WorldWideScience

Sample records for vivo expression technology

  1. Development of the recombinase-based in vivo expression technology in Streptococcus thermophilus and validation using the lactose operon promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junjua, M.; Galia, W.; Gaci, N.; Uriot, O.; Genay, M.; Bachmann, H.; Kleerebezem, M.; Dary, A.; Roussel, Y.

    2014-01-01


    Aims

    To construct and validate the recombinase-based in vivo expression technology (R-IVET) tool in Streptococcus thermophilus (ST).

    Methods and Results

    The R-IVET system we constructed in the LMD-9 strain includes the plasmid pULNcreB allowing transcriptional fusion

  2. Development of the recombinase-based in vivo expression technology in Streptococcus thermophilus and validation using the lactose operon promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junjua, M.; Galia, W.; Gaci, N.; Uriot, O.; Genay, M.; Bachmann, H.; Kleerebezem, M.; Dary, A.; Roussel, Y.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To construct and validate the recombinase-based in vivo expression technology (R-IVET) tool in Streptococcus thermophilus (ST). METHODS AND RESULTS: The R-IVET system we constructed in the LMD-9 strain includes the plasmid pULNcreB allowing transcriptional fusion with the gene of the

  3. Identification of a two-component Class IIb bacteriocin in Streptococcus pyogenes by recombinase-based in vivo expression technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Brent D.; Herfst, Christine A.; Tonial, Nicholas C.; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T.; Zeppa, Joseph J.; McCormick, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent bacterial pathogen that exhibits strict tropism for the human host, yet bacterial factors responsible for the ability of S. pyogenes to compete within this limited biological niche are not well understood. Using an engineered recombinase-based in vivo expression technology (RIVET) system, we identified an in vivo-induced promoter region upstream of a predicted Class IIb bacteriocin system in the M18 serotype S. pyogenes strain MGAS8232. This promoter element was not active under in vitro laboratory conditions, but was highly induced within the mouse nasopharynx. Recombinant expression of the predicted mature S. pyogenes bacteriocin peptides (designated SpbM and SpbN) revealed that both peptides were required for antimicrobial activity. Using a gain of function experiment in Lactococcus lactis, we further demonstrated S. pyogenes immunity function is encoded downstream of spbN. These data highlight the importance of bacterial gene regulation within appropriate environments to help understand mechanisms of niche adaptation by bacterial pathogens. PMID:27808235

  4. Identification of Salmonella enterica genes with a role in persistence on lettuce leaves during cold storage by recombinase-based in vivo expression technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupitski, Y; Brandl, M T; Pinto, R; Belausov, E; Tamir-Ariel, D; Burdman, S; Sela Saldinger, S

    2013-04-01

    Recurrent outbreaks of enteric illness linked to lettuce and a lack of efficacious strategies to decontaminate produce underscores the need for a better understanding of the molecular interactions of foodborne pathogens with plants. This study aimed at identifying Salmonella enterica genes involved in the persistence of this organism on post-harvest lettuce during cold storage using recombinase-based in vivo expression technology (RIVET). In total, 37 potentially induced loci were identified in four distinct screenings. Knockout mutations in eight upregulated genes revealed that four of them have a role in persistence of the pathogen in this system. These genes included stfC, bcsA, misL, and yidR, encoding a fimbrial outer membrane usher, a cellulose synthase catalytic subunit, an adhesin of the autotransporter family expressed from the Salmonella pathogenicity island-3, and a putative ATP/GTP-binding protein, respectively. bcsA, misL, and yidR but not stfC mutants were impaired also in attachment and biofilm formation, suggesting that these functions are required for survival of S. enterica on post-harvest lettuce. This is the first report that MisL, which has a role in Salmonella binding to fibronectin in animal hosts, is involved also in adhesion to plant tissue. Hence, our study uncovered a new plant attachment factor in Salmonella and demonstrates that RIVET is an effective approach for investigating human pathogen-plant interactions in a post-harvest leafy vegetable.

  5. Identification of Enterococcus faecalis antigens specifically expressed in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Seok-Woo Lee; Shet, Uttom K.; Sang-Won Park; Hyun-Pil Lim; Kwi-Dug Yun; Seong Soo Kang; Se Eun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Molecular mechanism of the pathogenicity of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), a suspected endodontic pathogen, has not yet been adequately elucidated due to limited information on its virulence factors. Here we report the identification of in vivo expressed antigens of E. faecalis by using a novel immunoscreening technique called change-mediated antigen technology (CMAT) and an experimental animal model of endodontic infection. Materials and Methods Among 4,500 E. coli...

  6. Identification of Enterococcus faecalis antigens specifically expressed in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Uttom K.; Park, Sang-Won; Lim, Hyun-Pil; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Molecular mechanism of the pathogenicity of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), a suspected endodontic pathogen, has not yet been adequately elucidated due to limited information on its virulence factors. Here we report the identification of in vivo expressed antigens of E. faecalis by using a novel immunoscreening technique called change-mediated antigen technology (CMAT) and an experimental animal model of endodontic infection. Materials and Methods Among 4,500 E. coli recombinant clones screened, 19 positive clones reacted reproducibly with hyperimmune sera obtained from rabbits immunized with E. faecalis cells isolated from an experimental endodontic infection. DNA sequences from 16 of these in vivo-induced (IVI) genes were determined. Results Identified protein antigens of E. faecalis included enzymes involved in housekeeping functions, copper resistance protein, putative outer membrane proteins, and proteins of unknown function. Conclusions In vivo expressed antigens of E. faecalis could be identified by using a novel immune-screening technique CMAT and an experimental animal model of endodontic infection. Detailed analysis of these IVI genes will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the endodontic infection of E. faecalis. PMID:26587417

  7. Ex vivo lung perfusion review of a revolutionary technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, George; Makdisi, Tony; Jarmi, Tambi; Caldeira, Christiano C

    2017-09-01

    Donor lung shortage has been the main reason to the increasing number of patients waiting for lung transplant. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is widely expanding technology to assess and prepare the lungs who are considered marginal for transplantation. the outcomes are encouraging and comparable to the lungs transplanted according to the standard criteria. in this article, we will discuss the history of development, the techniques and protocols of ex vivo, and the logics and rationales for ex vivo use.

  8. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  9. Portable XRF Technology to Quantify Pb in Bone In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Aaron James; Weisskopf, Marc; Nie, Linda Huiling

    2014-01-01

    Lead is a ubiquitous toxicant. Bone lead has been established as an important biomarker for cumulative lead exposures and has been correlated with adverse health effects on many systems in the body. K-shell X-ray fluorescence (KXRF) is the standard method for measuring bone lead, but this approach has many difficulties that have limited the widespread use of this exposure assessment method. With recent advancements in X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technology, we have developed a portable system that can quantify lead in bone in vivo within 3 minutes. Our study investigated improvements to the system, four calibration methods, and system validation for in vivo measurements. Our main results show that the detection limit of the system is 2.9 ppm with 2 mm soft tissue thickness, the best calibration method for in vivo measurement is background subtraction, and there is strong correlation between KXRF and portable LXRF bone lead results. Our results indicate that the technology is ready to be used in large human population studies to investigate adverse health effects of lead exposure. The portability of the system and fast measurement time should allow for this technology to greatly advance the research on lead exposure and public/environmental health.

  10. Expression of RANKL/OPG during bone remodeling in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, H., E-mail: tnk@ymghp.jp [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, 77 Ohsaki, Hofu, Yamaguchi 747-8511 (Japan); Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Mine, T. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Ogasa, H. [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Taguchi, T. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Liang, C.T. [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); National Health Research Institutes, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first study to determine the relationship between osteogenic differentiation and RANKL/OPG expression during bone remodeling in vivo. {yields} The OPG expression peak occurred during the bone formation phase, whereas the marked elevation of RANKL expression was observed during the bone resorption phase. {yields} Histological analysis showed that RANKL/OPG immunoreactivity was predominantly associated with bone marrow cells in the marrow cavity. {yields} The present study confirmed that RANKL/OPG are key factors linking bone formation to resorption during the bone remodeling process. -- Abstract: The interaction between receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) plays a dominant role in osteoclastogenesis. As both proteins are produced by osteoblast lineage cells, they are considered to represent a key link between bone formation and resorption. In this study, we investigated the expression of RANKL and OPG during bone remodeling in vivo to determine the relationship between osteoclastogenic stimulation and osteoblastic differentiation. Total RNA was prepared from rat femurs after marrow ablation on days 0, 3, 6, and 9. The temporal activation patterns of osteoblast-related genes (procollagen {alpha}1 (I), alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin) were examined by Northern blot analysis. An appreciable increase in the expression of these osteoblast markers was observed on day 3. The peak increase in gene expression was observed on day 6 followed by a slight reduction by day 9. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the OPG mRNA expression was markedly upregulated on day 6 and slightly decreased on day 9. In contrast, RANKL mRNA expression was increased by more than 20-fold on day 9. The RANKL/OPG ratio, an index of osteoclastogenic stimulation, peaked on day 9. Histological analysis showed that RANKL and OPG immunoreactivity were predominantly associated with bone marrow cells. The

  11. Positive expressive technologies for social wellness

    OpenAIRE

    Kanis, Marije

    2009-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Drawing on research from the fields of HCI, social and positive psychology, this thesis investigates the design of technologies that encourage the expression of positive emotions. In parallel, it details the deployment of effective design steps to guide, frame and eventually support understandings of positive mental and social usage effects of technology. Different artefacts termed P...

  12. In vivo imaging of inducible tyrosinase gene expression with an ultrasound array-based photoacoustic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tyler; Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    Tyrosinase, a key enzyme in the production of melanin, has shown promise as a reporter of genetic activity. While green fluorescent protein has been used extensively in this capacity, it is limited in its ability to provide information deep in tissue at a reasonable resolution. As melanin is a strong absorber of light, it is possible to image gene expression using tyrosinase with photoacoustic imaging technologies, resulting in excellent resolutions at multiple-centimeter depths. While our previous work has focused on creating and imaging MCF-7 cells with doxycycline-controlled tyrosinase expression, we have now established the viability of these cells in a murine model. Using an array-based photoacoustic imaging system with 5 MHz center frequency, we capture interleaved ultrasound and photoacoustic images of tyrosinase-expressing MCF-7 tumors both in a tissue mimicking phantom, and in vivo. Images of both the tyrosinase-expressing tumor and a control tumor are presented as both coregistered ultrasound-photoacoustic B-scan images and 3-dimensional photoacoustic volumes created by mechanically scanning the transducer. We find that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible with a signal level 12dB greater than that of the control tumor in vivo. Phantom studies with excised tumors show that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible at depths in excess of 2cm, and have suggested that our imaging system is sensitive to a transfection rate of less than 1%.

  13. VIVO Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology: Review and Outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, Tatiana; Blümel, Ina; Heller, Lambert

    2016-01-01

    This poster gives an overview about past, current and future activities of the VIVO Lab – a sub-group of the Open Science Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB). In the past there have been several corporate projects and implementations around VIVO, including the past corporate VIVO project – VIVO for the TIB, which was complemented with the additional features (VIVOPath and VIVO Deutsches Handbuch). The current subject area of the VIVO Lab covers, among other thi...

  14. Functional imaging: monitoring heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weisheng; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The regulation of genetic elements can be monitored in living animals using photoproteins as reporters. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the key catabolic enzyme in the heme degradation pathway. Here, HO expression serves as a model for in vivo functional imaging of transcriptional regulation of a clinically relevant gene. HO enzymatic activity is inhibited by heme analogs, metalloporphyrins, but many members of this family of compounds also activate transcription of the HO-1 promoter. The degree of transcriptional activation by twelve metalloporphyrins, differing at the central metal and porphyrin ring substituents, was evaluated in both NIH 3T3 stable lines and transgenic animals containing HO-1 promoter-luciferase gene fusions. In the correlative cell culture assays, the metalloporphyrins increased transcription form the full length HO promoter fusion to varying degrees, but none increased transcription from a truncated HO-1 promoter. These results suggested that one or both of the two distal enhancer elements located at -4 and -10 Kb upstream from transcriptional start are required for HO-1 induction by heme and its analogs. The full-length HO-1-luc fusion was then evaluated as a transgene in mice. It was possible to monitor the effects of the metalloporphyrins, SnMP and ZnPP, in living animals over time. This spatiotemporal analyses of gene expression in vivo implied that alterations in porphyrin ring substituents and the central metal may affect the extent of gene activation. These data further indicate that using photoprotein reporters, subtle differences in gene expression can be monitored in living animals.

  15. In Vivo Fluorescent Labeling of Tumor Cells with the HaloTag® Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Benink, Hélène A; McDougall, Mark G; Chico-Calero, Isabel; Kung, Andrew L

    2012-01-01

    Many fluorescent sensors are currently available for in vitro bio-physiological microscopic imaging. The ability to label cells in living animals with these fluorescent sensors would help translate some of these assays into in vivo applications. To achieve this goal, the first step is to establish a method for selectively labeling target cells with exogenous fluorophores. Here we tested whether the HaloTag® protein tagging system provides specific labeling of xenograft tumors in living animals. After systemic delivery of fluorophore-conjugated ligands, we performed whole animal planar fluorescent imaging to determine uptake in tag-expressing HCT116 xenografts. Our results demonstrate that HaloTag ligands containing red or near-infrared fluorophores have enhanced tumor uptake and are suitable for non-invasive in vivo imaging. Our proof-of-concept results establish feasibility for using HaloTag technology for bio-physiological imaging in living animals.

  16. Nanofibrous scaffolds incorporating PDGF-BB microspheres induce chemokine expression and tissue neogenesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiming Jin

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF exerts multiple cellular effects that stimulate wound repair in multiple tissues. However, a major obstacle for its successful clinical application is the delivery system, which ultimately controls the in vivo release rate of PDGF. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA microspheres (MS in nanofibrous scaffolds (NFS have been shown to control the release of rhPDGF-BB in vitro. In order to investigate the effects of rhPDGF-BB release from MS in NFS on gene expression and enhancement of soft tissue engineering, rhPDGF-BB was incorporated into differing molecular weight (MW polymeric MS. By controlling the MW of the MS over a range of 6.5 KDa-64 KDa, release rates of PDGF can be regulated over periods of weeks to months in vitro. The NFS-MS scaffolds were divided into multiple groups based on MS release characteristics and PDGF concentration ranging from 2.5-25.0 microg and evaluated in vivo in a soft tissue wound repair model in the dorsa of rats. At 3, 7, 14 and 21 days post-implantation, the scaffold implants were harvested followed by assessments of cell penetration, vasculogenesis and tissue neogenesis. Gene expression profiles using cDNA microarrays were performed on the PDGF-releasing NFS. The percentage of tissue invasion into MS-containing NFS at 7 days was higher in the PDGF groups when compared to controls. Blood vessel number in the HMW groups containing either 2.5 or 25 microg PDGF was increased above those of other groups at 7d (p<0.01. Results from cDNA array showed that PDGF strongly enhanced in vivo gene expression of the CXC chemokine family members such as CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL5. Thus, sustained release of rhPDGF-BB, controlled by slow-releasing MS associated with the NFS delivery system, enhanced cell migration and angiogenesis in vivo, and may be related to an induced expression of chemokine-related genes. This approach offers a technology to accurately control growth factor release to promote

  17. VIVO Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology: Review and Outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, Tatiana; Blümel, Ina; Heller, Lambert

    2016-01-01

    This poster gives an overview about past, current and future activities of the VIVO Lab – a sub-group of the Open Science Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB).  In the past there have been several corporate projects and implementations around VIVO, including the past corporate VIVO project – VIVO for the TIB, which was complemented with the additional features (VIVOPath and VIVO Deutsches Handbuch). The current subject area of the VIVO Lab covers, among other thi...

  18. Differential transgene expression in brain cells in vivo and in vitro from AAV-2 vectors with small transcriptional control units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kügler, S; Lingor, P; Schöll, U; Zolotukhin, S; Bähr, M

    2003-06-20

    Adeno-associated- (AAV) based vectors are promising tools for gene therapy applications in several organs, including the brain, but are limited by their small genome size. Two short promoters, the human synapsin 1 gene promoter (hSYN) and the murine cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter (mCMV), were evaluated in bicistronic AAV-2 vectors for their expression profiles in cultured primary brain cells and in the rat brain. Whereas transgene expression from the hSYN promoter was exclusively neuronal, the murine CMV promoter targeted expression mainly to astrocytes in vitro and showed weak transgene expression in vivo in retinal and cortical neurons, but strong expression in thalamic neurons. We propose that neuron specific transgene expression in combination with enhanced transgene capacity will further substantially improve AAV based vector technology.

  19. Activation of peritoneal cells upon in vivo transfection with a recombinant alphavirus expressing GM-CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimp, AH; Lansink, PO; Withoff, S; de Vries, EGE; Scherphof, GL; Wilschut, J; Daemen, T

    In this study we determined the in vivo localization of recombinant proteins expressed by intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) particles. Subsequently, we investigated the influence of i.p. administered SFV particles encoding recombinant murine

  20. In vivo expression of antimicrobial peptides in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Slotved, Hans-Christian; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    . Comparisons indicate that analyses of mRNA levels of AMPs may find greater differences in expression than analyses of protein levels. Few studies evaluate the effect of topical treatments on the expression of AMPs, and these indicate an inhibition of AMP expression, particularly after use of corticosteroids....... AMPs are important components of the skin as a defense against infections, and despite much research, the clinical importance of the effect of common treatments, including systemic treatments for AD and the interplay between AMPs and the skin microbiome, is still largely unknown....

  1. Bcl-x(L) expression in vivo in rheumatoid synovium.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Busteed, S

    2012-02-03

    To examine the expression of the apoptosis regulatory protein, Bcl-x(L), in the synovium of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-x(L) was carried out on synovial samples from patients with RA and OA. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis were performed to qualitatively examine the expression of Bcl-x(L). Bcl-x(L) expression was detected in the lining, endothelium and inflammatory cells of both RA (n=20) and OA (n=10) samples. However, there was significantly more expression in the lining of RA synovium compared to OA (77 vs 61%, p<0.05). Many of the positive cells in the RA subsynovium were noted to be plasma cells. There was a significant correlation between Bcl-x(L) expression and the number of inflammatory cells in the subsynovium of RA and OA patients (r (s)=0.376, p<0.05, n=30). Age and disease duration did not correlate with Bcl-x(L) expression in rheumatoid patients. Bcl-x(L) may play a role in the extended survival of synoviocytes and inflammatory cells in rheumatoid synovium.

  2. Mouse Protocadherin-1 Gene Expression Is Regulated by Cigarette Smoke Exposure In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Henk; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Brouwer, Uilke; den Boef, Lisette E.; Gras, Renee; Reinders-Luinge, Marjan; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; van der Toorn, Marco; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Sayers, Ian; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Nawijn, Martijn C.

    2014-01-01

    Protocadherin-1 (PCDH1) is a novel susceptibility gene for airway hyperresponsiveness, first identified in families exposed to cigarette smoke and is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells. Here, we asked how mouse Pcdh1 expression is regulated in lung structural cells in vivo under physiological

  3. Gene expression profiles of vitrified in vitro- and in vivo-derived bovine blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Digdem Aktoprakligil; Agca, Cansu; Aksu, Soner; Bagis, Haydar; Akkoc, Tolga; Caputcu, Arzu Tas; Arat, Sezen; Taskin, Ali Cihan; Kizil, Sedat H; Karasahin, Tahir; Akyol, Numan; Satilmis, Muharrem; Sagirkaya, Hakan; Ustuner, Burcu; Nur, Zekeriya; Agca, Yuksel

    2012-09-01

    Vitrification is becoming a preferred method for pre-implantation embryo cryopreservation. The objective of this study was to determine the differentially expressed genes of in vivo- and in vitro-produced bovine embryos after vitrification. In vitro- (IVF) and in vivo-derived (IVV) bovine blastocysts were identified as follows: in vitro-produced fresh (IVF-F), in vitro-produced vitrified (IVF-V), in vivo-derived fresh (IVV-F), in vivo-derived vitrified (IVV-V). The microarray results showed that 53 genes were differentially regulated between IVF and IVV, and 121 genes were differentially regulated between fresh and vitrified blastocysts (P vitro bovine blastocyst production protocols used in this study caused no major gene expression differences compared to those of in vivo-produced blastocysts. After vitrification, however, in vitro-produced blastocysts showed major gene expression differences compared to in vivo blastocysts. This study suggests that in vitro-produced embryos are of comparable quality to their in vivo counterparts. Vitrification of in vitro blastocysts, on the other hand, causes significant up-regulation of genes that are involved in stress responses. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Applications of nuclear technologies for in-vivo elemental analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Wielopolski, L.

    1982-01-01

    Measurement facilities developed, to date, include a unique whole-body-counter, (WBC); a total-body neutron-activation facility (TBNAA); and a partial-body activation facility (PBNAA). A variation of the prompt-gamma neutron-activation technique for measuring total-body nitrogen was developed to study body composition of cancer patients and the effect of nutritional regimens on the composition. These new techniques provide data in numerous clinical studies not previously amenable to investigation. The development and perfection of these techniques provide unique applications of radiation and radioisotopes to the early diagnosis of certain diseases and the evaluation of therapeutic programs. The PBNAA technique has been developed and calibrated for in-vivo measurement of metals. Development has gone forward on prompt-gamma neutron activation for the measurement of cadmium, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) for measurement of iron. Other techniques are being investigated for in-vivo measurement of metals such as silicon and beryllium.

  5. The proteome response to amyloid protein expression in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A Gomes

    Full Text Available Protein misfolding disorders such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and transthyretin amyloidosis are characterized by the formation of protein amyloid deposits. Although the nature and location of the aggregated proteins varies between different diseases, they all share similar molecular pathways of protein unfolding, aggregation and amyloid deposition. Most effects of these proteins are likely to occur at the proteome level, a virtually unexplored reality. To investigate the effects of an amyloid protein expression on the cellular proteome, we created a yeast expression system using human transthyretin (TTR as a model amyloidogenic protein. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a living test tube, to express native TTR (non-amyloidogenic and the amyloidogenic TTR variant L55P, the later forming aggregates when expressed in yeast. Differential proteome changes were quantitatively analyzed by 2D-differential in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. We show that the expression of the amyloidogenic TTR-L55P causes a metabolic shift towards energy production, increased superoxide dismutase expression as well as of several molecular chaperones involved in protein refolding. Among these chaperones, members of the HSP70 family and the peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase (PPIase were identified. The latter is highly relevant considering that it was previously found to be a TTR interacting partner in the plasma of ATTR patients but not in healthy or asymptomatic subjects. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO expression is also increased. Our findings suggest that refolding and degradation pathways are activated, causing an increased demand of energetic resources, thus the metabolic shift. Additionally, oxidative stress appears to be a consequence of the amyloidogenic process, posing an enhanced threat to cell survival.

  6. A 5' Noncoding Exon Containing Engineered Intron Enhances Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV Vectors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiamiao; Williams, James A; Luke, Jeremy; Zhang, Feijie; Chu, Kirk; Kay, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) expression system in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within a universal 5' UTR noncoding exon. Like minicircle DNA plasmids (devoid of bacterial backbone sequences), MIP plasmids overcome transcriptional silencing of the transgene. However, in addition MIP plasmids increase transgene expression by 2 and often >10 times higher than minicircle vectors in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we examined the effects of the MIP intronic sequences in a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector system. Recombinant AAV vectors containing an intron with a bacterial replication origin and bacterial selectable marker increased transgene expression by 40 to 100 times in vivo when compared with conventional AAV vectors. Therefore, inclusion of this noncoding exon/intron sequence upstream of the coding region can substantially enhance AAV-mediated gene expression in vivo.

  7. Garlic Influences Gene Expression In Vivo and In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Craig S; Dawson, Harry D; Novotny, Janet A

    2016-02-01

    There is a large body of preclinical research aimed at understanding the roles of garlic and garlic-derived preparations in the promotion of human health. Most of this research has targeted the possible functions of garlic in maintaining cardiovascular health and in preventing and treating cancer. A wide range of outcome variables has been used to investigate the bioactivity of garlic, ranging from direct measures of health status such as cholesterol concentrations, blood pressure, and changes in tumor size and number, to molecular and biochemical measures such as mRNA gene expression, protein concentration, enzyme activity, and histone acetylation status. Determination of how garlic influences mRNA gene expression has proven to be a valuable approach to elucidating the mechanisms of garlic bioactivity. Preclinical studies investigating the health benefits of garlic far outnumber human studies and have made frequent use of mRNA gene expression measurement. There is an immediate need to understand mRNA gene expression in humans as well. Although safety and ethical constraints limit the types of available human tissue, peripheral whole blood is readily accessible, and measuring mRNA gene expression in whole blood may provide a unique window to understanding how garlic intake affects human health. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Application of in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Rollins

    Full Text Available In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT is an immuno-screening technique that identifies bacterial antigens expressed during infection and not during standard in vitro culturing conditions. We applied IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis and identified PagA, seven members of a N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase autolysin family, three P60 family lipoproteins, two transporters, spore cortex lytic protein SleB, a penicillin binding protein, a putative prophage holin, respiratory nitrate reductase NarG, and three proteins of unknown function. Using quantitative real-time PCR comparing RNA isolated from in vitro cultured B. anthracis to RNA isolated from BALB/c mice infected with virulent Ames strain B. anthracis, we confirmed induced expression in vivo for a subset of B. anthracis genes identified by IVIAT, including L-alanine amidases BA3767, BA4073, and amiA (pXO2-42; the bacteriophage holin gene BA4074; and pagA (pXO1-110. The exogenous addition of two purified putative autolysins identified by IVIAT, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases BA0485 and BA2446, to vegetative B. anthracis cell suspensions induced a species-specific change in bacterial morphology and reduction in viable bacterial cells. Many of the proteins identified in our screen are predicted to affect peptidoglycan re-modeling, and our results support significant cell wall structural remodeling activity during B. anthracis infection. Identification of L-alanine amidases with B. anthracis specificity may suggest new potential therapeutic targets.

  9. Application of Fluorescent Protein Expressing Strains to Evaluation of Anti-Tuberculosis Therapeutic Efficacy In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Kong

    Full Text Available The slow growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, hinders development of new diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines. Using non-invasive real-time imaging technologies to monitor the disease process in live animals would facilitate TB research in all areas. We developed fluorescent protein (FP expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains for in vivo imaging, which can be used to track bacterial location, and to quantify bacterial load in live animals. We selected an optimal FP for in vivo imaging, by first cloning six FPs: tdTomato, mCherry, mPlum, mKate, Katushka and mKeima, into mycobacteria under either a mycobacterial Hsp60 or L5 promoter, and compared their fluorescent signals in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence from each FP-expressing strain was measured with a multimode reader using the optimal excitation and emission wavelengths for the FP. After normalizing bacterial numbers with optical density, the strain expressing L5-tdTomato displayed the highest fluorescence. We used the tdTomato-labeled M. bovis BCG to obtain real-time images of pulmonary infections in living mice and rapidly determined the number of bacteria present. Further comparison between L5-tdTomato and Hsp60-tdTomato revealed that L5-tdTomato carried four-fold more tdTomato gene copies than Hsp60-tdTomato, which eventually led to higher protein expression of tdTomato. Evaluating anti-TB efficacy of rifampicin and isoniazid therapy in vitro and in vivo using the L5-tdTomato strain demonstrated that this strain can be used to identify anti-TB therapeutic efficacy as quickly as 24 h post-treatment. These M. bovis BCG reporter strains represent a valuable new tool for evaluation of therapeutics, vaccines and virulence.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of HER2 Receptor Expression In Vivo by Near-Infrared Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Chernomordik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 overexpression in breast cancers is associated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. Current techniques for estimating this important characteristic use ex vivo assays that require tissue biopsies. We suggest a novel noninvasive method to characterize HER2 expression in vivo, using optical imaging, based on HER2-specific probes (albumin-binding domain–fused-(ZHER2:3422-Cys Affibody molecules [Affibody AB, Solna, Sweden], labeled with Alexa Fluor 750 [Molecular Probes, Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA] that could be used concomitantly with HER2-targeted therapy. Subcutaneous tumor xenografts, expressing different levels of HER2, were imaged with a near-infrared fluorescence small-animal imaging system at several times postinjection of the probe. The compartmental ligand-receptor model was used to calculate HER2 expression from imaging data. Correlation between HER2 amplification/overexpression in tumor cells and parameters, directly estimated from the sequence of optical images, was observed (eg, experimental data for BT474 xenografts indicate that initial slope, characterizing the temporal dependence of the fluorescence intensity detected in the tumor, linearly depends on the HER2 expression, as measured ex vivo by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the same tumor. The results obtained from tumors expressing different levels of HER2 substantiate a similar relationship between the initial slope and HER2 amplification/overexpression. This work shows that optical imaging, combined with mathematical modeling, allows noninvasive monitoring of HER2 expression in vivo.

  11. A quorum sensing-based in vivo expression system and its application in multivalent bacterial vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Teng; Ni, Chunshan; Zhang, Lingzhi; Wang, Qiyao; Xiao, Jingfan; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2015-03-18

    Delivery of antigens by live bacterial carriers can elicit effective humoral and cellular responses and may be an attractive strategy for live bacterial vaccine production through introduction of a vector that expresses an exogenous protective antigen. To overcome the instability and metabolic burden associated with plasmid introduction, alternative strategies, such as the use of in vivo-inducible promoters, have been proposed. However, screening an ideal in vivo-activated promoter with high efficiency and low leak expression in a particular strain poses great challenges to many researchers. In this work, we constructed an in vivo antigen-expressing vector suitable for Edwardsiella tarda, an enteric Gram-negative invasive intracellular pathogen of both animals and humans. By combining quorum sensing genes from Vibrio fischeri with iron uptake regulons, a synthetic binary regulation system (ironQS) for E. tarda was designed. In vitro expression assay demonstrated that the ironQS system is only initiated in the absence of Fe2+ in the medium when the cell density reaches its threshold. The ironQS system was further confirmed in vivo to present an in vivo-triggered and cell density-dependent expression pattern in larvae and adult zebrafish. A recombinant E. tarda vector vaccine candidate WED(ironQS-G) was established by introducing gapA34, which encodes the protective antigen glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from the fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila LSA34 into ironQS system, and the immune protection afforded by this vaccine was assessed in turbot (Scophtalmus maximus). Most of the vaccinated fish survived under the challenge with A. hydrophila LSA34 (RPS=67.0%) or E. tarda EIB202 (RPS=72.3%). Quorum sensing system has been extensively used in various gene structures in synthetic biology as a well-functioning and population-dependent gene circuit. In this work, the in vivo expression system, ironQS, maintained the high expression efficiency of the

  12. Transient transcription factor (OSKM) expression is key towards clinical translation of in vivo cell reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lázaro, Irene; Cossu, Giulio; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2017-06-01

    Reprogramming adult, fully differentiated cells to pluripotency in vivo via Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc (OSKM) overexpression has proved feasible in various independent studies and could be used to induce tissue regeneration owing to the proliferative capacity and differentiation potential of the reprogrammed cells. However, a number of these reports have described the generation of teratomas caused by sustained reprogramming, which precludes the therapeutic translation of this technology. A recent study by the Izpisúa-Belmonte laboratory described a cyclic regime for short-term OSKM expression in vivo that prevents complete reprogramming to the pluripotent state as well as tumorigenesis. We comment here on this and other studies that provide evidence that in vivo OSKM induction can enhance tissue regeneration, while avoiding the feared formation of teratomas. These results could inspire more research to explore the potential of in vivo reprogramming in regenerative medicine. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  13. Monitoring Gene Expression In Vivo with Nucleic Acid Molecular Switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David C. Ward; Patricia Bray-Ward

    2005-01-26

    The overall objectives of this project were (1) to develop allosteric ribozymes capable of acting as molecular switches for monitoring the levels of both wild-type and mutant mRNA species in living cells and whole animals and (2) to develop highly efficient reagents to deliver nucleic acid molecular switches into living cells, tissues and animals with the ultimate goal of expression profiling specific mRNAs of diagnostic or prognostic value within tumors in animals. During the past year, we have moved our laboratory to Nevada and in the moving process we have lost electronic and paper copies of prior progress reports concerning the construction and biological properties of the molecular switches. Since there was minimal progress during the last year on molecular switches, we are relying on past project reports to provide a summary of our data on this facet of the grant. Here we are summarizing the work done on the delivery reagents and their application to inducing mutations in living cells, which will include work done during the no cost extension.

  14. A Comparison of Red Fluorescent Proteins to Model DNA Vaccine Expression by Whole Animal In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnear, Ekaterina; Caproni, Lisa J; Tregoning, John S

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines can be manufactured cheaply, easily and rapidly and have performed well in pre-clinical animal studies. However, clinical trials have so far been disappointing, failing to evoke a strong immune response, possibly due to poor antigen expression. To improve antigen expression, improved technology to monitor DNA vaccine transfection efficiency is required. In the current study, we compared plasmid encoded tdTomato, mCherry, Katushka, tdKatushka2 and luciferase as reporter proteins for whole animal in vivo imaging. The intramuscular, subcutaneous and tattooing routes were compared and electroporation was used to enhance expression. We observed that overall, fluorescent proteins were not a good tool to assess expression from DNA plasmids, with a highly heterogeneous response between animals. Of the proteins used, intramuscular delivery of DNA encoding either tdTomato or luciferase gave the clearest signal, with some Katushka and tdKatushka2 signal observed. Subcutaneous delivery was weakly visible and nothing was observed following DNA tattooing. DNA encoding haemagglutinin was used to determine whether immune responses mirrored visible expression levels. A protective immune response against H1N1 influenza was induced by all routes, even after a single dose of DNA, though qualitative differences were observed, with tattooing leading to high antibody responses and subcutaneous DNA leading to high CD8 responses. We conclude that of the reporter proteins used, expression from DNA plasmids can best be assessed using tdTomato or luciferase. But, the disconnect between visible expression level and immunogenicity suggests that in vivo whole animal imaging of fluorescent proteins has limited utility for predicting DNA vaccine efficacy.

  15. Substance P receptor binding sites are expressed by glia in vivo after neuronal injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Mantyh, P W; Johnson, D J; Boehmer, C G; Catton, M D; Vinters, H V; Maggio, J E; Too, H P; Vigna, S R

    1989-01-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that glia can express functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters. To determine whether similar neurotransmitter receptors are also expressed by glia in vivo, we examined the glial scar in the transected optic nerve of the albino rabbit by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Receptor binding sites for radiolabeled calcitonin gene-related peptide, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide ...

  16. Expression of plasminogen activators in preimplantation rat embryos developed in vivo and in vitro

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    Har-Vardi Iris

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Embryo implantation plays a major role in embryogenesis and the outcome of pregnancy. Plasminogen activators (PAs have been implicated in mammalian fertilization, early stages of development and embryo implantation. The invasion of trophoblast cells into the endometrium during the implantation process can be blocked by inhibitors of serine proteases, illustrating the role of these enzymes in the invasion process. As in vitro developing embryos resulted in lower implantation rate than those developed in vivo we assume that a reduced PAs activity may lead to it. There is hardly any information regarding qualitative or quantitative differences in expression of PAs in preimplantation embryos, or comparisons between in vivo and in vitro developed embryos. The purpose of this study was to assess the expression of urokinase type (uPA and tissue type (tPA plasminogen activators in in vivo and in vitro preimplantation development in rat embryos using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and computerized image analysis. Methods Zygotes, 2-cell, 4-cell, 8-cell, morula and blastocyst stages of development were flushed from the reproductive tract (control groups of Wistar rats. Zygotes were flushed and grown in vitro to the above mentioned developmental stages and comprised the experimental groups. Immunofluorescence microscopy and computerized image analysis were used to evaluate both qualitative (localization and quantitative expression of plasminogen activators. Results uPA and tPA were found to be expressed in rat embryos throughout their preimplantation development, both in vivo and in vitro. While uPA was localized mainly in the cell cytoplasm, the tPA was detected mainly on cell surface and in the perivitelline space. In blastocysts, both in vivo and in vitro, uPA and tPA were localized in the trophectoderm cells. Total uPA content per embryo was higher in the in vivo as compared with the in vitro developed embryos at all stages

  17. In Vivo Imaging of Local Gene Expression Induced by Magnetic Hyperthermia

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    Olivier Sandre

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to demonstrate that colloidal dispersions of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dextran macromolecules placed in an alternating magnetic field can not only produce heat, but also that these particles could be used in vivo for local and noninvasive deposition of a thermal dose sufficient to trigger thermo-induced gene expression. Iron oxide nanoparticles were first characterized in vitro on a bio-inspired setup, and then they were assayed in vivo using a transgenic mouse strain expressing the luciferase reporter gene under transcriptional control of a thermosensitive promoter. Iron oxide nanoparticles dispersions were applied topically on the mouse skin or injected subcutaneously with Matrigel™ to generate so-called pseudotumors. Temperature was monitored continuously with a feedback loop to control the power of the magnetic field generator and to avoid overheating. Thermo-induced luciferase expression was followed by bioluminescence imaging 6 h after heating. We showed that dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle dispersions were able to induce in vivo mild hyperthermia compatible with thermo-induced gene expression in surrounding tissues and without impairing cell viability. These data open new therapeutic perspectives for using mild magnetic hyperthermia as noninvasive modulation of tumor microenvironment by local thermo-induced gene expression or drug release.

  18. Measurement of bacterial gene expression in vivo by laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time RT-PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kirstine Klitgaard; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Angen, Øystein

    2007-01-01

    Due to the relative small number of bacterial pathogens present in an infected host, exploration of pathogen gene expression in vivo is challenging. This study reports the development of a protocol for quantifying bacterial gene expression in vivo in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae using laser ca...... capture microdissection and real-time quantitative RT-PCR....

  19. Engineering multigene expression in vitro and in vivo with small terminators for T7 RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liping; Gao, Rong; Forster, Anthony C

    2009-12-15

    Engineering protein expression in vitro or in vivo is usually straightforward for single genes, but remains challenging for multiple genes because of the requirement of coordinated control. RNA and protein overexpression strategies often exploit T7 RNA polymerase and its natural TPhi Class I terminator. However, this terminator's inefficiency and large size (100 bp) are problematic for multigene construction and expression. Here, we measure the effects of tandem copies of a small (18 bp) Class II T7 terminator from vesicular stomatitis virus on transcription in vitro and on translation in vitro and in vivo. We first test monomeric and dimeric gene constructs, then attempt extension to pentameric gene constructs. "BioBrick" versions of a pET vector and translation factor genes were constructed to facilitate cloning, and His-tags were incorporated to allow copurification of all protein products for relatively unbiased analysis and easy purification. Several results were surprising, including imbalanced expression of the pentameric constructs in vivo, illustrating the value of synthetic biology for investigating gene expression. However, these problems were solved rationally by changing the orders of the genes and by adding extra promoters to the upstream gene or by moving to a more predictable in vitro translation system. These successes were significant, given our initial unexpected results and that we are unaware of another example of coordinated overexpression of five proteins. Our modular, flexible, rational method should further empower synthetic biologists wishing to overexpress multiple proteins simultaneously. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. In vivo deglycosylation of recombinant proteins in plants by co-expression with bacterial PNGase F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Tarlan; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2013-01-01

    At present, several eukaryotic expression systems including yeast, insect and mammalian cells and plants are used for the production of recombinant proteins. Proteins with potential N-glycosylation sites are efficiently glycosylated when expressed in these systems. However, the ability of the eukaryotic expression systems to glycosylate may be not desirable for some proteins. If target proteins that do not carry N-linked glycans in the native host contain potential N-linked glycosylation sites, they can be aberrantly glycosylated in the eukaryotic expression systems, thus, potentially impairing biological activity. Recently, we have developed a strategy of enzymatic deglycosylation of proteins in vivo by co-introducing bacterial PNGase F via agroinfiltration followed by transient expression in plants. (1) Here, we summarize our work on this topic and its potential implications.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor alpha regulates in vivo intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, M S; Vaporciyan, A A; Miyasaka, M; Tamatani, T; Ward, P A

    1993-06-01

    Lung injury following deposition of IgG immune complexes is neutrophil-dependent and requires both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and CD18. In the current studies, we have evaluated the relationship between TNF alpha and expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in vitro and in vivo. In both rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, TNF alpha induced an early (within 60 minutes) increase in ICAM-1 expression, followed by a peak at 6 to 8 hours, with relatively stable expression at 24 hours. Expression of E-selectin did not show the early phase (within 60 minutes) of up-regulation, peaked at 4 hours, and then declined thereafter. Using a radioimmunochemical assay in vivo, it was demonstrated that intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes caused a progressive increase in ICAM-1 expression in lung over an 8-hour period. In animals pretreated with antibody to TNF alpha, the intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1 was significantly reduced. These results were confirmed by immunoperoxidase analysis of lung tissue. It was also shown that airway instillation of TNF alpha caused up-regulation of ICAM-1 in lung. These data support the concept that deposition of IgG immune complexes in lung induces intrapulmonary up-regulation of ICAM-1 in a manner that is TNF alpha-dependent.

  2. Expression of nucleolar-related proteins in porcine preimplantation embryos produced in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Bolette; Wrenzycki, Christine; Strejcek, Frantisek

    2004-01-01

    embryonic mRNA transcription. Localization of proteins involved in the rRNA transcription (upstream binding factor [UBF], topoisomerase I, RNA polymerase I [RNA Pol I], and the RNA Pol I-associated factor PAF53) and processing (fibrillarin, nucleophosmin, and nucleolin) was assessed by immunocytochemistry....... Moreover, immunolocalization of RNA Pol I, but not of UBF, and the mRNA expression of PAF53 and UBF were significantly reduced or absent after culture with alpha-amanitin, indicating that RNA Pol I, PAF53, and presumably, UBF are derived from de novo embryonic transcription. Embryonic genomic activation...... was delayed in porcine embryos produced in vitro compared to the in vivo-derived counterparts with respect to mRNAs encoding PAF53 and UBF. Moreover, differences existed in the mRNA expression patterns of pRb between in vivo- and in vitro-developed embryos. These findings show, to our knowledge for the first...

  3. Positron emission tomography and gene therapy: basic concepts and experimental approaches for in vivo gene expression imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, Iván; Boán, JoséF; Martí-Climent, Josep M; Sangro, Bruno; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Prieto, Jesús; Richter, José A

    2004-01-01

    More than two decades of intense research have allowed gene therapy to move from the laboratory to the clinical setting, where its use for the treatment of human pathologies has been considerably increased in the last years. However, many crucial questions remain to be solved in this challenging field. In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) by combination of the appropriate PET reporter gene and PET reporter probe could provide invaluable qualitative and quantitative information to answer multiple unsolved questions about gene therapy. PET imaging could be used to define parameters not available by other techniques that are of substantial interest not only for the proper understanding of the gene therapy process, but also for its future development and clinical application in humans. This review focuses on the molecular biology basis of gene therapy and molecular imaging, describing the fundamentals of in vivo gene expression imaging by PET, and the application of PET to gene therapy, as a technology that can be used in many different ways. It could be applied to avoid invasive procedures for gene therapy monitoring; accurately diagnose the pathology for better planning of the most adequate therapeutic approach; as treatment evaluation to image the functional effects of gene therapy at the biochemical level; as a quantitative noninvasive way to monitor the location, magnitude and persistence of gene expression over time; and would also help to a better understanding of vector biology and pharmacology devoted to the development of safer and more efficient vectors.

  4. Substance P Receptor Binding Sites are Expressed by Glia in vivo after Neuronal Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantyh, Patrick W.; Johnson, Donald J.; Boehmer, Christian G.; Catton, Mark D.; Vinters, Harry V.; Maggio, John E.; Too, Heng-Phon; Vigna, Steven R.

    1989-07-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that glia can express functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters. To determine whether similar neurotransmitter receptors are also expressed by glia in vivo, we examined the glial scar in the transected optic nerve of the albino rabbit by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Receptor binding sites for radiolabeled calcitonin gene-related peptide, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were examined. Specific receptor binding sites for each of these neurotransmitters were identified in the rabbit forebrain but were not detected in the normal optic nerve or tract. In the transected optic nerve and tract, only receptor binding sites for substance P were expressed at detectable levels. The density of substance P receptor binding sites observed in this glial scar is among the highest observed in the rabbit forebrain. Ligand displacement and saturation experiments indicate that the substance P receptor binding site expressed by the glial scar has pharmacological characteristics similar to those of substance P receptors in the rabbit striatum, rat brain, and rat and canine gut. The present study demonstrates that glial cells in vivo express high concentrations of substance P receptor binding sites after transection of retinal ganglion cell axons. Because substance P has been shown to regulate inflammatory and immune responses in peripheral tissues, substance P may also, by analogy, be involved in regulating the glial response to injury in the central nervous system.

  5. Autocrine HBEGF expression promotes breast cancer intravasation, metastasis and macrophage-independent invasion in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z. N.; Sharma, V. P.; Beaty, B. T.; Roh-Johnson, M.; Peterson, E. A.; Van Rooijen, N.; Kenny, P. A.; Wiley, H. S.; Condeelis, J. S.; Segall, J. E.

    2014-10-13

    Increased expression of HBEGF in estrogen receptor-negative breast tumors is correlated with enhanced metastasis to distant organ sites and more rapid disease recurrence upon removal of the primary tumor. Our previous work has demonstrated a paracrine loop between breast cancer cells and macrophages in which the tumor cells are capable of stimulating macrophages through the secretion of colony-stimulating factor-1 while the tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), in turn, aid in tumor cell invasion by secreting epidermal growth factor. To determine how the autocrine expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands by carcinoma cells would affect this paracrine loop mechanism, and in particular whether tumor cell invasion depends on spatial ligand gradients generated by TAMs, we generated cell lines with increased HBEGF expression. We found that autocrine HBEGF expression enhanced in vivo intravasation and metastasis and resulted in a novel phenomenon in which macrophages were no longer required for in vivo invasion of breast cancer cells. In vitro studies revealed that expression of HBEGF enhanced invadopodium formation, thus providing a mechanism for cell autonomous invasion. The increased invadopodium formation was directly dependent on EGFR signaling, as demonstrated by a rapid decrease in invadopodia upon inhibition of autocrine HBEGF/EGFR signaling as well as inhibition of signaling downstream of EGFR activation. HBEGF expression also resulted in enhanced invadopodium function via upregulation of matrix metalloprotease 2 (MMP2) and MMP9 expression levels. We conclude that high levels of HBEGF expression can short-circuit the tumor cell/macrophage paracrine invasion loop, resulting in enhanced tumor invasion that is independent of macrophage signaling.

  6. Recent developments in therapeutic protein expression technologies in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Shah; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Pandupuspitasari, Nuruliarizki Shinta; Ahmed, Muhammad Mahmood; Liao, Yu Cai; Waheed, Muhammad Tahir; Sameeullah, Muhammad; Darkhshan; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Jan, Amanullah; Jan, Mohammad Tariq; Wu, Chao; Chun, Ma Xiao; Huang, Jianliang

    2015-02-01

    Infectious diseases and cancers are some of the commonest causes of deaths throughout the world. The previous two decades have witnessed a combined endeavor across various biological sciences to address this issue in novel ways. The advent of recombinant DNA technologies has provided the tools for producing recombinant proteins that can be used as therapeutic agents. A number of expression systems have been developed for the production of pharmaceutical products. Recently, advances have been made using plants as bioreactors to produce therapeutic proteins directed against infectious diseases and cancers. This review highlights the recent progress in therapeutic protein expression in plants (stable and transient), the factors affecting heterologous protein expression, vector systems and recent developments in existing technologies and steps towards the industrial production of plant-made vaccines, antibodies, and biopharmaceuticals.

  7. The Bright Fluorescent Protein mNeonGreen Facilitates Protein Expression Analysis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola Hostettler

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP has been tremendously useful in investigating cell architecture, protein localization, and protein function. Recent developments in transgenesis and genome editing methods now enable working with fewer transgene copies and, consequently, with physiological expression levels. However, lower signal intensity might become a limiting factor. The recently developed mNeonGreen protein is a brighter alternative to GFP in vitro. The goal of the present study was to determine how mNeonGreen performs in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans—a model used extensively for fluorescence imaging in intact animals. We started with a side-by-side comparison between cytoplasmic forms of mNeonGreen and GFP expressed in the intestine, and in different neurons, of adult animals. While both proteins had similar photostability, mNeonGreen was systematically 3–5 times brighter than GFP. mNeonGreen was also used successfully to trace endogenous proteins, and label specific subcellular compartments such as the nucleus or the plasma membrane. To further demonstrate the utility of mNeonGreen, we tested transcriptional reporters for nine genes with unknown expression patterns. While mNeonGreen and GFP reporters gave overall similar expression patterns, low expression tissues were detected only with mNeonGreen. As a whole, our work establishes mNeonGreen as a brighter alternative to GFP for in vivo imaging in a multicellular organism. Furthermore, the present research illustrates the utility of mNeonGreen to tag proteins, mark subcellular regions, and describe new expression patterns, particularly in tissues with low expression.

  8. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasko John EJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS, we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7 and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10 cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments.

  9. Codon-Optimized Luciola Italica Luciferase Variants for Mammalian Gene Expression in Culture and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey A. Maguire

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Luciferases have proven to be useful tools in advancing our understanding of biologic processes. Having a multitude of bioluminescent reporters with different properties is highly desirable. We characterized codon-optimized thermostable green- and red-emitting luciferase variants from the Italian firefly Luciola italica for mammalian gene expression in culture and in vivo. Using lentivirus vectors to deliver and stably express these luciferases in mammalian cells, we showed that both variants displayed similar levels of activity and protein half-lives as well as similar light emission kinetics and higher stability compared to the North American firefly luciferase. Further, we characterized the red-shifted variant for in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Intramuscular injection of tumor cells stably expressing this variant into nude mice yielded a robust luciferase activity. Light emission peaked at 10 minutes post-D-luciferin injection and retained > 60% of signal at 1 hour. Similarly, luciferase activity from intracranially injected glioma cells expressing the red-shifted variant was readily detected and used as a marker to monitor tumor growth over time. Overall, our characterization of these codon-optimized luciferases lays the groundwork for their further use as bioluminescent reporters in mammalian cells.

  10. Dual transgene expression in murine cerebellar Purkinje neurons by viral transduction in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie K Bosch

    Full Text Available Viral-vector mediated gene transfer to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in vivo is a promising avenue for gene therapy of cerebellar ataxias and for genetic manipulation in functional studies of animal models of cerebellar disease. Here, we report the results of experiments designed to identify efficient methods for viral transduction of adult murine Purkinje neurons in vivo. For these analyses, several lentiviral and an adeno-associated virus (AAV, serotype 1, vector with various promoter combinations were generated and compared for in situ transduction efficiency, assayed by fluorescent reporter protein expression in Purkinje neurons. Additional experiments were also conducted to identify the optimal experimental strategy for co-expression of two proteins in individual Purkinje neurons. Of the viruses tested, AAV1 with a CAG promoter exhibited the highest specificity for Purkinje neurons. To deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron, several methods were tested, including: an internal ribosome entry site (IRES, a 2A sequence, a dual promoter vector, and co-injection of two viruses. Efficient expression of both proteins in the same Purkinje neuron was only achieved by co-injecting two AAV1-CAG viruses. We found that use of an AAV1-CAG virus outperformed similar lentivirus vectors and that co-injection of two AAV1-CAG viruses could be used to efficiently deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron in adult mice. AAV1 with a CAG promoter is highly efficient and selective at transducing adult cerebellar Purkinje neurons and two AAV-CAG viruses can be used to efficiently express two proteins in the same neuron in vivo.

  11. Dual transgene expression in murine cerebellar Purkinje neurons by viral transduction in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Marie K; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Ornitz, David M

    2014-01-01

    Viral-vector mediated gene transfer to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in vivo is a promising avenue for gene therapy of cerebellar ataxias and for genetic manipulation in functional studies of animal models of cerebellar disease. Here, we report the results of experiments designed to identify efficient methods for viral transduction of adult murine Purkinje neurons in vivo. For these analyses, several lentiviral and an adeno-associated virus (AAV), serotype 1, vector with various promoter combinations were generated and compared for in situ transduction efficiency, assayed by fluorescent reporter protein expression in Purkinje neurons. Additional experiments were also conducted to identify the optimal experimental strategy for co-expression of two proteins in individual Purkinje neurons. Of the viruses tested, AAV1 with a CAG promoter exhibited the highest specificity for Purkinje neurons. To deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron, several methods were tested, including: an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), a 2A sequence, a dual promoter vector, and co-injection of two viruses. Efficient expression of both proteins in the same Purkinje neuron was only achieved by co-injecting two AAV1-CAG viruses. We found that use of an AAV1-CAG virus outperformed similar lentivirus vectors and that co-injection of two AAV1-CAG viruses could be used to efficiently deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron in adult mice. AAV1 with a CAG promoter is highly efficient and selective at transducing adult cerebellar Purkinje neurons and two AAV-CAG viruses can be used to efficiently express two proteins in the same neuron in vivo.

  12. First in Vivo Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Transcriptomes Reveal Mechanisms of Host Exploitation, Host-Specific Gene Expression, and Expressed Genotype Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Amy R; DiRenzo, Graziella V; McDonald, Caitlin A; Lips, Karen R; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2017-01-05

    For generalist pathogens, host species represent distinct selective environments, providing unique challenges for resource acquisition and defense from host immunity, potentially resulting in host-dependent differences in pathogen fitness. Gene expression modulation should be advantageous, responding optimally to a given host and mitigating the costs of generalism. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a fungal pathogen of amphibians, shows variability in pathogenicity among isolates, and within-strain virulence changes rapidly during serial passages through artificial culture. For the first time, we characterize the transcriptomic profile of Bd in vivo, using laser-capture microdissection. Comparison of Bd transcriptomes (strain JEL423) in culture and in two hosts (Atelopus zeteki and Hylomantis lemur), reveals >2000 differentially expressed genes that likely include key Bd defense and host exploitation mechanisms. Variation in Bd transcriptomes from different amphibian hosts demonstrates shifts in pathogen resource allocation. Furthermore, expressed genotype variant frequencies of Bd populations differ between culture and amphibian skin, and among host species, revealing potential mechanisms underlying rapid changes in virulence and the possibility that amphibian community composition shapes Bd evolutionary trajectories. Our results provide new insights into how changes in gene expression and infecting population genotypes can be key to the success of a generalist fungal pathogen. Copyright © 2017 Ellison et al.

  13. First in Vivo Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Transcriptomes Reveal Mechanisms of Host Exploitation, Host-Specific Gene Expression, and Expressed Genotype Shifts

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    Amy R. Ellison

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For generalist pathogens, host species represent distinct selective environments, providing unique challenges for resource acquisition and defense from host immunity, potentially resulting in host-dependent differences in pathogen fitness. Gene expression modulation should be advantageous, responding optimally to a given host and mitigating the costs of generalism. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, a fungal pathogen of amphibians, shows variability in pathogenicity among isolates, and within-strain virulence changes rapidly during serial passages through artificial culture. For the first time, we characterize the transcriptomic profile of Bd in vivo, using laser-capture microdissection. Comparison of Bd transcriptomes (strain JEL423 in culture and in two hosts (Atelopus zeteki and Hylomantis lemur, reveals >2000 differentially expressed genes that likely include key Bd defense and host exploitation mechanisms. Variation in Bd transcriptomes from different amphibian hosts demonstrates shifts in pathogen resource allocation. Furthermore, expressed genotype variant frequencies of Bd populations differ between culture and amphibian skin, and among host species, revealing potential mechanisms underlying rapid changes in virulence and the possibility that amphibian community composition shapes Bd evolutionary trajectories. Our results provide new insights into how changes in gene expression and infecting population genotypes can be key to the success of a generalist fungal pathogen.

  14. Human cancer cells express Slug-based epithelial-mesenchymal transition gene expression signature obtained in vivo

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    Anastassiou Dimitris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological mechanisms underlying cancer cell motility and invasiveness remain unclear, although it has been hypothesized that they involve some type of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Methods We used xenograft models of human cancer cells in immunocompromised mice, profiling the harvested tumors separately with species-specific probes and computationally analyzing the results. Results Here we show that human cancer cells express in vivo a precise multi-cancer invasion-associated gene expression signature that prominently includes many EMT markers, among them the transcription factor Slug, fibronectin, and α-SMA. We found that human, but not mouse, cells express the signature and Slug is the only upregulated EMT-inducing transcription factor. The signature is also present in samples from many publicly available cancer gene expression datasets, suggesting that it is produced by the cancer cells themselves in multiple cancer types, including nonepithelial cancers such as neuroblastoma. Furthermore, we found that the presence of the signature in human xenografted cells was associated with a downregulation of adipocyte markers in the mouse tissue adjacent to the invasive tumor, suggesting that the signature is triggered by contextual microenvironmental interactions when the cancer cells encounter adipocytes, as previously reported. Conclusions The known, precise and consistent gene composition of this cancer mesenchymal transition signature, particularly when combined with simultaneous analysis of the adjacent microenvironment, provides unique opportunities for shedding light on the underlying mechanisms of cancer invasiveness as well as identifying potential diagnostic markers and targets for metastasis-inhibiting therapeutics.

  15. Cytomegalovirus replicon-based regulation of gene expression in vitro and in vivo.

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    Hermine Mohr

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence for a connection between DNA replication and the expression of adjacent genes. Therefore, this study addressed the question of whether a herpesvirus origin of replication can be used to activate or increase the expression of adjacent genes. Cell lines carrying an episomal vector, in which reporter genes are linked to the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV origin of lytic replication (oriLyt, were constructed. Reporter gene expression was silenced by a histone-deacetylase-dependent mechanism, but was resolved upon lytic infection with MCMV. Replication of the episome was observed subsequent to infection, leading to the induction of gene expression by more than 1000-fold. oriLyt-based regulation thus provided a unique opportunity for virus-induced conditional gene expression without the need for an additional induction mechanism. This principle was exploited to show effective late trans-complementation of the toxic viral protein M50 and the glycoprotein gO of MCMV. Moreover, the application of this principle for intracellular immunization against herpesvirus infection was demonstrated. The results of the present study show that viral infection specifically activated the expression of a dominant-negative transgene, which inhibited viral growth. This conditional system was operative in explant cultures of transgenic mice, but not in vivo. Several applications are discussed.

  16. Regulation of endothelial-specific transgene expression by the LacI repressor protein in vivo.

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    Susan K Morton

    Full Text Available Genetically modified mice have played an important part in elucidating gene function in vivo. However, conclusions from transgenic studies may be compromised by complications arising from the site of transgene integration into the genome and, in inducible systems, the non-innocuous nature of inducer molecules. The aim of the present study was to use the vascular system to validate a technique based on the bacterial lac operon system, in which transgene expression can be repressed and de-repressed by an innocuous lactose analogue, IPTG. We have modified an endothelium specific promoter (TIE2 with synthetic LacO sequences and made transgenic mouse lines with this modified promoter driving expression of mutant forms of connexin40 and an independently translated reporter, EGFP. We show that tissue specificity of this modified promoter is retained in the vasculature of transgenic mice in spite of the presence of LacO sequences, and that transgene expression is uniform throughout the endothelium of a range of adult systemic and cerebral arteries and arterioles. Moreover, transgene expression can be consistently down-regulated by crossing the transgenic mice with mice expressing an inhibitor protein LacI(R, and in one transgenic line, transgene expression could be de-repressed rapidly by the innocuous inducer, IPTG. We conclude that the modified bacterial lac operon system can be used successfully to validate transgenic phenotypes through a simple breeding schedule with mice homozygous for the LacI(R protein.

  17. Solid-phase microextraction technology for in vitro and in vivo metabolite analysis

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    Zhang, Qihui; Zhou, Liandi; Chen, Hua; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Xia, Zhining; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of endogenous metabolites in biological samples may lead to the identification of biomarkers in metabolomics studies. To achieve accurate sample analysis, a combined method of continuous quick sampling and extraction is required for online compound detection. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) integrates sampling, extraction and concentration into a single solvent-free step for chemical analysis. SPME has a number of advantages, including simplicity, high sensitivity and a relatively non-invasive nature. In this article, we reviewed SPME technology in in vitro and in vivo analyses of metabolites after the ingestion of herbal medicines, foods and pharmaceutical agents. The metabolites of microorganisms in dietary supplements and in the gastrointestinal tract will also be examined. As a promising technology in biomedical and pharmaceutical research, SPME and its future applications will depend on advances in analytical technologies and material science. PMID:27695152

  18. Optogenetic in vivo cell manipulation in KillerRed-expressing zebrafish transgenics

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    Shidlovsky Konstantin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KillerRed (KR is a novel photosensitizer that efficiently generates reactive oxygen species (ROS in KR-expressing cells upon intense green or white light illumination in vitro, resulting in damage to their plasma membrane and cell death. Results We report an in vivo modification of this technique using a fluorescent microscope and membrane-tagged KR (mem-KR-expressing transgenic zebrafish. We generated several stable zebrafish Tol2 transposon-mediated enhancer-trap (ET transgenic lines expressing mem-KR (SqKR series, and mapped the transposon insertion sites. As mem-KR accumulates on the cell membrane and/or Golgi, it highlights cell bodies and extensions, and reveals details of cellular morphology. The photodynamic property of KR made it possible to damage cells expressing this protein in a dose-dependent manner. As a proof-of-principle, two zebrafish transgenic lines were used to affect cell viability and function: SqKR2 expresses mem-KR in the hindbrain rhombomeres 3 and 5, and elsewhere; SqKR15 expresses mem-KR in the heart and elsewhere. Photobleaching of KR by intense light in the heart of SqKR15 embryos at lower levels caused a reduction in pumping efficiency of the heart and pericardial edema and at higher levels - in cell death in the hindbrain of SqKR2 and in the heart of SqKR15 embryos. Conclusions An intense illumination of tissues expressing mem-KR affects cell viability and function in living zebrafish embryos. Hence, the zebrafish transgenics expressing mem-KR in a tissue-specific manner are useful tools for studying the biological effects of ROS.

  19. TMPRSS2- driven ERG expression in vivo increases self-renewal and maintains expression in a castration resistant subpopulation.

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    Orla M Casey

    Full Text Available Genomic rearrangements commonly occur in many types of cancers and often initiate or alter the progression of disease. Here we describe an in vivo mouse model that recapitulates the most frequent rearrangement in prostate cancer, the fusion of the promoter region of TMPRSS2 with the coding region of the transcription factor, ERG. A recombinant bacterial artificial chromosome including an extended TMPRSS2 promoter driving genomic ERG was constructed and used for transgenesis in mice. TMPRSS2-ERG expression was evaluated in tissue sections and FACS-fractionated prostate cell populations. In addition to the anticipated expression in luminal cells, TMPRSS2-ERG was similarly expressed in the Sca-1(hi/EpCAM(+ basal/progenitor fraction, where expanded numbers of clonogenic self-renewing progenitors were found, as assayed by in vitro sphere formation. These clonogenic cells increased intrinsic self renewal in subsequent generations. In addition, ERG dependent self-renewal and invasion in vitro was demonstrated in prostate cell lines derived from the model. Clinical studies have suggested that the TMPRSS2-ERG translocation occurs early in prostate cancer development. In the model described here, the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion alone was not transforming but synergized with heterozygous Pten deletion to promote PIN. Taken together, these data suggest that one function of TMPRSS2-ERG is the expansion of self-renewing cells, which may serve as targets for subsequent mutations. Primary prostate epithelial cells demonstrated increased post transcriptional turnover of ERG compared to the TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP cell line, originally isolated from a prostate cancer metastasis. Finally, we determined that TMPRSS2-ERG expression occurred in both castration-sensitive and resistant prostate epithelial subpopulations, suggesting the existence of androgen-independent mechanisms of TMPRSS2 expression in prostate epithelium.

  20. Effects of Assisted Reproduction Technology on Placental Imprinted Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Yukiko; Aoki, Chizu; Tamaki-Ishihara, Yuko; Fukuda, Yusuke; Kitamura, Mamoru; Matsue, Yoichi; So, Akiko; Morita, Mineto

    2010-01-01

    We used placental tissue to compare the imprinted gene expression of IGF2, H19, KCNQ1OT1, and CDKN1C of singletons conceived via assisted reproduction technology (ART) with that of spontaneously conceived (SC) singletons. Of 989 singletons examined (ART n = 65; SC n = 924), neonatal weight was significantly lower (P < .001) in the ART group than in the SC group, but placental weight showed no significant difference. Gene expression analyzed by real-time PCR was similar for both groups with appropriate-for-date (AFD) birth weight. H19 expression was suppressed in fetal growth retardation (FGR) cases in the ART and SC groups compared with AFD cases (P < .02 and P < .05, resp.). In contrast, CDKN1C expression was suppressed in FGR cases in the ART group (P < .01), while KCNQ1OT1 expression was hyperexpressed in FGR cases in the SC group (P < .05). As imprinted gene expression patterns differed between the ART and SC groups, we speculate that ART modifies epigenetic status even though the possibilities always exist. PMID:20706653

  1. Candesartan inhibits Toll-like receptor expression and activity both in vitro and in vivo

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    Dasu, Mohan R.; Riosvelasco, Andrea C.; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Toll-like receptors play an important role in the innate immune system and are found to be crucial in severe diseases like sepsis, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. TLR2 and TLR4 expression is upregulated in the inflammatory diseases. Angiotensin II in addition to stimulating vasoconstriction also induces an increase in ROS and a proinflammatory phenotype via AT1R. Angiotensin II type-1 receptor blocker (ARB), widely used as an antihypertensive drug, has been reported to also have anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, we investigated whether an ARB exerts anti-inflammatory effects via inhibiting TLR2 and TLR4 expression. Methods and results Monocytes were isolated from healthy human volunteers and treated with the synthetic lipoprotein Pam3CSK4 or LPS in the absence or presence of candesartan. Pretreatment of human monocytes with candesartan significantly decreased Pam3CSK4 or LPS induced TLR2 and TLR4 expression of both mRNA and protein levels (P candesartan treated mice show decreased TLR2 and TLR4 expression compared to vehicle control mice. Conclusion Pam3CSK4 and LPS induced TLR2 and TLR4 expression at mRNA and protein levels are inhibited by candesartan both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we define a novel pathway by which candesartan could induce anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:18495130

  2. FGF5 is expressed in melanoma and enhances malignancy in vitro and in vivo.

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    Ghassemi, Sara; Vejdovszky, Katharina; Sahin, Emine; Ratzinger, Lukas; Schelch, Karin; Mohr, Thomas; Peter-Vörösmarty, Barbara; Brankovic, Jelena; Lackner, Andreas; Leopoldi, Alexandra; Meindl, Diana; Pirker, Christine; Hegedus, Balazs; Marian, Brigitte; Holzmann, Klaus; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Grusch, Michael

    2017-10-20

    Although FGF5 mRNA was previously found expressed in some melanoma cell lines in contrast to normal human melanocytes, neither its contribution to melanoma growth nor its expression in melanoma tissue has been investigated. Here we demonstrate that ectopic overexpression of FGF5 in human melanoma cells with low endogenous FGF5 expression increased clonogenicity and invasion but not short-term growth in vitro. Silencing of FGF5 in melanoma cells with high endogenous FGF5 expression had the opposite effect on clonogenicity. FGF overexpression led to increased signaling along the MAPK and NFAT axis but had no effect on STAT3 signaling. In an in vivo experiment in immunocompromised mice, human melanoma xenografts overexpressing FGF5 showed enhanced tumor growth, a higher Ki-67 proliferation index, decreased apoptosis and enhanced angiogenesis. Immunohistochemistry performed on a tissue microarray demonstrated FGF5 protein expression in more than 50% of samples of melanoma and benign nevi. These data suggest that FGF5 has oncogenic potential in melanoma cells and contributes to melanoma growth in a subset of patients. This highlights the importance of further evaluating FGF5 as potential biomarker and therapy target in melanoma.

  3. Enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in Pleurotus ostreatus for in vivo analysis of fungal laccase promoters.

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    Amore, Antonella; Honda, Yoichi; Faraco, Vincenza

    2012-10-01

    The laccase family of Pleurotus ostreatus has been widely characterized, and studies of the genes coding for laccase isoenzymes in P. ostreatus have so far led to the identification of four different genes and the corresponding cDNAs, poxc, pox1, poxa1b and poxa3. Analyses of P. ostreatus laccase promoters poxc, pox1, poxa1b and poxa3 have allowed identification of several putative response elements, and sequences of metal-responsive elements involved in the formation of complexes with fungal proteins have been identified in poxc and poxa1b promoters. In this work, development of a system for in vivo analysis of P. ostreatus laccase promoter poxc by enhanced green fluorescent protein expression is performed, based on a poly ethylene glycol-mediated procedure for fungal transformation. A quantitative measurement of fluorescence expressed in P. ostreatus transformants is hereby reported for the first time for this fungus.

  4. Partial expression of catecholaminergic traits in cholinergic chick ciliary ganglia: studies in vivo and in vitro.

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    Iacovitti, L; Joh, T H; Albert, V R; Park, D H; Reis, D J; Teitelman, G

    1985-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that at embryonic Day (E) 8, some cells of the chick ciliary ganglion (CG) contain the catecholaminergic (CA) enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), but not phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PNMT); and that in culture essentially all cells express both enzymes. In the present study, we sought to determine, first, whether the expression of adrenergic traits in the CG in vivo is transient or permanent in the CG. To do so, CGs were removed from E5 to postnatal Day 5, fixed, and processed for the immunocytochemical localization of the CA enzymes: TH, L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), and PNMT. At all stages examined, some CG neurons expressed TH immunoreactivity (TH-IR) and all contained AADC-IR. However, none stained with PNMT antibodies, indicating that these cells stably express some, but not all, of the CA enzymes. Second, we examined whether CG neurons in culture expressed other CA markers. CG neurons did not contain detectable levels of TH enzyme activity nor did they transport and store exogenously supplied monoamines. These results indicate that some but not all traits necessary for adrenergic function are present in CG neurons in vitro. Third, we sought to establish whether CA expression in CG neurons is affected by modification in culture conditions. Cultures of CG neurons continued to express TH-IR even when grown in the presence of either 50% HCM or 20 mM KCl for 5 days. Finally, the expression of the cholinergic enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (CAT) was assessed in CG cultures by biochemical assay. CAT activity increased five-fold between 5 and 17 days in vitro, irrespective of the presence of TH-IR in 100% of the CG neurons of sister cultures. These data suggest that at least a subpopulation of CG neurons express both TH and CAT in culture. We conclude that the postmitotic neurons of the CG are able to express some but not all of the traits characteristic of a CA phenotype while maintaining cholinergic expression. These

  5. Expression of non-neuronal cholinergic system in maxilla of rat in vivo.

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    Guo, Jie; Wang, Lue; Xu, Haihua; Che, Xiaoxia

    2014-12-17

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is known to be a key neurotransmitter in the central and peripheral nervous systems, which is also produced in a variety of non-neuronal tissues and cell. The existence of ACh in maxilla in vivo and potential regulation role for osteogenesis need further study. Components of the cholinergic system (ACh, esterase, choline acetyltransferase, high-affinity choline uptake, n- and mAChRs) were determined in maxilla of rat in vivo, by means of Real-Time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results showed RNA for CarAT, carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase member 20 (Slc25a20), VAChT, OCTN2, OCT1, OCT3, organic cation transporter member 4 (Slc22a4), AChE, BChE, nAChR subunits α1, α2, α3, α5, α7, α10, β1, β2, β4, γ and mAChR subunits M1, M2, M3, M4, M5 were detected in rat's maxilla. RNA of VAChT, AChE, nAChR subunits α2, β1, β4 and mAChR subunits M4 had abundant expression (2(-ΔCt) > 0.03). Immunohistochemical staining was conducted for ACh, VAChT, nAChRα7 and AChE. ACh was expressed in mesenchymal cells, chondroblast, bone and cartilage matrix and bone marrow cells, The VAChT expression was very extensively while ACh receptor α7 was strongly expressed in newly formed bone matrix of endochondral and bone marrow ossification, AchE was found only in mesenchymal stem cells, cartilage and bone marrow cells. ACh might exert its effect on the endochondral and bone marrow ossification, and bone matrix mineralization in maxilla.

  6. Cellular senescence impairs circadian expression of clock genes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunieda, Takeshige; Minamino, Tohru; Katsuno, Taro; Tateno, Kaoru; Nishi, Jun-ichiro; Miyauchi, Hideyuki; Orimo, Masayuki; Okada, Sho; Komuro, Issei

    2006-03-03

    Circadian rhythms are regulated by a set of clock genes that form transcriptional feedback loops and generate circadian oscillation with a 24-hour cycle. Aging alters a broad spectrum of physiological, endocrine, and behavioral rhythms. Although recent evidence suggests that cellular aging contributes to various age-associated diseases, its effects on the circadian rhythms have not been examined. We report here that cellular senescence impairs circadian rhythmicity both in vitro and in vivo. Circadian expression of clock genes in serum-stimulated senescent cells was significantly weaker compared with that in young cells. Introduction of telomerase completely prevented this reduction of clock gene expression associated with senescence. Stimulation by serum activated the cAMP response element-binding protein, but the activation of this signaling pathway was significantly weaker in senescent cells. Treatment with activators of this pathway effectively restored the impaired clock gene expression of senescent cells. When young cells were implanted into young mice or old mice, the implanted cells were effectively entrained by the circadian rhythm of the recipients. In contrast, the entrainment of implanted senescent cells was markedly impaired. These results suggest that senescence decreases the ability of cells to transmit circadian signals to their clocks and that regulation of clock gene expression may be a novel strategy for the treatment of age-associated impairment of circadian rhythmicity.

  7. Cholinergic neurons of the chick ciliary ganglia express adrenergic traits in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelman, G; Joh, T H; Grayson, L; Park, D H; Reis, D J; Iacovitti, L

    1985-01-01

    In this study, we sought to determine whether neurons of the chick embryo ciliary ganglia (CG), a parasympathetic cholinergic ganglia, can express catecholaminergic (CA) traits. To accomplish this, we used immunocytochemical techniques to examine the presence of the CA enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in CGs removed from chick embryo at day 8 of development (E8). Few neurons containing TH but not PNMT were found in the E8 CG. To examine whether CG neurons express CA enzymes in vitro, CGs removed from E8 chick embryo were dissociated and kept in culture for 3 to 12 days. In 50% of the culture dishes, some neurons contain TH or PNMT after 5 days in vitro. In an equal proportion of culture plates, CG neurons did not express the enzymes. To determine whether the proportion of CG neurons expressing TH or PNMT is increased by tissue influences, ganglion cells were co-cultured with notochord. In 90% of the co-culture experiments, most neurons present in the culture dishes stained with TH or PNMT after 5 days in vitro. To test for the presence of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), another CA enzyme, cultures of CGs and CGs plus notochord were incubated with levodopa and processed for the detection of CA histofluorescence. Dopamine histofluorescence was present in all neurons after 3 days in vitro irrespective of the presence of notochord, suggesting that the expressions of TH and PNMT and that of AADC are differentially regulated. This study, therefore, demonstrates that cholinergic neurons of the CG contain CA enzymes in vivo and in vitro and that the proportion of neurons expressing CA traits during development in vitro can be increased by environmental cues such as those released by the notochord.

  8. Expressing the human proteome for affinity proteomics: optimising expression of soluble protein domains and in vivo biotinylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keates, Tracy; Cooper, Christopher D O; Savitsky, Pavel; Allerston, Charles K; Phillips, Claire; Hammarström, Martin; Daga, Neha; Berridge, Georgina; Mahajan, Pravin; Burgess-Brown, Nicola A; Müller, Susanne; Gräslund, Susanne; Gileadi, Opher

    2012-06-15

    The generation of affinity reagents to large numbers of human proteins depends on the ability to express the target proteins as high-quality antigens. The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) focuses on the production and structure determination of human proteins. In a 7-year period, the SGC has deposited crystal structures of >800 human protein domains, and has additionally expressed and purified a similar number of protein domains that have not yet been crystallised. The targets include a diversity of protein domains, with an attempt to provide high coverage of protein families. The family approach provides an excellent basis for characterising the selectivity of affinity reagents. We present a summary of the approaches used to generate purified human proteins or protein domains, a test case demonstrating the ability to rapidly generate new proteins, and an optimisation study on the modification of >70 proteins by biotinylation in vivo. These results provide a unique synergy between large-scale structural projects and the recent efforts to produce a wide coverage of affinity reagents to the human proteome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Silencing of ghrelin receptor expression inhibits endometrial cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Jenny N T; Jeffery, Penny L; Lee, John D; Seim, Inge; Roche, Deborah; Obermair, Andreas; Chopin, Lisa K; Chen, Chen

    2013-07-15

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide hormone produced predominantly in the stomach but also in a range of normal cell types and tumors, where it has endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine roles. Previously, we have demonstrated that ghrelin has proliferative and antiapoptotic effects in endometrial cancer cell lines, suggesting a potential role in promoting tumor growth. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ghrelin receptor, GHSR, and gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and characterized ghrelin and GHSR1a protein expression in human endometrial tumors. GHSR gene silencing was achieved in the Ishikawa and KLE endometrial cancer cell lines, using a lentiviral short-hairpin RNA targeting GHSR. The effects of GHSR1a knockdown were further analyzed in vivo using the Ishikawa cell line in a NOD/SCID xenograft model. Cell proliferation was reduced in cultured GHSR1a knockdown Ishikawa and KLE cells compared with scrambled controls in the absence of exogenously applied ghrelin and in response to exogenous ghrelin (1,000 nM). The tumor volumes were reduced significantly in GHSR1a knockdown Ishikawa mouse xenograft tumors compared with scrambled control tumours. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that ghrelin and GHSR1a are expressed in benign and cancerous glands in human endometrial tissue specimens, although there was no correlation between the intensity of staining and cancer grade. These data indicate that downregulation of GHSR expression significantly inhibits endometrial cancer cell line and mouse xenograft tumour growth. This is the first preclinical evidence that downregulation of GHSR may be therapeutic in endometrial cancer.

  10. Fluorescence detection, enumeration and characterization of single circulating cells in vivo: technology, applications and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Carolin; Patil, Roshani; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark

    2018-01-01

    There are many diseases and biological processes that involve circulating cells in the bloodstream, such as cancer metastasis, immunology, reproductive medicine, and stem cell therapies. This has driven significant interest in new technologies for the study of circulating cells in small animal research models and clinically. Most currently used methods require drawing and enriching blood samples from the body, but these suffer from a number of limitations. In contrast, ‘in vivo flow cytometry’ (IVFC) refers to set of technologies that allow study of cells directly in the bloodstream of the organism in vivo. In recent years the IVFC field has grown significantly and new techniques have been developed, including fluorescence microscopy, multi-photon, photo-acoustic, and diffuse fluorescence IVFC. In this paper we review recent technical advances in IVFC, with emphasis on instrumentation, contrast mechanisms, and detection sensitivity. We also describe key applications in biomedical research, including cancer research and immunology. Last, we discuss future directions for IVFC, as well as prospects for broader adoption by the biomedical research community and translation to humans clinically.

  11. Advanced cell culture technology for generation of in vivo-like tissue models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Przyborski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human tissues are mostly composed of different cell types, that are often highly organised in relation to each other. Often cells are arranged in distinct layers that enable signalling and cell-to-cell interactions. Here we describe the application of scaffold-based technology, that can be used to create advanced organotypic 3D models of various tissue types that more closely resemble in vivo-like conditions (Knight et al., 2011. The scaffold comprises a highly porous polystyrene material, engineered into a 200 micron thick membrane that is presented in various ways including multi-welled plates and well inserts, for use with conventional culture plasticware and medium perfusion systems. This technology has been applied to generate numerous unique types of co-culture model. For example: 1 a full thickness human skin construct comprising dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes, raised to the air-liquid interface to induce cornification of the upper layers (Fig.1 (Hill et al., 2015; 2 a neuron-glial co-culture to enable the study of neurite outgrowth interacting with astroglial cells to model and investigate the glial scar found in spinal cord injury (Clarke et al., 2016; 3 formation of a sub-mucosa consisting of a polarised simple epithelium, layer of ECM proteins simulating the basement membrane, and underlying stromal tissues (e.g. intestinal mucosa. These organotypic models demonstrate the versatility of scaffold membranes and the creation of advanced in vivo-like tissue models. Creating a layered arrangement more closely simulates the true anatomy and organisation of cells within many tissue types. The addition of different cell types in a temporal and spatial fashion can be used to study inter-cellular relationships and create more physiologically relevant in vivo-like cell-based assays. Methods that are relatively straightforward to use and that recreate the organised structure of real tissues will become valuable research tools for use in

  12. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Yang, Yun Jung; Yang, Byeongseon; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2012-10-24

    In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa) and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate the use of functional MAPs in practical applications and

  13. Rapid inducible protein displacement in Plasmodium in vivo and in vitro using knocksideways technology [version 1; referees: 3 approved

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    Katie R. Hughes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A deeper understanding of the biology of the Plasmodium parasite is essential in order to identify targets for interventions, with the ultimate aim of eliminating malaria. Determining the function(s of essential proteins in Plasmodium has, until recently, been hampered by the lack of efficient conditional systems to abrogate proteins. We report the adaptation of a conditional technology, knocksideways (KS, for use in Plasmodium berghei, which can potentially rapidly inactivate proteins of interest through relocalisation. The system is induced using rapamycin, which allows for KS both in vitro and in vivo and is effective more rapidly than any other reported system. KS utilises pairs of fluorescent tags that facilitate live imaging and allows for rapid confirmation of efficient protein redistribution on live parasites, allowing for streamlined workflows. We demonstrate the characteristics of the system using transgenically expressed cytoplasmic GFP and provide proof of principle by inducibly redistributing a number of proteins with different native, subcellular locations.  We also demonstrate that KS can be applied to both mammalian and insect stages of Plasmodium. KS expands the range of (conditional technologies for genetic manipulation of malaria parasites and offers the potential to be further developed for medium throughput phenotype screens.

  14. Suppression of PC-1/ENPP-1 expression improves insulin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Heather H; Chin, Chen-Ni; Wu, Margaret; Ni, Weihua; Quan, Shuo; Liu, Franklin; Dallas-Yang, Qing; Ellsworth, Kenneth; Ho, Thu; Zhang, Aiwu; Natasha, Tajneen; Li, Jing; Chapman, Kevin; Strohl, William; Li, Cai; Wang, I-Ming; Berger, Joel; An, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Bei B; Jiang, Guoqiang

    2009-08-15

    Plasma cell membrane glycoprotein-1, or ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodieterase (PC-1/ENPP1) has been shown to inhibit insulin signaling in cultured cells in vitro and in transgenic mice in vivo when overexpressed. Furthermore, both genetic polymorphism and increased expression of PC-1 have been reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes in humans. Thus it was proposed that PC-1 inhibition represents a potential strategy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, it has not been proven that suppression of PC-1 expression or inhibition of its function will actually improve insulin sensitivity. We show in the current study that transient overexpression of PC-1 inhibits insulin-stimulated insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in HEK293 cells, while knockdown of PC-1 with siRNA significantly increases insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in HuH7 human hepatoma cells. Adenoviral vector expressing a short hairpin RNA against mouse PC-1 (PC-1shRNA) was utilized to efficiently knockdown PC-1 expression in the livers of db/db mice. In comparison with db/db mice treated with a control virus, db/db mice treated with the PC-1shRNA adenovirus had approximately 80% lower hepatic PC-1 mRNA levels, approximately 30% lower ambient fed plasma glucose, approximately 25% lower fasting plasma glucose, and significantly improved oral glucose tolerance. Taken together, these results demonstrate that suppression of PC-1 expression improves insulin sensitivity in vitro and in an animal model of diabetes, supporting the proposition that PC-1 inhibition is a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  15. P2A-Fluorophore Tagging of BRAF Tightly Links Expression to Fluorescence In Vivo.

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    J Edward van Veen

    Full Text Available The Braf proto-oncogene is a key component of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade and is a critical regulator of both normal development and tumorigenesis in a variety of tissues. In order to elucidate BRAF's differing roles in varying cell types, it is important to understand both the pattern and timing of BRAF expression. Here we report the production of a mouse model that links the expression of Braf with the bright red fluorescent protein, tdTomato. We have utilized a P2A knock-in strategy, ensuring that BRAF and the fluorophore are expressed from the same endogenous promoter and from the same bicistronic mRNA transcript. This mouse model (BrafTOM shows bright red fluorescence in organs and cell types known to be sensitive to BRAF perturbation. We further show that on a cell-by-cell basis, fluorescence correlates with BRAF protein levels. Finally, we extend the utility of this mouse by demonstrating that the remnant P2A fragment attached to BRAF acts as a suitable epitope for immunoprecipitation and biochemical characterization of BRAF in vivo.

  16. Photodynamic therapy affects the expression of IL-6 and IL-10 in vivo

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    Gollnick, Sandra O.; Musser, David A.; Henderson, Barbara W.

    1998-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which can effectively destroy malignant tissue, also induces a complex immune response which potentiates anti-tumor immunity, but also inhibits skin contact hypersensitivity (CHS) and prolongs skin graft survival. The underlying mechanisms responsible for these effects are poorly understood, but are likely to involve meditation by cytokines. We demonstrate in a BALB/c mouse model that PDT delivered to normal and tumor tissue in vivo causes marked changes in the expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10. IL-6 mRNA and protein are rapidly and strongly enhanced in the PDT treated EMT6 tumor. Previous studies have shown that intratumoral injection of IL- 6 or transduction of the IL-6 gene into tumor cells can enhance tumor immunogenicity and inhibit tumor growth in experimental murine tumor systems. Thus, PDT may enhance local anti-tumor immunity by up-regulating IL-6. PDT also results in an increase in IL-10 mRNA and protein in the skin. The same PDT regime which enhances IL-10 production in the skin has been shown to strongly inhibit the CHS response. The kinetics of IL-10 expression coincide with the known kinetics of PDT induced CHS suppression and we propose that the enhanced IL-10 expression plays a role in the observed suppression of cell mediated responses seen following PDT.

  17. Expression and activity of eIF6 trigger malignant pleural mesothelioma growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miluzio, Annarita; Oliveto, Stefania; Pesce, Elisa; Mutti, Luciano; Murer, Bruno; Grosso, Stefano; Ricciardi, Sara; Brina, Daniela; Biffo, Stefano

    2015-11-10

    eIF6 is an antiassociation factor that regulates the availability of active 80S. Its activation is driven by the RACK1/PKCβ axis, in a mTORc1 independent manner. We previously described that eIF6 haploinsufficiency causes a striking survival in the Eμ-Myc mouse lymphoma model, with lifespans extended up to 18 months. Here we screen for eIF6 expression in human cancers. We show that Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma tumors (MPM) and a MPM cell line (REN cells) contain high levels of hyperphosphorylated eIF6. Enzastaurin is a PKC beta inhibitor used in clinical trials. We prove that Enzastaurin treatment decreases eIF6 phosphorylation rate, but not eIF6 protein stability. The growth of REN, in vivo, and metastasis are reduced by either Enzastaurin treatment or eIF6 shRNA. Molecular analysis reveals that eIF6 manipulation affects the metabolic status of malignant mesothelioma cells. Less glycolysis and less ATP content are evident in REN cells depleted for eIF6 or treated with Enzastaurin (Anti-Warburg effect). We propose that eIF6 is necessary for malignant mesothelioma growth, in vivo, and can be targeted by kinase inhibitors.

  18. In vivo imaging of integrin {alpha}{nu}{beta}{sub 3} expression using fluorescence-mediated tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallbrunn, Angelika von; Bremer, Christoph [University of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); University of Muenster, Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF Muenster, FG3), Muenster (Germany); Hoeltke, Carsten [University of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); University of Muenster, Departments of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Zuehlsdorf, Michael [University of Muenster, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Heindel, Walter [University of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Schaefers, Michael [University of Muenster, Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF Muenster, FG3), Muenster (Germany); University of Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); University of Muenster, Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF Muenster, ZPG 4b), Muenster (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Optical imaging would be desirable for cancer diagnostics since it can potentially resolve relevant oncological target structures in vivo. We therefore synthesised an {alpha}v{beta}{sub 3} targeted fluorochrome and imaged tumour xenografts with different {alpha}v{beta}{sub 3} expression levels using both planar and tomographic optical imaging methods. An {alpha}v{beta}{sub 3}-targeted RGD peptide was labelled with a cyanine dye (Cy 5.5). Binding of the optical tracer was tested on M21 melanoma (n = 5), HT-1080 fibrosarcoma (n = 6) and MCF-7 adenocarcinoma (n = 5) cells and their tumour xenografts. All optical imaging studies were performed using two-dimensional planar fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) technology and three-dimensional fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT). In vitro, the peptide-dye conjugate showed a clear binding affinity to {alpha}v{beta}{sub 3}-positive M21 and HT-1080 cells while {alpha}v{beta}{sub 3}-negative MCF-7 cells and pre-dosing with the free RGD peptide revealed little to no fluorescence. In vivo, tumour xenografts were clearly visualised by FRI and FMT up to 24 h post injection. FMT allowed quantification of the fluorochrome distribution in deeper tissue sections showing an average fluorochrome concentration of 417.61 {+-} 105.82 nM Cy 5.5 (M21), 353.68 {+-} 54.02 nM Cy 5.5 (HT-1080) and 262.83 {+-} 155.36 nM Cy 5.5 (MCF-7) in the target tissue 60 min after tracer administration. Competition with the free RGD peptide resulted in a reduction in the fluorochrome concentration in M21 tumour tissue (294.35 {+-} 84.27 nM). RGD-Cy 5.5 combined with novel tomographic optical imaging methods allows non-invasive imaging of tumour-associated {alpha}v{beta}{sub 3} expression and may thus be a promising strategy for sensitive evaluation of tumour target expression. (orig.)

  19. A molecular toolbox for rapid generation of viral vectors to up- or down-regulate in vivo neuronal gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie D. White

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a molecular toolbox for manipulation of neuronal gene expression in vivo. The toolbox includes promoters, ion channels, optogenetic tools, fluorescent proteins and intronic artificial microRNAs. The components are easily assembled into adeno-associated virus (AAV or lentivirus vectors using recombination cloning. We demonstrate assembly of toolbox components into lentivirus and AAV vectors and use these vectors for in vivo expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir3.1 and Kir3.2 and an artificial microRNA targeted against the ion channel HCN1 (HCN1 miR. We show that AAV assembled to express HCN1 miR produces efficacious and specific in vivo knockdown of HCN1 channels. Comparison of in vivo viral transduction using HCN1 miR with mice containing a germ line deletion of HCN1 reveals similar physiological phenotypes in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The easy assembly and re-usability of the toolbox components, together with the ability to up- or down-regulate neuronal gene expression in vivo, may be useful for applications in many areas of neuroscience.

  20. [Identification of APEC genes expressed in vivo by selective capture of transcribed sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Gao, Song; Wang, Xiao-quan; Jiao, Xin-an; Liu, Xiu-fan

    2007-06-01

    Direct screening of bacterial genes expressed during infection in the host is limited, because isolation of bacterial transcripts from host tissues necessitates separation from the abundance of host RNA. Selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) allows the selective capture of bacterial cDNA derived from infected tissues using hybridization to biotinylated bacterial genomic DNA. Avian pathogenic E. coli strain E037 (serogroup O78) was used in a chicken infection model to identify bacterial genes that are expressed in infected tissues. Three-week-old white leghorn specific-pathogen-free chickens were inoculated into the right thoracic air sac with a 0.1 mL suspension containing 10(7) CFU of APEC strain E037. Total RNA was isolated from infected tissues (pericardium and air sacs) 6 or 24h postinfection and converted to cDNAs. By using the cDNA selection method of selective capture of transcribed sequences and enrichment for the isolation of pathogen-specific (non-pathogenic E. coli K-12 strain ) transcripts, pathogen-specific cDNAs were identified. Randomly chosen cDNA clones derived from transcripts in the air sacs or pericardium were selected and sequenced. The clones, termed aec, contained numerous APEC-specific sequences. Among the distinct 31 aec clones, pathogen-specific clones contained sequences homologous to known and novel putative bacterial virulence gene products involved in adherence, iron transport, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis, plasmid replication and conjugation, putative phage encoded products, and gene products of unknown function. Overall, the current study provided a means to identify novel pathogen-specific genes expressed in vivo and insight regarding the global gene expression of a pathogenic E. coli strain in a natural animal host during the infectious process.

  1. Cathepsin D expression level affects alpha-synuclein processing, aggregation, and toxicity in vivo

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    Cullen Valerie

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated SNCA gene expression and intracellular accumulation of the encoded α-synuclein (aSyn protein are associated with the development of Parkinson disease (PD. To date, few enzymes have been examined for their ability to degrade aSyn. Here, we explore the effects of CTSD gene expression, which encodes the lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CathD, on aSyn processing. Results Over-expression of human CTSD cDNA in dopaminergic MES23.5 cell cultures induced the marked proteolysis of exogenously expressed aSyn proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, brain extractions, Western blotting and ELISA quantification revealed evidence for reduced levels of soluble endogenous aSyn in ctsd knock-out mice. However, these CathD-deficient mice also contained elevated levels of insoluble, oligomeric aSyn species, as detected by formic acid extraction. In accordance, immunohistochemical studies of ctsd-mutant brain from mice, sheep and humans revealed selective synucleinopathy-like changes that varied slightly among the three species. These changes included intracellular aSyn accumulation and formation of ubiquitin-positive inclusions. Furthermore, using an established Drosophila model of human synucleinopathy, we observed markedly enhanced retinal toxicity in ctsd-null flies. Conclusion We conclude from these complementary investigations that: one, CathD can effectively degrade excess aSyn in dopaminergic cells; two, ctsd gene mutations result in a lysosomal storage disorder that includes microscopic and biochemical evidence of aSyn misprocessing; and three, CathD deficiency facilitates aSyn toxicity. We therefore postulate that CathD promotes 'synucleinase' activity, and that enhancing its function may lower aSyn concentrations in vivo.

  2. In vivo reprogramming of immune cells: Technologies for induction of antigen-specific tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Ryan M; Casey, Liam M; Hughes, Kevin R; Miller, Stephen D; Shea, Lonnie D

    2017-05-15

    Technologies that induce antigen-specific immune tolerance by mimicking naturally occurring mechanisms have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of many immune-mediated pathologies such as autoimmunity, allograft rejection, and allergy. The immune system intrinsically has central and peripheral tolerance pathways for eliminating or modulating antigen-specific responses, which are being exploited through emerging technologies. Antigen-specific tolerogenic responses have been achieved through the functional reprogramming of antigen-presenting cells or lymphocytes. Alternatively, immune privileged sites have been mimicked using biomaterial scaffolds to locally suppress immune responses and promote long-term allograft survival. This review describes natural mechanisms of peripheral tolerance induction and the various technologies being developed to achieve antigen-specific immune tolerance in vivo. As currently approved therapies are non-specific and carry significant associated risks, these therapies offer significant progress towards replacing systemic immune suppression with antigen-specific therapies to curb aberrant immune responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Activation of peritoneal cells upon in vivo transfection with a recombinant alphavirus expressing GM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimp, A H; van der Vaart, E; Lansink, P O; Withoff, S; de Vries, E G; Scherphof, G L; Wilschut, J; Daemen, T

    2001-02-01

    In this study we determined the in vivo localization of recombinant proteins expressed by intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) particles. Subsequently, we investigated the influence of i.p. administered SFV particles encoding recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) on intraperitoneal recruitment and activation of cells. Finally, the therapeutic effect of SFV-GM-CSF treatment on an i.p. growing ovarian tumor was determined. Intraperitoneal injections of recombinant SFV particles encoding the reporter protein luciferase resulted in a high level of luciferase activity in cells of the peritoneal lining and tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity. Low levels of luciferase activity were found in liver, spleen and lungs. Injection of SFV-GM-CSF particles resulted in a slight increase in the number of peritoneal macrophages and in a significant increase in the number of neutrophils. In contrast to multiple i.p. injections with commercially available recombinant GM-CSF, i.p. injected SFV-GM-CSF particles activated the macrophages to tumor cytotoxicity. Although treatment of tumor-bearing mice with SFV-GM-CSF particles did not result in prolonged survival, tumor growth was inhibited for 2 weeks. Our findings indicate that macrophage-activating cytokines expressed by the efficient and safe recombinant SFV system when administered i.p. may provide an immunotherapeutic treatment modality additional to current chemotherapeutic treatment of intraperitoneally growing cancers.

  4. Persistent gene expression in rat liver in vivo by repetitive transfections using HVJ-liposome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, T; Fujimoto, J; Ueki, T; Yamamoto, H; Iwasaki, T; Morisita, R; Sawa, Y; Kaneda, Y; Takahashi, H; Okamoto, E

    1998-04-01

    Most viral vectors are highly immunogenic and are of limited use for somatic gene therapy that requires repetitive administrations. We have developed a highly efficient gene transduction procedure useful for repetitive transfections using liposome containing hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ-liposome). The Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) gene was embodied in HVJ-liposome, and introduced directly into the caudal lobe of rat liver that was transiently isolated from a systemic circulation. A 116 kDa beta-gal protein was detected in transfected rat liver tissues by Western blot analysis and it was expressed in more than two-thirds of the liver by histological staining. It was found that the transfection efficiency was not affected by repetitive transfections. In support of these findings, antibody response to HVJ-liposome detected in the rat sera was weak and transient. Furthermore, cytotoxic T lymphocytes were not elicited against autologous rat hepatocytes that were transfected in vivo using HVJ-liposome. Thus, our results demonstrate that the isolation of a target liver from systemic circulation and the direct administration of foreign genes using HVJ-liposomes are useful for high gene transduction and persistent gene expression in the liver.

  5. Effects of a skin-massaging device on the ex-vivo expression of human dermis proteins and in-vivo facial wrinkles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caberlotto, Elisa; Ruiz, Laetitia; Miller, Zane; Poletti, Mickael; Tadlock, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical and geometrical cues influence cell behaviour. At the tissue level, almost all organs exhibit immediate mechanical responsiveness, in particular by increasing their stiffness in direct proportion to an applied mechanical stress. It was recently shown in cultured-cell models, in particular with fibroblasts, that the frequency of the applied stress is a fundamental stimulating parameter. However, the influence of the stimulus frequency at the tissue level has remained elusive. Using a device to deliver an oscillating torque that generates cyclic strain at different frequencies, we studied the effect(s) of mild skin massage in an ex vivo model and in vivo. Skin explants were maintained ex vivo for 10 days and massaged twice daily for one minute at various frequencies within the range of 65-85 Hz. Biopsies were analysed at D0, D5 and D10 and processed for immuno-histological staining specific to various dermal proteins. As compared to untreated skin explants, the massaging procedure clearly led to higher rates of expression, in particular for decorin, fibrillin, tropoelastin, and procollagen-1. The mechanical stimulus thus evoked an anti-aging response. Strikingly, the expression was found to depend on the stimulus frequency with maximum expression at 75Hz. We then tested whether this mechanical stimulus had an anti-aging effect in vivo. Twenty Caucasian women (aged 65-75y) applied a commercial anti-aging cream to the face and neck, followed by daily treatments using the anti-aging massage device for 8 weeks. A control group of twenty-two women, with similar ages to the first group, applied the cream alone. At W0, W4 and W8, a blinded evaluator assessed the global facial wrinkles, skin texture, lip area, cheek wrinkles, neck sagging and neck texture using a clinical grading scale. We found that combining the massaging device with a skin anti-aging formulation amplified the beneficial effects of the cream.

  6. Effects of a skin-massaging device on the ex-vivo expression of human dermis proteins and in-vivo facial wrinkles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Caberlotto

    Full Text Available Mechanical and geometrical cues influence cell behaviour. At the tissue level, almost all organs exhibit immediate mechanical responsiveness, in particular by increasing their stiffness in direct proportion to an applied mechanical stress. It was recently shown in cultured-cell models, in particular with fibroblasts, that the frequency of the applied stress is a fundamental stimulating parameter. However, the influence of the stimulus frequency at the tissue level has remained elusive. Using a device to deliver an oscillating torque that generates cyclic strain at different frequencies, we studied the effect(s of mild skin massage in an ex vivo model and in vivo. Skin explants were maintained ex vivo for 10 days and massaged twice daily for one minute at various frequencies within the range of 65-85 Hz. Biopsies were analysed at D0, D5 and D10 and processed for immuno-histological staining specific to various dermal proteins. As compared to untreated skin explants, the massaging procedure clearly led to higher rates of expression, in particular for decorin, fibrillin, tropoelastin, and procollagen-1. The mechanical stimulus thus evoked an anti-aging response. Strikingly, the expression was found to depend on the stimulus frequency with maximum expression at 75Hz. We then tested whether this mechanical stimulus had an anti-aging effect in vivo. Twenty Caucasian women (aged 65-75y applied a commercial anti-aging cream to the face and neck, followed by daily treatments using the anti-aging massage device for 8 weeks. A control group of twenty-two women, with similar ages to the first group, applied the cream alone. At W0, W4 and W8, a blinded evaluator assessed the global facial wrinkles, skin texture, lip area, cheek wrinkles, neck sagging and neck texture using a clinical grading scale. We found that combining the massaging device with a skin anti-aging formulation amplified the beneficial effects of the cream.

  7. Exploring expressivity and emotion with artificial voice and speech technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauletto, Sandra; Balentine, Bruce; Pidcock, Chris; Jones, Kevin; Bottaci, Leonardo; Aretoulaki, Maria; Wells, Jez; Mundy, Darren P; Balentine, James

    2013-10-01

    Emotion in audio-voice signals, as synthesized by text-to-speech (TTS) technologies, was investigated to formulate a theory of expression for user interface design. Emotional parameters were specified with markup tags, and the resulting audio was further modulated with post-processing techniques. Software was then developed to link a selected TTS synthesizer with an automatic speech recognition (ASR) engine, producing a chatbot that could speak and listen. Using these two artificial voice subsystems, investigators explored both artistic and psychological implications of artificial speech emotion. Goals of the investigation were interdisciplinary, with interest in musical composition, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), commercial voice announcement applications, human-computer interaction (HCI), and artificial intelligence (AI). The work-in-progress points towards an emerging interdisciplinary ontology for artificial voices. As one study output, HCI tools are proposed for future collaboration.

  8. In Vivo Expression of miR-32 Induces Proliferation in Prostate Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latonen, Leena; Scaravilli, Mauro; Gillen, Andrew; Hartikainen, Samuli; Zhang, Fu-Ping; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Kujala, Paula; Poutanen, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2017-08-19

    miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression and are often deregulated in cancer. We have previously shown that miR-32 is an androgen receptor-regulated miRNA overexpressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer and that miR-32 can improve prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. To assess the effects of miR-32 in vivo, we developed transgenic mice overexpressing miR-32 in the prostate. The study indicated that transgenic miR-32 expression increases replicative activity in the prostate epithelium. We further observed an aging-associated increase in the incidence of goblet cell metaplasia in the prostate epithelium. Furthermore, aged miR-32 transgenic mice exhibited metaplasia-associated prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia at a low frequency. When crossbred with mice lacking the other allele of tumor-suppressor Pten (miR-32xPten(+/-) mice), miR-32 expression increased both the incidence and the replicative activity of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions in the dorsal prostate. The miR-32xPten(+/-) mice also demonstrated increased goblet cell metaplasia compared with Pten(+/-) mice. By performing a microarray analysis of mouse prostate tissue to screen downstream targets and effectors of miR-32, we identified RAC2 as a potential, and clinically relevant, target of miR-32. We also demonstrate down-regulation of several interesting, potentially prostate cancer-relevant genes (Spink1, Spink5, and Casp1) by miR-32 in the prostate tissue. The results demonstrate that miR-32 increases proliferation and promotes metaplastic transformation in mouse prostate epithelium, which may promote neoplastic alterations in the prostate. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In Vivo Genome Editing Restores Dystrophin Expression and Cardiac Function in Dystrophic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Refaey, Mona; Xu, Li; Gao, Yandi; Canan, Benjamin D; Adesanya, T M Ayodele; Warner, Sarah C; Akagi, Keiko; Symer, David E; Mohler, Peter J; Ma, Jianjie; Janssen, Paul M L; Han, Renzhi

    2017-09-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe inherited form of muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the reading frame of the dystrophin gene disrupting its protein expression. Dystrophic cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, and currently no effective treatment exists to halt its progression. Recent advancement in genome editing technologies offers a promising therapeutic approach in restoring dystrophin protein expression. However, the impact of this approach on Duchenne muscular dystrophy cardiac function has yet to be evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-mediated genome editing on dystrophin expression and cardiac function in mdx/Utr+/- mice after a single systemic delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus. To examine the efficiency and physiological impact of CRISPR-mediated genome editing on cardiac dystrophin expression and function in dystrophic mice. Here, we packaged SaCas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-associated 9 from Staphylococcus aureus) and guide RNA constructs into an adeno-associated virus vector and systemically delivered them to mdx/Utr+/- neonates. We showed that CRIPSR-mediated genome editing efficiently excised the mutant exon 23 in dystrophic mice, and immunofluorescence data supported the restoration of dystrophin protein expression in dystrophic cardiac muscles to a level approaching 40%. Moreover, there was a noted restoration in the architecture of cardiac muscle fibers and a reduction in the extent of fibrosis in dystrophin-deficient hearts. The contractility of cardiac papillary muscles was also restored in CRISPR-edited cardiac muscles compared with untreated controls. Furthermore, our targeted deep sequencing results confirmed that our adeno-associated virus-CRISPR/Cas9 strategy was very efficient in deleting the ≈23 kb of intervening genomic sequences. This study

  10. MicroRNA expression analysis of feline and canine parvovirus infection in vivo (felis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Zhou

    Full Text Available Feline panleukopenia is a common contagious disease with high morbidity and mortality. At present, feline parvovirus (FPV and canine parvovirus (CPV variants are the pathogens of feline panleukopenia. Many studies have shown that miRNAs are involved in virus-host interactions. Nevertheless, miRNA expression profiling of FPV (original virus or CPV-2b (new virus in cats has not been reported. To investigate these profiles, three 10-week-old cats were orally inoculated with 106 TCID50 of the viruses (FPV and CPV-2b, and the jejunums of one cat in each group were sectioned for miRNA sequencing at 5 days post-inoculation (dpi. This study is the first attempt to use miRNA analysis to understand the molecular basis of FPV and CPV infection in cats. The miRNA expression profiles of the jejunums of cats infected with FPV and CPV were obtained, and a subset of miRNAs was validated by real-time qPCR. The results show that a variety of metabolism-related pathways, cytokine- and pathogen-host interaction-related pathways, and pathology- and cellar structure-related pathways, as well as others, were affected. Specifically, the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, which is critical for cytokines and growth factors, was enriched. This description of the miRNAs involved in regulating FPV and CPV infection in vivo provides further insight into the mechanisms of viral infection and adaptation and might provide an alternative antiviral strategy for disease control and prevention.

  11. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Yoo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. Results A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Conclusion Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate

  12. Application of FRET Technology to the In Vivo Evaluation of Therapeutic Nucleic Acids (ANTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Hess, María Luisa; Alvarez-Salas, Luis Marat

    2007-02-01

    Developing applications for therapeutic nucleic acids (TNAs) (i.e. ribozymes, antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs), siRNA and aptamers) requires a reporter system designed to rapidly evaluate their in vivo effect. To this end we designed a reporter system based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) engineered to release the FRET effect produced by two green fluorescent protein (GFP) variants linked by a TNA target site. Because the FRET effect occurs instantaneously when two fluorophores are very close to each other (>100nm) stimulating emission of the acceptor fluorophore by the excitation of the donor fluorophore it has been widely use to reveal interactions between molecules. The present system (FRET2) correlates the FRET effect with the in vivo activity of distinct types of TNAs based on a model consisting of RNA from human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) previously shown accessible to TNAs. HPV-16 is the most common papillomavirus associated with cervical cancer, the leading cause of death by cancer in México. The FRET2 system was first tested in vitro and then used in bacteria in which transcription is linked to translation allowing controlled expression and rapid evaluation of the FRET2 protein. To assure accessibility of the target mRNA to TNAs, the FRET2 mRNA was probed by RNaseH assays prior FRET testing. The fluorescence features of the FRET2 system was tested with different FRET-producing GFP donor-acceptor pairs leading to selection of green (donor) and yellow (acceptor) variants of GFP as the most efficient. Modifications in aminoacid composition and linker length of the target sequence did not affect FRET efficiency. In vivo AS-ODN-mediated destruction of the chimerical FRET2 reporter mRNA resulted in the recovery of GFP fluorescent spectrum in a concentration and time dependent manner. Reported anti-HPV ribozymes were also tested with similar results. Therefore, we conclude that the FRET effect can be a useful tool in the

  13. Expression of perilipins in human skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo in relation to diet, exercise and energy balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, I M F; Haugen, F; Gulseth, H L

    2011-01-01

    , enhanced the expression of perilipin 2 and 3. Perilipin 1 mRNA correlated positively with body fat mass, whereas none of the perilipins were associated with insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, all perilipins mRNAs were expressed in human skeletal muscle. Diet as well as endurance exercise modulated......The perilipin proteins enclose intracellular lipid droplets. We describe the mRNA expression of the five perilipins in human skeletal muscle in relation to fatty acid supply, exercise and energy balance. We observed that all perilipins were expressed in skeletal muscle biopsies with the highest m......RNA levels of perilipin 2, 4 and 5. Cultured myotubes predominantly expressed perilipin 2 and 3. In vitro, incubation of myotubes with fatty acids enhanced mRNA expression of perilipin 1, 2 and 4. In vivo, low fat diet increased mRNA levels of perilipin 3 and 4. Endurance training, but not strength training...

  14. Application of NIR fluorescent markers to quantify expression level of HER2 receptors in carcinomas in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomordik, Victor; Hassan, Moinuddin; Lee, Sang Bong; Zielinski, Rafal; Capala, Jacek; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2010-02-01

    HER2 overexpression has been associated with a poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in breast cancer patients. However, quantitative estimates of this important characteristic have been limited to ex vivo ELISA essays of tissue biopsies and/or PET. We develop a novel approach in optical imaging, involving specific probes, not interfering with the binding of the therapeutic agents, thus, excluding competition between therapy and imaging. Affibody-based molecular probes seem to be ideal for in vivo analysis of HER2 receptors using near-infrared optical imaging. Fluorescence intensity distributions, originating from specific markers in the tumor area, can reveal the corresponding fluorophore concentration. We use temporal changes of the signal from a contrast agent, conjugated with HER2-specific Affibody as a signature to monitor in vivo the receptors status in mice with different HER2 over-expressed tumor models. Kinetic model, incorporating saturation of the bound ligands in the tumor area due to HER2 receptor concentration, is suggested to analyze relationship between tumor cell characteristics, i.e., HER2 overexpression, obtained by traditional ("golden standard") ex vivo methods (ELISA), and parameters, estimated from the series of images in vivo. Observed correlation between these parameters and HER2 overexpression substantiates application of our approach to quantify HER2 concentration in vivo.

  15. Repeatable, Inducible Micro-RNA-Based Technology Tightly Controls Liver Transgene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian I Oprea

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inducible systems for gene expression emerge as a new class of artificial vectors offering temporal and spatial exogenous control of gene expression. However, most inducible systems are less efficient in vivo and lack the target-organ specificity. In the present study, we have developed and optimized an oligonucleotide-based inducible system for the in vivo control of transgenes in the liver. We generated a set of simple, inducible plasmid-vectors based on the addition of four units of liver-specific miR-122 target sites to the 3′untranslated region of the gene of interest. Once the vector was delivered into hepatocytes this modification induced a dramatic reduction of gene expression that could be restored by the infusion of an antagomir for miR-122. The efficiency of the system was tested in vivo, and displayed low background and strong increase in gene expression upon induction. Moreover, gene expression was repeatedly induced even several months after the first induction showing no toxic effect in vivo. By combining tissue-specific control elements with antagomir treatment we generated, optimized and validated a robust inducible system that could be used successfully for in vivo experimental models requiring tight and cyclic control of gene expression.

  16. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-affibody molecule for in vivo assessment of HER2/neu expression with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Capala, Jacek [National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Shenoy, Nalini; Griffiths, Gary L. [National Institutes of Health, Imaging Probe Development Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Seidel, Jurgen; Choyke, Peter [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Overexpression of HER2/neu in breast cancer is correlated with a poor prognosis. It may vary between primary tumors and metastatic lesions and change during the treatment. Therefore, there is a need for a new means to assess HER2/neu expression in vivo. In this work, we used {sup 68}Ga-labeled DOTA-Z{sub HER2:2891}-Affibody to monitor HER2/neu expression in a panel of breast cancer xenografts. DOTA-Z{sub HER2:2891}-Affibody molecules were labeled with {sup 68}Ga. In vitro binding was characterized by a receptor saturation assay. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were conducted in athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneous human breast cancer tumors with three different levels of HER2/neu expression. Nonspecific uptake was analyzed using non-HER2-specific Affibody molecules. Signal detected by PET was compared with ex vivo assessment of the tracer uptake and HER2/neu expression. The {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Z{sub HER2:2891}-Affibody probe showed high binding affinity to MDA-MB-361 cells (K{sub D} = 1.4 {+-} 0.19 nM). In vivo biodistribution and PET imaging studies demonstrated high radioactivity uptake in HER2/neu-positive tumors. Tracer was eliminated quickly from the blood and normal tissues, resulting in high tumor-to-blood ratios. The highest concentration of radioactivity in normal tissue was seen in the kidneys (227 {+-} 14%ID/g). High-contrast PET images of HER2/neu-overexpressing tumors were recorded as soon as 1 h after tracer injection. A good correlation was observed between PET imaging, biodistribution estimates of tumor tracer concentration, and the receptor expression. These results suggest that PET imaging using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Z{sub HER2:2891}-Affibody is sensitive enough to detect different levels of HER2/neu expression in vivo. (orig.)

  17. Differential in vivo expression of mycobacterial antigens in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected lungs and lymph node tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Tehmina; Leversen, Nils Anders; Sviland, Lisbet; Wiker, Harald Gotten

    2014-10-03

    The clinical course of tuberculosis (TB) infection, bacterial load and the morphology of lesions vary between pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. Antigens expressed in abundance during infection could represent relevant antigens in the development of diagnostic tools, but little is known about the in vivo expression of various M. tuberculosis antigens in different clinical manifestations. The aim of this study was to study the differences in the presence of major secreted as well as somatic mycobacterial antigens in host tissues during advanced rapidly progressing and fatal pulmonary disease with mainly pneumonic infiltrates and high bacterial load, and to compare this to the presence of the same antigens in TB lymphadenitis cases, which is mainly chronic and self-limiting disease with organised granulomas and lower bacterial load. Human pulmonary (n = 3) and lymph node (n = 17) TB biopsies, and non-TB controls (n = 12) were studied. Ziehl-Neelsen stain, nested PCR 1S6110 and immunohistochemistry were performed. Major secreted (MPT32, MPT44, MPT46, MPT51, MPT53, MPT59, MPT63, and MPT64) and somatic mycobacterial antigens (Mce1A, Hsp65, and MPT57) were detected by using rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Plenty of bacilli were detectable with Ziehl-Neelsen stain in the lung biopsies while no bacilli were detected in the lymph node biopsies. All the cases were shown to be positive by PCR. Both secretory and somatic antigens were expressed in abundance in pulmonary infiltrates, while primarily somatic antigens were detected in the lymphadenitis cases. Of the secreted antigens, only MPT64 was consistently detected in both cases, indicating a preferential accumulation of this antigen within the inflammatory cells, even if the cells of the granuloma can efficiently restrict bacterial growth and clear away the secreted antigens. This study shows that major secreted mycobacterial antigens were found in high amounts in advanced pulmonary lesions without proper granuloma

  18. Constructive Technology Assessment of Gene Expression Profiling for Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retèl, Valesca Pavlawna; Retel, Valesca

    2011-01-01

    Constructive Technology Assessment (CTA) can be used as a complementary approach to Health Technology Assessment (HTA), especially for the early and dynamic introduction of new technologies in a controlled way. CTA is based on the idea that during the course of technology development, choices are

  19. In vivo imaging of endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression after radiosurgery in an animal model of arteriovenous malformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newsha Raoufi-Rad

    Full Text Available Focussed radiosurgery may provide a means of inducing molecular changes on the luminal surface of diseased endothelium to allow targeted delivery of novel therapeutic compounds. We investigated the potential of ionizing radiation to induce surface expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1 on endothelial cells (EC in vitro and in vivo, to assess their suitability as vascular targets in irradiated arteriovenous malformations (AVMs. Cultured brain microvascular EC were irradiated by linear accelerator at single doses of 0, 5, 15 or 25 Gy and expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 measured by qRT-PCR, Western, ELISA and immunocytochemistry. In vivo, near-infrared (NIR fluorescence optical imaging using Xenolight 750-conjugated ICAM-1 or VCAM-1 antibodies examined luminal biodistribution over 84 days in a rat AVM model after Gamma Knife surgery at a single 15 Gy dose. ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were minimally expressed on untreated EC in vitro. Doses of 15 and 25 Gy stimulated expression equally; 5 Gy was not different from the unirradiated. In vivo, normal vessels did not bind or retain the fluorescent probes, however binding was significant in AVM vessels. No additive increases in probe binding were found in response to radiosurgery at a dose of 15 Gy. In summary, radiation induces adhesion molecule expression in vitro but elevated baseline levels in AVM vessels precludes further induction in vivo. These molecules may be suitable targets in irradiated vessels without hemodynamic derangement, but not AVMs. These findings demonstrate the importance of using flow-modulated, pre-clinical animal models for validating candidate proteins for vascular targeting in irradiated AVMs.

  20. In vivo imaging of endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression after radiosurgery in an animal model of arteriovenous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoufi-Rad, Newsha; McRobb, Lucinda S; Lee, Vivienne S; Bervini, David; Grace, Michael; Ukath, Jaysree; Mchattan, Joshua; Sreenivasan, Varun K A; Duong, T T Hong; Zhao, Zhenjun; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2017-01-01

    Focussed radiosurgery may provide a means of inducing molecular changes on the luminal surface of diseased endothelium to allow targeted delivery of novel therapeutic compounds. We investigated the potential of ionizing radiation to induce surface expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) on endothelial cells (EC) in vitro and in vivo, to assess their suitability as vascular targets in irradiated arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Cultured brain microvascular EC were irradiated by linear accelerator at single doses of 0, 5, 15 or 25 Gy and expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 measured by qRT-PCR, Western, ELISA and immunocytochemistry. In vivo, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence optical imaging using Xenolight 750-conjugated ICAM-1 or VCAM-1 antibodies examined luminal biodistribution over 84 days in a rat AVM model after Gamma Knife surgery at a single 15 Gy dose. ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were minimally expressed on untreated EC in vitro. Doses of 15 and 25 Gy stimulated expression equally; 5 Gy was not different from the unirradiated. In vivo, normal vessels did not bind or retain the fluorescent probes, however binding was significant in AVM vessels. No additive increases in probe binding were found in response to radiosurgery at a dose of 15 Gy. In summary, radiation induces adhesion molecule expression in vitro but elevated baseline levels in AVM vessels precludes further induction in vivo. These molecules may be suitable targets in irradiated vessels without hemodynamic derangement, but not AVMs. These findings demonstrate the importance of using flow-modulated, pre-clinical animal models for validating candidate proteins for vascular targeting in irradiated AVMs.

  1. In vivo visualization of expression and function of miR221 in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Soon Hag; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    MicroRNA 221 has been known to be one of up-regulated miRNAs in papillary thyroid carcinoma. To evaluate the expression and function of miR221, we measured the quantities of primary or mature miR221 in normal thyroid or papillary cancer cells and examined the gene expression of Gaussian luciferase (Glue) regulated by miR221. Total RNA and small RNA were isolated from normal thyroid cells (HT-ori3) and papillary thyroid cancer cells (NPA, TPC-1). The quantities of primary miR221 or mature miR221 in cells were measured by qRT-PCR. We constructed a CMV/Gluc-3xPT{sub m}iR221 including 3 times repeated perfect target sequences of miR221 in the 3'UTR of Gluc. CMV/Gluc-3xPT{sub m}iR221 was transfected into HT-ori3, NPA, and TPC-1, CMV/Gluc was used as a control. Also, precursor miR221 or anti-miR221 were co-transfected with CMV/Gluc-3xPT{sub m}iR221 into each cells and compared the Gluc activities by luciferase assay and in vivo bioluminescence image. The quantities of primary miR221 of NPA or TPC-1 were 2.24 or 1.5 times more than that of HT-ori3, and quantities of mature miR221 in NPA or TPC-1 were 17 or 7 times more than that of HT-ori3, respectively. Gluc activities in NPA or TPC-1 transfected with CMV/Gluc-3xPT{sub m}iR221 were repressed 2 times or more than those of CMV/Gluc, respectively. Also, Gluc activities in NPA or TPC-1 co-transfected with pre-miR221 and CMV/Gluc-3xPT{sub m}iR221 were repressed 5 times or more down-regulated than those of CMV/Gluc, respectively. The other hand, Gluc activities in NPA or TPC-1 co-transfected with anti-miR221 and CMV/Gluc-3xPT{sub m}iR221 were retrieved as those of CMV/Gluc. In vivo bioluminescence images also showed that Gluc activities were repressed by pre.miR221 and retrieved by anti-miR221. These results suggest that CMV/Gluc-3xPT{sub m}iR221 system may be a useful tool for monitoring the quantities of miR221 and gene regulation by miR221 in a living animal.

  2. In vivo genotoxicity of nitramines, transformation products of amine-based carbon capture technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Coutris

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In times where we need to reduce our CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, it is important to get a clearer picture of the environmental impacts associated with potential mitigation technologies. Chemical absorption with amines is emerging as the most advanced mitigation technology for post-combustion capture of CO2 from fossil fuel power stations. Although the amine solvent used in this technology is recycled during the capture process, degradation products are formed and released into the environment. Among these degradation products, the aliphatic nitramine compounds dimethylnitramine and ethanolnitramine have been identified, whose environmental impact was unknown. In addition to conducting survival, growth and reproduction tests in a range of marine species, we looked into the in vivo genotoxic potential of these two compounds to experimentally exposed fish (Coutris et al. 2015. DNA damage was analyzed in blood samples collected from the caudal vein of juvenile turbot Scophthalmus maximus after 28 day exposure to nitramines, using the 12 mini-gels version of the comet assay, with and without digestion with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. Although whole organism bioassays indicated that nitramine toxicity through necrosis was low, the genotoxicity assessment revealed contrasting results, with ethanolnitramine found to be more genotoxic than dimethylnitramine by three orders of magnitude. At the lowest ethanolnitramine concentration (1 mg/L, 84 % DNA damage was observed, whereas 100 mg/L dimethylnitramine was required to cause 37 % DNA damage. The mechanisms of genotoxicity were also shown to differ between the two compounds, with oxidation of the DNA bases responsible for over 90 % of the genotoxicity of dimethylnitramine, whereas DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites were responsible for over 90 % of the genotoxicity of ethanolnitramine. Fish exposed to > 3 mg/L ethanolnitramine had virtually no DNA left in their red blood cells. The

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-induced disruption of gene expression in mouse embryonic brain and single neural stem cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalebic, Nereo; Taverna, Elena; Tavano, Stefania; Wong, Fong Kuan; Suchold, Dana; Winkler, Sylke; Huttner, Wieland B; Sarov, Mihail

    2016-03-01

    We have applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system in vivo to disrupt gene expression in neural stem cells in the developing mammalian brain. Two days after in utero electroporation of a single plasmid encoding Cas9 and an appropriate guide RNA (gRNA) into the embryonic neocortex of Tis21::GFP knock-in mice, expression of GFP, which occurs specifically in neural stem cells committed to neurogenesis, was found to be nearly completely (≈ 90%) abolished in the progeny of the targeted cells. Importantly, upon in utero electroporation directly of recombinant Cas9/gRNA complex, near-maximal efficiency of disruption of GFP expression was achieved already after 24 h. Furthermore, by using microinjection of the Cas9 protein/gRNA complex into neural stem cells in organotypic slice culture, we obtained disruption of GFP expression within a single cell cycle. Finally, we used either Cas9 plasmid in utero electroporation or Cas9 protein complex microinjection to disrupt the expression of Eomes/Tbr2, a gene fundamental for neocortical neurogenesis. This resulted in a reduction in basal progenitors and an increase in neuronal differentiation. Thus, the present in vivo application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in neural stem cells provides a rapid, efficient and enduring disruption of expression of specific genes to dissect their role in mammalian brain development. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  4. Acceleration of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm formation by aggregation substance expression in an ex vivo model of cardiac valve colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia N Chuang-Smith

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Infectious endocarditis involves formation of a microbial biofilm in vivo. Enterococcus faecalis Aggregation Substance (Asc10 protein enhances the severity of experimental endocarditis, where it has been implicated in formation of large vegetations and in microbial persistence during infection. In the current study, we developed an ex vivo porcine heart valve adherence model to study the initial interactions between Asc10(+ and Asc10(-E. faecalis and valve tissue, and to examine formation of E. faecalis biofilms on a relevant tissue surface. Scanning electron microscopy of the infected valve tissue provided evidence for biofilm formation, including growing masses of bacterial cells and the increasing presence of exopolymeric matrix over time; accumulation of adherent biofilm populations on the cardiac valve surfaces during the first 2-4 h of incubation was over 10-fold higher than was observed on abiotic membranes incubated in the same culture medium. Asc10 expression accelerated biofilm formation via aggregation between E. faecalis cells; the results also suggested that in vivo adherence to host tissue and biofilm development by E. faecalis can proceed by Asc10-dependent or Asc10-independent pathways. Mutations in either of two Asc10 subdomains previously implicated in endocarditis virulence reduced levels of adherent bacterial populations in the ex vivo system. Interference with the molecular interactions involved in adherence and initiation of biofilm development in vivo with specific inhibitory compounds could lead to more effective treatment of infectious endocarditis.

  5. Distribution of CaMKIIα expression in the brain in vivo, studied by CaMKIIα-GFP mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinjun; Zhang, Chunzhao; Szábo, Gábor; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2013-01-01

    To facilitate the study of the CaMKIIα function in vivo, a CaMKIIα-GFP transgenic mouse line was generated. Here, our goal is to provide the first neuroanatomical characterization of GFP expression in the CNS of this line of mouse. Overall, CaMKIIα -GFP expression is strong and highly heterogeneous, with the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus as the most abundantly expressed region. In the hippocampus, around 70% of granule and pyramidal neurons expressed strong GFP. In the neocortex, presumed pyramidal neurons were GFP positive: around 32% of layer II/III and 35% of layer VI neurons expressed GFP, and a lower expression rate was found in other layers. In the thalamus and hypothalamus, strong GFP signals were detected in the neuropil. GFP-positive cells were also found in many other regions such as the spinal trigeminal nucleus, cerebellum and basal ganglia. We further compared the GFP expression with specific antibody staining for CaMKIIα and GABA. We found that GFP+ neurons were mostly positive for CaMKIIα-IR throughout the brain, with some exceptions throughout the brain, especially in the deeper layers of neocortex. GFP and GABA-IR marked distinct neuronal populations in most brain regions with the exception of granule cells in the olfactory bulb, purkinje cells in the cerebellar, and some layer I cells in neocortex. In conclusion, GFP expression in the CaMKIIα-GFP mice is similar to the endogenous expression of CaMKIIα protein, thus these mice can be used in in vivo and in vitro physiological studies in which visualization of CaMKIIα- neuronal populations is required. PMID:23632380

  6. In vivo imaging of alpha-synuclein in mouse cortex demonstrates stable expression and differential subcellular compartment mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek K Unni

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of alpha-synuclein levels within cells is thought to play a critical role in Parkinson's Disease (PD pathogenesis and in other related synucleinopathies. These processes have been studied primarily in reduced preparations, including cell culture. We now develop methods to measure alpha-synuclein levels in the living mammalian brain to study in vivo protein mobility, turnover and degradation with subcellular specificity.We have developed a system using enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP-tagged human alpha-synuclein (Syn-GFP transgenic mice and in vivo multiphoton imaging to measure alpha-synuclein levels with subcellular resolution. This new experimental paradigm allows individual Syn-GFP-expressing neurons and presynaptic terminals to be imaged in the living mouse brain over a period of months. We find that Syn-GFP is stably expressed by neurons and presynaptic terminals over this time frame and further find that different presynaptic terminals can express widely differing levels of Syn-GFP. Using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP technique in vivo we provide evidence that at least two pools of Syn-GFP exist in terminals with lower levels of mobility than measured previously. These results demonstrate that multiphoton imaging in Syn-GFP mice is an excellent new strategy for exploring the biology of alpha-synuclein and related mechanisms of neurodegeneration.In vivo multiphoton imaging in Syn-GFP transgenic mice demonstrates stable alpha-synuclein expression and differential subcellular compartment mobility within cortical neurons. This opens new avenues for studying alpha-synuclein biology in the living brain and testing new therapeutics for PD and related disorders.

  7. Effect of irradiation on gene expression of rat liver adhesion molecules. In vivo and in vitro studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriconi, Federico; Malik, Ihtzaz; Ahmad, Ghayyor; Dudas, Joszef; Ramadori, Giuliano [Dept. of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology, Goettingen Univ. (Germany); Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Vorwerk, Hilke; Hille, Andrea; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Christiansen, Hans [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Goettingen Univ. (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Background and purpose: Migration of leukocytes into tissue is a key element of innate and adaptive immunity. An animal study showed that liver irradiation, in spite of induction of chemokine gene expression, does not lead to recruitment of leukocytes into the parenchyma. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression of adhesion molecules, which mediate leukocyte recruitment into organs, in irradiated rat liver in vivo and rat hepatocytes in vitro. Material and methods: Rat livers in vivo were irradiated selectively at 25 Gy. Isolated hepatocytes in vitro were irradiated at 8 Gy. RNA extracted within 48 h after irradiation in vivo and in vitro was analyzed by real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and Northern blot. Adhesion molecule concentration in serum was measured by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Cryostat sections of livers were used for immunohistology. Results: Significant radiation-induced increase of ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), JAM-1 (junctional adhesion molecule-1), {beta}{sub 1}-integrin, {beta}{sub 2}-integrin, E-cadherin, and P-selectin gene expression could be detected in vivo, while PECAM-1 (platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1) gene expression remained unchanged. In vitro, {beta}{sub 1}-integrin, JAM-1, and ICAM-2 showed a radiation-induced increased expression, whereas the levels of P-selectin, ICAM-1, PECAM-1, VCAM-1, Madcam-1 (mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1), {beta}{sub 2}-integrin, and E-cadherin were downregulated. However, incubation of irradiated hepatocytes with either tumor necrosis factor-(TNF-){alpha}, interleukin-(IL-)1{beta}, or IL-6 plus TNF-{alpha} led to an upregulation of P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Conclusion: The findings suggest that liver irradiation modulates gene expression of the main adhesion molecules in vivo and in cytokine-activated hepatocytes, with the exception of PECAM-1. This may be one reason for the lack of

  8. Detection of soluble expression and in vivo interactions of the inner membrane protein OppC using green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Q J; Zhai, J F; Zhang, M; Zhang, B

    2015-12-22

    In this study, the in vivo interaction system of oligopeptide permease (Opp) proteins was analyzed, and a high expression system of inner membrane protein OppC was constructed by flexible usage of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The Escherichia coli OppC gene, which encodes a transmembrane component of oligopeptide transporter, was cloned into different vectors. Recombinant plasmids were transformed into different E. coli strains, and the expression conditions were optimized. The effect of plasmids and expression strains on OppC production was evaluated by in-gel and western blot analyses. OppC produced by the pWaldo-GFPe vector, harboring the GFP reporter gene, transformed into E. coli C43(DE3) provided sufficient functional protein for biochemical and biophysical studies. In vivo protein-protein interactions were detected among oligopeptide permease proteins using a GFP fragment reassembly protocol. The substrate binding protein OppA showed no interaction with the other components, while the ATP-binding component OppD did not interact with OppF. OppD and OppF interacted with the transmembrane components OppB and OppC. OppB also showed direct interaction with OppC. In vivo OppC functionality was determined by constructing an OppC gene deletion strain. OppC was shown to be essential for peptide uptake, and non-essential for cell viability. These results could help in elucidating the oligopeptide transport mechanism in bacteria.

  9. Lentiviral expression of GAD67 and CCK promoter-driven opsins to target interneurons in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantoan Ritter, Laura; Macdonald, Douglas C; Ritter, Georg; Escors, David; Chiara, Francesca; Cariboni, Anna; Schorge, Stephanie; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Collins, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate the activity of interneurons with optogenetic tools offers the possibility of interfering with diseases caused by altered neuronal inhibition and synchrony, including epilepsy and schizophrenia. To develop vectors for therapeutic approaches, targeting optogenetic constructs to interneurons is therefore a key requirement. We investigated whether the interneuron-specific promoters glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)67 and cholecystokinin (CCK) allowed targeted lentiviral delivery of opsins to interneurons as a whole, or specifically CCK+ interneurons. We generated lentiviral (LV) plasmids encoding channelrhodopsin (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR) tagged with fluorophores and driven by GAD67 or CCK promoters. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) and LV vectors carrying opsins driven by pyramidal cell promoters were used as controls. We transduced neuronal cultures and rodent brain in vivo, immunostained specimens 6-8 weeks after in vivo injection and 7-14 days after in vitro transduction, and evaluated volume and specificity of expression by confocal microscopy. In vitro, 90% (19/21) of LV-CCK-NpHR2.0-EYFP expressing neurons were CCK+. In vivo, LV-GAD67-ChR2-mCherry was expressed in 2.6% (5/193), LV-GAD67-NpHR2.0-EYFP in approximately 15% (43/279) and LV-CCK-NpHR2.0-EYFP in 47% (9/19) of hippocampal GABA+ interneurons. GAD67 vectors expressed in larger volumes than CCK-driven constructs. AAV vector controls achieved the largest expression volumes. LV-CCK-NpHR2.0-EYFP may be useful for targeting CCK+ interneurons in culture. GAD67/CCK-driven lentiviral constructs are expressed in vivo, although expression is not specific for interneurons. Overall, expression levels are low compared to opsins driven by pyramidal cell promoters. A better understanding of GAD67 and CCK promoter structure or alternative techniques is required to reliably target opsins to interneurons using viral vectors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. β-adrenergic receptor-dependent alterations in murine cardiac transcript expression are differentially regulated by gefitinib in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Talarico

    Full Text Available β-adrenergic receptor (βAR-mediated transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR has been shown to promote cardioprotection in a mouse model of heart failure and we recently showed that this mechanism leads to enhanced cell survival in part via regulation of apoptotic transcript expression in isolated primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Thus, we hypothesized that this process could regulate cardiac transcript expression in vivo. To comprehensively assess cardiac transcript alterations in response to acute βAR-dependent EGFR transactivation, we performed whole transcriptome analysis of hearts from C57BL/6 mice given i.p. injections of the βAR agonist isoproterenol in the presence or absence of the EGFR antagonist gefitinib for 1 hour. Total cardiac RNA from each treatment group underwent transcriptome analysis, revealing a substantial number of transcripts regulated by each treatment. Gefitinib alone significantly altered the expression of 405 transcripts, while isoproterenol either alone or in conjunction with gefitinib significantly altered 493 and 698 distinct transcripts, respectively. Further statistical analysis was performed, confirming 473 transcripts whose regulation by isoproterenol were significantly altered by gefitinib (isoproterenol-induced up/downregulation antagonized/promoted by gefinitib, including several known to be involved in the regulation of numerous processes including cell death and survival. Thus, βAR-dependent regulation of cardiac transcript expression in vivo can be modulated by the EGFR antagonist gefitinib.

  11. LacZ and interleukin-3 expression in vivo after retroviral transduction of marrow-derived human osteogenic mesenchymal progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allay, J A; Dennis, J E; Haynesworth, S E; Majumdar, M K; Clapp, D W; Shultz, L D; Caplan, A I; Gerson, S L

    1997-08-10

    Human marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (hMPCs), which have the capacity for osteogenic and marrow stromal differentiation, were transduced with the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (MPSV)-based retrovirus, vM5LacZ, that contains the LacZ and neo genes. Stable transduction and gene expression occurred in 18% of cells. After culture expansion and selection in G418, approximately 70% of neo(r) hMPCs co-expressed LacZ. G418-selected hMPC retain their osteogenic potential and form bone in vivo when seeded into porous calcium phosphate ceramic cubes implanted subcutaneously into SCID mice. LacZ expression was evident within osteoblasts and osteocytes in bone developing within the ceramics 6 and 9 weeks after implantation. Likewise, hMPCs transduced with human interleukin-3 (hIL-3) cDNA, adhered to ceramic cubes and implanted into SCID mice, formed bone and secreted detectable levels of hIL-3 into the systemic circulation for at least 12 weeks. These data indicate that genetically transduced, culture-expanded bone marrow-derived hMPCs retain a precursor phenotype and maintain similar levels of transgene expression during osteogenic lineage commitment and differentiation in vivo. Because MPCs have been shown to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and tendon, these cells may be a useful target for gene therapy.

  12. Corticocancellous porcine bone in the healing of human extraction sockets: combining histomorphometry with osteoblast gene expression profiles in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Roberto; Capparé, Paolo; Romanos, Georgios E; Mariani, Elisabetta; Benasciutti, Elisa; Gherlone, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Different graft materials have been proposed to minimize the collapse of alveolar bone after tooth extraction. The aim of this study was to examine the use of porcine bone graft in fresh sockets via histomorphometric and in vivo gene expression profiling. Thirty fresh extraction sockets with three bone walls in 15 patients were selected. A split-mouth design was employed. On one side of the arch, 15 sockets received corticocancellous porcine bone as a graft, and on the other side, 15 sockets were left unfilled and considered as controls. Four months after surgery, four biopsy specimens were taken from each patient (two from the grafted site and two from the control site). The specimens were analyzed by histomorphometry and ex vivo osteoblast expansion, followed by highly sensitive osteoblast-specific gene expression profiling for Runx2, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, type I collagen, and alkaline phosphatase by quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Comparisons were made using the Student t test. After healing without complications, the grafted sites showed statistically significantly higher mean vital bone and lower mean connective tissue values than the control sites. Statistically significant higher expression of alkaline phosphatase and the matrix formation markers type I collagen and osteopontin were observed in the grafted group compared to the control group, whereas Runx2 and osteoprotegerin expression was comparable. Within the limits of this study, histologic examination and biomolecular evaluation confirmed good biocompatibility and high osteoconductivity of xenogeneic porcine bone in alveolar bone grafting.

  13. In vivo imaging of human breast cancer mouse model with high level expression of calcium sensing receptor at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baio, Gabriella; Tagliafico, Alberto; Neumaier, Carlo Emanuele [National Cancer Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, IST, Genoa (Italy); Fabbi, Marina; Carbotti, Grazia [National Cancer Institute, Unit of Immunological Therapy, IST, Genoa (Italy); Emionite, Laura; Cilli, Michele [National Cancer Institute, Animal Facility, IST, Genoa (Italy); Salvi, Sandra; Truini, Mauro [National Cancer Institute, Department of Pathology, IST, Genoa (Italy); Ghedin, Piero; Prato, Sabina [General Electric, GE, Milano (Italy)

    2012-03-15

    To demonstrate that manganese can visualise calcium sensing receptor (CaSR)-expressing cells in a human breast cancer murine model, as assessed by clinical 3T magnetic resonance (MR). Human MDA-MB-231-Luc or MCF7-Luc breast cancer cells were orthotopically grown in NOD/SCID mice to a minimum mass of 5 mm. Mice were evaluated on T1-weighted sequences before and after intravenous injection of MnCl{sub 2}. To block the CaSR-activated Ca{sup 2+} channels, verapamil was injected at the tumour site 5 min before Mn{sup 2+} administration. CaSR expression in vivo was studied by immunohistochemistry. Contrast enhancement was observed at the tumour periphery 10 min after Mn{sup 2+} administration, and further increased up to 40 min. In verapamil-treated mice, no contrast enhancement was observed. CaSR was strongly expressed at the tumour periphery. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can visualise CaSR-expressing breast cancer cells in vivo, opening up possibilities for a new MR contrast agent. (orig.)

  14. Satellite DNA methylation status and expression of selected genes in Bos indicus blastocysts produced in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, R; Bernal-Ulloa, S M; Chavarría, N A; Herrera-Puerta, E; Lucas-Hahn, A; Herrmann, D; Winkler, S; Pache, D; Niemann, H; Rodriguez-Osorio, N

    2017-04-01

    Bovine embryos produced in vivo and in vitro differ with respect to molecular profiles, including epigenetic marks and gene expression profiles. This study investigated the CpG methylation status in bovine testis satellite I (BTS) and Bos taurus alpha satellite I (BTαS) DNA sequences, and concomitantly the relative abundance of transcripts, critically involved in DNA methylation (DNMT1 and DNMT3A), growth and development (IGF2R) and pluripotency (POU5F1) in Bos indicus embryos produced in vitro or in vivo. Results revealed that methylation of BTS were higher (P vitro compared with their in vivo produced counterparts, while the methylation status of BTαS was similar in both groups. There were no significant differences in transcript abundance for DNMT3A, IGF2R and POU5F1 between blastocysts produced in vivo and in vitro. However, a significantly lower amount of DNMT1 transcripts was found in the in vitro cultured embryos (P vitro embryo production system.

  15. In Vivo Imaging of Tissue Physiological Function using EPR Spectroscopy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a technique for studying chemical species that have one or more unpaired electrons.  The current invention describes Echo-based Single Point Imaging (ESPI), a novel EPR image formation strategy that allows in vivo imaging of physiological function.  The National Cancer Institute's Radiation Biology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing an in vivo imaging using Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to measure active oxygen species.

  16. Effects of Ex Vivo Infection with ETEC on Jejunal Barrier Properties and Cytokine Expression in Probiotic-Supplemented Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodemann, Ulrike; Amasheh, Salah; Radloff, Judith; Kern, Martina; Bethe, Astrid; Wieler, Lothar H; Pieper, Robert; Zentek, Jürgen; Aschenbach, Jörg R

    2017-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are involved in piglet post-weaning diarrhea. Prophylactic measures including probiotics have been examined in infection experiments with live piglets. In the present study, we have tested whether the early effects of ETEC infection can also be evoked and studied in a model in which ETEC is added to whole mucosal tissues ex vivo, and whether this response can be modulated by prior supplementation of the piglets with probiotics. Jejunal barrier and transport properties of Enterococcus faecium-supplemented or control piglets were assessed in Ussing chambers. Part of the epithelia was challenged with an ETEC strain at the mucosal side. Fluxes of fluorescein as a marker of paracellular permeability, and the expression of selected tight junction (TJ) proteins and of proinflammatory cytokines were measured. The addition of ETEC ex vivo induced an increase in transepithelial resistance peaking in the first 2 h with a concomitant reduction in fluorescein fluxes, indicating tightening effects on barrier function. The response of short-circuit current after stimulation with PGE2 or glucose was reduced in epithelia treated with ETEC. ETEC induced a decrease in the TJ protein claudin-4 in the control diet group after 280 min and an increase in the mRNA expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-8 and TNF-α in both groups after 180 min. The addition of ETEC ex vivo affected barrier function and transport properties of the jejunal tissues and enhanced cytokine expression. The differences in claudin-4 expression in the jejunum might indicate a beneficial effect of E. faecium prefeeding.

  17. Bovine AAV transcytosis inhibition by tannic acid results in functional expression of CFTR in vitro and altered biodistribution in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, G; Ostedgaard, L; Vermeer, D; Swaim, W D; Karp, P; Chiorini, J A

    2012-05-01

    Bovine adeno-associated virus (BAAV) can enter a cell either through a transcytosis or transduction pathway. We previously demonstrated that particles entering via the transcytosis pathway can be redirected to transduce the cell by blocking particle exocytosis with tannic acid (TA). To investigate whether this approach is useful in lung gene therapy applications, we tested the effect of TA on BAAV transduction in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia in vitro, and in mouse lung in vivo. Our findings suggest that BAAV transcytosis can occur in vivo and that treatment with TA reduces transcytosis and increases lung transduction. TA treatment did not impair the sorting and the activity of the BAAV expressed cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator membrane protein.

  18. An Ebox element in the proximal Gata4 promoter is required for Gata4 expression in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Boulende Sab

    Full Text Available GATA4 is an essential transcription factor required for the development and function of multiple tissues, including a major role in gonadogenesis. Despite its crucial role, the molecular mechanisms that regulate Gata4 expression in vivo remain poorly understood. We recently found that the Gata4 gene is expressed as multiple transcripts with distinct 5' origins. These co-expressed alternative transcripts are generated by different non-coding first exons with transcripts E1a and E1b being the most prominent. Moreover, we previously showed that an Ebox element, located in Gata4 5' flanking sequences upstream of exon 1a, is important for the promoter activity of these sequences in cell lines. To confirm the importance of this element in vivo, we generated and characterized Gata4 Ebox knockout mice. Quantitative PCR analyses realized on gonads, heart and liver at three developmental stages (embryonic, pre-pubertal and adult revealed that the Ebox mutation leads to a robust and specific decrease (up to 89% of Gata4 E1a transcript expression in all tissues and stages examined. However, a detailed characterization of the gonads revealed normal morphology and GATA4 protein levels in these mutants. Our qPCR data further indicate that this outcome is most likely due to the presence of Gata4 E1b mRNA, whose expression levels were not decreased by the Ebox mutation. In conclusion, our work clearly confirms the importance of the proximal Ebox element and suggests that adequate GATA4 protein expression is likely protected by a compensation mechanism between Gata4 E1a and E1b transcripts operating at the translational level.

  19. Affibody-DyLight conjugates for in vivo assessment of HER2 expression by near-infrared optical imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Zielinski

    Full Text Available Amplification of the HER2/neu gene and/or overexpression of the corresponding protein have been identified in approximately 20% of invasive breast carcinomas. Assessment of HER2 expression in vivo would advance development of new HER2-targeted therapeutic agents and, potentially, facilitate choice of the proper treatment strategy offered to the individual patient. We present novel HER2-specific probes for in vivo evaluation of the receptor status by near-infrared (NIR optical imaging.Affibody molecules were expressed, purified, and labeled with NIR-fluorescent dyes. The binding affinity and specificity of the obtained probe were tested in vitro. For in vivo validation, the relationship of the measured NIR signal and HER2 expression was characterized in four breast cancer xenograft models, expressing different levels of HER2. Accumulation of Affibody molecules in tumor tissue was further confirmed by ex vivo analysis.Affibody-DyLight conjugates showed high affinity to HER2 (K(D = 3.66±0.26. No acute toxicity resulted from injection of the probes (up to 0.5 mg/kg into mice. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed a relatively short (37.53±2.8 min half-life of the tracer in blood. Fluorescence accumulation in HER2-positive BT-474 xenografts was evident as soon as a few minutes post injection and reached its maximum at 90 minutes. On the other hand, no signal retention was observed in HER2-negative MDA-MB-468 xenografts. Immunostaining of extracted tumor tissue confirmed penetration of the tracer into tumor tissue.The results of our studies suggest that Affibody-DyLight-750 conjugate is a powerful tool to monitor HER2 status in a preclinical setting. Following clinical validation, it might provide complementary means for assessment of HER2 expression in breast cancer patients (assuming availability of proper NIR scanners and/or be used to facilitate detection of HER2-positive metastatic lesions during NIR-assisted surgery.

  20. In vivo effect of quercetin flavonoid on hepatic gene expression and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the in vivo effects of quercetin on mRNA and activity levels of hepatic glutathione-S Transferase (GSTa2) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in aged rats. Quercetin treatment resulted in significant increase in relative hepatic mRNA levels for glutathione peroxidase, liver GPx ...

  1. Distinct C/EBPalpha motifs regulate lipogenic and gluconeogenic gene expression in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas A; Bereshchenko, Oxana; Garcia-Silva, Susana

    2007-01-01

    gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. In vivo deletion of a proline-histidine rich domain (PHR), dephosphorylated at S193 by insulin signaling, dysregulated genes involved in the generation of acetyl-CoA and NADPH for triglyceride synthesis and led to increased hepatic lipogenesis. These promoters bound SREBP-1....../EBPalpha phosphorylation as a PGC-1alpha-independent mechanism for regulating hepatic gluconeogenesis....

  2. Specific Surface Modifications of Silica Nanoparticles Diminish Inflammasome Activation and In Vivo Expression of Selected Inflammatory Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Marzaioli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Silica (SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs usage includes, but is not limited to, industrial and biomedical applications. Toxic effects of SiO2 NPs have been explored either in vitro or in vivo, assessing different surface modifications to reduce their harmful effects. Here, murine bone marrow-derived dendritic (BMDC and a mouse model of mild allergic inflammation were used to study inflammasome activation and lung inflammation. Our results showed that SiO2 plain NPs induced NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome activation, increasing interleukin (IL-1β release in vitro, and, to a lesser extent, in vivo. In addition, SiO2 plain NPs triggered a pulmonary inflammatory milieu in both non-sensitized (NS and sensitized (S mice, by inducing the expression of key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Electron microscopy showed that SiO2 NPs were mostly localized in alveolar macrophages, within vesicles and/or in phagolysosomes. Both the in vitro and the in vivo effects of SiO NPs were attenuated by coating NPs with phosphonate or amino groups, whereas PEGylation, although it mitigated inflammasome activation in vitro, was not a successful coating strategy in vivo. These findings highlight that multiple assays are required to determine the effect of surface modifications in limiting NPs inflammatory potential. Taken together, these data are obtained by comparing in vitro and in vivo effects of SiO2 NPs suggest the use of amino and phosphonate coating of silica NPs for commercial purposes and targeted applications, as they significantly reduce their proinflammatory potential.

  3. Withania somnifera aqueous extract facilitates the expression and release of GnRH: In vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Gupta, Muskan; Lakhman, Sukhwinder; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2015-10-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) has a long history in traditional medicines as an aphrodisiac. It has been known to influence sexual behaviour in animal models but mechanism of action is still unknown. The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which Ashwagandha extract exert its gonadotropic activities. Due to the complexity of neuroendocrine pathways, there are limited in vitro models available despite the strong demand for such systems to study and predict neuroendocrine effects of chemicals or natural products. Immortalized rat hypothalamic GnV-3 cell line was investigated as a model to screen for neuroendocrine effects of Ashwagandha extract. GnV-3 cells were cultured under different media conditions and evaluated after treatment with Ashwagandha water extract, for GnRH expression and release by immunostaining and ELISA respectively. These cells acquired differentiated morphology, characteristic shape displayed by preoptic GnRH neurons in vivo. In addition, GnV-3 cells exhibited upregulation of plasticity related polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and mature dendrite marker microtubule associated protein (MAP2) as well as GnRH expression and release. Chloroform fraction of the extract proved to exhibit all the bioactive properties as it induced differentiation and upregulated GnRH and MAP2 expression in GnV-3 cells, similar to Ashwagandha extract. Withanone and Withaferin A were found to be present in ASH-WEX and chloroform fraction while Withanone came out to be the major constituent of chloroform fraction. The preliminary in vivo studies in adult male animals showed that ASH-WEX was able to upregulate the GnRH levels although non-significantly. Taken together, this data demonstrate significant morphological and physiological changes in GnV-3 cells after treatment with Ashwagandha extract and may suggest the potential beneficial effects of Ashwagandha on reproductive functions in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  4. A multimode optical imaging system for preclinical applications in vivo: technology development, multiscale imaging, and chemotherapy assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Ljubimova, Julia; Gross, Zeev; Gray, Harry B; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K; Farkas, Daniel L

    2012-08-01

    Several established optical imaging approaches have been applied, usually in isolation, to preclinical studies; however, truly useful in vivo imaging may require a simultaneous combination of imaging modalities to examine dynamic characteristics of cells and tissues. We developed a new multimode optical imaging system designed to be application-versatile, yielding high sensitivity, and specificity molecular imaging. We integrated several optical imaging technologies, including fluorescence intensity, spectral, lifetime, intravital confocal, two-photon excitation, and bioluminescence, into a single system that enables functional multiscale imaging in animal models. The approach offers a comprehensive imaging platform for kinetic, quantitative, and environmental analysis of highly relevant information, with micro-to-macroscopic resolution. Applied to small animals in vivo, this provides superior monitoring of processes of interest, represented here by chemo-/nanoconstruct therapy assessment. This new system is versatile and can be optimized for various applications, of which cancer detection and targeted treatment are emphasized here.

  5. Analysis of in situ and ex vivo αVβ3 integrin expression during experimental carotid atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuyu; Jiang, Yibo; Sheng, Zulong; Zhang, Yi; An, Yanli; Yan, Fengdi; Ma, Genshan; Liu, Naifeng; Teng, Gaojun; Cheng, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Mural inflammation has been shown to contribute to the development of plaque, with the α(V)β(3) integrin highly expressed in atherosclerotic plaques. We herein examined α(V)β(3) integrin expression as a function of carotid atherosclerosis formation in the apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mouse. Constrictive collars were placed around the left common carotid arteries of apo E(-/-) mice maintained on a high-fat diet (n = 14). Before and 21 days following collar placement, in vivo serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of the carotid aortic diameter were performed using a 7T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Near- infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging was performed (n = 6) using an in vivo imaging system 0-24 hours following administration of 1.0 nmol c(RGDyK)-Cy5.5 via the tail vein. A competition experiment was performed by the co-injection of a saturating dose of bicyclic RGD peptide H-Glu[cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Tyr-Lys)]2 (n = 3). Following image acquisition and sacrifice at 24 hours after injection, carotid arteries were harvested for histological analyses. Neointima formation and arterial remodeling in the carotid arteries of apoE(-/-) mice were induced by the placement of a constrictive collar. Significantly greater fluorescent signals were obtained from constrictive collar left common carotid arteries as compared to uninvolved aortic segments in constrictive collar mice. Binding to stenotic lesions was efficiently blocked in competition experiments. Immunostaining confirmed the presence of mural α(V)β(3) integrin expression in macrophages in the neointima. Signal intensity increased in a macrophage density-dependent fashion in the stenotic segments. Mural α(V)β(3) integrin expression, as determined using RGD-Cy5.5 near-infrared optical imaging, was increased in carotid arteries with constrictive collars in experimental mice. This expression can estimate the macrophage-bound inflammatory activity of atherosclerotic lesions.

  6. Maintenance of EGFR and EGFRvIII expressions in an in vivo and in vitro model of human glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Broholm, Helle; Villingshøj, Mette

    2011-01-01

    , clinical studies with EGFR inhibitors have shown inconsistent results, and as such, further knowledge regarding the role of EGFR and EGFRvIII in GBM is needed. For this, an appropriate in vivo/in vitro tumor model is required. Here, we report the establishment of an experimental GBM model in which...... the expressions of EGFR and EGFRvIII are maintained both in xenograft tumors growing subcutaneously on mice and in cell cultures established in stem cell conditions. With this model it will be possible to further study the role of EGFR and EGFRvIII, and response to targeted therapy, in GBM....

  7. BAC-Dkk3-EGFP Transgenic Mouse: An In Vivo Analytical Tool for Dkk3 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Muranishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dickkopf (DKK family proteins are secreted modulators of the Wnt signaling pathway and are capable of regulating the development of many organs and tissues. We previously identified Dkk3 to be a molecule predominantly expressed in the mouse embryonic retina. However, which cell expresses Dkk3 in the developing and mature mouse retina remains to be elucidated. To examine the precise expression of the Dkk3 protein, we generated BAC-Dkk3-EGFP transgenic mice that express EGFP integrated into the Dkk3 gene in a BAC plasmid. Expression analysis using the BAC-Dkk3-EGFP transgenic mice revealed that Dkk3 is expressed in retinal progenitor cells (RPCs at embryonic stages and in Müller glial cells in the adult retina. Since Müller glial cells may play a potential role in retinal regeneration, BAC-Dkk3-EGFP mice could be useful for retinal regeneration studies.

  8. Using the Tg(nrd:egfp/albino zebrafish line to characterize in vivo expression of neurod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Thomas

    Full Text Available In this study, we used a newly-created transgenic zebrafish, Tg(nrd:egfp/albino, to further characterize the expression of neurod in the developing and adult retina and to determine neurod expression during adult photoreceptor regeneration. We also provide observations regarding the expression of neurod in a variety of other tissues. In this line, EGFP is found in cells of the developing and adult retina, pineal gland, cerebellum, olfactory bulbs, midbrain, hindbrain, neural tube, lateral line, inner ear, pancreas, gut, and fin. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we compare the expression of the nrd:egfp transgene to that of endogenous neurod and to known retinal cell types. Consistent with previous data based on in situ hybridizations, we show that during retinal development, the nrd:egfp transgene is not expressed in proliferating retinal neuroepithelium, and is expressed in a subset of retinal neurons. In contrast to previous studies, nrd:egfp is gradually re-expressed in all rod photoreceptors. During photoreceptor regeneration in adult zebrafish, in situ hybridization reveals that neurod is not expressed in Müller glial-derived neuronal progenitors, but is expressed in photoreceptor progenitors as they migrate to the outer nuclear layer and differentiate into new rod photoreceptors. During photoreceptor regeneration, expression of the nrd:egfp matches that of neurod. We conclude that Tg(nrd:egfp/albino is a good representation of endogenous neurod expression, is a useful tool to visualize neurod expression in a variety of tissues and will aid investigating the fundamental processes that govern photoreceptor regeneration in adults.

  9. In vivo deglycosylation of recombinant proteins in plants by co-expression with bacterial PNGase F

    OpenAIRE

    Mamedov, Tarlan; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2013-01-01

    At present, several eukaryotic expression systems including yeast, insect and mammalian cells and plants are used for the production of recombinant proteins. Proteins with potential N-glycosylation sites are efficiently glycosylated when expressed in these systems. However, the ability of the eukaryotic expression systems to glycosylate may be not desirable for some proteins. If target proteins that do not carry N-linked glycans in the native host contain potential N-linked glycosylation site...

  10. Shigella dysenteriae modulates BMP pathway to induce mucin gene expression in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Ashidha; Iyer, Soumya Chidambaram; Gopal, Udhayakumar; Devaraj, Niranjali; Halagowder, Devaraj

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cells in the intestine act as the first line of host defense against pathogens by increasing mucin production for clearance. Despite this fact, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which Shigella dysenteriae transduce mucin gene expression remain poorly defined. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway in mucin gene expression during S. dysenteriae infection. In this study we demonstrate that S. dysenteriae activates BMP signaling to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression in rat ileal loop model and in vitro. We also observed that BMP pathway regulates CDX2 expression which plays a critical role in induction of MUC2 gene during S. dysenteriae infection. In SMAD4 silenced cells S. dysenteriae infection did not abrogate MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression whereas in CDX2 silenced cells it induces differential expression of MUC5AC gene. These results suggest that SMAD4-CDX2 induces MUC2 gene expression whereas SMAD4 directly influences differential expression of MUC5AC gene. Altogether, our results show that during S. dysenteriae infection the BMP pathway modulates inflammatory transcription factors CDX2 and SMAD4 to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression which plays a key role in the regulation of host mucosal defense thereby paving a cue for therapeutic application.

  11. Shigella dysenteriae modulates BMP pathway to induce mucin gene expression in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashidha Gopal

    Full Text Available Mucosal epithelial cells in the intestine act as the first line of host defense against pathogens by increasing mucin production for clearance. Despite this fact, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which Shigella dysenteriae transduce mucin gene expression remain poorly defined. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP pathway in mucin gene expression during S. dysenteriae infection. In this study we demonstrate that S. dysenteriae activates BMP signaling to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression in rat ileal loop model and in vitro. We also observed that BMP pathway regulates CDX2 expression which plays a critical role in induction of MUC2 gene during S. dysenteriae infection. In SMAD4 silenced cells S. dysenteriae infection did not abrogate MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression whereas in CDX2 silenced cells it induces differential expression of MUC5AC gene. These results suggest that SMAD4-CDX2 induces MUC2 gene expression whereas SMAD4 directly influences differential expression of MUC5AC gene. Altogether, our results show that during S. dysenteriae infection the BMP pathway modulates inflammatory transcription factors CDX2 and SMAD4 to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression which plays a key role in the regulation of host mucosal defense thereby paving a cue for therapeutic application.

  12. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP changes gene expression of key molecules of the wound healing machinery and improves wound healing in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Arndt

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has the potential to interact with tissue or cells leading to fast, painless and efficient disinfection and furthermore has positive effects on wound healing and tissue regeneration. For clinical implementation it is necessary to examine how CAP improves wound healing and which molecular changes occur after the CAP treatment. In the present study we used the second generation MicroPlaSter ß® in analogy to the current clinical standard (2 min treatment time in order to determine molecular changes induced by CAP using in vitro cell culture studies with human fibroblasts and an in vivo mouse skin wound healing model. Our in vitro analysis revealed that the CAP treatment induces the expression of important key genes crucial for the wound healing response like IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TGF-ß1, TGF-ß2, and promotes the production of collagen type I and alpha-SMA. Scratch wound healing assays showed improved cell migration, whereas cell proliferation analyzed by XTT method, and the apoptotic machinery analyzed by protein array technology, was not altered by CAP in dermal fibroblasts. An in vivo wound healing model confirmed that the CAP treatment affects above mentioned genes involved in wound healing, tissue injury and repair. Additionally, we observed that the CAP treatment improves wound healing in mice, no relevant side effects were detected. We suggest that improved wound healing might be due to the activation of a specified panel of cytokines and growth factors by CAP. In summary, our in vitro human and in vivo animal data suggest that the 2 min treatment with the MicroPlaSter ß® is an effective technique for activating wound healing relevant molecules in dermal fibroblasts leading to improved wound healing, whereas the mechanisms which contribute to these observed effects have to be further investigated.

  13. Multigene expression in vivo: supremacy of large versus small terminators for T7 RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liping; Villarreal, Seth; Forster, Anthony C

    2012-04-01

    Designing and building multigene constructs is commonplace in synthetic biology. Yet functional successes at first attempts are rare because the genetic parts are not fully modular. In order to improve the modularity of transcription, we previously showed that transcription termination in vitro by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase could be made more efficient by substituting the standard, single, TΦ large (class I) terminator with adjacent copies of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) small (class II) terminator. However, in vitro termination at the downstream VSV terminator was less efficient than at the upstream VSV terminator, and multigene overexpression in vivo was complicated by unexpectedly inefficient VSV termination within Escherichia coli cells. Here, we address hypotheses raised in that study by showing that VSV or preproparathyroid hormone (PTH) small terminators spaced further apart can work independently (i.e., more efficiently) in vitro, and that VSV and PTH terminations are severely inhibited in vivo. Surprisingly, the difference between class II terminator function in vivo versus in vitro is not due to differences in plasmid supercoiling, as supercoiling had a minimal effect on termination in vitro. We therefore turned to TΦ terminators for "BioBrick" synthesis of a pentameric gene construct suitable for overexpression in vivo. This indeed enabled coordinated overexpression and copurification of five His-tagged proteins using the first construct attempted, indicating that this strategy is more modular than other strategies. An application of this multigene overexpression and protein copurification method is demonstrated by supplying five of the six E. coli translation factors required for reconstitution of translation from a single cell line via copurification, greatly simplifying the reconstitution. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Preparation of a Nanoscaled Poly(vinyl alcohol/Hydroxyapatite/DNA Complex Using High Hydrostatic Pressure Technology for In Vitro and In Vivo Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kimura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous research showed that poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA nanoparticles incorporating DNA with hydrogen bonds obtained by high hydrostatic pressurization are able to deliver DNA without any significant cytotoxicity. To enhance transfection efficiency of PVA/DNA nanoparticles, we describe a novel method to prepare PVA/DNA nanoparticles encapsulating nanoscaled hydroxyapatites (HAps prepared by high hydrostatic pressurization (980 MPa, which is designed to facilitate endosomal escape induced by dissolving HAps in an endosome. Scanning electron microscopic observation and dynamic light scattering measurement revealed that HAps were significantly encapsulated in PVA/HAp/DNA nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, and transgene expression of PVA/HAp/DNA nanoparticles were investigated using COS-7 cells. It was found that, in contrast to PVA/DNA nanoparticles, their internalization and transgene expression increased without cytotoxicity occurring. Furthermore, a similar level of transgene expression between plasmid DNA and PVA/HAp/DNA nanoparticles was achieved using in vivo hydrodynamic injection. Our results show a novel method of preparing PVA/DNA nanoparticles encapsulating HAp nano-crystals by using high hydrostatic pressure technology and the potential use of HAps as an enhancer of the transfection efficiency of PVA/DNA nanoparticles without significant cytotoxicity.

  15. Clonal analysis of the T-cell response to in vivo expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein Rv2034, using a CD154 expression based T-cell cloning method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Commandeur

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, remains a leading cause of death worldwide. A better understanding of the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are both important to TB protection, is essential to unravel the mechanisms of protection and to identify the key antigens seen by these T cells. We have recently identified a set of in vivo expressed Mtb genes (IVE-TB which is expressed during in vivo pulmonary infection in mice, and shown that their encoded antigens are potently recognized by polyclonal T cells from tuberculin skin test-positive, in vitro ESAT-6/CFP10-responsive individuals. Here we have cloned T cells specific for one of these newly identified in vivo expressed Mtb (IVE-TB antigens, Rv2034. T cells were enriched based on the expression of CD154 (CD40L, which represents a new method for selecting antigen-specific (low frequency T cells independent of their specific function. An Rv2034-specific CD4+ T-cell clone expressed the Th1 markers T-bet, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and the cytotoxicity related markers granzyme B and CD107a as measured by flow cytometry. The clone specifically recognized Rv2034 protein, Rv2034 peptide p81-100 and Mtb lysate. Remarkably, while the recognition of the dominant p81-100 epitope was HLA-DR restricted, the T-cell clone also recognized a neighboring epitope (p88-107 in an HLA-DR- as well as HLA-DQ1-restricted fashion. Importantly, the T-cell clone was able to inhibit Mtb outgrowth from infected monocytes significantly. The characterization of the polyfunctional and Mtb inhibitory T-cell response to IVE-TB Rv2034 at the clonal level provides detailed further insights into the potential of IVE-TB antigens as new vaccine candidate antigens in TB. Our new approach allowed the identification of T-cell subsets that likely play a significant role in controlling Mtb infection, and can be applied to the analysis of T-cell responses in patient populations.

  16. Large-scale experimental studies show unexpected amino acid effects on protein expression and solubility in vivo in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The biochemical and physical factors controlling protein expression level and solubility in vivo remain incompletely characterized. To gain insight into the primary sequence features influencing these outcomes, we performed statistical analyses of results from the high-throughput protein-production pipeline of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium. Proteins expressed in E. coli and consistently purified were scored independently for expression and solubility levels. These parameters nonetheless show a very strong positive correlation. We used logistic regressions to determine whether they are systematically influenced by fractional amino acid composition or several bulk sequence parameters including hydrophobicity, sidechain entropy, electrostatic charge, and predicted backbone disorder. Decreasing hydrophobicity correlates with higher expression and solubility levels, but this correlation apparently derives solely from the beneficial effect of three charged amino acids, at least for bacterial proteins. In fact, the three most hydrophobic residues showed very different correlations with solubility level. Leu showed the strongest negative correlation among amino acids, while Ile showed a slightly positive correlation in most data segments. Several other amino acids also had unexpected effects. Notably, Arg correlated with decreased expression and, most surprisingly, solubility of bacterial proteins, an effect only partially attributable to rare codons. However, rare codons did significantly reduce expression despite use of a codon-enhanced strain. Additional analyses suggest that positively but not negatively charged amino acids may reduce translation efficiency in E. coli irrespective of codon usage. While some observed effects may reflect indirect evolutionary correlations, others may reflect basic physicochemical phenomena. We used these results to construct and validate predictors of expression and solubility levels and overall protein usability, and we

  17. Human memory FOXP3+ Tregs secrete IL-17 ex vivo and constitutively express the T(H)17 lineage-specific transcription factor RORgamma t.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyoub, Maha; Deknuydt, Florence; Raimbaud, Isabelle; Dousset, Christelle; Leveque, Lucie; Bioley, Gilles; Valmori, Danila

    2009-05-26

    Recent studies have suggested a close relationship between CD4(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and proinflammatory IL-17-producing T helper cells (T(H)17) expressing the lineage-specific transcription factor RORgamma t. We report here the unexpected finding that human memory Tregs secrete IL-17 ex vivo and constitutively express RORgamma t. IL-17-secreting Tregs share some phenotypic and functional features with conventional T(H)17 cells, expressing high levels of CCR4 and CCR6 and low levels of CXCR3. However, unlike conventional T(H)17 cells, they express low levels of CD161 and mostly fail to cosecrete IL-22 and TNF-alpha ex vivo. Ex vivo secretion of IL-17 and constitutive expression of RORgamma t by human memory Tregs suggest that, in addition to their well-known suppressive functions, these cells likely play additional, as yet undescribed, proinflammatory functions.

  18. Human memory FOXP3+ Tregs secrete IL-17 ex vivo and constitutively express the TH17 lineage-specific transcription factor RORγt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyoub, Maha; Deknuydt, Florence; Raimbaud, Isabelle; Dousset, Christelle; Leveque, Lucie; Bioley, Gilles; Valmori, Danila

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a close relationship between CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and proinflammatory IL-17-producing T helper cells (TH17) expressing the lineage-specific transcription factor RORγt. We report here the unexpected finding that human memory Tregs secrete IL-17 ex vivo and constitutively express RORγt. IL-17-secreting Tregs share some phenotypic and functional features with conventional TH17 cells, expressing high levels of CCR4 and CCR6 and low levels of CXCR3. However, unlike conventional TH17 cells, they express low levels of CD161 and mostly fail to cosecrete IL-22 and TNF-α ex vivo. Ex vivo secretion of IL-17 and constitutive expression of RORγt by human memory Tregs suggest that, in addition to their well-known suppressive functions, these cells likely play additional, as yet undescribed, proinflammatory functions. PMID:19439651

  19. An optical neural interface: in vivo control of rodent motor cortex with integrated fiberoptic and optogenetic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravanis, Alexander M.; Wang, Li-Ping; Zhang, Feng; Meltzer, Leslie A.; Mogri, Murtaza Z.; Schneider, M. Bret; Deisseroth, Karl

    2007-09-01

    Neural interface technology has made enormous strides in recent years but stimulating electrodes remain incapable of reliably targeting specific cell types (e.g. excitatory or inhibitory neurons) within neural tissue. This obstacle has major scientific and clinical implications. For example, there is intense debate among physicians, neuroengineers and neuroscientists regarding the relevant cell types recruited during deep brain stimulation (DBS); moreover, many debilitating side effects of DBS likely result from lack of cell-type specificity. We describe here a novel optical neural interface technology that will allow neuroengineers to optically address specific cell types in vivo with millisecond temporal precision. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), an algal light-activated ion channel we developed for use in mammals, can give rise to safe, light-driven stimulation of CNS neurons on a timescale of milliseconds. Because ChR2 is genetically targetable, specific populations of neurons even sparsely embedded within intact circuitry can be stimulated with high temporal precision. Here we report the first in vivo behavioral demonstration of a functional optical neural interface (ONI) in intact animals, involving integrated fiberoptic and optogenetic technology. We developed a solid-state laser diode system that can be pulsed with millisecond precision, outputs 20 mW of power at 473 nm, and is coupled to a lightweight, flexible multimode optical fiber, ~200 µm in diameter. To capitalize on the unique advantages of this system, we specifically targeted ChR2 to excitatory cells in vivo with the CaMKIIα promoter. Under these conditions, the intensity of light exiting the fiber (~380 mW mm-2) was sufficient to drive excitatory neurons in vivo and control motor cortex function with behavioral output in intact rodents. No exogenous chemical cofactor was needed at any point, a crucial finding for in vivo work in large mammals. Achieving modulation of behavior with optical control of

  20. In Vivo EPR Resolution Enhancement Using Techniques Known from Quantum Computing Spin Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Robabeh; Halpern, Howard J; Takui, Takeji

    2017-01-01

    A crucial issue with in vivo biological/medical EPR is its low signal-to-noise ratio, giving rise to the low spectroscopic resolution. We propose quantum hyperpolarization techniques based on 'Heat Bath Algorithmic Cooling', allowing possible approaches for improving the resolution in magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging.

  1. Changes in cytochrome P450 gene expression and enzyme activity induced by xenobiotics in rabbits in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Palócz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As considerable inter-species differences exist in xenobiotic metabolism, developing new pharmaceutical therapies for use in different species is fraught with difficulties. For this reason, very few medicines have been registered for use in rabbits, despite their importance in inter alia meat and fur production. We have developed a rapid and sensitive screening system for drug safety in rabbits based on cytochrome P450 enzyme assays, specifically CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP3A6, employing an adaptation of the luciferin-based clinical assay currently used in human drug screening. Short-term (4-h cultured rabbit primary hepatocytes were treated with a cytochrome inducer (phenobarbital and 2 inhibitors (alpha-naphthoflavone and ketoconazole. In parallel, and to provide verification, New Zealand white rabbits were dosed with 80 mg/kg phenobarbital or 40 mg/kg ketoconazole for 3 d. Ketoconazole significantly increased CYP3A6 gene expression and decreased CYP3A6 activity both in vitro and in vivo. CYP1A1 activity was decreased by ketoconazole in vitro and increased in vivo. This is the first report of the inducer effect of ketoconazole on rabbit cytochrome isoenzymes in vivo. Our data support the use of a luciferin-based assay in short-term primary hepatocytes as an appropriate tool for xenobiotic metabolism assays and short-term toxicity testing in rabbits.

  2. In Vivo siRNA Delivery Using JC Virus-like Particles Decreases the Expression of RANKL in Rats

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    Daniel B Hoffmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone remodeling requires a precise balance between formation and resorption. This complex process involves numerous factors that orchestrate a multitude of biochemical events. Among these factors are hormones, growth factors, vitamins, cytokines, and, most notably, osteoprotegerin (OPG and the receptor activator for nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL. Inflammatory cytokines play a major role in shifting the RANKL/OPG balance toward excessive RANKL, resulting in osteoclastogenesis, which in turn initiates bone resorption, which is frequently associated with osteoporosis. Rebalancing RANKL/OPG levels may be achieved through either upregulation of OPG or through transient silencing of RANKL by means of RNA interference. Here, we describe the utilization of a viral capsid-based delivery system for in vivo and in vitro RNAi using synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA molecules in rat osteoblasts. Polyoma JC virus-derived virus-like particles are capable of delivering siRNAs to target RANKL in osteoblast cells both in vitro and in a rat in vivo system. Expression levels were monitored using quantitative real-time polymerase reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after single and repeated injections over a 14-day period. Our data indicate that this is an efficient and safe route for in vivo delivery of gene modulatory tools to study important molecular factors in a rat osteoporosis model.

  3. Over-expression of Adenine Nucleotide Translocase 1 (ANT1 Induces Apoptosis and Tumor Regression in vivo

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    Kim Chul-Woo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane and catalyzes the exchange of mitochondrial ATP for cytosolic ADP. ANT has been known to be a major component of the permeability transition pore complex of mitochondria and contributes to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Human ANT has four isoforms (ANT1, ANT2, ANT3, and ANT4, and the expression of the ANT isoforms is variable depending on the tissue and cell type, developmental stage, and proliferation status. Among the isoforms, ANT1 is highly expressed in terminally-differentiated tissues, but expressed in low levels in proliferating cells, such as cancer cells. In particular, over-expression of ANT1 induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. Methods We applied an ANT1 gene transfer approach to induce apoptosis and to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of ANT1 in a nude mouse model. Results We demonstrated that ANT1 transfection induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells, inactivated NF-κB activity, and increased Bax expression. ANT1-inducing apoptosis was accompanied by the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and the activation of caspases-9 and -3. Moreover, ANT1 transfection significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Conclusion Our results suggest that ANT1 transfection may be a useful therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer.

  4. Effects of specific and prolonged expression of zebrafish growth factors, Fgf2 and Lif in primordial germ cells in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Ten-Tsao, E-mail: wong20@purdue.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, 901 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Collodi, Paul [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, 901 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discovered that nanos3 3 Prime UTR prolonged PGC-specific protein expression up to 26 days. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Fgf2 in PGCs significantly increased PGC number at later developmental stages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Lif in PGCs resulted in a significant disruption of PGC migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lif illicited its effect on PGC migration through Lif receptor a. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our approach could be used to achieve prolonged PGC-specific expression of other proteins. -- Abstract: Primordial germ cells (PGCs), specified early in development, proliferate and migrate to the developing gonad before sexual differentiation occurs in the embryo and eventually give rise to spermatogonia or oogonia. In this study, we discovered that nanos3 3 Prime UTR, a common method used to label PGCs, not only directed PGC-specific expression of DsRed but also prolonged this expression up to 26 days post fertilization (dpf) when DsRed-nanos3 3 Prime UTR hybrid mRNAs were introduced into 1- to 2-cell-stage embryos. As such, we employed this knowledge to express zebrafish leukemia inhibitory factor (Lif), basic fibroblast growth factor (Fgf2) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) in the PGCs and evaluate their effects on PGC development in vivo for over a period of 3 weeks. The results show that expression of Fgf2 significantly increased PGC number at 14- and 21-dpf while Bmp4 resulted in severe ventralization and death of the embryos by 3 days. Expression of Lif resulted in a significant disruption of PGC migration. Mopholino knockdown experiments indicated that Lif illicited its effect on PGC migration through Lif receptor a (Lifra) but not Lifrb. The general approach described in this study could be used to achieve prolonged PGC-specific expression of other proteins to investigate their roles in germ cell and gonad development. The results also indicate that zebrafish PGCs

  5. Spatio-Temporal Gene Expression Profiling during In Vivo Early Ovarian Folliculogenesis: Integrated Transcriptomic Study and Molecular Signature of Early Follicular Growth.

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    Agnes Bonnet

    Full Text Available The successful achievement of early ovarian folliculogenesis is important for fertility and reproductive life span. This complex biological process requires the appropriate expression of numerous genes at each developmental stage, in each follicular compartment. Relatively little is known at present about the molecular mechanisms that drive this process, and most gene expression studies have been performed in rodents and without considering the different follicular compartments.We used RNA-seq technology to explore the sheep transcriptome during early ovarian follicular development in the two main compartments: oocytes and granulosa cells. We documented the differential expression of 3,015 genes during this phase and described the gene expression dynamic specific to these compartments. We showed that important steps occurred during primary/secondary transition in sheep. We also described the in vivo molecular course of a number of pathways. In oocytes, these pathways documented the chronology of the acquisition of meiotic competence, migration and cellular organization, while in granulosa cells they concerned adhesion, the formation of cytoplasmic projections and steroid synthesis. This study proposes the involvement in this process of several members of the integrin and BMP families. The expression of genes such as Kruppel-like factor 9 (KLF9 and BMP binding endothelial regulator (BMPER was highlighted for the first time during early follicular development, and their proteins were also predicted to be involved in gene regulation. Finally, we selected a data set of 24 biomarkers that enabled the discrimination of early follicular stages and thus offer a molecular signature of early follicular growth. This set of biomarkers includes known genes such as SPO11 meiotic protein covalently bound to DSB (SPO11, bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15 and WEE1 homolog 2 (S. pombe(WEE2 which play critical roles in follicular development but other biomarkers

  6. Interferon-alpha restores HIV-induced alteration of natural killer cell perforin expression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portales, Pierre; Reynes, Jacques; Pinet, Valérie; Rouzier-Panis, Régine; Baillat, Vincent; Clot, Jacques; Corbeau, Pierre

    2003-03-07

    The percentage and the activity of natural killer (NK) cells are known to be decreased in HIV-infected patients. However, the mechanisms responsible for this NK deficiency are poorly understood. Because of the role of NK cells in the host defence against microbial infections, this defect contributes to the virus-induced immune deficiency. The aim of the present study was to better understand this defect in order to be able to restore NK function in HIV infection. The expression of the cytolytic mediators perforin and granzyme A was analysed by flow cytometry, the lytic activity of peripheral blood NK cells of HIV-infected patients was analysed by cytotoxic assay, and the expression of perforin was followed during administration of interferon (IFN)alpha attached to polyethylene glycol (PEG)-IFNalpha. The lytic activity and the expression of perforin and granzyme A was low in NK cells of infected individuals in comparison with normal control volunteers. In both groups NK cytotoxic capacity was linked to perforin expression. The low perforin expression in HIV-infected subjects negatively correlated with HIV RNA plasma level. administration of PEG-IFNalpha restored perforin expression even in patients whose viral load was not reduced by this treatment. These results suggest that HIV-induced NK deficiency could be partly mediated by a defect in perforin and granzyme A expression, and that PEG-IFNalpha could be used in infected subjects to directly improve their natural immunity in addition to eventually reducing their viraemia.

  7. Concomitant expression of several peptide receptors in neuroendocrine tumours: molecular basis for in vivo multireceptor tumour targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Waser, Beatrice

    2003-05-01

    Peptide receptors have been found to represent excellent targets for in vivo cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent in vitro studies have shown that many cancers can overexpress not only one but several peptide receptors concomitantly. One of the challenges for nuclear medicine in this field in the coming decade will be to take advantage of the co-expression of peptide receptors for multireceptor tumour targeting. In vitro receptor studies can reveal which peptide receptor is overexpressed in which tumour and which receptors are co-expressed in an individual tumour; such knowledge is a prerequisite for successful in vivo development. One group of tumours of particular interest in this respect is the neuroendocrine tumours, which have previously been shown often to express peptide receptors. This review summarises our investigations of the concomitant expression of 13 different peptide receptors, in more than 100 neuroendocrine tumours of the human intestine, pancreas and lung, using in vitro receptor autoradiography with subtype-selective ligands. The incidence and density of the somatostatin receptors sst(1)-sst(5), the VIP receptors VPAC(1) and VPAC(2), the CCK(1) and CCK(2) receptors, the three bombesin receptor subtypes BB(1) (NMB receptor), BB(2) (GRP receptor) and BB(3), and GLP-1 receptors were evaluated. While the presence of VPAC(1) and sst(2) was detected in the majority of these neuroendocrine tumours, the other receptors, more differentially expressed, revealed a characteristic receptor pattern in several tumour types. Ileal carcinoids expressed sst(2) and VPAC(1) receptors in virtually all cases and had CCK(1), CCK(2), sst(1) or sst(5) in approximately half of the cases; they were the only tumours of this series to express NMB receptors. Insulinomas were characterised by a very high incidence of GLP-1, CCK(2) and VPAC(1) receptors, with the GLP-1 receptors expressed in a particularly high density; they expressed sst(2) in two-thirds and sst(1) in

  8. Concomitant expression of several peptide receptors in neuroendocrine tumours: molecular basis for in vivo multireceptor tumour targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Waser, Beatrice [Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, University of Berne, Murtenstrasse 31, PO Box 62, 3010, Berne (Switzerland)

    2003-05-01

    Peptide receptors have been found to represent excellent targets for in vivo cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent in vitro studies have shown that many cancers can overexpress not only one but several peptide receptors concomitantly. One of the challenges for nuclear medicine in this field in the coming decade will be to take advantage of the co-expression of peptide receptors for multireceptor tumour targeting. In vitro receptor studies can reveal which peptide receptor is overexpressed in which tumour and which receptors are co-expressed in an individual tumour; such knowledge is a prerequisite for successful in vivo development. One group of tumours of particular interest in this respect is the neuroendocrine tumours, which have previously been shown often to express peptide receptors. This review summarises our investigations of the concomitant expression of 13 different peptide receptors, in more than 100 neuroendocrine tumours of the human intestine, pancreas and lung, using in vitro receptor autoradiography with subtype-selective ligands. The incidence and density of the somatostatin receptors sst{sub 1}-sst{sub 5}, the VIP receptors VPAC{sub 1} and VPAC{sub 2}, the CCK{sub 1} and CCK{sub 2} receptors, the three bombesin receptor subtypes BB{sub 1} (NMB receptor), BB{sub 2} (GRP receptor) and BB{sub 3}, and GLP-1 receptors were evaluated. While the presence of VPAC{sub 1} and sst{sub 2} was detected in the majority of these neuroendocrine tumours, the other receptors, more differentially expressed, revealed a characteristic receptor pattern in several tumour types. Ileal carcinoids expressed sst{sub 2} and VPAC{sub 1} receptors in virtually all cases and had CCK{sub 1}, CCK{sub 2}, sst{sub 1} or sst{sub 5} in approximately half of the cases; they were the only tumours of this series to express NMB receptors. Insulinomas were characterised by a very high incidence of GLP-1, CCK{sub 2} and VPAC{sub 1} receptors, with the GLP-1 receptors expressed in a

  9. Granzyme A Is Expressed in Mouse Lungs during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection but Does Not Contribute to Protection In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Martin, Carlos; Pardo, Julián; Aguilo, Nacho

    2016-01-01

    Granzyme A, a serine protease expressed in the granules of cytotoxic T and Natural Killer cells, is involved in the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages. Granzyme A has been described to induce in macrophages in vitro the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways that impair intracellular mycobacterial replication. In the present study, we explored the physiological relevance of Granzyme A in the control of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in vivo. Our results show that, even though Granzyme A is expressed by cytotoxic cells from mouse lungs during pulmonary infection, its deficiency in knockout mice does not have an effect in the control of M. tuberculosis infection. In addition our findings indicate that absence of Granzyme A does not affect the protection conferred by the live-attenuated M. tuberculosis vaccine MTBVAC. Altogether, our findings are in apparent contradiction with previously published in vitro results and suggest that Granzyme A does not have a crucial role in vivo in the protective response to tuberculosis. PMID:27055232

  10. Granzyme A Is Expressed in Mouse Lungs during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection but Does Not Contribute to Protection In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Martin, Carlos; Pardo, Julián; Aguilo, Nacho

    2016-01-01

    Granzyme A, a serine protease expressed in the granules of cytotoxic T and Natural Killer cells, is involved in the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages. Granzyme A has been described to induce in macrophages in vitro the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways that impair intracellular mycobacterial replication. In the present study, we explored the physiological relevance of Granzyme A in the control of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in vivo. Our results show that, even though Granzyme A is expressed by cytotoxic cells from mouse lungs during pulmonary infection, its deficiency in knockout mice does not have an effect in the control of M. tuberculosis infection. In addition our findings indicate that absence of Granzyme A does not affect the protection conferred by the live-attenuated M. tuberculosis vaccine MTBVAC. Altogether, our findings are in apparent contradiction with previously published in vitro results and suggest that Granzyme A does not have a crucial role in vivo in the protective response to tuberculosis.

  11. Improved in Vivo Whole-Animal Detection Limits of Green Fluorescent Protein–Expressing Tumor Lines by Spectral Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny M. Tam

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Green fluorescent protein (GFP has been used for cell tracking and imaging gene expression in superficial or surgically exposed structures. However, in vivo murine imaging is often limited by several factors, including scatter and attenuation with depth and overlapping autofluorescence. The autofluorescence signals have spectral profiles that are markedly different from the GFP emission spectral profile. The use of spectral imaging allows separation and quantitation of these contributions to the total fluorescence signal seen in vivo by weighting known pure component profiles. Separation of relative GFP and autofluorescence signals is not readily possible using epifluorescent continuous-wave single excitation and emission bandpass imaging (EFI. To evaluate detection thresholds using these two methods, nude mice were subcutaneously injected with a series of GFP-expressing cells. For EFI, optimized excitation and emission bandpass filters were used. Owing to the ability to separate autofluorescence contributions from the emission signal using spectral imaging compared with the mixed contributions of GFP and autofluorescence in the emission signal recorded by the EFI system, we achieved a 300-fold improvement in the cellular detection limit. The detection limit was 3 × 103 cells for spectral imaging versus 1 × 106 cells for EFI. Despite contributions to image stacks from autofluorescence, a 100-fold dynamic range of cell number in the same image was readily visualized. Finally, spectral imaging was able to separate signal interference of red fluorescent protein from GFP images and vice versa. These findings demonstrate the utility of the approach in detecting low levels of multiple fluorescent markers for whole-animal in vivo applications.

  12. In vivo imaging and quantification of carbonic anhydrase IX expression as an endogenous biomarker of tumor hypoxia.

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    Bagna Bao

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX is a transmembrane protein that has been shown to be greatly upregulated under conditions of hypoxia in many tumor cell lines. Tumor hypoxia is associated with impaired efficacy of cancer therapies making CA IX a valuable target for preclinical and diagnostic imaging. We have developed a quantitative in vivo optical imaging method for detection of CA IX as a marker of tumor hypoxia based on a near-infrared (NIR fluorescent derivative of the CA IX inhibitor acetazolamide (AZ. The agent (HS680 showed single digit nanomolar inhibition of CA IX as well as selectivity over other CA isoforms and demonstrated up to 25-fold upregulation of fluorescent CA IX signal in hypoxic versus normoxic cells, which could be blocked by 60%-70% with unlabeled AZ. CA IX negative cell lines (HCT-116 and MDA-MB-231, as well as a non-binding control agent on CA IX positive cells, showed low fluorescent signal under both conditions. In vivo FMT imaging showed tumor accumulation and excellent tumor definition from 6-24 hours. In vivo selectivity was confirmed by pretreatment of the mice with unlabeled AZ resulting in >65% signal inhibition. HS680 tumor signal was further upregulated >2X in tumors by maintaining tumor-bearing mice in a low oxygen (8% atmosphere. Importantly, intravenously injected HS680 signal was co-localized specifically with both CA IX antibody and pimonidazole (Pimo, and was located away from non-hypoxic regions indicated by a Hoechst stain. Thus, we have established a spatial correlation of fluorescence signal obtained by non-invasive, tomographic imaging of HS680 with regions of hypoxia and CA IX expression. These results illustrate the potential of HS680 and combined with FMT imaging to non-invasively quantify CA IX expression as a hypoxia biomarker, crucial to the study of the underlying biology of hypoxic tumors and the development and monitoring of novel anti-cancer therapies.

  13. PPARδ activation induces hepatic long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 expression in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Dong, Bin; Shende, Vikram Ravindra; Liu, Jingwen

    2017-01-01

    The arachidonic acid preferred long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) is a key enzyme for fatty acid metabolism in various metabolic tissues. In this study, we utilized hamsters fed a normal chow diet, a high-fat diet or a high cholesterol and high fat diet (HCHFD) as animal models to explore novel transcriptional regulatory mechanisms for ACSL4 expression under hyperlipidemic conditions. Through cloning hamster ACSL4 homolog and tissue profiling ACSL4 mRNA and protein expressions we observed a selective upregulation of ACSL4 in testis and liver of HCHFD fed animals. Examination of transcriptional activators of the ACSL family revealed an increased hepatic expression of PPARδ but not PPARα in HCHFD fed hamsters. To explore a role of PPARδ in dietary cholesterol-mediated upregulation of ACSL4, we administered a PPARδ specific agonist L165041 to normolipidemic and dyslipidemic hamsters. We observed significant increases of hepatic ACSL4 mRNA and protein levels in all L165041-treated hamsters as compared to control animals. The induction of ACSL4 expression by L165041 in liver tissue in vivo was recapitulated in human primary hepatocytes and hepatocytes isolated from hamster and mouse. Moreover, employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we showed that depletion of PPARδ in hamster hepatocytes specifically reduced ACSL4 expression. Finally, utilizing HepG2 as a model system, we demonstrate that PPARδ activation leads to increased ACSL4 promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression, and consequently higher arachidonoyl-CoA synthetase activity. Taken together, we have discovered a novel PPARδ-mediated regulatory mechanism for ACSL4 expression in liver tissue and cultured hepatic cells. PMID:25645621

  14. Differential expression of the mammalian homologue of fasciclin II during olfactory development in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, John A; Fang, Hengsheng; Schwob, James E

    2004-06-28

    Developing olfactory sensory neurons are guided to the glomeruli of the olfactory bulb by an increasingly stringent process that is influenced by expression of odorant receptors, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and other kinds of signaling cascades. A fundamental feature of the projection is the connecting of broad zones in the epithelium to broad zones in the bulb, also termed rhinotopy. One molecule that parallels and may aid neurons in establishing rhinotopy is the mammalian homologue of fasciclin II (OCAM/mamFas II; also known as RNCAM and NCAM-2), an immunoglobulin superfamily CAM that is differentially expressed in the developing and mature olfactory epithelium (OE): Axons elaborated by ventral and lateral epithelium express the protein at high levels, whereas dorsomedial axons express little or no OCAM/mamFas II. Our investigation has demonstrated that OCAM/mamFas II is detectable early in the development of the rat OE. mRNA is evident on RT-PCR and in situ hybridization by E12.5, and protein is apparent by immunohistochemistry by E13.5. By using a tissue culture system that separates ventral septal epithelium (OCAM/mamFas II-positive) from dorsal (OCAM/mamFas II-negative), we find that explants maintain protein expression levels in vitro that are characteristic of the phenotype at the original location in vivo. At least some neurons are born in culture, suggesting that any cues that direct differential expression are also maintained in vitro. Finally, high OCAM/mamFas II expression correlates with increased growth and fasciculation of olfactory axons in vitro. These data and the similarity between OCAM/mamFas II, on the one hand, and fasciclin II and NCAM, on the other, suggest that OCAM/mamFas II might play a role in growth and fasciculation of primary olfactory axons during development of the projection. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters expression of neurogenesis-related genes in an ex vivo cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Christina R; Allan, Andrea M

    2014-08-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can lead to long-lasting changes in functional and genetic programs of the brain, which may underlie behavioral alterations seen in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Aberrant fetal programming during gestational alcohol exposure is a possible mechanism by which alcohol imparts teratogenic effects on the brain; however, current methods used to investigate the effects of alcohol on development often rely on either direct application of alcohol in vitro or acute high doses in vivo. In this study, we used our established moderate prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) model, resulting in maternal blood alcohol content of approximately 20 mM, and subsequent ex vivo cell culture to assess expression of genes related to neurogenesis. Proliferating and differentiating neural progenitor cell culture conditions were established from telencephalic tissue derived from embryonic day (E) 15-17 tissue exposed to alcohol via maternal drinking throughout pregnancy. Gene expression analysis on mRNA derived in vitro was performed using a microarray, and quantitative PCR was conducted for genes to validate the microarray. Student's t tests were performed for statistical comparison of each exposure under each culture condition using a 95% confidence interval. Eleven percent of genes on the array had significantly altered mRNA expression in the prenatal alcohol-exposed neural progenitor culture under proliferating conditions. These include reduced expression of Adora2a, Cxcl1, Dlg4, Hes1, Nptx1, and Vegfa and increased expression of Fgf13, Ndn, and Sox3; bioinformatics analysis indicated that these genes are involved in cell growth and proliferation. Decreased levels of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a were also found under proliferating conditions. Under differentiating conditions, 7.3% of genes had decreased mRNA expression; these include Cdk5rap3, Gdnf, Hey2, Heyl, Pard6b, and Ptn, which are associated with survival and differentiation as indicated by bioinformatics analysis

  16. Helicobacter pylori promotes the expression of Kruppel-like factor 5, a mediator of carcinogenesis, in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Noto

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is the strongest known risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori expresses a repertoire of virulence factors that increase gastric cancer risk, including the cag pathogenicity island and the vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA. One host element that promotes carcinogenesis within the gastrointestinal tract is Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5, a transcription factor that mediates key cellular functions. To define the role of KLF5 within the context of H. pylori-induced inflammation and injury, human gastric epithelial cells were co-cultured with the wild-type cag(+ H. pylori strain 60190. KLF5 expression was significantly upregulated following co-culture with H. pylori, but increased expression was independent of the cag island or VacA. To translate these findings into an in vivo model, C57BL/6 mice were challenged with the wild-type rodent-adapted cag(+ H. pylori strain PMSS1 or a PMSS1 cagE(- isogenic mutant. Similar to findings in vitro, KLF5 staining was significantly enhanced in gastric epithelium of H. pylori-infected compared to uninfected mice and this was independent of the cag island. Flow cytometry revealed that the majority of KLF5(+ cells also stained positively for the stem cell marker, Lrig1, and KLF5(+/Lrig1(+ cells were significantly increased in H. pylori-infected versus uninfected tissue. To extend these results into the natural niche of this pathogen, levels of KLF5 expression were assessed in human gastric biopsies isolated from patients with or without premalignant lesions. Levels of KLF5 expression increased in parallel with advancing stages of neoplastic progression, being significantly elevated in gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia compared to normal gastric tissue. These results indicate that H. pylori induces expression of KLF5 in gastric epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo, and that the degree of KLF5 expression parallels the severity of premalignant lesions in human

  17. [lambda] Phage Nanobioparticle Expressing Apoptin Efficiently Suppress Human Breast Carcinoma Tumor Growth In Vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Keyhanvar, Peyman; Seifalian, Alexander; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed; Ghaderi, Narmin; Issazadeh, Khosro; Amirmozafari, Nour; Verdi, Javad

    2013-01-01

      Using phages is a novel field of cancer therapy and phage nanobioparticles (NBPs) such as λ phage could be modified to deliver and express genetic cassettes into eukaryotic cells safely in contrast with animal viruses...

  18. λ Phage nanobioparticle expressing apoptin efficiently suppress human breast carcinoma tumor growth in vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Keyhanvar, Peyman; Seifalian, Alexander Marcus; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Ghaderi, Narmin; Issazadeh, Khosro; Amirmozafari, Nour; Verdi, Javad

    2013-01-01

    Using phages is a novel field of cancer therapy and phage nanobioparticles (NBPs) such as λ phage could be modified to deliver and express genetic cassettes into eukaryotic cells safely in contrast with animal viruses...

  19. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the bioactivity of hydroxyapatite-coated polyetheretherketone biocomposites created by cold spray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Jang, Hae Lin; Lee, Kyung Mee; Baek, Hae-Ri; Jin, Kyoungsuk; Hong, Kug Sun; Noh, Jun Hong; Lee, Hyun-Kyung

    2013-04-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a material that is widely used in medicine because its mechanical properties show excellent similarity to those of human bone. However, because it is bioinert, PEEK shows limited ability to bind to natural bone tissue. Here, we applied a cold spray method to make a hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated PEEK hybrid material and evaluated its osteointegration in vitro and in vivo. With the cold spray method, the HA coating formed a homogeneous layer and adhered strongly to the PEEK disk implant. When the material was tested in vitro, early cell adhesion and viability improved. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium concentration were also higher in cells cultured on HA-coated PEEK disks. In addition, the expression of osteoblast differentiation markers, such as ALP, bone sialoprotein and runt-related transcription factor 2, increased in these cells. For the in vivo test, we designed and implanted HA-coated PEEK cylinders into a rabbit ilium model by the press-fit method. The bone-implant contact ratio, trabecular number and trabecular thickness were determined using either three-dimensional microcomputed tomography or general two-dimensional histomorphometric analysis. This report demonstrates that the HA coating on the PEEK implant added with the cold spray method increased biocompatibility in vitro and promoted osteointegration in vivo, which suggests that the HA coating may improve the biofunctionality of various medical devices used in clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. High and low-virulent bovine Pasteurella multocida capsular type A isolates exhibit different virulence gene expression patterns in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nengzhang; Long, Qingshan; Du, Huihui; Zhang, Jixin; Pan, Tingting; Wu, Chenlu; Lei, Guihua; Peng, Yuanyi; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2016-11-30

    Pasteurella multocida capsular type A causes respiratory disease in cattle. P. multocida virulence gene expression patterns, especially among different virulent isolates, during in vitro and in vivo growth are poorly understood. Here we show that the highly virulent bovine P. multocida capsular type A isolate PmCQ2 exhibits a significantly higher growth rate in mice, as compared with a strain of lower virulence, P. multocida capsular type A isolate PmCQ6. Among the six known and potential virulence genes (ompA, ompH, pfhB2, hasR, pm0979, and pm0442) investigated, most genes were expressed more highly in both isolates when grown in vivo as compared with in vitro, with ompH and pm0442 having the highest magnitude of expression. Virulence gene expression was higher in PmCQ6 than in PmCQ2 during in vitro growth. However, in mice, most virulence genes were expressed more highly in PmCQ2 as compared with PmCQ6. Virulence gene expression was highest in the liver and lowest in the lung, but was uncorrelated to bacterial loads. This study indicates that individual pathogenic capacity of P. multocida isolates is associated with the virulence gene expression patterns in vivo growth but not in vitro, and the investigation of virulence gene expression in pathogen should be performed in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative study of skin autofluorescence expression in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis: A prospective in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, J H; Jeong, K H; Shin, M K

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis requires their differentiation from other eczematoid dermatitis and a determination of disease severity. However, both can be clinically difficult and the findings subjectively interpreted. We investigated the utility of in vivo autofluorescence (AF) measurements for diagnosis of both diseases, and determination of severity. Thirty patients with AD and 30 with psoriasis were recruited, together with sex- and age-matched patients with healthy skin. AF intensity was measured using the EcoSkin® fluorescence video dermatoscope. In AD and psoriasis patients, AF in non-sun-exposed lesional and non-lesional skin was measured. To identify the locations that reflect characteristics of AD, AF was also measured at the other sites in the patients with AD. AD was associated with lower AF and psoriasis with higher AF intensity peaking around 620 nm. In addition, skin AF intensity of each disease was associated with severity of lesion. Non-invasive measurement of skin AF in vivo can aid in diagnosis of AD and psoriasis as well as in treatment monitoring. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning ameliorates hypoxia-ischemia brain damage by activating Nrf2 expression in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiao; Lin, Han; Chen, Yu; Chen, Xiao; Shi, Jiazi; Chen, Ouyang; Li, Jiasi; Sun, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning (HBO-PC) could ameliorate hypoxia-ischemia brain damage (HIBD) by an increase of Nrf2 expression. P7 Sprague-Dawley rats (aged 7 d, n = 195) were used in two in vivo experiments, including BO-PC exposure experiments in non-HIBD models and treatment experiments in HIBD models. 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, Nissl Staining, and TUNEL staining were performed. And expressions of Nrf2, HO-1, and GSTs were measured. For in vitro studies, oxygen-glucose deprivation cells were established. Morphological and apoptotic staining and gene silencing of Nrf2 by siRNA transfection were investigated. For exposure experiments, HBO-PC for longer time increased the expression of Nrf2 significantly. And for treatment experiments, HBO-PC treatment significantly decreased infarction area, lessened neuronal injury, reduced apoptosis, and increased both the expression of Nrf2 and activities of its downstream proteins. Cytology tests confirmed effects of HBO-PC treatments. Besides, Nrf2 siRNA significantly reduced protective effects of HBO-PC. These observations demonstrated that an up-regulation of Nrf2 by HBO-PC might play an important role in the generation of tolerance against HIBD.

  3. Losartan Inhibits Vascular Calcification by Suppressing the BMP2 and Runx2 Expression in Rats In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mincai; Wu, Panfeng; Shao, Juan; Ke, Zhiqiang; Li, Dan; Wu, Jiliang

    2016-04-01

    The blockade of renin-angiotensin II system has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Since vascular calcification (VC) is commonly found in these diseases, the aim of this study was to examine whether or not losartan, a widely used angiotensin II receptor blockers, inhibits VC in rats in vivo. A rat model of VC was generated by treating rats with a combination of warfarin and vitamin K1. Two weeks after the treatments, the rats were treated with vehicle or without losartan (100 ng/kg/day) for 2 weeks. At the end of the experiments, aortic arteries were isolated for the examination of calcification morphology, mRNA and protein expression of BMP2 and Runx2, and osteoblast differentiation. Warfarin and vitamin K instigated vascular remodeling with calcified plaques in the aortic arteries in rats. Losartan significantly attenuated warfarin- and vitamin K-induced vascular injury and calcification. Consistently, losartan suppressed the levels of mRNA and protein expression of BMP2 and Runx2, two key factors for VC. Further, vascular calcified lesion areas expressed angiotensin II 1 receptor (AT1R). Finally, losartan treatment significantly inhibited apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) in rat arteries. We conclude that losartan suppresses VC by lowering the expression of AT1R, Runx2 and BMP2, and by inhibiting the apoptosis of VSMC in rat aortic arteries.

  4. Human breast cancer cell lines co-express neuronal, epithelial, and melanocytic differentiation markers in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingbei Zhang

    Full Text Available Differentiation programs are aberrant in cancer cells allowing them to express differentiation markers in addition to their tissue of origin. In the present study, we demonstrate the multi-lineage differentiation potential of breast cancer cell lines to express multiple neuronal/glial lineage-specific markers as well as mammary epithelial and melanocytic-specific markers. Multilineage expression was detected in luminal (MCF-7 and SKBR3 and basal (MDA-MB-231 types of human breast cancer cell lines. We also observed comparable co-expression of these three cell lineage markers in MDA-MB-435 cells in vitro, in MDA-MB-435 primary tumors derived from parental and single cell clones and in lung metastases in vivo. Furthermore, ectoderm multi-lineage transdifferentiation was also found in human melanoma (Ul-MeL and glioblastoma cell lines (U87 and D54. These observations indicate that aberrant multi-lineage transdifferentiation or lineage infidelity may be a wide spread phenomenon in cancer.

  5. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors Induce Tumor Cell Apoptosis In Vivo Primarily by Inhibiting VEGF Expression and Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Frost

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We found that rapalog mTOR inhibitors induce G1 arrest in the PTEN-null HS Sultan B-cell lymphoma line in vitro, but that administration of rapalogs in a HS Sultan xenograft model resulted in significant apoptosis, and that this correlated with induction of hypoxia and inhibition of neoangiogenesis and VEGF expression. Mechanistically, rapalogs prevent cap-dependent translation, but studies have shown that cap-independent, internal ribosome entry site (IRES-mediated translation of genes, such as c-myc and cyclin D, can provide a fail-safe mechanism that regulates tumor survival. Therefore, we tested if IRES-dependent expression of VEGF could likewise regulate sensitivity of tumor cells in vivo. To achieve this, we developed isogenic HS Sultan cell lines that ectopically express the VEGF ORF fused to the p27 IRES, an IRES sequence that is insensitive to AKT-mediated inhibition of IRES activity and effective in PTEN-null tumors. Mice challenged with p27-VEGF transfected tumor cells were more resistant to the antiangiogenic and apoptotic effects of the rapalog, temsirolimus, and active site mTOR inhibitor, pp242. Our results confirm the critical role of VEGF expression in tumors during treatment with mTOR inhibitors and underscore the importance of IRES activity as a resistance mechanism to such targeted therapy.

  6. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhin Kumar Guha

    Full Text Available In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495 within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA small ribosomal subunit (rns gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF encoded within a group I intron (mS1247. This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase. Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 intron or a group IIB type intron. This study showed that the expression of the HEase (in vivo in Escherichia coli can be regulated by manipulating the splicing efficiency of the HEase ORF-embedded group II introns. Exogenous magnesium chloride (MgCl2 stimulated the expression of a functional HEase but the addition of cobalt chloride (CoCl2 to growth media antagonized the expression of HEase activity. Ultimately the ability to attenuate HEase activity might be useful in precision genome engineering, minimizing off target activities, or where pathways have to be altered during a specific growth phase.

  7. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Tuhin Kumar; Hausner, Georg

    2016-01-01

    In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495) within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) small ribosomal subunit (rns) gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF) encoded within a group I intron (mS1247). This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase). Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 intron or a group IIB type intron. This study showed that the expression of the HEase (in vivo) in Escherichia coli can be regulated by manipulating the splicing efficiency of the HEase ORF-embedded group II introns. Exogenous magnesium chloride (MgCl2) stimulated the expression of a functional HEase but the addition of cobalt chloride (CoCl2) to growth media antagonized the expression of HEase activity. Ultimately the ability to attenuate HEase activity might be useful in precision genome engineering, minimizing off target activities, or where pathways have to be altered during a specific growth phase. PMID:26909494

  8. Nuclear expression of p27(Kip1) is associated with in vivo differentiation of adult human odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinz, Franz-Josef; Korkmaz, Yüksel; Cho, Britta; Raab, Wolfgang H M; Addicks, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    Odontoblasts are terminally differentiated cells of ectomesenchymal origin that produce the dentin. Differentiated odontoblasts cannot be identified yet by a single phenotypic marker protein; therefore, a combination of markers is currently used. Up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1) has been associated with exit from the cell cycle and terminal differentiation of mammalian cells. Immunoreactivity for p27(Kip1) protein was shown in many adult mouse tissues, but no information is available on the expression of p27(Kip1) in mammalian dental pulp. Healthy and carious adult human molars with reparative dentin formation were decalcified, cryoprotected, frozen embedded, and frozen sectioned. The expression of p27(Kip1) and nestin in cells of adult human dental pulp was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using free floating sections. p27(Kip1) showed strong nuclear expression in many differentiated human molar odontoblasts at the odontoblastic layer. Most cells of the cell-rich zone displayed low levels of p27(Kip1) despite the fact that preodontoblasts localized in the cell-rich zone of the subodontoblastic layer have been identified as quiescent cells. The nuclear expression of p27(Kip1) in stromal cells of the dental pulp was variable, indicating that subpopulations of these cells were in distinct states of differentiation. Odontoblasts generating reparative dentin showed comparable nuclear expression of p27(Kip1) in comparison with odontoblasts synthesizing primary/secondary dentin. This result indicates that odontoblasts synthesizing primary/secondary or reparative dentin exhibit a similar differentiation status. Our findings show that increased expression of nuclear p27(Kip1) occurred during differentiation from preodontoblasts to odontoblasts in adult healthy and carious molars. p27(Kip1) can be used as a novel nuclear marker protein for differentiated human odontoblasts in vivo. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists

  9. Evaluation of imaging technologies to correct for photon attenuation in the overlying tissue for in vivo bone strontium measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heirwegh, C M; Chettle, D R; Pejović-Milić, A

    2010-02-21

    The interpretation of measurements of bone strontium in vivo using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is presently hindered by overlying skin and soft-tissue absorption of the strontium x-rays. The use of imaging technologies to measure the overlying soft-tissue thickness at the index finger measuring site might allow correction of the strontium reading to estimate its concentration in bone. An examination of magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT) and high-frequency ultrasound (US) imaging technologies revealed that 55 MHz US had the smallest range of measurement uncertainty at 3.2% followed by 1 Tesla MR, 25 MHz US, 8 MHz US and CT at 4.3, 5.4, 6.6 and 7.1% uncertainty, respectively. Of these, only CT imaging appeared to underestimate total thickness (p < 0.05). Furthermore, an inter-study comparison on the accuracy of US measurements of the overlying tissue thickness at finger and ankle in nine subjects was investigated. The 8 MHz US system used in prior in vivo experiments was found to perform satisfactorily in a repeat study of ankle measurements, but indicated that finger thickness measurements may have been misread in previous studies by up to 17.7% (p < 0.025). Repeat ankle measurements were not significantly different from initial measurements at 2.2% difference.

  10. Pregnancy-induced gene expression changes in vivo among women with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goin, Dana E; Smed, Mette Kiel; Pachter, Lior

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about gene expression changes induced by pregnancy in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy women because the few studies previously conducted did not have pre-pregnancy samples available as baseline. We have established a cohort of women with RA and healthy...... women followed prospectively from a pre-pregnancy baseline. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that pregnancy-induced changes in gene expression among women with RA who improve during pregnancy (pregDASimproved) overlap substantially with changes observed among healthy women and differ from changes...... observed among women with RA who worsen during pregnancy (pregDASworse). METHODS: Global gene expression profiles were generated by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) from 11 women with RA and 5 healthy women before pregnancy (T0) and at the third trimester (T3). Among the women with RA, eight showed an improvement...

  11. [A new agroinoculation technology for foreign gene expression in plants by means of transient expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Jin, Tai-Cheng; Xu, Hong-Wei; Li, Hua; Zhou, Xiao-Fu

    2013-01-01

    Due to the laborious and scale-up limitation we have developed a simple method named "seed absorption" to express foreign proteins in plants by means of transient expression. It has been shown that the reporter gene GFP was expressed successfully in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants by seed absorbing Agrobacterium suspension containing TMV-based p35S-30B-GFP vector. Various factors influencing the gene expression were optimized including Agrobacterium cell density and other inoculation conditions. This method has the special advantages as simple work process, ease to scale-up, and further expanding the host range of plant bioreactor than previous methods. We assume that the seed absorption method will facilitate the industrial scale production of the recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in plants.

  12. In vivo functional expression of a screened P. aeruginosa chaperone-dependent lipase in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xiangping

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial lipases particularly Pseudomonas lipases are widely used for biotechnological applications. It is a meaningful work to design experiments to obtain high-level active lipase. There is a limiting factor for functional overexpression of the Pseudomonas lipase that a chaperone is necessary for effective folding. As previously reported, several methods had been used to resolve the problem. In this work, the lipase (LipA and its chaperone (LipB from a screened strain named AB which belongs to Pseudomonas aeruginosa were overexpressed in E. coli with two dual expression plasmid systems to enhance the production of the active lipase LipA without in vitro refolding process. Results In this work, we screened a lipase-produced strain named AB through the screening procedure, which was identified as P. aeruginosa on the basis of 16S rDNA. Genomic DNA obtained from the strain was used to isolate the gene lipA (936 bp and lipase specific foldase gene lipB (1023 bp. One single expression plasmid system E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and two dual expression plasmid systems E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB and E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB were successfully constructed. The lipase activities of the three expression systems were compared to choose the optimal expression method. Under the same cultured condition, the activities of the lipases expressed by E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB were 1300 U/L and 3200 U/L, respectively, while the activity of the lipase expressed by E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB was up to 8500 U/L. The lipase LipA had an optimal temperature of 30°C and an optimal pH of 9 with a strong pH tolerance. The active LipA could catalyze the reaction between fatty alcohols and fatty acids to generate fatty acid alkyl esters, which meant that LipA was able to catalyze esterification reaction. The most suitable fatty acid and alcohol substrates for esterification were octylic acid and hexanol

  13. Hormone Supplying Renal Cell Sheet In Vivo Produced by Tissue Engineering Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Sachiko, Sekiya; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Regenerative medicine is a new medical field and is expected to have a profoundly positive effect in curing difficult-to-treat diseases. Cell sheet fabrication is an important tissue engineering technology used in regenerative medicine. This study investigated the creation of a hormone-releasing tissue using cell sheet technology, which could be utilized in future therapy for chronic renal disease. Renal cell sheets were fabricated on a temperature-responsive cell culture surface wit...

  14. Cyclin D1 Expression and the Inhibitory Effect of Celecoxib on Ovarian Tumor Growth in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yun Zhai

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The report aims to investigate the relationship between the expression of cyclin D1 and Cyclooxgenase-2 (COX-2, thus to explore the molecular mechanisms of the antitumor efficacy of Celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor. Human ovarian SKOV-3 carcinoma cell xenograft-bearing mice were treated with Celecoxib by infusing gaster (i.g. twice/day for 21 days. The mRNA levels of COX-2 and cyclin D1 were determined by RT-PCR. The expression of cyclin D1 at the protein level was detected by immunohistochemistry, while COX-2 protein expression was determined by Western blot. A high-dose of Celecoxib (100 mg/kg significantly inhibited tumor growth (P < 0.05, and the expression of cyclin D1 was reduced by 61%. Celecoxib decreased the proliferation cell index by 40% (P < 0.001 and increased apoptotic index by 52% (P < 0.05 in high-dose Celecoxib treated group. Our results suggest that the antitumor efficacy of Celecoxib against ovarian cancer in mice may in part be mediated through suppression of cyclin D1, which may contribute to its ability to suppress proliferation.

  15. Gallium-68 DOTATOC PET/CT in vivo characterization of somatostatin receptor expression in the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorović-Tirnanić, Mila V; Gajić, Milan M; Obradović, Vladimir B; Baum, Richard P

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to investigate somatostatin receptor (sstr) expression in normal prostate by determining the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in neuroendocrine tumor (NET) patients, without NET involvement of the prostate gland, for establishing the reference standard. Sixty-four NET patients underwent (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. SUVmax of the prostate gland, normal liver, testes, and gluteus muscles were evaluated. The prostate gland size was measured. Statistical analysis was performed using dedicated software (SPSS13). Mean/median (68)Ga-DOTATOC SUVmax values were as follows: normal prostate 2.6 ± 0.0, slightly enlarged prostate 4.2 ± 1.6, prostatic hypertrophy 4.9 ± 1.6, prostatic hyperplasia 5.0 ± 1.5, prostate cancer 9.5 ± 2.1, normal liver 7.3 ± 1.8, testes 1.8 ± 0.5, and gluteus 1.0 ± 0.2. The normal prostate gland had three times less sstr expression than normal liver tissue. Strong correlation was found between patient age and sstr expression in prostate/prostate size. No significant difference existed in sstr expression between prostatic hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Much higher sstr expression was found in prostatic cancer compared with normal prostate. (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT defines the baseline sstr uptake in prostate not affected by NET (significantly lower than in the liver). Higher values were established in prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy. Only concomitant prostate cancer was associated with higher SUVmax in comparison with non-neoplastic liver.

  16. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Michael S.; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J.; Dillon, Stephanie M.; Barrett, Bradley S.; McCarter, Martin D.; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C.; Santiago, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies. PMID:26529416

  17. The Brain In Vivo Expresses the 2′,3′-cAMP-Adenosine Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Jackson, Travis C.; Bansal, Rashmi; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Puccio, Ava M.; Okonkwo, David O.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    Although multiple biochemical pathways produce adenosine, studies suggest that the 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway (2′,3′-cAMP → 2′-AMP/3′-AMP → adenosine) contributes to adenosine production in some cells/tissues/organs. To determine whether the 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway exists in vivo in the brain, we delivered to the brain (gray matter and white matter separately) via the inflow perfusate of a microdialysis probe either 2′,3′-cAMP, 3′,5′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, or 5′-AMP and measured the recovered metabolites in the microdialysis outflow perfusate with mass spectrometry. In both gray and white matter, 2′,3′-cAMP increased 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP and adenosine, and 3′,5′-cAMP increased 5′-AMP and adenosine. In both brain regions, 2′-AMP, 3-AMP and 5′-AMP were converted to adenosine. Microdialysis experiments in 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) wild-type mice demonstrated that traumatic brain injury (TBI; controlled cortical impact model) activated the brain 2,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway; similar experiments in CNPase knockout mice indicated that CNPase was involved in the metabolism of endogenous 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP and to adenosine. In CSF from TBI patients, 2′,3′-cAMP was significantly increased in the initial 12 hours after injury and strongly correlated with CSF levels of 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, adenosine and inosine. We conclude that in vivo, 2′,3′-cAMP is converted to 2′-AMP/3′-AMP, and these AMPs are metabolized to adenosine. This pathway exists endogenously in both mice and humans. PMID:22360621

  18. Nanostructured implant surface effect on osteoblast gene expression and bone-to-implant contact in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo_mendonca@dentistry.unc.edu [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Genomicas e Biotecnologia, SGAN Quadra 916, Modulo B, Av. W5 Norte 70.790-160-Asa Norte Brasilia/DF (Brazil); Bone Biology and Implant Therapy Laboratory, Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 404 Brauer Hall, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27511 (United States); Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Curso de Odontologia, Taguatinga/DF (Brazil); Baccelli Silveira Mendonca, Daniela [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Genomicas e Biotecnologia, SGAN Quadra 916, Modulo B, Av. W5 Norte 70.790-160-Asa Norte Brasilia/DF (Brazil) and Bone Biology and Implant Therapy Laboratory, Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 404 Brauer Hall, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27511 (United States); Pagotto Simoes, Luis Gustavo; Araujo, Andre Luis; Leite, Edson Roberto [Departmento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos-UFSCAR, Rod. Washington Luiz, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Golin, Alexsander Luiz [Departmento de Engenharia Mecanica, Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Curitiba, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Aragao, Francisco J.L. [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Genomicas e Biotecnologia, SGAN Quadra 916, Modulo B, Av. W5 Norte 70.790-160-Asa Norte Brasilia/DF (Brazil); Embrapa Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia, Laboratorio de Introducao e Expressao de Genes, PqEB W5 Norte, 70770-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Cooper, Lyndon F., E-mail: lyndon_cooper@dentistry.unc.edu [Bone Biology and Implant Therapy Laboratory, Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 404 Brauer Hall, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27511 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the response of nanostructured implant surfaces at the level of osteoblast differentiation and its effects in bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and removal-torque values (RTV). CpTi grade IV implants (1.6 x 4.0 mm) were machined or machined and subsequently coated with an oxide solution. The surfaces were divided into: machined (M), titania-anatase (An), titania-rutile (Ru), and zirconia (Zr). Surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and by X-ray microanalysis. Implants were inserted in rat tibia and harvested from 0 to 21 days for measurement of Alkaline Phosphatase, Bone Sialoprotein, Osteocalcin, Osteopontin, and RUNX-2 mRNA levels by real time PCR; from 0 to 56 days for RTV; and from 0 to 56 days for BIC. The roughness parameter (Sa) was compared by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey Test. Comparison of Torque removal values and histomorphometric measurements on implants in vivo was performed by Kruskal-Wallis test and the significance level for all statistical analyses was set at p {<=} 0.05. mRNA levels on all nanostructured surfaces were increased compared to M. At 56 days, the mean RTV in Ncm was 11.6 {+-} 2.5, 11.3 {+-} 2.4, 11.1 {+-} 3.5, 9.7 {+-} 1.4 for An, Ru, Zr, and M, respectively. Higher BIC (%) was measured for all the nanostructured surfaces versus M at 21 and 56 days (p < 0.05). Nanostructured topographic features composed of TiO{sub 2} or ZrO{sub 2} applied to machined cpTi implant promoted greater mesenchymal stem cell commitment to the osteoblast phenotype and associated increased BIC and physical association with bone. Highlights: {yields} Nanostructured surfaces using a sol-gel technique coated cpTi with TiO{sub 2} or ZrO{sub 2}. {yields} Evaluated molecular and mechanical effect of nanofeatures in vivo in rat tibiae. {yields} Nanofeatures improved the differentiation of rat MSCs into osteoblasts. {yields} Nanofeatures improved increased bone-to-implant contact and

  19. In Vivo Detection of c-MET Expression in a Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis Model Using Molecularly Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rheal A. Towner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional growth factor scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptor, c-MET, have been implicated in the genesis and malignant progression of numerous human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinomas. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas in the United States has increased noticeably over the past two decades and is listed as the fifth major cancer in men worldwide. In this study, we used a choline-deficient l-amino acid (CDAA-defined rat hepatocarcinogenesis model to visualize increased in vivo expression of the c-MET antigen in neoplastic lesion formation with the use of a super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO–anti-c-MET molecularly targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. SPIO–anti-c-MET was used for the first time to detect overexpression of c-MET in neoplastic nodules and tumors within the livers of CDAA-treated rats, as determined by a decrease in MRI signal intensity and a decrease in regional T2 values. Specificity for the binding of the molecularly targeted anti-c-MET contrast agent was determined using rat hepatoma (H4-II-E-C3 cell cultures and immunofluorescence microscopic imaging of the targeting agents within neoplastic liver tissue 1 to 2 hours following intravenous administration of SPIO–anti-c-MET and MRI investigation. This method has the ability to visualize in vivo the overexpression of c-MET at early developmental stages of tumor formation.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 fused to GFP, expressed in E. coli, successfully tracked MMP-2 distribution in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, A; Prado, A F; Issa, J P M; Gerlach, R F

    2016-08-01

    Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) participate in many physiological and pathological processes. One major limitation to a better understanding of the role MMPs play in these processes is the lack of well-characterized chimeric proteins and characterization of their fluorescence. The specialized literature has reported on few constructs bearing MMPs fused to the sequence of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), but none of the described constructs have been intended for expression in bacteria or for purification and use in vivo. This work has tested a recombinant reporter protein containing the MMP-2 catalytic domain fused to GFP in terms of purification efficiency, degradation of substrates in solution and in zymograms, kinetic activity, GFP fluorescence, and GFP fluorescence in whole animals after injection of the purified and lyophilized fluorescent protein. This work has also characterized rhMMP-2 (recombinant human MMP-2) and inactive clones and used them as negative controls in experiments employing catMMP-2/GFP and rhMMP-2. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has fully characterized a chimeric protein with the MMP-2 catalytic domain fused to GFP, that has efficiently purified such protein from bacteria in a single-step, and that has obtained an adequate chimeric protein for injection in animals and tracking of MMP-2 fate and activity in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metformin Accumulation Correlates with Organic Cation Transporter 2 Protein Expression and Predicts Mammary Tumor Regression In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkley, L Allyson; Rudolph, Michael C; Wellberg, Elizabeth A; Giles, Erin D; Wahdan-Alaswad, Reema S; Houck, Julie A; Edgerton, Susan M; Thor, Ann D; Schedin, Pepper; Anderson, Steven M; MacLean, Paul S

    2017-03-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have associated metformin treatment with a reduction in breast cancer incidence in prediabetic and type II diabetic populations. Uncertainty exists regarding which patient populations and/or tumor subtypes will benefit from metformin treatment, and most preclinical in vivo studies have given little attention to the cellular pharmacology of intratumoral metformin uptake. Epidemiologic reports consistently link western-style high fat diets (HFD), which drive overweight and obesity, with increased risk of breast cancer. We used a rat model of HFD-induced overweight and mammary carcinogenesis to define intratumoral factors that confer metformin sensitivity. Mammary tumors were initiated with 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea, and rats were randomized into metformin-treated (2 mg/mL drinking water) or control groups (water only) for 8 weeks. Two-thirds of existing mammary tumors responded to metformin treatment with decreased tumor volumes (P 0.11 cm3 reduction in tumor volume. Metformin treatment also decreased proinflammatory arachidonic acid >1.5-fold in responsive tumors (P = 0.023). Collectively, these preclinical data provide evidence for a direct effect of metformin in vivo and suggest that OCT2 expression may predict metformin uptake and tumor response. Cancer Prev Res; 10(3); 198-207. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Stepwise assembly of hyperaggregated forms of Drosophila zeste mutant protein suppresses white gene expression in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, J D; Pirrotta, V

    1993-01-01

    The zeste gene is involved in two chromosome pairing-dependent phenomena: transvection and the suppression of white gene expression. Both require the ability of zeste protein to multimerize, dependent on three interlaced hydrophobic heptad repeats in the C-terminal domain. The first step is dimerization through a leucine zipper. Two other heptad repeats are then required to form higher multimers. The zeta(1) mutation, which causes the pairing-dependent suppression of white, creates a new hydr...

  3. Dexamethasone increases aquaporin-2 protein expression in ex vivo inner medullary collecting duct suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minguang eChen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporin-2 (AQP2 is the vasopressin-regulated water channel that controls renal water reabsorption and plays an important role in the maintenance of body water homeostasis. However, whether and how glucocorticoid regulates AQP2 remains unclear. In this study, we examined the direct effect of dexamethasone on AQP2 protein expression and activity. Dexamethasone increased AQP2 protein abundance in rat inner medullary collecting duct suspensions. This was confirmed in HEK293 cells transfected with AQP2 cDNA. Cell surface protein biotinylation showed an increase of dexamethasone-induced cell membrane AQP2 expression and this effect was blocked by glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486. Functionally, dexamethasone treatment of oocytes injected with an AQP2 cRNA increased water transport activity as judged by cell rupture time in a hypo-osmotic solution (66 ± 13s in dexamethasone vs 101 ± 11s in control, n=15. We further found that dexamethasone treatment reduced AQP2 degradation, which could result in an increase of AQP2 protein. Interestingly, dexamethasone promoted cell membrane AQP2 moving to less buoyant lipid raft submicrodomains. Taken together, our data demonstrate that dexamethasone promotes AQP2 protein expression and increases water permeability mainly via inhibition of AQP2 protein degradation. The increase in AQP2 activity promotes water reabsorption, which may contribute to glucocorticoid-induced water retention and hypertension.

  4. Sensory Neuropeptides and Endogenous Opioids Expression in Human Dental Pulp with Asymptomatic Inflammation: In Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Chavarria-Bolaños

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study quantified the expression of substance P (SP, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, β-endorphins (β-End, and methionine-enkephalin (Met-Enk in human dental pulp following orthodontic intrusion. Methods. Eight patients were selected according to preestablished inclusion criteria. From each patient, two premolars (indicated for extraction due to orthodontic reasons were randomly assigned to two different groups: the asymptomatic inflammation group (EXPg, which would undergo controlled intrusive force for seven days, and the control group (CTRg, which was used to determine the basal levels of each substance. Once extracted, dental pulp tissue was prepared to determine the expression levels of both neuropeptides and endogenous opioids by radioimmunoassay (RIA. Results. All samples from the CTRg exhibited basal levels of both neuropeptides and endogenous opioids. By day seven, all patients were asymptomatic, even when all orthodontic-intrusive devices were still active. In the EXPg, the SP and CGRP exhibited statistically significant different levels. Although none of the endogenous opioids showed statistically significant differences, they all expressed increasing trends in the EXPg. Conclusions. SP and CGRP were identified in dental pulp after seven days of controlled orthodontic intrusion movement, even in the absence of pain.

  5. Tyrosinase Small Interfering RNA Effectively Suppresses Tyrosinase Gene Expression In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Xiu-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase is a bifunctional enzyme which oxidizes the initial step of melanin biosynthesis, that is, conversion of tyrosine to dopa and subsequently dopa to dopaquinone. It is a glycosylated protein and a major regulator of melanogenesis. To date, many approaches have been tried to regulate tyrosinase activity and melanin content. To that end, we screened small interfering RNA sequences for sequence-inhibited tyrosinase expression in B16 cells and in C57BL/6 mice. We analyzed tyrosinase mRNA levels by quantitative real-time PCR and determined tyrosinase activity and melanin content at 24, 48, and 72 hours after transfection. Results showed that siNM_011661_001 was the most efficient small interfering RNA sequence in suppressing tyrosinase mRNA expression, and cells transfected with this sequence showed lower tyrosinase activity. Moreover, intravitreous injection of siNM_011661_001 in C57BL/6 mice induced an efficient and stable gene-specific inhibition of expression at the posttranscriptional level.

  6. Dissection of goadsporin biosynthesis by in vitro reconstitution leading to designer analogues expressed in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Taro; Yamashita, Kona; Goto, Yuki; Shimomura, Morito; Hayashi, Shohei; Asamizu, Shumpei; Sugai, Yoshinori; Ikeda, Haruo; Suga, Hiroaki; Onaka, Hiroyasu

    2017-01-01

    Goadsporin (GS) is a member of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs), containing an N-terminal acetyl moiety, six azoles and two dehydroalanines in the peptidic main chain. Although the enzymes involved in GS biosynthesis have been defined, the principle of how the respective enzymes control the specific modifications remains elusive. Here we report a one-pot synthesis of GS using the enzymes reconstituted in the ‘flexible' in vitro translation system, referred to as the FIT–GS system. This system allows us to readily prepare not only the precursor peptide from its synthetic DNA template but also 52 mutants, enabling us to dissect the modification determinants of GodA for each enzyme. The in vitro knowledge has also led us to successfully produce designer GS analogues in vivo. The methodology demonstrated in this work is also applicable to other RiPP biosynthesis, allowing us to rapidly investigate the principle of modification events with great ease. PMID:28165449

  7. In vivo biochemical and gene expression analyses of the antioxidant activities and hypocholesterolaemic properties of Tamarindus indica fruit pulp extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chor Yin Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tamarindus indica (T. indica is a medicinal plant with many biological activities including anti-diabetic, hypolipidaemic and anti-bacterial activities. A recent study demonstrated the hypolipidaemic effect of T. indica fruit pulp in hamsters. However, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects have not been fully elucidated. Hence, the aims of this study were to evaluate the antioxidant activities and potential hypocholesterolaemic properties of T. indica, using in vitro and in vivo approaches. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The in vitro study demonstrated that T. indica fruit pulp had significant amount of phenolic (244.9 ± 10.1 mg GAE/extract and flavonoid (93.9 ± 2.6 mg RE/g extract content and possessed antioxidant activities. In the in vivo study, hamsters fed with high-cholesterol diet for ten weeks showed elevated serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL-C and LDL-C levels. Administration of T. indica fruit pulp to hypercholesterolaemic hamsters significantly lowered serum triglyceride, total cholesterol and LDL-C levels but had no effect on the HDL-C level. The lipid-lowering effect was accompanied with significant increase in the expression of Apo A1, Abcg5 and LDL receptor genes and significant decrease in the expression of HMG-CoA reductase and Mtp genes. Administration of T. indica fruit pulp to hypercholesterolaemic hamsters also protected against oxidative damage by increasing hepatic antioxidant enzymes, antioxidant activities and preventing hepatic lipid peroxidation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: It is postulated that tamarind fruit pulp exerts its hypocholesterolaemic effect by increasing cholesterol efflux, enhancing LDL-C uptake and clearance, suppressing triglyceride accumulation and inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis. T. indica fruit pulp has potential antioxidative effects and is potentially protective against diet-induced hypercholesterolaemia.

  8. In vivo biochemical and gene expression analyses of the antioxidant activities and hypocholesterolaemic properties of Tamarindus indica fruit pulp extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chor Yin; Mat Junit, Sarni; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Abdul Aziz, Azlina

    2013-01-01

    Tamarindus indica (T. indica) is a medicinal plant with many biological activities including anti-diabetic, hypolipidaemic and anti-bacterial activities. A recent study demonstrated the hypolipidaemic effect of T. indica fruit pulp in hamsters. However, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects have not been fully elucidated. Hence, the aims of this study were to evaluate the antioxidant activities and potential hypocholesterolaemic properties of T. indica, using in vitro and in vivo approaches. The in vitro study demonstrated that T. indica fruit pulp had significant amount of phenolic (244.9 ± 10.1 mg GAE/extract) and flavonoid (93.9 ± 2.6 mg RE/g extract) content and possessed antioxidant activities. In the in vivo study, hamsters fed with high-cholesterol diet for ten weeks showed elevated serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL-C and LDL-C levels. Administration of T. indica fruit pulp to hypercholesterolaemic hamsters significantly lowered serum triglyceride, total cholesterol and LDL-C levels but had no effect on the HDL-C level. The lipid-lowering effect was accompanied with significant increase in the expression of Apo A1, Abcg5 and LDL receptor genes and significant decrease in the expression of HMG-CoA reductase and Mtp genes. Administration of T. indica fruit pulp to hypercholesterolaemic hamsters also protected against oxidative damage by increasing hepatic antioxidant enzymes, antioxidant activities and preventing hepatic lipid peroxidation. It is postulated that tamarind fruit pulp exerts its hypocholesterolaemic effect by increasing cholesterol efflux, enhancing LDL-C uptake and clearance, suppressing triglyceride accumulation and inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis. T. indica fruit pulp has potential antioxidative effects and is potentially protective against diet-induced hypercholesterolaemia.

  9. Safety and efficient ex vivo expansion of stem cells using platelet-rich plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Prado, Roberto; Orive, Gorka

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the cell culture media supplements used in the ex vivo expansion of stem cells intended for cell therapy. Currently, the gold standard is the culture supplemented with fetal bovine serum, however, their use in cell therapy raises many concerns. The alternatives to its use are presented, ranging from the use of human serum to platelet-rich plasma (PRP), to serum-free media or extracellular matrix components. Finally, various growth factors present in PRP are described, which make it a safe and effective stem cell expansion supplement. These growth factors could be responsible for their efficiency, as they increase both stem cell proliferation and survival. The different PRP formulations are also discussed, as well as the need for protocol standardization.

  10. Expression and activity of eIF6 trigger Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma growth in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Miluzio, A.; Oliveto, S.; Pesce, E.; Mutti, L; Murer, B.; Grosso, S; Ricciardi, S.; Brina, D.; Biffo, S

    2015-01-01

    eIF6 is an antiassociation factor that regulates the availability of active 80S. Its activation is driven by the RACK1/PKC? axis, in a mTORc1 independent manner. We previously described that eIF6 haploinsufficiency causes a striking survival in the E?-Myc mouse lymphoma model, with lifespans extended up to 18 months. Here we screen for eIF6 expression in human cancers. We show that Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma tumors (MPM) and a MPM cell line (REN cells) contain high levels of hyperphosphor...

  11. Influences on gene expression in vivo by a Shine-Dalgarno sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Haining; Zhao, Qing; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I

    2006-01-01

    The Shine-Dalgarno (SD+: 5'-AAGGAGG-3') sequence anchors the mRNA by base pairing to the 16S rRNA in the small ribosomal subunit during translation initiation. We have here compared how an SD+ sequence influences gene expression, if located upstream or downstream of an initiation codon...... sites compete for ribosomes that bind to an SD+ located between them. A minor positive contribution to upstream initiation resulting from 3' to 5' ribosomal diffusion along the mRNA is suggested. Analysis of the E. coli K12 genome suggests that the SD+ or SD-like sequences are systematically avoided...

  12. Sequential expression of IGF-IB followed by active TGF-β1 induces synergistic pulmonary fibroproliferation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonegui, Graciela; Ni, Ai; Léger, Caroline; Kelly, Margaret M; Wong, Josée F; Jalloul, Ali; Winston, Brent W

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis, the end stage of a variety of fibroproliferative lung diseases, is usually induced after repetitive or chronic lung injury or inflammation. The mechanisms of fibroproliferation are poorly understood. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is significantly elevated in patients with pulmonary fibrosis and fibroproliferative acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, we showed that IGF-I overexpression alone in wild-type mouse lungs does not cause fibroproliferation. We therefore questioned whether IGF-I, acting together with active TGF-β1, a known profibrotic cytokine, enhances pulmonary fibroproliferation caused by active TGF-β1. A unique sequential adenoviral transgene mouse model was used expressing AdEmpty/AdTGF-β1 or AdhIGF-IB/AdTGF-β1 transgenes. IGF-IB plus active TGF-β1 transgene expression synergistically increased collagen deposition in the lung parenchyma compared with active TGF-β1 expression alone. The enhanced fibrosis was accompanied by an increased recruitment of macrophages and lymphocytes into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and inflammatory cells in the lungs. α-Smooth muscle actin expression, a marker of myofibroblast proliferation and differentiation, was also increased. Finally, fibroblasts exposed ex vivo to BALF isolated from AdhIGF-IB/AdTGF-β1-transduced mice showed synergistic collagen induction compared with BALF from AdEmpty/AdTGF-β1-transduced mice. This study provides the first direct evidence that IGF-I is able to synergistically enhance pulmonary fibroproliferation in cooperation with TGF-β1.

  13. In vivo and in vitro expression analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of Citrus tristeza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, B; Lee, R F; Niblett, C L

    2008-01-01

    Expression of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was studied in vivo and in vitro using a polyclonal antiserum raised against the recombinant CTV-RdRp protein. Although a 57-kDa CTV-RdRp was expected to be expressed by a +1 translational frameshift at the carboxyl terminus of a 400-kDa polyprotein, a 50-kDa protein was detected in CTV-infected but not in healthy citrus tissue by Western blot. This suggests that the RdRp was cleaved from the CTV polyprotein. The 50-kDa protein was present in both the cytoplasmic and membrane fractions, but it accumulated mainly in the membrane fraction, where most of the replication-associated proteins of RNA viruses are found. When the expression of a cloned CTV-RdRp gene encoding a 60-kDa fusion protein was studied in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system, two smaller proteins of about 50 kDa and 10 kDa were detected in addition to the expected 60-kDa protein. All three proteins were immunoprecipitated with the anti-CTV-RdRp serum, suggesting that the 50-kDa and 10-kDa proteins were fragments of the 60-kDa CTV-RdRp fusion protein. When the expression of the RdRp was analyzed at different times during in vitro translation, the 60-kDa and 50-kDa proteins were detected at all time points, and a small amount of the 10-kDa protein was detected after 30 min of translation. These results suggest that the CTV-RdRp may also be cleaved in vitro in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate.

  14. In Vivo Corneal Biomechanical Properties with Corneal Visualization Scheimpflug Technology in Chinese Population

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Wu; Lei Tian; Yi-fei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the repeatability of recalculated corneal visualization Scheimpflug technology (CorVis ST) parameters and to study the variation of biomechanical properties and their association with demographic and ocular characteristics. Methods. A total of 783 healthy subjects were included in this study. Comprehensive ophthalmological examinations were conducted. The repeatability of the recalculated biomechanical parameters with 90 subjects was assessed by the coefficient of variat...

  15. Net expression inhibits the growth of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell PL45 in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baiwen Li

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis due to late diagnosis and a lack of effective therapeutic options. Thus, it is important to better understand its molecular mechanisms and to develop more effective treatments for the disease. The ternary complex factor Net, which exerts its strong inhibitory function on transcription of proto-oncogene gene c-fos by forming ternary complexes with a second transcription factor, has been suspected of being involved in pancreatic cancer and other tumors biology. In this study, we found that the majority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues and cell lines had weak or no expression of Net, whereas significantly high level of Net expression occurred in paired adjacent normal tissues we studied. Furthermore, using in vitro and in vivo model systems, we found that overexpression of Net inhibited cell growth and survival and induced cell apoptosis in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell PL45; the mechanisms by which Net inhibited the cell cycle progression were mainly through P21-Cyclin D1/CDK4 Pathway. Our data thus suggested that Net might play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis, possibly by acting as a tumor suppressor gene.

  16. Screening for bioactive small molecules by in vivo monitoring of luciferase-based reporter gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Christian; Kombrink, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Chemical genetics is a scientific strategy that utilizes bioactive small molecules as experimental tools to dissect biological processes. Bioactive compounds occurring in nature represent an enormous diversity of structures that potentially can be used as activators or inhibitors of biochemical pathways, transport processes, regulatory networks, or developmental programs. Screening methods to identify bioactive small molecules can vary greatly, ranging from visual evaluation of phenotypic alterations to quantifying biometric traits such as enzyme activities. Here, we describe a general methodology that permits identification of compounds modulating the expression of reporter genes in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. The selection of luciferase-based reporter systems has the advantage that it allows in vivo imaging of reporter gene activity in a semiquantitative manner without affecting plant viability. We chose an Arabidopsis line harboring the luciferase reporter under the control of the jasmonate-inducible LOX2 promoter to screen for either activators or inhibitors of gene expression. The outlined assay conditions can readily be applied to Arabidopsis lines containing other reporter genes. Thereby screening for small molecules affecting different signaling pathways and/or phenotypic responses is possible.

  17. A GFP expressing influenza A virus to report in vivo tropism and protection by a matrix protein 2 ectodomain-specific monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, Sarah; Verhelst, Judith; Van den Hoecke, Silvie; Smet, Anouk; Schotsaert, Michael; Job, Emma R; Roose, Kenny; Schepens, Bert; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The severity of influenza-related illness is mediated by many factors, including in vivo cell tropism, timing and magnitude of the immune response, and presence of pre-existing immunity. A direct way to study cell tropism and virus spread in vivo is with an influenza virus expressing a reporter gene. However, reporter gene-expressing influenza viruses are often attenuated in vivo and may be genetically unstable. Here, we describe the generation of an influenza A virus expressing GFP from a tri-cistronic NS segment. To reduce the size of this engineered gene segment, we used a truncated NS1 protein of 73 amino acids combined with a heterologous dimerization domain to increase protein stability. GFP and nuclear export protein coding information were fused in frame with the truncated NS1 open reading frame and separated from each other by 2A self-processing sites. The resulting PR8-NS1(1-73)GFP virus was successfully rescued and replicated as efficiently as the parental PR8 virus in vitro and was slightly attenuated in vivo. Flow cytometry-based monitoring of cells isolated from PR8-NS1(1-73)GFP virus infected BALB/c mice revealed that GFP expression peaked on day two in all cell types tested. In particular respiratory epithelial cells and myeloid cells known to be involved in antigen presentation, including dendritic cells (CD11c+) and inflammatory monocytes (CD11b+ GR1+), became GFP positive following infection. Prophylactic treatment with anti-M2e monoclonal antibody or oseltamivir reduced GFP expression in all cell types studied, demonstrating the usefulness of this reporter virus to analyze the efficacy of antiviral treatments in vivo. Finally, deep sequencing analysis, serial in vitro passages and ex vivo analysis of PR8-NS1(1-73)GFP virus, indicate that this virus is genetically and phenotypically stable.

  18. Conditional constitutive expression system of a drug protein in vivo by positive feedback loop using an inducer-independent artificial transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Bin; Lim, Ho-Dong; You, Sung-Hwan; Cheong, Dae-Eun; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2018-01-22

    Bacterial-mediated drug delivery is a potential and promising strategy for the specific treatment of cancer with therapeutic molecules, especially with genetically encoded proteins. These proteins must be tightly regulated due to cytotoxicity and thus are usually expressed under the control of the P BAD and TetA/TetR promoters in vivo. Since protein expression from these systems is triggered by exogenous inducer, periodic intravenous injection of inducer is necessary. However, these treatments can result in non-homogenous and/or inefficient expression of therapeutic proteins in vivo due to impeded diffusion and dilution of the inducer further from the injection site. To overcome these hurdles, we designed a conditional constitutive expression system equipped with the artificial transcription factor, AraC C , which has two operator-binding domains and simultaneously binds to the I 1 and I 2 operators of the P BAD promoter for gene expression in an arabinose-independent manner. Using this construct and the wild type protein AraC under the control of the P BAD promoter, we constructed a self-positive feedback system to constitutively express the therapeutic protein when the induction of AraC was triggered once using arabinose. This expression system could be useful in various cancer treatment strategies using bacteria to deliver genetically encoded drugs in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Site-specific recombinases in genetic engineering: modern in vivo technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostash, B

    2010-01-01

    Current advances in the field of site-specific recombinases (SSR) and their application for pro- and eukaryotic genomics are reviewed. Functions of SSR and main types of the genetic rearrangements they catalyze are outlined. Examples described in the review show the potential of SSR for studies of a diverse array of fundamental and applied problems, which are not easily solved (or not solved at all) with the help of other experimental approaches. Use of SSR for wider set of biological systems, generation of recombinases with a strict temporal and spatial control of their activity and search for SSR displaying new substrate specificity are major directions of development of SSR-based technology.

  20. MMP-13 In-Vivo Molecular Imaging Reveals Early Expression in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaün, Mathieu; Peng, Jing; Hensley, Harvey H.; Roder, Navid; Flieder, Douglas B.; Houlle-Crépin, Solène; Abramovici-Roels, Olivia; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Thiberville, Luc; Clapper, Margie L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are overexpressed in lung cancer and may serve as potential targets for the development of bioactivable probes for molecular imaging. Objective To characterize and monitor the activity of MMPs during the progression of lung adenocarcinoma. Methods K-rasLSL-G12D mice were imaged serially during the development of adenocarcinomas using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and a probe specific for MMP-2, -3, -9 and -13. Lung tumors were identified using FMT and MRI co-registration, and the probe concentration in each tumor was assessed at each time-point. The expression of Mmp2, -3, -9, -13 was quantified by qRT-PCR using RNA isolated from microdissected tumor cells. Immunohistochemical staining of overexpressed MMPs in animals was assessed on human lung tumors. Results In mice, 7 adenomas and 5 adenocarcinomas showed an increase in fluorescent signal on successive FMT scans, starting between weeks 4 and 8. qRT-PCR assays revealed significant overexpression of only Mmp-13 in mice lung tumors. In human tumors, a high MMP-13 immunostaining index was found in tumor cells from invasive lesions (24/27), but in none of the non-invasive (0/4) (p=0.001). Conclusion MMP-13 is detected in early pulmonary invasive adenocarcinomas and may be a potential target for molecular imaging of lung cancer. PMID:26193700

  1. Examining Radiation-Induced In Vivo and In Vitro Gene Expression Changes of the Peripheral Blood in Different Laboratories for Biodosimetry Purposes: First RENEB Gene Expression Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, M; Badie, C; Quintens, R; Kriehuber, R; Manning, G; Macaeva, E; Njima, M; Oskamp, D; Strunz, S; Moertl, S; Doucha-Senf, S; Dahlke, S; Menzel, J; Port, M

    2016-02-01

    The risk of a large-scale event leading to acute radiation exposure necessitates the development of high-throughput methods for providing rapid individual dose estimates. Our work addresses three goals, which align with the directive of the European Union's Realizing the European Network of Biodosimetry project (EU-RENB): 1. To examine the suitability of different gene expression platforms for biodosimetry purposes; 2. To perform this examination using blood samples collected from prostate cancer patients (in vivo) and from healthy donors (in vitro); and 3. To compare radiation-induced gene expression changes of the in vivo with in vitro blood samples. For the in vitro part of this study, EDTA-treated whole blood was irradiated immediately after venipuncture using single X-ray doses (1 Gy/min(-1) dose rate, 100 keV). Blood samples used to generate calibration curves as well as 10 coded (blinded) samples (0-4 Gy dose range) were incubated for 24 h in vitro, lysed and shipped on wet ice. For the in vivo part of the study PAXgene tubes were used and peripheral blood (2.5 ml) was collected from prostate cancer patients before and 24 h after the first fractionated 2 Gy dose of localized radiotherapy to the pelvis [linear accelerator (LINAC), 580 MU/min, exposure 1-1.5 min]. Assays were run in each laboratory according to locally established protocols using either microarray platforms (2 laboratories) or qRT-PCR (2 laboratories). Report times on dose estimates were documented. The mean absolute difference of estimated doses relative to the true doses (Gy) were calculated. Doses were also merged into binary categories reflecting aspects of clinical/diagnostic relevance. For the in vitro part of the study, the earliest report time on dose estimates was 7 h for qRT-PCR and 35 h for microarrays. Methodological variance of gene expression measurements (CV ≤10% for technical replicates) and interindividual variance (≤twofold for all genes) were low. Dose estimates based on

  2. Increasing procaspase 8 expression using repurposed drugs to induce HIV infected cell death in ex vivo patient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Rahul; Cummins, Nathan W; Natesampillai, Sekar; Bren, Gary D; Chung, Thomas D; Baker, Jason; Henry, Keith; Pagliuzza, Amélie; Badley, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    HIV persists because a reservoir of latently infected CD4 T cells do not express viral proteins and are indistinguishable from uninfected cells. One approach to HIV cure suggests that reactivating HIV will activate cytotoxic pathways; yet when tested in vivo, reactivating cells do not die sufficiently to reduce cell-associated HIV DNA levels. We recently showed that following reactivation from latency, HIV infected cells generate the HIV specific cytotoxic protein Casp8p41 which is produced by HIV protease cleaving procaspase 8. However, cell death is prevented, possibly due to low procaspase 8 expression. Here, we tested whether increasing procaspase 8 levels in CD4 T cells will produce more Casp8p41 following HIV reactivation, causing more reactivated cells to die. Screening 1277 FDA approved drugs identified 168 that increased procaspase 8 expression by at least 1.7-fold. Of these 30 were tested for anti-HIV effects in an acute HIVIIIb infection model, and 9 drugs at physiologic relevant levels significantly reduced cell-associated HIV DNA. Primary CD4 T cells from ART suppressed HIV patients were treated with one of these 9 drugs and reactivated with αCD3/αCD28. Four drugs significantly increased Casp8p41 levels following HIV reactivation, and decreased total cell associated HIV DNA levels (flurbiprofen: p = 0.014; doxycycline: p = 0.044; indomethacin: p = 0.025; bezafibrate: P = 0.018) without effecting the viability of uninfected cells. Thus procaspase 8 levels can be increased pharmacologically and, in the context of HIV reactivation, increase Casp8p41 causing death of reactivating cells and decreased HIV DNA levels. Future studies will be required to define the clinical utility of this or similar approaches.

  3. Safety and in vivo Expression of a GNE-Transgene: A Novel Treatment Approach for Hereditary Inclusion Body Myopathy-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anagha P. Phadke

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary inclusion body myopathy-2 (HIBM2 is an adult-onset, muscular disease caused by mutations in the GNE gene. HIBM2-associated GNE mutations causing hyposialyation have been proposed to contribute to reduced muscle function in patients with HIBM2, though the exact cause of this disease is unknown. In the current studies we examined pre-clinical in vivo toxicity, and expression of the plasmid-based, CMV driven wild-type GNE plasmid vector. The plasmid vector was injected intramuscularly (IM or systemically (IV into BALB/c mice, following encapsulation in a cationic liposome (DOTAP:Cholesterol. Single IM injections of the GNE-lipoplex at 40 μg did not produce overt toxicity or deaths, indicating that the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL dose for IM injection was ≥40 μg. Single intravenous (IV infusion of GNE-lipoplex was lethal in 33% of animals at 100 μg dose, with a small proportion of animals in the 40 μg cohort demonstrating transient toxicity. Thus the NOAEL dose by the IV route was greater than 10 μg and less than or equal to 40 μg. Real-time RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated recombinant human GNE mRNA expression in 100% of muscle tissues that received IM injection of 40 μg GNE-lipoplex, at 2 weeks. These results indicate that GNE-lipoplex gene transfer is safe and can produce durable transgene expression in treated muscles. Our findings support future exploration of the clinical efficacy of GNE-lipoplex for experimental gene therapy of HIBM2.

  4. Forced expression of stabilized c-Fos in dendritic cells reduces cytokine production and immune responses in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ryoko; Suzuki, Mayu; Sakaguchi, Ryota; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Kimura, Akihiro; Shichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda-ku 102-0075 (Japan); Shiraishi, Hiroshi [Division of Medical Biochemistry, Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Saga Medical School, Saga (Japan); Shimoda, Kouji [Department of Laboratory Animal Center, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshimura, Akihiko, E-mail: yoshimura@a6.keio.jp [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda-ku 102-0075 (Japan)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos produced less inflammatory cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos activated T cells less efficiently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transgenic mice expressing stabilized c-Fos were resistant to EAE model. -- Abstract: Intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) suppresses innate immunity by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production by monocytic cells. We have shown that the transcription factor c-Fos is responsible for cAMP-mediated suppression of inflammatory cytokine production, and that c-Fos protein is stabilized by IKK{beta}-mediated phosphorylation. We found that S308 is one of the major phosphorylation sites, and that the S308D mutation prolongs c-Fos halflife. To investigate the role of stabilized c-Fos protein in dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo, we generated CD11c-promoter-deriven c-FosS308D transgenic mice. As expected, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from these Tg mice produced smaller amounts of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-{alpha}, IL-12, and IL-23, but higher levels of IL-10, in response to LPS, than those from wild-type (Wt) mice. When T cells were co-cultured with BMDCs from Tg mice, production of Th1 and Th17 cytokines was reduced, although T cell proliferation was not affected. Tg mice demonstrated more resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) than did Wt mice. These data suggest that c-Fos in DCs plays a suppressive role in certain innate and adaptive immune responses.

  5. Ex vivo evaluation of new 2D and 3D dental radiographic technology for detecting caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Donald; Mol, André; Everett, Eric T; Bangdiwala, Ananta

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Proximal dental caries remains a prevalent disease with only modest detection rates by current diagnostic systems. Many new systems are available without controlled validation of diagnostic efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of three potentially promising new imaging systems. Methods: This study evaluated the caries detection efficacy of Schick 33 (Sirona Dental, Salzburg, Austria) intraoral digital detector images employing an advanced sharpening filter, Planmeca ProMax® (Planmeca Inc., Helsinki, Finland) extraoral “panoramic bitewing” images and Sirona Orthophos XG3D (Sirona Dental) CBCT images with advanced artefact reduction. Conventional photostimulable phosphor images served as the control modality. An ex vivo study design using extracted human teeth, ten expert observers and micro-CT ground truth was employed. Results: Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated similar diagnostic efficacy of all systems (ANOVA p > 0.05). The sensitivity of the Schick 33 images (0.48) was significantly lower than the other modalities (0.53–0.62). The specificity of the Planmeca images (0.86) was significantly lower than Schick 33 (0.96) and XG3D (0.97). The XG3D showed significantly better cavitation detection sensitivity (0.62) than the other modalities (0.48–0.57). Conclusions: The Schick 33 images demonstrated reduced caries sensitivity, whereas the Planmeca panoramic bitewing images demonstrated reduced specificity. XG3D with artefact reduction demonstrated elevated sensitivity and specificity for caries detection, improved depth accuracy and substantially improved cavitation detection. Care must be taken to recognize potential false-positive caries lesions with Planmeca panoramic bitewing images. Use of CBCT for caries detection must be carefully balanced with the presence of metal artefacts, time commitment, financial cost and radiation dose. PMID:26670605

  6. An in vivo culture system for human embryos using an encapsulation technology: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockeel, C.; Mock, P.; Verheyen, G.; Bouche, N.; Le Goff, Ph.; Heyman, Y.; Wrenzycki, C.; Höffmann, K.; Niemann, H.; Haentjens, P.; de Los Santos, M.J.; Fernandez-Sanchez, M.; Velasco, M.; Aebischer, P.; Devroey, P.; Simón, C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Animal studies have demonstrated better embryo development in vivo than in vitro. This pilot study tested the feasibility of using a novel in utero culture system (IUCS) to obtain normal human fertilization and embryo development. METHODS The IUCS device comprised a perforated silicone hollow tube. The study included 13 patients (<36 years) undergoing a first intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment and 167 metaphase II oocytes in three groups. In Group 1, 1–2 h after ICSI, sibling oocytes were assigned to IUCS or conventional in vitro culture. The device was retrieved on Day 1, and all zygotes were cultured in vitro till Day 5. In Group 2, fertilized oocytes were assigned on Day 1, embryos retrieved on Day 3 and all embryos cultured till Day 5. In Group 3, after Day 0 assignment, embryos were retrieved on Day 3 for blastomere biopsy and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and cultured until Day 5. The highest quality blastocysts were transferred on Day 5. RESULTS Fertilization and embryo development were comparable in the in vitro and IUCS arms, with a tendency towards better embryo quality in the IUCS. FISH analysis in Group 3 revealed more normal embryos using the IUCS (P = 0.049). Three clinical pregnancies and live births were obtained: two from the IUCS arm and one from the in vitro arm. CONCLUSIONS Our pilot study shows that this new IUCS appears to be feasible and safe, supporting normal fertilization, embryo development and normal chromosomal segregation. Furthermore, live births are possible after the transient presence of a silicone device in the uterus.Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00480103. PMID:19273881

  7. Removing biofilms from microstructured titanium ex vivo: a novel approach using atmospheric plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupf, Stefan; Idlibi, Ahmad Nour; Marrawi, Fuad Al; Hannig, Matthias; Schubert, Andreas; von Mueller, Lutz; Spitzer, Wolfgang; Holtmann, Henrik; Lehmann, Antje; Rueppell, Andre; Schindler, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The removal of biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants is a still unresolved challenge. This experimental study investigated disinfection and removal of in situ formed biofilms from microstructured titanium using cold atmospheric plasma in combination with air/water spray. Titanium discs (roughness (Ra): 1.96 µm) were exposed to human oral cavities for 24 and 72 hours (n = 149 each) to produce biofilms. Biofilm thickness was determined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (n = 5 each). Plasma treatment of biofilms was carried out ex vivo using a microwave-driven pulsed plasma source working at temperatures from 39 to 43°C. Following plasma treatment, one group was air/water spray treated before re-treatment by second plasma pulses. Vital microorganisms on the titanium surfaces were identified by contact culture (Rodac agar plates). Biofilm presence and bacterial viability were quantified by fluorescence microscopy. Morphology of titanium surfaces and attached biofilms was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total protein amounts of biofilms were colorimetrically quantified. Untreated and air/water treated biofilms served as controls. Cold plasma treatment of native biofilms with a mean thickness of 19 µm (24 h) to 91 µm (72 h) covering the microstructure of the titanium surface caused inactivation of biofilm bacteria and significant reduction of protein amounts. Total removal of biofilms, however, required additional application of air/water spray, and a second series of plasma treatment. Importantly, the microstructure of the titanium discs was not altered by plasma treatment. The combination of atmospheric plasma and non-abrasive air/water spray is applicable for complete elimination of oral biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants and may enable new routes for the therapy of periimplant disease.

  8. Removing biofilms from microstructured titanium ex vivo: a novel approach using atmospheric plasma technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Rupf

    Full Text Available The removal of biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants is a still unresolved challenge. This experimental study investigated disinfection and removal of in situ formed biofilms from microstructured titanium using cold atmospheric plasma in combination with air/water spray. Titanium discs (roughness (Ra: 1.96 µm were exposed to human oral cavities for 24 and 72 hours (n = 149 each to produce biofilms. Biofilm thickness was determined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (n = 5 each. Plasma treatment of biofilms was carried out ex vivo using a microwave-driven pulsed plasma source working at temperatures from 39 to 43°C. Following plasma treatment, one group was air/water spray treated before re-treatment by second plasma pulses. Vital microorganisms on the titanium surfaces were identified by contact culture (Rodac agar plates. Biofilm presence and bacterial viability were quantified by fluorescence microscopy. Morphology of titanium surfaces and attached biofilms was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Total protein amounts of biofilms were colorimetrically quantified. Untreated and air/water treated biofilms served as controls. Cold plasma treatment of native biofilms with a mean thickness of 19 µm (24 h to 91 µm (72 h covering the microstructure of the titanium surface caused inactivation of biofilm bacteria and significant reduction of protein amounts. Total removal of biofilms, however, required additional application of air/water spray, and a second series of plasma treatment. Importantly, the microstructure of the titanium discs was not altered by plasma treatment. The combination of atmospheric plasma and non-abrasive air/water spray is applicable for complete elimination of oral biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants and may enable new routes for the therapy of periimplant disease.

  9. Ex vivo evaluation of new 2D and 3D dental radiographic technology for detecting caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaalaas, Laurence; Tyndall, Donald; Mol, André; Everett, Eric T; Bangdiwala, Ananta

    2016-01-01

    Proximal dental caries remains a prevalent disease with only modest detection rates by current diagnostic systems. Many new systems are available without controlled validation of diagnostic efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of three potentially promising new imaging systems. This study evaluated the caries detection efficacy of Schick 33 (Sirona Dental, Salzburg, Austria) intraoral digital detector images employing an advanced sharpening filter, Planmeca ProMax(®) (Planmeca Inc., Helsinki, Finland) extraoral "panoramic bitewing" images and Sirona Orthophos XG3D (Sirona Dental) CBCT images with advanced artefact reduction. Conventional photostimulable phosphor images served as the control modality. An ex vivo study design using extracted human teeth, ten expert observers and micro-CT ground truth was employed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated similar diagnostic efficacy of all systems (ANOVA p > 0.05). The sensitivity of the Schick 33 images (0.48) was significantly lower than the other modalities (0.53-0.62). The specificity of the Planmeca images (0.86) was significantly lower than Schick 33 (0.96) and XG3D (0.97). The XG3D showed significantly better cavitation detection sensitivity (0.62) than the other modalities (0.48-0.57). The Schick 33 images demonstrated reduced caries sensitivity, whereas the Planmeca panoramic bitewing images demonstrated reduced specificity. XG3D with artefact reduction demonstrated elevated sensitivity and specificity for caries detection, improved depth accuracy and substantially improved cavitation detection. Care must be taken to recognize potential false-positive caries lesions with Planmeca panoramic bitewing images. Use of CBCT for caries detection must be carefully balanced with the presence of metal artefacts, time commitment, financial cost and radiation dose.

  10. New Genome-Wide Algorithm Identifies Novel In-Vivo Expressed Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Antigens Inducing Human T-Cell Responses with Classical and Unconventional Cytokine Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Franken, Kees L. M. C.

    2016-01-01

    New strategies are needed to develop better tools to control TB, including identification of novel antigens for vaccination. Such Mtb antigens must be expressed during Mtb infection in the major target organ, the lung, and must be capable of eliciting human immune responses. Using genome......-wide transcriptomics of Mtb infected lungs we developed data sets and methods to identify IVE-TB (in-vivo expressed Mtb) antigens expressed in the lung. Quantitative expression analysis of 2,068 Mtb genes from the predicted first operons identified the most upregulated IVE-TB genes during in-vivo pulmonary infection....... By further analysing high-level conservation among whole-genome sequenced Mtb-complex strains (n = 219) and algorithms predicting HLA-class-Ia and II presented epitopes, we selected the most promising IVE-TB candidate antigens. Several of these were recognized by T-cells from in-vitro Mtb-PPD and ESAT6/CFP10...

  11. Influence of different surfactants on the technological properties and in vivo ocular tolerability of lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Antonio; Bucolo, Claudio; Romano, Giovanni Luca; Platania, Chiara Bianca Maria; Drago, Filippo; Puglisi, Giovanni; Pignatello, Rosario

    2014-08-15

    Addition of one or more surfactant agents is often necessary for the production of nanostructured lipid and polymeric systems. The removal of residual surfactants is a required step for technological and toxicological reasons, especially for peculiar applications, such as the ophthalmic field. This study was planned to assess the technological properties of some surfactants, commonly used for the production of lipid nanoparticles, as well as their ocular safety profile. Stable and small-size solid lipid nanoparticles were obtained using Dynasan(®) 114 as the lipid matrix and all the tested surfactants. However, from a toxicological point of view, the nanocarriers produced using Kolliphor(®) P188 were the most valuable, showing no irritant effect on the ocular surface up to the highest tested surfactant concentration (0.4%, w/v). The SLN produced using Cremophor(®) A25 and Lipoid(®) S100 were tolerated up to a surfactant concentration of 0.2% by weight, while for Tween(®) 80 and Kolliphor(®) HS 15 a maximum concentration of 0.05% can be considered totally not-irritant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  13. Eculizumab-C5 complexes express a C5a neoepitope in vivo: Consequences for interpretation of patient complement analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per H; Thomas, Anub Mathew; Bergseth, Grethe; Gustavsen, Alice; Volokhina, Elena B; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Mollnes, Tom E

    2017-09-01

    The complement system has obtained renewed clinical focus due to increasing number of patients treated with eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody inhibiting cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b. The FDA approved indications are paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, but many other diseases are candidates for complement inhibition. It has been postulated that eculizumab does not inhibit C5a formation in vivo, in contrast to what would be expected since it blocks C5 cleavage. We recently revealed that this finding was due to a false positive reaction in a C5a assay. In the present study, we identified expression of a neoepitope which was exposed on C5 after binding to eculizumab in vivo. By size exclusion chromatography of patient serum obtained before and after infusion of eculizumab, we document that the neoepitope was exposed in the fractions containing the eculizumab-C5 complexes, being positive in this actual C5a assay and negative in others. Furthermore, we confirmed that it was the eculizumab-C5 complexes that were detected in the C5a assay by adding an anti-IgG4 antibody as detection antibody. Competitive inhibition by anti-C5 antibodies localized the epitope to the C5a moiety of C5. Finally, acidification of C5, known to alter C5 conformation, induced a neoepitope reacting identical to the one we explored, in the C5a assays. These data are important for interpretation of complement analyses in patients treated with eculizumab. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression of kit ligand and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 during in vivo or in vitro development of ovarian follicles in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srividya, D; Praveen Chakravarthi, V; Kona, Ssr; Siva Kumar, Avn; Brahmaiah, K V; Rao, V H

    2017-08-01

    Expression of Kit ligand (KL) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3) genes was studied at different in vivo and corresponding in vitro stages of development of the ovarian follicles in sheep. The expression of both KL and IGFBP3 was significantly higher in the primordial follicles relative to any other stage of development. Compared to the other stages, the KL expression in the cumulus cells from in vivo grown large antral follicles and that of IGFBP3 in COCs' isolated from large antral follicles matured in vitro for 24 hr were significantly higher. In the oocytes from in vivo grown ovarian follicles, the expression of KL was the same at all the stages of development. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 expression was also the same in the oocytes at all the stages of the development except for a significantly lower expression in those from antral follicles. The expression of KL in the cumulus cells decreased significantly in the in vitro grown early antral follicles but did not change further as the development progressed. The expression of IGFBP3 in the cumulus cells from in vitro grown ovarian follicles appeared to increase as the development progressed although the increase was not significant between any two consecutive stages of development. In the oocytes in in vitro grown ovarian follicles, the expression levels of KL and IGFBP3 genes did not change with development. It is concluded that (i) KL and IGFBP3 genes follow specific patterns of expression during ovarian folliculogenesis and (ii) in vitro culture of preantral follicles compromises the development potential through alterations in the stage-specific patterns of expression of these and other developmentally important genes. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Development of Cu-64 labeled EGF for In Vivo PET Imaging of EGFR Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backer, Joseph M.

    2009-07-12

    In this project we proposed to establish feasibility of the development of targeted tracers for radionuclide imaging of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in cancer patients. The significance and impact of the proposed radiotracers are determined by the crucial role that EGFR plays in many cancers and by the rapid entrance of EGFR-inhibiting drugs into clinic. Clinical experience, however, revealed that only 10-25% of patients that are defined as EGFR-positive by immunohistochemical analysis respond to EGFR-directed therapeutics and there is poor correlation between EGFR immunohistochemistry and treatment. Therefore, for more efficacious use of EGFR-targeting therapeutics, there is a need for information about EGFR activity in patients. We hypothesized that radionuclide imaging of functionally active EGFR will provide such information and would allow for 1) rational patient stratification, 2) rapid monitoring of responses to therapy, and 3) development of personalized treatment regimens. We hypothesized that tracers based epidermal growth factor (EGF), a natural EGFR ligand, as a targeting vector would be particularly advantageous. First, only functionally active and therefore critical for disease progression EGFRs will bind and internalize an EGF-based tracer. Second, continuous internalization of EGF-based tracers by recyclable EGFR would lead to intracellular accumulation of radionuclide and improved signal-to-background ratio. Third, small size of EGF relative to antibodies would facilitate tumor penetration with vastly better non-specific soft tissue and blood clearance rates. Fourth, as a human protein, EGF is not expected to be immunogenic. Finally, at the beginning of this project, we have already engineered and expressed functionally active EGF with an N-terminal Cys-tag for site-specific conjugation of various payloads, including radionuclide chelators. In the Phase I of this project, in collaboration with Dr. Blankenberg’s group at Stanford

  16. Telomerase inhibition decreases alpha-fetoprotein expression and secretion by hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines: in vitro and in vivo study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roula Tahtouh

    Full Text Available Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. A direct relationship between poor prognosis and the concentration of serum AFP has been observed. Telomerase, an enzyme that stabilizes the telomere length, is expressed by 90% of HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of telomerase inhibition on AFP secretion and the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Proliferation and viability tests were performed using tetrazolium salt. Apoptosis was determined through the Annexin V assay using flow cytometry. The concentrations of AFP were measured using ELISA kits. The AFP mRNA expression was evaluated using RT-PCR, and cell migration was evaluated using a Boyden chamber assay. The in vivo effect of costunolide on AFP production was tested in NSG mice. Telomerase inhibition by costunolide and BIBR 1532 at 5 and 10 μM decreased AFP mRNA expression and protein secretion by HepG2/C3A cells. The same pattern was obtained with cells treated with hTERT siRNA. This treatment exhibited no apoptotic effect. The AFP mRNA expression and protein secretion by PLC/PRF/5 was decreased after treatment with BIBR1532 at 10 μM. In contrast, no effect was obtained for PLC/PRF/5 cells treated with costunolide at 5 or 10 μM. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway decreased the AFP concentration. In contrast, the MAPK/ERK pathway appeared to not be involved in HepG2/C3A cells, whereas ERK inhibition decreased the AFP concentration in PLC/PRF/5 cells. Modulation of the AFP concentration was also obtained after the inhibition or activation of PKC. Costunolide (30 mg/kg significantly decreased the AFP serum concentration of NSG mice bearing HepG2/C3A cells. Both the inhibition of telomerase and the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway decreased the AFP production of HepG2/C3A and PLC/PRF/5 cells, suggesting a relationship between telomerase and AFP expression through the PI3K

  17. Telomerase inhibition decreases alpha-fetoprotein expression and secretion by hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines: in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahtouh, Roula; Azzi, Anne-Sophie; Alaaeddine, Nada; Chamat, Soulaima; Bouharoun-Tayoun, Hasnaa; Wardi, Layal; Raad, Issam; Sarkis, Riad; Antoun, Najibe Abou; Hilal, George

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A direct relationship between poor prognosis and the concentration of serum AFP has been observed. Telomerase, an enzyme that stabilizes the telomere length, is expressed by 90% of HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of telomerase inhibition on AFP secretion and the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Proliferation and viability tests were performed using tetrazolium salt. Apoptosis was determined through the Annexin V assay using flow cytometry. The concentrations of AFP were measured using ELISA kits. The AFP mRNA expression was evaluated using RT-PCR, and cell migration was evaluated using a Boyden chamber assay. The in vivo effect of costunolide on AFP production was tested in NSG mice. Telomerase inhibition by costunolide and BIBR 1532 at 5 and 10 μM decreased AFP mRNA expression and protein secretion by HepG2/C3A cells. The same pattern was obtained with cells treated with hTERT siRNA. This treatment exhibited no apoptotic effect. The AFP mRNA expression and protein secretion by PLC/PRF/5 was decreased after treatment with BIBR1532 at 10 μM. In contrast, no effect was obtained for PLC/PRF/5 cells treated with costunolide at 5 or 10 μM. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway decreased the AFP concentration. In contrast, the MAPK/ERK pathway appeared to not be involved in HepG2/C3A cells, whereas ERK inhibition decreased the AFP concentration in PLC/PRF/5 cells. Modulation of the AFP concentration was also obtained after the inhibition or activation of PKC. Costunolide (30 mg/kg) significantly decreased the AFP serum concentration of NSG mice bearing HepG2/C3A cells. Both the inhibition of telomerase and the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway decreased the AFP production of HepG2/C3A and PLC/PRF/5 cells, suggesting a relationship between telomerase and AFP expression through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

  18. Dietary emulsifiers directly alter human microbiota composition and gene expression ex vivo potentiating intestinal inflammation.

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    Chassaing, Benoit; Van de Wiele, Tom; De Bodt, Jana; Marzorati, Massimo; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2017-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays a central role in the development of many chronic inflammatory diseases including IBD and metabolic syndrome. Administration of substances that alter microbiota composition, including the synthetic dietary emulsifiers polysorbate 80 (P80) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), can promote such inflammatory disorders. However, that inflammation itself impacts microbiota composition has obfuscated defining the extent to which these compounds or other substances act directly upon the microbiota versus acting on host parameters that promote inflammation, which subsequently reshapes the microbiota. We examined the direct impact of CMC and P80 on the microbiota using the mucosal simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (M-SHIME) model that maintains a complex stable human microbiota in the absence of a live host. This approach revealed that both P80 and CMC acted directly upon human microbiota to increase its proinflammatory potential, as revealed by increased levels of bioactive flagellin. The CMC-induced increase in flagellin was rapid (1 day) and driven by altered microbiota gene expression. In contrast, the P80-induced flagellin increase occurred more slowly and was closely associated with altered species composition. Transfer of both emulsifier-treated M-SHIME microbiotas to germ-free recipient mice recapitulated many of the host and microbial alterations observed in mice directly treated with emulsifiers. These results demonstrate a novel paradigm of deconstructing host-microbiota interactions and indicate that the microbiota can be directly impacted by these commonly used food additives, in a manner that subsequently drives intestinal inflammation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Advanced imaging approaches for regenerative medicine: Emerging technologies for monitoring stem cell fate in vitro and in vivo.

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    Kupfer, Molly E; Ogle, Brenda M

    2015-10-01

    The future of regenerative medicine relies on our ability to control stem cell fate in order to produce functional tissues. Stem cells are the preferred cell source for tissue engineering endeavors and regenerative medicine therapies due to their high potency and capacity for expansion. However, their potency also makes them very difficult to control, as they are in a constant state of flux. Therefore, in order to advance research in regenerative medicine, it is necessary to be able to monitor cell state and phenotype both in vitro and in vivo. This review will detail the imaging technologies currently in use to monitor stem cell phenotype, migration, and differentiation. In addition to providing examples of the most recent work in this area, we will also discuss the future of imaging technologies for regenerative medicine, and how current imaging modalities might be utilized to image specific cell functionality in order to track stem cell fate. The research area of imaging stem cells is progressing toward identifying mature and differentiating cells not only by phenotypic markers, but also by visualizing cell function. Many of the cutting-edge modalities detailed in this review have the potential to be harnessed toward this goal. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Advanced progress of microencapsulation technologies: in vivo and in vitro models for studying oral and transdermal drug deliveries.

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    Lam, P L; Gambari, R

    2014-03-28

    This review provides an overall discussion of microencapsulation systems for both oral and transdermal drug deliveries. Clinically, many drugs, especially proteins and peptides, are susceptible to the gastrointestinal tract and the first-pass metabolism after oral administration while some drugs exhibit low skin permeability through transdermal delivery route. Medicated microcapsules as oral and transdermal drug delivery vehicles are believed to offer an extended drug effect at a relatively low dose and provide a better patient compliance. The polymeric microcapsules can be produced by different microencapsulation methods and the drug microencapsulation technology provides the quality preservation for drug stabilization. The release of the entrapped drug is controlled and prolonged for specific usages. Some recent studies have focused on the evaluation of drug containing microcapsules on potential biological and therapeutic applications. For the oral delivery, in vivo animal models were used for evaluating possible treatment effects of drug containing microcapsules. For the transdermal drug delivery, skin delivery models were introduced to investigate the potential skin delivery of medicated microcapsules. Finally, the challenges and limitations of drug microencapsulation in real life are discussed and the commercially available drug formulations using microencapsulation technology for oral and transdermal applications are shown. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of hybridization-based and sequencing-based gene expression technologies on biological replicates

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    Cepko Connie L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput systems for gene expression profiling have been developed and have matured rapidly through the past decade. Broadly, these can be divided into two categories: hybridization-based and sequencing-based approaches. With data from different technologies being accumulated, concerns and challenges are raised about the level of agreement across technologies. As part of an ongoing large-scale cross-platform data comparison framework, we report here a comparison based on identical samples between one-dye DNA microarray platforms and MPSS (Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing. Results The DNA microarray platforms generally provided highly correlated data, while moderate correlations between microarrays and MPSS were obtained. Disagreements between the two types of technologies can be attributed to limitations inherent to both technologies. The variation found between pooled biological replicates underlines the importance of exercising caution in identification of differential expression, especially for the purposes of biomarker discovery. Conclusion Based on different principles, hybridization-based and sequencing-based technologies should be considered complementary to each other, rather than competitive alternatives for measuring gene expression, and currently, both are important tools for transcriptome profiling.

  2. Silencing of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNA interference suppresses human colorectal carcinoma growth in vivo

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    Wang Haibo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RhoA and RhoC have been proved to be over-expressed in many solid cancers, including colorectal cancer. The reduction of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNA interference (RNAi resulted growth inhibition of cancer cells. The present study was to evaluate the effect of silencing of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNAi on growth of human colorectal carcinoma (CRC in tumor-bearing nude mice in vivo. Methods To establish HCT116 cell transplantable model, the nude mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 1.0 × 107 HCT116 cells and kept growing till the tumor xenografts reached 5-7 mm in diameter. Then the mice were randomly assigned to three groups(seven mice in each group: (1 normal saline(NS group, (2replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the negative control shRNA (Ad-HK group and (3replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the 4-tandem linked RhoA and RhoC shRNAs (Ad-RhoA-RhoC group. Ad-HK (4 × 108 pfu, 30 ul/mouse, Ad-RhoA-RhoC (4 × 108 pfu, 30 ul/mouse or PBS (30 ul/mouse was injected intratumorally four times once every other day. The weight and volumes of tumor xenografts were recorded. The levels of RhoA and RhoC mRNA transcripts and proteins in tumor xenografts were detected by reverse quantitative transcription polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining respectively. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay was used to detect the death of cells. Results The xenografts in mice could be seen at 5th day from the implantation of HCT116 cells and all had reached 5-7 mm in size at 9th day. After injection intratumorally, the growth speed of tumor xenografts in Ad-RhoA-RhoC group was significantly delayed compared with those in NS and Ad-HK group(P RhoA and RhoC reduced more in Ad-RhoA-RhoC group than those in NS and Ad-HK group. The relative RhoA and RhoC mRNA transcripts were decreased to 48% and 43% respectively (P RhoA and Rho

  3. Thirty years of baculovirus-insect cell protein expression: from dark horse to mainstream technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oers, Monique M; Pijlman, Gorben P; Vlak, Just M

    2015-01-01

    In December 1983, a seminal paper appeared on the overexpression of human IFN-β in insect cells with a genetically engineered baculovirus. The finding that baculoviruses produced massive amounts of two proteins (polyhedrin and p10) by means of two very strong promoters and that the corresponding genes were dispensable for virus propagation in insect cells was crucial in the development of this expression system. During the next 30 years, major improvements were achieved over the original baculovirus expression vector (BEV) system, facilitating the engineering of the baculovirus vectors, the modification of the sugar moieties of glycoproteins expressed in insect cells and the scale-up of the cell culture process. To date, thousands of recombinant proteins have been produced in this successful expression system, including several protein-based human and veterinary vaccines that are currently on the market. Viral vectors based on adeno-associated virus are being produced using recombinant baculovirus technology and the first gene therapy treatment based on this method has been registered. Specially adapted BEVs are used to deliver and express heterologous genes in mammalian cells, and they may be used for gene therapy and cancer treatment in the future. The purpose of this review is to highlight the thirtieth 'anniversary' of this expression system by summarizing the fundamental research and major technological advances that allowed its development, whilst noting challenges for further improvements. © 2015 The Authors.

  4. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of novel implantation technology in hydrogel contact lenses for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulvi, Furqan A; Lakdawala, Dhara H; Shaikh, Anjum A; Desai, Ankita R; Choksi, Harsh H; Vaidya, Rutvi J; Ranch, Ketan M; Koli, Akshay R; Vyas, Bhavin A; Shah, Dinesh O

    2016-03-28

    Glaucoma is commonly treated using eye drops, which is highly inefficient due to rapid clearance (low residence time) from ocular surface. Contact lenses are ideally suited for controlled drug delivery to cornea, but incorporation of any drug loaded particulate system (formulation) affect the optical and physical property of contact lenses. The objective of the present work was to implant timolol maleate (TM) loaded ethyl cellulose nanoparticle-laden ring in hydrogel contact lenses that could provide controlled drug delivery at therapeutic rates without compromising critical lens properties. TM-implant lenses were developed, by dispersing TM encapsulated ethyl cellulose nanoparticles in acrylate hydrogel (fabricated as ring implant) and implanted the same in hydrogel contact lenses (sandwich system). The TM-ethyl cellulose nanoparticles were prepared by double emulsion method at different ratios of TM to ethyl cellulose. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the transformation of TM to amorphous state. In vitro release kinetic data showed sustained drug release within the therapeutic window for 168h (NP 1:3 batch) with 150μg loading. Cytotoxicity and ocular irritation study demonstrated the safety of TM-implant contact lenses. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rabbit tear fluid showed significant increase in mean residence time (MRT) and area under curve (AUC), with TM-implant contact lenses in comparison to eye drop therapy. In vivo pharmacodynamic data in rabbit model showed sustained reduction in intra ocular pressure for 192h. The study demonstrated the promising potential of implantation technology to treat glaucoma using contact lenses, and could serve as a platform for other ocular diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. In Vivo Corneal Biomechanical Properties with Corneal Visualization Scheimpflug Technology in Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Tian, Lei; Huang, Yi-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the repeatability of recalculated corneal visualization Scheimpflug technology (CorVis ST) parameters and to study the variation of biomechanical properties and their association with demographic and ocular characteristics. Methods. A total of 783 healthy subjects were included in this study. Comprehensive ophthalmological examinations were conducted. The repeatability of the recalculated biomechanical parameters with 90 subjects was assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Univariate and multivariate linear regression models were used to identify demographic and ocular factors. Results. The repeatability of the central corneal thickness (CCT), deformation amplitude (DA), and first/second applanation time (A1/A2-time) exhibited excellent repeatability (CV% ≤ 3.312% and ICC ≥ 0.929 for all measurements). The velocity in/out (V in/out), highest concavity- (HC-) radius, peak distance (PD), and DA showed a normal distribution. Univariate linear regression showed a statistically significant correlation between V in, V out, DA, PD, and HC-radius and IOP, CCT, and corneal volume, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that IOP and CCT were negatively correlated with V in, DA, and PD, while there was a positive correlation between V out and HC-radius. Conclusion. The ICCs of the recalculated parameters, CCT, DA, A1-time, and A2-time, exhibited excellent repeatability. IOP, CCT, and corneal volume significantly influenced the biomechanical properties of the eye.

  6. In Vivo Corneal Biomechanical Properties with Corneal Visualization Scheimpflug Technology in Chinese Population

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    Ying Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the repeatability of recalculated corneal visualization Scheimpflug technology (CorVis ST parameters and to study the variation of biomechanical properties and their association with demographic and ocular characteristics. Methods. A total of 783 healthy subjects were included in this study. Comprehensive ophthalmological examinations were conducted. The repeatability of the recalculated biomechanical parameters with 90 subjects was assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Univariate and multivariate linear regression models were used to identify demographic and ocular factors. Results. The repeatability of the central corneal thickness (CCT, deformation amplitude (DA, and first/second applanation time (A1/A2-time exhibited excellent repeatability (CV% ≤ 3.312% and ICC ≥ 0.929 for all measurements. The velocity in/out (Vin/out, highest concavity- (HC- radius, peak distance (PD, and DA showed a normal distribution. Univariate linear regression showed a statistically significant correlation between Vin, Vout, DA, PD, and HC-radius and IOP, CCT, and corneal volume, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that IOP and CCT were negatively correlated with Vin, DA, and PD, while there was a positive correlation between Vout and HC-radius. Conclusion. The ICCs of the recalculated parameters, CCT, DA, A1-time, and A2-time, exhibited excellent repeatability. IOP, CCT, and corneal volume significantly influenced the biomechanical properties of the eye.

  7. Allogeneic murine mesenchymal stem cells: migration to inflamed joints in vivo and amelioration of collagen induced arthritis when transduced to express CTLA4Ig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Catherine; Barry, Frank; Ritter, Thomas; O'Flatharta, Cathal; Howard, Linda; Shaw, Georgina; Anegon, Ignacio; Murphy, Mary

    2013-12-15

    Despite the immunosuppressive, homing, and regenerative capabilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), their ability to migrate to arthritic joints and influence the course of arthritis in vivo remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine if allogeneic MSCs migrate to inflamed joints in vivo and to determine if MSCs expressing the costimulation blocker cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 coupled to immunoglobulin-G (CTLA4Ig) could be used to ameliorate collagen induced arthritis (CIA). The migration of systemically delivered inbred mouse strain (FVB) MSCs to migrate to inflamed joints in CIA was studied using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the effect of BALB/c MSCs modified with an adenoviral vector to express CTLA4Ig, on T cell function in vitro and on CIA in vivo was assessed. After systemic delivery of FVB MSCs, eGFP DNA was detectable in the joints of mice with CIA confirming that some MSCs had reached to inflamed joints. BALB/c MSCs suppressed the secretion of both TNFα and IFNγ, and reduced the ratio of Th1:Th2 cytokine expression, by DBA/1 T cells in vitro irrespective of viral modification. The expression of CTLA4Ig did not augment this effect. Despite a worsening of disease scores after infusion of BALB/c MSCs in vivo, BALB/c MSCs expressing CTLA4Ig significantly delayed the onset of inflammatory arthritis in CIA. These data demonstrate that allogeneic MSCs can migrate to the inflamed joints of CIA in vivo and that genetically modified allogeneic MSCs may be considered for development of gene therapy strategies for inflammatory arthritis.

  8. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, B E; Roszell, L E; Murr, L E; Ramirez, D A; Demaree, J D; Klotz, B R; Rosencrance, A B; Dennis, W E; Bao, W; Perkins, E J; Dillman, J F; Bannon, D I

    2012-11-15

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up-regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down-regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin-dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Normothermic Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in Brain-dead Donors Reduces Inflammatory Cytokines and Toll-like Receptor Expression.

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    Shafaghi, Shadi; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Abbasi Dezfuli, Azizollah; Godarzi, Hoda; Sheikhy, Kambiz; Ansari Aval, Zahra; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Emami, Habib; Hosseini-Baharanchi, Fatemeh Sadat; Najafizadeh, Katayoun

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory responses and innate immunologic reactions play an important role in the respiratory system. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is considered a novel method in the evaluation and reconditioning of donor lungs prior to transplantation. However, EVLP's effect on inflammatory and metabolic markers of human lung tissue is unknown.  This study investigated how the performance of EVLP on brain-dead (BD) donor lungs affects the production and release of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-a), inflammatory cells and toll-like receptors (TLR) -2, 4. This study was conducted with an animal subject for qualification of EVLP team and then EVLP was performed on 4 human cases referred to Masih Daneshvari Hospital (Tehran,Iran), from May 2013 to July 2015. Two of these cases, who had acceptable lung function parameters, were enrolled in this study for immunologic investigations. Bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were taken before and after EVLP. Cytokines were quantitatively measured before lung retrieval, at the end of the lung removal, at the start of EVLP, and at the end of the each hour of EVLP. TLR expression was measured on the cells obtained by flow cytometry. TNF-a, IL-6 and IL-8 decreased in each stage of washing perfusate in both cases, and the level of cytokines in serum was in the normal range. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a decreasing expression of CD3, CD4/8, CD19, and CD16+56, as well as TLR-2 and TLR-4 in both cases. Intra-capillary pools of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-a) were determined to contribute to the lung injury during prolonged lung perfusion. This raises the possibility that EVLP donor lungs could be less immunogenic than standard lungs. However, to assess EVLP's effects on lung grafts and optimize recipient outcomes, further studies with a sufficient number of lungs are required.

  10. New synthetic peptides can enhance gene expression of key antioxidant defense enzymes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashoua, Victor E; Adams, David S; Volodina, Natalia V; Li, Hua

    2004-10-22

    Neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and age-related disorders have been attributed to the cellular damage caused by elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals (FRs). These cannot be adequately defended by existing levels of key antioxidant enzymes. Two peptides, 8 and 14 amino acids long, were synthesized and found to up-regulate, at nanomolar concentrations, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) m-RNAs (9- to 12-fold) within 3 h, and then elevate by 5- to 10-fold the protein levels of SOD, CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in rat primary cortical cultures. Kinetic studies showed that the peptide up-regulation of all three enzymes appears to be a coordinated process which occurs in vitro and in vivo. We also found that ischemia alone, without added drugs, can lead to enhanced gene expression of SOD, CAT, and GPX. This suggests that the CNS can initiate its own "defense" against ROS and FR. Thus, our peptides may activate such systems, as well as AP-1 transcription factor, reported in earlier findings to lead to "repair" (growth) of injured cells.

  11. Temporal Changes in Phosphatidylserine Expression and Glucose Metabolism after Myocardial Infarction: An in Vivo Imaging Study in Mice

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    Sebastian Lehner

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET for in vivo monitoring of phosphatidylserine externalization and glucose metabolism can potentially provide early predictors of outcome of cardioprotective therapies after myocardial infarction. We performed serial [68Ga]annexin A5 PET (annexin-PET and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET after myocardial infarction to determine the time of peak phosphatidylserine externalization in relation to impaired glucose metabolism in infracted tissue. Annexin- and FDG-PET recordings were obtained in female (C57BL6/N mice on days 1 to 4 after ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD artery. [68Ga]annexin A5 uptake (%ID/g in the LAD artery territory increased from 1.7 ± 1.1 on day 1 to 5.0 ± 3.3 on day 2 and then declined to 2.0 ± 1.4 on day 3 (p = .047 vs day 2 and 1.6 ± 1.4 on day 4 (p = .014 vs day 2. These results matched apoptosis rates as estimated by autoradiography and fluorescein staining. FDG uptake (%ID/g declined from 28 ± 14 on day 1 to 14 ± 3.5 on day 4 (p < .0001 vs day 1. Whereas FDG-PET revealed continuous loss of cell viability after permanent LAD artery occlusion, annexin-PET indicated peak phosphatidylserine expression at day 2, which might be the optimal time point for therapy monitoring.

  12. Distribution and expression in vitro and in vivo of DNA vaccine against lymphocystis disease virus in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fengrong; Sun, Xiuqin; Liu, Hongzhan; Wu, Xingan; Zhong, Nan; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Guodong

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocystis disease, caused by the lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV), is a significant worldwide problem in fish industry causing substantial economic losses. In this study, we aimed to develop the DNA vaccine against LCDV, using DNA vaccination technology. We evaluated plasmid pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3 kb as a DNA vaccine candidate. The plasmid DNA was transiently expressed after liposome transfection into the eukaryotic COS 7 cell line. The distribution and expression of the DNA vaccine (pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3kb) were also analyzed in tissues of the vaccinated Japanese flounder by PCR, RT-PCR and fluorescent microscopy. Results from PCR analysis indicated that the vaccine-containing plasmids were distributed in injected muscle, the muscle opposite the injection site, the hind intestine, gill, spleen, head, kidney and liver, 6 and 25 days after vaccination. The vaccine plasmids disappeared 100 d post-vaccination. Fluorescent microscopy revealed green fluorescence in the injected muscle, the muscle opposite the injection site, the hind intestine, gill, spleen, head, kidney and liver of fish 48 h post-vaccination, green fluorescence did not appear in the control treated tissue. Green fluorescence became weak at 60 days post-vaccination. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the mcp gene was expressed in all tested tissues of vaccinated fish 6-50 days post-vaccination. These results demonstrate that the antigen encoded by the DNA vaccine is distributed and expressed in all of the tissues analyzed in the vaccinated fish. The antigen would therefore potentially initiate a specific immune response. the plasmid DNA was injected into Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) intramuscularly and antibodies against LCDV were evaluated. The results indicate that the plasmid encoded DNA vaccine could induce an immune response to LCDV and would therefore offer immune protection against LCD. Further studies are required for the development and application of this promising DNA vaccine.

  13. Exploiting the yeast L-A viral capsid for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs as platform in vaccine development and foreign protein expression.

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    Frank Powilleit

    Full Text Available A novel expression system based on engineered variants of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae dsRNA virus L-A was developed allowing the in vivo assembly of chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs as a unique platform for a wide range of applications. We show that polypeptides fused to the viral capsid protein Gag self-assemble into isometric VLP chimeras carrying their cargo inside the capsid, thereby not only effectively preventing proteolytic degradation in the host cell cytosol, but also allowing the expression of a per se cytotoxic protein. Carboxyterminal extension of Gag by T cell epitopes from human cytomegalovirus pp65 resulted in the formation of hybrid VLPs that strongly activated antigen-specific CD8(+ memory T cells ex vivo. Besides being a carrier for polypeptides inducing antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, VLP chimeras were also shown to be effective in the expression and purification of (i a heterologous model protein (GFP, (ii a per se toxic protein (K28 alpha-subunit, and (iii a particle-associated and fully recyclable biotechnologically relevant enzyme (esterase A. Thus, yeast viral Gag represents a unique platform for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs, equally attractive and useful in vaccine development and recombinant protein production.

  14. In vivo monitoring of intranuclear p27(kip1) protein expression in breast cancer cells during trastuzumab (Herceptin) therapy.

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    Cornelissen, Bart; Kersemans, Veerle; McLarty, Kristin; Tran, Lara; Vallis, Katherine A; Reilly, Raymond M

    2009-10-01

    Trastuzumab, a humanized antibody directed against the Her2 receptor, induces the expression of p27(kip1), an intranuclear cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor in some breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a radioimmunoconjugate (RIC) to monitor trastuzumab-induced p27(kip1) protein up-regulation in vivo. Anti-p27(kip1) IgG was purified, and conjugated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate, to allow radiolabeling with (111)In for in vivo detection. Then tat peptide (GRKKRRQRRRPPQGYG), containing a nuclear localization sequence (underlined), was conjugated to the Fc-domain of IgG, using NaIO(4) oxidation of carbohydrates and the resulting Schiff base stabilized with NaCNBH(3). The conjugate was radiolabeled with (111)In, yielding [(111)In]-anti-p27(kip1)-tat. (111)In labeling efficiency, purity and p27(kip1) binding were measured. Trastuzumab-induced p27(kip1) up-regulation was assessed in a panel of breast cancer cell lines by Western blot analysis. Uptake and retention of [(111)In]-anti-p27(kip1)-tat were measured in MDA-MB-361 and SKBr3 cells after exposure to trastuzumab. Uptake of [(111)In]-anti-p27(kip1)-tat was determined at 72 h postintravenous injection in MDA-MB-361 xenografts in athymic mice treated with trastuzumab or saline. [(111)In]-anti-p27(kip1)-tat was synthesized to 97% purity. The RIC was able to bind to p27(kip1) protein and internalized in the cells and was transported to the nuclei of MDA-MB-361 cells. The level of p27(kip1) protein in MDA-MB-361 cells was increased after exposure to clinically relevant doses of trastuzumab for 3 days. Trastuzumab-mediated induction of p27(kip1) was not associated with increased cellular uptake or nuclear localization of [(111)In]-anti-p27(kip1)-tat (6.53+/-0.61% vs. 6.98+/-1.36% internalized into trastuzumab-treated vs. control cells, respectively). However, retention of [(111)In]-anti-p27(kip1)-tat at 72 h was increased approximately twofold (13.5+/-1.3% vs. 6.6+/-0.6% of internalized [(111)In

  15. In vivo monitoring of intranuclear p27{sup kip1} protein expression in breast cancer cells during trastuzumab (Herceptin) therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelissen, Bart [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3E2 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); MRC/CRUK Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, Oxford University, OX3 7LJ Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: bart.cornelissen@rob.ox.ac.uk; Kersemans, Veerle; McLarty, Kristin [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3E2 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Tran, Lara [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Vallis, Katherine A. [MRC/CRUK Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, Oxford University, OX3 7LJ Oxford (United Kingdom); Reilly, Raymond M. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3E2 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3E2 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    Introduction: Trastuzumab, a humanized antibody directed against the Her2 receptor, induces the expression of p27{sup kip1}, an intranuclear cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor in some breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a radioimmunoconjugate (RIC) to monitor trastuzumab-induced p27{sup kip1} protein up-regulation in vivo. Materials and Methods: Anti-p27{sup kip1} IgG was purified, and conjugated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate, to allow radiolabeling with {sup 111}In for in vivo detection. Then tat peptide (GRKKRRQRRRPPQGYG), containing a nuclear localization sequence (underlined), was conjugated to the Fc-domain of IgG, using NaIO{sub 4} oxidation of carbohydrates and the resulting Schiff base stabilized with NaCNBH{sub 3}. The conjugate was radiolabeled with {sup 111}In, yielding [{sup 111}In]-anti-p27{sup kip1}-tat. {sup 111}In labeling efficiency, purity and p27{sup kip1} binding were measured. Trastuzumab-induced p27{sup kip1} up-regulation was assessed in a panel of breast cancer cell lines by Western blot analysis. Uptake and retention of [{sup 111}In]-anti-p27{sup kip1}-tat were measured in MDA-MB-361 and SKBr3 cells after exposure to trastuzumab. Uptake of [{sup 111}In]-anti-p27{sup kip1}-tat was determined at 72 h postintravenous injection in MDA-MB-361 xenografts in athymic mice treated with trastuzumab or saline. Results: [{sup 111}In]-anti-p27{sup kip1}-tat was synthesized to 97% purity. The RIC was able to bind to p27{sup kip1} protein and internalized in the cells and was transported to the nuclei of MDA-MB-361 cells. The level of p27{sup kip1} protein in MDA-MB-361 cells was increased after exposure to clinically relevant doses of trastuzumab for 3 days. Trastuzumab-mediated induction of p27{sup kip1} was not associated with increased cellular uptake or nuclear localization of [{sup 111}In]-anti-p27{sup kip1}-tat (6.53{+-}0.61% vs. 6.98{+-}1.36% internalized into trastuzumab-treated vs. control cells, respectively). However

  16. In vivo crypt surface hyperproliferation is decreased by butyrate and increased by deoxycholate in normal rat colon: associated in vivo effects on c-Fos and c-Jun expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, O C; Zhou, D; Seto, R W; Jabbar, A; Choi, J; Lederer, H M; Rombeau, J L

    1996-01-01

    Studies on colon carcinogenesis suggest that the short-chain fatty acid butyrate may be protective, whereas the secondary bile acid deoxycholate may promote tumor development. Crypt surface hyperproliferation is regarded as a biomarker of colon cancer risk and can be modulated in vitro by the differentiation inducer butyrate and the tumor promoter deoxycholate. We hypothesized that butyrate decreases and deoxycholate increases crypt surface proliferation in vivo and that these effects are mediated by changes in the expression of the protooncogenes c-Fos and c-Jun, which are known to regulate proliferation and differentiation. Twenty-five adult Sprague-Dawley rats underwent colonic isolation and 24-hour intraluminal instillation of 10 mmol/L sodium chloride, 10 mmol/ L sodium butyrate, or 10 mmol/L sodium deoxycholate. Proliferation of the whole crypt and five crypt compartments from base to surface was assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. The øh value, an index of "premalignant" hyperproliferation, was calculated as the ratio of labeled cells in the two surface compartments divided by the labeled cells in the entire crypt. Expression of c-Fos and c-Jun was evaluated by Western blot. Crypt surface proliferation and the øh value were significantly decreased by butyrate and increased by deoxycholate. Butyrate increased colonic expression of c-Jun, whereas deoxycholate significantly induced c-Fos. The in vivo effects on surface proliferation are consistent with a potential protective [corrected] role for butyrate and a promotive role for deoxycholate in colon carcinogenesis. The concurrently observed effects on colonic c-Jun and c-Fos expression represent a novel finding and suggest that direct or indirect modulation of protooncogene expression may be the mechanism by which these dietary byproducts regulate proliferation in vivo.

  17. Temporal Changes in Phosphatidylserine Expression and Glucose Metabolism after Myocardial Infarction: An in Vivo Imaging Study in Mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lehner, Sebastian; Todica, Andrei; Brunner, Stefan; Uebleis, Christopher; Wang, Hao; Wängler, Carmen; Herbach, Nadja; Herrler, Tanja; Böning, Guido; Laubender, Rüdiger Paul; Cumming, Paul; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Franz, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) for in vivo monitoring of phosphatidylserine externalization and glucose metabolism can potentially provide early predictors of outcome of cardioprotective therapies after myocardial infarction...

  18. Acute blood glucose fluctuation enhances rat aorta endothelial cell apoptosis, oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Na; Shen, Haitao; Liu, Henan; Wang, Yanjun; Bai, Yu; Han, Ping

    2016-01-01

    .... In the present study, the influence of acute fluctuant hyperglycemia and persistent hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial cell apoptosis, function, oxidative stress and inflammation was examined in vivo...

  19. The Fas counterattack in vivo: apoptotic depletion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes associated with Fas ligand expression by human esophageal carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, M W

    2012-02-03

    Various cancer cell lines express Fas ligand (FasL) and can kill lymphoid cells by Fas-mediated apoptosis in vitro. FasL expression has been demonstrated in several human malignancies in vivo. We sought to determine whether human esophageal carcinomas express FasL, and whether FasL expression is associated with increased apoptosis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in vivo, thereby contributing to the immune privilege of the tumor. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively, FasL mRNA and protein were colocalized to neoplastic esophageal epithelial cells in all esophageal carcinomas (squamous, n = 6; adenocarcinoma, n = 2). The Extent of FasL expression was variable, with both FasL-positive and FasL-negative neoplastic regions occurring within tumors. TIL were detected by immunohistochemical staining for the leukocyte common Ag, CD45. FasL expression was associated with a mean fourfold depletion of TIL when compared with FasL-negative areas within the same tumors (range 1.6- to 12-fold, n = 6,p < 0.05). Cell death of TIL was detected by dual staining of CD45 (immunohistochemistry) and DNA strand breaks (TUNEL, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling). There was a mean twofold increase in detectable cell death among TIL in FasL-positive areas compared with FasL-negative areas (range 1.6- to 2.4-fold, n = 6, p < 0.05). In conclusion, we demonstrate a statistically significant, quantitative reduction of TIL concomitant with significantly increased TIL apoptosis within FasL-expressing areas of esophageal tumors. Our findings suggest Fas-mediated apoptotic depletion of TIL in response to FasL expression by esophageal cancers, and provide the first direct, quantitative evidence to support the Fas counterattack as a mechanism of immune privilege in vivo in human cancer.

  20. Chloroplast-Based Expression of Recombinant Proteins by Gateway® Cloning Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschamel, Johanna; Lössl, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Plastid transformation for the expression of recombinant proteins and entire enzymatic pathways has become a promising tool for plant biotechnology in the past decade. Several improvements of the technology have turned plant plastids into robust and dependable expression platforms for multiple high value compounds. In this chapter, we describe our current methodology based on Gateway(®) recombinant cloning, which we have adapted for plastid transformation. We describe the steps required for cloning, biolistic transformation, identification, and regeneration of transplastomic plant lines and Western blot analysis.

  1. Expression of colonization factor CS5 of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is enhanced in vivo and by the bile component Na glycocholate hydrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilda Nicklasson

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is an important cause of acute watery diarrhoea in developing countries. Colonization factors (CFs on the bacterial surface mediate adhesion to the small intestinal epithelium. Two of the most common CFs worldwide are coli surface antigens 5 and 6 (CS5, CS6. In this study we investigated the expression of CS5 and CS6 in vivo, and the effects of bile and sodium bicarbonate, present in the human gut, on the expression of CS5. Five CS5+CS6 ETEC isolates from adult Bangladeshi patients with acute diarrhoea were studied. The level of transcription from the CS5 operon was approximately 100-fold higher than from the CS6 operon in ETEC bacteria recovered directly from diarrhoeal stool without sub-culturing (in vivo. The glyco-conjugated primary bile salt sodium glycocholate hydrate (NaGCH induced phenotypic expression of CS5 in a dose-dependent manner and caused a 100-fold up-regulation of CS5 mRNA levels; this is the first description of NaGCH as an enteropathogenic virulence inducer. The relative transcription levels from the CS5 and CS6 operons in the presence of bile or NaGCH in vitro were similar to those in vivo. Another bile salt, sodium deoxycholate (NaDC, previously reported to induce enteropathogenic virulence, also induced expression of CS5, whereas sodium bicarbonate did not.

  2. Expression of colonization factor CS5 of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is enhanced in vivo and by the bile component Na glycocholate hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklasson, Matilda; Sjöling, Åsa; von Mentzer, Astrid; Qadri, Firdausi; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of acute watery diarrhoea in developing countries. Colonization factors (CFs) on the bacterial surface mediate adhesion to the small intestinal epithelium. Two of the most common CFs worldwide are coli surface antigens 5 and 6 (CS5, CS6). In this study we investigated the expression of CS5 and CS6 in vivo, and the effects of bile and sodium bicarbonate, present in the human gut, on the expression of CS5. Five CS5+CS6 ETEC isolates from adult Bangladeshi patients with acute diarrhoea were studied. The level of transcription from the CS5 operon was approximately 100-fold higher than from the CS6 operon in ETEC bacteria recovered directly from diarrhoeal stool without sub-culturing (in vivo). The glyco-conjugated primary bile salt sodium glycocholate hydrate (NaGCH) induced phenotypic expression of CS5 in a dose-dependent manner and caused a 100-fold up-regulation of CS5 mRNA levels; this is the first description of NaGCH as an enteropathogenic virulence inducer. The relative transcription levels from the CS5 and CS6 operons in the presence of bile or NaGCH in vitro were similar to those in vivo. Another bile salt, sodium deoxycholate (NaDC), previously reported to induce enteropathogenic virulence, also induced expression of CS5, whereas sodium bicarbonate did not.

  3. Expressive visual text-to-speech as an assistive technology for individuals with autism spectrum conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, S A; Stenger, B.; Van Dongen, L.; Yanagisawa, K.; Anderson, R; Wan, V.; Baron-Cohen, S; Cipolla, R.

    2016-01-01

    Adults with Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) experience marked difficulties in recognising the emotions of others and responding appropriately. The clinical characteristics of ASC mean that face to face or group interventions may not be appropriate for this clinical group. This article explores the potential of a new interactive technology, converting text to emotionally expressive speech, to improve emotion processing ability and attention to faces in adults with ASC. We demonstrate a method...

  4. Expression of REST4 in human gliomas in vivo and influence of pioglitazone on REST in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Huan [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China); Gao, Zhangfeng [Department of Neurosurgery, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Wu, Nayiyuan; Zeng, Liu; Tang, Xinyue; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Zhaoqian; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Liansheng [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China); Li, Zhi, E-mail: lizhi489@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China)

    2015-08-07

    The repressor element-1 (RE1) silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) has an irreplaceable role during the differentiation of neurons. REST has multiple splice variants which link to various types of cancer. Previous work had highlighted the role of REST in glioma, where the expression of REST is enhanced. But whether alternative splicing of REST is expressed in glioma has not been described. Here, we show that a specific isoform REST4 is expressed in glioma specimens, and will influence the mRNA level of REST in vivo. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists have a role of antineoplastic in various tumor cells, which including glioma cells. Moreover, study indicated that PPARγ agonist pioglitazone can promote alternative splicing of REST pre-mRNA. In this study, we selected pioglitazone as a tool drug to explore whether the role of pioglitazone in anti-glioma is mediated by regulating REST expression or promoting alternative splicing of REST in glioma cells. Results show that pioglitazone can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of glioma cell in vitro, which may be mediated by down-regulating REST mRNA level but not by inducing alternative splicing of REST pre-mRNA. Our study firstly reports the expression of REST4 in glioma tissue samples. And we recommend that pioglitazone, which can reduce the expression level of REST, represents a promising drug for therapy of glioma. - Highlights: • A specific isoform REST4 is expressed in glioma specimens in vivo. • REST4 will influence the mRNA level of REST in vivo. • Pioglitazone can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of glioma cells. • The role of pioglitazone in anti-glioma may be mediated by down-regulating REST.

  5. Adult ciliary neurotrophic factor receptors help maintain facial motor neuron choline acetyltransferase expression in vivo following nerve crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Rydyznski, Carolyn E; Rasch, Matthew S; Trinh, Dennis S; MacLennan, A John

    2017-04-01

    Exogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration promotes the survival of motor neurons in a wide range of models. It also increases the expression of the critical neurotransmitter enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) by in vitro motor neurons, likely independent of its effects on their survival. We have used the adult mouse facial nerve crush model and adult-onset conditional disruption of the CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) gene to directly examine the in vivo roles played by endogenous CNTF receptors in adult motor neuron survival and ChAT maintenance, independent of developmental functions. We have previously shown that adult activation of the CreER gene construct in floxed CNTFRα mice depletes this essential receptor subunit in a large subset of motor neurons (and all skeletal muscle, as shown in this study) but has no effect on the survival of intact or lesioned motor neurons, indicating that these adult CNTF receptors play no essential survival role in this model, in contrast to their essential role during embryonic development. Here we show that this same CNTFRα depletion does not affect ChAT labeling in nonlesioned motor neurons, but it significantly increases the loss of ChAT following nerve crush. The data suggest that, although neither motor neuron nor muscle CNTF receptors play a significant, nonredundant role in the maintenance of ChAT in intact adult motor neurons, the receptors become essential for ChAT maintenance when the motor neurons are challenged by nerve crush. Therefore, the data suggest that the receptors act as a critical component of an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1206-1215, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Downregulation of CD147 expression by RNA interference inhibits HT29 cell proliferation, invasion and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Pan, Yuqin; He, Bangshun; Xu, Yeqiong; Gao, Tianyi; Song, Guoqi; Sun, Huiling; Deng, Qiwen; Wang, Shukui

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of CD147 silencing on HT29 cell proliferation and invasion. We constructed a novel short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector pYr-mir30-shRNA. The plasmid was transferred to HT29 cells. The expression of CD147, MCT1 (lactate transporters monocarboxylate transporter 1) and MCT4 (lactate transporters monocarboxylate transporter 4) were monitored by quantitative PCR and western blotting, respectively. The MMP-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-2) and MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase-9) activities were determined by gelatin zymography assay, while the intracellular lactate concentration was determined by the lactic acid assay kit. WST-8 assay was used to determine the HT29 cell proliferation and the chemosensitivity. Invasion assay was used to determine the invasion of HT29 cells. In addition, we established a colorectal cancer model, and detected CD147 expression in vivo. The results showed that the expression of CD147 and MCT1 was significantly reduced at both mRNA and protein levels, and also the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was reduced. The proliferation and invasion were decreased, but chemosensitivity to cisplatin was increased. In vivo, the CD147 expression was also significantly decreased, and reduced the tumor growth after CD147 gene silencing. The results demonstrated that silencing of CD147 expression inhibited the proliferation and invasion, suggesting CD147 silencing might be an adjuvant gene therapy strategy to chemotherapy.

  7. Mercury-induced hepatotoxicity in zebrafish: in vivo mechanistic insights from transcriptome analysis, phenotype anchoring and targeted gene expression validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathavan Sinnakaruppan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is a prominent environmental contaminant that causes detrimental effects to human health. Although the liver has been known to be a main target organ, there is limited information on in vivo molecular mechanism of mercury-induced toxicity in the liver. By using transcriptome analysis, phenotypic anchoring and validation of targeted gene expression in zebrafish, mercury-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated and a number of perturbed cellular processes were identified and compared with those captured in the in vitro human cell line studies. Results Hepato-transcriptome analysis of mercury-exposed zebrafish revealed that the earliest deregulated genes were associated with electron transport chain, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, nuclear receptor signaling and apoptotic pathway, followed by complement system and proteasome pathway, and thereafter DNA damage, hypoxia, Wnt signaling, fatty acid synthesis, gluconeogenesis, cell cycle and motility. Comparative meta-analysis of microarray data between zebrafish liver and human HepG2 cells exposed to mercury identified some common toxicological effects of mercury-induced hepatotoxicity in both models. Histological analyses of liver from mercury-exposed fish revealed morphological changes of liver parenchyma, decreased nucleated cell count, increased lipid vesicles, glycogen and apoptotic bodies, thus providing phenotypic evidence for anchoring of the transcriptome analysis. Validation of targeted gene expression confirmed deregulated gene-pathways from enrichment analysis. Some of these genes responding to low concentrations of mercury may serve as toxicogenomic-based markers for detection and health risk assessment of environmental mercury contaminations. Conclusion Mercury-induced hepatotoxicity was triggered by oxidative stresses, intrinsic apoptotic pathway, deregulation of nuclear receptor and kinase activities including Gsk3 that deregulates Wnt signaling

  8. Tissue-specific expression and in vivo regulation of zebrafish orthologues of mammalian genes related to symptomatic hypomagnesemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Francisco J; Chen, Yu-Xuan; Flik, Gert; Bindels, René J; Hoenderop, Joost G

    2013-10-01

    Introduction of zebrafish as a model for human diseases with symptomatic hypomagnesemia urges to identify the regulatory transport genes involved in zebrafish Mg(2+) physiology. In humans, mutations related to hypomagnesemia are located in the genes TRPM6 and CNNM2, encoding for a Mg(2+) channel and transporter, respectively; EGF (epidermal growth factor); SLC12A3, which encodes for the Na(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter NCC; KCNA1 and KCNJ10, encoding for the K(+) channels Kv1.1 and Kir4.1, respectively; and FXYD2, which encodes for the γ-subunit of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Orthologues of these genes were found in the zebrafish genome. For cnnm2, kcna1 and kcnj10, two conserved paralogues were retrieved. Except for fxyd2, kcna1b and kcnj10 duplicates, transcripts of orthologues were detected in ionoregulatory organs such as the gills, kidney and gut. Gene expression analyses in zebrafish acclimated to a Mg(2+)-deficient (0 mM Mg(2+)) or a Mg(2+)-enriched (2 mM Mg(2+)) water showed that branchial trpm6, gut cnnm2b and renal slc12a3 responded to ambient Mg(2+). When changing the Mg(2+) composition of the diet (the main source for Mg(2+) in fish) to a Mg(2+)-deficient (0.01 % (w/w) Mg) or a Mg(2+)-enriched diet (0.7 % (w/w) Mg), mRNA expression of branchial trpm6, gut trpm6 and cnnm2 duplicates, and renal trpm6, egf, cnnm2a and slc12a3 was the highest in fish fed the Mg(2+)-deficient diet. The gene regulation patterns were in line with compensatory mechanisms to cope with Mg(2+)-deficiency or surplus. Our findings suggest that trpm6, egf, cnnm2 paralogues and slc12a3 are involved in the in vivo regulation of Mg(2+) transport in ionoregulatory organs of the zebrafish model.

  9. Acute blood glucose fluctuation enhances rat aorta endothelial cell apoptosis, oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Na; Shen, Haitao; Liu, Henan; Wang, Yanjun; Bai, Yu; Han, Ping

    2016-08-05

    Complications of diabetes mellitus (DM) are related not only to elevated plasma glucose, but also plasma glucose fluctuations. However, the specific mechanism underlying the role of plasma glucose fluctuation in the pathogenesis of DM complications remains poorly understood. In the present study, the influence of acute fluctuant hyperglycemia and persistent hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial cell apoptosis, function, oxidative stress and inflammation was examined in vivo. Rats were assigned to three different groups (n = 10/group) that received 48-h infusions of saline (SAL group), continuous 50 % glucose (constant high glucose group [CHG]), or intermittent 50 % glucose (acute blood glucose fluctuation group [AFG]). Plasma 8-isoprostaglandin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) levels were quantified by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) commercial kits. Plasma insulin levels were measured by radioimmunoassays (RIAs) using kits. The aortic segment was collected. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) were measured in endothelial homogenates prepared from endothelial cells harvested from the aorta using colorimetric kits. Apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Endothelial dysfunction was assessed by isometric tension recording to evaluate the endothelial function. The expression of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2 Associated X protein (Bax), pro caspase-3, caspase-3 p17, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and p47phox protein in rat aortic endothelial cells were tested with Western blot analysis. Endothelial cells reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was determined using dihydroethidium-dependent fluorescence microtopography in aortic cryo-sections. Expression of IL-6, TNF-α and ICAM-1 mRNAs in vascular endothelial cells were determined by real

  10. Targeted transgenesis at the HPRT locus: an efficient strategy to achieve tightly controlled in vivo conditional expression with the tet system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palais, G; Nguyen Dinh Cat, A; Friedman, H; Panek-Huet, N; Millet, A; Tronche, F; Gellen, B; Mercadier, J-J; Peterson, A; Jaisser, F

    2009-04-10

    The tet-inducible system has been widely used to achieve conditional gene expression in genetically modified mice. To alleviate the frequent difficulties associated with recovery of relevant transgenic founders, we tested whether a controlled strategy of transgenesis would support reliable cell-specific, doxycycline (Dox)-controlled transgene expression in vivo. Taking advantage of the potent hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine selection strategy and an embryonic stem (ES) cell line supporting efficient germ-line transmission, we used hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) targeting to insert a single copy tet-inducible construct designed to allow both glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) expression. Conditional, Dox-dependent GR and beta-Gal expression was evidenced in targeted ES cells. Breeding ES-derived single copy transgenic mice with mice bearing appropriate tet transactivators resulted in beta-Gal expression both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that observed in mice with random integration of the same construct. Interestingly, GR expression in mice was dependent on transgene orientation in the HPRT locus while embryonic stem cell expression was not. Thus, a conditional construct inserted in single copy and in predetermined orientation at the HPRT locus demonstrated a Dox-dependent gene expression phenotype in adult mice suggesting that controlled insertion of tet-inducible constructs at the HPRT locus can provide an efficient alternative strategy to reproducibly generate animal models with tetracycline-induced transgene expression.

  11. mRNA expression pattern of selected candidate genes differs in bovine oviductal epithelial cells in vitro compared with the in vivo state and during cell culture passages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh Mesgaran, Sadjad; Sharbati, Jutta; Einspanier, Ralf; Gabler, Christoph

    2016-08-15

    The mammalian oviduct provides the optimal environment for gamete maturation including sperm capacitation, fertilization, and development of the early embryo. Various cell culture models for primary bovine oviductal epithelial cells (BOEC) were established to reveal such physiological events. The aim of this study was to evaluate 17 candidate mRNA expression patterns in oviductal epithelial cells (1) in transition from in vivo cells to in vitro cells; (2) during three consecutive cell culture passages; (3) affected by the impact of LOW or HIGH glucose content media; and (4) influenced by different phases of the estrous cycle in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the release of a metabolite and proteins from BOEC at two distinct cell culture passage numbers was estimated to monitor the functionality. BOEC from 8 animals were isolated and cultured for three consecutive passages. Total RNA was extracted from in vivo and in vitro samples and subjected to reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction to reveal mRNA expression of selected candidate genes. The release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), oviduct-specific glycoprotein 1 (OVGP1) and interleukin 8 (IL8) by BOEC was measured by EIA or ELISA after 24 h. Almost all candidate genes (prostaglandin synthases, enzymes of cellular metabolism and mucins) mRNA expression pattern differed compared in vivo with in vitro state. In addition, transcription of most candidate genes was influenced by the number of cell culture passages. Different glucose medium content did not affect mRNA expression of most candidate genes. The phase of the estrous cycle altered some candidate mRNA expression in BOEC in vitro at later passages. The release of PGE2 and OVGP1 between passages did not differ. However, BOEC in passage 3 released significantly higher amount of IL8 compared with cells in passage 0. This study supports the hypothesis that candidate mRNA expression in BOEC was influenced by transition from the in vivo situation

  12. The Development of a Viral Mediated CRISPR/Cas9 System with Doxycycline Dependent gRNA Expression for Inducible In vitro and In vivo Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Solis, Christopher A; Ho, Anthony; Holehonnur, Roopashri; Ploski, Jonathan E

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease, from the type II prokaryotic Clustered Regularly Interspersed Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) adaptive immune system, has been adapted and utilized by scientists to edit the genomes of eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the development of a viral mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system that can be rendered inducible utilizing doxycycline (Dox) and can be delivered to cells in vitro and in vivo utilizing adeno-associated virus (AAV). Specifically, we developed an inducible gRNA (gRNAi) AAV vector that is designed to express the gRNA from a H1/TO promoter. This AAV vector is also designed to express the Tet repressor (TetR) to regulate the expression of the gRNAi in a Dox dependent manner. We show that H1/TO promoters of varying length and a U6/TO promoter can edit DNA with similar efficiency in vitro, in a Dox dependent manner. We also demonstrate that our inducible gRNAi vector can be used to edit the genomes of neurons in vivo within the mouse brain in a Dox dependent manner. Genome editing can be induced in vivo with this system by supplying animals Dox containing food for as little as 1 day. This system might be cross compatible with many existing S. pyogenes Cas9 systems (i.e., Cas9 mouse, CRISPRi, etc.), and therefore it likely can be used to render these systems inducible as well.

  13. The development of a viral mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system with doxycycline dependent gRNA expression for inducible in vitro and in vivo genome editing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. de Solis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease, from the type II prokaryotic Clustered Regularly Interspersed Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR adaptive immune system, has been adapted and utilized by scientists to edit the genomes of eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the development of a viral mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system that can be rendered inducible utilizing doxycycline (Dox and can be delivered to cells in vitro and in vivo utilizing adeno-associated virus (AAV. Specifically, we developed an inducible gRNA (gRNAi AAV vector that is designed to express the gRNA from a H1/TO promoter. This AAV vector is also designed to express the Tet repressor (TetR to regulate the expression of the gRNAi in a Dox dependent manner. We show that H1/TO promoters of varying length and a U6/TO promoter can edit DNA with similar efficiency in vitro, in a Dox dependent manner. We also demonstrate that our inducible gRNAi vector can be used to edit the genomes of neurons in vivo within the mouse brain in a Dox dependent manner. Genome editing can be induced in vivo with this system by supplying animals Dox containing food for as little as one day. This system might be cross compatible with many existing S. pyogenes Cas9 systems (i.e. Cas9 mouse, CRISPRi, etc., and therefore it likely can be used to render these systems inducible as well.

  14. In vivo biocompatibility and pacing function study of silver ion-based antimicrobial surface technology applied to cardiac pacemakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawcross, James; Bakhai, Ameet; Ansaripour, Ali; Armstrong, James; Lewis, David; Agg, Philip; De Godoy, Roberta; Blunn, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Evidence suggests that the rate of cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections is increasing more rapidly than the rates of CIED implantation and is associated with considerable mortality, morbidity and health economic impact. Antimicrobial surface treatments are being developed for CIEDs to reduce the risk of postimplantation infection within the subcutaneous implant pocket. Methods and analysis The feasibility of processing cardiac pacemakers with the Agluna antimicrobial silver ion surface technology and in vivo biocompatibility were evaluated. Antimicrobially processed (n=6) and control pacemakers (n=6) were implanted into subcutaneous pockets and connected to a part of the sacrospinalis muscle using an ovine model for 12 weeks. Pacemaker function was monitored preimplantation and postimplantation. Results Neither local infection nor systemic toxicity were detected in antimicrobial or control devices, and surrounding tissues showed no abnormal pathology or over-reactivity. Semiquantitative scores of membrane formation, cellular orientation and vascularity were applied over five regions of the pacemaker capsule and average scores compared. Results showed no significant difference between antimicrobially processed and control pacemakers. Silver analysis of whole blood at 7 days found that levels were a maximum of 10 parts per billion (ppb) for one sample, more typically ≤2 ppb, compared with <<2 ppb for preimplantation levels, well below reported toxic levels. Conclusions There was no evidence of adverse or abnormal pathology in tissue surrounding antimicrobially processed pacemakers, or deleterious effect on basic pacing capabilities and parameters at 12 weeks. This proof of concept study provides evidence of basic biocompatibility and feasibility of applying this silver ion-based antimicrobial surface to a titanium pacemaker surface. PMID:28674615

  15. Evaluation of Lentiviral-Mediated Expression of Sodium Iodide Symporter in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer and the Efficacy of In Vivo Imaging and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Ke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is one of the most deadly cancers. With intensive multimodalities of treatment, the survival remains low. ATC is not sensitive to 131I therapy due to loss of sodium iodide symporter (NIS gene expression. We have previously generated a stable human NIS-expressing ATC cell line, ARO, and the ability of iodide accumulation was restored. To make NIS-mediated gene therapy more applicable, this study aimed to establish a lentiviral system for transferring hNIS gene to cells and to evaluate the efficacy of in vitro and in vivo radioiodide accumulation for imaging and therapy. Lentivirus containing hNIS cDNA were produced to transduce ARO cells which do not concentrate iodide. Gene expression, cell function, radioiodide imaging and treatment were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that the transduced cells were restored to express hNIS and accumulated higher amount of radioiodide than parental cells. Therapeutic dose of 131I effectively inhibited the tumor growth derived from transduced cells as compared to saline-treated mice. Our results suggest that the lentiviral system efficiently transferred and expressed hNIS gene in ATC cells. The transduced cells showed a promising result of tumor imaging and therapy.

  16. Regulation of high mobility group box protein 1 expression following mechanical loading by orthodontic forces in vitro and in vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolf, Michael; Lossdörfer, Stefan; Küpper, Katharina; Jäger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    ...) cells challenged by mechanical loading similar to force levels being applied in orthodontic treatment in vitro and to transfer these findings to an in vivo microenvironment in an animal model of tooth movement in rats...

  17. Application of HaloTag technology to expression and purification of cannabinoid receptor CB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia; Sheen, Fangmin C; Zoubak, Lioudmila; Gawrisch, Klaus; Yeliseev, Alexei A

    2013-05-01

    Expression of milligram quantities of functional, stable G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) for high-resolution structural studies remains a challenging task. The goal of this work was to evaluate the usefulness of the HaloTag system (Promega) for expression and purification of the human cannabinoid receptor CB(2), an important target for development of drugs for treatment of immune disorders, inflammation, and pain. Here we investigated expression in Escherichia coli cells of the integral membrane receptor CB(2) as a fusion with the 34 kDa HaloTag at N- or C-terminal location, either in the presence or in the absence of the N-terminal maltose-binding protein (MBP). The CB(2) was flanked at both ends by the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease cleavage sites to allow for subsequent removal of expression partners. Expression by induction with either IPTG (in E. coli BL21(DE3) cell cultures) or by auto-induction (in E. coli KRX cells) were compared. While the N-terminal location of the HaloTag resulted in high levels of expression of the fusion CB(2), the recombinant receptor was not functional. However, when the HaloTag was placed in the C-terminal location, a fully active receptor was produced irrespective of induction method or bacterial strain used. For purification, the fusion protein was captured onto HaloLink resin in the presence of detergents. Treatment with specific TEV protease released the CB(2) upon washing. To our knowledge, this study represents the first example of expression, surface immobilization and purification of a functional GPCR using HaloTag technology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The rise of photoresponsive protein technologies applications in vivo: a spotlight on zebrafish developmental and cell biology [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Wei-Yan Chow

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish (Danio rerio is a powerful vertebrate model to study cellular and developmental processes in vivo. The optical clarity and their amenability to genetic manipulation make zebrafish a model of choice when it comes to applying optical techniques involving genetically encoded photoresponsive protein technologies. In recent years, a number of fluorescent protein and optogenetic technologies have emerged that allow new ways to visualize, quantify, and perturb developmental dynamics. Here, we explain the principles of these new tools and describe some of their representative applications in zebrafish.

  19. A locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotide (LNA silences PCSK9 and enhances LDLR expression in vitro and in vivo.

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    Nidhi Gupta

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9 is an important factor in the etiology of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH and is also an attractive therapeutic target to reduce low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol. PCSK9 accelerates the degradation of hepatic low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR and low levels of hepatic PCSK9 activity are associated with reduced levels of circulating LDL-cholesterol.The present study presents the first evidence for the efficacy of a locked nucleic acid (LNA antisense oligonucleotide (LNA ASO that targets both human and mouse PCSK9. We employed human hepatocytes derived cell lines HepG2 and HuH7 and a pancreatic mouse beta-TC3 cell line known to express high endogenous levels of PCSK9. LNA ASO efficiently reduced the mRNA and protein levels of PCSK9 with a concomitant increase in LDLR protein levels after transfection in these cells. In vivo efficacy of LNA ASO was further investigated in mice by tail vein intravenous administration of LNA ASO in saline solution. The level of PCSK9 mRNA was reduced by approximately 60%, an effect lasting more than 16 days. Hepatic LDLR protein levels were significantly up-regulated by 2.5-3 folds for at least 8 days and approximately 2 fold for 16 days. Finally, measurement of liver alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels revealed that long term LNA ASO treatment (7 weeks does not cause hepatotoxicity.LNA-mediated PCSK9 mRNA inhibition displayed potent reduction of PCSK9 in cell lines and mouse liver. Our data clearly revealed the efficacy and safety of LNA ASO in reducing PCSK9 levels, an approach that is now ready for testing in primates. The major significance and take home message of this work is the development of a novel and promising approach for human therapeutic intervention of the PCSK9 pathway and hence for reducing some of the cardiovascular risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome.

  20. [Establishment of the cell line that human lung adenocarcinoma can stably express luciferase which is absent of nm23-H1 expression and detecting its luminescence
in vitro and in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongming; Zhu, Daxing; Wu, Zhihao; Zhou, Qinghua

    2012-03-01

    On the condition that laboratory animals survive, we can detect the distribution of tumor cells by in vivo imaging that were labeled with firefly- luciferase (luc) gene. The purpose of this study is to establish a light-emitting cell line A549/nm23-H1-shRNA-luc which could express nm23-H1 shRNA and firefly-luciferase stably, and detect its bioluminescence in vitro and in vivo. It will provide the preparation for the next related experimental research in vivo. The optimal concentration of hygromycin B for screening A549/nm23-H1-shRNA cells was determined by concentration gradient method. We firstly transfected the plasmid (PGL4.50) with luc gene into A549/nm23-H1-shRNA cells and then screened the monoclonal cell line A549/nm23-H1-shRNA-luc with hyhromycin B. The positive monoclonal cell line was identified with an in vivo imaging system, thereafter the expression stability of luciferase was analyzed in the strongest light-emitting positive monoclonal cell line. The A549/nm23-H1-shRNA-luc cells were inoculated subcutaneously into right-hind groin of nude mice and then observed by the in vivo imaging system. The optimal concentration of hygromycin B used in screening A549/nm23-H1-shRNA cells was 300 μg/mL. After screening, the A549/nm23-H1-shRNA-luc cells established can express luciferase stably in vitro, a great linear correlation existed between the amount of cells (x) and bioluminescence values (y), with an equation of y=3,699.9x+992,237, and the square of the correlation coefficient (R2) was 0.975,1. To evaluate the stability of bioluminescence in vivo, 10 nude mice were randomly divided into two groups that the same number of cells were implanted into. The variation of bioluminescence values detected in vivo between the two groups of the same cells was not statistically significant (P>0.05). We have successfully established the cell line A549/nm23-H1-shRNA-luc which can express luciferase persistently and stably.

  1. How technology influences the therapeutic process: evaluation of the patient-therapist relationship in augmented reality exposure therapy and in vivo exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzesien, Maja; Bretón-López, Juana; Botella, Cristina; Burkhardt, Jean-Marie; Alcañiz, Mariano; Pérez-Ara, María Ángeles; Del Amo, Antonio Riera

    2013-07-01

    New technologies have slowly become a part of psychologists' therapeutic office. However, many therapists still have doubts about the possibility of creating a good therapeutic relationship with patients in the presence of technology. This study evaluates the development of the therapeutic alliance in individuals with small animal phobia disorder who were treated with Augmented Reality Exposure Therapy or In Vivo Exposure Therapy. Twenty-two participants received an intensive session of cognitive behavioural therapy in either a technology-mediated therapeutic context or in a traditional therapeutic context. The results show no significant difference for the therapeutic alliance between two conditions. The results seem to show that technologies such as Augmented Reality do not represent a danger to negatively influence the therapeutic alliance.

  2. Cross-platform analysis of global microRNA expression technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yauk, Carole L; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; Stead, John Dh; Williams, Andrew

    2010-05-26

    Although analysis of microRNAs (miRNAs) by DNA microarrays is gaining in popularity, these new technologies have not been adequately validated. We examined within and between platform reproducibility of four miRNA array technologies alongside TaqMan PCR arrays. Two distinct pools of reference materials were selected in order to maximize differences in miRNA content. Filtering for miRNA that yielded signal above background revealed 54 miRNA probes (matched by sequence) across all platforms. Using this probeset as well as all probes that were present on an individual platform, within-platform analyses revealed Spearman correlations of >0.9 for most platforms. Comparing between platforms, rank analysis of the log ratios of the two reference pools also revealed high correlation (range 0.663-0.949). Spearman rank correlation and concordance correlation coefficients for miRNA arrays against TaqMan qRT-PCR arrays were similar for all of the technologies. Platform performances were similar to those of previous cross-platform exercises on mRNA and miRNA microarray technologies. These data indicate that miRNA microarray platforms generated highly reproducible data and can be recommended for the study of changes in miRNA expression.

  3. Ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kant M; Lopes-Calcas, Ana; Honke, Michael L; O'Brien-Moran, Zoe; Buist, Richard; West, Michael; Martin, Melanie

    2017-07-01

    To advance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies further for in vivo tissue characterization with histopathologic validation, we investigated the feasibility of ex vivo tissue imaging of a surgically removed human brain tumor as a comprehensive approach for radiology-pathology correlation in histoanatomically identical fashion in a rare case of pigmented ganglioglioma with complex paramagnetic properties. Pieces of surgically removed ganglioglioma, containing melanin and hemosiderin pigments, were imaged with a small bore 7-T MRI scanner to obtain T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted image and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Corresponding histopathological slides were prepared for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain and special stains for melanin and iron/hemosiderin to correlate with MRI signal characteristics. Furthermore, mean diffusivity (MD) maps were generated from DTI data and correlated with cellularity using image analysis. While the presence of melanin was difficult to interpret in in vivo MRI with certainty due to concomitant hemosiderin pigments and calcium depositions, ex vivo tissue imaging clearly demonstrated pieces of tissue exhibiting the characteristic MR signal pattern for melanin with pathologic confirmation in a histoanatomically identical location. There was also concordant correlation between MD and cellularity. Although it is still in an initial phase of development, ex vivo tissue imaging is a promising approach, which offers radiology-pathology correlation in a straightforward and comprehensive manner.

  4. In vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging of FAP-expressing tumors with activatable FAP-targeted, single-chain Fv-immunoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüger, Ronny; Tansi, Felista L; Rabenhold, Markus; Steiniger, Frank; Kontermann, Roland E; Fahr, Alfred; Hilger, Ingrid

    2014-07-28

    Molecular and cellular changes that precede the invasive growth of solid tumors include the release of proteolytic enzymes and peptides in the tumor stroma, the recruitment of phagocytic and lymphoid infiltrates and alteration of the extracellular matrix. The reactive tumor stroma consists of a large number of myofibroblasts, characterized by high expression of fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP). FAP, a type-II transmembrane sialoglycoprotein is an attractive target in diagnosis and therapy of several pathologic disorders especially cancer. In the underlying work, a fluorescence-activatable liposome (fluorescence-quenched during circulation and fluorescence activation upon cellular uptake), bearing specific single-chain Fv fragments directed against FAP (scFv'FAP) was developed, and its potential for use in fluorescence diagnostic imaging of FAP-expressing tumor cells was evaluated by whole body fluorescence imaging. The liposomes termed anti-FAP-IL were prepared via post-insertion of ligand-phospholipid-conjugates into preformed DY-676-COOH-containing liposomes. The anti-FAP-IL revealed a homogeneous size distribution and showed specific interaction and binding with FAP-expressing cells in vitro. The high level of fluorescence quenching of the near-infrared fluorescent dye sequestered in the aqueous interior of the liposomes enables fluorescence imaging exclusively upon uptake and degradation by cells, which results in fluorescence activation. Only FAP-expressing cells were able to take up and activate fluorescence of anti-FAP-IL in vitro. Furthermore, anti-FAP-IL accumulated selectively in FAP-expressing xenograft models in vivo, as demonstrated by blocking experiments using free scFv'FAP. The local tumor fluorescence intensities were in agreement with the intrinsic degree of FAP-expression in different xenograft models. Thus, anti-FAP-IL can serve as a suitable in vivo diagnostic tool for pathological disorders accompanied by high FAP-expression

  5. Expression of Nitric Oxide-Transporting Aquaporin-1 Is Controlled by KLF2 and Marks Non-Activated Endothelium In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruud D Fontijn

    Full Text Available The flow-responsive transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2 maintains an anti-coagulant, anti-inflammatory endothelium with sufficient nitric oxide (NO-bioavailability. In this study, we aimed to explore, both in vitro and in human vascular tissue, expression of the NO-transporting transmembrane pore aquaporin-1 (AQP1 and its regulation by atheroprotective KLF2 and atherogenic inflammatory stimuli. In silico analysis of gene expression profiles from studies that assessed the effects of KLF2 overexpression in vitro and atherosclerosis in vivo on endothelial cells, identifies AQP1 as KLF2 downstream gene with elevated expression in the plaque-free vessel wall. Biomechanical and pharmaceutical induction of KLF2 in vitro is accompanied by induction of AQP1. Chromosome immunoprecipitation (CHIP confirms binding of KLF2 to the AQP1 promoter. Inflammatory stimulation of endothelial cells leads to repression of AQP1 transcription, which is restrained by KLF2 overexpression. Immunohistochemistry reveals expression of aquaporin-1 in non-activated endothelium overlying macrophage-poor intimae, irrespective whether these intimae are characterized as being plaque-free or as containing advanced plaque. We conclude that AQP1 expression is subject to KLF2-mediated positive regulation by atheroprotective shear stress and is downregulated under inflammatory conditions both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, endothelial expression of AQP1 characterizes the atheroprotected, non-inflamed vessel wall. Our data provide support for a continuous role of KLF2 in stabilizing the vessel wall via co-temporal expression of eNOS and AQP1 both preceding and during the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  6. The use of artificial microRNA technology to control gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamens, Andrew L; McHale, Marcus; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    In plants, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an effective trigger of RNA silencing, and several classes of endogenous small RNA (sRNA), processed from dsRNA substrates by DICER-like (DCL) endonucleases, are essential in controlling gene expression. One such sRNA class, the microRNAs (miRNAs) control the expression of closely related genes to regulate all aspects of plant development, including the determination of leaf shape, leaf polarity, flowering time, and floral identity. A single miRNA sRNA silencing signal is processed from a long precursor transcript of nonprotein-coding RNA, termed the primary miRNA (pri-miRNA). A region of the pri-miRNA is partially self-complementary allowing the transcript to fold back onto itself to form a stem-loop structure of imperfectly dsRNA. Artificial miRNA (amiRNA) technology uses endogenous pri-miRNAs, in which the miRNA and miRNA* (passenger strand of the miRNA duplex) sequences have been replaced with corresponding amiRNA/amiRNA* sequences that direct highly efficient RNA silencing of the targeted gene. Here, we describe the rules for amiRNA design, as well as outline the PCR and bacterial cloning procedures involved in the construction of an amiRNA plant expression vector to control target gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  7. Changes in global gene expression associated with 3D structure of tumors: an ex vivo matrix-free mesothelioma spheroid model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heungnam Kim

    Full Text Available Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to anti-tumor agents. Molecules involved in multicellular tumor microenvironments, however, are difficult to study ex vivo. Here, we generated a matrix-free tumor spheroid model using the NCI-H226 mesothelioma cell line and compared the gene expression profiles of spheroids and monolayers using microarray analysis. Microarray analysis revealed that 142 probe sets were differentially expressed between tumor spheroids and monolayers. Gene ontology analysis revealed that upregulated genes were primarily related to immune response, wound response, lymphocyte stimulation and response to cytokine stimulation, whereas downregulated genes were primarily associated with apoptosis. Among the 142 genes, 27 are located in the membrane and related to biologic processes of cellular movement, cell-to-cell signaling, cellular growth and proliferation and morphology. Western blot analysis validated elevation of MMP2, BAFF/BLyS/TNFSF13B, RANTES/CCL5 and TNFAIP6/TSG-6 protein expression in spheroids as compared to monolayers. Thus, we have reported the first large scale comparison of the transcriptional profiles using an ex vivo matrix-free spheroid model to identify genes specific to the three-dimensional biological structure of tumors. The method described here can be used for gene expression profiling of tumors other than mesothelioma.

  8. Changes in global gene expression associated with 3D structure of tumors: an ex vivo matrix-free mesothelioma spheroid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heungnam; Phung, Yen; Ho, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to anti-tumor agents. Molecules involved in multicellular tumor microenvironments, however, are difficult to study ex vivo. Here, we generated a matrix-free tumor spheroid model using the NCI-H226 mesothelioma cell line and compared the gene expression profiles of spheroids and monolayers using microarray analysis. Microarray analysis revealed that 142 probe sets were differentially expressed between tumor spheroids and monolayers. Gene ontology analysis revealed that upregulated genes were primarily related to immune response, wound response, lymphocyte stimulation and response to cytokine stimulation, whereas downregulated genes were primarily associated with apoptosis. Among the 142 genes, 27 are located in the membrane and related to biologic processes of cellular movement, cell-to-cell signaling, cellular growth and proliferation and morphology. Western blot analysis validated elevation of MMP2, BAFF/BLyS/TNFSF13B, RANTES/CCL5 and TNFAIP6/TSG-6 protein expression in spheroids as compared to monolayers. Thus, we have reported the first large scale comparison of the transcriptional profiles using an ex vivo matrix-free spheroid model to identify genes specific to the three-dimensional biological structure of tumors. The method described here can be used for gene expression profiling of tumors other than mesothelioma.

  9. Dual in vivo Photoacoustic and Fluorescence Imaging of HER2 Expression in Breast Tumors for Diagnosis, Margin Assessment, and Surgical Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Maeda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker-specific imaging probes offer ways to improve molecular diagnosis, intraoperative margin assessment, and tumor resection. Fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging probes are of particular interest for clinical applications because the combination enables deeper tissue penetration for tumor detection while maintaining imaging sensitivity compared to a single optical imaging modality. Here we describe the development of a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-targeting imaging probe to visualize differential levels of HER2 expression in a breast cancer model. Specifically, we labeled trastuzumab with Black Hole Quencher 3 (BHQ3 and fluorescein for photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging of HER2 overexpression, respectively. The dual-labeled trastuzumab was tested for its ability to detect HER2 overexpression in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated an over twofold increase in the signal intensity for HER2-overexpressing tumors in vivo, compared to low–HER2-expressing tumors, using photoacoustic imaging. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility of detecting tumors and positive surgical margins by fluorescence imaging. These results suggest that multimodal HER2-specific imaging of breast cancer using the BHQ3-fluorescein trastuzumab enables molecular-level detection and surgical margin assessment of breast tumors in vivo. This technique may have future clinical impact for primary lesion detection, as well as intraoperative molecular-level surgical guidance in breast cancer.

  10. Inhibition of Sox2 Expression in the Adult Neural Stem Cell Niche In Vivo by Monocationic-based siRNA Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Remaud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a major tool for basic and applied investigations. However, obtaining RNAi data that have physiological significance requires investigation of regulations and therapeutic strategies in appropriate in vivo settings. To examine in vivo gene regulation and protein function in the adult neural stem cell (NSC niche, we optimized a new non-viral vector for delivery of siRNA into the subventricular zone (SVZ. This brain region contains the neural stem and progenitor cells populations that express the stem cell marker, SOX2. Temporally and spatially controlled Sox2 knockdown was achieved using the monocationic lipid vector, IC10. siRNA/IC10 complexes were stable over time and smaller (<40 nm than jetSi complexes (≈400 nm. Immunocytochemistry showed that siRNA/IC10 complexes efficiently target both the progenitor and stem cell populations in the adult SVZ. Injection of the complexes into the lateral brain ventricle resulted in specific knockdown of Sox2 in the SVZ. Furthermore, IC10-mediated transient in vivo knockdown of Sox2-modulated expression of several genes implicated in NSC maintenance. Taken together, these data show that IC10 cationic lipid formulation can efficiently vectorize siRNA in a specific area of the adult mouse brain, achieving spatially and temporally defined loss of function.

  11. Quantitative, noninvasive, in vivo longitudinal monitoring of gene expression in the brain by co-AAV transduction with a PET reporter gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sea Young Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo imaging of vector transgene expression would be particularly valuable for repetitive monitoring of therapy in the brain, where invasive tissue sampling is contraindicated. We evaluated adeno-associated virus vector expression of a dopamine-2 receptor (D2R mutant (D2R80A by positron emission tomography in the brains of mice and cats. D2R80A is inactivated for intracellular signaling and binds subphysiologic amounts of the radioactive [18F]-fallypride analog of dopamine. The [18F]-fallypride signal bound to D2R80A in the injection site was normalized to the signal from endogenous D2R in the striatum and showed stable levels of expression within individual animals. A separate adeno-associated virus type 1 vector with identical gene expression control elements, expressing green fluorescent protein or a therapeutic gene, was coinjected with the D2R80A vector at equal doses into specific sites. Both transgenes had similar levels of gene expression by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and quantitative PCR assays, demonstrating that D2R80A is a faithful surrogate measure for expression of a gene of interest. This dual vector approach allows the D2R80A gene to be used with any therapeutic gene and to be injected into a single site for monitoring while the therapeutic gene can be distributed more widely as needed in each disease.

  12. In vivo versus in vitro protein abundance analysis of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 reveals changes in the expression of proteins involved in virulence, stress and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donohue-Rolfe Arthur

    2011-06-01

    of bacteria into the host cell cytosol were increased in vivo. Conclusions Global proteomic profiling of SD1 comparing in vivo vs. in vitro proteomes revealed differential expression of proteins geared towards survival of the pathogen in the host gut environment, including increased abundance of proteins involved in anaerobic energy respiration, acid resistance and virulence. The immunogenic OspC2, OspC3 and IpgA virulence proteins were detected solely under in vivo conditions, lending credence to their candidacy as potential vaccine targets.

  13. In vivo versus in vitro protein abundance analysis of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 reveals changes in the expression of proteins involved in virulence, stress and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntumalla, Srilatha; Zhang, Quanshun; Braisted, John C; Fleischmann, Robert D; Peterson, Scott N; Donohue-Rolfe, Arthur; Tzipori, Saul; Pieper, Rembert

    2011-06-24

    cytosol were increased in vivo. Global proteomic profiling of SD1 comparing in vivo vs. in vitro proteomes revealed differential expression of proteins geared towards survival of the pathogen in the host gut environment, including increased abundance of proteins involved in anaerobic energy respiration, acid resistance and virulence. The immunogenic OspC2, OspC3 and IpgA virulence proteins were detected solely under in vivo conditions, lending credence to their candidacy as potential vaccine targets.

  14. Simultaneous gene transfer of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP -2 and BMP-7 by in vivo electroporation induces rapid bone formation and BMP-4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyazaki Jun-ichi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcutaneous in vivo electroporation is expected to be an effective gene-transfer method for promoting bone regeneration using the BMP-2 plasmid vector. To promote enhanced osteoinduction using this method, we simultaneously transferred cDNAs for BMP-2 and BMP-7, as inserts in the non-viral vector pCAGGS. Methods First, an in vitro study was carried out to confirm the expression of BMP-2 and BMP-7 following the double-gene transfer. Next, the individual BMP-2 and BMP-7 plasmids or both together were injected into rat calf muscles, and transcutaneous electroporation was applied 8 times at 100 V, 50 msec. Results In the culture system, the simultaneous transfer of the BMP-2 and BMP-7 genes led to a much higher ALP activity in C2C12 cells than did the transfer of either gene alone. In vivo, ten days after the treatment, soft X-ray analysis showed that muscles that received both pCAGGS-BMP-2 and pCAGGS-BMP-7 had better-defined opacities than those receiving a single gene. Histological examination showed advanced ossification in calf muscles that received the double-gene transfer. BMP-4 mRNA was also expressed, and RT-PCR showed that its level increased for 3 days in a time-dependent manner in the double-gene transfer group. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that BMP-4-expressing cells resided in the matrix between muscle fibers. Conclusion The simultaneous transfer of BMP-2 and BMP-7 genes using in vivo electroporation induces more rapid bone formation than the transfer of either gene alone, and the increased expression of endogenous BMP-4 suggests that the rapid ossification is related to the induction of BMP-4.

  15. Report on emerging technologies for translational bioinformatics: a symposium on gene expression profiling for archival tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldron Levi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With over 20 million formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue samples archived each year in the United States alone, archival tissues remain a vast and under-utilized resource in the genomic study of cancer. Technologies have recently been introduced for whole-transcriptome amplification and microarray analysis of degraded mRNA fragments from FFPE samples, and studies of these platforms have only recently begun to enter the published literature. Results The Emerging Technologies for Translational Bioinformatics symposium on gene expression profiling for archival tissues featured presentations of two large-scale FFPE expression profiling studies (each involving over 1,000 samples, overviews of several smaller studies, and representatives from three leading companies in the field (Illumina, Affymetrix, and NuGEN. The meeting highlighted challenges in the analysis of expression data from archival tissues and strategies being developed to overcome them. In particular, speakers reported higher rates of clinical sample failure (from 10% to 70% than are typical for fresh-frozen tissues, as well as more frequent probe failure for individual samples. The symposium program is available at http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/ffpe. Conclusions Multiple solutions now exist for whole-genome expression profiling of FFPE tissues, including both microarray- and sequencing-based platforms. Several studies have reported their successful application, but substantial challenges and risks still exist. Symposium speakers presented novel methodology for analysis of FFPE expression data and suggestions for improving data recovery and quality assessment in pre-analytical stages. Research presentations emphasized the need for careful study design, including the use of pilot studies, replication, and randomization of samples among batches, as well as careful attention to data quality control. Regardless of any limitations in quantitave transcriptomics for

  16. The melanocortin-4 receptor is expressed in enteroendocrine L cells and regulates the release of peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide 1 in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panaro, Brandon L; Tough, Iain R; Engelstoft, Maja S

    2014-01-01

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is expressed in the brainstem and vagal afferent nerves and regulates a number of aspects of gastrointestinal function. Here we show that the receptor is also diffusely expressed in cells of the gastrointestinal system, from stomach to descending colon....... Furthermore, MC4R is the second most highly enriched GPCR in peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) expressing enteroendocrine L cells. When vectorial ion transport is measured across mouse or human intestinal mucosa, administration of α-MSH induces a MC4R-specific PYY-dependent antisecretory...... response consistent with a role for the MC4R in paracrine inhibition of electrolyte secretion. Finally, MC4R-dependent acute PYY and GLP-1 release from L cells can be stimulated in vivo by intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of melanocortin peptides to mice. This suggests physiological significance...

  17. Alpha-interferon induces enhanced expression of HLA-ABC antigens and beta-2-microglobulin in vivo and in vitro in various subsets of human lymphoid cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Larsen, J K; Plesner, T

    1987-01-01

    The effect of cloned alpha-interferon (alpha-IFN) on the in vitro and in vivo expression of HLA-ABC antigens and beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-m) on subpopulations of human lymphoid cells was studied by flow cytometry. Mononuclear cells isolated from patients and cell cultures were labelled...... with saturating amounts of FITC conjugated monoclonal anti-HLA-ABC or anti-beta-2-m. Phycoerythrin conjugated monoclonal antibodies were simultaneously used for the selection of T lymphocytes. T helper lymphocytes, T suppressor lymphocytes, B lymphocytes and monocytes. In vitro, alpha-IFN induced a significant......, except for T suppressor lymphocytes. The increase in beta-2-m only reached significance on T lymphocytes. T helper lymphocytes and monocytes (P less than 0.02). At 48 h after administration of alpha-IFN, expression of HLA-ABC antigens and beta-2-m approached pretreatment levels. Enhanced expression...

  18. Expressive visual text-to-speech as an assistive technology for individuals with autism spectrum conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, S A; Stenger, B; Van Dongen, L; Yanagisawa, K; Anderson, R; Wan, V; Baron-Cohen, S; Cipolla, R

    2016-07-01

    Adults with Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) experience marked difficulties in recognising the emotions of others and responding appropriately. The clinical characteristics of ASC mean that face to face or group interventions may not be appropriate for this clinical group. This article explores the potential of a new interactive technology, converting text to emotionally expressive speech, to improve emotion processing ability and attention to faces in adults with ASC. We demonstrate a method for generating a near-videorealistic avatar (XpressiveTalk), which can produce a video of a face uttering inputted text, in a large variety of emotional tones. We then demonstrate that general population adults can correctly recognize the emotions portrayed by XpressiveTalk. Adults with ASC are significantly less accurate than controls, but still above chance levels for inferring emotions from XpressiveTalk. Both groups are significantly more accurate when inferring sad emotions from XpressiveTalk compared to the original actress, and rate these expressions as significantly more preferred and realistic. The potential applications for XpressiveTalk as an assistive technology for adults with ASC is discussed.

  19. Protection of LDL from oxidation by olive oil polyphenols is associated with a downregulation of CD40-ligand expression and its downstream products in vivo in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañer, Olga; Covas, María-Isabel; Khymenets, Olha; Nyyssonen, Kristiina; Konstantinidou, Valentini; Zunft, Hans-Franz; de la Torre, Rafael; Muñoz-Aguayo, Daniel; Vila, Joan; Fitó, Montserrat

    2012-05-01

    Recently, the European Food Safety Authority approved a claim concerning the benefits of olive oil polyphenols for the protection of LDL from oxidation. Polyphenols could exert health benefits not only by scavenging free radicals but also by modulating gene expression. We assessed whether olive oil polyphenols could modulate the human in vivo expressions of atherosclerosis-related genes in which LDL oxidation is involved. In a randomized, crossover, controlled trial, 18 healthy European volunteers daily received 25 mL olive oil with a low polyphenol content (LPC: 2.7 mg/kg) or a high polyphenol content (HPC: 366 mg/kg) in intervention periods of 3 wk separated by 2-wk washout periods. Systemic LDL oxidation and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and the expression of proatherogenic genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells [ie, CD40 ligand (CD40L), IL-23α subunit p19 (IL23A), adrenergic β-2 receptor (ADRB2), oxidized LDL (lectin-like) receptor 1 (OLR1), and IL-8 receptor-α (IL8RA)] decreased after the HPC intervention compared with after the LPC intervention. Random-effects linear regression analyses showed 1) a significant decrease in CD40, ADRB2, and IL8RA gene expression with the decrease of LDL oxidation and 2) a significant decrease in intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and OLR1 gene expression with increasing concentrations of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol in urine. In addition to reducing LDL oxidation, the intake of polyphenol-rich olive oil reduces CD40L gene expression, its downstream products, and related genes involved in atherogenic and inflammatory processes in vivo in humans. These findings provide evidence that polyphenol-rich olive oil can act through molecular mechanisms to provide cardiovascular health benefits. This trial was registered at www.controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN09220811.

  20. Inducible knockout of Mef2a, -c, and -d from nestin-expressing stem/progenitor cells and their progeny unexpectedly uncouples neurogenesis and dendritogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latchney, Sarah E.; Jiang, Yindi; Petrik, David P.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Hsieh, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Myocyte enhancer factor (Mef)-2 transcription factors are implicated in activity-dependent neuronal processes during development, but the role of MEF2 in neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) in the adult brain is unknown. We used a transgenic mouse in which Mef2a, -c, and -d were inducibly deleted in adult nestin-expressing NSPCs and their progeny. Recombined cells in the hippocampal granule cell layer were visualized and quantified by yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) expression. In control mice, postmitotic neurons expressed Mef2a, -c, and -d, whereas type 1 stem cells and proliferating progenitors did not. Based on this expression, we hypothesized that Mef2a, -c, and -d deletion in adult nestin-expressing NSPCs and their progeny would result in fewer mature neurons. Control mice revealed an increase in YFP+ neurons and dendrite formation over time. Contrary to our hypothesis, inducible Mef2 KO mice also displayed an increase in YFP+ neurons over time—but with significantly stunted dendrites—suggesting an uncoupling of neuron survival and dendritogenesis. We also found non–cell-autonomous effects after Mef2a, -c, and -d deletion. These in vivo findings indicate a surprising functional role for Mef2a, -c, and -d in cell- and non–cell-autonomous control of adult hippocampal neurogenesis that is distinct from its role during development.—Latchney, S. E., Jiang, Y., Petrik, D. P., Eisch, A. J., Hsieh, J. Inducible knockout of Mef2a, -c, and -d from nestin-expressing stem/progenitor cells and their progeny unexpectedly uncouples neurogenesis and dendritogenesis in vivo. PMID:26286136

  1. Levels of 17beta-estradiol receptors expressed in embryonic and adult zebrafish following in vivo treatment of natural or synthetic ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Chandrasekar

    Full Text Available The nuclear receptors encompass a group of regulatory proteins involved in a number of physiological processes. The estrogen receptors (ERs, of which one alpha and one beta form exist in mammals function as transcription factors in response to 17beta-estradiol (E2. In zebrafish there are three gene products of estrogen receptors and they are denoted esr1 (ERalpha, esr2a (ERbeta2 and esr2b (ERbeta1. Total RNA of zebrafish early life stages (<3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours post fertilization and of adult fish (liver, intestine, eye, heart, brain, ovary, testis, gill, swim bladder and kidney were isolated following in vivo exposures. Using specific primers for each of the three zebrafish ERs the expression levels were quantified using real time PCR methodology. It was shown that in absence of exposure all three estrogen receptors were expressed in adult fish. The levels of expression of two of these three ER genes, the esr1 and esr2a were altered in organs such as liver, intestine, brain and testis in response to ligand (E2, diethylstilbestrol or 4-nonylphenol. During embryogenesis two of the three receptor genes, esr1 and esr2b were expressed, and in presence of ligand the mRNA levels of these two genes increased. The conclusions are i estrogen receptor genes are expressed during early development ii altered expression of esr genes in response to ligand is dependent on the cellular context; iii the estrogenic ligand 4-nonylphenol, a manufactured compound commonly found in sewage of water treatment plants, acts as an agonist of the estrogen receptor during development and has both agonist and antagonist properties in tissues of adult fish. This knowledge of esr gene function in development and in adult life will help to understand mechanisms of interfering mimicking endocrine chemicals in vivo.

  2. K-ATP channel expression and pharmacological in vivo and in vitro studies of the K-ATP channel blocker PNU-37883A in rat middle meningeal arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, K.B.; Boni, L.J.; Baun, M.

    2008-01-01

    intracranial arteries, including the middle meningeal artery (MMA). We studied the K-ATP channel expression profile in rat MMA and examined the potential inhibitory effects of the K-ATP channel blocker PNU-37883A on K-ATP channel opener-induced relaxation of the rat MMA, using the three K-ATP channel openers...... levcromakalim, pinacidil and P-1075. Experimental approach: mRNA and protein expression of K-ATP channel subunits in the rat MMA were studied by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. The in vivo and in vitro effects of the K-ATP channel drugs on rat MMA were studied in the genuine...... closed cranial window model and in myograph baths, respectively. Key results: Expression studies indicate that inwardly rectifying K+ (Kir)6.1/sulphonylurea receptor (SUR) 2B is the major K-ATP channel complex in rat MMA. PNU-37883A (0.5 mg kg(-1)) significantly inhibited the in vivo dilatory effect...

  3. Efficient and versatile one-step affinity purification of in vivo biotinylated proteins: Expression, characterization and structure analysis of recombinant human glutamate carboxypeptidase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tykvart, J.; Sacha, P.; Barinka, C.; Knedlik, T.; Starkova, J.; Lubkowski, J.; Konvalinka, J. (Gilead); (NCI); (Czech Academy)

    2012-02-07

    Affinity purification is a useful approach for purification of recombinant proteins. Eukaryotic expression systems have become more frequently used at the expense of prokaryotic systems since they afford recombinant eukaryotic proteins with post-translational modifications similar or identical to the native ones. Here, we present a one-step affinity purification set-up suitable for the purification of secreted proteins. The set-up is based on the interaction between biotin and mutated streptavidin. Drosophila Schneider 2 cells are chosen as the expression host, and a biotin acceptor peptide is used as an affinity tag. This tag is biotinylated by Escherichia coli biotin-protein ligase in vivo. We determined that localization of the ligase within the ER led to the most effective in vivo biotinylation of the secreted proteins. We optimized a protocol for large-scale expression and purification of AviTEV-tagged recombinant human glutamate carboxypeptidase II (Avi-GCPII) with milligram yields per liter of culture. We also determined the 3D structure of Avi-GCPII by X-ray crystallography and compared the enzymatic characteristics of the protein to those of its non-tagged variant. These experiments confirmed that AviTEV tag does not affect the biophysical properties of its fused partner. Purification approach, developed here, provides not only a sufficient amount of highly homogenous protein but also specifically and effectively biotinylates a target protein and thus enables its subsequent visualization or immobilization.

  4. Iloprost up-regulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression in human dental pulp cells in vitro and enhances pulpal blood flow in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limjeerajarus, Chalida Nakalekha; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Manokawinchoke, Jeeranan; Pavasant, Prasit

    2014-07-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a biomolecule capable of enhancing angiogenesis and cellular proliferation. We investigated the influence of a PGI2 analogue (iloprost) on dental pulp revascularization in vitro and in vivo by using human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) and a rat tooth injury model, respectively. Iloprost stimulated the human dental pulp cell mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in a significant dose-dependent manner. This mRNA up-regulation was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with a PGI2 receptor antagonist and forskolin (a protein kinase A activator). In contrast, a protein kinase A inhibitor significantly enhanced the iloprost-induced mRNA expression of VEGF, FGF-2, and PDGF. Pretreatment with a fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitor attenuated the VEGF, FGF-2, and PDGF mRNA expression, indicating opposing regulatory mechanisms. The effect of iloprost on the dental pulp was investigated in vivo by using a rat molar pulp injury model. The iloprost-treated group exhibited a significant increase in pulpal blood flow at 72 hours compared with control. The present study indicates that iloprost may be a candidate agent to promote neovascularization in dental pulp tissue, suggesting the potential clinical use of iloprost in vital pulp therapy. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A broad-spectrum sunscreen prevents UVA radiation-induced gene expression in reconstructed skin in vitro and in human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marionnet, Claire; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Seité, Sophie; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Lejeune, François; Bastien, Philippe; Rougier, André; Bernerd, Françoise; Krutmann, Jean

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of sunscreens to protect against ultraviolet (UV) A radiation is usually assessed by measuring erythema formation and pigmentation. The biological relevance of these endpoints for UVA-induced skin damage, however, is not known. We therefore carried out two complementary studies to determine UVA protection provided by a broad-spectrum sunscreen product at a molecular level by studying UVA radiation-induced gene expression. One study was performed on human reconstructed skin in vitro with a semi-global gene expression analysis of 227 genes in fibroblasts and 244 in keratinocytes. The second one was conducted in vivo in human volunteers and focused on genes involved in oxidative stress response and photo-ageing (haeme oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase-2, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, matrix metalloproteinase-1). In-vitro UVA radiation induced modulation of genes involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis, oxidative stress, heat shock responses, cell growth, inflammation and epidermal differentiation. Sunscreen pre-application abrogated or significantly reduced these effects, as underlined by unsupervised clustering analysis. The in vivo study confirmed that the sunscreen prevented UVA radiation-induced transcriptional expression of the five studied genes. These findings indicate the high efficacy of a broad-spectrum sunscreen in protecting human skin against UVA-induced gene responses and suggest that this approach is a biologically relevant complement to existing methods. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Detrimental effect of expression of Bt endotoxin Cry1Ac on in vitro regeneration, in vivo growth and development of tobacco and cotton transgenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Preeti; Singh, Amarjeet Kumar; Ray, Krishna; Chaudhary, Bhupendra; Kumar, Sanjeev; Gautam, Taru; Kanoria, Shaveta; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Paritosh; Pental, Deepak; Burma, Pradeep Kumar

    2011-06-01

    High levels of expression of the cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis cannot be routinely achieved in transgenic plants despite modifications made in the gene to improve its expression. This has been attributed to the instability of the transcript in a few reports. In the present study, based on the genetic transformation of cotton and tobacco, we show that the expression of the Cry1Ac endotoxin has detrimental effects on both the in vitro and in vivo growth and development of transgenic plants. A number of experiments on developing transgenics in cotton with different versions of cry1Ac gene showed that the majority of the plants did not express any Cry1Ac protein. Based on Southern blot analysis, it was also observed that a substantial number of lines did not contain the cry1Ac gene cassette although they contained the marker gene nptII. More significantly, all the lines that showed appreciable levels of expression were found to be phenotypically abnormal. Experiments on transformation of tobacco with different constructs expressing the cry1Ac gene showed that in vitro regeneration was inhibited by the encoded protein. Further, out of a total of 145 independent events generated with the different cry1Ac gene constructs in tobacco, only 21 showed expression of the Cry1Ac protein, confirming observations made in cotton that regenerants that express high levels of the Cry1Ac protein are selected against during regeneration of transformed events. This problem was circumvented by targeting the Cry1Ac protein to the chloroplast, which also significantly improved the expression of the protein.

  7. Constitutive expression of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A in arterial smooth muscle reduces the vascular response to injury in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Laurie K.; Resch, Zachary T.; Harstad, Sara L.; Overgaard, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) functions to increase local IGF-I bioactivity. In this study, we used transgenic mice that constitutively express human PAPP-A in arterial smooth muscle to test the hypothesis that overexpression of PAPP-A enhances vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) response to IGF-I in vivo. PAPP-A transgenic (Tg) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent unilateral carotid ligation, a model of injury-induced SMC hyperplasia and neointimal formation. In both WT and PAPP-A Tg mice, endogenous PAPP-A mRNA expression showed peak elevation 5 days after carotid ligation. However, PAPP-A Tg mice had 70–75% less neointima than WT at 5 and 10 days postligation, with a significant reduction in occlusion of the ligated artery. WT and PAPP-A Tg mice had equivalent increases in medial area and vessel remodeling postligation. There was little change in medial area and no evidence of neointima in the contralateral carotid of WT or PAPP-A Tg mice. Both WT and PAPP-A Tg carotids exhibited signs of dedifferentiation of SMC, which precedes the increase in proliferation and migration that results in neointimal formation. However, the number of proliferating cells in the media and neointima of the ligated PAPP-A Tg artery was reduced by 90% on day 5 postsurgery compared with WT. This decrease was associated with a significant decrease in an in vivo marker of IGF-I bioactivity and reduced IGF-I-stimulated receptor phosphorylation ex vivo. These data suggest differential effects of chronic (transgenic) and transient (endogenous) PAPP-A expression on neointimal formation following vascular injury that may be due in part to the differential impact on IGF-I signaling. PMID:23169786

  8. The HDAC inhibitor valproate induces a bivalent status of the CD20 promoter in CLL patients suggesting distinct epigenetic regulation of CD20 expression in CLL in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, Annarita; Hasni, Muhammad Sharif; Damm, Jesper Kofoed; Lennartsson, Andreas; Gullberg, Urban; Drott, Kristina

    2017-06-06

    Treatment with anti-CD20 antibodies is only moderately efficient in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a feature which has been explained by the inherently low CD20 expression in CLL. It has been shown that CD20 is epigenetically regulated and that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) can increase CD20 expression in vitro in CLL. To assess whether HDACis can upregulate CD20 also in vivo in CLL, the HDACi valproate was given to three del13q/NOTCH1wt CLL patients and CD20 levels were analysed (the PREVAIL study). Valproate treatment resulted in expected global activating histone modifications suggesting HDAC inhibitory effects. However, although valproate induced expression of CD20 mRNA and protein in the del13q/NOTCH1wt I83-E95 CLL cell line, no such effects were observed in the patients studied. In contrast to the cell line, in patients valproate treatment resulted in transient recruitment of the transcriptional repressor EZH2 to the CD20 promoter, correlating to an increase of the repressive histone mark H3K27me3. This suggests that valproate-mediated induction of CD20 may be hampered by EZH2 mediated H3K27me3 in vivo in CLL. Moreover, valproate treatment resulted in induction of EZH2 and global H3K27me3 in patient cells, suggesting transcriptionally repressive effects of valproate in CLL. Our results suggest new in vivo mechanisms of HDACis which may have implications on the design of future clinical trials in B-cell malignancies.

  9. Perforin expression directly ex vivo by HIV-specific CD8 T-cells is a correlate of HIV elite control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Hersperger

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Many immune correlates of CD8(+ T-cell-mediated control of HIV replication, including polyfunctionality, proliferative ability, and inhibitory receptor expression, have been discovered. However, no functional correlates using ex vivo cells have been identified with the known ability to cause the direct elimination of HIV-infected cells. We have recently discovered the ability of human CD8(+ T-cells to rapidly upregulate perforin--an essential molecule for cell-mediated cytotoxicity--following antigen-specific stimulation. Here, we examined perforin expression capability in a large cross-sectional cohort of chronically HIV-infected individuals with varying levels of viral load: elite controllers (n = 35, viremic controllers (n = 29, chronic progressors (n = 27, and viremic nonprogressors (n = 6. Using polychromatic flow cytometry and standard intracellular cytokine staining assays, we measured perforin upregulation, cytokine production, and degranulation following stimulation with overlapping peptide pools encompassing all proteins of HIV. We observed that HIV-specific CD8(+ T-cells from elite controllers consistently display an enhanced ability to express perforin directly ex vivo compared to all other groups. This ability is not restricted to protective HLA-B haplotypes, does not require proliferation or the addition of exogenous factors, is not restored by HAART, and primarily originates from effector CD8(+ T-cells with otherwise limited functional capability. Notably, we found an inverse relationship between HIV-specific perforin expression and viral load. Thus, the capability of HIV-specific CD8(+ T-cells to rapidly express perforin defines a novel correlate of control in HIV infection.

  10. Arsenic trioxide re-sensitizes ERα-negative breast cancer cells to endocrine therapy by restoring ERα expression in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijie; Wang, Liuxing; Fan, Qingxia; Wu, Xinai; Wang, Feng; Wang, Rui; Ma, Zhijun; Yang, Jianhua; Lu, Shih Hsin

    2011-09-01

    Approximately one-third of breast cancers lack estrogen receptor α (ERα) because of the hypermethylation of the CpG island in the receptor's promoter. These tumors are associated with poorer histological differentiation, a higher growth fraction, are rarely responsive to endocrine therapy and have a worse clinical outcome. Thus, re-expression of ERα in ERα-negative breast cancers may restore the sensitivity of antiestrogen therapy. The ERα-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-435s was treated with different concentrations of arsenic trioxide (As2O3). MS-PCR was used to detect the change in the methylation status of ERα. RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses were used to detect changes in the mRNA and protein expression of DNA methyl-transferase-1 (DNMT1) and ERα. Cell proliferation was examined using the MTT assay. A xenograft model in nude mice was used to further examine the results we observed in vitro. The ERα gene was demethylated after As2O3 treatment of MDA-MB-435s cells. RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses revealed that DNMT1 expression was inhibited and ERα was re-expressed in a concentration-dependent manner after As2O3 treatment. The MTT assay showed that cell proliferation was significantly suppressed after exposure to different concentrations of As2O3. Addition of tamoxifen (TAM) further suppressed levels of cell proliferation. In vivo, the xenograft tumor volumes of As2O3-treated mice were smaller than those observed in untreated and TAM-treated mice. Treatment with a combination of As2O3+TAM resulted in further suppression. As2O3 can act as a demethylation agent to restore ERα expression in ERα-negative breast cancer cells and re-sensitize these cells to endocrine therapy in vitro and in vivo.

  11. In Vivo Assessment of Growth and Virulence Gene Expression during Commensal and Pathogenic Lifestyles of luxABCDE-Tagged Enterococcus faecalis Strains in Murine Gastrointestinal and Intravenous Infection Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Pat G.; Hill, Colin; Diep, Dzung B.; Nes, Ingolf F.

    2013-01-01

    Cytolysin and gelatinase are prominent pathogenicity determinants associated with highly virulent Enterococcus faecalis strains. In an effort to explore the expression profiles of these virulence traits in vivo, we have employed E. faecalis variants expressing the luxABCDE cassette under the control of either the P16S, cytolysin, or gelatinase promoter for infections of Galleria mellonella caterpillars and mice. Systemic infection of G. mellonella with bioluminescence-tagged E. faecalis MMH594 revealed temporal regulation of both gelatinase and cytolysin promoters and demonstrated that these traits were induced in response to the host environment. Gavage of mice pretreated perorally with antibiotics resulted in efficient colonization of the murine gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in a strain-dependent manner, where the commensal baby isolate EF62 was more persistent than the nosocomial isolate MMH594. A highly significant correlation (R2 > 0.94) was found between bioluminescence and the CFU counts in mouse fecal samples. Both strains showed similar preferences for growth and persistence in the ileum, cecum, and colon. Cytolysin expression was uniform in these compartments of the intestinal lumen. In spite of high numbers (109 CFU/g of intestinal matter) in the ileum, cecum, and colon, no evidence of translocation or systemic infection could be observed. In the murine intravenous infection model, cytolysin expression was readily detected in the liver, kidneys, and bladder. At 72 h postinfection, the highest bacterial loads were found in the liver, kidneys, and spleen, with organ-specific expression levels of cytolysin ∼400- and ∼900-fold higher in the spleen and heart, respectively, than in the liver and kidneys. Taken together, this system based on the bioluminescence imaging technology is established as a new, powerful method to monitor the differential regulation of E. faecalis virulence determinants and to study the spatiotemporal course of infection in living

  12. Controlling RNA Expression in Cancer Using Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Detectable by MRI and In Vivo Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medarova, Zdravka; Balcioglu, Mustafa; Yigit, Mehmet V

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we describe a protocol for the preparation of iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles for noninvasive cancer imaging and therapy. In the first part of the chapter we describe the details of the contrast agent synthesis, functionalization, and characterization. In the second part we describe the methods for tumor imaging using the synthesized particles with noninvasive T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in vivo near infrared optical imaging.

  13. Simple and Rapid In Vivo Generation of Chromosomal Rearrangements using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael B. Blasco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs for chromosomal translocations in the endogenous loci by a knockin strategy is lengthy and costly. The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides an innovative and flexible approach for genome engineering of genomic loci in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for engineering a specific chromosomal translocation in adult mice in vivo. We designed CRISPR/Cas9 lentiviral vectors to induce cleavage of the murine endogenous Eml4 and Alk loci in order to generate the Eml4-Alk gene rearrangement recurrently found in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs. Intratracheal or intrapulmonary inoculation of lentiviruses induced Eml4-Alk gene rearrangement in lung cells in vivo. Genomic and mRNA sequencing confirmed the genome editing and the production of the Eml4-Alk fusion transcript. All mice developed Eml4-Alk-rearranged lung tumors 2 months after the inoculation, demonstrating that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a feasible and simple method for the generation of chromosomal rearrangements in vivo.

  14. In vivo construction of tissue-engineered cartilage using adipose-derived stem cells and bioreactor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongjun; Lu, Shibi; Peng, Jiang; Yang, Qiang; Liu, Shuyun; Zhang, Li; Huang, Jingxiang; Sui, Xiang; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Aiyuan; Xu, Wenjing; Guo, Quanyi; Song, Qing

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims to investigate the feasibility of tissue-engineered cartilage constructed in vivo and in vitro by dynamically culturing adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) with an articular cartilage acellular matrix in a bioreactor and subsequently implanting the cartilage in nude mice. ADSCs were proliferated, combined with three dimensional scaffolds (cell density: 5 × 10(7)/mL) and subsequently placed in a bioreactor and culture plate for 3 weeks. In the in vivo study, complexes cultured for 1 week under dynamic or static states were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice and collected after 3 weeks. Indicators such as gross morphology, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry were examined. In the in vitro study, histological observation showed that most scaffolds in the dynamic group were absorbed, and cell proliferation and matrix secretion were significant. Positive staining of safranin-O and alcian blue II collagen stain in the dynamic group was significantly stronger than that in the static culture group. In the in vivo study, cartilage-like tissues formed in the specimens of the two groups. Histological examination showed that cell distribution in the dynamic group was relatively more uniform than in the static group, and matrix secretion was relatively stronger. Bioreactor culturing can promote ADSC proliferation and cartilage differentiation and is thus a suitable method for constructing tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo.

  15. Altered Expression of Somatostatin Receptors in Pancreatic Islets from NOD Mice Cultured at Different Glucose Concentrations In Vitro and in Islets Transplanted to Diabetic NOD Mice In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ludvigsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatostatin acts via five receptors (sst1-5. We investigated if the changes in pancreatic islet sst expression in diabetic NOD mice compared to normoglycemic mice are a consequence of hyperglycemia or the ongoing immune reaction in the pancreas. Pancreatic islets were isolated from NOD mice precultured for 5 days and further cultured for 3 days at high or low glucose before examined. Islets were also isolated from NOD mice and transplanted to normal or diabetic mice in a number not sufficient to cure hyperglycemia. After three days, the transplants were removed and stained for sst1-5 and islet hormones. Overall, changes in sst islet cell expression were more common in islets cultured in high glucose concentration in vitro as compared to the islet transplantation in vivo to diabetic mice. The beta and PP cells exhibited more frequent changes in sst expression, while the alpha and delta cells were relatively unaffected by the high glucose condition. Our findings suggest that the glucose level may alter sst expressed in islets cells; however, immune mechanisms may counteract such changes in islet sst expression.

  16. Inhibiting GLUT-1 expression and PI3K/Akt signaling using apigenin improves the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yang-Yang; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Lu, Zhong-Jie; Fan, Jun; Huang, Ya-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Hypoxia is an important factor in radioresistance of laryngeal carcinoma. Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) is an important hypoxic marker in malignant tumors, including laryngeal carcinoma. Apigenin is a natural phytoestrogen flavonoid that has potential anticancer effects. Various studies have reported that the effects of apigenin on lowering GLUT-1 expression were involved in downregulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Thus, apigenin may improve the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma by suppressing the expression of GLUT-1 via the PI3K/Akt pathway. The effect of GLUT-1 and PI3K/Akt pathway-related factor expressions by apigenin or antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODNs) on the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma in vivo was assessed. The xenograft volume, xenograft weight and apoptosis detection were performed to determine radiosensitivity. The results showed that apigenin or apigenin plus GLUT-1 AS-ODNs improved the radiosensitivity of xenografts. Apigenin or apigenin plus GLUT-1 reduced the expression of GLUT-1, Akt, and PI3K mRNA after X-ray radiation. We found similar results at the protein level. The results suggest that the effects of apigenin on inhibiting xenograft growth and enhancing xenograft radiosensitivity may be associated with suppressing the expression of GLUT-1 via the PI3K/Akt pathway. In addition, apigenin may enhance the effects of GLUT-1 AS-ODNs via the same mechanism.

  17. Kinetics of expression of costimulatory molecules and their ligands in murine relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Navikas, V; Schaub, M

    1998-01-01

    We studied the kinetics of expression of costimulatory molecules and cytokines in the central nervous system (CNS) in murine relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). During the natural course of EAE, B7-2 expression in the CNS correlated with clinical signs, while B7-1 was exclu...

  18. Expression of functional tissue factor in activated T-lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo: A possible contribution of immunity to thrombosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Raffaele; Cirillo, Plinio; Ciccarelli, Giovanni; Barra, Giusi; Conte, Stefano; Pellegrino, Grazia; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Nassa, Giovanni; Pacifico, Francesco; Leonardi, Antonio; Insabato, Luigi; Calì, Gaetano; Golino, Paolo; Cimmino, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    T-lymphocyte activation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Plaques from ACS patients show a selective oligoclonal expansion of T-cells, indicating a specific, antigen-driven recruitment of T-lymphocytes within the unstable lesions. At present, however, it is not known whether T-cells may contribute directly to thrombosis by expressing functional tissue factor (TF). Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether T-cells are able to express functional TF in their activated status. In vitro, CD3(+)-cells, isolated from buffy coats, were stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 beads, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-17, INF-γ or PMA/ionomycin. Following stimulation, TF expression on cell-surface, at gene and protein levels, as well as its procoagulant activity in whole cells and microparticles was measured. In vivo, TF expression was evaluated in CD3(+)-cells isolated from the aorta and the coronary sinus of ACS-NSTEMI and stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) patients. The presence of CD3(+)-TF(+)cells was also evaluated by immunohistochemistry in thrombi aspirated from ACS-STEMI patients. PMA/ionomycin and IL-17 plus INF-γ stimulation resulted in a significant TF increase at gene and protein levels as well as at cell-surface expression. This was accompanied by a parallel increase in FXa generation, both in whole cells and in microparticles, indicating that the induced membrane-bound TF was active. Furthermore, transcardiac TF gradient was significantly higher in CD3(+)-cells obtained from ACS-patients compared to SCAD-patients. Interestingly, thrombi from ACS-STEMI patients resulted enriched in CD3(+)-cells, most of them expressing TF. Our data demonstrate that activated T-lymphocytes in vitro express functional TF on their membranes, suggesting a direct pathophysiological role of these cells in the thrombotic process; this hypothesis is further supported by the observations in vivo that CD3(+)-cells from coronary

  19. Determination and Modulation of Total and Surface Calcium-Sensing Receptor Expression in Monocytes In Vivo and In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccou, Julien; Boudot, Cédric; Mary, Aurélien; Kamel, Said; Drüeke, Tilman Bernhard; Fardellone, Patrice; Massy, Ziad; Brazier, Michel; Mentaverri, Romuald

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has previously been demonstrated in human circulating monocytes (HCM). The present study was designed to measure CaSR expression in HCM and to examine its potential modulation by pro-inflammatory cytokines, Ca2+, vitamin D sterols in U937 cell line. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent blood sampling with subsequent isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at 3 visits. Flow cytometry analysis (FACS) was performed initially (V1) and 19 days later (V2) to examine intra- and intersubject fluctuations of total and surface CaSR expression in HCM and 15 weeks later (V3) to study the effect of vitamin D supplementation. In vitro experiments were conducted to assess the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, calcidiol, calcitriol and Ca2+ on CaSR expression in U937 cell line. By FACS analysis, more than 95% of HCM exhibited cell surface CaSR staining. In contrast, CaSR staining failed to detect surface CaSR expression in other PBMC. After cell permeabilization, total CaSR expression was observed in more than 95% of all types of PBMC. Both total and surface CaSR expression in HCM showed a high degree of intra-assay reproducibility (<3%) and a moderate intersubject fluctuation. In response to vitamin D supplementation, there was no significant change for both total and surface CaSR expression. In the in vitro study, U937 cells showed strong total and surface CaSR expression, and both were moderately increased in response to calcitriol exposure. Neither total nor surface CaSR expression was modified by increasing Ca2+ concentrations. Total CaSR expression was concentration dependently decreased by TNFα exposure. In conclusion, CaSR expression can be easily measured by flow cytometry in human circulating monocytes. In the in vitro study, total and surface CaSR expression in the U937 cell line were increased by calcitriol but total CaSR expression was decreased by TNFα stimulation. PMID:24098349

  20. The early human germ cell lineage does not express SOX2 during in vivo development or upon in vitro culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrett, Rebecca M; Turnpenny, Lee; Eckert, Judith J

    2008-01-01

    NANOG, POU5F1, and SOX2 are required by the inner cell mass of the blastocyst and act cooperatively to maintain pluripotency in both mouse and human embryonic stem cells. Inadequacy of any one of them causes loss of the undifferentiated state. Mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs), from which...... pluripotent embryonic germ cells (EGCs) are derived, also express POU5F1, NANOG, and SOX2. Thus, a similar expression profile has been predicted for human PGCs. Here we show by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry that human PGCs express POU5F1 and NANOG but not SOX2, with no evidence...... within the human SOX2-negative germ cell lineage. These studies demonstrate an unexpected difference in gene expression between human and mouse. The human PGC is the first primary cell type described to express POU5F1 and NANOG but not SOX2. The data also provide a new reference point for studies...

  1. Towards In Vivo Imaging of Cancer Sialylation

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    Ivan Martinez-Duncker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo assessment of tumor glucose catabolism by positron emission tomography (PET has become a highly valued study in the medical management of cancer. Emerging technologies offer the potential to evaluate in vivo another aspect of cancer carbohydrate metabolism related to the increased anabolic use of monosaccharides like sialic acid (Sia. Sia is used for the synthesis of sialylated oligosaccharides in the cell surface that in cancer cells are overexpressed and positively associated to malignancy and worse prognosis because of their role in invasion and metastasis. This paper addresses the key points of the different strategies that have been developed to image Sia expression in vivo and the perspectives to translate it from the bench to the bedside where it would offer the clinician highly valued complementary information on cancer carbohydrate metabolism that is currently unavailable in vivo.

  2. Interval for the expression of the adaptive response induced by gamma radiation in leucocytes of mouse In vivo; Intervalo para la expresion de la respuesta adaptativa inducida por radiacion gamma en leucocitos de raton In vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The interval between the adaptive gamma radiation dose (0.01 Gy) and challenge (1.0 Gy) capable to induce the maximum expression of the adaptive response in lymphocytes of mouse In vivo. The animals were exposed to the mentioned doses with different intervals among both (1, 1.5, 5 or 18 hr). By means of the unicellular electrophoresis in gel technique, four damage parameters were analysed. The results showed that from the 1 hr interval an adaptive response was produced since in the pretreated organisms with 0.01 Gy the cells present lesser damage than in those not adapted. The maximum response was induced with the intervals between 2.5 and 5 hr and even though it persisted until 18 hr, the effect was reducing. (Author)

  3. Expression of RNA interference triggers from an oncolytic herpes simplex virus results in specific silencing in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo

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    Anesti Anna-Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA to tumours remains a major obstacle for the development of RNA interference (RNAi-based therapeutics. Following the promising pre-clinical and clinical results with the oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV OncoVEXGM-CSF, we aimed to express RNAi triggers from oncolytic HSV, which although has the potential to improve treatment by silencing tumour-related genes, was not considered possible due to the highly oncolytic properties of HSV. Methods To evaluate RNAi-mediated silencing from an oncolytic HSV backbone, we developed novel replicating HSV vectors expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA or artificial microRNA (miRNA against the reporter genes green fluorescent protein (eGFP and β-galactosidase (lacZ. These vectors were tested in non-tumour cell lines in vitro and tumour cells that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection both in vitro and in mice xenografts in vivo. Silencing was assessed at the protein level by fluorescent microscopy, x-gal staining, enzyme activity assay, and western blotting. Results Our results demonstrate that it is possible to express shRNA and artificial miRNA from an oncolytic HSV backbone, which had not been previously investigated. Furthermore, oncolytic HSV-mediated delivery of RNAi triggers resulted in effective and specific silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo, with the viruses expressing artificial miRNA being comprehensibly more effective. Conclusions This preliminary data provide the first demonstration of oncolytic HSV-mediated expression of shRNA or artificial miRNA and silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. The vectors developed in this study are being adapted to silence tumour-related genes in an ongoing study that aims to improve the effectiveness of oncolytic HSV treatment in tumours that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection and thus, potentially improve response rates seen

  4. A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornace, Jr, A J

    2007-03-03

    Abstract for final report for project entitled A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo which has been supported by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program for approximately 7 years. This project has encompassed two sequential awards, ER62683 and then ER63308, in the Gene Response Section in the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute. The project was temporarily suspended during the relocation of the Principal Investigators laboratory to the Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health at the end of 2004. Remaining support for the final year was transferred to this new site later in 2005 and was assigned the DOE Award Number ER64065. The major aims of this project have been 1) to characterize changes in gene expression in response to low-dose radiation responses; this includes responses in human cells lines, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and in vivo after human or murine exposures, as well as the effect of dose-rate on gene responses; 2) to characterize changes in gene expression that may be involved in bystander effects, such as may be mediated by cytokines and other intercellular signaling proteins; and 3) to characterize responses in transgenic mouse models with relevance to genomic stability. A variety of approaches have been used to study transcriptional events including microarray hybridization, quantitative single-probe hybridization which was developed in this laboratory, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter microarray analysis using genomic regulatory motifs. Considering the frequent responsiveness of genes encoding cytokines and related signaling proteins that can affect cellular metabolism, initial efforts were initiated to study radiation responses at the metabolomic level and to correlate with radiation-responsive gene expression. Productivity includes twenty-four published and in press manuscripts

  5. In Vivo Validation of In Silico Predicted Metabolic Engineering Strategies in Yeast: Disruption of α-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase and Expression of ATP-Citrate Lyase for Terpenoid Production.

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    Evamaria Gruchattka

    Full Text Available Engineering of the central carbon metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to redirect metabolic flux towards cytosolic acetyl-CoA has become a central topic in yeast biotechnology. A cell factory with increased flux into acetyl-CoA can be used for heterologous production of terpenoids for pharmaceuticals, biofuels, fragrances, or other acetyl-CoA derived compounds. In a previous study, we identified promising metabolic engineering targets in S. cerevisiae using an in silico stoichiometric metabolic network analysis. Here, we validate selected in silico strategies in vivo.Patchoulol was produced by yeast via a heterologous patchoulol synthase of Pogostemon cablin. To increase the metabolic flux from acetyl-CoA towards patchoulol, a truncated HMG-CoA reductase was overexpressed and farnesyl diphosphate synthase was fused with patchoulol synthase. The highest increase in production could be achieved by modifying the carbon source; sesquiterpenoid titer increased from glucose to ethanol by a factor of 8.4. Two strategies predicted in silico were chosen for validation in this work. Disruption of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase gene (KGD1 was predicted to redirect the metabolic flux via the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass towards acetyl-CoA. The metabolic flux was redirected as predicted, however, the effect was dependent on cultivation conditions and the flux was interrupted at the level of acetate. High amounts of acetate were produced. As an alternative pathway to synthesize cytosolic acetyl-CoA, ATP-citrate lyase was expressed as a polycistronic construct, however, in vivo performance of the enzyme needs to be optimized to increase terpenoid production.Stoichiometric metabolic network analysis can be used successfully as a metabolic prediction tool. However, this study highlights that kinetics, regulation and cultivation conditions may interfere, resulting in poor in vivo performance. Main sites of regulation need to be released and improved enzymes

  6. In Vivo Validation of In Silico Predicted Metabolic Engineering Strategies in Yeast: Disruption of α-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase and Expression of ATP-Citrate Lyase for Terpenoid Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruchattka, Evamaria; Kayser, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Engineering of the central carbon metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to redirect metabolic flux towards cytosolic acetyl-CoA has become a central topic in yeast biotechnology. A cell factory with increased flux into acetyl-CoA can be used for heterologous production of terpenoids for pharmaceuticals, biofuels, fragrances, or other acetyl-CoA derived compounds. In a previous study, we identified promising metabolic engineering targets in S. cerevisiae using an in silico stoichiometric metabolic network analysis. Here, we validate selected in silico strategies in vivo. Patchoulol was produced by yeast via a heterologous patchoulol synthase of Pogostemon cablin. To increase the metabolic flux from acetyl-CoA towards patchoulol, a truncated HMG-CoA reductase was overexpressed and farnesyl diphosphate synthase was fused with patchoulol synthase. The highest increase in production could be achieved by modifying the carbon source; sesquiterpenoid titer increased from glucose to ethanol by a factor of 8.4. Two strategies predicted in silico were chosen for validation in this work. Disruption of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase gene (KGD1) was predicted to redirect the metabolic flux via the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass towards acetyl-CoA. The metabolic flux was redirected as predicted, however, the effect was dependent on cultivation conditions and the flux was interrupted at the level of acetate. High amounts of acetate were produced. As an alternative pathway to synthesize cytosolic acetyl-CoA, ATP-citrate lyase was expressed as a polycistronic construct, however, in vivo performance of the enzyme needs to be optimized to increase terpenoid production. Stoichiometric metabolic network analysis can be used successfully as a metabolic prediction tool. However, this study highlights that kinetics, regulation and cultivation conditions may interfere, resulting in poor in vivo performance. Main sites of regulation need to be released and improved enzymes are essential to

  7. RGD Peptides-Conjugated Pluronic Triblock Copolymers Encapsulated with AP-2α Expression Plasmid for Targeting Gastric Cancer Therapy in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Zhimin; Sun, Peng; Fang, Cheng; Fang, Hongwei; Wang, Yueming; Ji, Jiajia; Chen, Jun

    2015-07-17

    Gastric cancer, a high-risk malignancy, is a genetic disease developing from a cooperation of multiple gene mutations and a multistep process. Gene therapy is a novel treatment method for treating gastric cancer. Here, we developed a novel Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides conjugated copolymers nanoparticles-based gene delivery system in order to actively targeting inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cells. These transcription factor (AP-2α) expression plasmids were also encapsulated into pluronic triblock copolymers nanoparticles which was constituted of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)- block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEO-block-PPO-block-PEO, P123). The size, morphology and composition of prepared nanocomposites were further characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). In MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) analysis, these nanocomposites have minor effects on the proliferation of GES-1 cells but significantly decreased the viability of MGC-803, suggesting they own low cytotoxicity but good antitumor activity. The following in vivo evaluation experiments confirmed that these nanocomposites could prevent the growth of gastric cancer cells in the tumor xenograft mice model. In conclusion, these unique RGD peptides conjugated P123 encapsulated AP-2α nanocomposites could selectively and continually kill gastric cancer cells by over-expression of AP-2α in vitro and in vivo; this exhibits huge promising applications in clinical gastric cancer therapy.

  8. RGD Peptides-Conjugated Pluronic Triblock Copolymers Encapsulated with AP-2α Expression Plasmid for Targeting Gastric Cancer Therapy in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer, a high-risk malignancy, is a genetic disease developing from a cooperation of multiple gene mutations and a multistep process. Gene therapy is a novel treatment method for treating gastric cancer. Here, we developed a novel Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD peptides conjugated copolymers nanoparticles-based gene delivery system in order to actively targeting inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cells. These transcription factor (AP-2α expression plasmids were also encapsulated into pluronic triblock copolymers nanoparticles which was constituted of poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly(propylene glycol- block-poly(ethylene glycol (PEO-block-PPO-block-PEO, P123. The size, morphology and composition of prepared nanocomposites were further characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS. In MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide analysis, these nanocomposites have minor effects on the proliferation of GES-1 cells but significantly decreased the viability of MGC-803, suggesting they own low cytotoxicity but good antitumor activity. The following in vivo evaluation experiments confirmed that these nanocomposites could prevent the growth of gastric cancer cells in the tumor xenograft mice model. In conclusion, these unique RGD peptides conjugated P123 encapsulated AP-2α nanocomposites could selectively and continually kill gastric cancer cells by over-expression of AP-2α in vitro and in vivo; this exhibits huge promising applications in clinical gastric cancer therapy.

  9. Fed-batch bioreactor performance and cell line stability evaluation of the artificial chromosome expression technology expressing an IgG1 in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Rodney G; Yu, Erwin; Roe, Susanna; Piatchek, Michele Bailey; Jones, Heather L; Mott, John; Kennard, Malcolm L; Goosney, Danika L; Monteith, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The artificial chromosome expression (ACE) technology system uses an engineered artificial chromosome containing multiple site-specific recombination acceptor sites for the rapid and efficient construction of stable cell lines. The construction of Chinese hamster ovary(CHO) cell lines expressing an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) using the ACE system has been previously described (Kennard et al., Biotechnol Bioeng. 2009;104:540-553). To further demonstrate the manufacturing feasibility of the ACE system, four CHO cell lines expressing the human IgG1 MAb 4A1 were evaluated in batch and fed-batch shake flasks and in a 2-L fed-batch bioreactor. The batch shake flasks achieved titers between 0.7 and 1.1 g/L, whereas the fed-batch shake flask process improved titers to 2.5–3.0 g/L. The lead 4A1 ACE cell line achieved titers of 4.0 g/L with an average specific productivity of 40 pg/(cell day) when cultured in a non optimized 2-L fed-batch bioreactor using a completely chemically defined process. Generational stability characterization of the lead 4A1-expressing cell line demonstrated that the cell line was stable for up to 75 days in culture. Product quality attributes of the 4A1 MAb produced by the ACE system during the stability evaluation period were unchanged and also comparable to existing expression technologies such as the CHO-dhfr system. The results of this evaluation demonstrate that a clonal, stable MAb-expressing CHO cell line can be produced using ACE technology that performs competitively using a chemically defined fed-batch bioreactor process with comparable product quality attributes to cell lines generated by existing technologies.

  10. In vitro and in vivo prostate cancer metastasis and chemoresistance can be modulated by expression of either CD44 or CD147.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingli Hao

    Full Text Available CD44 and CD147 are associated with cancer metastasis and progression. Our purpose in the study was to investigate the effects of down-regulation of CD44 or CD147 on the metastatic ability of prostate cancer (CaP cells, their docetaxel (DTX responsiveness and potential mechanisms involved in vitro and in vivo. CD44 and CD147 were knocked down (KD in PC-3M-luc CaP cells using short hairpin RNA (shRNA. Expression of CD44, CD147, MRP2 (multi-drug resistance protein-2 and MCT4 (monocarboxylate tranporter-4 was evaluated using immunofluorescence and Western blotting. The DTX dose-response and proliferation was measured by MTT and colony assays, respectively. The invasive potential was assessed using a matrigel chamber assay. Signal transduction proteins in PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk pathways were assessed by Western blotting. An in vivo subcutaneous (s.c. xenograft model was established to assess CaP tumorigenecity, lymph node metastases and DTX response. Our results indicated that KD of CD44 or CD147 decreased MCT4 and MRP2 expression, reduced CaP proliferation and invasive potential and enhanced DTX sensitivity; and KD of CD44 or CD147 down-regulated p-Akt and p-Erk, the main signal modulators associated with cell growth and survival. In vivo, CD44 or CD147-KD PC-3M-luc xenografts displayed suppressed tumor growth with increased DTX responsiveness compared to control xenografts. Both CD44 and CD147 enhance metastatic capacity and chemoresistance of CaP cells, potentially mediated by activation of the PI3K and MAPK pathways. Selective targeting of CD44/CD147 alone or combined with DTX may limit CaP metastasis and increase chemosensitivity, with promise for future CaP treatment.

  11. DIF-1 inhibits tumor growth in vivo reducing phosphorylation of GSK-3β and expressions of cyclin D1 and TCF7L2 in cancer model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Yoshihara, Tatsuya; Jingushi, Kentaro; Igawa, Kazuhiro; Tomooka, Katsuhiko; Watanabe, Yutaka; Morimoto, Sachio; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    We reported that differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), synthesized by Dictyostelium discoideum, inhibited proliferation of various tumor cell lines in vitro by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. However, it remained unexplored whether DIF-1 also inhibits tumor growth in vivo. In the present study, therefore, we examined in-vivo effects of DIF-1 using three cancer models: Mutyh-deficient mice with oxidative stress-induced intestinal tumors and nude mice xenografted with the human colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and cervical cancer cell line HeLa. In exploration for an appropriate route of administration, we found that orally administered DIF-1 was absorbed through the digestive tract to elevate its blood concentration to levels enough to suppress tumor cell proliferation. Repeated oral administration of DIF-1 markedly reduced the number and size of intestinal tumors that developed in Mutyh-deficient mice, reducing the phosphorylation level of GSK-3β Ser(9) and the expression levels of early growth response-1 (Egr-1), transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) and cyclin D1. DIF-1 also inhibited the growth of HCT-116- and HeLa-xenograft tumors together with decreasing phosphorylation level of GSK-3β Ser(9), although it was not statistically significant in HeLa-xenograft tumors. DIF-1 also suppressed the expressions of Egr-1, TCF7L2 and cyclin D1 in HCT-116-xenograft tumors and those of β-catenin, TCF7L2 and cyclin D1 in HeLa-xenograft tumors. This is the first report to show that DIF-1 inhibits tumor growth in vivo, consistent with its in-vitro action, suggesting that this compound may have potential as a novel anti-tumor agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular genetics of Psoriasis (Principles, technology, gene location, genetic polymorphism and gene expression).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Robaee, Ahmad A

    2010-11-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with an etiology bases on both environmental and genetic factors. As is the case of many autoimmune diseases its real cause remains poorly defined. However, it is known that genetic factors contribute to disease susceptibility. The linkage analysis has been used to identify multiple loci and alleles that confer risk of the disease. Some other studies have focused upon single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for mapping of probable causal variants. Other studies, using genome-wide analytical techniques, tried to link the disease to copy number variants (CNVs) that are segments of DNA ranging in size from kilobases to megabases that vary in copy number. CNVs represent an important element of genomic polymorphism in humans and harboring dosage-sensitive genes may cause or predispose to a variety of human genetic diseases. The mechanisms giving rise to SNPs and CNVs can be considered as fundamental processes underlying gene duplications, deletions, insertions, inversions and complex combinations of rearrangements. The duplicated genes being the results of 'successful' copies are fixed and maintained in the population. Conversely, many 'unsuccessful' duplicates remain in the genome as pseudogenes. There is another form of genetic variations termed copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH) with less information about their potential impact on complex diseases. Additional studies would include associated gene expression variations with either SNPs or CNVs. Now many genetic techniques such as PCR, real time PCR, microarray and restriction fragment length analysis are available for detecting genetic polymorphisms, gene mapping and estimation of gene expression. Recently, the scientists have used these tools to define genetic signatures of disease, to understand genetic causes of disease and to characterize the effects of certain drugs on gene expression. This review highlights the principles, technology and applications on

  13. Association between in vivo iododeoxyuridine labeling, MIB-1 expression, malignancy grade and clinical stage in human prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, M; Høyer, M; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1998-01-01

    Large variability in the biological behavior of prostate cancer makes prognostic markers important. The extent of tumor cell proliferation has been suggested as an important predictor of clinical outcome. Fifty-five patients suspected of having or with previously diagnosed prostate cancer were...... labeled in vivo with IdUrd (a thymidine analogue incorporated into DNA in S-phase cells) by intravenous infusion before transurethral resection. IdUrd-labeled cells and MIB-1-positive cells were detected by immunohistochemistry. We found statistically significant associations between the tumor cell...

  14. Robust Cardiomyocyte-Specific Gene Expression Following Systemic Injection of AAV: In Vivo Gene Delivery Follows a Poisson Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Konkal-Matt R.; Xu, Yaqin; Yang, Zequan; Acton, Scott T.; French, Brent A

    2010-01-01

    Newly-isolated serotypes of AAV readily cross the endothelial barrier to provide efficient transgene delivery throughout the body. However, tissue-specific expression is preferred in most experimental studies and gene therapy protocols. Previous efforts to restrict gene expression to the myocardium often relied on direct injection into heart muscle or intracoronary perfusion. Here, we report an AAV vector system employing the cardiac troponin T promoter (cTnT). Using luciferase and eGFP, the efficiency and specificity of cardiac reporter gene expression using AAV serotype capsids: AAV-1, 2, 6, 8 or 9 were tested after systemic administration to 1 week old mice. Luciferase assays showed that the cTnT promoter worked in combination with each of the AAV serotype capsids to provide cardiomyocyte-specific gene expression, but AAV-9 followed closely by AAV-8 was the most efficient. AAV9-mediated gene expression from the cTnT promoter was 640-fold greater in the heart compared to the next highest tissue (liver). eGFP fluorescence indicated a transduction efficiency of 96% using AAV-9 at a dose of only 3.15×1010 viral particles per mouse. Moreover, the intensity of cardiomyocyte eGFP fluorescence measured on a cell-by-cell basis revealed that AAV-mediated gene expression in the heart can be modeled as a Poisson distribution; requiring an average of nearly two vector genomes per cell to attain an 85% transduction efficiency. PMID:20703310

  15. Suppressive effects of anti-allergic agent suplatast tosilate (IPD-1151T on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on mouse splenocytes in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatsugu Kurokawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of IPD-1151T on the expression of costimulatory molecules, CD40, CD80 and CD86, were investigated in vivo using mice with allergic disorders. BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with two doses of dinitrophenylated ovalbumin (DNP-OVA at 1-week intervals. These mice then were treated intraperitoneally with 100μg/kg of IPD1151T once a day for 14 days, starting 7 days after the first immunization. On day 21, some mice were challenged intraperitoneally with DNP-OVA and the other mice were not challenged. All mice were autopsied on day 22 and assayed for immunoglobulin E, interleuken (IL-4 and IL-5 productions following DNP-OVA immunization. The intraperitoneal treatment with IPD-1151T strongly suppressed immunoglobulin E contents in serum, which were enhanced by DNA-OVA immunization. IPD-1151T also caused a decrease in both IL-4 and IL-5 levels in splenic lymphocytes. We next examined the influence of IPD1151T on co-stimulatory molecule expression on splenic lymphocytes. IPD-1151T caused suppression of CD40 and CD86 expression; however, the treatments did not affect CD80 expression.

  16. High class I HDAC activity and expression are associated with RelA/p65 activation in pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo

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    Neuhaus Peter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The strong association between aberrant HDAC activity and the occurrence of cancer has led to the development of a variety of HDAC inhibitors (HDIs, which emerge as promising new targeted anticancer therapeutics. Methods Due to the pivotal role of RelA/p65 in the tumorigenesis of pancreatic neoplasia we examined the expression of class I HDACs 1, 2 and 3 in a large cohort of human pancreatic carcinomas and correlated our findings with RelA/p65 expression status. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of the HDIs SAHA and VPA on RelA/p65 activity in pancreatic cancer cell culture models. Results Class I HDACs were strongly expressed in a subset of pancreatic adenocarcinomas and high expression was significantly correlated with increased nuclear translocation of RelA/p65 (p = 0.024. The link of HDAC activity and RelA/p65 in this tumor entity was confirmed in vitro, where RelA/p65 nuclear translocation as well as RelA/p65 DNA binding activity could be markedly diminished by HDI treatment. Conclusion The RelA/p65 inhibitory effects of SAHA and VPA in vitro and the close relationship of class I HDACs and RelA/p65 in vivo suggest that treatment with HDIs could serve as a promising approach to suppress NF-κB activity which in turn may lead to enhanced apoptosis and chemosensitization of pancreatic cancers.

  17. Dried chicory root modifies the activity and expression of porcine hepatic CYP3A but not 2C – Effect of in vitro and in vivo exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Martin Krøyer; Zamaratskaia, Galia; Andersen, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic cytochrome P450 expression and activity are dependent on many factors, including dietary ingredients. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro effect of chicory root on hepatic CYP3A and 2C in male pigs. Chicory feeding increased the expression of CYP3A29 m......RNA but not CYP2C33. Correspondingly, CYP3A activity was increased by chicory feeding, while CYP2C activity was not affected. Additionally, the in vitro effect of chicory extract on the CYP3A activity was investigated. It was shown that CYP3A activity in the microsomes from male pigs was inhibited......, but this effect was eliminated by pre-incubation. In both male and female pigs the CYP3A activity was increased in the presence of chicory after pre-incubation. Furthermore, gender-related differences in mRNA expression and activity were observed. CYP3A mRNA expression was greater in female pigs...

  18. The Alterations in the Expression and Function of P-Glycoprotein in Vitamin A-Deficient Rats as well as the Effect of Drug Disposition in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubang Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate whether vitamin A deficiency could alter P-GP expression and function in tissues of rats and whether such effects affected the drug distribution in vivo of vitamin A-deficient rats. We induced vitamin A-deficient rats by giving them a vitamin A-free diet for 12 weeks. Then, Abcb1/P-GP expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR and Western blot. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that Abcb1a mRNA levels were increased in hippocampus and liver. In kidney, it only showed an upward trend. Abcb1b mRNA levels were increased in hippocampus, but decreased in cerebral cortex, liver and kidney. Western blot results were in good accordance with the alterations of Abcb1b mRNA levels. P-GP function was investigated through tissue distribution and body fluid excretion of rhodamine 123 (Rho123, and the results proclaimed that P-GP activities were also in good accordance with P-GP expression in cerebral cortex, liver and kidney. The change of drug distribution was also investigated through the tissue distribution of vincristine, and the results showed a significantly upward trend in all indicated tissues of vitamin A-deficient rats. In conclusion, vitamin A deficiency may alter Abcb1/P-GP expression and function in rat tissues, and the alterations may increase drug activity/toxicity through the increase of tissue accumulation.

  19. Correlating Anatomy and Function with Gene Expression in Individual Neurons by Combining in Vivo Labeling, Patch Clamp, and Single Cell RNA-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten K. Pfeffer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The classification of neurons into distinct types is an ongoing effort aimed at revealing and understanding the diversity of the components of the nervous system. Recently available methods allow us to determine the gene expression pattern of individual neurons in the mammalian cerebral cortex to generate powerful categorization schemes. For a thorough understanding of neuronal diversity such genetic categorization schemes need to be combined with traditional classification parameters like position, axonal projection or response properties to sensory stimulation. Here we describe a method to link the gene expression of individual neurons with their position, axonal projection, or sensory response properties. Neurons are labeled in vivo based on their anatomical or functional properties and, using patch clamp pipettes, their RNA individually harvested in vitro for RNAseq. We validate the methodology using multiple established molecularly and anatomically distinct cell populations and explore molecular differences between uncharacterized neurons in mouse visual cortex. Gene expression patterns between L5 neurons projecting to frontal or contralateral cortex are distinct while L2 neurons differing in position, projection, or function are molecularly similar. With this method we can determine the genetic expression pattern of functionally and anatomically identified individual neurons.

  20. Sequential expression and cooperative interaction of c-Ha-ras and c-erbB genes in in vivo chemical carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, Z.; Fei, Y.; Roy, S.; Biswas, D.K. (Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA (USA)); Solt, D.B.; Polverini, P.J. (Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1989-02-01

    The level of expression of several cellular protooncogenes is examined at different stages of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced tumor development in hamster buccal pouch epithelium (HBPE). Results presented demonstrate overexpression of c-Ha-ras gene at a very early stage of tumor development, and this elevated level of expression of the gene persists throughout the tumorigenesis process. The expression of the cellular protooncogene c-erbB, on the other hand, can be detected only after 8-10 weeks of DMBA treatment of the tissue and increases with the progression of the disease. The overexpression of c-erbB gene can be correlated with the stage of extensive proliferation and subsequent invasion of the HBPE cells into the underlying connective tissue. This sequential pattern of stage-specific expression of the two cellular protooncogenes can be observed in (i) treated tissues, (ii) stage-representative cultured cells, and (iii) NIH 3T3 transformants derived with DNA from HBPE cells. The sequential overexpression of c-Ha-ras and c-erbB genes in a stage-specific manner and their cooperative interaction in the DMBA-induced in vivo oral carcinogenesis have been demonstrated.

  1. Expression of Clu and Tgfb1 during murine tooth development: effects of in-vivo transfection with anti-miR-214.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Sehic, Amer; Khuu, Cuong; Risnes, Steinar; Osmundsen, Harald

    2013-08-01

    Expression of clusterin (Clu) in the murine first molar tooth germ was markedly increased at postnatal developmental stages. The time-course of expression of this gene paralleled those of other genes encoding proteins involved during the secretory phase of odontogenesis, as described previously. Immunohistochemical studies of clusterin in murine molar tooth germs suggested this protein to be located in outer enamel epithelium, regressing enamel organ, secretory ameloblasts, and the dental epithelium connecting the tooth to the oral epithelium at an early eruptive stage. Immunolabelling of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) revealed it to be located close to clusterin. The levels of expression of Clu and Tgfb1 were markedly decreased following in-vivo transfection with anti-miR-214. In contrast, the expression of several genes associated with regulation of growth and development were increased by this treatment. We suggest that clusterin has functions during secretory odontogenesis and the early eruptive phase. Bioinformatic analysis after treatment with anti-miR-214 suggested that, whilst cellular activities associated with tooth mineralization and eruption were inhibited, activities associated with an alternative developmental activity (i.e. biosynthesis of contractile proteins) appeared to be stimulated. These changes probably occur through regulation mediated by a common cluster of transcription factors and support suggestions that microRNAs (miRNAs) are highly significant as regulators of differentiation during odontogenesis. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR method to measure the in vivo effect of dietary conjugated linoleic acid on porcine muscle PPAR gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meadus W.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA can activate (in vitro the nuclear transcription factors known as the peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPAR. CLA was fed at 11 g CLA/kg of feed for 45d to castrated male pigs (barrows to better understand long term effects of PPAR activation in vivo. The barrows fed CLA had lean muscle increased by 3.5% and overall fat reduced by 9.2% but intramuscular fat (IMF % was increased by 14% (P < 0.05. To measure the effect of long term feeding of CLA on porcine muscle gene expression, a semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was developed using cDNA normalized against the housekeeping genes cyclophilin and &bgr;-actin. This method does not require radioactivity or expensive PCR instruments with real-time fluorescent detection. PPAR&ggr; and the PPAR responsive gene AFABP but not PPAR&agr; were significantly increased (P < 0.05 in the CLA fed pig’s muscle. PPAR&agr; and PPAR&ggr; were also quantitatively tested for large differences in gene expression by western blot analysis but no significant difference was detected at this level. Although large differences in gene expression of the PPAR transcriptional factors could not be confirmed by western blotting techniques. The increased expression of AFABP gene, which is responsive to PPAR transcriptional factors, confirmed that dietary CLA can induce a detectable increase in basal PPAR transcriptional activity in the live animal.

  3. Dopamine receptor subtype 2 expression profile in nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas and in vivo response to cabergoline therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Neto, Leonardo; Wildemberg, Luiz Eduardo; Moraes, Aline B; Colli, Leandro M; Kasuki, Leandro; Marques, Nelma Verônica; Gasparetto, Emerson L; de Castro, Margaret; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2015-05-01

    To determine the dopamine receptor subtype 2 (DR2) mRNA levels and protein expression and to evaluate the effect of adjuvant cabergoline therapy on tumour volume (TV) in patients with postoperative residual nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA). The mRNA expression was quantified by real-time RT-PCR (TaqMan(®)), and protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Tumours were classified according to the percentage of immunostained cells for DR2 as scores 1 (Cabergoline was started at least 6 months after surgery in nine patients with residual tumours (3 mg/week). The cabergoline effect was prospectively evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging using three-dimensional volume calculation. TV reduction >25% was considered significant. The DR2 mRNA expression was variable but was observed in 100% of the samples (N = 20). DR2 protein expression was also observed in all the tumours (N = 34). Twenty-nine tumours (85%) were classified as score 2. The median DR2 mRNA expression was higher in the tumours classified as score 2 compared with score 1 (P = 0·007). TV reduction with cabergoline therapy was observed in 67% of the patients (6/9). The median TV before and after 6 months of treatment was 1·90 cm(3) (0·61-8·74) and 1·69 cm(3) (0·36-4·20) [P = 0·02], respectively. In conclusion, DR2 is expressed in all adenomas and the majority of the patients in this study displayed tumour shrinkage on cabergoline (CAB) therapy. Thus, CAB might be useful in adjuvant therapy in NFPA patients with residual tumours after surgery. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar [College of Pharmacy, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan [Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Surh, Young-Joon, E-mail: surh@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone attenuates phosphorylation of IκBα and DNA binding of NF-κB in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone inhibits phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, JNK and Akt in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins in mouse skin. -- Abstract: Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  5. Organ-specific and differential requirement of TYK2 and IFNAR1 for LPS-induced iNOS expression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painz, Ronald; Walter, Ingrid; Kolbe, Thomas; Rigler, Doris; Vogl, Claus; Steinborn, Ralf; Rülicke, Thomas; Helmreich, Magdalena; Karaghiosoff, Marina; Müller, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an integral structural component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and the principal active agent in the pathogenesis of endotoxin shock. LPS is a potent inducer of a variety of cytokines and inflammatory agents that lead to a profound alteration of gene expression patterns in cells and organs. The gene coding for the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is highly responsive to LPS in vitro and in vivo and accounts for the production of nitric oxide (NO). The Janus kinase (JAK) family member tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) is a constituent of the interferon (IFN) type I response pathway and an important effector in the progression of endotoxin shock. Macrophages deficient for IFNalphabeta receptor chain 1 (IFNAR1) or TYK2 were shown to have an impaired LPS-induced iNOS expression. Here we determined the contribution of IFNAR1 and TYK2 to iNOS expression in vivo in a lethal LPS challenge model. TYK2 and IFNAR1 were found to be crucial for the LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in spleen and lung that could be attributed to the Mac3-positive population. In liver LPS-induced iNOS mRNA expression was only partially impaired in TYK2-deficient mice and was unimpaired in IFNAR1-deficient mice, indicating organ specificity. TYK2(-/-) and IFNAR1(-/-) mice also differ with respect to IFNgamma production upon LPS challenge in that TYK2(-/-) mice show a defect while IFNAR1(-/-) mice do not. Our data suggest that iNOS is induced through IFNAR1 and TYK2 in Mac3-positive cells which are the main source of iNOS in spleen and lung. The LPS-induced iNOS expression in liver is independent of IFNAR1 and partially dependent on TYK2, which is most likely due to the lack of IFNgamma production in the absence of TYK2.

  6. Cell-type specific oxytocin gene expression from AAV delivered promoter deletion constructs into the rat supraoptic nucleus in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L Fields

    Full Text Available The magnocellular neurons (MCNs in the hypothalamus selectively express either oxytocin (OXT or vasopressin (AVP neuropeptide genes, a property that defines their phenotypes. Here we examine the molecular basis of this selectivity in the OXT MCNs by stereotaxic microinjections of adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors that contain various OXT gene promoter deletion constructs using EGFP as the reporter into the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON. Two weeks following injection of the AAVs, immunohistochemical assays of EGFP expression from these constructs were done to determine whether the EGFP reporter co-localizes with either the OXT- or AVP-immunoreactivity in the MCNs. The results show that the key elements in the OT gene promoter that regulate the cell-type specific expression the SON are located -216 to -100 bp upstream of the transcription start site. We hypothesize that within this 116 bp domain a repressor exists that inhibits expression specifically in AVP MCNs, thereby leading to the cell-type specific expression of the OXT gene only in the OXT MCNs.

  7. Endogenous expression of CD80 co-stimulatory molecule facilitates in vivo tumor regression of oral squamous carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Giovana R; Wen, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Most tumor tissues, especially those of non-hematopoietic origin, do not express CD80 co-stimulatory molecules, possibly as a mechanism to evade immune surveillance. The objective of this study was to determine whether abundant endogenous CD80 expression on oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) early during tumor progression can facilitate immune elimination and reverse immune tolerance. The growth of regressor and progressor oral SCC lines with differing endogenous CD80 expression were examined in immune-competent and -deficient mice. Immune effectors were determined by T-cell depletion experiments and immunohistochemistry. Our studies show regression of early tumor growth when immunocompetent animals are inoculated with oral SCC progressor cell lines expressing abundant endogenous CD80. The CD80-induced antitumor response was due largely to induced T-cell responses. Our findings suggest that inadequate CD80 expression during early oral SCC formation may contribute to the escape of tumors from immune elimination. This information can be useful in the design of new approaches to generate more effective immunotherapy against this disease.

  8. Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Nuclear and Gene Expression Changes During Human Disc Cell Apoptosis: In Vitro and In Vivo Annulus Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Helen E; Hoelscher, Gretchen L; Bethea, Synthia; Hanley, Edward N

    2015-06-15

    A study using cultured human annulus cells and human annular tissue. To further explore and define mitochondrial mechanisms related to disc cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Mitochondrial-dependent intrinsic signaling pathways are a well-recognized component of apoptosis (programmed cell death). Disc cell apoptosis is important because it is a major mechanism by which cell numbers decrease during disc degeneration. Our objective was to further explore and define mitochondrial mechanisms related to disc cell apoptosis. High-content screening techniques were used to study nuclear morphology and mitochondrial membrane potentials in cultured annulus cells. Gene expression in annulus tissue was studied with microarray analysis. Cultured cells showed significantly increased nuclear size (an indicator of apoptosis) with increasing Thompson grade (P potential (which results from the difference in electrical potential generated by the electrochemical gradient across the inner membrane of the mitochondrion) versus Thompson grade was identified in cultured human annulus cells in control conditions (r = 0.356, P potential was identified versus nontreated cells. Gene expression patterns in more degenerated Thompson grade III, IV, and V discs versus healthier grade I and II discs showed significant upregulation of a number of genes with well-recognized apoptosis roles in mitochondrial potential decline (ITM2B, beta-2-microglobulin, and cathepsin B, DAP, GAS1, and PDCD5) and TNF-α associations (cathepsin B, RAC1, and PPT1). Data presented here show the in vivo expression of apoptosis-related genes associated with the loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential with increasing Thompson scores. These data, which mimic our novel, direct cell-based in vitro findings, stress the importance of mitochondrial changes related to apoptosis and TNF-α during human disc degeneration. N/A.

  9. Antibodies against In Vivo-Expressed Antigens Are Sufficient To Protect against Lethal Aerosol Infection with Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Shawn M; Dyke, Jeremy S; Jelesijevic, Tomislav P; Michel, Frank; Lafontaine, Eric R; Hogan, Robert J

    2017-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei, a facultative intracellular bacterium and tier 1 biothreat, causes the fatal zoonotic disease glanders. The organism possesses multiple genes encoding autotransporter proteins, which represent important virulence factors and targets for developing countermeasures in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. In the present study, we investigated one of these autotransporters, BatA, and demonstrate that it displays lipolytic activity, aids in intracellular survival, is expressed in vivo, elicits production of antibodies during infection, and contributes to pathogenicity in a mouse aerosol challenge model. A mutation in the batA gene of wild-type strain ATCC 23344 was found to be particularly attenuating, as BALB/c mice infected with the equivalent of 80 median lethal doses cleared the organism. This finding prompted us to test the hypothesis that vaccination with the batA mutant strain elicits protective immunity against subsequent infection with wild-type bacteria. We discovered that not only does vaccination provide high levels of protection against lethal aerosol challenge with B. mallei ATCC 23344, it also protects against infection with multiple isolates of the closely related organism and causative agent of melioidosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei Passive-transfer experiments also revealed that the protective immunity afforded by vaccination with the batA mutant strain is predominantly mediated by IgG antibodies binding to antigens expressed exclusively in vivo Collectively, our data demonstrate that BatA is a target for developing medical countermeasures and that vaccination with a mutant lacking expression of the protein provides a platform to gain insights regarding mechanisms of protective immunity against B. mallei and B. pseudomallei, including antigen discovery. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Development of a multilayered palate substitute in rabbits: a histochemical ex vivo and in vivo analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Piedra, M A; Alaminos, M; Fernández-Valadés-Gámez, R; España-López, A; Liceras-Liceras, E; Sánchez-Montesinos, I; Martínez-Plaza, A; Sánchez-Quevedo, M C; Fernández-Valadés, R; Garzón, I

    2017-03-01

    Current tissue engineering technology focuses on developing simple tissues, whereas multilayered structures comprising several tissue types have rarely been described. We developed a highly biomimetic multilayered palate substitute with bone and oral mucosa tissues using rabbit cells and biomaterials subjected to nanotechnological techniques based on plastic compression. This novel palate substitute was autologously grafted in vivo, and histological and histochemical analyses were used to evaluate biointegration, cell function, and cell differentiation in the multilayered palate substitute. The three-dimensional structure of the multilayered palate substitute was histologically similar to control tissues, but the ex vivo level of cell and tissue differentiation were low as determined by the absence of epithelial differentiation although cytokeratins 4 and 13 were expressed. In vivo grafting was associated with greater cell differentiation, epithelial stratification, and maturation, but the expression of cytokeratins 4, 13, 5, and 19 at did not reach control tissue levels. Histochemical analysis of the oral mucosa stroma and bone detected weak signals for proteoglycans, elastic and collagen fibers, mineralization deposits and osteocalcin in the multilayered palate substitute cultured ex vivo. However, in vivo grafting was able to induce cell and tissue differentiation, although the expression levels of these components were always significantly lower than those found in controls, except for collagen in the bone layer. These results suggest that generation of a full-thickness multilayered palate substitute is achievable and that tissues become partially differentiated upon in vivo grafting.

  11. A method to assess target gene involvement in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo using lentiviral vectors expressing shRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Blosser

    Full Text Available Current methods to study angiogenesis in cancer growth and development can be difficult and costly, requiring extensive use of in vivo methodologies. Here, we utilized an in vitro adipocyte derived stem cell and endothelial colony forming cell (ADSC/ECFC co-culture system to investigate the effect of lentiviral-driven shRNA knockdown of target genes compared to a non-targeting shRNA control on cord formation using High Content Imaging. Cord formation was significantly reduced following knockdown of the VEGF receptor VEGFR2 in VEGF-driven cord formation and the FGF receptor FGFR1 in basic FGF (bFGF-driven cord formation. In addition, cord formation was significantly reduced following knockdown of the transcription factor forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1, a protein with known positive effects on angiogenesis and blood vessel stabilization in VEGF- and bFGF-driven cord formation. Lentiviral shRNA also demonstrated utility for stable knockdown of VEGFR2 and FOXO1 in ECFCs, allowing for interrogation of protein knockdown effects on in vivo neoangiogenesis in a Matrigel plug assay. In addition to interrogating the effect of gene knockdown in endothelial cells, we utilized lentiviral shRNA to knockdown specificity protein 1 (SP1, a transcription factor involved in the expression of VEGF, in U-87 MG tumor cells to demonstrate the ability to analyze angiogenesis in vitro in a tumor-driven transwell cord formation system and in tumor angiogenesis in vivo. A significant reduction in tumor-driven cord formation, VEGF secretion, and in vivo tumor angiogenesis was observed upon SP1 knockdown. Therefore, evaluation of target gene knockdown effects in the in vitro co-culture cord formation assay in the ADSC/ECFC co-culture, ECFCs alone, and in tumor cells translated directly to in vivo results, indicating the in vitro method as a robust, cost-effective and efficient in vitro surrogate assay to investigate target gene involvement in endothelial or tumor cell

  12. In vivo expression of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi genes in the blood of patients with typhoid fever in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaullah Sheikh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi is the cause of typhoid fever. It is a human-restricted pathogen, and few data exist on S. Typhi gene expression in humans.We applied an RNA capture and amplification technique, Selective Capture of Transcribed Sequences (SCOTS, and microarray hybridization to identify S. Typhi transcripts expressed in the blood of five humans infected with S. Typhi in Bangladesh. In total, we detected the expression of mRNAs for 2,046 S. Typhi genes (44% of the S. Typhi genome in human blood; expression of 912 genes was detected in all 5 patients, and expression of 1,100 genes was detected in 4 or more patients. Identified transcripts were associated with the virulence-associated PhoP regulon, Salmonella pathogenicity islands, the use of alternative carbon and energy sources, synthesis and transport of iron, thiamine, and biotin, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides and oxidative stress. The most highly represented group were genes currently annotated as encoding proteins designated as hypothetical, unknown, or unclassified. Of the 2,046 detected transcripts, 1,320 (29% of the S. Typhi genome had significantly different levels of detection in human blood compared to in vitro cultures; detection of 141 transcripts was significantly different in all 5 patients, and detection of 331 transcripts varied in at least 4 patients. These mRNAs encode proteins of unknown function, those involved in energy metabolism, transport and binding, cell envelope, cellular processes, and pathogenesis. We confirmed increased expression of a subset of identified mRNAs by quantitative-PCR.We report the first characterization of bacterial transcriptional profiles in the blood of patients with typhoid fever. S. Typhi is an important global pathogen whose restricted host range has greatly inhibited laboratory studies. Our results suggest that S. Typhi uses a largely uncharacterized genetic repertoire to survive within cells and utilize alternate

  13. In vivo pretargeted imaging of HER2 and TAG-72 expression using the HaloTag enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, J; Mosley, M; Uyeda, T; Cong, M; Fan, F.; Faulkner, S.; Cornelissen, B.

    2017-01-01

    A novel pretargeted SPECT imaging strategy based on the HaloTag enzyme has been evaluated for the first time in a living system. To determine the efficacy of this approach, two clinically relevant cancer biomarkers, HER2 and TAG-72, were selected to represent models of internalizing and non-internalizing antigens, respectively. In MDA-MB-231/H2N (HER2-expressing) and LS174T (TAG-72-expressing) xenograft tumors in mice, pretargeting experiments were performed in which HaloTag-conjugated deriva...

  14. Gene gun bombardment-mediated expression and translocation of EGFP-tagged GLUT4 in skeletal muscle fibres in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans P M M; Reynet, Christine; Schjerling, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cellular protein trafficking has been studied to date only in vitro or with techniques that are invasive and have a low time resolution. To establish a gentle method for analysis of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) trafficking in vivo in fully differentiated rat skeletal muscle fibres we combined......-old rats and peaked around 1 week after transfection. The gene gun was used subsequently with a plasmid coding for EGFP linked to the C-terminus of GLUT4 (GLUT4-EGFP). Rats were anaesthetised 5 days after transfection and insulin given i.v. with or without accompanying electrical hindleg muscle stimulation....... After stimulation, the hindlegs were fixed by perfusion. GLUT4-EGFP-positive FDB fibres were isolated and analysed by confocal microscopy. The intracellular distribution of GLUT4-EGFP under basal conditions as well as after translocation to the plasma membrane in response to insulin, contractions...

  15. Relative Expression Levels Rather Than Specific Activity Plays the Major Role in Determining In Vivo AKT Isoform Substrate Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel S. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The AKT protooncogene mediates many cellular processes involved in normal development and disease states such as cancer. The three structurally similar isoforms: AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3 exhibit both functional redundancy and isoform-specific functions; however the basis for their differential signalling remains unclear. Here we show that in vitro, purified AKT3 is ∼47-fold more active than AKT1 at phosphorylating peptide and protein substrates. Despite these marked variations in specific activity between the individual isoforms, a comprehensive analysis of phosphorylation of validated AKT substrates indicated only subtle differences in signalling via individual isoforms in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesise, at least in this model system, that relative tissue/cellular abundance, rather than specific activity, plays the dominant role in determining AKT substrate specificity in situ.

  16. Listeria monocytogenes encodes a functional ESX-1 secretion system whose expression is detrimental to in vivo infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Jorge; Reis, Olga; Vieira, Ana; Moura, Ines M; Zanolli Moreno, Luisa; Carvalho, Filipe; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-Del Portillo, Francisco; Sousa, Sandra; Cabanes, Didier

    2017-08-18

    Bacterial pathogenicity deeply depends on the ability to secrete virulence factors that bind specific targets on host cells and manipulate host responses. The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a human foodborne pathogen that remains a serious public health concern. To transport proteins across its cell envelope, this facultative intracellular pathogen engages a set of specialized secretion systems. Here we show that L. monocytogenes EGDe uses a specialized secretion system, named ESX-1, to secrete EsxA, a homolog of the virulence determinants ESAT-6 and EsxA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. Our data show that the L. monocytogenes ESX-1 secretion system and its substrates are dispensable for bacterial invasion and intracellular multiplication in eukaryotic cell lines. Surprisingly, we found that the EssC-dependent secretion of EsxA has a detrimental effect on L. monocytogenes in vivo infection.

  17. Artistic expression in the development of new technology for three dimensional imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sandra; Richardson, Martin; Azevedo, Isabel

    2011-02-01

    The medium of holography offers many new creative possibilities for the development of kinetic art. In the search of new forms of image display we examine new methods of capturing Three Dimensional animated images. Expression in new forms of visualisation leads to new methods for exploration auto-stereoscopic displays, three-dimensional imaging and holography. Artists have long combined cameras together to explore the human body as form and space and this paper sets out the potential of some of these techniques and in particular the technical potential of the use of multicamera capture techniques. Artists such as Tim Macmillan1 (2010) and Dayton Taylor2 (1997) use multi-lens cameras to create the illusion of capturing space and time for different effects, such as frozen moment, live action and slow motion (often seen as a cinemagraphic effect). However, their results are two-dimensional images made with a two-dimensional image capture system. Previous research on the interaction between art and technology has been based on twodimensional video art. This paper outlines a method of three-dimensional video capture to explore three-dimensional space and the human body. The stereoscopic specialist Ray Zone3 has written about the evolution of 3-D technology and 3-D film. Zone examines the development of these 3-D techniques and demonstrates the connection between two fields. This research extends our knowledge of Three Dimensional moving image as an art form. In the new art world, Holography has become a method increasingly used to develop kinetic art. In the search of new forms of display and image capture, we examine new techniques such as 3-D, including auto-stereoscopic display, three-dimensional imaging and holography.

  18. In Vivo Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus-Infected Mice Reveals Differential Temporal and Spatial Expression Patterns of fhuD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacconi, Marta; Haag, Andreas F; Chiarot, Emiliano; Donato, Paolo; Bagnoli, Fabio; Delany, Isabel; Bensi, Giuliano

    2017-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic human pathogen and a major cause of invasive infections such as bacteremia, endocarditis, pneumonia, and wound infections. FhuD2 is a staphylococcal lipoprotein involved in the uptake of iron-hydroxymate and is under the control of the iron uptake regulator Fur. This protein is part of an investigational multicomponent vaccine formulation that has shown protective efficacy in several murine models of infection. Even though fhuD2 expression has been shown to be upregulated in murine kidneys infected with S. aureus, it is not known whether the bacterium undergoes increased iron deprivation during prolonged infection. Furthermore, different S. aureus infection niches might provide different environments and levels of iron availability, resulting in different fhuD2 expression patterns among organs of the same host. To address these questions, we characterized the in vitro expression of the fhuD2 gene and confirmed Fur-dependent regulation of its expression. We further investigated its expression in mice infected with a bioluminescent reporter strain of S. aureus expressing the luciferase operon under the control of the fhuD2 promoter. The emission of bioluminescence in different organs was followed over a 7-day time course, and quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the RNA transcribed from the endogenous fhuD2 gene was performed. Using this approach, we were able to show that fhuD2 expression was induced during infection in all organs analyzed and that differences in expression were observed at different time points and in different infected organs. Our data suggest that S. aureus undergoes increased iron deprivation during the progression of infection in diverse host organs and accordingly induces dedicated iron acquisition mechanisms. Since FhuD2 plays a central role in providing the pathogen with the required iron, further knowledge of the patterns of fhuD2 expression in vivo during infection will be instrumental in better

  19. Sphingolipid-mediated restoration of Mitf expression and repigmentation in vivo in a mouse model of hair graying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bidisha; Singh, Suman Kumar; Mallick, Shampa; Bera, Rabindranath; Datta, Pijush K; Mandal, Mriganka; Roy, Syamal; Bhadra, Ranjan

    2009-04-01

    Recent advances in the identification and characterisation of stem cell populations has led to substantial interest in understanding the precise triggers that would operate to induce activation of quiescent stem cells. Melanocyte stem cells (MSCs) reside in the bulge region of the hair follicles and are characterised by reduced expression of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) and its target genes implicated in differentiation. Vitiligo is characterised by progressive destruction of differentiated melanocytes. However, therapies using UV irradiation therapy can induce a degree of repigmentation, suggesting that MSCs may be activated. As Mitf is implicated in control of proliferation, we have explored the possibility that inducing Mitf expression via lipid-mediated activation of the p38 stress-signalling pathway may represent a re-pigmentation strategy. Here we have isolated from placental extract a C18:0 sphingolipid able to induce Mitf and tyrosinase expression via activation of the p38 stress-signalling pathway. Strikingly, in age-onset gray-haired C57BL/6J mice that exhibit decaying Mitf expression, topical application of placental sphingolipid leads to increased Mitf in follicular melanocytes and fresh dense black hair growth. The results raise the possibility that lipid-mediated activation of the p38 pathway may represent a novel approach to an effective vitiligo therapy.

  20. Smooth muscle cells can express cytokeratins of "simple" epithelium. Immunocytochemical and biochemical studies in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gown, A M; Boyd, H C; Chang, Y; Ferguson, M; Reichler, B; Tippens, D

    1988-08-01

    Cytokeratins are a set of 19 proteins that together constitute the class of intermediate filament protein expressed by epithelial cells and tumors. Using a panel of 9 different monoclonal anti-cytokeratin antibodies, the authors have performed immunocytochemistry on methanol-fixed, frozen sections and methacarn-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue of human myometrial specimens. Anomalous cytokeratin expression (ACE) by smooth muscle cells was found in all specimens. Immunoblots of this tissue confirmed the presence of cytokeratin 19, and possibly 8. In addition, immunocytochemical studies demonstrated ACE in human fetal tissues within the intestinal muscularis and the heart, especially in the region of the aortic outflow tract, and in 8 of 19 cases of leiomyosarcoma from adults. Indirect immunofluorescence studies were also performed on cells explanted from myometrial tissue; the overwhelming majority of cells derived from these cultures were smooth muscle cells as verified by expression of muscle actins, and a subpopulation of these cells was found to be cytokeratin-positive. ACE was confirmed in vitro by double labeling experiments demonstrating simultaneous expression of muscle actins and cytokeratins within the same cell. The significance of this smooth muscle cell ACE is unknown, but it may be a phenotypic marker of smooth muscle in a proliferative state. ACE could be a source of confusion in the immunocytochemical analysis of poorly differentiated malignancies if a complete panel of antibodies is not employed.

  1. Cold stress equally enhances in vivo pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in chicken lines divergently selected for antibody responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangalapura, B.N.; Kaiser, M.G.; Poel, van der J.J.; Parmentier, H.K.; Lamont, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of cold stress, immunization and genetic selection on the expression of mRNA for cytokine genes in poultry have not been completely elucidated. Therefore, in the present experiment, using real-time quantitative RT-PCR, we evaluated the effect of cold stress and immunization with complete

  2. Increased expression of oxyproteins in the optic nerve head of an in vivo model of optic nerve ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Joon Mo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effects of microvascular compromise on the expression of oxidative proteins in the optic nerve head. Methods Endothelin-1 (0.1 μg/day was delivered to the perineural region of the anterior optic nerve by osmotically driven minipumps for two, four, and eight weeks in ten rabbits, respectively. As a control, a balanced salt solution was delivered for two and eight weeks in five rabbits, respectively. Expression of oxyproteins in the cornea, vitreous, retina, and optic nerve head for each time period was determined using the OxyBlot protein oxidation detection kit. Retina was stained with H&E and TUNEL for histological examination. Results There was a significant increase in the expression of oxyproteins in the optic nerve head after two weeks of endothelin-1 administration (p  Conclusions Administration of endothelin-1 to the microvasculature of the optic nerve leads to increased expression of oxyproteins in the optic nerve head and loss of retinal ganglion cells.

  3. Host gene expression profiling and in vivo cytokine studies to characterize the role of linezolid and vancomycin in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA murine sepsis model.

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    Batu K Sharma-Kuinkel

    Full Text Available Linezolid (L, a potent antibiotic for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, inhibits bacterial protein synthesis. By contrast, vancomycin (V is a cell wall active agent. Here, we used a murine sepsis model to test the hypothesis that L treatment is associated with differences in bacterial and host characteristics as compared to V. Mice were injected with S. aureus USA300, and then intravenously treated with 25 mg/kg of either L or V at 2 hours post infection (hpi. In vivo alpha-hemolysin production was reduced in both L and V-treated mice compared to untreated mice but the reduction did not reach the statistical significance [P = 0.12 for L; P = 0.70 for V. PVL was significantly reduced in L-treated mice compared to untreated mice (P = 0.02. However the reduction of in vivo PVL did not reach the statistical significance in V- treated mice compared to untreated mice (P = 0.27. Both antibiotics significantly reduced IL-1β production [P = 0.001 for L; P = 0.006 for V]. IL-6 was significantly reduced with L but not V antibiotic treatment [P<0.001 for L; P = 0.11 for V]. Neither treatment significantly reduced production of TNF-α. Whole-blood gene expression profiling showed no significant effect of L and V on uninfected mice. In S. aureus-infected mice, L altered the expression of a greater number of genes than V (95 vs. 42; P = 0.001. Pathway analysis for the differentially expressed genes identified toll-like receptor signaling pathway to be common to each S. aureus-infected comparison. Expression of immunomodulatory genes like Cxcl9, Cxcl10, Il1r2, Cd14 and Nfkbia was different among the treatment groups. Glycerolipid metabolism pathway was uniquely associated with L treatment in S. aureus infection. This study demonstrates that, as compared to V, treatment with L is associated with reduced levels of toxin production, differences in host inflammatory response, and distinct host gene expression

  4. Transfert de gène in vivo:
    étude, régulation et application de l'électrotransfert

    OpenAIRE

    Trollet, Capucine

    2005-01-01

    We have been dealing with different projects using a physical method of in vivo gene transfer,called electrotransfer, widely used in mouse muscle and skin with high gene expression.By in vivo optical imaging, we have been working on optimization of electrotransfer. We havedeveloped an artificial regulation system to in vivo control an exogenous gene expression based onthe antisense technology using muscular electrotransfer in mouse. We have worked on molecularoptimization of DNA electrotransf...

  5. Anti-inflammatory potential of Capparis spinosa L. in vivo in mice through inhibition of cell infiltration and cytokine gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Azhary, Khadija; Tahiri Jouti, Nadia; El Khachibi, Meryam; Moutia, Mouna; Tabyaoui, Imane; El Hou, Abdelhalim; Achtak, Hafid; Nadifi, Sellama; Habti, Norddine; Badou, Abdallah

    2017-01-31

    Several chronic inflammatory diseases are characterized by inappropriate CD4+ T cell response. In the present study, we assessed the ability of Capparis spinosa L. (CS) preparation to orientate, in vivo, the immune response mediated by CD4+ T cells towards an anti-inflammatory response. The in vivo study was carried out by using the contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model in Swiss mice. Then we performed a histological analysis followed by molecular study by using real time RT-PCR. We also realized a phytochemical screening and a liquid-liquid separation of CS preparation. Our study allowed us to detect a significantly reduced edema in mice treated with CS preparations relative to control. CS effect was dose dependent, statistically similar to that observed with indomethacin, independent of the plant genotype and of the period of treatment. Furthermore, our histology studies revealed that CS induced a significant decrease in immune cell infiltration, in vasodilatation and in dermis thickness in the inflammatory site. Interestingly, we showed that CS operated by inhibiting cytokine gene expression including IFNγ, IL-17 and IL-4. Besides, phytochemical screening of CS extract showed the presence of several chemical families such as saponins, flavonoids and alkaloids. One (hexane fraction) out of the three distinct prepared fractions, exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect similar to that of the raw preparation, and would likely contain the bioactive(s) molecule(s). Altogether, our data indicate that CS regulates inflammation induced in vivo in mice and thus could be a source of anti-inflammatory molecules, which could be used in some T lymphocyte-dependent inflammatory diseases.

  6. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppresses the expression of HSP70 and HSP90 and exhibits anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jung-Hoon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, one of the major catechins in green tea, is a potential chemopreventive agent for various cancers. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of EGCG on the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs and tumor suppression. Methods Cell colony formation was evaluated by a soft agar assay. Transcriptional activity of HSP70 and HSP90 was determined by luciferase reporter assay. An EGCG-HSPs complex was prepared using EGCG attached to the cyanogen bromide (CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. In vivo effect of EGCG on tumor growth was examined in a xenograft model. Results Treatment with EGCG decreased cell proliferation and colony formation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. EGCG specifically inhibited the expression of HSP70 and HSP90 by inhibiting the promoter activity of HSP70 and HSP90. Pretreatment with EGCG increased the stress sensitivity of MCF-7 cells upon heat shock (44°C for 1 h or oxidative stress (H2O2, 500 μM for 24 h. Moreover, treatment with EGCG (10 mg/kg in a xenograft model resulted in delayed tumor incidence and reduced tumor size, as well as the inhibition of HSP70 and HSP90 expression. Conclusions Overall, these findings demonstrate that HSP70 and HSP90 are potent molecular targets of EGCG and suggest EGCG as a drug candidate for the treatment of human cancer.

  7. Enforced ROR(gamma)t expression in haematopoietic stem cells increases regulatory T cell number, which reduces immunoreactivity and attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Nabekura, Tsukasa; Kawachi, Yasuhiro; Otsuka, Fujio; Onodera, Masafumi

    2011-03-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor gammat (ROR(gamma)t) is a key transcription factor involved in the generation of T-helper 17 (Th17) cells, which mediate tissue inflammation and autoimmunity. However, recent studies indicated that less than half of all ROR(gamma)t(+) Talphabeta cells express IL-17, while the others are Foxp3(+) Talphabeta cells expressing IL-10. These observations raise questions regarding the role of ROR(gamma)t in the early differentiation process of T cells from haematopoietic stem cells. To examine the role of RORyt in T cell differentiation, mice were reconstituted with ROR(gamma)t cDNA-transduced haematopoietic stem cells and the role of ROR(gamma)t in T cell differentiation was studied in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model in vivo. While the number of Th17 cells increased with the reduction in Thl cell number in transplanted mice, peripheral blood Foxp3(+) Talphabeta cell number also increased, which attenuated the severity of contact hypersensitivity on skin exposed to 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene. The number of non-transduced Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) also increased in these mice. These observations suggest that the enforced expression of ROR(gamma)t in haematopoietic stem cells induces differentiation of Thl7 cells and results in an increase in Foxp3(+) Treg cell number to limit self-tissue damage.

  8. Association analysis of toluene exposure time with high-throughput mRNA expressions and methylation patterns using in vivo samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Young; Yu, So Yeon; Kim, Seol Young; Ahn, Jeong Jin; Kim, Youngjoo; Kim, Gi Won; Son, Sang Wook; Park, Jong-Tae; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2016-04-01

    The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) resulting from outdoor air pollution can contribute to major public health problems. However, there has been limited research on the health effects in humans from the inhalation of VOCs. Therefore, this study conducted an in vivo analysis of the effects of toluene, one of the most commonly used chemicals in many industries, on gene expression and methylation over time using the high-throughput technique of microarray analysis. We separated participants into three groups (control, short-term exposure, and long-term exposure) to investigate the influence of toluene exposure time on gene expression. We then comprehensively analyzed and investigated the correlation between variations in gene expression and the occurrence of methylation. Twenty-six genes were upregulated and hypomethylated, while 32 genes were downregulated and hypermethylated. The pathways of these genes were confirmed to be associated with cell survival and the immune system. Based on our findings, these genes can help predict the effects of time-dependent exposure to toluene on human health. Thus, observations from our data may have implications for the identification of biomarkers of toluene exposure. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Expression of CD73 in Human Monocytes In Vitro and in a Swine Model of Myocardial Infarction In Vivo

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    Marta Monguió-Tortajada

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The ectoenzymes CD39 and CD73 regulate the purinergic signaling through the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP/ADP to AMP and to adenosine (Ado, respectively. This shifts the pro-inflammatory milieu induced by extracellular ATP to the anti-inflammatory regulation by Ado. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have potent immunomodulatory capabilities, including monocyte modulation toward an anti-inflammatory phenotype aiding tissue repair. In vitro, we observed that human cardiac adipose tissue-derived MSCs (cATMSCs and umbilical cord MSCs similarly polarize monocytes toward a regulatory M2 phenotype, which maintained the expression of CD39 and induced expression of CD73 in a cell contact dependent fashion, correlating with increased functional activity. In addition, the local treatment with porcine cATMSCs using an engineered bioactive graft promoted the in vivo CD73 expression on host monocytes in a swine model of myocardial infarction. Our results suggest the upregulation of ectonucleotidases on MSC-conditioned monocytes as an effective mechanism to amplify the long-lasting immunomodulatory and healing effects of MSCs delivery.

  10. Effect of conjugated linoleic acid on proliferation and cytokine expression of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells and splenocytes ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Lydia; von Soosten, Dirk; Sipka, Anja; Döll, Susanne; Beineke, Andreas; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Dänicke, Sven

    2012-04-01

    Twenty-five primiparous Holstein cows were divided into five experimental groups (five animals per group) by different feeding (control fat preparation [CON] or conjugated linoleic acid [CLA] supplement) and slaughtering times. The daily consumption of CLA was 6.0 g of the trans-10, cis-12 CLA-isomer and 5.7 g cis-9, trans-11 CLA isomer. An initial group (IG) was slaughtered one day post partum (pp) and the remaining 20 animals after 42 and 105 days pp, respectively. Blood for peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) separation was taken seven days ante partum and immediately before slaughter. The spleen was removed during dissection for isolation of splenocytes and samples for histopathological examination. Cell viability and Concanavalin A-stimulated proliferation was analysed by MTT and Alamar Blue assay. Basal expression of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-10, IL-12, tumour necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha] and interferon gamma [IFN-gamma]) was measured by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in unstimulated PMBC and splenocytes. With PBMC, stimulation indices increased from 1 day pp to 105 days pp with no differences between CLA and CON groups. With splenocytes, the stimulation index of the CLA group was lower compared to CON group 105 days pp. Baseline expression of cytokines was not effected by CLA feeding comparing similar time points. Also, no differences occurred in the expression of IL-4 in PBMC and IL-10 as well as TNF-alpha in both cell populations, when comparing the feeding groups separately with IG. IL-4 was more frequently expressed in CLA group 42 days pp in splenocytes. IFN-gamma expression was increased 105 days pp in CLA group in splenocytes and PBMC. IL-12 was higher expressed 105 days (PBMC) or 42 days pp (splenocytes) when compared to IG. There was no effect of CLA feeding or slaughter time on histopathology of the spleen. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate an inhibiting effect of CLA on the mitogen

  11. Design of an Optimized Wilms’ Tumor 1 (WT1 mRNA Construct for Enhanced WT1 Expression and Improved Immunogenicity In Vitro and In Vivo

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    Daphné Benteyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor antigen–encoding mRNA for dendritic cell (DC-based vaccination has gained increasing popularity in recent years. Within this context, two main strategies have entered the clinical trial stage: the use of mRNA for ex vivo antigen loading of DCs and the direct application of mRNA as a source of antigen for DCs in vivo. DCs transfected with mRNA-encoding Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1 protein have shown promising clinical results. Using a stepwise approach, we re-engineered a WT1 cDNA-carrying transcription vector to improve the translational characteristics and immunogenicity of the transcribed mRNA. Different modifications were performed: (i the WT1 sequence was flanked by the lysosomal targeting sequence of dendritic cell lysosomal-associated membrane protein to enhance cytoplasmic expression; (ii the nuclear localization sequence (NLS of WT1 was deleted to promote shuttling from the nucleus to the cytoplasm; (iii the WT1 DNA sequence was optimized in silico to improve translational efficiency; and (iv this WT1 sequence was cloned into an optimized RNA transcription vector. DCs electroporated with this optimized mRNA showed an improved ability to stimulate WT1-specific T-cell immunity. Furthermore, in a murine model, we were able to show the safety, immunogenicity, and therapeutic activity of this optimized mRNA. This work is relevant for the future development of improved mRNA-based vaccine strategies K.

  12. Telomerase Inhibition Decreases Alpha-Fetoprotein Expression and Secretion by Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Lines: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tahtouh, Roula; Azzi, Anne-Sophie; Alaaeddine, Nada; Chamat, Soulaima; Bouharoun-Tayoun, Hasnaa; Wardi, Layal; Raad, Issam; Sarkis, Riad; Antoun, Najibe Abou; Hilal, George

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A direct relationship between poor prognosis and the concentration of serum AFP has been observed. Telomerase, an enzyme that stabilizes the telomere length, is expressed by 90% of HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of telomerase inhibition on AFP secretion and the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Proliferation and viability tests were performed using tetrazolium salt. A...

  13. Lupinus albus Conglutin Gamma Modifies the Gene Expressions of Enzymes Involved in Glucose Hepatic Production In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Santiago, Ana E; Vargas-Guerrero, Belinda; García-López, Pedro M; Martínez-Ayala, Alma L; Domínguez-Rosales, José A; Gurrola-Díaz, Carmen M

    2017-06-01

    Lupinus albus seeds contain conglutin gamma (Cγ) protein, which exerts a hypoglycemic effect and positively modifies proteins involved in glucose homeostasis. Cγ could potentially be used to manage patients with impaired glucose metabolism, but there remains a need to evaluate its effects on hepatic glucose production. The present study aimed to analyze G6pc, Fbp1, and Pck1 gene expressions in two experimental animal models of impaired glucose metabolism. We also evaluated hepatic and renal tissue integrity following Cγ treatment. To generate an insulin resistance model, male Wistar rats were provided 30% sucrose solution ad libitum for 20 weeks. To generate a type 2 diabetes model (STZ), five-day-old rats were intraperitoneally injected with streptozotocin (150 mg/kg). Each animal model was randomized into three subgroups that received the following oral treatments daily for one week: 0.9% w/v NaCl (vehicle; IR-Ctrl and STZ-Ctrl); metformin 300 mg/kg (IR-Met and STZ-Met); and Cγ 150 mg/kg (IR-Cγ and STZ-Cγ). Biochemical parameters were assessed pre- and post-treatment using colorimetric or enzymatic methods. We also performed histological analysis of hepatic and renal tissue. G6pc, Fbp1, and Pck1 gene expressions were quantified using real-time PCR. No histological changes were observed in any group. Post-treatment G6pc gene expression was decreased in the IR-Cγ and STZ-Cγ groups. Post-treatment Fbp1 and Pck1 gene expressions were reduced in the IR-Cγ group but increased in STZ-Cγ animals. Overall, these findings suggest that Cγ is involved in reducing hepatic glucose production, mainly through G6pc inhibition in impaired glucose metabolism disorders.

  14. In vivo fate analysis reveals the multipotent and self-renewal features of embryonic AspM expressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaro, Cinzia; Butti, Erica; Bergamaschi, Andrea; Papale, Alessandro; Furlan, Roberto; Comi, Giancarlo; Martino, Gianvito; Muzio, Luca

    2011-04-29

    Radial Glia (RG) cells constitute the major population of neural progenitors of the mouse developing brain. These cells are located in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the cerebral cortex and during neurogenesis they support the generation of cortical neurons. Later on, during brain maturation, RG cells give raise to glial cells and supply the adult mouse brain of Neural Stem Cells (NSC). Here we used a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the CreER(T2) under the control of AspM promoter to monitor the progeny of an early cohort of RG cells during neurogenesis and in the post natal brain. Long term fate mapping experiments demonstrated that AspM-expressing RG cells are multi-potent, as they can generate neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes of the adult mouse brain. Furthermore, AspM descendants give also rise to proliferating progenitors in germinal niches of both developing and post natal brains. In the latter--i.e. the Sub Ventricular Zone--AspM descendants acquired several feature of neural stem cells, including the capability to generate neurospheres in vitro. We also performed the selective killing of these early progenitors by using a Nestin-GFP(flox)-TK allele. The forebrain specific loss of early AspM expressing cells caused the elimination of most of the proliferating cells of brain, a severe derangement of the ventricular zone architecture, and the impairment of the cortical lamination. We further demonstrated that AspM is expressed by proliferating cells of the adult mouse SVZ that can generate neuroblasts fated to become olfactory bulb neurons.

  15. In vivo fate analysis reveals the multipotent and self-renewal features of embryonic AspM expressing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Marinaro

    Full Text Available Radial Glia (RG cells constitute the major population of neural progenitors of the mouse developing brain. These cells are located in the ventricular zone (VZ of the cerebral cortex and during neurogenesis they support the generation of cortical neurons. Later on, during brain maturation, RG cells give raise to glial cells and supply the adult mouse brain of Neural Stem Cells (NSC. Here we used a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the CreER(T2 under the control of AspM promoter to monitor the progeny of an early cohort of RG cells during neurogenesis and in the post natal brain. Long term fate mapping experiments demonstrated that AspM-expressing RG cells are multi-potent, as they can generate neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes of the adult mouse brain. Furthermore, AspM descendants give also rise to proliferating progenitors in germinal niches of both developing and post natal brains. In the latter--i.e. the Sub Ventricular Zone--AspM descendants acquired several feature of neural stem cells, including the capability to generate neurospheres in vitro. We also performed the selective killing of these early progenitors by using a Nestin-GFP(flox-TK allele. The forebrain specific loss of early AspM expressing cells caused the elimination of most of the proliferating cells of brain, a severe derangement of the ventricular zone architecture, and the impairment of the cortical lamination. We further demonstrated that AspM is expressed by proliferating cells of the adult mouse SVZ that can generate neuroblasts fated to become olfactory bulb neurons.

  16. Assisted Reproductive Technology affects developmental kinetics, H19 Imprinting Control Region methylation and H19 gene expression in individual mouse embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandolo Luisa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last few years, an increase in imprinting anomalies has been reported in children born from Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART. Various clinical and experimental studies also suggest alterations of embryo development after ART. Therefore, there is a need for studying early epigenetic anomalies which could result from ART manipulations, especially on single embryos. In this study, we evaluated the impact of superovulation, in vitro fertilization (IVF and embryo culture conditions on proper genomic imprinting and blastocyst development in single mouse embryos. In this study, different experimental groups were established to obtain embryos from superovulated and non-superovulated females, either from in vivo or in vitro fertilized oocytes, themselves grown in vitro or not. The embryos were cultured either in M16 medium or in G1.2/G2.2 sequential medium. The methylation status of H19 Imprinting Control Region (ICR and H19 promoter was assessed, as well as the gene expression level of H19, in individual blastocysts. In parallel, we have evaluated embryo cleavage kinetics and recorded morphological data. Results We show that: 1. The culture medium influences early embryo development with faster cleavage kinetics for culture in G1.2/G2.2 medium compared to M16 medium. 2. Epigenetic alterations of the H19 ICR and H19 PP are influenced by the fertilization method since methylation anomalies were observed only in the in vitro fertilized subgroup, however to different degrees according to the culture medium. 3. Superovulation clearly disrupted H19 gene expression in individual blastocysts. Moreover, when embryos were cultured in vitro after either in vivo or in vitro fertilization, the percentage of blastocysts which expressed H19 was higher in G1.2/G2.2 medium compared to M16. Conclusion Compared to previous reports utilizing pools of embryos, our study enables us to emphasize a high individual variability of blastocysts in

  17. Foxo1 regulates Dbh expression and the activity of the sympathetic nervous system in vivo

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    Daisuke Kajimura

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor FoxO1 regulates multiple physiological processes. Here, we show that FoxO1 is highly expressed in neurons of the locus coeruleus and of various sympathetic ganglions, but not in the adrenal medulla. Consistent with this pattern of expression, mice lacking FoxO1 only in sympathetic neurons (FoxO1Dbh−/− display a low sympathetic tone without modification of the catecholamine content in the adrenal medulla. As a result, FoxO1Dbh−/− mice demonstrate an increased insulin secretion, improved glucose tolerance, low energy expenditure, and high bone mass. FoxO1 favors catecholamine synthesis because it is a potent regulator of the expression of Dbh that encodes the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of these neurotransmitters. By identifying FoxO1 as a transcriptional regulator of the sympathetic tone, these results advance our understanding of the control of some aspects of metabolism and of bone mass accrual.

  18. Standardized flavonoid-rich Eugenia jambolana seed extract retards in vitro and in vivo LDL oxidation and expression of VCAM-1 and P-selectin in atherogenic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Thouaojam, Menaka C; Sankhari, Jayantha M; Jain, Mahendra; Devkar, Ranjitsinh V; Ramachandran, A V

    2012-03-01

    The present inventory evaluates anti-atherogenic potential of flavonoid-rich Eugenia jambolana seed extract (EJSE) against in vitro low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, foam cell formation, and atherogenic (ATH) diet-induced experimental atherosclerosis in rats. EJSE was able to prevent in vitro LDL oxidation and oxidized LDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation. Also, EJSE supplementation to ATH rats significantly minimized increment in serum markers of LDL oxidation. The ex vivo oxidation indices were also minimized in LDL of EJSE-treated animals. Microscopic evaluation of thoracic aorta of ATH + EJSE rats recorded minimal evidence of atheromatous plaque formation, accumulation of lipid laden macrophages, calcium deposition, and expression of cell adhesion molecules (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and P-selectin). This is the first scientific report that demonstrates anti-atherogenic potential of EJSE and warrants further evaluation at clinical level.

  19. Doxorubicin in vivo rapidly alters expression and translation of myocardial electron transport chain genes, leads to ATP loss and caspase 3 activation.

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    Amy V Pointon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Doxorubicin is one of the most effective anti-cancer drugs but its use is limited by cumulative cardiotoxicity that restricts lifetime dose. Redox damage is one of the most accepted mechanisms of toxicity, but not fully substantiated. Moreover doxorubicin is not an efficient redox cycling compound due to its low redox potential. Here we used genomic and chemical systems approaches in vivo to investigate the mechanisms of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity, and specifically test the hypothesis of redox cycling mediated cardiotoxicity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were treated with an acute dose of either doxorubicin (DOX (15 mg/kg or 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ (25 mg/kg. DMNQ is a more efficient redox cycling agent than DOX but unlike DOX has limited ability to inhibit gene transcription and DNA replication. This allowed specific testing of the redox hypothesis for cardiotoxicity. An acute dose was used to avoid pathophysiological effects in the genomic analysis. However similar data were obtained with a chronic model, but are not specifically presented. All data are deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO. Pathway and biochemical analysis of cardiac global gene transcription and mRNA translation data derived at time points from 5 min after an acute exposure in vivo showed a pronounced effect on electron transport chain activity. This led to loss of ATP, increased AMPK expression, mitochondrial genome amplification and activation of caspase 3. No data gathered with either compound indicated general redox damage, though site specific redox damage in mitochondria cannot be entirely discounted. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate the major mechanism of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity is via damage or inhibition of the electron transport chain and not general redox stress. There is a rapid response at transcriptional and translational level of many of the genes coding for proteins of the electron transport chain

  20. Heterogeneous CD3 expression levels in differing T cell subsets correlate with the in vivo anti-CD3-mediated T cell modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Andrea; Barbagiovanni, Giulia; Jofra, Tatiana; Stabilini, Angela; Perol, Louis; Baeyens, Audrey; Anand, Santosh; Cagnard, Nicolas; Gagliani, Nicola; Piaggio, Eliane; Battaglia, Manuela

    2015-03-01

    The tolerogenic anti-CD3ε monoclonal Abs (anti-CD3) are promising compounds for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Anti-CD3 administration induces transient T cell depletion both in preclinical and in clinical studies. Notably, the said depletion mainly affects CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, type 1 diabetes reversal in preclinical models is accompanied by the selective expansion of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells, which are fundamental for the long-term maintenance of anti-CD3-mediated tolerance. The mechanisms that lead to this immune-shaping by affecting mainly CD4(+) T effector cells while sparing CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells have still to be fully elucidated. This study shows that CD3 expression levels differ from one T cell subset to another. CD4(+)Foxp3(-) T cells contain higher amounts of CD3 molecules than do CD4(+)Foxp3(+) and CD8(+) T cells in both mice and humans. The said differences correlate with the anti-CD3-mediated immune resetting that occurs in vivo after anti-CD3 administration in diabetic NOD mice. Additionally, transcriptome analysis demonstrates that CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells are significantly less responsive than are CD4(+)Foxp3(-) T cells to anti-CD3 treatment at a molecular level. Thus, heterogeneity in CD3 expression seems to confer to the various T cell subsets differing susceptibility to the in vivo tolerogenic anti-CD3-mediated modulation. These data shed new light on the molecular mechanism that underlies anti-CD3-mediated immune resetting and thus may open new opportunities to improve this promising treatment. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Expression of aromatase and estrogen receptor alpha in chondrosarcoma, but no beneficial effect of inhibiting estrogen signaling both in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage-forming tumors which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Estrogen signaling is known to play an important role in proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes and in growth plate regulation at puberty. Our experiments focus on unraveling the role of estrogen signaling in the regulation of neoplastic cartilage growth and on interference with estrogen signaling in chondrosarcomas in vitro and in vivo. Methods We investigated the protein expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1), androgen receptor (AR), and aromatase in tumor specimens of various chondrosarcoma subtypes, and (primary) chondrosarcoma cultures. Dose-response curves were generated of conventional central chondrosarcoma cell lines cultured in the presence of 17β-estradiol, dihydrotestosterone, 4-androstene-3,17 dione, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, fulvestrant and aromatase inhibitors. In a pilot series, the effect of anastrozole (n = 4) or exemestane (n = 2) treatment in 6 chondrosarcoma patients with progressive disease was explored. Results We showed protein expression of ESR1 and aromatase in a large majority of all subtypes. Only a minority of the tumors showed few AR positive cells. The dose-response assays showed no effect of any of the compounds on proliferation of conventional chondrosarcoma in vitro. The median progression-free survival of the patients treated with aromatase inhibitors did not significantly deviate from untreated patients. Conclusions The presence of ESR1 and aromatase in chondrosarcoma tumors and primary cultures supports a possible role of estrogen signaling in chondrosarcoma proliferation. However, our in vitro and pilot in vivo studies have shown no effect of estrogen-signaling inhibition on tumor growth. PMID:22613849

  2. Targeting FR-expressing cells in ovarian cancer with Fab-functionalized nanoparticles: a full study to provide the proof of principle from in vitro to in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarta, Alessandra; Bernareggi, Davide; Benigni, Fabio; Luison, Elena; Nano, Giuseppe; Nitti, Simone; Cesta, Maria Candida; di Ciccio, Luciano; Canevari, Silvana; Pellegrino, Teresa; Figini, Mariangela

    2015-01-01

    Efficient targeting in tumor therapies is still an open issue: systemic biodistribution and poor specific accumulation of drugs weaken efficacy of treatments. Engineered nanoparticles are expected to bring benefits by allowing specific delivery of drug to the tumor or acting themselves as localized therapeutic agents. In this study we have targeted epithelial ovarian cancer with inorganic nanoparticles conjugated to a human antibody fragment against the folate receptor over-expressed on cancer cells. The conjugation approach is generally applicable. Indeed several types of nanoparticles (either magnetic or fluorescent) were engineered with the fragment, and their biological activity was preserved as demonstrated by biochemical methods in vitro. In vivo studies with mice bearing orthotopic and subcutaneous tumors were performed. Elemental and histological analyses showed that the conjugated magnetic nanoparticles accumulated specifically and were retained at tumor sites longer than the non-conjugated nanoparticles.Efficient targeting in tumor therapies is still an open issue: systemic biodistribution and poor specific accumulation of drugs weaken efficacy of treatments. Engineered nanoparticles are expected to bring benefits by allowing specific delivery of drug to the tumor or acting themselves as localized therapeutic agents. In this study we have targeted epithelial ovarian cancer with inorganic nanoparticles conjugated to a human antibody fragment against the folate receptor over-expressed on cancer cells. The conjugation approach is generally applicable. Indeed several types of nanoparticles (either magnetic or fluorescent) were engineered with the fragment, and their biological activity was preserved as demonstrated by biochemical methods in vitro. In vivo studies with mice bearing orthotopic and subcutaneous tumors were performed. Elemental and histological analyses showed that the conjugated magnetic nanoparticles accumulated specifically and were retained

  3. Differential gene expression in chicken primary B cells infected ex vivo with attenuated and very virulent strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulwich, Katherine L; Giotis, Efstathios S; Gray, Alice; Nair, Venugopal; Skinner, Michael A; Broadbent, Andrew J

    2017-11-20

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) belongs to the family Birnaviridae and is economically important to the poultry industry worldwide. IBDV infects B cells in the bursa of Fabricius (BF), causing immunosuppression and morbidity in young chickens. In addition to strains that cause classical Gumboro disease, the so-called 'very virulent' (vv) strain, also in circulation, causes more severe disease and increased mortality. IBDV has traditionally been controlled through the use of live attenuated vaccines, with attenuation resulting from serial passage in non-lymphoid cells. However, the factors that contribute to the vv or attenuated phenotypes are poorly understood. In order to address this, we aimed to investigate host cell-IBDV interactions using a recently described chicken primary B-cell model, where chicken B cells are harvested from the BF and cultured ex vivo in the presence of chicken CD40L. We demonstrated that these cells could support the replication of IBDV when infected ex vivo in the laboratory. Furthermore, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of B cells infected with an attenuated strain (D78) and a very virulent strain (UK661) by microarray. We found that key genes involved in B-cell activation and signalling (TNFSF13B, CD72 and GRAP) were down-regulated following infection relative to mock, which we speculate could contribute to IBDV-mediated immunosuppression. Moreover, cells responded to infection by expressing antiviral type I IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes, but the induction was far less pronounced upon infection with UK661, which we speculate could contribute to its virulence.

  4. Nuclear Factor kappa B is central to Marek’s Disease herpesvirus induced neoplastic transformation of CD30 expressing lymphocytes in-vivo

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    Kumar Shyamesh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marek’s Disease (MD is a hyperproliferative, lymphomatous, neoplastic disease of chickens caused by the oncogenic Gallid herpesvirus type 2 (GaHV-2; MDV. Like several human lymphomas the neoplastic MD lymphoma cells overexpress the CD30 antigen (CD30hi and are in minority, while the non-neoplastic cells (CD30lo form the majority of population. MD is a unique natural in-vivo model of human CD30hi lymphomas with both natural CD30hi lymphomagenesis and spontaneous regression. The exact mechanism of neoplastic transformation from CD30lo expressing phenotype to CD30hi expressing neoplastic phenotype is unknown. Here, using microarray, proteomics and Systems Biology modeling; we compare the global gene expression of CD30lo and CD30hi cells to identify key pathways of neoplastic transformation. We propose and test a specific mechanism of neoplastic transformation, and genetic resistance, involving the MDV oncogene Meq, host gene products of the Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB family and CD30; we also identify a novel Meq protein interactome. Results Our results show that a CD30lo lymphocytes are pre-neoplastic precursors and not merely reactive lymphocytes; b multiple transformation mechanisms exist and are potentially controlled by Meq; c Meq can drive a feed-forward cycle that induces CD30 transcription, increases CD30 signaling which activates NF-κB, and, in turn, increases Meq transcription; d Meq transcriptional repression or activation of the CD30 promoter generally correlates with polymorphisms in the CD30 promoter distinguishing MD-lymphoma resistant and susceptible chicken genotypes e MDV oncoprotein Meq interacts with proteins involved in physiological processes central to lymphomagenesis. Conclusions In the context of the MD lymphoma microenvironment (and potentially in other CD30hi lymphomas as well, our results show that the neoplastic transformation is a continuum and the non-neoplastic cells are actually pre

  5. Transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 in pigs confers resistance against xenograft rejection during ex vivo perfusion of porcine kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Björn; Ramackers, Wolf; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Lemme, Erika; Hassel, Petra; Queisser, Anna-Lisa; Herrmann, Doris; Barg-Kues, Brigitte; Carnwath, Joseph W; Klose, Johannes; Tiede, Andreas; Friedrich, Lars; Baars, Wiebke; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Winkler, Michael; Niemann, Heiner

    2011-01-01

    The major immunological hurdle to successful porcine-to-human xenotransplantation is the acute vascular rejection (AVR), characterized by endothelial cell (EC) activation and perturbation of coagulation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its derivatives have anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory effects and protect against reactive oxygen species, rendering HO-1 a promising molecule to control AVR. Here, we report the production and characterization of pigs transgenic for human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) and demonstrate significant protection in porcine kidneys against xenograft rejection in ex vivo perfusion with human blood and transgenic porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC) in a TNF-α-mediated apoptosis assay. Transgenic and non-transgenic PAEC were tested in a TNF-α-mediated apoptosis assay. Expression of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin) was measured by real-time PCR. hHO-1 transgenic porcine kidneys were perfused with pooled and diluted human AB blood in an ex vivo perfusion circuit. MHC class-II up-regulation after induction with IFN-γ was compared between wild-type and hHO-1 transgenic PAEC. Cloned hHO-1 transgenic pigs expressed hHO-1 in heart, kidney, liver, and in cultured ECs and fibroblasts. hHO-1 transgenic PAEC were protected against TNF-α-mediated apoptosis. Real-time PCR revealed reduced expression of adhesion molecules like ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. These effects could be abrogated by the incubation of transgenic PAECs with the specific HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphorine IX (Zn(II)PPIX, 20 μm). IFN-γ induced up-regulation of MHC class-II molecules was significantly reduced in PAECs from hHO-1 transgenic pigs. hHO-1 transgenic porcine kidneys could successfully be perfused with diluted human AB-pooled blood for a maximum of 240 min (with and without C1 inh), while in wild-type kidneys, blood flow ceased after ∼60 min. Elevated levels of d-Dimer and TAT were detected, but no significant consumption of fibrinogen and

  6. Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology® treatment does not affect acute lung injury in a two-event in vivo model caused by stored blood components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, C. C.; Khan, S. Y.; Ball, J. Bradley; Kelher, M. R.; Marschner, S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology® (PRT) treatment uses riboflavin and UV light to inactivate pathogens in blood components. Neutrophil [polymorphonuclear cells (PMN)] priming activity accumulates during routine storage of cellular blood components, and this activity has been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). We hypothesize that PRT-treatment of blood components affects the priming activity generated during storage of packed RBCs (PRBCs) or platelet concentrates (PCs), which can elicit ALI in vivo. Methods Plasma, PRBCs and PCs were isolated from healthy donor’s whole blood or by apheresis. Half of a collected unit was treated with PRT treatment and the remainder was left as an unmodified control. Supernatant was collected during storage of PCs and PRBCs and assayed for PMN priming activity and used as the second event in a two-event in vivo model of TRALI. Results PRT treatment did not induce priming activity in plasma or affect the priming activity generated during storage of PCs or PRBCs as compared with the unmodified controls. The supernatants from stored, but not fresh, PCs and PRBCs did cause ALI as the second event in a two-event animal model of TRALI, which was unaffected by PRT treatment. We conclude that the PRT® treatment does not induce priming activity in plasma nor does it affect the priming activity generated during storage of PCs or PRBCs or their ability to cause ALI as the second event in a two-event in vivo model of TRALI. Moreover, the amount of priming activity in TRIMA®-isolated PCs was significantly less than SPECTRA®-isolated PCs. PMID:19951305

  7. A Live Vector Expressing HPV16 L1 Generates an Adjuvant-Induced Antibody Response In-vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirbaghaee, Zeinab; Bolhassani, Azam; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Motevalli, Fatemeh; Zohrei, Negar

    2015-12-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and cervical cancer has suggested the design of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against genital warts. The HPV capsid has made of two L1 and L2 coat proteins that have produced late in viral infections. Regarding to the recent studies, two commercial prophylactic vaccines have based on L1 viral like particles (VLPs) could strongly induce antibody responses, and protect human body from HPV infections. However, the use of these HPV vaccines has hindered due to their high cost and some limitations. Currently, among various vaccination strategies, live vector-based vaccines have attracted a great attention. Herein, a non-pathogenic strain of the protozoan organism known as Leishmania tarentolae has utilized to induce potent humoral immunity in mice model. At first, cloning of HPV16 L1 gene into Leishmania expression vector has performed and confirmed by PCR and digestion with restriction enzymes. The promastigotes of Leishmania tarentolae (L.tar) have transfected with linearized DNA construct by electroporation. Protein expression has analyzed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. Then, the immunogenicity of leishmania expressing L1 protein (L.tar-L1) has assessed in mice model. Our data has indicated that subcutaneous immunization of mice with the recombinant L.tar-L1 has led to enhance the levels of IgG1 and lgG2a in comparison with control groups. Furthermore, there was no significant increase in antibody levels between two and three times of immunizations. The recombinant live vector was able to induce humoral immunity in mice without need of any adjuvant. However, further studies have required to increase its efficiency.

  8. Ethanol increases osteoclastogenesis associated with the increased expression of RANK, PU.1 and MITF in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iitsuka, Natsumi; Hie, Mamiko; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Tsukamoto, Ikuyo

    2012-07-01

    Ethanol has been known to induce osteopenia. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for its effect have not been well characterized. This study investigated the effects of ethanol on bone metabolism and osteoclastogenesis using rats fed an ethanol-containing liquid diet (35% of calories from ethanol) for 3 weeks. Ethanol increased the activities of bone tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K, without affecting the levels of serum osteocalcin or bone alkaline phosphatase activity. Histological analysis showed an increased number of osteoclasts in the proximal tibia, but no significant change in the number of osteoblasts. The mRNA levels of receptor for activation of NF-κB (RANK), c-fos, c-jun, TRAP and cathepsin K were significantly increased, although those of macrophage colony-stimulating factor and c-fms were unaltered. The mRNA and protein levels of PU.1 and microphthalmia-associated trascription factor (MITF) also increased. Further, the osteoclastic differentiation of bone marrow-derived macrophage/monocyte precursor cells (BMMs) in vitro was stimulated by ethanol. The increased osteoclastogenesis of BMMs was associated with increased levels of RANK, PU.1 and MITF expression, activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Higher lipid peroxide levels and lower glutathione levels were also observed in the serum of the ethanol-fed rats. These results suggested that ethanol promoted osteoclastogenesis by increasing RANK expression through increases in the production of ROS, activation of ERK and expression of PU.1 and MITF.

  9. Silencing VDAC1 Expression by siRNA Inhibits Cancer Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth In Vivo

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    Tasleem Arif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in cellular metabolism and bioenergetics are vital for cancer cell growth and motility. Here, the role of the mitochondrial protein voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1, a master gatekeeper regulating the flux of metabolites and ions between mitochondria and the cytoplasm, in regulating the growth of several cancer cell lines was investigated by silencing VDAC1 expression using small interfering RNA (siRNA. A single siRNA specific to the human VDAC1 sequence at nanomolar concentrations led to some 90% decrease in VDAC1 levels in the lung A549 and H358, prostate PC-3, colon HCT116, glioblastoma U87, liver HepG2, and pancreas Panc-1 cancer cell lines. VDAC1 silencing persisted 144 hours post-transfection and resulted in profound inhibition of cell growth in cancer but not in noncancerous cells, with up to 90% inhibition being observed over 5 days that was prolonged by a second transfection. Cells expressing low VDAC1 levels showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and adenoside triphosphate (ATP levels, suggesting limited metabolite exchange between mitochondria and cytosol. Moreover, cells silenced for VDAC1 expression showed decreased migration, even in the presence of the wound healing accelerator basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. VDAC1-siRNA inhibited cancer cell growth in a Matrigel-based assay in host nude mice. Finally, in a xenograft lung cancer mouse model, chemically modified VDAC1-siRNA not only inhibited tumor growth but also resulted in tumor regression. This study thus shows that VDAC1 silencing by means of RNA interference (RNAi dramatically inhibits cancer cell growth and tumor development by disabling the abnormal metabolic behavior of cancer cells, potentially paving the way for a more effective pipeline of anticancer drugs.

  10. Co-expression of Argonaute2 enhances short hairpin RNA-induced RNA interference in Xenopus CNS neurons in vivo

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    Chih-ming Chen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sequence-specific gene silencing. Recent advances in our understanding of RNAi machinery make it possible to reduce protein expression by introducing short hairpin RNA (shRNA into cells of many systems, however, the efficacy of RNAi-mediated protein knockdown can be quite variable, especially in intact animals, and this limits its application. We built adaptable molecular tools, pSilencer (pSi and pReporter (pRe constructs, to evaluate the impact of different promoters, shRNA structures and overexpression of Ago2, the key enzyme in the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC, on the efficiency of RNAi. The magnitude of RNAi knockdown was evaluated in cultured cells and intact animals by comparing fluorescence intensity levels of GFP, the RNAi target, relative to mCherry, which was not targeted. Co-expression of human Ago2 with shRNA significantly enhanced efficiency of GFP knockdown in cell lines and in neurons of intact Xenopus tadpoles. Human H1- and U6-promotors alone or the U6-promotor with an enhancer element were equally effective at driving GFP knockdown. shRNA derived from the microRNA-30 design (shRNAmir30 enhanced the efficiency of GFP knockdown. Expressing pSi containing Ago2 with shRNA increased knockdown efficiency of an endogenous neuronal protein, the GluR2 subunit of the AMPA receptor, functionally accessed by recording AMPA receptor-mediated spontaneous synaptic currents in Xenopus CNS neurons. Our data suggest that co-expression of Ago2 and shRNA is a simple method to enhance RNAi in intact animals. While morpholino antisense knockdown is effective in Xenopus and Zebrafish, a principle advantage of the RNAi method is the possibility of spatial and temporal control of protein knockdown by use of cell type specific and regulatable pol II promoters to drive shRNA and Ago2. This should extend the application of RNAi to study gene function of intact brain circuits.

  11. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease

    OpenAIRE

    Tuhin Kumar Guha; Georg Hausner

    2016-01-01

    In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495) within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) small ribosomal subunit (rns) gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF) encoded within a group I intron (mS1247). This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase). Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 in...

  12. P247 and p523: two in vivo-expressed megalocytivirus proteins that induce protective immunity and are essential to viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available Megalocytivirus is a DNA virus with a broad host range among teleost fish. Although the complete genome sequences of a number of megalocytivirus isolates have been reported, the functions of most of the genes of this virus are unknown. In this study, we selected two megalocytivirus immunogens, P247 and P523, which were expressed during host infection and, when in the form of DNA vaccines (pCN247 and pCN523 respectively, elicited strong protectivity against lethal megalocytivirus challenge in a turbot (Scophthalmus maximus model. Compared to control fish, fish vaccinated with pCN247 and pCN523 exhibited drastically reduced viral loads in tissues and high levels of survival rates. Immune response analysis showed that pCN247 and pCN523 (i induced production of specific serum antibodies, (ii caused generation of cytotoxic immune cells and specific memory immune cells that responded to secondary antigen stimulation, and (iii upregulated the expression of genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity. To examine the potential role of P247 and P523 in viral infection, the expression of P247 and P523 was knocked down by siRNA. Subsequent in vivo infection study showed that P247 and P523 knockdown significantly impaired viral replication. Furthermore, whole-genome transcriptome analysis revealed that P247 and P523 knockdown altered the expression profiles of 26 and 41 viral genes, respectively, putatively participating in diverse aspects of viral infection. Taken together, these results indicate that P247 and P523 induce protective immunity in teleost and play fundamental roles essential to viral replication. These observations provide the first evidence that suggests a likely link between the protectivity of viral immunogens and their biological significance in viral replication.

  13. Cryotolerance and global gene-expression patterns of Bos taurus indicus and Bos taurus taurus in vitro- and in vivo-produced blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudano, Mateus J; Caixeta, Ester S; Paschoal, Daniela M; Martins, Alicio; Machado, Rui; Buratini, José; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda D C

    2014-10-01

    In a 2×2 factorial experimental design, embryo development, cryotolerance and global gene expression of Nellore (Bos taurus indicus) and Simmental (Bos taurus taurus) blastocysts produced in vitro (IVP) and in vivo (multiple ovulation derived embryo, MODE) were assessed. Blastocyst production was higher in Nellore than in Simmental (47.7±2.0% vs 27.0±2.0%) cows. The total numbers of ova or embryos recovered (5.5±0.9 vs 3.7±0.8) and transferable embryos (3.8±1.0 vs 2.3±0.8) per cow were not different between breeds. Simmental and MODE (34.6% and 38.5%, n=75 and 70) blastocysts had higher survival rates after cryopreservation compared with Nellore and IVP (20.2% and 18.1%, n=89 and 94) embryos, respectively. Differences between transcriptomes were addressed by principal-component analysis, which indicated that gene expression was affected by subspecies (158 genes), origin (532 genes) and interaction between both subspecies and origin (53 genes). Several functional processes and pathways relevant to lipid metabolism and embryo viability involving differentially expressed genes were identified. The lipid metabolism-related genes were upregulated in Simmental (AUH and ELOVL6) and IVP (ACSL3 and ACSL6) blastocysts. The expression profiles of genes related to mitochondrial metabolism (ATP5B), oxidative stress (GPX4), apoptosis (DAD1, DAP, PRDX2), heat shock (HSPA5), pregnancy (IFNT2, PAG2) and cell differentiation (KRT18) varied between experimental groups.

  14. The cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) activates hypothalamic urocortin-expressing neurons both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purser, Matthew J; Dalvi, Prasad S; Wang, Zi C; Belsham, Denise D

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces neurogenesis, reduces feeding, and induces weight loss. However, the central mechanisms by which CNTF acts are vague. We employed the mHypoE-20/2 line that endogenously expresses the CNTF receptor to examine the direct effects of CNTF on mRNA levels of urocortin-1, urocortin-2, agouti-related peptide, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotensin. We found that treatment of 10 ng/ml CNTF significantly increased only urocortin-1 mRNA by 1.84-fold at 48 h. We then performed intracerebroventricular injections of 0.5 mg/mL CNTF into mice, and examined its effects on urocortin-1 neurons post-exposure. Through double-label immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies against c-Fos and urocortin-1, we showed that central CNTF administration significantly activated urocortin-1 neurons in specific areas of the hypothalamus. Taken together, our studies point to a potential role for CNTF in regulating hypothalamic urocortin-1-expressing neurons to mediate its recognized effects on energy homeostasis, neuronal proliferaton/survival, and/or neurogenesis.

  15. The cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF activates hypothalamic urocortin-expressing neurons both in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Purser

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF induces neurogenesis, reduces feeding, and induces weight loss. However, the central mechanisms by which CNTF acts are vague. We employed the mHypoE-20/2 line that endogenously expresses the CNTF receptor to examine the direct effects of CNTF on mRNA levels of urocortin-1, urocortin-2, agouti-related peptide, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotensin. We found that treatment of 10 ng/ml CNTF significantly increased only urocortin-1 mRNA by 1.84-fold at 48 h. We then performed intracerebroventricular injections of 0.5 mg/mL CNTF into mice, and examined its effects on urocortin-1 neurons post-exposure. Through double-label immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies against c-Fos and urocortin-1, we showed that central CNTF administration significantly activated urocortin-1 neurons in specific areas of the hypothalamus. Taken together, our studies point to a potential role for CNTF in regulating hypothalamic urocortin-1-expressing neurons to mediate its recognized effects on energy homeostasis, neuronal proliferaton/survival, and/or neurogenesis.

  16. In Vivo Direct Molecular Imaging of Early Tumorigenesis and Malignant Progression Induced by Transgenic Expression of GFP-Met

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    Sharon Moshitch-Moshkovitz

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The tyrosine kinase receptor Met and its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF, play an important role in normal developmental processes, as well as in tumorigenicity and metastasis. We constructed a green fluorescent protein (GFP Met chimeric molecule that functions similarly to the wild-type Met receptor and generated GFP-Met transgenic mice. These mice ubiquitously expressed GFP-Met in specific epithelial and endothelial cells and displayed enhanced GFP-Met fluorescence in sebaceous glands. Thirty-two percent of males spontaneously developed adenomas, adenocarcinomas, and angiosarcomas in their lower abdominal sebaceous glands. Approximately 70% of adenocarcinoma tumors metastasized to the kidneys, lungs, or liver. Quantitative subcellularresolution intravital imaging revealed very high levels of GFP-Met in tumor lesions and in single isolated cells surrounding them, relative to normal sebaceous glands. These single cells preceded the formation of local and distal metastases. Higher GFP-Met levels correlated with earlier tumor onset and aggressiveness, further demonstrating the role of Met-HGF/SF signaling in cellular transformation and acquisition of invasive and metastatic phenotypes. Our novel mouse model and high-resolution intravital molecular imaging create a powerful tool that enables direct realtime molecular imaging of receptor expression and localization during primary events of tumorigenicity and metastasis at single-cell resolution.

  17. In Vivo Pretargeted Imaging of HER2 and TAG-72 Expression Using the HaloTag Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, James C; Mosley, Michael; Uyeda, H Tetsuo; Cong, Mei; Fan, Frank; Faulkner, Stephen; Cornelissen, Bart

    2017-07-03

    A novel pretargeted SPECT imaging strategy based on the HaloTag enzyme has been evaluated for the first time in a living system. To determine the efficacy of this approach, two clinically relevant cancer biomarkers, HER2 and TAG-72, were selected to represent models of internalizing and noninternalizing antigens, respectively. In MDA-MB-231/H2N (HER2-expressing) and LS174T (TAG-72-expressing) xenograft tumors in mice, pretargeting experiments were performed in which HaloTag-conjugated derivatives of the antibodies trastuzumab (anti-HER2) or CC49 (anti-TAG-72) were utilized as primary agents, and the small molecule HaloTag ligands 111In-HTL-1, -2, and -3 were evaluated as secondary agents. While this approach was not sufficiently sensitive to detect the internalizing HER2 antigen, pretargeting experiments involving the most optimal secondary agent, 111In-HTL-3, were successful in detecting the noninternalizing antigen TAG-72 and provided high-contrast SPECT images at 4 and 24 h postinjection.

  18. In vivo assessment of polydatin, a natural polyphenol compound, on arsenic-induced free radical overproduction, gene expression, and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan-Acaroz, Damla; Zemheri, Fahriye; Demirel, Hasan Huseyin; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Ince, Sinan; Eryavuz, Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a well-known contaminant of global groundwater. Its exposure causes several hazardous effects on animals and human via oxidative stress. The present study examined the effect of polydatin (PD) on free radical overproduction in rats exposed to As. Thirty-five male rats randomly allocated into five equal groups. To the control group, physiological saline was given orally and to the second group only 100 mg/L As was given by drinking water for 60 days. The other groups were treated with As (100 mg/L) and PD orally at 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day, respectively. Treatment with As enhanced malondialdehyde level but decreased glutathione level in blood, liver, kidney, brain, lung, and heart of rats. Also, As decreased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities of erythrocyte, liver, kidney, brain, lung, and heart in rats. Furthermore, As treatment gave rise to increased DNA damage and gene expressions of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), nuclear factor kappa beta (NFκB), p53, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the lung, brain, kidney, and liver. However, treatment of PD ameliorated As-exposed lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activities, DNA damage, gene expressions, and histopathological changes in tissues. In conclusion, PD has a dose-dependent protective effect on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense mechanism in rats against As exposure.

  19. Increased myocardial SERCA expression in early type 2 diabetes mellitus is insulin dependent: In vivo and in vitro data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredersdorf, Sabine; Thumann, Christian; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Vetter, Roland; Graf, Tobias; Luchner, Andreas; Riegger, Günter Aj; Schunkert, Heribert; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Weil, Joachim

    2012-05-23

    Calcium (Ca2+) handling proteins are known to play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of cardiomyopathy. However little is known about early changes in the diabetic heart and the impact of insulin treatment (Ins). Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats treated with or without insulin (ZDF ± Ins, n = 13) and lean littermates (controls, n = 7) were sacrificed at the age of 19 weeks. ZDF + Ins (n = 6) were treated with insulin for the last 6 weeks of life. Gene expression of Ca2+ ATPase in the cardiac sarcoplasmatic reticulum (SERCA2a, further abbreviated as SERCA) and phospholamban (PLB) were determined by northern blotting. Ca2+ transport of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum (SR) was assessed by oxalate-facilitated 45Ca-uptake in left ventricular homogenates. In addition, isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes were stimulated in cell culture with insulin, glucose or triiodthyronine (T3, positive control). mRNA expression of SERCA and PLB were measured by Taqman PCR. Furthermore, effects of insulin treatment on force of contraction and relaxation were evaluated by cardiomyocytes grown in a three-dimensional collagen matrix (engineered heart tissue, EHT) stimulated for 5 days by insulin. By western blot phosphorylations status of Akt was determed and the influence of wortmannin. SERCA levels increased in both ZDF and ZDF + Ins compared to control (control 100 ± 6.2 vs. ZDF 152 ± 26.6* vs. ZDF + Ins 212 ± 18.5*# % of control, *p SERCA/PLB ratio in ZDF and ZDF ± Ins was accompanied by enhanced Ca2+ uptake to the SR (control 1.58 ± 0.1 vs. ZDF 1.85 ± 0.06* vs. ZDF + Ins 2.03 ± 0.1* μg/mg/min, *p SERCA2a expression. As shown by in-vitro experiments, the effect of insulin on SERCA2a mRNA expression seemed to have a direct effect on cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, long-term treatment of engineered heart tissue with insulin increased the SERCA/PLB ratio and accelerated relaxation time. Akt was significantly phosphorylated

  20. Increased myocardial SERCA expression in early type 2 diabetes mellitus is insulin dependent: In vivo and in vitro data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredersdorf Sabine

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium (Ca2+ handling proteins are known to play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of cardiomyopathy. However little is known about early changes in the diabetic heart and the impact of insulin treatment (Ins. Methods Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats treated with or without insulin (ZDF ± Ins, n = 13 and lean littermates (controls, n = 7 were sacrificed at the age of 19 weeks. ZDF + Ins (n = 6 were treated with insulin for the last 6 weeks of life. Gene expression of Ca2+ ATPase in the cardiac sarcoplasmatic reticulum (SERCA2a, further abbreviated as SERCA and phospholamban (PLB were determined by northern blotting. Ca2+ transport of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum (SR was assessed by oxalate-facilitated 45Ca-uptake in left ventricular homogenates. In addition, isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes were stimulated in cell culture with insulin, glucose or triiodthyronine (T3, positive control. mRNA expression of SERCA and PLB were measured by Taqman PCR. Furthermore, effects of insulin treatment on force of contraction and relaxation were evaluated by cardiomyocytes grown in a three-dimensional collagen matrix (engineered heart tissue, EHT stimulated for 5 days by insulin. By western blot phosphorylations status of Akt was determed and the influence of wortmannin. Results SERCA levels increased in both ZDF and ZDF + Ins compared to control (control 100 ± 6.2 vs. ZDF 152 ± 26.6* vs. ZDF + Ins 212 ± 18.5*# % of control, *p  Conclusion The current data demonstrate that early type 2 diabetes is associated with an increase in the SERCA/PLB ratio and that insulin directly stimulates SERCA expression and relaxation velocity. These results underline the important role of insulin and calcium handling proteins in the cardiac adaptation process of type 2 diabetes mellitus contributing to cardiac remodeling and show the important role of PI3-kinase-Akt-SERCA2a signaling cascade.

  1. Nutmeg oil alleviates chronic inflammatory pain through inhibition of COX-2 expression and substance P release in vivo

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    Wei Kevin Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic pain, or sometimes referred to as persistent pain, reduces the life quality of patients who are suffering from chronic diseases such as inflammatory diseases, cancer and diabetes. Hence, herbal medicines draw many attentions and have been shown effective in the treatment or relief of pain. Methods and Results: Here in this study, we used the CFA-injected rats as a sustainable pain model to test the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of nutmeg oil, a spice flavor additive to beverages and baked goods produced from the seed of Myristica fragrans tree. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that nutmeg oil could potentially alleviate the CFA-injection induced joint swelling, mechanical allodynia and heat hyperanalgesia of rats through inhibition of COX-2 expression and blood substance P level, which made it possible for nutmeg oil to be a potential chronic pain reliever.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and leptin are associated with stress-induced interleukin-6 cytokine expression ex vivo in obesity.

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    Huang, Chun-Jung; Stewart, Jennifer K; Shibata, Yoshimi; Slusher, Aaron L; Acevedo, Edmund O

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with enhanced inflammation and mental stress, but limited information has addressed the potential additive effect of psychological stress on obesity-associated inflammation. This study examined whether obese subjects would elicit a greater host immune response (IL-6 mRNA and cytokine) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to mental stress. Blood samples for LPS-stimulated IL-6 mRNA and cytokine were collected prior to and following mental stress. Results showed that obese subjects elicited a greater LPS-induced IL-6 along with its mRNA expression following mental stress compared to normal-weight subjects. Stress-induced IL-6 cytokine response to LPS was correlated with the baseline levels of plasma LPS binding protein (LBP) and leptin. These findings are consistent with the idea that endogenous inflammatory agents (e.g., LBP and leptin), often elevated with obesity, enhance inflammatory responses to psychological stress. © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  3. Functional characterization of a full length pregnane X receptor, expression in vivo, and identification of PXR alleles, in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

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    Bainy, Afonso C.D. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Departamento de Bioquímica, CCB, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Kubota, Akira; Goldstone, Jared V. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Lille-Langøy, Roger [Department of Biology, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen (Norway); Karchner, Sibel I. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Celander, Malin C. [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, SE 405 30 Göteborg (Sweden); Hahn, Mark E. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Goksøyr, Anders [Department of Biology, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen (Norway); Stegeman, John J., E-mail: jstegeman@whoi.edu [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Full-length pxr has been cloned from zebrafish. •Alleles of pxr were identified in zebrafish. •Full length Pxr was activated less strongly than ligand binding domain in cell-based reporter assays. •High levels of pxr expression were found in eye and brain as well as in liver. •TCPOBOP and PB did not significantly alter expression of pxr in liver. -- Abstract: The pregnane X receptor (PXR) (nuclear receptor NR1I2) is a ligand activated transcription factor, mediating responses to diverse xenobiotic and endogenous chemicals. The properties of PXR in fish are not fully understood. Here we report on cloning and characterization of full-length PXR of zebrafish, Danio rerio, and pxr expression in vivo. Initial efforts gave a cDNA encoding a 430 amino acid protein identified as zebrafish pxr by phylogenetic and synteny analysis. The sequence of the cloned Pxr DNA binding domain (DBD) was highly conserved, with 74% identity to human PXR-DBD, while the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the cloned sequence was only 44% identical to human PXR-LBD. Sequence variation among clones in the initial effort prompted sequencing of multiple clones from a single fish. There were two prominent variants, one sequence with S183, Y218 and H383 and the other with I183, C218 and N383, which we designate as alleles pxr*1 (nr1i2*1) and pxr*2 (nr1i2*2), respectively. In COS-7 cells co-transfected with a PXR-responsive reporter gene, the full-length Pxr*1 (the more common variant) was activated by known PXR agonists clotrimazole and pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile but to a lesser extent than the full-length human PXR. Activation of full-length Pxr*1 was only 10% of that with the Pxr*1 LBD. Quantitative real time PCR analysis showed prominent expression of pxr in liver and eye, as well as brain and intestine of adult zebrafish. The pxr was expressed in heart and kidney at levels similar to that in intestine. The expression of pxr in liver was weakly induced by ligands for

  4. Transgenic Plasmodium parasites stably expressing Plasmodium vivax dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase as in vitro and in vivo models for antifolate screening

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    Yuthavong Yongyuth

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent cause of human malaria in tropical regions outside the African continent. The lack of a routine continuous in vitro culture of this parasite makes it difficult to develop specific drugs for this disease. To facilitate the development of anti-P. vivax drugs, bacterial and yeast surrogate models expressing the validated P. vivax target dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS have been generated; however, they can only be used as primary screening models because of significant differences in enzyme expression level and in vivo drug metabolism between the surrogate models and P. vivax parasites. Methods Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei parasites were transfected with DNA constructs bearing P. vivax dhfr-ts pyrimethamine sensitive (wild-type and pyrimethamine resistant (mutant alleles. Double crossover homologous recombination was used to replace the endogenous dhfr-ts of P. falciparum and P. berghei parasites with P. vivax homologous genes. The integration of Pvdhfr-ts genes via allelic replacement was verified by Southern analysis and the transgenic parasites lines validated as models by standard drug screening assays. Results Transgenic P. falciparum and P. berghei lines stably expressing PvDHFR-TS replacing the endogenous parasite DHFR-TS were obtained. Anti-malarial drug screening assays showed that transgenic parasites expressing wild-type PvDHFR-TS were pyrimethamine-sensitive, whereas transgenic parasites expressing mutant PvDHFR-TS were pyrimethamine-resistant. The growth and sensitivity to other types of anti-malarial drugs in the transgenic parasites were otherwise indistinguishable from the parental parasites. Conclusion With the permanent integration of Pvdhfr-ts gene in the genome, the transgenic Plasmodium lines expressing PvDHFR-TS are genetically stable and will be useful for screening anti-P. vivax compounds targeting PvDHFR-TS. A similar approach

  5. Naïve adult stem cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome express low levels of progerin in vivo

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    Vera Wenzel

    2012-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by segmental accelerated aging and early death from coronary artery disease or stroke. Nearly 90% of HGPS sufferers carry a G608G mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, producing a truncated form of prelamin A, referred to as “progerin”. Here, we report the isolation of naïve multipotent skin-derived precursor (SKP cells from dermal fibroblast cultures from HGPS donors. These cells form spheres and express the neural crest marker, nestin, in addition to the multipotent markers, OCT4, Sox2, Nanog and TG30; these cells can self-renew and differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts. The SMCs derived from the HGPS-SKPs accumulate nuclear progerin with increasing passages. A subset of the HGPS-naïve SKPs express progerin in vitro and in situ in HGPS skin sections. This is the first in vivo evidence that progerin is produced in adult stem cells, and implies that this protein could induce stem cells exhaustion as a mechanism contributing to aging. Our study provides a basis on which to explore therapeutic applications for HGPS stem cells and opens avenues for investigating the pathogenesis of other genetic diseases.

  6. Effect of gallium nitrate on the expression of osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of nuclear factor‑κB ligand in osteoblasts in vivo and in vitro.

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    Li, Jingwu; Wang, Guang-Bin; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Jing; Fu, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by the progressive loss of bone mass and the micro‑architectural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to bone fragility and an increased risk of fracture. Gallium has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of several diverse disorders that are characterized by accelerated bone loss. Osteoblasts orchestrate bone degradation by expressing the receptor activator of NF‑κB ligand (RANKL), however they additionally protect the skeleton by secreting osteoprotegerin (OPG). Therefore, the relative concentration of RANKL and OPG in bone is a key determinant of bone mass and strength. The current study demonstrated that gallium nitrate (GaN) is able to counteract bone loss in an experimental model of established osteoporosis. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats exhibited significantly increased bone mineral density following GaN treatment for 4 and 8 weeks by 19.3 and 37.3%, respectively (P<0.05). The bone volume of the OVX + GaN group was increased by 40.9% (P<0.05) compared with the OVX group. In addition, the current study demonstrated that GaN stimulates the synthesis of OPG however has no effect on the expression of RANKL in osteoblasts, as demonstrated by RT‑qPCR, western blotting and ELISA, resulting in an increase in the OPG/RANKL ratio and a reduction in osteoclast differentiation in vivo and in vitro.

  7. Effect of gallium nitrate on the expression of osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand in osteoblasts in vivo and in vitro

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    LI, JINGWU; WANG, GUANG-BIN; FENG, XUE; ZHANG, JING; FU, QIN

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by the progressive loss of bone mass and the micro-architectural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to bone fragility and an increased risk of fracture. Gallium has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of several diverse disorders that are characterized by accelerated bone loss. Osteoblasts orchestrate bone degradation by expressing the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), however they additionally protect the skeleton by secreting osteoprotegerin (OPG). Therefore, the relative concentration of RANKL and OPG in bone is a key determinant of bone mass and strength. The current study demonstrated that gallium nitrate (GaN) is able to counteract bone loss in an experimental model of established osteoporosis. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats exhibited significantly increased bone mineral density following GaN treatment for 4 and 8 weeks by 19.3 and 37.3%, respectively (P<0.05). The bone volume of the OVX + GaN group was increased by 40.9% (P<0.05) compared with the OVX group. In addition, the current study demonstrated that GaN stimulates the synthesis of OPG however has no effect on the expression of RANKL in osteoblasts, as demonstrated by RT-qPCR, western blotting and ELISA, resulting in an increase in the OPG/RANKL ratio and a reduction in osteoclast differentiation in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26647856

  8. GHGKHKNK Octapeptide (P-5m Inhibits Metastasis of HCCLM3 Cell Lines via Regulation of MMP-2 Expression in in Vitro and in Vivo Studies

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    Xun Zhu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available P-5m, an octapeptide derived from domain 5 of HKa, was initially found to inhibit the invasion and migration of melanoma cells. The high metastatic potential of melanoma cells was prevented by the HGK motif in the P-5m peptide in vitro and in an experimental lung metastasis model, suggesting that P-5m may play an important role in the regulation of tumor metastasis. The aim of this study was to measure the effect of P-5m on tumor metastasis of human hepatocarcinoma cell line (HCCLM3 in vitro and in vivo in a nude mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and detect the mechanisms involved in P-5m-induced anti-metastasis. By gelatin zymography, matrix metallo-proteinases 2 (MMP-2 activity in HCCLM3 was dramatically diminished by P-5m peptide. In addition, the migration and metastasis of HCCLM3 cells was also inhibited by the peptide in vitro. In an orthotopic model of HCC in nude mice, P-5m treatment effectively reduced the lung metastasis as well as the expression of MMP-2 in the tumor tissues. Overall, these observations indicate an important role for P-5m peptide in HCC invasion and metastasis, at least partially through modulation MMP-2 expression. These data suggests that P-5m may have therapeutic potential in metastatic human hepatocarcinoma.

  9. Functional expression of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) in pyr4 mutants of ustilago maydis allows target validation of DHODH inhibitors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zameitat, Elke; Freymark, Gerald; Dietz, Cornelia D; Löffler, Monika; Bölker, Michael

    2007-05-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH; EC 1.3.99.11) is a central enzyme of pyrimidine biosynthesis and catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate. DHODH is an important target for antiparasitic and cytostatic drugs since rapid cell proliferation often depends on the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. We have cloned the pyr4 gene encoding mitochondrial DHODH from the basidiomycetous plant pathogen Ustilago maydis. We were able to show that pyr4 contains a functional mitochondrial targeting signal. The deletion of pyr4 resulted in uracil auxotrophy, enhanced sensitivity to UV irradiation, and a loss of pathogenicity on corn plants. The biochemical characterization of purified U. maydis DHODH overproduced in Escherichia coli revealed that the U. maydis enzyme uses quinone electron acceptor Q6 and is resistant to several commonly used DHODH inhibitors. Here we show that the expression of the human DHODH gene fused to the U. maydis mitochondrial targeting signal is able to complement the auxotrophic phenotype of pyr4 mutants. While U. maydis wild-type cells were resistant to the DHODH inhibitor brequinar, strains expressing the human DHODH gene became sensitive to this cytostatic drug. Such engineered U. maydis strains can be used in sensitive in vivo assays for the development of novel drugs specifically targeted at either human or fungal DHODH.

  10. In vivo evaluation of battery-operated light-emitting diode-based photodynamic therapy efficacy using tumor volume and biomarker expression as endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mai, Zhiming; Rizvi, Imran; Hempstead, Joshua; Arnason, Stephen; Celli, Jonathan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. In view of the increase in cancer-related mortality rates in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC), there is an urgent need to develop economical therapies that can be utilized at minimal infrastructure institutions. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a photochemistry-based treatment modality, offers such a possibility provided that low-cost light sources and photosensitizers are available. In this proof-of-principle study, we focus on adapting the PDT light source to a low-resource setting and compare an inexpensive, portable, battery-powered light-emitting diode (LED) light source with a standard, high-cost laser source. The comparison studies were performed in vivo in a xenograft murine model of human squamous cell carcinoma subjected to 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX PDT. We observed virtually identical control of the tumor burden by both the LED source and the standard laser source. Further insights into the biological response were evaluated by biomarker analysis of necrosis, microvessel density, and hypoxia [carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression] among groups of control, LED-PDT, and laser-PDT treated mice. There is no significant difference in the percent necrotic volume and CAIX expression in tumors that were treated with the two different light sources. These encouraging preliminary results merit further investigations in orthotopic animal models of cancers prevalent in LMICs. PMID:25909707

  11. In vivo evaluation of battery-operated light-emitting diode-based photodynamic therapy efficacy using tumor volume and biomarker expression as endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mai, Zhiming; Rizvi, Imran; Hempstead, Joshua; Arnason, Stephen; Celli, Jonathan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-04-01

    In view of the increase in cancer-related mortality rates in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC), there is an urgent need to develop economical therapies that can be utilized at minimal infrastructure institutions. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a photochemistry-based treatment modality, offers such a possibility provided that low-cost light sources and photosensitizers are available. In this proof-of-principle study, we focus on adapting the PDT light source to a low-resource setting and compare an inexpensive, portable, battery-powered light-emitting diode (LED) light source with a standard, high-cost laser source. The comparison studies were performed in vivo in a xenograft murine model of human squamous cell carcinoma subjected to 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX PDT. We observed virtually identical control of the tumor burden by both the LED source and the standard laser source. Further insights into the biological response were evaluated by biomarker analysis of necrosis, microvessel density, and hypoxia [carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression] among groups of control, LED-PDT, and laser-PDT treated mice. There is no significant difference in the percent necrotic volume and CAIX expression in tumors that were treated with the two different light sources. These encouraging preliminary results merit further investigations in orthotopic animal models of cancers prevalent in LMICs.

  12. Molecular imaging of in vivo calcium ion expression in area postrema of total sleep deprived rats: Implications for cardiovascular regulation by TOF-SIMS analysis

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    Mai, Fu-Der; Chen, Li-You; Ling, Yong-Chien; Chen, Bo-Jung; Wu, Un-In; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2010-05-01

    Excessive calcium influx in chemosensitive neurons of area postrema (AP) is detrimental for sympathetic activation and participates in the disruption of cardiovascular activities. Since total sleep deprivation (TSD) is a stressful condition known to harm the cardiovascular function, the present study is aimed to determine whether the in vivo calcium expression in AP would significantly alter following TSD by the use of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and calretinin (a specific calcium sensor protein in AP neurons) immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that in normal rats, the calcium intensity was estimated to be 0.5 × 10 5 at m/ z 40.08. However, following TSD, the intensity for calcium ions was greatly increased to 1.2 × 10 5. Molecular imaging revealed that after TSD, various strongly expressed calcium signals were distributed throughout AP with clear identified profiles instead of randomly scattered within this region in normal rats. Immunohistochemical staining corresponded well with ionic image in which a majority of calcium-enriched gathering co-localized with calretinin positive neurons. The functional significance of TSD-induced calcium augmentation was demonstrated by increased heart rate and mean arterial pressure, clinical markers for cardiovascular dysfunction. Considering AP-mediated sympathetic activation is important for cardiovascular regulation, exaggerated calcium influx in AP would render this neurocircuitry more vulnerable to over-excitation, which might serve as the underlying mechanism for the development of TSD-relevant cardiovascular deficiency.

  13. HSP-72 accelerated expression in mononuclear cells induced in vivo by acetyl salicylic acid can be reproduced in vitro when combined with H2O2.

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    Alvaro A Sandoval-Montiel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among NSAIDs acetyl salicylic acid remains as a valuable tool because of the variety of benefic prophylactic and therapeutic effects. Nevertheless, the molecular bases for these responses have not been complete understood. We explored the effect of acetyl salicylic acid on the heat shock response. RESULTS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from rats challenged with acetyl salicylic acid presented a faster kinetics of expression of HSP-72 messenger RNA and protein in response to in vitro heat shock. This effect reaches its maximum 2 h after treatment and disappeared after 5 h. On isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from untreated rats, incubation with acetyl salicylic acid was ineffective to produce priming, but this effect was mimicked when the cells were incubated with the combination of H2O2+ ASA. CONCLUSIONS: Administration of acetyl salicylic acid to rats alters HSP-72 expression mechanism in a way that it becomes more efficient in response to in vitro heat shock. The fact that in vitro acetyl salicylic acid alone did not induce this priming effect implies that in vivo other signals are required. Priming could be reproduces in vitro with the combination of acetyl salicylic acid+H2O2.

  14. Subchronic toxicity study in vivo and allergenicity study in vitro for genetically modified rice that expresses pharmaceutical protein (human serum albumin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yao; Qi, Xiaozhe; Liu, Yifei; Guo, Mingzhang; Chen, Siyuan; He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao

    2014-10-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops that express pharmaceutical proteins have become an important focus of recent genetic engineering research. Food safety assessment is necessary for the commercial development of these crops. Subchronic toxicity study in vivo and allergenicity study in vitro were designed to evaluate the food safety of the rice variety expressing human serum albumin (HSA). Animals were fed rodent diets containing 12.5%, 25.0% and 50.0% GM or non-GM rice for 90 days. The composition analysis of the GM rice demonstrated several significant differences. However, most of the differences remained within the ranges reported in the literature. In the animal study, a range of indexes including clinical observation, feed efficiency, hematology, serum chemistry, organ weights and histopathology were examined. Random changes unrelated to the GM rice exposure, within the range of historical control values and not associated with any signs of illness were observed. The results of heat stability and in vitro digestion of HSA indicated no evidence of potential allergenicity of the protein. Overall, the results of these studies suggest that the GM rice appears to be safe as a dietary ingredient when it is used at up to 50% in the diet on a subchronic basis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New insights into the genetics of in vivo induction of maternal haploids, the backbone of doubled haploid technology in maize.

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    Prigge, Vanessa; Xu, Xiaowei; Li, Liang; Babu, Raman; Chen, Shaojiang; Atlin, Gary N; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2012-02-01

    Haploids and doubled haploid (DH) inbred lines have become an invaluable tool for maize genetic research and hybrid breeding, but the genetic basis of in vivo induction of maternal haploids is still unknown. This is the first study reporting comparative quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses of this trait in maize. We determined haploid induction rates (HIR) in testcrosses of a total of 1061 progenies of four segregating populations involving two temperate haploid inducers, UH400 (HIR = 8%) and CAUHOI (HIR = 2%), one temperate and two tropical inbreds with HIR = 0%, and up to three generations per population. Mean HIR of the populations ranged from 0.6 to 5.2% and strongly deviated from the midparent values. One QTL (qhir1) explaining up to p = 66% of the genetic variance was detected in bin 1.04 in the three populations involving a noninducer parent and the HIR-enhancing allele was contributed by UH400. Segregation ratios of loci in bin 1.04 were highly distorted against the UH400 allele in these three populations, suggesting that transmission failure of the inducer gamete and haploid induction ability are related phenomena. In the CAUHOI × UH400 population, seven QTL were identified on five chromosomes, with qhir8 on chromosome 9 having p > 20% in three generations of this cross. The large-effect QTL qhir1 and qhir8 will likely become fixed quickly during inducer development due to strong selection pressure applied for high HIR. Hence, marker-based pyramiding of small-effect and/or modifier QTL influencing qhir1 and qhir8 may help to further increase HIR in maize. We propose a conceptual genetic framework for inheritance of haploid induction ability, which is also applicable to other dichotomous traits requiring progeny testing, and discuss the implications of our results for haploid inducer development.

  16. In Vivo Assessment of Cold Tolerance through Chlorophyll-a Fluorescence in Transgenic Zoysiagrass Expressing Mutant Phytochrome A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururani, Mayank Anand; Venkatesh, Jelli; Ganesan, Markkandan; Strasser, Reto Jörg; Han, Yunjeong; Kim, Jeong-Il; Lee, Hyo-Yeon; Song, Pill-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll-a fluorescence analysis provides relevant information about the physiology of plants growing under abiotic stress. In this study, we evaluated the influence of cold stress on the photosynthetic machinery of transgenic turfgrass, Zoysia japonica, expressing oat phytochrome A (PhyA) or a hyperactive mutant phytochrome A (S599A) with post-translational phosphorylation blocked. Biochemical analysis of zoysiagrass subjected to cold stress revealed reduced levels of hydrogen peroxide, increased proline accumulation, and enhanced specific activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to those of control plants. Detailed analyses of the chlorophyll-a fluorescence data through the so-called OJIP test exhibited a marked difference in the physiological status among transgenic and control plants. Overall, these findings suggest an enhanced level of cold tolerance in S599A zoysiagrass cultivars as reflected in the biochemical and physiological analyses. Further, we propose that chlorophyll-a fluorescence analysis using OJIP test is an efficient tool in determining the physiological status of plants under cold stress conditions. PMID:26010864

  17. Expression of in vivo mechanical strain upon different wave forms of exogenous forces in rabbit craniofacial sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopher, Ross A; Nudera, James A; Wang, Xin; O'Grady, Kevin; Mao, Jeremy J

    2003-10-01

    Sutures are fibrous joints between craniofacial bones, providing an interesting model for studying the biomechanics of the interface between soft and mineralized tissues. To explore whether different wave forms of exogenous forces induce corresponding sutural strain wave forms, sutural strain of the premaxillomaxillary suture (PMS) and nasofrontal suture (NFS) of New Zealand White rabbits (N = 8) was recorded upon application of static, sine- and square-wave forces against the maxilla from 1 N to 5 N in 1 N increments. The PMS demonstrated compressive strain, whereas the NFS tensile strain. Despite a tenfold difference in peak PMS strain (- 1451 +/- 512 micro(epsilon)) and NFS strain (141 +/- 39 micro(epsilon)) in response to 5 N cyclic forces, wave forms of exogenous forces were expressed as corresponding wave forms of sutural strain in both the PMS and NFS. Peak sutural strain was similar upon static and sine-wave cyclic loading. Thus, cells and matrix components of fibrous sutural tissue experience different wave forms of exogenous forces as corresponding wave forms of tissue-borne mechanical strain. Current craniofacial orthopedic therapies exclusively utilize static forces to change the shape of craniofacial bones via mechanically induced bone apposition and resorption. The present data provide room for exploring whether cyclic forces capable of inducing different sutural strain wave forms may accelerate sutural anabolic or catabolic responses.

  18. In Vivo Assessment of Cold Tolerance through Chlorophyll-a Fluorescence in Transgenic Zoysiagrass Expressing Mutant Phytochrome A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Anand Gururani

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll-a fluorescence analysis provides relevant information about the physiology of plants growing under abiotic stress. In this study, we evaluated the influence of cold stress on the photosynthetic machinery of transgenic turfgrass, Zoysia japonica, expressing oat phytochrome A (PhyA or a hyperactive mutant phytochrome A (S599A with post-translational phosphorylation blocked. Biochemical analysis of zoysiagrass subjected to cold stress revealed reduced levels of hydrogen peroxide, increased proline accumulation, and enhanced specific activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to those of control plants. Detailed analyses of the chlorophyll-a fluorescence data through the so-called OJIP test exhibited a marked difference in the physiological status among transgenic and control plants. Overall, these findings suggest an enhanced level of cold tolerance in S599A zoysiagrass cultivars as reflected in the biochemical and physiological analyses. Further, we propose that chlorophyll-a fluorescence analysis using OJIP test is an efficient tool in determining the physiological status of plants under cold stress conditions.

  19. Two isoforms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutaredoxin 2 are expressed in vivo and localize to different subcellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrajas, José R; Porras, Pablo; Martínez-Galisteo, Emilia; Padilla, C Alicia; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Bárcena, J Antonio

    2002-06-15

    Glutaredoxin (Grx)2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a member of the two-cysteine (dithiol) subfamily of Grxs involved in the defence against oxidative stress in yeast. Recombinant yeast Grx2p, expressed in Escherichia coli, behaves as a 'classical' Grx that efficiently catalyses the reduction of hydroxyethyl disulphide by GSH. Grx2p also catalyses the reduction of GSSG by dihydrolipoamide with even higher efficiency. Western blot analysis of S. cerevisiae crude extracts identifies two isoforms of Grx2p of 15.9 and 11.9 kDa respectively. The levels of these two isoforms reach a peak during the exponential phase of growth in normal yeast extract/peptone/dextrose ('YPD') medium, with the long form predominating over the short one. From immunochemical analysis of subcellular fractions, it is shown that both isoforms are present in mitochondria, but only the short one is detected in the cytosolic fraction. On the other hand, only the long form is prominent in microsomes. Mitochondrial isoforms should represent the processed and unprocessed products of an open reading frame (YDR513W), with a putative start codon 99 bp upstream of the GRX2 start codon described thus far. These results indicate that GRX2 contains two in-frame start codons, and that translation from the first AUG results in a product that is targeted to mitochondria. The cytosolic form would result either by initiation from the second AUG, or by differential processing of one single translation product.

  20. Enzymatic properties, evidence for in vivo expression, and intracellular localization of shewasin D, the pepsin homolog from Shewanella denitrificans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Ana Rita; Cruz, Rui; Bur, Daniel; Huesgen, Pitter F.; Faro, Rosário; Manadas, Bruno; Wlodawer, Alexander; Faro, Carlos; Simões, Isaura

    2016-01-01

    The widespread presence of pepsin-like enzymes in eukaryotes together with their relevance in the control of multiple biological processes is reflected in the large number of studies published so far for this family of enzymes. By contrast, pepsin homologs from bacteria have only recently started to be characterized. The work with recombinant shewasin A from Shewanella amazonensis provided the first documentation of this activity in prokaryotes. Here we extend our studies to shewasin D, the pepsin homolog from Shewanella denitrificans, to gain further insight into this group of bacterial peptidases that likely represent ancestral versions of modern eukaryotic pepsin-like enzymes. We demonstrate that the enzymatic properties of recombinant shewasin D are strongly reminiscent of eukaryotic pepsin homologues. We determined the specificity preferences of both shewasin D and shewasin A using proteome-derived peptide libraries and observed remarkable similarities between both shewasins and eukaryotic pepsins, in particular with BACE-1, thereby confirming their phylogenetic proximity. Moreover, we provide first evidence of expression of active shewasin D in S. denitrificans cells, confirming its activity at acidic pH and inhibition by pepstatin. Finally, our results revealed an unprecedented localization for a family A1 member by demonstrating that native shewasin D accumulates preferentially in the cytoplasm. PMID:27029611

  1. Involvement of Histone Lysine Methylation in p21 Gene Expression in Rat Kidney In Vivo and Rat Mesangial Cells In Vitro under Diabetic Conditions

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    Xiangjun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN, a common complication associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, characterized by glomerular mesangial expansion, inflammation, accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM protein, and hypertrophy, is the major cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Increasing evidence suggested that p21-dependent glomerular and mesangial cell (MC hypertrophy play key roles in the pathogenesis of DN. Recently, posttranscriptional modifications (PTMs have uncovered novel molecular mechanisms involved in DN. However, precise regulatory mechanism of histone lysine methylation (HKme mediating p21 related hypertrophy associated with DN is not clear. We evaluated the roles of HKme and histone methyltransferase (HMT SET7/9 in p21 gene expression in glomeruli of diabetic rats and in high glucose- (HG- treated rat mesangial cells (RMCs. p21 gene expression was upregulated in diabetic rats glomeruli; chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays showed decreased histone H3-lysine9-dimethylation (H3K9me2 accompanied with enhanced histone H3-lysine4-methylation (H3K4me1/3 and SET7/9 occupancies at the p21 promoter. HG-treated RMCs exhibited increased p21 mRNA, H3K4me level, SET7/9 recruitment, and inverse H3K9me, which were reversed by TGF-β1 antibody. These data uncovered key roles of H3Kme and SET7/9 responsible for p21 gene expression in vivo and in vitro under diabetic conditions and confirmed preventive effect of TGF-β1 antibody on DN.

  2. Long-term Neuroglial Cocultures as a Brain Aging Model: Hallmarks of Senescence, MicroRNA Expression Profiles, and Comparison With In Vivo Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, Elisabetta; Luceri, Cristina; Scartabelli, Tania; Dolara, Piero; Casamenti, Fiorella; Pellegrini-Giampietro, Domenico E; Giovannelli, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate long-term neuroglial cocultures as a model for investigating senescence in the nervous system and to assess its similarities with in vivo models. To this aim, we maintained the cultures from 15 days in vitro (mature cultures) up to 27 days in vitro (senescent cultures), measuring senescence-associated, neuronal, dendritic, and astrocytic markers. Whole microRNA expression profiles were compared with those measured in the cortex of 18- and 24-month-old C57Bl/6J aged mice and of transgenic TgCRND8 mice, a model of amyloid-β deposition. Neuroglial cocultures displayed features of cellular senescence (increased senescence-associated-β-galactosidase activity, oxidative stress, γ-H2AX expression, IL-6 production, astrogliosis) that were concentration dependently counteracted by the antiaging compound resveratrol (1-5 µM). Among the 1,080 microRNAs analyzed, 335 were downregulated or absent in 27 compared with 15 days in vitro and resveratrol reversed this effect. A substantial overlapping was found between age-associated changes in microRNA expression profiles in vitro and in TgCRND8 mice but not in physiologically aged mice, indicating that this culture model displays more similarities with pathological than physiological brain aging. Our results demonstrate that neuroglial cocultures aged in vitro can be useful for investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms of brain aging and for preliminary testing of protective compounds. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Comparative effects of doxercalciferol (1α-hydroxyvitamin D₂) versus calcitriol (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃) on the expression of transporters and enzymes in the rat in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edwin C Y; Sondervan, Myrte; Jin, Cheng; Groothuis, Geny M M; Pang, K Sandy

    2011-04-01

    Effects of 1.28 nmol/kg doxercalciferol [1α(OH)D₂], a synthetic vitamin D₂ analog that undergoes metabolic activation to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₂, the naturally occurring, biologically active form of vitamin D₂, on rat transporters and enzymes were compared with those of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃ [1,25(OH)₂D₃, active form of vitamin D₃; 4.8 and 6.4 nmol/kg] given on alternate days intraperitoneally for 8 days. Changes were mostly confined to the intestine and kidney where the vitamin D receptor (VDR) was highly expressed: increased intestinal Cyp24 and Cyp3a1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and a modest elevation of apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter (Asbt) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) protein; increased renal VDR, Cyp24, Cyp3a9, Mdr1a, and Asbt mRNA, as well as Asbt and P-gp protein expression; and decreased renal PepT1 and Oat1 mRNA expression. In comparison, 1α(OH)D₂ treatment exerted a greater effect than 1,25(OH)₂D₃ on Cyp3a and Cyp24 mRNA. However, the farnesoid X receptor -related repressive effects on liver Cyp7a1 were absent because intestinal Asbt, FGF15 and portal bile acid concentrations were unchanged. Rats on the alternate day regimen showed milder changes and lessened signs of hypercalcemia and weight loss compared with rats receiving daily injections (similar or greater amounts of 0.64-2.56 nmol/kg daily ×4) described in previous reports, showing that the protracted pretreatment regimen was associated with milder inductive and lesser toxic effects in vivo. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. B Lymphocyte Stimulator (BLyS is expressed in human adipocytes in vivo and is related to obesity but not to insulin resistance.

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    Nike Müller

    Full Text Available Inflammation and metabolism have been shown to be evolutionary linked and increasing evidence exists that pro-inflammatory factors are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Until now, most data suggest that within adipose tissue these factors are secreted by cells of the innate immune system, e. g. macrophages. In the present study we demonstrate that B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS is increased in human obesity. In contrast to several pro-inflammatory factors, we found the source of BLyS in human adipose tissue to be the adipocytes rather than immune cells. In grade 3 obese human subjects, expression of BLyS in vivo in adipose tissue is significantly increased (p<0.001. Furthermore, BLyS serum levels are elevated in grade 3 human obesity (862.5+222.0 pg/ml vs. 543.7+60.7 pg/ml in lean controls, p<0.001 and are positively correlated to the BMI (r = 0.43, p<0.0002. In the present study, bariatric surgery significantly altered serum BLyS concentrations. In contrast, weight loss due to a very-low-calorie-formula-diet (800 kcal/d had no such effect. To examine metabolic activity of BLyS, in a translational research approach, insulin sensitivity was measured in human subjects in vivo before and after treatment with the human recombinant anti-BLyS antibody belimumab. Since BLyS is known to promote B-cell proliferation and immunoglobulin secretion, the present data suggest that adipocytes of grade 3 obese human subjects are able to activate the adaptive immune system, suggesting that in metabolic inflammation in humans both, innate and adaptive immunity, are of pathophysiological relevance.

  5. Expression levels of mRNA for insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2, IGF receptors and IGF binding proteins in in vivo and in vitro grown bovine follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebouças, Emanuela L; Costa, José J N; Passos, Maria J; Silva, Anderson W B; Rossi, Rodrigo O D S; van den Hurk, Robert; Silva, José R V

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated mRNA levels for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) IGF1 (IGF-I) and IGF2 (IGF-II), IGF receptors (IGF1R and IGF2R), and binding proteins (IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2. IGFBP-3, IGFBP-4, IGFBP-5 and IGFBP-6) in bovine follicles of 0.2, 0.5 or 1.0 mm in diameter. mRNA expression levels in in vitro cultured follicles that reached approximately 0.5 mm were compared with that of in vivo grown follicles. IGF1R and IGF2R expression levels in 0.5 mm in vivo follicles were higher than in 1.0 or 0.2 mm follicles, respectively. IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2. IGFBP-3, IGFBP-4, IGFBP-5 and IGFBP-6 showed variable expression in the follicular size classes analyzed. In vitro grown follicles had significantly reduced expression levels for IGF1, IGF1R, IGFBP-3, IGFBP-5 and IGFBP-6 mRNA when compared with 0.2 mm follicles, but, when compared with in vivo grown follicles (0.5 mm), only IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-6 showed a reduction in their expression. In conclusion, IGFs, their receptors and IGFBPs showed variable expression of mRNA levels in the follicular size classes analyzed.

  6. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  7. Design and optimization of a novel implantation technology in contact lenses for the treatment of dry eye syndrome: In vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulvi, Furqan A; Shaikh, Anjum A; Lakdawala, Dhara H; Desai, Ankita R; Pandya, Mihir M; Singhania, Sulabh S; Vaidya, Rutvi J; Ranch, Ketan M; Vyas, Bhavin A; Shah, Dinesh O

    2017-04-15

    Contact lenses are widely used for ophthalmic drug delivery, but incorporation of drug or formulation in the contact lenses affects its optical and physical property. In the present study, we have designed a novel hyaluronic acid (HA)-laden ring implant contact lenses (modified cast moulding method), to circumvent the changes in critical lens property. The objective was to improve the ocular residence time of HA, by providing sustained ocular HA delivery through implant contact lenses for the treatment of dry eye syndrome. Optimization of HA-implant was carried out using 3(2) factorial design by tailoring the amount of cross linker and thickness of implant, to achieve sustained HA release with constraint on effective ion diffusivity. The in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rabbit tear fluid showed sustained HA release up to 15days, by fabricating implant (80μgHA loading) with 78.4μm thickness (total thickness of lens=100μm) using 0.925% of cross linker, with effective ion diffusivity>1.5×10(-6)mm(2)/min. In vivo efficacy study in benzalkonium chloride induced dry eye syndrome rabbits showed faster healing with implant contact lenses in comparison to positive control group. The study demonstrated the promising potential of implantation technology to deliver hyaluronic acid without compromising optical and physical properties of contact lens. The limitation of contact lenses to be used as therapeutic device for controlled drug delivery is focused in this study. Incorporation of drug or formulation in the biomaterial affects the optical and physical property of contact lenses. The significance of project was to design a novel hyaluronic acid-laden ring implant contact lenses, to by-pass the changes in critical property of biomaterial. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Embryonic exposure to the fungicide vinclozolin causes virilization of females and alteration of progesterone receptor expression in vivo: an experimental study in mice

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    Baskin Laurence S

    2006-02-01

    estradiol. Conclusion The results suggest that vinclozolin virilizes females and directly or indirectly affects progesterone receptor expression. It also affects estrogen receptor expression in a sex-based manner. We found no in vivo effect of vinclozolin on androgen receptor expression. We propose that vinclozolin, which has been designated an anti-androgen, may also exert its effects by involving additional steroid-signaling pathways.

  9. Perfluorooctane sulfonate induces neuronal and oligodendrocytic differentiation in neural stem cells and alters the expression of PPARγ in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Ibrahim, Wan Norhamidah, E-mail: hamidah@science.upm.edu.my [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Tofighi, Roshan, E-mail: Roshan.Tofighi@ki.se [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Onishchenko, Natalia, E-mail: Natalia.Onishchenko@ki.se [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Rebellato, Paola, E-mail: Paola.Rebellato@ki.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Bose, Raj, E-mail: Raj.Bose@ki.se [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Uhlén, Per, E-mail: Per.Uhlen@ki.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Ceccatelli, Sandra, E-mail: Sandra.Ceccatelli@ki.se [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-05-15

    Perfluorinated compounds are ubiquitous chemicals of major concern for their potential adverse effects on the human population. We have used primary rat embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) to study the effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on the process of NSC spontaneous differentiation. Upon removal of basic fibroblast growth factor, NSCs were exposed to nanomolar concentrations of PFOS for 48 h, and then allowed to differentiate for additional 5 days. Exposure to 25 or 50 nM concentration resulted in a lower number of proliferating cells and a higher number of neurite-bearing TuJ1-positive cells, indicating an increase in neuronal differentiation. Exposure to 50 nM also significantly increased the number of CNPase-positive cells, pointing to facilitation of oligodendrocytic differentiation. PPAR genes have been shown to be involved in PFOS toxicity. By q-PCR we detected an upregulation of PPARγ with no changes in PPARα or PPARδ genes. One of the downstream targets of PPARs, the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) was also upregulated. The number of TuJ1- and CNPase-positive cells increased after exposure to PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone (RGZ, 3 μM) and decreased after pre-incubation with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 (5 μM). RGZ also upregulated the expression of PPARγ and UCP2 genes. Meanwhile GW9662 abolished the UCP2 upregulation and decreased Ca{sup 2+} activity induced by PFOS. Interestingly, a significantly higher expression of PPARγ and UCP3 genes was also detected in mouse neonatal brain after prenatal exposure to PFOS. These data suggest that PPARγ plays a role in the alteration of spontaneous differentiation of NSCs induced by nanomolar concentrations of PFOS. - Highlights: • PFOS decreases proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs). • PFOS induces neuronal and oligodendrocytic differentiation in NSCs. • PFOS alters expression of PPARγ and UCP2 in vitro. • PFOS alters expression of PPARγ and UCP3 in vivo. • Block of PPAR

  10. Development of novel budesonide pellets based on CODESTM technology: In vitro/in vivo evaluation in induced colitis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Dorkoosh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Budesonide is the drug of choice for treatment of active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. The aim of this study was to develop budesonide pellets based on a novel colon drug delivery system (CODES. Methods: Pellet cores containing lactulose or mannitol were prepared by extrusion/spheronization and coated with an acid soluble polymer (Eudragit E 100, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC and an enteric coat (Eudragit FS30D sequentially. In vitro drug release of coated pellets was studied using USP dissolution apparatus type II in buffers of pH 1.2 (2 hrs, pH of 7.4 (4 hrs and pH of 6.8 containing 8% rat cecal contents (RCC (18 hrs. The efficacy of the optimized formulation (containing 50% lactulose coated with Eudragit E (30% w/w and Eudragit FS30D (12% w/w was evaluated against 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS - induced colitis in rats. Results: The results of the kind of bacteria in vitro dissolution tests indicated absence of drug release in pHs of 1.2 and 7.4 and controlled release in buffer of pH 6.8 containing RCC. It was found that release rate was controlled by the type and amount of polysaccharide and the thickness of the acid soluble layer. The prepared formulation showed promising results in alleviating the conditions of experimental model of colitis. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that pellets based on CODES technology could be useful for colonic delivery of budesonide.

  11. In Vivo Effects of Pichia Pastoris-Expressed Antimicrobial Peptide Hepcidin on the Community Composition and Metabolism Gut Microbiota of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lanfang; Chen, Siyuan; Liu, Haiyan; Guo, Mingzhang; Xu, Wentao; He, Xiaoyun; Luo, Yunbo; Qi, Xiaozhe; Luo, Hongxia; Huang, Kunlun

    2016-01-01

    Hepcidin, one kind of antimicrobial peptides, is one of the promising alternatives to antibiotics with broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Hepcidins cloned from different kinds of fishes have been produced using exogenous expression systems, and their in vitro antimicrobial effects have been verified. However their in vivo effects on gut microbiota and gut health of hosts remain unclear. Here we performed a safety study of hepcidin so that it can be used to reduce microbial contaminations in the food and feed. In this study, Pichia pastoris-expressed Pseudosciaena crocea hepcidin (PC-hepc) was first assessed by simulated digestion tests and then administered to male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in different concentrations. Subchronic toxicity testing, high throughput 16S rRNA sequencing of gut microbiota, and examinations on gut metabolism and permeability were conducted. The results showed PC-hepc could be digested in simulated intestinal fluid but not in simulated gastric fluid. PC-hepc had no adverse effects on general health, except causing increase of blood glucose (still in the normal value range of this index) in all trial groups of female rats and intestinal inflammation in HD group of female rats. Community composition of gut microbiota of female MD and HD groups shifted compared with control group, of which the decrease of genus Akkermansia might be related to the increase of blood glucose and intestinal inflammation. Significant increase of fecal nitroreductase activity was also observed in female MD and HD groups. Our results suggest the uses of exogenous PC-hepc in normal dosage are safe, however excess dosage of it may cause intestinal disorder of animals.

  12. In Vivo Effects of Pichia Pastoris-Expressed Antimicrobial Peptide Hepcidin on the Community Composition and Metabolism Gut Microbiota of Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfang Tian

    Full Text Available Hepcidin, one kind of antimicrobial peptides, is one of the promising alternatives to antibiotics with broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Hepcidins cloned from different kinds of fishes have been produced using exogenous expression systems, and their in vitro antimicrobial effects have been verified. However their in vivo effects on gut microbiota and gut health of hosts remain unclear. Here we performed a safety study of hepcidin so that it can be used to reduce microbial contaminations in the food and feed. In this study, Pichia pastoris-expressed Pseudosciaena crocea hepcidin (PC-hepc was first assessed by simulated digestion tests and then administered to male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD rats in different concentrations. Subchronic toxicity testing, high throughput 16S rRNA sequencing of gut microbiota, and examinations on gut metabolism and permeability were conducted. The results showed PC-hepc could be digested in simulated intestinal fluid but not in simulated gastric fluid. PC-hepc had no adverse effects on general health, except causing increase of blood glucose (still in the normal value range of this index in all trial groups of female rats and intestinal inflammation in HD group of female rats. Community composition of gut microbiota of female MD and HD groups shifted compared with control group, of which the decrease of genus Akkermansia might be related to the increase of blood glucose and intestinal inflammation. Significant increase of fecal nitroreductase activity was also observed in female MD and HD groups. Our results suggest the uses of exogenous PC-hepc in normal dosage are safe, however excess dosage of it may cause intestinal disorder of animals.

  13. Suicide gene approach using a dual-expression lentiviral vector to enhance the safety of ex vivo gene therapy for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaee, F; Sugiyama, O; Virk, M S; Tang, H; Drissi, H; Lichtler, A C; Lieberman, J R

    2014-02-01

    'Ex vivo' gene therapy using viral vectors to overexpress BMP-2 is shown to heal critical-sized bone defects in experimental animals. To increase its safety, we constructed a dual-expression lentiviral vector to overexpress BMP-2 or luciferase and an HSV1-tk analog, Δtk (LV-Δtk-T2A-BMP-2/Luc). We hypothesized that administering ganciclovir (GCV) will eliminate the transduced cells at the site of implantation. The vector-induced expression of BMP-2 and luciferase in a mouse stromal cell line (W-20-17 cells) and mouse bone marrow cells (MBMCs) was reduced by 50% compared with the single-gene vector. W-20-17 cells were more sensitive to GCV compared with MBMCs (90-95% cell death at 12 days with GCV at 1 μg ml(-1) in MBMCs vs 90-95% cell death at 5 days by 0.1 μg ml(-1) of GCV in W-20-17 cells). Implantation of LV-Δtk-T2A-BMP-2 transduced MBMCs healed a 2 mm femoral defect at 4 weeks. Early GCV treatment (days 0-14) postoperatively blocked bone formation confirming a biologic response. Delayed GCV treatment starting at day 14 for 2 or 4 weeks reduced the luciferase signal from LV-Δtk-T2A-Luc-transduced MBMCs, but the signal was not completely eliminated. These data suggest that this suicide gene strategy has potential for clinical use in the future, but will need to be optimized for increased efficiency.

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of 64Cu-Labeled SarAr-Bombesin Analogs in Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor–Expressing Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Ferdani, Riccardo; Liang, Kexian; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Andrews, Rebecca; Sherman, Christopher D.; Achilefu, Samuel; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2011-01-01

    internalization into PC-3 cells. In vivo, the radiolabeled peptides demonstrated tumor-specific uptake (13.0 and 8.5 percentage injected dose per gram for 64Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7–14) and 64Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7–14), respectively, at 1 h) and imaging that was comparable to, or better than, that of the previously reported 64Cu-labeled bombesin analogs. The 64Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7–14) had more rapid blood clearance and lower tumor and normal-tissue uptake than 64Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7–14), resulting in similar tumor-to-blood ratios for each analog (15.1 vs. 11.3 for 64Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7–14) and 64Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7–14), respectively, at 1 h). Conclusion These studies demonstrate that 64Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7–14) and 64Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7–14) bound with high affinity to GRPR-expressing cells and that these peptides can be used for PET of GRPR-expressing prostate cancer. PMID:21321264

  15. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of 64Cu-labeled SarAr-bombesin analogs in gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-expressing prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lears, Kimberly A; Ferdani, Riccardo; Liang, Kexian; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Andrews, Rebecca; Sherman, Christopher D; Achilefu, Samuel; Anderson, Carolyn J; Rogers, Buck E

    2011-03-01

    -3 cells. In vivo, the radiolabeled peptides demonstrated tumor-specific uptake (13.0 and 8.5 percentage injected dose per gram for (64)Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7-14) and (64)Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7-14), respectively, at 1 h) and imaging that was comparable to, or better than, that of the previously reported (64)Cu-labeled bombesin analogs. The (64)Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7-14) had more rapid blood clearance and lower tumor and normal-tissue uptake than (64)Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7-14), resulting in similar tumor-to-blood ratios for each analog (15.1 vs. 11.3 for (64)Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7-14) and (64)Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7-14), respectively, at 1 h). These studies demonstrate that (64)Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7-14) and (64)Cu-SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7-14) bound with high affinity to GRPR-expressing cells and that these peptides can be used for PET of GRPR-expressing prostate cancer.

  16. Altered DNA methylation and expression of PLAGL1 in cord blood from assisted reproductive technology pregnancies compared with natural conceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Rebecca N; Gooding, Luke D; Louie, Kenny; Chan Wong, Edgar; Ma, Sai

    2016-09-01

    To investigate DNA methylation and expression of imprinted genes and an imprinted gene network (IGN) in neonates conceived via assisted reproductive technology (ART). Case control. Research institution. Two hundred sixty-four cases of cord blood and/or placental villi from neonates (101 IVF, 81 ICSI, 82 naturally conceived). Placentas were obtained at birth for biopsy and cord blood extraction. DNA methylation and expression of imprinted genes. DNA methylation at the PLAGL1 differentially methylated region (DMR) was significantly higher in IVF cord blood (48.0%) compared with controls (46.0%). No differences were found in DNA methylation between conception modes for KvDMR1 and LINE-1 in cord blood and placenta as well as PLAGL1 and PEG10 in placenta villi. PLAGL1 expression was lower in both IVF and ICSI cord blood groups than in controls (relative quantification of 0.65, 0.74, 0.89, respectively). Analyzing the expression of 3 genes in a PLAGL1 regulated IGN revealed different expression between conception modes and a significant correlation to PLAGL1 expression in only one (KCNQ1OT1). Our results suggest a stability of DNA methylation at imprinted DMRs; however, we show PLAGL1 methylation/expression to be altered after ART. As PLAGL1 expression correlated with only one of the three IGN genes in cord blood, we propose there is a more complex mechanism of regulating the IGN that may involve other genes and epigenetic modifications in this tissue. Further research investigating IGN-implicated genes in various neonatal tissues is warranted to elucidate the full effects ART-induced alterations to PLAGL1 and the IGN may have on fetal growth/development. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The in vivo effect of VIP, PACAP-38 and PACAP-27 and mRNA expression of their receptors in rat middle meningeal artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boni, L. J.; Ploug, Kenneth Beri; Olesen, Jes

    2009-01-01

    ) and PAC(1) receptors. The objective of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effect of VIP, PACAP-27, PACAP-38, the selective VPAC(1) agonist ([Lys15, Arg16, Leu27]-VIP(1-7)-GRF(8-27)) and a PAC(1) agonist, maxadilan on rat middle meningeal artery (MMA) diameter using the closed cranial window...... model. Selective antagonists were used for further characterization of the responses. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction experiments were also conducted to determine expression of mRNA of PACAP receptors in the MMA. The results showed that VIP, PACAP-38, PACAP-27 and the VPAC(1) specific...... agonist evoked significant dilations with the rank order of potency; VIP = PACAP-38 > PACAP-27 = [Lys15, Arg16, Leu27]-VIP(1-7)-GRF(8-27). Significant inhibition of dilation was only observed for the VPAC(1) antagonist PG97-269 on PACAP-38-induced dilation of MMA. The VPAC(2) antagonist PG99-465 and PAC(1...

  18. The Klebsiella pneumoniae YfgL (BamB) lipoprotein contributes to outer membrane protein biogenesis, type-1 fimbriae expression, anti-phagocytosis, and in vivo virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Ru; Chen, Chun-Tang; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Wang, Jin-Town

    2016-07-03

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen that causes several kinds of infections, including pneumonia, bacteremia, urinary tract infection and community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). Adhesion is the critical first step in the infection process. Our previous work demonstrated that the transcellular translocation is exploited by K. pneumoniae strains to migrate from the gut flora into other tissues, resulting in systemic infections. However, the initial stages of K. pneumoniae infection remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that a K. pneumoniae strain deleted for yfgL (bamB) exhibited reduced adherence to and invasion of host cells; changed biogenesis of major β-barrel outer membrane proteins; decreased transcriptional expression of type-1 fimbriae; and increased susceptibility to vancomycin and erythromycin. The yfgL deletion mutant also had reduced ability to against neutrophil phagocytosis; exhibited decreased induction of host IL-6 production; and was profoundly attenuated for virulence in a K. pneumoniae model of bacteremia. Thus, the K. pneumoniae YfgL lipoprotein mediates in outer membrane proteins biogenesis and is crucial for anti-phagocytosis and survival in vivo. These data provide a new insight for K. pneumoniae attachment and such knowledge could facilitate preventive therapies or alternative therapies against K. pneumoniae.

  19. Cytotoxic effects and changes in cytokine gene expression induced by microcystin-containing extract in fish immune cells--an in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymuszka, Anna; Adaszek, Łukasz

    2013-06-01

    Blooms of cyanobacteria producing very toxic secondary metabolites (especially microcystins) are potent environmental stressors, hazardous not only to aquatic animals but also to public health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an extract containing microcystins on immune cells isolated from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). In the present study it has been found that the extract induced apoptosis and inhibited in vitro lymphocyte proliferation. In addition, the results indicated the possible role of oxidative stress in this cytotoxicity and apoptosis. The in vivo investigations showed that the extract containing microcystins had greater suppressive effects on the essential functions of immune cells (intracellular reactive oxygen species production and lymphocyte proliferation) than the pure toxin alone. Moreover, immersion of fish in the toxic extract caused changes in the mRNA levels of various pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in carp leukocytes, while after exposure to the pure toxin, only IL1-β expression was markedly up-regulated. The observed modulatory effects on immune cells could have important implications for the health of planktivorous fish, which feed more frequently on toxic cyanobacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Preliminary probiotic and technological characterization of Pediococcus pentosaceus strain KID7 and in vivo assessment of its cholesterol-lowering activity

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    Karthiyaini eDamodharan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to characterize the probiotic properties of a Pediococcus pentosaceus strain, KID7, by in vitro and in vivo studies. The strain possessed tolerance to oro-gastrointestinal transit, adherence to the Caco-2 cell line, and antimicrobial activity. KID7 exhibited bile salt hydrolase activity and cholesterol-lowering activity, in vitro. In vivo cholesterol-lowering activity of KID7 was studied using atherogenic diet-fed hypercholesterolemic mice. The experimental animals (C57BL/6J mice were divided into 4 groups viz., normal diet-fed group (NCD, atherogenic diet-fed group (HCD, atherogenic diet- and KID7-fed group (HCD-KID7, and atherogenic diet- and Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 43121-fed group (HCD-L.ac as positive control. Serum total cholesterol (T-CHO level was significantly decreased by 19.8% in the HCD-KID7 group (P<0.05, but not in the HCD-L.ac group compared with the HCD group. LDL cholesterol levels in both HCD-KID7 and HCD-L.ac groups were decreased by 35.5% and 38.7%, respectively, compared with HCD group (both, P<0.05. Glutamyl pyruvic transaminase (GPT level was significantly lower in the HCD-KID7 and HCD-L.ac groups compared to HCD group and was equivalent to that of the NCD group. Liver T-CHO levels in the HCD-KID7 group were reduced significantly compared with the HCD group (P<0.05 but not in the HCD-L.ac group. Analysis of expression of genes associated with lipid metabolism in liver showed that low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR, cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1 and apolipoprotein E (APOE mRNA expression was significantly increase in the HCD-KID7 group compared to the HCD group. Furthermore, KID7 exhibited desired viability under freeze-drying and subsequent storage conditions with a combination of skim milk and galactomannan. P. pentosaceus KID7 could be a potential probiotic strain, which can be used to develop cholesterol-lowering functional food after appropriate human clinical trials.

  1. In vivo production of non-glycosylated recombinant proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana plants by co-expression with Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase H (Endo H) of Streptomyces plicatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Tarlan; Cicek, Kader; Gulec, Burcu; Ungor, Rifat; Hasanova, Gulnara

    2017-01-01

    A plant transient expression system, with eukaryotic post-translational modification machinery, offers superior efficiency, scalability, safety, and lower cost over other expression systems. However, due to aberrant N-glycosylation, this expression system may not be a suitable expression platform for proteins not carrying N-linked glycans in the native hosts. Therefore, it is crucial to develop a strategy to produce target proteins in a non-glycosylated form while preserving their native sequence, conformation and biological activity. Previously, we developed a strategy for enzymatic deglycosylation of proteins in planta by co-expressing bacterial peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F). Though PNGase F removes oligosaccharides from glycosylated proteins, in so doing it causes an amino acid change due to the deamidation of asparagine to aspartate in the N-X-S/T site. Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EC3.2.1.96, Endo H), another deglycosylating enzyme, catalyzes cleavage between two N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine residues of the chitobiose core of N-linked glycans, leaving a single N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine residue without the concomitant deamidation of asparagine. In this study, a method for in vivo deglycosylation of recombinant proteins in plants by transient co-expression with bacterial Endo H is described for the first time. Endo H was fully active in vivo. and successfully cleaved N-linked glycans from glycoproteins were tested. In addition, unlike the glycosylated form, in vivo Endo H deglycosylated Pfs48/45 was recognized by conformational specific Pfs48/45 monoclonal antibody, in a manner similar to its PNGase F deglycosylated counterpart. Furthermore, the deglycosylated PA83 molecule produced by Endo H showed better stability than a PNGase F deglycosylated counterpart. Thus, an Endo H in vivo deglycosylation approach provides another opportunity to develop vaccine antigens, therapeutic proteins, antibodies, and industrial enzymes.

  2. In vivo production of non-glycosylated recombinant proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana plants by co-expression with Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase H (Endo H of Streptomyces plicatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarlan Mamedov

    Full Text Available A plant transient expression system, with eukaryotic post-translational modification machinery, offers superior efficiency, scalability, safety, and lower cost over other expression systems. However, due to aberrant N-glycosylation, this expression system may not be a suitable expression platform for proteins not carrying N-linked glycans in the native hosts. Therefore, it is crucial to develop a strategy to produce target proteins in a non-glycosylated form while preserving their native sequence, conformation and biological activity. Previously, we developed a strategy for enzymatic deglycosylation of proteins in planta by co-expressing bacterial peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F. Though PNGase F removes oligosaccharides from glycosylated proteins, in so doing it causes an amino acid change due to the deamidation of asparagine to aspartate in the N-X-S/T site. Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EC3.2.1.96, Endo H, another deglycosylating enzyme, catalyzes cleavage between two N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine residues of the chitobiose core of N-linked glycans, leaving a single N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine residue without the concomitant deamidation of asparagine. In this study, a method for in vivo deglycosylation of recombinant proteins in plants by transient co-expression with bacterial Endo H is described for the first time. Endo H was fully active in vivo. and successfully cleaved N-linked glycans from glycoproteins were tested. In addition, unlike the glycosylated form, in vivo Endo H deglycosylated Pfs48/45 was recognized by conformational specific Pfs48/45 monoclonal antibody, in a manner similar to its PNGase F deglycosylated counterpart. Furthermore, the deglycosylated PA83 molecule produced by Endo H showed better stability than a PNGase F deglycosylated counterpart. Thus, an Endo H in vivo deglycosylation approach provides another opportunity to develop vaccine antigens, therapeutic proteins, antibodies, and industrial enzymes.

  3. Integrating technologies for comparing 3D gene expression domains in the developing chick limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Malcolm E; Clelland, Allyson K; Bain, Andrew; Baldock, Richard A; Murphy, Paula; Downie, Helen; Tickle, Cheryll; Davidson, Duncan R; Buckland, Richard A

    2008-05-01

    Chick embryos are good models for vertebrate development due to their accessibility and manipulability. Recent large increases in available genomic data from both whole genome sequencing and EST projects provide opportunities for identifying many new developmentally important chicken genes. Traditional methods of documenting when and where specific genes are expressed in embryos using whole amount and section in-situ hybridisation do not readily allow appreciation of 3-dimensional (3D) patterns of expression, but this can be accomplished by the recently developed microscopy technique, Optical Projection Tomography (OPT). Here we show that OPT data on the developing chick wing from different labs can be reliably integrated into a common database, that OPT is efficient in capturing 3D gene expression domains and that such domains can be meaningfully compared. Novel protocols are used to compare 3D expression domains of 7 genes known to be involved in chick wing development. This reveals previously unappreciated relationships and demonstrates the potential, using modern genomic resources, for building a large scale 3D atlas of gene expression. Such an atlas could be extended to include other types of data, such as fate maps, and the approach is also more generally applicable to embryos, organs and tissues.

  4. Co-introduced functional CCR2 potentiates in vivo anti-lung cancer functionality mediated by T cells double gene-modified to express WT1-specific T-cell receptor.

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    Hiroaki Asai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although gene-modification of T cells to express tumor-related antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR has clinically proved promise, there still remains room to improve the clinical efficacy of re-directed T-cell based antitumor adoptive therapy. In order to achieve more objective clinical responses using ex vivo-expanded tumor-responsive T cells, the infused T cells need to show adequate localized infiltration into the tumor. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human lung cancer cells variously express a tumor antigen, Wilms' Tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and an inflammatory chemokine, CCL2. However, CCR2, the relevant receptor for CCL2, is rarely expressed on activated T-lymphocytes. A HLA-A2402(+ human lung cancer cell line, LK79, which expresses high amounts of both CCL2 and WT1 mRNA, was employed as a target. Normal CD8(+ T cells were retrovirally gene-modified to express both CCR2 and HLA-A*2402-restricted and WT1(235-243 nonapeptide-specific TCR as an effector. Anti-tumor functionality mediated by these effector cells against LK79 cells was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. Finally the impact of CCL2 on WT1 epitope-responsive TCR signaling mediated by the effector cells was studied. Introduced CCR2 was functionally validated using gene-modified Jurkat cells and human CD3(+ T cells both in vitro and in vivo. Double gene-modified CD3(+ T cells successfully demonstrated both CCL2-tropic tumor trafficking and cytocidal reactivity against LK79 cells in vitro and in vivo. CCL2 augmented the WT1 epitope-responsive TCR signaling shown by relevant luciferase production in double gene-modified Jurkat/MA cells to express luciferase and WT1-specific TCR, and CCL2 also dose-dependently augmented WT1 epitope-responsive IFN-γ production and CD107a expression mediated by these double gene-modified CD3(+ T cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Introduction of the CCL2/CCR2 axis successfully potentiated in

  5. Tracking immune cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Eric T; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2013-10-01

    The increasing complexity of in vivo imaging technologies, coupled with the development of cell therapies, has fuelled a revolution in immune cell tracking in vivo. Powerful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are now being developed that use iron oxide- and ¹⁹F-based probes. These MRI technologies can be used for image-guided immune cell delivery and for the visualization of immune cell homing and engraftment, inflammation, cell physiology and gene expression. MRI-based cell tracking is now also being applied to evaluate therapeutics that modulate endogenous immune cell recruitment and to monitor emerging cellular immunotherapies. These recent uses show that MRI has the potential to be developed in many applications to follow the fate of immune cells in vivo.

  6. Ectopic expression of MCAM/MUC18 increases in vitro motility and invasiveness, but decreases in vivo tumorigenesis and metastasis of a mouse melanoma K1735-9 subline in a syngeneic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guang-Jer

    2016-12-01

    Ectopic expression of MCAM/MUC18, a cell adhesion molecule in the immunoglobulin-like gene superfamily, induces two moMCAM/MUC18-minus, non-metastatic mouse melanoma K1735 sublines, K3 (tumor+/metlow) and K10 (tumor-/metlow), to metastasize to lungs in a syngeneic C3H mouse model. In this report, we extended investigation of effects of moMCAM/MUC18 expression on tumorigenesis and metastasis in another lowly metastatic, however highly tumorigenic moMCAM/MUC18-minus mouse melanoma K1735 subline, K9 (tumor+++/metlow). We transfected this subline with the moMCAM/MUC18 cDNA, selected for G418-resistant clones with different expression levels of moMCAM/MUC18, and used them for testing effects of MCAM/MUC18 expression on in vitro growth rate, motility, and invasiveness, in vivo subcutaneous tumor growth, and pulmonary metastasis in syngeneic C3H brown mice. Similar to K3 and K10 cells, increased expression of MCAM/MUC18 in K9 cells did not significantly affect in vitro growth rate, but increased in vitro motility and invasiveness. Surprisingly, increased expression of MCAM/MUC18 in K9 cells decreased their induction of tumorigenesis and suppressed their establishment of pulmonary nodules in syngeneic C3H brown mice. We concluded that increased MCAM/MUC18 expression in K9 subline increased in vitro epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition; however, it suppressed in vivo tumorigenicity and metastasis. Thus MCAM/MUC18 acts as a tumor and metastasis suppressor for the K9 subline, different from its role in other K1735 sublines, K3 and K10. Different intrinsic co-factors in different K1735 sublines, which modulate the functions of MCAM/MUC18 in the cells that interact differently to the tumor microenvironment, may render sublines manifest differently in tumorigenicity and metastasis in vivo.

  7. Alteration of p53 Isoform expression to Treat Age-Related Disorders and Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhibition of delta133p53 may be a novel approach for cell senescence-mediated anti-proliferative therapy, including anti-cancer treatments. In addition, enhanced expression of delta 133p53 can extend the replicative lifespan of normal human cells. Therefore, this technology may provide a new method in the field of regenerative medicine for aging-related degenerative disease as well as cancer therapeutics. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties to co-develop or license a new method for inhibiting aging-related degenerative disease and cancer.

  8. In vivo Biodistribution of a Highly Attenuated Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Expressing HIV-1 Gag Following Intramuscular, Intranasal, or Intravenous Inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. Erik; Coleman, John W.; Kalyan, Narender K.; Calderon, Priscilla; Wright, Kevin J.; Obregon, Jennifer; Ogin-Wilson, Eleanor; Natuk, Robert J.; Clarke, David K.; Udem, Stephen A.; Cooper, David; Hendry, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (rVSVs) are being developed as potential HIV-1 vaccine candidates. To characterize the in vivo replication and dissemination of rVSV vectors in mice, high doses of a highly attenuated vector expressing HIV-1 Gag, rVSVIN- N4CT9-Gag1, and a prototypic reference virus, rVSVIN-HIVGag5, were delivered intramuscularly (IM), intranasally (IN), or intravenously (IV). We used quantitative, real-time RT-PCR (Q-PCR) and standard plaque assays to measure the temporal dissemination of these viruses to various tissues. Following IM inoculation, both viruses were detected primarily at the injection site as well as in draining lymph nodes; neither virus induced significant weight loss, pathologic signs, or evidence of neuroinvasion. In contrast, following IN inoculation, the prototypic virus was detected in all tissues tested and caused significant weight loss leading to death. IN administration of rVSVIN- N4CT9-Gag1 resulted in detection in numerous tissues (brain, lung, nasal turbinates, and lymph nodes) albeit in significantly reduced levels, which caused little or no weight loss nor any mortality. Following IV inoculation, both prototypic and attenuated viruses were detected by Q-PCR in all tissues tested. In contrast to the prototype, rVSVIN-N4CT9-Gag1 viral loads were significantly lower in all organs tested, and no infectious virus was detected in the brain following IV inoculation, despite the presence of viral RNA. These studies demonstrated significant differences in the biodistribution patterns of and the associated pathogenicity engendered by the prototypic and attenuated vectors in a highly susceptible host. PMID:19428903

  9. Anti-Tumor Effects of an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase of Newcastle Disease Virus in Vitro and in Vivo

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    Dongyun He

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy has been an attractive drug platform for targeted therapy of cancer over the past few years. Viral vectors can be used to target and lyse cancer cells, but achieving good efficacy and specificity with this treatment approach is a major challenge. Here, we assessed the ability of a novel dual-specific anti-tumor oncolytic adenovirus, expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN gene from the Newcastle disease virus under the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT promoter (Ad-hTERTp-E1a-HN, to inhibit esophageal cancer EC-109 cells in culture and to reduce tumor burden in xenografted BALB/c nude mice. In vitro, infection with Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN could inhibit the growth of EC-109 cells significantly and also protect normal human liver cell line L02 from growth suppression in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN also effectively and selectively decreased the sialic acid level on EC-109 cells, but not on L02 cells. Furthermore, Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN was shown to induce the apoptosis pathway via acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining (AO/EB staining, increase reactive oxygen species (ROS, reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and release cytochrome c. In vivo, xenografted BALB/c nude mice were treated via intratumoral or intravenous injections of Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN. Although both treatments showed an obvious suppression in tumor volume, only Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN delivered via intratumoral injection elicited a complete response to treatment. These results reinforced previous findings and highlighted the potential therapeutic application of Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN for treatment of esophageal cancer in clinical trials.

  10. Blue light-induced inflammatory marker