-12-01

    To study gas exchange in the filter during continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), an air-tight heated mixing chamber with adjustable CO2 supply was constructed and connected to a CVVHDF monitor. Bicarbonate-free crystalloid (Part 1) and packed red blood cell (Part 2) solutions were circulated at 150 ml x min(-1). Gas exchange expressed as pre-postfilter difference in CO2 and O2 contents was measured at different CVVHDF settings and temperatures of circulating and dialysis solutions. Ultrafiltration was most efficacious for CO2 removal (at 1,000 ml x h(-1) ultrafiltration CO2 losses reached 13% of prefilter CO2 content). Addition of dialysis (1,000 ml x h(-1)) increased CO2 loss to 17% and at maximal parameters (filtration 3,000 ml x h(-1), dialysis 2,500 ml x h(-1)), the loss of CO2 amounted to 35% of prefilter content. Temperature changes of circulating and/or dialysis fluids had no significant impact on CO2 losses. The O2 exchange during CVVHDF was negligible. Currently used CVVHDF is only marginally effective in CO2 removal. Higher volume ultrafiltration combined with dialysis can be expected to reach clinical significance.

  14. Hypoxia and hypercarbia in endophagous insects: Larval position in the plant gas exchange network is key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Casas, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Gas composition is an important component of any micro-environment. Insects, as the vast majority of living organisms, depend on O2 and CO2 concentrations in the air they breathe. Low O2 (hypoxia), and high CO2 (hypercarbia) levels can have a dramatic effect. For phytophagous insects that live within plant tissues (endophagous lifestyle), gas is exchanged between ambient air and the atmosphere within the insect habitat. The insect larva contributes to the modification of this environment by expiring CO2. Yet, knowledge on the gas exchange network in endophagous insects remains sparse. Our study identified mechanisms that modulate gas composition in the habitat of endophagous insects. Our aim was to show that the mere position of the insect larva within plant tissues could be used as a proxy for estimating risk of occurrence of hypoxia and hypercarbia, despite the widely diverse life history traits of these organisms. We developed a conceptual framework for a gas diffusion network determining gas composition in endophagous insect habitats. We applied this framework to mines, galls and insect tunnels (borers) by integrating the numerous obstacles along O2 and CO2 pathways. The nature and the direction of gas transfers depended on the physical structure of the insect habitat, the photosynthesis activity as well as stomatal behavior in plant tissues. We identified the insect larva position within the gas diffusion network as a predictor of risk exposure to hypoxia and hypercarbia. We ranked endophagous insect habitats in terms of risk of exposure to hypoxia and/or hypercarbia, from the more to the less risky as cambium mines>borer tunnels≫galls>bark mines>mines in aquatic plants>upper and lower surface mines. Furthermore, we showed that the photosynthetically active tissues likely assimilate larval CO2 produced. In addition, temperature of the microhabitat and atmospheric CO2 alter gas composition in the insect habitat. We predict that (i) hypoxia indirectly favors

  15. A Multivariable Index for Grading Exercise Gas Exchange Severity in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Ho Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH and heart failure (HF display many abnormalities in respiratory gas exchange. These abnormalities are accentuated with exercise and track with disease severity. However, use of gas exchange measures in day-to-day clinical practice is limited by several issues, including the large number of variables available and difficulty in data interpretation. Moreover, maximal exercise testing has limitations in clinical populations due to their complexity, patient anxiety and variability in protocols and cost. Therefore, a multivariable gas exchange index (MVI that integrates key gas exchange variables obtained during submaximal exercise into a severity score that ranges from normal to severe-very-severe is proposed. To demonstrate the usefulness of this index, we applied this to 2 groups (PAH, n=42 and HF, n=47 as well as to age matched healthy controls (n=25. We demonstrate that this score tracks WHO classification and right ventricular systolic pressure in PAH (r=0.53 and 0.73, P≤0.01 and NYHA and cardiac index in HF (r=0.49 and 0.74, P≤0.01. This index demonstrates a stronger relationship than any single gas exchange variable alone. In conclusion, MVI obtained from light, submaximal exercise gas exchange is a useful approach to simplify data interpretation in PAH and HF populations.

  16. Influence of collector heat capacity and internal conditions of heat exchanger on cool-down process of small gas liquefier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberimoghaddam, Ali; Bahri Rasht Abadi, Mohammad Mahdi

    2018-01-01

    Joule-Thomson cooling systems are commonly used in gas liquefaction. In small gas liquefiers, transient cool-down time is high. Selecting suitable conditions for cooling down process leads to decrease in time and cost. In the present work, transient thermal behavior of Joule-Thomson cooling system including counter current helically coiled tube in tube heat exchanger, expansion valve, and collector was studied using experimental tests and simulations. The experiments were performed using small gas liquefier and nitrogen gas as working fluid. The heat exchanger was thermally studied by experimental data obtained from a small gas liquefier. In addition, the simulations were performed using experimental data as variable boundary conditions. A comparison was done between presented and conventional methods. The effect of collector heat capacity and convection heat transfer coefficient inside the tubes on system performance was studied using temperature profiles along the heat exchanger.

  17. Long-term gas exchange characteristics as markers of deterioration in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramana Isabelle

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aim In patients with cystic fibrosis (CF the architecture of the developing lungs and the ventilation of lung units are progressively affected, influencing intrapulmonary gas mixing and gas exchange. We examined the long-term course of blood gas measurements in relation to characteristics of lung function and the influence of different CFTR genotype upon this process. Methods Serial annual measurements of PaO2 and PaCO2 assessed in relation to lung function, providing functional residual capacity (FRCpleth, lung clearance index (LCI, trapped gas (VTG, airway resistance (sReff, and forced expiratory indices (FEV1, FEF50, were collected in 178 children (88 males; 90 females with CF, over an age range of 5 to 18 years. Linear mixed model analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were used to define predominant lung function parameters influencing oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination. Results PaO2 decreased linearly from age 5 to 18 years, and was mainly associated with FRCpleth, (p 1 (p 50 (p p 2 showed a transitory phase of low PaCO2 values, mainly during the age range of 5 to 12 years. Both PaO2 and PaCO2 presented with different progression slopes within specific CFTR genotypes. Conclusion In the long-term evaluation of gas exchange characteristics, an association with different lung function patterns was found and was closely related to specific genotypes. Early examination of blood gases may reveal hypocarbia, presumably reflecting compensatory mechanisms to improve oxygenation.

  18. Oceanic Uptake of Oxygen During Deep Convection Events Through Diffusive and Bubble-Mediated Gas Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daoxun; Ito, Takamitsu; Bracco, Annalisa

    2017-10-01

    The concentration of dissolved oxygen (O2) plays fundamental roles in diverse chemical and biological processes throughout the oceans. The balance between the physical supply and the biological consumption controls the O2 level of the interior ocean, and the O2 supply to the deep waters can only occur through deep convection in the polar oceans. We develop a theoretical framework describing the oceanic O2 uptake during open-ocean deep convection events and test it against a suite of numerical sensitivity experiments. Our framework allows for two predictions, confirmed by the numerical simulations. First, both the duration and the intensity of the wintertime cooling contribute to the total O2 uptake for a given buoyancy loss. Stronger cooling leads to deeper convection and the oxygenation can reach down to deeper depths. Longer duration of the cooling period increases the total amount of O2 uptake over the convective season. Second, the bubble-mediated influx of O2 tends to weaken the diffusive influx by shifting the air-sea disequilibrium of O2 toward supersaturation. The degree of compensation between the diffusive and bubble-mediated gas exchange depends on the dimensionless number measuring the relative strength of oceanic vertical mixing and the gas transfer velocity. Strong convective mixing, which may occur under strong cooling, reduces the degree of compensation so that the two components of gas exchange together drive exceptionally strong oceanic O2 uptake.

  19. Finite element modeling of 129Xe diffusive gas exchange NMR in the human alveoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Neil J.; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M.

    2016-10-01

    Existing models of 129Xe diffusive exchange for lung microstructural modeling with time-resolved MR spectroscopy data have considered analytical solutions to one-dimensional, homogeneous models of the lungs with specific assumptions about the alveolar geometry. In order to establish a model system for simulating the effects of physiologically-realistic changes in physical and microstructural parameters on 129Xe exchange NMR, we have developed a 3D alveolar capillary model for finite element analysis. To account for the heterogeneity of the alveolar geometry across the lungs, we have derived realistic geometries for finite element analysis based on 2D histological samples and 3D micro-CT image volumes obtained from ex vivo biopsies of lung tissue from normal subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. The 3D alveolar capillary model permits investigation of the impact of alveolar geometrical parameters and diffusion and perfusion coefficients on the in vivo measured 129Xe CSSR signal response. The heterogeneity of alveolar microstructure that is accounted for in image-based models resulted in considerable alterations to the shape of the 129Xe diffusive uptake curve when compared to 1D models. Our findings have important implications for the future design and optimization of 129Xe MR experiments and in the interpretation of lung microstructural changes from this data.

  20. Operation of an ADR using helium exchange gas as a substitute for a failed heat switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-11-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 × 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  1. Biologically variable ventilation improves gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in a model of severe bronchospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, W Alan C; Buchman, Timothy G; Girling, Linda G; Walker, Elizabeth K-Y; McManus, Bruce M; Graham, M Ruth

    2007-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation can be lifesaving for status asthmaticus, but how best to accomplish mechanical ventilation is unclear. Biologically variable ventilation (mechanical ventilation that emulates healthy variation) and conventional control mode ventilation (monotonously regular) were compared in an animal model of bronchospasm to determine which approach yields better gas exchange and respiratory mechanics. A randomized prospective trial of biologically variable ventilation vs. control mode ventilation in swine. University research laboratory. Eighteen farm-raised pigs. Methacholine was administered as a nebulized aerosol to initiate bronchospasm, defined as doubling of peak inspiratory pressure and respiratory system resistance, and then randomized (n = 9 each group) to either continue control mode ventilation or switch to biologically variable ventilation at the same minute ventilation. Over the next 4 hrs, hemodynamics, blood gases, respiratory mechanics, and carbon dioxide expirograms were recorded hourly. At end-experiment, tracheobronchial lavage was undertaken to determine interleukin-6 and -10 concentrations. Measurements of physiologic variables and inflammatory cytokines showed that biologically variable ventilation significantly improved gas exchange, with greater arterial oxygen tensions (p = .006; group x time interaction), lower arterial carbon dioxide tensions (p = .0003; group effect), lower peak inspiratory pressures (p = .0001; group x time), greater static compliance (p = .0001; group x time), greater dynamic compliance (p = .0001; group x time), and lower total respiratory system resistance (p = .028; group x time), compared with conventional ventilation. The appearance of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (interleukin-6 and -10) was not affected by mode of ventilation. In this experimental model, biologically variable ventilation was superior to control mode ventilation in terms of gas exchange and respiratory mechanics

  2. Operation of an ADR Using Helium Exchange Gas as a Substitute for a Failed Heat Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  3. Nesting behaviour influences species-specific gas exchange across avian eggshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugal, Steven J; Maurer, Golo; Thomas, Gavin H; Hauber, Mark E; Grim, Tomáš; Cassey, Phillip

    2014-09-15

    Carefully controlled gas exchange across the eggshell is essential for the development of the avian embryo. Water vapour conductance (G(H2O)) across the shell, typically measured as mass loss during incubation, has been demonstrated to optimally ensure the healthy development of the embryo while avoiding desiccation. Accordingly, eggs exposed to sub-optimal gas exchange have reduced hatching success. We tested the association between eggshell G(H2O) and putative life-history correlates of adult birds, ecological nest parameters and physical characteristics of the egg itself to investigate how variation in G(H2O) has evolved to maintain optimal water loss across a diverse set of nest environments. We measured gas exchange through eggshell fragments in 151 British breeding bird species and fitted phylogenetically controlled, general linear models to test the relationship between G(H2O) and potential predictor parameters of each species. Of our 17 life-history traits, only two were retained in the final model: wet-incubating parent and nest type. Eggs of species where the parent habitually returned to the nest with wet plumage had significantly higher G(H2O) than those of parents that returned to the nest with dry plumage. Eggs of species nesting in ground burrows, cliffs and arboreal cups had significantly higher G(H2O) than those of species nesting on the ground in open nests or cups, in tree cavities and in shallow arboreal nests. Phylogenetic signal (measured as Pagel's λ) was intermediate in magnitude, suggesting that differences observed in the G(H2O) are dependent upon a combination of shared ancestry and species-specific life history and ecological traits. Although these data are correlational by nature, they are consistent with the hypothesis that parents constrained to return to the nest with wet plumage will increase the humidity of the nest environment, and the eggs of these species have evolved a higher G(H2O) to overcome this constraint and still

  4. Correlations in two-dimensional electron gas: Random-phase approximation with exchange and ladder results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederiva, F.; Lipparini, E.; Takayanagi, K.

    1997-12-01

    We have evaluated the density-density response of the two-dimensional electron gas at zero temperature by solving the Dyson equation for the particle-hole Green's function, including exchange Coulomb matrix elements and short-range contributions in the ladder approximation. We study the effect of these correlations on the total energy, compressibility per particle, local field factor G(q), static structure factor and pair-correlation function. Results are compared with the normal random-phase approximation, local field theories and quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

  5. Effects of deficit irrigation and straw mulching on gas exchange of cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Hnilička

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaves gas exchange were studied in one cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cultivar Harriet F1 grown under control conditions (C, deficit irrigation (S and straw mulch (M, as well as under control or deficit irrigation conditions and straw mulch in combination (CM or SM. Cucumber plants were grown in loose soil, foil tunnel. The photosynthesis rate (PN and transpiration rate (E were measured in the leaves in situ using the portable gas exchange system LCpro+. It follows from the results obtained that water deficit (PN was 11.88 μmol CO2.m−2.s−1 and E was 1.83 mmol H2O.m−2.s−1 provably decreases the gas exchange rate in cucumber plants in comparison with the irrigated control group (average value of PN - 15.03 μmol CO2.m−2.s−1 and E – 2.16 mmol H2O.m−2.s−1. The application of mulch in the control and stresses plants statistically insignificantly reduced the photosynthesis rates −14.91 μmol CO2.m−2.s−1 and 11.86 μmol CO2.m−2.s−1, respectively. However, after the application of the mulch to the plants growing in the variant of deficit irrigation and control conditions with mulch, the transpiration rate increased. The rate of transpiration (E by plants from control and deficit irrigation with mulch was 2.28 mmol H2O.m−2.s−1 and 2.24 mmol H2O.m−2.s−1, respectively. Photosynthesis and transpiration rate is also influenced by stomatal conductance (gs. The obtained values ​of the coefficient of determination (r2 is evident no stomatal inhibition of gas exchange for variants C (r2 = 0.1404 – PN; 0.2352 – E and CM (r2 = 0.2656 – PN; 0.2483 – E. No stomatal inhibition of photosynthesis was observed in SM variant (r2 = 0.2867, too. However, stomatal inhibition of photosynthesis and transpiration rate was based on the coefficient of determination found in plants with limited irrigation (PN – r2 = 0.5222 and E – r2 = 0.7191 and in SM variant (r2 = 0.8972.

  6. Microporous sensor: gas sorption, guest exchange and guest-dependant luminescence of metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapchenko, Sergey A; Samsonenko, Denis G; Dybtsev, Danil N; Melgunov, Maxim S; Fedin, Vladimir P

    2011-03-14

    Zn(II)-containing metal-organic framework (MOF) [Zn(4)(dmf)(ur)(2)(ndc)(4)] (ndc(2-) = 2,6-naphtalenedicarboxylate, ur = urotropin, dmf = N,N'-dimethylformamide) was synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography and gas sorption analysis. Host MOF retains its crystallinity after guest removal and exchange. Single-crystal to single-crystal formation of different host-guest systems with benzene and ferrocene was investigated. Interesting guest-depended luminescence properties of the porous host framework were observed.

  7. Changes in pulmonary blood flow do not affect gas exchange during intermittent ventilation in resting turtles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tobias; Hicks, James W.

    2008-01-01

    The breathing pattern of many different air-breathing vertebrates, including lungfish, anuran amphibians, turtles, crocodiles and snakes, is characterized by brief periods of lung ventilation interspersed among apnoeas of variable duration. These intermittent ventilatory cycles are associated...... experimentally. The present study measured pulmonary gas exchange in fully recovered, freely diving turtles, where changes in pulmonary blood flow were prevented by partial occlusion of the pulmonary artery. Prevention of L-R shunt during ventilation did not impair CO2 excretion and overall, oxygen uptake and CO...

  8. Modeling the effects of temperature and relative humidity on gas exchange of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia spp.) stems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guevara-Arauza, J.C.; Yahia, E.M.; Cedeno, L.; Tijskens, L.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    A model to estimate gas profile of modified atmosphere packaged (MAP) prickly pear cactus stems was developed and calibrated. The model describes the transient gas exchange taking in consideration the effect of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) on film permeability (FPgas), respiration rate

  9. Water removal characteristics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells using a dry gas purging method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Yeop; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Jang, Jong Hyun; Oh, In-Hwan; Cho, Eun Ae; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Lim, Tae-Hoon [Center for Fuel Cell Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea); Kim, Sang-Uk [Center for Fuel Cell Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea); Department of Chemical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea); Ko, Jaejun; Lim, Tae-Won [Fuel Cell Vehicle Team 1, Hyundai-Kia Corporate Research and Development Division, 104 Mabuk-Dong, Giheung-Gu, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-do 446-912 (Korea); Lee, Kwan-Young [Department of Chemical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea)

    2008-06-01

    Water removal from proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is of great importance to improve start-up ability and mitigate cell degradation when the fuel cell operates at subfreezing temperatures. In this study, we report water removal characteristics under various shut down conditions including a dry gas-purging step. In order to estimate the dehydration level of the electrolyte membrane, the high frequency resistance of the fuel cell stack was observed. Also, a novel method for measuring the amount of residual water in the fuel cell was developed to determine the amount of water removal. The method used the phase change of liquid water and was successfully applied to examine the water removal characteristics. Based on these works, the effects of several parameters such as purging time, flow rate of purging gas, operation current, and stack temperature on the amount of residual water were investigated. (author)

  10. Reduction of molecular gas diffusion through gaskets in leaf gas exchange cuvettes by leaf-mediated pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesgaard, Kristine S; Mikkelsen, Teis N; Ro-Poulsen, Helge; Ibrom, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    There is an ongoing debate on how to correct leaf gas exchange measurements for the unavoidable diffusion leakage that occurs when measurements are done in non-ambient CO2 concentrations. In this study, we present a theory on how the CO2 diffusion gradient over the gasket is affected by leaf-mediated pores (LMP) and how LMP reduce diffusive exchange across the gaskets. Recent discussions have so far neglected the processes in the quasi-laminar boundary layer around the gasket. Counter intuitively, LMP reduce the leakage through gaskets, which can be explained by assuming that the boundary layer at the exterior of the cuvette is enriched with air from the inside of the cuvette. The effect can thus be reduced by reducing the boundary layer thickness. The theory clarifies conflicting results from earlier studies. We developed leaf adaptor frames that eliminate LMP during measurements on delicate plant material such as grass leaves with circular cross section, and the effectiveness is shown with respiration measurements on a harp of Deschampsia flexuosa leaves. We conclude that the best solution for measurements with portable photosynthesis systems is to avoid LMP rather than trying to correct for the effects. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Short-term and long-term effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates of spinach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, K.; Kurata, K.

    In this study, spinach plants were grown under atmospheric and low pressure conditions with constant O2 and CO2 partial pressures, and the effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates were investigated. CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates of spinach grown under atmospheric pressure increased after short-term exposure to low total pressure due to the enhancement of leaf conductance. However, gas exchange rates of plants grown at 25 kPa total pressure were not greater than those grown at atmospheric pressure. Stomatal pore length and width were significantly smaller in leaves grown at low total pressure. This result suggested that gas exchange rates of plants grown under low total pressure were not stimulated even with the enhancement of gas diffusion because the stomatal size and stomatal aperture decreased.

  12. Devise of an exhaust gas heat exchanger for a thermal oil heater in a palm oil refinery plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chucherd, Panom; Kittisupakorn, Paisan

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the devise of an exhaust gas heat exchanger for waste heat recovery of the exhausted flue gas of palm oil refinery plant. This waste heat can be recovered by installing an economizer to heat the feed water which can save the fuel consumption of the coal fired steam boiler and the outlet temperature of flue gas will be controlled in order to avoid the acid dew point temperature and protect the filter bag. The decrease of energy used leads to the reduction of CO2 emission. Two designed economizer studied in this paper are gas in tube and water in tube. The gas in tube exchanger refers to the shell and tube heat exchanger which the flue gas flows in tube; this designed exchanger is used in the existing unit. The new designed water in tube refers to the shell and tube heat exchanger which the water flows in the tube; this designed exchanger is proposed for new implementation. New economizer has the overall coefficient of heat transfer of 19.03 W/m2.K and the surface heat transfer area of 122 m2 in the optimized case. Experimental results show that it is feasible to install economizer in the exhaust flue gas system between the air preheater and the bag filter, which has slightly disadvantage effect in the system. The system can raise the feed water temperature from 40 to 104°C and flow rate 3.31 m3/h, the outlet temperature of flue gas is maintained about 130 °C.

  13. Differential leaf gas exchange performance of mango cultivars infected by different isolates of Ceratocystis fimbriata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilka Messner da Silva Bispo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Caused by the vascular fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata, mango wilt is considered to be one of the most serious threats in mango-producing regions worldwide. However, changes in leaf gas exchange level and the mechanisms underlying host responses to this fungal infection remain poorly described. This study aimed to evaluate potential changes in the leaf gas exchange of different mango cultivars (Ubá, Espada, Haden and Tommy Atkins in response to two Brazilian isolates of C. fimbriata (CEBS15 and MSAK16 to non-invasively assess cultivar variability in relation to the basal level of resistance to mango wilt. Both isolates, regardless of the cultivar, caused reductions in stomatal conductance and, thus, a reduction in CO2 assimilation via diffusive limitations. Taking into account the full length of the internal lesion and the radial colonization of the stem tissues, both isolates showed equivalent aggressiveness when inoculated into the Haden and Tommy Atkins cultivars. Conversely, when compared to the CEBS15 isolate of C. fimbriata, the MSAK16 isolate was more aggressive in cv. Espada and less aggressive in cv. Ubá.

  14. TRINEXAPAC-ETHYL AFFECTS GROWTH AND GAS EXCHANGE OF UPLAND RICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RITA DE CASSIA FÉLIX ALVAREZ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A major problem affecting some upland rice cultivars is the increase in plant size when subjected to high doses of nitrogen fertilizer, leading to high levels of lodging. A method to reduce the height of upland rice, and therefore lodging, would be to use plant growth regulators. However, little information exists on the effect of these regulators on plant physiological processes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of trinexapac-ethyl application in upland rice via analysis of growth and gas exchange. The experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions using the BRS Primavera cultivar. A completely randomized design with eight replications was used. Treatments were carried out with and without the application of the plant growth regulator, and plants were subject to two-stage assessments in which physiological and gas-exchange indices were measured. The use of trinexapac-ethyl improved the growth of rice plants from the flowering to the physiological maturity stage, resulting in higher values of leaf area ratio, specific leaf area, and leaf matter ratio in treated plants. At the same time, it provided smaller reduction in net CO2 assimilation at the physiological maturity stage. Thus, net/apparent assimilation rate did not change after the application of growth regulator, but relative growth rate decreased in these treated plants. These results indicate the occurrence of self-shading in rice plants induced by what might be a supra-optimum trinexapac-ethyl concentration.

  15. Gas exchange during exercise in different evolutional stages of chronic Chagas' heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Palha de Oliveira

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare gas exchange at rest and during exercise in patients with chronic Chagas' heart disease grouped according to the Los Andes clinical/hemodynamic classification. METHODS: We studied 15 healthy volunteers and 52 patients grouped according to the Los Andes clinical/hemodynamic classification as follows: 17 patients in group IA (normal electrocardiogram/echocardiogram, 9 patients in group IB (normal electrocardiogram and abnormal echocardiogram, 14 patients in group II (abnormal electrocardiogram/echocardiogram, without congestive heart failure, and 12 patients in group III (abnormal electrocardiogram/echocardiogram with congestive heart failure. The following variables were analyzed: oxygen consumption (V O2, carbon dioxide production (V CO2, gas exchange rate (R, inspiratory current volume (V IC, expiratory current volume (V EC, respiratory frequency, minute volume (V E, heart rate (HR, maximum load, O2 pulse, and ventilatory anaerobic threshold (AT. RESULTS: When compared with the healthy group, patients in groups II and III showed significant changes in the following variables: V O2peak, V CO2peak, V ICpeak, V ECpeak, E, HR, and maximum load. Group IA showed significantly better results for these same variables as compared with group III. CONCLUSION: The functional capacity of patients in the initial phase of chronic Chagas' heart disease is higher than that of patients in an advanced phase and shows a decrease that follows the loss in cardiac-hemodynamic performance.

  16. Do We Need Exercise Tests to Detect Gas Exchange Impairment in Fibrotic Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Wallaert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with fibrotic idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (f-IIP, the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO has been used to predict abnormal gas exchange in the lung. However, abnormal values for arterial blood gases during exercise are likely to be the most sensitive manifestations of lung disease. The aim of this study was to compare DLCO, resting PaO2, P(A-aO2 at cardiopulmonary exercise testing peak, and oxygen desaturation during a 6-min walk test (6MWT. Results were obtained in 121 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, n=88 and fibrotic nonspecific interstitial pneumonias (NSIP, n=33. All but 3 patients (97.5% had low DLCO values (35 mmHg and 100 (83% demonstrated significant oxygen desaturation during 6MWT (>4%. Interestingly 27 patients had low DLCO and normal P(A-aO2, peak and/or no desaturation during the 6MWT. The 3 patients with normal DLCO also had normal PaO2, normal P(A-aO2, peak, and normal oxygen saturation during 6MWT. Our results demonstrate that in fibrotic IIP, DLCO better defines impairment of pulmonary gas exchange than resting PaO2, exercise P(A-aO2, peak, or 6MWT SpO2.

  17. Gas exchange kinetics following concentric-eccentric isokinetic arm and leg exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, U; Mookerjee, S; Steegmanns, A; Knicker, A; Hoffmann, U

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of exercise velocity (60, 150, 240deg∙s(-1)) and muscle mass (arm vs leg) on changes in gas exchange and arterio-venous oxygen content difference (avDO2) following high-intensity concentric-eccentric isokinetic exercise. Fourteen subjects (26.9±3.1years) performed a 3×20-repetition isokinetic exercise protocol. Recovery beat-to-beat cardiac output (CO) and breath-by-breath gas exchange were recorded to determine post-exercise half-time (t1/2) for oxygen uptake (V˙O2pulm), carbon dioxide output (V˙CO2pulm), and ventilation (V˙E). Significant differences of the t1/2 values were identified between 60 and 150deg∙s(-1). Significant differences in the t1/2 values were observed between V˙O2pulm and V˙CO2pulm and between V˙CO2pulm and V˙E. The time to attain the first avDO2-peak showed significant differences between arm and leg exercise. The present study illustrates, that V˙O2pulm kinetics are distorted due to non-linear CO dynamics. Therefore, it has to be taken into account, that V˙O2pulm may not be a valuable surrogate for muscular oxygen uptake kinetics in the recovery phases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of phosphine on the neural regulation of gas exchange in Periplaneta americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, James D; Haritos, Victoria S; Cooper, Paul D

    2008-04-01

    Phosphine is used for fumigating stored commodities, however an understanding of the physiological response to phosphine in insects is limited. Here we show how the central pattern generator for ventilation in the central nervous system (CNS) responds to phosphine and influences normal resting gas exchange. Using the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, that perform discontinuous gas exchange (DGE) at rest, we simultaneously measure ventilatory nervous output from the intact CNS, VCO(2) and water loss from live specimens. Exposure to 800 ppm phosphine at 25 degrees C for 2 h (n=13) during recording did not cause any mortality or obvious sub-lethal effects. Within 60 s of introducing phosphine into the air flow, all animals showed a distinct CNS response accompanied by a burst release of CO(2). The initial ventilatory response to phosphine displaced DGE and was typically followed by low, stable and continuous CO(2) output. CNS output was highest and most orderly under normoxic conditions during DGE. Phosphine caused a series of ventilatory CNS spikes preceding almost complete cessation of CNS output. Minimal CNS output was maintained during the 2 h normoxic recovery period and DGE was not reinstated. VCO(2) was slightly reduced and water loss significantly lower during the recovery period compared with those rates prior to phosphine exposure. A phosphine narcosis effect is rejected based on animals remaining alert at all times during exposure.

  19. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot-gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupp, E.R.; Trubelja, M.F.; Spear, K.E.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Experimental corrosion studies of hot gas filter materials and heat exchanger materials in oxidizing combustion environments have been initiated. Filter materials from 3M Co. and DuPont Lanxide Composites Inc. are being tested over a range of temperatures, times and gas flows. It has been demonstrated that morphological and phase changes due to corrosive effects occur after exposure of the 3M material to a combustion environment for as little as 25 hours at 800{degrees}C. The study of heat exchanger materials has focused on enhancing the corrosion resistance of DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} composite tubes by adding chromium to its surfaces by (1) heat treatments in a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder bed, or (2) infiltrating surface porosity with molten chromium nitrate. Each process is followed by a surface homogenization at 1500{degrees}C. The powder bed method has been most successful, producing continuous Cr-rich layers with thicknesses ranging from 20 to 250 {mu}m. As-received and Cr-modified DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} samples will be reacted with commonly encountered coal-ash slags to determine the Cr effects on corrosion resistance.

  20. Gas exchange parameters in leaves and ears of winter wheat Tricitum aestivum L. and its productivity under fungicide control conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna K. Jarmołkowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A research experiment was conducted in which rates of photosynthesis and transpiration were measured in leaves and ears of two winter wheat varieties grown under fungicide control conditions and without fungicide control. A LI-COR 6400 portable gas exchange system was used in the investigations. In most cases the fungicide Juwel was shown to have no effect on the gas exchange processes, whereas the other of the fungicidal agents applied - Swing - significantly decreased the gas exchange rates measured. Measurements of gas exchange parameters in ears showed that the intensity of gas exchange was low, in particular at the later stage of ear development. But the applied fungicide caused higher release of CO2 into the atmosphere than its uptake. Furthermore, the applied fungicides were found to significantly increase grain yield compared to the control treatment, both in the first and second year of the study. Among the tested varieties, 'Nutka' was characterized by higher productivity, in spite of lower 1000 kernel weight. However, this cultivar developed longer ears with a larger amount of grains.

  1. The structural design of the bat wing web and its possible role in gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanya, Andrew N; Mortola, Jacopo P

    2007-12-01

    The structure of the skin in the epauletted fruit bat (Epomophorus wahlbergi) wing and body trunk was studied with a view to understanding possible adaptations for gas metabolism and thermoregulation. In addition, gas exchange measurements were performed using a respirometer designed for the purpose. The body skin had an epidermis, a dermis with hair follicles and sweat glands and a fat-laden hypodermis. In contrast, the wing web skin was made up of a thin bilayered epidermis separated by a connective tissue core with collagen and elastic fibres and was devoid of hair follicles and sweat glands. The wings spanned 18-24 cm each, with about 753 cm2 of surface exposed to air. The body skin epidermis was thick (61 +/- 3 microm, SEM), the stratum corneum alone taking a third of it (21 +/- 3 microm). In contrast, the wing web skin epidermis was thinner at 9.8 +/- 0.7 microm, with a stratum corneum measuring 4.1 +/- 0.3 microm (41%). The wing capillaries in the wing web skin ran in the middle of the connective tissue core, with a resultant surface-capillary diffusion distance of 26.8 +/- 3.2 microm. The rate of oxygen consumption (VO2) of the wings alone and of the whole animal measured under light anaesthesia at ambient temperatures of 24 masculineC and 33 masculineC, averaged 6% and 10% of the total, respectively. Rate of carbon dioxide production had similar values. The membrane diffusing capacity for the wing web was estimated to be 0.019 ml O2 min(-1) mmHg(-1). We conclude that in Epomophorus wahlbergi, the wing web has structural modifications that permit a substantial contribution to the total gas exchange.

  2. Alveolar ventilation to perfusion heterogeneity and diffusion impairment in a mathematical model of gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Melo, M. F.; Loeppky, J. A.; Caprihan, A.; Luft, U. C.

    1993-01-01

    This study describes a two-compartment model of pulmonary gas exchange in which alveolar ventilation to perfusion (VA/Q) heterogeneity and impairment of pulmonary diffusing capacity (D) are simultaneously taken into account. The mathematical model uses as input data measurements usually obtained in the lung function laboratory. It consists of two compartments and an anatomical shunt. Each compartment receives fractions of alveolar ventilation and blood flow. Mass balance equations and integration of Fick's law of diffusion are used to compute alveolar and blood O2 and CO2 values compatible with input O2 uptake and CO2 elimination. Two applications are presented. The first is a method to partition O2 and CO2 alveolar-arterial gradients into VA/Q and D components. The technique is evaluated in data of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The second is a theoretical analysis of the effects of blood flow variation in alveolar and blood O2 partial pressures. The results show the importance of simultaneous consideration of D to estimate VA/Q heterogeneity in patients with diffusion impairment. This factor plays an increasing role in gas alveolar-arterial gradients as severity of COPD increases. Association of VA/Q heterogeneity and D may produce an increase of O2 arterial pressure with decreasing QT which would not be observed if only D were considered. We conclude that the presented computer model is a useful tool for description and interpretation of data from COPD patients and for performing theoretical analysis of variables involved in the gas exchange process.

  3. Ventilation-perfusion distributions and gas exchange during carbon dioxide-pneumoperitoneum in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, C M; Fredén, F; Maripuu, E; Hachenberg, T; Hedenstierna, G

    2010-11-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO₂)-pneumoperitoneum (PP) of 12 mm Hg increases arterial oxygenation, but it also promotes collapse of dependent lung regions. This seeming paradox prompted the present animal study on the effects of PP on ventilation-perfusion distribution (V/Q) and gas exchange. Fourteen anaesthetized pigs were studied. In seven pigs, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was used for spatial analysis of ventilation and perfusion distributions, and in another seven pigs, multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) was used for detailed analysis of V/Q matching. SPECT/MIGET and central haemodynamics and pulmonary gas exchange were recorded during anaesthesia before and 60 min after induction of PP. SPECT during PP showed no or only poorly ventilated regions in the dependent lung compared with the ventilation distribution during anaesthesia before PP. PP was accompanied by redistribution of blood flow away from the non- or poorly ventilated regions. V/Q analysis by MIGET showed decreased shunt from 9 (sd 2) to 7 (2)% after induction of PP (P<0.05). No regions of low V/Q were seen either before or during PP. Almost no regions of high V/Q developed during PP (1% of total ventilation). Pa(o₂) increased from 33 (1.2) to 35.7 (3.2) kPa (P<0.01) and arterial to end-tidal Pco₂ gradient (Pae'(co₂) increased from 0.3 (0.1) to 0.6 (0.2) kPa (P<0.05). Perfusion was redistributed away from dorsal, collapsed lung regions when PP was established. This resulted in a better V/Q match. A possible mechanism is enhanced hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

  4. Capture of elemental and organic iodine from dilute gas streams by silver-exchanged mordenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruffey, S.H.; Jubin, R.T.; Jordan, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of off-gas streams arising from reprocessing of used nuclear fuel (UNF) is an area of active study by the U.S. Department of Energy. Such off-gas streams contain volatile fission products, including long-lived {sup 129}I. Although {sup 129}I is released into the off-gas at multiple points within the chemical reprocessing flowsheet, previous research has focused on removal from the dissolver off-gas stream (DOG). The DOG is expected to contain up to 98% of iodine in UNF at ppm levels within the stream. Other off-gas streams will also contain iodine but at substantially lower concentrations. Recent work has shown that compliance with U.S. regulations will likely require capture of iodine from these dilute streams in addition to capture from DOG. In particular, the vessel off-gas (VOG) stream is expected to contain 1-3% of the total iodine inventory at ppb concentrations. A review of literature also indicates that the speciation of iodine in the VOG stream will differ from that of the DOG, with the DOG containing primarily I{sub 2} and the VOG containing a mixture of I{sub 2} and organic iodine species. Silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) has been identified for use in the removal of iodine from off-gas streams. It is an effective capture material for I{sub 2} at the concentrations expected in the DOG, but little is known about its performance in gas streams that may contain both I{sub 2} and organic iodides at very dilute concentrations. The experiments to be described were designed to separately characterize the adsorption of I{sub 2} and methyl iodide on AgZ through extended duration testing. Simulated vessel off-gases containing low levels of either I{sub 2} or methyl iodide were contacted with AgZ sorbent beds for up to four months. Through the use of sorbent beds in series and varied sampling times, key parameters such as adsorption rate, decontamination factor, and performance over time could be determined for the capture of each species by AgZ. This

  5. Performance of gas diffusion layer from coconut waste for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, H.; Destyorini, F.; Insiyanda, D. R.; Subhan, A.

    2017-04-01

    The performance of Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) synthesized from coconut waste. Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL), produced from coconut waste, as a part of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) component, has been characterized. In order to know the performance, the commercial products were used as the remaining parts of PEMFC. The proposed GDL possesses 69% porosity for diffusion of Hydrogen fuel and Oxygen, as well as for transporting electron. With the electrical conductivity of 500 mS.cm-1, it also has hydrophobic properties, which is important to avoid the reaction with water, with the contact angle of 139°. The 5 × 5 cm2 GDL paper was co-assembled with the catalyst, Nafion membrane, bipolar plate, current collector, end plate to obtain single Stack PEMFC. The performance was examined by flowing fuel and gas with the flow rate of 500 and 1000 ml.min-1, respectively, and analyse the I-V polarization curve. The measurements were carried out at 30, 35, and 40°C for 5 cycles to ensure the repeatability. The results shows that the current density and the maximum power density reaches 203 mA.cm-2 and 143 mW.cm-2, respectively, with a given voltage 0.6 V, at 40°C.

  6. Pulmonary Gas Exchange Abnormalities in Mild Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Implications for Dyspnea and Exercise Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbehairy, Amany F; Ciavaglia, Casey E; Webb, Katherine A; Guenette, Jordan A; Jensen, Dennis; Mourad, Sahar M; Neder, J Alberto; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2015-06-15

    Several studies in mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have shown a higher than normal ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide ([Formula: see text]e/[Formula: see text]co2) during exercise. Our objective was to examine pulmonary gas exchange abnormalities and the mechanisms of high [Formula: see text]e/[Formula: see text]co2 in mild COPD and its impact on dyspnea and exercise intolerance. Twenty-two subjects (11 patients with GOLD [Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease] grade 1B COPD, 11 age-matched healthy control subjects) undertook physiological testing and a symptom-limited incremental cycle exercise test with arterial blood gas collection. Patients (post-bronchodilator FEV1: 94 ± 10% predicted; mean ± SD) had evidence of peripheral airway dysfunction and reduced peak oxygen uptake compared with control subjects (80 ± 18 vs. 113 ± 24% predicted; PArterial blood gases were within the normal range and effective alveolar ventilation was not significantly different from control subjects throughout exercise. The alveolar-arterial O2 tension gradient was elevated at rest and throughout exercise in COPD (Parterial to end-tidal CO2 difference were all higher (Parterial blood gas homeostasis but at the expense of earlier dynamic mechanical constraints, greater dyspnea, and exercise intolerance in mild COPD.

  7. Slag and seed deposition on heat exchanger surfaces from gas-droplet mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, K. H.; Chung, P. M.; Carlson, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    Mechanisms of particulate deposition from turbulent streams to solid surfaces are first discussed. Two problems of current interest in MHD application are then analyzed. One is the collection of slag droplets on the interior wall of vertical tubes from the turbulent droplet-laden gas stream. Such processes take place during the cycle of the regenerative heat exchanger used to preheat combustion air. The other is the removal of sub-micron-size slag particles or collection of seed by a bank of staggered vertical tubes situated normal to the gas flow direction. Removal of both vapor and droplet phases of slag and seed is possible with such a system. While thermophoresis is found to be a strong function of the temperature difference between the gas stream and the film surface, it was found that lowering of the tube temperature may not greatly enhance the deposition rate because the lower temperature implies a thicker slag film, and the necessary temperature difference is not correspondingly increased.

  8. Gas diffusion layer for proton exchange membrane fuel cells - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cindrella, L. [Fuel Cell Research Laboratory, Department of Engineering Technology, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States); Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India); Kannan, A.M.; Lin, J.F.; Saminathan, K. [Fuel Cell Research Laboratory, Department of Engineering Technology, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States); Ho, Y. [Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung 41354 (China); Lin, C.W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Yunlin 640 (China); Wertz, J. [Hollingsworth and Vose Co., A.K. Nicholson Research Lab, 219 Townsend Road, West Groton, MA 01472 (United States)

    2009-10-20

    Gas diffusion layer (GDL) is one of the critical components acting both as the functional as well as the support structure for membrane-electrode assembly in the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The role of the GDL is very significant in the H{sub 2}/air PEM fuel cell to make it commercially viable. A bibliometric analysis of the publications on the GDLs since 1992 shows a total of 400+ publications (>140 papers in the Journal of Power Sources alone) and reveals an exponential growth due to reasons that PEMFC promises a lot of potential as the future energy source for varied applications and hence its vital component GDL requires due innovative analysis and research. This paper is an attempt to pool together the published work on the GDLs and also to review the essential properties of the GDLs, the method of achieving each one of them, their characterization and the current status and future directions. The optimization of the functional properties of the GDLs is possible only by understanding the role of its key parameters such as structure, porosity, hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity, gas permeability, transport properties, water management and the surface morphology. This paper discusses them in detail to provide an insight into the structural parts that make the GDLs and also the processes that occur in the GDLs under service conditions and the characteristic properties. The required balance in the properties of the GDLs to facilitate the counter current flow of the gas and water is highlighted through its characteristics. (author)

  9. Underwater photosynthesis and respiration in leaves of submerged wetland plants: gas films improve CO2 and O2 exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmer, Timothy David; Pedersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Many wetland plants have gas films on submerged leaf surfaces. We tested the hypotheses that leaf gas films enhance CO(2) uptake for net photosynthesis (P(N)) during light periods, and enhance O(2) uptake for respiration during dark periods. Leaves of four wetland species that form gas films, and......(N) was enhanced up to sixfold. Gas films on submerged leaves enable continued gas exchange via stomata and thus bypassing of cuticle resistance, enhancing exchange of O(2) and CO(2) with the surrounding water, and therefore underwater P(N) and respiration.......Many wetland plants have gas films on submerged leaf surfaces. We tested the hypotheses that leaf gas films enhance CO(2) uptake for net photosynthesis (P(N)) during light periods, and enhance O(2) uptake for respiration during dark periods. Leaves of four wetland species that form gas films......, and two species that do not, were used. Gas films were also experimentally removed by brushing with 0.05% (v/v) Triton X. Net O(2) production in light, or O(2) consumption in darkness, was measured at various CO(2) and O(2) concentrations. When gas films were removed, O(2) uptake in darkness was already...

  10. Comprehensive Analysis of the Therapeutic IgG4 Antibody Pembrolizumab: Hinge Modification Blocks Half Molecule Exchange In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Fengqiang; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Larry; Antonenko, Svetlana; Zhang, Shuli; Zhang, Yi Wei; Tabrizifard, Mohammad; Ermakov, Grigori; Wiswell, Derek; Beaumont, Maribel; Liu, Liming; Richardson, Daisy; Shameem, Mohammed; Ambrogelly, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    IgG4 antibodies are evolving as an important class of cancer immunotherapies. However, human IgG4 can undergo Fab arm (half molecule) exchange with other IgG4 molecules in vivo. The hinge modification by a point mutation (S228P) prevents half molecule exchange of IgG4. However, the experimental confirmation is still expected by regulatory agencies. Here, we report for the first time the extensive analysis of half molecule exchange for a hinge-modified therapeutic IgG4 molecule, pembrolizumab (Keytruda) targeting programmed death 1 (PD1) receptor that was approved for advanced melanoma. Studies were performed in buffer or human serum using multiple exchange partners including natalizumab (Tysabri) and human IgG4 pool. Formation of bispecific antibodies was monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, exchange with Fc fragments, mixed mode chromatography, immunoassays, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The half molecule exchange was also examined in vivo in SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. Both in vitro and in vivo results indicate that the hinge modification in pembrolizumab prevented half molecule exchange, whereas the unmodified counterpart anti-PD1 wt showed active exchange activity with other IgG4 antibodies or self-exchange activity with its own molecules. Our work, as an example expected for meeting regulatory requirements, contributes to establish without ambiguity that hinge-modified IgG4 antibodies are suitable for biotherapeutic applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. Apneic oxygenation combined with extracorporeal arteriovenous carbon dioxide removal provides sufficient gas exchange in experimental lung injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Nielsen, Jakob Koefoed

    Background and aim of study We hypothesized that continuous high airway pressure without ventilatory movements (apneic oxygenation), using an open lung approach, combined with extracorporeal, pumpless, arterio-venous, carbon dioxide (CO2) removal would provide adequate gas exchange in acute lung...... In this porcine lung injury model, apneic oxygenation with arteriovenous CO2 removal provided sufficient gas exchange and stable hemodynamics, indicating that the method might have a potential in the treatment of severe ARDS.   Acknowledgements The membrane lungs were kindly provided by Novalung GmbH, Germany....

  12. Differential leaf gas exchange responses to salinity and drought in the mangrove tree Avicecennia germinans (Avicenniaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrado, M A

    2006-06-01

    Leaf gas exchange was assessed in Avicennia germinans L. grown under different NaCl concentrations (0-40 per thousand), after salt-relief, and then during drought. Stomatal conductance (gs) and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) decreased with increasing NaCl concentration, and intrinsic water use efficiency (Pn / gs) increased. Under desalinization Pn / gs declined. Thus, gs did not change in plants grown at low NaCl concentration (10 per thousand), but increased up to 30-32% at higher NaCl concentration (20-40 per thousand). However, Pn was only slightly enhanced (10-15%). Under drought, Pn decreased by as much as 46% in plants grown at low NaCl concentration (10 per thousand) and by 22% at high NaCl concentration (40 per thousand). Thus, Pn / gs decreased and water use efficiency was lower during drought compared to estimates prior to salt-relief.

  13. Promoted Iron Nanocrystals Obtained via Ligand Exchange as Active and Selective Catalysts for Synthesis Gas Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Colloidal synthesis routes have been recently used to fabricate heterogeneous catalysts with more controllable and homogeneous properties. Herein a method was developed to modify the surface composition of colloidal nanocrystal catalysts and to purposely introduce specific atoms via ligands and change the catalyst reactivity. Organic ligands adsorbed on the surface of iron oxide catalysts were exchanged with inorganic species such as Na2S, not only to provide an active surface but also to introduce controlled amounts of Na and S acting as promoters for the catalytic process. The catalyst composition was optimized for the Fischer–Tropsch direct conversion of synthesis gas into lower olefins. At industrially relevant conditions, these nanocrystal-based catalysts with controlled composition were more active, selective, and stable than catalysts with similar composition but synthesized using conventional methods, possibly due to their homogeneity of properties and synergic interaction of iron and promoters. PMID:28824820

  14. Acclimation of a terrestrial plant to submergence facilitates gas exchange under water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mommer, L.; Pedersen, O.; Visser, E. J. W.

    2004-01-01

    Flooding imposes stress upon terrestrial plants since it severely hampers gas exchange rates between the shoot and the environment. The resulting oxygen deficiency is considered to be the major problem for submerged plants. Oxygen microelectrode studies have, however, shown that aquatic plants...... maintain relatively high internal oxygen pressures under water, and even may release oxygen via the roots into the sediment, also in dark. Based on these results, we challenge the dogma that oxygen pressures in submerged terrestrial plants immediately drop to levels at which aerobic respiration is impaired....... The present study demonstrates that the internal oxygen pressure in the petioles of Rumex palustris plants under water is indeed well above the critical oxygen pressure for aerobic respiration, provided that the air-saturated water is not completely stagnant. The beneficial effect of shoot acclimation...

  15. Hemodynamics and Gas Exchange Effects of Inhaled Nitrous Oxide in Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled nitrous oxide (iNO therapy aimed at improving pulmonary oxygenizing function and at decreasing artificial ventilation (AV load has been used in foreign clinical practice in the past decade. The study was undertaken to evaluate the hemodynamic and gas exchange effects of iNO in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that developed after car-diosurgical operations. Fifty-eight (43 males and 15 females patients aged 21 to 76 (55.2±2.4 years were examined. The study has demonstrated that in 48.3% of cases, the early stage of ARDS is attended by the increased tone pulmonary vessels due to impaired NO-dependent vasodilatation. In these patients, iNO therapy is an effective therapeutic method for correcting hemodynamic disorders and lung oxygenizing function.

  16. A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  17. Reprint of: A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  18. Assessment of breath-by-breath alveolar gas exchange: an alternative view of the respiratory cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cettolo, V; Francescato, Maria Pia

    2015-09-01

    Breath-by-breath (BbB) determination of the O2 flux at alveolar level implies the identification of the start and end points of each respiratory cycle; Grønlund defined them as the times in two successive breaths showing equal expiratory gas fractions. Alternatively, the start and end points of each breath might be linked to the ratio between the exchangeable and non-exchangeable gases. The alternative algorithm is described and evaluated with respect to the algorithm proposed by Grønlund. Oxygen and carbon dioxide fractions, and ventilatory flow at the mouth were continuatively recorded in 20 subjects over 6 min at rest and during a cycloergometer exercise including 4 increasing intensities lasting 6 min each. Alveolar BbB oxygen uptake was calculated from the gas and flow traces by means of the two methods at stake. Total number of analysed breaths was 14,257. The data obtained with the two methods were close to the identity line (average slope 0.998 ± 0.004; R > 0.994; n > 334 in all subjects). Average difference between the O2 uptake data obtained by the two methods amounted to -0.27 ± 1.29 mL/min, whilst the standard deviation of the differences was 11.5 ± 4.6 mL/min. The relative percentage difference was independent from the O2 uptake and showed an average bias amongst subjects close to zero (-0.06 ± 0.15 %). The alternative timing of the respiratory cycle provided congruent O2 uptake data and made the identification of the start and end points of each breath more robust without introducing systematic errors.

  19. Multifrequency Oscillatory Ventilation in the Premature Lung: Effects on Gas Exchange, Mechanics, and Ventilation Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczka, David W; Herrmann, Jacob; Zonneveld, C Elroy; Tingay, David G; Lavizzari, Anna; Noble, Peter B; Pillow, J Jane

    2015-12-01

    Despite the theoretical benefits of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) in preterm infants, systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials do not confirm improved outcomes. The authors hypothesized that oscillating a premature lung with multiple frequencies simultaneously would improve gas exchange compared with traditional single-frequency oscillatory ventilation (SFOV). The goal of this study was to develop a novel method for HFOV, termed "multifrequency oscillatory ventilation" (MFOV), which relies on a broadband flow waveform more suitable for the heterogeneous mechanics of the immature lung. Thirteen intubated preterm lambs were randomly assigned to either SFOV or MFOV for 1 h, followed by crossover to the alternative regimen for 1 h. The SFOV waveform consisted of a pure sinusoidal flow at 5 Hz, whereas the customized MFOV waveform consisted of a 5-Hz fundamental with additional energy at 10 and 15 Hz. Per standardized protocol, mean pressure at airway opening ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) and inspired oxygen fraction were adjusted as needed, and root mean square of the delivered oscillatory volume waveform (Vrms) was adjusted at 15-min intervals. A ventilatory cost function for SFOV and MFOV was defined as (Equation is included in full-text article.), where Wt denotes body weight. Averaged over all time points, MFOV resulted in significantly lower VC (246.9 ± 6.0 vs. 363.5 ± 15.9 ml mmHg kg) and (Equation is included in full-text article.)(12.8 ± 0.3 vs. 14.1 ± 0.5 cm H2O) compared with SFOV, suggesting more efficient gas exchange and enhanced lung recruitment at lower mean airway pressures. Oscillation with simultaneous multiple frequencies may be a more efficient ventilator modality in premature lungs compared with traditional single-frequency HFOV.

  20. Biologically variable ventilation prevents deterioration of gas exchange during prolonged anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, W A; Eschun, G M; Kowalski, S E; Graham, M R; Girling, L G; Lefevre, G R

    2000-02-01

    We have studied the time course of changes in gas exchange and respiratory mechanics using two different modes of ventilation during 7 h of isoflurane anaesthesia in pigs. One group received conventional control mode ventilation (CV). The other group received biologically variable ventilation (BVV) which simulates the breath-to-breath variation in ventilatory frequency (f) that characterizes normal spontaneous ventilation. After baseline measurements with CV, animals were allocated randomly to either CV or BVV (FIO2 1.0 with 1.5% end-tidal isoflurane). With BVV, there were 376 changes in f and tidal volume (VT) over 25.1 min. Ventilation was continued over the next 7 h and blood gases and respiratory mechanics were measured every 60 min. The modulation file used to control the ventilator for BVV used an inverse power law frequency distribution (I/fa with a = 2.3 +/- 0.3). After 7 h, at a similar delivered minute ventilation, significantly greater PaO2 (mean 72.3 (SD 4.0) vs 63.5 (6.5) kPa) and respiratory system compliance (1.08 (0.08) vs 0.92 (0.16) ml cm H2O-1 kg-1) and lower PaCO2 (6.5 (0.7) vs 8.7 (1.5) kPa) and shunt fraction (7.2 (2.7)% vs 12.3 (6.2)%) were seen with BVV, with no significant difference in peak airway pressure (16.3 (1.2) vs 15.3 (3.7) cm H2O). A deterioration in gas exchange and respiratory mechanics was seen with conventional control mode ventilation but not with BVV in this experimental model of prolonged anaesthesia.

  1. Effects of Salinity Stress on Gas Exchange, Growth, and Nutrient Concentrations of Two Citrus Rootstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Khoshbakht

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A greenhouse study was undertaken to assess the salt tolerance of two citrus rootstocks, namely, Bakraii (Citrus sp. and Trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata. A factorial experiment through a completely randomized design (CRD with three replications and four levels of salt including 0, 20, 40 and 60 mM NaCl was conducted. After eight weeks of treatment, number of leaves, plant height, leaf area, wet and dry weight of leaf, stem and root, length of root, chlorophyll content, net CO2 assimilation rate (ACO2, stomatal conductance (gs, transpiration (E and water use efficiency (WUE and ion concentrations were measured. Salinity decreased growth and net gas exchange. Trifoliate orange showed the most decrease in growth indices and net gas exchange compared with Bakraii. The ability to limit the transfer of sodium to leaves in low levels of salt was observed in Trifoliate orange, but this ability was not observed in high levels of salt. Results showed that accumulation of chloride in leaves and roots were less in Bakraii compared to the Trifoliate orange. The lower Cl- concentration in leaves of Bakraii than trifoliate orange suggests that the salinity tolerance of Bakraii is associated with less transport of Cl- to the leaves. Salinity increased K+ and decreased Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations in leaves of both rootstocks. It is proposed that salt stress effect on plant physiological processes such as changes in plant growth, Cl- and Na+ toxicity, and mineral distribution, decreases chlorophyll content and reduces the photosynthetic efficiency of these citrus species.

  2. A Systematic Method to Detect the Metabolic Threshold from Gas Exchange during Incremental Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A. Dolezal, Thomas W. Storer, Eric V. Neufeld, Stephanie Smooke, Chi-Hong Tseng, Christopher B. Cooper

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Incremental exercise consists of three domains of exercise intensity demarcated by two thresholds. The first of these thresholds, derived from gas exchange measurements, is defined as the metabolic threshold (V̇O2θ above which lactate accumulates. Correctly and reliably identified, V̇O2θ is a non-invasive, sub-maximal marker of aerobic function with practical value. This investigation compared variability in selection of V̇O2θ among interpreters with different levels of experience as well as from auto-detection algorithms employed by a commercially available metabolic cart (MC. Ten healthy young men performed three replicates of incremental cycle exercise during which gas exchange measurements were collected breath-by-breath. Two experienced interpreters (E and four novice interpreters (N determined V̇O2θ from plots of specific response variables. Interpreters noted methods used and confidence in their selections. V̇O2θ was automatically determined by the MC. Interclass correlations indicated that E agreed with each other (mean difference, 21 mL·min-1 and with the MC (23 mL·min-1, but not with N (-664 to 364 mL·min-1; N did not agree among themselves. Despite good overall agreement between E and MC, differences >500 mL·min-1 were seen in 50% of individual cases. N expressed unduly higher confidence and used different V̇O2θ selection strategies compared with E. Experience and use of a systematic approach is essential for correctly identifying V̇O2θ. Current guidelines for exercise testing and interpretation do not include recommendations for such an approach. Data from this study suggests that this may be a serious shortcoming. Until an alternative schema for V̇O2θ detection is developed prospectively, strategies based on the present study will give practitioners a systematic and consistent approach to threshold detection.

  3. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  4. Water loss and gas exchange by eggs of Manduca sexta: trading off costs and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, H Arthur

    2010-05-01

    Like all terrestrial organisms, insect eggs face a tradeoff between exchanging metabolic gases (O(2) and CO(2)) and conserving water. Here I summarize the physiology underlying this tradeoff and the ecological contexts in which it may be important. The ideas are illustrated primarily by work from my laboratory on eggs of the sphingid moth Manduca sexta. In particular, I discuss: (1) dynamic changes in metabolic demand and water loss during development; and (2) how the eggshell layers and embryonic tracheal system control the traffic of gases between the embryo and its environment. Subsequently, I identify three areas with interesting but unresolved issues: (1) what eggs actually experience in their microclimates, focusing particularly on the leaf microclimates relevant to eggs of M. sexta; (2) how egg experience influences whether or not hatchling larvae succeed in establishing feeding sites on host plants; and (3) whether Hetz and Bradley's [Hetz, S.K., Bradley, T.J., 2005. Insects breathe discontinuously to avoid oxygen toxicity. Nature 433, 516-519] oxygen toxicity hypothesis for discontinuous gas-exchange cycles applies to insect eggs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ternary effects on the gas exchange of isotopologues of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Graham D; Cernusak, Lucas A

    2012-07-01

    The ternary effects of transpiration rate on the rate of assimilation of carbon dioxide through stomata, and on the calculation of the intercellular concentration of carbon dioxide, are now included in standard gas exchange studies. However, the equations for carbon isotope discrimination and for the exchange of oxygen isotopologues of carbon dioxide ignore ternary effects. Here we introduce equations to take them into account. The ternary effect is greatest when the leaf-to-air vapour mole fraction difference is greatest, and its impact is greatest on parameters derived by difference, such as the mesophyll resistance to CO(2) assimilation, r(m) . We show that the mesophyll resistance to CO(2) assimilation has been underestimated in the past. The impact is also large when there is a large difference in isotopic composition between the CO(2) inside the leaf and that in the air. We show that this partially reconciles estimates of the oxygen isotopic composition of CO(2) in the chloroplast and mitochondria in the light and in the dark, with values close to equilibrium with the estimated oxygen isotopic composition of water at the sites of evaporation within the leaf. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Theoretical and experimental insights into effects of wind on leaf heat and gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    Transpiration and heat exchange by plant leaves are coupled physiological processes of significant importance for surface-climate interactions and ecohydrology. The common practice of modelling transpiration as an isothermal process (assuming equal leaf and air temperatures) may introduce significant bias into estimates of transpiration rates and water use efficiency (WUE, the amount of carbon gained by photosynthesis per unit of water lost by transpiration). In contrast, explicit consideration of stomatal and leaf boundary layer resistances in series and the leaf energy balance in a physically-based model led to some surprising results, such as suppressed transpiration rates for increasing wind speed at constant stomatal conductance. The model predicts that for high wind velocities, the same leaf conductance (for water vapour and carbon dioxide) can be maintained with less evaporative losses. If this leaf-scale effect is consistent across most leaves, it may have profound implications for canopy-scale water use efficiency under globally decreasing wind speeds. This presentation reports the results of a systematic study of the effect of wind speed on leaf heat and gas exchange rates and introduces a novel experimental design to verify the modelling results using an insulated wind tunnel and artificial leaves with defined pore geometries, allowing to measure leaf-scale latent and sensible heat fluxes independently. First experimental results and new insights will be highlighted.

  7. Interaction between Lung Mechanics and Gas Exchange by Low Volume High Frequency Pulmonary Ventilation in Patients with Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-21

    Mechanics and Gas Exchange by Low Volume High Frequency Pulmonary Ventilation in Patients with Respiratory Failure 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Jeffrey M. Drazen...15 06 Mechanical Ventilation 06 11 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) The factors influencing both dynamic...LL II,,,~ 1111.2 HIIIH 111.- MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHARi 1 I., m P.’N I. AD-A193 073 g’ Fi AD _ _ _ Interaction between Lung Mechanics and Gas

  8. Performance testing of cross flow heat exchanger operating in the atmosphere of flue gas particulate with vapor condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuntaphan, A.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Performance testing of a cross flow heat exchanger operating under the atmosphere of flue gas particulate from combustion was carried out in this work. This heat exchanger exchanges heat between flue gas from the fuel oil combustion and cold water. The heat exchanger is composed of a spiral finned tube bank having 3 rows and 8 tubes per row with a staggered arrangement. The fin spacings considered are 2.85 and 6.10 mm. The theories of thermodynamics and heat transfer are used for analyzing the performance of this system.In this experiment, the flue gas temperature of 200ºC from combustion having 0.35 kg/s mass flow rate flows along outside surface of the heat exchanger and transfers heat to the 25ºC cooling water having 0.15 kg/s mass flow rate flowing in the tube side. Each experiment uses 750 hr for testing. During the testing, part of flue gas condenses on the heat transfer surface.From the experiment, it was found that the heat transfer rate of both heat exchangers tended to decrease with time while the airside pressure drop increased. These results come from the fouling on the heat transfer surface. Moreover, it is found that the heat exchanger having 2.85 mm fin spacing has an approximately 4 times higher fouling resistance than that of the 6.10 mm fin spacing.In this work a model for calculating the fouling resistance is also developed as a the function of time. The model is developed from that of Kern and Seaton and the mean deviation of the model is 0.789.

  9. Lack of Agreement Between Gas Exchange Variables Measured by Two Metabolic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G.; Nunan, David; Donovan, Gay; Hodges, Lynette D.; Sandercock, Gavin R. H.; Brodie, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the agreement and consistency between gas exchange variables measured by two online metabolic systems during an incremental exercise test. After obtaining local ethics approval and informed consent, 15 healthy subjects performed an incremental exercise test to volitional fatigue using the Bruce protocol. The Innocor (Innovision, Denmark) and CardiO2 (Medical Graphics, USA) systems were placed in series, with the Innocor mouthpiece attached to the pneumotach of the CardiO2. Metabolic data were analysed during the last 30 seconds of each stage and at peak exercise. There were non- significant differences (p > 0.05) between the two systems in estimation of oxygen consumption (VO2) and in minute ventilation (VE). Mean Cronbach’s alpha for VO2 and VE were 0.88 and 0.92. The Bland-Altman analysis revealed that limits of agreement were -0.52 to 0.55 l.min-1 for VO2, and -8.74 to 10.66 l.min-1 for VE. Carbon dioxide production (VCO2) and consequently respiratory exchange ratio (RER) measured by the Innocor were significantly lower (p < 0.05) through all stages. The CardiO2 measured fraction of expired carbon dioxide (FeCO2) significantly higher (p < 0.05). The limits of agreement for VO2 and VE are wide and unacceptable in cardio-pulmonary exercise testing. The Innocor reported VCO2 systematically lower. Therefore the Innocor and CardiO2 metabolic systems cannot be used interchangeably without affecting the diagnosis of an individual patient. Results from the present study support previous suggestion that considerable care is needed when comparing metabolic data obtained from different automated metabolic systems. Key pointsThere is general concern regarding the limited knowledge available about the accuracy of a number of commercially available systems.Demonstrated limits of agreement between key gas exchange variables (oxygen consumption and minute ventilation) as measured by the two metabolic systems were wide and unacceptable

  10. Effect of stratified inequality of blood flow on gas exchange in liquid-filled lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. B.; Maloney, J. E.; Castle, B. L.

    1972-01-01

    This investigation set out to answer two questions: (1) are the distal alveoli in the terminal lung units less well perfused than the proximal alveoli, i.e., is there stratification of blood flow; and (2) if so, does this enhance gas exchange in the presence of stratified inequality of ventilation. Excised dog lungs were ventilated with saline and perfused with blood. Following single inspirations of xenon 133 in saline and various periods of breath holding, the expired xenon concentration against volume was measured and it confirmed marked stratified inequality of ventilation under these conditions. By measuring the rate of depletion of xenon from alveoli during a period of blood flow, we showed that the alveoli which emptied at the end of expiration had 16% less blood flow than those exhaling earlier. However, by measuring the xenon concentration in pulmonary venous blood, we found that about 10% less tracer was transferred from the alveoli into the blood when the inspired xenon was stratified within the respiratory zone. Thus while stratification of blood flow was confirmed, it was shown to impair rather than enhance the efficiency of gas transfer.

  11. The effect of exercise on pulmonary gas exchange in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantzker, D R; D'Alonzo, G E

    1986-12-01

    The effect of low level, steady-state exercise on pulmonary gas exchange was studied in 7 patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary hypertension. Exercise led to a significant fall in the arterial PO2 from 76 +/- 10 to 63 +/- 8 mm Hg, a rise in the arterial PCO2 from 56 +/- 6 to 62 +/- 8 mm Hg, and a fall in the mixed venous PO2 from 38 +/- 2 to 32 +/- 2 mm Hg. There was, however, no significant change in the degree of ventilation-perfusion inequality as quantified by the multiple inert gas technique and no evidence that impaired O2 diffusion was playing a role in the increased hypoxemia. We conclude that the worsening hypoxemia with exercise in patients with severe COPD is due to an inadequate ventilatory response (leading to a rise in arterial PCO2) and the impact of a decreased mixed venous PO2 on the end-capillary PO2 of low VA/Q lung units and shunt.

  12. Kinetic model for the vibrational energy exchange in flowing molecular gas mixtures. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenhaeuser, F.

    1987-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the development of a computational model for the description of the vibrational energy exchange in flowing gas mixtures, taking into account a given number of energy levels for each vibrational degree of freedom. It is possible to select an arbitrary number of energy levels. The presented model uses values in the range from 10 to approximately 40. The distribution of energy with respect to these levels can differ from the equilibrium distribution. The kinetic model developed can be employed for arbitrary gaseous mixtures with an arbitrary number of vibrational degrees of freedom for each type of gas. The application of the model to CO2-H2ON2-O2-He mixtures is discussed. The obtained relations can be utilized in a study of the suitability of radiation-related transitional processes, involving the CO2 molecule, for laser applications. It is found that the computational results provided by the model agree very well with experimental data obtained for a CO2 laser. Possibilities for the activation of a 16-micron and 14-micron laser are considered.

  13. Superhydrophobic PAN nanofibers for gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahuddin, Mohammad; Hwang, Gisuk; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are considered to be the promising alternatives of natural resources for generating electricity and power. An optimal water management in the gas diffusion layers (GDL) is critical to high fuel cell performance. Its basic functions include transportation of the reactant gas from flow channels to catalyst effectively, draining out the liquid water from catalyst layer to flow channels, and conducting electrons with low humidity. In this study, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was dissolved in a solvent and electrospun at various conditions to produce PAN nanofibers prior to the stabilization at 280 °C for 1 hour in the atmospheric pressure and carbonization at 850 °C for 1 hour. The surface hydrophobicity values of the carbonized PAN nanofibers were adjusted using superhydrophobic and hydrophilic agents. The thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties of the new GDLs depicted much better results compared to the conventionally used ones. The water condensation tests on the surfaces (superhydrophobic and hydrophilic) of the GDL showed a crucial step towards improved water managements in the fuel cell. This study may open up new possibilities for developing high- performing GDL materials for future PEM fuel cell applications.

  14. DOGEE-SOLAS: The Role of Surfactants in Air-Sea Gas Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, M. E.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.; Nightingale, P.

    2008-12-01

    One of the major aims of DOGEE-SOLAS was to improve our understanding of the role of surfactants in air- sea gas exchange. With this in mind we carried out a number of artificial surfactant releases on a research cruise in the North Atlantic (D320), during June-July of 2007. We used oleyl alcohol, a surrogate for natural surfactants which is relatively cheap and easy to obtain (it is used in the manufacture of cosmetics). The main release overlaid a dual tracer "patch" of SF6 and 3He; our aim was to directly compare values of the gas transfer velocity, kw, estimated within the surfactant covered patch with those estimated quasi- simultaneously in a second, surfactant-free patch about 20km away. A second release in conjunction with colleagues from the University of Hawaii had the aim of measuring DMS fluxes by eddy correlation both inside and outside a surfactant slick, and a third was undertaken in the path of one of two 14m ASIS (Air-Sea Interaction Spar) buoys operated by the University of Miami for direct comparison of surfactant effects on the fluxes of CO2, H2O, heat and momentum (eddy correlation) etc. We present here some preliminary findings from the work.

  15. Leaf gas exchange in cowpea and CO2 efflux in soil irrigated with saline water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderson J. de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Leaf gas exchanges in plants and soil respiration are important tools for assessing the effects of salinity on the soil-plant system. An experiment was conducted with cowpea irrigated with saline water (0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5 dS m-1 prepared with two sources: NaCl and a mixture of Ca, Mg, Na, K and Cl ions in a randomized block design and a 6 x 2 factorial scheme, with four replicates, totaling 48 experimental plots. At 20 days after planting (DAP, plants were evaluated for net photosynthesis (A, stomatal conductance (gs and transpiration (E using the Infra-Red Gas Analyzer (Model XT6400- LICOR, and water use efficiency, intrinsic water use efficiency and instantaneous efficiency of carboxylation were calculated. At 60 DAP, the soil CO2 efflux (soil respiration was determined with a camera (Model 6400-09- LICOR. Salinity caused reductions in A, gs and E. However, the salt source did not have significant effect on these variables. Soil CO2 efflux was reduced with the increase in the electrical conductivity, especially in the mixture of ions.

  16. Design of Plant Gas Exchange Experiments in a Variable Pressure Growth Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Sustainable human presence in extreme environments such as lunar and martian bases will require bioregenerative components to human life support systems where plants are used for generation of oxygen, food, and water. Reduced atmospheric pressures will be used to minimize mass and engineering requirements. Few studies have assessed the metabolic and developmental responses of plants to reduced pressure and varied oxygen atmospheres. The first tests of hypobaric pressures on plant gas exchange and biomass production at the Johnson Space Center will be initiated in January 1996 in the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), a large, closed plant growth chamber rated for 10.2 psi. Experiments were designed and protocols detailed for two complete growouts each of lettuce and wheat to generate a general database for human life support requirements and to answer questions about plant growth processes in reduced pressure and varied oxygen environments. The central objective of crop growth studies in the VPGC is to determine the influence of reduced pressure and reduced oxygen on the rates of photosynthesis, dark respiration, evapotranspiration and biomass production of lettuce and wheat. Due to the constraint of one experimental unit, internal controls, called pressure transients, will be used to evaluate rates of CO2 uptake, O2 evolution, and H2O generation. Pressure transients will give interpretive power to the results of repeated growouts at both reduced and ambient pressures. Other experiments involve the generation of response functions to partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and to light intensity. Protocol for determining and calculating rates of gas exchange have been detailed. In order to build these databases and implement the necessary treatment combinations in short time periods, specific requirements for gas injections and removals have been defined. A set of system capability checks will include determination of leakage rates conducted prior to the actual crop

  17. Mechanisms underlying gas exchange alterations in an experimental model of pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H.T. Ferreira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the ventilation/perfusion ratio that contributes to hypoxemia in pulmonary embolism by analyzing blood gases and volumetric capnography in a model of experimental acute pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolization with autologous blood clots was induced in seven pigs weighing 24.00 ± 0.6 kg, anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Significant changes occurred from baseline to 20 min after embolization, such as reduction in oxygen partial pressures in arterial blood (from 87.71 ± 8.64 to 39.14 ± 6.77 mmHg and alveolar air (from 92.97 ± 2.14 to 63.91 ± 8.27 mmHg. The effective alveolar ventilation exhibited a significant reduction (from 199.62 ± 42.01 to 84.34 ± 44.13 consistent with the fall in alveolar gas volume that effectively participated in gas exchange. The relation between the alveolar ventilation that effectively participated in gas exchange and cardiac output (V Aeff/Q ratio also presented a significant reduction after embolization (from 0.96 ± 0.34 to 0.33 ± 0.17 fraction. The carbon dioxide partial pressure increased significantly in arterial blood (from 37.51 ± 1.71 to 60.76 ± 6.62 mmHg, but decreased significantly in exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle (from 35.57 ± 1.22 to 23.15 ± 8.24 mmHg. Exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle returned to baseline values 40 min after embolism. The arterial to alveolar carbon dioxide gradient increased significantly (from 1.94 ± 1.36 to 37.61 ± 12.79 mmHg, as also did the calculated alveolar (from 56.38 ± 22.47 to 178.09 ± 37.46 mL and physiological (from 0.37 ± 0.05 to 0.75 ± 0.10 fraction dead spaces. Based on our data, we conclude that the severe arterial hypoxemia observed in this experimental model may be attributed to the reduction of the V Aeff/Q ratio. We were also able to demonstrate that V Aeff/Q progressively improves after embolization, a fact attributed to the alveolar ventilation redistribution

  18. Technical Note: A simple method for air–sea gas exchange measurements in mesocosms and its application in carbon budgeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Czerny

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesocosms as large experimental units provide the opportunity to perform elemental mass balance calculations, e.g. to derive net biological turnover rates. However, the system is in most cases not closed at the water surface and gases exchange with the atmosphere. Previous attempts to budget carbon pools in mesocosms relied on educated guesses concerning the exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere. Here, we present a simple method for precise determination of air–sea gas exchange in mesocosms using N2O as a deliberate tracer. Beside the application for carbon budgeting, transfer velocities can be used to calculate exchange rates of any gas of known concentration, e.g. to calculate aquatic production rates of climate relevant trace gases. Using an arctic KOSMOS (Kiel Off Shore Mesocosms for future Ocean Simulation experiment as an exemplary dataset, it is shown that the presented method improves accuracy of carbon budget estimates substantially. Methodology of manipulation, measurement, data processing and conversion to CO2 fluxes are explained. A theoretical discussion of prerequisites for precise gas exchange measurements provides a guideline for the applicability of the method under various experimental conditions.

  19. Dynamic response of a two-dimensional electron gas: Exact treatment of Coulomb exchange in the random-phase approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, K.; Lipparini, E.

    1995-07-01

    The Dyson equation for the particle-hole Green's function, including Coulomb exchange matrix elements, has been solved exactly for a two-dimensional electron gas. Static and dynamic dielectric functions have been calculated and compared with normal random-phase-approximation and recent quantum Monte Carlo results.

  20. The role of ozone atmosphere-snow gas exchange on polar, boundaru-layer tropospheric ozone - a review sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmig, D.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Butler, T.; Oltmans, S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research on snowpack processes and atmosphere-snow gas exchange has demonstrated that chemical and physical interactions between the snowpack and the overlaying atmosphere have a substantial impact on the composition of the lower troposphere. These observations also imply that ozone

  1. Canopy gas exchange and water use efficiency of 'Empire' apple in response to particle film, irrigation, and microclimatic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined the interaction between a reflective particle film and water use efficiency (WUE) response of irrigated and non-irrigated apple trees over a wide range of environmental conditions. The objectives were to measure the specific gas exchange and WUE response of 'Empire' apple treate...

  2. Stomatal kinetics and photosynthetic gas exchange along a continuum of isohydric to anisohydric regulation of plant water status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick C. Meinzer; Duncan D. Smith; David R. Woodruff; Danielle E. Marias; Katherine A. McCulloh; Ava R. Howard; Alicia L. Magedman

    2017-01-01

    Species’ differences in the stringency of stomatal control of plant water potential represent a continuum of isohydric to anisohydric behaviours. However, little is known about how quasi-steady-state stomatal regulation of water potential may relate to dynamic behaviour of stomata and photosynthetic gas exchange in species operating at different positions along this...

  3. Weak coordination among petiole, leaf, vein, and gas-exchange traits across 41 Australian angiosperm species and its possible implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and Aims Close coordination between leaf gas exchange and maximal hydraulic supply has been reported across diverse plant life-forms. However, recent reports suggest that this relationship may become weak or break down completely within the angiosperms. Methods To examine this possi...

  4. Linking nonstructural carbohydrate dynamics to gas exchange and leaf hydraulic behavior in Pinus edulis and Juniperus monosperma

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Woodruff; Frederick C. Meinzer; Danielle E. Marias; Sanna Sevanto; Michael W. Jenkins; Nate G. McDowell

    2014-01-01

    Leaf hydraulics, gas exchange and carbon storage in Pinus edulis and Juniperus monosperma, two tree species on opposite ends of the isohydry–anisohydry spectrum, were analyzed to examine relationships between hydraulic function and carbohydrate dynamics.Leaf hydraulic vulnerability,...

  5. Analysis of leakage in IRGA's leaf chambers of open gas exchange systems: quantification and its effects in photosynthesis parameterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J. Flexas; A. Díaz-Espejo; J. A. Berry; J. Cifre; J. Galmés; R. Kaldenhoff; H. Medrano; M. Ribas-Carbó

    2007-01-01

    ... Ci. A quantitative analysis of CO2 leakage in the chamber of a portable open gas exchange system (Li-6400, LI-COR Inc., NE, USA) was performed. In an empty chamber, the measured CO2 leakage was similar to that calculated using the manufacturer's equations...

  6. Effects of permethrin and amitraz on gas exchange and water loss in unfed adult females of Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of permethrin and amitraz on metabolism of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum, were examined using a flow-through carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor analyzer. Untreated adult female ticks exhibited a distinct discontinuous gas exchange pattern (DGEP) with no measurable water loss. Si...

  7. Do chestnut, northern red, and white oak germinant seedlings respond similary to light treatments? II. Gas exchange and chlorophyll responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanne Rebbeck; Amy Scherzer; Kurt. Gottschalk

    2012-01-01

    Understanding differences in physiological and growth strategies in low-light environments among upland oak species may help managers address the challenges of oaks' poor regeneration. Gas exchange and chlorophyll content were measured for northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.), and white oak (...

  8. LACK OF AGREEMENT BETWEEN GAS EXCHANGE VARIABLES MEASURED BY TWO METABOLIC SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DjordjeG. Jakovljevic

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the agreement and consistency between gas exchange variables measured by two online metabolic systems during an incremental exercise test. After obtaining local ethics approval and informed consent, 15 healthy subjects performed an incremental exercise test to volitional fatigue using the Bruce protocol. The Innocor (Innovision, Denmark and CardiO2 (Medical Graphics, USA systems were placed in series, with the Innocor mouthpiece attached to the pneumotach of the CardiO2. Metabolic data were analysed during the last 30 seconds of each stage and at peak exercise. There were non- significant differences (p > 0.05 between the two systems in estimation of oxygen consumption (VO2 and in minute ventilation (VE. Mean Cronbach's alpha for VO2 and VE were 0.88 and 0.92. The Bland-Altman analysis revealed that limits of agreement were -0.52 to 0.55 l.min-1 for VO2, and -8.74 to 10.66 l.min-1 for VE. Carbon dioxide production (VCO2 and consequently respiratory exchange ratio (RER measured by the Innocor were significantly lower (p < 0.05 through all stages. The CardiO2 measured fraction of expired carbon dioxide (FeCO2 significantly higher (p < 0.05. The limits of agreement for VO2 and VE are wide and unacceptable in cardio-pulmonary exercise testing. The Innocor reported VCO2 systematically lower. Therefore the Innocor and CardiO2 metabolic systems cannot be used interchangeably without affecting the diagnosis of an individual patient. Results from the present study support previous suggestion that considerable care is needed when comparing metabolic data obtained from different automated metabolic systems.

  9. Gas exchange and lung mechanics during high frequency ventilation in the perflubron-treated lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Gerhard K; Sheeran, Padraig; Heitz, David; Thompson, John E; Arnold, John H

    2008-11-01

    To identify the effect of perflubron on gas exchange and lung mechanics during high frequency oscillatory ventilation in an animal model. Prospective randomized animal trial. Eighteen Yorkshire swine. Three groups of six animals each were investigated: control (high frequency oscillatory ventilation alone), low dose perflubron (high frequency oscillatory ventilation plus perfluoro-octyl bromide [PFOB]-Lo, 1.5 mL/kg), and high dose perflubron (high frequency oscillatory ventilation plus PFOB-Hi, 3 mL/kg). Lung injury was induced with repeated saline lavage and amplified for 1 hr using large tidal volumes. Perflubron (Alliance, CA) or a sham dose (room air) was administered with bronchoscopic guidance. The animals were transitioned to high frequency oscillatory ventilation starting at a mean airway pressure of 15 cm H2O. Mean airway pressure was increased (inflation phase) by 5 cm H2O every 15 mins to a maximum mean airway pressure of 40 cm H2O. During the deflation phase, mean airway pressure was reduced by 5 cm H2O every 15 mins to a mean airway pressure of 15 cm H2O. Oxygenation was improved and pulmonary shunt fraction was reduced for PFOB-Hi compared with the control group only at a mean airway pressure of 15 and 20 cm H2O. At a maximal mean airway pressure of 40 cm H2O, oxygenation was not different between the groups, but pulmonary artery pressures were elevated in both PFOB-groups compared with the control group. During the deflation phase, oxygenation, pulmonary shunt fraction, and pulmonary artery pressures were adversely affected by PFOB-Hi and PFOB-Lo. Although PFOB-Hi compared with the control group improved oxygenation and reduced pulmonary shunt fraction only during the first pressure steps of a formal stepwise recruitment maneuver during high frequency oscillatory ventilation, this effect was not sustained during maximal recruitment. During the deflation phase, both PFOB groups were associated with worse gas exchange compared with the control group

  10. Alveolar Gas Exchange and Pulmonary Functions in Patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Anandhalakshmi; S, Manikandan; P, Ganeshkumar; C, Ramachandran

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing tremendously throughout the world especially in the developing countries. This disease affects various organs like eyes, nerves, kidneys and the heart. In this study, we investigated whether lungs are also one of the target organs of diabetes mellitus or not. To assess the pulmonary function parameters including alveolar gas exchange in patients with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus and to find the influence of hyperglycaemia and duration of diabetes. This cross sectional study involved 30 type II diabetic patients of age 30-60 years attending the diabetic outpatient department of SRM Medical College & Research Centre and 30 age and sex matched non-diabetic subjects as controls. The glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, fasting and post prandial blood glucose levels, pulmonary function parameters such as Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV1), Forced Expiratory Volume Percentage (FEV1 /FVC), Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR), Forced Expiratory Flow (25 - 75%), Peak Inspiratory flow ( PIF), Forced Inspiratory Vital Capacity ( FIVC), Total Lung Capacity ( TLC),Diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide( DLCO) were measured for all the participants using Easyone Pro computerised spirometer. DLCO was measured by single breath Carbon Monoxide (CO) diffusion test. The alveolar membrane permeability was assessed by evaluating the ratio of DLCO to Alveolar Ventilation (VA). The pulmonary function parameters FVC, FEV1, PEFR, PIF, FIVC, TLC , DLCO and DLCO/VA were significantly low (pII diabetes mellitus when compared to control group. The DLCO and DLCO/VA were significantly lower (p 7). We conclude that the pulmonary function parameters like FVC, FEV1, PEFR, PIF, FIVC, TLC and alveolar gas exchange were significantly reduced in patients with type II diabetes. The patients with Type II diabetes mellitus had a restrictive pattern of respiratory abnormality. The patients with poor glycaemic control( HbA1c > 7

  11. Gas exchange efficiency of an oxygenator with integrated pulsatile displacement blood pump for neonatal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlanstein, Peter C; Borchardt, Ralf; Mager, Ilona; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Oxygenators have been used in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) since the 1970s. The need to develop a more effective oxygenator for this patient cohort exists due to their size and blood volume limitations. This study sought to validate the next design iteration of a novel oxygenator for neonatal ECMO with an integrated pulsatile displacement pump, thereby superseding an additional blood pump. Pulsating blood flow within the oxygenator is generated by synchronized active air flow expansion and contraction of integrated silicone pump tubes and hose pinching valves located at the oxygenator inlet and outlet. The current redesign improved upon previous prototypes by optimizing silicone pump tube distribution within the oxygenator fiber bundle; introduction of an oval shaped inner fiber bundle core, and housing; and a higher fiber packing density, all of which in combination reduced the priming volume by about 50% (50 to 27 mL and 41 to 20 mL, respectively). Gas exchange efficiency was tested for two new oxygenators manufactured with different fiber materials: one with coating and one with smaller pore size, both capable of long-term use (OXYPLUS® and CELGARD®). Results demonstrated that the oxygen transfer for both oxygenators was 5.3-24.7 mlO2/min for blood flow ranges of 100-500 mlblood/min. Carbon dioxide transfer for both oxygenators was 3.7-26.3 mlCO2/min for the same blood flow range. These preliminary results validated the oxygenator redesign by demonstrating an increase in packing density and thus in gas transfer, an increase in pumping capacity and a reduction in priming volume.

  12. The boundary condition for vertical velocity and its interdependence with surface gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2017-07-01

    The law of conservation of linear momentum is applied to surface gas exchanges, employing scale analysis to diagnose the vertical velocity (w) in the boundary layer. Net upward momentum in the surface layer is forced by evaporation (E) and defines non-zero vertical motion, with a magnitude defined by the ratio of E to the air density, as w = E/ρ. This is true even right down at the surface where the boundary condition is w|0 = E/ρ|0 (where w|0 and ρ|0 represent the vertical velocity and density of air at the surface). This Stefan flow velocity implies upward transport of a non-diffusive nature that is a general feature of the troposphere but is of particular importance at the surface, where it assists molecular diffusion with upward gas migration (of H2O, for example) but opposes that of downward-diffusing species like CO2 during daytime. The definition of flux-gradient relationships (eddy diffusivities) requires rectification to exclude non-diffusive transport, which does not depend on scalar gradients. At the microscopic scale, the role of non-diffusive transport in the process of evaporation from inside a narrow tube - with vapour transport into an overlying, horizontal airstream - was described long ago in classical mechanics and is routinely accounted for by chemical engineers, but has been neglected by scientists studying stomatal conductance. Correctly accounting for non-diffusive transport through stomata, which can appreciably reduce net CO2 transport and marginally boost that of water vapour, should improve characterisations of ecosystem and plant functioning.

  13. The boundary condition for vertical velocity and its interdependence with surface gas exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kowalski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The law of conservation of linear momentum is applied to surface gas exchanges, employing scale analysis to diagnose the vertical velocity (w in the boundary layer. Net upward momentum in the surface layer is forced by evaporation (E and defines non-zero vertical motion, with a magnitude defined by the ratio of E to the air density, as w = E/ρ. This is true even right down at the surface where the boundary condition is w|0 = E/ρ|0 (where w|0 and ρ|0 represent the vertical velocity and density of air at the surface. This Stefan flow velocity implies upward transport of a non-diffusive nature that is a general feature of the troposphere but is of particular importance at the surface, where it assists molecular diffusion with upward gas migration (of H2O, for example but opposes that of downward-diffusing species like CO2 during daytime. The definition of flux–gradient relationships (eddy diffusivities requires rectification to exclude non-diffusive transport, which does not depend on scalar gradients. At the microscopic scale, the role of non-diffusive transport in the process of evaporation from inside a narrow tube – with vapour transport into an overlying, horizontal airstream – was described long ago in classical mechanics and is routinely accounted for by chemical engineers, but has been neglected by scientists studying stomatal conductance. Correctly accounting for non-diffusive transport through stomata, which can appreciably reduce net CO2 transport and marginally boost that of water vapour, should improve characterisations of ecosystem and plant functioning.

  14. Imaging in Vivo Extracellular pH with a Single Paramagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanshu Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of extracellular pH (pHe has potential utility for cancer diagnoses and for assessing the therapeutic effects of pH-dependent therapies. A single magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent that is detected through paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST was designed to measure tumor pHe throughout the range of physiologic pH and with magnetic resonance saturation powers that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer. The chemical characterization and modeling of the contrast agent Yb3+-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid, 10-o-aminoanilide (Yb-DO3A-oAA suggested that the aryl amine of the agent forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with a proximal carboxylate ligand, which was essential for generating a practical chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST effect from an amine. A ratio of CEST effects from the aryl amine and amide was linearly correlated with pH throughout the physiologic pH range. The pH calibration was used to produce a parametric pH map of a subcutaneous flank tumor on a mouse model of MCF-7 mammary carcinoma. Although refinements in the in vivo CEST MRI methodology may improve the accuracy of pHe measurements, this study demonstrated that the PARACEST contrast agent can be used to generate parametric pH maps of in vivo tumors with saturation power levels that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer.

  15. Scaling of stomatal size and density optimizes allocation of leaf epidermal space for gas exchange in angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Hugo Jan; Price, Charles A.; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Dekker, Stefan C.; Franks, Peter J.; Veneklaas, Erik J.

    2015-04-01

    Stomata on plant leaves are key traits in the regulation of terrestrial fluxes of water and carbon. The basic morphology of stomata consists of a diffusion pore and two guard cells that regulate the exchange of CO2 and water vapour between the leaf interior and the atmosphere. This morphology is common to nearly all land plants, yet stomatal size (defined as the area of the guard cell pair) and stomatal density (the number of stomata per unit area) range over three orders of magnitude across species. Evolution of stomatal sizes and densities is driven by selection pressure on the anatomical maximum stomatal conductance (gsmax), which determines the operational range of leaf gas exchange. Despite the importance of stomata traits for regulating leaf gas exchange, a quantitative understanding of the relation between adaptation of gsmax and the underlying co-evolution of stomatal sizes and densities is still lacking. Here we develop a theoretical framework for a scaling relationship between stomatal sizes and densities within the constraints set by the allocation of epidermal space and stomatal gas exchange. Our theory predicts an optimal scaling relationship that maximizes gsmax and minimizes epidermal space allocation to stomata. We test whether stomatal sizes and densities reflect this optimal scaling with a global compilation of stomatal trait data on 923 species reflecting most major clades. Our results show optimal scaling between stomatal sizes and densities across all species in the compiled data set. Our results also show optimal stomatal scaling across angiosperm species, but not across gymnosperm and fern species. We propose that the evolutionary flexibility of angiosperms to adjust stomatal sizes underlies their optimal allocation of leaf epidermal space to gas exchange.

  16. Gas exchange and water balance of a mistletoe species and its mangrove hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, G; Rada, F; Sternberg, L; Burguera, J L; Burguera, M; Orozco, A; Montilla, M; Zabala, O; Azocar, A; Canales, M J; Celis, A

    1989-02-01

    The gas exchange and water relations of the hemiparasite Pthirusa maritima and two its mangrove host species, Conocarpus erectus and Coccoloba uvifera, were studied in an intertidal zone of the Venezuelan coast. Carbon uptake and transpiration, leaf osmotic and total water potential, as well as nutrient content in the xylem sap and leaves of mistletoes and hosts were followed through the dry and wet season. In addition, carbon isotope ratios of leaf tissue were measured to further evaluate water use efficiency. Under similar light and humidity conditions, mistletoes had higher transpiration rates, lower leaf water potentials, and lower water use efficiencies than their hosts. Potassium content was much higher in mistletoes than in host leaves, but mineral nutrient content in the xylem sap of mistletoes was relatively low. The resistance of the liquid pathway from the soil to the leaf surface of mistletoes was larger than the total liquid flow resistance of host plants. Differences in the daily cycles of osmotic potential of the xylem sap also indicate the existence of a high resistance pathway along the vascular connection between the parasite pathway along the vascular connection between the parasite and its host. P. maritima mistletoes adjust to the different physiological characteristics of the host species which it parasitizes, thus ensuring an adequate water and carbon balance.

  17. LEAF GAS EXCHANGE CHARACTERISTICS OF FOUR PAPAYA GENOTYPES DURING DIFFERENT STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAMPOSTRINI ELIEMAR

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, was used four papaya (Carica papaya L. genotypes: three from the 'Solo ( Sunrise Solo TJ, Sunrise Solo 72/12 and Baixinho de Santa Amália group and one from the 'Formosa' group (Know-You 01. They were grown in plastic pots containing a sandy-clay-loam soil subjected to pH correction and fertilization, under greenhouse conditions. Throughout the experimental period plants were subjected to periodic irrigation to maintain the soil humitidy around field capacity. The experiment was conducted 73 days after sowing. In all genotypes, leaf gas exchange characteristics were determined. The net photosynthetic rate (A, mumol m-2 s-1 , stomatal conductance (g s mol m-2 s-1, leaf temperature (T I, 0C and intercellular carbon dioxide concentration (ci, muL L-1 on the 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th leaves from the plant apex were determined. No significant differences were observed for A, g s, c i, or Tl either among the leaves sampled from any of the genotypes. A was positively correlated with g s and in the other hand T I and g s were negatively correlated. The results suggest that, for 73 DAP, all the sampled papaya leaves functioned as sources of organs.

  18. Effect of saline irrigation water on gas exchange and proline metabolism in ber (Ziziphus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdi, D L; Bagri, G K

    2016-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in pots of 25 kg capacity to study the effect of saline irrigation (EC 0,5,10,15 and 20 dSm-1) prepared by mixing NaCl, NaSO4, CaCl and MgCl2 in 3:1 ratio of chloride and sulphate on gas exchange traits, membrane stability, chlorophyll stability index and osmolytic defense mechanism in Ziziphus rotundifolia and Ziziphus nummularia species of Indian jujube (Z.mauritiana). Result showed that net photosynthetic rate (PN), transpiration (e) and stomatal conductance were comparatively lower in Ziziphus nummularia, which further declined with increasing level of saline irrigation water. Chlorophyll stability and membrane stability also declined significantly in salt stress, with higher magnitude in Ziziphus nummularia. The activity of proline anabolic enzymes; Δ1-Pyrrolline-5-carboxylate reductase, Δ1-Pyrrolline-5-carboxylate synthetase and Ornithine-δ-aminotransferase were recorded higher in Ziziphus rotundifolia with decrease in proline dehydrogenase. The sodium content was observed higher in roots of Ziziphus rotundifolia and leaves of Ziziphus nummularia. Therefore, it is suggested that salt tolerance mechanism was more efficiently operative in Ziziphus rotundifolia owing to better management of physiological attributes, osmolytic defense mechanism and restricted translocation of sodium from root to leaves along with larger accumulation of potassium in its leaves.

  19. Gas exchange and leaf contents in bell pepper under energized water and biofertilizer doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca R. M. Borges

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of energized water and bovine biofertilizer doses on the gas exchange and NPK contents in leaves of yellow bell pepper plants. The experiment was conducted at the experimental area of the Federal University of Ceará, in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, from June to November 2011. The experiment was set in a randomized block design, in a split-plot scheme; the plots were composed of treatments with energized and non-energized water and the subplots of five doses of liquid biofertilizer (0, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 mL plant-1 week-1. The following variables were analyzed: transpiration, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis and leaf contents of nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and potassium (K. Water energization did not allow significant increases in the analyzed variables. The use of biofertilizer as the only source of fertilization was sufficient to provide the nutrients N, P and K at appropriate levels for the bell pepper crop.

  20. Effects of Drought and Rewetting on Growth and Gas Exchange of Minor European Broadleaved Tree Species

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    Jörg Kunz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Widespread and economically important European tree species such as Norway spruce, Scots pine, and European beech are projected to be negatively affected by the increasing intensity and frequency of dry and hot conditions in a future climate. Hence, there is an increasing need to investigate the suitability of presumably more drought tolerant species to ensure future ecological stability, biodiversity, and productivity of forests. Based on their distribution patterns and climatic envelopes, the rare, minor broadleaved tree species Sorbus torminalis ((L. CRANTZ, S. domestica (L., Acer campestre (L., and A. platanoides (L. are assumed to be drought tolerant, however, there is only limited experimental basis to support that notion. This study aimed at quantifying growth and gas exchange of seedlings of these species during drought conditions, and their capacity to recover following drought. For that purpose, they were compared to the common companion species Quercus petraea ((MATTUSCHKA LIEBL. and Fagus sylvatica (L.. Here, potted seedlings of these species were exposed to water limitation followed by rewetting cycles in a greenhouse experiment. Photosynthesis and transpiration rates, stomatal conductance as well as root and shoot growth rates indicated a high drought resistance of A. campestre and A. platanoides. Sorbus domestica showed a marked ability to recover after drought stress. Therefore, we conclude that these minor tree species have the potential to enrich forests on drought-prone sites. Results from this pot experiment need to be complemented by field studies, in which the drought response of the species is not influenced by restrictions to root development.

  1. Proton exchange membrane micro fuel cells on 3D porous silicon gas diffusion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, S.; Gautier, G.; Thery, J.; Desplobain, S.; Borella, M.; Ventura, L.; Laurent, J.-Y.

    2012-10-01

    Since the 90's, porous silicon has been studied and implemented in many devices, especially in MEMS technology. In this article, we present a new approach to build miniaturized proton exchange membrane micro-fuel cells using porous silicon as a hydrogen diffusion layer. In particular, we propose an innovative process to build micro fuel cells from a “corrugated iron like” 3D structured porous silicon substrates. This structure is able to increase up to 40% the cell area keeping a constant footprint on the silicon wafer. We propose here a process route to perform electrochemically 3D porous gas diffusion layers and to deposit fuel cell active layers on such substrates. The prototype peak power performance was measured to be 90 mW cm-2 in a “breathing configuration” at room temperature. These performances are less than expected if we compare with a reference 2D micro fuel cell. Actually, the active layer deposition processes are not fully optimized but this prototype demonstrates the feasibility of these 3D devices.

  2. Heat transfer in a compact heat exchanger containing rectangular channels and using helium gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Development of a National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which will fly at hypersonic speeds, require novel cooling techniques to manage the anticipated high heat fluxes on various components. A compact heat exchanger was constructed consisting of 12 parallel, rectangular channels in a flat piece of commercially pure nickel. The channel specimen was radiatively heated on the top side at heat fluxes of up to 77 W/sq cm, insulated on the back side, and cooled with helium gas flowing in the channels at 3.5 to 7.0 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 1400 to 28,000. The measured friction factor was lower than that of the accepted correlation for fully developed turbulent flow, although the uncertainty was high due to uncertainty in the channel height and a high ratio of dynamic pressure to pressure drop. The measured Nusselt number, when modified to account for differences in fluid properties between the wall and the cooling fluid, agreed with past correlations for fully developed turbulent flow in channels. Flow nonuniformity from channel-to-channel was as high as 12 pct above and 19 pct below the mean flow.

  3. Aerosolized perfluorocarbon improves gas exchange and pulmonary mechanics in preterm lambs with severe respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Xabier; Mielgo, Victoria; Valls-i-Soler, Adolf; Ruiz-del-Yerro, Estibaliz; Rey-Santano, Carmen

    2012-10-01

    Aerosolized perfluorocarbon (PFC) has been proposed as an alternative method of PFC administration; however, the efficacy of aerosolized PFC in a preterm animal model has not yet been demonstrated. Twelve preterm lambs were randomized to two groups: a perfluorodecalin (PFD) aerosol group (n = 6) receiving 10 ml/kg/h of PFD delivered by an intratracheal inhalation catheter followed by 4 h of mechanical ventilation (MV) or the control group, in which animals (n = 6) were managed for 6 h with MV. Gas exchange, pulmonary mechanics, cardiovascular parameters, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured. Both groups developed hypoxia, hypercarbia, and acidosis at baseline. Aerosolized PFD improved oxygenation (P mechanics (P < 0.0001) and changed carbon dioxide values to normal physiological levels, unlike the treatment given to the controls (P < 0.0003). The time course of mean arterial blood pressure and CBF were significantly affected by PFD aerosolization, especially during the first hour of life. CBF gradually decreased during the first hour in the PFD aerosol group and remained stable until the end of the follow-up, whereas CBF remained higher in the control group (P < 0.0028). Aerosolized PFD improves pulmonary function in preterm lambs and should be further investigated as an alternative mode of PFC administration.

  4. Leaf Gas Exchange and Chlorophyll a Fluorescence Imaging of Rice Leaves Infected with Monographella albescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatagiba, Sandro Dan; DaMatta, Fábio Murilo; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila

    2015-02-01

    This study was intended to analyze the photosynthetic performance of rice leaf blades infected with Monographella albescens by combining chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence images with gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment pools. The net CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, total Chl and carotenoid pools, and Chl a/b ratio all decreased but the internal CO2 concentration increased in the inoculated plants compared with their noninoculated counterparts. The first detectable changes in the images of Chl a fluorescence from the leaves of inoculated plants were already evident at 24 h after inoculation (hai) and increased dramatically as the leaf scald lesions expanded. However, these changes were negligible for the photosystem II photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) at 24 hai, in contrast to other Chl fluorescence traits such as the photochemical quenching coefficient, yield of photochemistry, and yield for dissipation by downregulation; which, therefore, were much more sensitive than the Fv/Fm ratio in assessing the early stages of fungal infection. It was also demonstrated that M. albescens was able to impair the photosynthetic process in both symptomatic and asymptomatic leaf areas. Overall, it was proven that Chl a fluorescence imaging is an excellent tool to describe the loss of functionality of the photosynthetic apparatus occurring in rice leaves upon infection by M. albescens.

  5. Leaf Gas Exchange and Chlorophyll a Fluorescence in Maize Leaves Infected with Stenocarpella macrospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Cardona, Maria Bianney; Wordell Filho, João Américo; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of macrospora leaf spot (MLS), caused by Stenocarpella macrospora, on photosynthetic gas exchange parameters and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters determined in leaves of plants from two maize cultivars ('ECVSCS155' and 'HIB 32R48H') susceptible and highly susceptible, respectively, to S. macrospora. MLS severity was significantly lower in the leaves of plants from ECVSCS155 relative to the leaves of plants from HIB 32R48H. In both cultivars, net CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate significantly decreased, while the internal to ambient CO2 concentration ratio increased in inoculated plants relative to noninoculated plants. The initial fluorescence and nonphotochemical quenching significantly increased in inoculated plants of ECVSCS155 and HIB 32R48H, respectively, relative to noninoculated plants. The maximum fluorescence, maximum PSII quantum efficiency, coefficient for photochemical quenching, and electron transport rate significantly decreased in inoculated plants relative to noninoculated plants. For both cultivars, concentrations of total chlorophyll (Chl) (a+b) and carotenoids and the Chl a/b ratio significantly decreased in inoculated plants relative to noninoculated plants. In conclusion, the results from the present study demonstrate, for the first time, that photosynthesis in the leaves of maize plants is dramatically affected during the infection process of S. macrospora, and impacts are primarily associated with limitations of a diffusive and biochemical nature.

  6. The effect of nebulized epinephrine on respiratory mechanics and gas exchange in bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numa, A H; Williams, G D; Dakin, C J

    2001-07-01

    Nebulized epinephrine has been advocated as a treatment for airway obstruction in infants with bronchiolitis; however, its effect on respiratory mechanics and gas exchange has been poorly documented to date. We performed a preinterventional and postinterventional study with primary outcome measures of mechanics (measured by single-breath occlusion passive deflation) and oxygenation and ventilation indices in order to measure the effects of nebulized epinephrine in infants requiring mechanical ventilation for RSV-positive bronchiolitis. A two-compartment model was used to describe respiratory mechanics in patients with nonlinear flow-volume curves. Nebulized epinephrine (0.5 mg/kg) was administered to 15 patients (median age, 0.19 yr; weight, 4.4 kg). Resistance decreased significantly in slow and fast compartments in 87 and 70% of patients, respectively. Median resistance in the slow compartment decreased from 0.427 to 0.198 cm H2O/ml/s (p = 0.0015) and in the fast compartment from 0.167 to 0.116 cm H2O/ ml/s (p = 0.018). Compliance, oxygenation index, and ventilation index were not significantly changed after administration of epinephrine. We conclude that nebulized epinephrine substantially improves respiratory system resistance but not oxygenation or ventilation indices. This may be because of the effects of epinephrine on oxygen consumption or ventilation-perfusion matching.

  7. Gas exchange and leaf anatomy of a C3-CAM hybrid, Yucca gloriosa (Asparagaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyduk, Karolina; Burrell, Nia; Lalani, Falak; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2016-03-01

    While the majority of plants use the typical C3 carbon metabolic pathway, ~6% of angiosperms have adapted to carbon limitation as a result of water stress by employing a modified form of photosynthesis known as Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). CAM plants concentrate carbon in the cells by temporally separating atmospheric carbon acquisition from fixation into carbohydrates. CAM has been studied for decades, but the evolutionary progression from C3 to CAM remains obscure. In order to better understand the morphological and physiological characteristics associated with CAM photosynthesis, phenotypic variation was assessed in Yucca aloifolia, a CAM species, Yucca filamentosa, a C3 species, and Yucca gloriosa, a hybrid species derived from these two yuccas exhibiting intermediate C3-CAM characteristics. Gas exchange, titratable leaf acidity, and leaf anatomical traits of all three species were assayed in a common garden under well-watered and drought-stressed conditions. Yucca gloriosa showed intermediate phenotypes for nearly all traits measured, including the ability to acquire carbon at night. Using the variation found among individuals of all three species, correlations between traits were assessed to better understand how leaf anatomy and CAM physiology are related. Yucca gloriosa may be constrained by a number of traits which prevent it from using CAM to as high a degree as Y. aloifolia. The intermediate nature of Y. gloriosa makes it a promising system in which to study the evolution of CAM. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Gas exchange and leaf anatomy of a C3–CAM hybrid, Yucca gloriosa (Asparagaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyduk, Karolina; Burrell, Nia; Lalani, Falak; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2016-01-01

    While the majority of plants use the typical C3 carbon metabolic pathway, ~6% of angiosperms have adapted to carbon limitation as a result of water stress by employing a modified form of photosynthesis known as Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). CAM plants concentrate carbon in the cells by temporally separating atmospheric carbon acquisition from fixation into carbohydrates. CAM has been studied for decades, but the evolutionary progression from C3 to CAM remains obscure. In order to better understand the morphological and physiological characteristics associated with CAM photosynthesis, phenotypic variation was assessed in Yucca aloifolia, a CAM species, Yucca filamentosa, a C3 species, and Yucca gloriosa, a hybrid species derived from these two yuccas exhibiting intermediate C3–CAM characteristics. Gas exchange, titratable leaf acidity, and leaf anatomical traits of all three species were assayed in a common garden under well-watered and drought-stressed conditions. Yucca gloriosa showed intermediate phenotypes for nearly all traits measured, including the ability to acquire carbon at night. Using the variation found among individuals of all three species, correlations between traits were assessed to better understand how leaf anatomy and CAM physiology are related. Yucca gloriosa may be constrained by a number of traits which prevent it from using CAM to as high a degree as Y. aloifolia. The intermediate nature of Y. gloriosa makes it a promising system in which to study the evolution of CAM. PMID:26717954

  9. Salt tolerance and regulation of gas exchange and hormonal homeostasis by auxin-priming in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Iqbal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the regulatory effects of auxin-priming on gas exchange and hormonal homeostasis in spring wheat subjected to saline conditions. Seeds of MH-97 (salt-intolerant and Inqlab-91 (salt-tolerant cultivars were subjected to 11 priming treatments (three hormones x three concentrations + two controls and evaluated under saline (15 dS m-1 and nonsaline (2.84 dS m-1 conditions. The priming treatments consisted of: 5.71, 8.56, and 11.42 × 10-4 mol L-1 indoleacetic acid; 4.92, 7.38, and 9.84 × 10-4 mol L-1 indolebutyric acid; 4.89, 7.34, and 9.79 × 10-4 mol L-1 tryptophan; and a control with hydroprimed seeds. A negative control with nonprimed seeds was also evaluated. All priming agents diminished the effects of salinity on endogenous abscisic acid concentration in the salt-intolerant cultivar. Grain yield was positively correlated with net CO2 assimilation rate and endogenous indoleacetic acid concentration, and it was negatively correlated with abscisic acid and free polyamine concentrations. In general, the priming treatment with tryptophan at 4.89 × 10-4 mol L-1 was the most effective in minimizing yield losses and reductions in net CO2 assimilation rate, under salt stress conditions. Hormonal homeostasis increases net CO2 assimilation rate and confers tolerance to salinity on spring wheat.

  10. Extremely low flow tracheal gas insufflation of helium-oxygen mixture improves gas exchange in a rabbit model of piston-type high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Atsushi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Aikawa, Tetsuya; Koike, Kenichi

    2013-04-08

    The purpose of this study was to show the effects of the tracheal gas insufflation (TGI) technique on gas exchange using helium-oxygen mixtures during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). We hypothesized that a helium-oxygen mixture delivered into the trachea using the TGI technique (0.3 L/min) would enhance gas exchange during HFOV. Three rabbits were prepared and ventilated by HFOV with carrier 70% helium/oxygen or 70% nitrogen/oxygen gas mixture with TGI in a crossover study. Changing the gas mixture from nitrogen70% to helium70% and back was performed three times per animal with constant ventilation parameters. Compared with the nitrogen-oxygen mixture, the helium-oxygen mixture of TGI reduced PaCO2 by 7.6 mmHg (p helium-oxygen mixture than with the nitrogen-oxygen mixture (p helium-oxygen mixture delivered into the trachea using the TGI technique would enhance CO2 elimination and improve oxygenation during HFOV.

  11. A STUDY ON MARKET OPPORTUNITIES IN NATURAL GAS IN MULTI COMMODITY EXCHANGE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S Saranya; K Kumutha Devi

    2016-01-01

      Commodity markets are where raw or primary products are exchanged. These raw commodities are traded on regulated commodities exchanges, in which they are bought and sold in standardized contracts...

  12. The greenhouse gas exchange responses of methane and nitrous oxide to forest change in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, P.; Christiansen, J. R.; Alberti, G.; Brüggemann, N.; Castaldi, S.; Gasche, R.; Kitzler, B.; Klemedtsson, L.; Lobo-do-Vale, R.; Moldan, F.; Rütting, T.; Schleppi, P.; Weslien, P.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2012-05-01

    Climate change and air pollution, interact with altering forest management and land-use change to produce short and long-term changes to forest in Europe. The impact of these changes on the forest greenhouse gas (GHG) balance is currently difficult to predict. To improve the mechanistic understanding of the ongoing changes, we studied the response of GHG (N2O, CH4) exchange from forest soils at twelve experimental or natural gradient forest sites, representing anticipated future forest change. The experimental manipulations one or more per site included nitrogen (N) addition (4 sites), changes of climate (temperature, 1 site; precipitation, 2 sites), soil hydrology (3 sites), harvest intensity (1 site), wood ash fertilization (1 site), pH gradient in peat (1 site) and afforestation of cropland (1 site). In most of the investigated treatments N2O emissions increased by 7 ± 3 (range 0-30) μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 across all treatments on mineral soils, but by up to 10 times the mineral soil maximum on an acidic organic soil. Soil moisture together with mineral soil C/N ratio and pH were found to significantly influence N2O emissions across all treatments. Emissions increased with N availability and decreased with soil C/N ratio, especially in interaction with increased soil moisture. High pH reduced the formation of N2O, even under otherwise favourable soil conditions. Oxidation (uptake) of CH4 was reduced from 16 ± 2 to 4 ± 6 μg CH4-C m-2 h-1 by the investigated treatments. The CH4 exchange was significantly influenced by soil moisture and soil C/N ratio across all treatments, and CH4 emissions occurred only in wet or water-saturated conditions. For most of the investigated forest manipulations or natural gradients, the response of both N2O and CH4 fluxes was towards reducing the overall GHG forest sink. The most resilient forests were dry Mediterranean forests, as well as forests with high soil C/N ratio or high soil pH. Mitigation strategies may focus on (i

  13. Alveolar recruiting maneuver in dogs under general anesthesia: effects on alveolar ventilation, gas exchange, and respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staffieri, F; De Monte, V; De Marzo, C; Scrascia, F; Crovace, A

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a recruiting maneuver (RM) on lung aeration, gas exchange, and respiratory mechanics during general anesthesia in mechanically ventilated dogs. A thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan, an arterial blood sample, and measurement of respiratory mechanics were performed 10 min before (baseline) and both 5 and 30 min after a vital capacity RM in 10 dogs under general anesthesia. The RM was performed by inflating the lung at 40 cm H(2)O for 20 s. Lung aeration was estimated by analyzing the radiographic attenuation of the CT images. Lung aeration and gas exchange improved significantly 5 min after the RM compared to baseline and returned to values similar to baseline by 30 min. Static lung compliance was not significantly affected by the RM. An RM induces a temporary improvement in lung function in healthy dogs under general anesthesia.

  14. The Effect of Water Stress on the Gas Exchange Parameters, Productivity and Seed Health of Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Pszczółkowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present pot experiment studied the effect of different soil moisture contents (60 - 70% CWC (capillary water capacity - control; 30 - 35% CWC - water stress on buckwheat productivity, the gas exchange parameters and health of buckwheat nuts. It was found that water deficit affected adversely certain biometric features investigated (plant height, number of nuts per cluster and caused a decrease in seed weight per plant. It was also shown that water stress reduced the values of the investigated gas exchange parameters (photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate, intercellular-space CO2 concentration, and stomatal conductance relative to the control treatment. Different soil moisture contents did not have a clear effect on fungal colonization of seeds. The multiplex PCR assays did not enable the detection of the genes responsible for mycotoxin synthesis. Under water deficit conditions, an increase was found in the content of albumin and globulin fractions as well as of glutelin fractions.

  15. Complement proteins bind to nanoparticle protein corona and undergo dynamic exchange in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangfang; Wang, Guankui; Griffin, James I.; Brenneman, Barbara; Banda, Nirmal K.; Holers, V. Michael; Backos, Donald S.; Wu, Linping; Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Simberg, Dmitri

    2017-05-01

    When nanoparticles are intravenously injected into the body, complement proteins deposit on the surface of nanoparticles in a process called opsonization. These proteins prime the particle for removal by immune cells and may contribute toward infusion-related adverse effects such as allergic responses. The ways complement proteins assemble on nanoparticles have remained unclear. Here, we show that dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide core-shell nanoworms incubated in human serum and plasma are rapidly opsonized with the third complement component (C3) via the alternative pathway. Serum and plasma proteins bound to the nanoworms are mostly intercalated into the nanoworm shell. We show that C3 covalently binds to these absorbed proteins rather than the dextran shell and the protein-bound C3 undergoes dynamic exchange in vitro. Surface-bound proteins accelerate the assembly of the complement components of the alternative pathway on the nanoworm surface. When nanoworms pre-coated with human plasma were injected into mice, C3 and other adsorbed proteins undergo rapid loss. Our results provide important insight into dynamics of protein adsorption and complement opsonization of nanomedicines.

  16. ESTIMATION OF GAS EXCHANGE INDICATORS AT 3-D MODELING OF THE WORKING PROCESS OF THE TWO-STROKE PETROL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Korohodskyi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With the help of 3-D modeling of the workflow of a two-stroke engine with spark ignition, crank-chamber scavenging and a carburetor feeding system in the modes of external speed characteristic the indices of gas exchange were evaluated. The simulation results are consistent with the experimental data and 3D simulation results in the AVL FIRE and MTFS® software complexes. The model allows performing optimized calculations of multiphase flow in ICE during experimental design work.

  17. Extracorporeal Gas Exchange and Spontaneous Breathing for the Treatment of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: An Alternative to Mechanical Ventilation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    and the artificial lung (extracorporeal gas exchange) in this setting. Design: Laboratory investigation. Setting: Animal ICU of a governmental...Finally, in this sce- nario, a somewhat new player, namely spontaneous breathing, would enter in the arena of the ICUs . This study sheds light on some... rehabilitation during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplan- tation. Respir Care 2013; 58:1291–1298 12. Turner DA, Cheifetz IM

  18. Drought limitations to leaf-level gas exchange: results from a model linking stomatal optimization and cohesion-tension theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberly A. Novick; Chelcy F. Miniat; James M. Vose

    2016-01-01

    We merge concepts from stomatal optimization theory and cohesion–tension theory to examine the dynamics of three mechanisms that are potentially limiting to leaf-level gas exchange in trees during drought: (1) a ‘demand limitation’ driven by an assumption of optimal stomatal functioning; (2) ‘hydraulic limitation’ of water movement from the roots to the leaves...

  19. Biogenic emissions and CO 2 gas exchange investigated on four Mediterranean shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, U.; van Eijk, J.; Bertin, N.; Staudt, M.; Kotzias, D.; Seufert, G.; Fugit, J.-L.; Torres, L.; Cecinato, A.; Brancaleoni, E.; Ciccioli, P.; Bomboi, T.

    In order to investigate the impact of plant physiology on emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds monoterpene emission rates from Rosmarinus officinalis (L.) and Pistacia lentiscus (L.) and isoprene emission rates from Erica arborea (L.) and Myrtus communis (L.) were determined. The study, an activity in the framework of BEMA (Biogenic Emissions in the Mediterranean Area), was carried out in May 1994 at Castelporziano near Rome in Italy, using a dynamic enclosure technique combined with recording CO 2 gas exchange, temperature and irradiance data. The monoterpenes dominating the emission pattern were 1,8-cineol, α-pinene and β-pinene for rosemary and α-pinene, linalool and β-pinene + sabinene for pistachio. Total monoterpene emission rates standardized to 30°C of 1.84 ± 0.24 and 0.35 ± 0.04 μg Cg -1 dw h -1 were found for rosemary and pistachio, respectively (on a leaf dry weight basis). Myrtle emitted 22.2 ± 4.9 μg C g -1 dw h -1 at standard conditions (30°C, PAR 1000 μmol photons m -2 s -1 as isoprene and erica 5.61 μg C g -1 dw h -1 The carbon loss due to terpenoid emissions per photosynthetically carbon uptake was about 0.01-0.1% for the monoterpene emitters. The isoprene emitting shrubs lost 0-0.9% of the assimilated carbon. The rapid induction of emissions in the sun after temporary shading indicates that isoprene emissions were closely linked to photosynthesis. A higher proportion of the assimilated carbon was lost as isoprene under conditions of high light and temperature compared to the morning and evening hours.

  20. Sleep associated gas exchange abnormalities in children and adolescents with habitual snoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carno, Margaret-Ann; Modrak, Joseph; Short, Renee; Ellis, Ethan R; Connolly, Heidi V

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of polysomnographically diagnosed OSAS and to describe the severity of sleep associated gas exchange abnormalities (SAGEA) in habitually snoring children. We hypothesized that there would be a high prevalence of OSAS in obese children with habitual snoring and that the most overweight children would have the most significant SAGEA. Retrospective chart review. Nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) data from 114 children and adolescents referred for habitual snoring were examined. 74 of the subjects were male (65%), average age of 9.78 +/- 4.19 years, average AHI 13.51 +/- 20.25, mean BMI z-score 1.79 +/- 1.18. BMI z-scores correlated positively with severity of OSAS (P < 0.05) such that children with progressive degrees of obesity had more frequent respiratory events during sleep. Additionally, severity of sleeping hypercapnea as measured by percent of total sleep time with EtCO(2) values above 50 mm Hg was more severe with progressive degrees of obesity. Likewise, all measures of oxyhemoglobin desaturation were more severe with progressive degrees of obesity. Positive correlations between the severity of SAGEA and degree of obesity remained even after controlling for the severity of OSAS. OSAS is highly prevalent in children referred to a pediatric sleep center with complaints of habitual snoring across a wide spectrum of weight categories. SAGEA increases with progressive obesity even when controlling for the severity of OSAS suggesting that obesity is an independent risk factor for SAGEA. Furthermore, because obese children frequently have SAGEA, capnography should be obtained during NPSG when possible. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Significant contribution from foliage-derived ABA in regulating gas exchange in Pinus radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Patrick J; McAdam, Scott A M; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2017-02-01

    The complex regulatory system controlling stomata involves physical and chemical signals that affect guard cell turgor to bring about changes in stomatal conductance (gs). Abscisic acid (ABA) closes stomata, yet the mechanisms controlling foliar ABA status in tree species remain unclear. The importance of foliage-derived ABA in regulating gas exchange was evaluated under treatments that affected phloem export through girdling and reduced water availability in the tree species, Pinus radiata (D. Don). Branch- and whole-plant girdling increased foliar ABA levels leading to declines in gs, despite no change in plant water status. Changes in gs were largely independent of the more transient increases in foliar non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), suggesting that gradual accumulation of foliar ABA was the primary mechanism for reductions in gs and assimilation. Whole-plant girdling eventually reduced root NSC, hindering root water uptake and decreasing foliar water potential, causing a dramatic increase in ABA level in leaves and concentrations in the xylem sap of shoots (4032 ng ml-1), while root xylem sap concentrations remained low (43 ng ml-1). Contrastingly, the drought treatment caused similar increases in xylem sap ABA in both roots and shoots, suggesting that declines in water potential result in relatively consistent changes in ABA along the hydraulic pathway. ABA levels in plant canopies can be regulated independently of changes in root water status triggered by changes by both phloem export and foliar water status. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. An Excel tool for deriving key photosynthetic parameters from combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra; Beerling, David J; Griffiths, Howard

    2016-06-01

    Combined photosynthetic gas exchange and modulated fluorometres are widely used to evaluate physiological characteristics associated with phenotypic and genotypic variation, whether in response to genetic manipulation or resource limitation in natural vegetation or crops. After describing relatively simple experimental procedures, we present the theoretical background to the derivation of photosynthetic parameters, and provide a freely available Excel-based fitting tool (EFT) that will be of use to specialists and non-specialists alike. We use data acquired in concurrent variable fluorescence-gas exchange experiments, where A/Ci and light-response curves have been measured under ambient and low oxygen. From these data, the EFT derives light respiration, initial PSII (photosystem II) photochemical yield, initial quantum yield for CO2 fixation, fraction of incident light harvested by PSII, initial quantum yield for electron transport, electron transport rate, rate of photorespiration, stomatal limitation, Rubisco (ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) rate of carboxylation and oxygenation, Rubisco specificity factor, mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion, light and CO2 compensation point, Rubisco apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, and Rubisco CO2 -saturated carboxylation rate. As an example, a complete analysis of gas exchange data on tobacco plants is provided. We also discuss potential measurement problems and pitfalls, and suggest how such empirical data could subsequently be used to parameterize predictive photosynthetic models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effect of Adding a Regenerator to Kornhauser's MIT "Two-Space" (Gas-Spring+Heat Exchanger) Test Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebiana, Asuquo B.; Gidugu, Praveen

    2008-01-01

    This study employed entropy-based second law post-processing analysis to characterize the various thermodynamic losses inside a 3-space solution domain (gas spring+heat exchanger+regenerator) operating under conditions of oscillating pressure and oscillating flow. The 3- space solution domain is adapted from the 2-space solution domain (gas spring+heat exchanger) in Kornhauser's MIT test rig by modifying the heat exchanger space to include a porous regenerator system. A thermal nonequilibrium model which assumes that the regenerator porous matrix and gas average temperatures can differ by several degrees at a given axial location and time during the cycle is employed. An important and primary objective of this study is the development and application of a thermodynamic loss post-processor to characterize the major thermodynamic losses inside the 3-space model. It is anticipated that the experience gained from thermodynamic loss analysis of the simple 3-space model can be extrapolated to more complex systems like the Stirling engine. It is hoped that successful development of loss post-processors will facilitate the improvement of the optimization capability of Stirling engine analysis codes through better understanding of the heat transfer and power losses. It is also anticipated that the incorporation of a successful thermal nonequilibrium model of the regenerator in Stirling engine CFD analysis codes, will improve our ability to accurately model Stirling regenerators relative to current multidimensional thermal-equilibrium porous media models.

  4. Modelling non-steady-state isotope enrichment of leaf water in a gas-exchange cuvette environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin; Simonin, Kevin A; Loucos, Karen E; Barbour, Margaret M

    2015-12-01

    The combined use of a gas-exchange system and laser-based isotope measurement is a tool of growing interest in plant ecophysiological studies, owing to its relevance for assessing isotopic variability in leaf water and/or transpiration under non-steady-state (NSS) conditions. However, the current Farquhar & Cernusak (F&C) NSS leaf water model, originally developed for open-field scenarios, is unsuited for use in a gas-exchange cuvette environment where isotope composition of water vapour (δv ) is intrinsically linked to that of transpiration (δE ). Here, we modified the F&C model to make it directly compatible with the δv -δE dynamic characteristic of a typical cuvette setting. The resultant new model suggests a role of 'net-flux' (rather than 'gross-flux' as suggested by the original F&C model)-based leaf water turnover rate in controlling the time constant (τ) for the approach to steady sate. The validity of the new model was subsequently confirmed in a cuvette experiment involving cotton leaves, for which we demonstrated close agreement between τ values predicted from the model and those measured from NSS variations in isotope enrichment of transpiration. Hence, we recommend that our new model be incorporated into future isotope studies involving a cuvette condition where the transpiration flux directly influences δv . There is an increasing popularity among plant ecophysiologists to use a gas-exchange system coupled to laser-based isotope measurement for investigating non-steady state (NSS) isotopic variability in leaf water (and/or transpiration); however, the current Farquhar & Cernusak (F&C) NSS leaf water model is unsuited for use in a gas-exchange cuvette environment due to its implicit assumption of isotope composition of water vapor (δv ) being constant and independent of that of transpiration (δE ). In the present study, we modified the F&C model to make it compatible with the dynamic relationship between δv and δE as is typically associated

  5. Evaluation of Cathode Gas Composition and Temperature Influences on Alkaline Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (AAEMFC Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topal Leyla

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different temperatures (55, 65, 75 and 85 °C and cathode gas compositions (O2, synthetic air, air and 90% synthetic air+10% CO2 on alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AAEMFC were evaluated. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEA were fabricated using commercial anion exchange membrane (AEM in OH- form and Pt catalyst. Polarization curves and voltage responses during constant current were performed in order to describe the influences of temperature and gas composition on the AAEMFC performance. The experimental results showed that the fuel cell performance increases with elevating temperatures for all applied gas compositions. Highest power density of 34.7 mW cm-2 was achieved for pure O2 as cathode feed. A decrease to 20.3 mW cm-2 was observed when cathode gas composition was changed to synthetic air due to reduction of the O2 partial pressure. The presence of CO2 in atmospheric air applied to the cathode stream caused a further drop of the maximum power density to 15.2 mW cm-2 driven by neutralization of OH- ions with CO2.

  6. Bottom-up design of a gas futures market in East Asia: Lessons from the Dojima rice exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunpeng Shi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The natural gas market in East Asia remains fragmented without a functioning benchmark price to duly reflect the dynamics of demand and supply forces in the region. A functional regional gas futures market, which is highly dependent on the presence of well-developed physical spot trading, is yet to be established. Since the intra-regional pipeline connection is largely non-existent in East Asia, it is the LNG spot cargo trading that is likely to become the basis for the regional gas futures market. This paper offers a novel approach to understanding the development of such a market by analyzing the experience of a different commodity market – the Dojima Rice Exchange (DRE – and identifying potentially transferrable lessons in the market design and the role of government regulations. Based on the case study analysis, implications for the development of natural gas trading hubs in East Asia are offered and an LNG futures exchange design is put forward.

  7. Plant water use efficiency over geological time--evolution of leaf stomata configurations affecting plant gas exchange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmuel Assouline

    Full Text Available Plant gas exchange is a key process shaping global hydrological and carbon cycles and is often characterized by plant water use efficiency (WUE - the ratio of CO2 gain to water vapor loss. Plant fossil record suggests that plant adaptation to changing atmospheric CO2 involved correlated evolution of stomata density (d and size (s, and related maximal aperture, amax . We interpreted the fossil record of s and d correlated evolution during the Phanerozoic to quantify impacts on gas conductance affecting plant transpiration, E, and CO2 uptake, A, independently, and consequently, on plant WUE. A shift in stomata configuration from large s-low d to small s-high d in response to decreasing atmospheric CO2 resulted in large changes in plant gas exchange characteristics. The relationships between gas conductance, gws , A and E and maximal relative transpiring leaf area, (amax ⋅d, exhibited hysteretic-like behavior. The new WUE trend derived from independent estimates of A and E differs from established WUE-CO2 trends for atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceeding 1,200 ppm. In contrast with a nearly-linear decrease in WUE with decreasing CO2 obtained by standard methods, the newly estimated WUE trend exhibits remarkably stable values for an extended geologic period during which atmospheric CO2 dropped from 3,500 to 1,200 ppm. Pending additional tests, the findings may affect projected impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 on components of the global hydrological cycle.

  8. Transient Performance Behavior of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell by Configuration of Membrane and Gas Diffusion Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang Soon; Han, Sang Seok; Lee, Pil Hyong; Park, Bong Il

    A single-phase, fully three-dimensional transient numerical simulation was performed to analyze the dynamic response of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with single serpentine flow channels. . In addition, the effects of the membrane and gas diffusion layer thickness on current density transient behavior were investigated using numerical simulation. An overshoot of current density is observed for all thicknesses of the membrane and gas diffusion layer at an abrupt change of operating voltage from 0.7 V to 0.5 V. The peak of the overshoot and the elapsed thickness time to reach to the steady state value increase with decreasing membrane thickness. It is thought that the thin membrane facilitates the transport of water and ions through the membrane, resulting in an increase in current density and humidification of the membrane. The elapsed time to reach steady state voltage become shorter and the peak of the overshoot decreases as the thickness of the gas diffusion layer decreases. We suggest that this occurs because a thick gas diffusion layer increases the distance between the current collector (as heat exchanger) and catalyst layer (as heat source), resulting in a low transport rate of heat generated by the electrochemical reaction at the catalyst layer.

  9. The effect of a heat and moisture exchanger on gas flow in a Mapleson F breathing system during inhalational induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Fonseca, J M; Wheeler, D W; Pook, J A

    2000-06-01

    Heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs) humidify, warm and filter inspired gas, protecting patients and apparatus during anaesthesia. Their incorporation into paediatric anaesthetic breathing systems is recommended. We experienced delays in inhalational induction whilst using a Mapleson F breathing system with an HME. We have demonstrated that the HME significantly alters gas flow within the breathing system. Approximately half of the fresh gas flow is delivered to the patient, the remainder being wasted into the expiratory limb of the breathing system. We suggest that the HME should be removed from the Mapleson F breathing system until inhalational induction is complete, or that the reservoir bag is completely occluded until an effective seal is obtained with the mask.

  10. Isomeric Differentiation of Green Tea Catechins using Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Emily D.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange reactions in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer are used to differentiate galloylated catechin stereoisomers (catechin gallate and epicatechin gallate; gallocatechin gallate and epigallocatechin gallate) and the non-galloylated analogs (catechin and epicatechin, gallocatechin and epigallocatechin). Significant differences in the hydrogen/deuterium exchange behavior of the four pairs of deprotonated catechin stereoisomers are observed upon reaction with D2O. Interestingly, the non-galloylated catechins undergo H/D exchange to a much greater extent than the galloylated species, incorporating deuterium at both aromatic/allylic and active phenolic sites. Non-galloylated catechin isomers are virtually indistinguishable by their H/D exchange kinetics over a wide range of reaction times (0.05 to 10 s). Our experimental results are explained using high-level ab initio calculations to elucidate the subtle structural variations in the catechin stereoisomers that lead to their differing H/D exchange kinetics. PMID:17702600

  11. Differential leaf gas exchange responses to salinity and drought in the mangrove tree Avicecennia germinans (Avicenniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A Sobrado

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Leaf gas exchange was assessed in Avicennia germinans L. grown under different NaCl concentrations (0-40‰, after salt-relief, and then during drought. Stomatal conductance (g s and net photosynthetic rate (Pn decreased with increasing NaCl concentration, and intrinsic water use efficiency (Pn / g s increased. Under desalinization Pn / g s declined. Thus, g s did not change in plants grown at low NaCl concentration (10‰, but increased up to 30-32% at higher NaCl concentration (20 - 40‰. However, Pn was only slightly enhanced (10- 15%. Under drought, Pn decreased by as much as 46% in plants grown at low NaCl concentration (10‰ and by 22% at high NaCl concentration (40‰. Thus, Pn / g s decreased and water use efficiency was lower during drought compared to estimates prior to salt-relief. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(2: 371-375. Epub 2006 Jun 01.Se estudió el intercambio de gases en las hojas de Avicennia germinans L. en varias concentraciones de NaCl (0-40‰, después de la desalinización y durante la desecación. La conductancia de los estomas (g s y la tasa de fotosíntesis (Pn decrecieron con el incremento en la concentración de NaCl, y se incrementó la eficiencia en el uso intrínseco de agua (Pn / g s. Bajo desalinización Pn / g s declinó. Así, g s no cambia en el crecimiento de las plantas a bajas concentraciones de NaCl (10‰, pero se incrementó hasta 30-32% a las concentraciones de NaCl más altas (20 - 40‰. Sin embargo, Pn aumentó ligeramente (10-15%. En desecación Pn fue reducido hasta un 46% a bajas concentaciones (10‰ de NaCl, y a un 22% a altas concentraciones (40‰ de NaCl. Así, Pn / g s decrecieron y la eficiencia en el uso de agua fue menor durante desecación en comparación con los evalolres stimados previos a la desalinización.

  12. The effect of dopexamine on ventilation perfusion distribution and pulmonary gas exchange in anesthetized, paralyzed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachenberg, T; Karmann, S; Pfeiffer, B; Thomas, H; Gründling, M; Wendt, M

    1998-02-01

    We studied the effects of the beta2-adrenoceptor and DA1-receptor agonist dopexamine on ventilation perfusion (V(A)/Q) distribution in anesthetized, paralyzed patients (n = 17) undergoing major abdominal surgery. Intrapulmonary shunt (Q(S)/Q(T)) (percentage of cardiac output [CO]), perfusion of low V(A)/Q areas (percentage of CO), ventilation of high V(A)/Q areas (percentage of total ventilation [V(E)]), and dead space ventilation [percentage of V(E)]) were calculated from the retention/excretion data of six inert gases. In the control state, Q(S)/Q(T) was 11% +/- 9% (mean +/- SD) and little perfusion of low V(A)/Q areas (3% +/- 4%) was observed. Infusion of 1.0 microg kg(-1) x min(-1) dopexamine had no effect on Q(S)/Q(T) and low V(A)/Q areas despite an increased CO (7.7 +/- 2.2 L/min versus 6.2 +/- 1.2 L/min; P < 0.01). Pao2 increased from 15.5 +/- 5.6 kPa (116 +/- 42 mm Hg) to 17.3 +/- 6.3 kPa (130 +/- 47 mm Hg) (P < 0.05). Infusion of 2.0 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) dopexamine further increased CO to 8.4 +/- 2.7 L/min (P < 0.01) without alterations of Q(S)/Q(T), perfusion of low V(A)/Q areas, and Pao2. We concluded that dopexamine (1.0 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) and 2.0 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) has no adverse effects on V(A)/Q relationships and Q(S)/Q(T) in anesthetized, paralyzed patients. The I.V. administration of vasoactive drugs can improve oxygen delivery to different organ systems but may impair pulmonary gas exchange. In anesthetized, paralyzed patients, we studied the effects of beta2-adrenoceptor and DA1-receptor agonist dopexamine on ventilation perfusion distribution. Dopexamine (1.0 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) and 2.0 microg x kg(-1) min(-1)) improved cardiac output and oxygenation without alterations of intrapulmonary shunt.

  13. Air breathing and aquatic gas exchange during hypoxia in armoured catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Graham R; Matey, Victoria; Mendoza, Julie-Anne; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Perry, Steve F; Almeida-Val, Vera M F; Val, Adalberto L

    2017-01-01

    Air breathing in fish is commonly believed to have arisen as an adaptation to aquatic hypoxia. The effectiveness of air breathing for tissue O2 supply depends on the ability to avoid O2 loss as oxygenated blood from the air-breathing organ passes through the gills. Here, we evaluated whether the armoured catfish (Hypostomus aff. pyreneusi)-a facultative air breather-can avoid branchial O2 loss while air breathing in aquatic hypoxia, and we measured various other respiratory and metabolic traits important for O2 supply and utilization. Fish were instrumented with opercular catheters to measure the O2 tension (PO2) of expired water, and air breathing and aquatic respiration were measured during progressive stepwise hypoxia in the water. Armoured catfish exhibited relatively low rates of O2 consumption and gill ventilation, and gill ventilation increased in hypoxia due primarily to increases in ventilatory stroke volume. Armoured catfish began air breathing at a water PO2 of 2.5 kPa, and both air-breathing frequency and hypoxia tolerance (as reflected by PO2 at loss of equilibrium, LOE) was greater in individuals with a larger body mass. Branchial O2 loss, as reflected by higher PO2 in expired than in inspired water, was observed in a minority (4/11) of individuals as water PO2 approached that at LOE. Armoured catfish also exhibited a gill morphology characterized by short filaments bearing short fused lamellae, large interlamellar cell masses, low surface area, and a thick epithelium that increased water-to-blood diffusion distance. Armoured catfish had a relatively low blood-O2 binding affinity when sampled in normoxia (P50 of 3.1 kPa at pH 7.4), but were able to rapidly increase binding affinity during progressive hypoxia exposure (to a P50 of 1.8 kPa). Armoured catfish also had low activities of several metabolic enzymes in white muscle, liver, and brain. Therefore, low rates of metabolism and gill ventilation, and a reduction in branchial gas-exchange capacity

  14. Soil-atmosphere trace gas exchange from tropical oil palm plantations on peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arn Teh, Yit; Manning, Frances; Zin Zawawi, Norliyana; Hill, Timothy; Chocholek, Melanie; Khoon Kho, Lip

    2015-04-01

    Oil palm is the largest agricultural crop in the tropics, accounting for 13 % of all tropical land cover. Due to its large areal extent, oil palm cultivation may have important implications not only for terrestrial stores of C and N, but may also impact regional and global exchanges of material and energy, including fluxes of trace gases and water vapor. In particular, recent expansion of oil palm into tropical peatlands has raised concerns over enhanced soil C emissions from degradation of peat, and elevated N-gas fluxes linked to N fertilizer application. Here we report our preliminary findings on soil carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from a long-term, multi-scale project investigating the C, N and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics of oil palm ecosystems established on peat soils in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Flux chamber measurements indicate that soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes averaged 20.0 ± 16.0 Mg CO2-C ha-1 yr-1, 37.4 ± 29.9 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1 and 4.7 ± 4.2 g N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Soil CO2 fluxes were on par with other drained tropical peatlands; whereas CH4 fluxes exceeded observations from similar study sites elsewhere. Nitrous oxide fluxes were in a similar range to fluxes from other drained tropical peatlands, but lower than emissions from mineral-soil plantations by up to three orders of magnitude. Fluxes of soil CO2 and N2O were spatially stratified, and contingent upon the distribution of plants, deposited harvest residues, and soil moisture. Soil CO2 fluxes were most heavily influenced by the distribution of palms and their roots. On average, autotrophic (root) respiration accounted for approximately 78 % of total soil CO2 flux, and total soil respiration declined steeply away from palms; e.g. soil CO2 fluxes in the immediate 1 m radius around palms were up to 6 times greater than fluxes in inter-palm spaces due to higher densities of roots. Placement of harvest residues played an important - but secondary

  15. Effects of acute temperature changes on aerial and aquatic gas exchange, pulmonary ventilation and blood gas status in the South American lungfish, Lepidosiren paradoxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin-Naves, J; Giusti, H; Glass, M L

    2004-06-01

    Lungfish (Dipnoi) are probably sister group relative to all land vertebrates (Tetrapoda). The South American lungfish, Lepidosiren paradoxa, depends markedly on pulmonary gas exchange. In this context, we report on temperature effects on aquatic and pulmonary respiration, ventilation and blood gases at 15, 25 and 35 degrees C. Lung ventilation increased from 0.5 (15 degrees C) to 8.1 ml BTPS kg(-1) min(-1) (35 degrees C), while pulmonary O(2)-uptake increased from 0.06 (15 degrees C) to 0.73 ml STPD kg(-1) min(-1) (35 degrees C). Meanwhile aquatic O(2)-uptake remained about the same ( approximately 0.01 ml STPD kg(-1) min(-1)) at all temperatures. Concomitantly, the pulmonary gas exchange ratio (R(E)) rose from 0.11 (15 degrees C) to 0.62 (35 degrees C), because a larger fraction of total CO(2) output became eliminated by the lung. Accordingly, PaCO(2) rose from 13 (15 degrees C) to 37 mm Hg (35 degrees C), leading to a significant decrease of pHa at higher temperature (pHa=7.58-15 degrees C; 7.33-35 degrees C). The acid-base status of L. paradoxa was characterized by a generally low pH (7.4-7.5), high bicarbonate level (20-25 mM) and PaO(2) ( approximately 80 mm Hg). The increased dependence on the lung at higher temperature parallels data for amphibians. Further, the effects of bimodal gas exchange on temperature-dependent acid-base regulation closely resemble those of anuran amphibians.

  16. A simulation code treating all twelve isotopic species of hydrogen gas and water for multistage chemical exchange column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Okuno, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1994-12-01

    A simulation code of the multistage chemical exchange column has been developed. The column has an electrolysis cell, a section for the liquid phase catalytic exchange, and a recombiner. The sieve trays and the catalyst beds are separated in the section for the liquid-vapor scrubbing steps and for the vapor-hydrogen gas exchange steps. This type of column is a promising system for the tritiated water processing. The code can deal with all the twelve molecular species of the hydrogen gas and the water. The equilibrium of atomic elements of H, D and T is also considered in the liquid phase. The Murphree-type factors are introduced in the code to evaluate the efficiencies for the sieve trays and catalyst beds. The solution of basic equations can be found out by the Newton-Raphson method. The atom fractions of D and T on the scrubbing trays are the independent variables of the equations: The order of the Jacobian matrix is only twice the number of sieve trays. The solution of the basic equations could be obtained for several example cases; and no difficulty was observed for the convergence of the calculations. Broyden`s method was quite effective to reduce computation time of the code. (author).

  17. Membrane oxygenator heat exchanger failure detected by unique blood gas findings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hawkins, Justin L

    2014-01-01

    .... One of these components is the heat exchanger of the membrane oxygenator. In this compartment, unsterile water from the heater cooler device is separated from the sterile blood by stainless steel, aluminum, or by polyurethane...

  18. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on gas exchange after methacholine challenge and isoprenaline inhalation in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, O; Lee, L N; Wagner, P D

    1989-03-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has antioxidant and possibly mucolytic properties. To determine whether NAC could be of benefit in acute bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine, 12 of 24 anaesthetized dogs (group 1) received NAC i.v. (loading dose 150 mg.kg-1, then 20 mg.kg-1.hr-1). The other 12 (group 2) received diluent. Nebulized methacholine (1%) was then inhaled until arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) fell to a mean of 5.5 kPa, after which isoprenaline 0.5% was inhaled in six dogs of each group to reverse bronchoconstriction. Over the next 3 h we measured total lung resistance, functional residual capacity (FRC), haemodynamic variables, and pulmonary gas exchange for respiratory and inert gases. After methacholine challenge, lung resistance increased and then fell similarly for both groups, but PaO2 was higher in the NAC group (by 0.6-1.9 kPa) throughout the observation period. The ventilation-perfusion distribution measured by inert gas elimination also showed less abnormality in the NAC treated dogs over this time. Mucus was visible during post-mortem in the large airways in about half of the dogs in both groups, with no significant differences between them. These results show that NAC produces a measurable improvement in gas exchange following methacholine challenge (both with and without subsequent isoprenaline therapy) by mechanisms that remain to be determined.

  19. Ab initio Exchange-Correlation Free Energy of the Uniform Electron Gas at Warm Dense Matter Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Simon; Dornheim, Tobias; Sjostrom, Travis; Malone, Fionn D.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Bonitz, Michael

    2017-09-01

    In a recent Letter [T. Dornheim et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 156403 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.156403], we presented the first quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) results for the warm dense electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. However, a complete parametrization of the exchange-correlation free energy with respect to density, temperature, and spin polarization remained out of reach due to the absence of (i) accurate QMC results below θ =kBT /EF=0.5 and (ii) QMC results for spin polarizations different from the paramagnetic case. Here we overcome both remaining limitations. By closing the gap to the ground state and by performing extensive QMC simulations for different spin polarizations, we are able to obtain the first completely ab initio exchange-correlation free energy functional; the accuracy achieved is an unprecedented ˜0.3 %. This also allows us to quantify the accuracy and systematic errors of various previous approximate functionals.

  20. Noninvasive determination of anaerobic threshold by monitoring the %SpO2 changes and respiratory gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikooie, Roohollah; Gharakhanlo, Reza; Rajabi, Hamid; Bahraminegad, Morteza; Ghafari, Ali

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of noninvasive anaerobic threshold (AT) estimation using %SpO2 (arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation) changes and respiratory gas exchanges. Fifteen active, healthy males performed 2 graded exercise tests on a motor-driven treadmill in 2 separated sessions. Respiratory gas exchanges and heart rate (HR), lactate concentration, and %SpO2 were measured continuously throughout the test. Anaerobic threshold was determined based on blood lactate concentration (lactate-AT), %SpO2 changes (%SpO2-AT), respiratory exchange ratio (RER-AT), V-slope method (V-slope-AT), and ventilatory equivalent for O2 (EqO2-AT). Blood lactate measuring was considered as gold standard assessment of AT and was applied to confirm the validity of other noninvasive methods. The mean O2 corresponding to lactate-AT, %SpO2-AT, RER-AT, V-slope -AT, and EqO2-AT were 2176.6 +/- 206.4, 1909.5 +/- 221.4, 2141.2 +/- 245.6, 1933.7 +/- 216.4, and 1975 +/- 232.4, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis indicates a significant correlation between 4 noninvasive methods and the criterion method. Blond-Altman plots showed the good agreement between O2 corresponding to AT in each method and lactate-AT (95% confidence interval (CI). Our results indicate that a noninvasive and easy procedure of monitoring the %SpO2 is a valid method for estimation of AT. Also, in the present study, the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) method seemed to be the best respiratory index for noninvasive estimation of anaerobic threshold, and the heart rate corresponding to AT predicted by this method can be used by coaches and athletes to define training zones.

  1. Characterizing the drivers of seedling leaf gas exchange responses to warming and altered precipitation: indirect and direct effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas G; Pold, Grace; Goranson, Carol; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic forces are projected to lead to warmer temperatures and altered precipitation patterns globally. The impact of these climatic changes on the uptake of carbon by the land surface will, in part, determine the rate and magnitude of these changes. However, there is a great deal of uncertainty in how terrestrial ecosystems will respond to climate in the future. Here, we used a fully factorial warming (four levels) by precipitation (three levels) manipulation experiment in an old-field ecosystem in the northeastern USA to examine the impact of climatic changes on leaf carbon exchange in five species of deciduous tree seedlings. We found that photosynthesis generally increased in response to increasing precipitation and decreased in response to warming. Respiration was less sensitive to the treatments. The net result was greater leaf carbon uptake in wetter and cooler conditions across all species. Structural equation modelling revealed the primary pathway through which climate impacted leaf carbon exchange. Net photosynthesis increased with increasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic enzyme capacity (V cmax ), and decreased with increasing respiration of leaves. Soil moisture and leaf temperature at the time of measurement most heavily influenced these primary drivers of net photosynthesis. Leaf respiration increased with increasing soil moisture, leaf temperature, and photosynthetic supply of substrates. Counter to the soil moisture response, respiration decreased with increasing precipitation amount, indicating that the response to short- (i.e. soil moisture) versus long-term (i.e. precipitation amount) water stress differed, possibly as a result of changes in the relative amounts of growth and maintenance demand for respiration over time. These data (>500 paired measurements of light and dark leaf gas exchange), now publicly available, detail the pathways by which climate can impact leaf gas exchange and could be useful for testing assumptions in

  2. Influence of inhaled nitric oxide on gas exchange during normoxic and hypoxic exercise in highly trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel, A W; Edwards, M R; Hunte, G S; McKenzie, D C

    2001-03-01

    This study tested the effects of inhaled nitric oxide [NO; 20 parts per million (ppm)] during normoxic and hypoxic (fraction of inspired O(2) = 14%) exercise on gas exchange in athletes with exercise-induced hypoxemia. Trained male cyclists (n = 7) performed two cycle tests to exhaustion to determine maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)) and arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (Sa(O(2)), Ohmeda Biox ear oximeter) under normoxic (VO(2 max) = 4.88 +/- 0.43 l/min and Sa(O(2)) = 90.2 +/- 0.9, means +/- SD) and hypoxic (VO(2 max) = 4.24 +/- 0.49 l/min and Sa(O(2)) = 75.5 +/- 4.5) conditions. On a third occasion, subjects performed four 5-min cycle tests, each separated by 1 h at their respective VO(2 max), under randomly assigned conditions: normoxia (N), normoxia + NO (N/NO), hypoxia (H), and hypoxia + NO (H/NO). Gas exchange, heart rate, and metabolic parameters were determined during each condition. Arterial blood was drawn at rest and at each minute of the 5-min test. Arterial PO(2) (Pa(O(2))), arterial PCO(2), and Sa(O(2)) were determined, and the alveolar-arterial difference for PO(2) (A-aDO(2)) was calculated. Measurements of Pa(O(2)) and Sa(O(2)) were significantly lower and A-aDO(2) was widened during exercise compared with rest for all conditions (P 0.05). We conclude that inhalation of 20 ppm NO during normoxic and hypoxic exercise has no effect on gas exchange in highly trained cyclists.

  3. Nitrogen availability effects on gas exchange measurements in field-grown maize (Zea mays L.) under irrigated Mediterranean conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isla, R.; Guillén, M.; Salmerón, M.

    2016-07-01

    There are limited studies about the effect of nitrogen (N) deficiency on leaf growth, N status, and photosynthetic capacity of maize grown under field conditions in a Mediterranean climate. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of different levels of mineral N availability on leaf gas exchange parameters of sprinkler irrigated maize. The experiment was conducted in a conventional maize field located in the central part of the Ebro valley (Spain) during two seasons. Using a portable LICOR-6400 equipment, instantaneous measurements and light response curves to gas exchange were conducted in plots with different levels of N supply ranging from deficient (no fertilized) to over-fertilized (300 kg N/ha). In addition to gas exchange measurements, mineral soil N content, chlorophyll meter readings (CMR), leaf N content, and grain yield were measured in the different plots. Results showed that grain yield reached a plateau (14.5 Mg/ha) when the mineral N available was about 179 kg/ha. CMR were linearly and highly related to total N in ear leaves. The relationship between light-saturated leaf photosynthesis measurements and CMR was significant but very weak (R2=0.13) at V8 and V14 stages but increased later in the growing season (R2=0.52). Plants with intermediate levels of N supply (48

  4. Variation of gas exchange within native plant species of Switzerland and relationships with ozone injury: an open-top experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Ferdinand, J A; Vanderheyden, D J; Skelly, J M; Innes, J L

    2001-01-01

    Gas exchange and ozone-induced foliar injury were intensively measured during a 6-day period in mid-August 1998 on leaves of Acer pseudoplatanus, Betula pendula, Corylus avellana, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus excelsior, Morus nigra, Prunus avium, Prunus serotina, Rhamnus cathartica, and Viburnum lantana at a forest nursery site in Canton Ticino, Switzerland. Plants were grown in four open plots (AA), four open-top chambers receiving carbon-filtered (CF) air, and four receiving non-filtered (NF) air. Significant variation in gas exchange (F > 12.7, P photosynthesis and average stomatal conductance differing by a factor of two. Species also varied significantly in foliar injury for those leaves for which we measured gas exchange (F = 39.6, P Plants grown in CF chambers had significantly higher net photosynthesis (A) and stomatal conductance to water vapor (gwv), and lower foliar injury than plants grown in NF chambers and AA plots; interactions between species and ozone treatments were significant for all variables (F > or = 2.2, P 0.1). Although A and gwv decreased and foliar injury increased with leaf age, the magnitude of these changes was lower for plants grown in CF chambers than for plants grown in NF chambers and AA plots. Neither ozone uptake threshold (r = 0.26, P > 0.20) nor whole-plant injury (r = -0.15, P > 0.41) was significantly correlated with stomatal conductance across these species. It appears that the relationships between stomatal conductance and foliar injury are species-specific and interactions between physiology and environments and leaf biochemical processes must be considered in determining species sensitivity to ambient ozone exposures.

  5. Leaf gas exchange and nutrient use efficiency help explain the distribution of two Neotropical mangroves under contrasting flooding and salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona-Olarte, Pablo; Krauss, Ken W.; Twilley, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Rhizophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa co-occur along many intertidal floodplains in the Neotropics. Their patterns of dominance shift along various gradients, coincident with salinity, soil fertility, and tidal flooding. We used leaf gas exchange metrics to investigate the strategies of these two species in mixed culture to simulate competition under different salinity concentrations and hydroperiods. Semidiurnal tidal and permanent flooding hydroperiods at two constant salinity regimes (10 g L−1 and 40 g L−1) were simulated over 10 months. Assimilation (A), stomatal conductance (gw), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), instantaneous photosynthetic water use efficiency (PWUE), and photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE) were determined at the leaf level for both species over two time periods. Rhizophora mangle had significantly higher PWUE than did L. racemosa seedlings at low salinities; however, L. racemosa had higher PNUE and stomatal conductance and gw, accordingly, had greater intercellular CO2 (calculated) during measurements. Both species maintained similar capacities for assimilation at 10 and 40 g L−1 salinity and during both permanent and tidal hydroperiod treatments. Hydroperiod alone had no detectable effect on leaf gas exchange. However, PWUE increased and PNUE decreased for both species at 40 g L−1 salinity compared to 10 g L−1. At 40 g L−1 salinity, PNUE was higher for L. racemosa than R. mangle with tidal flooding. These treatments indicated that salinity influences gas exchange efficiency, might affect how gases are apportioned intercellularly, and accentuates different strategies for distributing leaf nitrogen to photosynthesis for these two species while growing competitively.

  6. Leaf Gas Exchange and Nutrient Use Efficiency Help Explain the Distribution of Two Neotropical Mangroves under Contrasting Flooding and Salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Cardona-Olarte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhizophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa cooccur along many intertidal floodplains in the Neotropics. Their patterns of dominance shift along various gradients, coincident with salinity, soil fertility, and tidal flooding. We used leaf gas exchange metrics to investigate the strategies of these two species in mixed culture to simulate competition under different salinity concentrations and hydroperiods. Semidiurnal tidal and permanent flooding hydroperiods at two constant salinity regimes (10 g L−1 and 40 g L−1 were simulated over 10 months. Assimilation (A, stomatal conductance (gw, intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci, instantaneous photosynthetic water use efficiency (PWUE, and photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE were determined at the leaf level for both species over two time periods. Rhizophora mangle had significantly higher PWUE than did L. racemosa seedlings at low salinities; however, L. racemosa had higher PNUE and gw and, accordingly, had greater intercellular CO2 (calculated during measurements. Both species maintained similar capacities for A at 10 and 40 g L−1 salinity and during both permanent and tidal hydroperiod treatments. Hydroperiod alone had no detectable effect on leaf gas exchange. However, PWUE increased and PNUE decreased for both species at 40 g L−1 salinity compared to 10 g L−1. At 40 g L−1 salinity, PNUE was higher for L. racemosa than R. mangle with tidal flooding. These treatments indicated that salinity influences gas exchange efficiency, might affect how gases are apportioned intercellularly, and accentuates different strategies for distributing leaf nitrogen to photosynthesis for these two species while growing competitively.

  7. Nitrogen availability effects on gas exchange measurements in field-grown maize (Zea mays L. under irrigated Mediterranean conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Isla

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There are limited studies about the effect of nitrogen (N deficiency on leaf growth, N status, and photosynthetic capacity of maize grown under field conditions in a Mediterranean climate. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of different levels of mineral N availability on leaf gas exchange parameters of sprinkler irrigated maize. The experiment was conducted in a conventional maize field located in the central part of the Ebro valley (Spain during two seasons. Using a portable LICOR-6400 equipment, instantaneous measurements and light response curves to gas exchange were conducted in plots with different levels of N supply ranging from deficient (no fertilized to over-fertilized (300 kg N/ha. In addition to gas exchange measurements, mineral soil N content, chlorophyll meter readings (CMR, leaf N content, and grain yield were measured in the different plots. Results showed that grain yield reached a plateau (14.5 Mg/ha when the mineral N available was about 179 kg/ha. CMR were linearly and highly related to total N in ear leaves. The relationship between light-saturated leaf photosynthesis measurements and CMR was significant but very weak (R2=0.13 at V8 and V14 stages but increased later in the growing season (R2=0.52. Plants with intermediate levels of N supply (48

  8. Interaction of saddle girth construction and tension on respiratory mechanics and gas exchange during supramaximal treadmill exercise in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J; Slocombe, R F; Sides, R H; Bayly, W M; Kingston, J K

    2005-01-01

    To determine the effect of girth construction and tension on respiratory mechanics and gas exchange during supramaximal treadmill exercise in horses. Six healthy detrained Thoroughbred horses were exercised on a treadmill inclined at 10% at 110% VO2max. Horses were instrumented for respiratory mechanics and gas exchange studies, and data were recorded during incremental exercise tests. The animals were exercised for 2 min at 40% VO2max, and samples and measurements were collected at 1 min 45 sec. After 2 min, speed was increased to that estimated at 110% VO2max and data was collected at 45 sec, 90 sec and every 30 sec thereafter at this speed until the horses fatigued. Horses were run on three occasions with the same racing saddle and saddle packing but using two different girths, either an elastic girth (EG) or a standard canvas girth (SCG) which is nonelastic. A run with 5 kg tension applied to a standard canvas girth was the control for each horse, with additional runs at 15 kg using either the standard canvas girth or using the elastic girth. The runs were randomised and tensions applied were measured at end exhalation whilst at rest. Increasing girth tension was not associated with changes in respiratory mechanical or gas exchange properties. Although girths tightened to 15 kg tension had short run to fatigue times this was not found to be significantly different to girths set at 5 kg resting tension. Girth tensions declined at end exhalation in horses nearing fatigue. Loss in performance associated with high girth tensions is not due to alteration of respiratory mechanics. Loss in performance may be related to inspiratory muscles working at suboptimal lengths due to thoracic compression or compression of musculature around the chest. However, these changes are not reflected in altered respiratory mechanical or gas exchange properties measured during tidal breathing during supramaximal exercise. Other factors may hasten the onset of fatigue when horses

  9. A whole-plant chamber system for parallel gas exchange measurements of Arabidopsis and other herbaceous species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölling, Katharina; George, Gavin M; Künzli, Roland; Flütsch, Patrick; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic assimilation of carbon is a defining feature of the plant kingdom. The fixation of large amounts of carbon dioxide supports the synthesis of carbohydrates, which make up the bulk of plant biomass. Exact measurements of carbon assimilation rates are therefore crucial due to their impact on the plants metabolism, growth and reproductive success. Commercially available single-leaf cuvettes allow the detailed analysis of many photosynthetic parameters, including gas exchange, of a selected leaf area. However, these cuvettes can be difficult to use with small herbaceous plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana or plants having delicate or textured leaves. Furthermore, data from single leaves can be difficult to scale-up for a plant shoot with a complex architecture and tissues in different physiological states. Therefore, we constructed a versatile system-EGES-1-to simultaneously measure gas exchange in the whole shoots of multiple individual plants. Our system was designed to be able record data continuously over several days. The EGES-1 system yielded comparable measurements for eight plants for up to 6 days in stable, physiologically realistic conditions. The chambers seals have negligible permeability to carbon dioxide and the system is designed so as to detect any bulk-flow air leaks. We show that the system can be used to monitor plant responses to changing environmental conditions, such as changes in illumination or stress treatments, and to compare plants with phenotypically severe mutations. By incorporating interchangeable lids, the system could be used to measure photosynthetic gas exchange in several genera such as Arabidopsis, Nicotiana, Pisum, Lotus and Mesembryanthemum. EGES-1 can be introduced into a variety of growth facilities and measure gas exchange in the shoots diverse plant species grown in different growth media. It is ideal for comparing photosynthetic carbon assimilation of wild-type and mutant plants and/or plants undergoing

  10. Post-operative substrate utilisation and gas exchange using two different TPN-systems: glucose versus fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Eklund, A; Stjernström, H

    1985-01-01

    ). Amino acids corresponding to 12 g of nitrogen were given in both groups. Gas exchange, nitrogen balance, phosphate balance, vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) excretion, 1- and 3-methylhistidine in urine, acute phase proteins, immunoglobulins and albumin were followed. Substrate utilisation was calculated from...... indirect calorimetry data and nitrogen excretion. Metabolism in the early post-operative phase was found to adapt to the nutrition regimen given even though the composition was extreme either in fat or carbohydrate content. The glucose-insulin regimen had a better nitrogen sparing effect and based...

  11. Multiscale study of bacterial growth: Experiments and model to understand the impact of gas exchange on global growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalanne-Aulet, David; Piacentini, Adalberto; Guillot, Pierre; Marchal, Philippe; Moreau, Gilles; Colin, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Using a millifluidics and macroscale setup, we study quantitatively the impact of gas exchange on bacterial growth. In millifluidic environments, the permeability of the incubator materials allows an unlimited oxygen supply by diffusion. Moreover, the efficiency of diffusion at small scales makes the supply instantaneous in comparison with the cell division time. In hermetic closed vials, the amount of available oxygen is low. The growth curve has the same trend but is quantitatively different from the millifluidic situation. The analysis of all the data allows us to write a quantitative modeling enabling us to capture the entire growth process.

  12. Diurnal and seasonal variation in air exchange rates and interzonal flows measured by active tracer gas in five Danish homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Geo; Bekö, Gabriel; Toftum, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    We measured the air exchange rates (AER) in up to six rooms in five naturally ventilated dwellings across four seasons using active tracer gas. Night time AER was also estimated in all bedrooms based on occupant-generated CO2. Additionally, we studied the pollutant distribution across the dwellings...... and airflows between rooms. AERs changed rapidly during the day and differed between rooms. Occupant behavior (window opening) strongly influenced the AERs. AERs were highest in the summer, lowest in the winter. Interzonal airflow measurements indicated that the air within a given floor is well mixed, while...

  13. In vivo metabolic investigation of moxifloxacin using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in combination with online hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, B; Ramesh, M; Borkar, Roshan M; Srinivas, R; Padiya, Raju; Banerjee, Sanjay K

    2012-08-30

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of death from an infectious disease and moxifloxacin is an effective drug as compared to other fluoroquinolones. To date only two metabolites of the drug are known. Therefore, the present study on characterization of hitherto unknown in vivo metabolites of moxifloxacin using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) is undertaken. In vivo metabolites of moxifloxacin have been identified and characterized by using LC/ESI-MS/MS in combination with an online hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange technique. To identify in vivo metabolites, blood, urine and faeces samples were collected after oral administration of moxifloxacin to Sprague-Dawley rats. The samples were prepared using an optimized sample preparation approach involving protein precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction followed by solid-phase extraction and LC/MS/MS analysis. A total of nine phase I and ten phase II metabolites of moxifloxacin have been identified in urine samples including N-sulphated, glucuronide and hydroxylated metabolites which are also observed in plasma samples. In faeces samples, only the N-sulphated metabolite is observed. The structures of metabolites have been elucidated based on fragmentation patterns, accurate mass measurements and online H/D exchange LC/MS/MS experiments. Online H/D exchange experiments are used to support the identification and structural characterization of drug metabolites. A total of 19 in vivo metabolites of moxifloxacin have been characterized using LC/ESI-MS/MS in combination with accurate mass measurements and online H/D exchange experiments. The main phase I metabolites of moxifloxacin are hydroxylated, decarbonylated, desmethylated and desmethylhydroxylated metabolites which undergo subsequent phase II glucuronidation pathways. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Mixtures Using Ion-Exchanged Silicoaluminophosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J (Inventor); Rivera-Ramos, Milton E (Inventor); Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Na+-SAPO-34 sorbents were ion-exchanged with several individual metal cations for CO2 absorption at different temperatures (273-348 K) and pressures (<1 atm). In general, the overall adsorption performance of the exchanged materials increased as follows: Ce3+exchanged materials excelled at low-pressure ranges, exhibiting very sharp isotherms slopes at all temperatures. The Sr2+ species were responsible for the surface strong interaction and the cations were occupying exposed sites (SII') in the materials Chabazite cages. All the sorbent materials exhibited higher affinity for CO2 over the other gases tested (i.e., CH4, H2, N2 and O2) due to strong ion-quadrupole interactions. Sr2+-SAPO-34 sorbents are by far the best option for CO2 removal from CH4 mixtures, especially at low concentrations.

  15. LBA-ECO CD-02 Leaf Level Gas Exchange, Chemistry, and Isotopes, Amazonia, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports leaf gas flux and leaf properties from samples collected from trees, liana, pasture saplings, and pasture grass located at eight...

  16. LBA-ECO CD-02 Leaf Level Gas Exchange, Chemistry, and Isotopes, Amazonia, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports leaf gas flux and leaf properties from samples collected from trees, liana, pasture saplings, and pasture grass located at eight different...

  17. Gas exchange rates, plant height, yield components, and productivity of upland rice as affected by plant regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Félix Alvarez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate gas exchange rates, plant height, yield components, and productivity of upland rice, as affected by type and application time of plant growth regulators. A randomized block design, in a 4x2 factorial arrangement, with four replicates was used. Treatments consisted of three growth regulators (mepiquat chloride, trinexapac-ethyl, and paclobutrazol, besides a control treatment applied at two different phenological stages: early tillering or panicle primordial differentiation. The experiment was performed under sprinkler-irrigated field conditions. Net CO2 assimilation, stomatal conductance, plant transpiration, and water-use efficiency were measured four times in Primavera upland rice cultivar, between booting and milky grain phenophases. Gas exchange rates were neither influenced by growth regulators nor by application time. There was, however, interaction between these factors on the other variables. Application of trinexapac-ethyl at both tillering and differentiation stages reduced plant height and negatively affected yield components and rice productivity. However, paclobutrazol and mepiquat chloride applied at tillering, reduced plant height without affecting rice yield. Mepiquat chloride acted as a growth stimulator when applied at the differentiation stage, and significantly increased plant height, panicle number, and grain yield of upland rice.

  18. Leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence in wheat plants supplied with silicon and infected with Pyricularia oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Carlos Eduardo Aucique; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila; Moreira, Wiler Ribas; DaMatta, Fábio Murilo

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of silicon (Si) on the photosynthetic gas exchange parameters (net CO2 assimilation rate [A], stomatal conductance to water vapor [gs], internal CO2 concentration [Ci], and transpiration rate [E]) and chlorophyll fluorescence a parameters (maximum quantum quenching [Fv/Fm and Fv'/Fm'], photochemical [qP] and nonphotochemical [NPQ] quenching coefficients, and electron transport rate [ETR]) in wheat plants grown in a nutrient solution containing 0 mM (-Si) or 2 mM (+Si) Si and noninoculated or inoculated with Pyricularia oryzae. Blast severity decreased due to higher foliar Si concentration. For the inoculated +Si plants, A, gs, and E were significantly higher in contrast to the inoculated -Si plants. For the inoculated +Si plants, significant differences of Fv/Fm between the -Si and +Si plants occurred at 48, 96, and 120 h after inoculation (hai) and at 72, 96, and 120 hai for Fv'/Fm'. The Fv/Fm and Fv'/Fm', in addition to total chlorophyll concentration (a + b) and the chlorophyll a/b ratio, significantly decreased in the -Si plants compared with the +Si plants. Significant differences between the -Si and +Si inoculated plants occurred for qP, NPQ, and ETR. The supply of Si contributed to decrease blast severity in addition to improving gas exchange performance and causing less dysfunction at the photochemical level.

  19. Effect of Magnesium on Gas Exchange and Photosynthetic Efficiency of Coffee Plants Grown under Different Light Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaio Gonçalves de Lima Dias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of magnesium on the gas exchange and photosynthetic efficiency of Coffee seedlings grown in nutrient solution under different light levels. The experiment was conducted under controlled conditions in growth chambers and nutrient solution at the Department of Plant Pathology of the Federal University of Lavras. The treatments consisted of five different Mg concentrations (0, 48, 96, 192 and 384 mg·L−1 and four light levels (80, 160, 240 and 320 µmol photon m−2·s−1. Both the Mg concentration and light levels affected gas exchange in the coffee plants. Photosynthesis increased linearly with the increasing light, indicating that the light levels tested were low for this crop. The highest CO2 assimilation rate, lowest transpiration, and highest water use efficiency were observed with 250 mg·Mg·L−1, indicating that this concentration was the optimal Mg supply for the tested light levels.

  20. Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of carbon dioxide, ozone, and nitrogen oxides at a hardwood forest site in northern Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Seok

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of CO2, O3, and NOx (NO + NO2 were investigated at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS, a mid-latitude, low elevation hardwood forest site, during the 2007–2008 winter season. An automated trace gas sampling system was used to determine trace gas concentrations in the snowpack at multiple depths continuously throughout the snow-covered period from two adjacent plots. One natural plot and one with the soil covered by a Tedlar sheet were setup for investigating whether the primary source of measured trace gases was biogenic (i.e., from the soil or non-biogenic (i.e., from the snowpack. The results were compared with the “White on Green” study conducted at the Niwot Ridge (NWT Long Term Ecological Research site in Colorado. The average winter CO2 flux ± s.e. from the soil at UMBS was 0.54 ± 0.037 µmol m-2 s-1 using the gradient diffusion method and 0.71 ± 0.012 µmol m-2 s-1 using the eddy covariance method, and in a similar range as found for NWT. Observed snowpack-O3 exchange was also similar to NWT. However, nitrogen oxides (NOx fluxes from snow at UMBS were 10 times smaller than those at NWT, and fluxes were bi-directional with the direction of the flux dependent on NOx concentrations in ambient air. The compensation point for the change in the direction of NOx flux was estimated to be 0.92 nmol mol-1. NOx in snow also showed diurnal dependency on incident radiation. These NOx dynamics in the snow at UMBS were notably different compared to NWT, and primarily determined by snow-atmosphere interactions rather than by soil NOx emissions.

  1. On the Limiting Markov Process of Energy Exchanges in a Rarely Interacting Ball-Piston Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bálint, Péter; Gilbert, Thomas; Nándori, Péter; Szász, Domokos; Tóth, Imre Péter

    2017-02-01

    We analyse the process of energy exchanges generated by the elastic collisions between a point-particle, confined to a two-dimensional cell with convex boundaries, and a `piston', i.e. a line-segment, which moves back and forth along a one-dimensional interval partially intersecting the cell. This model can be considered as the elementary building block of a spatially extended high-dimensional billiard modeling heat transport in a class of hybrid materials exhibiting the kinetics of gases and spatial structure of solids. Using heuristic arguments and numerical analysis, we argue that, in a regime of rare interactions, the billiard process converges to a Markov jump process for the energy exchanges and obtain the expression of its generator.

  2. A symbiotic gas exchange between bioreactors enhances microalgal biomass and lipid productivities: taking advantage of complementary nutritional modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, C A; Ferreira, M E; da Silva, T Lopes; Gouveia, L; Novais, J M; Reis, A

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the association of two bioreactors: one photoautotrophic and the other heterotrophic, connected by the gas phase and allowing an exchange of O(2) and CO(2) gases between them, benefiting from a symbiotic effect. The association of two bioreactors was proposed with the aim of improving the microalgae oil productivity for biodiesel production. The outlet gas flow from the autotrophic (O(2) enriched) bioreactor was used as the inlet gas flow for the heterotrophic bioreactor. In parallel, the outlet gas flow from another heterotrophic (CO(2) enriched) bioreactor was used as the inlet gas flow for the autotrophic bioreactor. Aside from using the air supplied from the auto- and hetero-trophic bioreactors as controls, one mixotrophic bioreactor was also studied and used as a model, for its claimed advantage of CO(2) and organic carbon being simultaneously assimilated. The microalga Chlorella protothecoides was chosen as a model due to its ability to grow under different nutritional modes (auto, hetero, and mixotrophic), and its ability to attain a high biomass productivity and lipid content, suitable for biodiesel production. The comparison between heterotrophic, autotrophic, and mixotrophic Chlorella protothecoides growth for lipid production revealed that heterotrophic growth achieved the highest biomass productivity and lipid content (>22%), and furthermore showed that these lipids had the most suitable fatty acid profile in order to produce high quality biodiesel. Both associations showed a higher biomass productivity (10-20%), when comparing the two separately operated bioreactors (controls) which occurred on the fourth day. A more remarkable result would have been seen if in actuality the two bioreactors had been inter-connected in a closed loop. The biomass productivity gain would have been 30% and the lipid productivity gain would have been 100%, as seen by comparing the productivities of the symbiotic assemblage with the sum of the two

  3. Membrane oxygenator heat exchanger failure detected by unique blood gas findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Justin L

    2014-03-01

    Failure of components integrated into the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit, although rare, can bring about catastrophic results. One of these components is the heat exchanger of the membrane oxygenator. In this compartment, unsterile water from the heater cooler device is separated from the sterile blood by stainless steel, aluminum, or by polyurethane. These areas are glued or welded to keep the two compartments separate, maintaining sterility of the blood. Although quality control testing is performed by the manufacturer at the factory level, transport presents the real possibility for damage. Because of this, each manufacturer has included in the instructions for use a testing procedure for testing the integrity of the heat exchanger component. Water is circulated through the heat exchanger before priming and a visible check is made of the oxygenator bundle to check for leaks. If none are apparent, then priming of the oxygenator is performed. In this particular case, this procedure was not useful in detecting communication between the water and blood chambers of the oxygenator.

  4. Local area water removal analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell under gas purge conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold.

  5. Photosynthetic pigments and gas exchange in castor bean under conditions of above the optimal temperature and high CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola França Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The castor bean plant, a Euphorbiaceae oil seed C3-metabolism rustic and drought-resistant plant, is cultivated in a wide range of environments due to its good adaptive capacity. However, given the current environmental changes, many biochemical and physiological impacts may affect the productivity of important crops, such as castor bean. This work aimed to evaluate the impacts of the castor bean gas exchange in response to high temperature and increased CO2concentration.Our experiment was conducted in a phytotron located at Embrapa Algodão in 2010. We adopted a completely randomized design, with four treatments in a factorial combination of two temperatures (30/20 and 37/30°C and two CO2 levels (400 and 800 mmol L-1; four replications were performed, obtained in five surveys over the growth cycle, for a total of 80 sample units. An infrared gas analyzer (IRGA - Infra Red Gas Analyzer was used for the quantification of the photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration. An increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature negatively affected the physiology of the castor bean plants, decreasing the net rate of photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance.

  6. Maximum Potential Hydrogen Gas Retention in the sRF Resin Ion Exchange Column for the LAWPS Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Bottenus, Courtney LH; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2018-01-22

    The Low-Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) is being developed to provide treated supernatant liquid from the Hanford tank farms directly to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The design and development of the LAWPS is being conducted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC. A key process in LAWPS is the removal of radioactive Cs in ion exchange (IX) columns filled with spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. One accident scenario being evaluated is the loss of liquid flow through the sRF resin bed after it has been loaded with radioactive Cs and hydrogen gas is being generated by radiolysis. In normal operations, the generated hydrogen is expected to remain dissolved in the liquid and be continuously removed by liquid flow. For an accident scenario with a loss of flow, hydrogen gas can be retained within the IX column both in the sRF resin and below the bottom screen that supports the resin within the column. The purpose of this report is to summarize calculations that estimate the upper-bound volume of hydrogen gas that can be retained in the column and potentially be released to the headspace of the IX column or to process equipment connected to the IX column and, thus, pose a flammability hazard.

  7. Annual and transient signatures of gas exchange and transport in the Castañar de Ibor cave (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez-Cortes A.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The large microclimatic stability is a basic characteristic of the subterranean karst systems and causes a high sensitivity to changesin environmental conditions. High-accuracy monitoring of Castañar de Ibor cave (Spain determined the temporal evolution of theaerodynamic processes and ventilation rate by tracking CO2 and 222Rn levels over a twelve-month period. This cave is characterizedby a very stable microclimate, with high and relatively constant radon content (the mean value is 32200 Bq/m3, roughly, and thestandard deviation is 7600 Bq/m3 and a moderate and quite stable CO2 concentration (the mean value is 3730 ppm and the standarddeviation is 250 ppm. Beside the general patterns of cave microclimate throughout an annual cycle, some particular microclimaticprocesses are described with regard to the gas exchange between the cave and the outside atmosphere. There is a complexmicroclimatic functional relationship between the meteorological and cave microclimate conditions and the diffusion and flow of tracergases from the fractures and the pore system of soil and host rock to cave atmosphere. Transient variations of tracer gas on cave airare controlled by natural barometric fluxes and anthropogenic forced ventilation due to uncontrolled opening of cave entrance. Theshort-term fluctuations of gas levels on cave air reveal distinct patterns during the exhalation process of theses gases from the netof fissures and pores to the cave atmosphere, depending on the isolation effect of soil and host rock.

  8. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Metabolomics Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hossein; Karanji, Ahmad K.; Majuta, Sandra; Maurer, Megan M.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2017-09-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) in combination with gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) is evaluated as an analytical method for small-molecule standard and mixture characterization. Experiments show that compound ions exhibit unique HDX reactivities that can be used to distinguish different species. Additionally, it is shown that gas-phase HDX kinetics can be exploited to provide even further distinguishing capabilities by using different partial pressures of reagent gas. The relative HDX reactivity of a wide variety of molecules is discussed in light of the various molecular structures. Additionally, hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS) and HDX kinetics modeling of candidate (in silico) ion structures is utilized to estimate the relative ion conformer populations giving rise to specific HDX behavior. These data interpretation methods are discussed with a focus on developing predictive tools for HDX behavior. Finally, an example is provided in which ion mobility information is supplemented with HDX reactivity data to aid identification efforts of compounds in a metabolite extract. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. High Resolution CH4 Emissions and Dissolved CH4 Measurements Elucidate Surface Gas Exchange Processes in Toolik Lake, Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sontro, T.; Sollberger, S.; Kling, G. W.; Shaver, G. R.; Eugster, W.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 14% of the Alaskan North Slope is covered in lakes of various sizes and depths. Diffusive carbon emissions (CH4 and CO2) from these lakes offset the tundra sink by ~20 %, but the offset would substantially increase if ebullitive CH4 emissions were also considered. Ultimately, arctic lake CH4 emissions are not insignificant in the global CH4 budget and their contribution is bound to increase due to impacts from climate change. Here we present high resolution CH4 emission data as measured via eddy covariance and a Los Gatos gas analyzer during the ice free period from Toolik Lake, a deep (20 m) Arctic lake located on the Alaskan North Slope, over the last few summers. Emissions are relatively low (Gatos gas analyzer. Thus, having both the flux and the CH4 gradient across the air-water interface measured directly, we can calculate k and investigate the processes influencing CH4 gas exchange in this lake. Preliminary results indicate that there are two regimes in wind speed that impact k - one at low wind speeds up to ~5 m s-1 and another at higher wind speeds (max ~10 m s-1). The differential wind speeds during night and day may compound the effect of convective mixing and cause the diurnal variation in observed fluxes.

  10. Comparison of extracapillary and endocapillary blood flow oxygenators for open heart surgery in dogs: efficiency of gas exchange and platelet conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Katsuichiro; Tanaka, Ryou; Shibazaki, Akira; Nagashima, Yukiko; Hirao, Hidehiro; Namiki, Ryosuke; Takashima, Kazuaki; Noishiki, Yasuharu; Yamane, Yoshihisa

    2003-03-01

    The goal of the current study was to compare the efficiency of gas exchange and platelet conservation of a new extracapillary blood flow oxygenator versus an endocapillary blood flow oxygenator during open heart surgery with extracorporeal circulation in dogs. Dilation and remodeling of the right ventricular outflow tract of dogs was performed using a patch graft technique to simulate pulmonary stenosis. Sequential pre- and post-operative blood analysis revealed that gas exchange efficiency and platelet conservation was significantly greater with the extracapillary blood flow oxygenator than with the endocapillary blood flow oxygenator. However, the priming volume of the extracapillary blood flow oxygenator was significantly greater, leading to hemodilution. We conclude that while the extracapillary blood flow oxygenator provided benefits in terms of gas exchange and platelet conservation, development of a smaller extracapillary blood flow type oxygenator to reduce hemodilution effects would be beneficial.

  11. Different Techniques of Respiratory Support Do Not Significantly Affect Gas Exchange during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Newborn Piglet Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendler, Marc R; Maurer, Miriam; Hassan, Mohammad A; Huang, Li; Waitz, Markus; Mayer, Benjamin; Hummler, Helmut D

    2015-01-01

    There are no evidence-based recommendations on the use of different techniques of respiratory support and chest compressions (CC) during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We studied the short-term effects of different ventilatory support strategies along with CC representing clinical practice on gas exchange [arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2)], hemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation. We hypothesized that in newborn piglets with cardiac arrest, use of a T-piece resuscitator (TPR) providing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves gas exchange as measured by SaO2 during CPR as compared to using a self-inflating bag (SIB) without PEEP. Furthermore, we explored the effects of a mechanical ventilator without synchrony to CC. Thirty newborn piglets with asystole were randomized into three groups and resuscitated for 20 min [fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.21 for 10 min and 1.0 thereafter]. Group 1 received ventilation using a TPR [peak inspiratory pressure (PIP)/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min] with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 2 received ventilation using a SIB (PIP of 20 cm H2O without PEEP, rate 30/min) with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 3 received ventilation using a mechanical ventilator (PIP/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min). CC were applied with a rate of 120/min without synchrony to inflations. We found no significant differences in SaO2 between the three groups. However, there was a trend toward a higher SaO2 [TPR: 28.0% (22.3-40.0); SIB: 23.7% (13.4-52.3); ventilator: 44.1% (39.2-54.3); median (interquartile range)] and a lower PaCO2 [TPR: 95.6 mm Hg (82.1-113.6); SIB: 100.8 mm Hg (83.0-108.0); ventilator: 74.1 mm Hg (68.5-83.1); median (interquartile range)] in the mechanical ventilator group. We found no significant effect on gas exchange using different respiratory support strategies

  12. Boreal mire Green House Gas exchange in response to global change perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Mats

    2017-04-01

    High latitude boreal peatlands contribute importantly to the land-atmosphere-hydrosphere exchange of carbon and GHG, i.e. carbon dioxide, methane and dissolved organic carbon. High latitude biomes are identified as most vulnerable to changing climate. High latitudes are also characterized by a strong seasonality in incoming solar radiation, weather conditions and thus also in biogeochemical processes. The strong seasonality in incoming solar radiation, not to change in response to a changing climate, constitute firm constraints on how changes in air temperature, evapotranspiration and precipitation will affect biogeochemical processes underlying the land atmosphere and land hydrosphere exchange of green house gases. In this presentation I combine data from long-term monitoring, long-term field manipulations and detailed chemical analysis to understand how changes in atmosphere and weather conditions influence the major carbon fluxes of a boreal mire Net Ecosystem Carbon Balance. The long-term monitoring data contains >12 years of continuous Eddy Covariance CO2 data, growing season chamber CH4 data and continuous measurements of discharge export of DOC, CO2 and CH4. Data from long-term field snow removal manipulations and growing season temperature increase manipulations are used to further understand the impact of climate on mire carbon and GHG fluxes. Finally we uses Nuclear Magnetic Spectroscopy (NMR) to reveal how century scale changes in atmospheric CO2 from 300 to 400 pm CO2 and temperature have influenced the net photosynthetic capacity of Sphagnum mosses, the single most important plant genus for boreal mire carbon sequestration.

  13. Food production and gas exchange system using blue-green alga (Spirulina) for CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Otsubo, Koji; Nitta, Keiji; Hatayama, Shigeki

    In order to reduce the cultivation area required for the growth of higher plants in space adoption of algae, which have a higher photosynthetic ability, seems very suitable for obtaining oxygen and food as a useful source of high quality protein. The preliminary cultivation experiment for determining optimum cultivation conditions and for obtaining the critical design parameters of the cultivator itself has been conducted. Spirulina was cultivated in the 6-liter medium containing a sodium hydrogen carbonate solution and a cultivation temperature controlled using a thermostat. Generated oxygen gas was separated using a polypropyrene porous hollow fiber membrane module. Through this experiment, oxygen gas (at a concentration of more than 46%) at a rate of 100 ~ 150 ml per minute could be obtained.

  14. Food production and gas exchange system using blue-green alga (spirulina) for CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Otsubo, Koji; Nitta, Keiji; Hatayama, Shigeki

    1987-01-01

    In order to reduce the cultivation area required for the growth of higher plants in space adoption of algae, which have a higher photosynthetic ability, seems very suitable for obtaining oxygen and food as a useful source of high quality protein. The preliminary cultivation experiment for determining optimum cultivation conditions and for obtaining the critical design parameters of the cultivator itself was conducted. Spirulina was cultivated in the 6 liter medium containing a sodium hydrogen carbonate solution and a cultivation temperature controlled using a thermostat. Generated oxygen gas was separated using a polypropyrene porous hollow fiber membrane module. Through this experiment, oxygen gas (at a concentration of more than 46 percent) at a rate of 100 to approx. 150 ml per minute could be obtained.

  15. Theory of low temperature spin exchange scattering for a physiosorbed two-dimensional gas of hydrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, M.; Berlinsky, A.J.

    1983-07-01

    Calculations are presented of the two-dimensional scattering cross sections which are required to evaluate the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ and the frequency shift ..delta..v due to spin exchange collision between H atoms physisorbed on a surface. The results are used to interpret the recent measurements by Crampton and co-workers of the relaxation time T/sub 1/ for H atoms in the presence of solid H/sub 2/ walls. New results are also presented for T/sub 1/, due to three-dimensional scattering in the gas, using a more recent triplet H-H potential than the one previously employed by Berlinsky and Shizgal.

  16. Effects of ozone impact on the gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence of juvenile birch stems (Betula pendula Roth.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmann, Christiane [Department of Applied Botany, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstr. 5, 45117 Essen (Germany); Matyssek, Rainer [Department of Ecology/Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85354 Freising/Weihenstephan (Germany); Pfanz, Hardy [Department of Applied Botany, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstr. 5, 45117 Essen (Germany)], E-mail: hardy.pfanz@uni-due.de; Humar, Maja [Department of Agronomy, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2007-11-15

    Effects of ozone impact on gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence of juvenile birch (Betula pendula) stems and leaves were investigated. Significant differences in the response of leaves and stems to ozone were found. In leaves, O{sub 3} exposure led to a significant decline in photosynthetic rates, whereas stems revealed an increased dark respiration and a concomitant increase in corticular photosynthesis. In contrast to birch leaves, corticular photosynthesis appeared to support the carbon balance of stems or even of the whole-tree under O{sub 3} stress. The differences in the ozone-response between leaves and stems were found to be related to ozone uptake rates, and thus to inherent differences in leaf and stem O{sub 3} conductance. - Leaves of birch were more affected by ozone fumigation than corresponding stems, due to a higher ozone uptake rate.

  17. Technique for characterization of the wettability properties of gas diffusion media for proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurau, Vladimir; Mann, J Adin

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, a measurement technique based on the capillary penetration method is presented for use in estimating the wettability properties of gas diffusion media (GDM), a component for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The present method solves several critical issues, including the formation of an external meniscus and the evaporation of imbibed solvent, both of which greatly affect the apparent rate of solvent imbibition. Solvent evaporation is prevented by inserting a GDM sample between two thin stainless steel plates to form a tri-layer structure having non-porous evaporation covers on each side of the porous GDM sample. The presence of stainless steel plates in contact with the GDM sample was demonstrated to have a negligible impact on the evaluation of the Washburn material constant. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND PTFE CONTENT IN GAS DIFFUSION LAYER ON PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUR H. MASLAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous research and development activities have been conducted to optimize the operating parameters of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC by experiments and simulations. This study explains the development of a 3D model by using ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 to determine the optimum PEMFC parameters, namely, porosity and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE content, in the gas diffusion layer (GDL. A 3D model was developed to analyze the properties and effects of GDL. Simulation results showed that the increase in GDL porosity significantly improved the performance of PEMFC in generating electrical power. However, the performance of PEMFC decreased with increasing PTFE content in GDL. Thus, the PTFE content in the GDL must be optimized and the optimum PTFE content should be 5 wt%. The model developed in this simulation showed good capability in simulating the PEMFC parameters to assist the development process of PEMFC design.

  19. Greenhouse gas exchange of rewetted bog peat extraction sites and a Sphagnum cultivation site in northwest Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, C.; Höper, H.

    2015-04-01

    During the last decades an increasing area of drained peatlands has been rewetted. Especially in Germany, rewetting is the principal treatment on cutover sites when peat extraction is finished. The objectives are bog restoration and the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The first sites were rewetted in the 1980s. Thus, there is a good opportunity to study long-term effects of rewetting on greenhouse gas exchange, which has not been done so far on temperate cutover peatlands. Moreover, Sphagnum cultivating may become a new way to use cutover peatlands and agriculturally used peatlands as it permits the economical use of bogs under wet conditions. The climate impact of such measures has not been studied yet. We conducted a field study on the exchange of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide at three rewetted sites with a gradient from dry to wet conditions and at a Sphagnum cultivation site in NW Germany over the course of more than 2 years. Gas fluxes were measured using transparent and opaque closed chambers. The ecosystem respiration (CO2) and the net ecosystem exchange (CO2) were modelled at a high temporal resolution. Measured and modelled values fit very well together. Annually cumulated gas flux rates, net ecosystem carbon balances (NECB) and global warming potential (GWP) balances were determined. The annual net ecosystem exchange (CO2) varied strongly at the rewetted sites (from -201.7 ± 126.8 to 29.7± 112.7g CO2-C m-2 a-1) due to differing weather conditions, water levels and vegetation. The Sphagnum cultivation site was a sink of CO2 (-118.8 ± 48.1 and -78.6 ± 39.8 g CO2-C m-2 a-1). The annual CH4 balances ranged between 16.2 ± 2.2 and 24.2 ± 5.0g CH4-C m-2 a-1 at two inundated sites, while one rewetted site with a comparatively low water level and the Sphagnum farming site show CH4 fluxes close to 0. The net N2O fluxes were low and not significantly different between the four sites. The annual NECB was between -185.5 ± 126.9 and 49

  20. Dynamics of leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and stem diameter changes during freezing and thawing of Scots pine seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Lauri; Hölttä, Teemu; Lintunen, Anna; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Nikinmaa, Eero; Juurola, Eija

    2015-12-01

    Boreal trees experience repeated freeze-thaw cycles annually. While freezing has been extensively studied in trees, the dynamic responses occurring during the freezing and thawing remain poorly understood. At freezing and thawing, rapid changes take place in the water relations of living cells in needles and in stem. While freezing is mostly limited to extracellular spaces, living cells dehydrate, shrink and their osmotic concentration increases. We studied how the freezing-thawing dynamics reflected on leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and xylem and living bark diameter changes of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) saplings in controlled experiments. Photosynthetic rate quickly declined following ice nucleation and extracellular freezing in xylem and needles, almost parallel to a rapid shrinking of xylem diameter, while that of living bark followed with a slightly longer delay. While xylem and living bark diameters responded well to decreasing temperature and water potential of ice, the relationship was less consistent in the case of increasing temperature. Xylem showed strong temporal swelling at thawing suggesting water movement from bark. After thawing xylem diameter recovered to a pre-freezing level but living bark remained shrunk. We found that freezing affected photosynthesis at multiple levels. The distinct dynamics of photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance reveals that the decreased photosynthetic rate reflects impaired dark reactions rather than stomatal closure. Freezing also inhibited the capacity of the light reactions to dissipate excess energy as heat, via non-photochemical quenching, whereas photochemical quenching of excitation energy decreased gradually with temperature in agreement with the gas exchange data. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. MULTI-FREQUENCY OSCILLATORY VENTILATION IN THE PREMATURE LUNG: EFFECTS ON GAS EXCHANGE, MECHANICS, AND VENTILATION DISTRIBUTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczka, David W.; Herrmann, Jacob; Zonneveld, C. Elroy; Tingay, David G.; Lavizzari, Anna; Noble, Peter B.; Pillow, J. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the theoretical benefits of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) in preterm infants, systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials do not confirm improved outcomes. We hypothesized that oscillating a premature lung with multiple frequencies simultaneously would improve gas exchange compared to traditional single-frequency oscillatory ventilation (SFOV). The goal of this study was to develop a novel method for HFOV, termed ‘multi-frequency oscillatory ventilation’ (MFOV), which relies on a broadband flow waveform more suitable for the heterogeneous mechanics of the immature lung. Methods Thirteen intubated preterm lambs were randomized to either SFOV or MFOV for 1 hour, followed by crossover to the alternative regimen for 1 hour. The SFOV waveform consisted of a pure sinusoidal flow at 5 Hz, while the customized MFOV waveform consisted of a 5 Hz fundamental with additional energy at 10 and 15 Hz. Per standardized protocol, mean pressure at airway opening (P̅ao) and inspired O2 fraction were adjusted as needed, and root mean square of the delivered oscillatory volume waveform (Vrms) was adjusted 15-minute intervals. A ventilatory cost function for SFOV and MFOV was defined as VC=(Vrms2PaCO2)Wt−1, where Wt denotes body weight. Results Averaged over all time points, MFOV resulted in significantly lower VC (246.9±6.0 vs. 363.5±15.9 mL2 mmHg kg−1) and P̅ao (12.8±0.3 vs. 14.1±0.5 cmH2O) compared to SFOV, suggesting more efficient gas exchange and enhanced lung recruitment at lower mean airway pressures. Conclusions Oscillation with simultaneous multiple frequencies may be a more efficient ventilator modality in premature lungs compared to traditional single-frequency HFOV. PMID:26495977

  2. Peach water relations, gas exchange, growth and shoot mortality under water deficit in semi-arid weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Mitra; Davarynejad, Gholam Hossein; Génard, Michel; Bannayan, Mohammad; Azizi, Majid; Vercambre, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    In this study the sensitivity of peach tree (Prunus persica L.) to three water stress levels from mid-pit hardening until harvest was assessed. Seasonal patterns of shoot and fruit growth, gas exchange (leaf photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and transpiration) as well as carbon (C) storage/mobilization were evaluated in relation to plant water status. A simple C balance model was also developed to investigate sink-source relationship in relation to plant water status at the tree level. The C source was estimated through the leaf area dynamics and leaf photosynthesis rate along the season. The C sink was estimated for maintenance respiration and growth of shoots and fruits. Water stress significantly reduced gas exchange, and fruit, and shoot growth, but increased fruit dry matter concentration. Growth was more affected by water deficit than photosynthesis, and shoot growth was more sensitive to water deficit than fruit growth. Reduction of shoot growth was associated with a decrease of shoot elongation, emergence, and high shoot mortality. Water scarcity affected tree C assimilation due to two interacting factors: (i) reduction in leaf photosynthesis (-23% and -50% under moderate (MS) and severe (SS) water stress compared to low (LS) stress during growth season) and (ii) reduction in total leaf area (-57% and -79% under MS and SS compared to LS at harvest). Our field data analysis suggested a Ψstem threshold of -1.5 MPa below which daily net C gain became negative, i.e. C assimilation became lower than C needed for respiration and growth. Negative C balance under MS and SS associated with decline of trunk carbohydrate reserves--may have led to drought-induced vegetative mortality.

  3. Water relations and gas exchange in poplar and willow under water stress and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.D. [Washington State Univ., Intensive Forestry Program, Puyallup, WA (United States); Tognetti, R. [Universita del Molize, Dipartimento de Scienze Animali, Vegetali e dell' Ambiente, Compobasso (Italy); Pris, P. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Instituto per l' Agroselvicoltura, Porano (Italy)

    2002-05-01

    Predictions of shifts in rainfall patterns as atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] increases could impact the growth of fast growing trees such as Populus spp. and Salix spp. and the interaction between elevated CO{sub 2} and water stress in these species is unknown. The objectives of this study were to characterize the responses to elevated CO{sub 2} and water stress in these two species, and to determine if elevated CO{sub 2} mitigated drought stress effects. Gas exchange, water potential components, whole plant transpiration and growth response to soil drying and recovery were assessed in hybrid poplar (clone 53-246) and willow (Salix sagitta) rooted cuttings growing in either ambient (350 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) or elevated (700 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration ([CO{sub 2}]). Predawn water potential decreased with increasing water stress while midday water potentials remained unchanged (isohydric response). Turgor potentials at both predawn and midday increased in elevated [CO{sub 2}], indicative of osmotic adjustment. Gas exchange was reduced by water stress while elevated [CO{sub 2}] increased photosynthetic rates, reduced leaf conductance and nearly doubled instantaneous transpiration efficiency in both species. Dark respiration decreased in elevated [CO{sub 2}] and water stress reduced Rd in the trees growing in ambient [CO{sub 2}]. Willow had 56% lower whole plant hydraulic conductivity than poplar, and showed a 14% increase in elevated [CO{sub 2}] while poplar was unresponsive. The physiological responses exhibited by poplar and willow to elevated [CO{sub 2}] and water stress, singly, suggest that these species respond like other tree species. The interaction Of [CO{sub 2}] and water stress suggests that elevated [CO{sub 2}] did mitigate the effects of water stress in willow, but not in poplar. (au)

  4. Seasonal patterns and control of gas exchange in local populations of the Mediterranean evergreen shrub Pistacia lentiscus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexas, Jaume; Gulías, Javier; Jonasson, Sven; Medrano, Hipólito; Mus, Mauricio

    2001-02-01

    We examined temporal and spatial variations in net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, intrinsic water-use efficiency, sub-stomatal CO 2 concentration, apparent carboxylation efficiency and chlorophyll fluorescence in the Mediterranean shrub Pistacia lentiscus. The study was done at the extremes of a precipitation and temperature gradient on the coast and in the mountains of Mallorca, Spain, with gas exchange measurements at different times of the year, and combined measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence in a controlled experiment. The objectives were to relate annual variation in photosynthetic functions to environmentally induced constraints and to quantify to which extent local differences in climate can affect photosynthesis in shrub populations. In the mountain population, net photosynthesis peaked in spring and autumn, when water was abundant and temperature was moderately high. It was reduced in winter paralleling reduced carboxylation efficiency. Photosynthesis was at the annual minimum in summer at both sites due to drought-induced stomata closure combined with impaired function of the Calvin cycle. The coastal population maintained high photosynthesis in mid winter but had a pronounced decline in spring, and the summer decline lasted longer than in the mountains. Integrated over the seasons, net photosynthesis was about 25 % lower in the coastal than in the mountain population, in spite of maintained high mid winter photosynthesis. Hence, the reduction at the coast was mainly due to early onset of drought in spring and a long period of summer drought, showing that local climatic differences can cause pronounced spatial differences in plant carbon balance. As a consequence, similar differences probably also occur as a function of year-to-year variability of precipitation patterns and temperatures.

  5. Gas-particle interactions above a Dutch heathland: II. Concentrations and surface exchange fluxes of atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Size-dependent particle number fluxes measured by eddy-covariance (EC and continuous fluxes of ammonium (NH4+ measured with the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM are reported for a Dutch heathland. Daytime deposition velocities (Vd by EC with peak values of 5 to 10 mm s-1 increased with particle diameter (dp over the range 0.1–0.5 µm, and are faster than predicted by current models. With a mean Vd of 2.0 mm s-1 (daytime: 2.7; night-time 0.8 mm s-1 NH4+ fluxes by AGM are overall in agreement with former measurements and NH4+-N dry deposition amounts to 20% of the dry input of NH3-N over the measurement period. These surface exchange fluxes are analyzed together with simultaneous gas-phase flux measurements for indications of gas-particle interactions. On warm afternoons the apparent fluxes of acids and aerosol above the heathland showed several coinciding anomalies, all of which are consistent with NH4+ evaporation during deposition: (i canopy resistances for HNO3 and HCl of up to 100 s m-1, (ii simultaneous particle emission of small particles (DpDp>0.18 µm, (iii NH4+ deposition faster than derived from size-distributions and size-segregated EC particle fluxes. These observations coincide with the observations of (i surface concentration products of NH3 and HNO3 well below the thermodynamic equilibrium value and (ii Damköhler numbers that indicate chemical conversion to be sufficiently fast to modify exchange fluxes. The measurements imply a removal rate of volatile NH4+ of 3−30×10-6 s-1 averaged over the 1 km boundary-layer, while NH3 deposition is underestimated by typically 20 ng m-2 s-1 (28% and flux reversal may occur.

  6. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide effects on soybean and sorghum gas exchange in conventional and no-tillage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, S A; Runion, G B; Rogers, H H; Arriaga, F J

    2010-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO(2) concentration has led to concerns about potential effects on production agriculture. In the fall of 1997, a study was initiated to compare the response of two crop management systems (conventional tillage and no-tillage) to elevated CO(2). The study used a split-plot design replicated three times with two management systems as main plots and two atmospheric CO(2) levels (ambient and twice ambient) as split plots using open-top chambers on a Decatur silt loam soil (clayey, kaolinitic, thermic Rhodic Paleudults). The conventional system was a grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.] and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation with winter fallow and spring tillage practices. In the no-tillage system, sorghum and soybean were rotated, and three cover crops were used [crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)]. Over multiple growing seasons, the effect of management and CO(2) concentration on leaf-level gas exchange during row crop (soybean in 1999, 2001, and 2003; sorghum in 2000, 2002, and 2004) reproductive growth were evaluated. Treatment effects were fairly consistent across years. In general, higher photosynthetic rates were observed under CO(2) enrichment (more so with soybean) regardless of residue management practice. Elevated CO(2) led to decreases in stomatal conductance and transpiration, which resulted in increased water use efficiency. The effects of management system on gas exchange measurements were infrequently significant, as were interactions of CO(2) and management. These results suggest that better soil moisture conservation and high rates of photosynthesis can occur in both tillage systems in CO(2)-enriched environments during reproductive growth.

  7. Thermal-Conductivity Characterization of Gas Diffusion Layer in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers Under Mechanical Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamour, M.; Garnier, J. P.; Grandidier, J. C.; Ouibrahim, A.; Martemianov, S.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate information on the temperature field and associated heat transfer rates is particularly important for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and PEM electrolyzers. An important parameter in fuel cell and electrolyzer performance analysis is the effective thermal conductivity of the gas diffusion layer (GDL) which is a solid porous medium. Usually, this parameter is introduced in modeling and performance analysis without taking into account the dependence of the GDL thermal conductivity λ (in W · m-1 · K-1) on mechanical compression. Nevertheless, mechanical stresses arising in an operating system can change significantly the thermal conductivity and heat exchange. Metrology allowing the characterization of the GDL thermal conductivity as a function of the applied mechanical compression has been developed in this study using the transient hot-wire technique (THW). This method is the best for obtaining standard reference data in fluids, but it is rarely used for thermal-conductivity measurements in solids. The experiments provided with Quintech carbon cloth indicate a strong dependence (up to 300%) of the thermal conductivity λ on the applied mechanical load. The experiments have been provided in the pressure range 0 cloth layers have been provided. The conducted experiments indicate the independence of the measured thermal conductivity on the number of GDL layers and, thus, justify the robustness of the developed method and apparatus for this type of application.

  8. Radon 222 tracing of soil and forest canopy trace gas exchange in an open canopy boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussler, William, III; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Kelley, Cheryl A.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    A set of continuous, high-resolution atmospheric radon (Rn-222) concentration time series and radon soil flux measurements were acquired during the summer of 1990 at a micrometeorological tower site 13 km northwest of Schefferville, Quebec, Canada. The tower was located in a dry upland, open-canopy lichen-spruce woodland. For the period July 23 to August 1, 1990, the mean radon soil flux was 41.1 +/- 4.8 Bq m(exp -2)/h. Radon surface flux from the two end-member forest floor cover types (lichen mat and bare soil) were 38.8 +/- 5.1 and 61.8 +/- 15.6 Bq m(exp -2)/h, respectively. Average total forest canopy resistances computed using a simple 'flux box' model for radon exchange between the forest canopy and the overlying atmosphere range from 0.47 +/- 0.24 s cm(exp -1) to 2.65 +/- 1.61 cm(exp -1) for daytime hours (0900-1700 LT) and from 3.44 +/- 0.91 s cm(exp -1) to 10.55 +/- 7.16 s cm(exp -1) for nighttime hours (2000-0600) for the period July 23 to August 6, 1990. Continuous radon profiling of canopy atmospheres is a suitable approach for determining rates of biosphere/atmosphere trace gas exchange for remote field sites where daily equipment maintenance is not possible. where daily equipment maintenance is not possible.

  9. Evaluation of a gas in vitro system for predicting methane production in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsson, Rebecca; Ramin, Mohammad; Bertilsson, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Methane production from ruminant livestock varies with the diet as a result of factors such as dry matter intake, diet composition, and digestibility. To estimate the effect of dietary composition and feed additives, CH4 production can be measured in vitro as a first step because large numbers...... of samples can be incubated and analyzed at the same time. This study evaluated a recently developed in vitro method for prediction of in vivo CH4 production by examining the relationship between predicted and observed CH4 production values. A total of 49 different diets (observations), used in previous 13...... in vivo studies, were selected to include diets varying in nutrient composition. Methane production was measured in all in vivo studies by respiration chambers or the GreenFeed system (C-Lock Inc., Rapid City, SD). Overall, the in vitro system predicted CH4 production well (R2 = 0.96), but the values...

  10. Ex vivo water exchange performance and short-term clinical feasibility assessment of newly developed heat and moisture exchangers for pulmonary rehabilitation after total laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boer, Cindy; Muller, Sara H; Vincent, Andrew D; Züchner, Klaus; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2014-02-01

    Laryngectomized patients suffer from respiratory complaints due to insufficient warming and humidification of inspired air in the upper respiratory tract. Improvement of pulmonary humidification with significant reduction of pulmonary complaints is achieved by the application of a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) over the tracheostoma. The aim of this study was to determine whether the new Provox HMEs (XM-HME and XF-HME) have a better water exchange performance than their predecessors (R-HME and L-HME, respectively; Atos Medical, Hörby, Sweden). The other aim was to assess the short-term clinical feasibility of these HMEs. The XM-HME and XF-HME were weighed at the end of inspiration and at the end of expiration at different breathing volumes produced by a healthy volunteer. The associations between weight changes, breathing volume and absolute humidity were determined using both linear and non-linear mixed effects models. Study-specific questionnaires and tally sheets were used in the clinical feasibility study. The weight change of the XM-HME is 3.6 mg, this is significantly higher than that of the R-HME (2.0 mg). The weight change of the XF-HME (2.0 mg) was not significantly higher than that of the L-HME (1.8 mg). The absolute humidity values of both XM- and XF-HME were significantly higher than that of their predecessors. The clinical feasibility study did not reveal any practical problems over the course of 3 weeks. The XM-HME has a significantly better water exchange performance than its predecessor (R-HME). Both newly designed HMEs did succeed in the clinical feasibility study.

  11. A Determination of Air-Sea Gas Exchange and Upper Ocean Biological Production From Five Noble Gases and Tritiugenic Helium-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    og a . ..... .Joint Program V - Chemica r ceanography Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Oce Institution August 10, 2007...CO 2 is an important greenhouse gas. As mentioned above, CO 2 enters the ocean through air-sea gas exchange. Marine organ - isms then fix approximately...50 Pg of carbon per year (Field et al., 1998). Some of this organic matter is remineralized in the surface of the ocean and thus has no net effect on

  12. Seated and semi-recumbent positioning of the ventilated intensive care patient - effect on gas exchange, respiratory mechanics and hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Peter; Paratz, Jennifer; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    To compare the effect of semi-recumbent and sitting positions on gas exchange, respiratory mechanics and hemodynamics in patients weaning from mechanical ventilation. Upright positions are encouraged during rehabilitation of the critically ill but there effects have not been well described. A prospective, randomized, cross-over trial was conducted. Subjects were passively mobilized from supine into a seated position (out of bed) and from supine to a semi-recumbent position (>45° backrest elevation in bed). Arterial blood gas (PaO2/FiO2, PaO2, SaO2, PaCO2 and A-a gradient), respiratory mechanics (VE,VT, RR, Cdyn, RR/VT) and hemodynamic measurements (HR, MABP) were collected in supine and at 5 min and 30 min after re-positioning. Thirty-four intubated and ventilated subjects were enrolled. The angle of backrest inclination in sitting (67 ± 5°) was greater than gained with semi-recumbent positioning (50 ± 5°, p mechanic or hemodynamic values due to either position. Neither position resulted in significant changes in respiratory and hemodynamic parameters. Both positions can be applied safely in patients being weaned from ventilation. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of pulmonary gas exchange variables and lactic anaerobic capacity during field testing in elite indoor football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angius, L; Cominu, M; Filippi, M; Piredda, C; Migliaccio, G M; Pinna, M; Milia, R; Tocco, F; Concu, A; Crisafulli, A

    2013-10-01

    The aims of this study were: 1) to examine the gas exchange responses of elite indoor football players to a repeated sprint ability (RSA) test; and 2) to verify whether or not the excess of carbon dioxide production (CO2excess) correlates with blood lactate accumulation during RSA field testing. Eleven elite male indoor football players were recruited. A preliminary incremental exercise test on a treadmill was performed to elicit V'O2max. Then, participants underwent an RSA test consisting in a shuttle running through a course with various changes of direction while wearing a portable gas analyzer able to provide values of oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, and CO2excess. BLa concentrations during recovery were also measured. The main results were that: 1) during the RSA test subjects did not reached the V'O2max level achieved in the preliminary test; 2) during the RSA test BLa levels were higher compared with the preliminary test; 3) the peak BLa concentration during recovery was significantly correlated with the average CO2excess It was concluded that the RSA test did not appear to be useful to elicit V'O2max. Rather, it seemed suitable to recruit subjects' lactic anaerobic capacity. Moreover, CO2excess appeared suitable for qualitatively estimate BLa accumulation during field testing.

  14. Assessing gas exchange in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome: diagnostic techniques and prognostic relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattinoni, Luciano; Carlesso, Eleonora; Cressoni, Massimo

    2011-02-01

    To provide the most recent insights on the assessment of gas exchange in acute lung injury. Central venous blood may be used as a surrogate of arterial blood to assess carbon dioxide tension and acid-base status. In contrast arterial oxygenation cannot be estimated with confidence from venous blood. However, the use of venous blood associated with pulse oximetry may provide the SvO2 which is useful for monitoring and targeting the resuscitation therapy. Impaired CO2 clearance and increased dead space have been confirmed as useful prognostic indices of structural lung damage and mortality in acute respiratory failure. A simplified technique based on multiple inert gas technique has been described to assess ventilation-perfusion mismatch while a new analysis of pulse oximetry has been suggested to detect lung opening and closing. Finally, new insight has been provided on the relationship between lung anatomy, as detected by computed tomography, oxygenation and CO2 clearance. Although oxygenation assessment is of primary importance during respiratory lung injury, dead space and CO2 retention are more strictly associated with outcome. The association of central venous blood analysis and pulse oximetry may provide more information than arterial blood alone.

  15. Application of a self-supporting microporous layer to gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Heo, Yun; Ishida, Masayoshi; Nakano, Akihiro; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo

    2017-02-01

    The intrinsic effect of properties of a self-supporting microporous layer (MPL) on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is identified. First, a self-supporting MPL is fabricated and applied to a gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a PEMFC, when the GDL is either an integrated sample composed of a gas diffusion backing (GDB, i.e., carbon paper) combined with MPL or a sample with only MPL. Cell performance tests reveal that, the same as the MPL fabricated by the coating method, the self-supporting MPL on the GDB improves the cell performance at high current density. Furthermore, the GDL composed only of the MPL (i.e., GDB-free GDL) shows better performance than does the integrated GDB/MPL GDL. These results along with literature data strongly suggest that the low thermal conductivity of MPL induces a high temperature throughout the GDL, and thus vapor diffusion is dominant in the transport of product water through the MPL.

  16. The Iġnik Sikumi Field Experiment, Alaska North Slope: Design, operations, and implications for CO2−CH4 exchange in gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Schoderbek, David; Collett, Timothy S.; Ohtsuki, Satoshi; White, Mark; Anderson, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    The Iġnik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Exchange Field Experiment was conducted by ConocoPhillips in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy, the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation, and the U.S. Geological Survey within the Prudhoe Bay Unit on the Alaska North Slope during 2011 and 2012. The primary goals of the program were to (1) determine the feasibility of gas injection into hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and (2) observe reservoir response upon subsequent flowback in order to assess the potential for CO2 exchange for CH4 in naturally occurring gas hydrate reservoirs. Initial modeling determined that no feasible means of injection of pure CO2 was likely, given the presence of free water in the reservoir. Laboratory and numerical modeling studies indicated that the injection of a mixture of CO2 and N2 offered the best potential for gas injection and exchange. The test featured the following primary operational phases: (1) injection of a gaseous phase mixture of CO2, N2, and chemical tracers; (2) flowback conducted at downhole pressures above the stability threshold for native CH4 hydrate; and (3) an extended (30-days) flowback at pressures near, and then below, the stability threshold of native CH4 hydrate. The test findings indicate that the formation of a range of mixed-gas hydrates resulted in a net exchange of CO2 for CH4 in the reservoir, although the complexity of the subsurface environment renders the nature, extent, and efficiency of the exchange reaction uncertain. The next steps in the evaluation of exchange technology should feature multiple well applications; however, such field test programs will require extensive preparatory experimental and numerical modeling studies and will likely be a secondary priority to further field testing of production through depressurization. Additional insights gained from the field program include the following: (1) gas hydrate destabilization is self-limiting, dispelling any notion of the potential for

  17. Closed and continuous algae cultivation system for food production and gas exchange in CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Otsubo, Koji; Nitta, Keiji; Shimada, Atsuhiro; Fujii, Shigeo; Koyano, Takashi; Miki, Keizaburo

    In CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System), utilization of photosynthetic algae is an effective means for obtaining food and oxygen at the same time. We have chosen Spirulina, a blue-green alga, and have studied possibilities of algae utilization. We have developed an advanced algae cultivation system, which is able to produce algae continuously in a closed condition. Major features of the new system are as follows. o (1)In order to maintain homogeneous culture conditions, the cultivator was designed so as to cause a swirl on medium circulation. (2)Oxygen gas separation and carbon dioxide supply are conducted by a newly designed membrane module. (3)Algae mass and medium are separated by a specially designed harvester. (4)Cultivation conditions, such as pH, temperature, algae growth rate, light intensity and quanlity of generated oxygen gas are controlled by a computer system and the data are automatically recorded. This equipment is a primary model for ground experiments in order to obtain some design data for space use. A feasibility of algae cultivation in a closed condition is discussed on the basis of data obtained by use of this new system.

  18. Mathematical modeling of the "plant community -soil-like substrate -gas exchange with the human" closed ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhatov, Yuri; Gubanov, Vladimir; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Degermendzhy, Andrey G.

    A mathematical model of the "plant community -soil-like substrate -gas exchange with the human" experimental biological life support system (BLSS) has been constructed to predict its functioning and estimate feasibility of controlling it. The mathematical model consists of three compartments -two `phytotron' models (with wheat and radish) and the `mycotron' model (for mushrooms). The following components are included in the model: edible mushrooms (mushroom fruit bodies and mycelium); wheat; radish; straw (processed by mycelium); dead organic matter in the phytotron (separately for the wheat unit and for the radish unit); worms; worms' coprolites; vermicompost used as a soil-like substrate (SLS); bacterial microflora; min-eral nitrogen, phosphorus and iron; products of the system intended for humans (wheat grains, radish roots and mushroom fruit bodies); oxygen and carbon dioxide. Under continuous gas exchange, the mass exchange between the compartments occurs at the harvesting time. The conveyor character of the closed ecosystem functioning has been taken into account -the num-ber of culture age groups can be regulated (in experiments -4 and 8 age groups). The conveyor cycle duration can be regulated as well. The module is designed for the food and gas exchange requirements of 1/30 of a virtually present human. Aim of model analysis is determination of investigation direction in real experimental BLSS. The model allows doing dynamic calcu-lations of closure coefficient based on the main elements taken into account in the model and evaluating all dynamic components of the system under different conditions and modes of its operation, especially under the conditions that can hardly be created experimentally. One of the sustainability conditions can be long-duration functioning of the system under the light-ing that is far from the optimum. The mathematical model of the system can demonstrate variants of its sustainable functioning or ruin under various critical

  19. Gas Exchanges and Dehydration in Different Intensities of Conditioning in Tifton 85 Bermudagrass: Nutritional Value during Hay Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pasqualotto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at evaluating the intensity of Tifton 85 conditioning using a mower conditioner with free-swinging flail fingers and storage times on dehydration curve, fungi presence, nutritional value and in vitro digestibility of Tifton 85 bermudagrass hay dry matter (DM. The dehydration curve was determined in the whole plant for ten times until the baling. The zero time corresponded to the plant before cutting, which occurred at 11:00 and the other collections were carried out at 8:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 16:00. The experimental design was randomised blocks with two intensities of conditioning (high and low and ten sampling times, with five replications. The high and low intensities related to adjusting the deflector plate of the free iron fingers (8 and 18 cm. In order to determine gas exchanges during Tifton 85 bermudagrass dehydration, there were evaluations of mature leaves, which were placed in the upper middle third of each branch before the cutting, at every hour for 4 hours. A portable gas analyser was used by an infrared IRGA (6400xt. The analysed variables were photosynthesis (A, stomatal conductance (gs, internal CO2 concentration (Ci, transpiration (T, water use efficiency (WUE, and intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi. In the second part of this study, the nutritional value of Tifton 85 hay was evaluated, so randomised blocks were designed in a split plot through time, with two treatments placed in the following plots: high and low intensity of cutting and five different time points as subplots: cutting (additional treatment, baling and after 30, 60, and 90 days of storage. Subsequently, fungi that were in green plants as well as hay were determined and samples were collected from the grass at the cutting period, during baling, and after 30, 60, and 90 days of storage. It was observed that Tifton 85 bermudagrass dehydration occurred within 49 hours, so this was considered the best time for drying hay. Gas exchanges were

  20. The Study on Diurnal Changes in Leaf Gas Exchange of Lemon Balm, Catnip, Holy Basil and Sweet basil in Ahvaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahmoodi Sourestani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mediterranean climate conditions induce several stresses that plants have to cope with, especially during summer months when high temperature and radiation levels along with low water availability in the soil prevail for long periods. Variation in physiological traits such as photosynthesis and plant water status and their association with morphological characters can play an important role in the adaptability of the species to environmental constraints. The previous studies show that scorching weather not only affects the rate of gas exchange, but also results in diurnal changes in activity. Thus, the impact of environmental stresses on plants growing in these conditions should be assessed by examining the evolution of their diurnal variations on leaf gas exchange. Aromatic plants represent a renewable source of valuable compounds that can be used in food, perfumery, and pharmaceutical industry. Among these plants, sweet basil (Ocimumbasilicum, holy basil (Ocimum sanctum, lemon balm (Melissa officinalisL. and catnip (Nepetacataria are very important for different industries. Studies on environmental physiology of medicinal plants are relatively scarce and very few information is available concerning the physiological basis of medicinal plant response to heat stress that is one of the most important factors limiting production of medicinal plants in Khuzestan province. Material and methods: In order to evaluate the diurnal fluctuation of gas exchange of mentioned plants, an experiment was carried out in 2013 at research farm of Horticultural Science, Shahid Chamran University (31°20'N latitude and 48°40'E longitude and 22.5m mean sea level, Ahvaz (Iran, a site characterized by a semidry and scorching weather during late spring and summer. The experiment was arranged based on randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications and 4×8 factorial scheme (Four plants including lemon balm, catnip, holy basil and basil; and

  1. Mycorrhizal stimulation of leaf gas exchange in relation to root colonization, shoot size, leaf phosphorus and nitrogen: a quantitative analysis of the literature using meta-regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Augé

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM symbiosis often stimulates gas exchange rates of the host plant. This may relate to mycorrhizal effects on host nutrition and growth rate, or the influence may occur independently of these. Using meta-regression, we tested the strength of the relationship between AM-induced increases in gas exchange, and AM size and leaf mineral effects across the literature. With only a few exceptions, AM stimulation of carbon exchange rate (CER, stomatal conductance (gs and transpiration rate (E has been significantly associated with mycorrhizal stimulation of shoot dry weight, leaf phosphorus, leaf nitrogen: phosphorus ratio and percent root colonization. The sizeable mycorrhizal stimulation of CER, by 49% over all studies, has been about twice as large as the mycorrhizal stimulation of gs and E (28% and 26%, respectively. Carbon exchange rate has been over twice as sensitive as gs and four times as sensitive as E to mycorrhizal colonization rates. The AM-induced stimulation of CER increased by 19% with each AM-induced doubling of shoot size; the AM effect was about half as large for gs and E. The ratio of leaf N to leaf P has been more closely associated with mycorrhizal influence on leaf gas exchange than leaf P alone. The mycorrhizal influence on CER has declined markedly over the 35 years of published investigations.

  2. Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

    2013-12-01

    The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

  3. Flow structure and heat exchange analysis in internal cooling channel of gas turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Doerffer, Piotr; Telega, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the study of the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on the four walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of radial cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include corner fillet, ribs with fillet radii and special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which possesses very realistic features.

  4. Juvenile Rhus glabra leaves have higher temperatures and lower gas exchange rates than mature leaves when compared in the field during periods of high irradiance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, John L; Choinski, John S; Wise, Robert R

    2009-05-01

    We sought to test the hypothesis that stomatal development determines the timing of gas exchange competency, which then influences leaf temperature through transpirationally driven leaf cooling. To test this idea, daily patterns of gas exchange and leaflet temperature were obtained from leaves of two distinctively different developmental stages of smooth sumac (Rhus glabra) grown in its native habitat. Juvenile and mature leaves were also sampled for ultrastructural studies of stomatal development. When plants were sampled in May-June, the hypothesis was supported: juvenile leaflets were (for part of the day) from 1.4 to 6.0 degrees C warmer than mature leaflets and as much as 2.0 degrees C above ambient air temperature with lower stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rates than mature leaflets. When measurements were taken from July to October, no significant differences were observed, although mature leaflet gas exchange rates declined to the levels of the juvenile leaves. The gas exchange data were supported by the observations that juvenile leaves had approximately half the number of functional stomata on a leaf surface area basis as did mature leaves. It was concluded that leaf temperature and stage of leaf development in sumac are strongly linked with the higher surface temperatures observed in juvenile leaflets in the early spring possibly being involved in promoting photosynthesis and leaf expansion when air temperatures are cooler.

  5. Leaf-level gas-exchange uniformity and photosynthetic capacity among loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) genotypes of contrasting inherent genetic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Aspinwall; John S. King; Steven E. McKeand; Jean-Christophe Domec

    2011-01-01

    Variation in leaf-level gas exchange among widely planted genetically improved loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) genotypes could impact stand-level water use, carbon assimilation, biomass production, C allocation, ecosystem sustainability and biogeochemical cycling under changing environmental conditions. We examined uniformity in leaf-level light-saturated photosynthesis...

  6. Evaluating a new method to estimate the rate of leaf respiration in the light by analysis of combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Sun, Z.; Struik, P.C.; Gu, J.

    2011-01-01

    Day respiration (R(d)) is an important parameter in leaf ecophysiology. It is difficult to measure directly and is indirectly estimated from gas exchange (GE) measurements of the net photosynthetic rate (A), commonly using the Laisk method or the Kok method. Recently a new method was proposed to

  7. Gas exchange recovery following natural drought is rapid unless limited by loss of leaf hydraulic conductance: evidence from an evergreen woodland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Robert P; Brodribb, Timothy J; McAdam, Scott A M; Mitchell, Patrick J

    2017-09-01

    Drought can cause major damage to plant communities, but species damage thresholds and postdrought recovery of forest productivity are not yet predictable. We used an El Niño drought event as a natural experiment to test whether postdrought recovery of gas exchange could be predicted by properties of the water transport system, or if metabolism, primarily high abscisic acid concentration, might delay recovery. We monitored detailed physiological responses, including shoot sapflow, leaf gas exchange, leaf water potential and foliar abscisic acid (ABA), during drought and through the subsequent rehydration period for a sample of eight canopy and understory species. Severe drought caused major declines in leaf water potential, elevated foliar ABA concentrations and reduced stomatal conductance and assimilation rates in our eight sample species. Leaf water potential surpassed levels associated with incipient loss of leaf hydraulic conductance in four species. Following heavy rainfall gas exchange in all species, except those trees predicted to have suffered hydraulic impairment, recovered to prestressed rates within 1 d. Recovery of plant gas exchange was rapid and could be predicted by the hydraulic safety margin, providing strong support for leaf vulnerability to water deficit as an index of damage under natural drought conditions. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Theoretical reconsiderations when estimating the mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion in leaves of C3 plants by analysis of combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Struik, P.C.

    2009-01-01

    Existing methods to estimate the mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion (gm) are often based on combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. However, estimations of average gm by these methods are often unreliable either because the range of usable data is too narrow or because

  9. Radiation-use efficiency and gas exchange responses to water and nutrient availability in irrigated and fertilized stands of sweetgum and sycamore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher B. Allen; Rodney E. Will; Robert C. McGravey; David R. Coyle; Mark D. Coleman

    2005-01-01

    We investigated how water and nutrient availability affect radiation-use effeciency (e) and assessed leaf gas exchange as a possible mechanism for shifts in e. We measured aboveground net primary production (ANPP) and annual photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) capture to calculate e as well as leaf-level physiological variables (light-saturated net photosynthesis...

  10. Differential Effects of Endotracheal Suctioning on Gas Exchanges in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure under Pressure-Controlled and Volume-Controlled Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of open endotracheal suctioning on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in ARF patients under the modes of PCV or VCV. Ninety-six ARF patients were treated with open endotracheal suctioning and their variations in respiratory mechanics and gas exchange after the suctions were compared. Under PCV mode, compared with the initial level of tidal volume (VT, ARF patients showed 30.0% and 27.8% decrease at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Furthermore, the initial respiratory system compliance (Crs decreased by 29.6% and 28.5% at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under VCV mode, compared with the initial level, 38.6% and 37.5% increase in peak airway pressure (PAP were found at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under PCV mode, the initial PaO2 increased by 6.4% and 10.2 % at 3 min and 10 min, respectively, while 18.9% and 30.6% increase of the initial PaO2 were observed under VCV mode. Summarily, endotracheal suctioning may impair gas exchange and decrease lung compliance in ARF patients receiving mechanical ventilation under both PCV and VCV modes, but endotracheal suctioning effects on gas exchange were more severe and longer-lasting under PCV mode than VCV.

  11. Non-intrusive optical study of gas and its exchange in human maxillary sinuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, L.; Andersson, M.; Svensson, T.; Cassel-Engquist, M.; Svanberg, K.; Svanberg, S.

    2007-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel non-intrusive technique based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy to investigate human maxillary sinuses in vivo. The technique relies on the fact that free gases have much sharper absorption features (typical a few GHz) than the surrounding tissue. Molecular oxygen was detected at 760 nm. Volunteers have been investigated by injecting near-infrared light fibre-optically in contact with the palate inside the mouth. The multiply scattered light was detected externally by a handheld probe on and around the cheek bone. A significant signal difference in oxygen imprint was observed when comparing volunteers with widely different anamnesis regarding maxillary sinus status. Control measurements through the hand and through the cheek below the cheekbone were also performed to investigate any possible oxygen offset in the setup. These provided a consistently non-detectable signal level. The passages between the nasal cavity and the maxillary sinuses were also non-intrusively optically studied, to the best of our knowledge for the first time. These measurements provide information on the channel conductivity which may prove useful in facial sinus diagnostics. The results suggest that a clinical trial together with an ear-nose-throat (ENT) clinic should be carried out to investigate the clinical use of the new technique.

  12. Hydraulics and gas exchange recover more rapidly from severe drought stress in small pot-grown grapevines than in field-grown plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Pascual; Botía, Pablo; Keller, Markus

    2017-09-01

    Modifications of plant hydraulics and shoot resistances (Rshoot) induced by water withholding followed by rewatering, and their relationships with plant water status, leaf gas exchange and water use efficiency at the leaf level, were investigated in pot-grown and field-grown, own-rooted Syrah grapevines in an arid climate. Water stress induced anisohydric behavior, gradually reducing stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf photosynthesis (A) in response to decreasing midday stem water potential (Ψs). Water stress also rapidly increased intrinsic water-use efficiency (A/gs); this effect persisted for many days after rewatering. Whole-plant (Kplant), canopy (Kcanopy), shoot (Kshoot) and leaf (Kleaf) hydraulic conductances decreased during water stress, in tune with the gradual decrease in Ψs, leaf gas exchange and whole plant water use. Water-stressed vines also had a lower Ψ gradient between stem and leaf (ΔΨl), which was correlated with lower leaf transpiration rate (E). E and ΔΨl increased with increasing vapour pressure deficit (VPD) in non-stressed control vines but not in stressed vines. Perfusion of xylem-mobile dye showed that water flow to petioles and leaves was substantially reduced or even stopped under moderate and severe drought stress. Leaf blade hydraulic resistance accounted for most of the total shoot resistance. However, hydraulic conductance of the whole root system (Kroot) was not significantly reduced until water stress became very severe in pot-grown vines. Significant correlations between Kplant, Kcanopy and Ψs, Kcanopy and leaf gas exchange, Kleaf and Ψs, and Kleaf and A support a link between water supply, leaf water status and gas exchange. Upon re-watering, Ψs recovered faster than gas exchange and leaf-shoot hydraulics. A gradual recovery of hydraulic functionality of plant organs was also observed, the leaves being the last to recover after rewatering. In pot-grown vines, Kcanopy recovered rather quickly following restoration of

  13. Gas-phase carbon exchange between mangrove forests and the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayment, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Mangrove ecosystems are believed to be highly productive, storing carbon at rates as high as or higher than terrestrial tropical rainforests. Their high productivity is reflected in the high levels of organic carbon stored within, and exported from, these ecosystems. This includes so-called blue carbon - carbon of terrestrial origin sequestered in coastal margins. Despite their potential importance, significant knowledge gaps exist both in the magnitudes of the components of mangrove carbon balance, and the factors controlling them. These gaps result from the lack of primary datasets, which is itself a consequence of the complex nature of mangrove ecosystems, and of the difficult working conditions found there. Here, we report on a study designed to elucidate some of the environmental controls on the exchange of CO2 and CH4 to and from intact mangrove ecosystems in East Africa. Gazi Bay (4° 25'S, 39° 30'E), south of Mombasa, Kenya, encompasses around 600 ha of mangrove forest, including partially and severely degraded stands as well as restored areas. The area contains all 10 species of mangrove found in East Africa, including mono-specific areas of the two most common species, Avicennia marina and Rhizophora mucronata, sufficiently extensive for robust eddy covariance (EC) measurements. During 2012, open path EC measurements were made at both Avicennia marina and Rhizophora mucronata sites throughout a spring/neap tidal cycle. Flux data were fitted to a simple model describing the ecosystem level response to environmental variables. Stands of both species exhibited higher maximum net ecosystem uptake, but lower apparent quantum efficiency and lower dark respiration when inundated by high tides. Maximum net ecosystem uptake was higher in Rhizophora (12.8 (dry) - 16.5 (wet) μmol m-2 s-1) than in Avicennia (5.1 (dry) - 5.9 (wet) μmol m-2 s-1). Apparent quantum efficiency was twice as high in Rhizophora (0.09 (wet) - 0.12 (dry) mol mol-1) than in Avicennia (0

  14. A dynamic leaf gas-exchange strategy is conserved in woody plants under changing ambient CO2: evidence from carbon isotope discrimination in paleo and CO2 enrichment studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising atmospheric [CO2], ca, is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have reported that stomata regulate leaf gas-exchange around “set...

  15. A dynamic leaf gas-exchange strategy is conserved in woody plants under changing ambient CO2: evidence from carbon isotope discrimination in paleo and CO2 enrichment studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising atmospheric [CO2], ca, is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have reported that stomata regulate leaf gas-exchange around &ldq...

  16. Atmospheric concentrations and air–soil gas exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in remote, rural village and urban areas of Beijing–Tianjin region, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Simonich, Staci; Giri, Basant; Chang, Ying; Zhang, Yuguang; Jia, Yuling; Tao, Shu; Wang, Rong; Wang, Bin; Li, Wei; Cao, Jun; Lu, Xiaoxia

    2013-01-01

    Forty passive air samplers were deployed to study the occurrence of gas and particulate phase PAHs in remote, rural village and urban areas of Beijing–Tianjin region, North China for four seasons (spring, summer, fall and winter) from 2007 to 2008. The influence of emissions on the spatial distribution pattern of air PAH concentrations was addressed. In addition, the air–soil gas exchange of PAHs was studied using fugacity calculations. The median gaseous and particulate phase PAH concentrations were 222 ng/m3 and 114 ng/m3, respectively, with a median total PAH concentration of 349 ng/m3. Higher PAH concentrations were measured in winter than in other seasons. Air PAH concentrations measured at the rural villages and urban sites in the northern mountain region were significantly lower than those measured at sites in the southern plain during all seasons. However, there was no significant difference in PAH concentrations between the rural villages and urban sites in the northern and southern areas. This urban–rural PAH distribution pattern was related to the location of PAH emission sources and the population distribution. The location of PAH emission sources explained 56%–77% of the spatial variation in ambient air PAH concentrations. The annual median air–soil gas exchange flux of PAHs was 42.2 ng/m2/day from soil to air. Among the 15 PAHs measured, acenaphthylene (ACY) and acenaphthene (ACE) contributed to more than half of the total exchange flux. Furthermore, the air–soil gas exchange fluxes of PAHs at the urban sites were higher than those at the remote and rural sites. In summer, more gaseous PAHs volatilized from soil to air because of higher temperatures and increased rainfall. However, in winter, more gaseous PAHs deposited from air to soil due to higher PAH emissions and lower temperatures. The soil TOC concentration had no significant influence on the air–soil gas exchange of PAHs. PMID:21669328

  17. Catchment-Wide Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Exchange as Influenced by Land Use Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas; Ringgaard, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    . The measurements also included the turbulent fl uxes of methane above the wet grassland and of nitrous oxide above the agricultural area and ran continuously throughout the year 2009. The highest CO2 uptake rates (around 30 µmol m-2 s-1) were observed at the agricultural site; however, the site was a CO2 sink only...... from April to June and a CO2 source during the rest of the year. Over the whole year the forest plantation fi xed about 1850 g CO2 m-2 compared to only 870 g m-2 at the agricultural site, and it remained a CO2 sink throughout all seasons. The wet grassland site was a CO2 sink from March to October......, and its annual CO2 fixation was only marginally higher than that of the agricultural site. The emission of CH4 from the wet grassland showed large seasonal variations. Its annual total corresponded to 276 g CO2 equivalents m-2 (based on a 100-yrtime horizon) and reduced the greenhouse gas sink strength...

  18. Perfluoropolyether-functionalized gas diffusion layers for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Massimo; Sansotera, Maurizio; Navarrini, Walter; Bianchi, Claudia L.; Gallo Stampino, Paola; Latorrata, Saverio; Dotelli, Giovanni

    2014-07-01

    Linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) peroxide was used to confer superhydrophobic surface properties to gas diffusion layer (GDL) by means of direct functionalization of a GDL based on carbon cloth (CC) material. The thermal decomposition of a linear PFPE peroxide produces linear PFPE radicals that covalently bond the unsaturated moieties on the surface. Perfluorinated radicals are directly and covalently bound to the carbonaceous structure of the CC without any spacer that could decrease both thermal and chemical stability of the GDL. The obtained CC hydrophobicity exceeded the superhydrophobicity threshold and was enduringly stable. The relationship between the linkage of fluorinated chains and the variations of surface chemical-physical properties were studied combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), resistivity measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurements. Despite the excellent insulating properties of the PFPE polymer, the functionalized carbonaceous materials substantially retained their conductive properties. The PFPE-modified GDLs were tested in a single fuel cell at the lab scale. The cell tests were run at two temperatures (60 °C and 80 °C) with a relative humidity (RH) of hydrogen and air feeding gases equal to 80/100% and 60/100%, respectively.

  19. Development of gas diffusion layer using water based carbon slurry for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, J.F.; Liu, X.; Adame, A.; Villacorta, R. [Fuel Cell Research Laboratory, Engineering Technology Department, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States); Wertz, J. [Hollingsworth and Vose Co., A.K. Nicholson Research Lab, 219 Townsend Road, West Groton, MA 01472 (United States); Ahmad, R.; Thommes, M. [Quantachrome Instruments, 1900 Corporate Drive, Boynton Beach, FL 33426 (United States); Kannan, A.M., E-mail: amk@asu.ed [Fuel Cell Research Laboratory, Engineering Technology Department, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The micro-porous layer of gas diffusion layers (GDLs) was fabricated with the carbon slurry dispersed in water containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), by wire rod coating process. The aqueous carbon slurry with micelle-encapsulation was highly consistent and stable without losing any homogeneity even after adding polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder for hundreds of hours. The surface morphology, contact angle and pore size distribution of the GDLs were examined using SEM, Goniometer and Hg Porosimeter, respectively. GDLs fabricated with various SDS concentrations were assembled into MEAs and evaluated in a single cell PEMFC under diverse operating relative humidity (RH) conditions using H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/air as reactants. The peak power density of the single cell using the GDLs with optimum SDS concentration was 1400 and 500 mW cm{sup -2} with H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/air at 90% RH, respectively. GDLs were also fabricated with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) based carbon slurry for fuel cell performance comparison. It was found that the composition of the carbon slurry, specifically SDS concentration played a critical role in controlling the pore diameter as well as the corresponding pore volumes of the GDLs.

  20. Effects of aerial hypoxia and temperature on pulmonary breathing pattern and gas exchange in the South American lungfish, Lepidosiren paradoxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Glauber S F; Ventura, Daniela A D N; Zena, Lucas A; Giusti, Humberto; Glass, Mogens L; Klein, Wilfried

    2017-05-01

    The South American lungfish Lepidosiren paradoxa is an obligatory air-breathing fish possessing well-developed bilateral lungs, and undergoing seasonal changes in its habitat, including temperature changes. In the present study we aimed to evaluate gas exchange and pulmonary breathing pattern in L. paradoxa at different temperatures (25 and 30°C) and different inspired O2 levels (21, 12, 10, and 7%). Normoxic breathing pattern consisted of isolated ventilatory cycles composed of an expiration followed by 2.4±0.2 buccal inspirations. Both expiratory and inspiratory tidal volumes reached a maximum of about 35mlkg-1, indicating that L. paradoxa is able to exchange nearly all of its lung air in a single ventilatory cycle. At both temperatures, hypoxia caused a significant increase in pulmonary ventilation (V̇E), mainly due to an increase in respiratory frequency. Durations of the ventilatory cycle and expiratory and inspiratory tidal volumes were not significantly affected by hypoxia. Expiratory time (but not inspiratory) was significantly shorter at 30°C and at all O2 levels. While a small change in oxygen consumption (V̇O2) could be noticed, the carbon dioxide release (V̇CO2, P=0.0003) and air convection requirement (V̇E/V̇O2, P=0.0001) were significantly affected by hypoxia (7% O2) at both temperatures, when compared to normoxia, and pulmonary diffusion capacity increased about four-fold due to hypoxic exposure. These data highlight important features of the respiratory system of L. paradoxa, capable of matching O2 demand and supply under different environmental change, as well as help to understand the evolution of air breathing in lungfish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase improves gas exchange in ventilator-induced lung injury after pneumonectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suborov Evgeny V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes may cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI and enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO. We demonstrated in sheep that pneumonectomy followed by injurious ventilation promotes pulmonary edema. We wished both to test the hypothesis that neuronal NOS (nNOS, which is distributed in airway epithelial and neuronal tissues, could be involved in the pathogenesis of VILI and we also aimed at investigating the influence of an inhibitor of nNOS on the course of VILI after pneumonectomy. Methods Anesthetized sheep underwent right pneumonectomy, mechanical ventilation with tidal volumes (VT of 6 mL/kg and FiO2 0.5, and were subsequently randomized to a protectively ventilated group (PROTV; n = 8 keeping VT and FiO2 unchanged, respiratory rate (RR 25 inflations/min and PEEP 4 cm H2O for the following 8 hrs; an injuriously ventilated group with VT of 12 mL/kg, zero end-expiratory pressure, and FiO2 and RR unchanged (INJV; n = 8 and a group, which additionally received the inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (NI 1.0 mg/kg/h intravenously from 2 hours after the commencement of injurious ventilation (INJV + NI; n = 8. We assessed respiratory, hemodynamic and volumetric variables, including both the extravascular lung water index (EVLWI and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI. We measured plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx levels and examined lung biopsies for lung injury score (LIS. Results Both the injuriously ventilated groups demonstrated a 2–3-fold rise in EVLWI and PVPI, with no significant effects of NI. In the INJV group, gas exchange deteriorated in parallel with emerging respiratory acidosis, but administration of NI antagonized the derangement of oxygenation and the respiratory acidosis significantly. NOx displayed no significant changes and NI exerted no significant effect on LIS in the INJV group. Conclusion Inhibition of nNOS improved gas exchange

  2. Alterations in Gas Exchange and Oxidative Metabolism in Rice Leaves Infected by Pyricularia oryzae are Attenuated by Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domiciano, Gisele Pereira; Cacique, Isaías Severino; Chagas Freitas, Cecília; Filippi, Marta Cristina Corsi; DaMatta, Fábio Murilo; do Vale, Francisco Xavier Ribeiro; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila

    2015-06-01

    Rice blast, caused by Pyricularia oryzae, is the most important disease in rice worldwide. This study investigated the effects of silicon (Si) on the photosynthetic gas exchange parameters (net CO2 assimilation rate [A], stomatal conductance to water vapor [gs], internal-to-ambient CO2 concentration ratio [Ci/Ca], and transpiration rate [E]); chlorophyll fluorescence a (Chla) parameters (maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II [Fv/Fm], photochemical [qP] and nonphotochemical [NPQ] quenching coefficients, and electron transport rate [ETR]); concentrations of pigments, malondialdehyde (MDA), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2); and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and lypoxigenase (LOX) in rice leaves. Rice plants were grown in a nutrient solution containing 0 or 2 mM Si (-Si or +Si, respectively) with and without P. oryzae inoculation. Blast severity decreased with higher foliar Si concentration. The values of A, gs and E were generally higher for the +Si plants in comparison with the -Si plants upon P. oryzae infection. The Fv/Fm, qp, NPQ, and ETR were greater for the +Si plants relative to the -Si plants at 108 and 132 h after inoculation (hai). The values for qp and ETR were significantly higher for the -Si plants in comparison with the +Si plants at 36 hai, and the NPQ was significantly higher for the -Si plants in comparison with the +Si plants at 0 and 36 hai. The concentrations of Chla, Chlb, Chla+b, and carotenoids were significantly greater in the +Si plants relative to the -Si plants. For the -Si plants, the MDA and H2O2 concentrations were significantly higher than those in the +Si plants. The LOX activity was significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the -Si plants. The SOD and GR activities were significantly higher for the -Si plants than in the +Si plants. The CAT and APX activities were significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the -Si plants. The supply of

  3. Comparison of Univent tube and EZ blocker in one lung ventilation; airway pressures and gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoşten, Tülay; Aksu, Can; Kuş, Alparslan; Cesur, Sevim; Türkyılmaz, Neşe; Solak, Mine

    2017-05-13

    Univent tube (UT) and EZ-blocker were used for one-lung ventilation (OLV). UT is a single lumen tube with a small separate lumen containing a bronchial blocker. EZ-blocker differs with its unique y-shaped double-cuffed distal end. We aimed to compare these two airway devices effects on airway pressures, oxygenation, ventilation and haemodynamics during OLV. Patients undergoing elective thoracotomy for the first time were included in this prospective randomized study. Patients were divided into two groups as UT and EZ. Bronchial blockers (BB) placement time was recorded. In lateral decubitus position, airway pressures, static compliance, tidal volume (TV), respiratory rate (RR) and haemodynamic findings were recorded before inflating the BB cuff (Pre-OLV) and during OLV every 15 min. Arterial blood gas (ABG) samples were obtained before and during OLV. 70 patients were enrolled in the study. The demographic characteristics and data related to anesthesia and surgery were similar in both groups. It took longer to place EZ than UT (p = 0.02). Ppeak values were similar in both groups. Pplateau was significantly lower at the beginning of OLV (OLV15th min) and higher at the end of OLV (pre-DLV) in EZ group compared to UT (p = 0.01, p = 0.03). Cstatic were significantly higher at the beginning of OLV (OLV15th min) in EZ group compared to UT (p = 0.01). During the following measurements, Cstatic values were similar for both groups. Ventilation were achieved with similar TV and RR. ABG findings and haemodynamic variables were similar. EZ and Univent tube affected the airway pressures, oxygenation, ventilation and haemodynamic variables similarly during OLV in patients with normal respiratory function. These devices can be alternatives to each other based on clinical conditions.

  4. In vivo incorporation of copper into the iron-exchangeable and manganese-exchangeable superoxide dismutase from Propionibacterium shermanii. Amino acid sequence and identity of the protein moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, B; Sehn, A P; Schininà, M E; Barra, D

    1994-01-15

    Propionibacterium shermanii, an aerotolerant anaerobe, produces an iron-containing or a manganese-containing superoxide dismutase, depending on the metal supplied in the culture medium [Meier, B., Barra, D., Bossa, F., Calabrese, L. & Rotilio, G. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13977-13980]. In this study, we demonstrate in vivo incorporation of copper into an active superoxide-dismutase protein when iron and manganese are absent from the growth medium. Superoxide dismutases containing either iron, manganese or copper were isolated from P. shermanii, their complete amino acid sequences were determined and the identity of their protein moieties was established. The polypeptide chain is made up of 201 amino acid residues, corresponding to a molecular mass of 22.6 kDa. From sedimentation equilibrium experiments, the native protein shows a molecular mass of approximately 86 kDa and therefore consists of four identical subunits. The primary structure was compared with the structure of other Fe-superoxide dismutases and Mn-superoxide dismutases, in particular those possessing a strict metal cofactor specificity.

  5. Hydrogen gas reduces hyperoxic lung injury via the Nrf2 pathway in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tomohiro; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Shigemura, Norihisa; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Masutani, Kosuke; Tanaka, Yugo; Noda, Kentaro; Peng, Ximei; Takahashi, Toru; Billiar, Timothy R.; Okumura, Meinoshin; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperoxic lung injury is a major concern in critically ill patients who receive high concentrations of oxygen to treat lung diseases. Successful abrogation of hyperoxic lung injury would have a huge impact on respiratory and critical care medicine. Hydrogen can be administered as a therapeutic medical gas. We recently demonstrated that inhaled hydrogen reduced transplant-induced lung injury and induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1. To determine whether hydrogen could reduce hyperoxic lung injury and investigate the underlying mechanisms, we randomly assigned rats to four experimental groups and administered the following gas mixtures for 60 h: 98% oxygen (hyperoxia), 2% nitrogen; 98% oxygen (hyperoxia), 2% hydrogen; 98% balanced air (normoxia), 2% nitrogen; and 98% balanced air (normoxia), 2% hydrogen. We examined lung function by blood gas analysis, extent of lung injury, and expression of HO-1. We also investigated the role of NF-E2-related factor (Nrf) 2, which regulates HO-1 expression, by examining the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes and the ability of hydrogen to reduce hyperoxic lung injury in Nrf2-deficient mice. Hydrogen treatment during exposure to hyperoxia significantly improved blood oxygenation, reduced inflammatory events, and induced HO-1 expression. Hydrogen did not mitigate hyperoxic lung injury or induce HO-1 in Nrf2-deficient mice. These findings indicate that hydrogen gas can ameliorate hyperoxic lung injury through induction of Nrf2-dependent genes, such as HO-1. The findings suggest a potentially novel and applicable solution to hyperoxic lung injury and provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms and actions of hydrogen. PMID:23475767

  6. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure titration on gas exchange, respiratory mechanics and hemodynamics in anesthetized horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrósio, Aline M; Ida, Keila K; Souto, Maria Tmr; Oshiro, Alexandre H; Fantoni, Denise T

    2013-11-01

    To assess if positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration improves gas exchange and respiratory mechanics, without hemodynamic impairment in horses during anesthesia. Prospective, randomized study. Thirteen isoflurane-anesthetized healthy horses. After 60 minutes of anesthesia with spontaneous breathing, mechanical ventilation was initiated with an inspiratory-expiratory ratio of 1:2, PEEP of 5 cmH2O, tidal volume of 10-20 mL kg(-1) and respiratory rate adjusted to maintain normocapnia. Constant PEEP of 5 cmH2O was continued (control group; n = 6) or titrated (PEEP group; n = 7) by increasing and decreasing PEEP from 5 to 20 cmH2O at 15-minute intervals. The horses were instrumented with an arterial catheter to measure blood pressure and allow collection of blood for pH and blood gas analysis and a Swan-Ganz catheter for measurement of cardiac output (CO) using thermodilution. Cardiopulmonary assessment was recorded before PEEP titration and after 15 minutes at each PEEP value. In the PEEP group, static compliance (range) (Cst 278-463 mL cmH2O(-1)) was significantly higher and the shunt fraction (Q·s/Q·t 7-20%) and the alveolar-arterial oxygen difference [P(A-a)O2 95-325 mmHg] were significantly lower than in the control group [Cst of 246-290 mL cmH2O(-1), Q·s/Q·t of 16-19%, P(A-a)O2 of 253-310 mmHg; p respiratory mechanics impairment during inhalation anesthesia can be treated using PEEP titration from 5 to 20 cmH2O, without clinically important hemodynamic effects in healthy horses. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  7. Influences of pleural effusion on respiratory mechanics, gas exchange, hemodynamics, and recruitment effects in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chou-Chin; Hsu, Hsian-He; Wu, Chin-Pyng; Lee, Shih-Chun; Peng, Chung-Kan; Chang, Hung

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) cause substantial morbidity and mortality despite improvements in the understanding of lung injury and advances in treatment. Recruitment maneuver (RM) with high sustained airway pressures is proposed as an adjunct to mechanical ventilation to maintain alveolar patency. In addition, RM has been advocated to improve pulmonary gas exchange. However, many factors may influence responses to RM and the effect of pleural effusion (PLE) is unknown. There were four groups in this study (n = 6 in each group). Group A was the control group, group B was the PLE group, group C was ARDS with RM, and group D was ARDS with PLE and RM. RM was performed in groups C and D, consisting of a peak pressure of 45 cm H2O with positive end-expiratory pressure of 35 cm H2O sustained for 1 min. Arterial blood gas, systemic and pulmonary hemodynamics, lung water, and respiratory mechanics were measured throughout. After the induction of ALI/ARDS, there were significant decreases in partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood, mean arterial pressure, systemic vascular resistance, and lung compliance. There were also significant increases in the alveolar-arterial O2 tension difference, partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, and lung water. The RM improved oxygenation, which was attenuated by PLE. ALI/ARDS leads to poor oxygenation and hemodynamics. RM results in improved oxygenation, but this improvement is attenuated by PLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Water vapor exchange system using a hydrophilic microporous layer coated gas diffusion layer to enhance performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells without cathode humidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Tatsumi; Nakajima, Hironori; Morishita, Masashi

    2012-09-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) generally have external humidifiers to supply humidified hydrogen and oxidant gases, which prevents dehydration of the membrane. If a PEFC could be operated without humidification, then external humidifiers could be removed, which would result in a simplified PEFC system with increased total efficiency and reduced cost. A water vapor exchange system installed in the PEFC was developed to enhance the performance without cathode humidification. A gas diffusion layer (GDL) coated with a hydrophobic microporous layer (MPL) was used at the active reaction area. A GDL coated with a hydrophilic MPL consisting of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and carbon black was used at the cathode water vapor exchange area to promote water transport from the cathode outlet wet gas to the anode inlet dry gas. This is effective for reducing the IR overpotential, which enhances the PEFC performance. Appropriate enhancement of hydrophilicity by increasing the PVA content in the MPL to 20 mass% is effective to increase water transport from the cathode to anode. At the anode water exchange area, a GDL without the hydrophilic MPL is effective to promote water transport from the water exchange area to the active reaction area, which enhances the PEFC performance.

  9. Mycorrhizal Stimulation of Leaf Gas Exchange in Relation to Root Colonization, Shoot Size, Leaf Phosphorus and Nitrogen: A Quantitative Analysis of the Literature Using Meta-Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augé, Robert M.; Toler, Heather D.; Saxton, Arnold M.

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis often stimulates gas exchange rates of the host plant. This may relate to mycorrhizal effects on host nutrition and growth rate, or the influence may occur independently of these. Using meta-regression, we tested the strength of the relationship between AM-induced increases in gas exchange, and AM size and leaf mineral effects across the literature. With only a few exceptions, AM stimulation of carbon exchange rate (CER), stomatal conductance (gs), and transpiration rate (E) has been significantly associated with mycorrhizal stimulation of shoot dry weight, leaf phosphorus, leaf nitrogen:phosphorus ratio, and percent root colonization. The sizeable mycorrhizal stimulation of CER, by 49% over all studies, has been about twice as large as the mycorrhizal stimulation of gs and E (28 and 26%, respectively). CER has been over twice as sensitive as gs and four times as sensitive as E to mycorrhizal colonization rates. The AM-induced stimulation of CER increased by 19% with each AM-induced doubling of shoot size; the AM effect was about half as large for gs and E. The ratio of leaf N to leaf P has been more closely associated with mycorrhizal influence on leaf gas exchange than leaf P alone. The mycorrhizal influence on CER has declined markedly over the 35 years of published investigations. PMID:27524989

  10. Project, construction and assembling of a compact heat exchanger for natural gas generator; Nacionalizacao de um recuperador de calor destinado ao reaproveitamento energetico dos gases de combustao de uma microturbina alimentada com gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Raphael Chaves; Dutra, Jose Carlos Charamba; Santos, Thiago Victor de Oliveira; Oliveira, Guilherme Lacerda Batista de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this work is to present the construction of a heat exchanger developed for reuse of hot gases from a natural gas microturbine installed at the Laboratory of Micro-CHP at Federal University of Pernambuco. As in Brazil there was no manufacturer of similar equipment that could be used with this microturbine and imported equipment is very expensive, it, has proposed a project to CNPq for development of a national prototype, capable of replacing imports. The work talks about the design, construction, assembly, instrumentation and operation. The paper presents data taken from heat exchanger in operation. We recorded the temperature of fluids and held thermal exchange, which allowed the calculation of its effectiveness. The results show that the heat exchanger reached a satisfactory performance with maximum effectiveness of 0.8, condition for the full load of microturbine, and that represents a maximum heat recovered around 50 kW. (author)

  11. Biomass, gas exchange, and nutrient contents in upland rice plants affected by application forms of microorganism growth promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascente, Adriano Stephan; de Filippi, Marta Cristina Corsi; Lanna, Anna Cristina; de Souza, Alan Carlos Alves; da Silva Lobo, Valácia Lemes; da Silva, Gisele Barata

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms are considered a genetic resource with great potential for achieving sustainable development of agricultural areas. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of microorganism application forms on the production of biomass, gas exchange, and nutrient content in upland rice. The experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions in a completely randomized design in a factorial 7 × 3 + 1, with four replications. The treatments consisted of combining seven microorganisms with three application forms (microbiolized seed; microbiolized seed + soil drenched with a microorganism suspension at 7 and 15 days after sowing (DAS); and microbiolized seed + plant sprayed with a microorganism suspension at 7 and 15 DAS) and a control (water). Treatments with Serratia sp. (BRM32114), Bacillus sp. (BRM32110 and BRM32109), and Trichoderma asperellum pool provided, on average, the highest photosynthetic rate values and dry matter biomass of rice shoots. Plants treated with Burkolderia sp. (BRM32113), Serratia sp. (BRM32114), and Pseudomonas sp. (BRM32111 and BRM32112) led to the greatest nutrient uptake by rice shoots. Serratia sp. (BRM 32114) was the most effective for promoting an increase in the photosynthetic rate, and for the greatest accumulation of nutrients and dry matter at 84 DAS, in rice shoots, which differed from the control treatment. The use of microorganisms can bring numerous benefits of rice, such as improving physiological characteristics, nutrient uptake, biomass production, and grain yield.

  12. Effect of progressive drought stress on growth, leaf gas exchange, and antioxidant production in two maize cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Shakeel Ahmad; Tanveer, Mohsin; Ashraf, Umair; Hussain, Saddam; Shahzad, Babar; Khan, Imran; Wang, Longchang

    2016-09-01

    Drought stress is one of the major environmental factors responsible for reduction in crop productivity. In the present study, responses of two maize cultivars (Rung Nong 35 and Dong Dan 80) were examined to explicate the growth, yield, leaf gas exchange, leaf water contents, osmolyte accumulation, membrane lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant activity under progressive drought stress. Maize cultivars were subjected to varying field capacities (FC) viz., well-watered (80 % FC) and drought-stressed (35 % FC) at 45 days after sowing. The effects of drought stress were analyzed at 5, 10, 15, 20, ad 25 days after drought stress (DAS) imposition. Under prolonged drought stress, Rung Nong 35 exhibited higher reduction in growth and yield as compared to Dong Dan 80. Maize cultivar Dong Dan 80 showed higher leaf relative water content (RWC), free proline, and total carbohydrate accumulation than Run Nong 35. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide anion were increased with prolongation of drought stress, with higher rates in cultivar Run Nong 35 than cultivar Dong Dan 80. Higher production of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) resulted in improved growth and yield in Dong Dan 80. Overall, the cultivar Dong Dan 80 was better able to resist the detrimental effects of progressive drought stress as indicated by better growth and yield due to higher antioxidant enzymes, reduced lipid peroxidation, better accumulation of osmolytes, and maintenance of tissue water contents.

  13. Seasonal and diurnal gas exchange differences in ozone-sensitive common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) in relation to ozone uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergweiler, Chris [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)], E-mail: bergweiler@nre.umass.edu; Manning, William J. [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Chevone, Boris I. [Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis of common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) plants in two different soil moisture regimes were directly quantified and subsequently modeled over an entire growing season. Direct measurements captured the dynamic response of stomatal conductance to changing environmental conditions throughout the day, as well as declining gas exchange and carbon assimilation throughout the growth period beyond an early summer maximum. This phenomenon was observed in plants grown both with and without supplemental soil moisture, the latter of which should theoretically mitigate against harmful physiological effects caused by exposure to ozone. Seasonally declining rates of stomatal conductance were found to be substantial and incorporated into models, making them less susceptible to the overestimations of effective exposure that are an inherent source of error in ozone exposure indices. The species-specific evidence presented here supports the integration of dynamic physiological processes into flux-based modeling approaches for the prediction of ozone injury in vegetation. - Temporal variation in physiological processes underlying diurnal and seasonal ozone uptake are described for a key ozone bioindicator species of North America.

  14. Deriving ozone dose-response of photosynthesis in adult forest trees from branch-level cuvette gas exchange assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Then, C. [Unit of Alpine Timberline Ecophysiology, Federal Office and Research Centre for Forests, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Science Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany)], E-mail: christiane.then@uibk.ac.at; Loew, M.; Matyssek, R. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Science Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Wieser, G. [Unit of Alpine Timberline Ecophysiology, Federal Office and Research Centre for Forests, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2008-06-15

    Branch-level gas exchange provided the basis for assessing ozone flux in order to derive the dose-response relationship between cumulative O{sub 3} uptake (COU) and carbon gain in the upper sun crown of adult Fagus sylvatica. Fluxes of ozone, CO{sub 2} and water vapour were monitored simultaneously by climatized branch cuvettes. The cuvettes allowed branch exposure to an ambient or twice-ambient O{sub 3} regime, while tree crowns were exposed to the same O{sub 3} regimes (twice-ambient generated by a free-air canopy O{sub 3} exposure system). COU levels higher than 20 mmol m{sup -2} led to a pronounced decline in carbon gain under elevated O{sub 3}. The limiting COU range is consistent with findings on neighbouring branches exposed to twice-ambient O{sub 3} through free-air fumigation. The cuvette approach allows to estimate O{sub 3} flux at peripheral crown positions, where boundary layers are low, yielding a meso-scale within-crown resolution of photosynthetic foliage sensitivity under whole-tree free-air O{sub 3} fumigation. - Branch-level O{sub 3} dose dependence of photosynthesis derived from cuvette assessment yields sun-crown foliage sensitivity under whole-tree free-air O{sub 3} fumigation.

  15. Gas exchange and growth responses to nutrient enrichment in invasive Glyceria maxima and native New Zealand Carex species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorrell, Brian Keith; Brix, Hans; Fitridge, Isla

    2012-01-01

    the sedges, but correlations between leaf N, gas exchange parameters (Amaxa, Amaxm, Rd and gs) and RGR were all highly significant in G. maxima, whereas they were weak or absent in the sedges. Allocation of biomass (root:shoot ratio, leaf mass ratio, root mass ratio), plant N and P content, and allocation......) in G. maxima (17 ± 6 m2 kg-1) was 1.3 times that of the sedges, leading to 1.4 times higher maximum rates of photosynthesis (350 – 400 nmol CO2 g-1 dry mass s-1) expressed on a leaf mass basis (Amaxm) when N supply was unlimited, compared to the sedges (mass s-1). Analysis......, the sedges had 2.4 times higher intrinsic water use efficiency (A/gs: range 20-70 c.f. 8-30 µmol CO2 mol-1 H2O) and 1.6 times higher nitrogen use efficiency (NUE: 25 – 30 c.f. 20 – 23 g dry mass g-1 N) under excess N supply. Relative growth rates (RGR) were not significantly higher in G. maxima than...

  16. Gas diffusion electrode based on electrospun Pani/CNF nanofibers hybrid for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezarjaribi, M.; Jahanshahi, M.; Rahimpour, A.; Yaldagard, M.

    2014-03-01

    A novel hybrid system has been investigated based on polyaniline/carbon nanofiber (Pani/CNF) electrospun nanofibers for modification of gas diffusion electrode (GDE) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Pani/CNF hybrid nanofibers were synthesized directly on carbon paper by electrospinning method. For preparation of catalyst ink, 20 wt.% Pt/C electrocatalyst with a platinum loading of 0.4 mg cm-2 was prepared by polyol technique. SEM studies applied for morphological study of the modified GDE with hybrid nanofibers. This technique indicated that the electrospun nanofibers had a diameter of roughly 100 nm. XRD patterns also showed that the average size of Pt nanoparticles was about 2 nm. Subsequently, comparison of the hybrid electrode electrochemical behavior and 20 wt.% Pt/C commercial one was studied by cyclic voltammetry experiment. The electrochemical data indicated that the hybrid electrode exhibited higher current density (about 15 mA cm-2) and ESA (160 m2 gr-1) than commercial Pt/C with amount of about 10 mA cm-2 and 114 m2 gr-1, respectively. The results herein demonstrate that Pani/CNF nanofibers can be used as a good alternative electrode material for PEMFCs.

  17. Gas diffusion electrode based on electrospun Pani/CNF nanofibers hybrid for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hezarjaribi, M.; Jahanshahi, M., E-mail: mjahan@nit.ac.ir; Rahimpour, A.; Yaldagard, M.

    2014-03-01

    A novel hybrid system has been investigated based on polyaniline/carbon nanofiber (Pani/CNF) electrospun nanofibers for modification of gas diffusion electrode (GDE) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Pani/CNF hybrid nanofibers were synthesized directly on carbon paper by electrospinning method. For preparation of catalyst ink, 20 wt.% Pt/C electrocatalyst with a platinum loading of 0.4 mg cm{sup −2} was prepared by polyol technique. SEM studies applied for morphological study of the modified GDE with hybrid nanofibers. This technique indicated that the electrospun nanofibers had a diameter of roughly 100 nm. XRD patterns also showed that the average size of Pt nanoparticles was about 2 nm. Subsequently, comparison of the hybrid electrode electrochemical behavior and 20 wt.% Pt/C commercial one was studied by cyclic voltammetry experiment. The electrochemical data indicated that the hybrid electrode exhibited higher current density (about 15 mA cm{sup −2}) and ESA (160 m{sup 2} gr{sup −1}) than commercial Pt/C with amount of about 10 mA cm{sup −2} and 114 m{sup 2} gr{sup −1}, respectively. The results herein demonstrate that Pani/CNF nanofibers can be used as a good alternative electrode material for PEMFCs.

  18. Short-term effects of light quality on leaf gas exchange and hydraulic properties of silver birch (Betula pendula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niglas, Aigar; Papp, Kaisa; Sekiewicz, Maciej; Sellin, Arne

    2017-09-01

    Leaves have to acclimatize to heterogeneous radiation fields inside forest canopies in order to efficiently exploit diverse light conditions. Short-term effects of light quality on photosynthetic gas exchange, leaf water use and hydraulic traits were studied on Betula pendula Roth shoots cut from upper and lower thirds of the canopy of 39- to 35-year-old trees growing in natural forest stand, and illuminated with white, red or blue light in the laboratory. Photosynthetic machinery of the leaves developed in different spectral conditions acclimated differently with respect to incident light spectrum: the stimulating effect of complete visible spectrum (white light) on net photosynthesis is more pronounced in upper-canopy layers. Upper-canopy leaves exhibit less water saving behaviour, which may be beneficial for the fast-growing pioneer species on a daily basis. Lower-canopy leaves have lower stomatal conductance resulting in more efficient water use. Spectral gradients existing within natural forest stands represent signals for the fine-tuning of stomatal conductance and tree water relations to afford lavish water use in sun foliage and enhance leaf water-use efficiency in shade foliage sustaining greater hydraulic limitations. Higher sensitivity of hydraulic conductance of shade leaves to blue light probably contributes to the efficient use of short duration sunflecks by lower-canopy leaves. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The effect of foliar feeding of potassium salts and urea in spinach on gas exchange, leaf yield and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Borowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In a pot experiment conducted in a phytotron, the effectiveness of foliar feeding of different potassium salts, with and without the addition of 0.5% CO(NH22, in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. was investigated. Potassium was applied 3 times in the form of 1% solutions KCl, KNO3, K2SO4 and C6H5K3O7•H2O, compared to water as the control treatment. The obtained results show that foliar feeding of potassium salts in spinach is an efficient method of supplementing the level of K+ in plants during vegetation. Plants fed with KNO3 had the highest content of potassium in leaves, and those fertilized with K2SO4, C6H5K3O7 × H2O and KCl had an only slightly lower potassium content. The application of potassium salts resulted in more intensive gas exchange in leaves (stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, transpiration and, as a consequence of that, increased leaf yield. Potassium nitrate and citrate influenced most effectively the abovementioned processes. The treatment of spinach with potassium salts resulted in an increased content of protein, chlorophyll, carotenoids, nitrates and iron as well as a decreased content of vitamin C and calcium in leaves.

  20. Selective pulmonary vasodilation improves ventriculovascular coupling and gas exchange in a patient with unrepaired single-ventricle physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischard, F; Vanderpool, R; Jenkins, I; Dalabih, M; Colombo, J; Lax, D; Seckeler, M

    2015-06-01

    We describe a 63-year-old patient with unrepaired tricuspid valve atresia and a hypoplastic right ventricle (single-ventricle physiology) who presented with progressive symptomatic hypoxia. Her anatomy resulted in parallel pulmonary and systemic circulations, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and uncoupling of the ventricle/pulmonary artery. Hemodynamic and coupling data were obtained before and after pulmonary vasoactive treatment, first inhaled nitric oxide and later inhaled treprostinil. The coupling ratio (ratio of ventricular to vascular elastance) shunt fractions and dead space ventilation were calculated before and after treatment. Treatment resulted in improvement of the coupling ratio between the ventricle and the vasculature with optimization of stroke work, equalization of pulmonary and systolic flows, a decrease in dead space ventilation from 75% to 55%, and a significant increase in 6-minute walk distance and improved hypoxia. Inhaled treprostinil significantly increased 6-minute walk distance and improved hypoxia. This is the first report to show that pulmonary vasoactive treatment can be used in a patient with unrepaired single-ventricle anatomy and describes the hemodynamic effects of inhaled therapy on ventriculovascular coupling and gas exchange in the pulmonary circulation in this unique physiology.

  1. Pulmonary gas exchange and acid–base status during immobilisation of black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Fahlman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When immobilising wildlife, adverse side effects can include hypoxaemia, acidosis and hypertension. Pulmonary gas exchange and acid–base status were evaluated during immobilisation of 25 free-ranging and one boma-held black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis in Zimbabwe. The effect of different body positions on arterial oxygenation was evaluated. A combination of the following drugs was used: an opioid (etorphine or thiafentanil, azaperone and an a2 -adrenoceptor agonist (detomidine or xylazine. Respiratory and heart rates, rectal temperature and pulse oximetry–derived haemoglobin oxygen saturation were recorded. Serial arterial blood samples were analysed immediately in the field. Marked hypoxaemia and hypercapnia were recorded in immobilised free-ranging black rhinoceroses. Arterial oxygenation was higher during sternal compared to lateral recumbency. Most rhinoceroses developed acidaemia of respiratory and metabolic origin. Initially high lactate concentrations in free-ranging rhinoceroses decreased during immobilisation. Pulse oximetry was unreliable in the detection of hypoxaemia. Positioning in sternal recumbency and routine use of oxygen supplementation are recommended in the management of immobilised rhinoceroses as measures to improve arterial oxygenation.

  2. Isothermal ice crystallization kinetics in the gas-diffusion layer of a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, T J; Ciontea, M A; Radke, C J; Weber, A Z

    2012-01-17

    Nucleation and growth of ice in the fibrous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) are investigated using isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Isothermal crystallization rates and pseudo-steady-state nucleation rates are obtained as a function of subcooling from heat-flow and induction-time measurements. Kinetics of ice nucleation and growth are studied at two polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) loadings (0 and 10 wt %) in a commercial GDL for temperatures between 240 and 273 K. A nonlinear ice-crystallization rate expression is developed using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory, in which the heat-transfer-limited growth rate is determined from the moving-boundary Stefan problem. Induction times follow a Poisson distribution and increase upon addition of PTFE, indicating that nucleation occurs more slowly on a hydrophobic fiber than on a hydrophilic fiber. The determined nucleation rates and induction times follow expected trends from classical nucleation theory. A validated rate expression is now available for predicting ice-crystallization kinetics in GDLs. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Effects of ozone on growth, yield and leaf gas exchange rates of four Bangladeshi cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhtar, Nahid [United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Inada, Hidetoshi; Hoshino, Daiki; Kondo, Taisuke [Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Fukami, Motohiro [Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505 (Japan); Funada, Ryo [Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Izuta, Takeshi, E-mail: izuta@cc.tuat.ac.j [Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    To assess the effects of tropospheric O{sub 3} on rice cultivated in Bangladesh, four Bangladeshi cultivars (BR11, BR14, BR28 and BR29) of rice (Oryza sativa L.) were exposed daily to charcoal-filtered air or O{sub 3} at 60 and 100 nl l{sup -1} (10:00-17:00) from 1 July to 28 November 2008. The whole-plant dry mass and grain yield per plant of the four cultivars were significantly reduced by the exposure to O{sub 3}. The exposure to O{sub 3} significantly reduced net photosynthetic rate of the 12th and flag leaves of the four cultivars. The sensitivity to O{sub 3} of growth, yield and leaf gas exchange rates was not significantly different among the four cultivars. The present study suggests that the sensitivity to O{sub 3} of yield of the four Bangladeshi rice cultivars is greater than that of American rice cultivars and is similar to that of Japanese rice cultivars and that O{sub 3} may detrimentally affect rice production in Bangladesh. - Bangladeshi cultivars of rice are sensitive to O{sub 3} below 100 ppb.

  4. Comparative gas exchange and growth responses of C3 and C4 beach species grown at different salinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, T M

    1978-01-01

    Comparative laboratory gas exchange and relative growth rate experiments were conducted on three native California coastal strand species at four salinity treatment levels. Relative mesophyll conductance sensitivities to salinity of Atriplex leucophylla (Moq.) D. Dietr. (C4) and Atriplex californica Moq. in D.C. (C3) were nearly identical. Mesophyll conductances of both species were stimulated by moderate levels of salinity. Mesophyll conductances of Abronia maritima Nutt. ex Wats. (C3) were highest in the absence of salinity and depressed by increasing levels of salinity. Increasing levels of salinity generally decreased net photosynthesis and leaf conductances but increased water use efficiencies. The C4 species, Atriplex leucophylla, had higher mesophyll conductances and water use efficiencies at all salinity levels than the C3 species. The effects of salinity on relative growth and net assimilation rates of greenhouse grown plants were not directly correlated with the effects on net photosynthesis measured in the laboratory. Growth of Abronia maritima was greatly stimulated by low levels of salinity whereas photosynthesis was substantially inhibited. The possible significance of C4 photosynthesis in relation to salinity is discussed.

  5. Structure of the thoracic spiracular valves and their contribution to unidirectional gas exchange in flying blowflies Calliphora vicina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserthal, Lutz T; Fröhlich, Anja S

    2017-01-15

    The operation of the thoracic spiracular valves was analysed using anatomical and physiological techniques. Dense spiracular filter trichomes impede a diffusive gas exchange. However, the hinged posterior filter flap of the metathoracic spiracle (Sp2) opens passively during upstroke of the wings and closes by the suction of the sub-atmospheric tracheal pressure during the downstroke, which supports a unidirectional respiratory airflow. The action of the interior spiracular valve lids was recorded by photocell sensors oriented above the enlarged spiracles and projected onto the screen of a video camera. The thoracic spiracles opened much quicker (approximately 0.1 s) than they closed (1 s), suggesting that the spiracular muscles are openers, as confirmed by experimental induction of muscle contraction. Simultaneous photocell measurement revealed that the first and second thoracic spiracles act concordantly. At rest, the spiracles were mostly closed or only slightly open (flights, the valves opened wide at the start of the flight for a short time, and in many cases opened again after the flight ended. Often, the opening was wider after the flight ended than during the flight itself. During long spontaneous continuous flight phases (up to 2 h), the valves were only slightly open (flight. The advantage of generating sub-atmospheric pressure, supporting a unidirectional airflow with a PO2  increase above the resting level, is discussed. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Gas analyzer’s drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibai eGarcia-Tabar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2 and carbon dioxide (FCO2 of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001 in FO2 and FCO2 of -0.18% and -0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptake values were 5-6% lower (P < 0.001 whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8-9% higher (P < 0.001. The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 minutes of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise.

  7. The effect of strobilurins on leaf gas exchange, water use efficiency and ABA content in grapevine under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Espejo, Antonio; Cuevas, María Victoria; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel; Flexas, Jaume; Martorell, Sebastian; Fernández, José Enrique

    2012-03-01

    Strobilurins are one of the most important classes of agricultural fungicides. In addition to their anti-fungal effect, strobilurins have been reported to produce simultaneous effects in plant physiology. This study investigated whether the use of strobilurin fungicide improved water use efficiency in leaves of grapevines grown under field conditions in a Mediterranean climate in southern Spain. Fungicide was applied three times in the vineyard and measurements of leaf gas exchange, plant water status, abscisic acid concentration in sap ([ABA]), and carbon isotope composition in leaves were performed before and after applications. No clear effect on stomatal conductance, leaf water potential and intrinsic water use efficiency was found after three fungicide applications. ABA concentration was observed to increase after fungicide application on the first day, vanishing three days later. Despite this transient effect, evolution of [ABA] matched well with the evolution of leaf carbon isotope ratio, which can be used as a surrogate for plant water use efficiency. Morning stomatal conductance was negatively correlated to [ABA]. Yield was enhanced in strobilurin treated plants, whereas fruit quality remained unaltered. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Evaluation of a gas in vitro system for predicting methane production in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsson, Rebecca; Ramin, Mohammad; Bertilsson, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Methane production from ruminant livestock varies with the diet as a result of factors such as dry matter intake, diet composition, and digestibility. To estimate the effect of dietary composition and feed additives, CH4 production can be measured in vitro as a first step because large numbers...... known to affect CH4 production such as dry matter intake, digestibility, and dietary concentrations of fat and starch. However, some factors included in the model were not well predicted by the system, with residuals negatively related to neutral detergent fiber concentration and positively related...... obtained were slightly underestimated compared with observed in vivo values (mean 399 L/d compared with 418 L/d: root mean square prediction error = 51.6 L/d or 12.3% of observed mean). Further analysis of the effect on residuals showed no significant relationship between CH4 production and most factors...

  9. Effects of vegetation structure on soil carbon, nutrients and greenhouse gas exchange in a savannah ecosystem of Mount Kilimanjaro Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J.

    2015-12-01

    The savannah biome is a hotspot for biodiversity and wildlife conservation in Africa and recently got in the focus of research on carbon sequestration. Savannah ecosystems are under strong pressure from climate and land-use change, especially around populous areas like the Mt. Kilimanjaro region. Savannah vegetation consists of grassland with isolated trees and is therefore characterized by high spatial variation of canopy cover, aboveground biomass and root structure. The canopy structure is a major regulator for soil ecological parameters and soil-atmospheric trace gas exchange (CO2, N2O, CH4) in water limited environments. The spatial distribution of these parameters and the connection between above and belowground processes are important to understand and predict ecosystem changes and estimate its vulnerability. Our objective was to determine spatial trends and changes of soil parameters and relate their variability to the vegetation structure. We chose three trees from each of the two most dominant species (Acacia nilotica and Balanites aegyptiaca) in our research area. For each tree, we selected transects with nine sampling points of the same relative distances to the stem. At these each sampling point a soil core was taken and separated in 0-10 cm and 10-30 cm depth. We measured soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage, microbial biomass C and N, Natural δ13C, soil respiration, available nutrients, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC) as well as root biomass and -density, soil temperature and soil water content. Concentrations and stocks of C and N fractions, CEC and K+ decreased up to 50% outside the crown covered area. Microbial C:N ratio and CO2 efflux was about 30% higher outside the crown. This indicates N limitation and low C use efficiency in soil outside the crown area. We conclude that the spatial structure of aboveground biomass in savanna ecosystems leads to a spatial variance in nutrient limitation. Therefore, the capability of a savanna ecosystem

  10. A financial review and cost - benefit analysis of fuel storage tank upgrades at the Navy Exchange Gas Station, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California

    OpenAIRE

    Geldermann, Daniel F.

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis examines the costing allocations at the Navy Exchange Gas Station, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey California. From this a complete cost picture has been provided from which to improve cost data for future upgrade and maintenance decisions involving the facilities. This is becoming more critical in fight of both the funding reductions currently being experienced by the military services, and the growing complexity and e...

  11. The effect of the application of the biological control agent EM1 on gas exchange parameters and productivity of Pisum sativum L. infected with Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht.

    OpenAIRE

    Adam Okorski; Jacek Olszewski; Katarzyna Głowacka; Sylwia Okorska; Agnieszka Pszczółkowska

    2012-01-01

    A pot experiment on different methods of EM 1 application was conducted in the period 2002-2004. The study was carried out under controlled growth conditions. The experimental factor was the method of EM1 application. Before application, the biological preparation EM1 was propagated as recommended by the manufacturer (Greenland). The health status of the aboveground parts of 'Ramrod' pea plants was estimated at the flowering stage. The assessment of pea leaf gas exchange parameters (An, E, Gs...

  12. Combined effects of ventilation mode and positive end-expiratory pressure on mechanics, gas exchange and the epithelium in mice with acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammanomai, Apiradee; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The accepted protocol to ventilate patients with acute lung injury is to use low tidal volume (V(T)) in combination with recruitment maneuvers or positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, an important aspect of mechanical ventilation has not been considered: the combined effects of PEEP and ventilation modes on the integrity of the epithelium. Additionally, it is implicitly assumed that the best PEEP-V(T) combination also protects the epithelium. We aimed to investigate the effects of ventilation mode and PEEP on respiratory mechanics, peak airway pressures and gas exchange as well as on lung surfactant and epithelial cell integrity in mice with acute lung injury. HCl-injured mice were ventilated at PEEPs of 3 and 6 cmH(2)O with conventional ventilation (CV), CV with intermittent large breaths (CV(LB)) to promote recruitment, and a new mode, variable ventilation, optimized for mice (VV(N)). Mechanics and gas exchange were measured during ventilation and surfactant protein (SP)-B, proSP-B and E-cadherin levels were determined from lavage and lung homogenate. PEEP had a significant effect on mechanics, gas exchange and the epithelium. The higher PEEP reduced lung collapse and improved mechanics and gas exchange but it also down regulated surfactant release and production and increased epithelial cell injury. While CV(LB) was better than CV, VV(N) outperformed CV(LB) in recruitment, reduced epithelial injury and, via a dynamic mechanotransduction, it also triggered increased release and production of surfactant. For long-term outcome, selection of optimal PEEP and ventilation mode may be based on balancing lung physiology with epithelial injury.

  13. [The effects of endotracheal suction on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients under pressure-controlled or volume-controlled ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-wei; Liu, Zhi

    2007-10-01

    To compare the effects of endotracheal suction on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients receiving pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) or volume-controlled ventilation (VCV). A randomized cross-over study was conducted. Twenty-three mechanically ventilated patients were randomly assigned to ventilation with either PCV or VCV at first, and then the other. Endotracheal suction was performed with an open suction system. Changes in gas exchange and respiratory mechanics after suctions under the two modes were compared. With PCV, the tidal volume (VT) and the compliance were (6.60+/-1.95) ml/kg and (18+/-7) ml/cm H2O (1 cm H2O=0.098 kPa) respectively at 30 minutes after suction, as compared to (9.05+/-0.22) ml/kg and (24+/-6) ml/cm H2O respectively at baseline; the difference being significant (F=8.47, 8.01, all P0.05). With PCV, the heart rate (HR) and the mean systemic arterial pressure (MAP) were (109+/-20) beats/min and (89+/-10) mm Hg respectively at 5 minutes after suction, as compared to (97+/-17) beats/min and (83+/-12) mm Hg respectively at baseline; the difference being significant (F=5.86, 9.49, all P<0.05). With VCV, HR and MAP were (110+/-17) beats/min and (87+/-11) mm Hg respectively at 5 minutes after suction, as compared to (96+/-17) beats/min and (79+/-11) mm Hg respectively at baseline; the difference being significant (F=7.33, 7.96, all P<0.05). Endotracheal suction causes lung collapse leading to impairment of gas exchange and decreased compliance both under PCV and VCV, but the effect on gas exchange was more severe and persistent under PCV than under VCV.

  14. Combined Effects of Ventilation Mode and Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Mechanics, Gas Exchange and the Epithelium in Mice with Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammanomai, Apiradee; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The accepted protocol to ventilate patients with acute lung injury is to use low tidal volume (VT) in combination with recruitment maneuvers or positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, an important aspect of mechanical ventilation has not been considered: the combined effects of PEEP and ventilation modes on the integrity of the epithelium. Additionally, it is implicitly assumed that the best PEEP-VT combination also protects the epithelium. We aimed to investigate the effects of ventilation mode and PEEP on respiratory mechanics, peak airway pressures and gas exchange as well as on lung surfactant and epithelial cell integrity in mice with acute lung injury. HCl-injured mice were ventilated at PEEPs of 3 and 6 cmH2O with conventional ventilation (CV), CV with intermittent large breaths (CVLB) to promote recruitment, and a new mode, variable ventilation, optimized for mice (VVN). Mechanics and gas exchange were measured during ventilation and surfactant protein (SP)-B, proSP-B and E-cadherin levels were determined from lavage and lung homogenate. PEEP had a significant effect on mechanics, gas exchange and the epithelium. The higher PEEP reduced lung collapse and improved mechanics and gas exchange but it also down regulated surfactant release and production and increased epithelial cell injury. While CVLB was better than CV, VVN outperformed CVLB in recruitment, reduced epithelial injury and, via a dynamic mechanotransduction, it also triggered increased release and production of surfactant. For long-term outcome, selection of optimal PEEP and ventilation mode may be based on balancing lung physiology with epithelial injury. PMID:23326543

  15. Diurnal course of CO/sub 2/ gas exchange and saccharide production of sunflower leaves (Helianthus annuus L)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overdieck, D.

    1982-01-01

    The time course of single-leaf CO/sub 2/ gas exchange in full grown Helianthus annuus L. standing in the middle of a pot-culture was measured under field conditions over 24-h-periods. At 8:00, 12:00, 18:00, and in the next morning at 8:00 small pieces (diameter 12.8 and 14.8 mm) were cut from between the veins of adult leaves of all the plants in the culture. The samples at each time were homogenized and their contents of soluble glucose, fructose and sucrose, and after hydrolysis of insoluble polysaccharides (into glucose), were determined enzymatically by fractionated extraction. All soluble saccharides are accumulated from 8:00 to 12:00 and then reduced. At 18:00 they are at the same level as at 8:00 in the morning and remain at this level until the next morning at 8:00 (total average fluctuation: 48%). The glucose content from insoluble polysaccharides, on the other hand, increases both in the morning and in the afternoon until 18:00, and six times the content at 8:00 is obtained. At 8:00 the next morning, however, the level is again the same as on the previous day at 8:00. In most cases 70% of the dry-weight fluctuation can be ascribed to changes involving all saccharides analyzed. The existence of two independent pools of carbohydrates is discussed, one for labile soluble saccharides, and one for stabile insoluble reserve polysaccharides. The CO/sub 2/ net assimulation rates are positively correlated only with the increase of glucose from reserve polysaccharides. In no case is there any negative feedback from the soluble saccharides or insoluble glucose to CO/sub 2/ net assimulation. Environmental factors affecting CO/sub 2/ net assimulation and transpiration are evident in the contents of insoluble glucose polymers only and there only indirectly.

  16. Responses of sap flow, leaf gas exchange and growth of hybrid aspen to elevated atmospheric humidity under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niglas, Aigar; Kupper, Priit; Tullus, Arvo; Sellin, Arne

    2014-05-15

    An increase in average air temperature and frequency of rain events is predicted for higher latitudes by the end of the 21st century, accompanied by a probable rise in air humidity. We currently lack knowledge on how forest trees acclimate to rising air humidity in temperate climates. We analysed the leaf gas exchange, sap flow and growth characteristics of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides) trees growing at ambient and artificially elevated air humidity in an experimental forest plantation situated in the hemiboreal vegetation zone. Humidification manipulation did not affect the photosynthetic capacity of plants, but did affect stomatal responses: trees growing at elevated air humidity had higher stomatal conductance at saturating photosynthetically active radiation (gs sat) and lower intrinsic water-use efficiency (IWUE). Reduced stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in trees grown at elevated air humidity allowed slightly higher net photosynthesis and relative current-year height increments than in trees at ambient air humidity. Tree responses suggest a mitigating effect of higher air humidity on trees under mild water stress. At the same time, trees at higher air humidity demonstrated a reduced sensitivity of IWUE to factors inducing stomatal closure and a steeper decline in canopy conductance in response to water deficit, implying higher dehydration risk. Despite the mitigating impact of increased air humidity under moderate drought, a future rise in atmospheric humidity at high latitudes may be disadvantageous for trees during weather extremes and represents a potential threat in hemiboreal forest ecosystems. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  17. Gas exchange, leaf structure and nitrogen in contrasting successional tree species growing in open and understory sites during a drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, M D; Mostoller, S A

    1995-06-01

    Seasonal ecophysiology, leaf structure and nitrogen were measured in saplings of early (Populus grandidentata Michx. and Prunus serotina J.F. Ehrh.), middle (Fraxinus americana L. and Carya tomentosa Nutt.) and late (Acer rubrum L. and Cornus florida L.) successional tree species during severe drought on adjacent open and understory sites in central Pennsylvania, USA. Area-based net photosynthesis (A) and leaf conductance to water vapor diffusion (g(wv)) varied by site and species and were highest in open growing plants and early successional species at both the open and understory sites. In response to the period of maximum drought, both sunfleck and sun leaves of the early successional species exhibited smaller decreases in A than leaves of the other species. Shaded understory leaves of all species were more susceptible to drought than sun leaves and had negative midday A values during the middle and later growing season. Shaded understory leaves also displayed a reduced photosynthetic light response during the peak drought period. Sun leaves were thicker and had a greater mass per area (LMA) and nitrogen (N) content than shaded leaves, and early and middle successional species had higher N contents and concentrations than late successional species. In both sunfleck and sun leaves, seasonal A was positively related to predawn leaf Psi, g(wv), LMA and N, and was negatively related to vapor pressure deficit, midday leaf Psi and internal CO(2). Although a significant amount of plasticity occurred in all species for most gas exchange and leaf structural parameters, middle successional species exhibited the largest degree of phenotypic plasticity between open and understory plants.

  18. A 3-D functional-structural grapevine model that couples the dynamics of water transport with leaf gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junqi; Dai, Zhanwu; Vivin, Philippe; Gambetta, Gregory A; Henke, Michael; Peccoux, Anthony; Ollat, Nathalie; Delrot, Serge

    2017-12-23

    Predicting both plant water status and leaf gas exchange under various environmental conditions is essential for anticipating the effects of climate change on plant growth and productivity. This study developed a functional-structural grapevine model which combines a mechanistic understanding of stomatal function and photosynthesis at the leaf level (i.e. extended Farqhuhar-von Caemmerer-Berry model) and the dynamics of water transport from soil to individual leaves (i.e. Tardieu-Davies model). The model included novel features that account for the effects of xylem embolism (fPLC) on leaf hydraulic conductance and residual stomatal conductance (g0), variable root and leaf hydraulic conductance, and the microclimate of individual organs. The model was calibrated with detailed datasets of leaf photosynthesis, leaf water potential, xylem sap abscisic acid (ABA) concentration and hourly whole-plant transpiration observed within a soil drying period, and validated with independent datasets of whole-plant transpiration under both well-watered and water-stressed conditions. The model well captured the effects of radiation, temperature, CO2 and vapour pressure deficit on leaf photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance and leaf water potential, and correctly reproduced the diurnal pattern and decline of water flux within the soil drying period. In silico analyses revealed that decreases in g0 with increasing fPLC were essential to avoid unrealistic drops in leaf water potential under severe water stress. Additionally, by varying the hydraulic conductance along the pathway (e.g. root and leaves) and changing the sensitivity of stomatal conductance to ABA and leaf water potential, the model can produce different water use behaviours (i.e. iso- and anisohydric). The robust performance of this model allows for modelling climate effects from individual plants to fields, and for modelling plants with complex, non-homogenous canopies. In addition, the model provides a

  19. A steady-state stomatal model of balanced leaf gas exchange, hydraulics and maximal source-sink flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölttä, Teemu; Lintunen, Anna; Chan, Tommy; Mäkelä, Annikki; Nikinmaa, Eero

    2017-07-01

    Trees must simultaneously balance their CO2 uptake rate via stomata, photosynthesis, the transport rate of sugars and rate of sugar utilization in sinks while maintaining a favourable water and carbon balance. We demonstrate using a numerical model that it is possible to understand stomatal functioning from the viewpoint of maximizing the simultaneous photosynthetic production, phloem transport and sink sugar utilization rate under the limitation that the transpiration-driven hydrostatic pressure gradient sets for those processes. A key feature in our model is that non-stomatal limitations to photosynthesis increase with decreasing leaf water potential and/or increasing leaf sugar concentration and are thus coupled to stomatal conductance. Maximizing the photosynthetic production rate using a numerical steady-state model leads to stomatal behaviour that is able to reproduce the well-known trends of stomatal behaviour in response to, e.g., light, vapour concentration difference, ambient CO2 concentration, soil water status, sink strength and xylem and phloem hydraulic conductance. We show that our results for stomatal behaviour are very similar to the solutions given by the earlier models of stomatal conductance derived solely from gas exchange considerations. Our modelling results also demonstrate how the 'marginal cost of water' in the unified stomatal conductance model and the optimal stomatal model could be related to plant structural and physiological traits, most importantly, the soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance and soil moisture. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Short-term reproducibility of gas exchange measurements during bicycle exercise in patients with mild to moderate congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieshammer, S; Hetzel, M; Hetzel, J; Kochs, M; Hombach, V

    1992-05-01

    A series of 45 patients with congestive heart failure due to coronary disease had semisupine bicycle exercise tests (ramp protocol, 10 W/min) on two occasions separated by 3 to 7 days in order to determine the short-term reproducibility of gas exchange measurements during symptom-limited exercise. The percentage difference (PD) between each pair of measurements (m1, m2; PD = 100%.(m2-m1): m1) were calculated. The mean PD values (+/- 1 sigma) and the single determination standard deviations (SDSD) for exercise tolerance (ET, W), peak heart rate (pHR, 1/min), peak oxygen uptake (pVO2, ml/min/kg), peak carbon dioxide output (pVCO2, ml/min/kg), and peak minute ventilation (pVE, l/min) were as follows: [table: see text] No patient reached a plateau of oxygen uptake during the last portion of the ramp exercise test. Thus, pVO2 is not an objective endpoint. The single determination standard deviations show that exercise tolerance and peak oxygen uptake do not differ as to their reproducibility. The absolute values of PD were not a function of exercise tolerance for any of the parameters studied. The PD values for ET and pVO2 were normally distributed. The data suggest that a change in ET and pVO2 must exceed 27% and 28% between two sequential studies in an individual patient in order to be significant at the 5% level, respectively. For the one-tailed test situation, the changes in ET or pVO2 must be greater than 23% in order to be significant.

  1. Normal pulmonary gas exchange efficiency and absence of exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia in adults with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovering, Andrew T; Laurie, Steven S; Elliott, Jonathan E; Beasley, Kara M; Yang, Ximeng; Gust, Caitlyn E; Mangum, Tyler S; Goodman, Randall D; Hawn, Jerold A; Gladstone, Igor M

    2013-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary function is reduced in adults born very preterm, but it is unknown if this results in reduced pulmonary gas exchange efficiency during exercise and, consequently, leads to reduced aerobic capacity in subjects with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). We hypothesized that an excessively large alveolar to arterial oxygen difference (AaDO2) and resulting exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia (EIAH) would contribute to reduced aerobic fitness in adults born very preterm with and without BPD. Measurements of pulmonary function, lung volumes and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLco) were made at rest. Measurements of maximal oxygen consumption, peak workload, temperature- and tonometry-corrected arterial blood gases, and direct measure of hemoglobin saturation with oxygen (SaO2) were made preexercise and during cycle ergometer exercise in ex-preterm subjects ≤32-wk gestational age, with BPD (n = 12), without BPD (PRE; n = 12), and full term controls (CONT; n = 12) breathing room air. Both BPD and PRE had reduced pulmonary function and reduced DLco compared with CONT. The AaDO2 was not significantly different between groups, and there was no evidence of EIAH (SaO2 group preexercise or at any workload. Arterial O2 content was not significantly different between the groups preexercise or during exercise. However, peak power output was decreased in BPD and PRE subjects compared with CONT. We conclude that EIAH in adult subjects born very preterm with and without BPD does not likely contribute to the reduction in aerobic exercise capacity observed in these subjects.

  2. The effect of the application of the biological control agent EM1 on gas exchange parameters and productivity of Pisum sativum L. infected with Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Okorski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment on different methods of EM 1 application was conducted in the period 2002-2004. The study was carried out under controlled growth conditions. The experimental factor was the method of EM1 application. Before application, the biological preparation EM1 was propagated as recommended by the manufacturer (Greenland. The health status of the aboveground parts of 'Ramrod' pea plants was estimated at the flowering stage. The assessment of pea leaf gas exchange parameters (An, E, Gs, and Ci was made using a LI-Cor 6400 Portable Photosynthesis System. Soil application of EM1 combined with chemical control contributed to inhibiting Fusarium wilt of pea. Foliar application of EM1 combined with chemical control increased all gas exchange rates of pea leaves. Fusarium wilt of pea insignificantly decreased all gas exchange rates of pea leaves and the number of seeds per pod. The best method of EM1 application was soil treatment combined with chemical control, which increased all yield-related morphometric parameters of pea.

  3. Estimating CO2 gas exchange in mixed age vegetable plant communities grown on soil-like substrates for life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, V. V.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Ushakova, S. A.

    2018-02-01

    If soil-like substrate (SLS) is to be used in human life support systems with a high degree of mass closure, the rate of its gas exchange as a compartment for mineralization of plant biomass should be understood. The purpose of this study was to compare variations in CO2 gas exchange of vegetable plant communities grown on the soil-like substrate using a number of plant age groups, which determined the so-called conveyor interval. Two experimental plant communities were grown as plant conveyors with different conveyor intervals. The first plant community consisted of conveyors with intervals of 7 days for carrot and beet and 14 days for chufa sedge. The conveyor intervals in the second plant community were 14 days for carrot and beet and 28 days for chufa sedge. This study showed that increasing the number of age groups in the conveyor and, thus, increasing the frequency of adding plant waste to the SLS, decreased the range of variations in CO2 concentration in the "plant-soil-like substrate" system. However, the resultant CO2 gas exchange was shifted towards CO2 release to the atmosphere of the plant community with short conveyor intervals. The duration of the conveyor interval did not significantly affect productivity and mineral composition of plants grown on the SLS.

  4. A leaf gas exchange model that accounts for intra-canopy variability by considering leaf nitrogen content and local acclimation to radiation in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Jorge A; Louarn, Gaëtan; Perez Peña, Jorge; Ojeda, Hernán; Simonneau, Thierry; Lebon, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the distribution of gas exchange within a plant is a prerequisite for scaling up from leaves to canopies. We evaluated whether leaf traits were reliable predictors of the effects of leaf ageing and leaf irradiance on leaf photosynthetic capacity (V(cmax) , J(max) ) in field-grown vines (Vitis vinifera L). Simultaneously, we measured gas exchange, leaf mass per area (LMA) and nitrogen content (N(m) ) of leaves at different positions within the canopy and at different phenological stages. Daily mean leaf irradiance cumulated over 10 d (PPFD(10) ) was obtained by 3D modelling of the canopy structure. N(m) decreased over the season in parallel to leaf ageing while LMA was mainly affected by leaf position. PPFD(10) explained 66, 28 and 73% of the variation of LMA, N(m) and nitrogen content per area (N(a) ), respectively. Nitrogen content per unit area (N(a) = LMA × N(m) ) was the best predictor of the intra-canopy variability of leaf photosynthetic capacity. Finally, we developed a classical photosynthesis-stomatal conductance submodel and by introducing N(a) as an input, the model accurately simulated the daily pattern of gas exchange for leaves at different positions in the canopy and at different phenological stages during the season. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Cogeneration with gas turbines. Use of heat pipe type exchangers for the energy recuperation of exhausted gases; Cogeracao com turbinas a gas. O uso de trocador tipo tubos de calor (heat pipe) para a recuperacao energetica dos gases de exaustao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Jose Luz; Balestieri, Jose A.P.; Tanisho, Petronio Masanobu; Zanardi, Mauricio Araujo; Murcia, Nelson [UNESP, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia. Dept. de Energia

    1995-07-01

    Gas turbine cogeneration systems are being widely used in the simultaneous production of electricity and useful heat. Several devices can be indicated to the recovery of exhaust gas heat from gas turbine systems, for example heat recovery steam generators, boiling-water heaters, absorption refrigerating systems (cooled water), drying systems (heated air), each one indicated for a specific use of recovery heat. In this paper it is proposed the use of heat pipes exchangers in the recovery of exhaust gas heat to produce heated water to be used in a process. Heat pipes are devices that has high thermal conductance that can be used to reduce thermal losses to the environment. The use of heat pipes in these types of equipment can provide heat recoveries of high efficiency since both fluid flows are external and there are less contamination risks between the hot and cold streams. (author)

  6. Air-sea exchange and gas-particle partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons over the northwestern Pacific Ocean: Role of East Asian continental outflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zilan; Lin, Tian; Li, Zhongxia; Jiang, Yuqing; Li, Yuanyuan; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Huiwang; Guo, Zhigang

    2017-11-01

    We measured 15 parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in atmosphere and water during a research cruise from the East China Sea (ECS) to the northwestern Pacific Ocean (NWP) in the spring of 2015 to investigate the occurrence, air-sea gas exchange, and gas-particle partitioning of PAHs with a particular focus on the influence of East Asian continental outflow. The gaseous PAH composition and identification of sources were consistent with PAHs from the upwind area, indicating that the gaseous PAHs (three-to five-ring PAHs) were influenced by upwind land pollution. In addition, air-sea exchange fluxes of gaseous PAHs were estimated to be -54.2-107.4 ng m(-2) d(-1), and was indicative of variations of land-based PAH inputs. The logarithmic gas-particle partition coefficient (logKp) of PAHs regressed linearly against the logarithmic subcooled liquid vapor pressure (logPL(0)), with a slope of -0.25. This was significantly larger than the theoretical value (-1), implying disequilibrium between the gaseous and particulate PAHs over the NWP. The non-equilibrium of PAH gas-particle partitioning was shielded from the volatilization of three-ring gaseous PAHs from seawater and lower soot concentrations in particular when the oceanic air masses prevailed. Modeling PAH absorption into organic matter and adsorption onto soot carbon revealed that the status of PAH gas-particle partitioning deviated more from the modeling Kp for oceanic air masses than those for continental air masses, which coincided with higher volatilization of three-ring PAHs and confirmed the influence of air-sea exchange. Meanwhile, significant linear regressions between logKp and logKoa (logKsa) for PAHs were observed for continental air masses, suggesting the dominant effect of East Asian continental outflow on atmospheric PAHs over the NWP during the sampling campaign. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantification of regional early stage gas exchange changes using hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe MRI in a rat model of radiation-induced lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doganay, Ozkan, E-mail: ozkan.doganay@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Stirrat, Elaine [Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G1X8 (Canada); McKenzie, Charles [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Schulte, Rolf F. [General Electric Global Research, Munich 85748 (Germany); Santyr, Giles E. [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G1X8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G1L7 (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of hyperpolarized (HP) {sup 129}Xe MRI for detection of early stage radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in a rat model involving unilateral irradiation by assessing differences in gas exchange dynamics between irradiated and unirradiated lungs. Methods: The dynamics of gas exchange between alveolar air space and pulmonary tissue (PT), PT and red blood cells (RBCs) was measured using single-shot spiral iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation images of the right and left lungs of two age-matched cohorts of Sprague Dawley rats. The first cohort (n = 5) received 18 Gy irradiation to the right lung using a {sup 60}Co source and the second cohort (n = 5) was not irradiated and served as the healthy control. Both groups were imaged two weeks following irradiation when radiation pneumonitis (RP) was expected to be present. The gas exchange data were fit to a theoretical gas exchange model to extract measurements of pulmonary tissue thickness (L{sub PT}) and relative blood volume (V{sub RBC}) from each of the right and left lungs of both cohorts. Following imaging, lung specimens were retrieved and percent tissue area (PTA) was assessed histologically to confirm RP and correlate with MRI measurements. Results: Statistically significant differences in L{sub PT} and V{sub RBC} were observed between the irradiated and non-irradiated cohorts. In particular, L{sub PT} of the right and left lungs was increased approximately 8.2% and 5.0% respectively in the irradiated cohort. Additionally, V{sub RBC} of the right and left lungs was decreased approximately 36.1% and 11.7% respectively for the irradiated cohort compared to the non-irradiated cohort. PTA measurements in both right and left lungs were increased in the irradiated group compared to the non-irradiated cohort for both the left (P < 0.05) and right lungs (P < 0.01) confirming the presence of RP. PTA measurements also correlated with the

  8. Atmospheric concentrations and air-soil gas exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in remote, rural village and urban areas of Beijing-Tianjin region, North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Simonich, Staci; Giri, Basant; Chang, Ying; Zhang, Yuguang; Jia, Yuling; Tao, Shu; Wang, Rong; Wang, Bin; Li, Wei; Cao, Jun; Lu, Xiaoxia

    2011-07-01

    Forty passive air samplers were deployed to study the occurrence of gas and particulate phase PAHs in remote, rural village and urban areas of Beijing-Tianjin region, North China for four seasons (spring, summer, fall and winter) from 2007 to 2008. The influence of emissions on the spatial distribution pattern of air PAH concentrations was addressed. In addition, the air-soil gas exchange of PAHs was studied using fugacity calculations. The median gaseous and particulate phase PAH concentrations were 222 ng/m³ and 114 ng/m³, respectively, with a median total PAH concentration of 349 ng/m³. Higher PAH concentrations were measured in winter than in other seasons. Air PAH concentrations measured at the rural villages and urban sites in the northern mountain region were significantly lower than those measured at sites in the southern plain during all seasons. However, there was no significant difference in PAH concentrations between the rural villages and urban sites in the northern and southern areas. This urban-rural PAH distribution pattern was related to the location of PAH emission sources and the population distribution. The location of PAH emission sources explained 56%-77% of the spatial variation in ambient air PAH concentrations. The annual median air-soil gas exchange flux of PAHs was 42.2 ng/m²/day from soil to air. Among the 15 PAHs measured, acenaphthylene (ACY) and acenaphthene (ACE) contributed to more than half of the total exchange flux. Furthermore, the air-soil gas exchange fluxes of PAHs at the urban sites were higher than those at the remote and rural sites. In summer, more gaseous PAHs volatilized from soil to air because of higher temperatures and increased rainfall. However, in winter, more gaseous PAHs deposited from air to soil due to higher PAH emissions and lower temperatures. The soil TOC concentration had no significant influence on the air-soil gas exchange of PAHs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An Initial Investigation into the Use of a Flux Chamber Technique to Measure Soil-Atmosphere Gas Exchanges from Application of Biosolids to UK Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While a significant amount of work has been conducted to assess the concentration of pollutants in soils and waterways near land that has been amended with biosolids, a relatively small body of research investigating emissions to atmosphere is available in the literature. Some studies have indicated that while the CO2 emissions from soils decrease with fertiliser application, the CH4 and N2O emissions might be increased, offsetting the benefit. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to address this gap, by the use of a flux chamber technique to measure soil-atmosphere gas exchanges from the application of biosolids to land. This was done by applying three different types of biosolids to soils and measuring gases at the soil-atmosphere interface. The measurements were taken on areas with three different types of vegetation. The gases were collected using a flux chamber technique and analysed by gas chromatography. The results presented here are preliminary findings of an ongoing experiment. Insignificant variation appeared to occur between different areas of vegetation; however, small variations in gas concentrations were observed indicating a need for continued monitoring of soil-atmosphere gas exchanges to determine the long-term impacts on the atmosphere and the environment.

  10. Estimation of bubble-mediated air-sea gas exchange from concurrent DMS and CO2 transfer velocities at intermediate-high wind speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thomas G.; Landwehr, Sebastian; Miller, Scott D.; de Bruyn, Warren J.; Callaghan, Adrian H.; Scanlon, Brian; Ward, Brian; Yang, Mingxi; Saltzman, Eric S.

    2017-07-01

    Simultaneous air-sea fluxes and concentration differences of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were measured during a summertime North Atlantic cruise in 2011. This data set reveals significant differences between the gas transfer velocities of these two gases (Δkw) over a range of wind speeds up to 21 m s-1. These differences occur at and above the approximate wind speed threshold when waves begin breaking. Whitecap fraction (a proxy for bubbles) was also measured and has a positive relationship with Δkw, consistent with enhanced bubble-mediated transfer of the less soluble CO2 relative to that of the more soluble DMS. However, the correlation of Δkw with whitecap fraction is no stronger than with wind speed. Models used to estimate bubble-mediated transfer from in situ whitecap fraction underpredict the observations, particularly at intermediate wind speeds. Examining the differences between gas transfer velocities of gases with different solubilities is a useful way to detect the impact of bubble-mediated exchange. More simultaneous gas transfer measurements of different solubility gases across a wide range of oceanic conditions are needed to understand the factors controlling the magnitude and scaling of bubble-mediated gas exchange.

  11. Regulation of an in vivo metal-exchangeable superoxide dismutase from Propionibacterium shermanii exhibiting activity with different metal cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehn, A P; Meier, B

    1994-12-15

    The anaerobic, but aerotolerant Propionibacterium freudenreichii sp. shermanii contains a single superoxide dismutase [EC 1.15.1.1.] exhibiting comparable activity with iron or manganese as metal cofactor. The formation of superoxide dismutase is not depending on the supplementation of iron or manganese to the culture medium. Even in the absence of these metals the protein is built in comparable amounts. Bacteria grown in the absence of iron and manganese synthesize a superoxide dismutase with very low activity which had incorporated copper. If the medium was also depleted of copper, cobalt was incorporated, leading to an enzymically inactive form. In the absence of cobalt an enzymically inactive superoxide dismutase was built with unknown metal contents. Upon aeration the amount of superoxide dismutase activity increased continuously up to 9 h, due to a de novo synthesis of the protein. This superoxide dismutase had incorporated iron into the active centre. The superoxide dismutase of Propionibacterium shermanii is able to form a much wider variety of complexes with trace metal ions in vivo than previously recognized, leading to the hypothesis that the original function of these proteins was the binding of cytoplasmic trace metals present in excess.

  12. Determination of macromolecular exchange and PO2 in the microcirculation: a simple system for in vivo fluorescence and phosphorescence videomicroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres L.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a system with two epi-illumination sources, a DC-regulated lamp for transillumination and mechanical switches for rapid shift of illumination and detection of defined areas (250-750 µm² by fluorescence and phosphorescence videomicroscopy. The system permits investigation of standard microvascular parameters, vascular permeability as well as intra- and extravascular PO2 by phosphorescence quenching of Pd-meso-tetra (4-carboxyphenyl porphine (PORPH. A Pechan prism was used to position a defined region over the photomultiplier and TV camera. In order to validate the system for in vivo use, in vitro tests were performed with probes at concentrations that can be found in microvascular studies. Extensive in vitro evaluations were performed by filling glass capillaries with solutions of various concentrations of FITC-dextran (diluted in blood and in saline mixed with different amounts of PORPH. Fluorescence intensity and phosphorescence decay were determined for each mixture. FITC-dextran solutions without PORPH and PORPH solutions without FITC-dextran were used as references. Phosphorescence decay curves were relatively unaffected by the presence of FITC-dextran at all concentrations tested (0.1 µg/ml to 5 mg/ml. Likewise, fluorescence determinations were performed in the presence of PORPH (0.05 to 0.5 mg/ml. The system was successfully used to study macromolecular extravasation and PO2 in the rat mesentery circulation under controlled conditions and during ischemia-reperfusion.

  13. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MR technique for in-vivo liver imaging at 3.0 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shu-Zhong; Deng, Min; Wang, Yi-Xiang J. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (China); Yuan, Jing [Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital, Medical Physics and Research Department, Happy Valley, Hong Kong (China); Wei, Juan [Philips Healthcare Asia, Shanghai (China); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kennedy Krieger Institute, F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI for liver imaging at 3.0-T. Images were acquired at offsets (n = 41, increment = 0.25 ppm) from -5 to 5 ppm using a TSE sequence with a continuous rectangular saturation pulse. Amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) and GlycoCEST signals were quantified as the asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTR{sub asym}) at 3.5 ppm and the total MTR{sub asym} integrated from 0.5 to 1.5 ppm, respectively, from the corrected Z-spectrum. Reproducibility was assessed for rats and humans. Eight rats were devoid of chow for 24 hours and scanned before and after fasting. Eleven rats were scanned before and after one-time CCl4 intoxication. For reproducibility, rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST measurements had 95 % limits of agreement of -1.49 % to 1.28 % and -0.317 % to 0.345 %. Human liver APTw and GlycoCEST measurements had 95 % limits of agreement of -0.842 % to 0.899 % and -0.344 % to 0.164 %. After 24 hours, fasting rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST signals decreased from 2.38 ± 0.86 % to 0.67 ± 1.12 % and from 0.34 ± 0.26 % to -0.18 ± 0.37 % respectively (p < 0.05). After CCl4 intoxication rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST signals decreased from 2.46 ± 0.48 % to 1.10 ± 0.77 %, and from 0.34 ± 0.23 % to -0.16 ± 0.51 % respectively (p < 0.05). CEST liver imaging at 3.0-T showed high sensitivity for fasting as well as CCl4 intoxication. (orig.)

  14. A Potential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technique Based on Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer for In Vivo γ-Aminobutyric Acid Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Yan

    Full Text Available We developed a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST for GABA imaging and investigated the concentration-dependent CEST effect ofGABA in a rat model of brain tumor with blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption.All MRI studies were performed using a 7.0-T Agilent MRI scanner. Z-spectra for GABA were acquired at 7.0 T, 37°C, and a pH of 7.0 using varying B1 amplitudes. CEST images of phantoms with different concentrations of GABA solutions (pH, 7.0 and other metabolites (glutamine, myoinositol, creatinine, and choline were collected to investigate the concentration-dependent CEST effect of GABA and the potential contribution from other brain metabolites. CEST maps for GABA in rat brains with tumors were collected at baseline and 50 min, 1.5 h, and 2.0 h after the injection of GABA solution.The CEST effect of GABA was observed at approximately 2.75 parts per million(ppm downfield from bulk water, and this effect increased with an increase in the B1 amplitude and remained steady after the B1 amplitude reached 6.0 μT (255 Hz. The CEST effect of GABA was proportional to the GABA concentration in vitro. CEST imaging of GABA in a rat brain with a tumor and compromised BBB showed a gradual increase in the CEST effect after GABA injection.The findings of this study demonstrate the feasibility and potential of CEST MRI with the optimal B1 amplitude, which exhibits excellent spatial and temporal resolutions, to map changes in GABA.

  15. Diurnal course of CO/sub 2/ gas exchange and saccharide production of sunflower leaves (Helianthus annuus L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overdieck, D.

    1982-01-01

    The time course of single-leaf CO/sub 2/ gas exchange in full grown Helianthus annuus L. standing in the middle of a pot-culture was measured under field conditions over 24-h-periods. At 8.00, 12.00, 18.00, and in the next morning at 8.00 small pieces diameter (12.8 and 14.8 mm) were cut from between the veins of adult leaves of all the plants in the culture. The samples at each time were homogenized and their contents of soluble glucose, fructose and sucrose, and after hydrolysis of insoluble polysaccharides (into glucose), were determined enzymatically by fractionated extraction. All soluble saccharides are accumulated from 8.00 to 12.00 and then reduced. At 18.00 they are at the same level as at 8.00 in the morning and remain at this level until the next morning at 8.00 (total average fluctuation: 48%). The glucose content from insoluble polysaccharides, on the other hand, increases both in the morning and in the afternoon until 18.00, and six times the content at 8.00 is obtained. At 8.00 the next morning, however, the level is again the same as on the previous day at 8.00. In most cases 70% of the dry-weight fluctuation can be ascribed to changes involving all saccharides analyzed. The existence of two independent pools of carbohydrates is discussed, one for 'labile' soluble saccharides, and one for 'stabile' insoluble reserve polysaccharides. The CO/sub 2/ net assimilation rates are positively correlated only with the increase of glucose from reserve polysaccharides. In no case is there any negative feedback from the soluble saccharides or insoluble glucose to CO/sub 2/ net assimilation. Environmental factors affecting CO/sub 2/ net assimilation and transpiration are evident in the contents of insoluble glucose polymers only and there only indirectly.

  16. Mineral nutrition and elevated [CO(2)] interact to modify δ(13)C, an index of gas exchange, in Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John D; Linder, Sune

    2013-11-01

    The effects of the past century's increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) have been recorded in the stable carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of the annual growth rings of trees. The isotope record frequently shows increases in photosynthetic CO2 uptake relative to stomatal conductance, which estimates the CO2 concentration gradient across the stomata (ca - ci). This variable, which is one control over the net photosynthetic rate, has been suggested as a homeostatic gas-exchange set point that is easy to estimate from δ(13)C and [CO2]. However, in high-latitude conifer forests, the literature is mixed; some studies show increases in (ca - ci) and others show homeostasis. Here we present leaf and tree-ring δ(13)C data from a controlled experiment that tested factorial combinations of elevated [CO2] (365 and 700 ∝mol mol(-1)) and fertilization on mature Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees in northern Sweden. We found first that the leaf carbon pool was contaminated by the current photosynthate in the older leaf cohorts. This is the reverse of the common observation that older photosynthate reserves can be used to produce new tissue; here the older tissue contains recent photosynthate. We found that the tree-ring data lack such contamination and in any case they better integrate over the canopy and the growing season than do leaves. In the second and third years of treatment, elevated [CO2] alone increased (ca - ci) by 38%; when combined with fertilization, it increased (ca - ci) by 60%. The results of this study support the idea that annual rings provide a clearer isotopic signal than do foliage age-classes. The tree-ring data show that inferred (ca - ci) depends not only on [CO2], but also on mineral-nutrient status. The differences in (ca - ci) are sufficiently large to account for the treatment-induced increase in wood-volume production in these stands.

  17. Leaf gas exchange and oxidative stress in sorghum plants supplied with silicon and infected by Colletotrichum sublineolum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Renata Sousa; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila; Cavatte, Paulo Cezar; Martins, Samuel Cordeiro Vitor; Moreira, Wiler Ribas; Chaves, Agnaldo Rodrigues Melo; Damatta, Fábio Murilo

    2012-09-01

    Considering the economic importance of anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum sublineolum, and silicon (Si) to enhance sorghum resistance against this disease, this study aimed to investigate the effect of this element on leaf gas exchange and also the antioxidative system when infected by C. sublineolum. Plants from sorghum line CMSXS142 (BR 009 [Tx623] - Texas), growing in hydroponic culture with (+Si, 2 mM) or without (-Si) Si, were inoculated with C. sublineolum. Disease severity was assessed at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 days after inoculation (dai) and data were used to calculate the area under anthracnose progress curve (AUAPC). Further, the net carbon assimilation rate (A), stomatal conductance to water vapor (g(s)), internal-to-ambient CO₂ concentration ratio (C(i)/C(a)), and transpiration rate (E); the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and glutathione reductase (GR); the electrolyte leakage (EL), and the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined. The AUAPC was reduced by 86% for the +Si plants compared with the -Si plants. The values of A, g(s), and E were lower upon inoculation of -Si plants in contrast to inoculated +Si plants with decreases of 31 and 60% for A, 34 and 61% for g(s), and 27 and 57% for E, respectively, at 4 and 8 dai. For the noninoculated plants, there was no significant difference between the -Si and +Si treatments for the values of A, g(s), and E. The C(i)/C(a) ratio was similar between the -Si and +Si treatments, regardless of the pathogen inoculation. The activities of SOD, CAT, APX, and GR tended to be higher in the +Si plants compared with the -Si plants upon inoculation with C. sublineolum. The EL significantly increased for -Si plants compared with +Si plants. The MDA concentration significantly increased by 31 and 38% at 4 and 8 dai, respectively, for the -Si plants compared with the +Si plants. Based on these results, Si may have a

  18. Effects of exogenous putrescine on gas-exchange characteristics and chlorophyll fluorescence of NaCl-stressed cucumber seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Run Hua; Li, Jun; Guo, Shi Rong; Tezuka, Takafumi

    2009-06-01

    The effects of 10 mM putrescine (Put) treated by spraying on leaves on growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthetic gas-exchange characteristics, and chlorophyll fluorescence were investigated by growing cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L. cv. ChangChun mici) using hydroponics with or without 65 mM NaCl as a salt stress. Salt stress caused the reduction of growth such as leaf area, root volume, plant height, and fresh and dry weights. Furthermore, net photosynthesis rate (P(n)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), intercellular CO(2) concentration (C(i)), and transpiration rate (T(r)) were also reduced by NaCl, but water use efficiency (WUE; P(n)/T(r)) showed a tendency to be enhanced rather than reduced by NaCl. However, Put alleviated the reduction of P (n) by NaCl, and showed a further reduction of C (i) by NaCl. The reduction of g(s) and T(r) by NaCl was not alleviated at all. The enhancement of WUE by NaCl was shown to have no alleviation at day 1 after starting the treatment, but after that, the enhancement was gradually reduced till the control level. Maximum quantum efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)) showed no effects by any conditions based on the combination of NaCl and Put, and in addition, kept constant values in plants grown in each nutrient solution during this experimental period. The efficiency of excitation energy capture by open photosystem II (PSII) (F(v)'/F(m)'), actual efficiency of PSII (Phi(PSII)), and the coefficient on photochemical quenching (qP) of plants with NaCl were reduced with time, and the reduction was alleviated till the control level by treatment with Put. The F(v)'/F(m)', Phi(PSII), and qP of plants without NaCl and/or with Put showed no variation during the experiment. Non-photochemical quenching of the singlet excited state of chlorophyll a (NPQ) showed quite different manner from the others as mentioned above, namely, continued to enhance during the experiment.

  19. Numerical Investigation on the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Supercritical Liquefied Natural Gas in an Airfoil Fin Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongchao Zhao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As a new kind of highly compact and efficient micro-channel heat exchanger, the printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE is a promising candidate satisfying the heat exchange requirements of liquefied natural gas (LNG vaporization at low and high pressure. The effects of airfoil fin arrangement on heat transfer and flow resistance were numerically investigated using supercritical liquefied natural gas (LNG as working fluid. The thermal properties of supercritical LNG were tested by utilizing the REFPROF software database. Numerical simulations were performed using FLUENT. The inlet temperature of supercritical LNG was 121 K, and its pressure was 10.5 MPa. The reference mass flow rate of LNG was set as 1.22 g/s for the vertical pitch Lv = 1.67 mm and the staggered pitch Ls = 0 mm, with the Reynolds number of about 3750. The SST k-ω model was selected and verified by comparing with the experimental data using supercritical liquid nitrogen as cold fluid. The airfoil fin PCHE had better thermal-hydraulic performance than that of the straight channel PCHE. Moreover, the airfoil fins with staggered arrangement displayed better thermal performance than that of the fins with parallel arrangement. The thermal-hydraulic performance of airfoil fin PCHE was improved with increasing Ls and Lv. Moreover, Lv affected the Nusselt number and pressure drop of airfoil fin PCHE more obviously. In conclusion, a sparser staggered arrangement of fins showed a better thermal-hydraulic performance in airfoil fin PCHE.

  20. Assay of low deuterium enrichment of water by isotopic exchange with [U-13C3]acetone and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D; Diraison, F; Beylot, M; Brunengraber, D Z; Samols, M A; Anderson, V E; Brunengraber, H

    1998-05-01

    A sensitive assay of the 2H-enrichment of water based on the isotopic exchange between the hydrogens of water and of acetone in alkaline medium is described and validated. For low 2H-enrichments (0.008 to 0.5%), the sample is spiked with [U-13C3]acetone and NaOH. After exchange, 2H-enriched [U-13C3]acetone is extracted with chloroform and assayed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. With some instruments, ion-molecule reactions, resulting in increased baseline enrichment, are minimized by lowering the electron ionization energy from the usual 70 to 10 eV. The 2H-enrichment of water is amplified nearly sixfold in the M4/M3 ratio of [U-13C3]acetone. For high 2H-enrichments (0.25 to 100%), the use of unlabeled acetone suffices. After exchange, the mass isotopomer distribution of acetone is analyzed, yielding the 2H-enrichment of water. The assay with [U-13C3]acetone allows measuring the 2H-enrichment of water even in biological samples containing acetone. This technique is more rapid and economical than the classical isotope ratio mass spectrometric assay of the enrichment of hydrogen gas derived from the reduction of water.

  1. Scientific Verification Test of Orbitec Deployable Vegetable Production System for Salad Crop Growth on ISS- Gas Exchange System design and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldemire, Ashleigh

    2007-01-01

    The ability to produce and maintain salad crops during long term missions would be a great benefit to NASA; the renewable food supply would save cargo space, weight and money. The ambient conditions of previous ground controlled crop plant experiments do not reflect the microgravity and high CO2 concentrations present during orbit. It has been established that microgravity does not considerably alter plant growth. (Monje, Stutte, Chapman, 2005). To support plants in a space-craft environment efficient and effective lighting and containment units are necessary. Three lighting systems were previously evaluated for radish growth in ambient air; fluorescent lamps in an Orbitec Biomass Production System Educational (BPSE), a combination of red, blue, and green LED's in a Deployable Vegetable Production System (Veggie), and a combination of red and blue LED's in a Veggie. When mass measurements compared the entire possible growing area vs. power consumed by the respective units, the Veggies clearly exceeded the BPSE indicating that the LED units were a more resource efficient means of growing radishes under ambient conditions in comparison with fluorescent lighting. To evaluate the most productive light treatment system for a long term space mission a more closely simulated ISS environment is necessary. To induce a CO2 dense atmosphere inside the Veggie's and BPSE a gas exchange system has been developed to maintain a range of 1000-1200 ppm CO2 during a 21-day light treatment experiment. This report details the design and function of the gas exchange system. The rehabilitation, trouble shooting, maintenance and testing of the gas exchange system have been my major assignments. I have also contributed to the planting, daily measurements and harvesting of the radish crops 21-day light treatment verification test.

  2. Gas exchange and the coagulation system of the blood during the effect on the body of high concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosh, L.; Agadzhanyan, N. A.; Davydov, G. A.; Rybakov, B. K.; Sergiyenko, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    Maximum permissible concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide in a controlled atmosphere were determined by evaluating their effects on human gas exchange, blood coagulation, and tolerances to acute hypoxia, acceleration, and physical loads. It was found that functional disturbances depend on the concentration of respiratory gases and the length of stay in an altered atmosphere. By changing the atmospheric composition and by bringing the gaseous environment into accordance with the work and rest regimen and energy expenditures, the general reactivity of the body changes favorably.

  3. ANALYSIS OF GROWTH AND GAS EXCHANGE OF PLANTS Lonchocarpus sericeus (Poir.) D.C. IN FLOODING FOR THE RECOVERY OF THE RIPARIAN FORESTS

    OpenAIRE

    Jean Marcel Sousa Lira; Robério Anastácio Ferreira; Carlos Dias da Silva Junior; Elísio Marinho dos Santos Neto; Wislane da Silva Santana

    2013-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509812349In order to select species for using in the restoration of riparian forests on the banks of the Sao FranciscoRiver, in the state of Sergipe, an experiment was conducted to evaluate the growth and gas exchange ofplants Lonchocarpus sericeus (Poir.) D.C., subject to flooding conditions in the nursery. The experimentwas conducted at Forest Nursery, Department of Forest Sciences, Federal University of Sergipe (UFS),the municipality of São Cristóvão, (11 º 01...

  4. Association between tree-ring and needle delta13C and leaf gas exchange in Pinus halepensis under semi-arid conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tamir; Hemming, Deborah; Lin, Tongbao; Grünzweig, José M; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Rotenberg, Eyal; Yakir, Dan

    2005-06-01

    Associations between delta13C values and leaf gas exchanges and tree-ring or needle growth, used in ecophysiological compositions, can be complex depending on the relative timing of CO2 uptake and subsequent redistribution and allocation of carbon to needle and stem components. For palaeoenvironmental and dendroecological studies it is often interpreted in terms of a simple model of delta13C fractionation in C3 plants. However, in spite of potential complicating factors, few studies have actually examined these relationships in mature trees over inter- and intra-annual time-scales. Here, we present results from a 4 years study that investigated the links between variations in leaf gas-exchange properties, growth, and dated delta13C values along the needles and across tree rings of Aleppo pine trees growing in a semi-arid region under natural conditions or with supplemental summer irrigation. Sub-sections of tissue across annual rings and along needles, for which time of formation was resolved from growth rate analyses, showed rapid growth and delta13C responses to changing environmental conditions. Seasonal cycles of growth and delta13C (up to approximately 4 per thousand) significantly correlated (P < 0.01) with photosynthetically active radiation, vapour pressure deficit, air temperature, and soil water content. The irrigation significantly increased leaf net assimilation, stomatal conductance and needle and tree-ring growth rate, and markedly decreased needle and tree-ring delta13C values and its sensitivity to environmental parameters. The delta13C estimates derived from gas-exchange parameters, and weighted by assimilation, compared closely with seasonal and inter-annual delta13C values of needle- and tree-ring tissue. Higher stomatal conductances of the irrigated trees (0.22 vs. 0.08 mol m(-2) s(-1) on average) corresponded with approximately 2.0 per thousand lower average delta13C values, both measured and derived. Derived and measured delta13C values also

  5. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmittner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air–sea gas exchange has two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature-dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, since air–sea gas exchange is slow in the modern ocean, the biological effect dominates spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in contrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Calcium carbonate cycling, pH dependency of fractionation during air–sea gas exchange, and kinetic fractionation have minor effects on δ13CDIC. Accumulation of isotopically light carbon from anthropogenic fossil fuel burning has decreased the spatial variability of surface and deep δ13CDIC since the industrial revolution in our model simulations. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed and remineralized contributions as well as the effects of biology and air–sea gas exchange. The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC as well as the individual contributions and effects. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface

  6. [Effects of long-term ozone exposure on chlorophyll a fluorescence and gas exchange of winter-wheat leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, You-fei; Zhao, Ze; Wu, Rong-jun; Hu, Cheng-da; Liu, Hong-ju

    2010-02-01

    In order to provide basis for evaluating the effects of air pollutant such as O3 on crops yield and food security, the effects of O3 fumigation (ambient air, CK; 100 nL x L(-1), T1; 150 nL x L(-1), T2) on chlorophyll a fluorescence and gas exchange of a field-grown winter-wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Yang Mai 13) in different growing period were conducted via open-top chamber technique in conjunction with Diving-PAM fluorometer and LC pro + photosynthesis system. Results indicated that Fv/Fm caused by T1 was higher than 0.8, while the Pm, qP, (1-qP)/NPQ and Y(NO) were similar to those of CK, the NPQ and Y(NPQ) were increased by 13.5%-29.0% and 13.3%-22.7% respectively due to O3 stress. Under nature light (rapid light curve, RLC) and after dark adaptation (induction curve in steady-state, IC) the Yield of T1 was decreased by 4.6%-7.6% and 11.3%-19.3% respectively, with 8.0%-9.8% and 11.0%-23.1% reductions in Pn, and Gs compared to CK, respectively. In heading stage and blooming stage, the Ls of T, was greater than CK, but in filling stage and mature stage, it became lower compared to CK. The Fv/Fm was slightly lower than 0.8 under T2 treatment, with the Y(NO), (1-qP)/NPQ and c(i) were increased by 37.9%-75.6%, 157.1%-325.8% and 3.4%-18.1% relative to CK. Under RLC and IC condition, the Yield of T2 was respectively decreased by 10.2%-13.6% and 21.4%-29.1%, and the Pn, Ls, qP, Pm, NPQ and Y(NPQ) were decreased by 28.1%-39.9%, 5.2%-21.3%, 15.8%-30.4%, 27.6%-45.6%, 3.3%-52.9% and 5.7%-17.9% in comparison, respectively. Obviously the enhanced O3 causes a significant decrease in the capacity of photosynthesis of winter wheat, and the influence mechanism presents a series of dynamic changes according to growing seasons. The reduction of Fv/Fm under T1 treatment is a response of PS II reaction center to the increase of NPQ, and the decrease in Pn and Yield is a consequence of protective adjustment, by this approach, the antioxidant system and energy dissipation mechanism can

  7. Gas-phase fragmentation of peptides to increase the spatial resolution of the Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Generation of overlapping peptides in solution via multiple proteases requires a very high peak capacity for the LC-MS analysis to minimize signal overlap. An inherent advantage of a gas-phase fragmentation step is that the additional gas-phase fragment ions used to sublocalize deuterium...

  8. Small dead space heat and moisture exchangers do not impede gas exchange during noninvasive ventilation: a comparison with a heated humidifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Alexandre; Vargas, Frederic; Hilbert, Gilles; Gruson, Didier; Mousset-Hovaere, Maud; Castaing, Yves; Dreyfuss, Didier; Ricard, Jean Damien

    2010-08-01

    Adverse respiratory and gasometrical effects have been described in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) undergoing noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with standard heat and moisture exchangers (HME). We decided to evaluate respiratory parameters and arterial blood gases (ABG) of patients during NIV with small dead space HME compared with heated humidifier (HH). Prospective randomized crossover study. A 16-bed medical intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty patients receiving NIV for ARF. The effects of HME and HH on respiratory rate, minute ventilation, EtCO(2), oxygen saturation, airway occlusion pressure at 0.1 s, ABG, and comfort perception were compared during two randomly determined NIV periods of 30 min. The relative impact of HME and HH on these parameters was successively compared with or without addition of a flex tube (40 and 10 patients, respectively). No difference was observed between HME and HH regarding any of the studied parameters, whether or not a flex tube was added. If one decides to humidify patients' airways during NIV, one may do so with small dead space HME or HH without altering respiratory parameters.

  9. Diurnal and seasonal variation in air exchange rates and interzonal airflows measured by active and passive tracer gas in homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Gustavsen, Sine; Frederiksen, Marie

    2016-01-01

    studied the pollutant distribution from one room (source room) and interzonal airflows across the dwellings. The air within a given floor was well mixed, with the average tracer gas concentration in the non-source rooms reaching approximately 70% of the source room concentration. There was less air...... dwellings across four seasons using active tracer gas. Night time AERs were also estimated in the bedrooms based on occupant-generated CO2. Passive tracer gas measurements were performed for comparison. AERs changed frequently during the day. Differences in outdoor AERs were observed between individual...... bedrooms across the four seasons was 0.49 h-1 with the active tracer gas technique and 1.20 h-1 with the CO2 method. The average winter AER in the five homes with the passive tracer (0.63 h-1) differed substantially from the corresponding AER measured with the active tracer gas (0.25 h-1). Additionally, we...

  10. Pulmonary gas exchange and acid-base state at 5,260 m in high-altitude Bolivians and acclimatized lowlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Hans Peter; Araoz, Mauricio; Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2002-01-01

    hyperoxic work, capacity was 73% greater in N. Buffering of lactic acid was greater in N, with 20% less increase in base deficit per millimole per liter rise in lactate. These data show in L persistent alkalosis even after 9 wk at 5,260 m. In N, the data show 1) insignificant reduction in exercise capacity...... ventilation; and 4) better buffering of lactic acid. These results support and extend similar observations concerning adaptation in lung function in these and other high-altitude native groups previously performed at much lower altitudes.......Pulmonary gas exchange and acid-base state were compared in nine Danish lowlanders (L) acclimatized to 5,260 m for 9 wk and seven native Bolivian residents (N) of La Paz (altitude 3,600-4,100 m) brought acutely to this altitude. We evaluated normalcy of arterial pH and assessed pulmonary gas...

  11. Intercambio gaseoso en el síndrome de dificultad respiratoria aguda Gas exchange in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Raimondi

    2003-04-01

    efecto beneficioso de todas estas técnicas en la mejoría del IG en el ARDS, no se ha demostrado efecto beneficioso en la sobrevida.The hypoxemia of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS depends chiefly upon shunt and ventilation-perfusion (V A/Q inequality produced by fluid located in the interstitial space, alveolar collapse and flooding. Variables other than inspired oxygen fraction and the underlying physiological abnormality can influence arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2. Changes in cardiac output, hemoglobin concentration, oxygen consumption and alcalosis can cause changes in PaO2 through their influence on mixed venous PO2. Gas exchange (GE in ARDS may be studied using the inert gas elimination technique (MIGET which enables to define the distribution of ventilation and perfusion without necessarily altering the FIO2 differentiating shunt from lung units with low V A/Q ratios and dead space from lung units with high V A/Q ratios. Different ventilatory strategies that increase mean airway pressure (positive end-expiratory pressure, high tidal volumes, inverse inspiratory-expiratory ratio, etc improve PaO2 through increasing lung volume by recruiting new open alveoli and spreading the intra-alveolar fluid over a large surface area. Also prone-position ventilation would result in a marked improvement in GE enhancing dorsal lung ventilation by the effects on the gravitional distribution of pleural pressure and the reduction in the positive pleural pressure that develops in dorsal regions in ARDS. Inhaled nitric oxide (NO has been shown to increase PaO2 in ARDS patients by inducing vasodilation predominantly in ventilated areas redistributing pulmonary blood flow away from nonventilated toward ventilated areas of the lung thus resulting in a shunt reduction. On the same way inhaled prostaglandins (PGI2 or PGE1 causes selective pulmonary vasodilation improving pulmonary GE. Intravenous almitrine, a selective pulmonary vasoconstrictor, has been shown to

  12. Pulmonary gas exchange at maximal exercise in Danish lowlanders during 8 wk of acclimatization to 4,100 m and in high-altitude Aymara natives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Calbet, Jose A L; van Hall, Gerrit

    2004-01-01

    We aimed to test effects of altitude acclimatization on pulmonary gas exchange at maximal exercise. Six lowlanders were studied at sea level, in acute hypoxia (AH), and after 2 and 8 wk of acclimatization to 4,100 m (2W and 8W) and compared with Aymara high-altitude natives residing at this altit......We aimed to test effects of altitude acclimatization on pulmonary gas exchange at maximal exercise. Six lowlanders were studied at sea level, in acute hypoxia (AH), and after 2 and 8 wk of acclimatization to 4,100 m (2W and 8W) and compared with Aymara high-altitude natives residing...... in AH but increased significantly with acclimatization (51 +/- 1.1, 58 +/- 1.7, and 62 +/- 1.6 mmHg in AH, 2W, and 8W, respectively). PaO2 in lowlanders reached levels that were not different from those in high-altitude natives (66 +/- 1.2 mmHg). Arterial O2 saturation (SaO2) decreased during maximum......, but even acclimatization for 8 wk is insufficient to achieve levels reached by high-altitude natives....

  13. Tree age dependence and within-canopy variation of leaf gas exchange and antioxidative defence in Fagus sylvatica under experimental free-air ozone exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbinger, K. [Institut fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften, Universitaet Graz, Schubertstrasse 51, A-8010 Graz (Austria)]. E-mail: karin.herbinger@uni-graz.at; Then, Ch. [Bundesamt und Forschungszentrum fuer Wald, Abteilung Forstpflanzenphysiologie, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)]|[Lehrstuhl fuer Oekophysiologie der Pflanzen, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Sciences Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Loew, M.; Koch, N. [Lehrstuhl fuer Oekophysiologie der Pflanzen, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Sciences Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Haberer, K.; Alexous, M. [Institut fuer Forstbotanik und Baumphysiologie, Universitaet Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 053/054, D-79085 Freiburg (Germany); Remele, K. [Institut fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften, Universitaet Graz, Schubertstrasse 51, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Heerdt, C. [Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Grill, D. [Institut fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften, Universitaet Graz, Schubertstrasse 51, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Rennenberg, H. [Institut fuer Forstbotanik und Baumphysiologie, Universitaet Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 053/054, D-79085 Freiburg (Germany); Haeberle, K.-H.; Matyssek, R. [Lehrstuhl fuer Oekophysiologie der Pflanzen, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Sciences Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Tausz, M. [Institut fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften, Universitaet Graz, Schubertstrasse 51, A-8010 Graz (Austria)]|[[School of Forest and Ecosystem Science, University of Melbourne, Water Street, Creswick, Vic. 3363 (Australia); Wieser, G. [Bundesamt und Forschungszentrum fuer Wald, Abteilung Forstpflanzenphysiologie, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2005-10-15

    We characterized leaf gas exchange and antioxidative defence of two-year-old seedlings and 60-year-old trees of Fagus sylvatica exposed to ambient (1xO{sub 3}) or two-fold ambient (2xO{sub 3}) O{sub 3} concentrations (maximum of 150 ppb) in a free-air canopy exposure system throughout the growing season. Decline in photosynthesis from sun-exposed to shaded conditions was more pronounced in adult than juvenile trees. Seedling leaves and leaves in the sun-exposed canopy had higher stomatal conductance and higher internal CO{sub 2} concentrations relative to leaves of adult trees and leaves in shaded conditions. There was a weak overall depression of photosynthesis in the 2xO{sub 3} variants across age classes and canopy positions. Pigment and tocopherol concentrations of leaves were significantly affected by canopy position and tree age, whereas differences between 1xO{sub 3} and 2xO{sub 3} regimes were not observed. Glutathione concentrations were significantly increased under 2xO{sub 3} across both age classes and canopy levels. Seedlings differed from adult trees in relevant physiological and biochemical traits in ozone response. The water-soluble antioxidative systems responded most sensitively to 2xO{sub 3} without regard of tree age or canopy position. - Ozone effects on leaf gas exchange and antioxidative systems of beech across tree age and canopy level were investigated in a free air exposure system.

  14. Gas exchange and lung mechanics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: comparison of three different strategies of positive end expiratory pressure selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Ricardo; Aquino-Esperanza, José; Bonelli, Ignacio; Maskin, Patricio; Setten, Mariano; Danze, Florencia; Attie, Shiry; Rodriguez, Pablo O

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare gas exchange and lung mechanics between different strategies to select positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In 20 consecutive ARDS patients, 3 PEEP selection strategies were evaluated. One strategy was based on oxygenation using the ARDS network PEEP/fraction of inspired oxygen (Fio2) table; and two were based on lung mechanics, either PEEP titrated to reach a plateau pressure of 28 to 30 cm H2O as in the ExPress trial or best respiratory compliance method during a derecruitment maneuver. Gas exchange, airway pressures, stress index (SI), and end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure (P(tpe)) and end-inspiratory transpulmonary pressure (P(tpi)) values were assessed. Data are expressed as median (interquartile range [IQR]). Lower total PEEP levels were observed with the use of the PEEP/Fio2 table (8.7 [6-10] cm H2O); intermediate PEEP levels, with the Best Compliance approach (13.0 [10.2-13.8] cm H2O); and higher PEEP levels, with the ExPress strategy (16.5 [15.0-18.5] cm H2O) (P respiratory compliance approach resulted in better oxygenation levels without risk of overdistension according to SI and P(tpi), achieving a mild risk of lung collapse according to P(tpe). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiscale CT-Based Computational Modeling of Alveolar Gas Exchange during Artificial Lung Ventilation, Cluster (Biot and Periodic (Cheyne-Stokes Breathings and Bronchial Asthma Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Golov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An airflow in the first four generations of the tracheobronchial tree was simulated by the 1D model of incompressible fluid flow through the network of the elastic tubes coupled with 0D models of lumped alveolar components, which aggregates parts of the alveolar volume and smaller airways, extended with convective transport model throughout the lung and alveolar components which were combined with the model of oxygen and carbon dioxide transport between the alveolar volume and the averaged blood compartment during pathological respiratory conditions. The novel features of this work are 1D reconstruction of the tracheobronchial tree structure on the basis of 3D segmentation of the computed tomography (CT data; 1D−0D coupling of the models of 1D bronchial tube and 0D alveolar components; and the alveolar gas exchange model. The results of our simulations include mechanical ventilation, breathing patterns of severely ill patients with the cluster (Biot and periodic (Cheyne-Stokes respirations and bronchial asthma attack. The suitability of the proposed mathematical model was validated. Carbon dioxide elimination efficiency was analyzed in all these cases. In the future, these results might be integrated into research and practical studies aimed to design cyberbiological systems for remote real-time monitoring, classification, prediction of breathing patterns and alveolar gas exchange for patients with breathing problems.

  16. Effect of surfactant and partial liquid ventilation treatment on gas exchange and lung mechanics in immature lambs: influence of gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Santano, Carmen; Mielgo, Victoria; Gastiasoro, Elena; Valls-i-Soler, Adolfo; Murgia, Xabier

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant (SF) and partial liquid ventilation (PLV) improve gas exchange and lung mechanics in neonatal RDS. However, variations in the effects of SF and PLV with degree of lung immaturity have not been thoroughly explored. Experimental Neonatal Respiratory Physiology Research Unit, Cruces University Hospital. Prospective, randomized study using sealed envelopes. 36 preterm lambs were exposed (at 125 or 133-days of gestational age) by laparotomy and intubated. Catheters were placed in the jugular vein and carotid artery. All the lambs were assigned to one of three subgroups given: 20 mL/Kg perfluorocarbon and managed with partial liquid ventilation (PLV), surfactant (Curosurf®, 200 mg/kg) or (3) no pulmonary treatment (Controls) for 3 h. Cardiovascular parameters, blood gases and pulmonary mechanics were measured. In 125-day gestation lambs, SF treatment partially improved gas exchange and lung mechanics, while PLV produced significant rapid improvements in these parameters. In 133-day lambs, treatments with SF or PLV achieved similarly good responses. Neither surfactant nor PLV significantly affected the cardiovascular parameters. SF therapy response was more effective in the older gestational age group whereas the effectiveness of PLV therapy was not gestational age dependent.

  17. Pump out the volume--The effect of tracheal and subelytral pressure pulses on convective gas exchange in a dung beetle, Circellium bacchus (Fabricus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Frances D; Förster, Thomas D; Hetz, Stefan K

    2010-05-01

    Many flightless beetles like the large apterous dung beetle Circellium bacchus, possess a subelytral cavity (SEC) providing an extra air space below the elytra which connects to the tracheal system (TS) via metathoracic and abdominal spiracles. By measuring subelytral and intratracheal pressure as well as body movements and gas exchange simultaneously in a flow-through setup, we investigated the contribution of convection on Circellium respiratory gas exchange. No constriction phase was observed. TS and SEC pressures were always around atmospheric values. During interburst phase open abdominal spiracles and a leaky SEC led to small CO(2)-peaks on a continuous CO(2) baseline, driven by intermittent positive tracheal pressure peaks in anti-phase with small negative subelytral pressure peaks caused by dorso-ventral tergite action. Spiracle opening was accompanied by two types of body movements. Higher frequency telescoping body movements at the beginning of opening resulted in high amplitude SEC and TS pressure peaks. High frequency tergite movements caused subelytral pressure peaks and led to a saw tooth like CO(2) release pattern in a burst. We propose that during the burst open mesothoracic spiracles increase the compliance of the subelytral cavity allowing big volumes of tracheal air being pulled out by convection. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhancement of Leaf Gas Exchange and Primary Metabolites under Carbon Dioxide Enrichment Up-Regulates the Production of Secondary Metabolites in Labisia pumila Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Ibrahim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A split plot 3 by 3 experiment was designed to investigate and distinguish the relationships among production of primary metabolites (soluble sugar and starch, secondary metabolites (total phenolics, TP; total flavonoids, TF and leaf gas exchange of three varieties of the Malaysian medicinal herb Labisia pumila Blume, namely the varieties alata, pumila and lanceolata, under three levels of CO2 enrichment (400, 800 and 1,200 µmol mol−1 for 15 weeks. The treatment effects were solely contributed by CO2 enrichment levels; no varietal differences were observed. As CO2 levels increased from 400 to 1,200 µmol mol−1, the production of carbohydrates also increased steadily, especially for starch more than soluble sugar (sucrose. TF and TP content, simultaneously, reached their peaks under 1,200 µmol exposure, followed by 800 and 400 µmol mol−1. Net photosynthesis (A and quantum efficiency of photosystem II (fv/fm were also enhanced as CO2 increased from 400 to 1,200 µmol mol−1. Leaf gas exchange characteristics displayed a significant positive relationship with the production of secondary metabolites and carbohydrate contents. The increase in production of TP and TFs were manifested by high C/N ratio and low protein content in L. pumila seedlings, and accompanied by reduction in cholorophyll content that exhibited very significant negative relationships with total soluble sugar, starch and total non structural carbohydrate.

  19. Effect of surfactant and partial liquid ventilation treatment on gas exchange and lung mechanics in immature lambs: influence of gestational age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rey-Santano

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Surfactant (SF and partial liquid ventilation (PLV improve gas exchange and lung mechanics in neonatal RDS. However, variations in the effects of SF and PLV with degree of lung immaturity have not been thoroughly explored. SETTING: Experimental Neonatal Respiratory Physiology Research Unit, Cruces University Hospital. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized study using sealed envelopes. SUBJECTS: 36 preterm lambs were exposed (at 125 or 133-days of gestational age by laparotomy and intubated. Catheters were placed in the jugular vein and carotid artery. INTERVENTIONS: All the lambs were assigned to one of three subgroups given: 20 mL/Kg perfluorocarbon and managed with partial liquid ventilation (PLV, surfactant (Curosurf®, 200 mg/kg or (3 no pulmonary treatment (Controls for 3 h. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Cardiovascular parameters, blood gases and pulmonary mechanics were measured. In 125-day gestation lambs, SF treatment partially improved gas exchange and lung mechanics, while PLV produced significant rapid improvements in these parameters. In 133-day lambs, treatments with SF or PLV achieved similarly good responses. Neither surfactant nor PLV significantly affected the cardiovascular parameters. CONCLUSION: SF therapy response was more effective in the older gestational age group whereas the effectiveness of PLV therapy was not gestational age dependent.

  20. Biological effects of short-term, high-concentration exposure to methyl isocyanate. III. Influence on gas exchange in the guinea pig lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedde, M.R.; Dodd, D.E.; Troup, C.M.; Fowler, E.H.

    1987-06-01

    The influence of methyl isocyanate (MIC) inhalation on the gas exchange function of the lungs in guinea pigs was studied by measuring arterial blood gases, pH, and tracheal pressure during constant-volume, artificial ventilation with air or 100% O/sub 2/ at 40 and 120 min after exposure. A 15 min exposure to MIC at concentrations of 240 to 628 ppm caused a marked reduction in PaO/sub 2/ and pH/sub a/ and an elevated tracheal pressure during artificial ventilation. The low PaO/sub 2/ was only slightly elevated when the animals were ventilated with 100% O/sub 2/. Although the dry-wet lung weight ratio was reduced at the highest exposure concentration, the effect was not severe and no significant increase in lung water was found at the lower concentrations. MIC inhalation caused severe pulmonary blood shunting and ventilation/perfusion imbalance. This, in turn, led to hypoxemia, metabolic acidosis, and tissue hypoxia, which could produce death. The pulmonary gas exchange deficit likely resulted from bronchial and bronchiolar obstruction caused by sloughed epithelium and other debris from intra- and extrapulmonary airways.

  1. Performance evaluation of cross-flow single-phase liquid-to-gas polymer tube heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewanjee, Sujan; Hossain, Md. Rakibul; Rahman, Md. Ashiqur

    2017-06-01

    Reduced core weight and material cost, higher corrosion resistance are some of the major eye catching properties to study polymers over metal in heat exchanger applications in spite of the former's relatively low thermal conductivity and low strength. In the present study, performance of polymer parallel thin tube heat exchanger is numerically evaluated for cross flow liquid to air applications for a wide range of design and operating parameters such as tube diameter, thickness, fluid velocity and temperature, etc. using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Among a range of available polymeric materials, those with a moderate to high thermal conductivity and strength are selected for this study. A 90 cm × 1 cm single unit of polymer tubes, with appropriate number of tubes such that at least a gap of 5 mm is maintained in between the tubes, is used as a basic unit and multiple combination in the transverse direction of this single unit is simulated to measure the effect. The tube inner diameter is varied from 2 mm to 4 mm and the pressure drop is measured to have a relative idea of pumping cost. For each inner diameter the thickness is varied from .5 mm to 2.5 mm. The water velocity and the air velocity are varied from 0.4 m/s to 2 m/s and 1 m/s to 5 m/s, respectively. The performance of the polymer heat exchanger is compared with that of metal heat exchanger through and an optimum design for polymer heat exchanger is sought out.

  2. Nitrogen supply modulates the effect of changes in drying-rewetting frequency on soil C and N cycling and greenhouse gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, Lourdes; Durán, Jorge; Rodríguez, Alexandra; Roales, Javier; Gallardo, Antonio; Lovett, Gary M; Groffman, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    Climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition are two of the most important global change drivers. However, the interactions of these drivers have not been well studied. We aimed to assess how the combined effect of soil N additions and more frequent soil drying-rewetting events affects carbon (C) and N cycling, soil:atmosphere greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange, and functional microbial diversity. We manipulated the frequency of soil drying-rewetting events in soils from ambient and N-treated plots in a temperate forest and calculated the Orwin & Wardle Resistance index to compare the response of the different treatments. Increases in drying-rewetting cycles led to reductions in soil NO3- levels, potential net nitrification rate, and soil : atmosphere GHG exchange, and increases in NH4+ and total soil inorganic N levels. N-treated soils were more resistant to changes in the frequency of drying-rewetting cycles, and this resistance was stronger for C- than for N-related variables. Both the long-term N addition and the drying-rewetting treatment altered the functionality of the soil microbial population and its functional diversity. Our results suggest that increasing the frequency of drying-rewetting cycles can affect the ability of soil to cycle C and N and soil : atmosphere GHG exchange and that the response to this increase is modulated by soil N enrichment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Practical Perspectives On The In-Vitro And In-Vivo Evaluation Of A Fiber Optic Blood Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Douglas R.; Gehrich, John L.

    1988-06-01

    A new optical fluorescence-based microsensor has been developed to continuously monitor intra-arterial blood gases (pH, pCO2, p02) with a probe sufficiently small to share the lumen of a 20 gauge arterial catheter without compromising pressure fidelity or ease of blood withdrawal. The evaluation of performance has proceeded through a combination of in-vitro, animal and clinical studies. Each has had its own unique problems. This series of studies has re-emphasized the fact that acceptable clinical performance of even the best designed systems is not assured by success in in-vitro or even animal studies. In-vitro studies were conducted to quantify the precision and time response of the sensors and to obtain an assessment of performance characteristics in the in-vitro environment. System precision (1 S.D.) in tonometered bovine blood was 0.03 (pH units), 2 mm Hg (pCO2), and 4 mm Hg (p02). These results were collected over 40 points at two different temperatures (28 and 37 F). Average drift measured over a 200 hour continuous study period showed 0.005 pH units, 0.9 mm Hg pCO2, and 2.1 mm Hg p02 per 24 hour period. In-vivo animal studies (dog, pig, sheep, and rabbit) demonstrated the need for antithrombogenic materials. The probe system employs a covalently bound Heparin coating. However, maintenance of a patent IV drip line and adequate arterial flow was found to be critical. With proper attention to these factors, overall probe performance was found to be equivalent to that predicted by the in-vitro studies. Clinical trials in volunteers, and in critical care and surgical patients, have re-affirmed the need for antithrombogenic probe materials and adequate arterial blood flow. In addition, human studies revealed factors which can lead to sensor offsets, unless properly compensated by probe design. Subsequent clinical trials in volunteers and clinical subjects have verified that continuous monitoring of blood gases is feasible with accuracies approaching that of the

  4. Impact of nitrogen fertilization on soil-Atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges in eucalypt plantations with different soil characteristics in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Zheng, Hua; Chen, Falin; Li, Ruida; Yang, Miao; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Lan, Jun; Xiang, Xuewu

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization is necessary to sustain productivity in eucalypt plantations, but it can increase the risk of greenhouse gas emissions. However, the response of soil greenhouse gas emissions to N fertilization might be influenced by soil characteristics, which is of great significance for accurately assessing greenhouse gas budgets and scientific fertilization in plantations. We conducted a two-year N fertilization experiment (control [CK], low N [LN], middle N [MN] and high N [HN] fertilization) in two eucalypt plantations with different soil characteristics (higher and lower soil organic carbon sites [HSOC and LSOC]) in Guangxi, China, and assessed soil-atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges. The annual mean fluxes of soil CO2, CH4, and N2O were separately 153-266 mg m-2 h-1, -55 --40 μg m-2 h-1, and 11-95 μg m-2 h-1, with CO2 and N2O emissions showing significant seasonal variations. N fertilization significantly increased soil CO2 and N2O emissions and decreased CH4 uptake at both sites. There were significant interactions of N fertilization and SOC level on soil CO2 and N2O emissions. At the LSOC site, the annual mean flux of soil CO2 emission was only significantly higher than the CK treatment in the HN treatment, but, at the HSOC site, the annual mean flux of soil CO2 emission was significantly higher for both the LN (or MN) and HN treatments in comparison to the CK treatment. Under the CK and LN treatments, the annual mean flux of N2O emission was not significantly different between HSOC and LSOC sites, but under the HN treatment, it was significantly higher in the HSOC site than in the LSOC site. Correlation analysis showed that changes in soil CO2 and N2O emissions were significantly related to soil dissolved organic carbon, ammonia, nitrate and pH. Our results suggested significant interactions of N fertilization and soil characteristics existed in soil-atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges, which should be considered in assessing greenhouse gas

  5. Phenotypic plasticity of gas exchange pattern and water loss in Scarabaeus spretus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae): deconstructing the basis for metabolic rate variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terblanche, John S; Clusella-Trullas, Susana; Chown, Steven L

    2010-09-01

    Investigation of gas exchange patterns and modulation of metabolism provide insight into metabolic control systems and evolution in diverse terrestrial environments. Variation in metabolic rate in response to environmental conditions has been explained largely in the context of two contrasting hypotheses, namely metabolic depression in response to stressful or resource-(e.g. water) limited conditions, or elevation of metabolism at low temperatures to sustain life in extreme conditions. To deconstruct the basis for metabolic rate changes in response to temperature variation, here we undertake a full factorial study investigating the longer- and short-term effects of temperature exposure on gas exchange patterns. We examined responses of traits of gas exchange [standard metabolic rate (SMR); discontinuous gas exchange (DGE) cycle frequency; cuticular, respiratory and total water loss rate (WLR)] to elucidate the magnitude and form of plastic responses in the dung beetle, Scarabaeus spretus. Results showed that short- and longer-term temperature variation generally have significant effects on SMR and WLR. Overall, acclimation to increased temperature led to a decline in SMR (from 0.071+/-0.004 ml CO(2) h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 0.039+/-0.004 ml CO(2) h(-1) in 25 degrees C-acclimated beetles measured at 20 degrees C) modulated by reduced DGE frequency (15 degrees C acclimation: 0.554+/-0.027 mHz, 20 degrees C acclimation: 0.257+/-0.030 mHz, 25 degrees C acclimation: 0.208+/-0.027 mHz recorded at 20 degrees C), reduced cuticular WLRs (from 1.058+/-0.537 mg h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 0.900+/-0.400 mg h(-1) in 25 degrees C-acclimated beetles measured at 20 degrees C) and reduced total WLR (from 4.2+/-0.5 mg h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 3.1+/-0.5 mg h(-1) in 25 degrees C-acclimated beetles measured at 25 degrees C). Respiratory WLR was reduced from 2.25+/-0.40 mg h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 1.60+/-0.40 mg h

  6. Ecosystem CO2/H2O fluxes are explained by hydraulically limited gas exchange during tree mortality from spruce bark beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, John M.; Massman, William J.; Ewers, Brent E.; Huckaby, Laurie S.; Negrón, José F.

    2014-06-01

    Disturbances are increasing globally due to anthropogenic changes in land use and climate. This study determines whether a disturbance that affects the physiology of individual trees can be used to predict the response of the ecosystem by weighing two competing hypothesis at annual time scales: (a) changes in ecosystem fluxes are proportional to observable patterns of mortality or (b) to explain ecosystem fluxes the physiology of dying trees must also be incorporated. We evaluate these hypotheses by analyzing 6 years of eddy covariance flux data collected throughout the progression of a spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) epidemic in a Wyoming Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii)-subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) forest and testing for changes in canopy conductance (gc), evapotranspiration (ET), and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2. We predict from these hypotheses that (a) gc, ET, and NEE all diminish (decrease in absolute magnitude) as trees die or (b) that (1) gc and ET decline as trees are attacked (hydraulic failure from beetle-associated blue-stain fungi) and (2) NEE diminishes both as trees are attacked (restricted gas exchange) and when they die. Ecosystem fluxes declined as the outbreak progressed and the epidemic was best described as two phases: (I) hydraulic failure caused restricted gc, ET (28 ± 4% decline, Bayesian posterior mean ± standard deviation), and gas exchange (NEE diminished 13 ± 6%) and (II) trees died (NEE diminished 51 ± 3% with minimal further change in ET to 36 ± 4%). These results support hypothesis b and suggest that model predictions of ecosystem fluxes following massive disturbances must be modified to account for changes in tree physiological controls and not simply observed mortality.

  7. Micrometeorological measurement of hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyl compound air-water gas exchange in Lake Superior and comparison to model predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Rowe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Air-water exchange fluxes of persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT substances are frequently estimated using the Whitman two-film (W2F method, but micrometeorological flux measurements of these compounds over water are rarely attempted. We measured air-water exchange fluxes of hexachlorobenzene (HCB and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs on 14 July 2006 in Lake Superior using the modified Bowen ratio (MBR method. Measured fluxes were compared to estimates using the W2F method, and to estimates from an Internal Boundary Layer Transport and Exchange (IBLTE model that implements the NOAA COARE bulk flux algorithm and gas transfer model. We reveal an inaccuracy in the estimate of water vapor transfer velocity that is commonly used with the W2F method for PBT flux estimation, and demonstrate the effect of use of an improved estimation method. Flux measurements were conducted at three stations with increasing fetch in offshore flow (15, 30, and 60 km in southeastern Lake Superior. This sampling strategy enabled comparison of measured and predicted flux, as well as modification in near-surface atmospheric concentration with fetch, using the IBLTE model. Fluxes estimated using the W2F model were compared to fluxes measured by MBR. In five of seven cases in which the MBR flux was significantly greater than zero, concentration increased with fetch at 1-m height, which is qualitatively consistent with the measured volatilization flux. As far as we are aware, these are the first reported ship-based micrometeorological air-water exchange flux measurements of PCBs.

  8. Impact of ''off-label'' use of ivabradine on exercise capacity, gas exchange, functional class, quality of life, and neurohormonal modulation in patients with ischemic chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarullo, Filippo M; Fazio, Giovanni; Puccio, Danilo; Fasullo, Sergio; Paterna, Salvatore; Novo, Salvatore; Di Pasquale, Pietro

    2010-12-01

    epidemiologic studies indicate that elevated heart rate (HR) is an independent risk factor for mortality and morbidity in patients (pts) with chronic heart failure (CHF). Clinical trials with β-blockers suggest that HR reduction is an important mechanism of their benefit in pts with stable CHF. Pharmacologic inhibition of the I(f) current now provides the opportunity of pure HR reduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of ''Off-Label'' use of ivabradine on exercise capacity, gas exchange, functional class, quality of life, and neurohormonal modulation in pts with ischemic CHF. between January 2008 and June 2008, a graded maximal exercise test with respiratory gas analysis and an endurance test with constant workload corresponding to 85% of the peak VO(2) at the baseline and after 3 months were performed, and at the same times, N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels were also measured, in 60 pts (45 M, 15 F, mean age 52.7 ± 5.3 years), with stable ischemic CHF, New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classes II (n = 35)-III (n = 25), with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 40%, randomized to a ''off-label'' ivabradine use (n = 30) and a control group (n = 30). the exercise capacity increased from 14.8 ± 2.5 to 28.2 ± 3.5 min (P functional class and quality of life. the ''Off-Label'' use of ivabradine significantly improves the exercise capacity, gas exchange, functional heart failure class, quality of life, and neurohormonal modulation in pts with ischemic CHF.

  9. Probing the Binding Interfaces of Protein Complexes Using Gas-Phase H/D Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mistarz, Ulrik H; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F

    2016-01-01

    -millisecond time span after electrospray ionization by ND3 gas can provide structural insights into protein conformers present in solution. Here, we have explored the use of gas-phase HDX-MS for probing the higher-order structure and binding interfaces of protein complexes originating from native solution......, and illustrate that gas-phase HDX-MS can provide a sensitive and simple approach to measure the number of heteroatom-bound non-amide side-chain hydrogens involved in the binding interface of biologically relevant protein complexes....... conditions. Lysozyme ions bound by an oligosaccharide incorporated less deuterium than the unbound ion. Similarly, trypsin ions showed reduced deuterium uptake when bound by the peptide ligand vasopressin. Our results are in good agreement with crystal structures of the native protein complexes...

  10. Wind Speed and Sea State Dependencies of Air-Sea Gas Transfer: Results From the High Wind Speed Gas Exchange Study (HiWinGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, B. W.; Brumer, S. E.; Fairall, C. W.; Huebert, B. J.; Zappa, C. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Yang, M.; Bariteau, L.; Prytherch, J.; Hare, J. E.; Czerski, H.; Matei, A.; Pascal, R. W.

    2017-10-01

    A variety of physical mechanisms are jointly responsible for facilitating air-sea gas transfer through turbulent processes at the atmosphere-ocean interface. The nature and relative importance of these mechanisms evolves with increasing wind speed. Theoretical and modeling approaches are advancing, but the limited quantity of observational data at high wind speeds hinders the assessment of these efforts. The HiWinGS project successfully measured gas transfer coefficients (k660) with coincident wave statistics under conditions with hourly mean wind speeds up to 24 m s-1 and significant wave heights to 8 m. Measurements of k660 for carbon dioxide (CO2) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) show an increasing trend with respect to 10 m neutral wind speed (U10N), following a power law relationship of the form: k660 CO2˜U10N1.68 and k660 dms˜U10N1.33. Among seven high wind speed events, CO2 transfer responded to the intensity of wave breaking, which depended on both wind speed and sea state in a complex manner, with k660 CO2 increasing as the wind sea approaches full development. A similar response is not observed for DMS. These results confirm the importance of breaking waves and bubble injection mechanisms in facilitating CO2 transfer. A modified version of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment Gas transfer algorithm (COAREG ver. 3.5), incorporating a sea state-dependent calculation of bubble-mediated transfer, successfully reproduces the mean trend in observed k660 with wind speed for both gases. Significant suppression of gas transfer by large waves was not observed during HiWinGS, in contrast to results from two prior field programs.

  11. Digestion of wood-based hemicellulose extracts as screened by in vitro gas production method and verified in vivo using sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marketta Rinne

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential of pressurized hot water extracted hemicellulose fractions from various wood species as feeds for ruminants. In Experiment 1, the fermentability of several hemicellulose extracts was screened using an in vitro gas production method. The samples were extracted from spruce (Picea abies including mainly galactoglucomannan (GGM, from birch (Betula pendula consisting mainly of xylan and from larch (Larix sibirica consisting mainly of arabinogalactan. The GGM and xylan samples were readily fermented by rumen microbes while arabinogalactan was not. Based on the in vitro study, GGM was chosen for an in vivo digestibility trial using sheep, where it was fed at increasing proportions of diet dry matter (0, 47, 94 and 141 g kg-1 in a Latin Square design. The in vivo organic matter digestibility of GGM was relatively low, 0.58, but PHWE extracted hemicellulose has some potential as a feed for ruminants.

  12. Anion-exchange engineering of cookie-like Bi2S3/Bi2MoO6 heterostructure for enhanced photocatalytic activities and gas-sensing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yu; Li, Xiaoguang; Chu, Hang; Ge, Yuancai; Dong, Pei; Baines, Robert; Pei, Liyuan; Ye, Mingxin; Shen, Jianfeng

    2017-04-01

    Developing efficient visible-light-driven photocatalysts will advance alternative energy technologies, ultimately curbing the environmental pollution associated with fossil fuels. In this work, Bi2S3/Bi2MoO6 photocatalysts with a heterogeneous cookie-like structure were prepared for the first time by in-situ anion exchange at relatively low temperatures. The catalysts exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity, which we attributed to the photocurrent response, a diminished recombination rate of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, and the existence of a large heterojunction interface. These governing factors were discerned by photoelectrochemical measurements, calculated energy band positions and photoluminescence spectra. Bi2S3/Bi2MoO6 nanocomposites also exhibit better performance in response to gas than bare Bi2MoO6 according to gas sensing tests. Our work, in relaying a feasible method to synthesize Bi2S3/Bi2MoO6-based heterojunction superstructures, and documents a universal preparation method of synthetic heterogeneous complexes, and provides necessary groundwork for the development of next generation semiconductor photocatalytic technology and gas sensor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Technical Note: A minimally invasive experimental system for pCO2 manipulation in plankton cultures using passive gas exchange (atmospheric carbon control simulator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Brooke A.; Olson, M. Brady; Wuori, Tristen

    2017-05-01

    As research into the biotic effects of ocean acidification has increased, the methods for simulating these environmental changes in the laboratory have multiplied. Here we describe the atmospheric carbon control simulator (ACCS) for the maintenance of plankton under controlled pCO2 conditions, designed for species sensitive to the physical disturbance introduced by the bubbling of cultures and for studies involving trophic interaction. The system consists of gas mixing and equilibration components coupled with large-volume atmospheric simulation chambers. These chambers allow gas exchange to counteract the changes in carbonate chemistry induced by the metabolic activity of the organisms. The system is relatively low cost, very flexible, and when used in conjunction with semi-continuous culture methods, it increases the density of organisms kept under realistic conditions, increases the allowable time interval between dilutions, and/or decreases the metabolically driven change in carbonate chemistry during these intervals. It accommodates a large number of culture vessels, which facilitate multi-trophic level studies and allow the tracking of variable responses within and across plankton populations to ocean acidification. It also includes components that increase the reliability of gas mixing systems using mass flow controllers.

  14. ANALYSIS OF GROWTH AND GAS EXCHANGE OF PLANTS Lonchocarpus sericeus (Poir. D.C. IN FLOODING FOR THE RECOVERY OF THE RIPARIAN FORESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Marcel Sousa Lira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509812349In order to select species for using in the restoration of riparian forests on the banks of the Sao FranciscoRiver, in the state of Sergipe, an experiment was conducted to evaluate the growth and gas exchange ofplants Lonchocarpus sericeus (Poir. D.C., subject to flooding conditions in the nursery. The experimentwas conducted at Forest Nursery, Department of Forest Sciences, Federal University of Sergipe (UFS,the municipality of São Cristóvão, (11 º 01 'S latitude and 37 º 12' longitude W, altitude 20 m , stateof Sergipe, Brazil, from October 2006 to January 2007 under ambient conditions. We used a completelyrandomized design (CRD, factorial (2x7, two treatments (control - T0, plants at field capacity and flooded- T1 and days after flooding (0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 days. To simulate the condition of flooding,the plants were placed in plastic pots of black color with a volume of 5 L and more substrate. Followingthese pots were attached to pots with a volume of 10 L, which was added water until it reaches a waterdepth of 5 cm above the top of the plants. The control plants kept in pots with a volume of 5 L substratemaintained at field capacity. In non-destructive variables were used four replicates per treatment evaluatedevery fifteen days, where each replicate consists of six plants, totaling 24. Destructive variables used were4 replicates per treatment, determined biweekly from 15 days after flooding, where each replicate consistsof a plant totaling 24 plants. Therefore, 48 plants were used per treatment. The non-destructive variableswere height, diameter and number of leaves. While the destructive variables analyzed were dry weight ofroots, dry weight of shoots and dry weight of root / shoot ratio. In addition, we carried out analysis of gasexchange on a monthly basis and evaluated twelve plants per treatment, with two sampling leaves, fullyexpanded, per plant. The biometric variables were

  15. Simple setup for gas-phase h/d exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation and ion mobility for analysis of polypeptide structure on a liquid chromatographic time scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mistarz, Ulrik Hvid; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F

    2014-01-01

    with liquid chromatography and a chip-based automated nanoESI interface, allowing for online gas-phase HDX-MS analysis of peptides and proteins separated on a liquid chromatographic time scale at increased throughput. Furthermore, online gas-phase HDX-MS could be performed in tandem with ion mobility......Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) is a fast and sensitive, yet unharnessed analytical approach for providing information on the structural properties of biomolecules, in a complementary manner to mass analysis. Here, we describe a simple setup for ND3-mediated millisecond gas-phase HDX...... gas immediately upstream or downstream of the primary skimmer cone. The approach was implemented on three commercially available mass spectrometers and required no or minor fully reversible reconfiguration of gas-inlets of the ion source. Results from gas-phase HDX-MS of peptides using the aqueous ND3...

  16. Relationship of the demethylation of the DNA with the induction of the sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) In vivo; Relacion de la desmetilacion del ADN con la induccion de intercambios en las cromatidas hermanas (ICH) In vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toribio E, E

    2005-07-01

    The methylation of the DNA is an epigenetic modification that has an important paper in the regulation of the functionality of the genome of the organisms. It can be altered by demethylation processes, either natural or experimentally induced. The 5-azacytidine (Aza) is a compound that causes the demethylation of the DNA (dm-DNA), inducing with it, expression genic and increase in the frequency of the Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE). The SCE is a genotoxicity indicator, caused by diverse mutagens and carcinogen. Since the biological meaning and the formation mechanism of this phenomenon has not been totally illustrious, the exploration of the relation between the dm-DNA and the induction of SCE, it could offer new knowledge to explain those queries. The purpose of this work was to study in cells of the mouse bone marrow In vivo, the effect of the Aza on the induction of SCE, based on two aspects: 1) dose answer and 2) the effectiveness of multiple exhibition. To six groups of three to five animals, they are administered Aza to dose of 5, 10, 15 or 20 mg/Kg of weight; in sharp or multiple form, previously to the bromodeoxyuridine supply and 24 h was sacrificed after this; 2 h after an injection with colchicine. Preparations of those metaphases were made, those which were dyed by means of a technique of fluorescence more Giemsa. It was observed that to sharp low dose, the Aza produced an increment in the frequency of SCE that although small it was proportional and statistically significant. To sharp and multiple high doses, the Aza doesn't cause additional increments of SCE, but if toxicity at cellular level and of individuals. It is concluded that a relationship exists between the dm-DNA and the induction of SCE. It is suggested that the total demethylation of the DNA causes 2 SCE/Cell in cells of the mouse bone marrow, or that the cytotoxicity prevents to evidence a bigger induction. (Author)

  17. The Effect of a Novel Highly Selective Inhibitor of the Sodium/Calcium Exchanger (NCX) on Cardiac Arrhythmias in In Vitro and In Vivo Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohajda, Zsófia; Farkas-Morvay, Nikolett; Jost, Norbert; Nagy, Norbert; Geramipour, Amir; Horváth, András; Varga, Richárd S; Hornyik, Tibor; Corici, Claudia; Acsai, Károly; Horváth, Balázs; Prorok, János; Ördög, Balázs; Déri, Szilvia; Tóth, Dániel; Levijoki, Jouko; Pollesello, Piero; Koskelainen, Tuula; Otsomaa, Leena; Tóth, András; Baczkó, István; Leprán, István; Nánási, Péter P; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Virág, László

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effects of a new, highly selective sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) inhibitor, ORM-10962 were investigated on cardiac NCX current, Ca2+ transients, cell shortening and in experimental arrhythmias. The level of selectivity of the novel inhibitor on several major transmembrane ion currents (L-type Ca2+ current, major repolarizing K+ currents, late Na+ current, Na+/K+ pump current) was also determined. Ion currents in single dog ventricular cells (cardiac myocytes; CM), and action potentials in dog cardiac multicellular preparations were recorded utilizing the whole-cell patch clamp and standard microelectrode techniques, respectively. Ca2+ transients and cell shortening were measured in fluorescent dye loaded isolated dog myocytes. Antiarrhythmic effects of ORM-10962 were studied in anesthetized ouabain (10 μg/kg/min i.v.) pretreated guinea pigs and in ischemia-reperfusion models (I/R) of anesthetized coronary artery occluded rats and Langendorff perfused guinea pigs hearts. ORM-10962 significantly reduced the inward/outward NCX currents with estimated EC50 values of 55/67 nM, respectively. The compound, even at a high concentration of 1 μM, did not modify significantly the magnitude of ICaL in CMs, neither had any apparent influence on the inward rectifier, transient outward, the rapid and slow components of the delayed rectifier potassium currents, the late and peak sodium and Na+/K+ pump currents. NCX inhibition exerted moderate positive inotropic effect under normal condition, negative inotropy when reverse, and further positive inotropic effect when forward mode was facilitated. In dog Purkinje fibres 1 μM ORM-10962 decreased the amplitude of digoxin induced delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs). Pre-treatment with 0.3 mg/kg ORM-10962 (i.v.) 10 min before starting ouabain infusion significantly delayed the development and recurrence of ventricular extrasystoles (by about 50%) or ventricular tachycardia (by about 30%) in anesthetized guinea pigs

  18. A whole-plant chamber system for parallel gas exchange measurements of Arabidopsis and other herbaceous species

    OpenAIRE

    Kölling, Katharina; George, Gavin M; Künzli, Roland; Flütsch, Patrick; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Photosynthetic assimilation of carbon is a defining feature of the plant kingdom. The fixation of large amounts of carbon dioxide supports the synthesis of carbohydrates, which make up the bulk of plant biomass. Exact measurements of carbon assimilation rates are therefore crucial due to their impact on the plants metabolism, growth and reproductive success. Commercially available single-leaf cuvettes allow the detailed analysis of many photosynthetic parameters, including gas exch...

  19. New Method for Super Hydrophobic Treatment of Gas Diffusion Layers for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Using Electrochemical Reduction of Diazonium Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Yohann R J; Benayad, Anass; Schroder, Maxime; Morin, Arnaud; Pauchet, Joël

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this article is to report a new method for the surface functionalization of commercially available gas diffusion layers (GDLs) by the electrochemical reduction of diazonium salt containing hydrophobic functional groups. The method results in superhydrophobic GDLs, over a large area, without pore blocking. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study based on core level spectra and chemical mapping has demonstrated the successful grafting route, resulting in a homogeneous distribution of the covalently bonded hydrophobic molecules on the surface of the GDL fibers. The result was corroborated by contact angle measurement, showing similar hydrophobicity between the grafted and PTFE-modified GDLs. The electrochemically modified GDLs were tested in proton exchange membrane fuel cells under automotive, wet, and dry conditions and demonstrated improved performance over traditional GDLs.

  20. The Effect of Spectral Quality on Daily Patterns of Gas Exchange, Biomass Gain, and Water-Use-Efficiency in Tomatoes and Lisianthus: An Assessment of Whole Plant Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Lanoue

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in light-emitting diode (LED technology have made them a viable alternative to current lighting systems for both sole and supplemental lighting requirements. Understanding how wavelength specific LED lighting can affect plants is thus an area of great interest. Much research is available on the wavelength specific responses of leaves from multiple crops when exposed to long-term wavelength specific lighting. However, leaf measurements do not always extrapolate linearly to the complexities which are found within a whole plant canopy, namely mutual shading and leaves of different ages. Taken together, both tomato (Solanum lycopersicum leaves under short-term illumination and lisianthus (Eustoma grandiflorum and tomato whole plant diurnal patterns of plants acclimated to specific lighting indicate wavelength specific responses of both H2O and CO2 gas exchanges involved in the major growth parameters of a plant. Tomato leaves grown under a white light source indicated an increase in transpiration rate and internal CO2 concentration and a subsequent decrease in water-use-efficiency (WUE when exposed to a blue LED light source compared to a green LED light source. Interestingly, the maximum photosynthetic rate was observed to be similar. Using plants grown under wavelength specific supplemental lighting in a greenhouse, a decrease in whole plant WUE was seen in both crops under both red-blue (RB and red-white (RW LEDs when compared to a high pressure sodium (HPS light. Whole plant WUE was decreased by 31% under the RB LED treatment for both crops compared to the HPS treatment. Tomato whole plant WUE was decreased by 25% and lisianthus whole plant WUE was decreased by 15% when compared to the HPS treatment when grown under RW LED. The understanding of the effects of wavelength specific lighting on both leaf and whole plant gas exchange has significant implications on basic academic research as well as commercial greenhouse production.

  1. The Effect of Spectral Quality on Daily Patterns of Gas Exchange, Biomass Gain, and Water-Use-Efficiency in Tomatoes and Lisianthus: An Assessment of Whole Plant Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoue, Jason; Leonardos, Evangelos D; Ma, Xiao; Grodzinski, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in light-emitting diode (LED) technology have made them a viable alternative to current lighting systems for both sole and supplemental lighting requirements. Understanding how wavelength specific LED lighting can affect plants is thus an area of great interest. Much research is available on the wavelength specific responses of leaves from multiple crops when exposed to long-term wavelength specific lighting. However, leaf measurements do not always extrapolate linearly to the complexities which are found within a whole plant canopy, namely mutual shading and leaves of different ages. Taken together, both tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves under short-term illumination and lisianthus (Eustoma grandiflorum) and tomato whole plant diurnal patterns of plants acclimated to specific lighting indicate wavelength specific responses of both H2O and CO2 gas exchanges involved in the major growth parameters of a plant. Tomato leaves grown under a white light source indicated an increase in transpiration rate and internal CO2 concentration and a subsequent decrease in water-use-efficiency (WUE) when exposed to a blue LED light source compared to a green LED light source. Interestingly, the maximum photosynthetic rate was observed to be similar. Using plants grown under wavelength specific supplemental lighting in a greenhouse, a decrease in whole plant WUE was seen in both crops under both red-blue (RB) and red-white (RW) LEDs when compared to a high pressure sodium (HPS) light. Whole plant WUE was decreased by 31% under the RB LED treatment for both crops compared to the HPS treatment. Tomato whole plant WUE was decreased by 25% and lisianthus whole plant WUE was decreased by 15% when compared to the HPS treatment when grown under RW LED. The understanding of the effects of wavelength specific lighting on both leaf and whole plant gas exchange has significant implications on basic academic research as well as commercial greenhouse production.

  2. Within-canopy and ozone fumigation effects on delta13C and Delta18O in adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees: relation to meteorological and gas exchange parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Arthur; Löw, Markus; Heerdt, Christian; de Beeck, Maarten Op; Schumacher, Johannes; Grams, Thorsten E E; Bahnweg, Günther; Ceulemans, Reinhart; Werner, Herbert; Matyssek, Rainer; Rennenberg, Heinz; Haberer, Kristine

    2009-11-01

    In this study, the effects of different light intensities either in direct sunlight or in the shade crown of adult beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) trees on delta13C and Delta18O were determined under ambient (1 x O3) and twice-ambient (2 x O3) atmospheric ozone concentrations during two consecutive years (2003 and 2004). We analysed the isotopic composition in leaf bulk, leaf cellulose, phloem and xylem material and related the results to (a) meteorological data (air temperature, T and relative humidity, RH), (b) leaf gas exchange measurements (stomatal conductance, g(s); transpiration rate, E; and maximum photosynthetic activity, A(max)) and (c) the outcome of a steady-state evaporative enrichment model. Delta13C was significantly lower in the shade than in the sun crown in all plant materials, whilst Delta18O was increased significantly in the shade than in the sun crown in bulk material and cellulose. Elevated ozone had no effect on delta13C, although Delta18O was influenced by ozone to varied degrees during single months. We observed significant seasonal changes for both parameters, especially in 2004, and also significant differences between the study years. Relating the findings to meteorological data and gas exchange parameters, we conclude that the differences in Delta18O between the sun and the shade crown were predominantly caused by the Péclet effect. This assumption was supported by the modelled Delta18O values for leaf cellulose. It was demonstrated that independent of RH, light-dependent reduction of stomatal conductance (and thus transpiration) and of A(max) can drive the pattern of Delta18O increase with the concomitant decrease of delta13C in the shade crown. The effect of doubling ozone levels on time-integrated stomatal conductance and transpiration as indicated by the combined analysis of Delta18O and delta13C was much lower than the influence caused by the light exposure.

  3. Comparison of pulmonary gas exchange according to intraoperative ventilation modes for mitral valve repair surgery via thoracotomy with one-lung ventilation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woon-Seok; Kim, Seong-Hyop; Chung, Jin Woo

    2014-08-01

    Impaired pulmonary gas exchange after cardiac surgeries with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) often occurs, and the selection of mechanical ventilation mode, pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) or volume-controlled ventilation (VCV), may be important for preventing hypoxia and improving oxygenation. The authors hypothesized that patients with PCV would show better oxygenation, compared with VCV, during one-lung ventilation (OLV) for mitral valve repair surgery (MVP) via thoracotomy. Randomized controlled trial. University teaching hospital. Sixty patients in each group. MVP was performed using thoracotomy with OLV by PCV or VCV. Arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) were measured before anesthesia induction (T0), at skin incision (T1), after administration of heparin (T2), at 30 minutes after CPB weaning (T3), just before departure from the operating room to the intensive care unit (ICU) (T4), and 1 hour after ICU admission (T5), and PaO2/FIO2 ratio was calculated. Peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) and mean inspiratory pressure (Pmean) were recorded at T1, T2, T3, and T4. No significant difference was noted in the PaO2/FIO2 ratio between the groups at any measured point. PIP in the PCV group at all measured points was lower than that in the VCV group (T1, p<0.001; T2, p<0.001; T3, p<0.001; T4, p=0.025, respectively). Pmean was not different between the two groups at any measured point. PCV during OLV in patients undergoing MVP via a thoracotomy with OLV showed lower PIP compared with VCV, but this did not improve pulmonary gas exchange. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of foliar nutrition of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. with magnesium salts and urea on gas exchange, leaf yield and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Borowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In a pot experiment conducted in a phytotron, the effectiveness of foliar nutrition of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. with different magnesium salts with and without the addition of 0.5% CO(NH22 was studied. Magnesium was applied 3 times in the form of solutions of MgSO4 x 7H2O, Mg(NO32 x 6H2O, MgCl2 x 6H2O, C4H6O4Mg x 4H2O, compared to water as the control treatment. The obtained results showed that foliar feeding of spinach with inorganic magnesium salts was an efficient method for supplementing the Mg level in plants during the growing period. But the application of a metalo-organic complex in the form of magnesium acetate (C4H6O4Mg x 4H2O at a concentration of 1.7%, in spite of a similar effect on leaf Mg content, induced phytotoxic symptoms in the form of chlorotic and necrotic spots on the leaves. The application of the solutions of inorganic magnesium salts had a significant effect, resulting in more intensive leaf gas exchange (stomatal conductance, transpiration and photosynthesis and an increase in leaf yield. Magnesium sulphate affected the abovementioned processes in the most effective way, while magnesium acetate had a negative impact. Foliar feeding of spinach with the magnesium salts resulted in an increased leaf content of protein, chlorophyll, carotenoids, nitrates and proline, but a decrease in vitamin C content. The addition of urea to the applied magnesium salt solutions increased the plant gas exchange rates and the leaf content of protein, chlorophyll, carotenoids, nitrates and proline, but it decreased the content of vitamin C, potassium and magnesium.

  5. Non-invasive evaluation of gas exchange during a shuttle walking test vs. a 6-min walking test to assess exercise tolerance in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorati, Paolo; Antonucci, Rosa; Valli, Gabriele; Berton, Emanuela; De Marco, Francesca; Serra, Pietro; Palange, Paolo

    2003-05-01

    Walking tests, such as the "shuttle" incremental walking test (SWT) and the 6-min walking test (6'WT), are commonly utilized in evaluating exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the distance covered is the variable usually considered. Because lung gas exchange indexes are not measured, little is known about the physiological response elicited by different walking protocols. We compared exercise adaptation during the 6'WT and SWT in 13 male stable COPD patients [mean (SE) age: 70 (1) years; forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)): 1.2 (0.1) l; arterial O(2) tension (PaO(2)): 72 (2) mmHg; arterial CO(2) tension (PaCO(2)): 41 (1) mmHg]. Oxygen uptake (.VO(2)), CO(2) output (.VCO(2)), minute ventilation (.V(E)), and heart rate (HR) were monitored by a portable telemetric system. During the SWT a linear response in lung gas exchange indexes was observed while, during the 6'WT, the response was exponential. During the 6'WT, .VO(2), .VCO(2), .V(E), and HR values at steady-state (SS) were significantly lower compared to SWT peak values. For SWT, distance covered correlated with .VO(2PEAK), (R=0.86, p<0.001), .VCO(2PEAK), (R=0.87, p<0.001) and .V(EPEAK) (R=0.74, p<0.01); moreover, distance and .VO(2PEAK) were significantly correlated with peak .VO(2) values obtained during cycle ergometer incremental exercise (R=0.72, p<0.01 and R=0.92, p<0.0001, respectively). For 6'WT, the distance covered did not correlate with any pertinent physiological index. The two walking protocols reveal substantial differences in pathophysiologic adaptations and provide evidence that SWT is more accurate than the 6'WT in the evaluation of maximal exercise tolerance in COPD patients.

  6. The influence of gas-particle partitioning and surface-atmosphere exchange on ammonia during BAQS-Met

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ellis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Border Air Quality and Meteorology study (BAQS-Met was an intensive field campaign conducted in Southwestern Ontario during the summer of 2007. The focus of BAQS-Met was determining the causes of the formation of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5, and of the regional significance of trans-boundary transport and lake breeze circulations on that formation. Fast (1 Hz measurements of ammonia were acquired using a Quantum Cascade Laser Tunable Infrared Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS at the Harrow supersite. Measurements of PM2.5 ammonium, sulfate and nitrate were made using an Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC with hourly time resolution. The median mixing ratio of ammonia was 2.5 ppb, with occasional high spikes at night resulting from local emissions. Measurements were used to assess major local emissions of NH3, diurnal profiles and gas-particle partitioning. The measurements were compared with results from A Unified Regional Air-quality Modelling System (AURAMS. While the fraction of total ammonia (NHx≡NH3 + NH4+ observed in the gas phase peaks between 0.1 and 0.8, AURAMS tended to predict fractions of either less than 0.05 or greater than 0.8. The model frequently predicted acidic aerosol, in contrast with observations wherein NHx almost always exceeded the observed equivalents of sulfate. One explanation for our observations is that the net flux of ammonia from the land surface to the atmosphere increases when aerosol sulfate is present, effectively buffering the mixing ratio of gas phase ammonia, a process not included in the model. A simple representation of an offline bi-directional flux parameterization using the ISORROPIA thermodynamic model was successful at reducing the population of zero gas fraction points, but not the higher gas fraction points.

  7. What Can Be Learned from X-Ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in the Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Both solar wind charge exchange emission and diffuse thermal emission from the Local Bubble are strongly dominated in the soft X-ray band by lines from highly ionized elements. While both processes share many of the same lines, the spectra should differ significantly due to the different production mechanisms, abundances, and ionization states. Despite their distinct spectral signatures, current and past observatories have lacked the spectral resolution to adequately distinguish between the two sources. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy instrumentation proposed for future missions has the potential to answer fundamental questions such as whether there is any hot plasma in the Local Hot Bubble, and if so, what are the abundances of the emitting plasma and whether the plasma is in equilibrium. Such instrumentation will provide dynamic information about the solar wind including data on ion species which are currently difficult to track. It will also make possible remote sensing of the solar wind.

  8. In vitro gas and methane production of silages from whole-plant corn harvested at 4 different stages of maturity and a comparison with in vivo methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macome, F M; Pellikaan, W F; Hendriks, W H; Dijkstra, J; Hatew, B; Schonewille, J T; Cone, J W

    2017-11-01

    The current study investigated the relationship between in vitro and in vivo CH4 production by cows fed corn silage (CS)-based rations. In vivo CH4 production was measured in climate respiration chambers using 8 rumen-cannulated Holstein-Friesian cows. In vitro CH4 production was measured using rumen fluid from the 8 cows that were fully adapted to their respective experimental rations. The animals were grouped in 2 blocks, and randomly assigned to 1 of the 4 total mixed rations (TMR) that consisted of 75% experimental CS, 20% concentrate, and 5% wheat straw [dry matter (DM) basis]. The experimental CS were prepared from whole-plant corn that was harvested at either a very early (25% DM), early (28% DM), medium (32% DM), or late (40% DM) stage of maturity. The 4 experimental TMR and the corresponding CS served as substrate in 2 separate in vitro runs (each run representing 1 block of 4 animals) using rumen fluid from cows fed the TMR in question. No relationship was found between in vivo CH4 production and in vitro CH4 production measured at various time points between 2 and 48 h. None of the in vitro gas production (GP) and CH4 production parameters was influenced by an interaction between substrate and origin of rumen fluid. In vitro measured 48-h GP was not affected by the maturity of whole-plant corn, irrespective whether CS alone or as part of TMR was incubated in adapted rumen inoculum. Incubation of the experimental TMR did not affect the kinetics parameters associated with gas or CH4 production, but when CS alone was incubated the asymptote of GP of the soluble fraction was slightly decreased with increasing maturity of CS at harvest. In vitro CH4 production expressed as a percent of total gas was not affected by the maturity of whole-plant corn at harvest. Several in vitro parameters were significantly affected (GP) or tended to be affected (CH4) by diet fed to donor cows. It was concluded that the current in vitro technique is not suitable to predict in

  9. [Pulmonary gas exchange model: influence of the heterogeneity of distribution on the ventilation-perfusion and diffusion-perfusion ratios of oxygen transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beroff, M J; Lelong, F; Cherruault, Y

    1978-07-01

    The purpose of this pulmonary gas exchange model is to study the effect produced by an inhomogeneous distribution of the ventilation-perfusion (V A/Q) and diffusion-perfusion (D/Q) ratios on the oxygen transfer. We calculate partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in venous blood, in capillary blood and alveolar gas of each element as the unique solution of a non-linear system, the parameters of which are the local values of ventilation, perfusion and diffusion. We show that an inhomogeneous distribution of any ratio leads to a decrease of the mixed arterial concentration of oxygen and that the greater the inhomogeneity, the greater the decrease. We show by numerical stimulation that if two inhomogeneities (V A/Q) and (D/Q) are associated, the oxygen arterial concentration decrease is rather less important if the diffusion-ventilation ratio has a distribution almost homogeneous, i.e. if the V A/Q and D/Q inhomogeneities are almost identical.

  10. Measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air by collection onto an ion exchange resin and analysis by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, M. L.; Perraud, V.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-08-01

    Ammonia and amines are common trace gases in the atmosphere and have a variety of both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, with a major contribution coming from agricultural sites. In addition to their malodorous nature, both ammonia and amines have been shown to enhance particle formation from acids such as nitric, sulfuric and methanesulfonic acids, which has implications for visibility, human health and climate. A key component of quantifying the effects of these species on particle formation is accurate gas-phase measurements in both laboratory and field studies. However, these species are notoriously difficult to measure as they are readily taken up on surfaces, including onto glass surfaces from aqueous solution as established in the present studies. We describe here a novel technique for measuring gas-phase ammonia and amines that involves uptake onto a weak cation exchange resin followed by extraction and analysis using ion chromatography. Two variants - one for parts per billion concentrations in air and the second with lower (parts per trillion) detection limits - are described. The latter involves the use of a custom-designed high-pressure cartridge to hold the resin for in-line extraction. These methods avoid the use of sampling lines, which can lead to significant inlet losses of these compounds. They also have the advantages of being relatively simple and inexpensive. The applicability of this technique to ambient air is demonstrated in measurements made near a cattle farm in Chino, CA.

  11. Estimating the Distribution of Colored Dissolved Organic Matter During the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment Using Four-Dimensional Variational Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo, C. E.; Dwivedi, S.; Haine, T. W. N.; Ho, D. T.

    2017-01-01

    We diagnosed the effect of various physical processes on the distribution of mixed-layer colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and a sulfur hexauoride (SF6) tracer during the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment (SO GasEx). The biochemical upper ocean state estimate uses in situ and satellite biochemical and physical data in the study region, including CDOM (absorption coefcient and spectral slope), SF6, hydrography, and sea level anomaly. Modules for photobleaching of CDOM and surface transport of SF6 were coupled with an ocean circulation model for this purpose. The observed spatial and temporal variations in CDOM were captured by the state estimate without including any new biological source term for CDOM, assuming it to be negligible over the 26 days of the state estimate. Thermocline entrainment and photobleaching acted to diminish the mixed-layer CDOM with time scales of 18 and 16 days, respectively. Lateral advection of CDOM played a dominant role and increased the mixed-layer CDOM with a time scale of 12 days, whereas lateral diffusion of CDOM was negligible. A Lagrangian view on the CDOM variability was demonstrated by using the SF6 as a weighting function to integrate the CDOM elds. This and similar data assimilation methods can be used to provide reasonable estimates of optical properties, and other physical parameters over the short-term duration of a research cruise, and help in the tracking of tracer releases in large-scale oceanographic experiments, and in oceanographic process studies.

  12. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters. Topical report for part 1 of high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spear, K.E.; Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-11

    This program consists of two separate research areas. Part 1, for which this report is written, studied the high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic hot gas filters, while Part 2 studied the long-term durability of ceramic heat exchangers to coal combustion environments. The objectives of Part 1 were to select two candidate ceramic filter materials for flow-through hot corrosion studies and subsequent corrosion and mechanical properties characterization. In addition, a thermodynamic database was developed so that thermochemical modeling studies could be performed to simulate operating conditions of laboratory reactors and existing coal combustion power plants, and to predict the reactions of new filter materials with coal combustion environments. The latter would make it possible to gain insight into problems that could develop during actual operation of filters in coal combustion power plants so that potential problems could be addressed before they arise.

  13. X-ray CT imaging and image-based modelling study of gas exchange in the rice rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affholder, Marie-Cecile; Keyes, Samuel David; Roose, Tiina; Heppell, James; Kirk, Guy

    2016-04-01

    We used X-ray computer tomography and image-based modelling to investigate CO2 uptake by rice roots growing in submerged soil, and its consequences for the chemistry and biology of the rhizosphere. From previous work, three processes are known to greatly modify the rhizophere of rice and other wetland plants: (1) oxygenation of the submerged, anoxic soil by O2 transported through the root gas channels (aerenchyma); (2) oxidation of ferrous iron and resulting accumulation of ferric oxide; and (3) pH changes due to protons formed in iron oxidation and released from the roots to balance excess intake of cations over anions. A further process, so far not much investigated, is the possibility of CO2 uptake by the roots. Large amounts of CO2 accumulate in submerged soils because CO2 formed in soil respiration escapes only slowly by diffusion through the water-saturated soil pores. There is therefore a large CO2 gradient between the soil and the aerenchyma inside the root, and CO2 may be taken up by the roots and vented to the atmosphere. The extent of this and its consequences for rhizosphere chemistry and biology are poorly understood. We grew rice plants in a submerged, strongly-reduced, Philippine rice soil contained in 10-cm diameter, 20-cm deep Perspex pots. Four-week old rice seedlings, grown in nutrient culture, were transplanted into the pots at either 1 or 4 plants per pot, planted closely together. After 3 and 4 weeks, the pots were analysed with an X-ray CT scanner (Custom Nikon/Xtek Hutch; 80 mm by 56 mm field of view and 40 μm voxel size). Gas bubbles were extracted from the data by 3D median filtering and roots using a region-growth method. The images showed prominent and abundant gas bubbles in the soil bulk, but no or very few bubbles in the soil close to roots. There was a clear relation between the absence of gas bubbles and the presence of roots, as well as an increasing concentration of bubbles with depth through the soil. Analysis of the bubbles

  14. The ventilation-perfusion relation and gas exchange in mitral valve disease and coronary artery disease. Implications for anesthesia, extracorporeal circulation, and cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachenberg, T; Tenling, A; Hansson, H E; Tydén, H; Hedenstierna, G

    1997-04-01

    Patients with mitral valve disease (MVD) are at greater risk for respiratory complications after cardiac surgery compared with patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The authors hypothesized that ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) inequality is more pronounced in patients with MVD before and after induction of anesthesia and during and after surgery when extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is used. In patients with MVD (n = 12) or with CAD (n = 12), VA/Q distribution was determined using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Intrapulmonary shunt (Qs/Qr) defined as regions with VA/Q 100 [% of VE]) were calculated from the retention/excretion data of the inert gases. Recordings were obtained while patients spontaneously breathed air in the awake state, during mechanical ventilation after induction of anesthesia, after separation of patients from ECC, and 4 h after operation. Qs/Qr was low in the awake state (MVD group, 3% +/- 3%; CAD group, 3% +/- 4%) and increased after induction of anesthesia to 10% +/- 8% (MVD group, P < 0.05) and 11% +/- 7% (CAD group, P < 0.01). Qs/Qr increased further after separation from ECC (MVD group, 24% +/- 9%, P < 0.01; CAD group, 23% +/- 7%, P < 0.01). Similarly, alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference (PA-aO2) increased from 168 +/- 54 mmHg (anesthetized state) to 427 +/- 138 mmHg after ECC (MVD group, P < 0.01) and from 153 +/- 65 mmHg to 377 +/- 101 mmHg (CAD group, P < 0.01). In both groups, PA-aO2 was correlated with Qs/Qr. Four hours after operation, Qs/Qr had decreased significantly to 8% +/- 6% (CAD group) and 10% +/- 6% (MVD group). PA-aO2 and Qs/Qr showed no significant differences between the CAD and MVD groups. Qs/Qr is the main pathophysiologic mechanism of gas exchange impairment during cardiac surgery for MVD or CAD. Impairment of pulmonary gas exchange secondary to general anesthesia, cardiac surgery, and ECC are comparable for patients undergoing myocardial revascularization or mitral valve surgery.

  15. Depolarization of nuclear spin polarized 129Xe gas by dark rubidium during spin-exchange optical pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, M. A.; Burant, Alex; Wagner, Wolfgang; Branca, Rosa T.

    2017-06-01

    Continuous-flow spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) continues to serve as the most widespread method of polarizing 129Xe for magnetic resonance experiments. Unfortunately, continuous-flow SEOP still suffers from as-yet unidentified inefficiencies that prevent the production of large volumes of xenon with a nuclear spin polarization close to theoretically calculated values. In this work we use a combination of ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) measurements to study the effects of dark Rb vapor on hyperpolarized 129Xe in situ during continuous-flow SEOP. We find that dark Rb vapor in the optical cell outlet has negligible impact on the final 129Xe polarization at typical experimental conditions, but can become significant at higher oven temperatures and lower flow rates. Additionally, in the AAS spectra we also look for a signature of paramagnetic Rb clusters, previously identified as a source of xenon depolarization and a cause for SEOP inefficiency, for which we are able to set an upper limit of 8.3 × 1015 Rb dimers per cm3.

  16. Intensive measurements of gas, water, and energy exchange between vegetation and troposhere during the MONTES campaign in a vegetation gradient from short semi-desertic shrublands to tall wet temperate forests in the NW Mediterranean Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penuelas, J.; Guenther, A.; Rapparini, F.; Llusia, J.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.

    2013-01-01

    MONTES (“Woodlands”) was a multidisciplinary international field campaign aimed at measuring energy, water and especially gas exchange between vegetation and atmosphere in a gradient from short semi-desertic shrublands to tall wet temperate forests in NE Spain in the North Western Mediterranean

  17. Intensive measurements of gas, water, and energy exchange between vegetation and troposphere during the MONTES Campaign in a vegetation gradient from short semi-desertic shrublands to tall wet temperate forests in the NW Mediterranean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    MONTES (“Woodlands”) was a multidisciplinary international field campaign aimed at measuring energy, water and especially gas exchange between vegetation and atmosphere in a gradient from short semi-desertic shrublands to tall wet temperate forests in NE Spain in the North Wester...

  18. Gas exchange and stand-level estimates of water use and gross primary productivity in an experimental pine and switchgrass intercrop forestry system on the Lower Coastal Plain of North Carolina, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janine M. Albaugha; Jean-Christophe Domeca; Chris A. Maier; Eric B. Sucre; Zakiya H. Leggett; John S. King

    2014-01-01

    Despite growing interest in using switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) as a biofuel, there are limiteddata on the physiology of this species and its effect on stand water use and carbon (C) assimilationwhen grown as a forest intercrop for bioenergy. Therefore, we quantified gas exchange rates of switch-grass within intercropped plots and in pure switchgrass plots during...

  19. Intrahepatic gas at postmortem computed tomography: forensic experience as a potential guide for in vivo trauma imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowski, Christian; Sonnenschein, Martin; Thali, Michael J; Aghayev, Emin; Yen, Kathrin; Dirnhofer, Richard; Vock, Peter

    2007-04-01

    Until August 2004 there were 106 forensic cases examined with postmortem multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before traditional autopsy within the Virtopsy project. Intrahepatic gas (IHG) was a frequent finding in postmortem MSCT examinations. The aim of this study was to investigate its cause and significance. There were 84 virtopsy cases retrospectively investigated concerning the occurrence, location, and volume of IHG in postmortem MSCT imaging (1.25 mm collimation, 1.25 mm thickness). We assessed and noted the occurrence of intestinal distention, putrefaction, and systemic gas embolisms and the cause of death, possible open trauma, possible artificial respiration, and the postmortem interval. We investigated the relations between the findings using the contingency table (chi2 test) and the comparison of the postmortem intervals in both groups was performed using the t test in 79 nonputrefied corpses. IHG was found in 47 cases (59.5%). In five of the cases, the IHG was caused or influenced by putrefaction. Gas distribution within the liver of the remaining 42 cases was as follows: hepatic arteries in 21 cases, hepatic veins in 35 cases, and portal vein branches in 13 cases; among which combinations also occurred in 20 cases. The presence of IHG was strongly related to open trauma with systemic gas. Pulmonary barotrauma as occurring under artificial respiration or in drowning also caused IHG. Putrefaction did not seem to influence the occurrence of IHG until macroscopic signs of putrefaction were noticeable. IHG is a frequent finding in traumatic causes of death and requires a systemic gas embolism. Exceptions are putrefied or burned corpses. Common clinical causes such as necrotic bowel diseases appear rarely as a cause of IHG in our forensic case material.

  20. Effects of different fresh gas flows with or without a heat and moisture exchanger on inhaled gas humidity in adults undergoing general anaesthesia: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, José R C; Braz, Mariana G; Hayashi, Yoko; Martins, Regina H G; Betini, Marluci; Braz, Leandro G; El Dib, Regina

    2017-08-01

    The minimum inhaled gas absolute humidity level is 20 mgH2O l for short-duration use in general anaesthesia and 30 mgH2O l for long-duration use in intensive care to avoid respiratory tract dehydration. The aim is to compare the effects of different fresh gas flows (FGFs) through a circle rebreathing system with or without a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) on inhaled gas absolute humidity in adults undergoing general anaesthesia. Systematic review and meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials. We defined FGF (l min) as minimal (0.25 to 0.5), low (0.6 to 1.0) or high (≥2). We extracted the inhaled gas absolute humidity data at 60 and 120 min after connection of the patient to the breathing circuit. The effect size is expressed as the mean differences and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). PubMed, EMBASE, SciELO, LILACS and CENTRAL until January 2017. We included 10 studies. The inhaled gas absolute humidity was higher with minimal flow compared with low flow at 120 min [mean differences 2.51 (95%CI: 0.32 to 4.70); P = 0.02] but not at 60 min [mean differences 2.95 (95%CI: -0.95 to 6.84); P = 0.14], and higher with low flow compared with high flow at 120 min [mean differences 7.19 (95%CI: 4.53 to 9.86); P < 0.001]. An inhaled gas absolute humidity minimum of 20 mgH2O l was attained with minimal flow at all times but not with low or high flows. An HME increased the inhaled gas absolute humidity: with minimal flow at 120 min [mean differences 8.49 (95%CI: 1.15 to 15.84); P = 0.02]; with low flow at 60 min [mean differences 9.87 (95%CI: 3.18 to 16.57); P = 0.04] and 120 min [mean differences 7.19 (95%CI: 3.29 to 11.10); P = 0.003]; and with high flow of 2 l min at 60 min [mean differences 6.46 (95%CI: 4.05 to 8.86); P < 0.001] and of 3 l min at 120 min [mean differences 12.18 (95%CI: 6.89 to 17.47); P < 0.001]. The inhaled gas absolute humidity data attained or were near 30 mgH2O l when an

  1. The effect of whole body vibration short-term exercises on respiratory gas exchange in overweight and obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, Dirk; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Truijen, Steven; Ides, Kris; Vercruysse, Carl-Christian; Van Gaal, Luc

    2009-10-01

    To assess the effect of whole body vibration on oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production among overweight and obese women. In a randomized controlled trial, anthropometric measurements were taken in 20 adult overweight women. Ventilation of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and heart rate were measured using a portable gas-analysis system. After each exercise, a Borg's scale score was assessed. Exercises were performed on a vibration platform with a frequency of 35 Hz and with the intensity set on "high" (amplitude of 4 mm). Two dynamic exercises (squatting and calf raises) and one static exercise (standing) were performed during 3 minutes with and without vibration in a randomized order, with 10 minutes rest between exercises. Mean values of the third minute of exercise were compared. Ventilation of oxygen and carbon dioxide were consistently, significantly higher in the exercises with vibration compared with the exercises without vibration. Borg's scale scores only showed a significant difference between calf raises with and without vibration. The addition of whole body vibration to both static and dynamic exercises appears to significantly increase oxygen uptake in overweight and obese women. More research is needed to determine the physiological pathway and clinical relevance of this increase.

  2. Gas-particle interactions above a Dutch heathland: I. Surface exchange fluxes of NH3, SO2, HNO3 and HCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A field measurement campaign was carried out over a Dutch heathland to investigate the effect of gas-to-particle conversion and ammonium aerosol evaporation on surface/atmosphere fluxes of ammonia and related species. Continuous micrometeorological measurements of the surface exchange of NH3, SO2, HNO3 and HCl were made and are analyzed here with regard to average fluxes, deposition velocities (Vd, canopy resistances (Rc and canopy compensation point for NH3. Gradients of SO2, HNO3 and HCl were measured with a novel wet-denuder system with online anion chromatography. Measurements of HNO3 and HCl indicate an Rc of 100 to 200 s m-1 during warm daytime periods, probably at least partly due to non-zero acid partial pressures above NH4NO3 and NH4Cl on the leaf surfaces. Although it is likely that this observation is exacerbated by the effect of the evaporation of airborne NH4+ on the gradient measurements, the findings nevertheless add to the growing evidence that HNO3 and HCl are not always deposited at the maximum rate. Ammonia (NH3 fluxes show mainly deposition, with some periods of significant daytime emission. The net exchange could be reproduced both with an Rc model (deposition fluxes only using resistance parameterizations from former measurements, as well as with the can